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Sample records for model quantum fluid

  1. Modeling quantum fluid dynamics at nonzero temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berloff, Natalia G.; Brachet, Marc; Proukakis, Nick P.

    2014-01-01

    The detailed understanding of the intricate dynamics of quantum fluids, in particular in the rapidly growing subfield of quantum turbulence which elucidates the evolution of a vortex tangle in a superfluid, requires an in-depth understanding of the role of finite temperature in such systems. The Landau two-fluid model is the most successful hydrodynamical theory of superfluid helium, but by the nature of the scale separations it cannot give an adequate description of the processes involving vortex dynamics and interactions. In our contribution we introduce a framework based on a nonlinear classical-field equation that is mathematically identical to the Landau model and provides a mechanism for severing and coalescence of vortex lines, so that the questions related to the behavior of quantized vortices can be addressed self-consistently. The correct equation of state as well as nonlocality of interactions that leads to the existence of the roton minimum can also be introduced in such description. We review and apply the ideas developed for finite-temperature description of weakly interacting Bose gases as possible extensions and numerical refinements of the proposed method. We apply this method to elucidate the behavior of the vortices during expansion and contraction following the change in applied pressure. We show that at low temperatures, during the contraction of the vortex core as the negative pressure grows back to positive values, the vortex line density grows through a mechanism of vortex multiplication. This mechanism is suppressed at high temperatures. PMID:24704874

  2. Semiclassical approach to model quantum fluids using the statistical associating fluid theory for systems with potentials of variable range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejos, Víctor M; Gil-Villegas, Alejandro

    2012-05-14

    Thermodynamic properties of quantum fluids are described using an extended version of the statistical associating fluid theory for potentials of variable range (SAFT-VR) that takes into account quantum corrections to the Helmholtz free energy A, based on the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation. We present the theoretical background of this approach (SAFT-VRQ), considering two different cases depending on the continuous or discontinuous nature of the particles pair interaction. For the case of continuous potentials, we demonstrate that the standard Wigner-Kirkwood theory for quantum fluids can be derived from the de Broglie-Bohm formalism for quantum mechanics that can be incorporated within the Barker and Henderson perturbation theory for liquids in a straightforward way. When the particles interact via a discontinuous pair potential, the SAFT-VR method can be combined with the perturbation theory developed by Singh and Sinha [J. Chem. Phys. 67, 3645 (1977); and ibid. 68, 562 (1978)]. We present an analytical expression for the first-order quantum perturbation term for a square-well potential, and the theory is applied to model thermodynamic properties of hydrogen, deuterium, neon, and helium-4. Vapor-liquid equilibrium, liquid and vapor densities, isochoric and isobaric heat capacities, Joule-Thomson coefficients and inversion curves are predicted accurately with respect to experimental data. We find that quantum corrections are important for the global behavior of properties of these fluids and not only for the low-temperature regime. Predictions obtained for hydrogen compare very favorably with respect to cubic equations of state.

  3. Quantum fluid model of coherent stimulated radiation by a dense relativistic cold electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, L. F.; Serbeto, A.; Tsui, K. H. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Campus da Praia Vermelha, Niterói, RJ 24210-346 (Brazil); Mendonça, J. T.; Galvão, R. M. O. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP 05508-090 (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    Using a quantum fluid model, the linear dispersion relation for FEL pumped by a short wavelength laser wiggler is deduced. Subsequently, a new quantum corrected resonance condition is obtained. It is shown that, in the limit of low energy electron beam and low frequency pump, the quantum recoil effect can be neglected, recovering the classical FEL resonance condition, k{sub s}=4k{sub w}γ{sup 2}. On the other hand, for short wavelength and high energy electron beam, the quantum recoil effect becomes strong and the resonance condition turns into k{sub s}=2√(k{sub w}/λ{sub c})γ{sup 3/2}, with λ{sub c} being the reduced Compton wavelength. As a result, a set of nonlinear coupled equations, which describes the quantum FEL dynamics as a three-wave interaction, is obtained. Neglecting wave propagation effects, this set of equations is solved numerically and results are presented.

  4. Slip in quantum fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einzel, D.; Parpia, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    In this review the authors describe theoretical and experimental investigations of general slip phenomena in context with the flow of the quantum liquids 3 He, 4 He and their mixtures at low temperatures. The phenomena of slip is related to a boundary effect. It occurs when sufficiently dilute gases flow along the wall of an experimental cell. A fluid is said to exhibit slip when the fluid velocity at the wall is not equal to the wall's velocity. Such a situation occurs whenever the wall reflects the fluid particles in a specular-like manner, and/or if the fluid is describable in terms of a dilute ordinary gas (classical fluid) or a dilute gas of thermal excitations (quantum fluid). The slip effect in quantum fluids is discussed theoretically on the basis of generalized Landau-Boltzmann transport equations and generalized to apply to a regime of ballistic motion of the quasiparticles in the fluid. The central result is that the transport coefficient of bulk shear viscosity, which typically enters in the Poiseuille flow resistance and the transverse acoustic impedance, has to be replaced by geometry dependent effective viscosity, which depends on the details of the interaction of the fluid particles with the cell walls. The theoretical results are compared with various experimental data obtained in different geometries and for both Bose and Fermi quantum fluids. Good agreement between experiment and theory is found particularly in the case of pure normal and superfluid 3 He, with discrepancies probably arising because of deficiencies in characterization of the experimental surfaces

  5. Links between fluid mechanics and quantum mechanics: a model for information in economics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haven, Emmanuel

    2016-05-28

    This paper tallies the links between fluid mechanics and quantum mechanics, and attempts to show whether those links can aid in beginning to build a formal template which is usable in economics models where time is (a)symmetric and memory is absent or present. An objective of this paper is to contemplate whether those formalisms can allow us to model information in economics in a novel way. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Quantum field theory of fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripaios, Ben; Sutherland, Dave

    2015-02-20

    The quantum theory of fields is largely based on studying perturbations around noninteracting, or free, field theories, which correspond to a collection of quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillators. The quantum theory of an ordinary fluid is "freer", in the sense that the noninteracting theory also contains an infinite collection of quantum-mechanical free particles, corresponding to vortex modes. By computing a variety of correlation functions at tree and loop level, we give evidence that a quantum perfect fluid can be consistently formulated as a low-energy, effective field theory. We speculate that the quantum behavior is radically different from both classical fluids and quantum fields.

  7. Quantum fluids in the Kähler parametrization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holender, L., E-mail: holender@ufrrj.br [Grupo de Física Teórica e Matemática Física, Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Cx. Postal 23851, BR 465 Km 7, 23890-000 Seropédica, RJ (Brazil); Santos, M.A., E-mail: masantos@cce.ufes.br [Departamento de Física e Química, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (UFES), Avenida Fernando Ferarri S/N, Goiabeiras, 29060-900 Vitória, ES (Brazil); Vancea, I.V., E-mail: ionvancea@ufrrj.br [Grupo de Física Teórica e Matemática Física, Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Cx. Postal 23851, BR 465 Km 7, 23890-000 Seropédica, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-03-12

    In this Letter we address the problem of the quantization of the perfect relativistic fluids formulated in terms of the Kähler parametrization. This fluid model describes a large set of interesting systems such as the power law energy density fluids, Chaplygin gas, etc. In order to maintain the generality of the model, we apply the BRST method in the reduced phase space in which the fluid degrees of freedom are just the fluid potentials and the fluid current is classically resolved in terms of them. We determine the physical states in this setting, the time evolution and the path integral formulation. -- Highlights: ► We construct the BRST formulation of the quantum relativistic fluid. ► We determine the physical states in the reduced phase space. ► We determine the time evolution of the quantum fluid. ► We find the path integral formulation of the quantum fluid.

  8. A primer on quantum fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Barenghi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this primer is to cover the essential theoretical information, quickly and concisely, in order to enable senior undergraduate and beginning graduate students to tackle projects in topical research areas of quantum fluids, for example, solitons, vortices and collective modes. The selection of the material, both regarding the content and level of presentation, draws on the authors analysis of the success of relevant research projects with newcomers to the field, as well as of the students feedback from many taught and self-study courses on the subject matter. Starting with a brief historical overview, this text covers particle statistics, weakly interacting condensates and their dynamics and finally superfluid helium and quantum turbulence. At the end of each chapter (apart from the first) there will be some exercises. Detailed solutions can be made available to instructors upon request to the authors. .

  9. Quantum cosmological perturbations of multiple fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Patrick; Pinto-Neto, N.; Vitenti, Sandro D. P.

    2016-01-01

    The formalism to treat quantization and evolution of cosmological perturbations of multiple fluids is described. We first construct the Lagrangian for both the gravitational and matter parts, providing the necessary relevant variables and momenta leading to the quadratic Hamiltonian describing linear perturbations. The final Hamiltonian is obtained without assuming any equations of motions for the background variables. This general formalism is applied to the special case of two fluids, having in mind the usual radiation and matter mix which made most of our current Universe history. Quantization is achieved using an adiabatic expansion of the basis functions. This allows for an unambiguous definition of a vacuum state up to the given adiabatic order. Using this basis, we show that particle creation is well defined for a suitable choice of vacuum and canonical variables, so that the time evolution of the corresponding quantum fields is unitary. This provides constraints for setting initial conditions for an arbitrary number of fluids and background time evolution. We also show that the common choice of variables for quantization can lead to an ill-defined vacuum definition. Our formalism is not restricted to the case where the coupling between fields is small, but is only required to vary adiabatically with respect to the ultraviolet modes, thus paving the way to consistent descriptions of general models not restricted to single-field (or fluid).

  10. Sticking transition in a minimal model for the collisions of active particles in quantum fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Vishwanath; Brachet, Marc; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-10-01

    Particles of low velocity, traveling without dissipation in a superfluid, can interact and emit sound when they collide. We propose a minimal model in which the equations of motion of the particles, including a short-range repulsive force, are self-consistently coupled with the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We show that this model generates naturally an effective superfluid-mediated attractive interaction between the particles; and we study numerically the collisional dynamics of particles as a function of their incident kinetic energy and the length scale of the repulsive force. We find a transition from almost elastic to completely inelastic (sticking) collisions as the parameters are tuned. We find that aggregation and clustering result from this sticking transition in multiparticle systems.

  11. Lessons on collisionless reconnection from quantum fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhito eNarita

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic reconnection in space plasmas remains a challenge in physics in that the phenomenon is associated with the breakdown of frozen-in magnetic field in a collisionless medium. Such a topology change can also be found in superfluidity, known as the quantum vortex reconnection. We give a plasma physicists' view of superfluidity to obtain insights on essential processes in collisionless reconnection, including discussion of the kinetic and fluid pictures, wave dynamics, and time reversal asymmetry. The most important lesson from the quantum fluid is the scenario that reconnection is controlled by the physics of topological defects on the microscopic scale, and by the physics of turbulence on the macroscopic scale. Quantum vortex reconnection is accompanied by wave emission in the form of Kelvin waves and sound waves, which imprints the time reversal asymmetry.

  12. Quantum vortex fluid in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudnovsky, E.M.

    1995-01-01

    It is argued that in two dimensions the high-field zero-temperature phase of a type-II superconductor can be quantum vortex fluid. The average intervortex spacing in this phase takes discrete values, leading to macroscopic steps in the total flux through the superconductor on the applied magnetic field. In the absence of dissipation, the Hall conductivity is quantized in units of 4e 2 /πℎ

  13. An application of quantum fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himi, M.; Fukushima, K.

    1984-01-01

    Hydrodynamics is often applied to quantum phenomena such as heavy-ion collisions. But here is should be noted that local equilibrium is not always realized in these collision processes and also the quantum effect is not fully taken into account in hydrodynamics. In this sense, a fluid-dynamical treatment of quantum many-body systems which does not presuppose local equilibrium is required. As an attempt in this direction, we derive simultaneous equations governing the motion of local variables such as the particle density rho(r,t) and velocity field v(r,t) by averaging a many-body wave function. The equations obtained will be shown to unify into a single nonlinear Schroedinger-type equation. Hence this is worthy of being called a quantum fluid dynamics (QFD). In deriving the QFD, we have employed the time-dependent Hartree-Fock and the generalized scaling approximation. Particularly, in order to attain self-containedness, we have assumed a certain relation which is valid in the case of the locally isotropic strain tensor. The introduction of anisotropy requires other local variables reflecting explicitly the deviation from local equilibrium and thus has been left as a future task. (orig.)

  14. Quantum fluids of light in acoustic lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerda-Méndez, E. A.; Krizhanovskii, D. N.; Skolnick, M. S.; Santos, P. V.

    2018-01-01

    In this topical review, we report on the recent advances on the manipulation of hybrid light–matter quasi-particles called exciton–polaritons and their quantum condensed phases by means of acoustic and static periodic potentials. Polaritons are a superposition of photons and excitons and form in optical microcavities with quantum wells embedded in it. They are low-mass bosons in the dilute limit and have strong inter-particle interactions inherited from the excitonic component. Their capability to form quantum-condensed phases at temperatures in the kelvin range and to behave like quantum fluids makes them very attractive for novel solid-state devices. Since their de Broglie wavelength is of the order of a few micrometers, polaritons can be manipulated using static or dynamic potentials with micrometer scales. We present here a summary of the techniques used to submit polaritons and their condensed phases to periodic potentials, with an emphasis in dynamic ones produced by surface acoustic waves. We discuss the interesting phenomena that occur under such a modulation, such as condensation in excited states of the Brillouin zone, fragmentation of a condensate, formation of self-localized wavepackets, and Dirac and massive polaritons in static hexagonal and kagome lattices, respectively. The different techniques explored open the way to implement polariton-based quantum simulators, nano-optomechanic resonators and polaritonic topological insulators.

  15. Modeling Fluid Structure Interaction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benaroya, Haym

    2000-01-01

    The principal goal of this program is on integrating experiments with analytical modeling to develop physics-based reduced-order analytical models of nonlinear fluid-structure interactions in articulated naval platforms...

  16. Quantum Simulator for Transport Phenomena in Fluid Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacapo, A.; Sanz, M.; Lamata, L.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Succi, S.; Solano, E.

    2015-08-01

    Transport phenomena still stand as one of the most challenging problems in computational physics. By exploiting the analogies between Dirac and lattice Boltzmann equations, we develop a quantum simulator based on pseudospin-boson quantum systems, which is suitable for encoding fluid dynamics transport phenomena within a lattice kinetic formalism. It is shown that both the streaming and collision processes of lattice Boltzmann dynamics can be implemented with controlled quantum operations, using a heralded quantum protocol to encode non-unitary scattering processes. The proposed simulator is amenable to realization in controlled quantum platforms, such as ion-trap quantum computers or circuit quantum electrodynamics processors.

  17. Optimal control of molecular motion expressed through quantum fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Bijoy K.; Rabitz, Herschel; Askar, Attila

    2000-04-01

    A quantum fluid-dynamic (QFD) control formulation is presented for optimally manipulating atomic and molecular systems. In QFD the control quantum system is expressed in terms of the probability density ρ and the quantum current j. This choice of variables is motivated by the generally expected slowly varying spatial-temporal dependence of the fluid-dynamical variables. The QFD approach is illustrated for manipulation of the ground electronic state dynamics of HCl induced by an external electric field.

  18. Dipolar droplets in bosonic erbium quantum fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomaz, Lauriane; Baier, Simon; Petter, Daniel; Faraoni, Giulia; Becher, Jan-Hendrik; van Bijnen, Rick; Mark, Manfred J.; Ferlaino, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    Due to their large magnetic moment and exotic electronic configuration, atoms of the lanthanide family, such as dysprosium (Dy) and erbium (Er), are an ideal platform for exploring the competition between inter-particle interactions of different origins and behaviors. Recently, a novel phase of dilute droplet has been observed in an ultracold gas of bosonic Dy when changing the ratio of the contact and dipole-dipole interactions and setting the mean-field interactions to slightly attractive. This has been attributed to the distinct, non-vanishing, beyond-mean-field effects in dipolar gases when the mean interaction cancels. Here we report on the investigation of droplet physics in fluids of bosonic Er. By precise control of the scattering length a, we quantitatively probe the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC)-to-droplet phase diagram and the rich underlying dynamics. In a prolate geometry, we observe a crossover from a BEC to a single macro-droplet, prove the stabilizing role of quantum fluctuations and characterize the special dynamical properties of the droplet. In an oblate geometry, we observe the formation of assemblies of tinier droplets arranged in a chain and explore the special state dynamics following a quench of a, marked by successive merging and reformation events. L.C. is supported within the Marie Curie Individual Fellowship DIPPHASE No. 706809 of the European Commission.

  19. Time-dependent quantum fluid density functional theory of hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    GNLSE) of motion was earlier derived in our laboratory by combining density functional theory and quantum fluid dynamics in three- dimensional space. In continuation of the work reported previously, the GNLSE is applied to provide addi-.

  20. Time-dependent quantum fluid density functional theory of hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dependent density; density functional theory; quantum fluid dynamics. ... (HHG) is also examined. The present approach goes beyond the linear response formalism and, in principle, calculates the TD electron density to all orders of change.

  1. Are Quantum Models for Order Effects Quantum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Catarina; Wichert, Andreas

    2017-12-01

    The application of principles of Quantum Mechanics in areas outside of physics has been getting increasing attention in the scientific community in an emergent disciplined called Quantum Cognition. These principles have been applied to explain paradoxical situations that cannot be easily explained through classical theory. In quantum probability, events are characterised by a superposition state, which is represented by a state vector in a N-dimensional vector space. The probability of an event is given by the squared magnitude of the projection of this superposition state into the desired subspace. This geometric approach is very useful to explain paradoxical findings that involve order effects, but do we really need quantum principles for models that only involve projections? This work has two main goals. First, it is still not clear in the literature if a quantum projection model has any advantage towards a classical projection. We compared both models and concluded that the Quantum Projection model achieves the same results as its classical counterpart, because the quantum interference effects play no role in the computation of the probabilities. Second, it intends to propose an alternative relativistic interpretation for rotation parameters that are involved in both classical and quantum models. In the end, instead of interpreting these parameters as a similarity measure between questions, we propose that they emerge due to the lack of knowledge concerned with a personal basis state and also due to uncertainties towards the state of world and towards the context of the questions.

  2. Quantum cosmological metroland model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Edward [DAMTP, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Franzen, Anne, E-mail: ea212@cam.ac.u, E-mail: a.t.franzen@uu.n [Spinoza Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-02-21

    Relational particle mechanics is useful for modelling whole-universe issues such as quantum cosmology or the problem of time in quantum gravity, including some aspects outside the reach of comparably complex mini-superspace models. In this paper, we consider the mechanics of pure shape and not scale of four particles on a line, so that the only physically significant quantities are ratios of relative separations between the constituents' physical objects. Many of our ideas and workings extend to the N-particle case. As such models' configurations resemble depictions of metro lines in public transport maps, we term them 'N-stop metrolands'. This 4-stop model's configuration space is a 2-sphere, from which our metroland mechanics interpretation is via the 'cubic' tessellation. This model yields conserved quantities which are mathematically SO(3) objects like angular momenta but are physically relative dilational momenta (i.e. coordinates dotted with momenta). We provide and interpret various exact and approximate classical and quantum solutions for 4-stop metroland; from these results one can construct expectations and spreads of shape operators that admit interpretations as relative sizes and the 'homogeneity of the model universe's contents', and also objects of significance for the problem of time in quantum gravity (e.g. in the naive Schroedinger and records theory timeless approaches).

  3. COUPLED CHEMOTAXIS FLUID MODEL

    KAUST Repository

    LORZ, ALEXANDER

    2010-06-01

    We consider a model system for the collective behavior of oxygen-driven swimming bacteria in an aquatic fluid. In certain parameter regimes, such suspensions of bacteria feature large-scale convection patterns as a result of the hydrodynamic interaction between bacteria. The presented model consist of a parabolicparabolic chemotaxis system for the oxygen concentration and the bacteria density coupled to an incompressible Stokes equation for the fluid driven by a gravitational force of the heavier bacteria. We show local existence of weak solutions in a bounded domain in d, d = 2, 3 with no-flux boundary condition and in 2 in the case of inhomogeneous Dirichlet conditions for the oxygen. © 2010 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  4. Quantum fluid dynamics within a relativistic density-functional framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, S.K.; Deb, B.M.; Indian Inst. of Tech., Bombay. Group of Theoretical Studies)

    1984-01-01

    The authors explore certain interconnections between density-functional theory and quantum fluid dynamics of many-electron systems, in the relativistic domain, following the hydrodynamical approach for the one-particle Dirac equation. The spinor formulation is transformed into a tensor formulation, by defining a number of density functions. These lead to six 'classical' fluid dynamical equations, for a complete specification of the system. The various density functions and the hydrodynamical equations are physically interpreted. The relativistic hydrodynamics discussed, correspond to a 'spinning' fluid. The net many-electron fluid consists of components each of which is characterised by fluid dynamical quantities corresponding to each spinor. The net hydrodynamical quantities are obtained by summing over the occupied spinors. Thus, the earlier non-relativistic 'classical' picture of the many-electron fluid as a collection of individual fluid components is also valid in the relativistic domain. (author)

  5. Critical properties of effective gauge theories for novel quantum fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smoergrav, Eivind

    2005-07-01

    ;light vortices') loose co centricity with the vortices with large phase stiffness ('heavy vortices'), entering a liquid state. Paper 7: The phase diagram and critical properties of the N-component London superconductor are studied in zero and finite magnetic field. Direct and dual gauge field correlators for general N are given. The model with N = 3 exhibits three anomalies in the specific heat. We demonstrate the existence of two neutral 3D XY fixed points and one inverted charged 3D XY fixed point. In particular, for N = 2 we point out the possibility of two novel types of field induced phase transitions in ordered quantum fluids: 1) A phase transition from a superconductor to a superfluid or vice versa, driven by tuning an external magnetic field. This identifies the superconducting phase of liquid metallic hydrogen as a novel quantum fluid. 2) A phase transition corresponding to a quantum fluid analogue of sub-lattice melting, where a composite field induced Abrikosov vortex lattice is decomposed and disorders the phases of the constituent condensate with lowest bare phase stiffness. Both transitions belong to the 3D XY universality class. Paper 8: We study the phase structure of a 2-component superconductor in a high magnetic field. We identify a regime where first, at a certain temperature a field induced lattice of co centered vortices of both order parameters melts, causing the system to loose superconductivity (author)(tk)

  6. Modeling Quantum Well Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Alexandru Anghel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In semiconductor laser modeling, a good mathematical model gives near-reality results. Three methods of modeling solutions from the rate equations are presented and analyzed. A method based on the rate equations modeled in Simulink to describe quantum well lasers was presented. For different signal types like step function, saw tooth and sinus used as input, a good response of the used equations is obtained. Circuit model resulting from one of the rate equations models is presented and simulated in SPICE. Results show a good modeling behavior. Numerical simulation in MathCad gives satisfactory results for the study of the transitory and dynamic operation at small level of the injection current. The obtained numerical results show the specific limits of each model, according to theoretical analysis. Based on these results, software can be built that integrates circuit simulation and other modeling methods for quantum well lasers to have a tool that model and analysis these devices from all points of view.

  7. Time-dependent quantum fluid density functional theory of hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    derived in our laboratory by combining density functional theory and quantum fluid dynamics in three- dimensional space. In continuation of the .... repulsion, electron-nuclear Coulomb attraction, ex- change and correlation interactions, ..... Eberly J H, Grobe R, Law C K and Su Q 1992 Adv. At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Suppl. 1 301. 8.

  8. Time-dependent quantum fluid density functional theory of hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A time-dependent generalized non-linear Schrödinger equation (GNLSE) of motion was earlier derived in our laboratory by combining density functional theory and quantum fluid dynamics in threedimensional space. In continuation of the work reported previously, the GNLSE is applied to provide additional knowledge on ...

  9. Magnetoviscous model fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Kröger, M; Hess, S

    2003-01-01

    We review, apply and compare diverse approaches to the theoretical understanding of the dynamical and rheological behaviour of ferrofluids and magnetorheological (MR) fluids subject to external magnetic and flow fields. Simple models are introduced which are directly solvable by nonequilibrium Brownian or molecular dynamics computer simulation. In particular, the numerical results for ferrofluids quantify the domain of validity of uniaxial alignment of magnetic moments (in and) out of equilibrium. A Fokker-Planck equation for the dynamics of the magnetic moments - corresponding to the Brownian dynamics approach - and its implications are analysed under this approximation. The basic approach considers the effect of external fields on the dynamics of ellipsoid shaped permanent ferromagnetic domains (aggregates), whose size should depend on the strength of flow and magnetic field, the magnetic interaction parameter and concentration (or packing fraction). Results from analytic calculations and from simulation ar...

  10. Collision models in quantum optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarello, Francesco

    2017-12-01

    Quantum collision models (CMs) provide advantageous case studies for investigating major issues in open quantum systems theory, and especially quantum non-Markovianity. After reviewing their general definition and distinctive features, we illustrate the emergence of a CM in a familiar quantum optics scenario. This task is carried out by highlighting the close connection between the well-known input-output formalism and CMs. Within this quantum optics framework, usual assumptions in the CMs' literature - such as considering a bath of noninteracting yet initially correlated ancillas - have a clear physical origin.

  11. Modeling of quantum nanomechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Novotny, Tomas; Donarini, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are approaching the nanoscale, which ultimately implies that the mechanical motion needs to be treated quantum mechanically. In recent years our group has developed theoretical methods to analyze the shuttle transition in the quantum regime (Novotny, 2004...

  12. Nonlinear wave breaking in self-gravitating viscoelastic quantum fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitra, Aniruddha, E-mail: anibabun@gmail.com [Center for Plasma Studies, Department of Instrumentation Science, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, 700 032 (India); Roychoudhury, Rajkumar, E-mail: rajdaju@rediffmail.com [Advanced Centre for Nonlinear and Complex Phenomena, 1175 Survey Park, Kolkata 700075 (India); Department of Mathematics, Bethune College, Kolkata 700006 (India); Bhar, Radhaballav [Center for Plasma Studies, Department of Instrumentation Science, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, 700 032 (India); Khan, Manoranjan, E-mail: mkhan.ju@gmail.com [Center for Plasma Studies, Department of Instrumentation Science, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, 700 032 (India)

    2017-02-12

    The stability of a viscoelastic self-gravitating quantum fluid has been studied. Symmetry breaking instability of solitary wave has been observed through ‘viscosity modified Ostrovsky equation’ in weak gravity limit. In presence of strong gravitational field, the solitary wave breaks into shock waves. Response to a Gaussian perturbation, the system produces quasi-periodic short waves, which in terns predicts the existence of gravito-acoustic quasi-periodic short waves in lower solar corona region. Stability analysis of this dynamical system predicts gravity has the most prominent effect on the phase portraits, therefore, on the stability of the system. The non-existence of chaotic solution has also been observed at long wavelength perturbation through index value theorem. - Highlights: • In weak gravitational field, viscoelastic quantum fluid exhibits symmetry breaking instability. • Gaussian perturbation produces quasi-periodic gravito-acoustic waves into the system. • There exists no chaotic state of the system against long wavelength perturbations.

  13. Models of optical quantum computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krovi Hari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available I review some work on models of quantum computing, optical implementations of these models, as well as the associated computational power. In particular, we discuss the circuit model and cluster state implementations using quantum optics with various encodings such as dual rail encoding, Gottesman-Kitaev-Preskill encoding, and coherent state encoding. Then we discuss intermediate models of optical computing such as boson sampling and its variants. Finally, we review some recent work in optical implementations of adiabatic quantum computing and analog optical computing. We also provide a brief description of the relevant aspects from complexity theory needed to understand the results surveyed.

  14. Mesoscopic model for binary fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, C.; Tucci, K.; Alvarez-Llamoza, O.; Orozco-Guillén, E. E.; Morales, M.; Cosenza, M. G.

    2017-10-01

    We propose a model for studying binary fluids based on the mesoscopic molecular simulation technique known as multiparticle collision, where the space and state variables are continuous, and time is discrete. We include a repulsion rule to simulate segregation processes that does not require calculation of the interaction forces between particles, so binary fluids can be described on a mesoscopic scale. The model is conceptually simple and computationally efficient; it maintains Galilean invariance and conserves the mass and energy in the system at the micro- and macro-scale, whereas momentum is conserved globally. For a wide range of temperatures and densities, the model yields results in good agreement with the known properties of binary fluids, such as the density profile, interface width, phase separation, and phase growth. We also apply the model to the study of binary fluids in crowded environments with consistent results.

  15. Fluid analog model for boundary effects in field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, L. H.; Svaiter, N. F.

    2009-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations in the density of a fluid with a linear phonon dispersion relation are studied. In particular, we treat the changes in these fluctuations due to nonclassical states of phonons and to the presence of boundaries. These effects are analogous to similar effects in relativistic quantum field theory, and we argue that the case of the fluid is a useful analog model for effects in field theory. We further argue that the changes in the mean squared density are, in principle, observable by light scattering experiments.

  16. "Electronium": A Quantum Atomic Teaching Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, Marion; Niedderer, Hans; Scott, Philip; Leach, John

    2002-01-01

    Outlines an alternative atomic model to the probability model, the descriptive quantum atomic model Electronium. Discusses the way in which it is intended to support students in learning quantum-mechanical concepts. (Author/MM)

  17. Computational modelling in fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauguel, A.

    1985-01-01

    The modelling of the greatest part of environmental or industrial flow problems gives very similar types of equations. The considerable increase in computing capacity over the last ten years consequently allowed numerical models of growing complexity to be processed. The varied group of computer codes presented are now a complementary tool of experimental facilities to achieve studies in the field of fluid mechanics. Several codes applied in the nuclear field (reactors, cooling towers, exchangers, plumes...) are presented among others [fr

  18. Quantum entanglement and quantum phase transitions in frustrated Majumdar-Ghosh model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guanghua; Wang Chunhai; Deng Xiaoyan

    2011-01-01

    By using the density matrix renormalization group technique, the quantum phase transitions in the frustrated Majumdar-Ghosh model are investigated. The behaviors of the conventional order parameter and the quantum entanglement entropy are analyzed in detail. The order parameter is found to peak at J 2 ∼0.58, but not at the Majumdar-Ghosh point (J 2 =0.5). Although, the quantum entanglements calculated with different subsystems display dissimilarly, the extremes of their first derivatives approach to the same critical point. By finite size scaling, this quantum critical point J C 2 converges to around 0.301 in the thermodynamic limit, which is consistent with those predicted previously by some authors (Tonegawa and Harada, 1987 ; Kuboki and Fukuyama, 1987 ; Chitra et al., 1995 ). Across the J C 2 , the system undergoes a quantum phase transition from a gapless spin-fluid phase to a gapped dimerized phase.

  19. On static triplet structures in fluids with quantum behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesé, Luis M.

    2018-03-01

    The problem of the equilibrium triplet structures in fluids with quantum behavior is discussed. Theoretical questions of interest to the real space structures are addressed by studying the three types of structures that can be determined via path integrals (instantaneous, centroid, and total thermalized-continuous linear response). The cases of liquid para-H2 and liquid neon on their crystallization lines are examined with path-integral Monte Carlo simulations, the focus being on the instantaneous and the centroid triplet functions (equilateral and isosceles configurations). To analyze the results further, two standard closures, Kirkwood superposition and Jackson-Feenberg convolution, are utilized. In addition, some pilot calculations with path integrals and closures of the instantaneous triplet structure factor of liquid para-H2 are also carried out for the equilateral components. Triplet structural regularities connected to the pair radial structures are identified, a remarkable usefulness of the closures employed is observed (e.g., triplet spatial functions for medium-long distances, triplet structure factors for medium k wave numbers), and physical insight into the role of pair correlations near quantum crystallization is gained.

  20. A viable dark fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhateeb, Esraa

    2018-01-01

    We consider a cosmological model based on a generalization of the equation of state proposed by Nojiri and Odintsov (2004) and Štefančić (2005, 2006). We argue that this model works as a dark fluid model which can interpolate between dust equation of state and the dark energy equation of state. We show how the asymptotic behavior of the equation of state constrained the parameters of the model. The causality condition for the model is also studied to constrain the parameters and the fixed points are tested to determine different solution classes. Observations of Hubble diagram of SNe Ia supernovae are used to further constrain the model. We present an exact solution of the model and calculate the luminosity distance and the energy density evolution. We also calculate the deceleration parameter to test the state of the universe expansion.

  1. Parametric Modeling for Fluid Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Martinez, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Fluid Systems involves different projects that require parametric modeling, which is a model that maintains consistent relationships between elements as is manipulated. One of these projects is the Neo Liquid Propellant Testbed, which is part of Rocket U. As part of Rocket U (Rocket University), engineers at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida have the opportunity to develop critical flight skills as they design, build and launch high-powered rockets. To build the Neo testbed; hardware from the Space Shuttle Program was repurposed. Modeling for Neo, included: fittings, valves, frames and tubing, between others. These models help in the review process, to make sure regulations are being followed. Another fluid systems project that required modeling is Plant Habitat's TCUI test project. Plant Habitat is a plan to develop a large growth chamber to learn the effects of long-duration microgravity exposure to plants in space. Work for this project included the design and modeling of a duct vent for flow test. Parametric Modeling for these projects was done using Creo Parametric 2.0.

  2. Pair interactions of heavy vortices in quantum fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pshenichnyuk, Ivan A.

    2018-02-01

    The dynamics of quantum vortex pairs carrying heavy doping matter trapped inside their cores is studied. The nonlinear classical matter field formalism is used to build a universal mathematical model of a heavy vortex applicable to different types of quantum mixtures. It is shown how the usual vortex dynamics typical for undoped pairs qualitatively changes when heavy dopants are used: heavy vortices with opposite topological charges (chiralities) attract each other, while vortices with the same charge are repelled. The force responsible for such behavior appears as a result of superposition of vortices velocity fields in the presence of doping substance and can be considered as a special realization of the Magnus effect. The force is evaluated quantitatively and its inverse proportionality to the distance is demonstrated. The mechanism described in this paper gives an example of how a light nonlinear classical field may realize repulsive and attractive interactions between embedded heavy impurities.

  3. Complex fluids modeling and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Saramito, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive overview of the modeling of complex fluids, including many common substances, such as toothpaste, hair gel, mayonnaise, liquid foam, cement and blood, which cannot be described by Navier-Stokes equations. It also offers an up-to-date mathematical and numerical analysis of the corresponding equations, as well as several practical numerical algorithms and software solutions for the approximation of the solutions. It discusses industrial (molten plastics, forming process), geophysical (mud flows, volcanic lava, glaciers and snow avalanches), and biological (blood flows, tissues) modeling applications. This book is a valuable resource for undergraduate students and researchers in applied mathematics, mechanical engineering and physics.

  4. Innovative quantum technologies for microgravity fundamental physics and biological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierk, I.; Israelsson, U.; Lee, M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a new technology program, within the fundamental physics research program, focusing on four quantum technology areas: quantum atomics, quantum optics, space superconductivity and quantum sensor technology, and quantum fluid based sensor and modeling technology.

  5. Hybrid quantum-classical modeling of quantum dot devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantner, Markus; Mittnenzweig, Markus; Koprucki, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    The design of electrically driven quantum dot devices for quantum optical applications asks for modeling approaches combining classical device physics with quantum mechanics. We connect the well-established fields of semiclassical semiconductor transport theory and the theory of open quantum systems to meet this requirement. By coupling the van Roosbroeck system with a quantum master equation in Lindblad form, we introduce a new hybrid quantum-classical modeling approach, which provides a comprehensive description of quantum dot devices on multiple scales: it enables the calculation of quantum optical figures of merit and the spatially resolved simulation of the current flow in realistic semiconductor device geometries in a unified way. We construct the interface between both theories in such a way, that the resulting hybrid system obeys the fundamental axioms of (non)equilibrium thermodynamics. We show that our approach guarantees the conservation of charge, consistency with the thermodynamic equilibrium and the second law of thermodynamics. The feasibility of the approach is demonstrated by numerical simulations of an electrically driven single-photon source based on a single quantum dot in the stationary and transient operation regime.

  6. Strongly Correlated Quantum Fluids: Ultracold Quantum Gases, Quantum Chromodynamic Plasmas and Holographic Duality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    AdS. Crucially, the ’t Hooft coupling λ and the number of colors N of the 4D supersymmetric Yang – Mills theory were related to the AdS curvature in...mapping, the quantum field theory (QFT) is a QCD-like theory known as the N = 4 supersymmetric (SUSY) Yang – Mills theory [230]. This theory is conformal...the theory is in the plasma phase for all values of the coupling. The particle content of the N = 4 SUSY Yang – Mills theory differs from that of QCD

  7. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Rudiger; Casella, Francesco; Sielemann, Michael; Proelss, Katrin; Otter, Martin; Wetter, Michael

    2009-09-01

    This article discusses the Modelica.Fluid library that has been included in the Modelica Standard Library 3.1. Modelica.Fluid provides interfaces and basic components for the device-oriented modeling of onedimensional thermo-fluid flow in networks containing vessels, pipes, fluid machines, valves and fittings. A unique feature of Modelica.Fluid is that the component equations and the media models as well as pressure loss and heat transfer correlations are decoupled from each other. All components are implemented such that they can be used for media from the Modelica.Media library. This means that an incompressible or compressible medium, a single or a multiple substance medium with one or more phases might be used with one and the same model as long as the modeling assumptions made hold. Furthermore, trace substances are supported. Modeling assumptions can be configured globally in an outer System object. This covers in particular the initialization, uni- or bi-directional flow, and dynamic or steady-state formulation of mass, energy, and momentum balance. All assumptions can be locally refined for every component. While Modelica.Fluid contains a reasonable set of component models, the goal of the library is not to provide a comprehensive set of models, but rather to provide interfaces and best practices for the treatment of issues such as connector design and implementation of energy, mass and momentum balances. Applications from various domains are presented.

  8. Flocking from a quantum analogy: spin-orbit coupling in an active fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewe, Benjamin; Souslov, Anton; Goldbart, Paul M.

    2018-01-01

    Systems composed of strongly interacting self-propelled particles can form a spontaneously flowing polar active fluid. The study of the connection between the microscopic dynamics of a single such particle and the macroscopic dynamics of the fluid can yield insights into experimentally realizable active flows, but this connection is well understood in only a few select cases. We introduce a model of self-propelled particles based on an analogy with the motion of electrons that have strong spin-orbit coupling. We find that, within our model, self-propelled particles are subject to an analog of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle that relates translational and rotational noise. Furthermore, by coarse-graining this microscopic model, we establish expressions for the coefficients of the Toner-Tu equations—the hydrodynamic equations that describe an active fluid composed of these ‘active spins.’ The connection between stochastic self-propelled particles and quantum particles with spin may help realize exotic phases of matter using active fluids via analogies with systems composed of strongly correlated electrons.

  9. Dilute magnetic droplets of a bosonic erbium quantum fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomaz, Lauriane; Baier, Simon; Petter, Daniel; Faraoni, Giulia; Becher, Jan-Hendrik; van Bijnen, Rick; Mark, Manfred J.; Ferlaino, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    Due to their large magnetic moment and exotic electronic configuration, atoms of the lanthanide family, such as dysprosium (Dy) and erbium (Er), are an ideal platform for exploring the competition between inter-particle interactions of different origins and behaviors. Recently, a novel phase of dilute droplet has been observed in an ultracold gas of bosonic Dy when changing the ratio of the contact and dipole-dipole interactions and setting the mean-field interactions to slightly attractive. This has been attributed to the distinct, non-vanishing, beyond-mean-field effects in dipolar gases when the mean interaction cancels. Here we report on the investigation of droplet physics in fluids of bosonic Er. By precise control of the scattering length a, we quantitatively probe the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC)-to-droplet phase diagram and the rich underlying dynamics. In a prolate geometry, we observe a crossover from a BEC to a single macro-droplet, prove the stabilizing role of quantum fluctuations and characterize the special dynamical properties of the droplet. In an oblate geometry, we observe the formation of assemblies of tinier droplets arranged in a chain and explore the special state dynamics following a quench of a, marked by successive merging and reformation events. L.C. is supported within the Marie Curie Individual Fellowship DIPPHASE No. 706809 of the European Commission.

  10. Noncommutative Field Theory and the Dynamics of Quantum Hall Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Barbón, José L F

    2002-01-01

    We study the spectrum of density fluctuations of Fractional Hall Fluids in the context of the noncommutative hidrodynamical model of Susskind. We show that, within the weak-field expansion, the leading correction to the noncommutative Chern--Simons Lagrangian (a Maxwell term in the effective action,) destroys the incompressibility of the Hall fluid due to strong UV/IR effects at one loop. We speculate on possible relations of this instability with the transition to the Wigner crystal, and conclude that calculations within the weak-field expansion must be carried out with an explicit ultraviolet cutoff at the noncommutativity scale. We point out that the noncommutative dipoles exactly match the spatial structure of the Halperin--Kallin quasiexcitons. Therefore, we propose that the noncommutative formalism must describe accurately the spectrum at very large momenta, provided no weak-field approximations are made. We further conjecture that the noncommutative open Wilson lines are `vertex operators' for the quas...

  11. Cosmological model with macroscopic spin fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Szydlowski, Marek; Krawiec, Adam

    2003-01-01

    We consider a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model with some exotic perfect fluid with spin known as the Weyssenhoff fluid. The possibility that the dark energy may be described in part by the Weyssenhoff fluid is discussed. The observational constraint coming from supernovae type Ia observations is established. This result indicates that, whereas the cosmological constant is still needed to explain current observations, the model with spin fluid is admissible. For high redshifts $z ...

  12. Physics of quantum fluids. New trends and hot topics in atomic and polariton condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bramati, Alberto [Paris Univ. (France). Laboratoire Kastler Brossel; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France); Modugno, Michele (eds.) [IKERBASQUE, Bilbao (Spain); Univ. del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica e Historia de la Ciencia

    2013-10-01

    Provides an overview of the field of quantum fluids. Presents analogies and differences between polariton and atomic quantum fluids. With contributions from the major actors in the field. Explains a new type of quantum fluid with specific characteristics. The study of quantum fluids, stimulated by the discovery of superfluidity in liquid helium, has experienced renewed interest after the observation of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in ultra-cold atomic gases and the observation a new type of quantum fluid with specific characteristics derived from its intrinsic out-of-equilibrium nature. The main objective of this book is to take a snapshot of the state-of-the-art of this fast moving field with a special emphasis on the hot topics and new trends. Bringing together the most active specialists of the two areas (atomic and polaritonic quantum fluids), we expect that this book will facilitate the exchange and the collaboration between these two communities working on subjects with very strong analogies.

  13. Solvable models in quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Albeverio, S; Høegh-Krohn, R; Holden, H; Gesztesy, F

    2004-01-01

    This monograph presents a detailed study of a class of solvable models in quantum mechanics that describe the motion of a particle in a potential having support at the positions of a discrete (finite or infinite) set of point sources. Both situations-where the strengths of the sources and their locations are precisely known and where these are only known with a given probability distribution-are covered. The authors present a systematic mathematical approach to these models and illustrate its connections with previous heuristic derivations and computations. Results obtained by different method

  14. A quantum-implementable neural network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jialin; Wang, Lingli; Charbon, Edoardo

    2017-10-01

    A quantum-implementable neural network, namely quantum probability neural network (QPNN) model, is proposed in this paper. QPNN can use quantum parallelism to trace all possible network states to improve the result. Due to its unique quantum nature, this model is robust to several quantum noises under certain conditions, which can be efficiently implemented by the qubus quantum computer. Another advantage is that QPNN can be used as memory to retrieve the most relevant data and even to generate new data. The MATLAB experimental results of Iris data classification and MNIST handwriting recognition show that much less neuron resources are required in QPNN to obtain a good result than the classical feedforward neural network. The proposed QPNN model indicates that quantum effects are useful for real-life classification tasks.

  15. Will Quantum Cosmology Resurrect Chaotic Inflation Model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Pyo; Kim, Won

    2016-07-01

    The single field chaotic inflation model with a monomial power greater than one seems to be ruled out by the recent Planck and WMAP CMB data while Starobinsky model with a higher curvature term seems to be a viable model. Higher curvature terms being originated from quantum fluctuations, we revisit the quantum cosmology of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation for the chaotic inflation model. The semiclassical cosmology emerges from quantum cosmology with fluctuations of spacetimes and matter when the wave function is peaked around the semiclassical trajectory with quantum corrections a la the de Broglie-Bohm pilot theory.

  16. The quantum Rabi model: solution and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Qiongtao; Zhong, Honghua; Lee, Chaohong; Batchelor, Murray T

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a review of recent developments on various aspects of the quantum Rabi model. Particular emphasis is given on the exact analytic solution obtained in terms of confluent Heun functions. The analytic solutions for various generalisations of the quantum Rabi model are also discussed. Results are also reviewed on the level statistics and the dynamics of the quantum Rabi model. The article concludes with an introductory overview of several experimental realisations of the quantum Rabi model. An outlook towards future developments is also given. (topical review)

  17. Postquench prethermalization in a disordered quantum fluid of light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larré, Pierre-Élie; Delande, Dominique; Cherroret, Nicolas

    2018-04-01

    We study the coherence of a disordered and interacting quantum light field after propagation along a nonlinear optical fiber. Disorder is generated by a cross-phase modulation with a randomized auxiliary classical light field, while interactions are induced by self-phase modulation. When penetrating the fiber from free space, the incoming quantum light undergoes a disorder and interaction quench. By calculating the coherence function of the transmitted quantum light, we show that the decoherence induced by the quench spreads in a light-cone fashion in the nonequilibrium many-body quantum system, leaving the latter prethermalize with peculiar features originating from disorder.

  18. Quantum fluid dynamics in the Lagrangian representation and applications to photodissociation problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Fernando Sales; Askar, Attila; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    1999-08-01

    This paper considers the practical utility of quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) whereby the time-dependent Schrödinger's equation is transformed to observing the dynamics of an equivalent "gas continuum." The density and velocity of this equivalent gas continuum are respectively the probability density and the gradient of the phase of the wave function. The numerical implementation of the QFD equations is carried out within the Lagrangian approach, which transforms the solution of Schrödinger's equation into following the trajectories of a set of mass points, i.e., subparticles, obtained by discretization of the continuum equations. The quantum dynamics of the subparticles which arise in the present formalism through numerical discretization are coupled by the density and the quantum potential. Numerical illustrations are performed for photodissociation of NOCl and NO2 treated as two-dimensional models. The dissociation cross sections σ(ω) are evaluated in the dramatically short CPU times of 33 s for NOCl and 40 s for NO2 on a Pentium-200 MHz PC machine. The computational efficiency comes from a combination of (a) the QFD representation dealing with the near monotonic amplitude and phase as dependent variables, (b) the Lagrangian description concentrating the computation effort at all times into regions of highest probability as an optimal adaptive grid, and (c) the use of an explicit time integrator whereby the computational effort grows only linearly with the number of discrete points.

  19. Quantum Rabi Model with Trapped Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedernales, J S; Lizuain, I; Felicetti, S; Romero, G; Lamata, L; Solano, E

    2015-10-20

    We propose the quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi model in all parameter regimes by means of detuned bichromatic sideband excitations of a single trapped ion. We show that current setups can reproduce, in particular, the ultrastrong and deep strong coupling regimes of such a paradigmatic light-matter interaction. Furthermore, associated with these extreme dipolar regimes, we study the controlled generation and detection of their entangled ground states by means of adiabatic methods. Ion traps have arguably performed the first quantum simulation of the Jaynes-Cummings model, a restricted regime of the quantum Rabi model where the rotating-wave approximation holds. We show that one can go beyond and experimentally investigate the quantum simulation of coupling regimes of the quantum Rabi model that are difficult to achieve with natural dipolar interactions.

  20. Breakdown of the dissipationless quantum Hall state: Quantised steps and analogies with classical and quantum fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaves, L.

    2001-01-01

    The breakdown of the integer quantum Hall effect at high currents sometimes occurs a series of regular steps in the dissipative voltage drop bars used to maintain the US Resistance Standard, but have also been reported in other devices. It is proposed that the origin of the steps can be understood in terms of instability in the dissipationless flow at high electron drift velocities. The instability is induced by impurity- or defect- related inter-Landau level scattering processes in local macroscopic regions of the Hall bar. Electron-hole pairs (magneto-excitons) are generated in the quantum Hall fluid in these regions and that the electronic motion can be envisaged as a quantum analogue of the Karman vortex street which forms when a classical fluid flows past an obstacle. (author)

  1. Quantum kinetic Heisenberg models: a unique dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timonen, J.; Pilling, D.J.; Bullough, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    We suggest that the dynamics Glauber embodied in his kinetic Ising model can be introduced similarly and in an apparently unique way, into the quantum statistical mechanics of the quantum-integrable models like the Heisenberg, sine-Gordon and Massive Thirring models. The latter may suggest an extension of the theory to unique kinetic Ising models in two dimensions. The kinetic repulsive bose gas which is studied in detail in the steady state seems to be a solvable kinetic model. (author)

  2. Physics of quantum fluids new trends and hot topics in atomic and polariton condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Modugno, Michele

    2013-01-01

    The study of quantum fluids, stimulated by the discovery of superfluidity in liquid helium, has experienced renewed interest after the observation of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in ultra-cold atomic gases and the observation a new type of quantum fluid with specific characteristics derived from its intrinsic out-of-equilibrium nature. The main objective of this book is to take a snapshot of the state-of-the-art of this fast moving field with a special emphasis on the hot topics and new trends. Bringing together the most active specialists of the two areas (atomic and polaritonic quantum fluids), we expect that this book will facilitate the exchange and the collaboration between these two communities working on subjects with very strong analogies.

  3. Quantum decoration transformation for spin models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braz, F.F.; Rodrigues, F.C.; Souza, S.M. de; Rojas, Onofre

    2016-01-01

    It is quite relevant the extension of decoration transformation for quantum spin models since most of the real materials could be well described by Heisenberg type models. Here we propose an exact quantum decoration transformation and also showing interesting properties such as the persistence of symmetry and the symmetry breaking during this transformation. Although the proposed transformation, in principle, cannot be used to map exactly a quantum spin lattice model into another quantum spin lattice model, since the operators are non-commutative. However, it is possible the mapping in the “classical” limit, establishing an equivalence between both quantum spin lattice models. To study the validity of this approach for quantum spin lattice model, we use the Zassenhaus formula, and we verify how the correction could influence the decoration transformation. But this correction could be useless to improve the quantum decoration transformation because it involves the second-nearest-neighbor and further nearest neighbor couplings, which leads into a cumbersome task to establish the equivalence between both lattice models. This correction also gives us valuable information about its contribution, for most of the Heisenberg type models, this correction could be irrelevant at least up to the third order term of Zassenhaus formula. This transformation is applied to a finite size Heisenberg chain, comparing with the exact numerical results, our result is consistent for weak xy-anisotropy coupling. We also apply to bond-alternating Ising–Heisenberg chain model, obtaining an accurate result in the limit of the quasi-Ising chain.

  4. Hamiltonian closures in fluid models for plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, Emanuele

    2017-11-01

    This article reviews recent activity on the Hamiltonian formulation of fluid models for plasmas in the non-dissipative limit, with emphasis on the relations between the fluid closures adopted for the different models and the Hamiltonian structures. The review focuses on results obtained during the last decade, but a few classical results are also described, in order to illustrate connections with the most recent developments. With the hope of making the review accessible not only to specialists in the field, an introduction to the mathematical tools applied in the Hamiltonian formalism for continuum models is provided. Subsequently, we review the Hamiltonian formulation of models based on the magnetohydrodynamics description, including those based on the adiabatic and double adiabatic closure. It is shown how Dirac's theory of constrained Hamiltonian systems can be applied to impose the incompressibility closure on a magnetohydrodynamic model and how an extended version of barotropic magnetohydrodynamics, accounting for two-fluid effects, is amenable to a Hamiltonian formulation. Hamiltonian reduced fluid models, valid in the presence of a strong magnetic field, are also reviewed. In particular, reduced magnetohydrodynamics and models assuming cold ions and different closures for the electron fluid are discussed. Hamiltonian models relaxing the cold-ion assumption are then introduced. These include models where finite Larmor radius effects are added by means of the gyromap technique, and gyrofluid models. Numerical simulations of Hamiltonian reduced fluid models investigating the phenomenon of magnetic reconnection are illustrated. The last part of the review concerns recent results based on the derivation of closures preserving a Hamiltonian structure, based on the Hamiltonian structure of parent kinetic models. Identification of such closures for fluid models derived from kinetic systems based on the Vlasov and drift-kinetic equations are presented, and

  5. Fidelity susceptibility in the quantum Rabi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bo-Bo; Lv, Xiao-Chen

    2018-01-01

    Quantum criticality usually occurs in many-body systems. Recently it was shown that the quantum Rabi model, which describes a two-level atom coupled to a single model cavity field, presents quantum phase transitions from a normal phase to a superradiate phase when the ratio between the frequency of the two-level atom and the frequency of the cavity field extends to infinity. In this work, we study quantum phase transitions in the quantum Rabi model from the fidelity susceptibility perspective. We found that the fidelity susceptibility and the generalized adiabatic susceptibility present universal finite-size scaling behaviors near the quantum critical point of the Rabi model if the ratio between frequency of the two-level atom and frequency of the cavity field is finite. From the finite-size scaling analysis of the fidelity susceptibility, we found that the adiabatic dimension of the fidelity susceptibility and the generalized adiabatic susceptibility of fourth order in the Rabi model are 4 /3 and 2, respectively. Meanwhile, the correlation length critical exponent and the dynamical critical exponent in the quantum critical point of the Rabi model are found to be 3 /2 and 1 /3 , respectively. Since the fidelity susceptibility and the generalized adiabatic susceptibility are the moments of the quantum noise spectrum which are directly measurable by experiments in linear response regime, the scaling behavior of the fidelity susceptibility in the Rabi model could be tested experimentally. The simple structure of the quantum Rabi model paves the way for experimentally observing the universal scaling behavior of the fidelity susceptibility at a quantum phase transition.

  6. Quantum Graphical Models and Belief Propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leifer, M.S.; Poulin, D.

    2008-01-01

    Belief Propagation algorithms acting on Graphical Models of classical probability distributions, such as Markov Networks, Factor Graphs and Bayesian Networks, are amongst the most powerful known methods for deriving probabilistic inferences amongst large numbers of random variables. This paper presents a generalization of these concepts and methods to the quantum case, based on the idea that quantum theory can be thought of as a noncommutative, operator-valued, generalization of classical probability theory. Some novel characterizations of quantum conditional independence are derived, and definitions of Quantum n-Bifactor Networks, Markov Networks, Factor Graphs and Bayesian Networks are proposed. The structure of Quantum Markov Networks is investigated and some partial characterization results are obtained, along the lines of the Hammersley-Clifford theorem. A Quantum Belief Propagation algorithm is presented and is shown to converge on 1-Bifactor Networks and Markov Networks when the underlying graph is a tree. The use of Quantum Belief Propagation as a heuristic algorithm in cases where it is not known to converge is discussed. Applications to decoding quantum error correcting codes and to the simulation of many-body quantum systems are described

  7. Quantum-like Probabilistic Models Outside Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    We present a quantum-like (QL) model in that contexts (complexes of e.g. mental, social, biological, economic or even political conditions) are represented by complex probability amplitudes. This approach gives the possibility to apply the mathematical quantum formalism to probabilities induced in any domain of science. In our model quantum randomness appears not as irreducible randomness (as it is commonly accepted in conventional quantum mechanics, e.g. by von Neumann and Dirac), but as a consequence of obtaining incomplete information about a system. We pay main attention to the QL description of processing of incomplete information. Our QL model can be useful in cognitive, social and political sciences as well as economics and artificial intelligence. In this paper we consider in a more detail one special application — QL modeling of brain's functioning. The brain is modeled as a QL-computer.

  8. Computer simulation of liquid-vapor coexistence of confined quantum fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejos, Víctor M; Gil-Villegas, Alejandro; Martinez, Alejandro

    2013-11-14

    The liquid-vapor coexistence (LV) of bulk and confined quantum fluids has been studied by Monte Carlo computer simulation for particles interacting via a semiclassical effective pair potential Veff(r) = VLJ + VQ, where VLJ is the Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential (LJ) and VQ is the first-order Wigner-Kirkwood (WK-1) quantum potential, that depends on β = 1∕kT and de Boer's quantumness parameter Λ=h/σ√mε, where k and h are the Boltzmann's and Planck's constants, respectively, m is the particle's mass, T is the temperature of the system, and σ and ε are the LJ potential parameters. The non-conformal properties of the system of particles interacting via the effective pair potential Veff(r) are due to Λ, since the LV phase diagram is modified by varying Λ. We found that the WK-1 system gives an accurate description of the LV coexistence for bulk phases of several quantum fluids, obtained by the Gibbs Ensemble Monte Carlo method (GEMC). Confinement effects were introduced using the Canonical Ensemble (NVT) to simulate quantum fluids contained within parallel hard walls separated by a distance Lp, within the range 2σ ≤ Lp ≤ 6σ. The critical temperature of the system is reduced by decreasing Lp and increasing Λ, and the liquid-vapor transition is not longer observed for Lp∕σ < 2, in contrast to what has been observed for the classical system.

  9. Computer simulation of liquid-vapor coexistence of confined quantum fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejos, Víctor M.; Gil-Villegas, Alejandro; Martinez, Alejandro

    2013-11-01

    The liquid-vapor coexistence (LV) of bulk and confined quantum fluids has been studied by Monte Carlo computer simulation for particles interacting via a semiclassical effective pair potential Veff(r) = VLJ + VQ, where VLJ is the Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential (LJ) and VQ is the first-order Wigner-Kirkwood (WK-1) quantum potential, that depends on β = 1/kT and de Boer's quantumness parameter Λ = h/σ √{mɛ }, where k and h are the Boltzmann's and Planck's constants, respectively, m is the particle's mass, T is the temperature of the system, and σ and ɛ are the LJ potential parameters. The non-conformal properties of the system of particles interacting via the effective pair potential Veff(r) are due to Λ, since the LV phase diagram is modified by varying Λ. We found that the WK-1 system gives an accurate description of the LV coexistence for bulk phases of several quantum fluids, obtained by the Gibbs Ensemble Monte Carlo method (GEMC). Confinement effects were introduced using the Canonical Ensemble (NVT) to simulate quantum fluids contained within parallel hard walls separated by a distance Lp, within the range 2σ ⩽ Lp ⩽ 6σ. The critical temperature of the system is reduced by decreasing Lp and increasing Λ, and the liquid-vapor transition is not longer observed for Lp/σ < 2, in contrast to what has been observed for the classical system.

  10. Effective model of nonlinear circuit quantum electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigg, Simon; Devoret, Michel; Girvin, Steven

    2012-02-01

    Superconducting electronic circuits containing nonlinear elements such as Josephson junctions are of interest for quantum information processing. The low-energy spectrum of such circuits can now be measured to a precision of better than one part per million. A precise knowledge of their Hamiltonian that goes beyond current models is thus desirable. In this talk I will show how to quantize a superconducting, weakly nonlinear circuit from the knowledge of its classical linear admittance matrix. This approach represents a change of paradigm in circuit quantum electrodynamics and may potentially become a useful alternative to the standard models based on the language of atomic physics and quantum optics.

  11. 1D multi-fluid plasma models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, P.; Suender, D.

    1998-01-01

    1D and time-dependent multi-fluid plasma models are derived from multi-fluid MHD equations. Including neutral particles and their ionization stages as fluids increases the number of equations to be solved and the indeterminacy of the results considerably. For this reason, especially for the case of high-Z materials, the impurities are described by distinct approaches without restricting the impurity densities to be small compared with the hydrogen plasma density. Using the approach of the average ion model, neglecting the effect of the neutral particles, equalizing the plasma temperatures and adopting the condition of quasi-neutrality, we arrive at a three-fluid description and analyze wave front solution of the self-consistent system of equations obtained. This system is reduced to a two-fluid description assuming the flow velocities of the electrons and ions to be equal. This model can be reduced further to a currentless, modified one-fluid approach if the impurity density in dependence on the model functions is known. Introducing Lagrangian coordinates and assuming a constant total pressure a single reaction-diffusion equation for the temperature is obtained. A differential equation for the impurity density in dependence of the temperature has to be included. It determines the influence of the impurities on the reaction-diffusion process which affect not only the radiation loss but also the heat conduction. This is demonstrated for carbon, beryllium and high-Z impurities. (orig.)

  12. A microsphere suspension model of metamaterial fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Duan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Drawing an analogy to the liquid phase of natural materials, we theoretically propose a microsphere suspension model to realize a metamaterial fluid with artificial electromagnetic indexes. By immersing high-ε, micrometer-sized dielectric spheres in a low-ε insulating oil, the structured fluid exhibits liquid-like properties from dispersing phase as well as the isotropic negative electromagnetic parameters caused by Mie resonances from dispersed microspheres. The work presented here will benefit the development of structured fluids toward metamaterials.

  13. Fluid-line math model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandelman, A.; Nelson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Simplified mathematical model simulates large hydraulic systems on either analog or digital computers. Models of pumps, servoactuators, reservoirs, accumulators, and valves are connected generating systems containing six hundred elements.

  14. Fluid pumping: Some exploratory numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ord, A.; Henley, S.

    The concept of fluid pumping evolved from considerations of fluid behaviour within and surrounding faults and shear zones, particularly associated with earthquake initiation and propagation. Further, the interpretation of specific vein textures as originating from a crack-seal mechanism requires precipitation of material during pumping cycles. We explore here a new simple model for fluid pumping initiating within a dilatant, pressure dependant material, and the mechanical consequences of such a model, including the predicted behaviour of a fluid within the SiO2-H2O system. Changes in various properties such as permeability and mechanical properties are allowed according to rules based on defined geological processes. For example, porosity may increase with increasing shear and dilatancy of the rock, and both porosity and permeability decrease when and where the rock ‘seals’ as a result of pressure decrease and the resultant precipitation of SiO2. Histories of any variable may be explored for any part of the model. We may therefore test in a quantitative manner hypotheses for fluid pumping, and the deposition of quartz, and ultimately gold, in a deforming rock mass. Through exploring the feedback links between deformation, fluid flow, chemical transport, thermal transfer, we have the opportunity to test conceptually and quantitatively the various hypotheses for the formation of world class ore deposits.

  15. Projected Dipole Model for Quantum Plasmonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Wei; Wubs, Martijn; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2015-01-01

    as obtained with 1D quantum calculations, such as time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), and is determined once and for all. The model can be applied in two and three dimensions to any system size that is tractable within classical electrodynamics, while capturing quantum plasmonic aspects...... of nonlocal response and a finite work function with TDDFT-level accuracy. Applying the theory to dimers, we find quantum corrections to the hybridization even in mesoscopic dimers, as long as the gap itself is subnanometric....

  16. Quantum protocols within Spekkens' toy model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disilvestro, Leonardo; Markham, Damian

    2017-05-01

    Quantum mechanics is known to provide significant improvements in information processing tasks when compared to classical models. These advantages range from computational speedups to security improvements. A key question is where these advantages come from. The toy model developed by Spekkens [R. W. Spekkens, Phys. Rev. A 75, 032110 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevA.75.032110] mimics many of the features of quantum mechanics, such as entanglement and no cloning, regarded as being important in this regard, despite being a local hidden variable theory. In this work, we study several protocols within Spekkens' toy model where we see it can also mimic the advantages and limitations shown in the quantum case. We first provide explicit proofs for the impossibility of toy bit commitment and the existence of a toy error correction protocol and consequent k -threshold secret sharing. Then, defining a toy computational model based on the quantum one-way computer, we prove the existence of blind and verified protocols. Importantly, these two last quantum protocols are known to achieve a better-than-classical security. Our results suggest that such quantum improvements need not arise from any Bell-type nonlocality or contextuality, but rather as a consequence of steering correlations.

  17. Interfacial Fluid Mechanics A Mathematical Modeling Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ajaev, Vladimir S

    2012-01-01

    Interfacial Fluid Mechanics: A Mathematical Modeling Approach provides an introduction to mathematical models of viscous flow used in rapidly developing fields of microfluidics and microscale heat transfer. The basic physical effects are first introduced in the context of simple configurations and their relative importance in typical microscale applications is discussed. Then,several configurations of importance to microfluidics, most notably thin films/droplets on substrates and confined bubbles, are discussed in detail.  Topics from current research on electrokinetic phenomena, liquid flow near structured solid surfaces, evaporation/condensation, and surfactant phenomena are discussed in the later chapters. This book also:  Discusses mathematical models in the context of actual applications such as electrowetting Includes unique material on fluid flow near structured surfaces and phase change phenomena Shows readers how to solve modeling problems related to microscale multiphase flows Interfacial Fluid Me...

  18. Fast Quantum Rabi Model with Trapped Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya-Cessa, Héctor M

    2016-12-12

    We show how to produce a fast quantum Rabi model with trapped ions. Its importance resides not only in the acceleration of the phenomena that may be achieved with these systems, from quantum gates to the generation of nonclassical states of the vibrational motion of the ion, but also in reducing unwanted effects such as the decay of coherences that may appear in such systems.

  19. Two-fluid hydrodynamic model for semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maack, Johan Rosenkrantz; Mortensen, N. Asger; Wubs, Martijn

    2018-01-01

    The hydrodynamic Drude model (HDM) has been successful in describing the optical properties of metallic nanostructures, but for semiconductors where several different kinds of charge carriers are present an extended theory is required. We present a two-fluid hydrodynamic model for semiconductors...

  20. Quantum chromodynamics, chiral symmetry and bag models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soyeur, M.

    1983-08-01

    This course deals with the following subjects: quarks; quantum chromodynamics (the classical Lagrangian of QCD, quark masses, the classical equations of motion of QCD, general properties, lattices); chiral symmetry (massless free Dirac theory, realizations, the σ-model); the M.I.T. bag model (basic assumptions and equations of motion, spherical cavity approximation, properties of hadrons); the chiral bag models (basic assumptions, the cloudy bag model, the little bag model); non-topological soliton bag models

  1. Models of Quantum Space Time: Quantum Field Planes

    OpenAIRE

    Mack, G.; Schomerus, V.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum field planes furnish a noncommutative differential algebra $\\Omega$ which substitutes for the commutative algebra of functions and forms on a contractible manifold. The data required in their construction come from a quantum field theory. The basic idea is to replace the ground field ${\\bf C}$ of quantum planes by the noncommutative algebra ${\\cal A}$ of observables of the quantum field theory.

  2. Quantum-like Modeling of Cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei eKhrennikov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper begins with a historical review of the mutual influence of physics and psychology, from Freud's invention of psychic energy inspired by von Boltzmann' thermodynamics to the enrichment quantum physics gained from the side of psychology by the notion of complementarity (the invention of Niels Bohr who was inspired by William James, besides we consider the resonance of the correspondence between Wolfgang Pauli and Carl Jung in both physics and psychology. Then we turn to the problem of development of mathematical models for laws of thought starting with Boolean logic and progressing towards foundations of classical probability theory. Interestingly, the laws of classical logic and probability are routinely violated not only by quantum statistical phenomena but by cognitive phenomena as well. This is yet another common feature between quantum physics and psychology.In particular, cognitive data can exhibit a kind of the probabilistic interference effect. This similarity with quantum physics convinced a multi-disciplinary group of scientists (physicists, psychologists, economists, sociologists to apply the mathematical apparatus of quantum mechanics to modeling of cognition. We illustrate this activity by considering a few concrete phenomena: the order and disjunction effects, recognition of ambiguous figures, categorization-decision making.In Appendix 1 we briefly present essentials of theory of contextual probability and a method of representations of contextual probabilities by complex probability amplitudes(solution of the ``inverse Born's problem'' based on a quantum-like representation algorithm (QLRA.

  3. Quantum-like Modeling of Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2015-09-01

    This paper begins with a historical review of the mutual influence of physics and psychology, from Freud's invention of psychic energy inspired by von Boltzmann' thermodynamics to the enrichment quantum physics gained from the side of psychology by the notion of complementarity (the invention of Niels Bohr who was inspired by William James), besides we consider the resonance of the correspondence between Wolfgang Pauli and Carl Jung in both physics and psychology. Then we turn to the problem of development of mathematical models for laws of thought starting with Boolean logic and progressing towards foundations of classical probability theory. Interestingly, the laws of classical logic and probability are routinely violated not only by quantum statistical phenomena but by cognitive phenomena as well. This is yet another common feature between quantum physics and psychology. In particular, cognitive data can exhibit a kind of the probabilistic interference effect. This similarity with quantum physics convinced a multi-disciplinary group of scientists (physicists, psychologists, economists, sociologists) to apply the mathematical apparatus of quantum mechanics to modeling of cognition. We illustrate this activity by considering a few concrete phenomena: the order and disjunction effects, recognition of ambiguous figures, categorization-decision making. In Appendix 1 we briefly present essentials of theory of contextual probability and a method of representations of contextual probabilities by complex probability amplitudes (solution of the ``inverse Born's problem'') based on a quantum-like representation algorithm (QLRA).

  4. Solution of the quantum fluid dynamical equations with radial basis function interpolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xu-Guang; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel; Askar, Attila

    2000-01-01

    The paper proposes a numerical technique within the Lagrangian description for propagating the quantum fluid dynamical (QFD) equations in terms of the Madelung field variables R and S, which are connected to the wave function via the transformation ψ=exp{(R+iS)/(ℎ/2π)}. The technique rests on the QFD equations depending only on the form, not the magnitude, of the probability density ρ=|ψ| 2 and on the structure of R=(ℎ/2π)/2 ln ρ generally being simpler and smoother than ρ. The spatially smooth functions R and S are especially suitable for multivariate radial basis function interpolation to enable the implementation of a robust numerical scheme. Examples of two-dimensional model systems show that the method rivals, in both efficiency and accuracy, the split-operator and Chebychev expansion methods. The results on a three-dimensional model system indicates that the present method is superior to the existing ones, especially, for its low storage requirement and its uniform accuracy. The advantage of the new algorithm is expected to increase for higher dimensional systems to provide a practical computational tool. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  5. Solution of the quantum fluid dynamical equations with radial basis function interpolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xu-Guang; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel; Askar, Attila

    2000-05-01

    The paper proposes a numerical technique within the Lagrangian description for propagating the quantum fluid dynamical (QFD) equations in terms of the Madelung field variables R and S, which are connected to the wave function via the transformation ψ=exp\\{(R+iS)/ħ\\}. The technique rests on the QFD equations depending only on the form, not the magnitude, of the probability density ρ=\\|ψ\\|2 and on the structure of R=ħ/2 ln ρ generally being simpler and smoother than ρ. The spatially smooth functions R and S are especially suitable for multivariate radial basis function interpolation to enable the implementation of a robust numerical scheme. Examples of two-dimensional model systems show that the method rivals, in both efficiency and accuracy, the split-operator and Chebychev expansion methods. The results on a three-dimensional model system indicates that the present method is superior to the existing ones, especially, for its low storage requirement and its uniform accuracy. The advantage of the new algorithm is expected to increase for higher dimensional systems to provide a practical computational tool.

  6. Fluid and hybrid models for streamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Zdeněk

    2016-09-01

    Streamers are contracted ionizing waves with self-generated field enhancement that propagate into a low-ionized medium exposed to high electric field leaving filamentary trails of plasma behind. The widely used model to study streamer dynamics is based on drift-diffusion equations for electrons and ions, assuming local field approximation, coupled with Poisson's equation. For problems where presence of energetic electrons become important a fluid approach needs to be extended by a particle model, accompanied also with Monte Carlo Collision technique, that takes care of motion of these electrons. A combined fluid-particle approach is used to study an influence of surface emission processes on a fast-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure. It is found that fluid-only model predicts substantially faster reignition dynamics compared to coupled fluid-particle model. Furthermore, a hybrid model can be created in which the population of electrons is divided in the energy space into two distinct groups: (1) low energy `bulk' electrons that are treated with fluid model, and (2) high energy `beam' electrons, followed as particles. The hybrid model is then capable not only to deal with streamer discharges in laboratory conditions, but also allows us to study electron acceleration in streamer zone of lighting leaders. There, the production of fast electrons from streamers is investigated, since these (runaway) electrons act as seeds for the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) mechanism, important for high-energy atmospheric physics phenomena. Results suggest that high energy electrons effect the streamer propagation, namely the velocity, the peak electric field, and thus also the production rate of runaway electrons. This work has been supported by the Czech Science Foundation research project 15-04023S.

  7. A possible scheme for measuring gravitational waves by using a spinful quantum fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A method is proposed for measuring gravitational waves (GWs from the collective electromagnetic (EM response of a spinful quantum fluid, based on recent studies of the long-lived Mössbauer state 93mNb in a pure Nb crystal. A pronounced EM response was found for the geometric phase by rotating the sample in a magnetic field, suggesting that GWs could also be detected. It was recently suggested that the macroscopic wave functions confined in two twisted nonspherical superconductors would give a geometrical phase oscillation induced by GWs. The sensitivity to GWs would be inversely proportional to the square of the bound length, which is the detector size. The proposed sensitivity to GWs would be dramatically enhanced by changing the characteristic size, i.e., using the microscopic size of a non-spherical particle instead of the macroscopic detector size of a scalar quantum fluid. The collective EM response from the quantum fluid would allow the macroscopic geometrical phase to be read from microscopic particles. GWs in the millihertz range, with amplitude of 10−22, would be detectable.

  8. Optimal evolution models for quantum tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    The research presented in this article concerns the stroboscopic approach to quantum tomography, which is an area of science where quantum physics and linear algebra overlap. In this article we introduce the algebraic structure of the parametric-dependent quantum channels for 2-level and 3-level systems such that the generator of evolution corresponding with the Kraus operators has no degenerate eigenvalues. In such cases the index of cyclicity of the generator is equal to 1, which physically means that there exists one observable the measurement of which performed a sufficient number of times at distinct instants provides enough data to reconstruct the initial density matrix and, consequently, the trajectory of the state. The necessary conditions for the parameters and relations between them are introduced. The results presented in this paper seem to have considerable potential applications in experiments due to the fact that one can perform quantum tomography by conducting only one kind of measurement. Therefore, the analyzed evolution models can be considered optimal in the context of quantum tomography. Finally, we introduce some remarks concerning optimal evolution models in the case of n-dimensional Hilbert space. (paper)

  9. Tracer technology modeling the flow of fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Levenspiel, Octave

    2012-01-01

    A vessel’s behavior as a heat exchanger, absorber, reactor, or other process unit is dependent upon how fluid flows through the vessel.  In early engineering, the designer would assume either plug flow or mixed flow of the fluid through the vessel.  However, these assumptions were oftentimes inaccurate, sometimes being off by a volume factor of 100 or more.  The result of this unreliable figure produced ineffective products in multiple reaction systems.   Written by a pioneering researcher in the field of chemical engineering, the tracer method was introduced to provide more accurate flow data.  First, the tracer method measured the actual flow of fluid through a vessel.  Second, it developed a suitable model to represent the flow in question.  Such models are used to follow the flow of fluid in chemical reactors and other process units, like in rivers and streams, or solid and porous structures.  In medicine, the tracer method is used to study the flow of chemicals—harmful  and harmless—in the...

  10. Exact diagonalization library for quantum electron models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskakov, Sergei; Danilov, Michael

    2018-04-01

    We present an exact diagonalization C++ template library (EDLib) for solving quantum electron models, including the single-band finite Hubbard cluster and the multi-orbital impurity Anderson model. The observables that can be computed using EDLib are single particle Green's functions and spin-spin correlation functions. This code provides three different types of Hamiltonian matrix storage that can be chosen based on the model.

  11. Hybrid quantum teleportation: A theoretical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Shuntaro; Mizuta, Takahiro; Fuwa, Maria; Yoshikawa, Jun-ichi; Yonezawa, Hidehiro; Furusawa, Akira [Department of Applied Physics, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-12-04

    Hybrid quantum teleportation – continuous-variable teleportation of qubits – is a promising approach for deterministically teleporting photonic qubits. We propose how to implement it with current technology. Our theoretical model shows that faithful qubit transfer can be achieved for this teleportation by choosing an optimal gain for the teleporter’s classical channel.

  12. Non standard analysis, polymer models, quantum fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albeverio, S.

    1984-01-01

    We give an elementary introduction to non standard analysis and its applications to the theory of stochastic processes. This is based on a joint book with J.E. Fenstad, R. Hoeegh-Krohn and T. Lindstroeem. In particular we give a discussion of an hyperfinite theory of Dirichlet forms with applications to the study of the Hamiltonian for a quantum mechanical particle in the potential created by a polymer. We also discuss new results on the existence of attractive polymer measures in dimension d 1 2 phi 2 2 )sub(d)-model of interacting quantum fields. (orig.)

  13. On the non-Gaussian corrections in the self dynamics of semi-quantum fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colognesi, D., E-mail: daniele.colognesi@isc.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Bafile, U.; Celli, M. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Neumann, M. [Fakultät für Physik der Universität Wien, Strudlhofgasse 4, A-1090 Wien (Austria)

    2015-01-13

    Highlights: • We study the Gaussian approximation in the self dynamics of semi-quantum liquids. • Correction scheme for the self intermediate scattering function is proposed. • Deviations from the Gaussian approximation are calculated in liquid H{sub 2}. • Experimental data confirm our approach and show that corrections are necessary. - Abstract: This paper is devoted to the study of the limits of the well-known Gaussian approximation in the self dynamics of quantum systems. After introducing the basic formalism and shortly reviewing the methods used in classical systems to apply corrections to the Gaussian approximation, an extension to quantum fluids is devised, with a particular interest in the so-called semi-quantum fluids, i.e. those in which the single particle momentum distribution approximately retains its Maxwellian form (but not its classical width). In this case a detailed correction scheme for both the short- and the long-time behaviors of the intermediate scattering function is proposed. Subsequently, a practical test of this approach is performed on a high resolution neutron scattering spectrum derived from liquid parahydrogen at T=14.1 K. Extracting the spectral deviations from the Gaussian approximation with the help of an accurate centroid molecular dynamics simulation, we are able to describe them precisely and to derive the first two correction coefficients in this system by means of a simple fitting procedure. These experimental findings confirm the validity of our approach and show that a description of the self dynamics beyond the Gaussian approximation is necessary even in simple liquids affected by mild quantum effects.

  14. Dual-code quantum computation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Byung-Soo

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we propose the dual-code quantum computation model—a fault-tolerant quantum computation scheme which alternates between two different quantum error-correction codes. Since the chosen two codes have different sets of transversal gates, we can implement a universal set of gates transversally, thereby reducing the overall cost. We use code teleportation to convert between quantum states in different codes. The overall cost is decreased if code teleportation requires fewer resources than the fault-tolerant implementation of the non-transversal gate in a specific code. To analyze the cost reduction, we investigate two cases with different base codes, namely the Steane and Bacon-Shor codes. For the Steane code, neither the proposed dual-code model nor another variation of it achieves any cost reduction since the conventional approach is simple. For the Bacon-Shor code, the three proposed variations of the dual-code model reduce the overall cost. However, as the encoding level increases, the cost reduction decreases and becomes negative. Therefore, the proposed dual-code model is advantageous only when the encoding level is low and the cost of the non-transversal gate is relatively high.

  15. On Mathematical Modeling Of Quantum Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achuthan, P.; Narayanankutty, Karuppath

    2009-07-01

    The world of physical systems at the most fundamental levels is replete with efficient, interesting models possessing sufficient ability to represent the reality to a considerable extent. So far, quantum mechanics (QM) forming the basis of almost all natural phenomena, has found beyond doubt its intrinsic ingenuity, capacity and robustness to stand the rigorous tests of validity from and through appropriate calculations and experiments. No serious failures of quantum mechanical predictions have been reported, yet. However, Albert Einstein, the greatest theoretical physicist of the twentieth century and some other eminent men of science have stated firmly and categorically that QM, though successful by and large, is incomplete. There are classical and quantum reality models including those based on consciousness. Relativistic quantum theoretical approaches to clearly understand the ultimate nature of matter as well as radiation have still much to accomplish in order to qualify for a final theory of everything (TOE). Mathematical models of better, suitable character as also strength are needed to achieve satisfactory explanation of natural processes and phenomena. We, in this paper, discuss some of these matters with certain apt illustrations as well.

  16. Quantum Dynamics in the HMF Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plestid, Ryan; O'Dell, Duncan

    2017-04-01

    The Hamiltonian Mean Field (HMF) model represents a paradigm in the study of long-range interactions but has never been realized in a lab. Recently Shutz and Morigi (PRL 113) have come close but ultimately fallen short. Their proposal relied on cavity-induced interactions between atoms. If a design using cold atoms is to be successful, an understanding of quantum effects is essential. I will outline the natural quantum generalization of the HMF assuming a BEC by using a generalized Gross-Pitaevskii equation (gGPE). I will show how quantum effects modify features which are well understood in the classical model. More specifically, by working in the semi-classical regime (strong interparticle interactions) we can identify the universal features predicted by catastrophe theory dressed with quantum interference effects. The stationary states of gGPE can be solved exactly and are found to be described by self-consistent Mathieu functions. Finally, I will discuss the connection between the classical description of the dynamics in terms of the Vlassov equation, and the gGPE. We would like to thank the Government of Ontario's OGS program, NSERC, and the Perimeter Institute of Theoretical Physics.

  17. D-string fluid in conifold, I: Topological gauge model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahl Laamara, R.; Drissi, L.B.; Saidi, E.H.

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by similarities between quantum Hall systems a la Susskind and aspects of topological string theory on conifold as well as results obtained in [E.H. Saidi, Topological SL(2) gauge theory on conifold and noncommutative geometry, hep-th/0601020], we study the dynamics of D-string fluids running in deformed conifold in presence of a strong and constant RR background B-field. We first introduce the basis of D-string system in fluid approximation and then derive the holomorphic noncommutative gauge invariant field action describing its dynamics in conifold. This study may be also viewed as embedding Susskind description for Laughlin liquid in type IIB string theory. FQH systems on real manifolds RxS 2 and S 3 are shown to be recovered by restricting conifold to its Lagrangian sub-manifolds. Aspects of quantum behaviour of the string fluid are discussed. ring fluid are discussed

  18. Geochemical modeling of fluid-fluid and fluid-mineral interactions during geological CO2 storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, C.; Ji, X.; Lu, P.

    2013-12-01

    The long time required for effective CO2 storage makes geochemical modeling an indispensable tool for CCUS. One area of geochemical modeling research that is in urgent need is impurities in CO2 streams. Permitting impurities, such as H2S, in CO2 streams can lead to potential capital and energy savings. However, predicting the consequences of co-injection of CO2 and impurities into geological formations requires the understanding of the phase equilibrium and fluid-fluid interactions. To meet this need, we developed a statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT)-based equation of state (EOS) for the H2S-CO2-H2O-NaCl system at 373.15 concentration of NaCl up to 6 mol/kgH2O. The EoS allows us to predict equilibrium composition in both liquid and vapor phases, fugacity coefficients of components, and phase densities. Predictions show that inclusion of H2S in CO2 streams may lead to two-phase flow in pipelines. For H2S-CO2 mixtures at a given temperature the bubble and dew pressures decrease with increasing H2S content, while the mass density increases at low pressures and decreases at high pressures. Furthermore, the EoS can be incorporated into reservoir simulators so that the dynamic development of mixed fluid plumes in the reservoir can be simulated. Accurate modeling of fluid-mineral interactions must confront unresolved uncertainties of silicate dissolution - precipitation reaction kinetics. Most prominent among these uncertainties is the well-known lab-field apparent discrepancy in dissolution rates. Although reactive transport models that simulate the interactions between reservoir rocks and brine, and their attendant effects on porosity and permeability changes, have proliferated, whether these results have acceptable uncertainties are unknown. We have conducted a series of batch experiments at elevated temperatures and numerical simulations of coupled dissolution and precipitation reactions. The results show that taking into account of reaction coupling is able

  19. Path-integral and Ornstein-Zernike study of quantum fluid structures on the crystallization line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesé, Luis M., E-mail: msese@ccia.uned.es [Departamento de Ciencias y Técnicas Fisicoquímicas, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-03-07

    Liquid neon, liquid para-hydrogen, and the quantum hard-sphere fluid are studied with path integral Monte Carlo simulations and the Ornstein-Zernike pair equation on their respective crystallization lines. The results cover the whole sets of structures in the r-space and the k-space and, for completeness, the internal energies, pressures and isothermal compressibilities. Comparison with experiment is made wherever possible, and the possibilities of establishing k-space criteria for quantum crystallization based on the path-integral centroids are discussed. In this regard, the results show that the centroid structure factor contains two significant parameters related to its main peak features (amplitude and shape) that can be useful to characterize freezing.

  20. Quantum chaos and holographic tensor models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, Chethan; Sanyal, Sambuddha; Subramanian, P.N. Bala

    2017-01-01

    A class of tensor models were recently outlined as potentially calculable examples of holography: their perturbative large-N behavior is similar to the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) model, but they are fully quantum mechanical (in the sense that there is no quenched disorder averaging). These facts make them intriguing tentative models for quantum black holes. In this note, we explicitly diagonalize the simplest non-trivial Gurau-Witten tensor model and study its spectral and late-time properties. We find parallels to (a single sample of) SYK where some of these features were recently attributed to random matrix behavior and quantum chaos. In particular, the spectral form factor exhibits a dip-ramp-plateau structure after a running time average, in qualitative agreement with SYK. But we also observe that even though the spectrum has a unique ground state, it has a huge (quasi-?)degeneracy of intermediate energy states, not seen in SYK. If one ignores the delta function due to the degeneracies however, there is level repulsion in the unfolded spacing distribution hinting chaos. Furthermore, there are gaps in the spectrum. The system also has a spectral mirror symmetry which we trace back to the presence of a unitary operator with which the Hamiltonian anticommutes. We use it to argue that to the extent that the model exhibits random matrix behavior, it is controlled not by the Dyson ensembles, but by the BDI (chiral orthogonal) class in the Altland-Zirnbauer classification.

  1. A quantum probability model of causal reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S Trueblood

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available People can often outperform statistical methods and machine learning algorithms in situations that involve making inferences about the relationship between causes and effects. While people are remarkably good at causal reasoning in many situations, there are several instances where they deviate from expected responses. This paper examines three situations where judgments related to causal inference problems produce unexpected results and describes a quantum inference model based on the axiomatic principles of quantum probability theory that can explain these effects. Two of the three phenomena arise from the comparison of predictive judgments (i.e., the conditional probability of an effect given a cause with diagnostic judgments (i.e., the conditional probability of a cause given an effect. The third phenomenon is a new finding examining order effects in predictive causal judgments. The quantum inference model uses the notion of incompatibility among different causes to account for all three phenomena. Psychologically, the model assumes that individuals adopt different points of view when thinking about different causes. The model provides good fits to the data and offers a coherent account for all three causal reasoning effects thus proving to be a viable new candidate for modeling human judgment.

  2. Quantum chaos and holographic tensor models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, Chethan [Center for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science,Bangalore 560012 (India); Sanyal, Sambuddha [International Center for Theoretical Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research,Bangalore 560089 (India); Subramanian, P.N. Bala [Center for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science,Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2017-03-10

    A class of tensor models were recently outlined as potentially calculable examples of holography: their perturbative large-N behavior is similar to the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) model, but they are fully quantum mechanical (in the sense that there is no quenched disorder averaging). These facts make them intriguing tentative models for quantum black holes. In this note, we explicitly diagonalize the simplest non-trivial Gurau-Witten tensor model and study its spectral and late-time properties. We find parallels to (a single sample of) SYK where some of these features were recently attributed to random matrix behavior and quantum chaos. In particular, the spectral form factor exhibits a dip-ramp-plateau structure after a running time average, in qualitative agreement with SYK. But we also observe that even though the spectrum has a unique ground state, it has a huge (quasi-?)degeneracy of intermediate energy states, not seen in SYK. If one ignores the delta function due to the degeneracies however, there is level repulsion in the unfolded spacing distribution hinting chaos. Furthermore, there are gaps in the spectrum. The system also has a spectral mirror symmetry which we trace back to the presence of a unitary operator with which the Hamiltonian anticommutes. We use it to argue that to the extent that the model exhibits random matrix behavior, it is controlled not by the Dyson ensembles, but by the BDI (chiral orthogonal) class in the Altland-Zirnbauer classification.

  3. Coating Of Model Rheological Fluids In Microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelling, Kurt; Boehm, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Researchers have strived to understand and quantify the dynamics within the myriad micro/nano-devices proposed and developed within the last decade. Concepts such as fluid flow, mass transfer, molecule manipulation, and reaction kinetics must be understood in order to intelligently design and operate these devices. In addition to general engineering principles, intelligent design should also focus on material properties (e.g. density, viscosity, conductivity). One key property, viscosity, will play a large part of any fluidic device, including biomedical devices, because the fluids used will, most likely, be non-Newtonian and therefore highly dependent upon the shear rate. Be it a biomedical or macromolecule separation device, or simply the processing of polymeric material, select model polymers and simple flow schemes can be used to investigate the dynamics within micro-devices. Here, we present results for the processing of Newtonian and non-Newtonian polymeric fluids in micro-channels during two-phase penetrating flow. The system investigated is a circular capillary 100 microns in diameter, which is pre-filled with a polymeric liquid. The polymeric liquid is either of Newtonian viscosity, or the same liquid with dispersed high molecular weight polystyrene, which exhibits viscoelastic behavior. A second, immiscible phase, silicone oil of low Newtonian viscosity, is pumped into the system and subsequently cores the polymeric liquid. The dynamics of bubble flow (e.g. bubble velocity and bubble shape) as well as the influence of rheology on coating will be investigated. By studying these model systems, we will learn how complex fluids behave on progressively smaller size scales.

  4. Final state effects in inclusive quasielastic electron scattering from nuclei: Clues from quantum fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, R.N.; Clark, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The impulse approximation (IA) predicts that momentum distributions, n/sub k/, in many-body systems should be measurable by inclusive quasielastic scattering at high energy and momentum (w,Q) transfer. The observations that the cross section appears to satisfy ''Y-scaling'' (i.e., is a function not of both w and Q of a single variable, Y) is usually taken as a signature of the IA. In nuclear physics, inelastic electron scattering at GeV energies should reveal the high momentum components of the nuclear wave function. In quantum fluids, neutron scattering at hundreds of MeV energies should measure the Bose condensate in superfluid /sup 4/He and the Fermi surface discontinuity and depletion of the Fermi sea in /sup 3/He. In molecular and condensed matter systems, X-ray Compton scattering at keV energies reveals electronic n/sub k/. Such experiments test many-body wave functions calculated by methods such as Green Function and Path Integral Monte Carlo, and Fermi Hypernetted Chain. However, an outstanding issue has been the corrections to the IA due to the scattering of the recoiling particle from neighboring particles, which are termed ''final state effects'' (FSE). The FSE should be especially important in nuclei and quantum fluids where the potentials have steeply repulsive cores. While there have been a variety of theories proposed for FSE, until now none has been adequately tested by experiment. Recently, the ''hard core perturbation theory'' (HCPT) for FSE in quantum fluids by Silver has been successfully compared to new neutron scattering measurements on /sup 4/He by P. E. Sokol and colleagues. In this paper, we shall discuss the lessons of this success for the extraction of n/sub k/ in nuclei by inclusive ''quasielastic electron-nucleus scattering'' (QENS). 19 refs., 12 figs

  5. Rabi model as a quantum coherent heat engine: From quantum biology to superconducting circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Altintas, Ferdi; Hardal, Ali Ü. C.; Müstecaplıoğlu, Özgür E.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a multilevel quantum heat engine with a working medium described by a generalized Rabi model which consists of a two-level system coupled to a single-mode bosonic field. The model is constructed to be a continuum limit of a quantum biological description of light-harvesting complexes so that it can amplify quantum coherence by a mechanism which is a quantum analog of classical Huygens clocks. The engine operates in a quantum Otto cycle where the working medium is coupled to classic...

  6. The Quantum Hydrodynamic Model for Semiconductor Devices: Theory and Computations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardner, Carl

    1998-01-01

    .... This "smooth" quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model is derived specifically to handle in a mathematically rigorous way the discontinuities in the classical potential energy which occur at heterojunction barriers in quantum semiconductor devices...

  7. Digital quantum Rabi and Dicke models in superconducting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacapo, A; Las Heras, U; Pedernales, J S; DiCarlo, L; Solano, E; Lamata, L

    2014-12-15

    We propose the analog-digital quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi and Dicke models using circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). We find that all physical regimes, in particular those which are impossible to realize in typical cavity QED setups, can be simulated via unitary decomposition into digital steps. Furthermore, we show the emergence of the Dirac equation dynamics from the quantum Rabi model when the mode frequency vanishes. Finally, we analyze the feasibility of this proposal under realistic superconducting circuit scenarios.

  8. Stochastic background of relic gravitons in a bouncing quantum cosmological model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessada, Dennis [UNIFESP, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Laboratório de Física Teórica e Computação Científica, Rua São Nicolau, 210, 09913-030, Diadema, SP (Brazil); Pinto-Neto, Nelson; Siffert, Beatriz B. [ICRA — CBPF, Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, Urca, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Miranda, Oswaldo D., E-mail: dennis.bessada@unifesp.br, E-mail: beatriz@if.ufrj.br, E-mail: nelsonpn@cbpf.br, E-mail: oswaldo@das.inpe.br [INPE, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Av. dos Astronautas, 1758, 12227-010, São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2012-11-01

    The spectrum and amplitude of the stochastic background of relic gravitons produced in a bouncing universe is calculated. The matter content of the model consists of dust and radiation fluids, and the bounce occurs due to quantum cosmological effects when the universe approaches the classical singularity in the contracting phase. The resulting amplitude is very small and it cannot be observed by any present and near future gravitational wave detector. Hence, as in the ekpyrotic model, any observation of these relic gravitons will rule out this type of quantum cosmological bouncing model.

  9. Soluble supersymmetric quantum [ital XY] model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, A.E.; Girvin, S.M. (Department of Physics, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States))

    1993-07-01

    We present a supersymmetric modification of the [ital d]-dimensional quantum rotor model whose ground state is exactly soluble. The model undergoes a vortex-binding transition from insulator to metal as the rotor coupling is varied. The Hamiltonian contains three-site terms which are relevant: they change the universality class of the transition from that of the ([ital d]+1)- to the [ital d]-dimensional classical [ital XY] model. The metallic phase has algebraic off-diagonal long-range order but the superfluid density is identically zero. Variational wave functions for single-particle and collective excitations are presented.

  10. The Generalized Quantum Episodic Memory Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueblood, Jennifer S; Hemmer, Pernille

    2017-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that experienced events are often mapped to too many episodic states, including those that are logically or experimentally incompatible with one another. For example, episodic over-distribution patterns show that the probability of accepting an item under different mutually exclusive conditions violates the disjunction rule. A related example, called subadditivity, occurs when the probability of accepting an item under mutually exclusive and exhaustive instruction conditions sums to a number >1. Both the over-distribution effect and subadditivity have been widely observed in item and source-memory paradigms. These phenomena are difficult to explain using standard memory frameworks, such as signal-detection theory. A dual-trace model called the over-distribution (OD) model (Brainerd & Reyna, 2008) can explain the episodic over-distribution effect, but not subadditivity. Our goal is to develop a model that can explain both effects. In this paper, we propose the Generalized Quantum Episodic Memory (GQEM) model, which extends the Quantum Episodic Memory (QEM) model developed by Brainerd, Wang, and Reyna (2013). We test GQEM by comparing it to the OD model using data from a novel item-memory experiment and a previously published source-memory experiment (Kellen, Singmann, & Klauer, 2014) examining the over-distribution effect. Using the best-fit parameters from the over-distribution experiments, we conclude by showing that the GQEM model can also account for subadditivity. Overall these results add to a growing body of evidence suggesting that quantum probability theory is a valuable tool in modeling recognition memory. Copyright © 2016 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  11. Direct modeling for computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun

    2015-06-01

    All fluid dynamic equations are valid under their modeling scales, such as the particle mean free path and mean collision time scale of the Boltzmann equation and the hydrodynamic scale of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) focuses on the numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDEs), and its aim is to get the accurate solution of these governing equations. Under such a CFD practice, it is hard to develop a unified scheme that covers flow physics from kinetic to hydrodynamic scales continuously because there is no such governing equation which could make a smooth transition from the Boltzmann to the NS modeling. The study of fluid dynamics needs to go beyond the traditional numerical partial differential equations. The emerging engineering applications, such as air-vehicle design for near-space flight and flow and heat transfer in micro-devices, do require further expansion of the concept of gas dynamics to a larger domain of physical reality, rather than the traditional distinguishable governing equations. At the current stage, the non-equilibrium flow physics has not yet been well explored or clearly understood due to the lack of appropriate tools. Unfortunately, under the current numerical PDE approach, it is hard to develop such a meaningful tool due to the absence of valid PDEs. In order to construct multiscale and multiphysics simulation methods similar to the modeling process of constructing the Boltzmann or the NS governing equations, the development of a numerical algorithm should be based on the first principle of physical modeling. In this paper, instead of following the traditional numerical PDE path, we introduce direct modeling as a principle for CFD algorithm development. Since all computations are conducted in a discretized space with limited cell resolution, the flow physics to be modeled has to be done in the mesh size and time step scales. Here, the CFD is more or less a direct

  12. Investigating models for associating fluids using spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Solms, Nicolas; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Passos, Claudia Pereira

    2005-01-01

    Two equations of state (PC-SAFT and CPA) are used to predict the monomer fraction of pure associating fluids. The models each require five pure-component parameters usually obtained by fitting to experimental liquid density and vapor pressure data. Here we also incorporate monomer fractions...... measured using spectroscopy, resulting in models that better predict the monomer fraction (fraction of molecules not participating in hydrogen bonding), without sacrificing the accuracy of the liquid density and vapor pressure correlations. Thus, it is clear that monomer fraction prediction depends......-site schemes perform about equally for ethanol; for higher alcohols a two-site scheme is preferred. This is in accordance with steric arguments. Some difficulties in the interpretation of spectroscopic data and their comparison with the predictions of association models are illustrated. Apparently anomalous...

  13. Dynamics of vortices in polariton quantum fluids : From full vortices, to half vortices and vortex pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveaud-Plédran, Benoit

    2012-02-01

    Polariton quantum fluids may be created both spontaneously through a standard phase transition towards a Bose Einstein condensate, or may be resonantly driven with a well-defined speed. Thanks to the photonic component of polaritons, the properties of the quantum fluid may be accessed rather directly with in particular the possibility of detained interferometric studies. Here, I will detail the dynamics of vortices, obtained with a picosecond time resolution, in different configurations, with in particular their phase dynamics. I will show in particular the dynamics the dynamics of spontaneous creation of a vortex, the dissociation of a full vortex into two half vortices as well as the dynamics of the dissociation of a dark soliton line into a street of pairs of vortices. Work done at EPFL by a dream team of Postdocs PhD students and collaborators: K. Lagoudakis, G. Nardin, T. Paraiso, G. Grosso, F. Manni, Y L'eger, M. Portella Oberli, F. Morier-Genoud and the help of our friend theorists V, Savona, M. Vouters and T. Liew.

  14. Quantum ergodicity in the SYK model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altland, Alexander; Bagrets, Dmitry

    2018-05-01

    We present a replica path integral approach describing the quantum chaotic dynamics of the SYK model at large time scales. The theory leads to the identification of non-ergodic collective modes which relax and eventually give way to an ergodic long time regime (describable by random matrix theory). These modes, which play a role conceptually similar to the diffusion modes of dirty metals, carry quantum numbers which we identify as the generators of the Clifford algebra: each of the 2N different products that can be formed from N Majorana operators defines one effective mode. The competition between a decay rate quickly growing in the order of the product and a density of modes exponentially growing in the same parameter explains the characteristics of the system's approach to the ergodic long time regime. We probe this dynamics through various spectral correlation functions and obtain favorable agreement with existing numerical data.

  15. Quantum interference vs. quantum chaos in the nuclear shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández, Gerardo; Hautefeuille, M; Velázquez, V; Hernández, Edna M; Landa, E; Morales, I O; Frank, A; Fossion, R; Vargas, C E

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study the complexity of the nuclear states in terms of a two body quadupole-quadrupole interaction. Energy distributions and eigenvectors composition exhibit a visible interference pattern which is dependent on the intensity of the interaction. In analogy with optics, the visibility of the interference is related to the purity of the states, therefore, we show that the fluctuations associated with quantum chaos have as their origin the remaining quantum coherence with a visibility magnitude close to 5%

  16. Digital quantum Rabi and Dicke models in superconducting circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mezzacapo, A.; Las Heras, U.; Pedernales, J.S.; Di Carlo, L.; Solano, E.; Lamata, L.

    2014-01-01

    We propose the analog-digital quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi and Dicke models using circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). We find that all physical regimes, in particular those which are impossible to realize in typical cavity QED setups, can be simulated via unitary decomposition into

  17. Broken selection rule in the quantum Rabi model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forn Diaz, P.; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Harmans, C.J.P.M.; Solano, E; Mooij, J.E.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interaction between light and matter is very relevant for fundamental studies of quantum electrodynamics and for the development of quantum technologies. The quantum Rabi model captures the physics of a single atom interacting with a single photon at all regimes of coupling

  18. Are quantum-mechanical-like models possible, or necessary, outside quantum physics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnitsky, Arkady

    2014-12-01

    This article examines some experimental conditions that invite and possibly require recourse to quantum-mechanical-like mathematical models (QMLMs), models based on the key mathematical features of quantum mechanics, in scientific fields outside physics, such as biology, cognitive psychology, or economics. In particular, I consider whether the following two correlative features of quantum phenomena that were decisive for establishing the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics play similarly important roles in QMLMs elsewhere. The first is the individuality and discreteness of quantum phenomena, and the second is the irreducibly probabilistic nature of our predictions concerning them, coupled to the particular character of the probabilities involved, as different from the character of probabilities found in classical physics. I also argue that these features could be interpreted in terms of a particular form of epistemology that suspends and even precludes a causal and, in the first place, realist description of quantum objects and processes. This epistemology limits the descriptive capacity of quantum theory to the description, classical in nature, of the observed quantum phenomena manifested in measuring instruments. Quantum mechanics itself only provides descriptions, probabilistic in nature, concerning numerical data pertaining to such phenomena, without offering a physical description of quantum objects and processes. While QMLMs share their use of the quantum-mechanical or analogous mathematical formalism, they may differ by the roles, if any, the two features in question play in them and by different ways of interpreting the phenomena they considered and this formalism itself. This article will address those differences as well.

  19. Are quantum-mechanical-like models possible, or necessary, outside quantum physics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotnitsky, Arkady

    2014-01-01

    This article examines some experimental conditions that invite and possibly require recourse to quantum-mechanical-like mathematical models (QMLMs), models based on the key mathematical features of quantum mechanics, in scientific fields outside physics, such as biology, cognitive psychology, or economics. In particular, I consider whether the following two correlative features of quantum phenomena that were decisive for establishing the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics play similarly important roles in QMLMs elsewhere. The first is the individuality and discreteness of quantum phenomena, and the second is the irreducibly probabilistic nature of our predictions concerning them, coupled to the particular character of the probabilities involved, as different from the character of probabilities found in classical physics. I also argue that these features could be interpreted in terms of a particular form of epistemology that suspends and even precludes a causal and, in the first place, realist description of quantum objects and processes. This epistemology limits the descriptive capacity of quantum theory to the description, classical in nature, of the observed quantum phenomena manifested in measuring instruments. Quantum mechanics itself only provides descriptions, probabilistic in nature, concerning numerical data pertaining to such phenomena, without offering a physical description of quantum objects and processes. While QMLMs share their use of the quantum-mechanical or analogous mathematical formalism, they may differ by the roles, if any, the two features in question play in them and by different ways of interpreting the phenomena they considered and this formalism itself. This article will address those differences as well. (paper)

  20. Quantum Rabi model in the Brillouin zone with ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicetti, Simone; Rico, Enrique; Sabin, Carlos; Ockenfels, Till; Koch, Johannes; Leder, Martin; Grossert, Christopher; Weitz, Martin; Solano, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    The quantum Rabi model describes the interaction between a two-level quantum system and a single bosonic mode. We propose a method to perform a quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi model, introducing an implementation of the two-level system provided by the occupation of Bloch bands in the first Brillouin zone by ultracold atoms in tailored optical lattices. The effective qubit interacts with a quantum harmonic oscillator implemented in an optical dipole trap. Our realistic proposal allows one to experimentally investigate the quantum Rabi model for extreme parameter regimes, which are not achievable with natural light-matter interactions. When the simulated wave function exceeds the validity region of the simulation, we identify a generalized version of the quantum Rabi model in a periodic phase space.

  1. Modeling fluid flow in faulted basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faille, I.; Thibaut, M.; Cacas, M.C.; Have, P.; Willien, F.; Wolf, S.; Agelas, L.; Pegaz-Fiornet, S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a basin simulator designed to better take faults into account, either as conduits or as barriers to fluid flow. It computes hydrocarbon generation, fluid flow and heat transfer on the 4D (space and time) geometry obtained by 3D volume restoration. Contrary to classical basin simulators, this calculator does not require a structured mesh based on vertical pillars nor a multi-block structure associated to the fault network. The mesh follows the sediments during the evolution of the basin. It deforms continuously with respect to time to account for sedimentation, erosion, compaction and kinematic displacements. The simulation domain is structured in layers, in order to handle properly the corresponding heterogeneities and to follow the sedimentation processes (thickening of the layers). In each layer, the mesh is unstructured: it may include several types of cells such as tetrahedra, hexahedra, pyramid, prism, etc. However, a mesh composed mainly of hexahedra is preferred as they are well suited to the layered structure of the basin. Faults are handled as internal boundaries across which the mesh is non-matching. Different models are proposed for fault behavior such as impervious fault, flow across fault or conductive fault. The calculator is based on a cell centered Finite Volume discretization, which ensures conservation of physical quantities (mass of fluid, heat) at a discrete level and which accounts properly for heterogeneities. The numerical scheme handles the non matching meshes and guaranties appropriate connection of cells across faults. Results on a synthetic basin demonstrate the capabilities of this new simulator. (authors)

  2. Quantum modeling of ultrafast photoinduced charge separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozzi, Carlo Andrea; Troiani, Filippo; Tavernelli, Ivano

    2018-01-01

    Phenomena involving electron transfer are ubiquitous in nature, photosynthesis and enzymes or protein activity being prominent examples. Their deep understanding thus represents a mandatory scientific goal. Moreover, controlling the separation of photogenerated charges is a crucial prerequisite in many applicative contexts, including quantum electronics, photo-electrochemical water splitting, photocatalytic dye degradation, and energy conversion. In particular, photoinduced charge separation is the pivotal step driving the storage of sun light into electrical or chemical energy. If properly mastered, these processes may also allow us to achieve a better command of information storage at the nanoscale, as required for the development of molecular electronics, optical switching, or quantum technologies, amongst others. In this Topical Review we survey recent progress in the understanding of ultrafast charge separation from photoexcited states. We report the state-of-the-art of the observation and theoretical description of charge separation phenomena in the ultrafast regime mainly focusing on molecular- and nano-sized solar energy conversion systems. In particular, we examine different proposed mechanisms driving ultrafast charge dynamics, with particular regard to the role of quantum coherence and electron-nuclear coupling, and link experimental observations to theoretical approaches based either on model Hamiltonians or on first principles simulations.

  3. AFDM: An advanced fluid-dynamics model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henneges, G.; Kleinheins, S.

    1994-01-01

    This volume of the Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model (AFDM) documents the modeling of the equation of state (EOS) in the code. The authors present an overview of the basic concepts underlying the thermodynamics modeling and resulting EOS, which is a set of relations between the thermodynamic properties of materials. The AFDM code allows for multiphase-multimaterial systems, which they explore in three phase models: two-material solid, two-material liquid, and three-material vapor. They describe and compare two ways of specifying the EOS of materials: (1) as simplified analytic expressions, or (2) as tables that precisely describe the properties of materials and their interactions for mechanical equilibrium. Either of the two EOS models implemented in AFDM can be selected by specifying the option when preprocessing the source code for compilation. Last, the authors determine thermophysical properties such as surface tension, thermal conductivities, and viscosities in the model for the intracell exchanges of AFDM. Specific notations, routines, EOS data, plots, test results, and corrections to the code are available in the appendices

  4. Two-fluid model of the Skyrmion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralston, J.P.

    1986-04-01

    We consider the field-theory description of the Skyrme model incorporating quantum fluctuations of a condensed phase. This viewpoint clarifies the usefulness of the model for applications at the physical value of F/sub ..pi../, rather than F/sub ..pi../..-->..infinity. By creating covariant field-theory states associated with a translational-dependent condensate, we emphasize the effects of fluctuations and coherence in a calculation of the q/sup 2/ dependence of the baryon electromagnetic form factor F(q/sup 2/). Using the impulse approximation at large q/sup 2/, we find the model predicts F(q/sup 2/)approx.exp(-Vertical Barq/sup 2/Vertical Bar/lambda/sup 2/)/q /sup 2/, where lambdaapprox.1 GeV is a calculable scale. Appending a pion form factor of O(1/q/sup 2/), we interpret this in terms of higher-twist corrections, at moderate values of momentum transfer, to a leading term of O(1/q/sup 4/). The dependence on a regularization scale ..mu../sup 2/ and F/sub ..pi../ /sup 2/ is such that this result applies for a specified range of q/sup 2/, ..mu../sup 2/, and F/sub ..pi../ /sup 2/. However, the detailed results of the calculation are such that the large-F/sub ..pi../ /sup 2/ and large-..mu../sup 2/ limits do not commute.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bacillus anthracis ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal Article Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived from computed tomography (CT) or µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation-exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. Four different exposure scenarios were modeled in the rabbit based upon experimental inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulations were conducted at the highest exposure concentration used during the rabbit experimental exposures. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Despite the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the upper conducting airways of the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. This greater deposition of spores in the upper airways in the human resulted in lower penetration and deposition in the tracheobronchial airways and the deep lung than that predict

  6. Rabi model as a quantum coherent heat engine: From quantum biology to superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Ferdi; Hardal, Ali Ü. C.; Müstecaplıoǧlu, Özgür E.

    2015-02-01

    We propose a multilevel quantum heat engine with a working medium described by a generalized Rabi model which consists of a two-level system coupled to a single-mode bosonic field. The model is constructed to be a continuum limit of a quantum biological description of light-harvesting complexes so that it can amplify quantum coherence by a mechanism which is a quantum analog of classical Huygens clocks. The engine operates in a quantum Otto cycle where the working medium is coupled to classical heat baths in the isochoric processes of the four-stroke cycle, while either the coupling strength or the resonance frequency is changed in the adiabatic stages. We found that such an engine can produce work with an efficiency close to the Carnot bound when it operates at low temperatures and in the ultrastrong-coupling regime. The interplay of the effects of quantum coherence and quantum correlations on the engine performance is discussed in terms of second-order coherence, quantum mutual information, and the logarithmic negativity of entanglement. We point out that the proposed quantum Otto engine can be implemented experimentally with modern circuit quantum electrodynamic systems where flux qubits can be coupled ultrastrongly to superconducting transmission-line resonators.

  7. Carrier Statistics and Quantum Capacitance Models of Graphene Nanoscroll

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khaledian

    2014-01-01

    schematic perfect scroll-like Archimedes spiral. The DOS model was derived at first, while it was later applied to compute the carrier concentration and quantum capacitance model. Furthermore, the carrier concentration and quantum capacitance were modeled for both degenerate and nondegenerate regimes, along with examining the effect of structural parameters and chirality number on the density of state and carrier concentration. Latterly, the temperature effect on the quantum capacitance was studied too.

  8. Quantum vertex model for reversible classical computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamon, C; Mucciolo, E R; Ruckenstein, A E; Yang, Z-C

    2017-05-12

    Mappings of classical computation onto statistical mechanics models have led to remarkable successes in addressing some complex computational problems. However, such mappings display thermodynamic phase transitions that may prevent reaching solution even for easy problems known to be solvable in polynomial time. Here we map universal reversible classical computations onto a planar vertex model that exhibits no bulk classical thermodynamic phase transition, independent of the computational circuit. Within our approach the solution of the computation is encoded in the ground state of the vertex model and its complexity is reflected in the dynamics of the relaxation of the system to its ground state. We use thermal annealing with and without 'learning' to explore typical computational problems. We also construct a mapping of the vertex model into the Chimera architecture of the D-Wave machine, initiating an approach to reversible classical computation based on state-of-the-art implementations of quantum annealing.

  9. Output analysis of multiclass fluid models with static priorities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzenova, E.I.; Adan, I.J.B.F.; Kulkarni, V.G.

    2008-01-01

    We consider a stochastic fluid flow model with a single server and K infinite capacity buffers. The input to the k-th buffer is a Markovian on-off process that transmits fluid at a constant rate p(k) while it is on and at rate 0 while it is off. The fluid is emptied from the buffers by a single

  10. Analytical eigenstates for the quantum Rabi model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Honghua; Xie, Qiongtao; Lee, Chaohong; Batchelor, Murray T

    2013-01-01

    We develop a method to find analytical solutions for the eigenstates of the quantum Rabi model. These include symmetric, anti-symmetric and asymmetric analytic solutions given in terms of the confluent Heun functions. Both regular and exceptional solutions are given in a unified form. In addition, the analytic conditions for determining the energy spectrum are obtained. Our results show that conditions proposed by Braak (2011 Phys. Rev. Lett. 107 100401) are a type of sufficiency condition for determining the regular solutions. The well-known Judd isolated exact solutions appear naturally as truncations of the confluent Heun functions. (paper)

  11. Model-free thermodynamics of fluid vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Haim

    2011-12-01

    Motivated by a long-standing debate concerning the nature and interrelations of surface-tension variables in fluid membranes, we reformulate the thermodynamics of a membrane vesicle as a generic two-dimensional finite system enclosing a three-dimensional volume. The formulation is shown to require two tension variables, conjugate to the intensive constraints of area per molecule and volume-to-area ratio. We obtain the relation between these two variables in various scenarios, as well as their correspondence to other definitions of tension variables for membranes. Several controversies related to membrane tension are thereby resolved on a model-free thermodynamic level. The thermodynamic formulation may be useful also for treating large-scale properties of vesicles that are insensitive to the membrane's detailed statistical mechanics and interactions.

  12. A stochastic model for quantum measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budiyono, Agung

    2013-01-01

    We develop a statistical model of microscopic stochastic deviation from classical mechanics based on a stochastic process with a transition probability that is assumed to be given by an exponential distribution of infinitesimal stationary action. We apply the statistical model to stochastically modify a classical mechanical model for the measurement of physical quantities reproducing the prediction of quantum mechanics. The system+apparatus always has a definite configuration at all times, as in classical mechanics, fluctuating randomly following a continuous trajectory. On the other hand, the wavefunction and quantum mechanical Hermitian operator corresponding to the physical quantity arise formally as artificial mathematical constructs. During a single measurement, the wavefunction of the whole system+apparatus evolves according to a Schrödinger equation and the configuration of the apparatus acts as the pointer of the measurement so that there is no wavefunction collapse. We will also show that while the outcome of each single measurement event does not reveal the actual value of the physical quantity prior to measurement, its average in an ensemble of identical measurements is equal to the average of the actual value of the physical quantity prior to measurement over the distribution of the configuration of the system. (paper)

  13. Fisher information and quantum potential well model for finance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nastasiuk, V.A.

    2015-01-01

    The probability distribution function (PDF) for prices on financial markets is derived by extremization of Fisher information. It is shown how on that basis the quantum-like description for financial markets arises and different financial market models are mapped by quantum mechanical ones. - Highlights: • The financial Schrödinger equation is derived using the principle of minimum Fisher information. • Statistical models for price variation are mapped by the quantum models of coupled particle. • The model of quantum particle in parabolic potential well corresponds to Efficient market

  14. Quantum Brownian motion model for the stock market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangyi; Zhang, Jian-Wei; Guo, Hong

    2016-06-01

    It is believed by the majority today that the efficient market hypothesis is imperfect because of market irrationality. Using the physical concepts and mathematical structures of quantum mechanics, we construct an econophysical framework for the stock market, based on which we analogously map massive numbers of single stocks into a reservoir consisting of many quantum harmonic oscillators and their stock index into a typical quantum open system-a quantum Brownian particle. In particular, the irrationality of stock transactions is quantitatively considered as the Planck constant within Heisenberg's uncertainty relationship of quantum mechanics in an analogous manner. We analyze real stock data of Shanghai Stock Exchange of China and investigate fat-tail phenomena and non-Markovian behaviors of the stock index with the assistance of the quantum Brownian motion model, thereby interpreting and studying the limitations of the classical Brownian motion model for the efficient market hypothesis from a new perspective of quantum open system dynamics.

  15. Hierarchical Bayesian Modeling of Fluid-Induced Seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broccardo, M.; Mignan, A.; Wiemer, S.; Stojadinovic, B.; Giardini, D.

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we present a Bayesian hierarchical framework to model fluid-induced seismicity. The framework is based on a nonhomogeneous Poisson process with a fluid-induced seismicity rate proportional to the rate of injected fluid. The fluid-induced seismicity rate model depends upon a set of physically meaningful parameters and has been validated for six fluid-induced case studies. In line with the vision of hierarchical Bayesian modeling, the rate parameters are considered as random variables. We develop both the Bayesian inference and updating rules, which are used to develop a probabilistic forecasting model. We tested the Basel 2006 fluid-induced seismic case study to prove that the hierarchical Bayesian model offers a suitable framework to coherently encode both epistemic uncertainty and aleatory variability. Moreover, it provides a robust and consistent short-term seismic forecasting model suitable for online risk quantification and mitigation.

  16. Single Channel Quantum Color Image Encryption Algorithm Based on HSI Model and Quantum Fourier Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Li-Hua; He, Xiang-Tao; Tan, Ru-Chao; Zhou, Zhi-Hong

    2018-01-01

    In order to obtain high-quality color images, it is important to keep the hue component unchanged while emphasize the intensity or saturation component. As a public color model, Hue-Saturation Intensity (HSI) model is commonly used in image processing. A new single channel quantum color image encryption algorithm based on HSI model and quantum Fourier transform (QFT) is investigated, where the color components of the original color image are converted to HSI and the logistic map is employed to diffuse the relationship of pixels in color components. Subsequently, quantum Fourier transform is exploited to fulfill the encryption. The cipher-text is a combination of a gray image and a phase matrix. Simulations and theoretical analyses demonstrate that the proposed single channel quantum color image encryption scheme based on the HSI model and quantum Fourier transform is secure and effective.

  17. On a Quantum Model of Brain Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, K.-H.; Fichtner, L.; Freudenberg, W.; Ohya, M.

    2010-01-01

    One of the main activities of the brain is the recognition of signals. A first attempt to explain the process of recognition in terms of quantum statistics was given in [6]. Subsequently, details of the mathematical model were presented in a (still incomplete) series of papers (cf. [7, 2, 5, 10]). In the present note we want to give a general view of the principal ideas of this approach. We will introduce the basic spaces and justify the choice of spaces and operations. Further, we bring the model face to face with basic postulates any statistical model of the recognition process should fulfill. These postulates are in accordance with the opinion widely accepted in psychology and neurology.

  18. Simple Flows of Pseudoplastic Fluids Based on Dehaven Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walicka A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper three simple flows of visco-plastic fluids of DeHaven type or fluids similar to them are considered. These flows are: Poiseuille flow in a plane channel, Poiseuille flow through a circular pipe and rotating Couette flow between two coaxial cylinders. After presentation DeHaven model it was presented some models of fluids similar to this model. Next it was given the solutions of equations of motion for three flows mentioned above.

  19. Simple Flows of Pseudoplastic Fluids Based on Dehaven Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walicka, A.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper three simple flows of visco-plastic fluids of DeHaven type or fluids similar to them are considered. These flows are: Poiseuille flow in a plane channel, Poiseuille flow through a circular pipe and rotating Couette flow between two coaxial cylinders. After presentation DeHaven model it was presented some models of fluids similar to this model. Next it was given the solutions of equations of motion for three flows mentioned above.

  20. Mathematical model I. Electron and quantum mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Ramchandra Gadre

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The basic particle electron obeys various theories like electrodynamics, quantum mechanics and special relativity. Particle under different experimental conditions behaves differently, allowing us to observe different characteristics which become basis for these theories. In this paper, we have made an attempt to suggest a classical picture by studying the requirements of these three modern theories. The basic presumption is: There must be certain structural characteristics in a particle like electron which make it obey postulates of modern theories. As it is ‘difficult’ to find structure of electron experimentally, we make a mathematical attempt. For a classical approach, we require well defined systems and we have studied a system with two charged particles, proton and electron in a hydrogen atom. An attempt has been made to give a model to describe electron as seen by the proton. We then discuss how the model can satisfy the requirements of the three modern theories in a classical manner. The paper discusses basic aspects of relativity and electrodynamics. However the focus of the paper is on quantum mechanics.

  1. Random matrix model of adiabatic quantum computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, David R.; Adami, Christoph; Lue, Waynn; Williams, Colin P.

    2005-01-01

    We present an analysis of the quantum adiabatic algorithm for solving hard instances of 3-SAT (an NP-complete problem) in terms of random matrix theory (RMT). We determine the global regularity of the spectral fluctuations of the instantaneous Hamiltonians encountered during the interpolation between the starting Hamiltonians and the ones whose ground states encode the solutions to the computational problems of interest. At each interpolation point, we quantify the degree of regularity of the average spectral distribution via its Brody parameter, a measure that distinguishes regular (i.e., Poissonian) from chaotic (i.e., Wigner-type) distributions of normalized nearest-neighbor spacings. We find that for hard problem instances - i.e., those having a critical ratio of clauses to variables - the spectral fluctuations typically become irregular across a contiguous region of the interpolation parameter, while the spectrum is regular for easy instances. Within the hard region, RMT may be applied to obtain a mathematical model of the probability of avoided level crossings and concomitant failure rate of the adiabatic algorithm due to nonadiabatic Landau-Zener-type transitions. Our model predicts that if the interpolation is performed at a uniform rate, the average failure rate of the quantum adiabatic algorithm, when averaged over hard problem instances, scales exponentially with increasing problem size

  2. Mathematical model I. Electron and quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadre, Nitin Ramchandra

    2011-03-01

    The basic particle electron obeys various theories like electrodynamics, quantum mechanics and special relativity. Particle under different experimental conditions behaves differently, allowing us to observe different characteristics which become basis for these theories. In this paper, we have made an attempt to suggest a classical picture by studying the requirements of these three modern theories. The basic presumption is: There must be certain structural characteristics in a particle like electron which make it obey postulates of modern theories. As it is `difficult' to find structure of electron experimentally, we make a mathematical attempt. For a classical approach, we require well defined systems and we have studied a system with two charged particles, proton and electron in a hydrogen atom. An attempt has been made to give a model to describe electron as seen by the proton. We then discuss how the model can satisfy the requirements of the three modern theories in a classical manner. The paper discusses basic aspects of relativity and electrodynamics. However the focus of the paper is on quantum mechanics.

  3. Quantum phase transition of the transverse-field quantum Ising model on scale-free networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hangmo

    2015-01-01

    I investigate the quantum phase transition of the transverse-field quantum Ising model in which nearest neighbors are defined according to the connectivity of scale-free networks. Using a continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo simulation method and the finite-size scaling analysis, I identify the quantum critical point and study its scaling characteristics. For the degree exponent λ=6, I obtain results that are consistent with the mean-field theory. For λ=4.5 and 4, however, the results suggest that the quantum critical point belongs to a non-mean-field universality class. Further simulations indicate that the quantum critical point remains mean-field-like if λ>5, but it continuously deviates from the mean-field theory as λ becomes smaller.

  4. Chiral Modes at Exceptional Points in Exciton-Polariton Quantum Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, T; Li, G; Estrecho, E; Liew, T C H; Comber-Todd, D; Nalitov, A; Steger, M; West, K; Pfeiffer, L; Snoke, D W; Kavokin, A V; Truscott, A G; Ostrovskaya, E A

    2018-02-09

    We demonstrate the generation of chiral modes-vortex flows with fixed handedness in exciton-polariton quantum fluids. The chiral modes arise in the vicinity of exceptional points (non-Hermitian spectral degeneracies) in an optically induced resonator for exciton polaritons. In particular, a vortex is generated by driving two dipole modes of the non-Hermitian ring resonator into degeneracy. Transition through the exceptional point in the space of the system's parameters is enabled by precise manipulation of real and imaginary parts of the closed-wall potential forming the resonator. As the system is driven to the vicinity of the exceptional point, we observe the formation of a vortex state with a fixed orbital angular momentum (topological charge). This method can be extended to generate higher-order orbital angular momentum states through coalescence of multiple non-Hermitian spectral degeneracies. Our Letter demonstrates the possibility of exploiting nontrivial and counterintuitive properties of waves near exceptional points in macroscopic quantum systems.

  5. Femtosecond quantum fluid dynamics of helium atom under an intense laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, B.K.

    1998-01-01

    A comprehensive, nonperturbative, time-dependent quantum mechanical (TDQM) approach is proposed for studying the dynamics of a helium atom under an intense, ultrashort (femtoseconds) laser pulse. The method combines quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) and density functional theory. It solves a single generalized nonlinear Schroedinger equation of motion (EOM), involving time and three space variables, which is obtained from two QFD equations, namely, a continuity equation and an Euler-type equation. A highly accurate finite difference scheme along with a stability analysis is presented for numerically solving the EOM. Starting from the ground-state Hartree-Fock density for He at t = 0, the EOM yields the time-dependent (TD) electron density, effective potential surface, difference density, difference effective potential, ground-state probability, left-angle r right-angle, magnetic susceptibility, polarizability, flux, etc. By a Fourier transformation of the TD dipole moment along the linearly polarized-field direction, the power and rate spectra for photoemission are calculated. eleven mechanistic routes for photoemission are identified, which include high harmonic generation as well as many other spectral transitions involving ionized, singly excited, doubly excited (autoionizing), and continuum He states, based on the evolution of the system up to a particular time. Intimate connections between photoionization and photoemission are clearly observed through computer visualizations. Apart from being consistent with current experimental and theoretical results, the present results offer certain predictions on spectral transitions which are open to experimental verification

  6. Chiral Modes at Exceptional Points in Exciton-Polariton Quantum Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, T.; Li, G.; Estrecho, E.; Liew, T. C. H.; Comber-Todd, D.; Nalitov, A.; Steger, M.; West, K.; Pfeiffer, L.; Snoke, D. W.; Kavokin, A. V.; Truscott, A. G.; Ostrovskaya, E. A.

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate the generation of chiral modes-vortex flows with fixed handedness in exciton-polariton quantum fluids. The chiral modes arise in the vicinity of exceptional points (non-Hermitian spectral degeneracies) in an optically induced resonator for exciton polaritons. In particular, a vortex is generated by driving two dipole modes of the non-Hermitian ring resonator into degeneracy. Transition through the exceptional point in the space of the system's parameters is enabled by precise manipulation of real and imaginary parts of the closed-wall potential forming the resonator. As the system is driven to the vicinity of the exceptional point, we observe the formation of a vortex state with a fixed orbital angular momentum (topological charge). This method can be extended to generate higher-order orbital angular momentum states through coalescence of multiple non-Hermitian spectral degeneracies. Our Letter demonstrates the possibility of exploiting nontrivial and counterintuitive properties of waves near exceptional points in macroscopic quantum systems.

  7. New Results in Optical Modelling of Quantum Well Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvian Fara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This project brought further advancements to the quantum well solar cell concept proposed by Keith Barnham. In this paper, the optical modelling of MQW solar cells was analyzed and we focussed on the following topics: (i simulation of the refraction index and the reflectance, (ii simulation of the absorption coefficient, (iii simulation of the quantum efficiency for the absorption process, (iv discussion and modelling of the quantum confinement effect, and (v evaluation of datasheet parameters of the MQW cell.

  8. Modeling fluid injection induced microseismicity in shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcione, José M.; Currenti, Gilda; Johann, Lisa; Shapiro, Serge

    2018-02-01

    Hydraulic fracturing in shales generates a cloud of seismic—tensile and shear—events that can be used to evaluate the extent of the fracturing (event clouds) and obtain the hydraulic properties of the medium, such as the degree of anisotropy and the permeability. Firstly, we investigate the suitability of novel semi-analytical reference solutions for pore pressure evolution around a well after fluid injection in anisotropic media. To do so, we use cylindrical coordinates in the presence of a formation (a layer) and spherical coordinates for a homogeneous and unbounded medium. The involved differential equations are transformed to an isotropic diffusion equation by means of pseudo-spatial coordinates obtained from the spatial variables re-scaled by the permeability components. We consider pressure-dependent permeability components, which are independent of the spatial direction. The analytical solutions are compared to numerical solutions to verify their applicability. The comparison shows that the solutions are suitable for a limited permeability range and moderate to minor pressure dependences of the permeability. Once the pressure evolution around the well has been established, we can model the microseismic events. Induced seismicity by failure due to fluid injection in a porous rock depends on the properties of the hydraulic and elastic medium and in situ stress conditions. Here, we define a tensile threshold pressure above which there is tensile emission, while the shear threshold is obtained by using the octahedral stress criterion and the in situ rock properties and conditions. Subsequently, we generate event clouds for both cases and study the spatio-temporal features. The model considers anisotropic permeability and the results are spatially re-scaled to obtain an effective isotropic medium representation. For a 3D diffusion in spherical coordinates and exponential pressure dependence of the permeability, the results differ from those of the classical

  9. Quantum quench dynamics of the Luttinger model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iucci, A.; Cazalilla, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    The dynamics of the Luttinger model after a quantum quench is studied. We compute in detail one- and two-point correlation functions for two types of quenches: from a noninteracting to an interacting Luttinger model and vice versa. In the former case, the noninteracting Fermi gas features in the momentum distribution and other correlation functions are destroyed as time evolves. In the infinite-time limit, equal-time correlations are power laws but the critical exponents are found to differ from their equilibrium values. In all cases, we find that these correlations are well described by a generalized Gibbs ensemble [M. Rigol, V. Dunjko, V. Yurovsky, and M. Olshanii, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 050405 (2007)], which assigns a momentum-dependent temperature to each eigenmode.

  10. Algorithm Development for the Two-Fluid Plasma Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shumlak, Uri

    2002-01-01

    A preliminary algorithm based on the two-fluid plasma model is developed to investigate the possibility of simulating plasmas with a more physically accurate model than the MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) model...

  11. Vortex and half-vortex dynamics in a nonlinear spinor quantum fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominici, Lorenzo; Dagvadorj, Galbadrakh; Fellows, Jonathan M; Ballarini, Dario; De Giorgi, Milena; Marchetti, Francesca M; Piccirillo, Bruno; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Bramati, Alberto; Gigli, Giuseppe; Szymańska, Marzena H; Sanvitto, Daniele

    2015-12-01

    Vortices are archetypal objects that recur in the universe across the scale of complexity, from subatomic particles to galaxies and black holes. Their appearance is connected with spontaneous symmetry breaking and phase transitions. In Bose-Einstein condensates and superfluids, vortices are both point-like and quantized quasiparticles. We use a two-dimensional (2D) fluid of polaritons, bosonic particles constituted by hybrid photonic and electronic oscillations, to study quantum vortex dynamics. Polaritons benefit from easiness of wave function phase detection, a spinor nature sustaining half-integer vorticity, strong nonlinearity, and tuning of the background disorder. We can directly generate by resonant pulsed excitations a polariton condensate carrying either a full or half-integer vortex as initial condition and follow their coherent evolution using ultrafast imaging on the picosecond scale. The observations highlight a rich phenomenology, such as the spiraling of the half-vortex and the joint path of the twin charges of a full vortex, until the moment of their splitting. Furthermore, we observe the ordered branching into newly generated secondary couples, associated with the breaking of radial and azimuthal symmetries. This allows us to devise the interplay of nonlinearity and sample disorder in shaping the fluid and driving the vortex dynamics. In addition, our observations suggest that phase singularities may be seen as fundamental particles whose quantized events span from pair creation and recombination to 2D+t topological vortex strings.

  12. Tribodynamic Modeling of Digital Fluid Power Motors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Per

    In fluid power engineering, efficiency and reliability optimization have become a major objective. The interest in using fluid power transmission in wind and wave energy applications are producing requirements concerning efficiency and reliability in order to compete with other transmission systems...... design methods and tools are important to the development of digital fluid power machines. The work presented in this dissertation is part of a research program focusing on the development of digital fluid power MW-motors for use in hydraulic drive train in wind turbines. As part of this development....... In fluid power motoring and pumping units, a significant problem is that loss mechanisms do not scale down with diminishing power throughput. Although machines can reach peak efficiencies above 95%, the actual efficiency during operation, which includes part-load situations, is much lower. The invention...

  13. Martingale models for quantum state reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, S.L.; Brun, T.A. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States)]. E-mails: adler@ias.edu; tbrun@ias.edu; Brody, D.C. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: dorje@ic.ac.uk; Hughston, L.P. [Department of Mathematics, King' s College, Strand, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: lane.hughston@kcl.ac.uk

    2001-10-26

    Stochastic models for quantum state reduction give rise to statistical laws that are in most respects in agreement with those of quantum measurement theory. Here we examine the correspondence of the two theories in detail, making a systematic use of the methods of martingale theory. An analysis is carried out to determine the magnitude of the fluctuations experienced by the expectation of the observable during the course of the reduction process and an upper bound is established for the ensemble average of the greatest fluctuations incurred. We consider the general projection postulate of Lueders applicable in the case of a possibly degenerate eigenvalue spectrum, and derive this result rigorously from the underlying stochastic dynamics for state reduction in the case of both a pure and a mixed initial state. We also analyse the associated Lindblad equation for the evolution of the density matrix, and obtain an exact time-dependent solution for the state reduction that explicitly exhibits the transition from a general initial density matrix to the Lueders density matrix. Finally, we apply Girsanov's theorem to derive a set of simple formulae for the dynamics of the state in terms of a family of geometric Brownian motions, thereby constructing an explicit unravelling of the Lindblad equation. (author)

  14. Quantum-Like Bayesian Networks for Modeling Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina eMoreira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we explore an alternative quantum structure to perform quantum probabilistic inferences to accommodate the paradoxical findings of the Sure Thing Principle. We propose a Quantum-Like Bayesian Network, which consists in replacing classical probabilities by quantum probability amplitudes. However, since this approach suffers from the problem of exponential growth of quantum parameters, we also propose a similarity heuristic that automatically fits quantum parameters through vector similarities. This makes the proposed model general and predictive in contrast to the current state of the art models, which cannot be generalized for more complex decision scenarios and that only provide an explanatory nature for the observed paradoxes. In the end, the model that we propose consists in a nonparametric method for estimating inference effects from a statistical point of view. It is a statistical model that is simpler than the previous quantum dynamic and quantum-like models proposed in the literature. We tested the proposed network with several empirical data from the literature, mainly from the Prisoner's Dilemma game and the Two Stage Gambling game. The results obtained show that the proposed quantum Bayesian Network is a general method that can accommodate violations of the laws of classical probability theory and make accurate predictions regarding human decision-making in these scenarios.

  15. Lorentz invariant noncommutative algebra for cosmological models coupled to a perfect fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Everton M.C.; Marcial, Mateus V.; Mendes, Albert C.R.; Oliveira, Wilson [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: In current theoretical physics there is a relevant number of theoretical investigations that lead to believe that at the first moments of our Universe, the geometry was not commutative and the dominating physics at that time was ruled by the laws of noncommutative (NC) geometry. Therefore, the idea is that the physics of the early moments can be constructed based on these concepts. The first published work using the idea of a NC spacetime were carried out by Snyder who believed that NC principles could make the quantum field theory infinities disappear. However, it did not occur and Snyder's ideas were put to sleep for a long time. The main modern motivations that rekindle the investigation about NC field theories came from string theory and quantum gravity. In the context of quantum mechanics for example, R. Banerjee discussed how NC structures appear in planar quantum mechanics providing a useful way for obtaining them. The analysis was based on the NC algebra used in planar quantum mechanics that was originated from 't Hooft's analysis on dissipation and quantization. In this work we carry out a NC algebra analysis of the Friedmann-Robert-Walker model, coupled to a perfect fluid and in the presence of a cosmological constant. The classical field equations are modified, by the introduction of a shift operator, in order to introduce noncommutativity in these models. (author)

  16. Acoustic Velocity and Attenuation in Magnetorhelogical fluids based on an effective density fluid model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Min

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetrohelogical fluids (MRFs represent a class of smart materials whose rheological properties change in response to the magnetic field, which resulting in the drastic change of the acoustic impedance. This paper presents an acoustic propagation model that approximates a fluid-saturated porous medium as a fluid with a bulk modulus and effective density (EDFM to study the acoustic propagation in the MRF materials under magnetic field. The effective density fluid model derived from the Biot’s theory. Some minor changes to the theory had to be applied, modeling both fluid-like and solid-like state of the MRF material. The attenuation and velocity variation of the MRF are numerical calculated. The calculated results show that for the MRF material the attenuation and velocity predicted with this effective density fluid model are close agreement with the previous predictions by Biot’s theory. We demonstrate that for the MRF material acoustic prediction the effective density fluid model is an accurate alternative to full Biot’s theory and is much simpler to implement.

  17. Model of a programmable quantum processing unit based on a quantum transistor effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablayev, Farid; Andrianov, Sergey; Fetisov, Danila; Moiseev, Sergey; Terentyev, Alexandr; Urmanchev, Andrey; Vasiliev, Alexander

    2018-02-01

    In this paper we propose a model of a programmable quantum processing device realizable with existing nano-photonic technologies. It can be viewed as a basis for new high performance hardware architectures. Protocols for physical implementation of device on the controlled photon transfer and atomic transitions are presented. These protocols are designed for executing basic single-qubit and multi-qubit gates forming a universal set. We analyze the possible operation of this quantum computer scheme. Then we formalize the physical architecture by a mathematical model of a Quantum Processing Unit (QPU), which we use as a basis for the Quantum Programming Framework. This framework makes it possible to perform universal quantum computations in a multitasking environment.

  18. Quantum simulation of transverse Ising models with Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauss, Peter

    2018-04-01

    Quantum Ising models are canonical models for the study of quantum phase transitions (Sachdev 1999 Quantum Phase Transitions (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)) and are the underlying concept for many analogue quantum computing and quantum annealing ideas (Tanaka et al Quantum Spin Glasses, Annealing and Computation (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)). Here we focus on the implementation of finite-range interacting Ising spin models, which are barely tractable numerically. Recent experiments with cold atoms have reached the interaction-dominated regime in quantum Ising magnets via optical coupling of trapped neutral atoms to Rydberg states. This approach allows for the tunability of all relevant terms in an Ising spin Hamiltonian with 1/{r}6 interactions in transverse and longitudinal fields. This review summarizes the recent progress of these implementations in Rydberg lattices with site-resolved detection. Strong correlations in quantum Ising models have been observed in several experiments, starting from a single excitation in the superatom regime up to the point of crystallization. The rapid progress in this field makes spin systems based on Rydberg atoms a promising platform for quantum simulation because of the unmatched flexibility and strength of interactions combined with high control and good isolation from the environment.

  19. Rotating cylindrically symmetric Kaluza-Klein fluid model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Several relativistic cylindrically symmetric, non-static, inhomogeneous KK fluid models admitting dimensional reduction have been reported by Patel and Dadhich [2,3]. After Godel [4] gave relativistic model of a rotating dust universe, the study of rotating fluids in the context of general relativity received considerable attention ...

  20. Current algebra, statistical mechanics and quantum models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela Mendes, R.

    2017-11-01

    Results obtained in the past for free boson systems at zero and nonzero temperatures are revisited to clarify the physical meaning of current algebra reducible functionals which are associated to systems with density fluctuations, leading to observable effects on phase transitions. To use current algebra as a tool for the formulation of quantum statistical mechanics amounts to the construction of unitary representations of diffeomorphism groups. Two mathematical equivalent procedures exist for this purpose. One searches for quasi-invariant measures on configuration spaces, the other for a cyclic vector in Hilbert space. Here, one argues that the second approach is closer to the physical intuition when modelling complex systems. An example of application of the current algebra methodology to the pairing phenomenon in two-dimensional fermion systems is discussed.

  1. The implicit possibility of dualism in quantum probabilistic cognitive modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mender, Donald

    2013-06-01

    Pothos & Busemeyer (P&B) argue convincingly that quantum probability offers an improvement over classical Bayesian probability in modeling the empirical data of cognitive science. However, a weakness related to restrictions on the dimensionality of incompatible physical observables flows from the authors' "agnosticism" regarding quantum processes in neural substrates underlying cognition. Addressing this problem will require either future research findings validating quantum neurophysics or theoretical expansion of the uncertainty principle as a new, neurocognitively contextualized, "local" symmetry.

  2. A quantum energy transport model for semiconductor device simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sho, Shohiro, E-mail: shoshohiro@gmail.com [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Odanaka, Shinji [Computer Assisted Science Division, Cybermedia Center, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    This paper describes numerical methods for a quantum energy transport (QET) model in semiconductors, which is derived by using a diffusion scaling in the quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model. We newly drive a four-moments QET model similar with a classical ET model. Space discretization is performed by a new set of unknown variables. Numerical stability and convergence are obtained by developing numerical schemes and an iterative solution method with a relaxation method. Numerical simulations of electron transport in a scaled MOSFET device are discussed. The QET model allows simulations of quantum confinement transport, and nonlocal and hot-carrier effects in scaled MOSFETs.

  3. Modeling of Dynamic Fluid Forces in Fast Switching Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Daniel Beck; Johansen, Per; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen

    2015-01-01

    history term. For general valve geometries there are no simple solution to either of these terms. During development and design of such switching valves, it is therefore, common practice to use simple models to describe the opposing fluid forces, neglecting all but the viscous term which is determined...... force, but these models are computationally expensive and are not suitable for evaluating large numbers of different operation conditions or even design optimization. In the present paper, an effort is done to describe these fluid forces and their origin. An example of the total opposing fluid force...... the opposing fluid force well and gives accurate predictions under certain conditions. The proposed model is suitable for valve designers who need a computationally inexpensive fluid force model suitable for optimization routines or efficient dynamic models....

  4. Quantum dynamics modeled by interacting trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Rodríguez, L.; Uranga-Piña, L.; Martínez-Mesa, A.; Meier, C.

    2018-03-01

    We present quantum dynamical simulations based on the propagation of interacting trajectories where the effect of the quantum potential is mimicked by effective pseudo-particle interactions. The method is applied to several quantum systems, both for bound and scattering problems. For the bound systems, the quantum ground state density and zero point energy are shown to be perfectly obtained by the interacting trajectories. In the case of time-dependent quantum scattering, the Eckart barrier and uphill ramp are considered, with transmission coefficients in very good agreement with standard quantum calculations. Finally, we show that via wave function synthesis along the trajectories, correlation functions and energy spectra can be obtained based on the dynamics of interacting trajectories.

  5. Quantum Gravity Mathematical Models and Experimental Bounds

    CERN Document Server

    Fauser, Bertfried; Zeidler, Eberhard

    2007-01-01

    The construction of a quantum theory of gravity is the most fundamental challenge confronting contemporary theoretical physics. The different physical ideas which evolved while developing a theory of quantum gravity require highly advanced mathematical methods. This book presents different mathematical approaches to formulate a theory of quantum gravity. It represents a carefully selected cross-section of lively discussions about the issue of quantum gravity which took place at the second workshop "Mathematical and Physical Aspects of Quantum Gravity" in Blaubeuren, Germany. This collection covers in a unique way aspects of various competing approaches. A unique feature of the book is the presentation of different approaches to quantum gravity making comparison feasible. This feature is supported by an extensive index. The book is mainly addressed to mathematicians and physicists who are interested in questions related to mathematical physics. It allows the reader to obtain a broad and up-to-date overview on ...

  6. The Quantum Atomic Model "Electronium": A Successful Teaching Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, Marion; Niedderer, Hans; Scott, Philip; Leach, John

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the quantum atomic model Electronium. Outlines the Bremen teaching approach in which this model is used, and analyzes the learning of two students as they progress through the teaching unit. (Author/MM)

  7. Introduction to fluid model for RHIC heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraya, Shin

    2007-01-01

    An introductory review of the fluid model which has been looked upon as the promising phenomenological model for the heavy ion scattering experiments at RHIC is presented here. Subjects are especially focused on the fundamental assumptions of the model and the decision process of the phenomenological parameters considering newcomers to hadron physics. Introduction of thermodynamical quantities, 1+1 dimension model, time-space evolution of fluid, correspondence of fluid to particles, initial condition, boundary condition and comparison of the equation of state of fluid model and that of hadron model are described. Limitation of fluid picture and the validity of the model are discussed finally. It is summarized that the present fluid model does not predict much about results in advance but gives interpretation after the event, nevertheless it reproduces much of the experimental results in natural form. It is expected that the parameter of the fluid model is to be used as the intermediate theory to relate experimental results with theory. (S. Funahashi)

  8. Approximate Riemann solver for the two-fluid plasma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shumlak, U.; Loverich, J.

    2003-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for the simulation of plasma dynamics using the two-fluid plasma model. The two-fluid plasma model is more general than the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model often used for plasma dynamic simulations. The two-fluid equations are derived in divergence form and an approximate Riemann solver is developed to compute the fluxes of the electron and ion fluids at the computational cell interfaces and an upwind characteristic-based solver to compute the electromagnetic fields. The source terms that couple the fluids and fields are treated implicitly to relax the stiffness. The algorithm is validated with the coplanar Riemann problem, Langmuir plasma oscillations, and the electromagnetic shock problem that has been simulated with the MHD plasma model. A numerical dispersion relation is also presented that demonstrates agreement with analytical plasma waves

  9. Turbulence theories and modelling of fluids and plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Akira; Yokoi, Nobumitsu; Itoh, Sanae-I.; Itoh, Kimitaka

    2001-04-01

    Theoretical and heuristic modelling methods are reviewed for studying turbulence phenomena of fluids and plasmas. Emphasis is put on understanding of effects on turbulent characteristics due to inhomogeneities of field and plasma parameters. The similarity and dissimilarity between the methods for fluids and plasmas are sought in order to shed light on the properties that are shared or not by fluid and plasma turbulence. (author)

  10. Disciplines, models, and computers: the path to computational quantum chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhard, Johannes

    2014-12-01

    Many disciplines and scientific fields have undergone a computational turn in the past several decades. This paper analyzes this sort of turn by investigating the case of computational quantum chemistry. The main claim is that the transformation from quantum to computational quantum chemistry involved changes in three dimensions. First, on the side of instrumentation, small computers and a networked infrastructure took over the lead from centralized mainframe architecture. Second, a new conception of computational modeling became feasible and assumed a crucial role. And third, the field of computa- tional quantum chemistry became organized in a market-like fashion and this market is much bigger than the number of quantum theory experts. These claims will be substantiated by an investigation of the so-called density functional theory (DFT), the arguably pivotal theory in the turn to computational quantum chemistry around 1990.

  11. The supersymmetric t-J model with quantum group invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, A.; Karowski, M.

    1993-04-01

    An integrable quantum group deformation of the supersymmetric t-J model is introduced. Open boundary conditions lead to an spl q (2, 1) invariant hamiltonian. A general procedure to obtain such invariant models is proposed. To solve the model a generalized nested algebraic Bethe ansatz is constructed and the Bethe ansatz equations are obtained. The quantum supergroup structure of the model is investigated. (orig.)

  12. Modeling coherent errors in quantum error correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Dutton, Zachary

    2018-01-01

    Analysis of quantum error correcting codes is typically done using a stochastic, Pauli channel error model for describing the noise on physical qubits. However, it was recently found that coherent errors (systematic rotations) on physical data qubits result in both physical and logical error rates that differ significantly from those predicted by a Pauli model. Here we examine the accuracy of the Pauli approximation for noise containing coherent errors (characterized by a rotation angle ɛ) under the repetition code. We derive an analytic expression for the logical error channel as a function of arbitrary code distance d and concatenation level n, in the small error limit. We find that coherent physical errors result in logical errors that are partially coherent and therefore non-Pauli. However, the coherent part of the logical error is negligible at fewer than {ε }-({dn-1)} error correction cycles when the decoder is optimized for independent Pauli errors, thus providing a regime of validity for the Pauli approximation. Above this number of correction cycles, the persistent coherent logical error will cause logical failure more quickly than the Pauli model would predict, and this may need to be combated with coherent suppression methods at the physical level or larger codes.

  13. Quantum mechanical model for Maya Blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, María E.; Peña, Brisa; Contreras, César; Montero, Ana L.; Chianelli, Russell; Alvarado, Manuel; Olivas, Ramón; Rodríguez, Luz M.; Camacho, Héctor; Montero-Cabrera, Luis A.

    This work is about Maya Blue (MB), a pigment developed by Mesoamerican civilizations between the 5th and 16th centuries from an aluminosilicate mineral (palygorskite) and an organic dye (indigo). Two different supramolecular quantum-mechanical models afford explanations for the unusual stability of MB based on the oxidation of the indigo molecule during the heating process and its interaction with palygorskite. A model considering indigo derivatives attached to several aluminates shows the principal features of the experimental visible spectrum of MB within the TD-DFT methodology. Another model of an indigo oxidized species confined within an inorganic supramolecular cavity system, that involves about 170 atoms, was calculated after a large configuration interaction of single excited determinants within the NDOL approximation (Montero-Cabrera et al., J Chem Phys, 2007, 127, 145102). It allows a correct reproduction and interpretation of the corresponding spectrum. This second methodology provides the most satisfactory results, being able to manage very big molecular systems at a QM level. Structural explanation for the unusual stability of MB is also provided.

  14. Phenomenology of Low Quantum Gravity Scale Models

    CERN Document Server

    Benakli, Karim

    1999-01-01

    We study some phenomenological implications of models where the scale of quantum gravity effects lies much below the four-dimensional Planck scale. These models arise from M-theory vacua where either the internal space volume is large or the string coupling is very small. We provide a critical analysis of ways to unify electroweak, strong and gravitational interactions in M-theory. We discuss the relations between different scales in two M-vacua: Type I strings and Ho\\v rava--Witten supergravity models. The latter allows possibilities for an eleven-dimensional scale at TeV energies with one large dimension below separating our four-dimensional world from a hidden one. Different mechanisms for breaking supersymmetry (gravity mediated, gauge mediated and Scherk-Schwarz mechanisms) are discussed in this framework. Some phenomenological issues such as dark matter (with masses that may vary in time), origin of neutrino masses and axion scale are discussed. We suggest that these are indications that the string scal...

  15. The quantum mechanics of the supersymmetric nonlinear sigma-model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, A.C.; Macfarlane, A.J.; Popat, P.C.; Holten, J.W. van

    1984-01-01

    The classical and quantum mechanical formalisms of the models are developed. The quantisation is done in such a way that the quantum theory can be represented explicitly in as simple a form as possible, and the problem of ordering of operators is resolved so as to maintain the supersymmetry algebra of the classical theory. (author)

  16. Composable security in the bounded-quantum-storage model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.D.C. Wehner (Stephanie); J. Wullschleger

    2007-01-01

    htmlabstractWe present a simplified framework for proving sequential composability in the quantum setting. In particular, we give a new, simulation-based, definition for security in the bounded-quantum-storage model, and show that this definition allows for sequential composition of protocols.

  17. Fisher information and quantum potential well model for finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastasiuk, V. A.

    2015-09-01

    The probability distribution function (PDF) for prices on financial markets is derived by extremization of Fisher information. It is shown how on that basis the quantum-like description for financial markets arises and different financial market models are mapped by quantum mechanical ones.

  18. Modeling Tools Predict Flow in Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    "Because rocket engines operate under extreme temperature and pressure, they present a unique challenge to designers who must test and simulate the technology. To this end, CRAFT Tech Inc., of Pipersville, Pennsylvania, won Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Marshall Space Flight Center to develop software to simulate cryogenic fluid flows and related phenomena. CRAFT Tech enhanced its CRUNCH CFD (computational fluid dynamics) software to simulate phenomena in various liquid propulsion components and systems. Today, both government and industry clients in the aerospace, utilities, and petrochemical industries use the software for analyzing existing systems as well as designing new ones."

  19. A watershed model of individual differences in fluid intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kievit, Rogier A; Davis, Simon W; Griffiths, John; Correia, Marta M; Cam-Can; Henson, Richard N

    2016-10-01

    Fluid intelligence is a crucial cognitive ability that predicts key life outcomes across the lifespan. Strong empirical links exist between fluid intelligence and processing speed on the one hand, and white matter integrity and processing speed on the other. We propose a watershed model that integrates these three explanatory levels in a principled manner in a single statistical model, with processing speed and white matter figuring as intermediate endophenotypes. We fit this model in a large (N=555) adult lifespan cohort from the Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience (Cam-CAN) using multiple measures of processing speed, white matter health and fluid intelligence. The model fit the data well, outperforming competing models and providing evidence for a many-to-one mapping between white matter integrity, processing speed and fluid intelligence. The model can be naturally extended to integrate other cognitive domains, endophenotypes and genotypes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Poiseuille flow to measure the viscosity of particle model fluids.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backer, J.A.; Lowe, C.P.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Iedema, P.D.

    2005-01-01

    The most important property of a fluid is its viscosity, it determines the flow properties. If one simulates a fluid using a particle model, calculating the viscosity accurately is difficult because it is a collective property. In this article we describe a new method that has a better signal to

  1. Quantum transfer-matrices for the sausage model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhanov, Vladimir V.; Kotousov, Gleb A.; Lukyanov, Sergei L.

    2018-01-01

    In this work we revisit the problem of the quantization of the two-dimensional O(3) non-linear sigma model and its one-parameter integrable deformation — the sausage model. Our consideration is based on the so-called ODE/IQFT correspondence, a variant of the Quantum Inverse Scattering Method. The approach allowed us to explore the integrable structures underlying the quantum O(3)/sausage model. Among the obtained results is a system of non-linear integral equations for the computation of the vacuum eigenvalues of the quantum transfer-matrices.

  2. Quantum synchronization of the Schrödinger–Lohe model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun-Ho; Ha, Seung-Yeal

    2014-01-01

    We present a quantum synchronization estimate of the Schrödinger–Lohe (S–L) model introduced by Lohe (2010 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43 465301). The S–L model describes the dynamics of quantum oscillators on the nodes of a quantum network. When the coupling strength is positive and the maximal L 2 distances between normalized initial wave functions are smaller than (1/2), we show that the L 2 distances between wave functions converge to zero exponentially fast. Our result generalizes earlier work by Chi et al (2014 J. Math. Phys. 55 052703) for the Lohe model. (paper)

  3. Superradiant MeV γ Scattered by a Room-Temperature Spinor Quantum Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Cheng

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports have revealed the rich long-lived Mossbauer phenomenon of 93mNb, in which it has long been speculated that the delocalized 93mNb undergoes Bose-Einstein condensation following an increase in the 93mNb density beyond the threshold of 1012 cm−3 at room temperature. We now report on the superradiant Rayleigh of the M4 γ at 662 keV scattered into end-fire modes along the long axis of the sample, as evidence of Bose-Einstein condensation. We observed the Arago (Poisson’s spot in order to demonstrate a near-field γ-ray diffraction from a mm-sized γ source, as well as a γ interference beyond the Huygens-Fresnel principle. During the 107-day monitoring period, seven Sisyphus cycles of mode hopping appeared in the superradiance, which demonstrates the optomechanic bistabilty provided by the collective interaction between the spinor quantum fluid and the impinging γs. Condensate-light interaction produces a pm matter-wave grating to become a Fabry-Pérot resonator with a Q-factor on the order of 1020, from which end-fired γs lase.

  4. Quantum Rabi model in a superfluid Bose-Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicetti, S.; Romero, G.; Solano, E.; Sabín, C.

    2017-09-01

    We propose a quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi model in an atomic quantum dot, which is a single atom in a tight optical trap coupled to the quasiparticle modes of a superfluid Bose-Einstein condensate. This widely tunable setup allows us to simulate the ultrastrong coupling regime of light-matter interaction in a system which enjoys an amenable characteristic time scale, paving the way for an experimental analysis of the transition between the Jaynes-Cummings and the quantum Rabi dynamics using cold-atom systems. Our scheme can be naturally extended to simulate multiqubit quantum Rabi models. In particular, we discuss the appearance of effective two-qubit interactions due to phononic exchange, among other features.

  5. Quantum quenches in a holographic Kondo model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdmenger, Johanna [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut),Föhringer Ring 6, 80805, Munich (Germany); Institut für Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg,Am Hubland, 97074 Würzburg (Germany); Flory, Mario [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut),Föhringer Ring 6, 80805, Munich (Germany); Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University,Łojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Kraków (Poland); Newrzella, Max-Niklas; Strydom, Migael [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut),Föhringer Ring 6, 80805, Munich (Germany); Wu, Jackson M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama,Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2017-04-10

    We study non-equilibrium dynamics and quantum quenches in a recent gauge/ gravity duality model for a strongly coupled system interacting with a magnetic impurity with SU(N) spin. At large N, it is convenient to write the impurity spin as a bilinear in Abrikosov fermions. The model describes an RG flow triggered by the marginally relevant Kondo operator. There is a phase transition at a critical temperature, below which an operator condenses which involves both an electron and an Abrikosov fermion field. This corresponds to a holographic superconductor in AdS{sub 2} and models the impurity screening. We quench the Kondo coupling either by a Gaussian pulse or by a hyperbolic tangent, the latter taking the system from the condensed to the uncondensed phase or vice-versa. We study the time dependence of the condensate induced by this quench. The timescale for equilibration is generically given by the leading quasinormal mode of the dual gravity model. This mode also governs the formation of the screening cloud, which is obtained as the decrease of impurity degrees of freedom with time. In the condensed phase, the leading quasinormal mode is imaginary and the relaxation of the condensate is over-damped. For quenches whose final state is close to the critical point of the large N phase transition, we study the critical slowing down and obtain the combination of critical exponents zν=1. When the final state is exactly at the phase transition, we find that the exponential ringing of the quasinormal modes is replaced by a power-law behaviour of the form ∼t{sup −a}sin (blog t). This indicates the emergence of a discrete scale invariance.

  6. Quantum quenches in a holographic Kondo model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdmenger, Johanna; Flory, Mario; Newrzella, Max-Niklas; Strydom, Migael; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2017-01-01

    We study non-equilibrium dynamics and quantum quenches in a recent gauge/ gravity duality model for a strongly coupled system interacting with a magnetic impurity with SU(N) spin. At large N, it is convenient to write the impurity spin as a bilinear in Abrikosov fermions. The model describes an RG flow triggered by the marginally relevant Kondo operator. There is a phase transition at a critical temperature, below which an operator condenses which involves both an electron and an Abrikosov fermion field. This corresponds to a holographic superconductor in AdS 2 and models the impurity screening. We quench the Kondo coupling either by a Gaussian pulse or by a hyperbolic tangent, the latter taking the system from the condensed to the uncondensed phase or vice-versa. We study the time dependence of the condensate induced by this quench. The timescale for equilibration is generically given by the leading quasinormal mode of the dual gravity model. This mode also governs the formation of the screening cloud, which is obtained as the decrease of impurity degrees of freedom with time. In the condensed phase, the leading quasinormal mode is imaginary and the relaxation of the condensate is over-damped. For quenches whose final state is close to the critical point of the large N phase transition, we study the critical slowing down and obtain the combination of critical exponents zν=1. When the final state is exactly at the phase transition, we find that the exponential ringing of the quasinormal modes is replaced by a power-law behaviour of the form ∼t −a sin (blog t). This indicates the emergence of a discrete scale invariance.

  7. Quantum-like model of unconscious–conscious dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantum-like model of sensation–perception dynamics (originated in Helmholtz theory of unconscious inference) based on the theory of quantum apparatuses and instruments. We illustrate our approach with the model of bistable perception of a particular ambiguous figure, the Schröder stair. This is a concrete model for unconscious and conscious processing of information and their interaction. The starting point of our quantum-like journey was the observation that perception dynamics is essentially contextual which implies impossibility of (straightforward) embedding of experimental statistical data in the classical (Kolmogorov, 1933) framework of probability theory. This motivates application of nonclassical probabilistic schemes. And the quantum formalism provides a variety of the well-approved and mathematically elegant probabilistic schemes to handle results of measurements. The theory of quantum apparatuses and instruments is the most general quantum scheme describing measurements and it is natural to explore it to model the sensation–perception dynamics. In particular, this theory provides the scheme of indirect quantum measurements which we apply to model unconscious inference leading to transition from sensations to perceptions. PMID:26283979

  8. Superposition of episodic memories: overdistribution and quantum models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainerd, Charles J; Wang, Zheng; Reyna, Valerie F

    2013-10-01

    Memory exhibits episodic superposition, an analog of the quantum superposition of physical states: Before a cue for a presented or unpresented item is administered on a memory test, the item has the simultaneous potential to occupy all members of a mutually exclusive set of episodic states, though it occupies only one of those states after the cue is administered. This phenomenon can be modeled with a nonadditive probability model called overdistribution (OD), which implements fuzzy-trace theory's distinction between verbatim and gist representations. We show that it can also be modeled based on quantum probability theory. A quantum episodic memory (QEM) model is developed, which is derived from quantum probability theory but also implements the process conceptions of global matching memory models. OD and QEM have different strengths, and the current challenge is to identify contrasting empirical predictions that can be used to pit them against each other. © 2013 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  9. Quantum simulation of a Fermi-Hubbard model using a semiconductor quantum dot array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensgens, T.; Fujita, T.; Janssen, L.; Li, Xiao; van Diepen, C. J.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Das Sarma, S.; Vandersypen, L. M. K.

    2017-08-01

    Interacting fermions on a lattice can develop strong quantum correlations, which are the cause of the classical intractability of many exotic phases of matter. Current efforts are directed towards the control of artificial quantum systems that can be made to emulate the underlying Fermi-Hubbard models. Electrostatically confined conduction-band electrons define interacting quantum coherent spin and charge degrees of freedom that allow all-electrical initialization of low-entropy states and readily adhere to the Fermi-Hubbard Hamiltonian. Until now, however, the substantial electrostatic disorder of the solid state has meant that only a few attempts at emulating Fermi-Hubbard physics on solid-state platforms have been made. Here we show that for gate-defined quantum dots this disorder can be suppressed in a controlled manner. Using a semi-automated and scalable set of experimental tools, we homogeneously and independently set up the electron filling and nearest-neighbour tunnel coupling in a semiconductor quantum dot array so as to simulate a Fermi-Hubbard system. With this set-up, we realize a detailed characterization of the collective Coulomb blockade transition, which is the finite-size analogue of the interaction-driven Mott metal-to-insulator transition. As automation and device fabrication of semiconductor quantum dots continue to improve, the ideas presented here will enable the investigation of the physics of ever more complex many-body states using quantum dots.

  10. Quantum simulation of a Fermi-Hubbard model using a semiconductor quantum dot array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensgens, T; Fujita, T; Janssen, L; Li, Xiao; Van Diepen, C J; Reichl, C; Wegscheider, W; Das Sarma, S; Vandersypen, L M K

    2017-08-02

    Interacting fermions on a lattice can develop strong quantum correlations, which are the cause of the classical intractability of many exotic phases of matter. Current efforts are directed towards the control of artificial quantum systems that can be made to emulate the underlying Fermi-Hubbard models. Electrostatically confined conduction-band electrons define interacting quantum coherent spin and charge degrees of freedom that allow all-electrical initialization of low-entropy states and readily adhere to the Fermi-Hubbard Hamiltonian. Until now, however, the substantial electrostatic disorder of the solid state has meant that only a few attempts at emulating Fermi-Hubbard physics on solid-state platforms have been made. Here we show that for gate-defined quantum dots this disorder can be suppressed in a controlled manner. Using a semi-automated and scalable set of experimental tools, we homogeneously and independently set up the electron filling and nearest-neighbour tunnel coupling in a semiconductor quantum dot array so as to simulate a Fermi-Hubbard system. With this set-up, we realize a detailed characterization of the collective Coulomb blockade transition, which is the finite-size analogue of the interaction-driven Mott metal-to-insulator transition. As automation and device fabrication of semiconductor quantum dots continue to improve, the ideas presented here will enable the investigation of the physics of ever more complex many-body states using quantum dots.

  11. Physical models of semiconductor quantum devices

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The science and technology relating to nanostructures continues to receive significant attention for its applications to various fields including microelectronics, nanophotonics, and biotechnology. This book describes the basic quantum mechanical principles underlining this fast developing field. From the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics to nanomaterial properties, from device physics to research and development of new systems, this title is aimed at undergraduates, graduates, postgraduates, and researchers.

  12. On Equilibria of the Two-fluid Model in Magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frantzeskakis, Dimitri J.; Stratis, Ioannis G.; Yannacopoulos, Athanasios N.

    2004-01-01

    We show how the equilibria of the two-fluid model in magnetohydrodynamics can be described by the double curl equation and through the study of this equation we study some properties of these equilibria

  13. Seismoelectric fluid/porous-medium interface response model and measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakel, M.D.; Smeulders, D.M.J.; Slob, E.C.; Heller, H.K.J.

    2011-01-01

    Coupled seismic and electromagnetic (EM) wave effects in fluid-saturated porous media are measured since decades. However, direct comparisons between theoretical seismoelectric wavefields and measurements are scarce. A seismoelectric full-waveform numerical model is developed, which predicts both

  14. Computational electronics semiclassical and quantum device modeling and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Vasileska, Dragica; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Starting with the simplest semiclassical approaches and ending with the description of complex fully quantum-mechanical methods for quantum transport analysis of state-of-the-art devices, Computational Electronics: Semiclassical and Quantum Device Modeling and Simulation provides a comprehensive overview of the essential techniques and methods for effectively analyzing transport in semiconductor devices. With the transistor reaching its limits and new device designs and paradigms of operation being explored, this timely resource delivers the simulation methods needed to properly model state-of

  15. Kaleidoscope of exotic quantum phases in a frustrated XY model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varney, Christopher N; Sun, Kai; Galitski, Victor; Rigol, Marcos

    2011-08-12

    The existence of quantum spin liquids was first conjectured by Pomeranchuk some 70 years ago, who argued that frustration in simple antiferromagnetic theories could result in a Fermi-liquid-like state for spinon excitations. Here we show that a simple quantum spin model on a honeycomb lattice hosts the long sought for Bose metal with a clearly identifiable Bose surface. The complete phase diagram of the model is determined via exact diagonalization and is shown to include four distinct phases separated by three quantum phase transitions.

  16. MATHEMATICAL MODELLING OF TWO-SPECIES RELATIVISTIC FLUIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano Giambo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available An interface-capturing method is used to deduce equations governingfluid motion in a relativistic two-species flow. These kind of methodscombine simple fluid flow equations, which are the balance law forparticle number and energy-momentum tensor conservation equationfor global fluid, the balance laws for particle number density of eachspecies, with extra equations. Since equations of multi-species relativistic fluid are not closed assigning laws of the state of each species, closure equations are necessarily introduced. A model based on the axiom of existence of a temperature and an entropy for the global fluid, which verify an equation analogous to that holding in the case of a simple fluid, is formulated. Weak discontinuities compatible with such kind of mixture are also studied.

  17. Mechanistic Fluid Transport Model to Estimate Gastrointestinal Fluid Volume and Its Dynamic Change Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Alex; Jackson, Trachette; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Koenigsknecht, Mark; Wysocki, Jeffrey; Marciani, Luca; Amidon, Gordon L; Frances, Ann; Baker, Jason R; Hasler, William; Wen, Bo; Pai, Amit; Sun, Duxin

    2017-11-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) fluid volume and its dynamic change are integral to study drug disintegration, dissolution, transit, and absorption. However, key questions regarding the local volume and its absorption, secretion, and transit remain unanswered. The dynamic fluid compartment absorption and transit (DFCAT) model is proposed to estimate in vivo GI volume and GI fluid transport based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) quantified fluid volume. The model was validated using GI local concentration of phenol red in human GI tract, which was directly measured by human GI intubation study after oral dosing of non-absorbable phenol red. The measured local GI concentration of phenol red ranged from 0.05 to 168 μg/mL (stomach), to 563 μg/mL (duodenum), to 202 μg/mL (proximal jejunum), and to 478 μg/mL (distal jejunum). The DFCAT model characterized observed MRI fluid volume and its dynamic changes from 275 to 46.5 mL in stomach (from 0 to 30 min) with mucus layer volume of 40 mL. The volumes of the 30 small intestine compartments were characterized by a max of 14.98 mL to a min of 0.26 mL (0-120 min) and a mucus layer volume of 5 mL per compartment. Regional fluid volumes over 0 to 120 min ranged from 5.6 to 20.38 mL in the proximal small intestine, 36.4 to 44.08 mL in distal small intestine, and from 42 to 64.46 mL in total small intestine. The DFCAT model can be applied to predict drug dissolution and absorption in the human GI tract with future improvements.

  18. Immiscible multicomponent lattice Boltzmann model for fluids with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An immiscible multicomponent lattice Boltzmann model is developed for fluids with high relaxation time ratios, which is based on the model proposed by Shan and Chen (SC). In the SC model, an interaction potential between particles is incorporated into the discrete lattice. Boltzmann equation through the ...

  19. A Physically-Motivated Deformable Model Based on Fluid Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalba, Andrei C.; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.; Leonardis, A; Bischof, H; Pinz, A

    2006-01-01

    A novel deformable model for image segmentation and shape recovery is presented. The model is inspired by fluid dynamics and is based on a flooding simulation similar to the watershed paradigm. Unlike most watershed methods, our model has a continuous formulation, being described by two partial

  20. A dynamic neutral fluid model for the PIC scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Alan; Lieberman, Michael; Verboncoeur, John

    2010-11-01

    Fluid diffusion is an important aspect of plasma simulation. A new dynamic model is implemented using the continuity and boundary equations in OOPD1, an object oriented one-dimensional particle-in-cell code developed at UC Berkeley. The model is described and compared with analytical methods given in [1]. A boundary absorption parameter can be adjusted from ideal absorption to ideal reflection. Simulations exhibit good agreement with analytic time dependent solutions for the two ideal cases, as well as steady state solutions for mixed cases. For the next step, fluid sources and sinks due to particle-particle or particle-fluid collisions within the simulation volume and to surface reactions resulting in emission or absorption of fluid species will be implemented. The resulting dynamic interaction between particle and fluid species will be an improvement to the static fluid in the existing code. As the final step in the development, diffusion for multiple fluid species will be implemented. [4pt] [1] M.A. Lieberman and A.J. Lichtenberg, Principles of Plasma Discharges and Materials Processing, 2nd Ed, Wiley, 2005.

  1. On quantum approach to modeling of plasmon photovoltaic effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kluczyk, Katarzyna; David, Christin; Jacak, Witold Aleksander

    2017-01-01

    .g., upon commercial COMSOL software system). Both approaches are essentially classical ones and neglect quantum particularities related to plasmon excitations in metallic components. We demonstrate that these quantum plasmon effects are of crucial importance especially in theoretical simulations of plasmon...... to the semiconductor solar cell mediated by surface plasmons in metallic nanoparticles deposited on the top of the battery. In addition, short-ranged electron-electron interaction in metals is discussed in the framework of the semiclassical hydrodynamic model. The significance of the related quantum corrections...

  2. Incompatible quantum measurements admitting a local-hidden-variable model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintino, Marco Túlio; Bowles, Joseph; Hirsch, Flavien; Brunner, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    The observation of quantum nonlocality, i.e., quantum correlations violating a Bell inequality, implies the use of incompatible local quantum measurements. Here we consider the converse question. That is, can any set of incompatible measurements be used in order to demonstrate Bell inequality violation? Our main result is to construct a local hidden variable model for an incompatible set of qubit measurements. Specifically, we show that if Alice uses this set of measurements, then for any possible shared entangled state and any possible dichotomic measurements performed by Bob, the resulting statistics are local. This represents significant progress towards proving that measurement incompatibility does not imply Bell nonlocality in general.

  3. Matrix product state calculations for one-dimensional quantum chains and quantum impurity models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muender, Wolfgang

    2011-09-28

    This thesis contributes to the field of strongly correlated electron systems with studies in two distinct fields thereof: the specific nature of correlations between electrons in one dimension and quantum quenches in quantum impurity problems. In general, strongly correlated systems are characterized in that their physical behaviour needs to be described in terms of a many-body description, i.e. interactions correlate all particles in a complex way. The challenge is that the Hilbert space in a many-body theory is exponentially large in the number of particles. Thus, when no analytic solution is available - which is typically the case - it is necessary to find a way to somehow circumvent the problem of such huge Hilbert spaces. Therefore, the connection between the two studies comes from our numerical treatment: they are tackled by the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) and the numerical renormalization group (NRG), respectively, both based on matrix product states. The first project presented in this thesis addresses the problem of numerically finding the dominant correlations in quantum lattice models in an unbiased way, i.e. without using prior knowledge of the model at hand. A useful concept for this task is the correlation density matrix (CDM) which contains all correlations between two clusters of lattice sites. We show how to extract from the CDM, a survey of the relative strengths of the system's correlations in different symmetry sectors as well as detailed information on the operators carrying long-range correlations and the spatial dependence of their correlation functions. We demonstrate this by a DMRG study of a one-dimensional spinless extended Hubbard model, while emphasizing that the proposed analysis of the CDM is not restricted to one dimension. The second project presented in this thesis is motivated by two phenomena under ongoing experimental and theoretical investigation in the context of quantum impurity models: optical absorption

  4. Dynamic model of the electrorheological fluid based on measurement results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivenkov, K; Ulrich, S; Bruns, R

    2013-01-01

    To develop modern applications for vibration decoupling based on electrorheological fluids with suitable control strategies, an appropriate mathematical model of the ERF is necessary. The devices mostly used have annular-shape electrorheological valves. This requires the use of flow channels to measure the static and dynamic properties of the electrorheological fluids in similar flow conditions. Particularly for the identification of the dynamic behavior of the fluids, the influences of the non-electrorheological properties on the overall system must be taken into account. In this contribution three types of parameters with several nonlinear dependencies for the mapping of the static and dynamic properties of the ERF are considered: electro-rheological, hydraulic and electrical. The mathematical model introduced can precisely demonstrate the static and dynamic behavior of the electrorheological fluid and can be used for the future design of real systems for vibration decoupling or other systems with high dynamic requirements.

  5. A quantum anharmonic oscillator model for the stock market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tingting; Chen, Yu

    2017-02-01

    A financially interpretable quantum model is proposed to study the probability distributions of the stock price return. The dynamics of a quantum particle is considered an analog of the motion of stock price. Then the probability distributions of price return can be computed from the wave functions that evolve according to Schrodinger equation. Instead of a harmonic oscillator in previous studies, a quantum anharmonic oscillator is applied to the stock in liquid market. The leptokurtic distributions of price return can be reproduced by our quantum model with the introduction of mixed-state and multi-potential. The trend following dominant market, in which the price return follows a bimodal distribution, is discussed as a specific case of the illiquid market.

  6. Fluid flow modeling in complex areas*, **

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poullet Pascal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We show first results of 3D simulation of sea currents in a realistic context. We use the full Navier–Stokes equations for incompressible viscous fluid. The problem is solved using a second order incremental projection method associated with the finite volume of the staggered (MAC scheme for the spatial discretization. After validation on classical cases, it is used in a numerical simulation of the Pointe à Pitre harbour area. The use of the fictious domain method permits us to take into account the complexity of bathymetric data and allows us to work with regular meshes and thus preserves the efficiency essential for a 3D code. Dans cette étude, nous présentons les premiers résultats de simulation d’un écoulement d’un fluide incompressible visqueux dans un contexte environnemental réel. L’approche utilisée utilise une méthode de domaines fictifs pour une prise en compte d’un domaine physique tridimensionnel très irrégulier. Le schéma numérique combine un schéma de projection incrémentale et des volumes finis utilisant des volumes de contrôle adaptés à un maillage décalé. Les tests de validation sont menés pour les cas tests de la cavité double entraînée ainsi que l’écoulement dans un canal avec un obstacle placé de manière asymmétrique.

  7. Modeling Quantum Teleportation with Quantum Tools in Python (QuTiP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    quantum teleportation, quantum information, quantum networking, quantum physics, quantum communication , Bell inequality, Bell nonlocality, computational...word teleportation in this context means that the quantum state of one particle is being transferred to another particle, and not the transfer of...bounds on the average fidelity for different resource states. The original quantum teleportation protocol has = 1, which means that the

  8. Meteorological fluid dynamics asymptotic modelling, stability and chaotic atmospheric motion

    CERN Document Server

    Zeytounian, Radyadour K

    1991-01-01

    The author considers meteorology as a part of fluid dynamics. He tries to derive the properties of atmospheric flows from a rational analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations, at the same time analyzing various types of initial and boundary problems. This approach to simulate nature by models from fluid dynamics will be of interest to both scientists and students of physics and theoretical meteorology.

  9. Local lattice-gas model for immiscible fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.; Doolen, G.D.; Eggert, K.; Grunau, D.; Loh, E.Y.

    1991-01-01

    We present a lattice-gas model for two-dimensional immiscible fluid flows with surface tension that uses strictly local collision rules. Instead of using a local total color flux as Somers and Rem [Physica D 47, 39 (1991)], we use local colored holes to be the memory of particles of the same color. Interactions between walls and fluids are included that produce arbitrary contact angles

  10. Four-fluid model of PWR degraded cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearing, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the new two-dimensional, four-fluid fluid dynamics and heat transfer (FLUIDS) module of the MELPROG code. MELPROG is designed to give an integrated, mechanistic treatment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) core meltdown accidents from accident initiation to vessel melt-through. The code has a modular data storage and transfer structure, with each module providing the others with boundary conditions at each computational time step. Thus the FLUIDS module receives mass and energy source terms from the fuel pin module, the structures module, and the debris bed module, and radiation energy source terms from the radiation module. MELPROG, which models the reactor vessel, is also designed to model the vessel as a component in the TRAC/PF1 networking solution of a PWR reactor coolant system (RCS). The coupling between TRAC and MELPROG is implicit in the fluid dynamics of the reactor coolant (liquid water and steam) allowing an accurate simulation of the coupling between the vessel and the rest of the RCS during an accident. This paper deals specifically with the numerical model of fluid dynamics and heat transfer within the reactor vessel, which allows a much more realistic simulation (with less restrictive assumptions on physical behavior) of the accident than has been possible before

  11. Vison excitations in near-critical quantum dimer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strübi, G.; Ivanov, D. A.

    2011-06-01

    We study vison excitations in a quantum dimer model interpolating between the Rokhsar-Kivelson models on the square and triangular lattices. In the square-lattice case, the model is known to be critical and characterized by U(1) topological quantum numbers. Introducing diagonal dimers brings the model to a Z2 resonating-valence-bond phase. We study variationally the emergence of vison excitations at low concentration of diagonal dimers, close to the critical point. We find that, in this regime, vison excitations are large in size and their structure resembles vortices in type-II superconductors.

  12. A simplified quantum mechanical model of diatomic molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Drud

    1978-01-01

    A one-dimensional molecule model with Coulomb potentials replaced by delta functions is introduced. The mathematical simplicity of the model facilitates the quantum mechanical treatment and offers a straightforward demonstration of the essentials of two-particle problems. In spite of the crudenes...... of the model, quantitative results are obtained in fair agreement with those of a true hydrogen molecule....

  13. Security of Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution in the Bounded-Quantum-Storage Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pironio

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Device-independent quantum key distribution (DIQKD is a formalism that supersedes traditional quantum key distribution, as its security does not rely on any detailed modeling of the internal working of the devices. This strong form of security is only possible using devices producing correlations that violate a Bell inequality. Full security proofs of DIQKD have recently been reported, but they tolerate zero or small amounts of noise and are restricted to protocols based on specific Bell inequalities. Here, we provide a security proof of DIQKD that is both more efficient and noise resistant, and also more general, as it applies to protocols based on arbitrary Bell inequalities and can be adapted to cover supraquantum eavesdroppers limited by the no-signaling principle only. It is formulated, however, in the bounded-quantum-storage model, where an upper bound on the adversary’s quantum memory is a priori known. This condition is not a limitation at present, since the best existing quantum memories have very short coherence times.

  14. A Mathematical Model for Swallowing of Concentrated Fluids in Oesophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Pandey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This model investigates particularly the impact of an integral and a non-integral number of waves on the swallowing of food stuff such as jelly, tomato puree, soup, concentrated fruits juices and honey transported peristaltically through the oesophagus. The fluid is considered as a Casson fluid. Emphasis is on the study of the dependence of local pressure distribution on space and time. Mechanical efficiency, reflux limit and trapping are also discussed. The effect of Casson fluid vis-à-vis Newtonian fluid is investigated analytically and numerically too. The result is physically interpreted as that the oesophagus makes more efforts to swallow fluids with higher concentration. It is observed that the pressure is uniformly distributed when an integral number of waves is there in the oesophagus; but it is non-uniform when a non-integral number of waves is present therein. It is further observed that as the plug flow region widens, the pressure difference increases, which indicates that the averaged flow rate will reduce for a Casson fluid. It is also concluded that Casson fluids are more prone to reflux.

  15. Dynamic Modeling of ThermoFluid Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Munch

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the present study has been to developed dynamic models for two-phase flow in pipes (evaporation and condensation). Special attention has been given to modeling evaporators for refrigeration plant particular dry-expansion evaporators. Models of different complexity have been...... formulated. The different models deviate with respect to the detail¿s included and calculation time in connection with simulation. The models have been implemented in a new library named ThermoTwoPhase to the programming language Modelica. A test rig has been built with an evaporator instrumented in a way...... that the models can be validated against experimental data. The models developed van be used in connection with intelligent control of refrigerant flow to dry-expansion evaporators....

  16. Modeling of Phase Equilibria Containing Associating Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derawi, Samer; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    glycol + heptane, methylcyclohexane, hexane, propylene glycol + heptane, diethylene glycol + heptane, triethylene glycol + heptane, and tetraethylene glycol + heptane. The data obtained were correlated with the NRTL model and two different versions of the UNIQUAC equation. The NRTL model and one...... in terms of an activity coefficient model or an equation of state. Our target in this thesis is to review and develop such models capable of describing qualitatively as well as quantitatively phase equilibria in multicomponent multiphase systems containing non-polar, polar, and associating compounds...... coefficient) calculations has been carried out. UNIFAC is an activity coefficient model while AFC is a model specifically developed for Pow calculations. Five different versions of UNIFAC and the AFC correlation model have been compared with each other and with experimental data. The range of applicability...

  17. Generalized corresponding states model for bulk and interfacial properties in pure fluids and fluid mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, S. B.; Ely, J. F.

    2003-10-01

    We have formulated a general approach for transforming an analytical equation of state (EOS) into the crossover form and developed a generalized cubic (GC) EOS for pure fluids, which incorporates nonanalytic scaling laws in the critical region and in the limit ρ→0 is transformed into the ideal gas equation EOS. Using the GC EOS as a reference equation, we have developed a generalized version of the corresponding states (GCS) model, which contains the critical point parameters and accentric factor as input as well as the Ginzburg number Gi. For nonionic fluids we propose a simple correlation between the Ginzburg number Gi and Zc, ω, and molecular weight Mw. In the second step, we develop on the basis of the GCS model and the density functional theory a GCS-density functional theory (DFT) crossover model for the vapor-liquid interface and surface tension. We use the GCS-DFT model for the prediction of the PVT, vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) and surface properties of more than 30 pure fluids. In a wide range of thermodynamic states, including the nearest vicinity of the critical point, the GCS reproduces the PVT and VLE surface and the surface tension of one-component fluids (polar and nonpolar) with high accuracy. In the critical region, the GCS-DFT predictions for the surface tension are in excellent agreement with experimental data and theoretical renormalization-group model developed earlier. Using the principle of the critical-point universality we extended the GCS-DFT model to fluid mixtures and developed a field-variable based GCS-FV model. We provide extensive comparisons of the GCS-FV model with experimental data and with the GCS-XV model formulated in terms of the conventional density variable—composition. Far from the critical point both models, GCS-FV and GCS-XV, give practically similar results, but in the critical region, the GCS-FV model yields a better representation of the VLE surface of binary mixtures than the GCS-XV model. We also show that

  18. Quantum-Fluctuation-Driven Crossover from a Dilute Bose-Einstein Condensate to a Macrodroplet in a Dipolar Quantum Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Chomaz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In a joint experimental and theoretical effort, we report on the formation of a macrodroplet state in an ultracold bosonic gas of erbium atoms with strong dipolar interactions. By precise tuning of the s-wave scattering length below the so-called dipolar length, we observe a smooth crossover of the ground state from a dilute Bose-Einstein condensate to a dense macrodroplet state of more than 2×10^{4}  atoms. Based on the study of collective excitations and loss features, we prove that quantum fluctuations stabilize the ultracold gas far beyond the instability threshold imposed by mean-field interactions. Finally, we perform expansion measurements, showing that although self-bound solutions are prevented by losses, the interplay between quantum stabilization and losses results in a minimal time-of-flight expansion velocity at a finite scattering length.

  19. Laszlo Tisza and the two-fluid model of superfluidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balibar, Sébastien

    2017-11-01

    The "two-fluid model" of superfluidity was first introduced by Laszlo Tisza in 1938. On that year, Tisza published the principles of his model as a brief note in Nature and two articles in French in the Comptes rendus de l'Académie des sciences, followed in 1940 by two other articles in French in the Journal de physique et le Radium. In 1941, the two-fluid model was reformulated by Lev Landau on a more rigorous basis. Successive experiments confirmed the revolutionary idea introduced by Tisza: superfluid helium is indeed a surprising mixture of two fluids with independent velocity fields. His prediction of the existence of heat waves, a consequence of his model, was also confirmed. Then, it took several decades for the superfluidity of liquid helium to be fully understood.

  20. Generalized Roe's numerical scheme for a two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toumi, I.; Raymond, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is devoted to a mathematical and numerical study of a six equation two-fluid model. We will prove that the model is strictly hyperbolic due to the inclusion of the virtual mass force term in the phasic momentum equations. The two-fluid model is naturally written under a nonconservative form. To solve the nonlinear Riemann problem for this nonconservative hyperbolic system, a generalized Roe's approximate Riemann solver, is used, based on a linearization of the nonconservative terms. A Godunov type numerical scheme is built, using this approximate Riemann solver. 10 refs., 5 figs,

  1. Optimized dynamical decoupling in a model quantum memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biercuk, Michael J; Uys, Hermann; VanDevender, Aaron P; Shiga, Nobuyasu; Itano, Wayne M; Bollinger, John J

    2009-04-23

    Any quantum system, such as those used in quantum information or magnetic resonance, is subject to random phase errors that can dramatically affect the fidelity of a desired quantum operation or measurement. In the context of quantum information, quantum error correction techniques have been developed to correct these errors, but resource requirements are extraordinary. The realization of a physically tractable quantum information system will therefore be facilitated if qubit (quantum bit) error rates are far below the so-called fault-tolerance error threshold, predicted to be of the order of 10(-3)-10(-6). The need to realize such low error rates motivates a search for alternative strategies to suppress dephasing in quantum systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate massive suppression of qubit error rates by the application of optimized dynamical decoupling pulse sequences, using a model quantum system capable of simulating a variety of qubit technologies. We demonstrate an analytically derived pulse sequence, UDD, and find novel sequences through active, real-time experimental feedback. The latter sequences are tailored to maximize error suppression without the need for a priori knowledge of the ambient noise environment, and are capable of suppressing errors by orders of magnitude compared to other existing sequences (including the benchmark multi-pulse spin echo). Our work includes the extension of a treatment to predict qubit decoherence under realistic conditions, yielding strong agreement between experimental data and theory for arbitrary pulse sequences incorporating nonidealized control pulses. These results demonstrate the robustness of qubit memory error suppression through dynamical decoupling techniques across a variety of qubit technologies.

  2. Discrete modeling considerations in multiphase fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ransom, V.H.; Ramshaw, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The modeling of multiphase flows play a fundamental role in light water reactor safety. The main ingredients in our discrete modeling Weltanschauung are the following considerations: (1) Any physical model must be cast into discrete form for a digital computer. (2) The usual approach of formulating models in differential form and then discretizing them is potentially hazardous. It may be preferable to formulate the model in discrete terms from the outset. (3) Computer time and storage constraints limit the resolution that can be employed in practical calculations. These limits effectively define the physical phenomena, length scales, and time scales which cannot be directly represented in the calculation and therefore must be modeled. This information should be injected into the model formulation process at an early stage. (4) Practical resolution limits are generally so coarse that traditional convergence and truncation-error analyses become irrelevant. (5) A discrete model constitutes a reduced description of a physical system, from which fine-scale details are eliminated. This elimination creates a statistical closure problem. Methods from statistical physics may therefore be useful in the formulation of discrete models. In the present paper we elaborate on these themes and illustrate them with simple examples. 48 refs

  3. Flow modelling of a newtonian fluid by two regions- the region of pure fluid and porous region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampaio, R.; Gama, R.M.S. da

    1983-01-01

    A model of flow with two regions is presented using mixture theory. One region contains only pure fluid and the other a mixture of fluid and porous rigid solid. Compatibility conditons on the pure fluid-mixture interface are carefully discussed. The theory is used to solve a problem of a flow induced by pressure gradient and helicoidal motion of an impermeable cylinder on two rings one of pure fluid and another of mixture. (Author) [pt

  4. Numerical modeling of fluid flow in solid tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Soltani

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of interstitial fluid flow is developed, based on the application of the governing equations for fluid flow, i.e., the conservation laws for mass and momentum, to physiological systems containing solid tumors. The discretized form of the governing equations, with appropriate boundary conditions, is developed for a predefined tumor geometry. The interstitial fluid pressure and velocity are calculated using a numerical method, element based finite volume. Simulations of interstitial fluid transport in a homogeneous solid tumor demonstrate that, in a uniformly perfused tumor, i.e., one with no necrotic region, because of the interstitial pressure distribution, the distribution of drug particles is non-uniform. Pressure distribution for different values of necrotic radii is examined and two new parameters, the critical tumor radius and critical necrotic radius, are defined. Simulation results show that: 1 tumor radii have a critical size. Below this size, the maximum interstitial fluid pressure is less than what is generally considered to be effective pressure (a parameter determined by vascular pressure, plasma osmotic pressure, and interstitial osmotic pressure. Above this size, the maximum interstitial fluid pressure is equal to effective pressure. As a consequence, drugs transport to the center of smaller tumors is much easier than transport to the center of a tumor whose radius is greater than the critical tumor radius; 2 there is a critical necrotic radius, below which the interstitial fluid pressure at the tumor center is at its maximum value. If the tumor radius is greater than the critical tumor radius, this maximum pressure is equal to effective pressure. Above this critical necrotic radius, the interstitial fluid pressure at the tumor center is below effective pressure. In specific ranges of these critical sizes, drug amount and therefore therapeutic effects are higher because the opposing force, interstitial fluid

  5. Modelling Emission from Building Materials with Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Claus; Nielsen, Peter V.; Heiselberg, Per

    This paper presents a numerical model that by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is capable of dealing with both pollutant transport across the boundary layer and internal diffusion in the source without prior knowledge of which is the limiting process. The model provides the concentration...

  6. Application of computational fluid dynamics modelling to an ozone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling has been applied to examine the operation of the pre-ozonation system at Wiggins Waterworks, operated by Umgeni Water in Durban, South Africa. A hydraulic model has been satisfactorily verified by experimental tracer tests. The turbulence effect induced by the gas ...

  7. Two-dimensional quantum electrodynamics as a model in the constructive quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, K.R.

    1976-01-01

    We investigate two-dimensional quantum electrodynamics((QED) 2 ) type models on the basis of the Hamiltonian formalism of a vector field. The transformation into a sine-Gordon equation is clarified as a generalized mass-shift transformation through canonical linear transformations. (auth.)

  8. New hydrologic model of fluid migration in deep porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrievsky, A.; Balanyuk, I.

    2009-04-01

    The authors present a new hydrological model of mantle processes that effect on formation of oil-and-gas bearing basins, fault tectonics and thermal convection. Any fluid migration is initially induced by lateral stresses in the crust and lithosphere which result from global geodynamic processes related to the mantle convection. The global processes are further transformed into regional movements in weakness zones. Model of porous media in deep fractured zones and idea of self-oscillation processes in mantle layers and fractured zones of the crust at different depths was used as the basis for developed concept. The content of these notions resides in the fact that there are conditions of dynamic balance in mantle layers originating as a result of combination and alternate actions of compaction and dilatance mechanisms. These mechanisms can be manifested in different combinations and under different conditions as well as can be complemented by other processes influencing on regime of fluid migration. They can act under condition of passive margin, ocean rift and ocean subduction zones as well as in consolidated platform and sheet. Self-oscillation regime, sub vertical direction of fluid flows, anomalously high layer pressure, and high level of anomalies of various geophysical fields are common for them. A certain class of fluid dynamic models describing consolidation of sedimentary basins, free oscillation processes slow and quick (at the final stage) fluid dynamic processes of the evolution of a sedimentary basin in subduction zones is considered for the first time. The last model of quick fluid dynamic processes reflects the process of formation of hydrocarbon deposits in the zones of collision of lithosphere plates. The results of numerical simulation and diagrams reflecting consecutive stages of the gas-fluid dynamic front propagation are assessed of the Pri-Caspian depression as the example. Calculations with this model will simultaneously be carried out for

  9. Quantum Ising model on hierarchical structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Zhifang; Tao Ruibao.

    1989-11-01

    A quantum Ising chain with both the exchange couplings and the transverse fields arranged in a hierarchical way is considered. Exact analytical results for the critical line and energy gap are obtained. It is shown that when R 1 not= R 2 , where R 1 and R 2 are the hierarchical parameters for the exchange couplings and the transverse fields, respectively, the system undergoes a phase transition in a different universality class from the pure quantum Ising chain with R 1 =R 2 =1. On the other hand, when R 1 =R 2 =R, there exists a critical value R c dependent on the furcating number of the hierarchy. In case of R > R c , the system is shown to exhibit as Ising-like critical point with the critical behaviour the same as in the pure case, while for R c the system belongs to another universality class. (author). 19 refs, 2 figs

  10. Including fluid shear viscosity in a structural acoustic finite element model using a scalar fluid representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lei; Li, Yizeng; Grosh, Karl

    2013-01-01

    An approximate boundary condition is developed in this paper to model fluid shear viscosity at boundaries of coupled fluid-structure system. The effect of shear viscosity is approximated by a correction term to the inviscid boundary condition, written in terms of second order in-plane derivatives of pressure. Both thin and thick viscous boundary layer approximations are formulated; the latter subsumes the former. These approximations are used to develop a variational formation, upon which a viscous finite element method (FEM) model is based, requiring only minor modifications to the boundary integral contributions of an existing inviscid FEM model. Since this FEM formulation has only one degree of freedom for pressure, it holds a great computational advantage over the conventional viscous FEM formulation which requires discretization of the full set of linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The results from thick viscous boundary layer approximation are found to be in good agreement with the prediction from a Navier-Stokes model. When applicable, thin viscous boundary layer approximation also gives accurate results with computational simplicity compared to the thick boundary layer formulation. Direct comparison of simulation results using the boundary layer approximations and a full, linearized Navier-Stokes model are made and used to evaluate the accuracy of the approximate technique. Guidelines are given for the parameter ranges over which the accurate application of the thick and thin boundary approximations can be used for a fluid-structure interaction problem. PMID:23729844

  11. Asymptotic behavior of observables in the asymmetric quantum Rabi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, J.; Kollar, M.

    2018-01-01

    The asymmetric quantum Rabi model with broken parity invariance shows spectral degeneracies in the integer case, that is when the asymmetry parameter equals an integer multiple of half the oscillator frequency, thus hinting at a hidden symmetry and accompanying integrability of the model. We study the expectation values of spin observables for each eigenstate and observe characteristic differences between the integer and noninteger cases for the asymptotics in the deep strong coupling regime, which can be understood from a perturbative expansion in the qubit splitting. We also construct a parent Hamiltonian whose exact eigenstates possess the same symmetries as the perturbative eigenstates of the asymmetric quantum Rabi model in the integer case.

  12. Numerical linked-cluster approach to quantum lattice models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigol, Marcos; Bryant, Tyler; Singh, Rajiv R P

    2006-11-03

    We present a novel algorithm that allows one to obtain temperature dependent properties of quantum lattice models in the thermodynamic limit from exact diagonalization of small clusters. Our numerical linked-cluster approach provides a systematic framework to assess finite-size effects and is valid for any quantum lattice model. Unlike high temperature expansions, which have a finite radius of convergence in inverse temperature, these calculations are accurate at all temperatures provided the range of correlations is finite. We illustrate the power of our approach studying spin models on kagomé, triangular, and square lattices.

  13. PT-symmetric Quantum Chain Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Znojil

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A review is given of certain tridiagonal N-dimensional non-Hermitian J-parametric real-matrix quantum Hamiltonians H(N. The domains Ɗ(N of reality of their spectra of energies are studied, with particular attention paid to their exceptional-point boundaries ∂Ɗ(N. The strongest admissible couplings are specified in closed form for all N.

  14. Mathematical model I. Electron and quantum mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Nitin Ramchandra Gadre

    2011-01-01

    The basic particle electron obeys various theories like electrodynamics, quantum mechanics and special relativity. Particle under different experimental conditions behaves differently, allowing us to observe different characteristics which become basis for these theories. In this paper, we have made an attempt to suggest a classical picture by studying the requirements of these three modern theories. The basic presumption is: There must be certain structural characteristics in a particle like...

  15. Modeling of Non-Isothermal Cryogenic Fluid Sloshing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agui, Juan H.; Moder, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamic model was used to simulate the thermal destratification in an upright self-pressurized cryostat approximately half-filled with liquid nitrogen and subjected to forced sinusoidal lateral shaking. A full three-dimensional computational grid was used to model the tank dynamics, fluid flow and thermodynamics using the ANSYS Fluent code. A non-inertial grid was used which required the addition of momentum and energy source terms to account for the inertial forces, energy transfer and wall reaction forces produced by the shaken tank. The kinetics-based Schrage mass transfer model provided the interfacial mass transfer due to evaporation and condensation at the sloshing interface. The dynamic behavior of the sloshing interface, its amplitude and transition to different wave modes, provided insight into the fluid process at the interface. The tank pressure evolution and temperature profiles compared relatively well with the shaken cryostat experimental test data provided by the Centre National D'Etudes Spatiales.

  16. Reduced order modeling of some fluid flows of industrial interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, D; Terragni, F; Velazquez, A; Vega, J M

    2012-01-01

    Some basic ideas are presented for the construction of robust, computationally efficient reduced order models amenable to be used in industrial environments, combined with somewhat rough computational fluid dynamics solvers. These ideas result from a critical review of the basic principles of proper orthogonal decomposition-based reduced order modeling of both steady and unsteady fluid flows. In particular, the extent to which some artifacts of the computational fluid dynamics solvers can be ignored is addressed, which opens up the possibility of obtaining quite flexible reduced order models. The methods are illustrated with the steady aerodynamic flow around a horizontal tail plane of a commercial aircraft in transonic conditions, and the unsteady lid-driven cavity problem. In both cases, the approximations are fairly good, thus reducing the computational cost by a significant factor. (review)

  17. Reduced order modeling of some fluid flows of industrial interest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, D; Terragni, F; Velazquez, A; Vega, J M, E-mail: josemanuel.vega@upm.es [E.T.S.I. Aeronauticos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-06-01

    Some basic ideas are presented for the construction of robust, computationally efficient reduced order models amenable to be used in industrial environments, combined with somewhat rough computational fluid dynamics solvers. These ideas result from a critical review of the basic principles of proper orthogonal decomposition-based reduced order modeling of both steady and unsteady fluid flows. In particular, the extent to which some artifacts of the computational fluid dynamics solvers can be ignored is addressed, which opens up the possibility of obtaining quite flexible reduced order models. The methods are illustrated with the steady aerodynamic flow around a horizontal tail plane of a commercial aircraft in transonic conditions, and the unsteady lid-driven cavity problem. In both cases, the approximations are fairly good, thus reducing the computational cost by a significant factor. (review)

  18. Model of Biological Quantum Logic in DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Matthew Mihelic

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The DNA molecule has properties that allow it to act as a quantum logic processor. It has been demonstrated that there is coherent conduction of electrons longitudinally along the DNA molecule through pi stacking interactions of the aromatic nucleotide bases, and it has also been demonstrated that electrons moving longitudinally along the DNA molecule are subject to a very efficient electron spin filtering effect as the helicity of the DNA molecule interacts with the spin of the electron. This means that, in DNA, electrons are coherently conducted along a very efficient spin filter. Coherent electron spin is held in a logically and thermodynamically reversible chiral symmetry between the C2-endo and C3-endo enantiomers of the deoxyribose moiety in each nucleotide, which enables each nucleotide to function as a quantum gate. The symmetry break that provides for quantum decision in the system is determined by the spin direction of an electron that has an orbital angular momentum that is sufficient to overcome the energy barrier of the double well potential separating the C2-endo and C3-endo enantiomers, and that enantiomeric energy barrier is appropriate to the Landauer limit of the energy necessary to randomize one bit of information.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics investigation of turbulence models for non-newtonian fluid flow in anaerobic digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binxin

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, 12 turbulence models for single-phase non-newtonian fluid flow in a pipe are evaluated by comparing the frictional pressure drops obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with those from three friction factor correlations. The turbulence models studied are (1) three high-Reynolds-number k-ε models, (2) six low-Reynolds-number k-ε models, (3) two k-ω models, and (4) the Reynolds stress model. The simulation results indicate that the Chang-Hsieh-Chen version of the low-Reynolds-number k-ε model performs better than the other models in predicting the frictional pressure drops while the standard k-ω model has an acceptable accuracy and a low computing cost. In the model applications, CFD simulation of mixing in a full-scale anaerobic digester with pumped circulation is performed to propose an improvement in the effective mixing standards recommended by the U.S. EPA based on the effect of rheology on the flow fields. Characterization of the velocity gradient is conducted to quantify the growth or breakage of an assumed floc size. Placement of two discharge nozzles in the digester is analyzed to show that spacing two nozzles 180° apart with each one discharging at an angle of 45° off the wall is the most efficient. Moreover, the similarity rules of geometry and mixing energy are checked for scaling up the digester.

  20. A quantum relativistic integrable model as the continuous limit of the six-vertex model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Y.K.

    1992-01-01

    The six-vertex model in two-dimensional statistical mechanics is used to construct the L-matrix of a one-dimensional quantum relativistic integrable model through a continuous limit. This is the first step to extend the method used earlier by the author to construct quantum completely integrable systems from other well-known two-dimensional vertex models. (orig.)

  1. A Synthesis of Fluid Dynamics and Quantum Chemistry for the Design of Nanoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Preston J.

    1998-01-01

    In 1959, during a famous lecture entitled "There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom", Richard Feynman focused on the startling technical possibilities that would exist at the limit of miniaturization, that being atomically precise devices with dimensions in the nanometer range. A nanometer is both a convenient unit of length for medium to large sized molecules, and the root of the name of the new interdisciplinary field of "nanotechnology". Essentially, "nanoelectronics" denotes the goal of shrinking electronic devices, such as diodes and transistors, as well as integrated circuits of such devices that can perform logical operations, down to dimensions in the range of 100 nanometers. The thirty-year hiatus in the development of nanotechnology can figuratively be seen as a period of waiting for the bottom-up and atomically precise construction skills of synthetic chemistry to meet the top-down reductionist aspirations of device physics. The sub-nanometer domain of nineteenth-century classical chemistry has steadily grown, and state-of-the-art supramolecular chemistry can achieve atomic precision in non-repeating molecular assemblies of the size desired for nanotechnology. For nanoelectronics in particular, a basic understanding of the electron transport properties of molecules must also be developed. Quantum chemistry provides powerful computational methods that can accurately predict the properties of small to medium sized molecules on a desktop workstation, and those of large molecules if one has access to a supercomputer. Of the many properties of a molecule that quantum chemistry routinely predicts, the ability to carry a current is one that had not even been considered until recently. "Currently", there is a controversy over just how to define this key property. Reminiscent of the situation in high-Tc superconductivity, much of the difficulty arises from the different models that are used to simplify the complex electronic structure of real materials. A model

  2. Particle hopping vs. fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, K.

    1995-12-31

    Although particle hopping models have been introduced into traffic science in the 19509, their systematic use has only started recently. Two reasons for this are, that they are advantageous on modem computers, and that recent theoretical developments allow analytical understanding of their properties and therefore more confidence for their use. In principle, particle hopping models fit between microscopic models for driving and fluiddynamical models for traffic flow. In this sense, they also help closing the conceptual gap between these two. This paper shows connections between particle hopping models and traffic flow theory. It shows that the hydrodynamical limits of certain particle hopping models correspond to the Lighthill-Whitham theory for traffic flow, and that only slightly more complex particle hopping models produce already the correct traffic jam dynamics, consistent with recent fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow. By doing so, this paper establishes that, on the macroscopic level, particle hopping models are at least as good as fluid-dynamical models. Yet, particle hopping models have at least two advantages over fluid-dynamical models: they straightforwardly allow microscopic simulations, and they include stochasticity.

  3. Broken selection rule in the quantum Rabi model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forn-Díaz, P; Romero, G; Harmans, C J P M; Solano, E; Mooij, J E

    2016-06-07

    Understanding the interaction between light and matter is very relevant for fundamental studies of quantum electrodynamics and for the development of quantum technologies. The quantum Rabi model captures the physics of a single atom interacting with a single photon at all regimes of coupling strength. We report the spectroscopic observation of a resonant transition that breaks a selection rule in the quantum Rabi model, implemented using an LC resonator and an artificial atom, a superconducting qubit. The eigenstates of the system consist of a superposition of bare qubit-resonator states with a relative sign. When the qubit-resonator coupling strength is negligible compared to their own frequencies, the matrix element between excited eigenstates of different sign is very small in presence of a resonator drive, establishing a sign-preserving selection rule. Here, our qubit-resonator system operates in the ultrastrong coupling regime, where the coupling strength is 10% of the resonator frequency, allowing sign-changing transitions to be activated and, therefore, detected. This work shows that sign-changing transitions are an unambiguous, distinctive signature of systems operating in the ultrastrong coupling regime of the quantum Rabi model. These results pave the way to further studies of sign-preserving selection rules in multiqubit and multiphoton models.

  4. Optimization of morphing flaps based on fluid structure interaction modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlas, Athanasios; Akay, Busra

    2018-01-01

    This article describes the design optimization of morphing trailing edge flaps for wind turbines with ‘smart blades’. A high fidelity Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) simulation framework is utilized, comprised of 2D Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models....... A coupled aero-structural simulation of a 10% chordwise length morphing trailing edge flap for a 4 MW wind turbine rotor is carried out and response surfaces are produced with respect to the flap internal geometry design parameters for the design conditions. Surrogate model based optimization is applied...

  5. Impedance model for quantum-mechanical barrier problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelin, Evgenii A

    2007-01-01

    Application of the impedance model to typical quantum-mechanical barrier problems, including those for structures with resonant electron tunneling, is discussed. The efficiency of the approach is illustrated. The physical transparency and compactness of the model and its potential as a teaching and learning tool are discussed. (methodological notes)

  6. Thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galliero, Guillaume; Boned, Christian

    2009-12-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to estimate, analyze, and correlate the thermal conductivity of a fluid composed of short Lennard-Jones chains (up to 16 segments) over a large range of thermodynamic conditions. It is shown that the dilute gas contribution to the thermal conductivity decreases when the chain length increases for a given temperature. In dense states, simulation results indicate that the residual thermal conductivity of the monomer increases strongly with density, but is weakly dependent on the temperature. Compared to the monomer value, it has been noted that the residual thermal conductivity of the chain was slightly decreasing with its length. Using these results, an empirical relation, including a contribution due to the critical enhancement, is proposed to provide an accurate estimation of the thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model (up to 16 segments) over the domain 0.8values of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model merge on the same "universal" curve when plotted as a function of the excess entropy. Furthermore, it is shown that the reduced configurational thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model is approximately proportional to the reduced excess entropy for all fluid states and all chain lengths.

  7. Two-fluid model for locomotion under self-confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigh, Shang Yik; Lauga, Eric

    2017-09-01

    The bacterium Helicobacter pylori causes ulcers in the stomach of humans by invading mucus layers protecting epithelial cells. It does so by chemically changing the rheological properties of the mucus from a high-viscosity gel to a low-viscosity solution in which it may self-propel. We develop a two-fluid model for this process of swimming under self-generated confinement. We solve exactly for the flow and the locomotion speed of a spherical swimmer located in a spherically symmetric system of two Newtonian fluids whose boundary moves with the swimmer. We also treat separately the special case of an immobile outer fluid. In all cases, we characterize the flow fields, their spatial decay, and the impact of both the viscosity ratio and the degree of confinement on the locomotion speed of the model swimmer. The spatial decay of the flow retains the same power-law decay as for locomotion in a single fluid but with a decreased magnitude. Independent of the assumption chosen to characterize the impact of confinement on the actuation applied by the swimmer, its locomotion speed always decreases with an increase in the degree of confinement. Our modeling results suggest that a low-viscosity region of at least six times the effective swimmer size is required to lead to swimming with speeds similar to locomotion in an infinite fluid, corresponding to a region of size above ≈25 μ m for Helicobacter pylori.

  8. A numerical model for dynamic crustal-scale fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Fluid flow in the crust is often envisaged and modeled as continuous, yet minimal flow, which occurs over large geological times. This is a suitable approximation for flow as long as it is solely controlled by the matrix permeability of rocks, which in turn is controlled by viscous compaction of the pore space. However, strong evidence (hydrothermal veins and ore deposits) exists that a significant part of fluid flow in the crust occurs strongly localized in both space and time, controlled by the opening and sealing of hydrofractures. We developed, tested and applied a novel computer code, which considers this dynamic behavior and couples it with steady, Darcian flow controlled by the matrix permeability. In this dual-porosity model, fractures open depending on the fluid pressure relative to the solid pressure. Fractures form when matrix permeability is insufficient to accommodate fluid flow resulting from compaction, decompression (Staude et al. 2009) or metamorphic dehydration reactions (Weisheit et al. 2013). Open fractures can close when the contained fluid either seeps into the matrix or escapes by fracture propagation: mobile hydrofractures (Bons, 2001). In the model, closing and sealing of fractures is controlled by a time-dependent viscous law, which is based on the effective stress and on either Newtonian or non-Newtonian viscosity. Our simulations indicate that the bulk of crustal fluid flow in the middle to lower upper crust is intermittent, highly self-organized, and occurs as mobile hydrofractures. This is due to the low matrix porosity and permeability, combined with a low matrix viscosity and, hence, fast sealing of fractures. Stable fracture networks, generated by fluid overpressure, are restricted to the uppermost crust. Semi-stable fracture networks can develop in an intermediate zone, if a critical overpressure is reached. Flow rates in mobile hydrofractures exceed those in the matrix porosity and fracture networks by orders of magnitude

  9. A Quantum Implementation Model for Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar Daskin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The learning process for multilayered neural networks with many nodes makes heavy demands on computational resources. In some neural network models, the learning formulas, such as the Widrow–Hoff formula, do not change the eigenvectors of the weight matrix while flatting the eigenvalues. In infinity, these iterative formulas result in terms formed by the principal components of the weight matrix, namely, the eigenvectors corresponding to the non-zero eigenvalues. In quantum computing, the phase estimation algorithm is known to provide speedups over the conventional algorithms for the eigenvalue-related problems. Combining the quantum amplitude amplification with the phase estimation algorithm, a quantum implementation model for artificial neural networks using the Widrow–Hoff learning rule is presented. The complexity of the model is found to be linear in the size of the weight matrix. This provides a quadratic improvement over the classical algorithms. Quanta 2018; 7: 7–18.

  10. Conceptual models of microseismicity induced by fluid injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baro Urbea, J.; Lord-May, C.; Eaton, D. W. S.; Joern, D.

    2017-12-01

    Variations in the pore pressure due to fluid invasion are accountable for microseismic activity recorded in geothermal systems and during hydraulic fracturing operations. To capture this phenomenon on a conceptual level, invasion percolation models have been suggested to represent the flow network of fluids within a porous media and seismic activity is typically considered to be directly related to the expansion of the percolated area. Although such models reproduce scale-free frequency-magnitude distributions, the associated b-values of the Gutenberg-Richter relation do not align with observed data. Here, we propose an alternative conceptual invasion percolation model that decouples the fluid propagation from the microseismic events. Instead of a uniform pressure, the pressure is modeled to decay along the distance from the injection site. Wet fracture events are simulated with a stochastic spring block model exhibiting stick-slip dynamics as a result of the variations of the pore pressure. We show that the statistics of the stick-slip events are scale-free, but now the b-values depend on the level of heterogeneity in the local static friction coefficients. Thus, this model is able to reproduce the wide spectrum of b-values observed in field catalogs associated with fluid induced microseismicity. Moreover, the spatial distribution of microseismic events is also consistent with observations.

  11. Numerical simulation of fluid bed drying based on two-fluid model and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assari, M.R. [Jundi-shapur University, Dezful (Iran); Basirat Tabrizi, H.; Saffar-Avval, M. [Amirkabir University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tehran (Iran)

    2007-02-15

    A mathematical model for batch drying based on the Eulerian 'two-fluid models' was developed. The two-dimensional, axis-symmetrical cylindrical equations for both phases were solved numerically. The governing equations were discretized using a finite volume method with local grid refinement near the wall and inlet port. The effects of parameters such as inlet gas velocity and inlet gas temperature on the moisture content, temperature of solid and gas at the outlet are shown. This data from the model was compared with that obtained from experiments with a fluidized bed and found to be in reasonably good agreement. (author)

  12. Experimental Evaluation of Equivalent-Fluid Models for Melamine Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Albert R.; Schiller, Noah H.

    2016-01-01

    Melamine foam is a soft porous material commonly used in noise control applications. Many models exist to represent porous materials at various levels of fidelity. This work focuses on rigid frame equivalent fluid models, which represent the foam as a fluid with a complex speed of sound and density. There are several empirical models available to determine these frequency dependent parameters based on an estimate of the material flow resistivity. Alternatively, these properties can be experimentally educed using an impedance tube setup. Since vibroacoustic models are generally sensitive to these properties, this paper assesses the accuracy of several empirical models relative to impedance tube measurements collected with melamine foam samples. Diffuse field sound absorption measurements collected using large test articles in a laboratory are also compared with absorption predictions determined using model-based and measured foam properties. Melamine foam slabs of various thicknesses are considered.

  13. Development of models of the magnetorheological fluid damper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazakov, Yu.B., E-mail: elmash@em.ispu.ru; Morozov, N.A.; Nesterov, S.A., E-mail: sergeinesterov37@gmail.com

    2017-06-01

    The algorithm for analytical calculation of a power characteristic of magnetorheological (MR) dampers taking into account the rheological properties of MR fluid is considered. The nonlinear magnetorheological characteristics are represented by piecewise linear approximation to MR fluid areas with different viscosities. The extended calculated power characteristics of a MR damper are received and they coincide with actual results. The finite element model of a MR damper is developed; it allows carrying out the analysis of a MR damper taking into account the mutual influence of electromagnetic, hydrodynamic and thermal fields. The results of finite element simulation coincide with analytical solutions that allows using them for design development of a MR damper. - Highlights: • Division of a MR fluid rheological curve into two sections with different viscosities. • Algorithm for calculation of a power characteristic of MR dampers is proposed. • Finite element model of a MR damper is developed. • Results of finite element simulation coincide with analytical solutions.

  14. Lattice Boltzmann model for three-phase viscoelastic fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chiyu; Lei, Wenhai; Wang, Moran

    2018-02-01

    A lattice Boltzmann (LB) framework is developed for simulation of three-phase viscoelastic fluid flows in complex geometries. This model is based on a Rothman-Keller type model for immiscible multiphase flows which ensures mass conservation of each component in porous media even for a high density ratio. To account for the viscoelastic effects, the Maxwell constitutive relation is correctly introduced into the momentum equation, which leads to a modified lattice Boltzmann evolution equation for Maxwell fluids by removing the normal but excess viscous term. Our simulation tests indicate that this excess viscous term may induce significant errors. After three benchmark cases, the displacement processes of oil by dispersed polymer are studied as a typical example of three-phase viscoelastic fluid flow. The results show that increasing either the polymer intrinsic viscosity or the elastic modulus will enhance the oil recovery.

  15. A fluid model for Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigh, Shang-Yik; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Swimming microorganisms and self-propelled nanomotors are often found in confined environments. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori survives in the acidic environment of the human stomach and is able to penetrate gel-like mucus layers and cause infections by locally changing the rheological properties of the mucus from gel-like to solution-like. In this talk we propose an analytical model for the locomotion of Helicobacter pylori as a confined spherical squirmer which generates its own confinement. We solve analytically the flow field around the swimmer, and derive the swimming speed and energetics. The role of the boundary condition in the outer wall is discussed. An extension of our model is also proposed for other biological and chemical swimmers. Newton Trust.

  16. Reduced order modeling of fluid/structure interaction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Kalashnikova, Irina; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Brake, Matthew Robert

    2009-11-01

    This report describes work performed from October 2007 through September 2009 under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development project titled 'Reduced Order Modeling of Fluid/Structure Interaction.' This project addresses fundamental aspects of techniques for construction of predictive Reduced Order Models (ROMs). A ROM is defined as a model, derived from a sequence of high-fidelity simulations, that preserves the essential physics and predictive capability of the original simulations but at a much lower computational cost. Techniques are developed for construction of provably stable linear Galerkin projection ROMs for compressible fluid flow, including a method for enforcing boundary conditions that preserves numerical stability. A convergence proof and error estimates are given for this class of ROM, and the method is demonstrated on a series of model problems. A reduced order method, based on the method of quadratic components, for solving the von Karman nonlinear plate equations is developed and tested. This method is applied to the problem of nonlinear limit cycle oscillations encountered when the plate interacts with an adjacent supersonic flow. A stability-preserving method for coupling the linear fluid ROM with the structural dynamics model for the elastic plate is constructed and tested. Methods for constructing efficient ROMs for nonlinear fluid equations are developed and tested on a one-dimensional convection-diffusion-reaction equation. These methods are combined with a symmetrization approach to construct a ROM technique for application to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  17. Learning optimal quantum models is NP-hard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Cyril J.

    2018-02-01

    Physical modeling translates measured data into a physical model. Physical modeling is a major objective in physics and is generally regarded as a creative process. How good are computers at solving this task? Here, we show that in the absence of physical heuristics, the inference of optimal quantum models cannot be computed efficiently (unless P=NP ). This result illuminates rigorous limits to the extent to which computers can be used to further our understanding of nature.

  18. Landau fluid model for weakly nonlinear dispersive magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L.

    2005-01-01

    In may astrophysical plasmas such as the solar wind, the terrestrial magnetosphere, or in the interstellar medium at small enough scales, collisions are negligible. When interested in the large-scale dynamics, a hydrodynamic approach is advantageous not only because its numerical simulations is easier than of the full Vlasov-Maxwell equations, but also because it provides a deep understanding of cross-scale nonlinear couplings. It is thus of great interest to construct fluid models that extended the classical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations to collisionless situations. Two ingredients need to be included in such a model to capture the main kinetic effects: finite Larmor radius (FLR) corrections and Landau damping, the only fluid-particle resonance that can affect large scales and can be modeled in a relatively simple way. The Modelization of Landau damping in a fluid formalism is hardly possible in the framework of a systematic asymptotic expansion and was addressed mainly by means of parameter fitting in a linearized setting. We introduced a similar Landau fluid model but, that has the advantage of taking dispersive effects into account. This model properly describes dispersive MHD waves in quasi-parallel propagation. Since, by construction, the system correctly reproduces their linear dynamics, appropriate tests should address the nonlinear regime. In a first case, we show analytically that the weakly nonlinear modulational dynamics of quasi-parallel propagating Alfven waves is well captured. As a second test we consider the parametric decay instability of parallel Alfven waves and show that numerical simulations of the dispersive Landau fluid model lead to results that closely match the outcome of hybrid simulations. (Author)

  19. Phase-separation models for swimming enhancement in complex fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Yi; Lauga, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Swimming cells often have to self-propel through fluids displaying non-Newtonian rheology. While past theoretical work seems to indicate that stresses arising from complex fluids should systematically hinder low-Reynolds number locomotion, experimental observations suggest that locomotion enhancement is possible. In this paper we propose a physical mechanism for locomotion enhancement of microscopic swimmers in a complex fluid. It is based on the fact that microstructured fluids will generically phase-separate near surfaces, leading to the presence of low-viscosity layers, which promote slip and decrease viscous friction near the surface of the swimmer. We use two models to address the consequence of this phase separation: a nonzero apparent slip length for the fluid and then an explicit modeling of the change of viscosity in a thin layer near the swimmer. Considering two canonical setups for low-Reynolds number locomotion, namely the waving locomotion of a two-dimensional sheet and that of a three-dimensional filament, we show that phase-separation systematically increases the locomotion speeds, possibly by orders of magnitude. We close by confronting our predictions with recent experimental results.

  20. Evolution of quantum-like modeling in decision making processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrennikova, Polina

    2012-01-01

    The application of the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics to model behavioral patterns in social science and economics is a novel and constantly emerging field. The aim of the so called 'quantum like' models is to model the decision making processes in a macroscopic setting, capturing the particular 'context' in which the decisions are taken. Several subsequent empirical findings proved that when making a decision people tend to violate the axioms of expected utility theory and Savage's Sure Thing principle, thus violating the law of total probability. A quantum probability formula was devised to describe more accurately the decision making processes. A next step in the development of QL-modeling in decision making was the application of Schrödinger equation to describe the evolution of people's mental states. A shortcoming of Schrödinger equation is its inability to capture dynamics of an open system; the brain of the decision maker can be regarded as such, actively interacting with the external environment. Recently the master equation, by which quantum physics describes the process of decoherence as the result of interaction of the mental state with the environmental 'bath', was introduced for modeling the human decision making. The external environment and memory can be referred to as a complex 'context' influencing the final decision outcomes. The master equation can be considered as a pioneering and promising apparatus for modeling the dynamics of decision making in different contexts.

  1. Evolution of quantum-like modeling in decision making processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikova, Polina

    2012-12-01

    The application of the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics to model behavioral patterns in social science and economics is a novel and constantly emerging field. The aim of the so called 'quantum like' models is to model the decision making processes in a macroscopic setting, capturing the particular 'context' in which the decisions are taken. Several subsequent empirical findings proved that when making a decision people tend to violate the axioms of expected utility theory and Savage's Sure Thing principle, thus violating the law of total probability. A quantum probability formula was devised to describe more accurately the decision making processes. A next step in the development of QL-modeling in decision making was the application of Schrödinger equation to describe the evolution of people's mental states. A shortcoming of Schrödinger equation is its inability to capture dynamics of an open system; the brain of the decision maker can be regarded as such, actively interacting with the external environment. Recently the master equation, by which quantum physics describes the process of decoherence as the result of interaction of the mental state with the environmental 'bath', was introduced for modeling the human decision making. The external environment and memory can be referred to as a complex 'context' influencing the final decision outcomes. The master equation can be considered as a pioneering and promising apparatus for modeling the dynamics of decision making in different contexts.

  2. Computation of the equation of state of the quantum hard-sphere fluid utilizing several path-integral strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesé, Luis M

    2004-08-22

    The compressibility factor of the quantum hard-sphere fluid within the region (rho(N) (*)lambda(B) (*)computed by following four distinct routes involving the three pair radial correlation functions that are significant in the path-integral context, namely, instantaneous, pair linear response, and centroids. These functions are calculated with path-integral Monte Carlo simulations involving the Cao-Berne propagator. The first route to the equation of state is the instantaneous standard one, i.e., the usual volume derivative of the partition function expressed in terms of the instantaneous pair radial correlations. The other three routes stem from the extended compressibility theorem, which associates the isothermal compressibility with the three pair radial structures mentioned above and involves the solving of appropriate Ornstein-Zernike equations. An analysis of the error bars in the quantities computed is reported, and it is proven the usefulness of the centroid pair correlations to fix quantum equations of state. Also, the regions where the fluid-solid changes of phase should take place are identified with the use of indicators sensitive to order in the sample. The consistency of the current results is assessed and comparison with data available in the literature is made wherever possible. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics

  3. Multiscale modeling for fluid transport in nanosystems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jonathan W.; Jones, Reese E.; Mandadapu, Kranthi Kiran; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.

    2013-09-01

    Atomistic-scale behavior drives performance in many micro- and nano-fluidic systems, such as mircrofludic mixers and electrical energy storage devices. Bringing this information into the traditionally continuum models used for engineering analysis has proved challenging. This work describes one such approach to address this issue by developing atomistic-to-continuum multi scale and multi physics methods to enable molecular dynamics (MD) representations of atoms to incorporated into continuum simulations. Coupling is achieved by imposing constraints based on fluxes of conserved quantities between the two regions described by one of these models. The impact of electric fields and surface charges are also critical, hence, methodologies to extend finite-element (FE) MD electric field solvers have been derived to account for these effects. Finally, the continuum description can have inconsistencies with the coarse-grained MD dynamics, so FE equations based on MD statistics were derived to facilitate the multi scale coupling. Examples are shown relevant to nanofluidic systems, such as pore flow, Couette flow, and electric double layer.

  4. Cryptography in the Bounded Quantum-Storage Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Serge, Fehr; Schaffner, Christian

    2008-01-01

    We initiate the study of two-party cryptographic primitives with unconditional security, assuming that the adversary's quantum memory is of bounded size. We show that oblivious transfer and bit commitment can be implemented in this model using protocols where honest parties need no quantum memory......, whereas an adversarial player needs quantum memory of size at least $n/2$ in order to break the protocol, where $n$ is the number of qubits transmitted. This is in sharp contrast to the classical bounded-memory model, where we can only tolerate adversaries with memory of size quadratic in honest players......' memory size. Our protocols are efficient and noninteractive and can be implemented using today's technology. On the technical side, a new entropic uncertainty relation involving min-entropy is established....

  5. Cryptography In The Bounded Quantum-Storage Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Salvail, Louis; Schaffner, Christian

    2005-01-01

    We initiate the study of two-party cryptographic primitives with unconditional security, assuming that the adversary's quantum memory is of bounded size. We show that oblivious transfer and bit commitment can be implemented in this model using protocols where honest parties need no quantum memory......, whereas an adversarial player needs quantum memory of size at least n/2 in order to break the protocol, where n is the number of qubits transmitted. This is in sharp contrast to the classical bounded- memory model, where we can only tolerate adversaries with memory of size quadratic in honest players......' memory size. Our protocols are efficient, non-interactive and can be implemented using today's technology. On the technical side, a new entropic uncertainty relation involving min-entropy is established....

  6. Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2003-01-01

    In this lively look at quantum science, a physicist takes you on an entertaining and enlightening journey through the basics of subatomic physics. Along the way, he examines the paradox of quantum mechanics--beautifully mathematical in theory but confoundingly unpredictable in the real world. Marvel at the Dual Slit experiment as a tiny atom passes through two separate openings at the same time. Ponder the peculiar communication of quantum particles, which can remain in touch no matter how far apart. Join the genius jewel thief as he carries out a quantum measurement on a diamond without ever touching the object in question. Baffle yourself with the bizzareness of quantum tunneling, the equivalent of traveling partway up a hill, only to disappear then reappear traveling down the opposite side. With its clean, colorful layout and conversational tone, this text will hook you into the conundrum that is quantum mechanics.

  7. Leaback of Pulsatile Flow of Particle Fluid Suspension Model of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leaback of Pulsatile Flow of Particle Fluid Suspension Model of Blood Under Periodic Body Acceleration. ... The variation in body acceleration amplitude though affects the velocity profile in the capillary tubes, it has no effect on the leakback in the tubes. Leakback is mainly determined by the balance of the viscous drag and ...

  8. Inhomogeneous generalizations of Bianchi type VIh models with perfect fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S. R.; Prasad, A.

    1991-07-01

    Inhomogeneous universes admitting an Abelian G2 of isometry and filled with perfect fluid have been derived. These contain as special cases exact homogeneous universes of Bianchi type VIh. Many of these universes asymptotically tend to homogeneous Bianchi VIh universes. The models have been discussed for their physical and kinematical behaviors.

  9. Immiscible multicomponent lattice Boltzmann model for fluids with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ability to simulate immiscible multicomponent fluids with relaxation time ratio as large as 29.0 and to reduce 'spurious velocity'. In this work, the improved model is validated and studied using the central bubble case and the rising bubble case. It finds good applications in both static and dynamic cases for multicomponent ...

  10. New two-fluid (localized + band electron) model for manganites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. New two-fluid (localized + band electron) model for manganites. ( With HR Krishnamurthy,GV Pai,SR Hassan,V Shenoy,. Key ideas: T Gupta ….) Two types of eg electronic states arise in doped manganites (due to strong JT coupling, strong U, filling conditions, …):.

  11. Rotating cylindrically symmetric Kaluza-Klein fluid model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Kaluza-Klein field equations for stationary cylindrically symmetric fluid models in stan- dard Einstein theory are formulated and a set of physically viable solutions is reported. This set is believed to be the first such Kaluza-Klein solutions and it includes the Kaluza-Klein counterpart of. Davidson's solution describing ...

  12. Historical Review of the Fluid Percussion TBI Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce G Lyeth

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major health concern worldwide. Laboratory studies utilizing animal models of TBI are essential for addressing pathological mechanisms of brain injury and development of innovative treatments. Over the past 75 years, pioneering head injury researchers have devised and tested a number of fluid percussive methods to reproduce in animals the concussive clinical syndrome. The fluid percussion brain injury technique has evolved from early investigations that applied a generalized loading of the brain to more recent computer controlled systems. Of the many pre-clinical TBI models, the fluid percussion technique is one of the most extensively characterized and widely used models. Some of the most important advances involved the development of the Stalhammer device to produce concussion in cats and the later characterization of this device for application in rodents. The goal of this historical review is to provide readers with an appreciation for the time and effort expended by the pioneering researchers that have led to today’s state of the art fluid percussion animal models of TBI.

  13. Multi-physics fluid-structure interaction modelling software

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malan, AG

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The CSIR reseachers developed a new ground-breaking sofware modelling technlogies to be used in the design of safe and efficient next-generation aircraft. The field of Fluid-structure interaction (FIS) covers a massive range of engineering problems...

  14. FTL Quantum Models of the Photon and the Electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, Richard F.

    2007-01-01

    A photon is modeled by an uncharged superluminal quantum moving at 1.414c along an open 45-degree helical trajectory with radius R = λ/2π (where λ is the helical pitch or wavelength). A mostly superluminal spatial model of an electron is composed of a charged pointlike quantum circulating at an extremely high frequency ( 2.5 x 1020 hz) in a closed, double-looped hehcal trajectory whose helical pitch is one Compton wavelength h/mc. The quantum has energy and momentum but not rest mass, so its speed is not limited by c. sThe quantum's speed is superluminal 57% of the time and subluminal 43% of the time, passing through c twice in each trajectory cycle. The quantum's maximum speed in the electron's rest frame is 2.515c and its minimum speed is .707c. The electron model's helical trajectory parameters are selected to produce the electron's spin (ℎ/2π)/2 and approximate (without small QED corrections) magnetic moment e(ℎ/2π)/2m (the Bohr magneton μB) as well as its Dirac equation-related 'jittery motion' angular frequency 2mc2/(ℎ/2π), amplitude (ℎ/2π)/2mc and internal speed c. The two possible helicities of the electron model correspond to the electron and the positron. With these models, an electron is like a closed circulating photon. The electron's inertia is proposed to be related to the electron model's circulating internal Compton momentum mc. The internal superluminalily of the photon model, the internal superluminahty/subluminality of the electron model, and the proposed approach to the electron's inertia as ''momentum at rest'' within the electron, could be relevant to possible mechanisms of superluminal communication and transportation

  15. Two-dimensional hybrid Monte Carlo–fluid modelling of dc glow discharges: Comparison with fluid models, reliability, and accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eylenceoğlu, E.; Rafatov, I., E-mail: rafatov@metu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey); Kudryavtsev, A. A. [Saint Petersburg State University, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-15

    Two-dimensional hybrid Monte Carlo–fluid numerical code is developed and applied to model the dc glow discharge. The model is based on the separation of electrons into two parts: the low energetic (slow) and high energetic (fast) electron groups. Ions and slow electrons are described within the fluid model using the drift-diffusion approximation for particle fluxes. Fast electrons, represented by suitable number of super particles emitted from the cathode, are responsible for ionization processes in the discharge volume, which are simulated by the Monte Carlo collision method. Electrostatic field is obtained from the solution of Poisson equation. The test calculations were carried out for an argon plasma. Main properties of the glow discharge are considered. Current-voltage curves, electric field reversal phenomenon, and the vortex current formation are developed and discussed. The results are compared to those obtained from the simple and extended fluid models. Contrary to reports in the literature, the analysis does not reveal significant advantages of existing hybrid methods over the extended fluid model.

  16. Pre-quantum mechanics. Introduction to models with hidden variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grea, J.

    1976-01-01

    Within the context of formalism of hidden variable type, the author considers the models used to describe mechanical systems before the introduction of the quantum model. An account is given of the characteristics of the theoretical models and their relationships with experimental methodology. The models of analytical, pre-ergodic, stochastic and thermodynamic mechanics are studied in succession. At each stage the physical hypothesis is enunciated by postulate corresponding to the type of description of the reality of the model. Starting from this postulate, the physical propositions which are meaningful for the model under consideration are defined and their logical structure is indicated. It is then found that on passing from one level of description to another, one can obtain successively Boolean lattices embedded in lattices of continuous geometric type, which are themselves embedded in Boolean lattices. It is therefore possible to envisage a more detailed description than that given by the quantum lattice and to construct it by analogy. (Auth.)

  17. A new hybrid particle/fluid model for cometary dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Y.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V.; Toth, G.; Hansen, K. C.; Huang, Z.; Gombosi, T. I.; Fougere, N.; Rubin, M.

    2017-12-01

    Cometary dust grains, which originate from comets, are believed to contain clues to the formation and the evolution of comets. They also play an important role in shaping the cometary environment, as they are able to decelerate and heat the gas through collisions, carry charges and interact with the plasma environment, and possibly sublimate gases. Therefore, the loss rate and behavior of dust grains are of interest to scientists. Currently, mainly two types of numerical dust models exist: particle models and fluid models have been developed. Particle models, which keep track of the positions and velocities of all gas and dust particles, allow crossing dust trajectories and a more accurate description of returning dust grains than the fluid model. However, in order to compute the gas drag force, the particle model needs to follow more gas particles than dust particles. A fluid model is usually more computationally efficient and is often used to provide simulations on larger spatial and temporal scales. In this work, a new hybrid model is developed to combine the advantages of both particle and fluid models. In the new approach a fluid model based on the University of Michigan BATSRUS code computes the gas properties, and feeds the gas drag force to the particle model, which is based on the Adaptive Mesh Particle Simulator (AMPS) code, to calculate the motion of dust grains. The coupling is done via the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF). In addition to the capability of simulating the long-term dust phenomena, the model can also designate small active regions on the nucleus for comparison with the temporary fine dust features in observations. With the assistance of the newly developed model, the effect of viewing angles on observed dust jet shapes and the transportation of heavy dust grains from the southern to the northern hemisphere of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko will be studied and compared with Rosetta mission images. Preliminary results will be

  18. Modeling Study of High Pressure and High Temperature Reservoir Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varzandeh, Farhad

    S-characterization combinations and 260 reservoir fluids. PC-SAFT with the new general characterization method is shown to give the lowest AAD% and maximum deviation in calculation of saturation pressure, density and STO density, among all the tested characterization methods for PC-SAFT. Application of the new characterization...... be highly rewarding if successfully produced. This PhD project is part of the NextOil (New Extreme Oil and Gas in the Danish North Sea) project which is intended to reduce the uncertainties in HPHT field development. The main focus of this PhD is on accurate description of the reservoir fluid behavior under...... HPHT conditions to minimize the production risks from these types of reservoirs. In particular, the study has thoroughly evaluated several non-cubic Equations of State (EoSs) which are considered promising for HPHT fluid modeling, showing their advantages and short comings based on an extensive...

  19. Assessment of fluid-to-fluid modelling of critical heat flux in horizontal 37-element bundle flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, S.K.

    2006-01-01

    Fluid-to-fluid modelling laws of critical heat flux (CHF) available in the literature were reviewed. The applicability of the fluid-to-fluid modelling laws was assessed using available data ranging from low to high mass fluxes in horizontal 37-element bundles simulating a CANDU fuel string. Correlations consisting of dimensionless similarity groups were derived using modelling fluid data (Freon-12) to predict water CHF data in horizontal 37-element bundles with uniform and non-uniform axial-heat flux distribution (AFD). The results showed that at mass fluxes higher than ∼4,000 kg/m 2 s (water equivalent value), the vertical fluid-to-fluid modelling laws of Ahmad (1973) and Katto (1979) predict water CHF in horizontal 37-element bundles with non-uniform AFD with average errors of 1.4% and 3.0% and RMS errors of 5.9% and 6.1%, respectively. The Francois and Berthoud (2003) fluid-to-fluid modelling law predicts CHF in non-uniformly heated 37-element bundles in the horizontal orientation with an average error of 0.6% and an RMS error of 10.4% over the available range of 2,000 to 6,200 kg/m 2 s. (author)

  20. Fluid coupling in a discrete model of cochlear mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Stephen J; Lineton, Ben; Ni, Guangjian

    2011-09-01

    A discrete model of cochlear mechanics is introduced that includes a full, three-dimensional, description of fluid coupling. This formulation allows the fluid coupling and basilar membrane dynamics to be analyzed separately and then coupled together with a simple piece of linear algebra. The fluid coupling is initially analyzed using a wavenumber formulation and is separated into one component due to one-dimensional fluid coupling and one comprising all the other contributions. Using the theory of acoustic waves in a duct, however, these two components of the pressure can also be associated with a far field, due to the plane wave, and a near field, due to the evanescent, higher order, modes. The near field components are then seen as one of a number of sources of additional longitudinal coupling in the cochlea. The effects of non-uniformity and asymmetry in the fluid chamber areas can also be taken into account, to predict both the pressure difference between the chambers and the mean pressure. This allows the calculation, for example, of the effect of a short cochlear implant on the coupled response of the cochlea. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  1. Modelling exciton–phonon interactions in optically driven quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazir, Ahsan; McCutcheon, Dara

    2016-01-01

    We provide a self-contained review of master equation approaches to modelling phonon effects in optically driven self-assembled quantum dots. Coupling of the (quasi) two-level excitonic system to phonons leads to dissipation and dephasing, the rates of which depend on the excitation conditions...

  2. Construction of classical and quantum integrable field models ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    85, No. 5. — journal of. November 2015 physics pp. 899–913. Construction of classical and quantum integrable field models unravelling hidden possibilities .... It is interesting to note that the infinite set of conserved quantities associated with an inte- ..... that taking c2 as the Hamiltonian would lead to a NLS-type equation.

  3. Toward quantum-like modeling of financial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choustova, Olga

    2007-01-01

    We apply methods of quantum mechanics for mathematical modeling of price dynamics at the financial market. We propose to describe behavioral financial factors (e.g., expectations of traders) by using the pilot wave (Bohmian) model of quantum mechanics. Trajectories of prices are determined by two financial potentials: classical-like V(q) ('hard' market conditions, e.g., natural resources) and quantum-like U(q) (behavioral market conditions). On the one hand, our Bohmian model is a quantum-like model for the financial market, cf. with works of W. Segal, I. E. Segal, E. Haven, E. W. Piotrowski, J. Sladkowski. On the other hand (since Bohmian mechanics provides the possibility to describe individual price trajectories) it belongs to the domain of extended research on deterministic dynamics for financial assets (C.W.J. Granger, W.A. Barnett, A. J. Benhabib, W.A. Brock, C. Sayers, J. Y. Campbell, A. W. Lo, A. C. MacKinlay, A. Serletis, S. Kuchta, M. Frank, R. Gencay, T. Stengos, M. J. Hinich, D. Patterson, D. A. Hsieh, D. T. Caplan, J.A. Scheinkman, B. LeBaron and many others)

  4. Cryptography in the Bounded Quantum-Storage Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.B. Damgård (Ivan); S. Fehr (Serge); L. Salvail (Louis); C. Schaffner (Christian)

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractWe initiate the study of two-party cryptographic primitives with unconditional security, assuming that the adversary’s quantum memory is of bounded size. We show that oblivious transfer and bit commitment can be implemented in this model using protocols where honest parties need no

  5. Cryptography in the Bounded Quantum-Storage Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.B. Damgård (Ivan); S. Fehr (Serge); L. Salvail (Louis); C. Schaffner (Christian)

    2005-01-01

    htmlabstractWe initiate the study of two-party cryptographic primitives with unconditional security, assuming that the adversary’s quantum memory is of bounded size. We show that oblivious transfer and bit commitment can be implemented in this model using protocols where honest parties need no

  6. Quantum ring models and action-angle variables

    OpenAIRE

    Bellucci, Stefano; Nersessian, Armen; Saghatelian, Armen; Yeghikyan, Vahagn

    2010-01-01

    We suggest to use the action-angle variables for the study of properties of (quasi)particles in quantum rings. For this purpose we present the action-angle variables for three two-dimensional singular oscillator systems. The first one is the usual (Euclidean) singular oscillator, which plays the role of the confinement potential for the quantum ring. We also propose two singular spherical oscillator models for the role of the confinement system for the spherical ring. The first one is based o...

  7. Qudit quantum computation in the Jaynes-Cummings model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mischuck, Brian; Mølmer, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    We have developed methods for performing qudit quantum computation in the Jaynes-Cummings model with the qudits residing in a finite subspace of individual harmonic oscillator modes, resonantly coupled to a spin-1/2 system. The first method determines analytical control sequences for the one......- and two-qudit gates necessary for universal quantum computation by breaking down the desired unitary transformations into a series of state preparations implemented with the Law-Eberly scheme [ Law and Eberly Phys. Rev. Lett. 76 1055 (1996)]. The second method replaces some of the analytical pulse...

  8. Modeling Microgravity Induced Fluid Redistribution Autoregulatory and Hydrostatic Enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, J. G.; Werner, C.; Nelson, E. S.; Feola, A.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.; Ethier, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    Space flight induces a marked cephalad (headward) redistribution of blood and interstitial fluid potentially resulting in a loss of venous tone and reduction in heart muscle efficiency upon introduction into the microgravity environment. Using various types of computational models, we are investigating how this fluid redistribution may induce intracranial pressure changes, relevant to reported reductions in astronaut visual acuity, part of the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Methods: We utilize a lumped parameter cardiovascular system (CVS) model, augmented by compartments comprising the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) space, as the primary tool to describe how microgravity, and the associated lack of hydrostatic gradient, impacts fluid redistribution. Models of ocular fluid pressures and biomechanics then accept the output of the above model as boundary condition input to allow more detailed, local analysis (see IWS Abstract by Ethier et al.). Recently, we enhanced the capabilities our previously reported CVS model through the implementation of robust autoregulatory mechanisms and a more fundamental approach to the implementation of hydrostatic mechanisms. Modifying the approach of Blanco et al., we implemented auto-regulation in a quasi-static manner, as an averaged effect across the span of one heartbeat. This approach reduced the higher frequency perturbations from the regulatory mechanism and was intended to allow longer simulation times (days) than models that implement within-beat regulatory mechanisms (minutes). A more fundamental approach to hydrostatics was implemented by a quasi-1D approach, in which compartment descriptions include compartment length, orientation and relative position, allowed for modeling of body orientation, relative body positioning and, in the future, alternative gravity environments. At this time the inclusion of hydrostatic mechanisms supplies additional capabilities to train and validate the CVS model

  9. Cardioplegia heat exchanger design modelling using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driel, M R

    2000-11-01

    A new cardioplegia heat exchanger has been developed by Sorin Biomedica. A three-dimensional computer-aided design (CAD) model was optimized using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling. CFD optimization techniques have commonly been applied to velocity flow field analysis, but CFD analysis was also used in this study to predict the heat exchange performance of the design before prototype fabrication. The iterative results of the optimization and the actual heat exchange performance of the final configuration are presented in this paper. Based on the behaviour of this model, both the water and blood fluid flow paths of the heat exchanger were optimized. The simulation predicted superior heat exchange performance using an optimal amount of energy exchange surface area, reducing the total contact surface area, the device priming volume and the material costs. Experimental results confirm the empirical results predicted by the CFD analysis.

  10. Cosmological effects of a class of fluid dark energy models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carturan, Daniela; Finelli, Fabio

    2003-01-01

    We study the impact of a generalized Chaplygin gas as a candidate for dark energy on density perturbations and on cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. The generalized Chaplygin gas is a fluid component with an exotic equation of state p=-A/ρ α (a polytropic gas with negative constant and exponent). Such a component interpolates in time between dust and a cosmological constant, with an intermediate behavior as p=A 1/(1+α) +αρ. Perturbations of this fluid are stable on small scales but behave in a very different way with respect to standard quintessence. Moreover, a generalized Chaplygin gas could also represent an archetypal example of the phenomenological unified models of dark energy and dark matter. The results presented here show how CMB anisotropies and density perturbations in this class of models differ from those of a cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant

  11. Fluid mechanics and heat transfer advances in nonlinear dynamics modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Asli, Kaveh Hariri

    2015-01-01

    This valuable new book focuses on new methods and techniques in fluid mechanics and heat transfer in mechanical engineering. The book includes the research of the authors on the development of optimal mathematical models and also uses modern computer technology and mathematical methods for the analysis of nonlinear dynamic processes. It covers technologies applicable to both fluid mechanics and heat transfer problems, which include a combination of physical, mechanical, and thermal techniques. The authors develop a new method for the calculation of mathematical models by computer technology, using parametric modeling techniques and multiple analyses for mechanical system. The information in this book is intended to help reduce the risk of system damage or failure. Included are sidebar discussions, which contain information and facts about each subject area that help to emphasize important points to remember.

  12. Mathematical Modelling of Fluid Flow in Cone and Cavitation Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milada KOZUBKOVÁ

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Problem of cavitation is the undesirable phenomena occuring in the fluid flow in many hydraulic application (pumps, turbines, valves, etc.. Therefore this is in the focus of interest using experimental and mathematical methods. Based on cavitation modelling in Laval nozzle results and experience [1], [2], [4], following problem described as the water flow at the outlet from turbine blade wheel was solved. Primarily the problem is simplified into modelling of water flow in cone. Profiles of axial, radial and tangential velocity are defined on inlet zone. The value of pressure is defined on the outlet. Boundary conditions were defined by main investigator of the grant project – Energy Institute, Victor Kaplan’s Department of Fluid Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology. The value of air volume was insignificant. Cavitation was solved by Singhal model of cavitation.

  13. A New Unified Dark Fluid Model and Its Cosmic Constraint

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Lixin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new unified dark fluid (UDF) model with equation of state (EoS) $w(a)=-\\alpha/(\\beta a^{-n}+1)$, which includes the generalized Chaplygin gas model (gGg) as its special case, where $\\alpha$, $\\beta$ and $n$ are three positive numbers. It is clear that this model reduces to the gCg model with EoS $w(a)=-B_s/(B_s+(1-B_s)a^{-3(1+\\alpha)})$, when $\\alpha=1$, $\\beta=(1-B_s)/B_s$ and $n=3(1+\\alpha)$. By combination the cold dark matter and the cosmological constant, one ...

  14. Bluff Body Fluid Interactions Modelling for Micro Energy Harvesting Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhuyan, M S; Majlis, B Y; Islam, S; Othman, M; Ali, Sawal H Md; Kalaivani, C

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we have presented a MEMS-based piezoelectric fluid-flow based micro energy harvester. The design and modelling of the energy harvester structure was based on a piezoelectric cantilever affixed to a bluff-body. In a cross fluid flow, pressure in the flow channel, in the wake of the bluff body, fluctuates with the same frequency as the pressure variation caused by the Kármán Vortex Street. This fluctuation of pressure in the flow channel causes the piezoelectric cantilever, trailing the bluff-body, to vibrate in a direction normal to the fluid flow direction. COMSOL finite element analysis software are used for the evaluation of various mechanical analysis of the micro energy harvester structure like, physical the Stress and Strain state in the cantilever structures, Eigen frequency Analysis, Transient analysis to demonstrate the feasibility of the design. Detailed steps of modelling and simulation results of the uniform cantilever were explained. The results confirm the probability of the fluid flow based MEMS energy harvester.

  15. Space-time fluid mechanics computation of heart valve models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Kenji; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.; Buscher, Austin; Asada, Shohei

    2014-10-01

    Fluid mechanics computation of heart valves with an interface-tracking (moving-mesh) method was one of the classes of computations targeted in introducing the space-time (ST) interface tracking method with topology change (ST-TC). The ST-TC method is a new version of the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized ST (DSD/SST) method. It can deal with an actual contact between solid surfaces in flow problems with moving interfaces, while still possessing the desirable features of interface-tracking methods, such as better resolution of the boundary layers. The DSD/SST method with effective mesh update can already handle moving-interface problems when the solid surfaces are in near contact or create near TC, if the "nearness" is sufficiently "near" for the purpose of solving the problem. That, however, is not the case in fluid mechanics of heart valves, as the solid surfaces need to be brought into an actual contact when the flow has to be completely blocked. Here we extend the ST-TC method to 3D fluid mechanics computation of heart valve models. We present computations for two models: an aortic valve with coronary arteries and a mechanical aortic valve. These computations demonstrate that the ST-TC method can bring interface-tracking accuracy to fluid mechanics of heart valves, and can do that with computational practicality.

  16. Loop quantum cosmology of k=1 FRW models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Pawlowski, Tomasz; Singh, Parampreet; Vandersloot, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    The closed, k=1, FRW model coupled to a massless scalar field is investigated in the framework of loop quantum cosmology using analytical and numerical methods. As in the k=0 case, the scalar field can be again used as emergent time to construct the physical Hilbert space and introduce Dirac observables. The resulting framework is then used to address a major challenge of quantum cosmology: resolving the big-bang singularity while retaining agreement with general relativity at large scales. It is shown that the framework fulfills this task. In particular, for states which are semiclassical at some late time, the big bang is replaced by a quantum bounce and a recollapse occurs at the value of the scale factor predicted by classical general relativity. Thus, the ''difficulties'' pointed out by Green and Unruh in the k=1 case do not arise in a more systematic treatment. As in k=0 models, quantum dynamics is deterministic across the deep Planck regime. However, because it also retains the classical recollapse, in contrast to the k=0 case one is now led to a cyclic model. Finally, we clarify some issues raised by Laguna's recent work addressed to computational physicists

  17. A Landau fluid model for dissipative trapped electron modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedrick, C.L.; Leboeuf, J.N.; Sidikman, K.L.

    1995-09-01

    A Landau fluid model for dissipative trapped electron modes is developed which focuses on an improved description of the ion dynamics. The model is simple enough to allow nonlinear calculations with many harmonics for the times necessary to reach saturation. The model is motivated by a discussion that starts with the gyro-kinetic equation and emphasizes the importance of simultaneously including particular features of magnetic drift resonance, shear, and Landau effects. To ensure that these features are simultaneously incorporated in a Landau fluid model with only two evolution equations, a new approach to determining the closure coefficients is employed. The effect of this technique is to reduce the matching of fluid and kinetic responses to a single variable, rather than two, and to allow focusing on essential features of the fluctuations in question, rather than features that are only important for other types of fluctuations. Radially resolved nonlinear calculations of this model, advanced in time to reach saturation, are presented to partially illustrate its intended use. These calculations have a large number of poloidal and toroidal harmonics to represent the nonlinear dynamics in a converged steady state which includes cascading of energy to both short and long wavelengths

  18. Review and comparison of bi-fluid interpenetration mixing models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enaux, C.

    2006-01-01

    Today, there is a lot of bi-fluid models with two different speeds: Baer-Nunziato models; Godunov-Romensky models. coupled Euler's equations, and so on. In this report, one compares the most used models in the fields of physics and mathematics while basing this study on the literature. From the point of view of physics. for each model. one reviews: -) the type of mixture considered and modeling assumptions, -) the technique of construction, -) some properties like the respect of thermodynamical principles, the respect of the Galilean invariance principle, or the equilibrium conservation. From the point of view of mathematics, for each model, one looks at: -) the possibility of writing the equations in conservative form, -) hyperbolicity, -) the existence of a mathematical entropy. Finally, a unified review of the models is proposed. It is shown that under certain closing assumptions or for certain flow types. some of the models become equivalent. (author)

  19. Exponential vanishing of the ground-state gap of the quantum random energy model via adiabatic quantum computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adame, J.; Warzel, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this note, we use ideas of Farhi et al. [Int. J. Quantum. Inf. 6, 503 (2008) and Quantum Inf. Comput. 11, 840 (2011)] who link a lower bound on the run time of their quantum adiabatic search algorithm to an upper bound on the energy gap above the ground-state of the generators of this algorithm. We apply these ideas to the quantum random energy model (QREM). Our main result is a simple proof of the conjectured exponential vanishing of the energy gap of the QREM

  20. Quantum Monte Carlo study of the Rabi-Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flottat, Thibaut; Hébert, Frédéric; Rousseau, Valéry G.; Batrouni, George Ghassan

    2016-10-01

    We study, using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations, the ground state properties of a one dimensional Rabi-Hubbard model. The model consists of a lattice of Rabi systems coupled by a photon hopping term between near neighbor sites. For large enough coupling between photons and atoms, the phase diagram generally consists of only two phases: a coherent phase and a compressible incoherent one separated by a quantum phase transition (QPT). We show that, as one goes deeper in the coherent phase, the system becomes unstable exhibiting a divergence of the number of photons. The Mott phases which are present in the Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard model are not observed in these cases due to the presence of non-negligible counter-rotating terms. We show that these two models become equivalent only when the detuning is negative and large enough, or if the counter-rotating terms are small enough

  1. Modelling of fluid-solid interactions using an adaptive mesh fluid model coupled with a combined finite-discrete element model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viré, Axelle; Xiang, Jiansheng; Milthaler, Frank; Farrell, Patrick Emmet; Piggott, Matthew David; Latham, John-Paul; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Pain, Christopher Charles

    2012-12-01

    Fluid-structure interactions are modelled by coupling the finite element fluid/ocean model `Fluidity-ICOM' with a combined finite-discrete element solid model `Y3D'. Because separate meshes are used for the fluids and solids, the present method is flexible in terms of discretisation schemes used for each material. Also, it can tackle multiple solids impacting on one another, without having ill-posed problems in the resolution of the fluid's equations. Importantly, the proposed approach ensures that Newton's third law is satisfied at the discrete level. This is done by first computing the action-reaction force on a supermesh, i.e. a function superspace of the fluid and solid meshes, and then projecting it to both meshes to use it as a source term in the fluid and solid equations. This paper demonstrates the properties of spatial conservation and accuracy of the method for a sphere immersed in a fluid, with prescribed fluid and solid velocities. While spatial conservation is shown to be independent of the mesh resolutions, accuracy requires fine resolutions in both fluid and solid meshes. It is further highlighted that unstructured meshes adapted to the solid concentration field reduce the numerical errors, in comparison with uniformly structured meshes with the same number of elements. The method is verified on flow past a falling sphere. Its potential for ocean applications is further shown through the simulation of vortex-induced vibrations of two cylinders and the flow past two flexible fibres.

  2. Regularization of quantum gravity in the matrix model approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Haruhiko

    1991-02-01

    We study divergence problem of the partition function in the matrix model approach for two-dimensional quantum gravity. We propose a new model V(φ) = 1/2Trφ 2 + g 4 /NTrφ 4 + g'/N 4 Tr(φ 4 ) 2 and show that in the sphere case it has no divergence problem and the critical exponent is of pure gravity. (author)

  3. The quantum nonlinear Schroedinger model with point-like defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudrelier, V; Mintchev, M; Ragoucy, E

    2004-01-01

    We establish a family of point-like impurities which preserve the quantum integrability of the nonlinear Schroedinger model in 1+1 spacetime dimensions. We briefly describe the construction of the exact second quantized solution of this model in terms of an appropriate reflection-transmission algebra. The basic physical properties of the solution, including the spacetime symmetry of the bulk scattering matrix, are also discussed. (letter to the editor)

  4. The Quantum Sine-Gordon Model in Perturbative AQFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahns, Dorothea; Rejzner, Kasia

    2017-08-01

    We study the Sine-Gordon model with Minkowski signature in the framework of perturbative algebraic quantum field theory. We calculate the vertex operator algebra braiding property. We prove that in the finite regime of the model, the expectation value—with respect to the vacuum or a Hadamard state—of the Epstein Glaser S-matrix and the interacting current or the field respectively converge, both given as formal power series.

  5. Modelling Transcapillary Transport of Fluid and Proteins in Hemodialysis Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Pietribiasi

    Full Text Available The kinetics of protein transport to and from the vascular compartment play a major role in the determination of fluid balance and plasma refilling during hemodialysis (HD sessions. In this study we propose a whole-body mathematical model describing water and protein shifts across the capillary membrane during HD and compare its output to clinical data while evaluating the impact of choosing specific values for selected parameters.The model follows a two-compartment structure (vascular and interstitial space and is based on balance equations of protein mass and water volume in each compartment. The capillary membrane was described according to the three-pore theory. Two transport parameters, the fractional contribution of large pores (αLP and the total hydraulic conductivity (LpS of the capillary membrane, were estimated from patient data. Changes in the intensity and direction of individual fluid and solute flows through each part of the transport system were analyzed in relation to the choice of different values of small pores radius and fractional conductivity, lymphatic sensitivity to hydraulic pressure, and steady-state interstitial-to-plasma protein concentration ratio.The estimated values of LpS and αLP were respectively 10.0 ± 8.4 mL/min/mmHg (mean ± standard deviation and 0.062 ± 0.041. The model was able to predict with good accuracy the profiles of plasma volume and serum total protein concentration in most of the patients (average root-mean-square deviation < 2% of the measured value.The applied model provides a mechanistic interpretation of fluid transport processes induced by ultrafiltration during HD, using a minimum of tuned parameters and assumptions. The simulated values of individual flows through each kind of pore and lymphatic absorption rate yielded by the model may suggest answers to unsolved questions on the relative impact of these not-measurable quantities on total vascular refilling and fluid balance.

  6. Dynamic structure factor for liquid He4 and quantum lattice model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.H.

    1975-01-01

    It has been realized for some time now that the quantum lattice model (or the anisotropic Heisenberg antiferromagnetic model) is a useful model for studying the properties of quantum liquids especially near the lambda transition. The static critical values calculated from the quantum lattice model are in good agreement with the observed values. Furthermore, it was shown recently that there are collective modes in the quantum lattice model which are equivalent to the plasmons. Hence, it would seem to be interesting to study the dynamic structure factor for the quantum lattice model and to make a comparison with experiment. Work on the dynamic structure factor is reported here. (Auth.)

  7. Quantum computing with photons: introduction to the circuit model, the one-way quantum computer, and the fundamental principles of photonic experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barz, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Quantum physics has revolutionized our understanding of information processing and enables computational speed-ups that are unattainable using classical computers. This tutorial reviews the fundamental tools of photonic quantum information processing. The basics of theoretical quantum computing are presented and the quantum circuit model as well as measurement-based models of quantum computing are introduced. Furthermore, it is shown how these concepts can be implemented experimentally using photonic qubits, where information is encoded in the photons’ polarization. (tutorial)

  8. A THC Simulator for Modeling Fluid-Rock Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Sahar; Galvan, Boris; Heinze, Thomas; Miller, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    Fluid-rock interactions play an essential role in many earth processes, from a likely influence on earthquake nucleation and aftershocks, to enhanced geothermal system, carbon capture and storage (CCS), and underground nuclear waste repositories. In THC models, two-way interactions between different processes (thermal, hydraulic and chemical) are present. Fluid flow influences the permeability of the rock especially if chemical reactions are taken into account. On one hand solute concentration influences fluid properties while, on the other hand, heat can affect further chemical reactions. Estimating heat production from a naturally fractured geothermal systems remains a complex problem. Previous works are typically based on a local thermal equilibrium assumption and rarely consider the salinity. The dissolved salt in fluid affects the hydro- and thermodynamical behavior of the system by changing the hydraulic properties of the circulating fluid. Coupled thermal-hydraulic-chemical models (THC) are important for investigating these processes, but what is needed is a coupling to mechanics to result in THMC models. Although similar models currently exist (e.g. PFLOTRAN), our objective here is to develop algorithms for implementation using the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) computer architecture to be run on GPU clusters. To that aim, we present a two-dimensional numerical simulation of a fully coupled non-isothermal non-reactive solute flow. The thermal part of the simulation models heat transfer processes for either local thermal equilibrium or nonequilibrium cases, and coupled to a non-reactive mass transfer described by a non-linear diffusion/dispersion model. The flow process of the model includes a non-linear Darcian flow for either saturated or unsaturated scenarios. For the unsaturated case, we use the Richards' approximation for a mixture of liquid and gas phases. Relative permeability and capillary pressure are determined by the van Genuchten relations

  9. Improved quantum circuit modelling based on Heisenberg representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y. H.; Khalil-Hani, M.; Marsono, M. N.

    2018-02-01

    Heisenberg model allows a more compact representation of certain quantum states and enables efficient modelling of stabilizer gates operation and single-qubit measurement in computational basis on classical computers. Since generic quantum circuit modelling appears intractable on classical computers, the Heisenberg representation that makes the modelling process at least practical for certain circuits is crucial. This paper proposes efficient algorithms to facilitate accurate global phase maintenance for both stabilizer and non-stabilizer gates application that play a vital role in the stabilizer frames data structure, which is based on the Heisenberg representation. The proposed algorithms are critical as maintaining global phase involves compute-intensive operations that are necessary for the modelling of each quantum gate. In addition, the proposed work overcomes the limitations of prior work where the phase factors due to non-stabilizer gates application was not taken into consideration. The verification of the proposed algorithms is made against the golden reference model that is constructed based on the conventional state vector approach.

  10. Ground state configurations in two-mode quantum Rabi models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilingaryan, Suren; Rodríguez-Lara, B. M.

    We study two models describing a single two-level system coupled to two boson field modes in either a parallel or orthogonal configuration. Both models may be feasible for experimental realization through Raman adiabatic driving in cavity QED. We study their ground state configurations; that is, we find the quantum precursors of the corresponding semi-classical phase transitions. We found that the ground state configurations of both models present the same critical coupling as the quantum Rabi model. Around this critical coupling, the ground state goes from the so-called normal configuration with no excitation, the qubit in the ground state and the fields in the quantum vacuum state, to a ground state with excitations, the qubit in a superposition of ground and excited state, while the fields are not in the vacuum anymore, for the first model. The second model shows a more complex ground state configuration landscape where we find the normal configuration mentioned above, two single-mode configurations, where just one of the fields and the qubit are excited, and a dual-mode configuration, where both fields and the qubit are excited. S A Chilingaryan acknowledges financial support from CONACYT.

  11. Particles at fluid-fluid interfaces: A new Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard surface- phase-field-crystal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aland, Sebastian; Lowengrub, John; Voigt, Axel

    2012-10-01

    Colloid particles that are partially wetted by two immiscible fluids can become confined to fluid-fluid interfaces. At sufficiently high volume fractions, the colloids may jam and the interface may crystallize. The fluids together with the interfacial colloids form an emulsion with interesting material properties and offer an important route to new soft materials. A promising approach to simulate these emulsions was presented in Aland [Phys. FluidsPHFLE61070-663110.1063/1.3584815 23, 062103 (2011)], where a Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard model for the macroscopic two-phase fluid system was combined with a surface phase-field-crystal model for the microscopic colloidal particles along the interface. Unfortunately this model leads to spurious velocities which require very fine spatial and temporal resolutions to accurately and stably simulate. In this paper we develop an improved Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard-surface phase-field-crystal model based on the principles of mass conservation and thermodynamic consistency. To validate our approach, we derive a sharp interface model and show agreement with the improved diffuse interface model. Using simple flow configurations, we show that the new model has much better properties and does not lead to spurious velocities. Finally, we demonstrate the solid-like behavior of the crystallized interface by simulating the fall of a solid ball through a colloid-laden multiphase fluid.

  12. Particles at fluid-fluid interfaces: A new Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard surface- phase-field-crystal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aland, Sebastian; Lowengrub, John; Voigt, Axel

    2012-10-01

    Colloid particles that are partially wetted by two immiscible fluids can become confined to fluid-fluid interfaces. At sufficiently high volume fractions, the colloids may jam and the interface may crystallize. The fluids together with the interfacial colloids form an emulsion with interesting material properties and offer an important route to new soft materials. A promising approach to simulate these emulsions was presented in Aland et al. [Phys. Fluids 23, 062103 (2011)], where a Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard model for the macroscopic two-phase fluid system was combined with a surface phase-field-crystal model for the microscopic colloidal particles along the interface. Unfortunately this model leads to spurious velocities which require very fine spatial and temporal resolutions to accurately and stably simulate. In this paper we develop an improved Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard-surface phase-field-crystal model based on the principles of mass conservation and thermodynamic consistency. To validate our approach, we derive a sharp interface model and show agreement with the improved diffuse interface model. Using simple flow configurations, we show that the new model has much better properties and does not lead to spurious velocities. Finally, we demonstrate the solid-like behavior of the crystallized interface by simulating the fall of a solid ball through a colloid-laden multiphase fluid.

  13. A computational fluid dynamic model for fluidized bed heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusuf, R.; Melaaen, M.C.; Mathiesen, V.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study heat transfer from a heated wall in a gas fluidized bed using the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) approach. An Eulerian-Eulerian simulation of a two dimensional bubbling bed at ambient conditions with a heated wall is carried out on the in-house code FLOTRACS-MP-3D. An empirical as well as a mechanistic model for solid phase thermal conductivity is tested. Effect of operating parameters like velocity and particle size are also investigated. The fluid dynamic model is able to predict the qualitative trends for the influence of operating parameters as well as high heat transfer coefficients observed in gas fluidized beds. (author)

  14. Resilience of the quantum Rabi model in circuit QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manucharyan, Vladimir E; Baksic, Alexandre; Ciuti, Cristiano

    2017-01-01

    In circuit quantum electrodynamics (circuit QED), an artificial ‘circuit atom’ can couple to a quantized microwave radiation much stronger than its real atomic counterpart. The celebrated quantum Rabi model describes the simplest interaction of a two-level system with a single-mode boson field. When the coupling is large enough, the bare multilevel structure of a realistic circuit atom cannot be ignored even if the circuit is strongly anharmonic. We explored this situation theoretically for flux (fluxonium) and charge (Cooper pair box) type multi-level circuits tuned to their respective flux/charge degeneracy points. We identified which spectral features of the quantum Rabi model survive and which are renormalized for large coupling. Despite significant renormalization of the low-energy spectrum in the fluxonium case, the key quantum Rabi feature—nearly-degenerate vacuum consisting of an atomic state entangled with a multi-photon field—appears in both types of circuits when the coupling is sufficiently large. Like in the quantum Rabi model, for very large couplings the entanglement spectrum is dominated by only two, nearly equal eigenvalues, in spite of the fact that a large number of bare atomic states are actually involved in the atom-resonator ground state. We interpret the emergence of the two-fold degeneracy of the vacuum of both circuits as an environmental suppression of flux/charge tunneling due to their dressing by virtual low-/high-impedance photons in the resonator. For flux tunneling, the dressing is nothing else than the shunting of a Josephson atom with a large capacitance of the resonator. Suppression of charge tunneling is a manifestation of the dynamical Coulomb blockade of transport in tunnel junctions connected to resistive leads. (paper)

  15. Modeling Fluid-Structure Interaction in ANSYS Workbench

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-31

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 31 August 2016 – 03 October 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Modeling Fluid-Structure Interaction in ANSYS Workbench...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 1 D IS TR IB U TI O N S TA TE M EN T A .A pp ro ve d fo rp ub lic re le as e; di st rib

  16. Cellular-automata supercomputers for fluid-dynamics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margolus, N.; Toffoli, T.; Vichniac, G.

    1986-01-01

    We report recent developments in the modeling of fluid dynamics, and give experimental results (including dynamical exponents) obtained using cellular automata machines. Because of their locality and uniformity, cellular automata lend themselves to an extremely efficient physical realization; with a suitable architecture, an amount of hardware resources comparable to that of a home computer can achieve (in the simulation of cellular automata) the performance of a conventional supercomputer

  17. Modeling the cometary environment using a fluid approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Yinsi

    Comets are believed to have preserved the building material of the early solar system and to hold clues to the origin of life on Earth. Abundant remote observations of comets by telescopes and the in-situ measurements by a handful of space missions reveal that the cometary environments are complicated by various physical and chemical processes among the neutral gases and dust grains released from comets, cometary ions, and the solar wind in the interplanetary space. Therefore, physics-based numerical models are in demand to interpret the observational data and to deepen our understanding of the cometary environment. In this thesis, three models using a fluid approach, which include important physical and chemical processes underlying the cometary environment, have been developed to study the plasma, neutral gas, and the dust grains, respectively. Although models based on the fluid approach have limitations in capturing all of the correct physics for certain applications, especially for very low gas density environment, they are computationally much more efficient than alternatives. In the simulations of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko at various heliocentric distances with a wide range of production rates, our multi-fluid cometary neutral gas model and multi-fluid cometary dust model have achieved comparable results to the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) model, which is based on a kinetic approach that is valid in all collisional regimes. Therefore, our model is a powerful alternative to the particle-based model, especially for some computationally intensive simulations. Capable of accounting for the varying heating efficiency under various physical conditions in a self-consistent way, the multi-fluid cometary neutral gas model is a good tool to study the dynamics of the cometary coma with different production rates and heliocentric distances. The modeled H2O expansion speeds reproduce the general trend and the speed's nonlinear dependencies of production rate

  18. Quantum Monte Carlo method for models of molecular nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrachea, Liliana; Rozenberg, Marcelo J.

    2005-07-01

    We introduce a quantum Monte Carlo technique to calculate exactly at finite temperatures the Green function of a fermionic quantum impurity coupled to a bosonic field. While the algorithm is general, we focus on the single impurity Anderson model coupled to a Holstein phonon as a schematic model for a molecular transistor. We compute the density of states at the impurity in a large range of parameters, to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method. We also obtain the conductance of the impurity model and analyze different regimes. The results show that even in the case when the effective attractive phonon interaction is larger than the Coulomb repulsion, a Kondo-like conductance behavior might be observed.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of the rheological and dynamical properties of a model alkane fluid under confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, S.T.; Cummings, P.T.; Cochran, H.D.

    1999-01-01

    We study the effect of wall endash fluid interactions on the state conditions and the effective properties of a model dodecane fluid confined between parallel solid walls. A significant increase in the effective density of the confined fluid is observed with increasing strength of the wall endash fluid interaction. The effect of the wall endash fluid interaction on the rotational relaxation and diffusional relaxation of the fluid is seen in the significant slowing down of the relaxation with increasing wall endash fluid interaction strength. The difference between the confined fluid and the three-dimensional bulk fluid is demonstrated by the strong anisotropy of the dynamical properties, the molecular rotation, and self-diffusion. The viscosity of the confined fluid shows a large difference between weak and strong wall endash fluid interactions, and a significant difference from bulk fluid at low shear rate. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  20. Modeling interfacial area transport in multi-fluid systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Many typical chemical engineering operations are multi-fluid systems. They are carried out in distillation columns (vapor/liquid), liquid-liquid contactors (liquid/liquid) and other similar devices. An important parameter is interfacial area concentration, which determines the rate of interfluid heat, mass and momentum transfer and ultimately, the overall performance of the equipment. In many cases, the models for determining interfacial area concentration are empirical and can only describe the cases for which there is experimental data. In an effort to understand multiphase reactors and the mixing process better, a multi-fluid model has been developed as part of a research effort to calculate interfacial area transport in several different types of in-line static mixers. For this work, the ensemble-averaged property conservation equations have been derived for each fluid and for the mixture. These equations were then combined to derive a transport equation for the interfacial area concentration. The final, one-dimensional model was compared to interfacial area concentration data from two sizes of Kenics in-line mixer, two sizes of concurrent jet and a Tee mixer. In all cases, the calculated and experimental data compared well with the highest scatter being with the Tee mixer comparison.

  1. Fluid models for kinetic effects in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolyakov, A.I.; Hirose, A.; Yagi, M.; Callen, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Fluid models for toroidal plasma are considered paying particular attention to the effects of particle motion along the equilibrium magnetic field. It is shown that the basic fluid equations can be obtained either as moments of the drift-kinetic equation, or from the standard fluid equations by expanding them in 1/B small parameter. It is shown that the collisionless gyroviscosity accounts for the effects of the particle magnetic drift in the parallel component of the momentum balance equation. Simple truncated model of the plasma response for arbitrary ω D (magnetic drift frequency) and k parallel V t (parallel transit frequency) is proposed. In the absence of resonances, which can be inhibited by the particle magnetic drift, this model recovers the exact kinetic results with satisfactory accuracy. In general case, the kinetic closure for the effects of the particle motion along the magnetic field is suggested in terms of the parallel viscosity and the heat flux. They are directly calculated from the linear drift-kinetic equation. Simplified expressions in the different asymptotic limits are derived

  2. Fluid model of the magnetic presheath in a turbulent plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanojevic, M; Duhovnik, J; Jelic, N; Kendl, A; Kuhn, S

    2005-01-01

    A fluid model of the magnetic presheath in a turbulent boundary plasma is presented. Turbulent transport corrections of the classical three-dimensional fluid transport equations, which can be used to study magnetic presheaths in various geometries, are derived by means of the ensemble averaging procedure from the statistical theory of plasma turbulence. Then, the magnetic presheath in front of an infinite plane surface is analysed in detail. The linearized planar magnetic presheath equations are applied to the plasma-presheath-magnetic-presheath boundary (i.e. the magnetic presheath edge), whereas the original non-linear planar magnetic presheath equations are used for the entire magnetic presheath, allowing for various sets of experimentally relevant free model parameters to be applied. Important new results of this study are, among others, new expressions for the fluid Bohm criterion at the Debye sheath edge and for the ion flux density perpendicular to the wall. These new results, which exhibit corrections due to the turbulent charged particle transport, can qualitatively explain the fact that whenever the angle between the magnetic field and the wall is very small (i.e. several degrees) or zero, electric currents, measured by Langmuir probes in the boundary regions of nuclear fusion devices and in various low-temperature plasmas, are anomalously enhanced in comparison with those expected or predicted by other theoretical models

  3. Semiconductor Quantum Dash Broadband Emitters: Modeling and Experiments

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa

    2013-10-01

    Broadband light emitters operation, which covers multiple wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum, has been established as an indispensable element to the human kind, continuously advancing the living standard by serving as sources in important multi-disciplinary field applications such as biomedical imaging and sensing, general lighting and internet and mobile phone connectivity. In general, most commercial broadband light sources relies on complex systems for broadband light generation which are bulky, and energy hungry. \\tRecent demonstration of ultra-broadband emission from semiconductor light sources in the form of superluminescent light emitting diodes (SLDs) has paved way in realization of broadband emitters on a completely novel platform, which offered compactness, cost effectiveness, and comparatively energy efficient, and are already serving as a key component in medical imaging systems. The low power-bandwidth product is inherent in SLDs operating in the amplified spontaneous emission regime. A quantum leap in the advancement of broadband emitters, in which high power and large bandwidth (in tens of nm) are in demand. Recently, the birth of a new class of broadband semiconductor laser diode (LDs) producing multiple wavelength light in stimulated emission regime was demonstrated. This very recent manifestation of a high power-bandwidth-product semiconductor broadband LDs relies on interband optical transitions via quantum confined dot/dash nanostructures and exploiting the natural inhomogeneity of the self-assembled growth technology. This concept is highly interesting and extending the broad spectrum of stimulated emission by novel device design forms the central focus of this dissertation. \\tIn this work, a simple rate equation numerical technique for modeling InAs/InP quantum dash laser incorporating the properties of inhomogeneous broadening effect on lasing spectra was developed and discussed, followed by a comprehensive experimental analysis

  4. Nonlinear unitary quantum collapse model with self-generated noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geszti, Tamás

    2018-04-01

    Collapse models including some external noise of unknown origin are routinely used to describe phenomena on the quantum-classical border; in particular, quantum measurement. Although containing nonlinear dynamics and thereby exposed to the possibility of superluminal signaling in individual events, such models are widely accepted on the basis of fully reproducing the non-signaling statistical predictions of quantum mechanics. Here we present a deterministic nonlinear model without any external noise, in which randomness—instead of being universally present—emerges in the measurement process, from deterministic irregular dynamics of the detectors. The treatment is based on a minimally nonlinear von Neumann equation for a Stern–Gerlach or Bell-type measuring setup, containing coordinate and momentum operators in a self-adjoint skew-symmetric, split scalar product structure over the configuration space. The microscopic states of the detectors act as a nonlocal set of hidden parameters, controlling individual outcomes. The model is shown to display pumping of weights between setup-defined basis states, with a single winner randomly selected and the rest collapsing to zero. Environmental decoherence has no role in the scenario. Through stochastic modelling, based on Pearle’s ‘gambler’s ruin’ scheme, outcome probabilities are shown to obey Born’s rule under a no-drift or ‘fair-game’ condition. This fully reproduces quantum statistical predictions, implying that the proposed non-linear deterministic model satisfies the non-signaling requirement. Our treatment is still vulnerable to hidden signaling in individual events, which remains to be handled by future research.

  5. Two-Fluid Mathematical Models for Blood Flow in Stenosed Arteries: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar DS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The pulsatile flow of blood through stenosed arteries is analyzed by assuming the blood as a two-fluid model with the suspension of all the erythrocytes in the core region as a non-Newtonian fluid and the plasma in the peripheral layer as a Newtonian fluid. The non-Newtonian fluid in the core region of the artery is assumed as a (i Herschel-Bulkley fluid and (ii Casson fluid. Perturbation method is used to solve the resulting system of non-linear partial differential equations. Expressions for various flow quantities are obtained for the two-fluid Casson model. Expressions of the flow quantities obtained by Sankar and Lee (2006 for the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model are used to get the data for comparison. It is found that the plug flow velocity and velocity distribution of the two-fluid Casson model are considerably higher than those of the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model. It is also observed that the pressure drop, plug core radius, wall shear stress and the resistance to flow are significantly very low for the two-fluid Casson model than those of the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model. Hence, the two-fluid Casson model would be more useful than the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model to analyze the blood flow through stenosed arteries.

  6. Combining multiblock and detailed fluid flow models (LOVI) - MASIT17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alopaeus, V.; Moilanen, P.; Visuri, O.; Laakkonen, M.; Aittamaa, J. (Helsinki University of Technology, Faculty of Chemistry and Materials Sciences, Department of Biotechnology and Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)); Heiskanen, K.; Wierink, G. (Helsinki University of Technology, Faculty of Chemistry and Materials Sciences, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Espoo (Finland)); Manninen, M.; Seppaelae, M. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland))

    2008-07-01

    The goal of this research project is to develop models for scale-up, design and operation of heterogeneous reactors. By computing a detailed fluid flow field and using it in a multiblock-model the computing times can be kept reasonable. Our modelling is based on phenomenological models verified on experimental results. Several experimental apparatuses have been used to study gas-liquid flow (tapered channel, 14/200dm3 stirred vessels and the 'giraffe') and bubble-particle interactions. A particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) apparatus is being purchased during 2008 to study fluid flow fields. There has been extensive experimental activity. During this project phenomenological models have been verified, numerical methods for the calculation of population balances have been improved, a novel local mixing time analysis method has been developed and automated multiblock generation algorithms have been developed. A method of evaluating CFD results with a single glance with a two-block model has been introduced. Fermentation process of Galilaeus and the flotation cell of Outotec have been modelled. (orig.)

  7. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokkam, Ram [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  8. Free surface modelling with two-fluid model and reduced numerical diffusion of the interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strubelj, Luka; Tiselj, Izrok

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The free surface flows are successfully modelled with one of existing free surface models, such as: level set method, volume of fluid method (with/without surface reconstruction), front tracking, two-fluid model (two momentum equations) with modified interphase force and others. The main disadvantage of two-fluid model used for simulations of free surface flows is numerical diffusion of the interface, which can be significantly reduced using the method presented in this paper. Several techniques for reduction of numerical diffusion of the interface have been implemented in the volume of fluid model and are based on modified numerical schemes for advection of volume fraction near the interface. The same approach could be used also for two-fluid method, but according to our experience more successful reduction of numerical diffusion of the interface can be achieved with conservative level set method. Within the conservative level set method, continuity equation for volume fraction is solved and after that the numerical diffusion of the interface is reduced in such a way that the thickness of the interface is kept constant during the simulation. Reduction of the interface diffusion can be also called interface sharpening. In present paper the two-fluid model with interface sharpening is validated on Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Under assumptions of isothermal and incompressible flow of two immiscible fluids, we simulated a system with the fluid of higher density located above the fluid of smaller density in two dimensions. Due to gravity in the system, fluid with higher density moves below the fluid with smaller density. Initial condition is not a flat interface between the fluids, but a sine wave with small amplitude, which develops into a mushroom-like structure. Mushroom-like structure in simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability later develops to small droplets as result of numerical dispersion of interface (interface sharpening

  9. Promoting Conceptual Coherence in Quantum Learning through Computational Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee-Sun

    2012-02-01

    In order to explain phenomena at the quantum level, scientists use multiple representations in verbal, pictorial, mathematical, and computational forms. Conceptual coherence among these multiple representations is used as an analytical framework to describe student learning trajectories in quantum physics. A series of internet-based curriculum modules are designed to address topics in quantum mechanics, semiconductor physics, and nano-scale engineering applications. In these modules, students are engaged in inquiry-based activities situated in a highly interactive computational modeling environment. This study was conducted in an introductory level solid state physics course. Based on in-depth interviews with 13 students, methods for identifying conceptual coherence as a function of students' level of understanding are presented. Pre-post test comparisons of 20 students in the course indicate a statistically significant improvement in students' conceptual coherence of understanding quantum phenomena before and after the course, Effect Size = 1.29 SD. Additional analyses indicate that students who responded to the modules more coherently improved their conceptual coherence to a greater extent than those who did less to the modules after controlling for their course grades.

  10. Lattice refining loop quantum cosmology, anisotropic models, and stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojowald, Martin; Cartin, Daniel; Khanna, Gaurav

    2007-01-01

    A general class of loop quantizations for anisotropic models is introduced and discussed, which enhances loop quantum cosmology by relevant features seen in inhomogeneous situations. The main new effect is an underlying lattice which is being refined during dynamical changes of the volume. In general, this leads to a new feature of dynamical difference equations which may not have constant step-size, posing new mathematical problems. It is discussed how such models can be evaluated and what lattice refinements imply for semiclassical behavior. Two detailed examples illustrate that stability conditions can put strong constraints on suitable refinement models, even in the absence of a fundamental Hamiltonian which defines changes of the underlying lattice. Thus, a large class of consistency tests of loop quantum gravity becomes available. In this context, it will also be seen that quantum corrections due to inverse powers of metric components in a constraint are much larger than they appeared recently in more special treatments of isotropic, free scalar models where they were artificially suppressed

  11. Fluid flow and heat transfer modeling for castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, H.M.; Liu, Y.Y.; Sha, W.T.

    1986-01-01

    Casting is fundamental to manufacturing of many types of equipment and products. Although casting is a very old technology that has been in existence for hundreds of years, it remains a highly empirical technology, and production of new castings requires an expensive and time-consuming trial-and-error approach. In recent years, mathematical modeling of casting has received increasing attention; however, a majority of the modeling work has been in the area of heat transfer and solidification. Very little work has been done in modeling fluid flow of the liquid melt. This paper presents a model of fluid flow coupled with heat transfer of a liquid melt for casting processes. The model to be described in this paper is an extension of the COMMIX code and is capable of handling castings with any shape, size, and material. A feature of this model is the ability to track the liquid/gas interface and liquid/solid interface. The flow of liquid melt through the sprue and runners and into the mold cavity is calculated as well as three-dimensional temperature and velocity distributions of the liquid melt throughout the casting process. 14 refs., 13 figs

  12. Mathematical models for quantum point contact spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exner, P.; Seba, P.

    1986-01-01

    Two mathematical models intended to describe the point contact spectroscopical experiments are constructed. It adds a new item to the list of recently discovered applications of the self-adjoint extension theory

  13. Fluid Dynamic Models for Bhattacharyya-Based Discriminant Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Yung-Kyun; Hamm, Jihun; Park, Frank Chongwoo; Zhang, Byoung-Tak; Lee, Daniel D

    2018-01-01

    Classical discriminant analysis attempts to discover a low-dimensional subspace where class label information is maximally preserved under projection. Canonical methods for estimating the subspace optimize an information-theoretic criterion that measures the separation between the class-conditional distributions. Unfortunately, direct optimization of the information-theoretic criteria is generally non-convex and intractable in high-dimensional spaces. In this work, we propose a novel, tractable algorithm for discriminant analysis that considers the class-conditional densities as interacting fluids in the high-dimensional embedding space. We use the Bhattacharyya criterion as a potential function that generates forces between the interacting fluids, and derive a computationally tractable method for finding the low-dimensional subspace that optimally constrains the resulting fluid flow. We show that this model properly reduces to the optimal solution for homoscedastic data as well as for heteroscedastic Gaussian distributions with equal means. We also extend this model to discover optimal filters for discriminating Gaussian processes and provide experimental results and comparisons on a number of datasets.

  14. Modeling vertical loads in pools resulting from fluid injection. [BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, W.; McCauley, E.W.

    1978-06-15

    Table-top model experiments were performed to investigate pressure suppression pool dynamics effects due to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) for the Peachbottom Mark I boiling water reactor containment system. The results guided subsequent conduct of experiments in the /sup 1///sub 5/-scale facility and provided new insight into the vertical load function (VLF). Model experiments show an oscillatory VLF with the download typically double-spiked followed by a more gradual sinusoidal upload. The load function contains a high frequency oscillation superimposed on a low frequency one; evidence from measurements indicates that the oscillations are initiated by fluid dynamics phenomena.

  15. Modeling vertical loads in pools resulting from fluid injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, W.; McCauley, E.W.

    1978-01-01

    Table-top model experiments were performed to investigate pressure suppression pool dynamics effects due to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) for the Peachbottom Mark I boiling water reactor containment system. The results guided subsequent conduct of experiments in the 1 / 5 -scale facility and provided new insight into the vertical load function (VLF). Model experiments show an oscillatory VLF with the download typically double-spiked followed by a more gradual sinusoidal upload. The load function contains a high frequency oscillation superimposed on a low frequency one; evidence from measurements indicates that the oscillations are initiated by fluid dynamics phenomena

  16. Numerical model for macroscopic quantum superpositions based on phase-covariant quantum cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buraczewski, A.; Stobińska, M.

    2012-10-01

    Macroscopically populated quantum superpositions pose a question to what extent the macroscopic world obeys quantum mechanical laws. Recently, such superpositions for light, generated by an optimal quantum cloner, have been demonstrated. They are of fundamental and technological interest. We present numerical methods useful for modeling of these states. Their properties are governed by a Gaussian hypergeometric function, which cannot be reduced to either elementary or easily tractable functions. We discuss the method of efficient computation of this function for half-integer parameters and a moderate value of its argument. We show how to dynamically estimate a cutoff for infinite sums involving this function performed over its parameters. Our algorithm exceeds double precision and is parallelizable. Depending on the experimental parameters it chooses one of the several ways of summation to achieve the best efficiency. The methods presented here can be adjusted for analysis of similar experimental schemes. Program summary Program title: MQSVIS Catalogue identifier: AEMR_ v1_ 0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMR_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1643 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13212 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C with OpenMP extensions (main numerical program), Python (helper scripts). Computer: Modern PC (tested on AMD and Intel processors), HP BL2x220. Operating system: Unix/Linux. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes (OpenMP). RAM: 200 MB for single run for 1000×1000 tile Classification: 4.15, 18. External routines: OpenMP Nature of problem: Recently, macroscopically populated quantum superpositions for light, generated by an optimal quantum cloner, have

  17. Slow dynamics in translation-invariant quantum lattice models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidis, Alexios A.; Žnidarič, Marko; Medvedyeva, Mariya; Abanin, Dmitry A.; Prosen, Tomaž; Papić, Z.

    2018-03-01

    Many-body quantum systems typically display fast dynamics and ballistic spreading of information. Here we address the open problem of how slow the dynamics can be after a generic breaking of integrability by local interactions. We develop a method based on degenerate perturbation theory that reveals slow dynamical regimes and delocalization processes in general translation invariant models, along with accurate estimates of their delocalization time scales. Our results shed light on the fundamental questions of the robustness of quantum integrable systems and the possibility of many-body localization without disorder. As an example, we construct a large class of one-dimensional lattice models where, despite the absence of asymptotic localization, the transient dynamics is exceptionally slow, i.e., the dynamics is indistinguishable from that of many-body localized systems for the system sizes and time scales accessible in experiments and numerical simulations.

  18. Quantum Chemical Modeling of Homogeneous Water Oxidation Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Rong-Zhen; Siegbahn, Per E M

    2017-11-23

    The design of efficient and robust water oxidation catalysts has proven challenging in the development of artificial photosynthetic systems for solar energy harnessing and storage. Tremendous progress has been made in the development of homogeneous transition-metal complexes capable of mediating water oxidation. To improve the efficiency of the catalyst and to design new catalysts, a detailed mechanistic understanding is necessary. Quantum chemical modeling calculations have been successfully used to complement the experimental techniques to suggest a catalytic mechanism and identify all stationary points, including transition states for both O-O bond formation and O 2 release. In this review, recent progress in the applications of quantum chemical methods for the modeling of homogeneous water oxidation catalysis, covering various transition metals, including manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, ruthenium, and iridium, is discussed. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. A quantum heat engine based on Tavis-Cummings model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai-Wei; Li, Ran; Zhang, Guo-Feng

    2017-09-01

    This paper will investigate a four-stroke quantum heat engine based on the Tavis-Cummings model. The cycle of the heat engine is similar to the Otto cycle in classical thermodynamics. The relationship between output power as well as cycle efficiency and external physical system parameters are given. Under this condition, the entanglement behavior of the system will be studied. The system can show considerable entanglement by strictly controlling relevant parameters. Unlike common two-level quantum heat engines, efficiency is a function of temperature, showing interesting and unexpected phenomena. Several ways to adjust engine properties by external parameters are proposed, with which the output power and efficiency can be optimized. The heat engine model exhibits high efficiency and output power with the participation of a small number of photons, and decay rapidly as the number of photons increases in entangled area but shows interesting behaviors in non-entangled area of photon numbers.

  20. Quantum quench dynamics in analytically solvable one-dimensional models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iucci, Anibal; Cazalilla, Miguel A.; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2008-03-01

    In connection with experiments in cold atomic systems, we consider the non-equilibrium dynamics of some analytically solvable one-dimensional systems which undergo a quantum quench. In this quench one or several of the parameters of the Hamiltonian of an interacting quantum system are changed over a very short time scale. In particular, we concentrate on the Luttinger model and the sine-Gordon model in the Luther-Emery point. For the latter, we show that the order parameter and the two-point correlation function relax in the long time limit to the values determined by a generalized Gibbs ensemble first discussed by J. T. Jaynes [Phys. Rev. 106, 620 (1957); 108, 171 (1957)], and recently conjectured by M. Rigol et.al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 050405 (2007)] to apply to the non-equilibrium dynamics of integrable systems.

  1. Mathematical modelling of peristaltic propulsion of viscoplastic bio-fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, D; Bég, Osman A

    2014-01-01

    This article studies theoretically the transportation of rheological viscoplastic fluids through physiological vessels by continuous muscle contraction and relaxation, that is, peristalsis. Both cases of planar and cylindrical physiological vessels are considered. A mathematical model is developed under long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. Expressions for axial velocity in core region, axial velocity in plug flow region, volume flow rate and pressure gradient in non-dimensional form are obtained. A comparative study of velocity profiles, pressure distribution, friction force and mechanical efficiency for different viscoplastic liquids is conducted. The influence of width of plug flow region, shear rate strain index and yield stress index on the pressure distribution, friction force and mechanical efficiency is elaborated. The study is relevant to gastric fluid mechanics and also non-Newtonian biomimetic pump hazardous waste systems exploiting peristaltic mechanisms.

  2. Two-fluid model for the simultaneous flow of colloids and fluids in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    To describe the velocities of particles such as ions, protein molecules and colloids dispersed or dissolved in a fluid, it is important to also describe the forces acting on the fluid, including pressure gradients and friction of the fluid with the particles and with the porous media through which

  3. A realistic model for quantum theory with a locality property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, P.H.

    1987-04-01

    A model reproducing the predictions of relativistic quantum theory to any desired degree of accuracy is described in this paper. It involves quantities that are independent of the observer's knowledge, and therefore can be called real, and which are defined at each point in space, and therefore can be called local in a rudimentary sense. It involves faster-than-light, but not instantaneous, action at distance

  4. Computational models for the berry phase in semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakar, S., E-mail: rmelnik@wlu.ca; Melnik, R. V. N., E-mail: rmelnik@wlu.ca [M2NeT Lab, Wilfrid Laurier University, 75 University Ave W, Waterloo, ON N2L 3C5 (Canada); Sebetci, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mevlana University, 42003, Konya (Turkey)

    2014-10-06

    By developing a new model and its finite element implementation, we analyze the Berry phase low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures, focusing on quantum dots (QDs). In particular, we solve the Schrödinger equation and investigate the evolution of the spin dynamics during the adiabatic transport of the QDs in the 2D plane along circular trajectory. Based on this study, we reveal that the Berry phase is highly sensitive to the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit lengths.

  5. Quantum metric spaces as a model for pregeometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, E.; Cespedes, J.; Verdaguer, E.

    1992-01-01

    A new arena for the dynamics of spacetime is proposed, in which the basic quantum variable is the two-point distance on a metric space. The scaling dimension (that is, the Kolmogorov capacity) in the neighborhood of each point then defines in a natural way a local concept of dimension. We study our model in the region of parameter space in which the resulting spacetime is not too different from a smooth manifold

  6. Quantum modeling of two-level photovoltaic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aram Tahereh Nemati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a quantum formalism that provides a quantitative picture of the fundamental processes of charge separation that follow an absorption event. We apply the formalism to two-level photovoltaic cells and our purpose is to pedagogically explain the main aspects of the model. The formalism is developed in the energy domain and provides detailed knowledge about existence or absence of localized states and their effects on electronic structure and photovoltaic yield.

  7. A Quantum Implementation Model for Artificial Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Daskin, Ammar

    2016-01-01

    The learning process for multi layered neural networks with many nodes makes heavy demands on computational resources. In some neural network models, the learning formulas, such as the Widrow-Hoff formula, do not change the eigenvectors of the weight matrix while flatting the eigenvalues. In infinity, this iterative formulas result in terms formed by the principal components of the weight matrix: i.e., the eigenvectors corresponding to the non-zero eigenvalues. In quantum computing, the phase...

  8. A Quantum Implementation Model for Artificial Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ammar Daskin

    2018-01-01

    The learning process for multilayered neural networks with many nodes makes heavy demands on computational resources. In some neural network models, the learning formulas, such as the Widrow–Hoff formula, do not change the eigenvectors of the weight matrix while flatting the eigenvalues. In infinity, these iterative formulas result in terms formed by the principal components of the weight matrix, namely, the eigenvectors corresponding to the non-zero eigenvalues. In quantum computing, the pha...

  9. Modeling fluid-rock interaction at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viani, B.E.; Bruton, C.J.

    1992-08-01

    Volcanic rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada aie being assessed for their suitability as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste. Recent progress in modeling fluid-rock interactions, in particular the mineralogical and chemical changes that may accompany waste disposal at Yucca Mountain, will be reviewed in this publication. In Part 1 of this publication, ''Geochemical Modeling of Clinoptilolite-Water Interactions,'' solid-solution and cation-exchange models for the zeolite clinoptilolite are developed and compared to experimental and field observations. At Yucca Mountain, clinoptilolite which is found lining fractures and as a major component of zeolitized tuffs, is expected to play an important role in sequestering radionuclides that may escape from a potential nuclear waste repository. The solid-solution and ion-exchange models were evaluated by comparing predicted stabilities and exchangeable cation distributions of clinoptilolites with: (1) published binary exchange data; (2) compositions of coexisting clinoptilolites and formation waters at Yucca Mountain; (3) experimental sorption isotherms of Cs and Sr on zeolitized tuff, and (4) high temperature experimental data. Good agreement was found between predictions and expertmental data, especially for binary exchange and Cs and Sr sorption on clinoptilolite. Part 2 of this publication, ''Geochemical Simulation of Fluid-Rock Interactions at Yucca Mountain,'' describes preliminary numerical simulations of fluid-rock interactions at Yucca Mountain. The solid-solution model developed in the first part of the paper is used to evaluate the stability and composition of clinciptilolite and other minerals in the host rock under ambient conditions and after waste emplacement

  10. General approach to characterizing reservoir fluids for EoS models using a large PVT database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varzandeh, Farhad; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Yan, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Fluid characterization is needed when applying any EoS model to reservoir fluids. It is important especially for non-cubic models such as PC-SAFT where fluid characterization is less mature. Furthermore, there is a great interest to apply non-cubic models to high pressure high temperature reservoir...

  11. Quark Model in the Quantum Mechanics Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussar, P. E.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses in detail the totally symmetric three-quark karyonic wave functions. The two-body mesonic states are also discussed. A brief review of the experimental efforts to identify the quark model multiplets is given. (Author/SK)

  12. XYZ Quantum Heisenberg Models with p-Orbital Bosons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinheiro, Fernanda; Bruun, Georg; Martikainen, Jani-Petri

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate how the spin-1/2 XYZ quantum Heisenberg model can be realized with bosonic atoms loaded in the p band of an optical lattice in the Mott regime. The combination of Bose statistics and the symmetry of the p-orbital wave functions leads to a nonintegrable Heisenberg model...... with antiferromagnetic couplings. Moreover, the sign and relative strength of the couplings characterizing the model are shown to be experimentally tunable. We display the rich phase diagram in the one-dimensional case and discuss finite size effects relevant for trapped systems. Finally, experimental issues related...

  13. Modelling of heat transfer to fluids at a supercritical pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuisheng, He

    2014-01-01

    A key feature of Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) is that, by raising the pressure of the reactor coolant fluid above the critical value, a phase change crisis is avoided. However, the changes in water density as it flows through the core of an SCWR are actually much higher than in the current water-cooled reactors. In a typical design, the ratio of the density of water at the core inlet to that at exit is as high as 7:1. Other fluid properties also vary significantly, especially around the pseudo-critical temperature (at which the specific heat capacity peaks). As a result, turbulent flow and heat transfer behaviour in the core is extremely complex and under certain conditions, significant heat transfer deterioration can potentially occur. Consequently, understanding and being able to predict flow and heat transfer phenomena under normal steady operation conditions and in start-up and hypothetical fault conditions are fundamental to the design of SCWR. There have been intensive studies on flow and heat transfer to fluids at supercritical pressure recently and several excellent review papers have been published. In the talk, we will focus on some turbulence modelling issues encountered in CFD simulations. The talk will first discuss some flow and heat transfer issues related to fluids at supercritical pressures and their potential implications in SCWR, and some recent developments in the understanding and modelling techniques of such problems, which will be followed by an outlook for some future developments.Factors which have a major influence on the flow and will be discussed are buoyancy and flow acceleration due to thermal expansion (both are due to density variations but involve different mechanisms) and the nonuniformity of other fluid properties. In addition, laminar-turbulent flow transition coupled with buoyancy and flow acceleration plays an important role in heat transfer effectiveness and wall temperature in the entrance region but such

  14. Quantum Theory of Layer Vibration in the Layer-Structured Fermi Fluid : Nuclear Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Koichi, TAKAHASHI; Tatsuo, TSUKAMOTO; Department of Liberal Arts, Tohoku Gakuin University; Department of Liberal Arts, Tohoku Gakuin University

    1993-01-01

    A method of introducing collective motion into the layered Fermi fluid (LFF) is discussed by concentrating on layer vibrations. By the random phase approximation (RPA), the original dynamical degrees of freedom of particles are separated into collective modes (CMs), uncorrelated (harmonic) oscillator modes (UOMs) and two-dimensional (2D) motions of particles within layers, which leads to a subband structure of particle spectrum. Transverse CMs cause the system's instability in case the intera...

  15. Bubbles in Non-Newtonian Fluids: A Multiscale Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank X.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the concept of a multiscale modeling approach is highlighted with which physical phenomena at different scales can be studied. The work reports a multiscale approach to describe the dynamics of a chain of bubbles rising in non-Newtonian fluids. By means of the Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV and the Lattice Boltzmann (LB simulation, a deep understanding of the complex flow pattern around a single bubble is gained at microscale. The interactions and coalescences between bubbles rising in non-Newtonian fluids are experimentally investigated by the PIV measurements, birefringence and rheological characterization for both an isolated bubble and a chain of bubbles formed from a submerged orifice. Two aspects are identified as central to interactions and coalescence: the stress creation by the passage of bubbles and their relaxation due to the fluid’s memory. This competition between the creation and relaxation of stresses displays non-linear complex dynamics. Along with the detailed knowledge around a single bubble, these fundamental mechanisms governing bubbles’ collective behavior in a train of bubbles at mesoscale lead to a cognitive modeling based on behavioral rules. By simulating bubbles as adaptive agents with the surround fluid via residual stresses, model predictions for consecutive coalescence between a great number of bubbles compare very satisfactorily with the experimental investigation at macroscale. Obviously this new approach captures important quantitative and qualitative features of the collective behaviors of bubbles at macroscale level which are predicted by the mesoscopic cognitive modeling approach of the interactions rules which are deduced from the understanding of the microscopic mechanism of the flow around a single bubble.

  16. ANFIS modeling for prediction of particle motions in fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdari, Arman; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2015-11-01

    Accurate dynamic analysis of parcel of solid particles driven in fluid flow system is of interest for many natural and industrial applications such as sedimentation process, study of cloud particles in atmosphere, etc. In this paper, numerical modeling of solid particles in incompressible flow using Eulerian-Lagrangian approach is carried out to investigate the dynamic behavior of particles in different flow conditions; channel and cavity flow. Although modern computers have been well developed, the high computational time and costs for this kind of problems are still demanded. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is used to simulate fluid flows and combined with the Lagrangian approach to predict the motion of particles in the range of masses. Some particles are selected, and subjected to Adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) to predict the trajectory of moving solid particles. Using a hybrid learning procedure from computational particle movement, the ANFIS can construct an input-output mapping based on fuzzy if-then rules and stipulated computational fluid dynamics prediction pairs. The obtained results from ANFIS algorithm is validated and compared with the set of benchmark data provided based on point-like approach coupled with the LBM method.

  17. Beyond Poiseuille: Preservation Fluid Flow in an Experimental Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Poiseuille’s equation describes the relationship between fluid viscosity, pressure, tubing diameter, and flow, yet it is not known if cold organ perfusion systems follow this equation. We investigated these relationships in an ex vivo model and aimed to offer some rationale for equipment selection. Increasing the cannula size from 14 to 20 Fr increased flow rate by a mean (SD of 13 (12%. Marshall’s hyperosmolar citrate was three times less viscous than UW solution, but flows were only 45% faster. Doubling the bag pressure led to a mean (SD flow rate increase of only 19 (13%, not twice the rate. When external pressure devices were used, 100 mmHg of continuous pressure increased flow by a mean (SD of 43 (17% when compared to the same pressure applied initially only. Poiseuille’s equation was not followed; this is most likely due to “slipping” of preservation fluid within the plastic tubing. Cannula size made little difference over the ranges examined; flows are primarily determined by bag pressure and fluid viscosity. External infusor devices require continuous pressurisation to deliver high flow. Future studies examining the impact of perfusion variables on graft outcomes should include detailed equipment descriptions.

  18. A Fluid Model for Performance Analysis in Cellular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coupechoux Marceau

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new framework to study the performance of cellular networks using a fluid model and we derive from this model analytical formulas for interference, outage probability, and spatial outage probability. The key idea of the fluid model is to consider the discrete base station (BS entities as a continuum of transmitters that are spatially distributed in the network. This model allows us to obtain simple analytical expressions to reveal main characteristics of the network. In this paper, we focus on the downlink other-cell interference factor (OCIF, which is defined for a given user as the ratio of its outer cell received power to its inner cell received power. A closed-form formula of the OCIF is provided in this paper. From this formula, we are able to obtain the global outage probability as well as the spatial outage probability, which depends on the location of a mobile station (MS initiating a new call. Our analytical results are compared to Monte Carlo simulations performed in a traditional hexagonal network. Furthermore, we demonstrate an application of the outage probability related to cell breathing and densification of cellular networks.

  19. Multiphysical modelling of fluid transport through osteo-articular media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Thibault; Naili, Salah; Sansalone, Vittorio

    2010-03-01

    In this study, a multiphysical description of fluid transport through osteo-articular porous media is presented. Adapted from the model of Moyne and Murad, which is intended to describe clayey materials behaviour, this multiscale modelling allows for the derivation of the macroscopic response of the tissue from microscopical information. First the model is described. At the pore scale, electrohydrodynamics equations governing the electrolyte movement are coupled with local electrostatics (Gauss-Poisson equation), and ionic transport equations. Using a change of variables and an asymptotic expansion method, the macroscopic description is carried out. Results of this model are used to show the importance of couplings effects on the mechanotransduction of compact bone remodelling.

  20. Topological quantum error correction in the Kitaev honeycomb model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Chan; Brell, Courtney G.; Flammia, Steven T.

    2017-08-01

    The Kitaev honeycomb model is an approximate topological quantum error correcting code in the same phase as the toric code, but requiring only a 2-body Hamiltonian. As a frustrated spin model, it is well outside the commuting models of topological quantum codes that are typically studied, but its exact solubility makes it more amenable to analysis of effects arising in this noncommutative setting than a generic topologically ordered Hamiltonian. Here we study quantum error correction in the honeycomb model using both analytic and numerical techniques. We first prove explicit exponential bounds on the approximate degeneracy, local indistinguishability, and correctability of the code space. These bounds are tighter than can be achieved using known general properties of topological phases. Our proofs are specialized to the honeycomb model, but some of the methods may nonetheless be of broader interest. Following this, we numerically study noise caused by thermalization processes in the perturbative regime close to the toric code renormalization group fixed point. The appearance of non-topological excitations in this setting has no significant effect on the error correction properties of the honeycomb model in the regimes we study. Although the behavior of this model is found to be qualitatively similar to that of the standard toric code in most regimes, we find numerical evidence of an interesting effect in the low-temperature, finite-size regime where a preferred lattice direction emerges and anyon diffusion is geometrically constrained. We expect this effect to yield an improvement in the scaling of the lifetime with system size as compared to the standard toric code.

  1. A new exactly solvable spatially one-dimensional quantum superradiance fermi-medium model and properties of its quantum solitonic states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Blackmore

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A new exactly solvable spatially one-dimensional quantum superradiance model describing a charged fermionic medium interacting with external electromagnetic field is proposed. The infinite hierarchy of quantuum conservation laws and many-particle Bethe eigenstates that model quantum solitonic impulse structures are constructed. The Hamilton operator renormalization procedure subject to a physically stable vacuum is described, the quantum excitations and quantum solitons, related with the thermodynamical equilibrity of the model, are discussed.

  2. Two-photon quantum Rabi model with superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicetti, S.; Rossatto, D. Z.; Rico, E.; Solano, E.; Forn-Díaz, P.

    2018-01-01

    We propose a superconducting circuit to implement a two-photon quantum Rabi model in a solid-state device, where a qubit and a resonator are coupled by a two-photon interaction. We analyze the input-output relations for this circuit in the strong-coupling regime and find that fundamental quantum-optical phenomena are qualitatively modified. For instance, two-photon interactions are shown to yield a single- or two-photon blockade when a pumping field is either applied to the cavity mode or to the qubit, respectively. In addition, we derive an effective Hamiltonian for perturbative ultrastrong two-photon couplings in the dispersive regime, where two-photon interactions introduce a qubit-state-dependent Kerr term. Finally, we analyze the spectral collapse of the multiqubit two-photon quantum Rabi model and find a scaling of the critical coupling with the number of qubits. Using realistic parameters with the circuit proposed, three qubits are sufficient to reach the collapse point.

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo Simulation of Frustrated Kondo Lattice Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Toshihiro; Assaad, Fakher F.; Grover, Tarun

    2018-03-01

    The absence of the negative sign problem in quantum Monte Carlo simulations of spin and fermion systems has different origins. World-line based algorithms for spins require positivity of matrix elements whereas auxiliary field approaches for fermions depend on symmetries such as particle-hole symmetry. For negative-sign-free spin and fermionic systems, we show that one can formulate a negative-sign-free auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo algorithm that allows Kondo coupling of fermions with the spins. Using this general approach, we study a half-filled Kondo lattice model on the honeycomb lattice with geometric frustration. In addition to the conventional Kondo insulator and antiferromagnetically ordered phases, we find a partial Kondo screened state where spins are selectively screened so as to alleviate frustration, and the lattice rotation symmetry is broken nematically.

  4. Error modelling of quantum Hall array resistance standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano, Martina; Oe, Takehiko; Ortolano, Massimo; Callegaro, Luca; Kaneko, Nobu-Hisa

    2018-04-01

    Quantum Hall array resistance standards (QHARSs) are integrated circuits composed of interconnected quantum Hall effect elements that allow the realization of virtually arbitrary resistance values. In recent years, techniques were presented to efficiently design QHARS networks. An open problem is that of the evaluation of the accuracy of a QHARS, which is affected by contact and wire resistances. In this work, we present a general and systematic procedure for the error modelling of QHARSs, which is based on modern circuit analysis techniques and Monte Carlo evaluation of the uncertainty. As a practical example, this method of analysis is applied to the characterization of a 1 MΩ QHARS developed by the National Metrology Institute of Japan. Software tools are provided to apply the procedure to other arrays.

  5. Time response model of ER fluids for precision control of motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyanagi, Ken'ichi

    2009-01-01

    For improvement of control performance or new control demands of mechatronics devices using particle type ER fluids, it will be needed to further investigate a response time of the fluids. It is commonly said around 5-mili seconds, however, the formula structure of that delay has not been clear. This study aims to develop a functional damper (attenuators), that can control its viscous characteristics in real time using ER fluids as its working fluid. ER dampers are useful to accomplish high precision positioning not to prevent high speed movement of the motor. To realize the functional damper that can be manipulated according to situations or tasks, the modeling and control of ER fluids are necessary. This paper investigates time delay affects of ER fluids and makes an in-depth dynamic model of the fluid by utilizing simulation and experiment. The mathematical model has a dead-time and first ordered delays of the fluid and the high voltage amplifier for the fluid.

  6. Large time periodic solutions to coupled chemotaxis-fluid models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chunhua

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we deal with the time periodic problem to coupled chemotaxis-fluid models. We prove the existence of large time periodic strong solutions for the full chemotaxis-Navier-Stokes system in spatial dimension N=2, and the existence of large time periodic strong solutions for the chemotaxis-Stokes system in spatial dimension N=3. On the basis of these, the regularity of the solutions can be further improved. More precisely speaking, if the time periodic source g and the potential force \

  7. A coupled chemotaxis-fluid model: Global existence

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jian-Guo

    2011-09-01

    We consider a model arising from biology, consisting of chemotaxis equations coupled to viscous incompressible fluid equations through transport and external forcing. Global existence of solutions to the Cauchy problem is investigated under certain conditions. Precisely, for the chemotaxis-Navier- Stokes system in two space dimensions, we obtain global existence for large data. In three space dimensions, we prove global existence of weak solutions for the chemotaxis-Stokes system with nonlinear diffusion for the cell density.© 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Numerical Modeling of Fluid Flow in the Tape Casting Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Masoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2011-01-01

    The flow behavior of the fluid in the tape casting process is analyzed. A simple geometry is assumed for running the numerical calculations in ANSYS Fluent and the main parameters are expressed in non-dimensional form. The effect of different values for substrate velocity and pressure force...... of the substrate velocity is evaluated. The results of the modeling show that a relatively uniform tape thickness can be achieved. Moreover, the results are compared with selected experimental and analytical data from literature and good agreement is found....

  9. An anisotropic three-fluid model for heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovas, I.; Zimanyi, J.; Csernai, L.P.; Greiner, W.

    1981-01-01

    The nucleons taking part in heavy ion reactions are considered as a three-fluid system. The first and second components correspond to the target and the projectile, while the thermalised nucleons produced in the course of the collision belong to the third component. Making use of the Boltzmann-equation, hydrodynamical equations are derived which yield also the anisotropy of the momentum distribution. The equation of state for anisotropic nuclear matter is derived from a field theoretical model in the mean field approximation. (Auth.)

  10. On the structure factor of a quantum fluid - a new look

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridhar, R.; Vasudevan, R.

    1980-01-01

    An integral equation for the structure factor of a quantum liquid is derived making use of the first and third moment sum rules for the dynamic structure factor s(k,ω). It is assumed that single and two particle intermediate states saturate the sum rules. The solution of the resulting linear integral equation leads to the Bogolyubov result for weak potentials and approaches the classical free particle value if the two particle interaction is switched off. It is further shown that the non-linear equation of Mihara and Puff (1968) when properly linearised taking into account one and two particle intermediate states is similar to the one obtained in the present case. (author)

  11. Two-fluid model stability, simulation and chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Bertodano, Martín López de; Clausse, Alejandro; Ransom, Victor H

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses the linear and nonlinear two-phase stability of the one-dimensional Two-Fluid Model (TFM) material waves and the numerical methods used to solve it. The TFM fluid dynamic stability is a problem that remains open since its inception more than forty years ago. The difficulty is formidable because it involves the combined challenges of two-phase topological structure and turbulence, both nonlinear phenomena. The one dimensional approach permits the separation of the former from the latter. The authors first analyze the kinematic and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities with the simplified one-dimensional Fixed-Flux Model (FFM). They then analyze the density wave instability with the well-known Drift-Flux Model. They demonstrate that the Fixed-Flux and Drift-Flux assumptions are two complementary TFM simplifications that address two-phase local and global linear instabilities separately. Furthermore, they demonstrate with a well-posed FFM and a DFM two cases of nonlinear two-phase behavior that are ...

  12. Bukhvostov–Lipatov model and quantum-classical duality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Bazhanov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Bukhvostov–Lipatov model is an exactly soluble model of two interacting Dirac fermions in 1+1 dimensions. The model describes weakly interacting instantons and anti-instantons in the O(3 non-linear sigma model. In our previous work [arXiv:1607.04839] we have proposed an exact formula for the vacuum energy of the Bukhvostov–Lipatov model in terms of special solutions of the classical sinh-Gordon equation, which can be viewed as an example of a remarkable duality between integrable quantum field theories and integrable classical field theories in two dimensions. Here we present a complete derivation of this duality based on the classical inverse scattering transform method, traditional Bethe ansatz techniques and analytic theory of ordinary differential equations. In particular, we show that the Bethe ansatz equations defining the vacuum state of the quantum theory also define connection coefficients of an auxiliary linear problem for the classical sinh-Gordon equation. Moreover, we also present details of the derivation of the non-linear integral equations determining the vacuum energy and other spectral characteristics of the model in the case when the vacuum state is filled by 2-string solutions of the Bethe ansatz equations.

  13. Bukhvostov-Lipatov model and quantum-classical duality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhanov, Vladimir V.; Lukyanov, Sergei L.; Runov, Boris A.

    2018-02-01

    The Bukhvostov-Lipatov model is an exactly soluble model of two interacting Dirac fermions in 1 + 1 dimensions. The model describes weakly interacting instantons and anti-instantons in the O (3) non-linear sigma model. In our previous work [arxiv:arXiv:1607.04839] we have proposed an exact formula for the vacuum energy of the Bukhvostov-Lipatov model in terms of special solutions of the classical sinh-Gordon equation, which can be viewed as an example of a remarkable duality between integrable quantum field theories and integrable classical field theories in two dimensions. Here we present a complete derivation of this duality based on the classical inverse scattering transform method, traditional Bethe ansatz techniques and analytic theory of ordinary differential equations. In particular, we show that the Bethe ansatz equations defining the vacuum state of the quantum theory also define connection coefficients of an auxiliary linear problem for the classical sinh-Gordon equation. Moreover, we also present details of the derivation of the non-linear integral equations determining the vacuum energy and other spectral characteristics of the model in the case when the vacuum state is filled by 2-string solutions of the Bethe ansatz equations.

  14. Luminescence model with quantum impact parameter for low energy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz-Galindo, H S; Martínez-Davalos, A; Belmont-Moreno, E; Galindo, S

    2002-01-01

    We have modified an analytical model of induced light production by energetic ions interacting in scintillating materials. The original model is based on the distribution of energy deposited by secondary electrons produced along the ion's track. The range of scattered electrons, and thus the energy distribution, depends on a classical impact parameter between the electron and the ion's track. The only adjustable parameter of the model is the quenching density rho sub q. The modification here presented, consists in proposing a quantum impact parameter that leads to a better fit of the model to the experimental data at low incident ion energies. The light output response of CsI(Tl) detectors to low energy ions (<3 MeV/A) is fitted with the modified model and comparison is made to the original model.

  15. Using hybrid neural models to describe supercritical fluid extraction processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FONSECA A. P.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the results of a hybrid neural model (HNM technique as applied to modeling supercritical fluid extraction (SCFE curves obtained from two Brazilian vegetable matrices. The serial HNM employed uses a neural network to estimate parameters of a phenomenological model. A small set of SCFE data for each vegetable was used to generate a semi-empirical extended data set, large enough for efficient network training, using three different approaches. Afterwards, other sets of experimental data, not used during the training procedure, were used to validate each approach. The HNM correlates well withthe experimental data, and it is shown that the predictions accomplished with this technique may be promising for SCFE purposes.

  16. Modeling of dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laux, Harald

    1998-08-01

    A general two-fluid model is derived and applied in CFD computations to various test cases of important industrial multiphase flows. It is general in the sense of its applicability to dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flows. The model is limited to isothermal flow without mass transfer and only one particle phase is described. The instantaneous fluid phase equations, including the phase interaction terms, are derived from a volume averaging technique, and the instantaneous particle phase equations are derived from the kinetic theory of granular material. Whereas the averaging procedure, the treatment of the interaction terms, and the kinetic theory approach have been reported in literature prior to this work the combination of the approaches is new. The resulting equations are derived without ambiguity in the interpretation of the particle phase pressure (equation-of-state of particle phase). The basic modeling for the particle phase is improved in two steps. Because in the basic modeling only stresses due to kinetic and collisional interactions are included, a simple model for an effective viscosity is developed in order to allow also frictional stresses within the particle phase. Moreover, turbulent stresses and turbulent dispersion of particles play often an important role for the transport processes. Therefore in a second step, a two-equation turbulence model for both fluid and particle phase turbulence is derived by applying the phasic average to the instantaneous equations. The resulting k-{epsilon}-k{sup d}-{epsilon}{sup d} model is new. Mathematical closure is attempted such that the resulting set of equations is valid for both dilute arid dense flows. During the development of the closure relations a clear distinction is made between granular or ''viscous'' microscale fluctuations and turbulent macro scale fluctuations (true particle turbulence) within the particle phase. The set of governing equations is discretized by using a

  17. Understanding quantum measurement from the solution of dynamical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Balian, Roger; Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.

    2013-01-01

    The quantum measurement problem, to wit, understanding why a unique outcome is obtained in each individual experiment, is currently tackled by solving models. After an introduction we review the many dynamical models proposed over the years for elucidating quantum measurements. The approaches range from standard quantum theory, relying for instance on quantum statistical mechanics or on decoherence, to quantum–classical methods, to consistent histories and to modifications of the theory. Next, a flexible and rather realistic quantum model is introduced, describing the measurement of the z-component of a spin through interaction with a magnetic memory simulated by a Curie–Weiss magnet, including N≫1 spins weakly coupled to a phonon bath. Initially prepared in a metastable paramagnetic state, it may transit to its up or down ferromagnetic state, triggered by its coupling with the tested spin, so that its magnetization acts as a pointer. A detailed solution of the dynamical equations is worked out, exhibiting several time scales. Conditions on the parameters of the model are found, which ensure that the process satisfies all the features of ideal measurements. Various imperfections of the measurement are discussed, as well as attempts of incompatible measurements. The first steps consist in the solution of the Hamiltonian dynamics for the spin-apparatus density matrix D -hat (t). Its off-diagonal blocks in a basis selected by the spin–pointer coupling, rapidly decay owing to the many degrees of freedom of the pointer. Recurrences are ruled out either by some randomness of that coupling, or by the interaction with the bath. On a longer time scale, the trend towards equilibrium of the magnet produces a final state D -hat (t f ) that involves correlations between the system and the indications of the pointer, thus ensuring registration. Although D -hat (t f ) has the form expected for ideal measurements, it only describes a large set of runs. Individual runs are

  18. Understanding quantum measurement from the solution of dynamical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E. [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique et Systèmes Complexes, ISMANS, 44 Av. Bartholdi, 72000 Le Mans (France); Balian, Roger [Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M., E-mail: T.M.Nieuwenhuizen@uva.nl [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The quantum measurement problem, to wit, understanding why a unique outcome is obtained in each individual experiment, is currently tackled by solving models. After an introduction we review the many dynamical models proposed over the years for elucidating quantum measurements. The approaches range from standard quantum theory, relying for instance on quantum statistical mechanics or on decoherence, to quantum–classical methods, to consistent histories and to modifications of the theory. Next, a flexible and rather realistic quantum model is introduced, describing the measurement of the z-component of a spin through interaction with a magnetic memory simulated by a Curie–Weiss magnet, including N≫1 spins weakly coupled to a phonon bath. Initially prepared in a metastable paramagnetic state, it may transit to its up or down ferromagnetic state, triggered by its coupling with the tested spin, so that its magnetization acts as a pointer. A detailed solution of the dynamical equations is worked out, exhibiting several time scales. Conditions on the parameters of the model are found, which ensure that the process satisfies all the features of ideal measurements. Various imperfections of the measurement are discussed, as well as attempts of incompatible measurements. The first steps consist in the solution of the Hamiltonian dynamics for the spin-apparatus density matrix D{sup -hat} (t). Its off-diagonal blocks in a basis selected by the spin–pointer coupling, rapidly decay owing to the many degrees of freedom of the pointer. Recurrences are ruled out either by some randomness of that coupling, or by the interaction with the bath. On a longer time scale, the trend towards equilibrium of the magnet produces a final state D{sup -hat} (t{sub f}) that involves correlations between the system and the indications of the pointer, thus ensuring registration. Although D{sup -hat} (t{sub f}) has the form expected for ideal measurements, it only describes a large set of

  19. Generic Hubbard model description of semiconductor quantum-dot spin qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuo; Wang, Xin; Das Sarma, S.

    2011-04-01

    We introduce a Hubbard model as the simple quantum generalization of the classical capacitance circuit model to study semiconductor quantum-dot spin qubits. We prove theoretically that our model is equivalent to the usual capacitance circuit model in the absence of quantum fluctuations. However, our model naturally includes quantum effects such as hopping and spin exchange. The parameters of the generalized Hubbard model can either be directly read off from the experimental plot of the stability diagram or be calculated from the microscopic theory, establishing a quantitative connection between the two. We show that, while the main topology of the charge stability diagram is determined by the ratio between intersite and on-site Coulomb repulsion, fine details of the stability diagram reveal information about quantum effects. Extracting quantum information from experiments using our Hubbard model approach is simple, but would require the measurement resolution to increase by an order of magnitude.

  20. Modeling of movement-induced and flow-induced fluid forces in fast switching valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Daniel Beck; Johansen, Per; Schmidt, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    Fast switching fluid power valves set strict requirements on performance, size and energy efficiency and simulation models are therefore needed to obtain good designs of such components. The valve moving member is subject to fluid forces depending on the valve flow rate and movement of the valve...... member itself. These fluid forces may be accurately simulated using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis, but such models suffer from being computationally expensive and is not suited for optimization routines. In this paper, a computationally inexpensive method for modeling the fluid forces...... is proposed, which includes both the flow-induced fluid forces and the movement-induced fluid forces resulting from movement of the valve moving member. The movement-induced fluid force model is based on a known solution to the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. A method for accurately simulating the flow...

  1. Effect of fluid supplementation and modality on peritoneal permeability characteristics in a rat peritoneal dialysis model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zweers, M. M.; Splint, L. J.; Krediet, R. T.; Struijk, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hemoconcentration may influence peritoneal permeability parameters in anesthetized animals without fluid supplementation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of fluid supplementation on peritoneal permeability in an acute peritoneal dialysis model in

  2. Dynamical Causal Modeling from a Quantum Dynamical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiralp, Emre; Demiralp, Metin

    2010-09-01

    Recent research suggests that any set of first order linear vector ODEs can be converted to a set of specific vector ODEs adhering to what we have called "Quantum Harmonical Form (QHF)". QHF has been developed using a virtual quantum multi harmonic oscillator system where mass and force constants are considered to be time variant and the Hamiltonian is defined as a conic structure over positions and momenta to conserve the Hermiticity. As described in previous works, the conversion to QHF requires the matrix coefficient of the first set of ODEs to be a normal matrix. In this paper, this limitation is circumvented using a space extension approach expanding the potential applicability of this method. Overall, conversion to QHF allows the investigation of a set of ODEs using mathematical tools available to the investigation of the physical concepts underlying quantum harmonic oscillators. The utility of QHF in the context of dynamical systems and dynamical causal modeling in behavioral and cognitive neuroscience is briefly discussed.

  3. Phase Transitions for Quantum XY-Model on the Cayley Tree of Order Three in Quantum Markov Chain Scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhamedov, Farrukh; Saburov, Mansoor

    2010-06-01

    In the present paper we study forward Quantum Markov Chains (QMC) defined on a Cayley tree. Using the tree structure of graphs, we give a construction of quantum Markov chains on a Cayley tree. By means of such constructions we prove the existence of a phase transition for the XY-model on a Cayley tree of order three in QMC scheme. By the phase transition we mean the existence of two distinct QMC for the given family of interaction operators {K }. (author)

  4. Integrable models in 1+1 dimensional quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faddeev, Ludvig.

    1982-09-01

    The goal of this lecture is to present a unifying view on the exactly soluble models. There exist several reasons arguing in favor of the 1+1 dimensional models: every exact solution of a field-theoretical model can teach about the ability of quantum field theory to describe spectrum and scattering; some 1+1 d models have physical applications in the solid state theory. There are several ways to become acquainted with the methods of exactly soluble models: via classical statistical mechanics, via Bethe Ansatz, via inverse scattering method. Fundamental Poisson bracket relation FPR and/or fundamental commutation relations FCR play fundamental role. General classification of FPR is given with promizing generalizations to FCR

  5. Anisotropic models are unitary: A rejuvenation of standard quantum cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sridip; Banerjee, Narayan

    2016-12-01

    The present work proves that the folklore of the pathology of non-conservation of probability in quantum anisotropic models is wrong. It is shown in full generality that all operator ordering can lead to a Hamiltonian with a self-adjoint extension as long as it is constructed as a symmetric operator. It is indicated that the self-adjoint extension, however, is not unique and this non-uniqueness is suspected not to be a feature of anisotropic models only, in the sense that there exists operator orderings such that Hamiltonian for an isotropic homogeneous cosmological model does not have unique self-adjoint extension. For isotropic model, there is a special unique extension associated with quadratic form of Hamiltonian, i.e., a Friedrich's extension. Details of calculations are carried out for a Bianchi III model as an example.

  6. Quantum entanglement in two-electron atomic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzano, D; Plastino, A R; Dehesa, J S [Instituto Carlos I de Fisica Teorica y Computacional, Universidad de Granada, Granada E-18071 (Spain); Koga, T, E-mail: arplastino@ugr.e [Applied Chemistry Research Unit, Graduate School of Engineering, Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido 050-8585 (Japan)

    2010-07-09

    We explore the main entanglement properties exhibited by the eigenfunctions of two exactly soluble two-electron models, the Crandall atom and the Hooke atom, and compare them with the entanglement features of helium-like systems. We compute the amount of entanglement associated with the wavefunctions corresponding to the fundamental and first few excited states of these models. We investigate the dependence of the entanglement on the parameters of the models and on the quantum numbers of the eigenstates. It is found that the amount of entanglement of the system tends to increase with energy in both models. In addition, we study the entanglement of a few states of helium-like systems, which we compute using high-quality Kinoshita-like eigenfunctions. The dependence of the entanglement of helium-like atoms on the nuclear charge and on energy is found to be consistent with the trends observed in the previous two model systems.

  7. Modeling stock return distributions with a quantum harmonic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, K.; Choi, M. Y.; Dai, B.; Sohn, S.; Yang, B.

    2017-11-01

    We propose a quantum harmonic oscillator as a model for the market force which draws a stock return from short-run fluctuations to the long-run equilibrium. The stochastic equation governing our model is transformed into a Schrödinger equation, the solution of which features “quantized” eigenfunctions. Consequently, stock returns follow a mixed χ distribution, which describes Gaussian and non-Gaussian features. Analyzing the Financial Times Stock Exchange (FTSE) All Share Index, we demonstrate that our model outperforms traditional stochastic process models, e.g., the geometric Brownian motion and the Heston model, with smaller fitting errors and better goodness-of-fit statistics. In addition, making use of analogy, we provide an economic rationale of the physics concepts such as the eigenstate, eigenenergy, and angular frequency, which sheds light on the relationship between finance and econophysics literature.

  8. Experiments and Modeling of G-Jitter Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, F. W.; Ramachandran, N.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    While there is a general understanding of the acceleration environment onboard an orbiting spacecraft, past research efforts in the modeling and analysis area have still not produced a general theory that predicts the effects of multi-spectral periodic accelerations on a general class of experiments nor have they produced scaling laws that a prospective experimenter can use to assess how an experiment might be affected by this acceleration environment. Furthermore, there are no actual flight experimental data that correlates heat or mass transport with measurements of the periodic acceleration environment. The present investigation approaches this problem with carefully conducted terrestrial experiments and rigorous numerical modeling for better understanding the effect of residual gravity and gentler on experiments. The approach is to use magnetic fluids that respond to an imposed magnetic field gradient in much the same way as fluid density responds to a gravitational field. By utilizing a programmable power source in conjunction with an electromagnet, both static and dynamic body forces can be simulated in lab experiments. The paper provides an overview of the technique and includes recent results from the experiments.

  9. Modeling agglomeration processes in fluid-bed granulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cryer, S.A.

    1999-10-01

    Many agrochemicals are formulated as water dispersive granules through agglomeration, beginning with a fine powder ({approximately}1 {micro}m) and ending with granules on the order of 500 {micro}m. Powders are charged into a granulation system with a liquid binding agent, and granules are subsequently grown to an appropriate size. Granulation in fluid beds is presented using a mass conserving discretized population balance equation. Coalesce kernels governing the rate and extent of granulation are assumed dependent on the Stokes number, which is indirectly liked to important process variables (air and under flow rate, bed charge, bed geometry) such that the physical processes governing particle coalescence and rebound are correlated to process variables. A new coalescence kernel is proposed based on physical insight, simplicity, and deterministic equivalent modeling to account for uncertainty. This kernel is based on a Stokes number method where uncertainty in the Stokes number is characterized by polynomial chaos expansions. The magnitude of the coalescence kernel is proportional to the probability of the distribution of Stokes number exceeding a critical value. This mechanistic/semiempirical approach to fluid-bed agglomeration fosters an environment for process scaleup by eliminating specific equipment and process variable constraints to focus on the underlying mechanisms for proper scale-up procedures. Model predictions using this new kernel are then compared to experimental pilot-plant observations.

  10. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of two passive samplers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Justin; Holsen, Thomas M.; Dhaniyala, Suresh

    2006-01-01

    To effectively use a passive sampler for monitoring trace contaminants in the gas-phase, its sampling characteristics as a function of ambient wind conditions must be known. In this study two commonly used passive samplers were evaluated using computational fluid dynamics. Contaminant uptake by the polyurethane foam (PUF) was modeled using a species transport model. The external-internal flow interactions in the sampler were characterized, and the uptake rates of contaminant species were quantified. The simulations show that flow fields in the samplers have strong velocity gradients, and single-point velocity measurements do not capture flow interactions accurately. Sampling rates calculated for a PUF in freestream are in good agreement with sampling rates for PUFs in the passive samplers studied for the same average velocity over the PUF. The calculated sampling rates are in general agreement with those obtained experimentally by other researchers. - The effect of wind speed on sampling rates of two commonly used passive samplers was investigated using computational fluid dynamic techniques

  11. Dynamic modeling of oil boom failure using computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, R. H.; Brown, H. M.; An, C. F.; Rowe, R. D.

    1997-01-01

    Oil retention boom failure mechanisms have been identified and studied using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), a powerful modeling tool combining fluid dynamics and mathematics with high speed computer technology. This study utilized a commercially available CFD package, 'Fluent', to simulate the oil-water flow around a barrier. 'Drainage failure', 'droplet entrainment' and 'critical accumulation' were modeled using this software. Flow characteristics were found to be different for different failure mechanisms. In the drainage failure process, the oil slick was compressed against the barrier until the slick was deep enough for the oil to leak under the barrier. During boom failure due to droplet entrainment, the oil-water interface of the oil slick was wavy and unstable. During boom failure due to critical accumulation, the oil remained a single mass and moved under the barrier readily. The most significant observation, however, was that flow patterns around barriers are modified by the presence of oil. Therefore, towing and wave-conformity tests of booms will not be meaningful unless such tests are conducted with oil present. 15 refs., 11 figs

  12. Ising formulation of associative memory models and quantum annealing recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Siddhartha; Shehab, Omar; Balu, Radhakrishnan

    2017-12-01

    Associative memory models, in theoretical neuro- and computer sciences, can generally store at most a linear number of memories. Recalling memories in these models can be understood as retrieval of the energy minimizing configuration of classical Ising spins, closest in Hamming distance to an imperfect input memory, where the energy landscape is determined by the set of stored memories. We present an Ising formulation for associative memory models and consider the problem of memory recall using quantum annealing. We show that allowing for input-dependent energy landscapes allows storage of up to an exponential number of memories (in terms of the number of neurons). Further, we show how quantum annealing may naturally be used for recall tasks in such input-dependent energy landscapes, although the recall time may increase with the number of stored memories. Theoretically, we obtain the radius of attractor basins R (N ) and the capacity C (N ) of such a scheme and their tradeoffs. Our calculations establish that for randomly chosen memories the capacity of our model using the Hebbian learning rule as a function of problem size can be expressed as C (N ) =O (eC1N) , C1≥0 , and succeeds on randomly chosen memory sets with a probability of (1 -e-C2N) , C2≥0 with C1+C2=(0.5-f ) 2/(1 -f ) , where f =R (N )/N , 0 ≤f ≤0.5 , is the radius of attraction in terms of the Hamming distance of an input probe from a stored memory as a fraction of the problem size. We demonstrate the application of this scheme on a programmable quantum annealing device, the D-wave processor.

  13. A Review of Hemolysis Prediction Models for Computational Fluid Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hai; Engel, Sebastian; Janiga, Gábor; Thévenin, Dominique

    2017-07-01

    Flow-induced hemolysis is a crucial issue for many biomedical applications; in particular, it is an essential issue for the development of blood-transporting devices such as left ventricular assist devices, and other types of blood pumps. In order to estimate red blood cell (RBC) damage in blood flows, many models have been proposed in the past. Most models have been validated by their respective authors. However, the accuracy and the validity range of these models remains unclear. In this work, the most established hemolysis models compatible with computational fluid dynamics of full-scale devices are described and assessed by comparing two selected reference experiments: a simple rheometric flow and a more complex hemodialytic flow through a needle. The quantitative comparisons show very large deviations concerning hemolysis predictions, depending on the model and model parameter. In light of the current results, two simple power-law models deliver the best compromise between computational efficiency and obtained accuracy. Finally, hemolysis has been computed in an axial blood pump. The reconstructed geometry of a HeartMate II shows that hemolysis occurs mainly at the tip and leading edge of the rotor blades, as well as at the leading edge of the diffusor vanes. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Flow over Stepped Spillway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raad Hoobi Irzooki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In present paper, the computational fluid dynamics (CFD - program Flow-3D was used toanalyze and study the characteristics of flow energy dissipation over stepped spillways. Threedifferent spillway heights ( (15, 20 and 25cm were used. For each one of these models, threenumbers of steps (N (5, 10 and 25 and three spillway slopes (S (0.5, 1 and 1.25 were used.Eight different discharges ranging (600-8500cm³/s were passed over each one of these models,therefore the total runs of this study are 216. The energy dissipation over these models and thepressure distribution on the horizontal and vertical step faces over some models were studied. Forverification purpose of the (CFD program, the experimental work was conducted on four models ofstepped spillway and five different discharges were passed over each model. The magnitude ofdissipated energy on models was compared with results of numerical program under sameconditions. The comparison showed good agreement between them with standard percentage errorranging between (-2.01 - 11.13%. Thus, the program Flow-3D is a reasonable numerical programwhich can be used in this study.Results showed that the energy dissipation increases with increased spillway height anddecreased number of steps and spillway slope. Also, the energy dissipation decreases withincreasing the flow rate. An empirical equation for measuring the energy dissipation was derivedusing the dimensional analysis. The coefficient of determination of this equation ( equals 0.766.

  15. Development of bubble-induced turbulence model for advanced two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoi, Hideaki; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    A two-fluid model can simulate two-phase flow by computational cost less than detailed two-phase flow simulation method such as interface tracking method. The two-fluid model is therefore useful for thermal hydraulic analysis in the large-scale domain such as rod bundles. However, since the two-fluid model includes a lot of constitutive equations verified by use of experimental results, it has problems that the result of analyses depends on accuracy of the constitutive equations. To solve these problems, an advanced two-fluid model has been developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency. In this model, interface tracking method is combined with two-fluid model to accurately predict large interface structure behavior. Liquid clusters and bubbles larger than a computational cell are calculated using the interface tracking method, and those smaller than the cell are simulated by the two-fluid model. The constitutive equations to evaluate the effects of small bubbles or droplets on two-phase flow are also required in the advanced two-fluid model, just as with the conventional two-fluid model. However, the dependency of small bubbles and droplets on two-phase flow characteristics is relatively small, and fewer experimental results are required to verify the characteristics of large interface structures. Turbulent dispersion force model is one of the most important constitutive equations for the advanced two-fluid model. The turbulent dispersion force model has been developed by many researchers for the conventional two-fluid model. However, existing models implicitly include the effects of large bubbles and the deformation of bubbles, and are unfortunately not applicable to the advanced two-fluid model. In the previous study, the authors suggested the turbulent dispersion force model based on the analogy of Brownian motion. And the authors improved the turbulent dispersion force model in consideration of bubble-induced turbulence to improve the analysis results for small

  16. Decoherence and Entanglement Simulation in a Model of Quantum Neural Network Based on Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altaisky Mikhail V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the simulation of a quantum neural network based on quantum dots using numerical method of path integral calculation. In the proposed implementation of the quantum neural network using an array of single-electron quantum dots with dipole-dipole interaction, the coherence is shown to survive up to 0.1 nanosecond in time and up to the liquid nitrogen temperature of 77K.We study the quantum correlations between the quantum dots by means of calculation of the entanglement of formation in a pair of quantum dots on the GaAs based substrate with dot size of 100 ÷ 101 nanometer and interdot distance of 101 ÷ 102 nanometers order.

  17. Comparison of kinetic and fluid neutral models for attached and detached state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furubayashi, M.; Hoshino, K.; Toma, M.; Hatayama, A.; Coster, D.; Schneider, R.; Bonnin, X.; Kawashima, H.; Asakura, N.; Suzuki, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Neutral behavior has an important role in the transport simulations of the edge plasma. Most of the edge plasma transport codes treat neutral particles by a simple fluid model or a kinetic model. The fluid model allows faster calculations. However, the applicability of the fluid model is limited. In this study, simulation results of JT-60U from kinetic neutral model and fluid neutral model are compared under the attached and detached state, using the 2D edge plasma code package, SOLPS5.0. In the SOL region, no significant differences are observed in the upstream plasma profiles between kinetic and fluid neutral models. However, in the divertor region, large differences are observed in plasma and neutral profiles. Therefore, further optimization of the fluid neutral model should be performed. Otherwise kinetic neutral model should be used to analyze the divertor region.

  18. Computational methods of the Advanced Fluid Dynamics Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohl, W.R.; Wilhelm, D.; Parker, F.R.

    1987-01-01

    To more accurately treat severe accidents in fast reactors, a program has been set up to investigate new computational models and approaches. The product of this effort is a computer code, the Advanced Fluid Dynamics Model (AFDM). This paper describes some of the basic features of the numerical algorithm used in AFDM. Aspects receiving particular emphasis are the fractional-step method of time integration, the semi-implicit pressure iteration, the virtual mass inertial terms, the use of three velocity fields, higher order differencing, convection of interfacial area with source and sink terms, multicomponent diffusion processes in heat and mass transfer, the SESAME equation of state, and vectorized programming. A calculated comparison with an isothermal tetralin/ammonia experiment is performed. We conclude that significant improvements are possible in reliably calculating the progression of severe accidents with further development

  19. Modeling classical and quantum radiation from laser-plasma accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of models and the “Virtual Detector for Synchrotron Radiation” (vdsr code that accurately describe the production of synchrotron radiation are described. These models and code are valid in the classical and linear (single-scattering quantum regimes and are capable of describing radiation produced from laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs through a variety of mechanisms including betatron radiation, undulator radiation, and Thomson/Compton scattering. Previous models of classical synchrotron radiation, such as those typically used for undulator radiation, are inadequate in describing the radiation spectra from electrons undergoing small numbers of oscillations. This is due to an improper treatment of a mathematical evaluation at the end points of an integration that leads to an unphysical plateau in the radiation spectrum at high frequencies, the magnitude of which increases as the number of oscillation periods decreases. This is important for betatron radiation from LPAs, in which the betatron strength parameter is large but the number of betatron periods is small. The code vdsr allows the radiation to be calculated in this regime by full integration over each electron trajectory, including end-point effects, and this code is used to calculate betatron radiation for cases of experimental interest. Radiation from Thomson scattering and Compton scattering is also studied with vdsr. For Thomson scattering, radiation reaction is included by using the Sokolov method for the calculation of the electron dynamics. For Compton scattering, quantum recoil effects are considered in vdsr by using Monte Carlo methods. The quantum calculation has been benchmarked with the classical calculation in a classical regime.

  20. Time evolution in deparametrized models of loop quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assanioussi, Mehdi; Lewandowski, Jerzy; Mäkinen, Ilkka

    2017-07-01

    An important aspect in understanding the dynamics in the context of deparametrized models of loop quantum gravity (LQG) is to obtain a sufficient control on the quantum evolution generated by a given Hamiltonian operator. More specifically, we need to be able to compute the evolution of relevant physical states and observables with a relatively good precision. In this article, we introduce an approximation method to deal with the physical Hamiltonian operators in deparametrized LQG models, and we apply it to models in which a free Klein-Gordon scalar field or a nonrotational dust field is taken as the physical time variable. This method is based on using standard time-independent perturbation theory of quantum mechanics to define a perturbative expansion of the Hamiltonian operator, the small perturbation parameter being determined by the Barbero-Immirzi parameter β . This method allows us to define an approximate spectral decomposition of the Hamiltonian operators and hence to compute the evolution over a certain time interval. As a specific example, we analyze the evolution of expectation values of the volume and curvature operators starting with certain physical initial states, using both the perturbative method and a straightforward expansion of the expectation value in powers of the time variable. This work represents a first step toward achieving the goal of understanding and controlling the new dynamics developed in Alesci et al. [Phys. Rev. D 91, 124067 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevD.91.124067] and Assanioussi et al. [Phys. Rev. D 92, 044042 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevD.92.044042].

  1. Exactly soluble two-state quantum models with linear couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torosov, B T; Vitanov, N V

    2008-01-01

    A class of exact analytic solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation is presented for a two-state quantum system coherently driven by a nonresonant external field. The coupling is a linear function of time with a finite duration and the detuning is constant. Four special models are considered in detail, namely the shark, double-shark, tent and zigzag models. The exact solution is derived by rotation of the Landau-Zener propagator at an angle of π/4 and is expressed in terms of Weber's parabolic cylinder function. Approximations for the transition probabilities are derived for all four models by using the asymptotics of the Weber function; these approximations demonstrate various effects of physical interest for each model

  2. Twisted sigma-model solitons on the quantum projective line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Giovanni

    2018-04-01

    On the configuration space of projections in a noncommutative algebra, and for an automorphism of the algebra, we use a twisted Hochschild cocycle for an action functional and a twisted cyclic cocycle for a topological term. The latter is Hochschild-cohomologous to the former and positivity in twisted Hochschild cohomology results into a lower bound for the action functional. While the equations for the critical points are rather involved, the use of the positivity and the bound by the topological term lead to self-duality equations (thus yielding twisted noncommutative sigma-model solitons, or instantons). We present explicit nontrivial solutions on the quantum projective line.

  3. Quantum Electrostatic Model for Optical Properties of Nanoscale Gold Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Haoliang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The optical properties of thin gold films with thickness varying from 2.5 nm to 30 nm are investigated. Due to the quantum size effect, the optical constants of the thin gold film deviate from the Drude model for bulk material as film thickness decreases, especially around 2.5 nm, where the electron energy level becomes discrete. A theory based on the self-consistent solution of the Schrödinger equation and the Poisson equation is proposed and its predictions agree well with experimental results.

  4. BOOK REVIEW: Plasma and Fluid Turbulence: Theory and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, A.; Itoh, S. I.; Itoh, K.

    2003-03-01

    The area of turbulence has been covered by many books over the years. This has, of course, mainly been fluid turbulence, while the area of plasma turbulence has been treated much less. This book by Yoshizawa et al covers both plasma and fluid turbulence, in a way that does justice to both areas at the same time as cross-disciplinary aspects are illuminated. The book should be useful to physicists working in both areas partly because it examines fundamental aspects in a pedagogical way, partly because it is up to date and partly because of the cross-disciplinary aspects which enrich both areas. It is written as an advanced textbook. The reader should have previous knowledge of at least one of the areas and also some background in statistical physics. The book starts with the very important and highly up to date area of structure formation which is relevant both to fluids and plasmas. Here, pipe flow of fluids is treated as an introduction to the area, then follows discussion of the generation of magnetic fields by turbulent motion in stellar objects and stucture formation in plasmas confined by a magnetic field. Also the concept of bifurcation is introduced. This part builds up knowledge from the simple fluid case to the problems of magnetic confinement of plasmas in a very pedagogical way. It continues by introducing the fundamentals of fluid turbulence. This is done very systematically and concepts useful for industrial applications like the K-e method and several ways of heuristic modelling are introduced. Also the two dimensional vortex equation, which is also relevant to magnetized plasmas is introduced. In chapter 5 the statistical theory of turbulence is treated. It starts with a very nice and easy to understand example of renormalization of a simple nonlinear equation where the exact solution is known. It introduces the method of partial renormalization, Greens functions and the direct interaction approximation (DIA). The book then continues with an

  5. Quantum Transmemetic Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Edward W.; Sładkowski, Jan

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * A Quantum Model of Free Will * Quantum Acquisition of Knowledge * Thinking as a Quantum Algorithm * Counterfactual Measurement as a Model of Intuition * Quantum Modification of Freud's Model of Consciousness * Conclusion * Acknowledgements * References

  6. Dynamic modeling of fluid power transmissions for wind turbines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeveen, N.F.B.; Jarquin Laguna, A.

    2011-01-01

    Fluid power transmission for wind turbines is quietly gaining more ground/interest. The principle of the various concepts presented so far is to convert aerodynamic torque of the rotor blades into a pressurized fluid flow by means of a positive displacement pump. At the other end of the fluid power

  7. Multiscale modeling of fluid flow and mass transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuoka, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Bijeljic, B.; Lin, Q.; Blunt, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, there are some reports on a simulation of fluid flow in pore spaces of rocks using Navier-Stokes equations. These studies mostly adopt a X-ray CT to create 3-D numerical grids of the pores in micro-scale. However, results may be of low accuracy when the rock has a large pore size distribution, because pores, whose size is smaller than resolution of the X-ray CT may be neglected. We recently found out by tracer tests in a laboratory using a brine saturated Ryukyu limestone and inject fresh water that a decrease of chloride concentration took longer time. This phenomenon can be explained due to weak connectivity of the porous networks. Therefore, it is important to simulate entire pore spaces even those of very small sizes in which diffusion is dominant. We have developed a new methodology for multi-level modeling for pore scale fluid flow in porous media. The approach is to combine pore-scale analysis with Darcy-flow analysis using two types of X-ray CT images in different resolutions. Results of the numerical simulations showed a close match with the experimental results. The proposed methodology is an enhancement for analyzing mass transport and flow phenomena in rocks with complicated pore structure.

  8. Quantum interference in thermoelectric molecular junctions: A toy model perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Daijiro; Avdoshenko, Stas M.; Sevinçli, Hâldun; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2014-08-01

    Quantum interference (QI) phenomena between electronic states in molecular circuits offer a new opportunity to design new types of molecular devices such as molecular sensors, interferometers, and thermoelectric devices. Controlling the QI effect is a key challenge for such applications. For the development of single molecular devices employing QI effects, a systematic study of the relationship between electronic structure and the quantum interference is needed. In order to uncover the essential topological requirements for the appearance of QI effects and the relationship between the QI-affected line shape of the transmission spectra and the electronic structures, we consider a homogeneous toy model where all on-site energies are identical and model four types of molecular junctions due to their topological connectivities. We systematically analyze their transmission spectra, density of states, and thermoelectric properties. Even without the degree of freedom for on-site energies an asymmetric Fano peak could be realized in the homogeneous systems with the cyclic configuration. We also calculate the thermoelectric properties of the model systems with and without fluctuation of on-site energies. Even under the fluctuation of the on-site energies, the finite thermoelectrics are preserved for the Fano resonance, thus cyclic configuration is promising for thermoelectric applications. This result also suggests the possibility to detect the cyclic configuration in the homogeneous systems and the presence of the QI features from thermoelectric measurements.

  9. Classical and Quantum Consistency of the DGP Model

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolis, A; Nicolis, Alberto; Rattazzi, Riccardo

    2004-01-01

    We study the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model by the method of the boundary effective action. The truncation of this action to the bending mode \\pi consistently describes physics in a wide range of regimes both at the classical and at the quantum level. The Vainshtein effect, which restores agreement with precise tests of general relativity, follows straightforwardly. We give a simple and general proof of stability, i.e. absence of ghosts in the fluctuations, valid for most of the relevant cases, like for instance the spherical source in asymptotically flat space. However we confirm that around certain interesting self-accelerating cosmological solutions there is a ghost. We consider the issue of quantum corrections. Around flat space \\pi becomes strongly coupled below a macroscopic length of 1000 km, thus impairing the predictivity of the model. Indeed the tower of higher dimensional operators which is expected by a generic UV completion of the model limits predictivity at even larger length scales. We outline ...

  10. Minimal Models for a Superconductor-Insulator Conformal Quantum Phase Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Diamantini, M Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Conformal field theories do not only classify 2D classical critical behavior but they also govern a certain class of 2D quantum critical behavior. In this latter case it is the ground state wave functional of the quantum theory that is conformally invariant, rather than the classical action. We show that the superconducting-insulating (SI) quantum phase transition in 2D Josephson junction arrays (JJAs) is a (doubled) $c=1$ Gaussian conformal quantum critical point. The quantum action describing this system is a doubled Maxwell-Chern-Simons model in the strong coupling limit. We also argue that the SI quantum transitions in frustrated JJAs realize the other possible universality classes of conformal quantum critical behavior, corresponding to the unitary minimal models at central charge $c=1-6/m(m+1)$.

  11. Open-System Quantum Annealing in Mean-Field Models with Exponential Degeneracy*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostyantyn Kechedzhi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Real-life quantum computers are inevitably affected by intrinsic noise resulting in dissipative nonunitary dynamics realized by these devices. We consider an open-system quantum annealing algorithm optimized for such a realistic analog quantum device which takes advantage of noise-induced thermalization and relies on incoherent quantum tunneling at finite temperature. We theoretically analyze the performance of this algorithm considering a p-spin model that allows for a mean-field quasiclassical solution and, at the same time, demonstrates the first-order phase transition and exponential degeneracy of states, typical characteristics of spin glasses. We demonstrate that finite-temperature effects introduced by the noise are particularly important for the dynamics in the presence of the exponential degeneracy of metastable states. We determine the optimal regime of the open-system quantum annealing algorithm for this model and find that it can outperform simulated annealing in a range of parameters. Large-scale multiqubit quantum tunneling is instrumental for the quantum speedup in this model, which is possible because of the unusual nonmonotonous temperature dependence of the quantum-tunneling action in this model, where the most efficient transition rate corresponds to zero temperature. This model calculation is the first analytically tractable example where open-system quantum annealing algorithm outperforms simulated annealing, which can, in principle, be realized using an analog quantum computer.

  12. The Real and the Mathematical in Quantum Modeling: From Principles to Models and from Models to Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnitsky, Arkady

    2017-06-01

    The history of mathematical modeling outside physics has been dominated by the use of classical mathematical models, C-models, primarily those of a probabilistic or statistical nature. More recently, however, quantum mathematical models, Q-models, based in the mathematical formalism of quantum theory have become more prominent in psychology, economics, and decision science. The use of Q-models in these fields remains controversial, in part because it is not entirely clear whether Q-models are necessary for dealing with the phenomena in question or whether C-models would still suffice. My aim, however, is not to assess the necessity of Q-models in these fields, but instead to reflect on what the possible applicability of Q-models may tell us about the corresponding phenomena there, vis-à-vis quantum phenomena in physics. In order to do so, I shall first discuss the key reasons for the use of Q-models in physics. In particular, I shall examine the fundamental principles that led to the development of quantum mechanics. Then I shall consider a possible role of similar principles in using Q-models outside physics. Psychology, economics, and decision science borrow already available Q-models from quantum theory, rather than derive them from their own internal principles, while quantum mechanics was derived from such principles, because there was no readily available mathematical model to handle quantum phenomena, although the mathematics ultimately used in quantum did in fact exist then. I shall argue, however, that the principle perspective on mathematical modeling outside physics might help us to understand better the role of Q-models in these fields and possibly to envision new models, conceptually analogous to but mathematically different from those of quantum theory, helpful or even necessary there or in physics itself. I shall suggest one possible type of such models, singularized probabilistic, SP, models, some of which are time-dependent, TDSP-models. The

  13. Mesoscopic dispersion of colloidal agglomerate in a complex fluid modelled by a hybrid fluid-particle model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzwinel, Witold; Yuen, David A

    2002-03-15

    The dispersion of the agglomerating fluid process involving colloids has been investigated at the mesoscale level by a discrete particle approach--the hybrid fluid-particle model (FPM). Dynamical processes occurring in the granulation of colloidal agglomerate in solvents are severely influenced by coupling between the dispersed microstructures and the global flow. On the mesoscale this coupling is further exacerbated by thermal fluctuations, particle-particle interactions between colloidal beds, and hydrodynamic interactions between colloidal beds and the solvent. Using the method of FPM, we have tackled the problem of dispersion of a colloidal slab being accelerated in a long box filled with a fluid. Our results show that the average size of the agglomerated fragments decreases with increasing shearing rate gamma, according to the power law A x gamma(k), where k is around 2. For larger values of gamma, the mean size of the agglomerate S(avg) increases slowly with gamma from the collisions between the aggregates and the longitudinal stretching induced by the flow. The proportionality constant A increases exponentially with the scaling factor of the attractive forces acting between the colloidal particles. The value of A shows a rather weak dependence on the solvent viscosity. But A increases proportionally with the scaling factor of the colloid-solvent dissipative interactions. Similar type of dependence can be found for the mixing induced by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities involving the colloidal agglomerate and the solvent. Three types of fragmentation structures can be identified, which are called rupture, erosion, and shatter. They generate very complex structures with multiresolution character. The aggregation of colloidal beds is formed by the collisions between aggregates, which are influenced by the flow or by the cohesive forces for small dispersion energies. These results may be applied to enhance our understanding concerning the nonlinear complex

  14. A Bingham-plastic model for fluid mud transport under waves and currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-rong; Wu, Bo; Huhe, Ao-de

    2014-04-01

    Simplified equations of fluid mud motion, which is described as Bingham-Plastic model under waves and currents, are presented by order analysis. The simplified equations are non-linear ordinary differential equations which are solved by hybrid numerical-analytical technique. As the computational cost is very low, the effects of wave current parameters and fluid mud properties on the transportation velocity of the fluid mud are studied systematically. It is found that the fluid mud can move toward one direction even if the shear stress acting on the fluid mud bed is much smaller than the fluid mud yield stress under the condition of wave and current coexistence. Experiments of the fluid mud motion under current with fluctuation water surface are carried out. The fluid mud transportation velocity predicted by the presented mathematical model can roughly match that measured in experiments.

  15. Comparing plasma fluid models of different order for 1D streamer ionization fronts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Markosyan (Aram); H.J. Teunissen (Jannis); S. Dujko (Sasa); U. M. Ebert (Ute)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractWe evaluate the performance of three plasma fluid models: the first order reaction-drift-diffusion model based on the local field approximation; the second order reaction-drift-diffusion model based on the local energy approximation and a recently developed high order fluid model by

  16. Phase equilibrium modeling of triglycerides in supercritical fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinophakun, T.; Phithakchokchai, B.

    2011-01-01

    To design a reactor and separator for a supercritical biodiesel process, phase equilibria of multi-component mixtures in supercritical fluids should be determined using group contribution with association equation of state (GCA-EOS) as a thermodynamics method. The model is considered for two systems of reactants and products. System 1 is comprised of methanol and triglycerides from two sources (palm and Jatropha oils); and System 2 is unconverted methanol, FAME (product) and glycerol (by-product). Pressure and temperature diagrams were developed at different mole fraction of methanol (x MeOH ). As x MeOH increased, the critical temperature (T c ) and pressure (p c ) increased. The increasing temperature causes the immiscibility region and the amount of methanol at the plait point to decrease. The maximum plait point pressure was observed at 19.20 MPa for palm and 19.33 MPa for Jatropha oil systems.

  17. COTHERM: Modelling fluid-rock interactions in Icelandic geothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thien, Bruno; Kosakowski, Georg; Kulik, Dmitrii

    2014-05-01

    Mineralogical alteration of reservoir rocks, driven by fluid circulation in natural or enhanced geothermal systems, is likely to influence the long-term performance of geothermal power generation. A key factor is the change of porosity due to dissolution of primary minerals and precipitation of secondary phases. Porosity changes will affect fluid circulation and solute transport, which, in turn, influence mineralogical alteration. This study is part of the Sinergia COTHERM project (COmbined hydrological, geochemical and geophysical modeling of geotTHERMal systems) that is an integrative research project aimed at improving our understanding of the sub-surface processes in magmatically-driven natural geothermal systems. We model the mineralogical and porosity evolution of Icelandic geothermal systems with 1D and 2D reactive transport models. These geothermal systems are typically high enthalphy systems where a magmatic pluton is located at a few kilometers depth. The shallow plutons increase the geothermal gradient and trigger the circulation of hydrothermal waters with a steam cap forming at shallow depth. We investigate two contrasting geothermal systems: Krafla, for which the water recharge consists of meteoritic water; and Reykjanes, for which the water recharge mainly consists of seawater. The initial rock composition is a fresh basalt. We use the GEM-Selektor geochemical modeling package [1] for calculation of kinetically controlled mineral equilibria between the rock and the ingression water. We consider basalt minerals dissolution kinetics according to Palandri & Kharaka [2]. Reactive surface areas are assumed to be geometric surface areas, and are corrected using a spherical-particle surface/mass relationship. For secondary minerals, we consider the partial equilibrium assuming that the primary mineral dissolution is slow, and the secondary mineral precipitation is fast. Comparison of our modeling results with the mineralogical assemblages observed in the

  18. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    UM,SUKKEE; WANG,C.Y.; CHEN,KEN S.

    2000-02-11

    A transient, multi-dimensional model has been developed to simulate proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The model accounts simultaneously for electrochemical kinetics, current distribution, hydrodynamics and multi-component transport. A single set of conservation equations valid for flow channels, gas-diffusion electrodes, catalyst layers and the membrane region are developed and numerically solved using a finite-volume-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. The numerical model is validated against published experimental data with good agreement. Subsequently, the model is applied to explore hydrogen dilution effects in the anode feed. The predicted polarization cubes under hydrogen dilution conditions are found to be in qualitative agreement with recent experiments reported in the literature. The detailed two-dimensional electrochemical and flow/transport simulations further reveal that in the presence of hydrogen dilution in the fuel stream, hydrogen is depleted at the reaction surface resulting in substantial kinetic polarization and hence a lower current density that is limited by hydrogen transport from the fuel stream to the reaction site.

  19. Critical Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification Models. Part II: Kinetic and Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Żogała

    2014-01-01

    Originality/value: This paper presents state of art in the field of coal gasification modeling using kinetic and computational fluid dynamics approach. The paper also presents own comparative analysis (concerned with mathematical formulation, input data and parameters, basic assumptions, obtained results etc. of the most important models of underground coal gasification.

  20. Numerical models for fluid-grains interactions: opportunities and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteghamatian Amir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of a multi-scale approach, we develop numerical models for suspension flows. At the micro scale level, we perform particle-resolved numerical simulations using a Distributed Lagrange Multiplier/Fictitious Domain approach. At the meso scale level, we use a two-way Euler/Lagrange approach with a Gaussian filtering kernel to model fluid-solid momentum transfer. At both the micro and meso scale levels, particles are individually tracked in a Lagrangian way and all inter-particle collisions are computed by a Discrete Element/Soft-sphere method. The previous numerical models have been extended to handle particles of arbitrary shape (non-spherical, angular and even non-convex as well as to treat heat and mass transfer. All simulation tools are fully-MPI parallel with standard domain decomposition and run on supercomputers with a satisfactory scalability on up to a few thousands of cores. The main asset of multi scale analysis is the ability to extend our comprehension of the dynamics of suspension flows based on the knowledge acquired from the high-fidelity micro scale simulations and to use that knowledge to improve the meso scale model. We illustrate how we can benefit from this strategy for a fluidized bed, where we introduce a stochastic drag force model derived from micro-scale simulations to recover the proper level of particle fluctuations. Conversely, we discuss the limitations of such modelling tools such as their limited ability to capture lubrication forces and boundary layers in highly inertial flows. We suggest ways to overcome these limitations in order to enhance further the capabilities of the numerical models.

  1. Numerical models for fluid-grains interactions: opportunities and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteghamatian, Amir; Rahmani, Mona; Wachs, Anthony

    2017-06-01

    In the framework of a multi-scale approach, we develop numerical models for suspension flows. At the micro scale level, we perform particle-resolved numerical simulations using a Distributed Lagrange Multiplier/Fictitious Domain approach. At the meso scale level, we use a two-way Euler/Lagrange approach with a Gaussian filtering kernel to model fluid-solid momentum transfer. At both the micro and meso scale levels, particles are individually tracked in a Lagrangian way and all inter-particle collisions are computed by a Discrete Element/Soft-sphere method. The previous numerical models have been extended to handle particles of arbitrary shape (non-spherical, angular and even non-convex) as well as to treat heat and mass transfer. All simulation tools are fully-MPI parallel with standard domain decomposition and run on supercomputers with a satisfactory scalability on up to a few thousands of cores. The main asset of multi scale analysis is the ability to extend our comprehension of the dynamics of suspension flows based on the knowledge acquired from the high-fidelity micro scale simulations and to use that knowledge to improve the meso scale model. We illustrate how we can benefit from this strategy for a fluidized bed, where we introduce a stochastic drag force model derived from micro-scale simulations to recover the proper level of particle fluctuations. Conversely, we discuss the limitations of such modelling tools such as their limited ability to capture lubrication forces and boundary layers in highly inertial flows. We suggest ways to overcome these limitations in order to enhance further the capabilities of the numerical models.

  2. Classical and quantum Big Brake cosmology for scalar field and tachyonic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamenshchik, A. Yu. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and INFN, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy) and L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin str. 2, 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Manti, S. [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-02-21

    We study a relation between the cosmological singularities in classical and quantum theory, comparing the classical and quantum dynamics in some models possessing the Big Brake singularity - the model based on a scalar field and two models based on a tachyon-pseudo-tachyon field . It is shown that the effect of quantum avoidance is absent for the soft singularities of the Big Brake type while it is present for the Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities. Thus, there is some kind of a classical - quantum correspondence, because soft singularities are traversable in classical cosmology, while the strong Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities are not traversable.

  3. Improved quantum efficiency models of CZTSe: GE nanolayer solar cells with a linear electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sanghyun; Price, Kent J; Saucedo, Edgardo; Giraldo, Sergio

    2018-02-08

    We fabricated and characterized CZTSe:Ge nanolayer (quantum efficiency for Ge doped CZTSe devices. The linear electric field model is developed with the incomplete gamma function of the quantum efficiency as compared to the empirical data at forward bias conditions. This model is characterized with a consistent set of parameters from a series of measurements and the literature. Using the analytical modelling method, the carrier collection profile in the absorber is calculated and closely fitted by the developed mathematical expressions to identify the carrier dynamics during the quantum efficiency measurement of the device. The analytical calculation is compared with the measured quantum efficiency data at various bias conditions.

  4. Classical and quantum Big Brake cosmology for scalar field and tachyonic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenshchik, A. Yu.; Manti, S.

    2013-01-01

    We study a relation between the cosmological singularities in classical and quantum theory, comparing the classical and quantum dynamics in some models possessing the Big Brake singularity - the model based on a scalar field and two models based on a tachyon-pseudo-tachyon field . It is shown that the effect of quantum avoidance is absent for the soft singularities of the Big Brake type while it is present for the Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities. Thus, there is some kind of a classical - quantum correspondence, because soft singularities are traversable in classical cosmology, while the strong Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities are not traversable.

  5. Space-Time Uncertainty and Cosmology: a Proposed Quantum Model of the Universe [ 245Kb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosto S.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper introduces a cosmological model of the quantum universe. The aim of the model is (i to identify the possible mechanism that governs the matter/antimatter ratio existing in the universe and concurrently to propose (ii a reasonable growth mechanism of the universe and (iii a possible explanation of the dark energy. The concept of timespace uncertainty, on which is based the present quantum approach, has been proven able to bridge quantum mechanics and relativity.

  6. A System-Level Throughput Model for Quantum Key Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-17

    credence is given to the monumental task of classical information processing or the time it takes to accomplish relative to quantum transmission. The...object. In quantum entanglement , the physical properties of particle pairs or groups of particles are correlated – the quantum state of each particle...Weihs, ’ Entangled quantum key distribution over two free-space optical links’, Opt. Express, vol. 16, no. 21, p. 16840, 2008. [14] C. Fung, X. Ma and

  7. Towards quantum simulation of the Kondo-Lattice-Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochanke, Andre

    2017-04-25

    Ultracold quantum gases of alkaline-earth-like metals are a versatile tool to investigate interacting many-body physics by realizing clean and controllable experimental model systems. Their intriguing properties range from energetically low-lying clock transitions, which allow for high-resolution spectroscopy, over meta-stable states, which can be regarded as a second species with orbital degree of freedom, to SU(N) symmetry, allowing novel magnetic phases. These open up new possibilities for quantum simulators. Using them in combination with optical lattices dissipative Fermi-Hubbard models and the Kondo-lattice-model can be realized, two promising examples for probing strongly correlated systems. This thesis presents an experimental apparatus for producing ultracold samples of fermionic {sup 173}Yb (N≤6). A new bicolor dipole trap was implemented with a final, average trap frequency of anti ω=36 Hz. Using optical, resonant pumping and an Optical-Stern-Gerlach scheme, the spin mixture can arbitrarily be changed from a six- to a one-component gas. Typically the degenerate Fermi gases consist of 87000 atoms at 17.5% T{sub F} (N=6) and of 47000 atoms at 19.4% T{sub F} (N=1). The lowest lying meta-stable state {sup 3}P{sub 0} (578 nm) is coherently controlled using a clock-laser setup with a linewidth of FWHM=1 Hz by means of Rabi oscillations or rapid adiabatic passage. By conducting spectroscopic measurements in a 3D magic lattice (759 nm) we demonstrate inter band transitions and observe the {sup 1}S{sub 0}<=>{sup 3}P{sub 0} excitation with a resolution of FWHM=50(2) Hz. Applying these techniques to a two-component spin mixture reveals a shift of the clock-transition caused by spin-exchange interaction between the orbital symmetric vertical stroke eg right angle {sup +} vertical stroke ↑↓ right angle {sup -} and the orbital antisymmetric vertical stroke eg right angle {sup -} vertical stroke ↑↓ right angle {sup +} state. Using the inelastic properties of

  8. A toy model of a macroscopic quantum coherent system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muñoz-Vega, R; Flores-Godoy, J J; Fernández-Anaya, G; Salinas-Hernández, E

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with macroscopic quantum coherence while using only basic quantum mechanics. A square double well is used to illustrate Leggett–Caldeira oscillations. The effect of thermal radiation on two-level systems is discussed. The concept of decoherence is introduced at an elementary level. Reference values are deduced for the energy, temperature and time scales involved in macroscopic quantum coherence. (paper)

  9. A fully dynamic magneto-rheological fluid damper model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z.; Christenson, R. E.

    2012-06-01

    Control devices can be used to dissipate the energy of a civil structure subjected to dynamic loading, thus reducing structural damage and preventing failure. Semiactive control devices have received significant attention in recent years. The magneto-rheological (MR) fluid damper is a promising type of semiactive device for civil structures due to its mechanical simplicity, inherent stability, high dynamic range, large temperature operating range, robust performance, and low power requirements. The MR damper is intrinsically nonlinear and rate-dependent, both as a function of the displacement across the MR damper and the command current being supplied to the MR damper. As such, to develop control algorithms that take maximum advantage of the unique features of the MR damper, accurate models must be developed to describe its behavior for both displacement and current. In this paper, a new MR damper model that includes a model of the pulse-width modulated (PWM) power amplifier providing current to the damper, a proposed model of the time varying inductance of the large-scale 200 kN MR dampers coils and surrounding MR fluid—a dynamic behavior that is not typically modeled—and a hyperbolic tangent model of the controllable force behavior of the MR damper is presented. Validation experimental tests are conducted with two 200 kN large-scale MR dampers located at the Smart Structures Technology Laboratory (SSTL) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Lehigh University Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) facility. Comparison with experimental test results for both prescribed motion and current and real-time hybrid simulation of semiactive control of the MR damper shows that the proposed MR damper model can accurately predict the fully dynamic behavior of the large-scale 200 kN MR damper.

  10. A Modelling Approach to Multibody Dynamics of Fluid Power Machinery with Hydrodynamic Lubrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Per; Rømer, Daniel; Andersen, Torben Ole

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency potential of the digital displacement technology and the increasing interest in hydraulic transmissions in wind and wave energy applications has created an incentive for development of high efficiency fluid power machinery. Modelling and analysis of fluid power machinery loss...... to be coupled with multibody dynamics models. The focus of the current paper is an approach where the transient pressure field in hydrodynamic lubricated joint clearances are modelled by a set of control volumes and coupled with the fluid power machinery mechanics....

  11. The Blended Finite Element Method for Multi-fluid Plasma Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 07 June 2016 - 01 July 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Blended Finite Element Method for Multi-fluid Plasma...BLENDED FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR MULTI-FLUID PLASMA MODELING Éder M. Sousa1, Uri Shumlak2 1ERC INC., IN-SPACE PROPULSION BRANCH (RQRS) AIR FORCE RESEARCH...MULTI-FLUID PLASMA MODEL 2 BLENDED FINITE ELEMENT METHOD Blended Finite Element Method Nodal Continuous Galerkin Modal Discontinuous Galerkin Model

  12. Quantum phase transitions in effective spin-ladder models for graphene zigzag nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koop, Cornelie; Wessel, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    We examine the magnetic correlations in quantum spin models that were derived recently as effective low-energy theories for electronic correlation effects on the edge states of graphene nanoribbons. For this purpose, we employ quantum Monte Carlo simulations to access the large-distance properties, accounting for quantum fluctuations beyond mean-field-theory approaches to edge magnetism. For certain chiral nanoribbons, antiferromagnetic interedge couplings were previously found to induce a gapped quantum disordered ground state of the effective spin model. We find that the extended nature of the intraedge couplings in the effective spin model for zigzag nanoribbons leads to a quantum phase transition at a large, finite value of the interedge coupling. This quantum critical point separates the quantum disordered region from a gapless phase of stable edge magnetism at weak intraedge coupling, which includes the ground states of spin-ladder models for wide zigzag nanoribbons. To study the quantum critical behavior, the effective spin model can be related to a model of two antiferromagnetically coupled Haldane-Shastry spin-half chains with long-ranged ferromagnetic intrachain couplings. The results for the critical exponents are compared also to several recent renormalization-group calculations for related long-ranged interacting quantum systems.

  13. Magnetic Electron Filtering by Fluid Models for the PEGASES Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leray, Gary; Chabert, Pascal; Lichtenberg, Allan; Lieberman, Michael

    2009-10-01

    The PEGASES thruster produces thrust by creating positive and negative ions, which are then accelerated. To accelerate both type of ions, electrons need to be filtered, which is achieved by applying a static magnetic field strong enough to magnetize the electrons but not the ions. A 1D fluid model with three species (electrons, positive and negative ions) and an analytical model are proposed to understand this process for an oxygen plasma with p = 10 mTorr and B0 = 300 G [1]. The resulting ion-ion plasma formation in the transverse direction (perpendicular to the magnetic field) is demonstrated. It is shown that an additional electron/positive ion loss term is required. The solutions are evaluated for two main parameters: the ionizing fraction at the plasma center (x = 0), ne0/ng, and the electronegativity ratio at the center, α0=nn0/ne0. The effect of geometry and magnetic field amplitude are also discussed. [4pt] [1] Leray G, Chabert P, Lichtenberg A J and Lieberman M A, J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys., Plasma Modelling Cluster issue, to appear (2009)

  14. A fluid-mechanical model of elastocapillary coalescence

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Kiran

    2014-03-25

    © 2014 Cambridge University Press. We present a fluid-mechanical model of the coalescence of a number of elastic objects due to surface tension. We consider an array of spring-block elements separated by thin liquid films, whose dynamics are modelled using lubrication theory. With this simplified model of elastocapillary coalescence, we present the results of numerical simulations for a large number of elements, N = O(104). A linear stability analysis shows that pairwise coalescence is always the most unstable mode of deformation. However, the numerical simulations show that the cluster sizes actually produced by coalescence from a small white-noise perturbation have a distribution that depends on the relative strength of surface tension and elasticity, as measured by an elastocapillary number K. Both the maximum cluster size and the mean cluster size scale like K-1/2 for small K. An analytical solution for the response of the system to a localized perturbation shows that such perturbations generate propagating disturbance fronts, which leave behind \\'frozen-in\\' clusters of a predictable size that also depends on K. A good quantitative comparison between the cluster-size statistics from noisy perturbations and this \\'frozen-in\\' cluster size suggests that propagating fronts may play a crucial role in the dynamics of coalescence.

  15. Critical exponents for the Reggeon quantum spin model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brower, R.C.; Furman, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    The Reggeon quantum spin (RQS) model on the transverse lattice in D dimensional impact parameter space has been conjectured to have the same critical behaviour as the Reggeon field theory (RFT). Thus from a high 'temperature' series of ten (D=2) and twenty (D=1) terms for the RQS model the authors extrapolate to the critical temperature T=Tsub(c) by Pade approximants to obtain the exponents eta=0.238 +- 0.008, z=1.16 +- 0.01, γ=1.271 +- 0.007 for D=2 and eta=0.317 +- 0.002, z=1.272 +- 0.007, γ=1.736 +- 0.001, lambda=0.57 +- 0.03 for D=1. These exponents naturally interpolate between the D=0 and D=4-epsilon results for RFT as expected on the basis of the universality conjecture. (Auth.)

  16. Solitons in Skyrme - Faddeev spinor model and quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybakov, Y

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of unification of Skyrme and Faddeev approaches for the description of baryons and leptons respectively as topological solitons within the scope of 16-spinor model. The motivation for such a unification is based on a special 8- semispinor identity invented by the Italian geometrician F. Brioschi. This remarkable identity permits one to realize baryon or lepton states through the effect of spontaneous symmetry breaking emerging due to special structure of the Higgs potential in the model. At large distances from the particle - soliton small excitation of the vacuum satisfies Klein - Gordon equation with some mass that permits one to establish the correspondence with quantum mechanics in special stochastic representation of the wave function for extended particles - solitons. Finally, we illustrate the peculiar properties of stochastic representation by the famous T. Young's experiment with n slits in soliton realization. (paper)

  17. Quantum dynamics of the driven and dissipative Rabi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriet, Loïc; Ristivojevic, Zoran; Orth, Peter P.; Le Hur, Karyn

    2014-08-01

    The Rabi model considers a two-level system (or spin 1/2) coupled to a quantized harmonic oscillator and describes the simplest interaction between matter and light. The recent experimental progress in solid-state circuit quantum electrodynamics has engendered theoretical efforts to quantitatively describe the mathematical and physical aspects of the light-matter interaction beyond the rotating-wave approximation. We develop a stochastic Schrödinger equation approach which enables us to access the strong-coupling limit of the Rabi model and study the effects of dissipation and ac drive in an exact manner. We include the effect of Ohmic noise on the non-Markovian spin dynamics, resulting in Kondo-type correlations, as well as cavity losses. We compute the time evolution of spin variables in various conditions. As a consideration for future work, we discuss the possibility of reaching a steady state with one polariton in realistic experimental conditions.

  18. Extended orbital modeling of spin qubits in double quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Zack; Ramon, Guy

    2018-01-01

    Orbital modeling of two electron spins confined in a double quantum dot is revisited. We develop an extended Hund-Mulliken approach that includes excited orbitals, allowing for a triplet configuration with both electrons residing in a single dot. This model improves the reliability and applicability of the standard Hund-Mulliken approximation, while remaining largely analytical, thus it enables us to identify the mechanisms behind the exchange coupling dynamics that we find. In particular, our calculations are in close agreement with exchange values that were recently measured at a high interdot bias regime, where the double occupancy triplet configuration is energetically accessible, demonstrating reduced sensitivity to bias fluctuations, while maintaining the large exchange needed for fast gating.

  19. Fluid-structure interactions models, analysis and finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This book starts by introducing the fundamental concepts of mathematical continuum mechanics for fluids and solids and their coupling. Special attention is given to the derivation of variational formulations for the subproblems describing fluid- and solid-mechanics as well as the coupled fluid-structure interaction problem. Two monolithic formulations for fluid-structure interactions are described in detail: the well-established ALE formulation and the modern Fully Eulerian formulation, which can effectively deal with problems featuring large deformation and contact. Further, the book provides details on state-of-the-art discretization schemes for fluid- and solid-mechanics and considers the special needs of coupled problems with interface-tracking and interface-capturing techniques. Lastly, advanced topics like goal-oriented error estimation, multigrid solution and gradient-based optimization schemes are discussed in the context of fluid-structure interaction problems.

  20. Fluid-Structure Interaction in Continuum Models of Bacterial Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Jared A.

    Bacterial biofilms are aggregates of cells that adhere to nearly any solid-fluid interface. While many have harmful effects, such as industrial damage and nosocomial infections, certain biofilm species are now generating renewable energy as the fundamental components of Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs). In an MFC, bacteria consume organic waste and, as they respire, produce free electrons. To do so efficiently, the bacteria must operate at peak metabolic activity, and so require an ample supply of nutrients. But existing MFC systems face several nutrient delivery problems, including clogging and downstream depletion. Ameliorating these problems will require a better understanding of the interplay between structural development and the surrounding fluid flow. In addition to delivering nutrients that affect biofilm growth, the fluid also exerts stresses that cause erosion, detachment, and deformation. These structural changes, in turn, affect the flow and alter the nutrient distribution. To account for this feedback effect, I have developed a continuum model that couples the growth and deformation processes. My model augments an existing growth model with evolution equations derived from Morphoelasticity Theory, by showing that the growth tensor can be directly related to the biofilm velocity potential. This result helps overcome one of the major practical limitations of Morphoelasticity--there is no physical framework for specifying the growth tensor. Through further analysis of the growth tensor, I define the related adjugate and anisotropic growth tensors, which can be more meaningful measures of growth for some models. Under the assumption of small strain, I show that there exists a small correction to the biofilm growth velocity (the accommodation velocity) that represents the effect of the elastic response on the evolution of the biofilm shape. I derive a solvability condition for the accommodation velocity, and show that it leads to a novel evolution equation for

  1. Multimode quantum model of a cw atom laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hope, J.J.; Haine, S.A.; Savage, C.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Laser cooling allows dilute atomic gases to be cooled to within K of absolute zero. Ultracold gases were first achieved twenty years ago and have since found applications in areas such as spectroscopy, time standards, frequency standards, quantum information processing and atom optics. The atomic analogue of the lasing mode in optical lasers is Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC), in which a cooled sample of atoms condense into the lowest energy quantum state. This new state of matter was recently achieved in dilute Bose gases in 1995. Atoms coupled out of a BEC exhibit long-range spatial coherence, and provide the coldest atomic source currently available. These atomic sources are called 'atom lasers' because the BEC is analogous to the lasing mode of an optical laser. The high spectral flux from optical lasers is caused by a process called gain-narrowing, which requires continuous wave (cw) operation. Coupling a BEC quickly into an untrapped state forms a coherent atomic beam but it has a spread in momentum as large as the trapped BEC. Coupling the atoms out more slowly reduces the output linewidth at the expense of reducing the overall flux. These atom lasers are equivalent to Q-switched optical lasers. A cw atom laser with gain-narrowing would produce an increasingly monoenergetic output as the flux increased, dramatically improving the spectral flux. A cw atom laser is therefore a major goal of the atom optics community, but there are several theoretical and practical obstacles to understanding the complexities of such a system. The main obstacle to the production of a cw atom laser is the technical difficulties involved in continuously pumping the lasing mode. No complete theory exists which describes a cw atom laser. Complete cw atom laser models require a quantum field description due to their non-Markovian dynamics, significant spatial effects and the dependence of the output on the quantum statistics of the lasing mode. The extreme dimensionality

  2. Mathematical modeling of fluid and solute transport in peritoneal dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Waniewski, Jacek

    2001-01-01

    Optimization of peritoneal dialysis schedule and dialysis fluid composition needs, among others, methods for quantitative assessment of fluid and solute transport. Furthermore, an integrative quantitative description of physiological processes within the tissue, which contribute to the net transfer of fluid and solutes, is necessary for interpretation of the data and for predictions of the outcome of possible intervention into the peritoneal transport system. The current pro...

  3. Quantum mechanical effects analysis of nanostructured solar cell models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badea Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantum mechanical effects resulted from the inclusion of nanostructures, represented by quantum wells and quantum dots, in the i-layer of an intermediate band solar cell will be analyzed. We will discuss the role of these specific nanostructures in the increasing of the solar cells efficiency. InAs quantum wells being placed in the i-layer of a gallium arsenide (GaAs p-i-n cell, we will analyze the quantum confined regions and determine the properties of the eigenstates located therein. Also, we simulate the electroluminescence that occurs due to the nanostructured regions.

  4. Thermodynamic quantum critical behavior of the anisotropic Kondo necklace model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, D. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150-Urca, 22290-180 RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: daniel@cbpf.br; Continentino, M.A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Campus da Praia Vermelha, Niteroi, RJ 24.210-340 (Brazil); Wang Hanting [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2009-03-15

    The Ising-like anisotropy parameter {delta} in the Kondo necklace model is analyzed using the bond-operator method at zero and finite temperatures for arbitrary d dimensions. A decoupling scheme on the double time Green's functions is used to find the dispersion relation for the excitations of the system. At zero temperature and in the paramagnetic side of the phase diagram, we determine the spin gap exponent {nu}z{approx}0.5 in three dimensions and anisotropy between 0{<=}{delta}{<=}1, a result consistent with the dynamic exponent z=1 for the Gaussian character of the bond-operator treatment. On the other hand, in the antiferromagnetic phase at low but finite temperatures, the line of Neel transitions is calculated for {delta}<<1. For d>2 it is only re-normalized by the anisotropy parameter and varies with the distance to the quantum critical point (QCP) |g| as, T{sub N}{proportional_to}|g|{sup {psi}} where the shift exponent {psi}=1/(d-1). Nevertheless, in two dimensions, a long-range magnetic order occurs only at T=0 for any {delta}<<1. In the paramagnetic phase, we also find a power law temperature dependence on the specific heat at the quantum critical trajectoryJ/t=(J/t){sub c}, T{yields}0. It behaves as C{sub V}{proportional_to}T{sup d} for {delta}{<=}1 and {approx}1, in concordance with the scaling theory for z=1.

  5. Advanced Fluid Reduced Order Models for Compressible Flow.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tezaur, Irina Kalashnikova [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Fike, Jeffrey A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carlberg, Kevin Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Barone, Matthew F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maddix, Danielle [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mussoni, Erin E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Balajewicz, Maciej [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report summarizes fiscal year (FY) 2017 progress towards developing and implementing within the SPARC in-house finite volume flow solver advanced fluid reduced order models (ROMs) for compressible captive-carriage flow problems of interest to Sandia National Laboratories for the design and qualification of nuclear weapons components. The proposed projection-based model order reduction (MOR) approach, known as the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD)/Least- Squares Petrov-Galerkin (LSPG) method, can substantially reduce the CPU-time requirement for these simulations, thereby enabling advanced analyses such as uncertainty quantification and de- sign optimization. Following a description of the project objectives and FY17 targets, we overview briefly the POD/LSPG approach to model reduction implemented within SPARC . We then study the viability of these ROMs for long-time predictive simulations in the context of a two-dimensional viscous laminar cavity problem, and describe some FY17 enhancements to the proposed model reduction methodology that led to ROMs with improved predictive capabilities. Also described in this report are some FY17 efforts pursued in parallel to the primary objective of determining whether the ROMs in SPARC are viable for the targeted application. These include the implemen- tation and verification of some higher-order finite volume discretization methods within SPARC (towards using the code to study the viability of ROMs on three-dimensional cavity problems) and a novel structure-preserving constrained POD/LSPG formulation that can improve the accuracy of projection-based reduced order models. We conclude the report by summarizing the key takeaways from our FY17 findings, and providing some perspectives for future work.

  6. Theoretical models for fluid thermodynamics based on the quasi-Gaussian entropy theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amadei, Andrea

    1998-01-01

    Summary The theoretical modeling of fluid thermodynamics is one of the most challenging fields in physical chemistry. In fact the fluid behavior, except at very low density conditions, is still extremely difficult to be modeled from a statistical mechanical point of view, as for any realistic model

  7. Fluid model of dc glow discharge with nonlocal ionization source term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafatov, I R; Bogdanov, E A; Kudryavtsev, A A

    2012-01-01

    We developed and tested a simple hybrid model for a glow discharge, which incorporates nonlocal ionization by fast electrons into the fluid framework. Calculations have been performed for an argon gas. Comparison with the experimental data as well as with the hybrid (particle) and fluid modelling results demonstated good applicability of the proposed model.

  8. Quantum-Assisted Learning of Hardware-Embedded Probabilistic Graphical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Benedetti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mainstream machine-learning techniques such as deep learning and probabilistic programming rely heavily on sampling from generally intractable probability distributions. There is increasing interest in the potential advantages of using quantum computing technologies as sampling engines to speed up these tasks or to make them more effective. However, some pressing challenges in state-of-the-art quantum annealers have to be overcome before we can assess their actual performance. The sparse connectivity, resulting from the local interaction between quantum bits in physical hardware implementations, is considered the most severe limitation to the quality of constructing powerful generative unsupervised machine-learning models. Here, we use embedding techniques to add redundancy to data sets, allowing us to increase the modeling capacity of quantum annealers. We illustrate our findings by training hardware-embedded graphical models on a binarized data set of handwritten digits and two synthetic data sets in experiments with up to 940 quantum bits. Our model can be trained in quantum hardware without full knowledge of the effective parameters specifying the corresponding quantum Gibbs-like distribution; therefore, this approach avoids the need to infer the effective temperature at each iteration, speeding up learning; it also mitigates the effect of noise in the control parameters, making it robust to deviations from the reference Gibbs distribution. Our approach demonstrates the feasibility of using quantum annealers for implementing generative models, and it provides a suitable framework for benchmarking these quantum technologies on machine-learning-related tasks.

  9. Open quantum system model of the one-dimensional Burgers equation with tunable shear viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yepez, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    Presented is an analysis of an open quantum model of the time-dependent evolution of a flow field governed by the nonlinear Burgers equation in one spatial dimension. The quantum model is a system of qubits where there exists a minimum time interval in the time-dependent dynamics. Each temporally discrete unitary quantum-mechanical evolution is followed by state reduction of the quantum state. The mesoscopic behavior of this quantum model is described by a quantum Boltzmann equation with a naturally emergent entropy function and H theorem and the model obeys the detailed balance principle. The macroscopic-scale effective field theory for the quantum model is derived using a perturbative Chapman-Enskog expansion applied to the linearized quantum Boltzmann equation. The entropy function is consistent with the quantum-mechanical collision process and a Fermi-Dirac single-particle distribution function for the occupation probabilities of the qubit's energy eigenstates. Comparisons are presented between analytical predictions and numerical predictions and the agreement is excellent, indicating that the nonlinear Burgers equation with a tunable shear viscosity is the operative macroscopic scale effective field theory

  10. Quantum-Assisted Learning of Hardware-Embedded Probabilistic Graphical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Marcello; Realpe-Gómez, John; Biswas, Rupak; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro

    2017-10-01

    Mainstream machine-learning techniques such as deep learning and probabilistic programming rely heavily on sampling from generally intractable probability distributions. There is increasing interest in the potential advantages of using quantum computing technologies as sampling engines to speed up these tasks or to make them more effective. However, some pressing challenges in state-of-the-art quantum annealers have to be overcome before we can assess their actual performance. The sparse connectivity, resulting from the local interaction between quantum bits in physical hardware implementations, is considered the most severe limitation to the quality of constructing powerful generative unsupervised machine-learning models. Here, we use embedding techniques to add redundancy to data sets, allowing us to increase the modeling capacity of quantum annealers. We illustrate our findings by training hardware-embedded graphical models on a binarized data set of handwritten digits and two synthetic data sets in experiments with up to 940 quantum bits. Our model can be trained in quantum hardware without full knowledge of the effective parameters specifying the corresponding quantum Gibbs-like distribution; therefore, this approach avoids the need to infer the effective temperature at each iteration, speeding up learning; it also mitigates the effect of noise in the control parameters, making it robust to deviations from the reference Gibbs distribution. Our approach demonstrates the feasibility of using quantum annealers for implementing generative models, and it provides a suitable framework for benchmarking these quantum technologies on machine-learning-related tasks.

  11. Study and discretization of kinetic models and fluid models at low Mach number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellacherie, Stephane

    2011-01-01

    This thesis summarizes our work between 1995 and 2010. It concerns the analysis and the discretization of Fokker-Planck or semi-classical Boltzmann kinetic models and of Euler or Navier-Stokes fluid models at low Mach number. The studied Fokker-Planck equation models the collisions between ions and electrons in a hot plasma, and is here applied to the inertial confinement fusion. The studied semi-classical Boltzmann equations are of two types. The first one models the thermonuclear reaction between a deuterium ion and a tritium ion producing an α particle and a neutron particle, and is also in our case used to describe inertial confinement fusion. The second one (known as the Wang-Chang and Uhlenbeck equations) models the transitions between electronic quantified energy levels of uranium and iron atoms in the AVLIS isotopic separation process. The basic properties of these two Boltzmann equations are studied, and, for the Wang-Chang and Uhlenbeck equations, a kinetic-fluid coupling algorithm is proposed. This kinetic-fluid coupling algorithm incited us to study the relaxation concept for gas and immiscible fluids mixtures, and to underline connections with classical kinetic theory. Then, a diphasic low Mach number model without acoustic waves is proposed to model the deformation of the interface between two immiscible fluids induced by high heat transfers at low Mach number. In order to increase the accuracy of the results without increasing computational cost, an AMR algorithm is studied on a simplified interface deformation model. These low Mach number studies also incited us to analyse on cartesian meshes the inaccuracy at low Mach number of Godunov schemes. Finally, the LBM algorithm applied to the heat equation is justified

  12. Short-Term Load Forecasting Model Based on Quantum Elman Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhisheng Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Short-term load forecasting model based on quantum Elman neural networks was constructed in this paper. The quantum computation and Elman feedback mechanism were integrated into quantum Elman neural networks. Quantum computation can effectively improve the approximation capability and the information processing ability of the neural networks. Quantum Elman neural networks have not only the feedforward connection but also the feedback connection. The feedback connection between the hidden nodes and the context nodes belongs to the state feedback in the internal system, which has formed specific dynamic memory performance. Phase space reconstruction theory is the theoretical basis of constructing the forecasting model. The training samples are formed by means of K-nearest neighbor approach. Through the example simulation, the testing results show that the model based on quantum Elman neural networks is better than the model based on the quantum feedforward neural network, the model based on the conventional Elman neural network, and the model based on the conventional feedforward neural network. So the proposed model can effectively improve the prediction accuracy. The research in the paper makes a theoretical foundation for the practical engineering application of the short-term load forecasting model based on quantum Elman neural networks.

  13. Applications of density matrix in the fractional quantum mechanics: Thomas-Fermi model and Hohenberg-Kohn theorems revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    The many-body space fractional quantum system is studied using the density matrix method. We give the new results of the Thomas-Fermi model, obtain the quantum pressure of the free electron gas. We also show the validity of the Hohenberg-Kohn theorems in the space fractional quantum mechanics and generalize the density functional theory to the fractional quantum mechanics. -- Highlights: → Thomas-Fermi model under the framework of fractional quantum mechanics is studied. → We show the validity of the HK theorems in the space fractional quantum mechanics. → The density functional theory is generalized to the fractional quantum mechanics.

  14. Nanoscale capacitance: A quantum tight-binding model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Feng; Wu, Jian; Li, Yang; Lu, Jun-Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Landauer-Buttiker formalism with the assumption of semi-infinite electrodes as reservoirs has been the standard approach in modeling steady electron transport through nanoscale devices. However, modeling dynamic electron transport properties, especially nanoscale capacitance, is a challenging problem because of dynamic contributions from electrodes, which is neglectable in modeling macroscopic capacitance and mesoscopic conductance. We implement a self-consistent quantum tight-binding model to calculate capacitance of a nano-gap system consisting of an electrode capacitance C‧ and an effective capacitance Cd of the middle device. From the calculations on a nano-gap made of carbon nanotube with a buckyball therein, we show that when the electrode length increases, the electrode capacitance C‧ moves up while the effective capacitance Cd converges to a value which is much smaller than the electrode capacitance C‧. Our results reveal the importance of electrodes in modeling nanoscale ac circuits, and indicate that the concepts of semi-infinite electrodes and reservoirs well-accepted in the steady electron transport theory may be not applicable in modeling dynamic transport properties.

  15. Thermodynamic Property Model of Wide-Fluid Phase Propane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Astina

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available A new thermodynamic property model for propane is expressed in form of the Helmholtz free energy function. It consists of eight terms of the ideal-gas part and eighteen terms of the residual part. Accurate experimental data of fluid properties and theoretical approach from the intermolecular potential were simultaneously considered in the development to insure accuracy and to improve reliability of the equation of state over wide range of pressures and temperatures. Based on the state range of experimental data used in the model development, the validity range is judged from the triple-point of 85.48 K to temperature of 450 K and pressure up to 60 MPa. The uncertainties with respect to different properties are estimated to be 0.03% in ideal-gas isobaric specific heat, 0.2% in liquid phase density, 0.3% in gaseous phase density 1% in specific heats, 0.1% in vapor-pressure except at very low temperatures, 0.05% in saturated-liquid density, 0.02% in speed of sound of the gaseous phase and 1% in speed of sound of the liquid phase.

  16. Probing the (empirical quantum structure embedded in the periodic table with an effective Bohr model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington Nardin Favaro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The atomic shell structure can be observed by inspecting the experimental periodic properties of the Periodic Table. The (quantum shell structure emerges from these properties and in this way quantum mechanics can be explicitly shown considering the (semi-quantitative periodic properties. These periodic properties can be obtained with a simple effective Bohr model. An effective Bohr model with an effective quantum defect (u was considered as a probe in order to show the quantum structure embedded in the Periodic Table. u(Z shows a quasi-smoothed dependence of Z, i.e., u(Z ≈ Z2/5 - 1.

  17. PREFACE: Singular interactions in quantum mechanics: solvable models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Antonio, Gianfausto; Exner, Pavel; Geyler, Vladimir

    2005-06-01

    This issue comprises two dozen research papers which are all in one sense or another devoted to models in which the interaction is singular and sharply localized; a typical example is a quantum particle interacting with a family of δ-type potentials. Such an idealization usually makes analysis of their properties considerably easier, sometimes allowing us to reduce it to a simple algebraic problem—this is why one speaks about solvable models. The subject can be traced back to the early days of quantum mechanics; however, the progress in this field was slow and uneven until the 1960s, mostly because singular interactions are often difficult to deal with mathematically and intuitive arguments do not work. After overcoming the initial difficulties the `classical' theory of point interactions was developed, and finally summarized in 1988 in a monograph by Albeverio, Gesztesy, Høegh-Krohn, and Holden, which you will find quoted in numerous places within this issue. A reliable way to judge theories is to observe the progress they make within one or two decades. In this case there is no doubt that the field has witnessed a continuous development and covered areas which nobody had thought of when the subject first emerged. The reader may see it in the second edition of the aforementioned book which was published by AMS Chelsea only recently and contained a brief survey of these new achievements. It is no coincidence that this topical issue appears at the same time; it has been conceived as its counterpart and a forum at which fresh results in the field can demonstrated. Let us briefly survey the contents of the issue. While the papers included have in common the basic subject, they represent a broad spectrum philosophically as well as technically, and any attempt to classify them is somewhat futile. Nevertheless, we will divide them into a few groups. The first comprises contributions directly related to the usual point-interaction ideology. M Correggi and one of the

  18. Nonperturbative quantum dynamics of a new inflation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyanovsky, D.; Cormier, D.; Holman, R.; Kumar, S.P.; Vega, H.J. de

    1998-01-01

    We consider an O(N) model coupled self-consistently to gravity in the semiclassical approximation, where the field is subject to open-quotes new inflationclose quotes type initial conditions. We study the dynamics self-consistently and non-perturbatively with non-equilibrium field theory methods in the large N limit. We find that spinodal instabilities drive the growth of non-perturbatively large quantum fluctuations which shut off the inflationary growth of the scale factor. We find that a very specific combination of these large fluctuations plus the inflaton zero mode assemble into a new effective field. This new field behaves classically and it is the object which actually rolls down. We show how this reinterpretation saves the standard picture of how metric perturbations are generated during inflation and that the spinodal growth of fluctuations dominates the time dependence of the Bardeen variable for superhorizon modes during inflation. We compute the amplitude and index for the spectrum of scalar density and tensor perturbations and argue that in all models of this type the spinodal instabilities are responsible for a open-quotes redclose quotes spectrum of primordial scalar density perturbations. A criterion for the validity of these models is provided and contact with the reconstruction program is established validating some of the results within a non-perturbative framework. The decoherence aspects and the quantum to classical transition through inflation are studied in detail by following the full evolution of the density matrix and relating the classicality of cosmological perturbations to that of long-wavelength matter fluctuations. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  19. Countability of Planck Boxes in Quantum Branching Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezin, Alexander A.

    2002-04-01

    Two popular paradigms of cosmological quantum branching are Many World (MW) model of parallel universes (Everett, Deutsch) and inflationary quantum foam (IQF) model (Guth, Linde). Taking Planck L,T units as physically smallest, our Big Bang miniverse with size 10E28 cm and duration 10E18 sec has some 10E244 (N) elementary 4D Planck Boxes (PB) in its entire spacetime history. Using combinatorics, N! (about 10E10E247) is upper estimate for number of all possible 4D states, i.e. scale of "eternal return" (ER; Nietzsche, Eliade) for such miniverses. To count all states in full Megaverse (all up and down branches of infinite tree of all MW and/or IQF miniverses) we recall that all countable infinities have same (aleph-naught) cardinality (Cantor). Using Godel-type numbering, count PB in our miniverse by primes. This uses first N primes. Both MW and IQF models presume splitting of miniverses as springing (potentially) from each PB, making each PB infinitely rich, inexhaustible and unique. Next branching level is counted by integers p1Ep2, third level by p1Ep2Ep3 integers, etc, ad infinitum. To count in up and down directions from "our" miniverse, different branching subsets of powers of primes can be used at all levels of tower exponentiation. Thus, all PB in all infinitude of MW and/or IQF branches can be uniquely counted by never repeating integers (tower exponents of primes), offering escape from grim ER scenarios.

  20. Quantum-critical scaling of fidelity in 2D pairing models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamski, Mariusz; Jȩdrzejewski, Janusz; Krokhmalskii, Taras

    2017-01-01

    The laws of quantum-critical scaling theory of quantum fidelity, dependent on the underlying system dimensionality D, have so far been verified in exactly solvable 1D models, belonging to or equivalent to interacting, quadratic (quasifree), spinless or spinfull, lattice-fermion models. The obtained results are so appealing that in quest for correlation lengths and associated universal critical indices ν, which characterize the divergence of correlation lengths on approaching critical points, one might be inclined to substitute the hard task of determining an asymptotic behavior at large distances of a two-point correlation function by an easier one, of determining the quantum-critical scaling of the quantum fidelity. However, the role of system's dimensionality has been left as an open problem. Our aim in this paper is to fill up this gap, at least partially, by verifying the laws of quantum-critical scaling theory of quantum fidelity in a 2D case. To this end, we study correlation functions and quantum fidelity of 2D exactly solvable models, which are interacting, quasifree, spinfull, lattice-fermion models. The considered 2D models exhibit new, as compared with 1D ones, features: at a given quantum-critical point there exists a multitude of correlation lengths and multiple universal critical indices ν, since these quantities depend on spatial directions, moreover, the indices ν may assume larger values. These facts follow from the obtained by us analytical asymptotic formulae for two-point correlation functions. In such new circumstances we discuss the behavior of quantum fidelity from the perspective of quantum-critical scaling theory. In particular, we are interested in finding out to what extent the quantum fidelity approach may be an alternative to the correlation-function approach in studies of quantum-critical points beyond 1D.

  1. Multiphysical modelling of fluid transport through osteo-articular media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault Lemaire

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a multiphysical description of fluid transport through osteo-articular porous media is presented. Adapted from the model of Moyne and Murad, which is intended to describe clayey materials behaviour, this multiscale modelling allows for the derivation of the macroscopic response of the tissue from microscopical information. First the model is described. At the pore scale, electrohydrodynamics equations governing the electrolyte movement are coupled with local electrostatics (Gauss-Poisson equation, and ionic transport equations. Using a change of variables and an asymptotic expansion method, the macroscopic description is carried out. Results of this model are used to show the importance of couplings effects on the mechanotransduction of compact bone remodelling.Neste estudo uma descrição multifísica do transporte de fluidos em meios porosos osteo articulares é apresentada. Adaptado a partir do modelo de Moyne e Murad proposto para descrever o comportamento de materiais argilosos a modelagem multiescala permite a derivação da resposta macroscópica do tecido a partir da informação microscópica. Na primeira parte o modelo é apresentado. Na escala do poro as equações da eletro-hidrodinâmica governantes do movimento dos eletrolitos são acopladas com a eletrostática local (equação de Gauss-Poisson e as equações de transporte iônico. Usando uma mudança de variáveis e o método de expansão assintótica a derivação macroscópica é conduzida. Resultados do modelo proposto são usados para salientar a importância dos efeitos de acoplamento sobre a transdução mecânica da remodelagem de ossos compactados.

  2. Markov Chain-Like Quantum Biological Modeling of Mutations, Aging, and Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan B. Djordjevic

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that quantum mechanics is relevant in photosynthesis, magnetoreception, enzymatic catalytic reactions, olfactory reception, photoreception, genetics, electron-transfer in proteins, and evolution; to mention few. In our recent paper published in Life, we have derived the operator-sum representation of a biological channel based on codon basekets, and determined the quantum channel model suitable for study of the quantum biological channel capacity. However, this model is essentially memoryless and it is not able to properly model the propagation of mutation errors in time, the process of aging, and evolution of genetic information through generations. To solve for these problems, we propose novel quantum mechanical models to accurately describe the process of creation spontaneous, induced, and adaptive mutations and their propagation in time. Different biological channel models with memory, proposed in this paper, include: (i Markovian classical model, (ii Markovian-like quantum model, and (iii hybrid quantum-classical model. We then apply these models in a study of aging and evolution of quantum biological channel capacity through generations. We also discuss key differences of these models with respect to a multilevel symmetric channel-based Markovian model and a Kimura model-based Markovian process. These models are quite general and applicable to many open problems in biology, not only biological channel capacity, which is the main focus of the paper. We will show that the famous quantum Master equation approach, commonly used to describe different biological processes, is just the first-order approximation of the proposed quantum Markov chain-like model, when the observation interval tends to zero. One of the important implications of this model is that the aging phenotype becomes determined by different underlying transition probabilities in both programmed and random (damage Markov chain-like models of aging, which

  3. Stochastic Surrogates for Measurements and Computer Models of Fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Baar, J.H.S.

    2014-01-01

    Both measurements and computer simulations of fluids introduce a prediction problem. A Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurement of a flow field results in a discrete grid of velocity vectors, from which we aim to predict the velocity field or related quantities. In Computational Fluid Dynamics

  4. Revised Starling equation and the glycocalyx model of transvascular fluid exchange: an improved paradigm for prescribing intravenous fluid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, T E; Woodcock, T M

    2012-03-01

    I.V. fluid therapy does not result in the extracellular volume distribution expected from Starling's original model of semi-permeable capillaries subject to hydrostatic and oncotic pressure gradients within the extracellular fluid. Fluid therapy to support the circulation relies on applying a physiological paradigm that better explains clinical and research observations. The revised Starling equation based on recent research considers the contributions of the endothelial glycocalyx layer (EGL), the endothelial basement membrane, and the extracellular matrix. The characteristics of capillaries in various tissues are reviewed and some clinical corollaries considered. The oncotic pressure difference across the EGL opposes, but does not reverse, the filtration rate (the 'no absorption' rule) and is an important feature of the revised paradigm and highlights the limitations of attempting to prevent or treat oedema by transfusing colloids. Filtered fluid returns to the circulation as lymph. The EGL excludes larger molecules and occupies a substantial volume of the intravascular space and therefore requires a new interpretation of dilution studies of blood volume and the speculation that protection or restoration of the EGL might be an important therapeutic goal. An explanation for the phenomenon of context sensitivity of fluid volume kinetics is offered, and the proposal that crystalloid resuscitation from low capillary pressures is rational. Any potential advantage of plasma or plasma substitutes over crystalloids for volume expansion only manifests itself at higher capillary pressures.

  5. Quantum Phase Transition and Universal Dynamics in the Rabi Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Myung-Joong; Puebla, Ricardo; Plenio, Martin B

    2015-10-30

    We consider the Rabi Hamiltonian, which exhibits a quantum phase transition (QPT) despite consisting only of a single-mode cavity field and a two-level atom. We prove QPT by deriving an exact solution in the limit where the atomic transition frequency in the unit of the cavity frequency tends to infinity. The effect of a finite transition frequency is studied by analytically calculating finite-frequency scaling exponents as well as performing a numerically exact diagonalization. Going beyond this equilibrium QPT setting, we prove that the dynamics under slow quenches in the vicinity of the critical point is universal; that is, the dynamics is completely characterized by critical exponents. Our analysis demonstrates that the Kibble-Zurek mechanism can precisely predict the universal scaling of residual energy for a model without spatial degrees of freedom. Moreover, we find that the onset of the universal dynamics can be observed even with a finite transition frequency.

  6. Dissipative phase transition in the open quantum Rabi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Myung-Joong; Rabl, Peter; Plenio, Martin B.

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate that the open quantum Rabi model (QRM) exhibits a second-order dissipative phase transition (DPT) and propose a method to observe this transition with trapped ions. The interplay between the ultrastrong qubit-oscillator coupling and the oscillator damping brings the system into a steady state with a diverging number of excitations, in which a DPT is allowed to occur even with a finite number of system components. The universality class of the open QRM, modified from the closed QRM by a Markovian bath, is identified by finding critical exponents and scaling functions using the Keldysh functional integral approach. We propose to realize the open QRM with two trapped ions where the coherent coupling and the rate of dissipation can be individually controlled and adjusted over a wide range. Thanks to this controllability, our work opens a possibility to investigate potentially rich dynamics associated with a dissipative phase transition.

  7. Atomistic Modeling of Nanostructures via the BFS Quantum Approximate Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Garces, Jorge E.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Farias, D.

    2003-01-01

    Ideally, computational modeling techniques for nanoscopic physics would be able to perform free of limitations on the type and number of elements, while providing comparable accuracy when dealing with bulk or surface problems. Computational efficiency is also desirable, if not mandatory, for properly dealing with the complexity of typical nano-strucured systems. A quantum approximate technique, the BFS method for alloys, which attempts to meet these demands, is introduced for the calculation of the energetics of nanostructures. The versatility of the technique is demonstrated through analysis of diverse systems, including multi-phase precipitation in a five element Ni-Al-Ti-Cr-Cu alloy and the formation of mixed composition Co-Cu islands on a metallic Cu(III) substrate.

  8. Classical and quantum stochastic models of resistive and memristive circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, John E.; Zhang, Guofeng

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine stochastic Markovian models for circuits in phase space for which the drift term is equivalent to the standard circuit equations. In particular, we include dissipative components corresponding to both a resistor and a memristor in series. We obtain a dilation of the problem which is canonical in the sense that the underlying Poisson bracket structure is preserved under the stochastic flow. We do this first of all for standard Wiener noise but also treat the problem using a new concept of symplectic noise, where the Poisson structure is extended to the noise as well as the circuit variables, and in particular where we have canonically conjugate noises. Finally, we construct a dilation which describes the quantum mechanical analogue.

  9. Quantum plasmonics: from jellium models to ab initio calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varas Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Light-matter interaction in plasmonic nanostructures is often treated within the realm of classical optics. However, recent experimental findings show the need to go beyond the classical models to explain and predict the plasmonic response at the nanoscale. A prototypical system is a nanoparticle dimer, extensively studied using both classical and quantum prescriptions. However, only very recently, fully ab initio time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT calculations of the optical response of these dimers have been carried out. Here, we review the recent work on the impact of the atomic structure on the optical properties of such systems. We show that TDDFT can be an invaluable tool to simulate the time evolution of plasmonic modes, providing fundamental understanding into the underlying microscopical mechanisms.

  10. Model Checking for a Class of Performance Properties of Fluid Stochastic Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bujorianu, L.M.; Bujorianu, M.C.; Horváth, A.; Telek, M.

    2006-01-01

    Recently, there is an explosive development of fluid approa- ches to computer and distributed systems. These approaches are inherently stochastic and generate continuous state space models. Usually, the performance measures for these systems are defined using probabilities of reaching certain sets

  11. Manin Matrices, Quantum Elliptic Commutative Families and Characteristic Polynomial of Elliptic Gaudin Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri Talalaev

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we construct the quantum spectral curve for the quantum dynamical elliptic gl_n Gaudin model. We realize it considering a commutative family corresponding to the Felder's elliptic quantum group E_{τ,h}(gl_n and taking the appropriate limit. The approach of Manin matrices here suits well to the problem of constructing the generation function of commuting elements which plays an important role in SoV and Langlands concept.

  12. Mapping trapped atomic gas with spin-orbit coupling to quantum Rabi-like model

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Haiping; Chen, Shu

    2013-01-01

    We construct a connection of the ultracold atomic system in a harmonic trap with Raman-induced spin-orbit coupling to the quantum Rabi-like model. By mapping the trapped atomic system to a Rabi-like model, we can get the exact solution of the Rabi-like model following the methods to solve the quantum Rabi model. The existence of such a mapping implies that we can study the basic model in quantum optics by using trapped atomic gases with spin-orbit coupling.

  13. Development of the tube bundle structure for fluid-structure interaction analysis model - Intermediate Report -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Kyung Ho; Kim, Jae Yong; Lee, Kang Hee; Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Hyung Kyu

    2009-07-01

    Tube bundle structures within a Boiler or heat exchanger are laid the fluid-structure, thermal-structure and fluid-thermal-structure coupled boundary condition. In these complicated boundary conditions, Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) occurs when fluid flow causes deformation of the structure. This deformation, in turn, changes the boundary conditions for the fluid flow. The structural analysis have been executed as follows. First of all, divide the fluid and structural analysis discipline, and then independently analyzed each other. However, the fluid dynamic force effect the behavior of the structure, and the vibration amplitude of the structure to fluid. FSI analysis model was separately created fluid and structure model, and then defined the fsi boundary condition, and simultaneously analyzed in one domain. The analysis results were compared with those of the experimental method for validating the analysis model. Flow-induced vibration test was executed with single rod configuration. The vibration amplitudes of a fuel rod were measured by the laser vibro-meter system in x and y-direction. The analyses results were not closely with the test data, but the trend was very similar with the test result. In fsi coupled analysis case, the turbulent model was very important with the reliability of the accuracy of the analysis model. Therefore, the analysis model will be needed to further study

  14. Quantum triangulations moduli space, quantum computing, non-linear sigma models and Ricci flow

    CERN Document Server

    Carfora, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    This book discusses key conceptual aspects and explores the connection between triangulated manifolds and quantum physics, using a set of case studies ranging from moduli space theory to quantum computing to provide an accessible introduction to this topic. Research on polyhedral manifolds often reveals unexpected connections between very distinct aspects of mathematics and physics. In particular, triangulated manifolds play an important role in settings such as Riemann moduli space theory, strings and quantum gravity, topological quantum field theory, condensed matter physics, critical phenomena and complex systems. Not only do they provide a natural discrete analogue to the smooth manifolds on which physical theories are typically formulated, but their appearance is also often a consequence of an underlying structure that naturally calls into play non-trivial aspects of representation theory, complex analysis and topology in a way that makes the basic geometric structures of the physical interactions involv...

  15. Mathematical and numerical analysis of a multi-velocity multi-fluid model for interpenetration of miscible fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enaux, C.

    2007-11-01

    The simulation of indirect laser implosion requires an accurate knowledge of the inter-penetration of the laser target materials turned into plasma. This work is devoted to the study of a multi-velocity multi-fluid model recently proposed by Scannapieco and Cheng (SC) to describe the inter-penetration of miscible fluids. In this document, we begin with presenting the SC model in the context of miscible fluids flow modelling. Afterwards, the mathematical analysis of the model is carried out (study of the hyperbolicity, existence of a strictly convex mathematical entropy, asymptotic analysis and diffusion limit). As a conclusion the problem is well set. Then, we focus on the problem of numerical resolution of systems of conservation laws with a relaxation source term, because SC model belongs to this class. The main difficulty of this task is to capture on a coarse grid the asymptotic behaviour of the system when the source term is stiff. The main contribution of this work lies in the proposition of a new technique, allowing us to construct a Lagrangian numerical flux taking into account the presence of the source term. This technique is applied first on the model-problem of a one-dimensional Euler system with friction, and then on the multi-fluid SC model. In both cases, we prove that the new scheme is asymptotic-preserving and entropic under a CFL-like condition. The two-dimensional extension of the scheme is done by using a standard alternate directions method. Some numerical results highlight the contribution of the new flux, compared with a standard Lagrange plus Remap scheme where the source term is processed using an operator splitting. (author)

  16. Collisional transport across the magnetic field in drift-fluid models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    2016-01-01

    Drift ordered fluid models are widely applied in studies of low-frequency turbulence in the edge and scrape-off layer regions of magnetically confined plasmas. Here, we show how collisional transport across the magnetic field is self-consistently incorporated into drift-fluid models without...... altering the drift-fluid energy integral. We demonstrate that the inclusion of collisional transport in drift-fluid models gives rise to diffusion of particle density, momentum, and pressures in drift-fluid turbulence models and, thereby, obviates the customary use of artificial diffusion in turbulence...... simulations. We further derive a computationally efficient, two-dimensional model, which can be time integrated for several turbulence de-correlation times using only limited computational resources. The model describes interchange turbulence in a two-dimensional plane perpendicular to the magnetic field...

  17. Surfactant micelles: model systems for flow instabilities of complex fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perge, Christophe; Fardin, Marc-Antoine; Manneville, Sébastien

    2014-04-01

    Complex fluids such as emulsions, colloidal gels, polymer or surfactant solutions are all characterized by the existence of a "microstructure" which may couple to an external flow on time scales that are easily probed in experiments. Such a coupling between flow and microstructure usually leads to instabilities under relatively weak shear flows that correspond to vanishingly small Reynolds numbers. Wormlike micellar surfactant solutions appear as model systems to study two examples of such instabilities, namely shear banding and elastic instabilities. Focusing on a semidilute sample we show that two-dimensional ultrafast ultrasonic imaging allows for a thorough investigation of unstable shear-banded micellar flows. In steady state, radial and azimuthal velocity components are recovered and unveil the original structure of the vortical flow within an elastically unstable high shear rate band. Furthermore thanks to an unprecedented frame rate of up to 20,000 fps, transients and fast dynamics can be resolved, which paves the way for a better understanding of elastic turbulence.

  18. A field-theoretic approach to Spin Foam models in Quantum Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Vitale, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    We present an introduction to Group Field Theory models, motivating them on the basis of their relationship with discretized BF models of gravity. We derive the Feynmann rules and compute quantum corrections in the coherent states basis.

  19. Fluid stiction modeling for quickly separating plates considering the liquid tensile strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Daniel Beck; Johansen, Per; Pedersen, Henrik C.

    2015-01-01

    the time dependent fluid stiction phenomenon, including a fluid tensile strength and cavitation effects, is proposed. The model is based on Reynolds theory, and the pressure distribution in the liquid zone is solved analytically for each time step, leading to a computationally efficient model without...... given that proper selections of liquid tensile strength and initial plate distance are made....

  20. A physical five-equation model for compressible two-fluid flow, and its numerical treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Kreeft (Jasper); B. Koren (Barry)

    2009-01-01

    htmlabstractA novel five-equation model for inviscid, non-heat-conducting, compressible two-fluid flow is derived, together with an appropriate numerical method. The model uses flow equations based on conservation laws and exchange laws only. The two fluids exchange momentum and energy, for which

  1. Analog quantum simulation of the Rabi model in the ultra-strong coupling regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braumüller, Jochen; Marthaler, Michael; Schneider, Andre; Stehli, Alexander; Rotzinger, Hannes; Weides, Martin; Ustinov, Alexey V

    2017-10-03

    The quantum Rabi model describes the fundamental mechanism of light-matter interaction. It consists of a two-level atom or qubit coupled to a quantized harmonic mode via a transversal interaction. In the weak coupling regime, it reduces to the well-known Jaynes-Cummings model by applying a rotating wave approximation. The rotating wave approximation breaks down in the ultra-strong coupling regime, where the effective coupling strength g is comparable to the energy ω of the bosonic mode, and remarkable features in the system dynamics are revealed. Here we demonstrate an analog quantum simulation of an effective quantum Rabi model in the ultra-strong coupling regime, achieving a relative coupling ratio of g/ω ~ 0.6. The quantum hardware of the simulator is a superconducting circuit embedded in a cQED setup. We observe fast and periodic quantum state collapses and revivals of the initial qubit state, being the most distinct signature of the synthesized model.An analog quantum simulation scheme has been explored with a quantum hardware based on a superconducting circuit. Here the authors investigate the time evolution of the quantum Rabi model at ultra-strong coupling conditions, which is synthesized by slowing down the system dynamics in an effective frame.

  2. Mathematical modeling of the dynamic stability of fluid conveying pipe based on integral equation formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfelsoufi, Z.; Azrar, L.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a mathematical modeling of flutter and divergence analyses of fluid conveying pipes based on integral equation formulations is presented. Dynamic stability problems related to fluid pressure, velocity, tension, topography slope and viscoelastic supports and foundations are formulated. A methodological approach is presented and the required matrices, associated to the influencing fluid and pipe parameters, are explicitly given. Internal discretizations are used allowing to investigate the deformation, the bending moment, slope and shear force at internal points. Velocity–frequency, pressure-frequency and tension-frequency curves are analyzed for various fluid parameters and internal elastic supports. Critical values of divergence and flutter behaviors with respect to various fluid parameters are investigated. This model is general and allows the study of dynamic stability of tubes crossed by stationary and instationary fluid on various types of supports. Accurate predictions can be obtained and are of particular interest for a better performance and for an optimal safety of piping system installations. - Highlights: • Modeling the flutter and divergence of fluid conveying pipes based on RBF. • Dynamic analysis of a fluid conveying pipe with generalized boundary conditions. • Considered parameters fluid are the pressure, tension, slopes topography, velocity. • Internal support increase the critical velocity value. • This methodologies determine the fluid parameters effects.

  3. Stochastic quantization of a topological quantum mechanical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, Sergio; Krein, Gastao; Menezes, Gabriel; Svaiter, Nami Fux

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Stochastic quantization of complex actions has been extensively studied in the literature. In these models, a Markovian Langevin equation is used in order to study the quantization of such systems. In such papers, the advantages of the Markovian stochastic quantization method were explored and exposed. However, many drawbacks of the method were also pointed out, such as instability of the simulations with absence of convergence and sometimes convergence to the wrong limit. Indeed, although several alternative methods have been proposed to deal with interesting physical systems where the action is complex, these approaches do not suggest any general way of solving the particular difficulties that arise in each situation. Here, we wish to make contributions to the program of stochastic quantization of theories with imaginary action by investigating the consequences of a non-Markovian stochastic quantization in a particular situation, namely a quantum mechanical topological action. We analyze the Markovian stochastic quantization for a topological quantum mechanical action which is analog to a Maxwell-Chern-Simons action in the Weyl gauge. Afterwards we consider a Langevin equation with memory kernel and Einstein's relations with colored noise. We show that convergence towards equilibrium is achieved in both regimes. We also sketch a simple numerical analysis to investigate the possible advantages of non-Markovian procedure over the usual Markovian quantization. Both retarded Green's function for the diffusion problem are considered in such analysis. We show that, although the results indicated that the effect of memory kernel, as usually expected, is to delay the convergence to equilibrium, non-Markovian systems imply a faster decay compared to Markovian ones as well as smoother convergence to equilibrium. (author)

  4. De Broglie wavelets versus Schroedinger wave functions: A ribbon model approach to quantum theory and the mechanisms of quantum interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jau

    1996-02-01

    As an alternative to better physical explanations of the mechanisms of quantum interference and the origins of uncertainty broadening, a linear hopping model is proposed with ``color-varying`` dynamics to reflect fast exchange between time-reversed states. Intricate relations between this model, particle-wave dualism, and relativity are discussed. The wave function is shown to possess dual characteristics of a stable, localized ``soliton-like`` de Broglie wavelet and a delocalized, interfering Schroedinger carrier wave function.

  5. A quantum informed continuum model for ferroelectric and flexoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, William S.

    2013-04-01

    Correlations between quantum mechanics and continuum mechanics are investigated by exploring relations based on the electron density and electrostatic forces within an atomic lattice in ferroelectric materials. Theoretically, it is shown that anisotropic stress is dependent upon electrostatic forces that originate from the quadrupole density. This relation is directly determined if the nuclear charge and electron density are known. The result is an extension of the Hellmann-Feynman theory used to quantify stresses based on electrostatics. Further, flexoelectricity is found to be proportional to the next two higher order poles. These relations are obtained by correlating a nucleus-nucleus potential and nucleus-electron potential with the deformation gradient and second order gradient. An example is given for barium titanate by solving the electron density using density function theory (DFT) calculations. Changes in energy and stress under different lattice geometric constraints are modeled and compared to nonlinear continuum mechanics to understand differences in formulating a model directly from DFT calculations versus a nonlinear continuum model that uses polarization versus the quadrupole density as the order parameter.

  6. Modeling high-efficiency quantum dot sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pedro, Victoria; Xu, Xueqing; Mora-Seró, Iván; Bisquert, Juan

    2010-10-26

    With energy conversion efficiencies in continuous growth, quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSCs) are currently under an increasing interest, but there is an absence of a complete model for these devices. Here, we compile the latest developments in this kind of cells in order to attain high efficiency QDSCs, modeling the performance. CdSe QDs have been grown directly on a TiO(2) surface by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction to ensure high QD loading. ZnS coating and previous growth of CdS were analyzed. Polysulfide electrolyte and Cu(2)S counterelectrodes were used to provide higher photocurrents and fill factors, FF. Incident photon-to-current efficiency peaks as high as 82%, under full 1 sun illumination, were obtained, which practically overcomes the photocurrent limitation commonly observed in QDSCs. High power conversion efficiency of up to 3.84% under full 1 sun illumination (V(oc) = 0.538 V, j(sc) = 13.9 mA/cm(2), FF = 0.51) and the characterization and modeling carried out indicate that recombination has to be overcome for further improvement of QDSC.

  7. Positivity in Lorentzian Barrett-Crane models of quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade Cherrington, J [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Christensen, J Daniel [Department of Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-02-07

    The Barrett-Crane models of Lorentzian quantum gravity are a family of spin foam models based on the Lorentz group. We show that for various choices of edge and face amplitudes, including the Perez-Rovelli normalization, the amplitude for every triangulated closed 4-manifold is a non-negative real number. Roughly speaking, this means that if one sums over triangulations, there is no interference between the different triangulations. We prove non-negativity by transforming the model into a 'dual variables' formulation in which the amplitude for a given triangulation is expressed as an integral over three copies of hyperbolic space for each tetrahedron. Then we prove that, expressed in this way, the integrand is non-negative. In addition to implying that the amplitude is non-negative, the non-negativity of the integrand is highly significant from the point of view of numerical computations, as it allows statistical methods such as the Metropolis algorithm to be used for efficient computation of expectation values of observables.

  8. Classical Logic and Quantum Logic with Multiple and Common Lattice Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen Pavičić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a proper propositional quantum logic and show that it has multiple disjoint lattice models, only one of which is an orthomodular lattice (algebra underlying Hilbert (quantum space. We give an equivalent proof for the classical logic which turns out to have disjoint distributive and nondistributive ortholattices. In particular, we prove that both classical logic and quantum logic are sound and complete with respect to each of these lattices. We also show that there is one common nonorthomodular lattice that is a model of both quantum and classical logic. In technical terms, that enables us to run the same classical logic on both a digital (standard, two-subset, 0-1-bit computer and a nondigital (say, a six-subset computer (with appropriate chips and circuits. With quantum logic, the same six-element common lattice can serve us as a benchmark for an efficient evaluation of equations of bigger lattice models or theorems of the logic.

  9. Quantum radar

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2011-01-01

    This book offers a concise review of quantum radar theory. Our approach is pedagogical, making emphasis on the physics behind the operation of a hypothetical quantum radar. We concentrate our discussion on the two major models proposed to date: interferometric quantum radar and quantum illumination. In addition, this book offers some new results, including an analytical study of quantum interferometry in the X-band radar region with a variety of atmospheric conditions, a derivation of a quantum radar equation, and a discussion of quantum radar jamming.This book assumes the reader is familiar w

  10. Modeling, Simulation, and Analysis of a Decoy State Enabled Quantum Key Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    Protecting Information, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006. [6] M. A. Nielsen and I. L. Chuang, Quantum Computation and Quantum Information...configurable to interfere with Bob’s ability to detect a weak coherent pulse. DR D 5 The QKD model shall be accurate, flexible, usable , extensible

  11. Mathematical Models of Fluid Dynamics Modeling, Theory, Basic Numerical Facts An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Ansorge, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Without sacrificing scientific strictness, this introduction to the field guides readers through mathematical modeling, the theoretical treatment of the underlying physical laws and the construction and effective use of numerical procedures to describe the behavior of the dynamics of physical flow. The book is carefully divided into three main parts:. - The design of mathematical models of physical fluid flow;. - A theoretical treatment of the equations representing the model, as Navier-Stokes, Euler, and boundary layer equations, models of turbulence, in order to gain qualitative as well as q

  12. Modelling of Mass Transfer Phenomena in Chemical and Biochemical Reactor Systems using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Hilde Kristina

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is the application of numerical methods to solve systems of partial differential equations related to fluid dynamics. The continuity and the momentum equations are the most commonly applied equations within CFD, and together they can be used to calculate...... the velocity and pressure distributions in a fluid. CFD also enables the modelling of several fluids simultaneously, e.g. gas bubbles in a liquid, as well as the presence of turbulence and dissolved chemicals in a fluid, and many other phenomena. This makes CFD an appreciated tool for studying flow structures...... and an ion-exchange reaction are also modelled and compared to experimental data. The thesis includes a comprehensive overview of the fundamentals behind a CFD software, as well as a more detailed review of the fluid dynamic phenomena investigated in this project. The momentum and continuity equations...

  13. Numerical Modeling and Investigation of Fluid-Driven Fracture Propagation in Reservoirs Based on a Modified Fluid-Mechanically Coupled Model in Two-Dimensional Particle Flow Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing is a useful tool for enhancing rock mass permeability for shale gas development, enhanced geothermal systems, and geological carbon sequestration by the high-pressure injection of a fracturing fluid into tight reservoir rocks. Although significant advances have been made in hydraulic fracturing theory, experiments, and numerical modeling, when it comes to the complexity of geological conditions knowledge is still limited. Mechanisms of fluid injection-induced fracture initiation and propagation should be better understood to take full advantage of hydraulic fracturing. This paper presents the development and application of discrete particle modeling based on two-dimensional particle flow code (PFC2D. Firstly, it is shown that the modeled value of the breakdown pressure for the hydraulic fracturing process is approximately equal to analytically calculated values under varied in situ stress conditions. Furthermore, a series of simulations for hydraulic fracturing in competent rock was performed to examine the influence of the in situ stress ratio, fluid injection rate, and fluid viscosity on the borehole pressure history, the geometry of hydraulic fractures, and the pore-pressure field, respectively. It was found that the hydraulic fractures in an isotropic medium always propagate parallel to the orientation of the maximum principal stress. When a high fluid injection rate is used, higher breakdown pressure is needed for fracture propagation and complex geometries of fractures can develop. When a low viscosity fluid is used, fluid can more easily penetrate from the borehole into the surrounding rock, which causes a reduction of the effective stress and leads to a lower breakdown pressure. Moreover, the geometry of the fractures is not particularly sensitive to the fluid viscosity in the approximate isotropic model.

  14. Three Solvable Matrix Models of a Quantum Catastrophe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Levai, G.; Růžička, František; Znojil, Miloslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 9 (2014), s. 2875-2890 ISSN 0020-7748 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : quantum theory * PT symmetry * Finite-dimensional non-Hermitian Hamiltonians * exceptional-point localization * quantum theory of catastrophes * methods of computer algebra Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.184, year: 2014

  15. Holographic aspects of black holes, matrix models and quantum criticality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papadoulaki, O.

    2017-01-01

    In one word the core subject of this thesis is holography. What we mean by holography broadly is the mapping of a gravitational theory in D dimensions to a quantum mechanics system or quantum field theory in one less dimension In chapter 1, we give a basic and self-contained introduction of the

  16. Bianchi Type-I cosmological mesonic stiff fluid models in Lyra's ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bianchi Type-I cosmological models in Lyra's geometry are obtained when the source of gravitational field is a perfect fluid coupled with massless mesonic scalar field. Some physical and kinematical properties of the models are also discussed.

  17. ADDRESSING HUMAN EXPOSURES TO AIR POLLUTANTS AROUND BUILDINGS IN URBAN AREAS WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper discusses the status and application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models to address challenges for modeling human exposures to air pollutants around urban building microenvironments. There are challenges for more detailed understanding of air pollutant sour...

  18. Serum and Synovial Fluid Serum Amyloid A Response in Equine Models of Synovitis and Septic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Elsa K; Brandon Wiese, R; Graham, Megan R; Tyler, Amelia J; Settlage, Julie M; Werre, Stephen R; Petersson-Wolfe, Christina S; Kanevsky-Mullarky, Isis; Dahlgren, Linda A

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the serum and synovial fluid serum amyloid A (SAA) response in equine models of synovitis and septic arthritis and to compare handheld and validated immunoturbidometric assays for SAA quantification. Controlled, experimental study. Healthy adult horses (n = 9). Synovitis (n = 4) and septic arthritis (n = 5) were induced using lipopolysaccharide and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively, and serial serum and synovial fluid samples were collected. Serial synovial fluid cytology was performed for both models and synovial fluid from the septic arthritis model was submitted for bacterial culture. Serum and synovial fluid SAA were quantified by handheld test and immunoturbidometric assay. Cytologic and SAA data were compared within and between models (mixed model ANOVA) and results of SAA assays were compared using category-by-category analysis (weighted kappa coefficient). Synovial fluid total nucleated cell counts and total protein increased significantly following induction of both models. Serum and synovial fluid SAA remained normal in synovitis horses and increased significantly in septic arthritis horses. Serum SAA increased more rapidly than synovial fluid SAA. Agreement was 98% when SAA concentrations were low (septic arthritis in horses. SAA concentrations for the assays diverged and examination using a larger sample size is needed before direct numeric comparisons between the assays can be made. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  19. Many-body dissipative particle dynamics modeling of fluid flow in fine-grained nanoporous shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yidong; Goral, Jan; Huang, Hai; Miskovic, Ilija; Meakin, Paul; Deo, Milind

    2017-05-01

    A many-body dissipative particle dynamics model, namely, MDPD, is applied for simulation of pore-scale, multi-component, multi-phase fluid flows in fine-grained, nanoporous shales. Since this model is able to simultaneously capture the discrete features of fluid molecules in nanometer size pores and continuum fluid dynamics in larger pores, and is relatively easy to parameterize, it has been recognized as being particularly suitable for simulating complex fluid flow in multi-length-scale nanopore networks of shales. A remarkable feature of this work is the integration of a high-resolution FIB-SEM (focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy) digital imaging technique to the MDPD model for providing 3D voxel data that contain the invaluable geometrical and compositional information of shale samples. This is the first time that FIB-SEM is seamlessly linked to a Lagrangian model like MDPD for fluid flow simulation, which offers a robust approach to bridging gaps between the molecular- and continuum-scales, since the relevant spatial and temporal scales are too big for molecular dynamics, and too small for computational fluid dynamics with known constitutive models. Simulations ranging from a number of benchmark problems to a forced two-fluid flow in a Woodford shale sample are presented. Results indicate that this model can be used to deliver reasonable simulations for multi-component, multi-phase fluid flows in arbitrarily complex pore networks in shales.

  20. Development of the tube bundle structure for fluid-structure interaction analysis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Kyung Ho; Kim, Jae Yong

    2010-02-01

    Tube bundle structures within a Boiler or heat exchanger are laid the fluid-structure, thermal-structure and fluid-thermal-structure coupled boundary condition. In these complicated boundary conditions, Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) occurs when fluid flow causes deformation of the structure. This deformation, in turn, changes the boundary conditions for the fluid flow. The structural analysis discipline, and then independently analyzed each other. However, the fluid dynamic force effect the behavior of the structure, and the vibration amplitude of the structure to fluid. FSI analysis model was separately created fluid and structure model, and then defined the fsi boundary condition, and simultaneously analyzed in one domain. The analysis results were compared with those of the experimental method for validating the analysis model. Flow-induced vibration test was executed with single rod configuration. The vibration amplitudes of a fuel rod were measured by the laser vibro-meter system in x and y-direction. The analyses results were not closely with the test data, but the trend was very similar with the test result. In fsi coupled analysis case, the turbulent model was very important with the reliability of the accuracy of the analysis model. Therefore, the analysis model will be needed to further study