WorldWideScience

Sample records for model qualitatively reproduces

  1. Towards reproducible descriptions of neuronal network models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilen Nordlie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Progress in science depends on the effective exchange of ideas among scientists. New ideas can be assessed and criticized in a meaningful manner only if they are formulated precisely. This applies to simulation studies as well as to experiments and theories. But after more than 50 years of neuronal network simulations, we still lack a clear and common understanding of the role of computational models in neuroscience as well as established practices for describing network models in publications. This hinders the critical evaluation of network models as well as their re-use. We analyze here 14 research papers proposing neuronal network models of different complexity and find widely varying approaches to model descriptions, with regard to both the means of description and the ordering and placement of material. We further observe great variation in the graphical representation of networks and the notation used in equations. Based on our observations, we propose a good model description practice, composed of guidelines for the organization of publications, a checklist for model descriptions, templates for tables presenting model structure, and guidelines for diagrams of networks. The main purpose of this good practice is to trigger a debate about the communication of neuronal network models in a manner comprehensible to humans, as opposed to machine-readable model description languages. We believe that the good model description practice proposed here, together with a number of other recent initiatives on data-, model-, and software-sharing, may lead to a deeper and more fruitful exchange of ideas among computational neuroscientists in years to come. We further hope that work on standardized ways of describing--and thinking about--complex neuronal networks will lead the scientific community to a clearer understanding of high-level concepts in network dynamics, and will thus lead to deeper insights into the function of the brain.

  2. Qualitative and quantitative histopathology in transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder. An international investigation of intra- and interobserver reproducibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Sasaki, M; Fukuzawa, S

    1994-01-01

    of both qualitative and quantitative grading methods. Grading of malignancy was performed by one observer in Japan (using the World Health Organization scheme), and by two observers in Denmark (using the Bergkvist system). A "translation" between the systems, grade for grade, and kappa statistics were....... The results obtained in this study stress the need for objective, quantitative histopathologic techniques substituting qualitative, subjective methods in prognosis-related grading of malignancy....... a random, systematic sampling scheme. RESULTS: The results were compared by bivariate correlation analyses and Kendall's tau. The international interobserver reproducibility of qualitative gradings was rather poor (kappa = 0.51), especially for grade 2 tumors (kappa = 0.28). Likewise, the interobserver...

  3. Reproducibility of LCA models of crude oil production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafi, Kourosh; Brandt, Adam R

    2014-11-04

    Scientific models are ideally reproducible, with results that converge despite varying methods. In practice, divergence between models often remains due to varied assumptions, incompleteness, or simply because of avoidable flaws. We examine LCA greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions models to test the reproducibility of their estimates for well-to-refinery inlet gate (WTR) GHG emissions. We use the Oil Production Greenhouse gas Emissions Estimator (OPGEE), an open source engineering-based life cycle assessment (LCA) model, as the reference model for this analysis. We study seven previous studies based on six models. We examine the reproducibility of prior results by successive experiments that align model assumptions and boundaries. The root-mean-square error (RMSE) between results varies between ∼1 and 8 g CO2 eq/MJ LHV when model inputs are not aligned. After model alignment, RMSE generally decreases only slightly. The proprietary nature of some of the models hinders explanations for divergence between the results. Because verification of the results of LCA GHG emissions is often not possible by direct measurement, we recommend the development of open source models for use in energy policy. Such practice will lead to iterative scientific review, improvement of models, and more reliable understanding of emissions.

  4. Reproducibility Issues : Avoiding Pitfalls in Animal Inflammation Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laman, Jon D; Kooistra, Susanne M; Clausen, Björn E; Clausen, Björn E.; Laman, Jon D.

    2017-01-01

    In light of an enhanced awareness of ethical questions and ever increasing costs when working with animals in biomedical research, there is a dedicated and sometimes fierce debate concerning the (lack of) reproducibility of animal models and their relevance for human inflammatory diseases. Despite

  5. Modeling and evaluating repeatability and reproducibility of ordinal classifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Mast; W.N. van Wieringen

    2010-01-01

    This paper argues that currently available methods for the assessment of the repeatability and reproducibility of ordinal classifications are not satisfactory. The paper aims to study whether we can modify a class of models from Item Response Theory, well established for the study of the reliability

  6. Multi-laboratory assessment of reproducibility, qualitative and quantitative performance of SWATH-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Ben C; Hunter, Christie L; Liu, Yansheng; Schilling, Birgit; Rosenberger, George; Bader, Samuel L; Chan, Daniel W; Gibson, Bradford W; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Held, Jason M; Hirayama-Kurogi, Mio; Hou, Guixue; Krisp, Christoph; Larsen, Brett; Lin, Liang; Liu, Siqi; Molloy, Mark P; Moritz, Robert L; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Schlapbach, Ralph; Selevsek, Nathalie; Thomas, Stefani N; Tzeng, Shin-Cheng; Zhang, Hui; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2017-08-21

    Quantitative proteomics employing mass spectrometry is an indispensable tool in life science research. Targeted proteomics has emerged as a powerful approach for reproducible quantification but is limited in the number of proteins quantified. SWATH-mass spectrometry consists of data-independent acquisition and a targeted data analysis strategy that aims to maintain the favorable quantitative characteristics (accuracy, sensitivity, and selectivity) of targeted proteomics at large scale. While previous SWATH-mass spectrometry studies have shown high intra-lab reproducibility, this has not been evaluated between labs. In this multi-laboratory evaluation study including 11 sites worldwide, we demonstrate that using SWATH-mass spectrometry data acquisition we can consistently detect and reproducibly quantify >4000 proteins from HEK293 cells. Using synthetic peptide dilution series, we show that the sensitivity, dynamic range and reproducibility established with SWATH-mass spectrometry are uniformly achieved. This study demonstrates that the acquisition of reproducible quantitative proteomics data by multiple labs is achievable, and broadly serves to increase confidence in SWATH-mass spectrometry data acquisition as a reproducible method for large-scale protein quantification.SWATH-mass spectrometry consists of a data-independent acquisition and a targeted data analysis strategy that aims to maintain the favorable quantitative characteristics on the scale of thousands of proteins. Here, using data generated by eleven groups worldwide, the authors show that SWATH-MS is capable of generating highly reproducible data across different laboratories.

  7. Reproducibility Issues: Avoiding Pitfalls in Animal Inflammation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laman, Jon D; Kooistra, Susanne M; Clausen, Björn E

    2017-01-01

    In light of an enhanced awareness of ethical questions and ever increasing costs when working with animals in biomedical research, there is a dedicated and sometimes fierce debate concerning the (lack of) reproducibility of animal models and their relevance for human inflammatory diseases. Despite evident advancements in searching for alternatives, that is, replacing, reducing, and refining animal experiments-the three R's of Russel and Burch (1959)-understanding the complex interactions of the cells of the immune system, the nervous system and the affected tissue/organ during inflammation critically relies on in vivo models. Consequently, scientific advancement and ultimately novel therapeutic interventions depend on improving the reproducibility of animal inflammation models. As a prelude to the remaining hands-on protocols described in this volume, here, we summarize potential pitfalls of preclinical animal research and provide resources and background reading on how to avoid them.

  8. A force-based model to reproduce stop-and-go waves in pedestrian dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chraibi, Mohcine; Schadschneider, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Stop-and-go waves in single-file movement are a phenomenon that is ob- served empirically in pedestrian dynamics. It manifests itself by the co-existence of two phases: moving and stopping pedestrians. We show analytically based on a simplified one-dimensional scenario that under some conditions the system can have instable homogeneous solutions. Hence, oscillations in the trajectories and in- stabilities emerge during simulations. To our knowledge there exists no force-based model which is collision- and oscillation-free and meanwhile can reproduce phase separation. We develop a new force-based model for pedestrian dynamics able to reproduce qualitatively the phenomenon of phase separation. We investigate analytically the stability condition of the model and define regimes of parameter values where phase separation can be observed. We show by means of simulations that the predefined conditions lead in fact to the expected behavior and validate our model with respect to empirical findings.

  9. Qualitative and quantitative histopathology in transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder. An international investigation of intra- and interobserver reproducibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Sasaki, M; Fukuzawa, S

    1994-01-01

    of both qualitative and quantitative grading methods. Grading of malignancy was performed by one observer in Japan (using the World Health Organization scheme), and by two observers in Denmark (using the Bergkvist system). A "translation" between the systems, grade for grade, and kappa statistics were....... The results obtained in this study stress the need for objective, quantitative histopathologic techniques substituting qualitative, subjective methods in prognosis-related grading of malignancy....... a random, systematic sampling scheme.RESULTS: The results were compared by bivariate correlation analyses and Kendall's tau. The international interobserver reproducibility of qualitative gradings was rather poor (kappa = 0.51), especially for grade 2 tumors (kappa = 0.28). Likewise, the interobserver...

  10. Assessment of Modeling Capability for Reproducing Storm Impacts on TEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, J. S.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Rastaetter, L.; Bilitza, D.; Codrescu, M.; Coster, A. J.; Emery, B. A.; Foerster, M.; Foster, B.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Huba, J. D.; Goncharenko, L. P.; Mannucci, A. J.; Namgaladze, A. A.; Pi, X.; Prokhorov, B. E.; Ridley, A. J.; Scherliess, L.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.; Zhu, L.

    2014-12-01

    During geomagnetic storm, the energy transfer from solar wind to magnetosphere-ionosphere system adversely affects the communication and navigation systems. Quantifying storm impacts on TEC (Total Electron Content) and assessment of modeling capability of reproducing storm impacts on TEC are of importance to specifying and forecasting space weather. In order to quantify storm impacts on TEC, we considered several parameters: TEC changes compared to quiet time (the day before storm), TEC difference between 24-hour intervals, and maximum increase/decrease during the storm. We investigated the spatial and temporal variations of the parameters during the 2006 AGU storm event (14-15 Dec. 2006) using ground-based GPS TEC measurements in the selected 5 degree eight longitude sectors. The latitudinal variations were also studied in two longitude sectors among the eight sectors where data coverage is relatively better. We obtained modeled TEC from various ionosphere/thermosphere (IT) models. The parameters from the models were compared with each other and with the observed values. We quantified performance of the models in reproducing the TEC variations during the storm using skill scores. This study has been supported by the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at the Goddard Space Flight Center. Model outputs and observational data used for the study will be permanently posted at the CCMC website (http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov) for the space science communities to use.

  11. Reproducibility and Transparency in Ocean-Climate Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, N.; Adcroft, A.; Hallberg, R.; Griffies, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Reproducibility is a cornerstone of the scientific method. Within geophysical modeling and simulation achieving reproducibility can be difficult, especially given the complexity of numerical codes, enormous and disparate data sets, and variety of supercomputing technology. We have made progress on this problem in the context of a large project - the development of new ocean and sea ice models, MOM6 and SIS2. Here we present useful techniques and experience.We use version control not only for code but the entire experiment working directory, including configuration (run-time parameters, component versions), input data and checksums on experiment output. This allows us to document when the solutions to experiments change, whether due to code updates or changes in input data. To avoid distributing large input datasets we provide the tools for generating these from the sources, rather than provide raw input data.Bugs can be a source of non-determinism and hence irreproducibility, e.g. reading from or branching on uninitialized memory. To expose these we routinely run system tests, using a memory debugger, multiple compilers and different machines. Additional confidence in the code comes from specialised tests, for example automated dimensional analysis and domain transformations. This has entailed adopting a code style where we deliberately restrict what a compiler can do when re-arranging mathematical expressions.In the spirit of open science, all development is in the public domain. This leads to a positive feedback, where increased transparency and reproducibility makes using the model easier for external collaborators, who in turn provide valuable contributions. To facilitate users installing and running the model we provide (version controlled) digital notebooks that illustrate and record analysis of output. This has the dual role of providing a gross, platform-independent, testing capability and a means to documents model output and analysis.

  12. Using a 1-D model to reproduce diurnal SST signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna; Høyer, Jacob L.

    2014-01-01

    of measurement. A generally preferred approach to bridge the gap between in situ and remotely obtained measurements is through modelling of the upper ocean temperature. This ESA supported study focuses on the implementation of the 1 dimensional General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM), in order to resolve...... profiles, along with the selection of the coefficients for the 2-band parametrisation of light’s penetration in the water column, hold a key role in the agreement of the modelled output with observations. To improve the surface heat budget and the distribution of heat, the code was modified to include...... Institution Upper Ocean Processes Group archive. The successful implementation of the new parametrisations is verified while the model reproduces the diurnal signals seen from in situ measurements. Special focus is given to testing and validation of different set-ups using campaign data from the Atlantic...

  13. Venusian Polar Vortex reproduced by a general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Hiroki; Sugimoto, Norihiko; Takagi, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    Unlike the polar vortices observed in the Earth, Mars and Titan atmospheres, the observed Venus polar vortex is warmer than the mid-latitudes at cloud-top levels (~65 km). This warm polar vortex is zonally surrounded by a cold latitude band located at ~60 degree latitude, which is a unique feature called 'cold collar' in the Venus atmosphere [e.g. Taylor et al. 1980; Piccioni et al. 2007]. Although these structures have been observed in numerous previous observations, the formation mechanism is still unknown. In addition, an axi-asymmetric feature is always seen in the warm polar vortex. It changes temporally and sometimes shows a hot polar dipole or S-shaped structure as shown by a lot of infrared measurements [e.g. Garate-Lopez et al. 2013; 2015]. However, its vertical structure has not been investigated. To solve these problems, we performed a numerical simulation of the Venus atmospheric circulation using a general circulation model named AFES for Venus [Sugimoto et al. 2014] and reproduced these puzzling features.And then, the reproduced structures of the atmosphere and the axi-asymmetirc feature are compared with some previous observational results.In addition, the quasi-periodical zonal-mean zonal wind fluctuation is also seen in the Venus polar vortex reproduced in our model. This might be able to explain some observational results [e.g. Luz et al. 2007] and implies that the polar vacillation might also occur in the Venus atmosphere, which is silimar to the Earth's polar atmosphere. We will also show some initial results about this point in this presentation.

  14. Reproducibility of qualitative assessments of temporal lobe atrophy in MRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarria-Estrada, S; Acevedo, C; Mitjana, R; Frascheri, L; Siurana, S; Auger, C; Rovira, A

    2015-01-01

    To determine the reproducibility of the Scheltens visual rating scale in establishing atrophy of the medial temporal lobe. We used coronal T1-weighted inversion recovery sequences on a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner to study 25 patients with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive decline and 25 subjects without cognitive decline. Five neuroradiologists trained to apply the Scheltens visual rating scale analyzed the images. We used the interclass correlation coefficient to evaluate interrater and intrarater agreement. Raters scored 20 (80%) of the 25 patients with mild cognitive decline or Alzheimer's disease between 2 and 4; by contrast, they scored 21 (84%) of the 25 subjects without cognitive decline between 0 and 1. The interrater agreement was consistently greater than 0.82, with a 95% confidence interval of (0.7-0.9). The intrarater agreement ranged from 0.82 to 0.87, with a 95% confidence interval of (0.56-0.93). The Scheltens visual rating scale is reproducible among observers, and this finding supports its use in clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Research Spotlight: Improved model reproduces the 2003 European heat wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2011-04-01

    In August 2003, record-breaking temperatures raged across much of Europe. In France, maximum temperatures of 37°C (99°F) persisted for 9 days straight, the longest such stretch since 1873. About 40,000 deaths (14,000 in France alone) were attributed to the extreme heat and low humidity. Various climate conditions must come into alignment to produce extreme weather like the 2003 heat wave, and despite a concerted effort, forecasting models have so far been unable to accurately reproduce the event—including the modern European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ensemble modeling system for seasonal forecasts, which went into operation in 2007. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2010GL046455, 2011)

  16. Reproducibility of UAV-based photogrammetric surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Niels; Smith, Mike; Cammeraat, Erik; Keesstra, Saskia

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion, rapid geomorphological change and vegetation degradation are major threats to the human and natural environment in many regions. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry are invaluable tools for the collection of highly detailed aerial imagery and subsequent low cost production of 3D landscapes for an assessment of landscape change. Despite the widespread use of UAVs for image acquisition in monitoring applications, the reproducibility of UAV data products has not been explored in detail. This paper investigates this reproducibility by comparing the surface models and orthophotos derived from different UAV flights that vary in flight direction and altitude. The study area is located near Lorca, Murcia, SE Spain, which is a semi-arid medium-relief locale. The area is comprised of terraced agricultural fields that have been abandoned for about 40 years and have suffered subsequent damage through piping and gully erosion. In this work we focused upon variation in cell size, vertical and horizontal accuracy, and horizontal positioning of recognizable landscape features. The results suggest that flight altitude has a significant impact on reconstructed point density and related cell size, whilst flight direction affects the spatial distribution of vertical accuracy. The horizontal positioning of landscape features is relatively consistent between the different flights. We conclude that UAV data products are suitable for monitoring campaigns for land cover purposes or geomorphological mapping, but special care is required when used for monitoring changes in elevation.

  17. Can a coupled meteorology–chemistry model reproduce the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of a coupled meteorology–chemistry model, i.e., Weather Research and Forecast and Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ), to reproduce the historical trend in aerosol optical depth (AOD) and clear-sky shortwave radiation (SWR) over the Northern Hemisphere has been evaluated through a comparison of 21-year simulated results with observation-derived records from 1990 to 2010. Six satellite-retrieved AOD products including AVHRR, TOMS, SeaWiFS, MISR, MODIS-Terra and MODIS-Aqua as well as long-term historical records from 11 AERONET sites were used for the comparison of AOD trends. Clear-sky SWR products derived by CERES at both the top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface as well as surface SWR data derived from seven SURFRAD sites were used for the comparison of trends in SWR. The model successfully captured increasing AOD trends along with the corresponding increased TOA SWR (upwelling) and decreased surface SWR (downwelling) in both eastern China and the northern Pacific. The model also captured declining AOD trends along with the corresponding decreased TOA SWR (upwelling) and increased surface SWR (downwelling) in the eastern US, Europe and the northern Atlantic for the period of 2000–2010. However, the model underestimated the AOD over regions with substantial natural dust aerosol contributions, such as the Sahara Desert, Arabian Desert, central Atlantic and northern Indian Ocean. Estimates of the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) at TOA a

  18. A reproducible nonlethal animal model for studying cyanide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, J; Marino, M T; von Bredow, J D; Kaminskis, A; Brewer, T

    2000-12-01

    Previous studies using bolus intravenous injections of sodium cyanide have been used to model the sudden exposure to high concentrations of cyanide that could occur on the battlefield. This study was designed to develop a model that would simulate the type of exposure to cyanide gas that could happen during actual low-level continuous types of exposure and then compare it with the bolus model. Cardiovascular and respiratory recordings taken from anesthetized dogs have been used previously to characterize the lethal effects of cyanide. The intravenous, bolus injection of 2.5 mg/kg sodium cyanide provides a model in which a greater than lethal concentration is attained. In contrast, our model uses a slow, intravenous infusion of cyanide to titrate each animal to its own inherent end point, which coincides with the amount of cyanide needed to induce death through respiratory arrest. In this model, therapeutic intervention can be used to restore respiration and allow for the complete recovery of the animals. After recovery, the same animal can be given a second infusion of cyanide, followed again by treatment and recovery, providing a reproducible end point. This end point can then be expressed as the total amount of cyanide per body weight (mg/kg) required to kill. In this study, the average dose of sodium cyanide among 12 animals was 1.21 mg/kg, which is approximately half the cyanide used in the bolus model. Thus, titration to respiratory arrest followed by resuscitation provides a repetitive-use animal model that can be used to test the efficacy of various forms of pretreatment and/or therapy without the loss of a single animal.

  19. A reproducible brain tumour model established from human glioblastoma biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xingang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing clinically relevant animal models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM remains a challenge, and many commonly used cell line-based models do not recapitulate the invasive growth patterns of patient GBMs. Previously, we have reported the formation of highly invasive tumour xenografts in nude rats from human GBMs. However, implementing tumour models based on primary tissue requires that these models can be sufficiently standardised with consistently high take rates. Methods In this work, we collected data on growth kinetics from a material of 29 biopsies xenografted in nude rats, and characterised this model with an emphasis on neuropathological and radiological features. Results The tumour take rate for xenografted GBM biopsies were 96% and remained close to 100% at subsequent passages in vivo, whereas only one of four lower grade tumours engrafted. Average time from transplantation to the onset of symptoms was 125 days ± 11.5 SEM. Histologically, the primary xenografts recapitulated the invasive features of the parent tumours while endothelial cell proliferations and necrosis were mostly absent. After 4-5 in vivo passages, the tumours became more vascular with necrotic areas, but also appeared more circumscribed. MRI typically revealed changes related to tumour growth, several months prior to the onset of symptoms. Conclusions In vivo passaging of patient GBM biopsies produced tumours representative of the patient tumours, with high take rates and a reproducible disease course. The model provides combinations of angiogenic and invasive phenotypes and represents a good alternative to in vitro propagated cell lines for dissecting mechanisms of brain tumour progression.

  20. Qualitative-Modeling-Based Silicon Neurons and Their Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Takashi; Sekikawa, Munehisa; Li, Jing; Nanami, Takuya; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The ionic conductance models of neuronal cells can finely reproduce a wide variety of complex neuronal activities. However, the complexity of these models has prompted the development of qualitative neuron models. They are described by differential equations with a reduced number of variables and their low-dimensional polynomials, which retain the core mathematical structures. Such simple models form the foundation of a bottom-up approach in computational and theoretical neuroscience. We proposed a qualitative-modeling-based approach for designing silicon neuron circuits, in which the mathematical structures in the polynomial-based qualitative models are reproduced by differential equations with silicon-native expressions. This approach can realize low-power-consuming circuits that can be configured to realize various classes of neuronal cells. In this article, our qualitative-modeling-based silicon neuron circuits for analog and digital implementations are quickly reviewed. One of our CMOS analog silicon neuron circuits can realize a variety of neuronal activities with a power consumption less than 72 nW. The square-wave bursting mode of this circuit is explained. Another circuit can realize Class I and II neuronal activities with about 3 nW. Our digital silicon neuron circuit can also realize these classes. An auto-associative memory realized on an all-to-all connected network of these silicon neurons is also reviewed, in which the neuron class plays important roles in its performance. PMID:27378842

  1. Establishment of reproducible osteosarcoma rat model using orthotopic implantation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhe; Sun, Honghui; Fan, Qingyu; Long, Hua; Yang, Tongtao; Ma, Bao'an

    2009-05-01

    negligible and the procedure was simple to perform and easily reproduced. It may be a useful tool in the investigation of antiangiogenic and anticancer therapeutics. Ultrasound was found to be a highly accurate tool for tumor diagnosis, localization and measurement and may be recommended for monitoring tumor growth in this model.

  2. Qualitative Analysis of Somitogenesis Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maschke-Dutz E.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Although recently the properties of a single somite cell oscillator have been intensively investigated, the system-level nature of the segmentation clock remains largely unknown. To elaborate qualitatively this question, we examine the possibility to transform a well-known time delay somite cell oscillator to dynamical system of differential equations allowing qualitative analysis.

  3. New model for datasets citation and extraction reproducibility in VAMDC

    CERN Document Server

    Zwölf, Carlo Maria; Dubernet, Marie-Lise

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a new paradigm for the identification of datasets extracted from the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) e-science infrastructure. Such identification includes information on the origin and version of the datasets, references associated to individual data in the datasets, as well as timestamps linked to the extraction procedure. This paradigm is described through the modifications of the language used to exchange data within the VAMDC and through the services that will implement those modifications. This new paradigm should enforce traceability of datasets, favour reproducibility of datasets extraction, and facilitate the systematic citation of the authors having originally measured and/or calculated the extracted atomic and molecular data.

  4. New model for datasets citation and extraction reproducibility in VAMDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwölf, Carlo Maria; Moreau, Nicolas; Dubernet, Marie-Lise

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present a new paradigm for the identification of datasets extracted from the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) e-science infrastructure. Such identification includes information on the origin and version of the datasets, references associated to individual data in the datasets, as well as timestamps linked to the extraction procedure. This paradigm is described through the modifications of the language used to exchange data within the VAMDC and through the services that will implement those modifications. This new paradigm should enforce traceability of datasets, favor reproducibility of datasets extraction, and facilitate the systematic citation of the authors having originally measured and/or calculated the extracted atomic and molecular data.

  5. Can a regional climate model reproduce observed extreme temperatures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter F. Craigmile

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Using output from a regional Swedish climate model and observations from the Swedish synoptic observational network, we compare seasonal minimum temperatures from model output and observations using marginal extreme value modeling techniques. We make seasonal comparisons using generalized extreme value models and empirically estimate the shift in the distribution as a function of the regional climate model values, using the Doksum shift function. Spatial and temporal comparisons over south central Sweden are made by building hierarchical Bayesian generalized extreme value models for the observed minima and regional climate model output. Generally speaking the regional model is surprisingly well calibrated for minimum temperatures. We do detect a problem in the regional model to produce minimum temperatures close to 0◦C. The seasonal spatial effects are quite similar between data and regional model. The observations indicate relatively strong warming, especially in the northern region. This signal is present in the regional model, but is not as strong.

  6. A model project for reproducible papers: critical temperature for the Ising model on a square lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Dolfi, M; Hehn, A; Imriška, J; Pakrouski, K; Rønnow, T F; Troyer, M; Zintchenko, I; Chirigati, F; Freire, J; Shasha, D

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple, yet typical simulation in statistical physics, consisting of large scale Monte Carlo simulations followed by an involved statistical analysis of the results. The purpose is to provide an example publication to explore tools for writing reproducible papers. The simulation estimates the critical temperature where the Ising model on the square lattice becomes magnetic to be Tc /J = 2.26934(6) using a finite size scaling analysis of the crossing points of Binder cumulants. We provide a virtual machine which can be used to reproduce all figures and results.

  7. A structured model of video reproduces primary visual cortical organisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Berkes

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The visual system must learn to infer the presence of objects and features in the world from the images it encounters, and as such it must, either implicitly or explicitly, model the way these elements interact to create the image. Do the response properties of cells in the mammalian visual system reflect this constraint? To address this question, we constructed a probabilistic model in which the identity and attributes of simple visual elements were represented explicitly and learnt the parameters of this model from unparsed, natural video sequences. After learning, the behaviour and grouping of variables in the probabilistic model corresponded closely to functional and anatomical properties of simple and complex cells in the primary visual cortex (V1. In particular, feature identity variables were activated in a way that resembled the activity of complex cells, while feature attribute variables responded much like simple cells. Furthermore, the grouping of the attributes within the model closely parallelled the reported anatomical grouping of simple cells in cat V1. Thus, this generative model makes explicit an interpretation of complex and simple cells as elements in the segmentation of a visual scene into basic independent features, along with a parametrisation of their moment-by-moment appearances. We speculate that such a segmentation may form the initial stage of a hierarchical system that progressively separates the identity and appearance of more articulated visual elements, culminating in view-invariant object recognition.

  8. Learning Action Models: Qualitative Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolander, T.; Gierasimczuk, N.; van der Hoek, W.; Holliday, W.H.; Wang, W.-F.

    2015-01-01

    In dynamic epistemic logic, actions are described using action models. In this paper we introduce a framework for studying learnability of action models from observations. We present first results concerning propositional action models. First we check two basic learnability criteria: finite

  9. Reproducing Phenomenology of Peroxidation Kinetics via Model Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruslanov, Anatole D.; Bashylau, Anton V.

    2010-06-01

    We studied mathematical modeling of lipid peroxidation using a biochemical model system of iron (II)-ascorbate-dependent lipid peroxidation of rat hepatocyte mitochondrial fractions. We found that antioxidants extracted from plants demonstrate a high intensity of peroxidation inhibition. We simplified the system of differential equations that describes the kinetics of the mathematical model to a first order equation, which can be solved analytically. Moreover, we endeavor to algorithmically and heuristically recreate the processes and construct an environment that closely resembles the corresponding natural system. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to theoretically predict both the kinetics of oxidation and the intensity of inhibition without resorting to analytical and biochemical research, which is important for cost-effective discovery and development of medical agents with antioxidant action from the medicinal plants.

  10. Reproducible Infection Model for Clostridium perfringens in Broiler Chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl; Friis-Holm, Lotte Bjerrum; Heuer, Ole Eske

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to establish an infection and disease model for Clostridium perfringens in broiler chickens. Previous experiments had failed to induce disease and only a transient colonization with challenge strains had been obtained. In the present study, two series of experiments w...

  11. Learning Actions Models: Qualitative Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolander, Thomas; Gierasimczuk, Nina

    2015-01-01

    —they are identifiable in the limit.We then move on to a particular learning method, which proceeds via restriction of a space of events within a learning-specific action model. This way of learning closely resembles the well-known update method from dynamic epistemic logic. We introduce several different learning......In dynamic epistemic logic, actions are described using action models. In this paper we introduce a framework for studying learnability of action models from observations. We present first results concerning propositional action models. First we check two basic learnability criteria: finite...... identifiability (conclusively inferring the appropriate action model in finite time) and identifiability in the limit (inconclusive convergence to the right action model). We show that deterministic actions are finitely identifiable, while non-deterministic actions require more learning power...

  12. Hydrological Modeling Reproducibility Through Data Management and Adaptors for Model Interoperability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Because of a lack of centralized planning and no widely-adopted standards among hydrological modeling research groups, research communities, and the data management teams meant to support research, there is chaos when it comes to data formats, spatio-temporal resolutions, ontologies, and data availability. All this makes true scientific reproducibility and collaborative integrated modeling impossible without some glue to piece it all together. Our Virtual Watershed Integrated Modeling System provides the tools and modeling framework hydrologists need to accelerate and fortify new scientific investigations by tracking provenance and providing adaptors for integrated, collaborative hydrologic modeling and data management. Under global warming trends where water resources are under increasing stress, reproducible hydrological modeling will be increasingly important to improve transparency and understanding of the scientific facts revealed through modeling. The Virtual Watershed Data Engine is capable of ingesting a wide variety of heterogeneous model inputs, outputs, model configurations, and metadata. We will demonstrate one example, starting from real-time raw weather station data packaged with station metadata. Our integrated modeling system will then create gridded input data via geostatistical methods along with error and uncertainty estimates. These gridded data are then used as input to hydrological models, all of which are available as web services wherever feasible. Models may be integrated in a data-centric way where the outputs too are tracked and used as inputs to "downstream" models. This work is part of an ongoing collaborative Tri-state (New Mexico, Nevada, Idaho) NSF EPSCoR Project, WC-WAVE, comprised of researchers from multiple universities in each of the three states. The tools produced and presented here have been developed collaboratively alongside watershed scientists to address specific modeling problems with an eye on the bigger picture of

  13. Learning Actions Models: Qualitative Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolander, Thomas; Gierasimczuk, Nina

    2015-01-01

    identifiability (conclusively inferring the appropriate action model in finite time) and identifiability in the limit (inconclusive convergence to the right action model). We show that deterministic actions are finitely identifiable, while non-deterministic actions require more learning power......—they are identifiable in the limit.We then move on to a particular learning method, which proceeds via restriction of a space of events within a learning-specific action model. This way of learning closely resembles the well-known update method from dynamic epistemic logic. We introduce several different learning...

  14. Qualitative models of global warming amplifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milošević, U.; Bredeweg, B.; de Kleer, J.; Forbus, K.D.

    2010-01-01

    There is growing interest from ecological experts to create qualitative models of phenomena for which numerical information is sparse or missing. We present a number of successful models in the field of environmental science, namely, the domain of global warming. The motivation behind the effort is

  15. Qualitative models of global warming amplifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milošević, U.; Bredeweg, B.; de Kleer, J.; Forbus, K.D.

    2010-01-01

    There is growing interest from ecological experts to create qualitative models of phenomena for which numerical information is sparse or missing. We present a number of successful models in the field of environmental science, namely, the domain of global warming. The motivation behind the effort is

  16. Probability of Detection (POD) as a statistical model for the validation of qualitative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehling, Paul; LaBudde, Robert A; Brunelle, Sharon L; Nelson, Maria T

    2011-01-01

    A statistical model is presented for use in validation of qualitative methods. This model, termed Probability of Detection (POD), harmonizes the statistical concepts and parameters between quantitative and qualitative method validation. POD characterizes method response with respect to concentration as a continuous variable. The POD model provides a tool for graphical representation of response curves for qualitative methods. In addition, the model allows comparisons between candidate and reference methods, and provides calculations of repeatability, reproducibility, and laboratory effects from collaborative study data. Single laboratory study and collaborative study examples are given.

  17. Accuracy and reproducibility of measurements on plaster models and digital models created using an intraoral scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camardella, Leonardo Tavares; Breuning, Hero; de Vasconcellos Vilella, Oswaldo

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of measurements made on digital models created using an intraoral color scanner compared to measurements on dental plaster models. This study included impressions of 28 volunteers. Alginate impressions were used to make plaster models, and each volunteers' dentition was scanned with a TRIOS Color intraoral scanner. Two examiners performed measurements on the plaster models using a digital caliper and measured the digital models using Ortho Analyzer software. The examiners measured 52 distances, including tooth diameter and height, overjet, overbite, intercanine and intermolar distances, and the sagittal relationship. The paired t test was used to assess intra-examiner performance and measurement accuracy of the two examiners for both plaster and digital models. The level of clinically relevant differences between the measurements according to the threshold used was evaluated and a formula was applied to calculate the chance of finding clinically relevant errors on measurements on plaster and digital models. For several parameters, statistically significant differences were found between the measurements on the two different models. However, most of these discrepancies were not considered clinically significant. The measurement of the crown height of upper central incisors had the highest measurement error for both examiners. Based on the interexaminer performance, reproducibility of the measurements was poor for some of the parameters. Overall, our findings showed that most of the measurements on digital models created using the TRIOS Color scanner and measured with Ortho Analyzer software had a clinically acceptable accuracy compared to the same measurements made with a caliper on plaster models, but the measuring method can affect the reproducibility of the measurements.

  18. Qualitative and quantitative histopathology in transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder. An international investigation of intra- and interobserver reproducibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Sasaki, M; Fukuzawa, S

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Histopathologic, prognosis-related grading of malignancy by means of morphologic examination in transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder (TCC) may be subject to observer variation, resulting in a reduced level of reproducibility. This may confound comparisons of treatment...... results. Using objective, unbiased stereologic techniques and ordinary histomorphometry, such problems may be solved. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A study of 110 patients with papillary or solid transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder in stage Ta through T4 was carried out, addressing reproducibility...

  19. A Qualitative Acceleration Model Based on Intervals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester MARTINEZ-MARTIN

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available On the way to autonomous service robots, spatial reasoning plays a main role since it properly deals with problems involving uncertainty. In particular, we are interested in knowing people's pose to avoid collisions. With that aim, in this paper, we present a qualitative acceleration model for robotic applications including representation, reasoning and a practical application.

  20. Automated Qualitative Modeling of Dynamic Physical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    paths of states that match a qualitative history. DATMI differs from QSIM- CHECK in that it first constructs an envisionment of the model, a graph...containing all possible model states where an arc connects two states if one could be a successor of the other. Once it has constructed the envisionment ...DATMI is fairly efficient in finding paths through it that correspond to interpretations of the measurements. However, the number of envisionment

  1. Qualitative modeling of the dynamics of detonations with losses

    KAUST Repository

    Faria, Luiz

    2015-01-01

    We consider a simplified model for the dynamics of one-dimensional detonations with generic losses. It consists of a single partial differential equation that reproduces, at a qualitative level, the essential properties of unsteady detonation waves, including pulsating and chaotic solutions. In particular, we investigate the effects of shock curvature and friction losses on detonation dynamics. To calculate steady-state solutions, a novel approach to solving the detonation eigenvalue problem is introduced that avoids the well-known numerical difficulties associated with the presence of a sonic point. By using unsteady numerical simulations of the simplified model, we also explore the nonlinear stability of steady-state or quasi-steady solutions. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  2. Building Qualitative Models of Thermodynamic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    two containers 61 53 Envisionment for simple flow with thermal properties 62 54 Envisionment for simple flow without thermal properties 63 55 A...pump and a path connecting two containers 64 56 Scenario input for a pump and a return path between two containers . . 64 57 Envisionment for the...Specifically, the domain model is written in the language of QPE[8], an envisioner for Qualitative Process theory . We assume a reading knowledge of QP theory

  3. Bitwise identical compiling setup: prospective for reproducibility and reliability of earth system modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Reproducibility and reliability are fundamental principles of scientific research. A compiling setup that includes a specific compiler version and compiler flags is essential technical supports for Earth system modeling. With the fast development of computer software and hardware, compiling setup has to be updated frequently, which challenges the reproducibility and reliability of Earth system modeling. The existing results of a simulation using an original compiling setup may be irreproducible by a newer compiling setup because trivial round-off errors introduced by the change of compiling setup can potentially trigger significant changes in simulation results. Regarding the reliability, a compiler with millions of lines of codes may have bugs that are easily overlooked due to the uncertainties or unknowns in Earth system modeling. To address these challenges, this study shows that different compiling setups can achieve exactly the same (bitwise identical results in Earth system modeling, and a set of bitwise identical compiling setups of a model can be used across different compiler versions and different compiler flags. As a result, the original results can be more easily reproduced; for example, the original results with an older compiler version can be reproduced exactly with a newer compiler version. Moreover, this study shows that new test cases can be generated based on the differences of bitwise identical compiling setups between different models, which can help detect software bugs or risks in the codes of models and compilers and finally improve the reliability of Earth system modeling.

  4. Accuracy and reproducibility of dental replica models reconstructed by different rapid prototyping techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazeveld, Aletta; Huddleston Slater, James J. R.; Ren, Yijin

    INTRODUCTION: Rapid prototyping is a fast-developing technique that might play a significant role in the eventual replacement of plaster dental models. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of physical dental models reconstructed from digital data by several rapid

  5. Voxel-level reproducibility assessment of modality independent elastography in a pre-clinical murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Katelyn M.; Weis, Jared A.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2015-03-01

    Changes in tissue mechanical properties, measured non-invasively by elastography methods, have been shown to be an important diagnostic tool, particularly for cancer. Tissue elasticity information, tracked over the course of therapy, may be an important prognostic indicator of tumor response to treatment. While many elastography techniques exist, this work reports on the use of a novel form of elastography that uses image texture to reconstruct elastic property distributions in tissue (i.e., a modality independent elastography (MIE) method) within the context of a pre-clinical breast cancer system.1,2 The elasticity results have previously shown good correlation with independent mechanical testing.1 Furthermore, MIE has been successfully utilized to localize and characterize lesions in both phantom experiments and simulation experiments with clinical data.2,3 However, the reproducibility of this method has not been characterized in previous work. The goal of this study is to evaluate voxel-level reproducibility of MIE in a pre-clinical model of breast cancer. Bland-Altman analysis of co-registered repeat MIE scans in this preliminary study showed a reproducibility index of 24.7% (scaled to a percent of maximum stiffness) at the voxel level. As opposed to many reports in the magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) literature that speak to reproducibility measures of the bulk organ, these results establish MIE reproducibility at the voxel level; i.e., the reproducibility of locally-defined mechanical property measurements throughout the tumor volume.

  6. QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS OF BOBWHITE QUAIL POPULATION MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李先义; 朱德明

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the qualitative behavior of solutions of the bobwhite quail pop-ulation modelwhere 0 < a < 1 < a + b,p,c ∈ (0, ∞) and k is a nonnegative integer, is investigated.Some necessary and suficient as well as sufficient conditions for all solutions of the modelto oscillate and some sufficient conditions for all positive solutions of the model to benonoscillatory and the convergence of nonoscillatory solutions are derived. Furthermore,the permanence of every positive solution of the model is also showed. Many known resultsare improved and extended and some new results are obtained for G. Ladas' open problems.

  7. A standardised and reproducible model of intra-abdominal infection and abscess formation in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosscha, K; Nieuwenhuijs, VB; Gooszen, AW; van Duijvenbode-Beumer, H; Visser, MR; Verweij, Willem; Akkermans, LMA

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To develop a standardised and reproducible model of intra-abdominal infection and abscess formation in rats. Design: Experimental study. Setting: University hospital, The Netherlands. Subjects: 36 adult male Wistar rats. Interventions: In 32 rats, peritonitis was produced using two differ

  8. Using the mouse to model human disease: increasing validity and reproducibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica J. Justice

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Experiments that use the mouse as a model for disease have recently come under scrutiny because of the repeated failure of data, particularly derived from preclinical studies, to be replicated or translated to humans. The usefulness of mouse models has been questioned because of irreproducibility and poor recapitulation of human conditions. Newer studies, however, point to bias in reporting results and improper data analysis as key factors that limit reproducibility and validity of preclinical mouse research. Inaccurate and incomplete descriptions of experimental conditions also contribute. Here, we provide guidance on best practice in mouse experimentation, focusing on appropriate selection and validation of the model, sources of variation and their influence on phenotypic outcomes, minimum requirements for control sets, and the importance of rigorous statistics. Our goal is to raise the standards in mouse disease modeling to enhance reproducibility, reliability and clinical translation of findings.

  9. Anatomical Reproducibility of a Head Model Molded by a Three-dimensional Printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Kosuke; Nemoto, Masaaki; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Okonogi, Shinichi; Nomoto, Jun; Harada, Naoyuki; Sugo, Nobuo; Miyazaki, Chikao

    2015-01-01

    We prepared rapid prototyping models of heads with unruptured cerebral aneurysm based on image data of computed tomography angiography (CTA) using a three-dimensional (3D) printer. The objective of this study was to evaluate the anatomical reproducibility and accuracy of these models by comparison with the CTA images on a monitor. The subjects were 22 patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysm who underwent preoperative CTA. Reproducibility of the microsurgical anatomy of skull bone and arteries, the length and thickness of the main arteries, and the size of cerebral aneurysm were compared between the CTA image and rapid prototyping model. The microsurgical anatomy and arteries were favorably reproduced, apart from a few minute regions, in the rapid prototyping models. No significant difference was noted in the measured lengths of the main arteries between the CTA image and rapid prototyping model, but errors were noted in their thickness (p 3D printer. It was concluded that these models are useful tools for neurosurgical simulation. The thickness of the main arteries and size of cerebral aneurysm should be comprehensively judged including other neuroimaging in consideration of errors.

  10. Qualitative and Quantitative Integrated Modeling for Stochastic Simulation and Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The simulation and optimization of an actual physics system are usually constructed based on the stochastic models, which have both qualitative and quantitative characteristics inherently. Most modeling specifications and frameworks find it difficult to describe the qualitative model directly. In order to deal with the expert knowledge, uncertain reasoning, and other qualitative information, a qualitative and quantitative combined modeling specification was proposed based on a hierarchical model structure framework. The new modeling approach is based on a hierarchical model structure which includes the meta-meta model, the meta-model and the high-level model. A description logic system is defined for formal definition and verification of the new modeling specification. A stochastic defense simulation was developed to illustrate how to model the system and optimize the result. The result shows that the proposed method can describe the complex system more comprehensively, and the survival probability of the target is higher by introducing qualitative models into quantitative simulation.

  11. Cellular automaton model in the fundamental diagram approach reproducing the synchronized outflow of wide moving jams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Jun-fang, E-mail: tianhustbjtu@hotmail.com [MOE Key Laboratory for Urban Transportation Complex Systems Theory and Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Yuan, Zhen-zhou; Jia, Bin; Fan, Hong-qiang; Wang, Tao [MOE Key Laboratory for Urban Transportation Complex Systems Theory and Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2012-09-10

    Velocity effect and critical velocity are incorporated into the average space gap cellular automaton model [J.F. Tian, et al., Phys. A 391 (2012) 3129], which was able to reproduce many spatiotemporal dynamics reported by the three-phase theory except the synchronized outflow of wide moving jams. The physics of traffic breakdown has been explained. Various congested patterns induced by the on-ramp are reproduced. It is shown that the occurrence of synchronized outflow, free outflow of wide moving jams is closely related with drivers time delay in acceleration at the downstream jam front and the critical velocity, respectively. -- Highlights: ► Velocity effect is added into average space gap cellular automaton model. ► The physics of traffic breakdown has been explained. ► The probabilistic nature of traffic breakdown is simulated. ► Various congested patterns induced by the on-ramp are reproduced. ► The occurrence of synchronized outflow of jams depends on drivers time delay.

  12. Hidden-variable models for the spin singlet: I. Non-local theories reproducing quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Di Lorenzo, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    A non-local hidden variable model reproducing the quantum mechanical probabilities for a spin singlet is presented. The non-locality is concentrated in the distribution of the hidden variables. The model otherwise satisfies both the hypothesis of outcome independence, made in the derivation of Bell inequality, and of compliance with Malus's law, made in the derivation of Leggett inequality. It is shown through the prescription of a protocol that the non-locality can be exploited to send information instantaneously provided that the hidden variables can be measured, even though they cannot be controlled.

  13. On some problems with reproducing the Standard Model fields and interactions in five-dimensional warped brane world models

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyakov, Mikhail N

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper we discuss some problems which arise, when the matter, gauge and Higgs fields are allowed to propagate in the bulk of five-dimensional brane world models with compact extra dimension and their zero Kaluza-Klein modes are supposed to exactly reproduce the Standard Model fields and their interactions.

  14. Reproducibility blues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulverer, Bernd

    2015-11-12

    Research findings advance science only if they are significant, reliable and reproducible. Scientists and journals must publish robust data in a way that renders it optimally reproducible. Reproducibility has to be incentivized and supported by the research infrastructure but without dampening innovation.

  15. How Qualitative Methods Can be Used to Inform Model Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husbands, Samantha; Jowett, Susan; Barton, Pelham; Coast, Joanna

    2017-06-01

    Decision-analytic models play a key role in informing healthcare resource allocation decisions. However, there are ongoing concerns with the credibility of models. Modelling methods guidance can encourage good practice within model development, but its value is dependent on its ability to address the areas that modellers find most challenging. Further, it is important that modelling methods and related guidance are continually updated in light of any new approaches that could potentially enhance model credibility. The objective of this article was to highlight the ways in which qualitative methods have been used and recommended to inform decision-analytic model development and enhance modelling practices. With reference to the literature, the article discusses two key ways in which qualitative methods can be, and have been, applied. The first approach involves using qualitative methods to understand and inform general and future processes of model development, and the second, using qualitative techniques to directly inform the development of individual models. The literature suggests that qualitative methods can improve the validity and credibility of modelling processes by providing a means to understand existing modelling approaches that identifies where problems are occurring and further guidance is needed. It can also be applied within model development to facilitate the input of experts to structural development. We recommend that current and future model development would benefit from the greater integration of qualitative methods, specifically by studying 'real' modelling processes, and by developing recommendations around how qualitative methods can be adopted within everyday modelling practice.

  16. Current reinforcement model reproduces center-in-center vein trajectory of Physarum polycephalum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Dai; Schenz, Daniel; Kuroda, Shigeru; Sato, Katsuhiko; Ueda, Kei-Ichi; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2017-06-01

    Vein networks span the whole body of the amoeboid organism in the plasmodial slime mould Physarum polycephalum, and the network topology is rearranged within an hour in response to spatio-temporal variations of the environment. It has been reported that this tube morphogenesis is capable of solving mazes, and a mathematical model, named the 'current reinforcement rule', was proposed based on the adaptability of the veins. Although it is known that this model works well for reproducing some key characters of the organism's maze-solving behaviour, one important issue is still open: In the real organism, the thick veins tend to trace the shortest possible route by cutting the corners at the turn of corridors, following a center-in-center trajectory, but it has not yet been examined whether this feature also appears in the mathematical model, using corridors of finite width. In this report, we confirm that the mathematical model reproduces the center-in-center trajectory of veins around corners observed in the maze-solving experiment. © 2017 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  17. [Amniocentesis trainer: development of a cheap and reproducible new training model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassin, M; Cordier, A-G; Laher, G; Benachi, A; Mandelbrot, L

    2012-11-01

    Amniocentesis is the most common invasive procedure for prenatal diagnosis. It is essential to master this sampling technique prior to performing more complex ultrasound-guided interventions (cordocentesis, drain insertion). Training is a challenge because of the risks associated with the procedure, as well as the impact on the patient's anxiety. An amniocentesis simulator allows for safe training and repeats interventions, thus accelerating the learning curve, and also allows for periodic evaluation of proficiency. We present here a new, simple, and cost-effective amniotrainer model that reproduces real life conditions, using chicken breast and condoms filled with water.

  18. Extreme Rainfall Events Over Southern Africa: Assessment of a Climate Model to Reproduce Daily Extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C.; Kniveton, D.; Layberry, R.

    2007-12-01

    It is increasingly accepted that any possible climate change will not only have an influence on mean climate but may also significantly alter climatic variability. This issue is of particular importance for environmentally vulnerable regions such as southern Africa. The subcontinent is considered especially vulnerable extreme events, due to a number of factors including extensive poverty, disease and political instability. Rainfall variability and the identification of rainfall extremes is a function of scale, so high spatial and temporal resolution data are preferred to identify extreme events and accurately predict future variability. The majority of previous climate model verification studies have compared model output with observational data at monthly timescales. In this research, the assessment of a state-of-the-art climate model to simulate climate at daily timescales is carried out using satellite derived rainfall data from the Microwave Infra-Red Algorithm (MIRA). This dataset covers the period from 1993-2002 and the whole of southern Africa at a spatial resolution of 0.1 degree longitude/latitude. Once the model's ability to reproduce extremes has been assessed, idealised regions of SST anomalies are used to force the model, with the overall aim of investigating the ways in which SST anomalies influence rainfall extremes over southern Africa. In this paper, results from sensitivity testing of the UK Meteorological Office Hadley Centre's climate model's domain size are firstly presented. Then simulations of current climate from the model, operating in both regional and global mode, are compared to the MIRA dataset at daily timescales. Thirdly, the ability of the model to reproduce daily rainfall extremes will be assessed, again by a comparison with extremes from the MIRA dataset. Finally, the results from the idealised SST experiments are briefly presented, suggesting associations between rainfall extremes and both local and remote SST anomalies.

  19. A novel highly reproducible and lethal nonhuman primate model for orthopox virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Kramski

    Full Text Available The intentional re-introduction of Variola virus (VARV, the agent of smallpox, into the human population is of great concern due its bio-terroristic potential. Moreover, zoonotic infections with Cowpox (CPXV and Monkeypox virus (MPXV cause severe diseases in humans. Smallpox vaccines presently available can have severe adverse effects that are no longer acceptable. The efficacy and safety of new vaccines and antiviral drugs for use in humans can only be demonstrated in animal models. The existing nonhuman primate models, using VARV and MPXV, need very high viral doses that have to be applied intravenously or intratracheally to induce a lethal infection in macaques. To overcome these drawbacks, the infectivity and pathogenicity of a particular CPXV was evaluated in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus.A CPXV named calpox virus was isolated from a lethal orthopox virus (OPV outbreak in New World monkeys. We demonstrated that marmosets infected with calpox virus, not only via the intravenous but also the intranasal route, reproducibly develop symptoms resembling smallpox in humans. Infected animals died within 1-3 days after onset of symptoms, even when very low infectious viral doses of 5x10(2 pfu were applied intranasally. Infectious virus was demonstrated in blood, saliva and all organs analyzed.We present the first characterization of a new OPV infection model inducing a disease in common marmosets comparable to smallpox in humans. Intranasal virus inoculation mimicking the natural route of smallpox infection led to reproducible infection. In vivo titration resulted in an MID(50 (minimal monkey infectious dose 50% of 8.3x10(2 pfu of calpox virus which is approximately 10,000-fold lower than MPXV and VARV doses applied in the macaque models. Therefore, the calpox virus/marmoset model is a suitable nonhuman primate model for the validation of vaccines and antiviral drugs. Furthermore, this model can help study mechanisms of OPV pathogenesis.

  20. Digital versus plaster study models: how accurate and reproducible are they?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abizadeh, Neilufar; Moles, David R; O'Neill, Julian; Noar, Joseph H

    2012-09-01

    To compare measurements of occlusal relationships and arch dimensions taken from digital study models with those taken from plaster models. Laboratory study The Orthodontic Department, Kettering General Hospital, Kettering, UK Methods and materials: One hundred and twelve sets of study models with a range of malocclusions and various degrees of crowding were selected. Occlusal features were measured manually with digital callipers on the plaster models. The same measurements were performed on digital images of the study models. Each method was carried out twice in order to check for intra-operator variability. The repeatability and reproducibility of the methods was assessed. Statistically significant differences between the two methods were found. In 8 of the 16 occlusal features measured, the plaster measurements were more repeatable. However, those differences were not of sufficient magnitude to have clinical relevance. In addition there were statistically significant systematic differences for 12 of the 16 occlusal features, with the plaster measurements being greater for 11 of these, indicating the digital model scans were not a true 11 representation of the plaster models. The repeatability of digital models compared with plaster models is satisfactory for clinical applications, although this study demonstrated some systematic differences. Digital study models can therefore be considered for use as an adjunct to clinical assessment of the occlusion, but as yet may not supersede current methods for scientific purposes.

  1. Fourier modeling of the BOLD response to a breath-hold task: Optimization and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Joana; Jorge, João; Sousa, Inês; Vilela, Pedro; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2016-07-15

    Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) reflects the capacity of blood vessels to adjust their caliber in order to maintain a steady supply of brain perfusion, and it may provide a sensitive disease biomarker. Measurement of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response to a hypercapnia-inducing breath-hold (BH) task has been frequently used to map CVR noninvasively using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, the best modeling approach for the accurate quantification of CVR maps remains an open issue. Here, we compare and optimize Fourier models of the BOLD response to a BH task with a preparatory inspiration, and assess the test-retest reproducibility of the associated CVR measurements, in a group of 10 healthy volunteers studied over two fMRI sessions. Linear combinations of sine-cosine pairs at the BH task frequency and its successive harmonics were added sequentially in a nested models approach, and were compared in terms of the adjusted coefficient of determination and corresponding variance explained (VE) of the BOLD signal, as well as the number of voxels exhibiting significant BOLD responses, the estimated CVR values, and their test-retest reproducibility. The brain average VE increased significantly with the Fourier model order, up to the 3rd order. However, the number of responsive voxels increased significantly only up to the 2nd order, and started to decrease from the 3rd order onwards. Moreover, no significant relative underestimation of CVR values was observed beyond the 2nd order. Hence, the 2nd order model was concluded to be the optimal choice for the studied paradigm. This model also yielded the best test-retest reproducibility results, with intra-subject coefficients of variation of 12 and 16% and an intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.74. In conclusion, our results indicate that a Fourier series set consisting of a sine-cosine pair at the BH task frequency and its two harmonics is a suitable model for BOLD-fMRI CVR measurements

  2. On the reproducibility of spatiotemporal traffic dynamics with microscopic traffic models

    CERN Document Server

    Knorr, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Traffic flow is a very prominent example of a driven non-equilibrium system. A characteristic phenomenon of traffic dynamics is the spontaneous and abrupt drop of the average velocity on a stretch of road leading to congestion. Such a traffic breakdown corresponds to a boundary-induced phase transition from free flow to congested traffic. In this paper, we study the ability of selected microscopic traffic models to reproduce a traffic breakdown, and we investigate its spatiotemporal dynamics. For our analysis, we use empirical traffic data from stationary loop detectors on a German Autobahn showing a spontaneous breakdown. We then present several methods to assess the results and compare the models with each other. In addition, we will also discuss some important modeling aspects and their impact on the resulting spatiotemporal pattern. The investigation of different downstream boundary conditions, for example, shows that the physical origin of the traffic breakdown may be artificially induced by the setup of...

  3. On the reproducibility of spatiotemporal traffic dynamics with microscopic traffic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Florian; Schreckenberg, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Traffic flow is a very prominent example of a driven non-equilibrium system. A characteristic phenomenon of traffic dynamics is the spontaneous and abrupt drop of the average velocity on a stretch of road leading to congestion. Such a traffic breakdown corresponds to a boundary-induced phase transition from free flow to congested traffic. In this paper, we study the ability of selected microscopic traffic models to reproduce a traffic breakdown, and we investigate its spatiotemporal dynamics. For our analysis, we use empirical traffic data from stationary loop detectors on a German Autobahn showing a spontaneous breakdown. We then present several methods to assess the results and compare the models with each other. In addition, we will also discuss some important modeling aspects and their impact on the resulting spatiotemporal pattern. The investigation of different downstream boundary conditions, for example, shows that the physical origin of the traffic breakdown may be artificially induced by the setup of the boundaries.

  4. Reproducibility, reliability and validity of measurements obtained from Cecile3 digital models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Adolfo Watanabe-Kanno

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the reproducibility, reliability and validity of measurements in digital models compared to plaster models. Fifteen pairs of plaster models were obtained from orthodontic patients with permanent dentition before treatment. These were digitized to be evaluated with the program Cécile3 v2.554.2 beta. Two examiners measured three times the mesiodistal width of all the teeth present, intercanine, interpremolar and intermolar distances, overjet and overbite. The plaster models were measured using a digital vernier. The t-Student test for paired samples and interclass correlation coefficient (ICC were used for statistical analysis. The ICC of the digital models were 0.84 ± 0.15 (intra-examiner and 0.80 ± 0.19 (inter-examiner. The average mean difference of the digital models was 0.23 ± 0.14 and 0.24 ± 0.11 for each examiner, respectively. When the two types of measurements were compared, the values obtained from the digital models were lower than those obtained from the plaster models (p < 0.05, although the differences were considered clinically insignificant (differences < 0.1 mm. The Cécile digital models are a clinically acceptable alternative for use in Orthodontics.

  5. Quantitative Evaluation of Ionosphere Models for Reproducing Regional TEC During Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, J. S.; Kuznetsova, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Bilitza, D.; Codrescu, M.; Coster, A. J.; Emery, B.; Foster, B.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Goncharenko, L. P.; Huba, J.; Mitchell, C. N.; Ridley, A. J.; Fedrizzi, M.; Scherliess, L.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.; Zhu, L.

    2015-12-01

    TEC (Total Electron Content) is one of the key parameters in description of the ionospheric variability that has influence on the accuracy of navigation and communication systems. To assess current TEC modeling capability of ionospheric models during geomagnetic storms and to establish a baseline against which future improvement can be compared, we quantified the ionospheric models' performance by comparing modeled vertical TEC values with ground-based GPS TEC measurements and Multi-Instrument Data Analysis System (MIDAS) TEC. The comparison focused on North America and Europe sectors during selected two storm events: 2006 AGU storm (14-15 Dec. 2006) and 2013 March storm (17-19 Mar. 2013). The ionospheric models used for this study range from empirical to physics-based, and physics-based data assimilation models. We investigated spatial and temporal variations of TEC during the storms. In addition, we considered several parameters to quantify storm impacts on TEC: TEC changes compared to quiet time, rate of TEC change, and maximum increase/decrease during the storms. In this presentation, we focus on preliminary results of the comparison of the models performance in reproducing the storm-time TEC variations using the parameters and skill scores. This study has been supported by the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at the Goddard Space Flight Center. Model outputs and observational data used for the study will be permanently posted at the CCMC website (http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov) for the space science communities to use.

  6. Qualitative vs. quantitative software process simulation modelling: conversion and comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, He; Kitchenham, Barbara; Jeffery, Ross

    2009-01-01

    peer-reviewed Software Process Simulation Modeling (SPSM) research has increased in the past two decades. However, most of these models are quantitative, which require detailed understanding and accurate measurement. As the continuous work to our previous studies in qualitative modeling of software process, this paper aims to investigate the structure equivalence and model conversion between quantitative and qualitative process modeling, and to compare the characteristics and performance o...

  7. Assessment of the reliability of reproducing two-dimensional resistivity models using an image processing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishola, Kehinde S; Nawawi, Mohd Nm; Abdullah, Khiruddin; Sabri, Ali Idriss Aboubakar; Adiat, Kola Abdulnafiu

    2014-01-01

    This study attempts to combine the results of geophysical images obtained from three commonly used electrode configurations using an image processing technique in order to assess their capabilities to reproduce two-dimensional (2-D) resistivity models. All the inverse resistivity models were processed using the PCI Geomatica software package commonly used for remote sensing data sets. Preprocessing of the 2-D inverse models was carried out to facilitate further processing and statistical analyses. Four Raster layers were created, three of these layers were used for the input images and the fourth layer was used as the output of the combined images. The data sets were merged using basic statistical approach. Interpreted results show that all images resolved and reconstructed the essential features of the models. An assessment of the accuracy of the images for the four geologic models was performed using four criteria: the mean absolute error and mean percentage absolute error, resistivity values of the reconstructed blocks and their displacements from the true models. Generally, the blocks of the images of maximum approach give the least estimated errors. Also, the displacement of the reconstructed blocks from the true blocks is the least and the reconstructed resistivities of the blocks are closer to the true blocks than any other combined used. Thus, it is corroborated that when inverse resistivity models are combined, most reliable and detailed information about the geologic models is obtained than using individual data sets.

  8. Classical signal model reproducing quantum probabilities for single and coincidence detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikov, Andrei; Nilsson, Börje; Nordebo, Sven

    2012-05-01

    We present a simple classical (random) signal model reproducing Born's rule. The crucial point of our approach is that the presence of detector's threshold and calibration procedure have to be treated not as simply experimental technicalities, but as the basic counterparts of the theoretical model. We call this approach threshold signal detection model (TSD). The experiment on coincidence detection which was done by Grangier in 1986 [22] played a crucial role in rejection of (semi-)classical field models in favour of quantum mechanics (QM): impossibility to resolve the wave-particle duality in favour of a purely wave model. QM predicts that the relative probability of coincidence detection, the coefficient g(2) (0), is zero (for one photon states), but in (semi-)classical models g(2)(0) >= 1. In TSD the coefficient g(2)(0) decreases as 1/ɛ2d, where ɛd > 0 is the detection threshold. Hence, by increasing this threshold an experimenter can make the coefficient g(2) (0) essentially less than 1. The TSD-prediction can be tested experimentally in new Grangier type experiments presenting a detailed monitoring of dependence of the coefficient g(2)(0) on the detection threshold. Structurally our model has some similarity with the prequantum model of Grossing et al. Subquantum stochasticity is composed of the two counterparts: a stationary process in the space of internal degrees of freedom and the random walk type motion describing the temporal dynamics.

  9. Accuracy and reproducibility of linear measurements of resin, plaster, digital and printed study-models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Waleed K; Ariffin, Emy; Sherriff, Martyn; Bister, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    To compare the accuracy and reproducibility of measurements of on-screen three-dimensional (3D) digital surface models captured by a 3Shape R700™ laser-scanner, with measurements made using a digital caliper on acrylic, plaster models or model replicas. Four sets of typodont models were used. Acrylic models, alginate impressions, plaster models and physical replicas were measured. The 3Shape R700™ laser-scanning device with 3Shape™ software was used for scans and measurements. Linear measurements were recorded for selected landmarks, on each of the physical models and on the 3D digital surface models on ten separate occasions by a single examiner. Comparing measurements taken on the physical models the mean difference of the measurements was 0.32 mm (SD 0.15 mm). For the different methods (physical versus digital) the mean difference was 0.112 mm (SD 0.15 mm). None of the values showed a statistically significant difference (p plaster and acrylic models. The comparison of measurements on the physical models showed no significant difference. The 3Shape R700™ is a reliable device for capturing surface details of models in a digital format. When comparing measurements taken manually and digitally there was no statistically significant difference. The Objet Eden 250™ 3D prints proved to be as accurate as the original acrylic, plaster, or alginate impressions as was shown by the accuracy of the measurements taken. This confirms that using virtual study models can be a reliable method, replacing traditional plaster models.

  10. Reproducibility of VPCT parameters in the normal pancreas: comparison of two different kinetic calculation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Sascha; Schulze, Maximilian; Horger, Thomas; Oelker, Aenne; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Horger, Marius

    2015-09-01

    To assess the reproducibility of volume computed tomographic perfusion (VPCT) measurements in normal pancreatic tissue using two different kinetic perfusion calculation models at three different time points. Institutional ethical board approval was obtained for retrospective analysis of pancreas perfusion data sets generated by our prospective study for liver response monitoring to local therapy in patients experiencing unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma, which was approved by the institutional review board. VPCT of the entire pancreas was performed in 41 patients (mean age, 64.8 years) using 26 consecutive volume measurements and intravenous injection of 50 mL of iodinated contrast at a flow rate of 5 mL/s. Blood volume(BV) and blood flow (BF) were calculated using two mathematical methods: maximum slope + Patlak analysis versus deconvolution method. Pancreas perfusion was calculated using two volume of interests. Median interval between the first and the second VPCT was 2 days and between the second and the third VPCT 82 days. Variability was assessed with within-patient coefficients of variation (CVs) and Bland-Altman analyses. Interobserver agreement for all perfusion parameters was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). BF and BV values varied widely by method of analysis as did within-patient CVs for BF and BV at the second versus the first VPCT by 22.4%/50.4% (method 1) and 24.6%/24.0% (method 2) measured in the pancreatic head and 18.4%/62.6% (method 1) and 23.8%/28.1% (method 2) measured in the pancreatic corpus and at the third versus the first VPCT by 21.7%/61.8% (method 1) and 25.7%/34.5% (method 2) measured also in the pancreatic head and 19.1%/66.1% (method 1) and 22.0%/31.8% (method 2) measured in the pancreatic corpus, respectively. Interobserver agreement measured with ICC shows fair-to-good reproducibility. VPCT performed with the presented examinational protocol is reproducible and can be used for monitoring

  11. A methodology for acquiring qualitative knowledge for probabilistic graphical models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærulff, Uffe Bro; Madsen, Anders L.

    2004-01-01

    We present a practical and general methodology that simplifies the task of acquiring and formulating qualitative knowledge for constructing probabilistic graphical models (PGMs). The methodology efficiently captures and communicates expert knowledge, and has significantly eased the model developm......We present a practical and general methodology that simplifies the task of acquiring and formulating qualitative knowledge for constructing probabilistic graphical models (PGMs). The methodology efficiently captures and communicates expert knowledge, and has significantly eased the model...

  12. Classical signal model reproducing quantum probabilities for single and coincidence detections

    CERN Document Server

    Khrennikov, Andrei; Nordebo, Sven

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple classical (random) signal model reproducing Born's rule. The crucial point of our approach is that the presence of detector's threshold and calibration procedure have to be treated not as simply experimental technicalities, but as the basic counterparts of the theoretical model. We call this approach threshold signal detection model (TSD). The experiment on coincidence detection which was done by Grangier in 1986 \\cite{Grangier} played a crucial role in rejection of (semi-)classical field models in favor of quantum mechanics (QM): impossibility to resolve the wave-particle duality in favor of a purely wave model. QM predicts that the relative probability of coincidence detection, the coefficient $g^{(2)}(0),$ is zero (for one photon states), but in (semi-)classical models $g^{(2)}(0)\\geq 1.$ In TSD the coefficient $g^{(2)}(0)$ decreases as $1/{\\cal E}_d^2,$ where ${\\cal E}_d>0$ is the detection threshold. Hence, by increasing this threshold an experimenter can make the coefficient $g^{(2)}...

  13. An analytical nonlinear model for laminate multiferroic composites reproducing the DC magnetic bias dependent magnetoelectric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lizhi; Wan, Yongping; Li, Faxin

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we propose an analytical nonlinear model for laminate multiferroic composites in which the magnetic-field-induced strain in magnetostrictive phase is described by a standard square law taking the stress effect into account, whereas the ferroelectric phase retains a linear piezoelectric response. Furthermore, differing from previous models which assume uniform deformation, we take into account the stress attenuation and adopt non-uniform deformation along the layer thickness in both piezoelectric and magnetostrictive phases. Analysis of this model on L-T and L-L modes of sandwiched Terfenol-D/lead zirconate titanate/Terfenol-D composites can well reproduce the observed dc magnetic field (H(dc)) dependent magnetoelectric coefficients, which reach their maximum with the H(dc) all at about 500 Oe. The model also suggests that stress attenuation along the layer thickness in practical composites should be taken into account. Furthermore, the model also indicates that a high volume fraction of magnetostrictive phase is required to get giant magnetoelectric coupling, coinciding with existing models.

  14. Assessment of a climate model to reproduce rainfall variability and extremes over Southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C. J. R.; Kniveton, D. R.; Layberry, R.

    2010-01-01

    It is increasingly accepted that any possible climate change will not only have an influence on mean climate but may also significantly alter climatic variability. A change in the distribution and magnitude of extreme rainfall events (associated with changing variability), such as droughts or flooding, may have a far greater impact on human and natural systems than a changing mean. This issue is of particular importance for environmentally vulnerable regions such as southern Africa. The sub-continent is considered especially vulnerable to and ill-equipped (in terms of adaptation) for extreme events, due to a number of factors including extensive poverty, famine, disease and political instability. Rainfall variability and the identification of rainfall extremes is a function of scale, so high spatial and temporal resolution data are preferred to identify extreme events and accurately predict future variability. The majority of previous climate model verification studies have compared model output with observational data at monthly timescales. In this research, the assessment of ability of a state of the art climate model to simulate climate at daily timescales is carried out using satellite-derived rainfall data from the Microwave Infrared Rainfall Algorithm (MIRA). This dataset covers the period from 1993 to 2002 and the whole of southern Africa at a spatial resolution of 0.1° longitude/latitude. This paper concentrates primarily on the ability of the model to simulate the spatial and temporal patterns of present-day rainfall variability over southern Africa and is not intended to discuss possible future changes in climate as these have been documented elsewhere. Simulations of current climate from the UK Meteorological Office Hadley Centre's climate model, in both regional and global mode, are firstly compared to the MIRA dataset at daily timescales. Secondly, the ability of the model to reproduce daily rainfall extremes is assessed, again by a comparison with

  15. Models that include supercoiling of topological domains reproduce several known features of interphase chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Fabrizio; Dorier, Julien; Burnier, Yannis; Stasiak, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the structure of interphase chromosomes is essential to elucidate regulatory mechanisms of gene expression. During recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing expanded the power of chromosome conformation capture (3C) methods that provide information about reciprocal spatial proximity of chromosomal loci. Since 2012, it is known that entire chromatin in interphase chromosomes is organized into regions with strongly increased frequency of internal contacts. These regions, with the average size of ∼1 Mb, were named topological domains. More recent studies demonstrated presence of unconstrained supercoiling in interphase chromosomes. Using Brownian dynamics simulations, we show here that by including supercoiling into models of topological domains one can reproduce and thus provide possible explanations of several experimentally observed characteristics of interphase chromosomes, such as their complex contact maps.

  16. A novel, stable and reproducible acute lung injury model induced by oleic acid in immature piglet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yao-bin; LING Feng; ZHANG Yan-bo; LIU Ai-jun; LIU Dong-hai; QIAO Chen-hui; WANG Qiang; LIU Ying-long

    2011-01-01

    Background Young children are susceptible to pulmonary injury,and acute lung injury (ALl) often results in a high mortality and financial costs in pediatric patients.A good ALl model will help us to gain a better understanding of the real pathophysiological picture and to evaluate novel treatment approaches to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) more accurately and liberally.This study aimed to establish a hemodynamically stable and reproducible model with ALl in piglet induced by oleic acid.Methods Six Chinese mini-piglets were used to establish ALl models by oleic acid.Hemodynamic and pulmonary function data were measured.Histopathological assessment was performed.Results Mean blood pressure,heart rate (HR),cardiac output (CO),central venous pressure (CVP) and left atrial pressure (LAP) were sharply decreased after oleic acid given,while the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) was increased in comparison with baseline (P <0.05).pH,arterial partial pressure of O2 (PaO2),PaO2/inspired O2 fraction (FiO2) and lung compliance decreased,while PaCO2 and airway pressure increased in comparison with baseline (P <0.05).The lung histology showed severe inflammation,hyaline membranes,intra-alveolar and interstitial hemorrhage.Conclusion This experiment established a stable model which allows for a diversity of studies on early lung injury.

  17. Demography-based adaptive network model reproduces the spatial organization of human linguistic groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitán, José A.; Manrubia, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of human linguistic groups presents a number of interesting and nontrivial patterns. The distributions of the number of speakers per language and the area each group covers follow log-normal distributions, while population and area fulfill an allometric relationship. The topology of networks of spatial contacts between different linguistic groups has been recently characterized, showing atypical properties of the degree distribution and clustering, among others. Human demography, spatial conflicts, and the construction of networks of contacts between linguistic groups are mutually dependent processes. Here we introduce an adaptive network model that takes all of them into account and successfully reproduces, using only four model parameters, not only those features of linguistic groups already described in the literature, but also correlations between demographic and topological properties uncovered in this work. Besides their relevance when modeling and understanding processes related to human biogeography, our adaptive network model admits a number of generalizations that broaden its scope and make it suitable to represent interactions between agents based on population dynamics and competition for space.

  18. Exploring predictive and reproducible modeling with the single-subject FIAC dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu; Pereira, Francisco; Lee, Wayne; Strother, Stephen; Mitchell, Tom

    2006-05-01

    Predictive modeling of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has the potential to expand the amount of information extracted and to enhance our understanding of brain systems by predicting brain states, rather than emphasizing the standard spatial mapping. Based on the block datasets of Functional Imaging Analysis Contest (FIAC) Subject 3, we demonstrate the potential and pitfalls of predictive modeling in fMRI analysis by investigating the performance of five models (linear discriminant analysis, logistic regression, linear support vector machine, Gaussian naive Bayes, and a variant) as a function of preprocessing steps and feature selection methods. We found that: (1) independent of the model, temporal detrending and feature selection assisted in building a more accurate predictive model; (2) the linear support vector machine and logistic regression often performed better than either of the Gaussian naive Bayes models in terms of the optimal prediction accuracy; and (3) the optimal prediction accuracy obtained in a feature space using principal components was typically lower than that obtained in a voxel space, given the same model and same preprocessing. We show that due to the existence of artifacts from different sources, high prediction accuracy alone does not guarantee that a classifier is learning a pattern of brain activity that might be usefully visualized, although cross-validation methods do provide fairly unbiased estimates of true prediction accuracy. The trade-off between the prediction accuracy and the reproducibility of the spatial pattern should be carefully considered in predictive modeling of fMRI. We suggest that unless the experimental goal is brain-state classification of new scans on well-defined spatial features, prediction alone should not be used as an optimization procedure in fMRI data analysis.

  19. A stable and reproducible human blood-brain barrier model derived from hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo Cecchelli

    Full Text Available The human blood brain barrier (BBB is a selective barrier formed by human brain endothelial cells (hBECs, which is important to ensure adequate neuronal function and protect the central nervous system (CNS from disease. The development of human in vitro BBB models is thus of utmost importance for drug discovery programs related to CNS diseases. Here, we describe a method to generate a human BBB model using cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells. The cells were initially differentiated into ECs followed by the induction of BBB properties by co-culture with pericytes. The brain-like endothelial cells (BLECs express tight junctions and transporters typically observed in brain endothelium and maintain expression of most in vivo BBB properties for at least 20 days. The model is very reproducible since it can be generated from stem cells isolated from different donors and in different laboratories, and could be used to predict CNS distribution of compounds in human. Finally, we provide evidence that Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway mediates in part the BBB inductive properties of pericytes.

  20. Can a global model reproduce observed trends in summertime surface ozone levels?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Koumoutsaris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying trends in surface ozone concentrations are critical for assessing pollution control strategies. Here we use observations and results from a global chemical transport model to examine the trends (1991–2005 in daily maximum 8-hour average concentrations in summertime surface ozone at rural sites in Europe and the United States. We find a decrease in observed ozone concentrations at the high end of the probability distribution at many of the sites in both regions. The model attributes these trends to a decrease in local anthropogenic ozone precursors, although simulated decreasing trends are overestimated in comparison with observed ones. The low end of observed distribution show small upward trends over Europe and the western US and downward trends in Eastern US. The model cannot reproduce these observed trends, especially over Europe and the western US. In particular, simulated changes between the low and high end of the distributions in these two regions are not significant. Sensitivity simulations indicate that emissions from far away source regions do not affect significantly ozone trends at both ends of the distribution. This is in contrast with previously available results, which indicated that increasing ozone trends at the low percentiles may reflect an increase in ozone background associated with increasing remote sources of ozone precursors. Possible reasons for discrepancies between observed and simulated trends are discussed.

  1. Animal models that best reproduce the clinical manifestations of human intoxication with organophosphorus compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Edna F R; Aracava, Yasco; DeTolla, Louis J; Beecham, E Jeffrey; Basinger, G William; Wakayama, Edgar J; Albuquerque, Edson X

    2014-08-01

    The translational capacity of data generated in preclinical toxicological studies is contingent upon several factors, including the appropriateness of the animal model. The primary objectives of this article are: 1) to analyze the natural history of acute and delayed signs and symptoms that develop following an acute exposure of humans to organophosphorus (OP) compounds, with an emphasis on nerve agents; 2) to identify animal models of the clinical manifestations of human exposure to OPs; and 3) to review the mechanisms that contribute to the immediate and delayed OP neurotoxicity. As discussed in this study, clinical manifestations of an acute exposure of humans to OP compounds can be faithfully reproduced in rodents and nonhuman primates. These manifestations include an acute cholinergic crisis in addition to signs of neurotoxicity that develop long after the OP exposure, particularly chronic neurologic deficits consisting of anxiety-related behavior and cognitive deficits, structural brain damage, and increased slow electroencephalographic frequencies. Because guinea pigs and nonhuman primates, like humans, have low levels of circulating carboxylesterases-the enzymes that metabolize and inactivate OP compounds-they stand out as appropriate animal models for studies of OP intoxication. These are critical points for the development of safe and effective therapeutic interventions against OP poisoning because approval of such therapies by the Food and Drug Administration is likely to rely on the Animal Efficacy Rule, which allows exclusive use of animal data as evidence of the effectiveness of a drug against pathologic conditions that cannot be ethically or feasibly tested in humans.

  2. A Semi-Analytic dynamical friction model that reproduces core stalling

    CERN Document Server

    Petts, James A; Read, Justin I

    2015-01-01

    We present a new semi-analytic model for dynamical friction based on Chandrasekhar's formalism. The key novelty is the introduction of physically motivated, radially varying, maximum and minimum impact parameters. With these, our model gives an excellent match to full N-body simulations for isotropic background density distributions, both cuspy and shallow, without any fine-tuning of the model parameters. In particular, we are able to reproduce the dramatic core-stalling effect that occurs in shallow/constant density cores, for the first time. This gives us new physical insight into the core-stalling phenomenon. We show that core stalling occurs in the limit in which the product of the Coulomb logarithm and the local fraction of stars with velocity lower than the infalling body tends to zero. For cuspy backgrounds, this occurs when the infalling mass approaches the enclosed background mass. For cored backgrounds, it occurs at larger distances from the centre, due to a combination of a rapidly increasing minim...

  3. Stochastic model of financial markets reproducing scaling and memory in volatility return intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontis, V.; Havlin, S.; Kononovicius, A.; Podobnik, B.; Stanley, H. E.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the volatility return intervals in the NYSE and FOREX markets. We explain previous empirical findings using a model based on the interacting agent hypothesis instead of the widely-used efficient market hypothesis. We derive macroscopic equations based on the microscopic herding interactions of agents and find that they are able to reproduce various stylized facts of different markets and different assets with the same set of model parameters. We show that the power-law properties and the scaling of return intervals and other financial variables have a similar origin and could be a result of a general class of non-linear stochastic differential equations derived from a master equation of an agent system that is coupled by herding interactions. Specifically, we find that this approach enables us to recover the volatility return interval statistics as well as volatility probability and spectral densities for the NYSE and FOREX markets, for different assets, and for different time-scales. We find also that the historical S&P500 monthly series exhibits the same volatility return interval properties recovered by our proposed model. Our statistical results suggest that human herding is so strong that it persists even when other evolving fluctuations perturbate the financial system.

  4. Reproducibility of summertime diurnal precipitation over northern Eurasia simulated by CMIP5 climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, N.; Takayabu, Y. N.

    2015-12-01

    Reproducibility of diurnal precipitation over northern Eurasia simulated by CMIP5 climate models in their historical runs were evaluated, in comparison with station data (NCDC-9813) and satellite data (GSMaP-V5). We first calculated diurnal cycles by averaging precipitation at each local solar time (LST) in June-July-August during 1981-2000 over the continent of northern Eurasia (0-180E, 45-90N). Then we examined occurrence time of maximum precipitation and a contribution of diurnally varying precipitation to the total precipitation.The contribution of diurnal precipitation was about 21% in both NCDC-9813 and GSMaP-V5. The maximum precipitation occurred at 18LST in NCDC-9813 but 16LST in GSMaP-V5, indicating some uncertainties even in the observational datasets. The diurnal contribution of the CMIP5 models varied largely from 11% to 62%, and their timing of the precipitation maximum ranged from 11LST to 20LST. Interestingly, the contribution and the timing had strong negative correlation of -0.65. The models with larger diurnal precipitation showed precipitation maximum earlier around noon. Next, we compared sensitivity of precipitation to surface temperature and tropospheric humidity between 5 models with large diurnal precipitation (LDMs) and 5 models with small diurnal precipitation (SDMs). Precipitation in LDMs showed high sensitivity to surface temperature, indicating its close relationship with local instability. On the other hand, synoptic disturbances were more active in SDMs with a dominant role of the large scale condensation, and precipitation in SDMs was more related with tropospheric moisture. Therefore, the relative importance of the local instability and the synoptic disturbances was suggested to be an important factor in determining the contribution and timing of the diurnal precipitation. Acknowledgment: This study is supported by Green Network of Excellence (GRENE) Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology

  5. SDG and qualitative trend based model multiple scale validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dong; Xu, Xin; Yin, Jianjin; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Beike

    2017-09-01

    Verification, Validation and Accreditation (VV&A) is key technology of simulation and modelling. For the traditional model validation methods, the completeness is weak; it is carried out in one scale; it depends on human experience. The SDG (Signed Directed Graph) and qualitative trend based multiple scale validation is proposed. First the SDG model is built and qualitative trends are added to the model. And then complete testing scenarios are produced by positive inference. The multiple scale validation is carried out by comparing the testing scenarios with outputs of simulation model in different scales. Finally, the effectiveness is proved by carrying out validation for a reactor model.

  6. Commentary on the integration of model sharing and reproducibility analysis to scholarly publishing workflow in computational biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ahmet; Guess, Trent M; Halloran, Jason P; Modenese, Luca; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Thelen, Darryl G; Umberger, Brian R; Erdemir, Ahmet; Guess, Trent M; Halloran, Jason P; Modenese, Luca; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Thelen, Darryl G; Umberger, Brian R; Umberger, Brian R; Erdemir, Ahmet; Thelen, Darryl G; Guess, Trent M; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Modenese, Luca; Halloran, Jason P

    2016-10-01

    The overall goal of this paper is to demonstrate that dissemination of models and analyses for assessing the reproducibility of simulation results can be incorporated in the scientific review process in biomechanics. As part of a special issue on model sharing and reproducibility in the IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, two manuscripts on computational biomechanics were submitted: Rajagopal et al., IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., 2016 and Schmitz and Piovesan, IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., 2016. Models used in these studies were shared with the scientific reviewers and the public. In addition to the standard review of the manuscripts, the reviewers downloaded the models and performed simulations that reproduced results reported in the studies. There was general agreement between simulation results of the authors and those of the reviewers. Discrepancies were resolved during the necessary revisions. The manuscripts and instructions for download and simulation were updated in response to the reviewers' feedback; changes that may otherwise have been missed if explicit model sharing and simulation reproducibility analysis was not conducted in the review process. Increased burden on the authors and the reviewers, to facilitate model sharing and to repeat simulations, were noted. When the authors of computational biomechanics studies provide access to models and data, the scientific reviewers can download and thoroughly explore the model, perform simulations, and evaluate simulation reproducibility beyond the traditional manuscript-only review process. Model sharing and reproducibility analysis in scholarly publishing will result in a more rigorous review process, which will enhance the quality of modeling and simulation studies and inform future users of computational models.

  7. Fast bootstrapping and permutation testing for assessing reproducibility and interpretability of multivariate fMRI decoding models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan R Conroy

    Full Text Available Multivariate decoding models are increasingly being applied to functional magnetic imaging (fMRI data to interpret the distributed neural activity in the human brain. These models are typically formulated to optimize an objective function that maximizes decoding accuracy. For decoding models trained on full-brain data, this can result in multiple models that yield the same classification accuracy, though some may be more reproducible than others--i.e. small changes to the training set may result in very different voxels being selected. This issue of reproducibility can be partially controlled by regularizing the decoding model. Regularization, along with the cross-validation used to estimate decoding accuracy, typically requires retraining many (often on the order of thousands of related decoding models. In this paper we describe an approach that uses a combination of bootstrapping and permutation testing to construct both a measure of cross-validated prediction accuracy and model reproducibility of the learned brain maps. This requires re-training our classification method on many re-sampled versions of the fMRI data. Given the size of fMRI datasets, this is normally a time-consuming process. Our approach leverages an algorithm called fast simultaneous training of generalized linear models (FaSTGLZ to create a family of classifiers in the space of accuracy vs. reproducibility. The convex hull of this family of classifiers can be used to identify a subset of Pareto optimal classifiers, with a single-optimal classifier selectable based on the relative cost of accuracy vs. reproducibility. We demonstrate our approach using full-brain analysis of elastic-net classifiers trained to discriminate stimulus type in an auditory and visual oddball event-related fMRI design. Our approach and results argue for a computational approach to fMRI decoding models in which the value of the interpretation of the decoding model ultimately depends upon optimizing a

  8. Rainfall variability and extremes over southern Africa: Assessment of a climate model to reproduce daily extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C. J. R.; Kniveton, D. R.; Layberry, R.

    2009-04-01

    It is increasingly accepted that that any possible climate change will not only have an influence on mean climate but may also significantly alter climatic variability. A change in the distribution and magnitude of extreme rainfall events (associated with changing variability), such as droughts or flooding, may have a far greater impact on human and natural systems than a changing mean. This issue is of particular importance for environmentally vulnerable regions such as southern Africa. The subcontinent is considered especially vulnerable to and ill-equipped (in terms of adaptation) for extreme events, due to a number of factors including extensive poverty, famine, disease and political instability. Rainfall variability and the identification of rainfall extremes is a function of scale, so high spatial and temporal resolution data are preferred to identify extreme events and accurately predict future variability. The majority of previous climate model verification studies have compared model output with observational data at monthly timescales. In this research, the assessment of ability of a state of the art climate model to simulate climate at daily timescales is carried out using satellite derived rainfall data from the Microwave Infra-Red Algorithm (MIRA). This dataset covers the period from 1993-2002 and the whole of southern Africa at a spatial resolution of 0.1 degree longitude/latitude. The ability of a climate model to simulate current climate provides some indication of how much confidence can be applied to its future predictions. In this paper, simulations of current climate from the UK Meteorological Office Hadley Centre's climate model, in both regional and global mode, are firstly compared to the MIRA dataset at daily timescales. This concentrates primarily on the ability of the model to simulate the spatial and temporal patterns of rainfall variability over southern Africa. Secondly, the ability of the model to reproduce daily rainfall extremes will

  9. A qualitative model structure sensitivity analysis method to support model selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoey, S.; Seuntjens, P.; van der Kwast, J.; Nopens, I.

    2014-11-01

    The selection and identification of a suitable hydrological model structure is a more challenging task than fitting parameters of a fixed model structure to reproduce a measured hydrograph. The suitable model structure is highly dependent on various criteria, i.e. the modeling objective, the characteristics and the scale of the system under investigation and the available data. Flexible environments for model building are available, but need to be assisted by proper diagnostic tools for model structure selection. This paper introduces a qualitative method for model component sensitivity analysis. Traditionally, model sensitivity is evaluated for model parameters. In this paper, the concept is translated into an evaluation of model structure sensitivity. Similarly to the one-factor-at-a-time (OAT) methods for parameter sensitivity, this method varies the model structure components one at a time and evaluates the change in sensitivity towards the output variables. As such, the effect of model component variations can be evaluated towards different objective functions or output variables. The methodology is presented for a simple lumped hydrological model environment, introducing different possible model building variations. By comparing the effect of changes in model structure for different model objectives, model selection can be better evaluated. Based on the presented component sensitivity analysis of a case study, some suggestions with regard to model selection are formulated for the system under study: (1) a non-linear storage component is recommended, since it ensures more sensitive (identifiable) parameters for this component and less parameter interaction; (2) interflow is mainly important for the low flow criteria; (3) excess infiltration process is most influencing when focussing on the lower flows; (4) a more simple routing component is advisable; and (5) baseflow parameters have in general low sensitivity values, except for the low flow criteria.

  10. Composite model to reproduce the mechanical behaviour of methane hydrate bearing soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Methane hydrate bearing sediments (MHBS) are naturally-occurring materials containing different components in the pores that may suffer phase changes under relative small temperature and pressure variations for conditions typically prevailing a few hundreds of meters below sea level. Their modelling needs to account for heat and mass balance equations of the different components, and several strategies already exist to combine them (e.g., Rutqvist & Moridis, 2009; Sánchez et al. 2014). These equations have to be completed by restrictions and constitutive laws reproducing the phenomenology of heat and fluid flows, phase change conditions and mechanical response. While the formulation of the non-mechanical laws generally includes explicitly the mass fraction of methane in each phase, which allows for a natural update of parameters during phase changes, mechanical laws are, in most cases, stated for the whole solid skeleton (Uchida et al., 2012; Soga et al. 2006). In this paper, a mechanical model is proposed to cope with the response of MHBS. It is based on a composite approach that allows defining the thermo-hydro-mechanical response of mineral skeleton and solid hydrates independently. The global stress-strain-temperature response of the solid phase (grains + hydrate) is then obtained by combining both responses according to energy principle following the work by Pinyol et al. (2007). In this way, dissociation of MH can be assessed on the basis of the stress state and temperature prevailing locally within the hydrate component. Besides, its structuring effect is naturally accounted for by the model according to patterns of MH inclusions within soil pores. This paper describes the fundamental hypothesis behind the model and its formulation. Its performance is assessed by comparison with laboratory data presented in the literature. An analysis of MHBS response to several stress-temperature paths representing potential field cases is finally presented. References

  11. A qualitative model for temporal reasoning with incomplete information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geffner, H. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas (Venezuela)

    1996-12-31

    We develop a qualitative framework for temporal reasoning with incomplete information that features a modeling language based on rules and a semantics based on infinitesimal probabilities. The framework relates logical and probabilistical models, and accommodates in a natural way features that have been found problematic in other models like non-determinism, action qualifications, parallel actions, and abduction to actions and fluents.

  12. Can a stepwise steady flow computational fluid dynamics model reproduce unsteady particulate matter separation for common unit operations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathapati, Subbu-Srikanth; Sansalone, John J

    2011-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is emerging as a model for resolving the fate of particulate matter (PM) by unit operations subject to rainfall-runoff loadings. However, compared to steady flow CFD models, there are greater computational requirements for unsteady hydrodynamics and PM loading models. Therefore this study examines if integrating a stepwise steady flow CFD model can reproduce PM separation by common unit operations loaded by unsteady flow and PM loadings, thereby reducing computational effort. Utilizing monitored unit operation data from unsteady events as a metric, this study compares the two CFD modeling approaches for a hydrodynamic separator (HS), a primary clarifier (PC) tank, and a volumetric clarifying filtration system (VCF). Results indicate that while unsteady CFD models reproduce PM separation of each unit operation, stepwise steady CFD models result in significant deviation for HS and PC models as compared to monitored data; overestimating the physical size requirements of each unit required to reproduce monitored PM separation results. In contrast, the stepwise steady flow approach reproduces PM separation by the VCF, a combined gravitational sedimentation and media filtration unit operation that provides attenuation of turbulent energy and flow velocity.

  13. A novel, recovery, and reproducible minimally invasive cardiopulmonary bypass model with lung injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ling-ke; CHENG Wei; LIU Dong-hai; ZHANG Jing; ZHU Yao-bin; QIAO Chen-hui; ZHANG Yan-bo

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has been shown to be associated with a systemic inflammatory response leading to postoperative organ dysfunction.Elucidating the underlying mechanisms and developing protective strategies for the pathophysiological consequences of CPB have been hampered due to the absence of a satisfactory recovery animal model.The purpose of this study was to establish a good rat model of CPB to study the pathophysiology of potential complications.Methods Twenty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 450-560 g were randomly divided into a CPB group (n=10)and a control group (n=10).All rats were anaesthetized and mechanically ventilated.The carotid artery and jugular vein were cannulated.The blood was drained from the dght atrium via the right jugular and transferred by a miniaturized roller pump to a hollow fiber oxygenator and back to the rat via the left carotid artery.Priming consisted of 8 ml of homologous blood and 8 ml of colloid.The surface of the hollow fiber oxygenator was 0.075 m2.CPB was conducted for 60 minutes at a flow rate of 100-120 ml.kg-1.min-1 in the CPB group.Oxygen flow/perfusion flow was 0.8 to 1.0,and the mean arterial pressure remained 60-80 mmHg.Blood gas analysis,hemodynamic investigations,and lung histology were subsequently examined.Results All CPB rats recovered from the operative process without incident.Normal cardiac function after successful weaning was confirmed by electrocardiography and blood pressure measurements.Mean arterial pressure remained stable.The results of blood gas analysis at different times were within the normal range.Levels of IL-1β and TNF-α were higher in the lung tissue in the CPB group (P <0.005).Histological examination revealed marked increases in interstitial congestion,edema,and inflammation in the CPB group.Conclusion This novel,recovery,and reproducible minimally invasive CPB model may open the field for various studies on the pathophysiological process of CPB and systemic

  14. Assessing reproducibility by the within-subject coefficient of variation with random effects models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, H; Shih, W J

    1996-12-01

    In this paper we consider the use of within-subject coefficient of variation (WCV) for assessing the reproducibility or reliability of a measurement. Application to assessing reproducibility of biochemical markers for measuring bone turnover is described and the comparison with intraclass correlation is discussed. Both maximum likelihood and moment confidence intervals of WCV are obtained through their corresponding asymptotic distributions. Normal and log-normal cases are considered. In general, WCV is preferred when the measurement scale bears intrinsic meaning and is not subject to arbitrary shifting. The intraclass correlation may be preferred when a fixed population of subjects can be well identified.

  15. Reproducible long-term disc degeneration in a large animal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, R.J.W.; Helder, M.N.; Kroeze, R.J.; Bank, R.A.; Smit, T.H.; Wuisman, P.I.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. Twelve goats were chemically degenerated and the development of the degenerative signs was followed for 26 weeks to evaluate the progression of the induced degeneration. The results were also compared with a previous study to determine the reproducibility. OBJECTIVES. The purpose of th

  16. Reproducing the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fifth Edition: Factor Model Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaujean, A. Alexander

    2016-01-01

    One of the ways to increase the reproducibility of research is for authors to provide a sufficient description of the data analytic procedures so that others can replicate the results. The publishers of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fifth Edition (WISC-V) do not follow these guidelines when reporting their confirmatory factor…

  17. Assessment of the potential forecasting skill of a global hydrological model in reproducing the occurrence of monthly flow extremes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Candogan Yossef, N.A.N.N.; Beek, L.P.H. van; Kwadijk, J.C.J.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2012-01-01

    As an initial step in assessing the prospect of using global hydrological models (GHMs) for hydrological forecasting, this study investigates the skill of the GHM PCRGLOBWB in reproducing the occurrence of past extremes in monthly discharge on a global scale. Global terrestrial hydrology from 1958

  18. Can a coupled meteorology–chemistry model reproduce the historical trend in aerosol direct radiative effects over the Northern Hemisphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of a coupled meteorology–chemistry model, i.e., Weather Research and Forecast and Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ), to reproduce the historical trend in aerosol optical depth (AOD) and clear-sky shortwave radiation (SWR) over the Northern Hemisphere h...

  19. Can a coupled meteorology–chemistry model reproduce the historical trend in aerosol direct radiative effects over the Northern Hemisphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of a coupled meteorology–chemistry model, i.e., Weather Research and Forecast and Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ), to reproduce the historical trend in aerosol optical depth (AOD) and clear-sky shortwave radiation (SWR) over the Northern Hemisphere h...

  20. Reproducibility of scratch assays is affected by the initial degree of confluence: Experiments, modelling and model selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wang; Shah, Esha T; Penington, Catherine J; McCue, Scott W; Chopin, Lisa K; Simpson, Matthew J

    2016-02-01

    Scratch assays are difficult to reproduce. Here we identify a previously overlooked source of variability which could partially explain this difficulty. We analyse a suite of scratch assays in which we vary the initial degree of confluence (initial cell density). Our results indicate that the rate of re-colonisation is very sensitive to the initial density. To quantify the relative roles of cell migration and proliferation, we calibrate the solution of the Fisher-Kolmogorov model to cell density profiles to provide estimates of the cell diffusivity, D, and the cell proliferation rate, λ. This procedure indicates that the estimates of D and λ are very sensitive to the initial density. This dependence suggests that the Fisher-Kolmogorov model does not accurately represent the details of the collective cell spreading process, since this model assumes that D and λ are constants that ought to be independent of the initial density. Since higher initial cell density leads to enhanced spreading, we also calibrate the solution of the Porous-Fisher model to the data as this model assumes that the cell flux is an increasing function of the cell density. Estimates of D and λ associated with the Porous-Fisher model are less sensitive to the initial density, suggesting that the Porous-Fisher model provides a better description of the experiments.

  1. Some problems with reproducing the Standard Model fields and interactions in five-dimensional warped brane world models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolyakov, Mikhail N.; Volobuev, Igor P.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we examine, from the purely theoretical point of view and in a model-independent way, the case, when matter, gauge and Higgs fields are allowed to propagate in the bulk of five-dimensional brane world models with compact extra dimension, and the Standard Model fields and their interactions are supposed to be reproduced by the corresponding zero Kaluza-Klein modes. An unexpected result is that in order to avoid possible pathological behavior in the fermion sector, it is necessary to impose constraints on the fermion field Lagrangian. In the case when the fermion zero modes are supposed to be localized at one of the branes, these constraints imply an additional relation between the vacuum profile of the Higgs field and the form of the background metric. Moreover, this relation between the vacuum profile of the Higgs field and the form of the background metric results in the exact reproduction of the gauge boson and fermion sectors of the Standard Model by the corresponding zero mode four-dimensional effective theory in all the physically relevant cases, allowed by the absence of pathologies. Meanwhile, deviations from these conditions can lead either back to pathological behavior in the fermion sector or to a variance between the resulting zero mode four-dimensional effective theory and the Standard Model, which, depending on the model at hand, may, in principle, result in constraints putting the theory out of the reach of the present day experiments.

  2. Qualitative model of a plasma photoelectric converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunov, N. A.; Flamant, G.

    2009-01-01

    A converter of focused optical radiation into electric current is considered on the basis of the photovoltaic effect in plasmas. The converter model is based on analysis of asymmetric spatial distributions of charge particle number density and ambipolar potential in the photoplasma produced by external optical radiation focused in a heat pipe filled with a mixture of alkali vapor and a heavy inert gas. Energy balance in the plasma photoelectric converter is analyzed. The conditions in which the external radiation energy is effectively absorbed in the converter are indicated. The plasma parameters for which the energy of absorbed optical radiation is mainly spent on sustaining the ambipolar field in the plasma are determined. It is shown that the plasma photoelectric converter makes it possible to attain a high conversion efficiency for focused solar radiation.

  3. Quantitative versus qualitative modeling: a complementary approach in ecosystem study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondavalli, C; Favilla, S; Bodini, A

    2009-02-01

    Natural disturbance or human perturbation act upon ecosystems by changing some dynamical parameters of one or more species. Foreseeing these modifications is necessary before embarking on an intervention: predictions may help to assess management options and define hypothesis for interventions. Models become valuable tools for studying and making predictions only when they capture types of interactions and their magnitude. Quantitative models are more precise and specific about a system, but require a large effort in model construction. Because of this very often ecological systems remain only partially specified and one possible approach to their description and analysis comes from qualitative modelling. Qualitative models yield predictions as directions of change in species abundance but in complex systems these predictions are often ambiguous, being the result of opposite actions exerted on the same species by way of multiple pathways of interactions. Again, to avoid such ambiguities one needs to know the intensity of all links in the system. One way to make link magnitude explicit in a way that can be used in qualitative analysis is described in this paper and takes advantage of another type of ecosystem representation: ecological flow networks. These flow diagrams contain the structure, the relative position and the connections between the components of a system, and the quantity of matter flowing along every connection. In this paper it is shown how these ecological flow networks can be used to produce a quantitative model similar to the qualitative counterpart. Analyzed through the apparatus of loop analysis this quantitative model yields predictions that are by no means ambiguous, solving in an elegant way the basic problem of qualitative analysis. The approach adopted in this work is still preliminary and we must be careful in its application.

  4. Elusive reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Gio Batta

    2014-08-01

    Reproducibility remains a mirage for many biomedical studies because inherent experimental uncertainties generate idiosyncratic outcomes. The authentication and error rates of primary empirical data are often elusive, while multifactorial confounders beset experimental setups. Substantive methodological remedies are difficult to conceive, signifying that many biomedical studies yield more or less plausible results, depending on the attending uncertainties. Real life applications of those results remain problematic, with important exceptions for counterfactual field validations of strong experimental signals, notably for some vaccines and drugs, and for certain safety and occupational measures. It is argued that industrial, commercial and public policies and regulations could not ethically rely on unreliable biomedical results; rather, they should be rationally grounded on transparent cost-benefit tradeoffs.

  5. Intra- and interobserver reliability and intra-catheter reproducibility using frequency domain optical coherence tomography for the evaluation of morphometric stent parameters and qualitative assessment of stent strut coverage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonsen, Lisbeth, E-mail: Lisbeth.antonsen@rsyd.dk; Thayssen, Per; Junker, Anders; Veien, Karsten Tange; Hansen, Henrik Steen; Hansen, Knud Nørregaard; Hougaard, Mikkel; Jensen, Lisette Okkels

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Frequency-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) is a high-resolution imaging tool (~ 10–15 μm), which enables near-histological in-vivo images of the coronary vessel wall. The use of the technique is increasing, both for research- and clinical purposes. This study sought to investigate the intra- and interobserver reliability, as well as the intra-catheter reproducibility of quantitative FD-OCT-assessment of morphometric stent parameters and qualitative FD-OCT-evaluation of strut coverage in 10 randomly selected 6-month follow-up Nobori® biolimus-eluting stents (N-BESs). Methods: Ten N-BESs (213 cross sectional areas (CSAs) and 1897 struts) imaged with OCT 6 months post-implantation were randomly selected and analyzed by 2 experienced analysts, and the same 10 N-BESs were analyzed by one of the analysts 3 months later. Further, 2 consecutive pullbacks randomly performed in another 10 N-BESs (219 CSAs and 1860 struts) were independently assessed by one of the analysts. Results: The intraobserver variability with regard to relative difference of mean luminal area and mean stent area at the CSA-level was very low: 0.1% ± 1.4% and 0.5% ± 3.2%. Interobserver variability also proved to be low: − 2.1% ± 3.3% and 2.1% ± 4.6%, and moreover, very restricted intra-catheter variation was observed: 0.02% ± 6.8% and − 0.18% ± 5.2%. The intraobserver-, interobserver- and intra-catheter reliability for the qualitative evaluation of strut coverage was found to be: kappa (κ) = 0.91 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88–0.93, p < 0.01), κ = 0.88 (95% CI: 0.85–0.91, p < 0.01), and κ = 0.73 (95% CI: 0.68–0.78, p < 0.01), respectively. Conclusions: FD-OCT is a reproducible and reliable imaging tool for quantitative evaluation of stented coronary segments, and for qualitative assessment of strut coverage. - Highlights: • Frequency-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) is increasingly adopted in the catherization laboratories. • This

  6. Impact of soil parameter and physical process on reproducibility of hydrological processes by land surface model in semiarid grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, S.; Yorozu, K.; Asanuma, J.; Kondo, M.; Saito, K.

    2014-12-01

    The land surface model (LSM) takes part in the land-atmosphere interaction on the earth system model for the climate change research. In this study, we evaluated the impact of soil parameters and physical process on reproducibility of hydrological process by LSM Minimal Advanced Treatments of Surface Interaction and RunOff (MATSIRO; Takata et al, 2003, GPC) forced by the meteorological data observed at grassland in semiarid climate in China and Mongolia. The testing of MATSIRO was carried out offline mode over the semiarid grassland sites at Tongyu (44.42 deg. N, 122.87 deg. E, altitude: 184m) in China, Kherlen Bayan Ulaan (KBU; 47.21 deg. N, 108.74 deg. E, altitude: 1235m) and Arvaikheer (46.23 N, 102.82E, altitude: 1,813m) in Mongolia. Although all sites locate semiarid grassland, the climate condition is different among sites, which the annual air temperature and precipitation are 5.7 deg. C and 388mm (Tongyu), 1.2 deg.C and 180mm (KBU), and 0.4 deg. C and 245mm(Arvaikheer). We can evaluate the effect of climate condition on the model performance. Three kinds of experiments have been carried out, which was run with the default parameters (CTL), the observed parameters (OBS) for soil physics and hydrology, and vegetation, and refined MATSIRO with the effect of ice in thermal parameters and unfrozen water below the freezing with same parameters as OBS run (OBSr). The validation data has been provided by CEOP(http://www.ceop.net/) , RAISE(http://raise.suiri.tsukuba.ac.jp/), GAME-AAN (Miyazaki et al., 2004, JGR) for Tongyu, KBU, and Arvaikheer, respectively. The reproducibility of the net radiation, the soil temperature (Ts), and latent heat flux (LE) were well reproduced by OBS and OBSr run. The change of soil physical and hydraulic parameter affected the reproducibility of soil temperature (Ts) and soil moisture (SM) as well as energy flux component especially for the sensible heat flux (H) and soil heat flux (G). The reason for the great improvement on the

  7. Intra- and interobserver reliability and intra-catheter reproducibility using frequency domain optical coherence tomography for the evaluation of morphometric stent parameters and qualitative assessment of stent strut coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Lisbeth; Thayssen, Per; Junker, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    to investigate the intra- and interobserver reliability, as well as the intra-catheter reproducibility of quantitative FD-OCT-assessment of morphometric stent parameters and qualitative FD-OCT-evaluation of strut coverage in 10 randomly selected 6-month follow-up Nobori® biolimus-eluting stents (N-BESs). METHODS...... (CI): 0.88-0.93, pquantitative evaluation of stented coronary segments, and for qualitative assessment of strut coverage.......PURPOSE: Frequency-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) is a high-resolution imaging tool (~10-15μm), which enables near-histological in-vivo images of the coronary vessel wall. The use of the technique is increasing, both for research- and clinical purposes. This study sought...

  8. Assessing the relative effectiveness of statistical downscaling and distribution mapping in reproducing rainfall statistics based on climate model results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langousis, Andreas; Mamalakis, Antonios; Deidda, Roberto; Marrocu, Marino

    2016-01-01

    To improve the level skill of climate models (CMs) in reproducing the statistics of daily rainfall at a basin level, two types of statistical approaches have been suggested. One is statistical correction of CM rainfall outputs based on historical series of precipitation. The other, usually referred to as statistical rainfall downscaling, is the use of stochastic models to conditionally simulate rainfall series, based on large-scale atmospheric forcing from CMs. While promising, the latter approach attracted reduced attention in recent years, since the developed downscaling schemes involved complex weather identification procedures, while demonstrating limited success in reproducing several statistical features of rainfall. In a recent effort, Langousis and Kaleris () developed a statistical framework for simulation of daily rainfall intensities conditional on upper-air variables, which is simpler to implement and more accurately reproduces several statistical properties of actual rainfall records. Here we study the relative performance of: (a) direct statistical correction of CM rainfall outputs using nonparametric distribution mapping, and (b) the statistical downscaling scheme of Langousis and Kaleris (), in reproducing the historical rainfall statistics, including rainfall extremes, at a regional level. This is done for an intermediate-sized catchment in Italy, i.e., the Flumendosa catchment, using rainfall and atmospheric data from four CMs of the ENSEMBLES project. The obtained results are promising, since the proposed downscaling scheme is more accurate and robust in reproducing a number of historical rainfall statistics, independent of the CM used and the characteristics of the calibration period. This is particularly the case for yearly rainfall maxima.

  9. How well do CMIP5 climate models reproduce explosive cyclones in the extratropics of the Northern Hemisphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, C.; Zwiers, F. W.

    2016-02-01

    Extratropical explosive cyclones are rapidly intensifying low pressure systems with severe wind speeds and heavy precipitation, affecting livelihoods and infrastructure primarily in coastal and marine environments. This study evaluates how well the most recent generation of climate models reproduces extratropical explosive cyclones in the Northern Hemisphere for the period 1980-2005. An objective-feature tracking algorithm is used to identify and track cyclones from 25 climate models and three reanalysis products. Model biases are compared to biases in the sea surface temperature (SST) gradient, the polar jet stream, the Eady growth rate, and model resolution. Most models accurately reproduce the spatial distribution of explosive cyclones when compared to reanalysis data ( R = 0.94), with high frequencies along the Kuroshio Current and the Gulf Stream. Three quarters of the models however significantly underpredict explosive cyclone frequencies, by a third on average and by two thirds in the worst case. This frequency bias is significantly correlated with jet stream speed in the inter-model spread ( R ≥ 0.51), which in the Atlantic is correlated with a negative meridional SST gradient ( R = -0.56). The importance of the jet stream versus other variables considered in this study also applies to the interannual variability of explosive cyclone frequency. Furthermore, models with fewer explosive cyclones tend to underpredict the corresponding deepening rates ( R ≥ 0.88). A follow-up study will assess the impacts of climate change on explosive cyclones, and evaluate how model biases presented in this study affect the projections.

  10. A Qualitative and Quantitative Evaluation of 8 Clear Sky Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneton, Eric

    2016-10-27

    We provide a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of 8 clear sky models used in Computer Graphics. We compare the models with each other as well as with measurements and with a reference model from the physics community. After a short summary of the physics of the problem, we present the measurements and the reference model, and how we "invert" it to get the model parameters. We then give an overview of each CG model, and detail its scope, its algorithmic complexity, and its results using the same parameters as in the reference model. We also compare the models with a perceptual study. Our quantitative results confirm that the less simplifications and approximations are used to solve the physical equations, the more accurate are the results. We conclude with a discussion of the advantages and drawbacks of each model, and how to further improve their accuracy.

  11. A novel, comprehensive, and reproducible porcine model for determining the timing of bruises in forensic pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, Kristiane; Jensen, Henrik Elvang

    2016-01-01

    that resulted in bruises were inflicted on the back. In addition, 2 control pigs were included in the study. The pigs were euthanized consecutively from 1 to 10 h after the infliction of bruises. Following gross evaluation, skin, and muscle tissues were sampled for histology. Results Grossly, the bruises...... appeared uniform and identical to the tramline bruises seen in humans and pigs subjected to blunt trauma. Histologically, the number of neutrophils in the subcutis, the number of macrophages in the muscle tissue, and the localization of neutrophils and macrophages in muscle tissue showed a time...... in order to identify gross and histological parameters that may be useful in determining the age of a bruise. Methods The mechanical device was able to apply a single reproducible stroke with a plastic tube that was equivalent to being struck by a man. In each of 10 anesthetized pigs, four strokes...

  12. Assessment of the performance of numerical modeling in reproducing a replenishment of sediments in a water-worked channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juez, C.; Battisacco, E.; Schleiss, A. J.; Franca, M. J.

    2016-06-01

    The artificial replenishment of sediment is used as a method to re-establish sediment continuity downstream of a dam. However, the impact of this technique on the hydraulics conditions, and resulting bed morphology, is yet to be understood. Several numerical tools have been developed during last years for modeling sediment transport and morphology evolution which can be used for this application. These models range from 1D to 3D approaches: the first being over simplistic for the simulation of such a complex geometry; the latter requires often a prohibitive computational effort. However, 2D models are computationally efficient and in these cases may already provide sufficiently accurate predictions of the morphology evolution caused by the sediment replenishment in a river. Here, the 2D shallow water equations in combination with the Exner equation are solved by means of a weak-coupled strategy. The classical friction approach considered for reproducing the bed channel roughness has been modified to take into account the morphological effect of replenishment which provokes a channel bed fining. Computational outcomes are compared with four sets of experimental data obtained from several replenishment configurations studied in the laboratory. The experiments differ in terms of placement volume and configuration. A set of analysis parameters is proposed for the experimental-numerical comparison, with particular attention to the spreading, covered surface and travel distance of placed replenishment grains. The numerical tool is reliable in reproducing the overall tendency shown by the experimental data. The effect of fining roughness is better reproduced with the approach herein proposed. However, it is also highlighted that the sediment clusters found in the experiment are not well numerically reproduced in the regions of the channel with a limited number of sediment grains.

  13. ARCHITECTURES AND ALGORITHMS FOR COGNITIVE NETWORKS ENABLED BY QUALITATIVE MODELS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balamuralidhar, P.

    2013-01-01

    the qualitative models in a cognitive engine. Further I use the methodology in multiple functional scenarios of cognitive networks including self- optimization and self- monitoring. In the case of self-optimization, I integrate principles from monotonicity analysis to evaluate and enhance qualitative models......Complexity of communication networks is ever increasing and getting complicated by their heterogeneity and dynamism. Traditional techniques are facing challenges in network performance management. Cognitive networking is an emerging paradigm to make networks more intelligent, thereby overcoming...... traditional limitations and potentially achieving better performance. The vision is that, networks should be able to monitor themselves, reason upon changes in self and environment, act towards the achievement of specific goals and learn from experience. The concept of a Cognitive Engine (CE) supporting...

  14. Qualitative response models: A survey of methodology and illustrative applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nojković Aleksandra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces econometric modeling with discrete (categorical dependent variables. Such models, commonly referred to as qualitative response (QR models, have become a standard tool of microeconometric analysis. Microeconometric research represents empirical analysis of microdata, i.e. economic information about individuals, households and firms. Microeconometrics has been most widely adopted in various fields, such as labour economics, consumer behavior, or economy of transport. The latest research shows that this methodology can also be successfully transferred to macroeconomic context and applied to time series and panel data analysis in a wider scope. .

  15. Machine learning-based kinetic modeling: a robust and reproducible solution for quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Leyun; Cheng, Caixia; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2017-05-07

    A variety of compartment models are used for the quantitative analysis of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) data. Traditionally, these models use an iterative fitting (IF) method to find the least squares between the measured and calculated values over time, which may encounter some problems such as the overfitting of model parameters and a lack of reproducibility, especially when handling noisy data or error data. In this paper, a machine learning (ML) based kinetic modeling method is introduced, which can fully utilize a historical reference database to build a moderate kinetic model directly dealing with noisy data but not trying to smooth the noise in the image. Also, due to the database, the presented method is capable of automatically adjusting the models using a multi-thread grid parameter searching technique. Furthermore, a candidate competition concept is proposed to combine the advantages of the ML and IF modeling methods, which could find a balance between fitting to historical data and to the unseen target curve. The machine learning based method provides a robust and reproducible solution that is user-independent for VOI-based and pixel-wise quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data.

  16. Machine learning-based kinetic modeling: a robust and reproducible solution for quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Leyun; Cheng, Caixia; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2017-05-01

    A variety of compartment models are used for the quantitative analysis of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) data. Traditionally, these models use an iterative fitting (IF) method to find the least squares between the measured and calculated values over time, which may encounter some problems such as the overfitting of model parameters and a lack of reproducibility, especially when handling noisy data or error data. In this paper, a machine learning (ML) based kinetic modeling method is introduced, which can fully utilize a historical reference database to build a moderate kinetic model directly dealing with noisy data but not trying to smooth the noise in the image. Also, due to the database, the presented method is capable of automatically adjusting the models using a multi-thread grid parameter searching technique. Furthermore, a candidate competition concept is proposed to combine the advantages of the ML and IF modeling methods, which could find a balance between fitting to historical data and to the unseen target curve. The machine learning based method provides a robust and reproducible solution that is user-independent for VOI-based and pixel-wise quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data.

  17. An Abstraction Theory for Qualitative Models of Biological Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Banks, Richard; 10.4204/EPTCS.40.3

    2010-01-01

    Multi-valued network models are an important qualitative modelling approach used widely by the biological community. In this paper we consider developing an abstraction theory for multi-valued network models that allows the state space of a model to be reduced while preserving key properties of the model. This is important as it aids the analysis and comparison of multi-valued networks and in particular, helps address the well-known problem of state space explosion associated with such analysis. We also consider developing techniques for efficiently identifying abstractions and so provide a basis for the automation of this task. We illustrate the theory and techniques developed by investigating the identification of abstractions for two published MVN models of the lysis-lysogeny switch in the bacteriophage lambda.

  18. Cellular automaton model with dynamical 2D speed-gap relation reproduces empirical and experimental features of traffic flow

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Junfang; Ma, Shoufeng; Zhu, Chenqiang; Jiang, Rui; Ding, YaoXian

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes an improved cellular automaton traffic flow model based on the brake light model, which takes into account that the desired time gap of vehicles is remarkably larger than one second. Although the hypothetical steady state of vehicles in the deterministic limit corresponds to a unique relationship between speeds and gaps in the proposed model, the traffic states of vehicles dynamically span a two-dimensional region in the plane of speed versus gap, due to the various randomizations. It is shown that the model is able to well reproduce (i) the free flow, synchronized flow, jam as well as the transitions among the three phases; (ii) the evolution features of disturbances and the spatiotemporal patterns in a car-following platoon; (iii) the empirical time series of traffic speed obtained from NGSIM data. Therefore, we argue that a model can potentially reproduce the empirical and experimental features of traffic flow, provided that the traffic states are able to dynamically span a 2D speed-gap...

  19. Recruiting Transcultural Qualitative Research Participants: A Conceptual Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phyllis Eide

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Working with diverse populations poses many challenges to the qualitative researcher who is a member of the dominant culture. Traditional methods of recruitment and selection (such as flyers and advertisements are often unproductive, leading to missed contributions from potential participants who were not recruited and researcher frustration. In this article, the authors explore recruitment issues related to the concept of personal knowing based on experiences with Aboriginal Hawai'ian and Micronesian populations, wherein knowing and being known are crucial to successful recruitment of participants. They present a conceptual model that incorporates key concepts of knowing the other, cultural context, and trust to guide other qualitative transcultural researchers. They also describe challenges, implications, and concrete suggestions for recruitment of participants.

  20. Compliant bipedal model with the center of pressure excursion associated with oscillatory behavior of the center of mass reproduces the human gait dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chang Keun; Park, Sukyung

    2014-01-03

    Although the compliant bipedal model could reproduce qualitative ground reaction force (GRF) of human walking, the model with a fixed pivot showed overestimations in stance leg rotation and the ratio of horizontal to vertical GRF. The human walking data showed a continuous forward progression of the center of pressure (CoP) during the stance phase and the suspension of the CoP near the forefoot before the onset of step transition. To better describe human gait dynamics with a minimal expense of model complexity, we proposed a compliant bipedal model with the accelerated pivot which associated the CoP excursion with the oscillatory behavior of the center of mass (CoM) with the existing simulation parameter and leg stiffness. Owing to the pivot acceleration defined to emulate human CoP profile, the arrival of the CoP at the limit of the stance foot over the single stance duration initiated the step-to-step transition. The proposed model showed an improved match of walking data. As the forward motion of CoM during single stance was partly accounted by forward pivot translation, the previously overestimated rotation of the stance leg was reduced and the corresponding horizontal GRF became closer to human data. The walking solutions of the model ranged over higher speed ranges (~1.7 m/s) than those of the fixed pivoted compliant bipedal model (~1.5m/s) and exhibited other gait parameters, such as touchdown angle, step length and step frequency, comparable to the experimental observations. The good matches between the model and experimental GRF data imply that the continuous pivot acceleration associated with CoM oscillatory behavior could serve as a useful framework of bipedal model.

  1. An exact arithmetic toolbox for a consistent and reproducible structural analysis of metabolic network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chindelevitch, Leonid; Trigg, Jason; Regev, Aviv; Berger, Bonnie

    2014-10-07

    Constraint-based models are currently the only methodology that allows the study of metabolism at the whole-genome scale. Flux balance analysis is commonly used to analyse constraint-based models. Curiously, the results of this analysis vary with the software being run, a situation that we show can be remedied by using exact rather than floating-point arithmetic. Here we introduce MONGOOSE, a toolbox for analysing the structure of constraint-based metabolic models in exact arithmetic. We apply MONGOOSE to the analysis of 98 existing metabolic network models and find that the biomass reaction is surprisingly blocked (unable to sustain non-zero flux) in nearly half of them. We propose a principled approach for unblocking these reactions and extend it to the problems of identifying essential and synthetic lethal reactions and minimal media. Our structural insights enable a systematic study of constraint-based metabolic models, yielding a deeper understanding of their possibilities and limitations.

  2. A novel porcine model of ataxia telangiectasia reproduces neurological features and motor deficits of human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beraldi, Rosanna; Chan, Chun-Hung; Rogers, Christopher S; Kovács, Attila D; Meyerholz, David K; Trantzas, Constantin; Lambertz, Allyn M; Darbro, Benjamin W; Weber, Krystal L; White, Katherine A M; Rheeden, Richard V; Kruer, Michael C; Dacken, Brian A; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Davis, Bryan T; Rohret, Judy A; Struzynski, Jason T; Rohret, Frank A; Weimer, Jill M; Pearce, David A

    2015-11-15

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a progressive multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the AT-mutated (ATM) gene. AT is a neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by cerebellar degeneration in children leading to motor impairment. The disease progresses with other clinical manifestations including oculocutaneous telangiectasia, immune disorders, increased susceptibly to cancer and respiratory infections. Although genetic investigations and physiological models have established the linkage of ATM with AT onset, the mechanisms linking ATM to neurodegeneration remain undetermined, hindering therapeutic development. Several murine models of AT have been successfully generated showing some of the clinical manifestations of the disease, however they do not fully recapitulate the hallmark neurological phenotype, thus highlighting the need for a more suitable animal model. We engineered a novel porcine model of AT to better phenocopy the disease and bridge the gap between human and current animal models. The initial characterization of AT pigs revealed early cerebellar lesions including loss of Purkinje cells (PCs) and altered cytoarchitecture suggesting a developmental etiology for AT and could advocate for early therapies for AT patients. In addition, similar to patients, AT pigs show growth retardation and develop motor deficit phenotypes. By using the porcine system to model human AT, we established the first animal model showing PC loss and motor features of the human disease. The novel AT pig provides new opportunities to unmask functions and roles of ATM in AT disease and in physiological conditions.

  3. Can a global model reproduce observed trends in summertime surface ozone levels?

    OpenAIRE

    S. Koumoutsaris; I. Bey

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying trends in surface ozone concentrations are critical for assessing pollution control strategies. Here we use observations and results from a global chemical transport model to examine the trends (1991–2005) in daily maximum 8-hour average concentrations in summertime surface ozone at rural sites in Europe and the United States. We find a decrease in observed ozone concentrations at the high end of the probability distribution at many of the sites in both regions. The model attribut...

  4. Validation of EURO-CORDEX regional climate models in reproducing the variability of precipitation extremes in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Busuioc, Aristita

    2016-04-01

    EURO-CORDEX is the European branch of the international CORDEX initiative that aims to provide improved regional climate change projections for Europe. The main objective of this paper is to document the performance of the individual models in reproducing the variability of precipitation extremes in Romania. Here three EURO-CORDEX regional climate models (RCMs) ensemble (scenario RCP4.5) are analysed and inter-compared: DMI-HIRHAM5, KNMI-RACMO2.2 and MPI-REMO. Compared to previous studies, when the RCM validation regarding the Romanian climate has mainly been made on mean state and at station scale, a more quantitative approach of precipitation extremes is proposed. In this respect, to have a more reliable comparison with observation, a high resolution daily precipitation gridded data set was used as observational reference (CLIMHYDEX project). The comparison between the RCM outputs and observed grid point values has been made by calculating three extremes precipitation indices, recommended by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection Indices (ETCCDI), for the 1976-2005 period: R10MM, annual count of days when precipitation ≥10mm; RX5DAY, annual maximum 5-day precipitation and R95P%, precipitation fraction of annual total precipitation due to daily precipitation > 95th percentile. The RCMs capability to reproduce the mean state for these variables, as well as the main modes of their spatial variability (given by the first three EOF patterns), are analysed. The investigation confirms the ability of RCMs to simulate the main features of the precipitation extreme variability over Romania, but some deficiencies in reproducing of their regional characteristics were found (for example, overestimation of the mea state, especially over the extra Carpathian regions). This work has been realised within the research project "Changes in climate extremes and associated impact in hydrological events in Romania" (CLIMHYDEX), code PN II-ID-2011-2-0073, financed by the Romanian

  5. Augmenting a Large-Scale Hydrology Model to Reproduce Groundwater Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampoulis, D.; Reager, J. T., II; Andreadis, K.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    To understand the influence of groundwater on terrestrial ecosystems and society, global assessment of groundwater temporal fluctuations is required. A water table was initialized in the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model in a semi-realistic approach to account for groundwater variability. Global water table depth data derived from observations at nearly 2 million well sites compiled from government archives and published literature, as well as groundwater model simulations, were used to create a new soil layer of varying depth for each model grid cell. The new 4-layer version of VIC, hereafter named VIC-4L, was run with and without assimilating NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) observations. The results were compared with simulations using the original VIC version (named VIC-3L) with GRACE assimilation, while all runs were compared with well data.

  6. Energy and nutrient deposition and excretion in the reproducing sow: model development and evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, A V; Strathe, A B; Theil, Peter Kappel;

    2014-01-01

    Air and nutrient emissions from swine operations raise environmental concerns. During the reproduction phase, sows consume and excrete large quantities of nutrients. The objective of this study was to develop a mathematical model to describe energy and nutrient partitioning and predict manure...... excretion and composition and methane emissions on a daily basis. The model was structured to contain gestation and lactation modules, which can be run separately or sequentially, with outputs from the gestation module used as inputs to the lactation module. In the gestating module, energy and protein...... production, and maternal growth with body tissue losses constrained within biological limits. Global sensitivity analysis showed that nonlinearity in the parameters was small. The model outputs considered were the total protein and fat deposition, average urinary and fecal N excretion, average methane...

  7. An exponent tunable network model for reproducing density driven superlinear relation

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Yuhao; Xu, Lida; Gao, Zi-You

    2014-01-01

    Previous works have shown the universality of allometric scalings under density and total value at city level, but our understanding about the size effects of regions on them is still poor. Here, we revisit the scaling relations between gross domestic production (GDP) and population (POP) under total and density value. We first reveal that the superlinear scaling is a general feature under density value crossing different regions. The scaling exponent $\\beta$ under density value falls into the range $(1.0, 2.0]$, which unexpectedly goes beyond the range observed by Pan et al. (Nat. Commun. vol. 4, p. 1961 (2013)). To deal with the wider range, we propose a network model based on 2D lattice space with the spatial correlation factor $\\alpha$ as parameter. Numerical experiments prove that the generated scaling exponent $\\beta$ in our model is fully tunable by the spatial correlation factor $\\alpha$. We conjecture that our model provides a general platform for extensive urban and regional studies.

  8. A simple branching model that reproduces language family and language population distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwämmle, Veit; de Oliveira, Paulo Murilo Castro

    2009-07-01

    Human history leaves fingerprints in human languages. Little is known about language evolution and its study is of great importance. Here we construct a simple stochastic model and compare its results to statistical data of real languages. The model is based on the recent finding that language changes occur independently of the population size. We find agreement with the data additionally assuming that languages may be distinguished by having at least one among a finite, small number of different features. This finite set is also used in order to define the distance between two languages, similarly to linguistics tradition since Swadesh.

  9. An exact arithmetic toolbox for a consistent and reproducible structural analysis of metabolic network models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chindelevitch, Leonid; Trigg, Jason; Regev, Aviv; Berger, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    .... Flux balance analysis is commonly used to analyse constraint-based models. Curiously, the results of this analysis vary with the software being run, a situation that we show can be remedied by using exact rather than floating-point arithmetic...

  10. Reproducible infection model for Clostridium perfringens in broiler chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl; Friis-Holm, Lotte Bjerrum; Heuer, Ole Eske

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to establish an infection and disease model for Clostridium perfringens in broiler chickens. Previous experiments had failed to induce disease and only a transient colonization with challenge strains had been obtained. In the present study, two series of experiments w...

  11. Establishing a Reproducible Hypertrophic Scar following Thermal Injury: A Porcine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J. Rapp, MD

    2015-02-01

    Conclusions: Deep partial-thickness thermal injury to the back of domestic swine produces an immature hypertrophic scar by 10 weeks following burn with thickness appearing to coincide with the location along the dorsal axis. With minimal pig to pig variation, we describe our technique to provide a testable immature scar model.

  12. Accuracy and reproducibility of dental measurements on tomographic digital models: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Jamille B; Christovam, Ilana O; Alencar, David S; da Motta, Andréa F J; Mattos, Claudia T; Cury-Saramago, Adriana

    2017-04-26

    The aim of this systematic review with meta-analysis was to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of dental measurements obtained from digital study models generated from CBCT compared with those acquired from plaster models. The electronic databases Cochrane Library, Medline (via PubMed), Scopus, VHL, Web of Science, and System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe were screened to identify articles from 1998 until February 2016. The inclusion criteria were: prospective and retrospective clinical trials in humans; validation and/or comparison articles of dental study models obtained from CBCT and plaster models; and articles that used dental linear measurements as an assessment tool. The methodological quality of the studies was carried out by Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 (QUADAS-2) tool. A meta-analysis was performed to validate all comparative measurements. The databases search identified a total of 3160 items and 554 duplicates were excluded. After reading titles and abstracts, 12 articles were selected. Five articles were included after reading in full. The methodological quality obtained through QUADAS-2 was poor to moderate. In the meta-analysis, there were statistical differences between the mesiodistal widths of mandibular incisors, maxillary canines and premolars, and overall Bolton analysis. Therefore, the measurements considered accurate were maxillary and mandibular crowding, intermolar width and mesiodistal width of maxillary incisors, mandibular canines and premolars, in both arches for molars. Digital models obtained from CBCT were not accurate for all measures assessed. The differences were clinically acceptable for all dental linear measurements, except for maxillary arch perimeter. Digital models are reproducible for all measurements when intraexaminer assessment is considered and need improvement in interexaminer evaluation.

  13. Validation and reproducibility assessment of modality independent elastography in a pre-clinical model of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Jared A.; Kim, Dong K.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2014-03-01

    Clinical observations have long suggested that cancer progression is accompanied by extracellular matrix remodeling and concomitant increases in mechanical stiffness. Due to the strong association of mechanics and tumor progression, there has been considerable interest in incorporating methodologies to diagnose cancer through the use of mechanical stiffness imaging biomarkers, resulting in commercially available US and MR elastography products. Extension of this approach towards monitoring longitudinal changes in mechanical properties along a course of cancer therapy may provide means for assessing early response to therapy; therefore a systematic study of the elasticity biomarker in characterizing cancer for therapeutic monitoring is needed. The elastography method we employ, modality independent elastography (MIE), can be described as a model-based inverse image-analysis method that reconstructs elasticity images using two acquired image volumes in a pre/post state of compression. In this work, we present preliminary data towards validation and reproducibility assessment of our elasticity biomarker in a pre-clinical model of breast cancer. The goal of this study is to determine the accuracy and reproducibility of MIE and therefore the magnitude of changes required to determine statistical differences during therapy. Our preliminary results suggest that the MIE method can accurately and robustly assess mechanical properties in a pre-clinical system and provide considerable enthusiasm for the extension of this technique towards monitoring therapy-induced changes to breast cancer tissue architecture.

  14. Experimental and Numerical Models of Complex Clinical Scenarios; Strategies to Improve Relevance and Reproducibility of Joint Replacement Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, Joan E; Swider, Pascal; Goreham-Voss, Curtis; Soballe, Kjeld

    2016-02-01

    This research review aims to focus attention on the effect of specific surgical and host factors on implant fixation, and the importance of accounting for them in experimental and numerical models. These factors affect (a) eventual clinical applicability and (b) reproducibility of findings across research groups. Proper function and longevity for orthopedic joint replacement implants relies on secure fixation to the surrounding bone. Technology and surgical technique has improved over the last 50 years, and robust ingrowth and decades of implant survival is now routinely achieved for healthy patients and first-time (primary) implantation. Second-time (revision) implantation presents with bone loss with interfacial bone gaps in areas vital for secure mechanical fixation. Patients with medical comorbidities such as infection, smoking, congestive heart failure, kidney disease, and diabetes have a diminished healing response, poorer implant fixation, and greater revision risk. It is these more difficult clinical scenarios that require research to evaluate more advanced treatment approaches. Such treatments can include osteogenic or antimicrobial implant coatings, allo- or autogenous cellular or tissue-based approaches, local and systemic drug delivery, surgical approaches. Regarding implant-related approaches, most experimental and numerical models do not generally impose conditions that represent mechanical instability at the implant interface, or recalcitrant healing. Many treatments will work well in forgiving settings, but fail in complex human settings with disease, bone loss, or previous surgery. Ethical considerations mandate that we justify and limit the number of animals tested, which restricts experimental permutations of treatments. Numerical models provide flexibility to evaluate multiple parameters and combinations, but generally need to employ simplifying assumptions. The objectives of this paper are to (a) to highlight the importance of mechanical

  15. Evaluation of Nitinol staples for the Lapidus arthrodesis in a reproducible biomechanical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Alexander Russell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available While the Lapidus procedure is a widely accepted technique for treatment of hallux valgus, the optimal fixation method to maintain joint stability remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical properties of new Shape Memory Alloy staples arranged in different configurations in a repeatable 1st Tarsometatarsal arthrodesis model. Ten sawbones models of the whole foot (n=5 per group were reconstructed using a single dorsal staple or two staples in a delta configuration. Each construct was mechanically tested in dorsal four-point bending, medial four-point bending, dorsal three-point bending and plantar cantilever bending with the staples activated at 37°C. The peak load, stiffness and plantar gapping were determined for each test. Pressure sensors were used to measure the contact force and area of the joint footprint in each group. There was a significant (p < 0.05 increase in peak load in the two staple constructs compared to the single staple constructs for all testing modalities. Stiffness also increased significantly in all tests except dorsal four-point bending. Pressure sensor readings showed a significantly higher contact force at time zero and contact area following loading in the two staple constructs (p < 0.05. Both groups completely recovered any plantar gapping following unloading and restored their initial contact footprint. The biomechanical integrity and repeatability of the models was demonstrated with no construct failures due to hardware or model breakdown. Shape memory alloy staples provide fixation with the ability to dynamically apply and maintain compression across a simulated arthrodesis following a range of loading conditions.

  16. Reproducibility of the heat/capsaicin skin sensitization model in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavallone LF

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Laura F Cavallone,1 Karen Frey,1 Michael C Montana,1 Jeremy Joyal,1 Karen J Regina,1 Karin L Petersen,2 Robert W Gereau IV11Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University in St Louis, School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA; 2California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, CA, USAIntroduction: Heat/capsaicin skin sensitization is a well-characterized human experimental model to induce hyperalgesia and allodynia. Using this model, gabapentin, among other drugs, was shown to significantly reduce cutaneous hyperalgesia compared to placebo. Since the larger thermal probes used in the original studies to produce heat sensitization are now commercially unavailable, we decided to assess whether previous findings could be replicated with a currently available smaller probe (heated area 9 cm2 versus 12.5–15.7 cm2.Study design and methods: After Institutional Review Board approval, 15 adult healthy volunteers participated in two study sessions, scheduled 1 week apart (Part A. In both sessions, subjects were exposed to the heat/capsaicin cutaneous sensitization model. Areas of hypersensitivity to brush stroke and von Frey (VF filament stimulation were measured at baseline and after rekindling of skin sensitization. Another group of 15 volunteers was exposed to an identical schedule and set of sensitization procedures, but, in each session, received either gabapentin or placebo (Part B.Results: Unlike previous reports, a similar reduction of areas of hyperalgesia was observed in all groups/sessions. Fading of areas of hyperalgesia over time was observed in Part A. In Part B, there was no difference in area reduction after gabapentin compared to placebo.Conclusion: When using smaller thermal probes than originally proposed, modifications of other parameters of sensitization and/or rekindling process may be needed to allow the heat/capsaicin sensitization protocol to be used as initially intended. Standardization and validation of

  17. geoKepler Workflow Module for Computationally Scalable and Reproducible Geoprocessing and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowart, C.; Block, J.; Crawl, D.; Graham, J.; Gupta, A.; Nguyen, M.; de Callafon, R.; Smarr, L.; Altintas, I.

    2015-12-01

    The NSF-funded WIFIRE project has developed an open-source, online geospatial workflow platform for unifying geoprocessing tools and models for for fire and other geospatially dependent modeling applications. It is a product of WIFIRE's objective to build an end-to-end cyberinfrastructure for real-time and data-driven simulation, prediction and visualization of wildfire behavior. geoKepler includes a set of reusable GIS components, or actors, for the Kepler Scientific Workflow System (https://kepler-project.org). Actors exist for reading and writing GIS data in formats such as Shapefile, GeoJSON, KML, and using OGC web services such as WFS. The actors also allow for calling geoprocessing tools in other packages such as GDAL and GRASS. Kepler integrates functions from multiple platforms and file formats into one framework, thus enabling optimal GIS interoperability, model coupling, and scalability. Products of the GIS actors can be fed directly to models such as FARSITE and WRF. Kepler's ability to schedule and scale processes using Hadoop and Spark also makes geoprocessing ultimately extensible and computationally scalable. The reusable workflows in geoKepler can be made to run automatically when alerted by real-time environmental conditions. Here, we show breakthroughs in the speed of creating complex data for hazard assessments with this platform. We also demonstrate geoKepler workflows that use Data Assimilation to ingest real-time weather data into wildfire simulations, and for data mining techniques to gain insight into environmental conditions affecting fire behavior. Existing machine learning tools and libraries such as R and MLlib are being leveraged for this purpose in Kepler, as well as Kepler's Distributed Data Parallel (DDP) capability to provide a framework for scalable processing. geoKepler workflows can be executed via an iPython notebook as a part of a Jupyter hub at UC San Diego for sharing and reporting of the scientific analysis and results from

  18. The link between the Barents Sea and ENSO events reproduced by NEMO model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Stepanov

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of observational data in the Barents Sea along a meridian at 33°30´ E between 70°30´ and 72°30´ N has reported a negative correlation between El Niño/La Niña-Southern Oscillation (ENSO events and water temperature in the top 200 m: the temperature drops about 0.5 °C during warm ENSO events while during cold ENSO events the top 200 m layer of the Barents Sea is warmer. Results from 1 and 1/4-degree global NEMO models show a similar response for the whole Barents Sea. During the strong warm ENSO event in 1997–1998 an anticyclonic atmospheric circulation is settled over the Barents Sea instead of a usual cyclonic circulation. This change enhances heat loses in the Barents Sea, as well as substantially influencing the Barents Sea inflow from the North Atlantic, via changes in ocean currents. Under normal conditions along the Scandinavian peninsula there is a warm current entering the Barents sea from the North Atlantic, however after the 1997–1998 event this current is weakened.

    During 1997–1998 the model annual mean temperature in the Barents Sea is decreased by about 0.8 °C, also resulting in a higher sea ice volume. In contrast during the cold ENSO events in 1999–2000 and 2007–2008 the model shows a lower sea ice volume, and higher annual mean temperatures in the upper layer of the Barents Sea of about 0.7 °C.

    An analysis of model data shows that the Barents Sea inflow is the main source for the variability of Barents Sea heat content, and is forced by changing pressure and winds in the North Atlantic. However, surface heat-exchange with atmosphere can also play a dominant role in the Barents Sea annual heat balance, especially for the subsequent year after ENSO events.

  19. A computational model incorporating neural stem cell dynamics reproduces glioma incidence across the lifespan in the human population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Bauer

    Full Text Available Glioma is the most common form of primary brain tumor. Demographically, the risk of occurrence increases until old age. Here we present a novel computational model to reproduce the probability of glioma incidence across the lifespan. Previous mathematical models explaining glioma incidence are framed in a rather abstract way, and do not directly relate to empirical findings. To decrease this gap between theory and experimental observations, we incorporate recent data on cellular and molecular factors underlying gliomagenesis. Since evidence implicates the adult neural stem cell as the likely cell-of-origin of glioma, we have incorporated empirically-determined estimates of neural stem cell number, cell division rate, mutation rate and oncogenic potential into our model. We demonstrate that our model yields results which match actual demographic data in the human population. In particular, this model accounts for the observed peak incidence of glioma at approximately 80 years of age, without the need to assert differential susceptibility throughout the population. Overall, our model supports the hypothesis that glioma is caused by randomly-occurring oncogenic mutations within the neural stem cell population. Based on this model, we assess the influence of the (experimentally indicated decrease in the number of neural stem cells and increase of cell division rate during aging. Our model provides multiple testable predictions, and suggests that different temporal sequences of oncogenic mutations can lead to tumorigenesis. Finally, we conclude that four or five oncogenic mutations are sufficient for the formation of glioma.

  20. Can a global model chemical mechanism reproduce NO, NO2, and O3 measurements above a tropical rainforest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Hewitt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A cross-platform field campaign, OP3, was conducted in the state of Sabah in Malaysian Borneo between April and July of 2008. Among the suite of observations recorded, the campaign included measurements of NOx and O3–crucial outputs of any model chemistry mechanism. We describe the measurements of these species made from both the ground site and aircraft. We examine the output from the global model p-TOMCAT at two resolutions for this location during the April campaign period. The models exhibit reasonable ability in capturing the NOx diurnal cycle, but ozone is overestimated. We use a box model containing the same chemical mechanism to explore the weaknesses in the global model and the ability of the simplified global model chemical mechanism to capture the chemistry at the rainforest site. We achieve a good fit to the data for all three species (NO, NO2, and O3, though the model is much more sensitive to changes in the treatment of physical processes than to changes in the chemical mechanism. Indeed, without some parameterization of the nighttime boundary layer-free troposphere mixing, a time dependent box model will not reproduce the observations. The final simulation uses this mixing parameterization for NO and NO2 but not O3, as determined by the vertical structure of each species, and matches the measurements well.

  1. Can model observers be developed to reproduce radiologists' diagnostic performances? Our study says not so fast!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juhun; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Reiser, Ingrid; Boone, John M.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine radiologists' diagnostic performances on different image reconstruction algorithms that could be used to optimize image-based model observers. We included a total of 102 pathology proven breast computed tomography (CT) cases (62 malignant). An iterative image reconstruction (IIR) algorithm was used to obtain 24 reconstructions with different image appearance for each image. Using quantitative image feature analysis, three IIRs and one clinical reconstruction of 50 lesions (25 malignant) were selected for a reader study. The reconstructions spanned a range of smooth-low noise to sharp-high noise image appearance. The trained classifiers' AUCs on the above reconstructions ranged from 0.61 (for smooth reconstruction) to 0.95 (for sharp reconstruction). Six experienced MQSA radiologists read 200 cases (50 lesions times 4 reconstructions) and provided the likelihood of malignancy of each lesion. Radiologists' diagnostic performances (AUC) ranged from 0.7 to 0.89. However, there was no agreement among the six radiologists on which image appearance was the best, in terms of radiologists' having the highest diagnostic performances. Specifically, two radiologists indicated sharper image appearance was diagnostically superior, another two radiologists indicated smoother image appearance was diagnostically superior, and another two radiologists indicated all image appearances were diagnostically similar to each other. Due to the poor agreement among radiologists on the diagnostic ranking of images, it may not be possible to develop a model observer for this particular imaging task.

  2. The ability of a GCM-forced hydrological model to reproduce global discharge variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. C. Sperna Weiland

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Data from General Circulation Models (GCMs are often used to investigate hydrological impacts of climate change. However GCM data are known to have large biases, especially for precipitation. In this study the usefulness of GCM data for hydrological studies, with focus on discharge variability and extremes, was tested by using bias-corrected daily climate data of the 20CM3 control experiment from a selection of twelve GCMs as input to the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB. Results of these runs were compared with discharge observations of the GRDC and discharges calculated from model runs based on two meteorological datasets constructed from the observation-based CRU TS2.1 and ERA-40 reanalysis. In the first dataset the CRU TS 2.1 monthly timeseries were downscaled to daily timeseries using the ERA-40 dataset (ERA6190. This dataset served as a best guess of the past climate and was used to analyze the performance of PCR-GLOBWB. The second dataset was created from the ERA-40 timeseries bias-corrected with the CRU TS 2.1 dataset using the same bias-correction method as applied to the GCM datasets (ERACLM. Through this dataset the influence of the bias-correction method was quantified. The bias-correction was limited to monthly mean values of precipitation, potential evaporation and temperature, as our focus was on the reproduction of inter- and intra-annual variability.

    After bias-correction the spread in discharge results of the GCM based runs decreased and results were similar to results of the ERA-40 based runs, especially for rivers with a strong seasonal pattern. Overall the bias-correction method resulted in a slight reduction of global runoff and the method performed less well in arid and mountainous regions. However, deviations between GCM results and GRDC statistics did decrease for Q, Q90 and IAV. After bias-correction consistency amongst

  3. Validation of the 3D Skin Comet assay using full thickness skin models: transferability and reproducibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Reisinger

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The 3D Skin Comet assay was developed to improve the in vitro prediction of the genotoxic potential of dermally applied chemicals. For this purpose, a classical read-out for genotoxicity (i.e. comet formation was combined with reconstructed 3D skin models as well-established test systems. Five laboratories (BASF, BfR (Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Henkel, Procter & Gamble and TNO Triskilion started to validate this assay using the Phenion® Full- Thickness (FT Skin Model and 8 coded chemicals with financial support by Cosmetics Europe and the German Ministry of Education & Research. There was an excellent overall predictivity of the expected genotoxicity (>90%. Four labs correctly identified all chemicals and the fifth correctly identified 80% of the chemicals. Background DNA damage was low and values for solvent (acetone and positive (methyl methanesulfonate (MMS controls were comparable among labs. Inclusion of the DNA-polymerase inhibitor, aphidicolin (APC, in the protocol improved the predictivity of the assay since it enabled robust detection of pro-mutagens e.g., 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and benzo[a]pyrene. Therefore, all negative findings are now confirmed by additional APC experiments to come to a final conclusion. Furthermore, MMC, which intercalates between DNA strands causing covalent binding, was detected with the standard protocol, in which it gave weak but statistically significant responses. Stronger responses, however, were obtained using a cross-linker specific protocol in which MMC reduced the migration of MMS-induced DNA damage. These data support the use of the Phenion® FT in the Comet assay: no false-positives and only one false-negative finding in a single lab. Testing will continue to obtain data for 30 chemicals. Once validated, the 3D Skin Comet assay is foreseen to be used as a follow-up test for positive results from the current in vitro genotoxicity test battery.

  4. PAMELA positron and electron spectra are reproduced by 3-dimensional cosmic-ray modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Gaggero, Daniele; Maccione, Luca; Di Bernardo, Giuseppe; Evoli, Carmelo

    2013-01-01

    The PAMELA collaboration recently released the $e^+$ absolute spectrum between 1 and 300 GeV in addition to the positron fraction and $e^-$ spectrum previously measured in the same time period. We use the newly developed 3-dimensional upgrade of the DRAGON code and the charge dependent solar modulation HelioProp code to consistently describe those data. We obtain very good fits of all data sets if a $e^+$ + $e^-$ hard extra-component peaked at 1 TeV is added to a softer $e^-$ background and the secondary $e^\\pm$ produced by the spallation of cosmic ray proton and helium nuclei. All sources are assumed to follow a realistic spiral arm spatial distribution. Remarkably, PAMELA data do not display any need of charge asymmetric extra-component. Finally, plain diffusion, or low re-acceleration, propagation models which are tuned against nuclear data, nicely describe PAMELA lepton data with no need to introduce a low energy break in the proton and Helium spectra.

  5. The diverse broad-band light-curves of Swift GRBs reproduced with the cannonball model

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo; De Rújula, A

    2009-01-01

    Two radiation mechanisms, inverse Compton scattering (ICS) and synchrotron radiation (SR), suffice within the cannonball (CB) model of long gamma ray bursts (LGRBs) and X-ray flashes (XRFs) to provide a very simple and accurate description of their observed prompt emission and afterglows. Simple as they are, the two mechanisms and the burst environment generate the rich structure of the light curves at all frequencies and times. This is demonstrated for 33 selected Swift LGRBs and XRFs, which are well sampled from early time until late time and well represent the entire diversity of the broad band light curves of Swift LGRBs and XRFs. Their prompt gamma-ray and X-ray emission is dominated by ICS of glory light. During their fast decline phase, ICS is taken over by SR which dominates their broad band afterglow. The pulse shape and spectral evolution of the gamma-ray peaks and the early-time X-ray flares, and even the delayed optical `humps' in XRFs, are correctly predicted. The canonical and non-canonical X-ra...

  6. A Detailed Data-Driven Network Model of Prefrontal Cortex Reproduces Key Features of In Vivo Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, Joachim; Hertäg, Loreen; Durstewitz, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    The prefrontal cortex is centrally involved in a wide range of cognitive functions and their impairment in psychiatric disorders. Yet, the computational principles that govern the dynamics of prefrontal neural networks, and link their physiological, biochemical and anatomical properties to cognitive functions, are not well understood. Computational models can help to bridge the gap between these different levels of description, provided they are sufficiently constrained by experimental data and capable of predicting key properties of the intact cortex. Here, we present a detailed network model of the prefrontal cortex, based on a simple computationally efficient single neuron model (simpAdEx), with all parameters derived from in vitro electrophysiological and anatomical data. Without additional tuning, this model could be shown to quantitatively reproduce a wide range of measures from in vivo electrophysiological recordings, to a degree where simulated and experimentally observed activities were statistically indistinguishable. These measures include spike train statistics, membrane potential fluctuations, local field potentials, and the transmission of transient stimulus information across layers. We further demonstrate that model predictions are robust against moderate changes in key parameters, and that synaptic heterogeneity is a crucial ingredient to the quantitative reproduction of in vivo-like electrophysiological behavior. Thus, we have produced a physiologically highly valid, in a quantitative sense, yet computationally efficient PFC network model, which helped to identify key properties underlying spike time dynamics as observed in vivo, and can be harvested for in-depth investigation of the links between physiology and cognition.

  7. A new mathematical approach for qualitative modeling of the insulin-TOR-MAPK network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Frederik Nijhout

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develop a novel mathematical model of the insulin-TOR-MAPK signaling network that controls growth. Most data on the properties of the insulin and MAPK signaling networks are static and the responses to experimental interventions, such as knockouts, overexpression, and hormonal input are typically reported as scaled quantities. The modeling paradigm we develop here uses scaled variables and is ideally suited to simulate systems in which much of the available data are scaled. Our mathematical representation of signaling networks provides a way to reconcile theory and experiments, thus leading to a better understanding of the properties and function of these signaling networks. We test the performance of the model against a broad diversity of experimental data. The model correctly reproduces experimental insulin dose-response relationships. We study the interaction between insulin and MAPK signaling in the control of protein synthesis, and the interactions between amino acids, insulin and TOR signaling. We study the effects of variation in FOXO expression on protein synthesis and glucose transport capacity, and show that a FOXO knockout can partially rescue protein synthesis capacity of an insulin receptor knockout. We conclude that the modeling paradigm we develop provides a simple tool to investigate the qualitative properties of signaling networks.

  8. Universal free school breakfast: a qualitative model for breakfast behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise eHarvey-Golding

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the provision of school breakfast has increased significantly in the UK. However, research examining the effectiveness of school breakfast is still within relative stages of infancy, and findings to date have been rather mixed. Moreover, previous evaluations of school breakfast schemes have been predominantly quantitative in their methodologies. Presently there are few qualitative studies examining the subjective perceptions and experiences of stakeholders, and thereby an absence of knowledge regarding the sociocultural impacts of school breakfast. The purpose of this study was to investigate the beliefs, views and attitudes, and breakfast consumption behaviors, among key stakeholders, served by a council-wide universal free school breakfast initiative, within the North West of England, UK. A sample of children, parents and school staff were recruited from three primary schools, participating in the universal free school breakfast scheme, to partake in semi-structured interviews and small focus groups. A Grounded Theory analysis of the data collected identified a theoretical model of breakfast behaviors, underpinned by the subjective perceptions and experiences of these key stakeholders. The model comprises of three domains relating to breakfast behaviors, and the internal and external factors that are perceived to influence breakfast behaviors, among children, parents and school staff. Findings were validated using triangulation methods, member checks and inter-rater reliability measures. In presenting this theoretically grounded model for breakfast behaviors, this paper provides a unique qualitative insight into the breakfast consumption behaviors and barriers to breakfast consumption, within a socioeconomically deprived community, participating in a universal free school breakfast intervention program.

  9. The statistics of repeating patterns of cortical activity can be reproduced by a model network of stochastic binary neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxin, Alex; Hakim, Vincent; Brunel, Nicolas

    2008-10-15

    Calcium imaging of the spontaneous activity in cortical slices has revealed repeating spatiotemporal patterns of transitions between so-called down states and up states (Ikegaya et al., 2004). Here we fit a model network of stochastic binary neurons to data from these experiments, and in doing so reproduce the distributions of such patterns. We use two versions of this model: (1) an unconnected network in which neurons are activated as independent Poisson processes; and (2) a network with an interaction matrix, estimated from the data, representing effective interactions between the neurons. The unconnected model (model 1) is sufficient to account for the statistics of repeating patterns in 11 of the 15 datasets studied. Model 2, with interactions between neurons, is required to account for pattern statistics of the remaining four. Three of these four datasets are the ones that contain the largest number of transitions, suggesting that long datasets are in general necessary to render interactions statistically visible. We then study the topology of the matrix of interactions estimated for these four datasets. For three of the four datasets, we find sparse matrices with long-tailed degree distributions and an overrepresentation of certain network motifs. The remaining dataset exhibits a strongly interconnected, spatially localized subgroup of neurons. In all cases, we find that interactions between neurons facilitate the generation of long patterns that do not repeat exactly.

  10. Isokinetic eccentric exercise as a model to induce and reproduce pathophysiological alterations related to delayed onset muscle soreness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik; Vestergaard-Poulsen, P; Kanstrup, I.L.

    1998-01-01

    Physiological alterations following unaccustomed eccentric exercise in an isokinetic dynamometer of the right m. quadriceps until exhaustion were studied, in order to create a model in which the physiological responses to physiotherapy could be measured. In experiment I (exp. I), seven selected...... parameters were measured bilaterally in 7 healthy subjects at day 0 as a control value. Then after a standardized bout of eccentric exercise the same parameters were measured daily for the following 7 d (test values). The measured parameters were: the ratio of phosphocreatine to inorganic phosphate (PCr...... (133Xenon washout technique). This was repeated in experiment II (exp. II) 6-12 months later in order to study reproducibility. In experiment III (exp. III), the normal fluctuations over 8 d of the seven parameters were measured, without intervention with eccentric exercise in 6 other subjects. All...

  11. Efficient and Reproducible Myogenic Differentiation from Human iPS Cells: Prospects for Modeling Miyoshi Myopathy In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akihito; Woltjen, Knut; Miyake, Katsuya; Hotta, Akitsu; Ikeya, Makoto; Yamamoto, Takuya; Nishino, Tokiko; Shoji, Emi; Sehara-Fujisawa, Atsuko; Manabe, Yasuko; Fujii, Nobuharu; Hanaoka, Kazunori; Era, Takumi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Isobe, Ken-ichi; Kimura, En; Sakurai, Hidetoshi

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) has enabled the production of in vitro, patient-specific cell models of human disease. In vitro recreation of disease pathology from patient-derived hiPSCs depends on efficient differentiation protocols producing relevant adult cell types. However, myogenic differentiation of hiPSCs has faced obstacles, namely, low efficiency and/or poor reproducibility. Here, we report the rapid, efficient, and reproducible differentiation of hiPSCs into mature myocytes. We demonstrated that inducible expression of myogenic differentiation1 (MYOD1) in immature hiPSCs for at least 5 days drives cells along the myogenic lineage, with efficiencies reaching 70–90%. Myogenic differentiation driven by MYOD1 occurred even in immature, almost completely undifferentiated hiPSCs, without mesodermal transition. Myocytes induced in this manner reach maturity within 2 weeks of differentiation as assessed by marker gene expression and functional properties, including in vitro and in vivo cell fusion and twitching in response to electrical stimulation. Miyoshi Myopathy (MM) is a congenital distal myopathy caused by defective muscle membrane repair due to mutations in DYSFERLIN. Using our induced differentiation technique, we successfully recreated the pathological condition of MM in vitro, demonstrating defective membrane repair in hiPSC-derived myotubes from an MM patient and phenotypic rescue by expression of full-length DYSFERLIN (DYSF). These findings not only facilitate the pathological investigation of MM, but could potentially be applied in modeling of other human muscular diseases by using patient-derived hiPSCs. PMID:23626698

  12. Reproducing Kernel Particle Method for Non-Linear Fracture Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Zhongqing; Zhou Benkuan; Chen Dapeng

    2006-01-01

    To study the non-linear fracture, a non-linear constitutive model for piezoelectric ceramics was proposed, in which the polarization switching and saturation were taken into account. Based on the model, the non-linear fracture analysis was implemented using reproducing kernel particle method (RKPM). Using local J-integral as a fracture criterion, a relation curve of fracture loads against electric fields was obtained. Qualitatively, the curve is in agreement with the experimental observations reported in literature. The reproducing equation, the shape function of RKPM, and the transformation method to impose essential boundary conditions for meshless methods were also introduced. The computation was implemented using object-oriented programming method.

  13. A short-term mouse model that reproduces the immunopathological features of rhinovirus-induced exacerbation of COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singanayagam, Aran; Glanville, Nicholas; Walton, Ross P; Aniscenko, Julia; Pearson, Rebecca M; Pinkerton, James W; Horvat, Jay C; Hansbro, Philip M; Bartlett, Nathan W; Johnston, Sebastian L

    2015-08-01

    Viral exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), commonly caused by rhinovirus (RV) infections, are poorly controlled by current therapies. This is due to a lack of understanding of the underlying immunopathological mechanisms. Human studies have identified a number of key immune responses that are associated with RV-induced exacerbations including neutrophilic inflammation, expression of inflammatory cytokines and deficiencies in innate anti-viral interferon. Animal models of COPD exacerbation are required to determine the contribution of these responses to disease pathogenesis. We aimed to develop a short-term mouse model that reproduced the hallmark features of RV-induced exacerbation of COPD. Evaluation of complex protocols involving multiple dose elastase and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration combined with RV1B infection showed suppression rather than enhancement of inflammatory parameters compared with control mice infected with RV1B alone. Therefore, these approaches did not accurately model the enhanced inflammation associated with RV infection in patients with COPD compared with healthy subjects. In contrast, a single elastase treatment followed by RV infection led to heightened airway neutrophilic and lymphocytic inflammation, increased expression of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10)/IP-10 (interferon γ-induced protein 10) and CCL5 [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5]/RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted), mucus hypersecretion and preliminary evidence for increased airway hyper-responsiveness compared with mice treated with elastase or RV infection alone. In summary, we have developed a new mouse model of RV-induced COPD exacerbation that mimics many of the inflammatory features of human disease. This model, in conjunction with human models of disease, will provide an essential tool for studying disease mechanisms and allow testing of novel therapies with potential to

  14. Reproducing Electric Field Observations during Magnetic Storms by means of Rigorous 3-D Modelling and Distortion Matrix Co-estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Püthe, Christoph; Manoj, Chandrasekharan; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    Electric fields induced in the conducting Earth during magnetic storms drive currents in power transmission grids, telecommunication lines or buried pipelines. These geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) can cause severe service disruptions. The prediction of GIC is thus of great importance for public and industry. A key step in the prediction of the hazard to technological systems during magnetic storms is the calculation of the geoelectric field. To address this issue for mid-latitude regions, we developed a method that involves 3-D modelling of induction processes in a heterogeneous Earth and the construction of a model of the magnetospheric source. The latter is described by low-degree spherical harmonics; its temporal evolution is derived from observatory magnetic data. Time series of the electric field can be computed for every location on Earth's surface. The actual electric field however is known to be perturbed by galvanic effects, arising from very local near-surface heterogeneities or topography, which cannot be included in the conductivity model. Galvanic effects are commonly accounted for with a real-valued time-independent distortion matrix, which linearly relates measured and computed electric fields. Using data of various magnetic storms that occurred between 2000 and 2003, we estimated distortion matrices for observatory sites onshore and on the ocean bottom. Strong correlations between modellings and measurements validate our method. The distortion matrix estimates prove to be reliable, as they are accurately reproduced for different magnetic storms. We further show that 3-D modelling is crucial for a correct separation of galvanic and inductive effects and a precise prediction of electric field time series during magnetic storms. Since the required computational resources are negligible, our approach is suitable for a real-time prediction of GIC. For this purpose, a reliable forecast of the source field, e.g. based on data from satellites

  15. Can CFMIP2 models reproduce the leading modes of cloud vertical structure in the CALIPSO-GOCCP observations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Yang, Song

    2017-02-01

    Using principal component (PC) analysis, three leading modes of cloud vertical structure (CVS) are revealed by the GCM-Oriented CALIPSO Cloud Product (GOCCP), i.e. tropical high, subtropical anticyclonic and extratropical cyclonic cloud modes (THCM, SACM and ECCM, respectively). THCM mainly reflect the contrast between tropical high clouds and clouds in middle/high latitudes. SACM is closely associated with middle-high clouds in tropical convective cores, few-cloud regimes in subtropical anticyclonic clouds and stratocumulus over subtropical eastern oceans. ECCM mainly corresponds to clouds along extratropical cyclonic regions. Models of phase 2 of Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP2) well reproduce the THCM, but SACM and ECCM are generally poorly simulated compared to GOCCP. Standardized PCs corresponding to CVS modes are generally captured, whereas original PCs (OPCs) are consistently underestimated (overestimated) for THCM (SACM and ECCM) by CFMIP2 models. The effects of CVS modes on relative cloud radiative forcing (RSCRF/RLCRF) (RSCRF being calculated at the surface while RLCRF at the top of atmosphere) are studied in terms of principal component regression method. Results show that CFMIP2 models tend to overestimate (underestimated or simulate the opposite sign) RSCRF/RLCRF radiative effects (REs) of ECCM (THCM and SACM) in unit global mean OPC compared to observations. These RE biases may be attributed to two factors, one of which is underestimation (overestimation) of low/middle clouds (high clouds) (also known as stronger (weaker) REs in unit low/middle (high) clouds) in simulated global mean cloud profiles, the other is eigenvector biases in CVS modes (especially for SACM and ECCM). It is suggested that much more attention should be paid on improvement of CVS, especially cloud parameterization associated with particular physical processes (e.g. downwelling regimes with the Hadley circulation, extratropical storm tracks and others), which

  16. Can a coupled meteorology-chemistry model reproduce the historical trend in aerosol direct radiative effects over the Northern Hemisphere?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xing

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability of a coupled meteorology-chemistry model, i.e., WRF-CMAQ, in reproducing the historical trend in AOD and clear-sky short-wave radiation (SWR over the Northern Hemisphere has been evaluated through a comparison of 21 year simulated results with observation-derived records from 1990–2010. Six satellite retrieved AOD products including AVHRR, TOMS, SeaWiFS, MISR, MODIS-terra and -aqua as well as long-term historical records from 11 AERONET sites were used for the comparison of AOD trends. Clear-sky SWR products derived by CERES at both TOA and surface as well as surface SWR data derived from seven SURFRAD sites were used for the comparison of trends in SWR. The model successfully captured increasing AOD trends along with the corresponding increased TOA SWR (upwelling and decreased surface SWR (downwelling in both eastern China and the northern Pacific. The model also captured declining AOD trends along with the corresponding decreased TOA SWR (upwelling and increased surface SWR (downwelling in eastern US, Europe and northern Atlantic for the period of 2000–2010. However, the model underestimated the AOD over regions with substantial natural dust aerosol contributions, such as the Sahara Desert, Arabian Desert, central Atlantic and north Indian Ocean. Estimates of aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE at TOA are comparable with those derived by measurements. Compared to GCMs, the model exhibits better estimates of surface- aerosol direct radiative efficiency (Eτ. However, surface-DRE tends to be underestimated due to the underestimated AOD in land and dust regions. Further investigation of TOA-Eτ estimations as well as the dust module used for estimates of windblown-dust emissions is needed.

  17. A Bloch-McConnell simulator with pharmacokinetic modeling to explore accuracy and reproducibility in the measurement of hyperpolarized pyruvate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Christopher M.; Bankson, James A.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of hyperpolarized (HP) agents has the potential to probe in-vivo metabolism with sensitivity and specificity that was not previously possible. Biological conversion of HP agents specifically for cancer has been shown to correlate to presence of disease, stage and response to therapy. For such metabolic biomarkers derived from MRI of hyperpolarized agents to be clinically impactful, they need to be validated and well characterized. However, imaging of HP substrates is distinct from conventional MRI, due to the non-renewable nature of transient HP magnetization. Moreover, due to current practical limitations in generation and evolution of hyperpolarized agents, it is not feasible to fully experimentally characterize measurement and processing strategies. In this work we use a custom Bloch-McConnell simulator with pharmacokinetic modeling to characterize the performance of specific magnetic resonance spectroscopy sequences over a range of biological conditions. We performed numerical simulations to evaluate the effect of sequence parameters over a range of chemical conversion rates. Each simulation was analyzed repeatedly with the addition of noise in order to determine the accuracy and reproducibility of measurements. Results indicate that under both closed and perfused conditions, acquisition parameters can affect measurements in a tissue dependent manner, suggesting that great care needs to be taken when designing studies involving hyperpolarized agents. More modeling studies will be needed to determine what effect sequence parameters have on more advanced acquisitions and processing methods.

  18. An Effective and Reproducible Model of Ventricular Fibrillation in Crossbred Yorkshire Swine (Sus scrofa) for Use in Physiologic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgert, James M; Johnson, Arthur D; Garcia-Blanco, Jose C; Craig, W John; O'Sullivan, Joseph C

    2015-10-01

    Transcutaneous electrical induction (TCEI) has been used to induce ventricular fibrillation (VF) in laboratory swine for physiologic and resuscitation research. Many studies do not describe the method of TCEI in detail, thus making replication by future investigators difficult. Here we describe a detailed method of electrically inducing VF that was used successfully in a prospective, experimental resuscitation study. Specifically, an electrical current was passed through the heart to induce VF in crossbred Yorkshire swine (n = 30); the current was generated by using two 22-gauge spinal needles, with one placed above and one below the heart, and three 9V batteries connected in series. VF developed in 28 of the 30 pigs (93%) within 10 s of beginning the procedure. In the remaining 2 swine, VF was induced successfully after medial redirection of the superior parasternal needle. The TCEI method is simple, reproducible, and cost-effective. TCEI may be especially valuable to researchers with limited access to funding, sophisticated equipment, or colleagues experienced in interventional cardiology techniques. The TCEI method might be most appropriate for pharmacologic studies requiring VF, VF resulting from the R-on-T phenomenon (as in prolonged QT syndrome), and VF arising from other ectopic or reentrant causes. However, the TCEI method does not accurately model the most common cause of VF, acute coronary occlusive disease. Researchers must consider the limitations of TCEI that may affect internal and external validity of collected data, when designing experiments using this model of VF.

  19. A rat tail temporary static compression model reproduces different stages of intervertebral disc degeneration with decreased notochordal cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Hiroaki; Yurube, Takashi; Kakutani, Kenichiro; Maeno, Koichiro; Takada, Toru; Yamamoto, Junya; Kurakawa, Takuto; Akisue, Toshihiro; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Nishida, Kotaro

    2014-03-01

    The intervertebral disc nucleus pulposus (NP) has two phenotypically distinct cell types-notochordal cells (NCs) and non-notochordal chondrocyte-like cells. In human discs, NCs are lost during adolescence, which is also when discs begin to show degenerative signs. However, little evidence exists regarding the link between NC disappearance and the pathogenesis of disc degeneration. To clarify this, a rat tail disc degeneration model induced by static compression at 1.3 MPa for 0, 1, or 7 days was designed and assessed for up to 56 postoperative days. Radiography, MRI, and histomorphology showed degenerative disc findings in response to the compression period. Immunofluorescence displayed that the number of DAPI-positive NP cells decreased with compression; particularly, the decrease was notable in larger, vacuolated, cytokeratin-8- and galectin-3-co-positive cells, identified as NCs. The proportion of TUNEL-positive cells, which predominantly comprised non-NCs, increased with compression. Quantitative PCR demonstrated isolated mRNA up-regulation of ADAMTS-5 in the 1-day loaded group and MMP-3 in the 7-day loaded group. Aggrecan-1 and collagen type 2α-1 mRNA levels were down-regulated in both groups. This rat tail temporary static compression model, which exhibits decreased NC phenotype, increased apoptotic cell death, and imbalanced catabolic and anabolic gene expression, reproduces different stages of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  20. An update on the rotenone models of Parkinson's disease: their ability to reproduce the features of clinical disease and model gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michaela E; Bobrovskaya, Larisa

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by two major neuropathological hallmarks: the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) and the presence of Lewy bodies in the surviving SN neurons, as well as other regions of the central and peripheral nervous system. Animal models have been invaluable tools for investigating the underlying mechanisms of the pathogenesis of PD and testing new potential symptomatic, neuroprotective and neurorestorative therapies. However, the usefulness of these models is dependent on how precisely they replicate the features of clinical PD with some studies now employing combined gene-environment models to replicate more of the affected pathways. The rotenone model of PD has become of great interest following the seminal paper by the Greenamyre group in 2000 (Betarbet et al., 2000). This paper reported for the first time that systemic rotenone was able to reproduce the two pathological hallmarks of PD as well as certain parkinsonian motor deficits. Since 2000, many research groups have actively used the rotenone model worldwide. This paper will review rotenone models, focusing upon their ability to reproduce the two pathological hallmarks of PD, motor deficits, extranigral pathology and non-motor symptoms. We will also summarize the recent advances in neuroprotective therapies, focusing on those that investigated non-motor symptoms and review rotenone models used in combination with PD genetic models to investigate gene-environment interactions.

  1. QSAR model reproducibility and applicability: a case study of rate constants of hydroxyl radical reaction models applied to polybrominated diphenyl ethers and (benzo-)triazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Partha Pratim; Kovarich, Simona; Gramatica, Paola

    2011-08-01

    The crucial importance of the three central OECD principles for quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model validation is highlighted in a case study of tropospheric degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by OH, applied to two CADASTER chemical classes (PBDEs and (benzo-)triazoles). The application of any QSAR model to chemicals without experimental data largely depends on model reproducibility by the user. The reproducibility of an unambiguous algorithm (OECD Principle 2) is guaranteed by redeveloping MLR models based on both updated version of DRAGON software for molecular descriptors calculation and some freely available online descriptors. The Genetic Algorithm has confirmed its ability to always select the most informative descriptors independently on the input pool of variables. The ability of the GA-selected descriptors to model chemicals not used in model development is verified by three different splittings (random by response, K-ANN and K-means clustering), thus ensuring the external predictivity of the new models, independently of the training/prediction set composition (OECD Principle 5). The relevance of checking the structural applicability domain becomes very evident on comparing the predictions for CADASTER chemicals, using the new models proposed herein, with those obtained by EPI Suite. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A rat model of post-traumatic stress disorder reproduces the hippocampal deficits seen in the human syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonal eGoswami

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent progress, the causes and pathophysiology of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD remain poorly understood, partly because of ethical limitations inherent to human studies. One approach to circumvent this obstacle is to study PTSD in a valid animal model of the human syndrome. In one such model, extreme and long-lasting behavioral manifestations of anxiety develop in a subset of Lewis rats after exposure to an intense predatory threat that mimics the type of life-and-death situation known to precipitate PTSD in humans. This study aimed to assess whether the hippocampus-associated deficits observed in the human syndrome are reproduced in this rodent model. Prior to predatory threat, different groups of rats were each tested on one of three object recognition memory tasks that varied in the types of contextual clues (i.e. that require the hippocampus or not the rats could use to identify novel items. After task completion, the rats were subjected to predatory threat and, one week later, tested on the elevated plus maze. Based on their exploratory behavior in the plus maze, rats were then classified as resilient or PTSD-like and their performance on the pre-threat object recognition tasks compared. The performance of PTSD-like rats was inferior to that of resilient rats but only when subjects relied on an allocentric frame of reference to identify novel items, a process thought to be critically dependent on the hippocampus. Therefore, these results suggest that even prior to trauma, PTSD-like rats show a deficit in hippocampal-dependent functions, as reported in twin studies of human PTSD.

  3. Reproducing the organic matter model of anthropogenic dark earth of Amazonia and testing the ecotoxicity of functionalized charcoal compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Rodrigues Linhares

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to obtain organic compounds similar to the ones found in the organic matter of anthropogenic dark earth of Amazonia (ADE using a chemical functionalization procedure on activated charcoal, as well as to determine their ecotoxicity. Based on the study of the organic matter from ADE, an organic model was proposed and an attempt to reproduce it was described. Activated charcoal was oxidized with the use of sodium hypochlorite at different concentrations. Nuclear magnetic resonance was performed to verify if the spectra of the obtained products were similar to the ones of humic acids from ADE. The similarity between spectra indicated that the obtained products were polycondensed aromatic structures with carboxyl groups: a soil amendment that can contribute to soil fertility and to its sustainable use. An ecotoxicological test with Daphnia similis was performed on the more soluble fraction (fulvic acids of the produced soil amendment. Aryl chloride was formed during the synthesis of the organic compounds from activated charcoal functionalization and partially removed through a purification process. However, it is probable that some aryl chloride remained in the final product, since the ecotoxicological test indicated that the chemical functionalized soil amendment is moderately toxic.

  4. Enhancement of accuracy and reproducibility of parametric modeling for estimating abnormal intra-QRS potentials in signal-averaged electrocardiograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2008-09-01

    This work analyzes and attempts to enhance the accuracy and reproducibility of parametric modeling in the discrete cosine transform (DCT) domain for the estimation of abnormal intra-QRS potentials (AIQP) in signal-averaged electrocardiograms. One hundred sets of white noise with a flat frequency response were introduced to simulate the unpredictable, broadband AIQP when quantitatively analyzing estimation error. Further, a high-frequency AIQP parameter was defined to minimize estimation error caused by the overlap between normal QRS and AIQP in low-frequency DCT coefficients. Seventy-two patients from Taiwan were recruited for the study, comprising 30 patients with ventricular tachycardia (VT) and 42 without VT. Analytical results showed that VT patients had a significant decrease in the estimated AIQP. The global diagnostic performance (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve) of AIQP rose from 73.0% to 84.2% in lead Y, and from 58.3% to 79.1% in lead Z, when the high-frequency range fell from 100% to 80%. The combination of AIQP and ventricular late potentials further enhanced performance to 92.9% (specificity=90.5%, sensitivity=90%). Therefore, the significantly reduced AIQP in VT patients, possibly also including dominant unpredictable potentials within the normal QRS complex, may be new promising evidence of ventricular arrhythmias.

  5. Qualitative modeling of the decision-making process using electrooculography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marandi, Ramtin Zargari; Sabzpoushan, S H

    2015-12-01

    A novel method based on electrooculography (EOG) has been introduced in this work to study the decision-making process. An experiment was designed and implemented wherein subjects were asked to choose between two items from the same category that were presented within a limited time. The EOG and voice signals of the subjects were recorded during the experiment. A calibration task was performed to map the EOG signals to their corresponding gaze positions on the screen by using an artificial neural network. To analyze the data, 16 parameters were extracted from the response time and EOG signals of the subjects. Evaluation and comparison of the parameters, together with subjects' choices, revealed functional information. On the basis of this information, subjects switched their eye gazes between items about three times on average. We also found, according to statistical hypothesis testing-that is, a t test, t(10) = 71.62, SE = 1.25, p < .0001-that the correspondence rate of a subjects' gaze at the moment of selection with the selected item was significant. Ultimately, on the basis of these results, we propose a qualitative choice model for the decision-making task.

  6. Assessment of an ensemble of ocean-atmosphere coupled and uncoupled regional climate models to reproduce the climatology of Mediterranean cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaounas, Emmanouil; Kelemen, Fanni Dora; Wernli, Heini; Gaertner, Miguel Angel; Reale, Marco; Sanchez-Gomez, Emilia; Lionello, Piero; Calmanti, Sandro; Podrascanin, Zorica; Somot, Samuel; Akhtar, Naveed; Romera, Raquel; Conte, Dario

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to assess the skill of regional climate models (RCMs) at reproducing the climatology of Mediterranean cyclones. Seven RCMs are considered, five of which were also coupled with an oceanic model. All simulations were forced at the lateral boundaries by the ERA-Interim reanalysis for a common 20-year period (1989-2008). Six different cyclone tracking methods have been applied to all twelve RCM simulations and to the ERA-Interim reanalysis in order to assess the RCMs from the perspective of different cyclone definitions. All RCMs reproduce the main areas of high cyclone occurrence in the region south of the Alps, in the Adriatic, Ionian and Aegean Seas, as well as in the areas close to Cyprus and to Atlas mountains. The RCMs tend to underestimate intense cyclone occurrences over the Mediterranean Sea and reproduce 24-40 % of these systems, as identified in the reanalysis. The use of grid nudging in one of the RCMs is shown to be beneficial, reproducing about 60 % of the intense cyclones and keeping a better track of the seasonal cycle of intense cyclogenesis. Finally, the most intense cyclones tend to be similarly reproduced in coupled and uncoupled model simulations, suggesting that modeling atmosphere-ocean coupled processes has only a weak impact on the climatology and intensity of Mediterranean cyclones.

  7. A computational model for histone mark propagation reproduces the distribution of heterochromatin in different human cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwämmle, Veit; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin is a highly compact and dynamic nuclear structure that consists of DNA and associated proteins. The main organizational unit is the nucleosome, which consists of a histone octamer with DNA wrapped around it. Histone proteins are implicated in the regulation of eukaryote genes and they carry numerous reversible post-translational modifications that control DNA-protein interactions and the recruitment of chromatin binding proteins. Heterochromatin, the transcriptionally inactive part of the genome, is densely packed and contains histone H3 that is methylated at Lys 9 (H3K9me). The propagation of H3K9me in nucleosomes along the DNA in chromatin is antagonizing by methylation of H3 Lysine 4 (H3K4me) and acetylations of several lysines, which is related to euchromatin and active genes. We show that the related histone modifications form antagonized domains on a coarse scale. These histone marks are assumed to be initiated within distinct nucleation sites in the DNA and to propagate bi-directionally. We propose a simple computer model that simulates the distribution of heterochromatin in human chromosomes. The simulations are in agreement with previously reported experimental observations from two different human cell lines. We reproduced different types of barriers between heterochromatin and euchromatin providing a unified model for their function. The effect of changes in the nucleation site distribution and of propagation rates were studied. The former occurs mainly with the aim of (de-)activation of single genes or gene groups and the latter has the power of controlling the transcriptional programs of entire chromosomes. Generally, the regulatory program of gene transcription is controlled by the distribution of nucleation sites along the DNA string.

  8. Reproducibility and accuracy of linear measurements on dental models derived from cone-beam computed tomography compared with digital dental casts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waard, O. de; Rangel, F.A.; Fudalej, P.S.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Breuning, K.H.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to determine the reproducibility and accuracy of linear measurements on 2 types of dental models derived from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans: CBCT images, and Anatomodels (InVivoDental, San Jose, Calif); these were compared with digital models gene

  9. Environmental Consequences of Wildlife Tourism: The Use of Formalised Qualitative Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselý Štěpán

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a simple qualitative model of environmental consequences of wildlife tourism. Qualitative models use just three values: Positive/Increasing, Zero/Constant and Negative/Decreasing. Such quantifiers of trends are the least information intensive. Qualitative models can be useful, since models of wildlife tourism include such variables as, for example, Biodiversity (BIO, Animals’ habituation to tourists (HAB or Plant composition change (PLA that are sometimes difficult or costly to quantify. Hence, a significant fraction of available information about wildlife tourism and its consequences is not of numerical nature, for example, if HAB is increasing then BIO is decreasing. Such equationless relations are studied in this paper. The model has 10 variables and 20 equationless pairwise interrelations among them. The model is solved and 15 solutions, that is, scenarios are obtained. All qualitative states, including the first and second qualitative derivatives with respect to time, of all variables are specified for each scenario.

  10. Randomised reproducing graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Jordan, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a model for a growing random graph based on simultaneous reproduction of the vertices. The model can be thought of as a generalisation of the reproducing graphs of Southwell and Cannings and Bonato et al to allow for a random element, and there are three parameters, $\\alpha$, $\\beta$ and $\\gamma$, which are the probabilities of edges appearing between different types of vertices. We show that as the probabilities associated with the model vary there are a number of phase transitions, in particular concerning the degree sequence. If $(1+\\alpha)(1+\\gamma)1$ then the degree of a typical vertex grows to infinity, and the proportion of vertices having any fixed degree $d$ tends to zero. We also give some results on the number of edges and on the spectral gap.

  11. The Need for Reproducibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robey, Robert W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-06-27

    The purpose of this presentation is to consider issues of reproducibility, specifically it determines whether bitwise reproducible computation is possible, if computational research in DOE improves its publication process, and if reproducible results can be achieved apart from the peer review process?

  12. Development of a Three-Dimensional Hand Model Using Three-Dimensional Stereophotogrammetry: Assessment of Image Reproducibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge A Hoevenaren

    Full Text Available Using three-dimensional (3D stereophotogrammetry precise images and reconstructions of the human body can be produced. Over the last few years, this technique is mainly being developed in the field of maxillofacial reconstructive surgery, creating fusion images with computed tomography (CT data for precise planning and prediction of treatment outcome. Though, in hand surgery 3D stereophotogrammetry is not yet being used in clinical settings.A total of 34 three-dimensional hand photographs were analyzed to investigate the reproducibility. For every individual, 3D photographs were captured at two different time points (baseline T0 and one week later T1. Using two different registration methods, the reproducibility of the methods was analyzed. Furthermore, the differences between 3D photos of men and women were compared in a distance map as a first clinical pilot testing our registration method.The absolute mean registration error for the complete hand was 1.46 mm. This reduced to an error of 0.56 mm isolating the region to the palm of the hand. When comparing hands of both sexes, it was seen that the male hand was larger (broader base and longer fingers than the female hand.This study shows that 3D stereophotogrammetry can produce reproducible images of the hand without harmful side effects for the patient, so proving to be a reliable method for soft tissue analysis. Its potential use in everyday practice of hand surgery needs to be further explored.

  13. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) Level 3 Package: Qualitative Models, Version 1, Release 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouiya, Claudine; Keating, Sarah M; Berenguier, Duncan; Naldi, Aurélien; Thieffry, Denis; van Iersel, Martijn P; Le Novère, Nicolas; Helikar, Tomáš

    2015-09-04

    Quantitative methods for modelling biological networks require an in-depth knowledge of the biochemical reactions and their stoichiometric and kinetic parameters. In many practical cases, this knowledge is missing. This has led to the development of several qualitative modelling methods using information such as, for example, gene expression data coming from functional genomic experiments. The SBML Level 3 Version 1 Core specification does not provide a mechanism for explicitly encoding qualitative models, but it does provide a mechanism for SBML packages to extend the Core specification and add additional syntactical constructs. The SBML Qualitative Models package for SBML Level 3 adds features so that qualitative models can be directly and explicitly encoded. The approach taken in this package is essentially based on the definition of regulatory or influence graphs. The SBML Qualitative Models package defines the structure and syntax necessary to describe qualitative models that associate discrete levels of activities with entity pools and the transitions between states that describe the processes involved. This is particularly suited to logical models (Boolean or multi-valued) and some classes of Petri net models can be encoded with the approach.

  14. From Peer-Reviewed to Peer-Reproduced in Scholarly Publishing: The Complementary Roles of Data Models and Workflows in Bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Beltrán, Alejandra; Li, Peter; Zhao, Jun; Avila-Garcia, Maria Susana; Roos, Marco; Thompson, Mark; van der Horst, Eelke; Kaliyaperumal, Rajaram; Luo, Ruibang; Lee, Tin-Lap; Lam, Tak-Wah; Edmunds, Scott C; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Rocca-Serra, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Reproducing the results from a scientific paper can be challenging due to the absence of data and the computational tools required for their analysis. In addition, details relating to the procedures used to obtain the published results can be difficult to discern due to the use of natural language when reporting how experiments have been performed. The Investigation/Study/Assay (ISA), Nanopublications (NP), and Research Objects (RO) models are conceptual data modelling frameworks that can structure such information from scientific papers. Computational workflow platforms can also be used to reproduce analyses of data in a principled manner. We assessed the extent by which ISA, NP, and RO models, together with the Galaxy workflow system, can capture the experimental processes and reproduce the findings of a previously published paper reporting on the development of SOAPdenovo2, a de novo genome assembler. Executable workflows were developed using Galaxy, which reproduced results that were consistent with the published findings. A structured representation of the information in the SOAPdenovo2 paper was produced by combining the use of ISA, NP, and RO models. By structuring the information in the published paper using these data and scientific workflow modelling frameworks, it was possible to explicitly declare elements of experimental design, variables, and findings. The models served as guides in the curation of scientific information and this led to the identification of inconsistencies in the original published paper, thereby allowing its authors to publish corrections in the form of an errata. SOAPdenovo2 scripts, data, and results are available through the GigaScience Database: http://dx.doi.org/10.5524/100044; the workflows are available from GigaGalaxy: http://galaxy.cbiit.cuhk.edu.hk; and the representations using the ISA, NP, and RO models are available through the SOAPdenovo2 case study website http://isa-tools.github.io/soapdenovo2/. philippe

  15. An Integrated Qualitative and Quantitative Biochemical Model Learning Framework Using Evolutionary Strategy and Simulated Annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zujian; Pang, Wei; Coghill, George M

    2015-01-01

    Both qualitative and quantitative model learning frameworks for biochemical systems have been studied in computational systems biology. In this research, after introducing two forms of pre-defined component patterns to represent biochemical models, we propose an integrative qualitative and quantitative modelling framework for inferring biochemical systems. In the proposed framework, interactions between reactants in the candidate models for a target biochemical system are evolved and eventually identified by the application of a qualitative model learning approach with an evolution strategy. Kinetic rates of the models generated from qualitative model learning are then further optimised by employing a quantitative approach with simulated annealing. Experimental results indicate that our proposed integrative framework is feasible to learn the relationships between biochemical reactants qualitatively and to make the model replicate the behaviours of the target system by optimising the kinetic rates quantitatively. Moreover, potential reactants of a target biochemical system can be discovered by hypothesising complex reactants in the synthetic models. Based on the biochemical models learned from the proposed framework, biologists can further perform experimental study in wet laboratory. In this way, natural biochemical systems can be better understood.

  16. Reproducibility study of [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} uptake in murine models of human tumor xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Edwin; Liu, Shuangdong; Chin, Frederick; Cheng, Zhen [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Gowrishankar, Gayatri; Yaghoubi, Shahriar [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Wedgeworth, James Patrick [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Berndorff, Dietmar; Gekeler, Volker [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Global Drug Discovery, Berlin (Germany); Gambhir, Sanjiv S. [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Nuclear Medicine, Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2011-04-15

    An {sup 18}F-labeled PEGylated arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) dimer [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} has been used to image tumor {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin levels in preclinical and clinical studies. Serial positron emission tomography (PET) studies may be useful for monitoring antiangiogenic therapy response or for drug screening; however, the reproducibility of serial scans has not been determined for this PET probe. The purpose of this study was to determine the reproducibility of the integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-targeted PET probe, [{sup 18}F ]FPP(RGD){sub 2} using small animal PET. Human HCT116 colon cancer xenografts were implanted into nude mice (n = 12) in the breast and scapular region and grown to mean diameters of 5-15 mm for approximately 2.5 weeks. A 3-min acquisition was performed on a small animal PET scanner approximately 1 h after administration of [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} (1.9-3.8 MBq, 50-100 {mu}Ci) via the tail vein. A second small animal PET scan was performed approximately 6 h later after reinjection of the probe to assess for reproducibility. Images were analyzed by drawing an ellipsoidal region of interest (ROI) around the tumor xenograft activity. Percentage injected dose per gram (%ID/g) values were calculated from the mean or maximum activity in the ROIs. Coefficients of variation and differences in %ID/g values between studies from the same day were calculated to determine the reproducibility. The coefficient of variation (mean {+-}SD) for %ID{sub mean}/g and %ID{sub max}/g values between [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} small animal PET scans performed 6 h apart on the same day were 11.1 {+-} 7.6% and 10.4 {+-} 9.3%, respectively. The corresponding differences in %ID{sub mean}/g and %ID{sub max}/g values between scans were -0.025 {+-} 0.067 and -0.039 {+-} 0.426. Immunofluorescence studies revealed a direct relationship between extent of {alpha}{sub {nu}}{beta}{sub 3} integrin expression in tumors and tumor vasculature

  17. CONFIG - Adapting qualitative modeling and discrete event simulation for design of fault management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jane T.; Basham, Bryan D.

    1989-01-01

    CONFIG is a modeling and simulation tool prototype for analyzing the normal and faulty qualitative behaviors of engineered systems. Qualitative modeling and discrete-event simulation have been adapted and integrated, to support early development, during system design, of software and procedures for management of failures, especially in diagnostic expert systems. Qualitative component models are defined in terms of normal and faulty modes and processes, which are defined by invocation statements and effect statements with time delays. System models are constructed graphically by using instances of components and relations from object-oriented hierarchical model libraries. Extension and reuse of CONFIG models and analysis capabilities in hybrid rule- and model-based expert fault-management support systems are discussed.

  18. A right to reproduce?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Muireann

    2010-10-01

    How should we conceive of a right to reproduce? And, morally speaking, what might be said to justify such a right? These are just two questions of interest that are raised by the technologies of assisted reproduction. This paper analyses the possible legitimate grounds for a right to reproduce within the two main theories of rights; interest theory and choice theory.

  19. Magni Reproducibility Example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    An example of how to use the magni.reproducibility package for storing metadata along with results from a computational experiment. The example is based on simulating the Mandelbrot set.......An example of how to use the magni.reproducibility package for storing metadata along with results from a computational experiment. The example is based on simulating the Mandelbrot set....

  20. Long-term stability, reproducibility, and statistical sensitivity of a telemetry-instrumented dog model: A 27-month longitudinal assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Ryan M; Ng, Khing Jow; Chi, Liguo; Jin, Xidong; Reinhart, Glenn A

    2015-01-01

    ICH guidelines, as well as best-practice and ethical considerations, provide strong rationale for use of telemetry-instrumented dog colonies for cardiovascular safety assessment. However, few studies have investigated the long-term stability of cardiovascular function at baseline, reproducibility in response to pharmacologic challenge, and maintenance of statistical sensitivity to define the usable life of the colony. These questions were addressed in 3 identical studies spanning 27months and were performed in the same colony of dogs. Telemetry-instrumented dogs (n=4) received a single dose of dl-sotalol (10mg/kg, p.o.), a β1 adrenergic and IKr blocker, or vehicle, in 3 separate studies spanning 27months. Systemic hemodynamics, cardiovascular function, and ECG parameters were monitored for 18h post-dose; plasma drug concentrations (Cp) were measured at 1, 3, 5, and 24h post-dose. Baseline hemodynamic/ECG values were consistent across the 27-month study with the exception of modest age-dependent decreases in heart rate and the corresponding QT-interval. dl-Sotalol elicited highly reproducible effects in each study. Reductions in heart rate after dl-sotalol treatment ranged between -22 and -32 beats/min, and slight differences in magnitude could be ascribed to variability in dl-sotalol Cp (range=3230-5087ng/mL); dl-sotalol also reduced LV-dP/dtmax 13-22%. dl-Sotalol increased the slope of the PR-RR relationship suggesting inhibition of AV-conduction. Increases in the heart-rate corrected QT-interval were not significantly different across the 3 studies and results of a power analysis demonstrated that the detection limit for QTc values was not diminished throughout the 27month period and across a range of power assumptions despite modest, age-dependent changes in heart rate. These results demonstrate the long-term stability of a telemetry dog colony as evidenced by a stability of baseline values, consistently reproducible response to pharmacologic challenge and no

  1. Measurement of cerebral blood flow by intravenous xenon-133 technique and a mobile system. Reproducibility using the Obrist model compared to total curve analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Holstein, P; Lassen, N A

    1986-01-01

    and side-to-side asymmetry. Data were analysed according to the Obrist model and the results compared with those obtained using a model correcting for the air passage artifact. Reproducibility was of the same order of magnitude as reported using stationary equipment. The side-to-side CBF asymmetry...... differences, but in low flow situations the artifact model yielded significantly more stable results. The present apparatus, equipped with 3-5 detectors covering each hemisphere, offers the opportunity of performing serial CBF measurements in situations not otherwise feasible....

  2. Oxygen distribution in tumors: A qualitative analysis and modeling study providing a novel Monte Carlo approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerlöf, Jakob H., E-mail: Jakob@radfys.gu.se [Department of Radiation Physics, Göteborg University, Göteborg 41345 (Sweden); Kindblom, Jon [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg 41345 (Sweden); Bernhardt, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, Göteborg University, Göteborg 41345, Sweden and Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg 41345 (Sweden)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To construct a Monte Carlo (MC)-based simulation model for analyzing the dependence of tumor oxygen distribution on different variables related to tumor vasculature [blood velocity, vessel-to-vessel proximity (vessel proximity), and inflowing oxygen partial pressure (pO{sub 2})]. Methods: A voxel-based tissue model containing parallel capillaries with square cross-sections (sides of 10 μm) was constructed. Green's function was used for diffusion calculations and Michaelis-Menten's kinetics to manage oxygen consumption. The model was tuned to approximately reproduce the oxygenational status of a renal carcinoma; the depth oxygenation curves (DOC) were fitted with an analytical expression to facilitate rapid MC simulations of tumor oxygen distribution. DOCs were simulated with three variables at three settings each (blood velocity, vessel proximity, and inflowing pO{sub 2}), which resulted in 27 combinations of conditions. To create a model that simulated variable oxygen distributions, the oxygen tension at a specific point was randomly sampled with trilinear interpolation in the dataset from the first simulation. Six correlations between blood velocity, vessel proximity, and inflowing pO{sub 2} were hypothesized. Variable models with correlated parameters were compared to each other and to a nonvariable, DOC-based model to evaluate the differences in simulated oxygen distributions and tumor radiosensitivities for different tumor sizes. Results: For tumors with radii ranging from 5 to 30 mm, the nonvariable DOC model tended to generate normal or log-normal oxygen distributions, with a cut-off at zero. The pO{sub 2} distributions simulated with the six-variable DOC models were quite different from the distributions generated with the nonvariable DOC model; in the former case the variable models simulated oxygen distributions that were more similar to in vivo results found in the literature. For larger tumors, the oxygen distributions became

  3. Evaluating quantitative and qualitative models: an application for nationwide water erosion assessment in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, B.G.J.S.; Keyzer, M.A.; Stroosnijder, L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper tests the candidacy of one qualitative response model and two quantitative models for a nationwide water erosion hazard assessment in Ethiopia. After a descriptive comparison of model characteristics the study conducts a statistical comparison to evaluate the explanatory power of the mode

  4. Evaluating quantitative and qualitative models: an application for nationwide water erosion assessment in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, B.G.J.S.; Keyzer, M.A.; Stroosnijder, L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper tests the candidacy of one qualitative response model and two quantitative models for a nationwide water erosion hazard assessment in Ethiopia. After a descriptive comparison of model characteristics the study conducts a statistical comparison to evaluate the explanatory power of the mode

  5. Evaluating quantitative and qualitative models: an application for nationwide water erosion assessment in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, B.G.J.S.; Keyzer, M.A.; Stroosnijder, L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper tests the candidacy of one qualitative response model and two quantitative models for a nationwide water erosion hazard assessment in Ethiopia. After a descriptive comparison of model characteristics the study conducts a statistical comparison to evaluate the explanatory power of the

  6. AI/OR computational model for integrating qualitative and quantitative design methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agogino, Alice M.; Bradley, Stephen R.; Cagan, Jonathan; Jain, Pramod; Michelena, Nestor

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical framework for integrating qualitative and numerical computational methods for optimally-directed design is described. The theory is presented as a computational model and features of implementations are summarized where appropriate. To demonstrate the versatility of the methodology we focus on four seemingly disparate aspects of the design process and their interaction: (1) conceptual design, (2) qualitative optimal design, (3) design innovation, and (4) numerical global optimization.

  7. Qualitative mathematics for the social sciences mathematical models for research on cultural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rudolph, Lee

    2012-01-01

    In this book Lee Rudolph brings together international contributors who combine psychological and mathematical perspectives to analyse how qualitative mathematics can be used to create models of social and psychological processes. Bridging the gap between the fields with an imaginative and stimulating collection of contributed chapters, the volume updates the current research on the subject, which until now has been rather limited, focussing largely on the use of statistics. Qualitative Mathematics for the Social Sciences contains a variety of useful illustrative figures, in

  8. AI/OR computational model for integrating qualitative and quantitative design methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agogino, Alice M.; Bradley, Stephen R.; Cagan, Jonathan; Jain, Pramod; Michelena, Nestor

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical framework for integrating qualitative and numerical computational methods for optimally-directed design is described. The theory is presented as a computational model and features of implementations are summarized where appropriate. To demonstrate the versatility of the methodology we focus on four seemingly disparate aspects of the design process and their interaction: (1) conceptual design, (2) qualitative optimal design, (3) design innovation, and (4) numerical global optimization.

  9. Towards Reproducibility in Computational Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Christopher; Wagener, Thorsten; Freer, Jim; Han, Dawei

    2016-04-01

    The ability to reproduce published scientific findings is a foundational principle of scientific research. Independent observation helps to verify the legitimacy of individual findings; build upon sound observations so that we can evolve hypotheses (and models) of how catchments function; and move them from specific circumstances to more general theory. The rise of computational research has brought increased focus on the issue of reproducibility across the broader scientific literature. This is because publications based on computational research typically do not contain sufficient information to enable the results to be reproduced, and therefore verified. Given the rise of computational analysis in hydrology over the past 30 years, to what extent is reproducibility, or a lack thereof, a problem in hydrology? Whilst much hydrological code is accessible, the actual code and workflow that produced and therefore documents the provenance of published scientific findings, is rarely available. We argue that in order to advance and make more robust the process of hypothesis testing and knowledge creation within the computational hydrological community, we need to build on from existing open data initiatives and adopt common standards and infrastructures to: first make code re-useable and easy to find through consistent use of metadata; second, publish well documented workflows that combine re-useable code together with data to enable published scientific findings to be reproduced; finally, use unique persistent identifiers (e.g. DOIs) to reference re-useable and reproducible code, thereby clearly showing the provenance of published scientific findings. Whilst extra effort is require to make work reproducible, there are benefits to both the individual and the broader community in doing so, which will improve the credibility of the science in the face of the need for societies to adapt to changing hydrological environments.

  10. Automated Techniques for the Qualitative Analysis of Ecological Models: Continuous Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn van Coller

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The mathematics required for a detailed analysis of the behavior of a model can be formidable. In this paper, I demonstrate how various computer packages can aid qualitative analyses by implementing techniques from dynamical systems theory. Because computer software is used to obtain the results, the techniques can be used by nonmathematicians as well as mathematicians. In-depth analyses of complicated models that were previously very difficult to study can now be done. Because the paper is intended as an introduction to applying the techniques to ecological models, I have included an appendix describing some of the ideas and terminology. A second appendix shows how the techniques can be applied to a fairly simple predator-prey model and establishes the reliability of the computer software. The main body of the paper discusses a ratio-dependent model. The new techniques highlight some limitations of isocline analyses in this three-dimensional setting and show that the model is structurally unstable. Another appendix describes a larger model of a sheep-pasture-hyrax-lynx system. Dynamical systems techniques are compared with a traditional sensitivity analysis and are found to give more information. As a result, an incomplete relationship in the model is highlighted. I also discuss the resilience of these models to both parameter and population perturbations.

  11. Reproducible Research in Speech Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandaacute;lmandaacute;n Abari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Reproducible research is the minimum standard of scientific claims in cases when independent replication proves to be difficult. With the special combination of available software tools, we provide a reproducibility recipe for the experimental research conducted in some fields of speech sciences. We have based our model on the triad of the R environment, the EMU-format speech database, and the executable publication. We present the use of three typesetting systems (LaTeX, Markdown, Org, with the help of a mini research.

  12. Reproducibility in Seismic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Verdejo O.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the field of exploration seismology, there is interest at national level of integrating reproducibility in applied, educational and research activities related to seismic processing and imaging. This reproducibility implies the description and organization of the elements involved in numerical experiments. Thus, a researcher, teacher or student can study, verify, repeat, and modify them independently. In this work, we document and adapt reproducibility in seismic processing and imaging to spread this concept and its benefits, and to encourage the use of open source software in this area within our academic and professional environment. We present an enhanced seismic imaging example, of interest in both academic and professional environments, using Mexican seismic data. As a result of this research, we prove that it is possible to assimilate, adapt and transfer technology at low cost, using open source software and following a reproducible research scheme.

  13. Three-dimensional surgical modelling with an open-source software protocol: study of precision and reproducibility in mandibular reconstruction with the fibula free flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganry, L; Quilichini, J; Bandini, C M; Leyder, P; Hersant, B; Meningaud, J P

    2017-08-01

    Very few surgical teams currently use totally independent and free solutions to perform three-dimensional (3D) surgical modelling for osseous free flaps in reconstructive surgery. This study assessed the precision and technical reproducibility of a 3D surgical modelling protocol using free open-source software in mandibular reconstruction with fibula free flaps and surgical guides. Precision was assessed through comparisons of the 3D surgical guide to the sterilized 3D-printed guide, determining accuracy to the millimetre level. Reproducibility was assessed in three surgical cases by volumetric comparison to the millimetre level. For the 3D surgical modelling, a difference of less than 0.1mm was observed. Almost no deformations (modelling was between 0.1mm and 0.4mm, and the average precision of the complete reconstructed mandible was less than 1mm. The open-source software protocol demonstrated high accuracy without complications. However, the precision of the surgical case depends on the surgeon's 3D surgical modelling. Therefore, surgeons need training on the use of this protocol before applying it to surgical cases; this constitutes a limitation. Further studies should address the transfer of expertise. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cocaine addiction related reproducible brain regions of abnormal default-mode network functional connectivity: a group ICA study with different model orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaoyu; Lee, Seong-Whan

    2013-08-26

    Model order selection in group independent component analysis (ICA) has a significant effect on the obtained components. This study investigated the reproducible brain regions of abnormal default-mode network (DMN) functional connectivity related with cocaine addiction through different model order settings in group ICA. Resting-state fMRI data from 24 cocaine addicts and 24 healthy controls were temporally concatenated and processed by group ICA using model orders of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50, respectively. For each model order, the group ICA approach was repeated 100 times using the ICASSO toolbox and after clustering the obtained components, centrotype-based anterior and posterior DMN components were selected for further analysis. Individual DMN components were obtained through back-reconstruction and converted to z-score maps. A whole brain mixed effects factorial ANOVA was performed to explore the differences in resting-state DMN functional connectivity between cocaine addicts and healthy controls. The hippocampus, which showed decreased functional connectivity in cocaine addicts for all the tested model orders, might be considered as a reproducible abnormal region in DMN associated with cocaine addiction. This finding suggests that using group ICA to examine the functional connectivity of the hippocampus in the resting-state DMN may provide an additional insight potentially relevant for cocaine-related diagnoses and treatments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Spatial-temporal reproducibility assessment of global seasonal forecasting system version 5 model for Dam Inflow forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, S.; Suh, A. S.; Soohee, H.

    2016-12-01

    The GloSea5(Global Seasonal forecasting system version 5) is provided and operated by the KMA(Korea Meteorological Administration). GloSea5 provides Forecast(FCST) and Hindcast(HCST) data and its horizontal resolution is about 60km (0.83° x 0.56°) in the mid-latitudes. In order to use this data in watershed-scale water management, GloSea5 needs spatial-temporal downscaling. As such, statistical downscaling was used to correct for systematic biases of variables and to improve data reliability. HCST data is provided in ensemble format, and the highest statistical correlation(R2 = 0.60, RMSE = 88.92, NSE = 0.57) of ensemble precipitation was reported for the Yongdam Dam watershed on the #6 grid. Additionally, the original GloSea5(600.1mm) showed the greatest difference(-26.5%) compared to observations(816.1mm) during the summer flood season. However, downscaled GloSea5 was shown to have only a ?3.1% error rate. Most of the underestimated results corresponded to precipitation levels during the flood season and the downscaled GloSea5 showed important results of restoration in precipitation levels. Per the analysis results of spatial autocorrelation using seasonal Moran's I, the spatial distribution was shown to be statistically significant. These results can improve the uncertainty of original GloSea5 and substantiate its spatial-temporal accuracy and validity. The spatial-temporal reproducibility assessment will play a very important role as basic data for watershed-scale water management.

  16. The Proximal Medial Sural Nerve Biopsy Model: A Standardised and Reproducible Baseline Clinical Model for the Translational Evaluation of Bioengineered Nerve Guides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Bozkurt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous nerve transplantation (ANT is the clinical gold standard for the reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects. A large number of bioengineered nerve guides have been tested under laboratory conditions as an alternative to the ANT. The step from experimental studies to the implementation of the device in the clinical setting is often substantial and the outcome is unpredictable. This is mainly linked to the heterogeneity of clinical peripheral nerve injuries, which is very different from standardized animal studies. In search of a reproducible human model for the implantation of bioengineered nerve guides, we propose the reconstruction of sural nerve defects after routine nerve biopsy as a first or baseline study. Our concept uses the medial sural nerve of patients undergoing diagnostic nerve biopsy (≥2 cm. The biopsy-induced nerve gap was immediately reconstructed by implantation of the novel microstructured nerve guide, Neuromaix, as part of an ongoing first-in-human study. Here we present (i a detailed list of inclusion and exclusion criteria, (ii a detailed description of the surgical procedure, and (iii a follow-up concept with multimodal sensory evaluation techniques. The proximal medial sural nerve biopsy model can serve as a preliminarynature of the injuries or baseline nerve lesion model. In a subsequent step, newly developed nerve guides could be tested in more unpredictable and challenging clinical peripheral nerve lesions (e.g., following trauma which have reduced comparability due to the different nature of the injuries (e.g., site of injury and length of nerve gap.

  17. Geographic Expansion Strategic Model in Iran: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Yazdani

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: For promotion of community health and improvement of the national and international position of Iran’s medical universities and HE centers, policymakers should consider the diverse factors that influence HE expansion in our developed model.

  18. Representing and managing uncertainty in qualitative ecological models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuttle, T.; Bredeweg, B.; Salles, P.; Neumann, M.

    2009-01-01

    Ecologists and decision makers need ways to understand systems, test ideas, and make predictions and explanations about systems. However, uncertainty about causes and effects of processes and parameter values is pervasive in models of ecological systems. Uncertainty associated with incomplete

  19. Whole-body skeletal imaging in mice utilizing microPET: optimization of reproducibility and applications in animal models of bone disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Frank [The Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California School of Medicine, 700 Westwood Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich (Germany); Lee, Yu-Po; Lieberman, Jay R. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Loening, Andreas M.; Chatziioannou, Arion [The Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California School of Medicine, 700 Westwood Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Freedland, Stephen J.; Belldegrun, Arie S. [Department of Urology, University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Leahy, Richard [University of Southern California School of Bioengineering, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sawyers, Charles L. [Department of Medicine, University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Gambhir, Sanjiv S. [The Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California School of Medicine, 700 Westwood Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA-Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Biomathematics, University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2002-09-01

    The aims were to optimize reproducibility and establish [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion bone scanning in mice, using a dedicated small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner (microPET) and to correlate functional findings with anatomical imaging using computed tomography (microCAT). Optimal tracer uptake time for [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion was determined by performing dynamic microPET scans. Quantitative reproducibility was measured using region of interest (ROI)-based counts normalized to (a) the injected dose, (b) integral of the heart time-activity curve, or (c) ROI over the whole skeleton. Bone lesions were repetitively imaged. Functional images were correlated with X-ray and microCAT. The plateau of [{sup 18}F]fluoride uptake occurs 60 min after injection. The highest reproducibility was achieved by normalizing to an ROI over the whole skeleton, with a mean percent coefficient of variation [(SD/mean) x 100] of <15%-20%. Benign and malignant bone lesions were successfully repetitively imaged. Preliminary correlation of microPET with microCAT demonstrated the high sensitivity of microPET and the ability of microCAT to detect small osteolytic lesions. Whole-body [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion bone imaging using microPET is reproducible and can be used to serially monitor normal and pathological changes to the mouse skeleton. Morphological imaging with microCAT is useful to display correlative changes in anatomy. Detailed in vivo studies of the murine skeleton in various small animal models of bone diseases should now be possible. (orig.)

  20. A Proposed Model of Retransformed Qualitative Data within a Mixed Methods Research Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Most models of mixed methods research design provide equal emphasis of qualitative and quantitative data analyses and interpretation. Other models stress one method more than the other. The present article is a discourse about the investigator's decision to employ a mixed method design to examine special education teachers' advocacy and…

  1. A Proposed Model of Retransformed Qualitative Data within a Mixed Methods Research Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Most models of mixed methods research design provide equal emphasis of qualitative and quantitative data analyses and interpretation. Other models stress one method more than the other. The present article is a discourse about the investigator's decision to employ a mixed method design to examine special education teachers' advocacy and…

  2. Applications of abduction: hypothesis testing of neuroendocrinological qualitative compartmental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, T; Compton, P

    1997-06-01

    It is difficult to assess hypothetical models in poorly measured domains such as neuroendocrinology. Without a large library of observations to constrain inference, the execution of such incomplete models implies making assumptions. Mutually exclusive assumptions must be kept in separate worlds. We define a general abductive multiple-worlds engine that assesses such models by (i) generating the worlds and (ii) tests if these worlds contain known behaviour. World generation is constrained via the use of relevant envisionment. We describe QCM, a modeling language for compartmental models that can be processed by this inference engine. This tool has been used to find faults in theories published in international refereed journals; i.e. QCM can detect faults which are invisible to other methods. The generality and computational limits of this approach are discussed. In short, this approach is applicable to any representation that can be compiled into an and-or graph, provided the graphs are not too big or too intricate (fanout < 7).

  3. A Method for Inducing Process Models from Qualitative Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildemuth, Barbara M.

    1990-01-01

    Describes a method for inducing a theoretical model of a series of events that occur in an ongoing process. A data analysis method that transforms narrative data into event histories is explained, a spreadsheet display that compares event histories is described, and future research is suggested. (17 references) (LRW)

  4. Qualitative Analysis for Rheodynamic Model of Cardiac Pressure Pulsations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-cong Liu; Bei-ye Feng

    2004-01-01

    In this paper,we give a rigorous mathematical and complete parameter analysis for the rheodynamic model of cardiac and obtain the conditions and parameter region for global existence and uniqueness of limit cycle and the global bifurcation diagram of limit cycles.We also discuss the resonance phenomenons of the perturbed system.

  5. Can four-zero-texture mass matrix model reproduce the quark and lepton mixing angles and CP violating phases?

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuda, K; Matsuda, Koichi; Nishiura, Hiroyuki

    2006-01-01

    We reconsider an universal mass matrix model which has a seesaw-invariant structure with four-zero texture common to all quarks and leptons. The CKM quark and MNS lepton mixing matrices of the model are analyzed analytically.We show that the model can be consistent with all the experimental data of neutrino oscillation and quark mixings by tuning free parameters of the model. It is also shown that the model predicts a relatively large value for (1,3) element of the MNS lepton mixing matrix, |(U_{MNS})_{13}|^2 \\simeq 2.6 \\times 10^{-2}. Using the seesaw mechanism, we also discuss the conditions for the components of the Dirac and the right-handed Majorana neutrino mass matrices which lead to the neutrino mass matrix consistent with the experimental data.

  6. Unicriterion Model: A Qualitative Decision Making Method That Promotes Ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Guilherme Silvano Lobo Pimentel

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Management decision making methods frequently adopt quantitativemodels of several criteria that bypass the question of whysome criteria are considered more important than others, whichmakes more difficult the task of delivering a transparent viewof preference structure priorities that might promote ethics andlearning and serve as a basis for future decisions. To tackle thisparticular shortcoming of usual methods, an alternative qualitativemethodology of aggregating preferences based on the rankingof criteria is proposed. Such an approach delivers a simpleand transparent model for the solution of each preference conflictfaced during the management decision making process. Themethod proceeds by breaking the decision problem into ‘two criteria– two alternatives’ scenarios, and translating the problem ofchoice between alternatives to a problem of choice between criteriawhenever appropriate. The unicriterion model method is illustratedby its application in a car purchase and a house purchasedecision problem.

  7. Assessment of a numerical model to reproduce event‐scale erosion and deposition distributions in a braided river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measures, R.; Hicks, D. M.; Brasington, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerical morphological modeling of braided rivers, using a physics‐based approach, is increasingly used as a technique to explore controls on river pattern and, from an applied perspective, to simulate the impact of channel modifications. This paper assesses a depth‐averaged nonuniform sediment model (Delft3D) to predict the morphodynamics of a 2.5 km long reach of the braided Rees River, New Zealand, during a single high‐flow event. Evaluation of model performance primarily focused upon using high‐resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of Difference, derived from a fusion of terrestrial laser scanning and optical empirical bathymetric mapping, to compare observed and predicted patterns of erosion and deposition and reach‐scale sediment budgets. For the calibrated model, this was supplemented with planform metrics (e.g., braiding intensity). Extensive sensitivity analysis of model functions and parameters was executed, including consideration of numerical scheme for bed load component calculations, hydraulics, bed composition, bed load transport and bed slope effects, bank erosion, and frequency of calculations. Total predicted volumes of erosion and deposition corresponded well to those observed. The difference between predicted and observed volumes of erosion was less than the factor of two that characterizes the accuracy of the Gaeuman et al. bed load transport formula. Grain size distributions were best represented using two φ intervals. For unsteady flows, results were sensitive to the morphological time scale factor. The approach of comparing observed and predicted morphological sediment budgets shows the value of using natural experiment data sets for model testing. Sensitivity results are transferable to guide Delft3D applications to other rivers. PMID:27708477

  8. Assessment of a numerical model to reproduce event-scale erosion and deposition distributions in a braided river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R D; Measures, R; Hicks, D M; Brasington, J

    2016-08-01

    Numerical morphological modeling of braided rivers, using a physics-based approach, is increasingly used as a technique to explore controls on river pattern and, from an applied perspective, to simulate the impact of channel modifications. This paper assesses a depth-averaged nonuniform sediment model (Delft3D) to predict the morphodynamics of a 2.5 km long reach of the braided Rees River, New Zealand, during a single high-flow event. Evaluation of model performance primarily focused upon using high-resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of Difference, derived from a fusion of terrestrial laser scanning and optical empirical bathymetric mapping, to compare observed and predicted patterns of erosion and deposition and reach-scale sediment budgets. For the calibrated model, this was supplemented with planform metrics (e.g., braiding intensity). Extensive sensitivity analysis of model functions and parameters was executed, including consideration of numerical scheme for bed load component calculations, hydraulics, bed composition, bed load transport and bed slope effects, bank erosion, and frequency of calculations. Total predicted volumes of erosion and deposition corresponded well to those observed. The difference between predicted and observed volumes of erosion was less than the factor of two that characterizes the accuracy of the Gaeuman et al. bed load transport formula. Grain size distributions were best represented using two φ intervals. For unsteady flows, results were sensitive to the morphological time scale factor. The approach of comparing observed and predicted morphological sediment budgets shows the value of using natural experiment data sets for model testing. Sensitivity results are transferable to guide Delft3D applications to other rivers.

  9. Competing species system as a qualitative model of radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendykier, Jacek; Bieniasiewicz, Marcin; Lipowski, Adam; Pawlak, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    To examine complex features of tumor dynamics we analyze a competing-species lattice model that takes into account the competition for nutrients or space as well as interaction with therapeutic factors such as drugs or radiation. Our model might be interpreted as a certain prey-predator system having three trophic layers: (i) the basal species that might be interpreted as nutrients; (ii) normal and tumor cells that consume nutrients, and (iii) therapeutic factors that might kill either nutrient, normal or tumor cells. Using a wide spectrum of parameters we examined survival of our species and tried to identify the corresponding dynamical regimes. It was found that the radiotherapy influences mainly the limit of starvation i.e. the value of an update probability where the tumor cells go extinct as a result of insufficient nutrient supply and competition with normal cells. The other limiting value of this probability, corresponding to the coexistence of the normal and tumor cells in abundance of nutrients, is almost not affected by radiotherapy. We have also found the coexistence of all species on the phase diagrams.

  10. An integrated qualitative and quantitative modeling framework for computer‐assisted HAZOP studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jing; Zhang, Laibin; Hu, Jinqiu

    2014-01-01

    and validated on a case study concerning a three‐phase separation process. The multilevel flow modeling (MFM) methodology is used to represent the plant goals and functions. First, means‐end analysis is used to identify and formulate the intention of the process design in terms of components, functions...... safety critical operations, its causes and consequences. The outcome is a qualitative hazard analysis of selected process deviations from normal operations and their consequences as input to a traditional HAZOP table. The list of unacceptable high risk deviations identified by the qualitative HAZOP...... analysis is used as input for rigorous analysis and evaluation by the quantitative analysis part of the framework. To this end, dynamic first‐principles modeling is used to simulate the system behavior and thereby complement the results of the qualitative analysis part. The practical framework for computer...

  11. The Qualitative and Numerical Analysis of the Cosmological Model Based on Phantom Scalar Field with Self

    CERN Document Server

    Ignat'ev, Yu G

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the asymptotic behavior of the cosmological model based on phantom scalar field on the ground of qualitative analysis of the system of the cosmological model's differential equations and show that as opposed to models with classical scalar field, such models have stable asymptotic solutions with constant value of the potential both in infinite past and infinite future. We also develop numerical models of the cosmological evolution models with phantom scalar field in this paper. {\\bf keywords}: cosmological model, phantom scalar field, quality analysis, asymptotic behavior, numerical simulation, numerical gravitation.\\\\ {\\bf PACS}: 04.20.Cv, 98.80.Cq, 96.50.S 52.27.Ny

  12. Downscaling SSPs in the GBM Delta - Integrating Science, Modelling and Stakeholders Through Qualitative and Quantitative Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Andrew; Barbour, Emily; Salehin, Mashfiqus; Munsur Rahman, Md.; Hutton, Craig; Lazar, Attila

    2016-04-01

    A downscaled scenario development process was adopted in the context of a project seeking to understand relationships between ecosystem services and human well-being in the Ganges-Brahmaputra delta. The aim was to link the concerns and priorities of relevant stakeholders with the integrated biophysical and poverty models used in the project. A 2-stage process was used to facilitate the connection between stakeholders concerns and available modelling capacity: the first to qualitatively describe what the future might look like in 2050; the second to translate these qualitative descriptions into the quantitative form required by the numerical models. An extended, modified SSP approach was adopted, with stakeholders downscaling issues identified through interviews as being priorities for the southwest of Bangladesh. Detailed qualitative futures were produced, before modellable elements were quantified in conjunction with an expert stakeholder cadre. Stakeholder input, using the methods adopted here, allows the top-down focus of the RCPs to be aligned with the bottom-up approach needed to make the SSPs appropriate at the more local scale, and also facilitates the translation of qualitative narrative scenarios into a quantitative form that lends itself to incorporation of biophysical and socio-economic indicators. The presentation will describe the downscaling process in detail, and conclude with findings regarding the importance of stakeholder involvement (and logistical considerations), balancing model capacity with expectations and recommendations on SSP refinement at local levels.

  13. Downscaling SSPs in Bangladesh - Integrating Science, Modelling and Stakeholders Through Qualitative and Quantitative Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, A.; Barbour, E.; Salehin, M.; Hutton, C.; Lázár, A. N.; Nicholls, R. J.; Rahman, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    A downscaled scenario development process was adopted in the context of a project seeking to understand relationships between ecosystem services and human well-being in the Ganges-Brahmaputra delta. The aim was to link the concerns and priorities of relevant stakeholders with the integrated biophysical and poverty models used in the project. A 2-stage process was used to facilitate the connection between stakeholders concerns and available modelling capacity: the first to qualitatively describe what the future might look like in 2050; the second to translate these qualitative descriptions into the quantitative form required by the numerical models. An extended, modified SSP approach was adopted, with stakeholders downscaling issues identified through interviews as being priorities for the southwest of Bangladesh. Detailed qualitative futures were produced, before modellable elements were quantified in conjunction with an expert stakeholder cadre. Stakeholder input, using the methods adopted here, allows the top-down focus of the RCPs to be aligned with the bottom-up approach needed to make the SSPs appropriate at the more local scale, and also facilitates the translation of qualitative narrative scenarios into a quantitative form that lends itself to incorporation of biophysical and socio-economic indicators. The presentation will describe the downscaling process in detail, and conclude with findings regarding the importance of stakeholder involvement (and logistical considerations), balancing model capacity with expectations and recommendations on SSP refinement at local levels.

  14. Attempting to train a digital human model to reproduce human subject reach capabilities in an ejection seat aircraft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zehner, G.F.; Hudson, J.A.; Oudenhuijzen, A.

    2006-01-01

    From 1997 through 2002, the Air Force Research Lab and TNO Defence, Security and Safety (Business Unit Human Factors) were involved in a series of tests to quantify the accuracy of five Human Modeling Systems (HMSs) in determining accommodation limits of ejection seat aircraft. The results of these

  15. How well can a convection-permitting climate model reproduce decadal statistics of precipitation, temperature and cloud characteristics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisson, Erwan; Van Weverberg, Kwinten; Demuzere, Matthias; Devis, Annemarie; Saeed, Sajjad; Stengel, Martin; van Lipzig, Nicole P. M.

    2016-11-01

    Convection-permitting climate model are promising tools for improved representation of extremes, but the number of regions for which these models have been evaluated are still rather limited to make robust conclusions. In addition, an integrated interpretation of near-surface characteristics (typically temperature and precipitation) together with cloud properties is limited. The objective of this paper is to comprehensively evaluate the performance of a `state-of-the-art' regional convection-permitting climate model for a mid-latitude coastal region with little orographic forcing. For this purpose, an 11-year integration with the COSMO-CLM model at Convection-Permitting Scale (CPS) using a grid spacing of 2.8 km was compared with in-situ and satellite-based observations of precipitation, temperature, cloud properties and radiation (both at the surface and the top of the atmosphere). CPS clearly improves the representation of precipitation, in especially the diurnal cycle, intensity and spatial distribution of hourly precipitation. Improvements in the representation of temperature are less obvious. In fact the CPS integration overestimates both low and high temperature extremes. The underlying cause for the overestimation of high temperature extremes was attributed to deficiencies in the cloud properties: The modelled cloud fraction is only 46 % whereas a cloud fraction of 65 % was observed. Surprisingly, the effect of this deficiency was less pronounced at the radiation balance at the top of the atmosphere due to a compensating error, in particular an overestimation of the reflectivity of clouds when they are present. Overall, a better representation of convective precipitation and a very good representation of the daily cycle in different cloud types were demonstrated. However, to overcome remaining deficiencies, additional efforts are necessary to improve cloud characteristics in CPS. This will be a challenging task due to compensating deficiencies that currently

  16. Autobiography and Anorexia: A Qualitative Alternative to Prochaska and DiClemente's Stages of Change Model

    OpenAIRE

    Félix Díaz; Natalia Solano Pinto; Irene Solbes

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we propose a qualitative approach to the study of the ways in which people face good and poor health issues. During the last 30 years, Prochaska and DiClemente's "trans-theoretical model" (1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1992) has gained relevance as a model to assess disposition for change in patients. We revise the features of the model and its common techniques to assess stages of change, underlining its methodological and conceptual problems. Particularly, we discuss the paradoxe...

  17. Gravitational wave background from Standard Model physics: qualitative features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghiglieri, J.; Laine, M. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Albert Einstein Center, University of Bern,Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2015-07-16

    Because of physical processes ranging from microscopic particle collisions to macroscopic hydrodynamic fluctuations, any plasma in thermal equilibrium emits gravitational waves. For the largest wavelengths the emission rate is proportional to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In the Standard Model at T>160 GeV, the shear viscosity is dominated by the most weakly interacting particles, right-handed leptons, and is relatively large. We estimate the order of magnitude of the corresponding spectrum of gravitational waves. Even though at small frequencies (corresponding to the sub-Hz range relevant for planned observatories such as eLISA) this background is tiny compared with that from non-equilibrium sources, the total energy carried by the high-frequency part of the spectrum is non-negligible if the production continues for a long time. We suggest that this may constrain (weakly) the highest temperature of the radiation epoch. Observing the high-frequency part directly sets a very ambitious goal for future generations of GHz-range detectors.

  18. Gravitational wave background from Standard Model physics: Qualitative features

    CERN Document Server

    Ghiglieri, J

    2015-01-01

    Because of physical processes ranging from microscopic particle collisions to macroscopic hydrodynamic fluctuations, any plasma in thermal equilibrium emits gravitational waves. For the largest wavelengths the emission rate is proportional to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In the Standard Model at T > 160 GeV, the shear viscosity is dominated by the most weakly interacting particles, right-handed leptons, and is relatively large. We estimate the order of magnitude of the corresponding spectrum of gravitational waves. Even though at small frequencies (corresponding to the sub-Hz range relevant for planned observatories such as eLISA) this background is tiny compared with that from non-equilibrium sources, the total energy carried by the high-frequency part of the spectrum is non-negligible if the production continues for a long time. We suggest that this may constrain (weakly) the highest temperature of the radiation epoch. Observing the high-frequency part directly sets a very ambitious goal for future ge...

  19. Teaching Qualitative Research for Human Services Students: A Three-Phase Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goussinsky, Ruhama; Reshef, Arie; Yanay-Ventura, Galit; Yassour-Borochowitz, Dalit

    2011-01-01

    Qualitative research is an inherent part of the human services profession, since it emphasizes the great and multifaceted complexity characterizing human experience and the sociocultural context in which humans act. In the department of human services at Emek Yezreel College, Israel, we have developed a three-phase model to ensure a relatively…

  20. Measurements of boat motion in waves at Durban harbour for qualitative validation of motion model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mosikare, OR

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available in Waves at Durban Harbour for Qualitative Validation of Motion Model O.R. Mosikare1,2, N.J. Theron1, W. Van der Molen 1 University of Pretoria, South Africa, 0001 2Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Meiring Naude Rd, Brummeria, 0001...

  1. A Qualitative Study of Parental Modeling and Social Support for Physical Activity in Underserved Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Marcie S.; Wilson, Dawn K.; Griffin, Sarah; Evans, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    This study obtained qualitative data to assess how parental role modeling and parental social support influence physical activity in underserved (minority, low-income) adolescents. Fifty-two adolescents (22 males, 30 females; ages 10-14 years, 85% African-American) participated in a focus group (6-10 per group, same gender). Focus groups were…

  2. A two-stage unsupervised learning algorithm reproduces multisensory enhancement in a neural network model of the corticotectal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasio, Thomas J; Patton, Paul E

    2003-07-30

    Multisensory enhancement (MSE) is the augmentation of the response to sensory stimulation of one modality by stimulation of a different modality. It has been described for multisensory neurons in the deep superior colliculus (DSC) of mammals, which function to detect, and direct orienting movements toward, the sources of stimulation (targets). MSE would seem to improve the ability of DSC neurons to detect targets, but many mammalian DSC neurons are unimodal. MSE requires descending input to DSC from certain regions of parietal cortex. Paradoxically, the descending projections necessary for MSE originate from unimodal cortical neurons. MSE, and the puzzling findings associated with it, can be simulated using a model of the corticotectal system. In the model, a network of DSC units receives primary sensory input that can be augmented by modulatory cortical input. Connection weights from primary and modulatory inputs are trained in stages one (Hebb) and two (Hebb-anti-Hebb), respectively, of an unsupervised two-stage algorithm. Two-stage training causes DSC units to extract information concerning simulated targets from their inputs. It also causes the DSC to develop a mixture of unimodal and multisensory units. The percentage of DSC multisensory units is determined by the proportion of cross-modal targets and by primary input ambiguity. Multisensory DSC units develop MSE, which depends on unimodal modulatory connections. Removal of the modulatory influence greatly reduces MSE but has little effect on DSC unit responses to stimuli of a single modality. The correspondence between model and data suggests that two-stage training captures important features of self-organization in the real corticotectal system.

  3. How to Conduct a Qualitative Program Evaluation in the Light of Eisner’s Educational Connoisseurship and Criticism Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Yüksel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe quantitative methodologies have been traditionally employed in the educational research so far. However, as long as with the appreciation and widespread use of the qualitative methodologies in many disciplines, many different educational areas have started to be examined in terms of qualitative research aspects. Particularly, the qualitative evaluation of the education programs has received considerable interest and there have been recently some attempts to develop a qualitative methodology for evaluating educational programs based upon the tenets of program evaluation. The evaluators have underlined the benefits of qualitative methods to boost the information shared with decision-makers and policy makers. The most inclusive endeavour has been carried out by Eisner. Eisner’s program evaluation model presents the role of educational connoisseurship and criticism in educational evaluation in terms of qualitative evaluation. This study aims at examining how a qualitative program evaluation is conducted in relation with the Eisner’s evaluation model.

  4. A first attempt to reproduce basaltic soil chronosequences using a process-based soil profile model: implications for our understanding of soil evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M.; Gloor, M.; Lloyd, J.

    2012-04-01

    Soils are complex systems which hold a wealth of information on both current and past conditions and many biogeochemical processes. The ability to model soil forming processes and predict soil properties will enable us to quantify such conditions and contribute to our understanding of long-term biogeochemical cycles, particularly the carbon cycle and plant nutrient cycles. However, attempts to confront such soil model predictions with data are rare, although increasingly more data from chronosquence studies is becoming available for such a purpose. Here we present initial results of an attempt to reproduce soil properties with a process-based soil evolution model similar to the model of Kirkby (1985, J. Soil Science). We specifically focus on the basaltic soils in both Hawaii and north Queensland, Australia. These soils are formed on a series of volcanic lava flows which provide sequences of different aged soils all with a relatively uniform parent material. These soil chronosequences provide a snapshot of a soil profile during different stages of development. Steep rainfall gradients in these regions also provide a system which allows us to test the model's ability to reproduce soil properties under differing climates. The mechanistic, soil evolution model presented here includes the major processes of soil formation such as i) mineral weathering, ii) percolation of rainfall through the soil, iii) leaching of solutes out of the soil profile iv) surface erosion and v) vegetation and biotic interactions. The model consists of a vertical profile and assumes simple geometry with a constantly sloping surface. The timescales of interest are on the order of tens to hundreds of thousand years. The specific properties the model predicts are, soil depth, the proportion of original elemental oxides remaining in each soil layer, pH of the soil solution, organic carbon distribution and CO2 production and concentration. The presentation will focus on a brief introduction of the

  5. Decadal Variability Shown by the Arctic Ocean Hydrochemical Data and Reproduced by an Ice-Ocean Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Ikeda; R. Colony; H. Yamaguchi; T. Ikeda

    2005-01-01

    The Arctic is experiencing a significant warming trend as well as a decadal oscillation. The atmospheric circulation represented by the Polar Vortex and the sea ice cover show decadal variabilities, while it has been difficult to reveal the decadal oscillation from the ocean interior. The recent distribution of Russian hydrochemical data collected from the Arctic Basin provides useful information on ocean interior variabilities. Silicate is used to provide the most valuable data for showing the boundary between the silicate-rich Pacific Water and the opposite Atlantic Water. Here, it is assumed that the silicate distribution receives minor influence from seasonal biological productivity and Siberian Rivers outflow. It shows a clear maximum around 100m depth in the Canada Basin, along with a vertical gradient below 100 m, which provides information on the vertical motion of the upper boundary of the Atlantic Water at a decadal time scale. The boundary shifts upward (downward), as realized by the silicate reduction (increase) at a fixed depth, responding to a more intense (weaker) Polar Vortex or a positive (negative) phase of the Arctic Oscillation. A coupled ice-ocean model is employed to reconstruct this decadal oscillation.

  6. Reproducibility of haemodynamical simulations in a subject-specific stented aneurysm model--a report on the Virtual Intracranial Stenting Challenge 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaelli, A G; Augsburger, L; Cebral, J R; Ohta, M; Rüfenacht, D A; Balossino, R; Benndorf, G; Hose, D R; Marzo, A; Metcalfe, R; Mortier, P; Mut, F; Reymond, P; Socci, L; Verhegghe, B; Frangi, A F

    2008-07-19

    This paper presents the results of the Virtual Intracranial Stenting Challenge (VISC) 2007, an international initiative whose aim was to establish the reproducibility of state-of-the-art haemodynamical simulation techniques in subject-specific stented models of intracranial aneurysms (IAs). IAs are pathological dilatations of the cerebral artery walls, which are associated with high mortality and morbidity rates due to subarachnoid haemorrhage following rupture. The deployment of a stent as flow diverter has recently been indicated as a promising treatment option, which has the potential to protect the aneurysm by reducing the action of haemodynamical forces and facilitating aneurysm thrombosis. The direct assessment of changes in aneurysm haemodynamics after stent deployment is hampered by limitations in existing imaging techniques and currently requires resorting to numerical simulations. Numerical simulations also have the potential to assist in the personalized selection of an optimal stent design prior to intervention. However, from the current literature it is difficult to assess the level of technological advancement and the reproducibility of haemodynamical predictions in stented patient-specific models. The VISC 2007 initiative engaged in the development of a multicentre-controlled benchmark to analyse differences induced by diverse grid generation and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technologies. The challenge also represented an opportunity to provide a survey of available technologies currently adopted by international teams from both academic and industrial institutions for constructing computational models of stented aneurysms. The results demonstrate the ability of current strategies in consistently quantifying the performance of three commercial intracranial stents, and contribute to reinforce the confidence in haemodynamical simulation, thus taking a step forward towards the introduction of simulation tools to support diagnostics and

  7. Accuracy and reproducibility of voxel based superimposition of cone beam computed tomography models on the anterior cranial base and the zygomatic arches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania M Nada

    Full Text Available Superimposition of serial Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT scans has become a valuable tool for three dimensional (3D assessment of treatment effects and stability. Voxel based image registration is a newly developed semi-automated technique for superimposition and comparison of two CBCT scans. The accuracy and reproducibility of CBCT superimposition on the anterior cranial base or the zygomatic arches using voxel based image registration was tested in this study. 16 pairs of 3D CBCT models were constructed from pre and post treatment CBCT scans of 16 adult dysgnathic patients. Each pair was registered on the anterior cranial base three times and on the left zygomatic arch twice. Following each superimposition, the mean absolute distances between the 2 models were calculated at 4 regions: anterior cranial base, forehead, left and right zygomatic arches. The mean distances between the models ranged from 0.2 to 0.37 mm (SD 0.08-0.16 for the anterior cranial base registration and from 0.2 to 0.45 mm (SD 0.09-0.27 for the zygomatic arch registration. The mean differences between the two registration zones ranged between 0.12 to 0.19 mm at the 4 regions. Voxel based image registration on both zones could be considered as an accurate and a reproducible method for CBCT superimposition. The left zygomatic arch could be used as a stable structure for the superimposition of smaller field of view CBCT scans where the anterior cranial base is not visible.

  8. A qualitative model of limiting factors for a salmon life cycle in the context of river rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noble, R.A.A.; Bredeweg, B.; Linnebank, F.; Salles, P.; Cowx, I.G.

    2009-01-01

    Qualitative Reasoning modelling has been promoted as a tool for formalising, integrating and exploring conceptual knowledge in ecological systems, such as river rehabilitation, which draw different information from multiple domains. A qualitative model was developed in Garp3 to capture and formalise

  9. A CFBPN Artificial Neural Network Model for Educational Qualitative Data Analyses: Example of Students' Attitudes Based on Kellerts' Typologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorek, Nurettin; Ugulu, Ilker

    2015-01-01

    In this study, artificial neural networks are suggested as a model that can be "trained" to yield qualitative results out of a huge amount of categorical data. It can be said that this is a new approach applied in educational qualitative data analysis. In this direction, a cascade-forward back-propagation neural network (CFBPN) model was…

  10. A flexible and qualitatively stable model for cell cycle dynamics including DNA damage effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Clark D; Johnson, Charles R; Zhou, Tong; Simpson, Dennis A; Kaufmann, William K

    2012-01-01

    This paper includes a conceptual framework for cell cycle modeling into which the experimenter can map observed data and evaluate mechanisms of cell cycle control. The basic model exhibits qualitative stability, meaning that regardless of magnitudes of system parameters its instances are guaranteed to be stable in the sense that all feasible trajectories converge to a certain trajectory. Qualitative stability can also be described by the signs of real parts of eigenvalues of the system matrix. On the biological side, the resulting model can be tuned to approximate experimental data pertaining to human fibroblast cell lines treated with ionizing radiation, with or without disabled DNA damage checkpoints. Together these properties validate a fundamental, first order systems view of cell dynamics. Classification Codes: 15A68.

  11. Adaptation and Validation of QUick, Easy, New, CHEap, and Reproducible (QUENCHER) Antioxidant Capacity Assays in Model Products Obtained from Residual Wine Pomace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pino-García, Raquel; García-Lomillo, Javier; Rivero-Pérez, María D; González-SanJosé, María L; Muñiz, Pilar

    2015-08-12

    Evaluation of the total antioxidant capacity of solid matrices without extraction steps is a very interesting alternative for food researchers and also for food industries. These methodologies have been denominated QUENCHER from QUick, Easy, New, CHEap, and Reproducible assays. To demonstrate and highlight the validity of QUENCHER (Q) methods, values of Q-method validation were showed for the first time, and they were tested with products of well-known different chemical properties. Furthermore, new QUENCHER assays to measure scavenging capacity against superoxide, hydroxyl, and lipid peroxyl radicals were developed. Calibration models showed good linearity (R(2) > 0.995), proportionality and precision (CV antioxidant capacity values significantly different from those obtained with water. The dilution of samples with powdered cellulose was discouraged because possible interferences with some of the matrices analyzed may take place.

  12. Reproducible ion-current-based approach for 24-plex comparison of the tissue proteomes of hibernating versus normal myocardium in swine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jun; Young, Rebeccah; Page, Brian J; Shen, Xiaomeng; Tata, Nazneen; Li, Jun; Duan, Xiaotao; Fallavollita, James A; Canty, John M

    2014-05-02

    Hibernating myocardium is an adaptive response to repetitive myocardial ischemia that is clinically common, but the mechanism of adaptation is poorly understood. Here we compared the proteomes of hibernating versus normal myocardium in a porcine model with 24 biological replicates. Using the ion-current-based proteomic strategy optimized in this study to expand upon previous proteomic work, we identified differentially expressed proteins in new molecular pathways of cardiovascular interest. The methodological strategy includes efficient extraction with detergent cocktail; precipitation/digestion procedure with high, quantitative peptide recovery; reproducible nano-LC/MS analysis on a long, heated column packed with small particles; and quantification based on ion-current peak areas. Under the optimized conditions, high efficiency and reproducibility were achieved for each step, which enabled a reliable comparison of 24 the myocardial samples. To achieve confident discovery of differentially regulated proteins in hibernating myocardium, we used highly stringent criteria to define "quantifiable proteins". These included the filtering criteria of low peptide FDR and S/N > 10 for peptide ion currents, and each protein was quantified independently from ≥2 distinct peptides. For a broad methodological validation, the quantitative results were compared with a parallel, well-validated 2D-DIGE analysis of the same model. Excellent agreement between the two orthogonal methods was observed (R = 0.74), and the ion-current-based method quantified almost one order of magnitude more proteins. In hibernating myocardium, 225 significantly altered proteins were discovered with a low false-discovery rate (∼3%). These proteins are involved in biological processes including metabolism, apoptosis, stress response, contraction, cytoskeleton, transcription, and translation. This provides compelling evidence that hibernating myocardium adapts to chronic ischemia. The major metabolic

  13. Reproducible research in palaeomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurcock, Pontus; Florindo, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    The reproducibility of research findings is attracting increasing attention across all scientific disciplines. In palaeomagnetism as elsewhere, computer-based analysis techniques are becoming more commonplace, complex, and diverse. Analyses can often be difficult to reproduce from scratch, both for the original researchers and for others seeking to build on the work. We present a palaeomagnetic plotting and analysis program designed to make reproducibility easier. Part of the problem is the divide between interactive and scripted (batch) analysis programs. An interactive desktop program with a graphical interface is a powerful tool for exploring data and iteratively refining analyses, but usually cannot operate without human interaction. This makes it impossible to re-run an analysis automatically, or to integrate it into a larger automated scientific workflow - for example, a script to generate figures and tables for a paper. In some cases the parameters of the analysis process itself are not saved explicitly, making it hard to repeat or improve the analysis even with human interaction. Conversely, non-interactive batch tools can be controlled by pre-written scripts and configuration files, allowing an analysis to be 'replayed' automatically from the raw data. However, this advantage comes at the expense of exploratory capability: iteratively improving an analysis entails a time-consuming cycle of editing scripts, running them, and viewing the output. Batch tools also tend to require more computer expertise from their users. PuffinPlot is a palaeomagnetic plotting and analysis program which aims to bridge this gap. First released in 2012, it offers both an interactive, user-friendly desktop interface and a batch scripting interface, both making use of the same core library of palaeomagnetic functions. We present new improvements to the program that help to integrate the interactive and batch approaches, allowing an analysis to be interactively explored and refined

  14. Can a Dusty Warm Absorber Model Reproduce the Soft X-ray Spectra of MCG-6-30-15 and Mrk 766?

    CERN Document Server

    Sako, M; Branduardi-Raymont, G; Kaastra, J S; Brinkman, A C; Page, M J; Behar, E; Paerels, F B S; Kinkhabwala, A; Liedahl, D A; Den Herder, J W A

    2003-01-01

    XMM-Newton RGS spectra of MCG-6-30-15 and Mrk 766 exhibit complex discrete structure, which was interpreted in a paper by Branduardi-Raymont et al. (2001) as evidence for the existence of relativistically broadened Lyman alpha emission from carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, produced in the inner-most regions of an accretion disk around a Kerr black hole. This suggestion was subsequently criticized in a paper by Lee et al. (2001), who argued that for MCG-6-30-15, the Chandra HETG spectrum, which is partially overlapping the RGS in spectral coverage, is adequately fit by a dusty warm absorber model, with no relativistic line emission. We present a reanalysis of the original RGS data sets in terms of the Lee et al. (2001) model, and demonstrate that spectral models consisting of a smooth continuum with ionized and dust absorption alone cannot reproduce the RGS spectra of both objects. The original relativistic line model with warm absorption proposed by Branduardi-Raymont et al. (2001) provides a superior fit to the...

  15. Current status of the ability of the GEMS/MACC models to reproduce the tropospheric CO vertical distribution as measured by MOZAIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Elguindi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Vertical profiles of CO taken from the MOZAIC aircraft database are used to globally evaluate the performance of the GEMS/MACC models, including the ECMWF-Integrated Forecasting System (IFS model coupled to the CTM MOZART-3 with 4DVAR data assimilation for the year 2004. This study provides a unique opportunity to compare the performance of three offline CTMs (MOZART-3, MOCAGE and TM5 driven by the same meteorology as well as one coupled atmosphere/CTM model run with data assimilation, enabling us to assess the potential gain brought by the combination of online transport and the 4DVAR chemical satellite data assimilation.

    First we present a global analysis of observed CO seasonal averages and interannual variability for the years 2002–2007. Results show that despite the intense boreal forest fires that occurred during the summer in Alaska and Canada, the year 2004 had comparably lower tropospheric CO concentrations. Next we present a validation of CO estimates produced by the MACC models for 2004, including an assessment of their ability to transport pollutants originating from the Alaskan/Canadian wildfires. In general, all the models tend to underestimate CO. The coupled model and the CTMs perform best in Europe and the US where biases range from 0 to -25% in the free troposphere and from 0 to -50% in the surface and boundary layers (BL. Using the 4DVAR technique to assimilate MOPITT V4 CO significantly reduces biases by up to 50% in most regions. However none of the models, even the IFS-MOZART-3 coupled model with assimilation, are able to reproduce well the CO plumes originating from the Alaskan/Canadian wildfires at downwind locations in the eastern US and Europe. Sensitivity tests reveal that deficiencies in the fire emissions inventory and injection height play a role.

  16. Opening Reproducible Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüst, Daniel; Konkol, Markus; Pebesma, Edzer; Kray, Christian; Klötgen, Stephanie; Schutzeichel, Marc; Lorenz, Jörg; Przibytzin, Holger; Kussmann, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    Open access is not only a form of publishing such that research papers become available to the large public free of charge, it also refers to a trend in science that the act of doing research becomes more open and transparent. When science transforms to open access we not only mean access to papers, research data being collected, or data being generated, but also access to the data used and the procedures carried out in the research paper. Increasingly, scientific results are generated by numerical manipulation of data that were already collected, and may involve simulation experiments that are completely carried out computationally. Reproducibility of research findings, the ability to repeat experimental procedures and confirm previously found results, is at the heart of the scientific method (Pebesma, Nüst and Bivand, 2012). As opposed to the collection of experimental data in labs or nature, computational experiments lend themselves very well for reproduction. Some of the reasons why scientists do not publish data and computational procedures that allow reproduction will be hard to change, e.g. privacy concerns in the data, fear for embarrassment or of losing a competitive advantage. Others reasons however involve technical aspects, and include the lack of standard procedures to publish such information and the lack of benefits after publishing them. We aim to resolve these two technical aspects. We propose a system that supports the evolution of scientific publications from static papers into dynamic, executable research documents. The DFG-funded experimental project Opening Reproducible Research (ORR) aims for the main aspects of open access, by improving the exchange of, by facilitating productive access to, and by simplifying reuse of research results that are published over the Internet. Central to the project is a new form for creating and providing research results, the executable research compendium (ERC), which not only enables third parties to

  17. Modeling the alcoholic fermentation of xylose by Pichia stipitis using a qualitative reasoning approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrin, F. (INRA (Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique), Biometrics and Artificial Intelligence Station, 31 - Castanet-Tolosan (France)); Delgenes, J.P. (INRA, Biotechnological Lab. for Food Industry Environment, 11 - Narbonne (France)); Moletta, R. (INRA, Biotechnological Lab. for Food Industry Environment, 11 - Narbonne (France))

    1994-03-01

    Qualitative Reasoning is a set of Artificial Intelligence theories, methods, and techniques that provide an answer to modeling problems in domains in which one can have a clear notion of how a system is functioning without being able to express it as classical mathematical equations, and where is posed the problem of using jointly quantitative and qualitative data, as well as processing a big amount of complex knowledge. SIMAO ('a System to Interpret Measurements And Observations') is an attempt to deal with such problems. Although primarily devised for heterogeneous data interpretation in hydroecology, it was thought possible to use SIMAO in a wider context, like biotechnological processes. Starting from specific problems posed by a batch fermentation, the D-xylose conversion into ethanol by the yeast Pichia stipitis, this paper descibes how was built and used a SIMAO model aimed at predicting the fermentation issue from initial conditions, i.e. set-points values and substrate concentration. (orig.)

  18. Qualitative Analysis and Numerical Simulation of Equations of the Standard Cosmological Model: $\\Lambda\

    CERN Document Server

    Ignat'ev, Yurii

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of qualitative analysis of the system of differential equations of the standard cosmological model it is shown that in the case of zero cosmological constant this system has a stable center corresponding to zero values of potential and its derivative at infinity. Thus, the cosmological model based on single massive classical scalar field in infinite future would give a flat Universe. The carried out numerical simulation of the dynamic system corresponding to the system of Einstein - Klein - Gordon equations showed that at great times of the evolution the invariant cosmological acceleration has an oscillating character and changes from $-2$ (braking), to $+1$ (acceleration). Average value of the cosmological acceleration is negative and is equal to $-1/2$. Oscillations of the cosmological acceleration happen on the background of rapidly falling Hubble constant. In the case of nonzero value of the cosmological constant depending on its value there are possible three various qualitative behavior typ...

  19. Business Scenario Evaluation Method Using Monte Carlo Simulation on Qualitative and Quantitative Hybrid Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samejima, Masaki; Akiyoshi, Masanori; Mitsukuni, Koshichiro; Komoda, Norihisa

    We propose a business scenario evaluation method using qualitative and quantitative hybrid model. In order to evaluate business factors with qualitative causal relations, we introduce statistical values based on propagation and combination of effects of business factors by Monte Carlo simulation. In propagating an effect, we divide a range of each factor by landmarks and decide an effect to a destination node based on the divided ranges. In combining effects, we decide an effect of each arc using contribution degree and sum all effects. Through applied results to practical models, it is confirmed that there are no differences between results obtained by quantitative relations and results obtained by the proposed method at the risk rate of 5%.

  20. Evaluation models and Brazilian health reform: a qualitative-participatory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, Maria Lúcia Magalhães; Mercado-Martinez, Francisco Javier

    2010-06-01

    Throughout the last years, there has been a growing interest in ongoing assessment proposals in Latin America, which are more far-reaching and not traditional. The aim of this study was to analyze the potential of qualitative-participatory evaluation in view of the challenge of strengthening health reforms in the region, particularly those considered progressive, such as the Brazilian case. There is the need to assess health reforms in a rigorous and permanent way, especially the incongruity when using normative models to evaluate health systems based on principles of universality, comprehensiveness, humanization and democratic management. In addition to the demand for assessment instruments and strategies, the Brazilian health reform requires the adoption of evaluation proposals and practices that are founded on other paradigms, distinct from the hegemonic one, in the sphere of health assessment. It is recommended that emerging evaluative models be used, such as those with a qualitative-participatory approach.

  1. Qualitative Modelling of Quasi-homogeneous Effects in ERK and STAT Interaction Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valko Petrov

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of qualitative analysis of author's model published in previous paper, the stability and temporal behaviour of quasi-homogeneous distributions of ERK-protein concentrations are analyzed in terms of corresponding reaction-diffusion problem. The stable quasi-homogeneous distributions are treated as a dynamical basis of pathway compartmentalization. It is also shown, that a crowding effect exists in the form of loss of pathway stability. An experimentally verifiable issue for possible existence of protein scaffolding mechanism is derived on the basis of its qualitative correspondence with the pattern formation and molecular crowding effects inherent to the considered model. Moreover, it is demonstrated, that the predicted ERK and STAT pathway instability can be interpreted as traveling wave propagation of molecular concentration drop and jump from the nucleus membrane to the cell one and vice versa.

  2. Reproducing the observed energy-dependent structure of Earth's electron radiation belts during storm recovery with an event-specific diffusion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, J.-F.; Reeves, G. D.; Cunningham, G. S.; Loridan, V.; Denton, M.; Santolík, O.; Kurth, W. S.; Kletzing, C. A.; Turner, D. L.; Henderson, M. G.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.

    2016-06-01

    We present dynamic simulations of energy-dependent losses in the radiation belt "slot region" and the formation of the two-belt structure for the quiet days after the 1 March storm. The simulations combine radial diffusion with a realistic scattering model, based data-driven spatially and temporally resolved whistler-mode hiss wave observations from the Van Allen Probes satellites. The simulations reproduce Van Allen Probes observations for all energies and L shells (2-6) including (a) the strong energy dependence to the radiation belt dynamics (b) an energy-dependent outer boundary to the inner zone that extends to higher L shells at lower energies and (c) an "S-shaped" energy-dependent inner boundary to the outer zone that results from the competition between diffusive radial transport and losses. We find that the characteristic energy-dependent structure of the radiation belts and slot region is dynamic and can be formed gradually in ~15 days, although the "S shape" can also be reproduced by assuming equilibrium conditions. The highest-energy electrons (E > 300 keV) of the inner region of the outer belt (L ~ 4-5) also constantly decay, demonstrating that hiss wave scattering affects the outer belt during times of extended plasmasphere. Through these simulations, we explain the full structure in energy and L shell of the belts and the slot formation by hiss scattering during storm recovery. We show the power and complexity of looking dynamically at the effects over all energies and L shells and the need for using data-driven and event-specific conditions.

  3. Qualitative Analysis on a Reaction-Diffusion Prey Predator Model and the Corresponding Steady-States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qunyi BIE; Rui PENG

    2009-01-01

    The authors study a diffusive prey-predator model subject to the homogeneous Neumann boundary condition and give some qualitative descriptions of solutions to this reaction-diffusion system and its corresponding steady-state problem.The local and global stability of the positive constant steady-state are discussed,and then some results for nonexistence of positive non-constant steady-states are derived.

  4. A qualitative study of parental modeling and social support for physical activity in underserved adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Marcie S.; Wilson, Dawn K.; Griffin, Sarah; Evans, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    This study obtained qualitative data to assess how parental role modeling and parental social support influence physical activity in underserved (minority, low-income) adolescents. Fifty-two adolescents (22 males, 30 females; ages 10–14 years, 85% African-American) participated in a focus group (6–10 per group, same gender). Focus groups were audiotaped, transcribed and coded by independent raters. Inter-rater reliabilities indicated adequate agreement [inter-rater reliability (r) = 0.84]. Th...

  5. A Computational Model of Human-Robot Spatial Interactions Based on a Qualitative Trajectory Calculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Dondrup

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a probabilistic sequential model of Human-Robot Spatial Interaction (HRSI using a well-established Qualitative Trajectory Calculus (QTC to encode HRSI between a human and a mobile robot in a meaningful, tractable, and systematic manner. Our key contribution is to utilise QTC as a state descriptor and model HRSI as a probabilistic sequence of such states. Apart from the sole direction of movements of human and robot modelled by QTC, attributes of HRSI like proxemics and velocity profiles play vital roles for the modelling and generation of HRSI behaviour. In this paper, we particularly present how the concept of proxemics can be embedded in QTC to facilitate richer models. To facilitate reasoning on HRSI with qualitative representations, we show how we can combine the representational power of QTC with the concept of proxemics in a concise framework, enriching our probabilistic representation by implicitly modelling distances. We show the appropriateness of our sequential model of QTC by encoding different HRSI behaviours observed in two spatial interaction experiments. We classify these encounters, creating a comparative measurement, showing the representational capabilities of the model.

  6. The Development of a Qualitative Dynamic Attribute Value Model for Healthcare Institutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan- I Lee

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available  Background: Understanding customers has become an urgent topic for increasing competitiveness. The purpopse of  the study was to develop a qualitative dynamic attribute value model which provides insight into the customers' value for healthcare institute managers by conducting the initial open-ended questionnaire survey to select participants purposefully."nMethods: A total number of 427 questionnaires was conducted in two hospitals in Taiwan (one district hospital with 635 beds and one academic hospital with 2495 beds and 419 questionnaires were received in nine weeks. Then, apply qualitative in-depth interviews to explore customers' perspective of values for building a model of partial differential equations."nResults: This study concludes nine categories of value, including cost, equipment, physician background, physicain care, environment, timing arrangement, relationship, brand image and additional value, to construct objective network for customer value and qualitative dynamic attribute value model where the network shows the value process of loyalty development via its effect on customer satisfaction, customer relationship, customer loyalty and healthcare service."nConclusion: One set predicts the customer relationship based on comminent, including service quality, communication and em­pahty. As the same time, customer loyalty based on trust, involves buzz marketing, brand and image.  Customer value of the current instance is useful for traversing original customer attributes and identifing customers on different service share.

  7. The development of a qualitative dynamic attribute value model for healthcare institutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wan-I

    2010-01-01

    Understanding customers has become an urgent topic for increasing competitiveness. The purpopse of the study was to develop a qualitative dynamic attribute value model which provides insight into the customers' value for healthcare institute managers by conducting the initial open-ended questionnaire survey to select participants purposefully. A total number of 427 questionnaires was conducted in two hospitals in Taiwan (one district hospital with 635 beds and one academic hospital with 2495 beds) and 419 questionnaires were received in nine weeks. Then, apply qualitative in-depth interviews to explore customers' perspective of values for building a model of partial differential equations. This study concludes nine categories of value, including cost, equipment, physician background, physicain care, environment, timing arrangement, relationship, brand image and additional value, to construct objective network for customer value and qualitative dynamic attribute value model where the network shows the value process of loyalty development via its effect on customer satisfaction, customer relationship, customer loyalty and healthcare service. One set predicts the customer relationship based on comminent, including service quality, communication and empahty. As the same time, customer loyalty based on trust, involves buzz marketing, brand and image. Customer value of the current instance is useful for traversing original customer attributes and identifing customers on different service share.

  8. Current status of the ability of the GEMS/MACC models to reproduce the tropospheric CO vertical distribution as measured by MOZAIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Elguindi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Vertical profiles of CO taken from the MOZAIC aircraft database are used to present (1 a global analysis of CO seasonal averages and interannual variability for the years 2002–2007 and (2 a global validation of CO estimates produced by the MACC models for 2004, including an assessment of their ability to transport pollutants originating from the Alaskan/Canadian wildfires. Seasonal averages and interannual variability from several MOZAIC sites representing different regions of the world show that CO concentrations are highest and most variable during the winter season. The inter-regional variability is significant with concentrations increasing eastward from Europe to Japan. The impact of the intense boreal fires, particularly in Russia, during the fall of 2002 on the Northern Hemisphere CO concentrations throughout the troposphere is well represented by the MOZAIC data.

    A global validation of the GEMS/MACC GRG models which include three stand-alone CTMs (MOZART, MOCAGE and TM5 and the coupled ECMWF Integrated Forecasting System (IFS/MOZART model with and without MOPITT CO data assimilation show that the models have a tendency to underestimate CO. The models perform best in Europe and the US where biases range from 0 to –25% in the free troposphere and from 0 to –50% in the surface and boundary layers (BL. The biases are largest in the winter and during the daytime when emissions are highest, indicating that current inventories are too low. Data assimilation is shown to reduce biases by up to 25% in some regions. The models are not able to reproduce well the CO plumes originating from the Alaskan/Canadian wildfires at downwind locations in the eastern US and Europe, not even with assimilation. Sensitivity tests reveal that this is mainly due to deficiencies in the fire emissions inventory and injection height.

  9. Reproducible research in vadose zone sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    A significant portion of present-day soil and Earth science research is computational, involving complex data analysis pipelines, advanced mathematical and statistical models, and sophisticated computer codes. Opportunities for scientific progress are greatly diminished if reproducing and building o...

  10. A Qualitative Study of Domain Specific Languages for Model Driven Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Qaiser Saleem

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In Model-Driven development, software system design is represented through models which are created using general purpose modeling languages e.g., UML. Later on system artifacts are automatically generated from these models. Model-Driven Security is a specialization of Model-Driven paradigm towards the domain of security, where security objectives are modeled along the system models and security infrastructures are directly generated from these models. Currently available general purpose modeling languages like UML do not have capability to model the security objectives along the system models. Over the past decade, many researchers are trying to address these limitations of the general purpose modeling languages and come up with several Domain Specific Modeling Languages for Model Driven Security. In this study, a comparative study is presented regarding the security Domain Specific Modeling Languages presented by the most prominent researchers for the development of secure system. A success criteria has been defined and these DSLs are critically analyzed based on it to obtain the qualitative results.

  11. Learning Qualitative Differential Equation models: a survey of algorithms and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Wei; Coghill, George M

    2010-03-01

    Over the last two decades, qualitative reasoning (QR) has become an important domain in Artificial Intelligence. QDE (Qualitative Differential Equation) model learning (QML), as a branch of QR, has also received an increasing amount of attention; many systems have been proposed to solve various significant problems in this field. QML has been applied to a wide range of fields, including physics, biology and medical science. In this paper, we first identify the scope of this review by distinguishing QML from other QML systems, and then review all the noteworthy QML systems within this scope. The applications of QML in several application domains are also introduced briefly. Finally, the future directions of QML are explored from different perspectives.

  12. Bio-Logic Builder: A Non-Technical Tool for Building Dynamical, Qualitative Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helikar, Tomáš; Kowal, Bryan; Madrahimov, Alex; Shrestha, Manish; Pedersen, Jay; Limbu, Kahani; Thapa, Ishwor; Rowley, Thaine; Satalkar, Rahul; Kochi, Naomi; Konvalina, John; Rogers, Jim A.

    2012-01-01

    Computational modeling of biological processes is a promising tool in biomedical research. While a large part of its potential lies in the ability to integrate it with laboratory research, modeling currently generally requires a high degree of training in mathematics and/or computer science. To help address this issue, we have developed a web-based tool, Bio-Logic Builder, that enables laboratory scientists to define mathematical representations (based on a discrete formalism) of biological regulatory mechanisms in a modular and non-technical fashion. As part of the user interface, generalized “bio-logic” modules have been defined to provide users with the building blocks for many biological processes. To build/modify computational models, experimentalists provide purely qualitative information about a particular regulatory mechanisms as is generally found in the laboratory. The Bio-Logic Builder subsequently converts the provided information into a mathematical representation described with Boolean expressions/rules. We used this tool to build a number of dynamical models, including a 130-protein large-scale model of signal transduction with over 800 interactions, influenza A replication cycle with 127 species and 200+ interactions, and mammalian and budding yeast cell cycles. We also show that any and all qualitative regulatory mechanisms can be built using this tool. PMID:23082121

  13. Bio-logic builder: a non-technical tool for building dynamical, qualitative models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Helikar

    Full Text Available Computational modeling of biological processes is a promising tool in biomedical research. While a large part of its potential lies in the ability to integrate it with laboratory research, modeling currently generally requires a high degree of training in mathematics and/or computer science. To help address this issue, we have developed a web-based tool, Bio-Logic Builder, that enables laboratory scientists to define mathematical representations (based on a discrete formalism of biological regulatory mechanisms in a modular and non-technical fashion. As part of the user interface, generalized "bio-logic" modules have been defined to provide users with the building blocks for many biological processes. To build/modify computational models, experimentalists provide purely qualitative information about a particular regulatory mechanisms as is generally found in the laboratory. The Bio-Logic Builder subsequently converts the provided information into a mathematical representation described with Boolean expressions/rules. We used this tool to build a number of dynamical models, including a 130-protein large-scale model of signal transduction with over 800 interactions, influenza A replication cycle with 127 species and 200+ interactions, and mammalian and budding yeast cell cycles. We also show that any and all qualitative regulatory mechanisms can be built using this tool.

  14. Modelling Activities In Kinematics Understanding quantitative relations with the contribution of qualitative reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfanos, Stelios

    2010-01-01

    In Greek traditional teaching a lot of significant concepts are introduced with a sequence that does not provide the students with all the necessary information required to comprehend. We consider that understanding concepts and the relations among them is greatly facilitated by the use of modelling tools, taking into account that the modelling process forces students to change their vague, imprecise ideas into explicit causal relationships. It is not uncommon to find students who are able to solve problems by using complicated relations without getting a qualitative and in-depth grip on them. Researchers have already shown that students often have a formal mathematical and physical knowledge without a qualitative understanding of basic concepts and relations." The aim of this communication is to present some of the results of our investigation into modelling activities related to kinematical concepts. For this purpose, we have used ModellingSpace, an environment that was especially designed to allow students from eleven to seventeen years old to express their ideas and gradually develop them. The ModellingSpace enables students to build their own models and offers the choice of observing directly simulations of real objects and/or all the other alternative forms of representations (tables of values, graphic representations and bar-charts). The students -in order to answer the questions- formulate hypotheses, they create models, they compare their hypotheses with the representations of their models and they modify or create other models when their hypotheses did not agree with the representations. In traditional ways of teaching, students are educated to utilize formulas as the most important strategy. Several times the students recall formulas in order to utilize them, without getting an in-depth understanding on them. Students commonly use the quantitative type of reasoning, since it is primarily used in teaching, although it may not be fully understood by them

  15. Qualitative models to predict impacts of human interventions in a wetland ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Loiselle

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The large shallow wetlands that dominate much of the South American continent are rich in biodiversity and complexity. Many of these undamaged ecosystems are presently being examined for their potential economic utility, putting pressure on local authorities and the conservation community to find ways of correctly utilising the available natural resources without compromising the ecosystem functioning and overall integrity. Contrary to many northern hemisphere ecosystems, there have been little long term ecological studies of these systems, leading to a lack of quantitative data on which to construct ecological or resource use models. As a result, decision makers, even well meaning ones, have difficulty in determining if particular economic activities can potentially cause significant damage to the ecosystem and how one should go about monitoring the impacts of such activities. While the direct impact of many activities is often known, the secondary indirect impacts are usually less clear and can depend on local ecological conditions.

    The use of qualitative models is a helpful tool to highlight potential feedback mechanisms and secondary effects of management action on ecosystem integrity. The harvesting of a single, apparently abundant, species can have indirect secondary effects on key trophic and abiotic compartments. In this paper, loop model analysis is used to qualitatively examine secondary effects of potential economic activities in a large wetland area in northeast Argentina, the Esteros del Ibera. Based on interaction with local actors together with observed ecological information, loop models were constructed to reflect relationships between biotic and abiotic compartments. A series of analyses were made to study the effect of different economic scenarios on key ecosystem compartments. Important impacts on key biotic compartments (phytoplankton, zooplankton, ichthyofauna, aquatic macrophytes and on the abiotic environment

  16. Factors Affecting Cervical Cancer Screening Behaviors Based On the Precaution Adoption Process Model: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmani, Afshin; Baghianimoghadam, Mohammah Hossein; Enjezab, Behnaz; Mazloomy Mahmoodabad, Seyed Saeed; Askarshahi, Mohsen

    2015-11-17

    One of the most preventable cancers in women is cervical cancer. Pap smear test is an effective screening program; however, it is not conducted very frequently. The aim of this study is explaining the determinants affecting women's participation in the Pap smear test based on precaution adoption process model with a qualitative approach. This study was a qualitative approach using a Directed Content Analysis methodology which was conducted in 2014. Participants were 30 rural women who participated in this study voluntarily in sarvabad, Iran. Purposive sampling was initiated and continued until data saturation. Semi-structured interviews were the primary method of data collection. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis and continuous comparisons. Women`s information and awareness about cervical cancer and Pap smear is insufficient and most of them believed that they were not at risk; however, they perceived the severity of the disease. Some of them had no adequate understanding of the test benefits. They pointed to the lack of time, financial difficulties, fear of test result and lack of awareness as the main barriers against the Pap smear test; however, they did not say that they were not willing to do the test. Findings could help health policy makers to find the right area and purpose to facilitate the participation of women in the Pap smear test.

  17. Probability of identification: a statistical model for the validation of qualitative botanical identification methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBudde, Robert A; Harnly, James M

    2012-01-01

    A qualitative botanical identification method (BIM) is an analytical procedure that returns a binary result (1 = Identified, 0 = Not Identified). A BIM may be used by a buyer, manufacturer, or regulator to determine whether a botanical material being tested is the same as the target (desired) material, or whether it contains excessive nontarget (undesirable) material. The report describes the development and validation of studies for a BIM based on the proportion of replicates identified, or probability of identification (POI), as the basic observed statistic. The statistical procedures proposed for data analysis follow closely those of the probability of detection, and harmonize the statistical concepts and parameters between quantitative and qualitative method validation. Use of POI statistics also harmonizes statistical concepts for botanical, microbiological, toxin, and other analyte identification methods that produce binary results. The POI statistical model provides a tool for graphical representation of response curves for qualitative methods, reporting of descriptive statistics, and application of performance requirements. Single collaborator and multicollaborative study examples are given.

  18. Multi-objective intelligent coordinating optimization blending system based on qualitative and quantitative synthetic model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ya-lin; MA Jie; GUI Wei-hua; YANG Chun-hua; ZHANG Chuan-fu

    2006-01-01

    A multi-objective intelligent coordinating optimization strategy based on qualitative and quantitative synthetic model for Pb-Zn sintering blending process was proposed to obtain optimal mixture ratio. The mechanism and neural network quantitative models for predicting compositions and rule models for expert reasoning were constructed based on statistical data and empirical knowledge. An expert reasoning method based on these models were proposed to solve blending optimization problem, including multi-objective optimization for the first blending process and area optimization for the second blending process, and to determine optimal mixture ratio which will meet the requirement of intelligent coordination. The results show that the qualified rates of agglomerate Pb, Zn and S compositions are increased by 7.1%, 6.5% and 6.9%, respectively, and the fluctuation of sintering permeability is reduced by 7.0 %, which effectively stabilizes the agglomerate compositions and the permeability.

  19. DEPENDENCE OF QUALITATIVE BEHAVIOR OF THE NUMERICAL SOLUTIONS ON THE IGNITION TEMPERATURE FOR A COMBUSTION MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-ting Zhang; Lung-an Ying

    2005-01-01

    We study the dependence of qualitative behavior of the numerical solutions (obtained by a projective and upwind finite difference scheme) on the ignition temperature for a combustion model problem with general initial condition. Convergence to weak solution is proved under the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition. Some condition on the ignition temperature is given to guarantee the solution containing a strong detonation wave or a weak detonation wave. Finally, we give some numerical examples which show that a strong detonation wave can be transformed to a weak detonation wave under some well-chosen ignition temperature.

  20. Safety and Reproducibility of a Clinical Trial System Using Induced Blood Stage Plasmodium vivax Infection and Its Potential as a Model to Evaluate Malaria Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Suzanne; Sekuloski, Silvana; Sikulu, Maggy; Hugo, Leon; Khoury, David; Cromer, Deborah; Davenport, Miles; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Ivinson, Karen; Ockenhouse, Christian; McCarthy, James

    2016-01-01

    Background Interventions to interrupt transmission of malaria from humans to mosquitoes represent an appealing approach to assist malaria elimination. A limitation has been the lack of systems to test the efficacy of such interventions before proceeding to efficacy trials in the field. We have previously demonstrated the feasibility of induced blood stage malaria (IBSM) infection with Plasmodium vivax. In this study, we report further validation of the IBSM model, and its evaluation for assessment of transmission of P. vivax to Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. Methods Six healthy subjects (three cohorts, n = 2 per cohort) were infected with P. vivax by inoculation with parasitized erythrocytes. Parasite growth was monitored by quantitative PCR, and gametocytemia by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) for the mRNA pvs25. Parasite multiplication rate (PMR) and size of inoculum were calculated by linear regression. Mosquito transmission studies were undertaken by direct and membrane feeding assays over 3 days prior to commencement of antimalarial treatment, and midguts of blood fed mosquitoes dissected and checked for presence of oocysts after 7–9 days. Results The clinical course and parasitemia were consistent across cohorts, with all subjects developing mild to moderate symptoms of malaria. No serious adverse events were reported. Asymptomatic elevated liver function tests were detected in four of six subjects; these resolved without treatment. Direct feeding of mosquitoes was well tolerated. The estimated PMR was 9.9 fold per cycle. Low prevalence of mosquito infection was observed (1.8%; n = 32/1801) from both direct (4.5%; n = 20/411) and membrane (0.9%; n = 12/1360) feeds. Conclusion The P. vivax IBSM model proved safe and reliable. The clinical course and PMR were reproducible when compared with the previous study using this model. The IBSM model presented in this report shows promise as a system to test transmission-blocking interventions

  1. Qualitative model of the operating mechanism of the protective coating for low pressure Hg lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnochub, A V [DECO Ltd, PO Box 40, 141701 Dolgoprudnyi (Russian Federation); Vasiliev, A I [LIT Technology Ltd, Krasnobogatyrskaya 44, 107076 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-04-07

    Interaction between the plasma and protective coating on the inner side of low pressure mercury lamp bulbs is considered. Under the assumption that the main way of decreasing the transmission of the bulb wall is the implantation of Hg ions within the fused quartz and formation of complexes [HgO] therein, a qualitative model of the attenuation mechanism is offered. The influence of the characteristics of a coating (thickness, close-packed structures, the lattice parameter, mass of atoms) on the transmission of the bulb walls is analysed. On the basis of the suggested model, estimates of the change in minimum transmission of bulb walls were made for lamps with and without protective coating. It is shown that in spite of approximations, the proposed model is in good agreement with experimental data.

  2. Qualitative Behaviour of Solutions in Two Models of Thin Liquid Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Michal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For the thin-film model of a viscous flow which originates from lubrication approximation and has a full nonlinear curvature term, we prove existence of nonnegative weak solutions. Depending on initial data, we show algebraic or exponential dissipation of an energy functional which implies dissipation of the solution arc length that is a well known property for a Hele-Shaw flow. For the classical thin-film model with linearized curvature term, under some restrictions on parameter and gradient values, we also prove analytically the arc length dissipation property for positive solutions. We compare the numerical solutions for both models, with nonlinear and with linearized curvature terms. In regimes when solutions develop finite time singularities, we explain the difference in qualitative behaviour of solutions.

  3. MARIKA - A model revision system using qualitative analysis of simulations. [of human orientation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groleau, Nicolas; Frainier, Richard; Colombano, Silvano; Hazelton, Lyman; Szolovits, Peter

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes portions of a novel system called MARIKA (Model Analysis and Revision of Implicit Key Assumptions) to automatically revise a model of the normal human orientation system. The revision is based on analysis of discrepancies between experimental results and computer simulations. The discrepancies are calculated from qualitative analysis of quantitative simulations. The experimental and simulated time series are first discretized in time segments. Each segment is then approximated by linear combinations of simple shapes. The domain theory and knowledge are represented as a constraint network. Incompatibilities detected during constraint propagation within the network yield both parameter and structural model alterations. Interestingly, MARIKA diagnosed a data set from the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Vestibular Laboratory as abnormal though the data was tagged as normal. Published results from other laboratories confirmed the finding. These encouraging results could lead to a useful clinical vestibular tool and to a scientific discovery system for space vestibular adaptation.

  4. Involving mental health service users in suicide-related research: a qualitative inquiry model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, David; Procter, Nicholas; Fassett, Denise; Handley, Christine

    2016-03-01

    To describe the research model developed and successfully deployed as part of a multi-method qualitative study investigating suicidal service-users' experiences of mental health nursing care. Quality mental health care is essential to limiting the occurrence and burden of suicide, however there is a lack of relevant research informing practice in this context. Research utilising first-person accounts of suicidality is of particular importance to expanding the existing evidence base. However, conducting ethical research to support this imperative is challenging. The model discussed here illustrates specific and more generally applicable principles for qualitative research regarding sensitive topics and involving potentially vulnerable service-users. Researching into mental health service users with first-person experience of suicidality requires stakeholder and institutional support, researcher competency, and participant recruitment, consent, confidentiality, support and protection. Research with service users into their experiences of sensitive issues such as suicidality can result in rich and valuable data, and may also provide positive experiences of collaboration and inclusivity. If challenges are not met, objectification and marginalisation of service-users may be reinforced, and limitations in the evidence base and service provision may be perpetuated.

  5. Avoiding and identifying errors in health technology assessment models: qualitative study and methodological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilcott, J; Tappenden, P; Rawdin, A; Johnson, M; Kaltenthaler, E; Paisley, S; Papaioannou, D; Shippam, A

    2010-05-01

    Health policy decisions must be relevant, evidence-based and transparent. Decision-analytic modelling supports this process but its role is reliant on its credibility. Errors in mathematical decision models or simulation exercises are unavoidable but little attention has been paid to processes in model development. Numerous error avoidance/identification strategies could be adopted but it is difficult to evaluate the merits of strategies for improving the credibility of models without first developing an understanding of error types and causes. The study aims to describe the current comprehension of errors in the HTA modelling community and generate a taxonomy of model errors. Four primary objectives are to: (1) describe the current understanding of errors in HTA modelling; (2) understand current processes applied by the technology assessment community for avoiding errors in development, debugging and critically appraising models for errors; (3) use HTA modellers' perceptions of model errors with the wider non-HTA literature to develop a taxonomy of model errors; and (4) explore potential methods and procedures to reduce the occurrence of errors in models. It also describes the model development process as perceived by practitioners working within the HTA community. A methodological review was undertaken using an iterative search methodology. Exploratory searches informed the scope of interviews; later searches focused on issues arising from the interviews. Searches were undertaken in February 2008 and January 2009. In-depth qualitative interviews were performed with 12 HTA modellers from academic and commercial modelling sectors. All qualitative data were analysed using the Framework approach. Descriptive and explanatory accounts were used to interrogate the data within and across themes and subthemes: organisation, roles and communication; the model development process; definition of error; types of model error; strategies for avoiding errors; strategies for

  6. Osteolytica: An automated image analysis software package that rapidly measures cancer-induced osteolytic lesions in in vivo models with greater reproducibility compared to other commonly used methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, H R; Karmakharm, T; Lawson, M A; Walker, R E; Harris, W; Fellows, C; Huggins, I D; Richmond, P; Chantry, A D

    2016-02-01

    Methods currently used to analyse osteolytic lesions caused by malignancies such as multiple myeloma and metastatic breast cancer vary from basic 2-D X-ray analysis to 2-D images of micro-CT datasets analysed with non-specialised image software such as ImageJ. However, these methods have significant limitations. They do not capture 3-D data, they are time-consuming and they often suffer from inter-user variability. We therefore sought to develop a rapid and reproducible method to analyse 3-D osteolytic lesions in mice with cancer-induced bone disease. To this end, we have developed Osteolytica, an image analysis software method featuring an easy to use, step-by-step interface to measure lytic bone lesions. Osteolytica utilises novel graphics card acceleration (parallel computing) and 3-D rendering to provide rapid reconstruction and analysis of osteolytic lesions. To evaluate the use of Osteolytica we analysed tibial micro-CT datasets from murine models of cancer-induced bone disease and compared the results to those obtained using a standard ImageJ analysis method. Firstly, to assess inter-user variability we deployed four independent researchers to analyse tibial datasets from the U266-NSG murine model of myeloma. Using ImageJ, inter-user variability between the bones was substantial (±19.6%), in contrast to using Osteolytica, which demonstrated minimal variability (±0.5%). Secondly, tibial datasets from U266-bearing NSG mice or BALB/c mice injected with the metastatic breast cancer cell line 4T1 were compared to tibial datasets from aged and sex-matched non-tumour control mice. Analyses by both Osteolytica and ImageJ showed significant increases in bone lesion area in tumour-bearing mice compared to control mice. These results confirm that Osteolytica performs as well as the current 2-D ImageJ osteolytic lesion analysis method. However, Osteolytica is advantageous in that it analyses over the entirety of the bone volume (as opposed to selected 2-D images), it

  7. Evaluation of guidewire path reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Sebastian; Hoffmann, Kenneth R; Noël, Peter B; Ionita, Ciprian N; Dmochowski, Jacek

    2008-05-01

    The number of minimally invasive vascular interventions is increasing. In these interventions, a variety of devices are directed to and placed at the site of intervention. The device used in almost all of these interventions is the guidewire, acting as a monorail for all devices which are delivered to the intervention site. However, even with the guidewire in place, clinicians still experience difficulties during the interventions. As a first step toward understanding these difficulties and facilitating guidewire and device guidance, we have investigated the reproducibility of the final paths of the guidewire in vessel phantom models on different factors: user, materials and geometry. Three vessel phantoms (vessel diameters approximately 4 mm) were constructed having tortuousity similar to the internal carotid artery from silicon tubing and encased in Sylgard elastomer. Several trained users repeatedly passed two guidewires of different flexibility through the phantoms under pulsatile flow conditions. After the guidewire had been placed, rotational c-arm image sequences were acquired (9 in. II mode, 0.185 mm pixel size), and the phantom and guidewire were reconstructed (512(3), 0.288 mm voxel size). The reconstructed volumes were aligned. The centerlines of the guidewire and the phantom vessel were then determined using region-growing techniques. Guidewire paths appear similar across users but not across materials. The average root mean square difference of the repeated placement was 0.17 +/- 0.02 mm (plastic-coated guidewire), 0.73 +/- 0.55 mm (steel guidewire) and 1.15 +/- 0.65 mm (steel versus plastic-coated). For a given guidewire, these results indicate that the guidewire path is relatively reproducible in shape and position.

  8. Analysis of Water Conflicts across Natural and Societal Boundaries: Integration of Quantitative Modeling and Qualitative Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y.; Balaram, P.; Islam, S.

    2009-12-01

    , the knowledge generated from these studies cannot be easily generalized or transferred to other basins. Here, we present an approach to integrate the quantitative and qualitative methods to study water issues and capture the contextual knowledge of water management- by combining the NSSs framework and an area of artificial intelligence called qualitative reasoning. Using the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin dispute as an example, we demonstrate how quantitative modeling and qualitative reasoning can be integrated to examine the impact of over abstraction of water from the river on the ecosystem and the role of governance in shaping the evolution of the ACF water dispute.

  9. Pushing the Frontier of Data-Oriented Geodynamic Modeling: from Qualitative to Quantitative to Predictive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Hu, J.; Zhou, Q.

    2016-12-01

    The rapid accumulation of geophysical and geological data sets poses an increasing demand for the development of geodynamic models to better understand the evolution of the solid Earth. Consequently, the earlier qualitative physical models are no long satisfying. Recent efforts are focusing on more quantitative simulations and more efficient numerical algorithms. Among these, a particular line of research is on the implementation of data-oriented geodynamic modeling, with the purpose of building an observationally consistent and physically correct geodynamic framework. Such models could often catalyze new insights into the functioning mechanisms of the various aspects of plate tectonics, and their predictive nature could also guide future research in a deterministic fashion. Over the years, we have been working on constructing large-scale geodynamic models with both sequential and variational data assimilation techniques. These models act as a bridge between different observational records, and the superposition of the constraining power from different data sets help reveal unknown processes and mechanisms of the dynamics of the mantle and lithosphere. We simulate the post-Cretaceous subduction history in South America using a forward (sequential) approach. The model is constrained using past subduction history, seafloor age evolution, tectonic architecture of continents, and the present day geophysical observations. Our results quantify the various driving forces shaping the present South American flat slabs, which we found are all internally torn. The 3-D geometry of these torn slabs further explains the abnormal seismicity pattern and enigmatic volcanic history. An inverse (variational) model simulating the late Cenozoic western U.S. mantle dynamics with similar constraints reveals a different mechanism for the formation of Yellowstone-related volcanism from traditional understanding. Furthermore, important insights on the mantle density and viscosity structures

  10. A method to identify energy efficiency measures for factory systems based on qualitative modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Krones, Manuela

    2017-01-01

    Manuela Krones develops a method that supports factory planners in generating energy-efficient planning solutions. The method provides qualitative description concepts for factory planning tasks and energy efficiency knowledge as well as an algorithm-based linkage between these measures and the respective planning tasks. Its application is guided by a procedure model which allows a general applicability in the manufacturing sector. The results contain energy efficiency measures that are suitable for a specific planning task and reveal the roles of various actors for the measures’ implementation. Contents Driving Concerns for and Barriers against Energy Efficiency Approaches to Increase Energy Efficiency in Factories Socio-Technical Description of Factory Planning Tasks Description of Energy Efficiency Measures Case Studies on Welding Processes and Logistics Systems Target Groups Lecturers and Students of Industrial Engineering, Production Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Mechanical Engineering Practi...

  11. Varying total population enhances disease persistence: Qualitative analysis on a diffusive SIS epidemic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huicong; Peng, Rui; Wang, Feng-Bin

    2017-01-01

    This paper performs qualitative analysis on an SIS epidemic reaction-diffusion system with a linear source in spatially heterogeneous environment. The main feature of our model lies in that its total population number varies, compared to its counterpart proposed by Allen et al. [2]. The uniform bounds of solutions are derived, based on which, the threshold dynamics in terms of the basic reproduction number is established and the global stability of the unique endemic equilibrium is discussed when spatial environment is homogeneous. In particular, the asymptotic profile of endemic equilibria is determined if the diffusion rate of the susceptible or infected population is small or large. The theoretical results show that a varying total population can enhance persistence of infectious disease, and therefore the disease becomes more threatening and harder to control.

  12. Qualitative Analysis and Numerical Simulation of Equations of the Standard Cosmological Model

    CERN Document Server

    Ignat'ev, Yurii

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of qualitative theory of differential equations it is shown that dynamic system based on the system of Einstein - Klein - Gordon equations with regard to Friedman Universe has a stable center corresponding to zero values of scalar potential and its derivative at infinity. Thus, the cosmological model based on single massive classical scalar field in infinite future would give a flat Universe. The carried out numerical simulation of the dynamic system corresponding to the system of Einstein - Klein - Gordon equations showed that at great times of the evolution the invariant cosmological acceleration has a microscopic oscillating character ($T\\sim 2\\pi mt$), while macroscopic value of the cosmological acceleration varies from $+1$ at inflation stage after which if decreases fast to $-1/2$ (non-relativistic stage), and then slowly tends to $-1$ (ultrarelativistic stage).

  13. Model-based analysis for qualitative data: an application in Drosophila germline stem cell regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Pargett

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Discovery in developmental biology is often driven by intuition that relies on the integration of multiple types of data such as fluorescent images, phenotypes, and the outcomes of biochemical assays. Mathematical modeling helps elucidate the biological mechanisms at play as the networks become increasingly large and complex. However, the available data is frequently under-utilized due to incompatibility with quantitative model tuning techniques. This is the case for stem cell regulation mechanisms explored in the Drosophila germarium through fluorescent immunohistochemistry. To enable better integration of biological data with modeling in this and similar situations, we have developed a general parameter estimation process to quantitatively optimize models with qualitative data. The process employs a modified version of the Optimal Scaling method from social and behavioral sciences, and multi-objective optimization to evaluate the trade-off between fitting different datasets (e.g. wild type vs. mutant. Using only published imaging data in the germarium, we first evaluated support for a published intracellular regulatory network by considering alternative connections of the same regulatory players. Simply screening networks against wild type data identified hundreds of feasible alternatives. Of these, five parsimonious variants were found and compared by multi-objective analysis including mutant data and dynamic constraints. With these data, the current model is supported over the alternatives, but support for a biochemically observed feedback element is weak (i.e. these data do not measure the feedback effect well. When also comparing new hypothetical models, the available data do not discriminate. To begin addressing the limitations in data, we performed a model-based experiment design and provide recommendations for experiments to refine model parameters and discriminate increasingly complex hypotheses.

  14. Production process reproducibility and product quality consistency of transient gene expression in HEK293 cells with anti-PD1 antibody as the model protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Kai; Han, Lei; Zong, Huifang; Chen, Junsheng; Zhang, Baohong; Zhu, Jianwei

    2017-03-01

    Demonstration of reproducibility and consistency of process and product quality is one of the most crucial issues in using transient gene expression (TGE) technology for biopharmaceutical development. In this study, we challenged the production consistency of TGE by expressing nine batches of recombinant IgG antibody in human embryonic kidney 293 cells to evaluate reproducibility including viable cell density, viability, apoptotic status, and antibody yield in cell culture supernatant. Product quality including isoelectric point, binding affinity, secondary structure, and thermal stability was assessed as well. In addition, major glycan forms of antibody from different batches of production were compared to demonstrate glycosylation consistency. Glycan compositions of the antibody harvested at different time periods were also measured to illustrate N-glycan distribution over the culture time. From the results, it has been demonstrated that different TGE batches are reproducible from lot to lot in overall cell growth, product yield, and product qualities including isoelectric point, binding affinity, secondary structure, and thermal stability. Furthermore, major N-glycan compositions are consistent among different TGE batches and conserved during cell culture time.

  15. Autobiography and Anorexia: A Qualitative Alternative to Prochaska and DiClemente's Stages of Change Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Díaz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we propose a qualitative approach to the study of the ways in which people face good and poor health issues. During the last 30 years, Prochaska and DiClemente's "trans-theoretical model" (1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1992 has gained relevance as a model to assess disposition for change in patients. We revise the features of the model and its common techniques to assess stages of change, underlining its methodological and conceptual problems. Particularly, we discuss the paradoxes set by "pre-contemplation" as a concept; the exogenous definition of human problems in terms of institutional and clinical criteria; and the ambiguity of the model, where the purpose of accompanying and orienting the patient contrasts with the imposition of problem definitions and solution strategies. We propose a narrative analysis of autobiographies of patients as an alternative that recasts their own notions of "change," "problem," and "vital trajectory." We illustrate this possibility with the analysis of an autobiographic interview with a woman who has a history of anorexia. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1203209

  16. Contextual sensitivity in scientific reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bavel, Jay J; Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Brady, William J; Reinero, Diego A

    2016-06-07

    In recent years, scientists have paid increasing attention to reproducibility. For example, the Reproducibility Project, a large-scale replication attempt of 100 studies published in top psychology journals found that only 39% could be unambiguously reproduced. There is a growing consensus among scientists that the lack of reproducibility in psychology and other fields stems from various methodological factors, including low statistical power, researcher's degrees of freedom, and an emphasis on publishing surprising positive results. However, there is a contentious debate about the extent to which failures to reproduce certain results might also reflect contextual differences (often termed "hidden moderators") between the original research and the replication attempt. Although psychologists have found extensive evidence that contextual factors alter behavior, some have argued that context is unlikely to influence the results of direct replications precisely because these studies use the same methods as those used in the original research. To help resolve this debate, we recoded the 100 original studies from the Reproducibility Project on the extent to which the research topic of each study was contextually sensitive. Results suggested that the contextual sensitivity of the research topic was associated with replication success, even after statistically adjusting for several methodological characteristics (e.g., statistical power, effect size). The association between contextual sensitivity and replication success did not differ across psychological subdisciplines. These results suggest that researchers, replicators, and consumers should be mindful of contextual factors that might influence a psychological process. We offer several guidelines for dealing with contextual sensitivity in reproducibility.

  17. Hyperbolic L2-modules with Reproducing Kernels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David EELPODE; Frank SOMMEN

    2006-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, the Dirac operator on the Klein model for the hyperbolic space is considered. A function space containing L2-functions on the sphere Sm-1 in (R)m, which are boundary values of solutions for this operator, is defined, and it is proved that this gives rise to a Hilbert module with a reproducing kernel.

  18. Comparing Reasons for Quitting Substance Abuse with the Constructs of Behavioral Models: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Tavakoli Ghouchani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The world population has reached over seven billion people. Of these, 230 million individuals abuse substances. Therefore, substance abuse prevention and treatment programs have received increasing attention during the past two decades. Understanding people’s motivations for quitting drug abuse is essential to the success of treatment. This study hence sought to identify major motivations for quitting and to compare them with the constructs of health education models. Materials and Methods: In the present study, qualitative content analysis was used to determine the main motivations for quitting substance abuse. Overall, 22 patients, physicians, and psychotherapists were selected from several addiction treatment clinics in Bojnord (Iran during 2014. Purposeful sampling method was applied and continued until data saturation was achieved. Data were collected through semi-structured, face-to-face interviews and field notes. All interviews were recorded and transcribed. Results: Content analysis revealed 33 sub-categories and nine categories including economic problems, drug-related concerns, individual problems, family and social problems, family expectations, attention to social status, beliefs about drug addiction, and valuing the quitting behavior. Accordingly, four themes, i.e. perceived threat, perceived barriers, attitude toward the behavior, and subjective norms, were extracted. Conclusion: Reasons for quitting substance abuse match the constructs of different behavioral models (e.g. the health belief model and the theory of planned behavior.

  19. A qualitative assessment of a community antiretroviral therapy group model in Tete, Mozambique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freya Rasschaert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To improve retention on ART, Médecins Sans Frontières, the Ministry of Health and patients piloted a community-based antiretroviral distribution and adherence monitoring model through Community ART Groups (CAG in Tete, Mozambique. By December 2012, almost 6000 patients on ART had formed groups of whom 95.7% were retained in care. We conducted a qualitative study to evaluate the relevance, dynamic and impact of the CAG model on patients, their communities and the healthcare system. METHODS: Between October 2011 and May 2012, we conducted 16 focus group discussions and 24 in-depth interviews with the major stakeholders involved in the CAG model. Audio-recorded data were transcribed verbatim and analysed using a grounded theory approach. RESULTS: Six key themes emerged from the data: 1 Barriers to access HIV care, 2 CAG functioning and actors involved, 3 Benefits for CAG members, 4 Impacts of CAG beyond the group members, 5 Setbacks, and 6 Acceptance and future expectations of the CAG model. The model provides cost and time savings, certainty of ART access and mutual peer support resulting in better adherence to treatment. Through the active role of patients, HIV information could be conveyed to the broader community, leading to an increased uptake of services and positive transformation of the identity of people living with HIV. Potential pitfalls included limited access to CAG for those most vulnerable to defaulting, some inequity to patients in individual ART care and a high dependency on counsellors. CONCLUSION: The CAG model resulted in active patient involvement and empowerment, and the creation of a supportive environment improving the ART retention. It also sparked a reorientation of healthcare services towards the community and strengthened community actions. Successful implementation and scalability requires (a the acceptance of patients as partners in health, (b adequate resources, and (c a well-functioning monitoring and

  20. Selection mechanisms underlying high impact biomedical research--a qualitative analysis and causal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary Zelko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although scientific innovation has been a long-standing topic of interest for historians, philosophers and cognitive scientists, few studies in biomedical research have examined from researchers' perspectives how high impact publications are developed and why they are consistently produced by a small group of researchers. Our objective was therefore to interview a group of researchers with a track record of high impact publications to explore what mechanism they believe contribute to the generation of high impact publications. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Researchers were located in universities all over the globe and interviews were conducted by phone. All interviews were transcribed using standard qualitative methods. A Grounded Theory approach was used to code each transcript, later aggregating concept and categories into overarching explanation model. The model was then translated into a System Dynamics mathematical model to represent its structure and behavior. Five emerging themes were found in our study. First, researchers used heuristics or rules of thumb that came naturally to them. Second, these heuristics were reinforced by positive feedback from their peers and mentors. Third, good communication skills allowed researchers to provide feedback to their peers, thus closing a positive feedback loop. Fourth, researchers exhibited a number of psychological attributes such as curiosity or open-mindedness that constantly motivated them, even when faced with discouraging situations. Fifth, the system is dominated by randomness and serendipity and is far from a linear and predictable environment. Some researchers, however, took advantage of this randomness by incorporating mechanisms that would allow them to benefit from random findings. The aggregation of these themes into a policy model represented the overall expected behavior of publications and their impact achieved by high impact researchers. CONCLUSIONS: The proposed

  1. Effectively Communicating Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Grieger, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    This article is a guide for counseling researchers wishing to communicate the methods and results of their qualitative research to varied audiences. The authors posit that the first step in effectively communicating qualitative research is the development of strong qualitative research skills. To this end, the authors review a process model for…

  2. The establishment and external validation of NIR qualitative analysis model for waste polyester-cotton blend fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Li, Wen-Xia; Zhao, Guo-Liang; Tang, Shi-Jun; Li, Xue-Jiao; Wu, Hong-Mei

    2014-10-01

    A series of 354 polyester-cotton blend fabrics were studied by the near-infrared spectra (NIRS) technology, and a NIR qualitative analysis model for different spectral characteristics was established by partial least squares (PLS) method combined with qualitative identification coefficient. There were two types of spectrum for dying polyester-cotton blend fabrics: normal spectrum and slash spectrum. The slash spectrum loses its spectral characteristics, which are effected by the samples' dyes, pigments, matting agents and other chemical additives. It was in low recognition rate when the model was established by the total sample set, so the samples were divided into two types of sets: normal spectrum sample set and slash spectrum sample set, and two NIR qualitative analysis models were established respectively. After the of models were established the model's spectral region, pretreatment methods and factors were optimized based on the validation results, and the robustness and reliability of the model can be improved lately. The results showed that the model recognition rate was improved greatly when they were established respectively, the recognition rate reached up to 99% when the two models were verified by the internal validation. RC (relation coefficient of calibration) values of the normal spectrum model and slash spectrum model were 0.991 and 0.991 respectively, RP (relation coefficient of prediction) values of them were 0.983 and 0.984 respectively, SEC (standard error of calibration) values of them were 0.887 and 0.453 respectively, SEP (standard error of prediction) values of them were 1.131 and 0.573 respectively. A series of 150 bounds samples reached used to verify the normal spectrum model and slash spectrum model and the recognition rate reached up to 91.33% and 88.00% respectively. It showed that the NIR qualitative analysis model can be used for identification in the recycle site for the polyester-cotton blend fabrics.

  3. Preliminary clinical nursing leadership competency model: a qualitative study from Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supamanee, Treeyaphan; Krairiksh, Marisa; Singhakhumfu, Laddawan; Turale, Sue

    2011-12-01

    This qualitative study explored the clinical nursing leadership competency perspectives of Thai nurses working in a university hospital. To collect data, in-depth interviews were undertaken with 23 nurse administrators, and focus groups were used with 31 registered nurses. Data were analyzed using content analysis, and theory development was guided by the Iceberg model. Nurses' clinical leadership competencies emerged, comprising hidden characteristics and surface characteristics. The hidden characteristics composed three elements: motive (respect from the nursing and healthcare team and being secure in life), self-concept (representing positive attitudes and values), and traits (personal qualities necessary for leadership). The surface characteristics comprised specific knowledge of nurse leaders about clinical leadership, management and nursing informatics, and clinical skills, such as coordination, effective communication, problem solving, and clinical decision-making. The study findings help nursing to gain greater knowledge of the essence of clinical nursing leadership competencies, a matter critical for theory development in leadership. This study's results later led to the instigation of a training program for registered nurse leaders at the study site, and the formation of a preliminary clinical nursing leadership competency model.

  4. Agrometeorological models for forecasting the qualitative attributes of "Valência" oranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreto, Victor Brunini; Rolim, Glauco de Souza; Zacarin, Bruno Gustavo; Vanin, Ana Paula; de Souza, Leone Maia; Latado, Rodrigo Rocha

    2016-09-01

    Forecasting is the act of predicting unknown future events using available data. Estimating, in contrast, uses data to simulate an actual condition. Brazil is the world's largest producer of oranges, and the state of São Paulo is the largest producer in Brazil. The "Valência" orange is among the most common cultivars in the state. We analyzed the influence of monthly meteorological variables during the growth cycle of Valência oranges grafted onto "Rangpur" lime rootstocks (VACR) for São Paulo, and developed monthly agrometeorological models for forecasting the qualitative attributes of VACR in mature orchard. For fruits per box for all months, the best accuracy was of 0.84 % and the minimum forecast range of 4 months. For the relation between °brix and juice acidity (RATIO) the best accuracy was of 0.69 % and the minimum forecast range of 5 months. Minimum, mean and maximum air temperatures, and relative evapotranspiration were the most important variables in the models.

  5. The Reflective Model of Intercultural Competency: A Multidimensional, Qualitative Approach to Study Abroad Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tracy Rundstrom

    2009-01-01

    Judging from the recent surge in research on outcomes assessment, many study abroad offices rely on quantitative surveys and measures to collect student outcomes data. This paper presents a multidimensional, qualitative approach to data collection. This approach makes qualitative data easy to collect and encourages students to reflect and…

  6. Qualitative mathematical models to support ecosystem-based management of Australia's Northern Prawn Fishery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambacher, Jeffrey M; Rothlisberg, Peter C; Loneragan, Neil R

    2015-01-01

    A major decline in the catch of the banana prawn [shrimp], Penaeus (Fenneropenaeus) merguiensis, occurred over a six-year period in the Weipa region of the northeastern Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia. Three main hypotheses have been developed to explain this decline: (1) prawn recruitment collapsed due to overfishing; (2) recruitment collapsed due to a change in the prawn's environment; and (3) adult banana prawns were still present, but fishers could no longer effectively find or catch them. Qualitative mathematical models were used to link population biology, environmental factors, and fishery dynamics to evaluate the alternative hypotheses. This modeling approach provides the means to rapidly integrate knowledge across disciplines and consider alternative hypotheses about how the structure and function of an ecosystem affects its dynamics. Alternative models were constructed to address the different hypotheses and also to encompass a diversity of opinion about the underlying dynamics of the system. Key findings from these analyses are that: instability in the system can arise when discarded fishery bycatch supports relatively high predation pressure; system stability can be enhanced by management of fishing effort or stock catchability; catch per unit effort is not necessarily a reliable indicator of stock abundance; a change in early-season rainfall should affect all stages in the banana prawn's life cycle; and a reduced catch in the Weipa region can create and reinforce a shift in fishing effort away from Weipa. Results from the models informed an approach to test the hypotheses (i.e., an experimental fishing program), and promoted understanding of the system among researchers, management agencies, and industry. The analytical tools developed in this work to address stages of a prawn life cycle and fishery dynamics are generally applicable to any exploited natural. resource.

  7. Qualitative studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Qualitative Studies (QS) aims to become a central forum for discussions of qualitative research in psychology, education, communication, cultural studies, health sciences and social sciences in general...

  8. The Maudsley Model of Family-Based Treatment for Anorexia Nervosa: A Qualitative Evaluation of Parent-to-Parent Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Paul; Brown, Jac; Madden, Sloane

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the qualitative analysis of a randomized control trial that explores the use of parent-to-parent consultations as an augmentation to the Maudsley model of family-based treatment for anorexia. Twenty families were randomized into two groups, 10 receiving standard treatment and 10 receiving an additional parent-to-parent…

  9. Qualitative Contrast between Knowledge-Limited Mixed-State and Variable-Resources Models of Visual Change Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosofsky, Robert M.; Donkin, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We report an experiment designed to provide a qualitative contrast between knowledge-limited versions of mixed-state and variable-resources (VR) models of visual change detection. The key data pattern is that observers often respond "same" on big-change trials, while simultaneously being able to discriminate between same and small-change…

  10. The Maudsley Model of Family-Based Treatment for Anorexia Nervosa: A Qualitative Evaluation of Parent-to-Parent Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Paul; Brown, Jac; Madden, Sloane

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the qualitative analysis of a randomized control trial that explores the use of parent-to-parent consultations as an augmentation to the Maudsley model of family-based treatment for anorexia. Twenty families were randomized into two groups, 10 receiving standard treatment and 10 receiving an additional parent-to-parent…

  11. Life Story of Chinese College Students with Perfectionism Personality: A Qualitative Study Based on a Life Story Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Min; Zi, Fei

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript aims to explore and delineate the common characteristics of college students with perfectionism, to promote an in-depth understanding of dynamic personality development of perfectionists from the views of life story model proposed by McAdams (1985). The researchers adopted a narrative qualitative research method. The life stories…

  12. Three-feature model to reproduce the topology of citation networks and the effects from authors' visibility on their h-index

    CERN Document Server

    Amancio, Diego R; Costa, Luciano da F; 10.1016/j.joi.2012.02.005

    2013-01-01

    Various factors are believed to govern the selection of references in citation networks, but a precise, quantitative determination of their importance has remained elusive. In this paper, we show that three factors can account for the referencing pattern of citation networks for two topics, namely "graphenes" and "complex networks", thus allowing one to reproduce the topological features of the networks built with papers being the nodes and the edges established by citations. The most relevant factor was content similarity, while the other two - in-degree (i.e. citation counts) and {age of publication} had varying importance depending on the topic studied. This dependence indicates that additional factors could play a role. Indeed, by intuition one should expect the reputation (or visibility) of authors and/or institutions to affect the referencing pattern, and this is only indirectly considered via the in-degree that should correlate with such reputation. Because information on reputation is not readily avai...

  13. A method to isolate bacterial communities and characterize ecosystems from food products: Validation and utilization in as a reproducible chicken meat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouger, Amélie; Remenant, Benoit; Prévost, Hervé; Zagorec, Monique

    2017-04-17

    Influenced by production and storage processes and by seasonal changes the diversity of meat products microbiota can be very variable. Because microbiotas influence meat quality and safety, characterizing and understanding their dynamics during processing and storage is important for proposing innovative and efficient storage conditions. Challenge tests are usually performed using meat from the same batch, inoculated at high levels with one or few strains. Such experiments do not reflect the true microbial situation, and the global ecosystem is not taken into account. Our purpose was to constitute live stocks of chicken meat microbiotas to create standard and reproducible ecosystems. We searched for the best method to collect contaminating bacterial communities from chicken cuts to store as frozen aliquots. We tested several methods to extract DNA of these stored communities for subsequent PCR amplification. We determined the best moment to collect bacteria in sufficient amounts during the product shelf life. Results showed that the rinsing method associated to the use of Mobio DNA extraction kit was the most reliable method to collect bacteria and obtain DNA for subsequent PCR amplification. Then, 23 different chicken meat microbiotas were collected using this procedure. Microbiota aliquots were stored at -80°C without important loss of viability. Their characterization by cultural methods confirmed the large variability (richness and abundance) of bacterial communities present on chicken cuts. Four of these bacterial communities were used to estimate their ability to regrow on meat matrices. Challenge tests performed on sterile matrices showed that these microbiotas were successfully inoculated and could overgrow the natural microbiota of chicken meat. They can therefore be used for performing reproducible challenge tests mimicking a true meat ecosystem and enabling the possibility to test the influence of various processing or storage conditions on complex meat

  14. Business Models, Vaccination Services, and Public Health Relationships of Retail Clinics: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Bayo C; Fisher, Allison Kennedy; Shoemaker, Sarah J; Pozniak, Alyssa; Stokley, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Despite the rapid growth of retail clinics (RCs), literature is limited in terms of how these facilities offer preventive services, particularly vaccination services. The purpose of this study was to obtain an in-depth understanding of the RC business model pertaining to vaccine offerings, profitability, and decision making. From March to June 2009, we conducted 15 interviews with key individuals from three types of organizations: 12 representatives of RC corporations, 2 representatives of retail hosts (i.e., stores in which the RCs are located), and 1 representative of an industry association. We analyzed interview transcripts qualitatively. Our results indicate that consumer demand and profitability were the main drivers in offering vaccinations. RCs in this sample primarily offered vaccinations to adults and adolescents, and they were not well integrated with local public health and immunization registries. Our findings demonstrate the potential for stronger linkages with public health in these settings. The findings also may help inform future research to increase patient access to vaccination services at RCs.

  15. Experienced Practitioners’ Beliefs Utilized to Create a Successful Massage Therapist Conceptual Model: a Qualitative Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Anne B.; Munk, Niki

    2017-01-01

    Background The massage therapy profession in the United States has grown exponentially, with 35% of the profession’s practitioners in practice for three years or less. Investigating personal and social factors with regard to the massage therapy profession could help to identify constructs needed to be successful in the field. Purpose This data-gathering exercise explores massage therapists’ perceptions on what makes a successful massage therapist that will provide guidance for future research. Success is defined as supporting oneself and practice solely through massage therapy and related, revenue-generating field activity. Participants and Setting Ten successful massage therapy practitioners from around the United States who have a minimum of five years of experience. Research Design Semistructured qualitative interviews were used in an analytic induction framework; index cards with preidentified concepts printed on them were utilized to enhance conversation. An iterative process of interview coding and analysis was used to determine themes and subthemes. Results Based on the participants input, the categories in which therapists needed to be successful were organized into four main themes: effectively establish therapeutic relationships, develop massage therapy business acumen, seek valuable learning environments and opportunities, and cultivate strong social ties and networks. The four themes operate within specific contexts (e.g., regulation and licensing requirements in the therapists’ state), which may also influence the success of the massage therapist. Conclusions The model needs to be tested to explore which constructs explain variability in success and attrition rate. Limitations and future research implications are discussed. PMID:28690704

  16. Designing a Qualitative Model of Doping Phenomenon Effect on Sport Marketing in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasem Manouchehri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There a number of factors effecting consumers' purchase behavior. It is believed that celebrities can effect selling positively by transferring their popular image to the endorsed product. But, it is heard lots about excommunicate behaviors in the sport world today. Disclosure of the recent doping affairs relating to Lance Armstrong's seven wins in Tour De France is just one among many spectacular and also negative cases. The main aim of the present paper was to explore the effect of doping phenomenon on sport marketing. Depth interviews data were analyzed in three phases: open coding, axial coding, and selective coding. 297 open codes were achieved by 18 interviews. Grouping axial codes in each case and comparing, all gained codes can be divided in five groups: brand image (athlete and endorsed product brands images, moral reasoning (moral coupling, moral decoupling, and moral rationalization, consumer behavioral consequences (word of mouth, purchasing intention, and brand loyalty, attitude change (attitudes change toward athlete and brand, and moral emotions (moral evaluation, contempt, anger, disgust, and sympathy. The proposed qualitative model for the effect of doping phenomenon on sport marketing in Iran illustrated that moral emotions and product brand image affected by the doped athlete brand image and it resulted in attitudes change toward endorser athlete and endorsed brand and negative consumer behavioral consequences, however, moral reasoning strategies emerged by cognitive dissonance might protect consumers behavior from negative effects.

  17. Spiraling between qualitative and quantitative data on women's health behaviors: a double helix model for mixed methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendlinger, Sheryl; Cwikel, Julie

    2008-02-01

    A double helix spiral model is presented which demonstrates how to combine qualitative and quantitative methods of inquiry in an interactive fashion over time. Using findings on women's health behaviors (e.g., menstruation, breast-feeding, coping strategies), we show how qualitative and quantitative methods highlight the theory of knowledge acquisition in women's health decisions. A rich data set of 48 semistructured, in-depth ethnographic interviews with mother-daughter dyads from six ethnic groups (Israeli, European, North African, Former Soviet Union [FSU], American/Canadian, and Ethiopian), plus seven focus groups, provided the qualitative sources for analysis. This data set formed the basis of research questions used in a quantitative telephone survey of 302 Israeli women from the ages of 25 to 42 from four ethnic groups. We employed multiple cycles of data analysis from both data sets to produce a more detailed and multidimensional picture of women's health behavior decisions through a spiraling process.

  18. Qualitative evaluation of adherence therapy in Parkinson’s disease: a multidirectional model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daley DJ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available David James Daley,1,2 Katherine Helen O’Leary Deane,3 Richard John Gray,4 Rebekah Hill,3 Phyo Kyaw Myint5 1Norwich Medical School, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, 2Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, 3School of Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, UK; 4Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar; 5Epidemiology Group, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Institute of Applied Health Sciences, College of Life Sciences and Medicine, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK Background: Medication can control the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Despite this, non-adherence with medication is prevalent in PD. Treatments for improving adherence with medication have been investigated in many chronic conditions, including PD. However, few researchers have evaluated their interventions qualitatively. We investigated the acceptability and potential mechanism of action of adherence therapy (AT in PD patients and their spouse/carers who received the intervention as part of a randomized controlled trial. Methods: Sixteen participants (ten patients and six spouses/carers who had recently completed the trial were purposely selected in order to cover a range of ages and disease severity. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in the participants’ homes. Data were transcribed and analyzed using a thematic approach. A second researcher, naïve to PD and AT, analyzed the data independently to limit bias. Results: The trial showed that AT significantly improved both medication adherence and quality of life in people with PD. Specifically, patients who received AT reported improvements in mobility, activities of daily living, emotional wellbeing, cognition, communication, and body discomfort. General beliefs about medication also significantly improved in those who received AT compared with controls. In the current qualitative evaluation, a

  19. QSTR modeling for qualitative and quantitative toxicity predictions of diverse chemical pesticides in honey bee for regulatory purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kunwar P; Gupta, Shikha; Basant, Nikita; Mohan, Dinesh

    2014-09-15

    Pesticides are designed toxic chemicals for specific purposes and can harm nontarget species as well. The honey bee is considered a nontarget test species for toxicity evaluation of chemicals. Global QSTR (quantitative structure-toxicity relationship) models were established for qualitative and quantitative toxicity prediction of pesticides in honey bee (Apis mellifera) based on the experimental toxicity data of 237 structurally diverse pesticides. Structural diversity of the chemical pesticides and nonlinear dependence in the toxicity data were evaluated using the Tanimoto similarity index and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman statistics. Probabilistic neural network (PNN) and generalized regression neural network (GRNN) QSTR models were constructed for classification (two and four categories) and function optimization problems using the toxicity end point in honey bees. The predictive power of the QSTR models was tested through rigorous validation performed using the internal and external procedures employing a wide series of statistical checks. In complete data, the PNN-QSTR model rendered a classification accuracy of 96.62% (two-category) and 95.57% (four-category), while the GRNN-QSTR model yielded a correlation (R(2)) of 0.841 between the measured and predicted toxicity values with a mean squared error (MSE) of 0.22. The results suggest the appropriateness of the developed QSTR models for reliably predicting qualitative and quantitative toxicities of pesticides in honey bee. Both the PNN and GRNN based QSTR models constructed here can be useful tools in predicting the qualitative and quantitative toxicities of the new chemical pesticides for regulatory purposes.

  20. Configurational Model for Conductivity of Stabilized Fluorite Structure Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Finn Willy

    1981-01-01

    The formalism developed here furnishes means by which ionic configurations, solid solution limits, and conductivity mechanisms in doped fluorite structures can be described. The present model differs markedly from previous models but reproduces qualitatively reality. The analysis reported...

  1. Reproducible Bioinformatics Research for Biologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book chapter describes the current Big Data problem in Bioinformatics and the resulting issues with performing reproducible computational research. The core of the chapter provides guidelines and summaries of current tools/techniques that a noncomputational researcher would need to learn to pe...

  2. Evaluation of multichannel reproduced sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choisel, Sylvain; Wickelmaier, Florian Maria

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted with the goal of quantifying auditory attributes which underlie listener preference for multichannel reproduced sound. Short musical excerpts were presented in mono, stereo and several multichannel formats to a panel of forty selected listeners. Scaling of auditory attributes...

  3. [Reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grein, H-J; Schmidt, O; Ritsche, A

    2014-11-01

    Reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement is limited by various factors. The main factors affecting reproducibility include the characteristics of the measurement method and of the subject and the examiner. This article presents the results of a study on this topic, focusing on the reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement in healthy eyes. The results of previous studies are not all presented in the same way by the respective authors and cannot be fully standardized without consulting the original scientific data. To the extent that they are comparable, the results of our study largely correspond largely with those of previous investigations: During repeated subjective refraction measurement, 95% of the deviation from the mean value was approximately ±0.2 D to ±0.65 D for the spherical equivalent and cylindrical power. The reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement in healthy eyes is limited, even under ideal conditions. Correct assessment of refraction results is only feasible after identifying individual variability. Several measurements are required. Refraction cannot be measured without a tolerance range. The English full-text version of this article is available at SpringerLink (under supplemental).

  4. Reproducible research in computational science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Roger D

    2011-12-02

    Computational science has led to exciting new developments, but the nature of the work has exposed limitations in our ability to evaluate published findings. Reproducibility has the potential to serve as a minimum standard for judging scientific claims when full independent replication of a study is not possible.

  5. The explanatory models of depression and anxiety in primary care: a qualitative study from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Gracy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biggest barrier to treatment of common mental disorders in primary care settings is low recognition among health care providers. This study attempts to explore the explanatory models of common mental disorders (CMD with the goal of identifying how they could help in improving the recognition, leading to effective treatment in primary care. Results The paper describes findings of a cross sectional qualitative study nested within a large randomized controlled trial (the Manas trial. Semi structured interviews were conducted with 117 primary health care attendees (30 males and 87 females suffering from CMD. Main findings of the study are that somatic phenomena were by far the most frequent presenting problems; however, psychological phenomena were relatively easily elicited on probing. Somatic phenomena were located within a biopsychosocial framework, and a substantial proportion of informants used the psychological construct of ‘tension’ or ‘worry’ to label their illness, but did not consider themselves as suffering from a ‘mental disorder’. Very few gender differences were observed in the descriptions of symptoms but at the same time the pattern of adverse life events and social difficulties varied across gender. Conclusion Our study demonstrates how people present their illness through somatic complaints but clearly link their illness to their psychosocial world. However they do not associate their illness to a ‘mental disorder’ and this is an important phenomenon that needs to be recognized in management of CMD in primary settings. Our study also elicits important gender differences in the experience of CMD.

  6. Disease management projects and the Chronic Care Model in action: baseline qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Bethany Hipple; Adams, Samantha A; Nieboer, Anna P; Bal, Roland

    2012-05-11

    Disease management programs, especially those based on the Chronic Care Model (CCM), are increasingly common in The Netherlands. While disease management programs have been well-researched quantitatively and economically, less qualitative research has been done. The overall aim of the study is to explore how disease management programs are implemented within primary care settings in The Netherlands; this paper focuses on the early development and implementation stages of five disease management programs in the primary care setting, based on interviews with project leadership teams. Eleven semi-structured interviews were conducted at the five selected sites with sixteen professionals interviewed; all project directors and managers were interviewed. The interviews focused on each project's chosen chronic illness (diabetes, eating disorders, COPD, multi-morbidity, CVRM) and project plan, barriers to development and implementation, the project leaders' action and reactions, as well as their roles and responsibilities, and disease management strategies. Analysis was inductive and interpretive, based on the content of the interviews. After analysis, the results of this research on disease management programs and the Chronic Care Model are viewed from a traveling technology framework. This analysis uncovered four themes that can be mapped to disease management and the Chronic Care Model: (1) changing the health care system, (2) patient-centered care, (3) technological systems and barriers, and (4) integrating projects into the larger system. Project leaders discussed the paths, both direct and indirect, for transforming the health care system to one that addresses chronic illness. Patient-centered care was highlighted as needed and a paradigm shift for many. Challenges with technological systems were pervasive. Project leaders managed the expenses of a traveling technology, including the social, financial, and administration involved. At the sites, project leaders served

  7. Accuracy and reproducibility of patient-specific hemodynamic models of stented intracranial aneurysms: report on the Virtual Intracranial Stenting Challenge 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cito, S; Geers, A J; Arroyo, M P; Palero, V R; Pallarés, J; Vernet, A; Blasco, J; San Román, L; Fu, W; Qiao, A; Janiga, G; Miura, Y; Ohta, M; Mendina, M; Usera, G; Frangi, A F

    2015-01-01

    Validation studies are prerequisites for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to be accepted as part of clinical decision-making. This paper reports on the 2011 edition of the Virtual Intracranial Stenting Challenge. The challenge aimed to assess the reproducibility with which research groups can simulate the velocity field in an intracranial aneurysm, both untreated and treated with five different configurations of high-porosity stents. Particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) measurements were obtained to validate the untreated velocity field. Six participants, totaling three CFD solvers, were provided with surface meshes of the vascular geometry and the deployed stent geometries, and flow rate boundary conditions for all inlets and outlets. As output, they were invited to submit an abstract to the 8th International Interdisciplinary Cerebrovascular Symposium 2011 (ICS'11), outlining their methods and giving their interpretation of the performance of each stent configuration. After the challenge, all CFD solutions were collected and analyzed. To quantitatively analyze the data, we calculated the root-mean-square error (RMSE) over uniformly distributed nodes on a plane slicing the main flow jet along its axis and normalized it with the maximum velocity on the slice of the untreated case (NRMSE). Good agreement was found between CFD and PIV with a NRMSE of 7.28%. Excellent agreement was found between CFD solutions, both untreated and treated. The maximum difference between any two groups (along a line perpendicular to the main flow jet) was 4.0 mm/s, i.e. 4.1% of the maximum velocity of the untreated case, and the average NRMSE was 0.47% (range 0.28-1.03%). In conclusion, given geometry and flow rates, research groups can accurately simulate the velocity field inside an intracranial aneurysm-as assessed by comparison with in vitro measurements-and find excellent agreement on the hemodynamic effect of different stent configurations.

  8. Reproducibility of NIF hohlraum measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, J. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Turnbull, D. P.; Casey, D. T.; Albert, F.; Bachmann, B. L.; Doeppner, T.; Divol, L.; Grim, G. P.; Hoover, M.; Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B. J.; Michel, P. A.; Moore, A. S.; Pino, J. E.; Schneider, M. B.; Tipton, R. E.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Strozzi, D. J.; Widmann, K.; Hohenberger, M.

    2015-11-01

    The strategy of experimentally ``tuning'' the implosion in a NIF hohlraum ignition target towards increasing hot-spot pressure, areal density of compressed fuel, and neutron yield relies on a level of experimental reproducibility. We examine the reproducibility of experimental measurements for a collection of 15 identical NIF hohlraum experiments. The measurements include incident laser power, backscattered optical power, x-ray measurements, hot-electron fraction and energy, and target characteristics. We use exact statistics to set 1-sigma confidence levels on the variations in each of the measurements. Of particular interest is the backscatter and laser-induced hot-spot locations on the hohlraum wall. Hohlraum implosion designs typically include variability specifications [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. We describe our findings and compare with the specifications. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  9. Managing depression in people with multimorbidity: a qualitative evaluation of an integrated collaborative care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Sarah E; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Adeyemi, Isabel; Coupe, Nia; Coventry, Peter A

    2015-03-05

    Patients with comorbid depression and physical health problems have poorer outcomes compared with those with single long term conditions (LTCs), or multiple LTCs without depression. Primary care has traditionally struggled to provide integrated care for this group. Collaborative care can reduce depression in people with LTCs but evidence is largely based on trials conducted in the United States that adopted separate treat to target protocols for physical and mental health. Little is known about whether collaborative care that integrates depression care within the management of LTCs is implementable in UK primary care, and acceptable to patients and health care professionals. Nested interview study within the COINCIDE trial of collaborative care for patients with depression and diabetes/CHD (ISRCTN80309252). The study was conducted in primary care practices in North West England. Professionals delivering the interventions (nurses, GPs and psychological well-being practitioners) and patients in the intervention arm were invited to participate in semi-structured qualitative interviews. Based on combined thematic analysis of 59 transcripts, we identified two major themes: 1) Integration: patients and professionals valued collaborative ways of working because it enhanced co-ordination of mental and physical health care and provided a sense that patients' health was being more holistically managed. 2) Division: patients and professionals articulated a preference for therapeutic and spatial separation between mental and physical health. Patients especially valued a separate space outside of their LTC clinic to discuss their emotional health problems. The COINCIDE care model, that sought to integrate depression care within the context of LTC management, achieved service level integration but not therapeutic integration. Patients preferred a protected space to discuss mental health issues, and professionals maintained barriers around physical and mental health expertise

  10. Shortening the learning curve in endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery: a reproducible polymer tumor model for the trans-sphenoidal trans-tubercular approach to retro-infundibular tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhouma, Moncef; Baidya, Nishanta B; Ismaïl, Abdelhay A; Zhang, Jun; Ammirati, Mario

    2013-09-01

    Endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery attracts an increasing number of young neurosurgeons. This recent technique requires specific technical skills for the approaches to non-pituitary tumors (expanded endoscopic endonasal surgery). Actual residents' busy schedules carry the risk of compromising their laboratory training by limiting significantly the dedicated time for dissections. To enhance and shorten the learning curve in expanded endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery, we propose a reproducible model based on the implantation of a polymer via an intracranial route to provide a pathological retro-infundibular expansive lesion accessible to a virgin expanded endoscopic endonasal route, avoiding the ethically-debatable need to hundreds of pituitary cases in live patients before acquiring the desired skills. A polymer-based tumor model was implanted in 6 embalmed human heads via a microsurgical right fronto-temporal approach through the carotido-oculomotor cistern to mimic a retro-infundibular tumor. The tumor's position was verified by CT-scan. An endoscopic endonasal trans-sphenoidal trans-tubercular trans-planum approach was then carried out on a virgin route under neuronavigation tracking. Dissection of the tumor model from displaced surrounding neurovascular structures reproduced live surgery's sensations and challenges. Post-implantation CT-scan allowed the pre-removal assessment of the tumor insertion, its relationships as well as naso-sphenoidal anatomy in preparation of the endoscopic approach. Training on easily reproducible retro-infundibular approaches in a context of pathological distorted anatomy provides a unique opportunity to avoid the need for repetitive live surgeries to acquire skills for this kind of rare tumors, and may shorten the learning curve for endoscopic endonasal surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Modeling Virtual Healthcare Systems: Methods for Qualitative Case Analysis and Sociometry of Institutional Infrastructures

    OpenAIRE

    Séror, Ann

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a strategy for the qualitative analysis of virtual institutional infrastructures serving complex healthcare systems. Methodologies considered include case analysis, grounded theory, and sociometry. The discussion is illustrated with references to case analyses of diverse healthcare systems. Particular attention is focused on ideological values expressed in market dynamics and system control structures.

  12. Modeling virtual healthcare systems: methods for qualitative case analysis and sociometry of institutional infrastructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séror, Ann

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a strategy for the qualitative analysis of virtual institutional infrastructures serving complex healthcare systems. Methodologies considered include case analysis, grounded theory, and sociometry. The discussion is illustrated with references to case analyses of diverse healthcare systems. Particular attention is focused on ideological values expressed in market dynamics and system control structures.

  13. Co-Designing and Co-Teaching Graduate Qualitative Methods: An Innovative Ethnographic Workshop Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordner, Alissa; Klein, Peter T.; Baiocchi, Gianpaolo

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an innovative collaboration between graduate students and a faculty member to co-design and co-teach a graduate-level workshop-style qualitative methods course. The goal of co-designing and co-teaching the course was to involve advanced graduate students in all aspects of designing a syllabus and leading class discussions in…

  14. Co-Designing and Co-Teaching Graduate Qualitative Methods: An Innovative Ethnographic Workshop Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordner, Alissa; Klein, Peter T.; Baiocchi, Gianpaolo

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an innovative collaboration between graduate students and a faculty member to co-design and co-teach a graduate-level workshop-style qualitative methods course. The goal of co-designing and co-teaching the course was to involve advanced graduate students in all aspects of designing a syllabus and leading class discussions in…

  15. Probability of identification (POI): a statistical model for the validation of qualitative botanical identification methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    A qualitative botanical identification method (BIM) is an analytical procedure which returns a binary result (1 = Identified, 0 = Not Identified). A BIM may be used by a buyer, manufacturer, or regulator to determine whether a botanical material being tested is the same as the target (desired) mate...

  16. Characterization and optimization of experimental variables within a reproducible bladder encrustation model and in vitro evaluation of the efficacy of urease inhibitors for the prevention of medical device-related encrustation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David S; Djokic, Jasmina; Gorman, Sean P

    2006-01-01

    This study presents a reproducible, cost-effective in vitro encrustation model and, furthermore, describes the effects of components of the artificial urine and the presence of agents that modify the action of urease on encrustation on commercially available ureteral stents. The encrustation model involved the use of small-volume reactors (700 mL) containing artificial urine and employing an orbital incubator (at 37 degrees C) to ensure controlled stirring. The artificial urine contained sources of calcium and magnesium (both as chlorides), albumin and urease. Alteration of the ratio (% w/w) of calcium salt to magnesium salt affected the mass of encrustation, with the greatest encrustation noted whenever magnesium was excluded from the artificial urine. Increasing the concentration of albumin, designed to mimic the presence of protein in urine, significantly decreased the mass of both calcium and magnesium encrustation until a plateau was observed. Finally, exclusion of urease from the artificial urine significantly reduced encrustation due to the indirect effects of this enzyme on pH. Inclusion of the urease inhibitor, acetohydroxamic acid, or urease substrates (methylurea or ethylurea) into the artificial medium markedly reduced encrustation on ureteral stents. In conclusion, this study has described the design of a reproducible, cost-effective in vitro encrustation model. Encrustation was markedly reduced on biomaterials by the inclusion of agents that modify the action of urease. These agents may, therefore, offer a novel clinical approach to the control of encrustation on urological medical devices.

  17. Qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelling, Leslie

    2015-03-25

    Qualitative research has an important role in helping nurses and other healthcare professionals understand patient experiences of health and illness. Qualitative researchers have a large number of methodological options and therefore should take care in planning and conducting their research. This article offers a brief overview of some of the key issues qualitative researchers should consider.

  18. Reproducing American Sign Language Sentences: Cognitive Scaffolding in Working Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted eSupalla

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The American Sign Language Sentence Reproduction Test (ASL-SRT requires the precise reproduction of a series of ASL sentences increasing in complexity and length. Error analyses of such tasks provides insight into working memory and scaffolding processes. Data was collected from three groups expected to differ in fluency: deaf children, deaf adults and hearing adults, all users of ASL. Quantitative (correct/incorrect recall and qualitative error analyses were performed. Percent correct on the reproduction task supports its sensitivity to fluency as test performance clearly differed across the three groups studied. A linguistic analysis of errors further documented differing strategies and bias across groups. Subjects’ recall projected the affordance and constraints of deep linguistic representations to differing degrees, with subjects resorting to alternate processing strategies in the absence of linguistic knowledge. A qualitative error analysis allows us to capture generalizations about the relationship between error pattern and the cognitive scaffolding, which governs the sentence reproduction process. Highly fluent signers and less-fluent signers share common chokepoints on particular words in sentences. However, they diverge in heuristic strategy. Fluent signers, when they make an error, tend to preserve semantic details while altering morpho-syntactic domains. They produce syntactically correct sentences with equivalent meaning to the to-be-reproduced one, but these are not verbatim reproductions of the original sentence. In contrast, less-fluent signers tend to use a more linear strategy, preserving lexical status and word ordering while omitting local inflections, and occasionally resorting to visuo-motoric imitation. Thus, whereas fluent signers readily use top-down scaffolding in their working memory, less fluent signers fail to do so. Implications for current models of working memory across spoken and signed modalities are

  19. How well do environmental archives of atmospheric mercury deposition in the Arctic reproduce rates and trends depicted by atmospheric models and measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodsite, M E; Outridge, P M; Christensen, J H; Dastoor, A; Muir, D; Travnikov, O; Wilson, S

    2013-05-01

    This review compares the reconstruction of atmospheric Hg deposition rates and historical trends over recent decades in the Arctic, inferred from Hg profiles in natural archives such as lake and marine sediments, peat bogs and glacial firn (permanent snowpack), against those predicted by three state-of-the-art atmospheric models based on global Hg emission inventories from 1990 onwards. Model veracity was first tested against atmospheric Hg measurements. Most of the natural archive and atmospheric data came from the Canadian-Greenland sectors of the Arctic, whereas spatial coverage was poor in other regions. In general, for the Canadian-Greenland Arctic, models provided good agreement with atmospheric gaseous elemental Hg (GEM) concentrations and trends measured instrumentally. However, there are few instrumented deposition data with which to test the model estimates of Hg deposition, and these data suggest models over-estimated deposition fluxes under Arctic conditions. Reconstructed GEM data from glacial firn on Greenland Summit showed the best agreement with the known decline in global Hg emissions after about 1980, and were corroborated by archived aerosol filter data from Resolute, Nunavut. The relatively stable or slowly declining firn and model GEM trends after 1990 were also corroborated by real-time instrument measurements at Alert, Nunavut, after 1995. However, Hg fluxes and trends in northern Canadian lake sediments and a southern Greenland peat bog did not exhibit good agreement with model predictions of atmospheric deposition since 1990, the Greenland firn GEM record, direct GEM measurements, or trends in global emissions since 1980. Various explanations are proposed to account for these discrepancies between atmosphere and archives, including problems with the accuracy of archive chronologies, climate-driven changes in Hg transfer rates from air to catchments, waters and subsequently into sediments, and post-depositional diagenesis in peat bogs

  20. Reproducibility of a reaming test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Müller, Pavel; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    The reproducibility of a reaming test was analysed to document its applicability as a performance test for cutting fluids. Reaming tests were carried out on a drilling machine using HSS reamers. Workpiece material was an austenitic stainless steel, machined using 4.75 m•min−1 cutting speed and 0...... a built–up edge occurrence hindering a robust evaluation of cutting fluid performance, if the data evaluation is based on surface finish only. Measurements of hole geometry provide documentation to recognise systematic error distorting the performance test....

  1. Reproducibility of a reaming test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Müller, Pavel; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    The reproducibility of a reaming test was analysed to document its applicability as a performance test for cutting fluids. Reaming tests were carried out on a drilling machine using HSS reamers. Workpiece material was an austenitic stainless steel, machined using 4.75 m∙min-1 cutting speed and 0...... a built-up edge occurrence hindering a robust evaluation of cutting fluid performance, if the data evaluation is based on surface finish only. Measurements of hole geometry provide documentation to recognize systematic error distorting the performance test....

  2. Theoretical Modeling and Computer Simulations for the Origins and Evolution of Reproducing Molecular Systems and Complex Systems with Many Interactive Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shoudan

    2000-01-01

    Our research effort has produced nine publications in peer-reviewed journals listed at the end of this report. The work reported here are in the following areas: (1) genetic network modeling; (2) autocatalytic model of pre-biotic evolution; (3) theoretical and computational studies of strongly correlated electron systems; (4) reducing thermal oscillations in atomic force microscope; (5) transcription termination mechanism in prokaryotic cells; and (6) the low glutamine usage in thennophiles obtained by studying completely sequenced genomes. We discuss the main accomplishments of these publications.

  3. Exploring the experiences of client involvement in medication decisions using a shared decision making model: results of a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goscha, Richard; Rapp, Charles

    2015-04-01

    This qualitative study explored a newly introduced model of shared decision making (CommonGround) and how psychiatric medications were experienced by clients, prescribers, case managers and peer support staff. Of the twelve client subjects, six were highly engaged in shared decision-making and six were not. Five notable differences were found between the two groups including the presence of a goal, use of personal medicine, and the behavior of case managers and prescribers. Implications for a shared decision making model in psychiatry are discussed.

  4. Simulation of the hydrodynamic conditions of the eye to better reproduce the drug release from hydrogel contact lenses: experiments and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, A F R; Valente, A; Pereira, J M C; Pereira, J C F; Filipe, H P; Mata, J L G; Colaço, R; Saramago, B; Serro, A P

    2016-12-01

    Currently, most in vitro drug release studies for ophthalmic applications are carried out in static sink conditions. Although this procedure is simple and useful to make comparative studies, it does not describe adequately the drug release kinetics in the eye, considering the small tear volume and flow rates found in vivo. In this work, a microfluidic cell was designed and used to mimic the continuous, volumetric flow rate of tear fluid and its low volume. The suitable operation of the cell, in terms of uniformity and symmetry of flux, was proved using a numerical model based in the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations. The release profile of a model system (a hydroxyethyl methacrylate-based hydrogel (HEMA/PVP) for soft contact lenses (SCLs) loaded with diclofenac) obtained with the microfluidic cell was compared with that obtained in static conditions, showing that the kinetics of release in dynamic conditions is slower. The application of the numerical model demonstrated that the designed cell can be used to simulate the drug release in the whole range of the human eye tear film volume and allowed to estimate the drug concentration in the volume of liquid in direct contact with the hydrogel. The knowledge of this concentration, which is significantly different from that measured in the experimental tests during the first hours of release, is critical to predict the toxicity of the drug release system and its in vivo efficacy. In conclusion, the use of the microfluidic cell in conjunction with the numerical model shall be a valuable tool to design and optimize new therapeutic drug-loaded SCLs.

  5. Accessibility and Reproducibility of Stable High-qmin Steady-State Scenarios by q-profile+βN Model Predictive Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, E.; Wehner, W.; Holcomb, C. T.; Victor, B.; Ferron, J. R.; Luce, T. C.

    2016-10-01

    The capability of combined q-profile and βN control to enable access to and repeatability of steady-state scenarios for qmin > 1.4 discharges has been assessed in DIII-D experiments. To steer the plasma to the desired state, model predictive control (MPC) of both the q-profile and βN numerically solves successive optimization problems in real time over a receding time horizon by exploiting efficient quadratic programming techniques. A key advantage of this control approach is that it allows for explicit incorporation of state/input constraints to prevent the controller from driving the plasma outside of stability/performance limits and obtain, as closely as possible, steady state conditions. The enabler of this feedback-control approach is a control-oriented model capturing the dominant physics of the q-profile and βN responses to the available actuators. Experiments suggest that control-oriented model-based scenario planning in combination with MPC can play a crucial role in exploring stability limits of scenarios of interest. Supported by the US DOE under DE-SC0010661.

  6. Large barrier, highly uniform and reproducible Ni-Si/4H-SiC forward Schottky diode characteristics: testing the limits of Tung's model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Sabih U.; Sudarshan, Tangali S.; Rana, Tawhid A.; Song, Haizheng; Chandrashekhar, M. V. S.

    2014-07-01

    We report highly ideal (n < 1.1), uniform nickel silicide (Ni-Si)/SiC Schottky barrier (1.60-1.67 eV with a standard deviation <2.8%) diodes, fabricated on 4H-SiC epitaxial layers grown by chemical vapour deposition. The barrier height was constant over a wide epilayer doping range of 1014-1016 cm-3, apart from a slight decrease consistent with image force lowering. This remarkable uniformity was achieved by careful optimization of the annealing of the Schottky interface to minimize non-idealities that could lead to inhomogeneity. Tung's barrier inhomogeneity model was used to quantify the level of inhomogeneity in the optimized annealed diodes. The estimated ‘bulk’ barrier height (1.75 eV) was consistent with the Shockley-Mott limit for the Ni-Si/4H-SiC interface, implying an unpinned Fermi level. But the model was not useful to explain the poor ideality in unoptimized, as-deposited Schottky contacts (n = 1.6 - 2.5). We show analytically and numerically that only idealities n < 1.21 can be explained using Tung's model, irrespective of material system, indicating that the barrier height inhomogeneity is not the only cause of poor ideality in Schottky diodes. For explaining this highly non-ideal behaviour, other factors (e.g. interface traps, morphological defects, extrinsic impurities, etc) need to be considered.

  7. Qualitative Content Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Mayring

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describes an approach of systematic, rule guided qualitative text analysis, which tries to preserve some methodological strengths of quantitative content analysis and widen them to a concept of qualitative procedure. First the development of content analysis is delineated and the basic principles are explained (units of analysis, step models, working with categories, validity and reliability. Then the central procedures of qualitative content analysis, inductive development of categories and deductive application of categories, are worked out. The possibilities of computer programs in supporting those qualitative steps of analysis are shown and the possibilities and limits of the approach are discussed. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0002204

  8. ADMET Evaluation in Drug Discovery. Part 17: Development of Quantitative and Qualitative Prediction Models for Chemical-Induced Respiratory Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Tailong; Chen, Fu; Liu, Hui; Sun, Huiyong; Kang, Yu; Li, Dan; Li, Youyong; Hou, Tingjun

    2017-07-03

    As a dangerous end point, respiratory toxicity can cause serious adverse health effects and even death. Meanwhile, it is a common and traditional issue in occupational and environmental protection. Pharmaceutical and chemical industries have a strong urge to develop precise and convenient computational tools to evaluate the respiratory toxicity of compounds as early as possible. Most of the reported theoretical models were developed based on the respiratory toxicity data sets with one single symptom, such as respiratory sensitization, and therefore these models may not afford reliable predictions for toxic compounds with other respiratory symptoms, such as pneumonia or rhinitis. Here, based on a diverse data set of mouse intraperitoneal respiratory toxicity characterized by multiple symptoms, a number of quantitative and qualitative predictions models with high reliability were developed by machine learning approaches. First, a four-tier dimension reduction strategy was employed to find an optimal set of 20 molecular descriptors for model building. Then, six machine learning approaches were used to develop the prediction models, including relevance vector machine (RVM), support vector machine (SVM), regularized random forest (RRF), extreme gradient boosting (XGBoost), naïve Bayes (NB), and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Among all of the models, the SVM regression model shows the most accurate quantitative predictions for the test set (q(2)ext = 0.707), and the XGBoost classification model achieves the most accurate qualitative predictions for the test set (MCC of 0.644, AUC of 0.893, and global accuracy of 82.62%). The application domains were analyzed, and all of the tested compounds fall within the application domain coverage. We also examined the structural features of the compounds and important fragments with large prediction errors. In conclusion, the SVM regression model and the XGBoost classification model can be employed as accurate prediction tools

  9. Provider experiences of the implementation of a new tuberculosis treatment programme: A qualitative study using the normalisation process model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Simon

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis (TB is a major contributor to the global burden of disease. In many settings, including South Africa, treatment outcomes remain poor. In contrast, many antiretroviral treatment (ART programmes are achieving high levels of adherence and good outcomes. The ART programme model for maintaining treatment adherence may therefore hold promise for TB treatment. Changing treatment models, however, requires an assessment of how staff receive the new model, as they are responsible for programme implementation. Using the normalization process model as an analytic framework, this paper aims to explore staff perceptions of a new TB treatment programme modelled on the ART treatment programme. Methods A qualitative approach was used. Interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with clinic staff from five intervention clinics. Data were analysed initially using qualitative content analysis. The resulting categories were then organised under the constructs of the normalization process model. Results Staff recounted a number of challenges with implementing the programme. Interviews and focus group discussions identified factors relating to the main categories of the normalization process model. The key issues hindering the normalisation of the programme within clinics related to the interactional workability, relational integration and skill-set workability constructs of the model. These included hierarchical relationships, teamwork, training needs and insufficient internalisation by staff of the empowerment approach included in the programme. Logistical and management issues also impacted negatively on the normalization of the programme at the clinics. Conclusion The normalization process model assisted in categorising the challenges experienced during implementation of the intervention. The results suggest that issues remain that need to be resolved before the programme is implemented more widely. Considerable work is

  10. A Mouse Model That Reproduces the Developmental Pathways and Site Specificity of the Cancers Associated With the Human BRCA1 Mutation Carrier State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Yen, Hai-Yun; Austria, Theresa; Pettersson, Jonas; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Maxson, Robert; Widschwendter, Martin; Dubeau, Louis

    2015-10-01

    Predisposition to breast and extrauterine Müllerian carcinomas in BRCA1 mutation carriers is due to a combination of cell-autonomous consequences of BRCA1 inactivation on cell cycle homeostasis superimposed on cell-nonautonomous hormonal factors magnified by the effects of BRCA1 mutations on hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle. We used the Müllerian inhibiting substance type 2 receptor (Mis2r) promoter and a truncated form of the Follicle stimulating hormone receptor (Fshr) promoter to introduce conditional knockouts of Brca1 and p53 not only in mouse mammary and Müllerian epithelia, but also in organs that control the estrous cycle. Sixty percent of the double mutant mice developed invasive Müllerian and mammary carcinomas. Mice carrying heterozygous mutations in Brca1 and p53 also developed invasive tumors, albeit at a lesser (30%) rate, in which the wild type alleles were no longer present due to loss of heterozygosity. While mice carrying heterozygous mutations in both genes developed mammary tumors, none of the mice carrying only a heterozygous p53 mutation developed such tumors (P < 0.0001), attesting to a role for Brca1 mutations in tumor development. This mouse model is attractive to investigate cell-nonautonomous mechanisms associated with cancer predisposition in BRCA1 mutation carriers and to investigate the merit of chemo-preventive drugs targeting such mechanisms.

  11. A Mouse Model That Reproduces the Developmental Pathways and Site Specificity of the Cancers Associated With the Human BRCA1 Mutation Carrier State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Predisposition to breast and extrauterine Müllerian carcinomas in BRCA1 mutation carriers is due to a combination of cell-autonomous consequences of BRCA1 inactivation on cell cycle homeostasis superimposed on cell-nonautonomous hormonal factors magnified by the effects of BRCA1 mutations on hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle. We used the Müllerian inhibiting substance type 2 receptor (Mis2r promoter and a truncated form of the Follicle stimulating hormone receptor (Fshr promoter to introduce conditional knockouts of Brca1 and p53 not only in mouse mammary and Müllerian epithelia, but also in organs that control the estrous cycle. Sixty percent of the double mutant mice developed invasive Müllerian and mammary carcinomas. Mice carrying heterozygous mutations in Brca1 and p53 also developed invasive tumors, albeit at a lesser (30% rate, in which the wild type alleles were no longer present due to loss of heterozygosity. While mice carrying heterozygous mutations in both genes developed mammary tumors, none of the mice carrying only a heterozygous p53 mutation developed such tumors (P < 0.0001, attesting to a role for Brca1 mutations in tumor development. This mouse model is attractive to investigate cell-nonautonomous mechanisms associated with cancer predisposition in BRCA1 mutation carriers and to investigate the merit of chemo-preventive drugs targeting such mechanisms.

  12. Towards personalized integrated dementia care: a qualitative study into the implementation of different models of case management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Mierlo, Lisa D; Meiland, Franka J M; Van Hout, Hein P J; Dröes, Rose-Marie

    2014-07-08

    The aim of this process evaluation was to provide insight into facilitators and barriers to the delivery of community-based personalized dementia care of two different case management models, i.e. the linkage model and the combined intensive case management/joint agency model. These two emerging dementia care models differ considerably in the way they are organized and implemented. Insight into facilitators and barriers in the implementation of different models is needed to create future guidelines for successful implementation of case management in other regions. A qualitative case study design was used; semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 stakeholders on the execution and continuation phases of the implementation process. The stakeholders represented a broad range of perspectives (i.e. project leaders, case managers, health insurers, municipalities). The independence of the case management organization in the intensive model facilitated the implementation, whereas the presence of multiple competing case management providers in the linkage model impeded the implementation. Most impeding factors were found in the linkage model and were related to the organizational structure of the dementia care network and how partners collaborate with each other in this network. The results of this process evaluation show that the intensive case management model is easier to implement as case managers in this model tend to be more able to provide quality of care, are less impeded by competitiveness of other care organizations and are more closely connected to the expert team than case managers in the linkage model.

  13. The persistence of subsistence: qualitative social-ecological modeling of indigenous aquatic hunting and gathering in tropical Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Barber

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Subsistence remains critical to indigenous people in settler-colonial states such as Australia, providing key foundations for indigenous identities and for wider state recognition. However, the drivers of contemporary subsistence are rarely fully articulated and analyzed in terms of likely changing conditions. Our interdisciplinary team combined past research experience gained from multiple sites with published literature to create two generalized qualitative models of the socio-cultural and environmental influences on indigenous aquatic subsistence in northern Australia. One model focused on the longer term (inter-year to generational persistence of subsistence at the community scale, the other model on shorter term (day to season drivers of effort by active individuals. The specification of driver definitions and relationships demonstrates the complexities of even generalized and materialist models of contemporary subsistence practices. The qualitative models were analyzed for emergent properties and for responses to plausible changes in key variables: access, habitat degradation, social security availability, and community dysfunction. Positive human community condition is shown to be critical to the long-term persistence of subsistence, but complex interactions of negative and positive drivers shape subsistence effort expended at the individual scale and within shorter time frames. Such models enable motivations, complexities, and the potential management and policy levers of significance to be identified, defined, causally related, and debated. The models can be used to augment future models of human-natural systems, be tested against case-specific field conditions and/or indigenous perspectives, and aid preliminary assessments of the effects on subsistence of changes in social and environmental conditions, including policy settings.

  14. Health beliefs and folk models of diabetes in British Bangladeshis: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Helman, Cecil; Chowdhury, A Mu’min

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To explore the experience of diabetes in British Bangladeshis, since successful management of diabetes requires attention not just to observable behaviour but to the underlying attitudes and belief systems which drive that behaviour. Design: Qualitative study of subjects’ experience of diabetes using narratives, semi-structured interviews, focus groups, and pile sorting exercises. A new qualitative method, the structured vignette, was developed for validating researchers’ understanding of primary level culture. Subjects: 40 British Bangladeshi patients with diabetes, and 10 non-Bangladeshi controls, recruited from primary care. Result: Several constructs were detected in relation to body image, cause and nature of diabetes, food classification, and knowledge of complications. In some areas, the similarities between Bangladeshi and non-Bangladeshi subjects were as striking as their differences. There was little evidence of a fatalistic or deterministic attitude to prognosis, and most informants seemed highly motivated to alter their diet and comply with treatment. Structural and material barriers to behaviour change were at least as important as “cultural” ones. Conclusion: Bangladeshi culture is neither seamless nor static, but some widely held beliefs and behaviours have been identified. Some of these have a potentially beneficial effect on health and should be used as the starting point for culturally sensitive diabetes education. PMID:9550958

  15. NASA space cancer risk model-2014: Uncertainties due to qualitative differences in biological effects of HZE particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis

    Uncertainties in estimating health risks from exposures to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) — comprised of protons and high-energy and charge (HZE) nuclei are an important limitation to long duration space travel. HZE nuclei produce both qualitative and quantitative differences in biological effects compared to terrestrial radiation leading to large uncertainties in predicting risks to humans. Our NASA Space Cancer Risk Model-2012 (NSCR-2012) for estimating lifetime cancer risks from space radiation included several new features compared to earlier models from the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) used at NASA. New features of NSCR-2012 included the introduction of NASA defined radiation quality factors based on track structure concepts, a Bayesian analysis of the dose and dose-rate reduction effectiveness factor (DDREF) and its uncertainty, and the use of a never-smoker population to represent astronauts. However, NSCR-2012 did not include estimates of the role of qualitative differences between HZE particles and low LET radiation. In this report we discuss evidence for non-targeted effects increasing cancer risks at space relevant HZE particle absorbed doses in tissue (Mars exploration will be described, and compared to those of our earlier NSCR-2012 model.

  16. Multiple methods for multiple futures: Integrating qualitative scenario planning and quantitative simulation modeling for natural resource decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symstad, Amy; Fisichelli, Nicholas A.; Miller, Brian; Rowland, Erika; Schuurman, Gregor W.

    2017-01-01

    Scenario planning helps managers incorporate climate change into their natural resource decision making through a structured “what-if” process of identifying key uncertainties and potential impacts and responses. Although qualitative scenarios, in which ecosystem responses to climate change are derived via expert opinion, often suffice for managers to begin addressing climate change in their planning, this approach may face limits in resolving the responses of complex systems to altered climate conditions. In addition, this approach may fall short of the scientific credibility managers often require to take actions that differ from current practice. Quantitative simulation modeling of ecosystem response to climate conditions and management actions can provide this credibility, but its utility is limited unless the modeling addresses the most impactful and management-relevant uncertainties and incorporates realistic management actions. We use a case study to compare and contrast management implications derived from qualitative scenario narratives and from scenarios supported by quantitative simulations. We then describe an analytical framework that refines the case study’s integrated approach in order to improve applicability of results to management decisions. The case study illustrates the value of an integrated approach for identifying counterintuitive system dynamics, refining understanding of complex relationships, clarifying the magnitude and timing of changes, identifying and checking the validity of assumptions about resource responses to climate, and refining management directions. Our proposed analytical framework retains qualitative scenario planning as a core element because its participatory approach builds understanding for both managers and scientists, lays the groundwork to focus quantitative simulations on key system dynamics, and clarifies the challenges that subsequent decision making must address.

  17. The emotional coaching model: quantitative and qualitative research into relationships, communication and decisions in physical and sports rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respizzi, Stefano; Covelli, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    The emotional coaching model uses quantitative and qualitative elements to demonstrate some assumptions relevant to new methods of treatment in physical rehabilitation, considering emotional, cognitive and behavioral aspects in patients, whether or not they are sportsmen. Through quantitative tools (Tampa Kinesiophobia Scale, Emotional Interview Test, Previous Re-Injury Test, and reports on test scores) and qualitative tools (training contracts and relationships of emotional alliance or "contagion"), we investigate initial assumptions regarding: the presence of a cognitive and emotional mental state of impasse in patients at the beginning of the rehabilitation pathway; the curative value of the emotional alliance or "emotional contagion" relationship between healthcare provider and patient; the link between the patient's pathology and type of contact with his own body and emotions; analysis of the psychosocial variables for the prediction of possible cases of re-injury for patients who have undergone or are afraid to undergo reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Although this approach is still in the experimental stage, the scores of the administered tests show the possibility of integrating quantitative and qualitative tools to investigate and develop a patient's physical, mental and emotional resources during the course of his rehabilitation. Furthermore, it seems possible to identify many elements characterizing patients likely to undergo episodes of re-injury or to withdraw totally from sporting activity. In particular, such patients are competitive athletes, who fear or have previously undergone ACL reconstruction. The theories referred to (the transactional analysis theory, self-determination theory) and the tools used demonstrate the usefulness of continuing this research in order to build a shared coaching model treatment aimed at all patients, sportspeople or otherwise, which is not only physical but also emotional, cognitive and

  18. The Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydman, Roman; Johansen, Søren; Rahbek, Anders

    We introduce the Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis (QEH) as a new approach to modeling macroeconomic and financial outcomes. Building on John Muth's seminal insight underpinning the Rational Expectations Hypothesis (REH), QEH represents the market's forecasts to be consistent with the predictions...

  19. The Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydman, Roman; Johansen, Søren; Rahbek, Anders

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis (QEH) as a new approach to modeling macroeconomic and financial outcomes. Building on John Muth's seminal insight underpinning the Rational Expectations Hypothesis (REH), QEH represents the market's forecasts to be consistent with the predictions...

  20. Governance arrangements for IT project portfolio management qualitative insights and a quantitative modeling approach

    CERN Document Server

    Frey, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Due to the growing importance of IT-based innovations, contemporary firms face an excessive number of proposals for IT projects. As typically only a fraction of these projects can be implemented with the given capacity, IT project portfolio management as a relatively new discipline has received growing attention in research and practice in recent years.?Thorsten Frey demonstrates how companies are struggling to find the right balance between local autonomy and central overview about all projects in the organization. In this context, impacts of different contextual factors on the design of governance arrangements for IT project portfolio management are demonstrated. Moreover, consequences of the use of different organizational designs are analyzed. The author presents insights from a qualitative empirical study as well as a simulative approach.

  1. Qualitative differences in polysaccharide and sugar tastes in the rat: a two-carbohydrate taste model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissenbaum, J W; Sclafani, A

    1987-01-01

    A conditioned taste aversion paradigm was used to assess the qualitative similarities between the tastes of a polysaccharide (Polycose) solution and sugar solutions (sucrose, maltose, glucose, fructose). In Experiment I, three groups of female rats were water deprived and conditioned to avoid a 0.025 M Polycose, a 0.1 M sucrose, or a 0.1 M maltose solution by pairing solution consumption with a lithium chloride (LiCl) injection; in a control group water consumption was paired with the LiCl injection. The extent to which the experimental groups generalized their conditioned aversion to the other three solutions was then assessed. The Polycose-conditioned group avoided the maltose solution more than the sucrose solution, and the maltose-conditioned group avoided the Polycose solution more than the sucrose solution. The sucrose-conditioned group avoided the maltose and Polycose solutions to the same relatively low degree. In additional tests the three experimental groups showed similar aversions to a glucose solution, but only the sucrose-conditioned rats avoided a fructose solution. Rats in a second experiment also displayed relatively little cross-generalization between Polycose and sucrose aversions even though they were tested with different solution concentrations. Additional tests confirmed the results obtained in Experiment 1 with maltose, glucose, and fructose solutions, and also revealed that the sucrose-conditioned group, but not the Polycose-conditioned group avoided saccharin solutions. Neither Polycose- nor sucrose-conditioned groups avoided quinine, sodium chloride, or hydrochloric acid solutions. These results, along with other recent findings, suggest that rats have two types of "carbohydrate" taste receptors, one for polysaccharides and one for sucrose, which produce qualitatively distinct gustatory sensations.

  2. On the formation of crystalline microstructures of monolayers seen in terms of qualitative diffusion-type models at mesoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadomski, A.

    2008-09-01

    It is well known (see, e.g., K. A. Beklemishev and D. B. Berg, Pis’ma Zh. Tekh. Fiz. 33 (19), 40 (2007) [Tech. Phys. Lett. 33, 825 (2007)]) that many diffusion-type growth models allow qualitative features of growing microstructures to be obtained without employing any special information on the molecules constituting the microstructural domains. It has also been noted that the time needed to obtain a polycrystalline structure must be carefully estimated by engaging statistical-mechanical ensemble-averaging methods. The latter seems to be, in general, a difficult task because the problem is left as non-ergodic. The former, in turn, is supposed to be remedied while realizing that the qualitative estimates can become quantitative when offered at the mesoscopic level and when appropriately supported by a suitable construction of the diffusion function. In addition to comprising the Gibbs (non-negative) entropy production framework as a firm basis deeply rooted in the first law of thermodynamics for open thermodynamic systems, this construction can be seen as good as the frequently used Avrami-Kolmogorov phenomenology. This type of proposal cannot be easily postponed in the modeling of phospholipid monolayers or other two-dimensional amphiphilic, soft-matter-type systems.

  3. Effective Form of Reproducing the Total Financial Potential of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portna Oksana V.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of scientific principles of reproducing the total financial potential of the country and its effective form is an urgent problem both in theoretical and practical aspects of the study, the solution of which is intended to ensure the active mobilization and effective use of the total financial potential of Ukraine, and as a result — its expanded reproduction as well, which would contribute to realization of the internal capacities for stabilization of the national economy. The purpose of the article is disclosing the essence of the effective form of reproducing the total financial potential of the country, analyzing the results of reproducing the total financial potential of Ukraine. It has been proved that the basis for the effective form of reproducing the total financial potential of the country is the volume and flow of resources, which are associated with the «real» economy, affect the dynamics of GDP and define it, i.e. resource and process forms of reproducing the total financial potential of Ukraine (which precede the effective one. The analysis of reproducing the total financial potential of Ukraine has shown that in the analyzed period there was an increase in the financial possibilities of the country, but steady dynamics of reduction of the total financial potential was observed. If we consider the amount of resources involved in production, creating a net value added and GDP, it occurs on a restricted basis. Growth of the total financial potential of Ukraine is connected only with extensive quantitative factors rather than intensive qualitative changes.

  4. Perspectives on econometric modelling to inform policy: a UK qualitative case study of minimum unit pricing of alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katikireddi, Srinivasa V; Bond, Lyndal; Hilton, Shona

    2014-06-01

    Novel policy interventions may lack evaluation-based evidence. Considerations to introduce minimum unit pricing (MUP) of alcohol in the UK were informed by econometric modelling (the 'Sheffield model'). We aim to investigate policy stakeholders' views of the utility of modelling studies for public health policy. In-depth qualitative interviews with 36 individuals involved in MUP policy debates (purposively sampled to include civil servants, politicians, academics, advocates and industry-related actors) were conducted and thematically analysed. Interviewees felt familiar with modelling studies and often displayed detailed understandings of the Sheffield model. Despite this, many were uneasy about the extent to which the Sheffield model could be relied on for informing policymaking and preferred traditional evaluations. A tension was identified between this preference for post hoc evaluations and a desire for evidence derived from local data, with modelling seen to offer high external validity. MUP critics expressed concern that the Sheffield model did not adequately capture the 'real life' world of the alcohol market, which was conceptualized as a complex and, to some extent, inherently unpredictable system. Communication of modelling results was considered intrinsically difficult but presenting an appropriate picture of the uncertainties inherent in modelling was viewed as desirable. There was general enthusiasm for increased use of econometric modelling to inform future policymaking but an appreciation that such evidence should only form one input into the process. Modelling studies are valued by policymakers as they provide contextually relevant evidence for novel policies, but tensions exist with views of traditional evaluation-based evidence. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association.

  5. On The Reproducibility of Seasonal Land-surface Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, T J

    2004-10-22

    The sensitivity of the continental seasonal climate to initial conditions is estimated from an ensemble of decadal simulations of an atmospheric general circulation model with the same specifications of radiative forcings and monthly ocean boundary conditions, but with different initial states of atmosphere and land. As measures of the ''reproducibility'' of continental climate for different initial conditions, spatio-temporal correlations are computed across paired realizations of eleven model land-surface variables in which the seasonal cycle is either included or excluded--the former case being pertinent to climate simulation, and the latter to seasonal anomaly prediction. It is found that the land-surface variables which include the seasonal cycle are impacted only marginally by changes in initial conditions; moreover, their seasonal climatologies exhibit high spatial reproducibility. In contrast, the reproducibility of a seasonal land-surface anomaly is generally low, although it is substantially higher in the Tropics; its spatial reproducibility also markedly fluctuates in tandem with warm and cold phases of the El Nino/Southern Oscillation. However, the overall degree of reproducibility depends strongly on the particular land-surface anomaly considered. It is also shown that the predictability of a land-surface anomaly implied by its reproducibility statistics is consistent with what is inferred from more conventional predictability metrics. Implications of these results for climate model intercomparison projects and for operational forecasts of seasonal continental climate also are elaborated.

  6. A new approach to testing an integrated water systems model using qualitative scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.G.; Kok, de J.L.; Titus, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Integrated systems models have been developed over decades, aiming to support the decision-makers in the planning and managing of natural resources. The inherent model complexity, lack of knowledge about the linkages among model components, scarcity of field data, and uncertainty involved with inter

  7. How to Conduct a Qualitative Program Evaluation in the Light of Eisner’s Educational Connoisseurship and Criticism Model

    OpenAIRE

    İsmail Yüksel

    2010-01-01

    AbstractThe quantitative methodologies have been traditionally employed in the educational research so far. However, as long as with the appreciation and widespread use of the qualitative methodologies in many disciplines, many different educational areas have started to be examined in terms of qualitative research aspects. Particularly, the qualitative evaluation of the education programs has received considerable interest and there have been recently some attempts to develop a qualitative m...

  8. Qualitative breakdown of the noncrossing approximation for the symmetric one-channel Anderson impurity model at all temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposetti, C. N.; Manuel, L. O.; Roura-Bas, P.

    2016-08-01

    The Anderson impurity model is studied by means of the self-consistent hybridization expansions in its noncrossing (NCA) and one-crossing (OCA) approximations. We have found that for the one-channel spin-1 /2 particle-hole symmetric Anderson model, the NCA results are qualitatively wrong for any temperature, even when the approximation gives the exact threshold exponents of the ionic states. Actually, the NCA solution describes an overscreened Kondo effect, because it is the same as for the two-channel infinite-U single-level Anderson model. We explicitly show that the NCA is unable to distinguish between these two very different physical systems, independently of temperature. Using the impurity entropy as an example, we show that the low-temperature values of the NCA entropy for the symmetric case yield the limit Simp(T =0 ) →ln√{2 }, which corresponds to the zero temperature entropy of the overscreened Kondo model. Similar pathologies are predicted for any other thermodynamic property. On the other hand, we have found that the OCA approach lifts the artificial mapping between the models and restores correct properties of the ground state, for instance, a vanishing entropy at low enough temperatures Simp(T =0 ) →0 . Our results indicate that the very well known NCA should be used with caution close to the symmetric point of the Anderson model.

  9. Model endophenotype for bipolar disorder: Qualitative Analysis, etiological factors, and research areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naraiana de Oliveira Tavares

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to present an updated view of the writings on the endophenotype model for bipolar disorder using analytical methodologies. A review and analysis of networks was performed through descriptors and keywords that characterize the composition of the endophenotype model as a model of health. Information was collected from between 1992 and 2014, and the main thematic areas covered in the articles were identified. We discuss the results and question their cohesion, emphasizing the need to strengthen and identify the points of connection between etiological factors and characteristics that make up the model of endophenotypes for bipolar disorder.

  10. [Implementation of the new clinical practice training model in Andalusia: a qualitative evaluation of the Nursing and Physiotherapy degrees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Sola, Cayetano; Granero-Molina, José; Márquez-Membrive, Josefa; Aguilera-Manrique, Gabriel; Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida M

    2014-01-01

    The design of new Bachelor degree courses, together with the agreement reached between the Regional Government of Andalusia and Andalusian universities shape the new clinical training model for Health Science students. The aim of this project is to present a qualitative evaluation of the implementation of the new model in Nursing and Physiotherapy degrees at the University of Almeria and the Andalusian Public Health System. An exploratory qualitative study using document content analysis techniques, by analyzing 12 reports from teachers and those responsible for Practicum in Nursing and Physiotherapy degrees at the University of Almeria. The reports included opinions and proposals from university and clinical placement teachers, healthcare professionals or clinical placement tutors, students, and those in positions of responsibility as regards clinical placements. Three categories emerged in the data analysis: Health system organization, with sub-categories of disparity between shifts, difficulties with supervisor coordination, feelings of a lack of control, disparities in evaluation criteria and geographic distribution; academic organization, with sub-categories of short rotations, a lack of information received by the clinical placement tutor, and carrying out placements without studying the theory; and management of the work agreement, with sub-categories of being discouraged by what is received in return, extra work for those in charge, and delays in evaluations. The study suggests a need to support and guide clinical tutors, to increase coordination between the university and health services, to organize the students' theoretical and practical training and to provide the management of the model with flexibility and transparency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. A qualitative model of Riacho Fundo (DF, Brazil) water basin sustainability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salles, P.; Bredeweg, B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a model aiming at supporting stakeholders to improve their understanding of the effects of land use changes using the Brazilian Riacho Fundo water basin as a case study. The paper makes two contributions: it presents a model about sustainability in a small tropical water basin,

  12. A Qualitative Application of Kirkpatrick's Model for Evaluating Workshops and Conferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, James L.; Larson, Steven

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the evaluation of workshops and conferences and presents an application of Kirkpatrick's four-stage evaluation model, an accepted model for measuring performance and instructional interventions. Highlights include presurveys and postsurveys; participant reaction forms during the meetings; and assessing previous participants. (10…

  13. Simplified Qualitative Discrete Numerical Model to Determine Cracking Pattern in Brittle Materials by Means of Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ochoa-Avendaño

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the formulation, implementation, and validation of a simplified qualitative model to determine the crack path of solids considering static loads, infinitesimal strain, and plane stress condition. This model is based on finite element method with a special meshing technique, where nonlinear link elements are included between the faces of the linear triangular elements. The stiffness loss of some link elements represents the crack opening. Three experimental tests of bending beams are simulated, where the cracking pattern calculated with the proposed numerical model is similar to experimental result. The advantages of the proposed model compared to discrete crack approaches with interface elements can be the implementation simplicity, the numerical stability, and the very low computational cost. The simulation with greater values of the initial stiffness of the link elements does not affect the discontinuity path and the stability of the numerical solution. The exploded mesh procedure presented in this model avoids a complex nonlinear analysis and regenerative or adaptive meshes.

  14. Mathematical Foundations of Qualitative Reasoning

    OpenAIRE

    Trave-Massuyes, Louise; Ironi, Liliana; Dague, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    We examine different formalisms for modeling qualitatively physical systems and their associated inferential processes that allow us to derive qualitative predictions from the models. We highlight the mathematical aspects of these processes along with their potential and limitations. The article then bridges to quantitative modeling, highlighting the benefits of qualitative reasoning-based approaches in the framework of system identification, and discusses open research issues.

  15. Evaluation of multichannel reproduced sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choisel, Sylvain; Wickelmaier, Florian Maria

    2007-01-01

    , as well as overall preference, was based on consistency tests of binary paired-comparison judgments and on modeling the choice frequencies using probabilistic choice models. As a result, the preferences of non-expert listeners could be measured reliably at a ratio scale level. Principal components derived...... from the quantified attributes predict overall preference well. The findings allow for some generalizations within musical program genres regarding the perception of and preference for certain spatial reproduction modes, but for limited generalizations across selections from different musical genres....

  16. Theory of reproducing kernels and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Saitoh, Saburou

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a large extension of the general theory of reproducing kernels published by N. Aronszajn in 1950, with many concrete applications. In Chapter 1, many concrete reproducing kernels are first introduced with detailed information. Chapter 2 presents a general and global theory of reproducing kernels with basic applications in a self-contained way. Many fundamental operations among reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces are dealt with. Chapter 2 is the heart of this book. Chapter 3 is devoted to the Tikhonov regularization using the theory of reproducing kernels with applications to numerical and practical solutions of bounded linear operator equations. In Chapter 4, the numerical real inversion formulas of the Laplace transform are presented by applying the Tikhonov regularization, where the reproducing kernels play a key role in the results. Chapter 5 deals with ordinary differential equations; Chapter 6 includes many concrete results for various fundamental partial differential equations. In Chapt...

  17. Filters, reproducing kernel, and adaptive meshfree method

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Y.; Chen, J.-S.; Lu, H.

    Reproducing kernel, with its intrinsic feature of moving averaging, can be utilized as a low-pass filter with scale decomposition capability. The discrete convolution of two nth order reproducing kernels with arbitrary support size in each kernel results in a filtered reproducing kernel function that has the same reproducing order. This property is utilized to separate the numerical solution into an unfiltered lower order portion and a filtered higher order portion. As such, the corresponding high-pass filter of this reproducing kernel filter can be used to identify the locations of high gradient, and consequently serves as an operator for error indication in meshfree analysis. In conjunction with the naturally conforming property of the reproducing kernel approximation, a meshfree adaptivity method is also proposed.

  18. Scaling Qualitative Probability

    OpenAIRE

    Burgin, Mark

    2017-01-01

    There are different approaches to qualitative probability, which includes subjective probability. We developed a representation of qualitative probability based on relational systems, which allows modeling uncertainty by probability structures and is more coherent than existing approaches. This setting makes it possible proving that any comparative probability is induced by some probability structure (Theorem 2.1), that classical probability is a probability structure (Theorem 2.2) and that i...

  19. A chemical energy approach of avascular tumor growth: multiscale modeling and qualitative results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampatzoglou, Pantelis; Dassios, George; Hadjinicolaou, Maria; Kourea, Helen P; Vrahatis, Michael N

    2015-01-01

    In the present manuscript we propose a lattice free multiscale model for avascular tumor growth that takes into account the biochemical environment, mitosis, necrosis, cellular signaling and cellular mechanics. This model extends analogous approaches by assuming a function that incorporates the biochemical energy level of the tumor cells and a mechanism that simulates the behavior of cancer stem cells. Numerical simulations of the model are used to investigate the morphology of the tumor at the avascular phase. The obtained results show similar characteristics with those observed in clinical data in the case of the Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) of the breast.

  20. Examination of reproducibility in microbiological degredation experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Helle Mølgaard; Spliid, Henrik; Holst, Helle

    1998-01-01

    Experimental data indicate that certain microbiological degradation experiments have a limited reproducibility. Nine identical batch experiments were carried out on 3 different days to examine reproducibility. A pure culture, isolated from soil, grew with toluene as the only carbon and energy sou....... The limited reproducibility may be caused by variability in the preculture, or more precisely, variations in the physiological state of the bacteria in the precultures just before used as inoculum....

  1. Qualitative Properties in a More General Delayed Hematopoietic Stem Cells Model*

    OpenAIRE

    Aziz-Alaoui M. A.; Yafia R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a more general model describing the dynamics of Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSC) model with one delay. Its dynamics are studied in terms of local stability and Hopf bifurcation. We prove the existence of the possible steady state and their stability with respect to the time delay and without delay. We show that a sequence of Hopf bifurcations occur at the positive steady state as the delay crosses some critical values. We illustrate our results by some numerical ...

  2. A general multivariate qualitative model for sizing stand-alone photovoltaic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidrach-de-Cardona, M. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada II, E.T.S.I. Informatica, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Mora Lopez, L. [Dpto. Lenguajes y C. Computacion, E.T.S.I. Informatica, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain)

    1999-10-01

    We considered a general model for sizing a stand-alone photovoltaic system, using as energy input data the information available in any irradiation atlas. The parameters of the model are estimated by multivariate linear regression. The results obtained from the numerical loss of load probability size method (LOLP) were used as initial input data to fit the mode. For this fit we have used daily global irradiation data taken from 222 US meteorological stations for the period 1961-1990. The expression proposed allows us to determine the photovoltaic array size, with a coefficient of determination to 0.96. This coefficient is independent of the used LOLP value. System parameters and mean monthly values for daily global irradiation on the modules surface are taken as independent variables in the model. It also shows that the proposed model can be used with the same accuracy for other locations not considered in the estimation of the model. We also propose a model which would allow us to calculate optimum tilts for the array surface taking the latitude into account as well as the variability of the incident irradiation.

  3. The co-operative model as a means of stakeholder management: An exploratory qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell Hammond

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The South African economy has for some time been characterised by high unemployment, income inequality and a skills mismatch, all of which have contributed to conflict between business, government and labour. The co-operative model of stakeholder management is examined as a possible mitigating organisational form in this high-conflict environment. International experience indicates some success with co-operative models but they are not easy to implement effectively and face severe obstacles. Trust and knowledge sharing are critical for enabling a co-operative model of stakeholder management, which requires strong governance and adherence to strict rules. The model must balance the tension between optimisation of governance structures and responsiveness to members' needs. Furthermore, support from social and political institutions is necessary. We find barriers to scalability which manifest in the lack of depth of business skills, negative perception of the co-operative model by external stakeholders, government ambivalence, and a lack of willingness on the part of workers to co-operate for mutual benefit.

  4. The Time Delays’ Effects on the Qualitative Behavior of an Economic Growth Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Bianca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A further generalization of an economic growth model is the main topic of this paper. The paper specifically analyzes the effects on the asymptotic dynamics of the Solow model when two time delays are inserted: the time employed in order that the capital is used for production and the necessary time so that the capital is depreciated. The existence of a unique nontrivial positive steady state of the generalized model is proved and sufficient conditions for the asymptotic stability are established. Moreover, the existence of a Hopf bifurcation is proved and, by using the normal form theory and center manifold argument, the explicit formulas which determine the stability, direction, and period of bifurcating periodic solutions are obtained. Finally, numerical simulations are performed for supporting the analytical results.

  5. Qualitative properties and hopf bifurcation in haematopoietic disease model with chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafia R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider a model describing the dynamics of Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSC disease with chemotherapy. The model is given by a system of three ordinary differential equations with discrete delay. Its dynamics are studied in term of local stability of the possible steady states for the case without drug intervention term. We prove the existence of periodic oscillations for each case when the delay passes trough a critical values. In the end, we illustrate our results by some numerical simulations.

  6. Family Adaptation to Stroke: A Metasynthesis of Qualitative Research based on Double ABCX Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hesamzadeh, RN, PhD Student of Nursing

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: The results of the study are in conformity with the tenets of the Double ABCX Model. Family adaptation is a dynamic process and the present study findings provide rich information on proper assessment and intervention to the practitioners working with families of stroke survivors.

  7. The development of a model of dignity in illness based on qualitative interviews with seriously ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gennip, Isis E; Pasman, H Roeline W; Oosterveld-Vlug, Mariska G; Willems, Dick L; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D

    2013-08-01

    While knowledge on factors affecting personal dignity of patients nearing death is quite substantial, far less is known about how patients living with a serious disease understand dignity. To develop a conceptual model of dignity that illuminates the process by which serious illness can undermine patients' dignity, and that is applicable to a wide patient population. Qualitative interview study. 34 patients with either cancer, early stage dementia, or a severe chronic illness were selected from an extensive cohort study into advance directives. In-depth interviews were carried out exploring the experiences of seriously ill patients with regard to their personal dignity. The interview transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis and a conceptual model was constructed based on the resulting themes. We developed a two-step dignity model of illness. According to this model, illness related conditions do not affect patients' dignity directly but indirectly by affecting the way patients perceive themselves. We identified three components shaping self-perception: (a) the individual self: the subjective experiences and internally held qualities of the patient; (b) the relational self: the self within reciprocal interaction with others; and, (c) the societal self: the self as a social object in the eyes of others. The merits of the model are two-folded. First, it offers an organizing framework for further research into patients' dignity. Secondly, the model can serve to facilitate care for seriously ill patients in practice by providing insight into illness and dignity at the level of the individual patient where intervention can be effectively targeted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the echolocation strategies of bats on the basis of mathematical modelling and laboratory experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikkyu Aihara

    Full Text Available Prey pursuit by an echolocating bat was studied theoretically and experimentally. First, a mathematical model was proposed to describe the flight dynamics of a bat and a single prey. In this model, the flight angle of the bat was affected by [Formula: see text] angles related to the flight path of the single moving prey, that is, the angle from the bat to the prey and the flight angle of the prey. Numerical simulation showed that the success rate of prey capture was high, when the bat mainly used the angle to the prey to minimize the distance to the prey, and also used the flight angle of the prey to minimize the difference in flight directions of itself and the prey. Second, parameters in the model were estimated according to experimental data obtained from video recordings taken while a Japanese horseshoe bat (Rhinolphus derrumequinum nippon pursued a moving moth (Goniocraspidum pryeri in a flight chamber. One of the estimated parameter values, which represents the ratio in the use of the [Formula: see text] angles, was consistent with the optimal value of the numerical simulation. This agreement between the numerical simulation and parameter estimation suggests that a bat chooses an effective flight path for successful prey capture by using the [Formula: see text] angles. Finally, the mathematical model was extended to include a bat and [Formula: see text] prey. Parameter estimation of the extended model based on laboratory experiments revealed the existence of bat's dynamical attention towards [Formula: see text] prey, that is, simultaneous pursuit of [Formula: see text] prey and selective pursuit of respective prey. Thus, our mathematical model contributes not only to quantitative analysis of effective foraging, but also to qualitative evaluation of a bat's dynamical flight strategy during multiple prey pursuit.

  9. Prediction of qualitative parameters of slab steel ingot using numerical modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tkadlečková

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the verification of casting and solidification of heavy slab ingot weighing 40 t from tool steel by means of numerical modelling with use of a finite element method. The pre-processing, processing and post-processing phases of numerical modelling are outlined. Also, the problems with determination of the thermodynamic properties of materials and with determination of the heat transfer between the individual parts of the casting system are discussed. The final porosity, macrosegregation and the risk of cracks were predicted. The results allowed us to use the slab ingot instead of the conventional heavy steel ingot and to improve the ratio, the chamfer and the external shape of the wall of the new design of the slab ingot.

  10. A Qualitative Analysis of The Bianchi Type IV Viscous Fluid Model

    CERN Document Server

    Kohli, Ikjyot Singh

    2012-01-01

    We are interested in formulating a viscous model of the universe based on The Bianchi Type IV algebra. We first begin by considering a congruence of fluid lines in spacetime, upon which, analyzing their propagation behaviour, we derive the famous Raychaudhuri equation, but, in the context of viscous fluids. We will then go through in great detail the topological and algebraic structure of a Bianchi Type IV algebra, by which we will derive the corresponding structure and constraint equations. From this, we will look at The Einstein field equations in the context of orthonormal frames, and derive the resulting dynamical equations: The Raychaudhuri Equation, generalized Friedmann equation, shear propagation equations, and a set of non-trivial constraint equations. We show that for cases in which the bulk viscous pressure is significantly larger than the shear viscosity, this cosmological model isotropizes asymptotically.

  11. Multiphase modeling and qualitative analysis of the growth of tumor cords

    CERN Document Server

    Tosin, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a macroscopic model of tumor cord growth is developed, relying on the mathematical theory of deformable porous media. Tumor is modeled as a saturated mixture of proliferating cells, extracellular fluid and extracellular matrix, that occupies a spatial region close to a blood vessel whence cells get the nutrient needed for their vital functions. Growth of tumor cells takes place within a healthy host tissue, which is in turn modeled as a saturated mixture of non-proliferating cells. Interactions between these two regions are accounted for as an essential mechanism for the growth of the tumor mass. By weakening the role of the extracellular matrix, which is regarded as a rigid non-remodeling scaffold, a system of two partial differential equations is derived, describing the evolution of the cell volume ratio coupled to the dynamics of the nutrient, whose higher and lower concentration levels determine proliferation or death of tumor cells, respectively. Numerical simulations of a reference two-dim...

  12. Modeling and mapping of cadmium in soils based on qualitative and quantitative auxiliary variables in a cadmium contaminated area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shanshan; Lu, Anxiang; Wang, Jihua; Huo, Lili

    2017-02-15

    The aim of this study was to measure the improvement in mapping accuracy of spatial distribution of Cd in soils by using geostatistical methods combined with auxiliary factors, especially qualitative variables. Significant correlations between Cd content and correlation environment variables that are easy to obtain (such as topographic factors, distance to residential area, land use types and soil types) were analyzed systematically and quantitatively. Based on 398 samples collected from a Cd contaminated area (Hunan Province, China), we estimated the spatial distribution of Cd in soils by using spatial interpolation models, including ordinary kriging (OK), and regression kriging (RK) with each auxiliary variable, all quantitative variables (RKWQ) and all auxiliary variables (RKWA). Results showed that mapping with RK was more consistent with the sampling data of the spatial distribution of Cd in the study area than mapping with OK. The performance indicators (smaller mean error, mean absolute error, root mean squared error values and higher relative improvement of RK than OK) indicated that the introduction of auxiliary variables can improve the prediction accuracy of Cd in soils for which the spatial structure could not be well captured by point-based observation (nugget to sill ratio=0.76) and strong relationships existed between variables to be predicted and auxiliary variables. The comparison of RKWA with RKWQ further indicated that the introduction of qualitative variables improved the prediction accuracy, and even weakened the effects of quantitative factors. Furthermore, the significantly different relative improvement with similar R(2) and varying spatial dependence showed that a reasonable choice of auxiliary variables and analysis of spatial structure of regression residuals are equally important to ensure accurate predictions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Reproducibility principles, problems, practices, and prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Maasen, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Featuring peer-reviewed contributions from noted experts in their fields of research, Reproducibility: Principles, Problems, Practices, and Prospects presents state-of-the-art approaches to reproducibility, the gold standard sound science, from multi- and interdisciplinary perspectives. Including comprehensive coverage for implementing and reflecting the norm of reproducibility in various pertinent fields of research, the book focuses on how the reproducibility of results is applied, how it may be limited, and how such limitations can be understood or even controlled in the natural sciences, computational sciences, life sciences, social sciences, and studies of science and technology. The book presents many chapters devoted to a variety of methods and techniques, as well as their epistemic and ontological underpinnings, which have been developed to safeguard reproducible research and curtail deficits and failures. The book also investigates the political, historical, and social practices that underlie repro...

  14. Explorations in statistics: statistical facets of reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran-Everett, Douglas

    2016-06-01

    Learning about statistics is a lot like learning about science: the learning is more meaningful if you can actively explore. This eleventh installment of Explorations in Statistics explores statistical facets of reproducibility. If we obtain an experimental result that is scientifically meaningful and statistically unusual, we would like to know that our result reflects a general biological phenomenon that another researcher could reproduce if (s)he repeated our experiment. But more often than not, we may learn this researcher cannot replicate our result. The National Institutes of Health and the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology have created training modules and outlined strategies to help improve the reproducibility of research. These particular approaches are necessary, but they are not sufficient. The principles of hypothesis testing and estimation are inherent to the notion of reproducibility in science. If we want to improve the reproducibility of our research, then we need to rethink how we apply fundamental concepts of statistics to our science.

  15. Diffusion of a collaborative care model in primary care: a longitudinal qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedel Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Although collaborative team models (CTM improve care processes and health outcomes, their diffusion poses challenges related to difficulties in securing their adoption by primary care clinicians (PCPs. The objectives of this study are to understand: (1 how the perceived characteristics of a CTM influenced clinicians' decision to adopt -or not- the model; and (2 the model's diffusion process. Methods We conducted a longitudinal case study based on the Diffusion of Innovations Theory. First, diffusion curves were developed for all 175 PCPs and 59 nurses practicing in one borough of Paris. Second, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a representative sample of 40 PCPs and 15 nurses to better understand the implementation dynamics. Results Diffusion curves showed that 3.5 years after the start of the implementation, 100% of nurses and over 80% of PCPs had adopted the CTM. The dynamics of the CTM's diffusion were different between the PCPs and the nurses. The slopes of the two curves are also distinctly different. Among the nurses, the critical mass of adopters was attained faster, since they adopted the CTM earlier and more quickly than the PCPs. Results of the semi-structured interviews showed that these differences in diffusion dynamics were mostly founded in differences between the PCPs' and the nurses' perceptions of the CTM's compatibility with norms, values and practices and its relative advantage (impact on patient management and work practices. Opinion leaders played a key role in the diffusion of the CTM among PCPs. Conclusion CTM diffusion is a social phenomenon that requires a major commitment by clinicians and a willingness to take risks; the role of opinion leaders is key. Paying attention to the notion of a critical mass of adopters is essential to developing implementation strategies that will accelerate the adoption process by clinicians.

  16. A qualitative readiness-requirements assessment model for enterprise big-data infrastructure investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olama, Mohammed M.; McNair, Allen W.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Nutaro, James J.

    2014-05-01

    In the last three decades, there has been an exponential growth in the area of information technology providing the information processing needs of data-driven businesses in government, science, and private industry in the form of capturing, staging, integrating, conveying, analyzing, and transferring data that will help knowledge workers and decision makers make sound business decisions. Data integration across enterprise warehouses is one of the most challenging steps in the big data analytics strategy. Several levels of data integration have been identified across enterprise warehouses: data accessibility, common data platform, and consolidated data model. Each level of integration has its own set of complexities that requires a certain amount of time, budget, and resources to implement. Such levels of integration are designed to address the technical challenges inherent in consolidating the disparate data sources. In this paper, we present a methodology based on industry best practices to measure the readiness of an organization and its data sets against the different levels of data integration. We introduce a new Integration Level Model (ILM) tool, which is used for quantifying an organization and data system's readiness to share data at a certain level of data integration. It is based largely on the established and accepted framework provided in the Data Management Association (DAMADMBOK). It comprises several key data management functions and supporting activities, together with several environmental elements that describe and apply to each function. The proposed model scores the maturity of a system's data governance processes and provides a pragmatic methodology for evaluating integration risks. The higher the computed scores, the better managed the source data system and the greater the likelihood that the data system can be brought in at a higher level of integration.

  17. A Qualitative Readiness-Requirements Assessment Model for Enterprise Big-Data Infrastructure Investment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; McNair, Wade [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL; Nutaro, James J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    In the last three decades, there has been an exponential growth in the area of information technology providing the information processing needs of data-driven businesses in government, science, and private industry in the form of capturing, staging, integrating, conveying, analyzing, and transferring data that will help knowledge workers and decision makers make sound business decisions. Data integration across enterprise warehouses is one of the most challenging steps in the big data analytics strategy. Several levels of data integration have been identified across enterprise warehouses: data accessibility, common data platform, and consolidated data model. Each level of integration has its own set of complexities that requires a certain amount of time, budget, and resources to implement. Such levels of integration are designed to address the technical challenges inherent in consolidating the disparate data sources. In this paper, we present a methodology based on industry best practices to measure the readiness of an organization and its data sets against the different levels of data integration. We introduce a new Integration Level Model (ILM) tool, which is used for quantifying an organization and data system s readiness to share data at a certain level of data integration. It is based largely on the established and accepted framework provided in the Data Management Association (DAMA-DMBOK). It comprises several key data management functions and supporting activities, together with several environmental elements that describe and apply to each function. The proposed model scores the maturity of a system s data governance processes and provides a pragmatic methodology for evaluating integration risks. The higher the computed scores, the better managed the source data system and the greater the likelihood that the data system can be brought in at a higher level of integration.

  18. Qualitative analysis of an integro-differential equation model of periodic chemotherapy

    KAUST Repository

    Jain, Harsh Vardhan

    2012-12-01

    An existing model of tumor growth that accounts for cell cycle arrest and cell death induced by chemotherapy is extended to simulate the response to treatment of a tumor growing in vivo. The tumor is assumed to undergo logistic growth in the absence of therapy, and treatment is administered periodically rather than continuously. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the global stability of the cancer-free equilibrium are derived and conditions under which the system evolves to periodic solutions are determined. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Existence and qualitative properties of travelling waves for an epidemiological model with mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griette, Quentin; Raoul, Gaël

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we are interested in a non-monotonic system of logistic reaction-diffusion equations. This system of equations models an epidemic where two types of pathogens are competing, and a mutation can change one type into the other with a certain rate. We show the existence of travelling waves with minimal speed, which are usually non-monotonic. Then we provide a description of the shape of those constructed travelling waves, and relate them to some Fisher-KPP fronts with non-minimal speed.

  20. Qualitative analysis on a diffusive prey-predator model with ratio-dependent functional response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate a prey-predator model with diffusion and ratio-dependent functional response subject to the homogeneous Neumann boundary condition. Our main focuses are on the global behavior of the reaction-diffusion system and its corresponding steady-state problem. We first apply various Lyapunov functions to discuss the global stability of the unique positive constant steady-state. Then, for the steady-state system, we establish some a priori upper and lower estimates for positive steady-states, and derive several results for non-existence of positive non-constant steady-states if the diffusion rates are large or small.

  1. QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS OF AN SEIS EPIDEMIC MODEL WITH NONLINEAR INCIDENCE RATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG La-di; LI Jian-quan

    2006-01-01

    By means of limit theory and Fonda's theorem, an SEIS epidemic model with constant recruitment and the disease-related rate is considered. The incidence term is of the nonlinear form, and the basic reproduction number is found. If the basic reproduction number is less than one, there exists only the disease-free equilibrium, which is globally asymptotically stable, and the disease dies out eventually. If the basic reproduction number is greater than one, besides the unstable disease-free equilibrium, there exists also a unique endemic equilibrium, which is locally asymptotically stable, and the disease is uniformly persistent.

  2. The chemical plant management qualitative support system

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to capture the benefits of common sense qualitative reasoning about process phenomena as displayed in the human behavior mental model. The control features of qualitative modeling and simulation were qualitative variable description and logic rules for manipulating variable values between systematic states. The additional measure of qualitative information value was introduced. This study is the first report in the literature showing the measure of qualitative inform...

  3. Mathematical-statistical models and qualitative theories for economic and social sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Maturo, Fabrizio; Kacprzyk, Janusz

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a broad spectrum of problems related to statistics, mathematics, teaching, social science, and economics as well as a range of tools and techniques that can be used to solve these problems. It is the result of a scientific collaboration between experts in the field of economic and social systems from the University of Defence in Brno (Czech Republic), G. d’Annunzio University of Chieti-Pescara (Italy), Pablo de Olavid eUniversity of Sevilla (Spain), and Ovidius University in Constanţa, (Romania). The studies included were selected using a peer-review process and reflect heterogeneity and complexity of economic and social phenomena. They and present interesting empirical research from around the globe and from several research fields, such as statistics, decision making, mathematics, complexity, psychology, sociology and economics. The volume is divided into two parts. The first part, “Recent trends in mathematical and statistical models for economic and social sciences”, collects pap...

  4. Mathematical Modeling of Hidden Intimate Partner Violence in Spain: A Quantitative and Qualitative Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. De la Poza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fact that women are abused by their male partner is something that happens worldwide in the 21st century. In numerous cases, abuse only becomes publicly known when a fatal event occurs and is beyond any possible remedy, that is, when men murder their female partner. Since 2003, 793 (September 4, 2015 women have been assassinated by their significant other or excouple in Spain. Only 7.2% of murdered women had reported their fear and previous intimate partner violence (IPV to the police. Even when the number of female victims is comparable to the number of victims by terrorism, the Government has not assigned an equal amount of resources to diminish the magnitude of this hidden social problem. In this paper, a mathematical epidemiological model to forecast intimate partner violence in Spain is constructed. Both psychological and physical aggressor subpopulations are predicted and simulated. The model’s robustness versus uncertain parameters is studied by a sensitivity analysis.

  5. Qualitative analysis of stationary Keller-Segel chemotaxis models with logistic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Yan, Jingda; Gai, Chunyi

    2016-06-01

    We study the stationary Keller-Segel chemotaxis models with logistic cellular growth over a one-dimensional region subject to the Neumann boundary condition. We show that nonconstant solutions emerge in the sense of Turing's instability as the chemotaxis rate {χ} surpasses a threshold number. By taking the chemotaxis rate as the bifurcation parameter, we carry out bifurcation analysis on the system to obtain the explicit formulas of bifurcation values and small amplitude nonconstant positive solutions. Moreover, we show that solutions stay strictly positive in the continuum of each branch. The stabilities of these steady-state solutions are well studied when the creation and degradation rate of the chemical is assumed to be a linear function. Finally, we investigate the asymptotic behaviors of the monotone steady states. We construct solutions with interesting patterns such as a boundary spike when the chemotaxis rate is large enough and/or the cell motility is small.

  6. How are pharmacists in Ontario adapting to practice change? Results of a qualitative analysis using Kotter's change management model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Beatriz; Gregory, Paul A M; Austin, Zubin

    2017-01-01

    The pace of practice change in community pharmacy over the past decade has been significant, yet there is little evidence documenting implementation of change in the profession. Kotter's change management model was selected as a theoretical framework for this exploratory qualitative study. Community pharmacists were interviewed using a semistructured protocol based on Kotter's model. Data were analyzed and coded using a constant-comparative iterative method aligned with the stages of change management outlined by Kotter. Twelve community pharmacists were interviewed. Three key themes emerged: 1) the profession has successfully established the urgency to, and created a climate conducive for, change; 2) the profession has been less successful in engaging and enabling the profession to actually implement change; and 3) legislative changes (for example, expansion of pharmacists' scope of practice) may have occurred prematurely, prior to other earlier stages of the change process being consolidated. As noted by most participants, allowing change is not implementing change: pharmacists reported feeling underprepared and lacking confidence to actually make change in their practices and believe that more emphasis on practical, specific implementation tactics is needed. Change management is complex and time and resource intensive. There is a need to provide personalized, detailed, context-specific implementation strategies to pharmacists to allow them to take full advantage of expanded scope of practice.

  7. How to Conduct a Qualitative Program Evaluation in the Light of Eisner's Educational Connoisseurship and Criticism Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    The quantitative methodologies have been traditionally employed in the educational research so far. However, as long as with the appreciation and widespread use of the qualitative methodologies in many disciplines, many different educational areas have started to be examined in terms of qualitative research aspects. Particularly, the qualitative…

  8. A Critical Review of Qualitative Research Methods in Evaluating Nursing Curriculum Models: Implication for Nursing Education in the Arab World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devadas, Briliya

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this critical literature review was to examine qualitative studies done on innovative nursing curriculums in order to determine which qualitative methods have been most effective in investigating the effectiveness of the curriculum and which would be most appropriate in an Arab Islamic country. Data Sources: At least 25 studies…

  9. A qualitative model for strategic analysis of organizations. Application and alternative proposal on a study case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Ferro Moreno

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The strategic analysis of organizations is based on the internal and external environments, in order to identify positive and negative variables and factors. The interrelation and timing of these strategic forces are essential to create alternative solutions that tend to achieve the organizational objectives.The normative prospective has theorical and methodological foundations to create a desired future and from it, be able to identify impelling and restraining forces that have influence on the particular problematic situation (go from the current situation to a better one in a certain time.The aim of this article is to analyze on a strategic way a real case with a normative-prospective model that considers the temporal dynamics of the factors impact and variables in time allowing to suggest alternative solutions.Semi-structured interviews were performed with all the employees of this case and structured observations and workshops with the commercial and general management.In consequence, with the results, the desired, current and improved situations were built. Additionally, forces were identified classified and appreciated and lastly solutions were suggested. With the proposed prospective method, alternative solutions could be constructed in order to settle temporary organizational objectives. No constraints were found to use the current method in other cases.Keywords: Strategic forces, Normative prospective, Problematic situations, Strategies

  10. Qualitative analysis of Kantowski-Sachs metric in a generic class of f(R) models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon, Genly [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Casilla 4950, Valparaíso (Chile); Roque, Armando A., E-mail: genly.leon@ucv.cl, E-mail: arestrada@ucf.edu.cu [Grupo de Estudios Avanzados, Universidad de Cienfuegos, Carretera a Rodas, Cuatro Caminos, s/n. Cienfuegos (Cuba)

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we investigate, from the dynamical systems perspective, the evolution of a Kantowski-Sachs metric in a generic class of f(R) models. We present conditions (i.e., differentiability conditions, existence of minima, monotony intervals, etc.) for a free input function related to the f(R), that guarantee the asymptotic stability of well-motivated physical solutions, specially, self-accelerated solutions, allowing to describe both inflationary- and late-time acceleration stages of the cosmic evolution. We discuss which f(R) theories allows for a cosmic evolution with an acceptable matter era, in correspondence to the modern cosmological paradigm. We find a very rich behavior, and amongst others the universe can result in isotropized solutions with observables in agreement with observations, such as de Sitter, quintessence-like, or phantom solutions. Additionally, we find that a cosmological bounce and turnaround are realized in a part of the parameter-space as a consequence of the metric choice.

  11. Qualitative analysis of Kantowski-Sachs metric in a generic class of $f(R)$ models

    CERN Document Server

    Leon, Genly

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate, from the dynamical systems perspective, the evolution of a Kantowski-Sachs metric in a generic class of $f(R)$ models. We present conditions (i. e., differentiability conditions, existence of minima, monotony intervals, etc.) for a free input function related to the $f(R)$, that guarantee the asymptotic stability of well-motivated physical solutions, specially, self-accelerated solutions, allowing to describe both inflationary- and late-time acceleration stages of the cosmic evolution. We discuss which $f(R)$ theories allows for a cosmic evolution with an acceptable matter era, in correspondence to the modern cosmological paradigm. We find a very rich behavior, and amongst others the universe can result in isotropized solutions with observables in agreement with observations, such as de Sitter, quintessence-like, or phantom solutions. Additionally, we find that a cosmological bounce and turnaround are realized in a part of the parameter-space as a consequence of the metric choice...

  12. Qualitative and quantitative changes in phospholipids and proteins investigated by spectroscopic techniques in animal depression model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depciuch, J.; Sowa-Kucma, M.; Nowak, G.; Papp, M.; Gruca, P.; Misztak, P.; Parlinska-Wojtan, M.

    2017-04-01

    Depression becomes nowadays a high mortality civilization disease with one of the major causes being chronic stress. Raman, Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-vis) spectroscopies were used to determine the changes in the quantity and structure of phospholipids and proteins in the blood serum of rats subjected to chronic mild stress, which is a common animal depression model. Moreover, the efficiency of the imipramine treatment was evaluated. It was found that chronic mild stress not only damages the structure of the phospholipids and proteins, but also decreases their level in the blood serum. A 5 weeks imipramine treatment did increase slightly the quantity of proteins, leaving the damaged phospholipids unchanged. Structural information from phospholipids and proteins was obtained by UV-vis spectroscopy combined with the second derivative of the FTIR spectra. Indeed, the structure of proteins in blood serum of stressed rats was normalized after imipramine therapy, while the impaired structure of phospholipids remained unaffected. These findings strongly suggest that the depression factor, which is chronic mild stress, may induce permanent (irreversible) damages into the phospholipid structure identified as shortened carbon chains. This study shows a possible new application of spectroscopic techniques in the diagnosis and therapy monitoring of depression.

  13. A reproducible accelerated in vitro release testing method for PLGA microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Lee, Kyulim; Choi, Stephanie; Qu, Wen; Wang, Yan; Burgess, Diane J

    2016-02-10

    The objective of the present study was to develop a discriminatory and reproducible accelerated in vitro release method for long-acting PLGA microspheres with inner structure/porosity differences. Risperidone was chosen as a model drug. Qualitatively and quantitatively equivalent PLGA microspheres with different inner structure/porosity were obtained using different manufacturing processes. Physicochemical properties as well as degradation profiles of the prepared microspheres were investigated. Furthermore, in vitro release testing of the prepared risperidone microspheres was performed using the most common in vitro release methods (i.e., sample-and-separate and flow through) for this type of product. The obtained compositionally equivalent risperidone microspheres had similar drug loading but different inner structure/porosity. When microsphere particle size appeared similar, porous risperidone microspheres showed faster microsphere degradation and drug release compared with less porous microspheres. Both in vitro release methods investigated were able to differentiate risperidone microsphere formulations with differences in porosity under real-time (37 °C) and accelerated (45 °C) testing conditions. Notably, only the accelerated USP apparatus 4 method showed good reproducibility for highly porous risperidone microspheres. These results indicated that the accelerated USP apparatus 4 method is an appropriate fast quality control tool for long-acting PLGA microspheres (even with porous structures).

  14. MRSA model of learning and adaptation: a qualitative study among the general public

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohde Rodney E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More people in the US now die from Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections than from HIV/AIDS. Often acquired in healthcare facilities or during healthcare procedures, the extremely high incidence of MRSA infections and the dangerously low levels of literacy regarding antibiotic resistance in the general public are on a collision course. Traditional medical approaches to infection control and the conventional attitude healthcare practitioners adopt toward public education are no longer adequate to avoid this collision. This study helps us understand how people acquire and process new information and then adapt behaviours based on learning. Methods Using constructivist theory, semi-structured face-to-face and phone interviews were conducted to gather pertinent data. This allowed participants to tell their stories so their experiences could deepen our understanding of this crucial health issue. Interview transcripts were analysed using grounded theory and sensitizing concepts. Results Our findings were classified into two main categories, each of which in turn included three subthemes. First, in the category of Learning, we identified how individuals used their Experiences with MRSA, to answer the questions: What was learned? and, How did learning occur? The second category, Adaptation gave us insights into Self-reliance, Reliance on others, and Reflections on the MRSA journey. Conclusions This study underscores the critical importance of educational programs for patients, and improved continuing education for healthcare providers. Five specific results of this study can reduce the vacuum that currently exists between the knowledge and information available to healthcare professionals, and how that information is conveyed to the public. These points include: 1 a common model of MRSA learning and adaptation; 2 the self-directed nature of adult learning; 3 the focus on general MRSA information, care and

  15. Learning Reproducibility with a Yearly Networking Contest

    KAUST Repository

    Canini, Marco

    2017-08-10

    Better reproducibility of networking research results is currently a major goal that the academic community is striving towards. This position paper makes the case that improving the extent and pervasiveness of reproducible research can be greatly fostered by organizing a yearly international contest. We argue that holding a contest undertaken by a plurality of students will have benefits that are two-fold. First, it will promote hands-on learning of skills that are helpful in producing artifacts at the replicable-research level. Second, it will advance the best practices regarding environments, testbeds, and tools that will aid the tasks of reproducibility evaluation committees by and large.

  16. Thou Shalt Be Reproducible! A Technology Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Mair

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article elaborates on reproducibility in psychology from a technological viewpoint. Modernopen source computational environments are shown and explained that foster reproducibilitythroughout the whole research life cycle, and to which emerging psychology researchers shouldbe sensitized, are shown and explained. First, data archiving platforms that make datasets publiclyavailable are presented. Second, R is advocated as the data-analytic lingua franca in psychologyfor achieving reproducible statistical analysis. Third, dynamic report generation environments forwriting reproducible manuscripts that integrate text, data analysis, and statistical outputs such asfigures and tables in a single document are described. Supplementary materials are provided inorder to get the reader started with these technologies.

  17. The Economics of Reproducibility in Preclinical Research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard P Freedman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Low reproducibility rates within life science research undermine cumulative knowledge production and contribute to both delays and costs of therapeutic drug development. An analysis of past studies indicates that the cumulative (total prevalence of irreproducible preclinical research exceeds 50%, resulting in approximately US$28,000,000,000 (US$28B/year spent on preclinical research that is not reproducible-in the United States alone. We outline a framework for solutions and a plan for long-term improvements in reproducibility rates that will help to accelerate the discovery of life-saving therapies and cures.

  18. Qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Lisa; Dertadian, George

    2017-08-07

    This narrative review aims to highlight key insights from qualitative research on drug use and drug users by profiling a selection of classic works. Consensus methods were used to identify and select four papers published in 1938, 1969, 1973 and 1984 considered to be classics. These landmark qualitative studies included the first account of addiction as a social process, demonstrating that people have meaningful responses to drug use that cannot be reduced to their pharmacological effects; the portrayal of inner-city heroin users as exacting, energetic and engaged social agents; identification of the interactive social learning processes involved in becoming a drug user; the application of the 'career' concept to understanding transitions and trajectories of drug use over time; and the articulation of a framework for understanding drug use that incorporates the interaction between pharmacology, psychology and social environments. These classic sociological and anthropological studies deployed qualitative research methods to show how drug use is shaped by complex sets of factors situated within social contexts, viewing drug users as agents engaged actively in social processes and worlds. Their findings have been used to challenge stereotypes about drug use and drug users, develop a deeper understanding of drug use among hidden, hard-to-research and under-studied populations, and provide the foundations for significant developments in scientific knowledge about the nature of drug use. They continue to retain their relevance, providing important correctives to biomedical and behaviourist paradigms, reminding us that drug use is a social process, and demonstrating how the inductive approach of qualitative research can strengthen the way we understand and respond to drug use and related harms. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  19. Clinical teaching and learning within a preceptorship model in an acute care hospital in Ireland; a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSharry, Edel; Lathlean, Judith

    2017-04-01

    A preceptorship model of clinical teaching was introduced to support the new all-graduate nurse education programme in Ireland in 2002. Little is known about how this model impacts upon the pedagogical practices of the preceptor or student learning in clinical practice leading to question what constitutes effective teaching and learning in clinical practice at undergraduate level. This study aimed to explore the clinical teaching and learning within a preceptorship model in an acute care hospital in Ireland and identify when best practice, based on current theoretical professional and educational principles occurred. A qualitative research study of a purposively selected sample of 13 students and 13 preceptors, working together in four clinical areas in one hospital in Ireland. Methods were semi-structured interviews, analysed thematically, complemented by documentary analysis relating to the teaching and assessment of the students. Ethical approval was gained from the hospital's Ethics Committee. Preceptor-student contact time within an empowering student-preceptor learning relationship was the foundation of effective teaching and learning and assessment. Dialoguing and talking through practice enhanced the students' knowledge and understanding, while the ability of the preceptor to ask higher order questions promoted the students' clinical reasoning and problem solving skills. Insufficient time to teach, and an over reliance on students' ability to participate in and contribute to practice with minimal guidance were found to negatively impact students' learning. Concepts such as cognitive apprenticeship, scaffolding and learning in communities of practice can be helpful in understanding the processes entailed in preceptorship. Preceptors need extensive educational preparation and support to ensure they have the pedagogical competencies necessary to provide the cognitive teaching techniques that foster professional performance and clinical reasoning. National

  20. 基于云模型的定性运算理论与方法%Theory and Method of Qualitative Operation based on Cloud Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪利

    2012-01-01

    It is the most important key problem for the qualitative theory to practice application that the qualitative value is operated like the quantitative value. Relative research methods proposed have the shortcoming. The theory and method of qualitative operation based on cloud model is proposed in this paper. Firstly the qualitative relation of operation based on cloud model is given on the basis of basic operation of cloud model. Secondly the resolving method of one-variable-one-time qualitative equation based on cloud model is proposed. In this theory and method the qualitative value can be calculated exactly and precisely. The method has the character of fusion of qualitative and quantitative value. It provides the important reference method for the qualitative operation application in the fields of system analysis and simulation and so on.%将定性值像定量值一样参与运算和推导,是定性理论走向真正实际应用必须解决的极为关键的研究问题.相关研究提出的方法在此方面均有一定的局限性.本文提出了一种基于云模型的定性运算理论与方法.首先在云模型基本运算的基础上提出了基于云模型的定性关系演算方法,其次提出了基于云模型的一元一次定性方程的求解方法.理论和方法能比较科学合理地计算出定性值,且具有定性与定量相互融合的特点.为定性演算和推导在系统分析和仿真等领域中进一步应用提供了重要的借鉴方法.

  1. Reproducibility Experiment of OSL and TL Dosimeter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Reproducibility is an important property of personal dosimeter. It not only can indicate the stability of dosimeter, appraise the precision and accuracy of measured value, but also can evaluate the

  2. Reproducible statistical analysis with multiple languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenth, Russell; Højsgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the system for making reproducible statistical analyses. differs from other systems for reproducible analysis in several ways. The two main differences are: (1) Several statistics programs can be in used in the same document. (2) Documents can be prepared using OpenOffice or ......This paper describes the system for making reproducible statistical analyses. differs from other systems for reproducible analysis in several ways. The two main differences are: (1) Several statistics programs can be in used in the same document. (2) Documents can be prepared using Open......Office or \\LaTeX. The main part of this paper is an example showing how to use and together in an OpenOffice text document. The paper also contains some practical considerations on the use of literate programming in statistics....

  3. Reproducing Monocultural Education: Ethnic Majority Staff's Discursive Constructions of Monocultural School Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mampaey, Jelle; Zanoni, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of ethnic majority staff in the perpetuation of monocultural education that excludes non-western, ethnic minority cultures and reproduces institutional racism in schools. Based on qualitative data collected through semi-structured interviews in four ethnically diverse schools in the Flemish educational system, we…

  4. Reproducibility of AMPLICOR enterovirus PCR test results.

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    The reproducibility of AMPLICOR enterovirus PCR test results was determined with clinical samples of cerebrospinal fluid, serum, urine, and throat and rectal swabs. Among 608 samples from which duplicate aliquots were run simultaneously, only seven pairs gave discordant results. Among 104 samples from which duplicate aliquots were run in separate assays, no discordance was seen. Overall, the reproducibility of test kit results was 99% (705 of 712).

  5. Relevant principal factors affecting the reproducibility of insect primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Norichika; Iwabuchi, Kikuo

    2017-06-01

    The primary culture of insect cells often suffers from problems with poor reproducibility in the quality of the final cell preparations. The cellular composition of the explants (cell number and cell types), surgical methods (surgical duration and surgical isolation), and physiological and genetic differences between donors may be critical factors affecting the reproducibility of culture. However, little is known about where biological variation (interindividual differences between donors) ends and technical variation (variance in replication of culture conditions) begins. In this study, we cultured larval fat bodies from the Japanese rhinoceros beetle, Allomyrina dichotoma, and evaluated, using linear mixed models, the effect of interindividual variation between donors on the reproducibility of the culture. We also performed transcriptome analysis of the hemocyte-like cells mainly seen in the cultures using RNA sequencing and ultrastructural analyses of hemocytes using a transmission electron microscope, revealing that the cultured cells have many characteristics of insect hemocytes.

  6. Qualitative modeling identifies IL-11 as a novel regulator in maintaining self-renewal in human pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedi ePeterson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotency in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs is regulated by three transcription factors - OCT3/4, SOX2 and NANOG. To fully exploit the therapeutic potential of these cells it is essential to have a good mechanistic understanding of the maintenance of self-renewal and pluripotency. In this study, we demonstrate a powerful systems biology approach in which we first expand literature-based network encompassing the core regulators of pluripotency by assessing the behaviour of genes targeted by perturbation experiments. We focused our attention on highly regulated genes encoding cell surface and secreted proteins as these can be more easily manipulated by the use of inhibitors or recombinant proteins. Qualitative modeling based on combining boolean networks and in silico perturbation experiments were employed to identify novel pluripotency-regulating genes. We validated Interleukin-11 (IL-11 and demonstrate that this cytokine is a novel pluripotency-associated factor capable of supporting self-renewal in the absence of exogenously added bFGF in culture. To date, the various protocols for hESCs maintenance require supplementation with bFGF to activate the Activin/Nodal branch of the TGFβ signaling pathway. Additional evidence supporting our findings is that IL-11 belongs to the same protein family as LIF, which is known to be necessary for maintaining pluripotency in mouse but not in human ESCs. These cytokines operate through the same gp130 receptor which interacts with Janus kinases. Our finding might explain why mESCs are in a more naïve cell state compared to hESCs and how to convert primed hESCs back to the naïve state. Taken together, our integrative modeling approach has identified novel genes as putative candidates to be incorporated into the expansion of the current gene regulatory network responsible for inducing and maintaining pluripotency.

  7. Quantitative assessment of key parameters in qualitative vulnerability methods applied in karst systems based on an integrated numerical modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doummar, Joanna; Kassem, Assaad

    2017-04-01

    In the framework of a three-year PEER (USAID/NSF) funded project, flow in a Karst system in Lebanon (Assal) dominated by snow and semi arid conditions was simulated and successfully calibrated using an integrated numerical model (MIKE-She 2016) based on high resolution input data and detailed catchment characterization. Point source infiltration and fast flow pathways were simulated by a bypass function and a high conductive lens respectively. The approach consisted of identifying all the factors used in qualitative vulnerability methods (COP, EPIK, PI, DRASTIC, GOD) applied in karst systems and to assess their influence on recharge signals in the different hydrological karst compartments (Atmosphere, Unsaturated zone and Saturated zone) based on the integrated numerical model. These parameters are usually attributed different weights according to their estimated impact on Groundwater vulnerability. The aim of this work is to quantify the importance of each of these parameters and outline parameters that are not accounted for in standard methods, but that might play a role in the vulnerability of a system. The spatial distribution of the detailed evapotranspiration, infiltration, and recharge signals from atmosphere to unsaturated zone to saturated zone was compared and contrasted among different surface settings and under varying flow conditions (e.g., in varying slopes, land cover, precipitation intensity, and soil properties as well point source infiltration). Furthermore a sensitivity analysis of individual or coupled major parameters allows quantifying their impact on recharge and indirectly on vulnerability. The preliminary analysis yields a new methodology that accounts for most of the factors influencing vulnerability while refining the weights attributed to each one of them, based on a quantitative approach.

  8. Evaluation of the usefulness of 2 prediction models of clinical prediction models in physical therapy: a qualitative process evaluation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, L. van; Verhagen, A.F.; Koes, B.; Vet, R. de; Anema, H.; Heymans, M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purposes of this study were to (1) evaluate the usefulness of 2 prediction models by assessing the actual use and advantages/disadvantages of application in daily clinical practice and (2) propose recommendations to enhance their implementation. METHODS: Physical therapists working in

  9. Reproducibility in Data-Scarce Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darch, P. T.

    2016-12-01

    Among the usual requirements for reproducibility are large volumes of data and computationally intensive methods. Many fields within earth sciences, however, do not meet these requirements. Data are scarce and data-intensive methods are not well established. How can science be reproducible under these conditions? What changes, both infrastructural and cultural, are needed to advance reproducibility? This paper presents findings from a long-term social scientific case study of an emergent and data scarce field, the deep subseafloor biosphere. This field studies interactions between microbial communities living in the seafloor and the physical environments they inhabit. Factors such as these make reproducibility seem a distant goal for this community: - The relative newness of the field. Serious study began in the late 1990s; - The highly multidisciplinary nature of the field. Researchers come from a range of physical and life science backgrounds; - Data scarcity. Domain researchers produce much of these data in their own onshore laboratories by analyzing cores from international ocean drilling expeditions. Allocation of cores is negotiated between researchers from many fields. These factors interact in multiple ways to inhibit reproducibility: - Incentive structures emphasize producing new data and new knowledge rather than reanalysing extant data; - Only a few steps of laboratory analyses can be reproduced - such as analysis of DNA sequences, but not extraction of DNA from cores -, due to scarcity of cores; - Methodological heterogeneity is a consequence of multidisciplinarity, as researchers bring different techniques from diverse fields. - Few standards for data collection or analysis are available at this early stage of the field; - While datasets from multiple biological and physical phenomena can be integrated into a single workflow, curation tends to be divergent. Each type of dataset may be subject to different disparate policies and contributed to different

  10. Assessing the effect of quantitative and qualitative predictors on gastric cancer individuals survival using hierarchical artificial neural network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Zohreh; Mohammad, Kazem; Mahmoudi, Mahmood; Parsaeian, Mahbubeh; Zeraati, Hojjat

    2013-01-01

    There are numerous unanswered questions in the application of artificial neural network models for analysis of survival data. In most studies, independent variables have been studied as qualitative dichotomous variables, and results of using discrete and continuous quantitative, ordinal, or multinomial categorical predictive variables in these models are not well understood in comparison to conventional models. This study was designed and conducted to examine the application of these models in order to determine the survival of gastric cancer patients, in comparison to the Cox proportional hazards model. We studied the postoperative survival of 330 gastric cancer patients who suffered surgery at a surgical unit of the Iran Cancer Institute over a five-year period. Covariates of age, gender, history of substance abuse, cancer site, type of pathology, presence of metastasis, stage, and number of complementary treatments were entered in the models, and survival probabilities were calculated at 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months using the Cox proportional hazards and neural network models. We estimated coefficients of the Cox model and the weights in the neural network (with 3, 5, and 7 nodes in the hidden layer) in the training group, and used them to derive predictions in the study group. Predictions with these two methods were compared with those of the Kaplan-Meier product limit estimator as the gold standard. Comparisons were performed with the Friedman and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Survival probabilities at different times were determined using the Cox proportional hazards and a neural network with three nodes in the hidden layer; the ratios of standard errors with these two methods to the Kaplan-Meier method were 1.1593 and 1.0071, respectively, revealed a significant difference between Cox and Kaplan-Meier (P neural network, and the neural network and the standard (Kaplan-Meier), as well as better accuracy for the neural network (with 3 nodes in the hidden layer

  11. 定性推理的电路故障传播建模分析方法%A Qualitative Modeling Method Based on Qualitative Reasoning of Fault Propagation in Circuit System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈忱; 马晓龙; 张士刚; 曾照洋; 刘丹丹

    2016-01-01

    Aimed at the problems that in the existing fault propagation models and analysis methods based on qualitative reasoning often neglect the non�structural failure caused by the drift of performance parame-ters,this paper proposes a brand new method of fault propagation modeling and analysis,as well as the propagation mechanism,signal�aggregation mechanism,influence mechanism,and the reasoning process. In this method,taking the analysis of fault signal strength as a core,the fault signals produced in the source in the connectivity models transmit to each indenture level in the qualitative network model of cir-cuit system through the hierarchical modeling way.Then,the paper adopts the colored qualitative network to evaluate the fault effect and its severity quickly and intuitively.Finally,the paper verifies the practical effect of this method by the autopilot at a certain robot plane.%针对现有故障传播定性推理模型与分析方法较少考虑因性能参数变化引起的非结构性故障的问题,提出了一种全新的电路系统故障传播建模方法,并制定了传播机制、作用机制、影响机制以及相应的推理流程。该方法以传播过程中的故障信号强度分析为核心,通过层次化建模的方式将元器件层连通性模型中故障源产生的故障信号传递至电路系统定性网络模型的各个约定层次之中;并采用着色定性网络的形式对造成的故障影响及其严重程度进行定性评价,快速且直观地展现了电路系统故障传播推理分析过程;最终以某无人机自动驾驶仪为对象验证了该方法的实际应用效果。

  12. Qualitative Economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fast, Michael; Clark II, Woodrow W

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is about science from a book that on Qualitative Economics (Clark and Fast 2008), specifically building a science of economics, grounded in understanding of organizations and what is beneath the surface of structures and activities. Economics should be, as a science, concerned with i...... things; it is about interaction and it is about construction. If we are not able to understand and describe how people interact and construct, we can not develop any theory of economics or understand human dynamics that is scientific.......This chapter is about science from a book that on Qualitative Economics (Clark and Fast 2008), specifically building a science of economics, grounded in understanding of organizations and what is beneath the surface of structures and activities. Economics should be, as a science, concerned with its...... assumptions and how to develop and formulate theories of ideas and reality that produce descriptions of how to understand phenomenon that create experiences, hypotheses generation and replicable data which need to be connected to everyday business life. Economics has to start with a discussion of philosophy...

  13. Data Science Innovations That Streamline Development, Documentation, Reproducibility, and Dissemination of Models in Computational Thermodynamics: An Application of Image Processing Techniques for Rapid Computation, Parameterization and Modeling of Phase Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiorso, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Computational thermodynamics (CT) represents a collection of numerical techniques that are used to calculate quantitative results from thermodynamic theory. In the Earth sciences, CT is most often applied to estimate the equilibrium properties of solutions, to calculate phase equilibria from models of the thermodynamic properties of materials, and to approximate irreversible reaction pathways by modeling these as a series of local equilibrium steps. The thermodynamic models that underlie CT calculations relate the energy of a phase to temperature, pressure and composition. These relationships are not intuitive and they are seldom well constrained by experimental data; often, intuition must be applied to generate a robust model that satisfies the expectations of use. As a consequence of this situation, the models and databases the support CT applications in geochemistry and petrology are tedious to maintain as new data and observations arise. What is required to make the process more streamlined and responsive is a computational framework that permits the rapid generation of observable outcomes from the underlying data/model collections, and importantly, the ability to update and re-parameterize the constitutive models through direct manipulation of those outcomes. CT procedures that take models/data to the experiential reference frame of phase equilibria involve function minimization, gradient evaluation, the calculation of implicit lines, curves and surfaces, contour extraction, and other related geometrical measures. All these procedures are the mainstay of image processing analysis. Since the commercial escalation of video game technology, open source image processing libraries have emerged (e.g., VTK) that permit real time manipulation and analysis of images. These tools find immediate application to CT calculations of phase equilibria by permitting rapid calculation and real time feedback between model outcome and the underlying model parameters.

  14. Reproducibility of psychophysics and electroencephalography during offset analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, M; Piasco, A; Nissen, T D; Graversen, C; Gazerani, P; Lucas, M-F; Dahan, A; Drewes, A M; Brock, C

    2014-07-01

    Offset analgesia (OA) is a pain-inhibiting mechanism, defined as a disproportionately large decrease in pain perception in response to a discrete decrease in noxious stimulus intensity. Hence, the aims were (1) to investigate whether psychophysics and electroencephalography (EEG) can be assessed simultaneously during OA and (2) to assess whether OA is reproducible within the same day as well as between different days. Two separate studies investigated OA: Study I (13 healthy volunteers; seven men; 25.5 ± 0.65 years) aimed at determining the feasibility of recording psychophysics and EEG simultaneously during OA. Study II (18 healthy volunteers; 12 men; 34 ± 3.15 years) assessed reproducibility of OA in terms of psychophysics and EEG. Subjects were presented to a 30-s OA heat stimulus paradigm on the volar forearm and psychophysics, and EEG recordings were obtained throughout the procedure. Reproducibility was assessed within the same day and between different days, using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Additionally, the reproducible psychophysical parameters were correlated to relevant EEG frequency bands. Simultaneous recording of psychophysics and EEG affects the frequency distribution in terms of alpha suppression. Reproducibility was proven for the psychophysics and EEG frequency bands both within the same day (all ICCs > 0.62) and between different days (all ICCs > 0.66, except for the delta band). Correlations between psychophysics and EEG were found in the theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz) and gamma (32-80 Hz) bands (all p < 0.01). OA is a robust and reproducible model for experimental pain research, making it suitable for future research. © 2013 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  15. A Bayesian Perspective on the Reproducibility Project: Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etz, Alexander; Vandekerckhove, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the results of the recent Reproducibility Project: Psychology by the Open Science Collaboration. We compute Bayes factors-a quantity that can be used to express comparative evidence for an hypothesis but also for the null hypothesis-for a large subset (N = 72) of the original papers and their corresponding replication attempts. In our computation, we take into account the likely scenario that publication bias had distorted the originally published results. Overall, 75% of studies gave qualitatively similar results in terms of the amount of evidence provided. However, the evidence was often weak (i.e., Bayes factor psychological literature. We further conclude that traditional sample sizes are insufficient and that a more widespread adoption of Bayesian methods is desirable.

  16. Reproducing Kernel for D2(Ω, ρ) and Metric Induced by Reproducing Kernel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhen Gang

    2009-01-01

    An important property of the reproducing kernel of D2(Ω, ρ) is obtained and the reproducing kernels for D2(Ω, ρ) are calculated when Ω = Bn × Bn and ρ are some special functions. A reproducing kernel is used to construct a semi-positive definite matrix and a distance function defined on Ω×Ω. An inequality is obtained about the distance function and the pseudodistance induced by the matrix.

  17. Reproducibility, controllability, and optimization of LENR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, David J. [The George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) measurements are significantly, and increasingly reproducible. Practical control of the production of energy or materials by LENR has yet to be demonstrated. Minimization of costly inputs and maximization of desired outputs of LENR remain for future developments. The paper concludes by underlying that it is now clearly that demands for reproducible experiments in the early years of LENR experiments were premature. In fact, one can argue that irreproducibility should be expected for early experiments in a complex new field. As emphasized in the paper and as often happened in the history of science, experimental and theoretical progress can take even decades. It is likely to be many years before investments in LENR experiments will yield significant returns, even for successful research programs. However, it is clearly that a fundamental understanding of the anomalous effects observed in numerous experiments will significantly increase reproducibility, improve controllability, enable optimization of processes, and accelerate the economic viability of LENR.

  18. Reproducibility of surface roughness in reaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Pavel; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    concentration of the oil in water-based cutting fluid (or when using a straight mineral oil) results in surface profiles that are more reproducible at higher cutting speed. Moreover, it can be seen that three cutting fluids (two water-based cutting fluids with different oil concentration and a straight mineral......An investigation on the reproducibility of surface roughness in reaming was performed to document the applicability of this approach for testing cutting fluids. Austenitic stainless steel was used as a workpiece material and HSS reamers as cutting tools. Reproducibility of the results was evaluated...... oil) used in connection with a low cutting speed result in "identical" surface profiles. Biggest uncertainty contributors were due to the process repeatability and repeatability around the hole circumference. This was however only in the case of high cutting speeds and low degree of oil concentration...

  19. Reproducibility of operator processing for radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui Shen; DeNardo, Gerald L.; DeNardo, Sally J.; Aina, Yuan; DeNardo, Diane A.; Lamborn, Kathleen R

    1997-01-01

    Reproducibility of operator processing for radiation dose and biological half-life was assessed for radioimmunotherapy. Mean coefficient of variation for intra-operator consecutive processing and for inter-operator processing was less than 15% for all tissues. The mean coefficient of variation for intra-operator processing over 2 wk or inter-operator processing comparing an experienced and less experienced operator was generally greater, and particularly so for tumors. Satisfactory reproducibility was achievable using visual determination of regions of interests after 80 h of training.

  20. Archiving Reproducible Research with R and Dataverse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeper, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Reproducible research and data archiving are increasingly important issues in research involving statistical analyses of quantitative data. This article introduces the dvn package, which allows R users to publicly archive datasets, analysis files, codebooks, and associated metadata in Dataverse...... Network online repositories, an open-source data archiving project sponsored by Harvard University. In this article I review the importance of data archiving in the context of reproducible research, introduce the Dataverse Network, explain the implementation of the dvn package, and provide example code...... for archiving and releasing data using the package....

  1. Archiving Reproducible Research with R and Dataverse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeper, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Reproducible research and data archiving are increasingly important issues in research involving statistical analyses of quantitative data. This article introduces the dvn package, which allows R users to publicly archive datasets, analysis files, codebooks, and associated metadata in Dataverse...... Network online repositories, an open-source data archiving project sponsored by Harvard University. In this article I review the importance of data archiving in the context of reproducible research, introduce the Dataverse Network, explain the implementation of the dvn package, and provide example code...

  2. Measurement of Liver Iron Concentration by MRI Is Reproducible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José María Alústiza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The objectives were (i construction of a phantom to reproduce the behavior of iron overload in the liver by MRI and (ii assessment of the variability of a previously validated method to quantify liver iron concentration between different MRI devices using the phantom and patients. Materials and Methods. A phantom reproducing the liver/muscle ratios of two patients with intermediate and high iron overload. Nine patients with different levels of iron overload were studied in 4 multivendor devices and 8 of them were studied twice in the machine where the model was developed. The phantom was analysed in the same equipment and 14 times in the reference machine. Results. FeCl3 solutions containing 0.3, 0.5, 0.6, and 1.2 mg Fe/mL were chosen to generate the phantom. The average of the intramachine variability for patients was 10% and for the intermachines 8%. For the phantom the intramachine coefficient of variation was always below 0.1 and the average of intermachine variability was 10% for moderate and 5% for high iron overload. Conclusion. The phantom reproduces the behavior of patients with moderate or high iron overload. The proposed method of calculating liver iron concentration is reproducible in several different 1.5 T systems.

  3. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, Joanna E.; Aarts, Alexander A.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Attridge, Peter R.; Attwood, Angela; Axt, Jordan; Babel, Molly; Bahník, Štěpán; Baranski, Erica; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bartmess, Elizabeth; Beer, Jennifer; Bell, Raoul; Bentley, Heather; Beyan, Leah; Binion, Grace; Borsboom, Denny; Bosch, Annick; Bosco, Frank A.; Bowman, Sara D.; Brandt, Mark J.; Braswell, Erin; Brohmer, Hilmar; Brown, Benjamin T.; Brown, Kristina; Brüning, Jovita; Calhoun-Sauls, Ann; Callahan, Shannon P.; Chagnon, Elizabeth; Chandler, Jesse; Chartier, Christopher R.; Cheung, Felix; Christopherson, Cody D.; Cillessen, Linda; Clay, Russ; Cleary, Hayley; Cloud, Mark D.; Conn, Michael; Cohoon, Johanna; Columbus, Simon; Cordes, Andreas; Costantini, Giulio; Alvarez, Leslie D Cramblet; Cremata, Ed; Crusius, Jan; DeCoster, Jamie; DeGaetano, Michelle A.; Penna, Nicolás Delia; Den Bezemer, Bobby; Deserno, Marie K.; Devitt, Olivia; Dewitte, Laura; Dobolyi, David G.; Dodson, Geneva T.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Donohue, Ryan; Dore, Rebecca A.; Dorrough, Angela; Dreber, Anna; Dugas, Michelle; Dunn, Elizabeth W.; Easey, Kayleigh; Eboigbe, Sylvia; Eggleston, Casey; Embley, Jo; Epskamp, Sacha; Errington, Timothy M.; Estel, Vivien; Farach, Frank J.; Feather, Jenelle; Fedor, Anna; Fernández-Castilla, Belén; Fiedler, Susann; Field, James G.; Fitneva, Stanka A.; Flagan, Taru; Forest, Amanda L.; Forsell, Eskil; Foster, Joshua D.; Frank, Michael C.; Frazier, Rebecca S.; Fuchs, Heather; Gable, Philip; Galak, Jeff; Galliani, Elisa Maria; Gampa, Anup; Garcia, Sara; Gazarian, Douglas; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Giner-Sorolla, Roger; Glöckner, Andreas; Goellner, Lars; Goh, Jin X.; Goldberg, Rebecca; Goodbourn, Patrick T.; Gordon-McKeon, Shauna; Gorges, Bryan; Gorges, Jessie; Goss, Justin; Graham, Jesse; Grange, James A.; Gray, Jeremy; Hartgerink, Chris; Hartshorne, Joshua; Hasselman, Fred; Hayes, Timothy; Heikensten, Emma; Henninger, Felix; Hodsoll, John; Holubar, Taylor; Hoogendoorn, Gea; Humphries, Denise J.; Hung, Cathy O Y; Immelman, Nathali; Irsik, Vanessa C.; Jahn, Georg; Jäkel, Frank; Jekel, Marc; Johannesson, Magnus; Johnson, Larissa G.; Johnson, David J.; Johnson, Kate M.; Johnston, William J.; Jonas, Kai; Joy-Gaba, Jennifer A.; Kappes, Heather Barry; Kelso, Kim; Kidwell, Mallory C.; Kim, Seung Kyung; Kirkhart, Matthew; Kleinberg, Bennett; Knežević, Goran; Kolorz, Franziska Maria; Kossakowski, Jolanda J.; Krause, Robert Wilhelm; Krijnen, Job; Kuhlmann, Tim; Kunkels, Yoram K.; Kyc, Megan M.; Lai, Calvin K.; Laique, Aamir; Lakens, Daniël|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/298811855; Lane, Kristin A.; Lassetter, Bethany; Lazarević, Ljiljana B.; Le Bel, Etienne P.; Lee, Key Jung; Lee, Minha; Lemm, Kristi; Levitan, Carmel A.; Lewis, Melissa; Lin, Lin; Lin, Stephanie; Lippold, Matthias; Loureiro, Darren; Luteijn, Ilse; MacKinnon, Sean; Mainard, Heather N.; Marigold, Denise C.; Martin, Daniel P.; Martinez, Tylar; Masicampo, E. J.; Matacotta, Josh; Mathur, Maya; May, Michael; Mechin, Nicole; Mehta, Pranjal; Meixner, Johannes; Melinger, Alissa; Miller, Jeremy K.; Miller, Mallorie; Moore, Katherine; Möschl, Marcus; Motyl, Matt; Müller, Stephanie M.; Munafo, Marcus; Neijenhuijs, Koen I.; Nervi, Taylor; Nicolas, Gandalf; Nilsonne, Gustav; Nosek, Brian A.; Nuijten, Michèle B.; Olsson, Catherine; Osborne, Colleen; Ostkamp, Lutz; Pavel, Misha; Penton-Voak, Ian S.; Perna, Olivia; Pernet, Cyril; Perugini, Marco; Pipitone, R. Nathan; Pitts, Michael; Plessow, Franziska; Prenoveau, Jason M.; Rahal, Rima Maria; Ratliff, Kate A.; Reinhard, David; Renkewitz, Frank; Ricker, Ashley A.; Rigney, Anastasia; Rivers, Andrew M.; Roebke, Mark; Rutchick, Abraham M.; Ryan, Robert S.; Sahin, Onur; Saide, Anondah; Sandstrom, Gillian M.; Santos, David; Saxe, Rebecca; Schlegelmilch, René; Schmidt, Kathleen; Scholz, Sabine; Seibel, Larissa; Selterman, Dylan Faulkner; Shaki, Samuel; Simpson, William B.; Sinclair, H. Colleen; Skorinko, Jeanine L M; Slowik, Agnieszka; Snyder, Joel S.; Soderberg, Courtney; Sonnleitner, Carina; Spencer, Nick; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Steegen, Sara; Stieger, Stefan; Strohminger, Nina; Sullivan, Gavin B.; Talhelm, Thomas; Tapia, Megan; Te Dorsthorst, Anniek; Thomae, Manuela; Thomas, Sarah L.; Tio, Pia; Traets, Frits; Tsang, Steve; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Turchan, Paul; Valášek, Milan; Van't Veer, Anna E.; Van Aert, Robbie; Van Assen, Marcel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/407629971; Van Bork, Riet; Van De Ven, Mathijs; Van Den Bergh, Don; Van Der Hulst, Marije; Van Dooren, Roel; Van Doorn, Johnny; Van Renswoude, Daan R.; Van Rijn, Hedderik; Vanpaemel, Wolf; Echeverría, Alejandro Vásquez; Vazquez, Melissa; Velez, Natalia; Vermue, Marieke; Verschoor, Mark; Vianello, Michelangelo; Voracek, Martin; Vuu, Gina; Wagenmakers, Eric Jan; Weerdmeester, Joanneke; Welsh, Ashlee; Westgate, Erin C.; Wissink, Joeri; Wood, Michael; Woods, Andy; Wright, Emily; Wu, Sining; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Zuni, Kellylynn

    2015-01-01

    Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available. Rep

  4. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, Joanna E.; Aarts, Alexander A.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Attridge, Peter R.; Attwood, Angela; Axt, Jordan; Babel, Molly; Bahník, Štěpán; Baranski, Erica; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bartmess, Elizabeth; Beer, Jennifer; Bell, Raoul; Bentley, Heather; Beyan, Leah; Binion, Grace; Borsboom, Denny; Bosch, Annick; Bosco, Frank A.; Bowman, Sara D.; Brandt, Mark J.; Braswell, Erin; Brohmer, Hilmar; Brown, Benjamin T.; Brown, Kristina; Brüning, Jovita; Calhoun-Sauls, Ann; Callahan, Shannon P.; Chagnon, Elizabeth; Chandler, Jesse; Chartier, Christopher R.; Cheung, Felix; Christopherson, Cody D.; Cillessen, Linda; Clay, Russ; Cleary, Hayley; Cloud, Mark D.; Conn, Michael; Cohoon, Johanna; Columbus, Simon; Cordes, Andreas; Costantini, Giulio; Alvarez, Leslie D Cramblet; Cremata, Ed; Crusius, Jan; DeCoster, Jamie; DeGaetano, Michelle A.; Penna, Nicolás Delia; Den Bezemer, Bobby; Deserno, Marie K.; Devitt, Olivia; Dewitte, Laura; Dobolyi, David G.; Dodson, Geneva T.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Donohue, Ryan; Dore, Rebecca A.; Dorrough, Angela; Dreber, Anna; Dugas, Michelle; Dunn, Elizabeth W.; Easey, Kayleigh; Eboigbe, Sylvia; Eggleston, Casey; Embley, Jo; Epskamp, Sacha; Errington, Timothy M.; Estel, Vivien; Farach, Frank J.; Feather, Jenelle; Fedor, Anna; Fernández-Castilla, Belén; Fiedler, Susann; Field, James G.; Fitneva, Stanka A.; Flagan, Taru; Forest, Amanda L.; Forsell, Eskil; Foster, Joshua D.; Frank, Michael C.; Frazier, Rebecca S.; Fuchs, Heather; Gable, Philip; Galak, Jeff; Galliani, Elisa Maria; Gampa, Anup; Garcia, Sara; Gazarian, Douglas; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Giner-Sorolla, Roger; Glöckner, Andreas; Goellner, Lars; Goh, Jin X.; Goldberg, Rebecca; Goodbourn, Patrick T.; Gordon-McKeon, Shauna; Gorges, Bryan; Gorges, Jessie; Goss, Justin; Graham, Jesse; Grange, James A.; Gray, Jeremy; Hartgerink, Chris; Hartshorne, Joshua; Hasselman, Fred; Hayes, Timothy; Heikensten, Emma; Henninger, Felix; Hodsoll, John; Holubar, Taylor; Hoogendoorn, Gea; Humphries, Denise J.; Hung, Cathy O Y; Immelman, Nathali; Irsik, Vanessa C.; Jahn, Georg; Jäkel, Frank; Jekel, Marc; Johannesson, Magnus; Johnson, Larissa G.; Johnson, David J.; Johnson, Kate M.; Johnston, William J.; Jonas, Kai; Joy-Gaba, Jennifer A.; Kappes, Heather Barry; Kelso, Kim; Kidwell, Mallory C.; Kim, Seung Kyung; Kirkhart, Matthew; Kleinberg, Bennett; Knežević, Goran; Kolorz, Franziska Maria; Kossakowski, Jolanda J.; Krause, Robert Wilhelm; Krijnen, Job; Kuhlmann, Tim; Kunkels, Yoram K.; Kyc, Megan M.; Lai, Calvin K.; Laique, Aamir; Lakens, Daniël|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/298811855; Lane, Kristin A.; Lassetter, Bethany; Lazarević, Ljiljana B.; Le Bel, Etienne P.; Lee, Key Jung; Lee, Minha; Lemm, Kristi; Levitan, Carmel A.; Lewis, Melissa; Lin, Lin; Lin, Stephanie; Lippold, Matthias; Loureiro, Darren; Luteijn, Ilse; MacKinnon, Sean; Mainard, Heather N.; Marigold, Denise C.; Martin, Daniel P.; Martinez, Tylar; Masicampo, E. J.; Matacotta, Josh; Mathur, Maya; May, Michael; Mechin, Nicole; Mehta, Pranjal; Meixner, Johannes; Melinger, Alissa; Miller, Jeremy K.; Miller, Mallorie; Moore, Katherine; Möschl, Marcus; Motyl, Matt; Müller, Stephanie M.; Munafo, Marcus; Neijenhuijs, Koen I.; Nervi, Taylor; Nicolas, Gandalf; Nilsonne, Gustav; Nosek, Brian A.; Nuijten, Michèle B.; Olsson, Catherine; Osborne, Colleen; Ostkamp, Lutz; Pavel, Misha; Penton-Voak, Ian S.; Perna, Olivia; Pernet, Cyril; Perugini, Marco; Pipitone, R. Nathan; Pitts, Michael; Plessow, Franziska; Prenoveau, Jason M.; Rahal, Rima Maria; Ratliff, Kate A.; Reinhard, David; Renkewitz, Frank; Ricker, Ashley A.; Rigney, Anastasia; Rivers, Andrew M.; Roebke, Mark; Rutchick, Abraham M.; Ryan, Robert S.; Sahin, Onur; Saide, Anondah; Sandstrom, Gillian M.; Santos, David; Saxe, Rebecca; Schlegelmilch, René; Schmidt, Kathleen; Scholz, Sabine; Seibel, Larissa; Selterman, Dylan Faulkner; Shaki, Samuel; Simpson, William B.; Sinclair, H. Colleen; Skorinko, Jeanine L M; Slowik, Agnieszka; Snyder, Joel S.; Soderberg, Courtney; Sonnleitner, Carina; Spencer, Nick; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Steegen, Sara; Stieger, Stefan; Strohminger, Nina; Sullivan, Gavin B.; Talhelm, Thomas; Tapia, Megan; Te Dorsthorst, Anniek; Thomae, Manuela; Thomas, Sarah L.; Tio, Pia; Traets, Frits; Tsang, Steve; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Turchan, Paul; Valášek, Milan; Van't Veer, Anna E.; Van Aert, Robbie; Van Assen, Marcel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/407629971; Van Bork, Riet; Van De Ven, Mathijs; Van Den Bergh, Don; Van Der Hulst, Marije; Van Dooren, Roel; Van Doorn, Johnny; Van Renswoude, Daan R.; Van Rijn, Hedderik; Vanpaemel, Wolf

    2015-01-01

    Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available.

  5. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Alexander A.; Anderson, Joanna E.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Attridge, Peter R.; Attwood, Angela; Axt, Jordan; Babel, Molly; Bahnik, Stepan; Baranski, Erica; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bartmess, Elizabeth; Beer, Jennifer; Bell, Raoul; Bentley, Heather; Beyan, Leah; Binion, Grace; Borsboom, Denny; Bosch, Annick; Bosco, Frank A.; Bowman, Sara D.; Brandt, Mark J.; Braswell, Erin; Brohmer, Hilmar; Brown, Benjamin T.; Brown, Kristina; Bruening, Jovita; Calhoun-Sauls, Ann; Chagnon, Elizabeth; Callahan, Shannon P.; Chandler, Jesse; Chartier, Christopher R.; Cheung, Felix; Cillessen, Linda; Christopherson, Cody D.; Clay, Russ; Cleary, Hayley; Cloud, Mark D.; Cohn, Michael; Cohoon, Johanna; Columbus, Simon; Cordes, Andreas; Costantini, Giulio; Alvarez, Leslie D. Cramblet; Cremata, Ed; Crusius, Jan; DeCoster, Jamie; DeGaetano, Michelle A.; Della Penna, Nicolas; den Bezemer, Bobby; Deserno, Marie K.; Devitt, Olivia; Dewitte, Laura; Dobolyi, David G.; Dodson, Geneva T.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Donohue, Ryan; Dore, Rebecca A.; Dorrough, Angela; Dreber, Anna; Dugas, Michelle; Dunn, Elizabeth W.; Easey, Kayleigh; Eboigbe, Sylvia; Eggleston, Casey; Embley, Jo; Epskamp, Sacha; Errington, Timothy M.; Estel, Vivien; Farach, Frank J.; Feather, Jenelle; Fedor, Anna; Fernandez-Castilla, Belen; Fiedler, Susann; Field, James G.; Fitneva, Stanka A.; Flagan, Taru; Forest, Amanda L.; Forsell, Eskil; Foster, Joshua D.; Frank, Michael C.; Frazier, Rebecca S.; Fuchs, Heather; Gable, Philip; Galak, Jeff; Galliani, Elisa Maria; Gampa, Anup; Garcia, Sara; Gazarian, Douglas; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Giner-Sorolla, Roger; Gloeckner, Andreas; Goellner, Lars; Goh, Jin X.; Goldberg, Rebecca; Goodbourn, Patrick T.; Gordon-McKeon, Shauna; Gorges, Bryan; Gorges, Jessie; Goss, Justin; Graham, Jesse; Grange, James A.; Gray, Jeremy; Hartgerink, Chris; Hartshorne, Joshua; Hasselman, Fred; Hayes, Timothy; Heikensten, Emma; Henninger, Felix; Hodsoll, John; Holubar, Taylor; Hoogendoorn, Gea; Humphries, Denise J.; Hung, Cathy O. -Y.; Immelman, Nathali; Irsik, Vanessa C.; Jahn, Georg; Jaekel, Frank; Jekel, Marc; Johannesson, Magnus; Johnson, Larissa G.; Johnson, David J.; Johnson, Kate M.; Johnston, William J.; Jonas, Kai; Joy-Gaba, Jennifer A.; Kappes, Heather Barry; Kelso, Kim; Kidwell, Mallory C.; Kim, Seung Kyung; Kirkhart, Matthew; Kleinberg, Bennett; Knezevic, Goran; Kolorz, Franziska Maria; Kossakowski, Jolanda J.; Krause, Robert Wilhelm; Krijnen, Job; Kuhlmann, Tim; Kunkels, Yoram K.; Kyc, Megan M.; Lai, Calvin K.; Laique, Aamir; Lakens, Daniel; Lane, Kristin A.; Lassetter, Bethany; Lazarevic, Ljiljana B.; LeBel, Etienne P.; Lee, Key Jung; Lee, Minha; Lemm, Kristi; Levitan, Carmel A.; Lewis, M.; Lin, Lin; Lin, Stephanie; Lippold, Matthias; Loureiro, Darren; Luteijn, Ilse; Mackinnon, Sean; Mainard, Heather N.; Marigold, Denise C.; Martin, Daniel P.; Martinez, Tylar; Masicampo, E. J.; Matacotta, Josh; Mathur, Maya; May, Michael; Mechin, Nicole; Mehta, Pranjal; Meixner, Johannes; Melinger, Alissa; Miller, Jeremy K.; Miller, Mallorie; Moore, Katherine; Moeschl, Marcus; Motyl, Matt; Mueller, Stephanie M.; Munafo, Marcus; Neijenhuijs, Koen I.; Nervi, Taylor; Nicolas, Gandalf; Nilsonne, Gustav; Nosek, Brian A.; Nuijten, Michele B.; Olsson, Catherine; Osborne, Colleen; Ostkamp, Lutz; Pavel, Misha; Penton-Voak, Ian S.; Perna, Olivia; Pernet, Cyril; Perugini, Marco; Pipitone, R. Nathan; Pitts, Michael; Plessow, Franziska; Prenoveau, Jason M.; Rahal, Rima-Maria; Ratliff, Kate A.; Reinhard, David; Renkewitz, Frank; Ricker, Ashley A.; Rigney, Anastasia; Rivers, Andrew M.; Roebke, Mark; Rutchick, Abraham M.; Ryan, Robert S.; Sahin, Onur; Saide, Anondah; Sandstrom, Gillian M.; Santos, David; Saxe, Rebecca; Schmidt, Kathleen; Schlegelmilch, Rene; Seibel, Larissa; Scholz, Sabine; Selterman, Dylan Faulkner; Shaki, Samuel; Simpson, William B.; Sinclair, H. Colleen; Skorinko, Jeanine L. M.; Slowik, Agnieszka; Snyder, Joel S.; Soderberg, Courtney; Sonnleitner, Carina; Spencer, Nick; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Steegen, Sara; Stieger, Stefan; Strohminger, Nina; Sullivan, Gavin B.; Talhelm, Thomas; Tapia, Megan; te Dorsthorst, Anniek; Thomae, Manuela; Thomas, Sarah L.; Tio, Pia; Traets, Frits; Tsang, Steve; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Turchan, Paul; Valasek, Milan; van 't Veer, Anna E.; Van Aert, Robbie; van Assen, M.A.L.M.; van Bork, Riet; van de Ven, Mathijs; van den Bergh, Don; van der Hulst, Marije; van Dooren, Roel; van Doorn, Johnny; van Renswoude, Daan R.; van Rijn, Hedderik; Vanpaemel, Wolf; Echeverria, Alejandro Vasquez; Vazquez, Melissa; Velez, Natalia; Vermue, Marieke; Verschoor, Mark

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. Scientific claims should not gain credence because of the status or authority of their originator but by the replicability of their supporting evidence. Even research

  6. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, Joanna E.; Aarts, Alexander A.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Attridge, Peter R.; Attwood, Angela; Axt, Jordan; Babel, Molly; Bahník, Štěpán; Baranski, Erica; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bartmess, Elizabeth; Beer, Jennifer; Bell, Raoul; Bentley, Heather; Beyan, Leah; Binion, Grace; Borsboom, Denny; Bosch, Annick; Bosco, Frank A.; Bowman, Sara D.; Brandt, Mark J.; Braswell, Erin; Brohmer, Hilmar; Brown, Benjamin T.; Brown, Kristina; Brüning, Jovita; Calhoun-Sauls, Ann; Callahan, Shannon P.; Chagnon, Elizabeth; Chandler, Jesse; Chartier, Christopher R.; Cheung, Felix; Christopherson, Cody D.; Cillessen, Linda; Clay, Russ; Cleary, Hayley; Cloud, Mark D.; Conn, Michael; Cohoon, Johanna; Columbus, Simon; Cordes, Andreas; Costantini, Giulio; Alvarez, Leslie D Cramblet; Cremata, Ed; Crusius, Jan; DeCoster, Jamie; DeGaetano, Michelle A.; Penna, Nicolás Delia; Den Bezemer, Bobby; Deserno, Marie K.; Devitt, Olivia; Dewitte, Laura; Dobolyi, David G.; Dodson, Geneva T.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Donohue, Ryan; Dore, Rebecca A.; Dorrough, Angela; Dreber, Anna; Dugas, Michelle; Dunn, Elizabeth W.; Easey, Kayleigh; Eboigbe, Sylvia; Eggleston, Casey; Embley, Jo; Epskamp, Sacha; Errington, Timothy M.; Estel, Vivien; Farach, Frank J.; Feather, Jenelle; Fedor, Anna; Fernández-Castilla, Belén; Fiedler, Susann; Field, James G.; Fitneva, Stanka A.; Flagan, Taru; Forest, Amanda L.; Forsell, Eskil; Foster, Joshua D.; Frank, Michael C.; Frazier, Rebecca S.; Fuchs, Heather; Gable, Philip; Galak, Jeff; Galliani, Elisa Maria; Gampa, Anup; Garcia, Sara; Gazarian, Douglas; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Giner-Sorolla, Roger; Glöckner, Andreas; Goellner, Lars; Goh, Jin X.; Goldberg, Rebecca; Goodbourn, Patrick T.; Gordon-McKeon, Shauna; Gorges, Bryan; Gorges, Jessie; Goss, Justin; Graham, Jesse; Grange, James A.; Gray, Jeremy; Hartgerink, Chris; Hartshorne, Joshua; Hasselman, Fred; Hayes, Timothy; Heikensten, Emma; Henninger, Felix; Hodsoll, John; Holubar, Taylor; Hoogendoorn, Gea; Humphries, Denise J.; Hung, Cathy O Y; Immelman, Nathali; Irsik, Vanessa C.; Jahn, Georg; Jäkel, Frank; Jekel, Marc; Johannesson, Magnus; Johnson, Larissa G.; Johnson, David J.; Johnson, Kate M.; Johnston, William J.; Jonas, Kai; Joy-Gaba, Jennifer A.; Kappes, Heather Barry; Kelso, Kim; Kidwell, Mallory C.; Kim, Seung Kyung; Kirkhart, Matthew; Kleinberg, Bennett; Knežević, Goran; Kolorz, Franziska Maria; Kossakowski, Jolanda J.; Krause, Robert Wilhelm; Krijnen, Job; Kuhlmann, Tim; Kunkels, Yoram K.; Kyc, Megan M.; Lai, Calvin K.; Laique, Aamir; Lakens, Daniël; Lane, Kristin A.; Lassetter, Bethany; Lazarević, Ljiljana B.; Le Bel, Etienne P.; Lee, Key Jung; Lee, Minha; Lemm, Kristi; Levitan, Carmel A.; Lewis, Melissa; Lin, Lin; Lin, Stephanie; Lippold, Matthias; Loureiro, Darren; Luteijn, Ilse; MacKinnon, Sean; Mainard, Heather N.; Marigold, Denise C.; Martin, Daniel P.; Martinez, Tylar; Masicampo, E. J.; Matacotta, Josh; Mathur, Maya; May, Michael; Mechin, Nicole; Mehta, Pranjal; Meixner, Johannes; Melinger, Alissa; Miller, Jeremy K.; Miller, Mallorie; Moore, Katherine; Möschl, Marcus; Motyl, Matt; Müller, Stephanie M.; Munafo, Marcus; Neijenhuijs, Koen I.; Nervi, Taylor; Nicolas, Gandalf; Nilsonne, Gustav; Nosek, Brian A.; Nuijten, Michèle B.; Olsson, Catherine; Osborne, Colleen; Ostkamp, Lutz; Pavel, Misha; Penton-Voak, Ian S.; Perna, Olivia; Pernet, Cyril; Perugini, Marco; Pipitone, R. Nathan; Pitts, Michael; Plessow, Franziska; Prenoveau, Jason M.; Rahal, Rima Maria; Ratliff, Kate A.; Reinhard, David; Renkewitz, Frank; Ricker, Ashley A.; Rigney, Anastasia; Rivers, Andrew M.; Roebke, Mark; Rutchick, Abraham M.; Ryan, Robert S.; Sahin, Onur; Saide, Anondah; Sandstrom, Gillian M.; Santos, David; Saxe, Rebecca; Schlegelmilch, René; Schmidt, Kathleen; Scholz, Sabine; Seibel, Larissa; Selterman, Dylan Faulkner; Shaki, Samuel; Simpson, William B.; Sinclair, H. Colleen; Skorinko, Jeanine L M; Slowik, Agnieszka; Snyder, Joel S.; Soderberg, Courtney; Sonnleitner, Carina; Spencer, Nick; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Steegen, Sara; Stieger, Stefan; Strohminger, Nina; Sullivan, Gavin B.; Talhelm, Thomas; Tapia, Megan; Te Dorsthorst, Anniek; Thomae, Manuela; Thomas, Sarah L.; Tio, Pia; Traets, Frits; Tsang, Steve; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Turchan, Paul; Valášek, Milan; Van't Veer, Anna E.; Van Aert, Robbie; Van Assen, Marcel; Van Bork, Riet; Van De Ven, Mathijs; Van Den Bergh, Don; Van Der Hulst, Marije; Van Dooren, Roel; Van Doorn, Johnny; Van Renswoude, Daan R.; Van Rijn, Hedderik; Vanpaemel, Wolf; Echeverría, Alejandro Vásquez; Vazquez, Melissa; Velez, Natalia; Vermue, Marieke; Verschoor, Mark; Vianello, Michelangelo; Voracek, Martin; Vuu, Gina; Wagenmakers, Eric Jan; Weerdmeester, Joanneke; Welsh, Ashlee; Westgate, Erin C.; Wissink, Joeri; Wood, Michael; Woods, Andy; Wright, Emily; Wu, Sining; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Zuni, Kellylynn

    2015-01-01

    Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available. Rep

  7. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Alexander A.; Anderson, Joanna E.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Attridge, Peter R.; Attwood, Angela; Axt, Jordan; Babel, Molly; Bahnik, Stepan; Baranski, Erica; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bartmess, Elizabeth; Beer, Jennifer; Bell, Raoul; Bentley, Heather; Beyan, Leah; Binion, Grace; Borsboom, Denny; Bosch, Annick; Bosco, Frank A.; Bowman, Sara D.; Brandt, Mark J.; Braswell, Erin; Brohmer, Hilmar; Brown, Benjamin T.; Brown, Kristina; Bruening, Jovita; Calhoun-Sauls, Ann; Chagnon, Elizabeth; Callahan, Shannon P.; Chandler, Jesse; Chartier, Christopher R.; Cheung, Felix; Cillessen, Linda; Christopherson, Cody D.; Clay, Russ; Cleary, Hayley; Cloud, Mark D.; Cohn, Michael; Cohoon, Johanna; Columbus, Simon; Cordes, Andreas; Costantini, Giulio; Alvarez, Leslie D. Cramblet; Cremata, Ed; Crusius, Jan; DeCoster, Jamie; DeGaetano, Michelle A.; Della Penna, Nicolas; den Bezemer, Bobby; Deserno, Marie K.; Devitt, Olivia; Dewitte, Laura; Dobolyi, David G.; Dodson, Geneva T.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Donohue, Ryan; Dore, Rebecca A.; Dorrough, Angela; Dreber, Anna; Dugas, Michelle; Dunn, Elizabeth W.; Easey, Kayleigh; Eboigbe, Sylvia; Eggleston, Casey; Embley, Jo; Epskamp, Sacha; Errington, Timothy M.; Estel, Vivien; Farach, Frank J.; Feather, Jenelle; Fedor, Anna; Fernandez-Castilla, Belen; Fiedler, Susann; Field, James G.; Fitneva, Stanka A.; Flagan, Taru; Forest, Amanda L.; Forsell, Eskil; Foster, Joshua D.; Frank, Michael C.; Frazier, Rebecca S.; Fuchs, Heather; Gable, Philip; Galak, Jeff; Galliani, Elisa Maria; Gampa, Anup; Garcia, Sara; Gazarian, Douglas; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Giner-Sorolla, Roger; Gloeckner, Andreas; Goellner, Lars; Goh, Jin X.; Goldberg, Rebecca; Goodbourn, Patrick T.; Gordon-McKeon, Shauna; Gorges, Bryan; Gorges, Jessie; Goss, Justin; Graham, Jesse; Grange, James A.; Gray, Jeremy; Hartgerink, Chris; Hartshorne, Joshua; Hasselman, Fred; Hayes, Timothy; Heikensten, Emma; Henninger, Felix; Hodsoll, John; Holubar, Taylor; Hoogendoorn, Gea; Humphries, Denise J.; Hung, Cathy O. -Y.; Immelman, Nathali; Irsik, Vanessa C.; Jahn, Georg; Jaekel, Frank; Jekel, Marc; Johannesson, Magnus; Johnson, Larissa G.; Johnson, David J.; Johnson, Kate M.; Johnston, William J.; Jonas, Kai; Joy-Gaba, Jennifer A.; Kappes, Heather Barry; Kelso, Kim; Kidwell, Mallory C.; Kim, Seung Kyung; Kirkhart, Matthew; Kleinberg, Bennett; Knezevic, Goran; Kolorz, Franziska Maria; Kossakowski, Jolanda J.; Krause, Robert Wilhelm; Krijnen, Job; Kuhlmann, Tim; Kunkels, Yoram K.; Kyc, Megan M.; Lai, Calvin K.; Laique, Aamir; Lakens, Daniel; Lane, Kristin A.; Lassetter, Bethany; Lazarevic, Ljiljana B.; LeBel, Etienne P.; Lee, Key Jung; Lee, Minha; Lemm, Kristi; Levitan, Carmel A.; Lewis, M.; Lin, Lin; Lin, Stephanie; Lippold, Matthias; Loureiro, Darren; Luteijn, Ilse; Mackinnon, Sean; Mainard, Heather N.; Marigold, Denise C.; Martin, Daniel P.; Martinez, Tylar; Masicampo, E. J.; Matacotta, Josh; Mathur, Maya; May, Michael; Mechin, Nicole; Mehta, Pranjal; Meixner, Johannes; Melinger, Alissa; Miller, Jeremy K.; Miller, Mallorie; Moore, Katherine; Moeschl, Marcus; Motyl, Matt; Mueller, Stephanie M.; Munafo, Marcus; Neijenhuijs, Koen I.; Nervi, Taylor; Nicolas, Gandalf; Nilsonne, Gustav; Nosek, Brian A.; Nuijten, Michele B.; Olsson, Catherine; Osborne, Colleen; Ostkamp, Lutz; Pavel, Misha; Penton-Voak, Ian S.; Perna, Olivia; Pernet, Cyril; Perugini, Marco; Pipitone, R. Nathan; Pitts, Michael; Plessow, Franziska; Prenoveau, Jason M.; Rahal, Rima-Maria; Ratliff, Kate A.; Reinhard, David; Renkewitz, Frank; Ricker, Ashley A.; Rigney, Anastasia; Rivers, Andrew M.; Roebke, Mark; Rutchick, Abraham M.; Ryan, Robert S.; Sahin, Onur; Saide, Anondah; Sandstrom, Gillian M.; Santos, David; Saxe, Rebecca; Schmidt, Kathleen; Schlegelmilch, Rene; Seibel, Larissa; Scholz, Sabine; Selterman, Dylan Faulkner; Shaki, Samuel; Simpson, William B.; Sinclair, H. Colleen; Skorinko, Jeanine L. M.; Slowik, Agnieszka; Snyder, Joel S.; Soderberg, Courtney; Sonnleitner, Carina; Spencer, Nick; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Steegen, Sara; Stieger, Stefan; Strohminger, Nina; Sullivan, Gavin B.; Talhelm, Thomas; Tapia, Megan; te Dorsthorst, Anniek; Thomae, Manuela; Thomas, Sarah L.; Tio, Pia; Traets, Frits; Tsang, Steve; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Turchan, Paul; Valasek, Milan; van 't Veer, Anna E.; Van Aert, Robbie; van Assen, M.A.L.M.; van Bork, Riet; van de Ven, Mathijs; van den Bergh, Don; van der Hulst, Marije; van Dooren, Roel; van Doorn, Johnny; van Renswoude, Daan R.; van Rijn, Hedderik; Vanpaemel, Wolf; Echeverria, Alejandro Vasquez; Vazquez, Melissa; Velez, Natalia; Vermue, Marieke; Verschoor, Mark; Vianello, Michelangelo; Voracek, Martin; Vuu, Gina; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; Weerdmeester, Joanneke; Welsh, Ashlee; Westgate, Erin C.; Wissink, Joeri; Wood, Michael; Woods, Andy; Wright, Emily; Wu, Sining; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Zuni, Kellylynn

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. Scientific claims should not gain credence because of the status or authority of their originator but by the replicability of their supporting evidence. Even research

  8. A PHYSICAL ACTIVITY QUESTIONNAIRE: REPRODUCIBILITY AND VALIDITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Barbosa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the Quantification de L'Activite Physique en Altitude chez les Enfants (QAPACE supervised self-administered questionnaire reproducibility and validity on the estimation of the mean daily energy expenditure (DEE on Bogotá's schoolchildren. The comprehension was assessed on 324 students, whereas the reproducibility was studied on a different random sample of 162 who were exposed twice to it. Reproducibility was assessed using both the Bland-Altman plot and the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC. The validity was studied in a sample of 18 girls and 18 boys randomly selected, which completed the test - re-test study. The DEE derived from the questionnaire was compared with the laboratory measurement results of the peak oxygen uptake (Peak VO2 from ergo-spirometry and Leger Test. The reproducibility ICC was 0.96 (95% C.I. 0.95-0.97; by age categories 8-10, 0.94 (0.89-0. 97; 11-13, 0.98 (0.96- 0.99; 14-16, 0.95 (0.91-0.98. The ICC between mean TEE as estimated by the questionnaire and the direct and indirect Peak VO2 was 0.76 (0.66 (p<0.01; by age categories, 8-10, 11-13, and 14-16 were 0.89 (0.87, 0.76 (0.78 and 0.88 (0.80 respectively. The QAPACE questionnaire is reproducible and valid for estimating PA and showed a high correlation with the Peak VO2 uptake

  9. ITK: Enabling Reproducible Research and Open Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Michael McCormick

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Reproducibility verification is essential to the practice of the scientific method. Researchers report their findings, which are strengthened as other independent groups in the scientific community share similar outcomes. In the many scientific fields where software has become a fundamental tool for capturing and analyzing data, this requirement of reproducibility implies that reliable and comprehensive software platforms and tools should be made available to the scientific community. The tools will empower them and the public to verify, through practice, the reproducibility of observations that are reported in the scientific literature.Medical image analysis is one of the fields in which the use of computational resources, both software and hardware, are an essential platform for performing experimental work. In this arena, the introduction of the Insight Toolkit (ITK in 1999 has transformed the field and facilitates its progress by accelerating the rate at which algorithmic implementations are developed, tested, disseminated and improved. By building on the efficiency and quality of open source methodologies, ITK has provided the medical image community with an effective platform on which to build a daily workflow that incorporates the true scientific practices of reproducibility verification.This article describes the multiple tools, methodologies, and practices that the ITK community has adopted, refined, and followed during the past decade, in order to become one of the research communities with the most modern reproducibility verification infrastructure. For example, 207 contributors have created over 2400 unit tests that provide over 84% code line test coverage. The Insight Journal, an open publication journal associated with the toolkit, has seen over 360,000 publication downloads. The median normalized closeness centrality, a measure of knowledge flow, resulting from the distributed peer code review system was high, 0.46.

  10. Reproducing entanglement through local classical resources with no communication

    CERN Document Server

    Di Lorenzo, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Entanglement is one of the most intriguing features of quantum mechanics. It gives rise to peculiar correlations which cannot be reproduced by a large class of alternative theories, the so-called hidden-variable models, that use parameters in addition to the wave-function. This incompatibility was quantified through the celebrated Bell inequalities, and more recently through new inequalities due to Leggett. Experiments confirm the predictions of quantum mechanics. However, this does not imply that quantum mechanics is the ultimate theory, unsusceptible of improvement, nor that quantum mechanics is essentially non-local. The theories ruled out by Bell and Leggett inequalities are required to satisfy some hypotheses, none of which is implied by locality alone. By dropping one or more hypotheses, it is possible not only to violate said inequalities, but to reproduce the quantum mechanical predictions altogether. So far, the models proposed were only mathematical constructs. In this paper we provide a classical r...

  11. Research on the method of fuzzy qualitative modeling for AUV%自主式水下机器人模糊定性建模方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张铭钧; 宋炜胥; 褚振忠

    2013-01-01

    针对自主式水下机器人难以建立精确动力学数学模型的问题,提出了一种基于模糊定性仿真理论的运动建模方法.根据状态转换中系统变量的变化方向,给出了模糊定性状态转换类型的细化分类方法.对于系统变量定量信息定性化过程中的采样时间确定问题,研究了基于系统变量模糊定性状态的自适应采样时间选取方法.文中建立了“海狸”号实验样机的模糊定性模型.水池实验表明,所提方法能够准确描述水下机器人在不同运动状态下的模糊定性行为.%The examination of a dynamic modeling method for autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) based on a fuzzy qualitative simulation theory was proposed as a research study. The difficulty indicated in previous studies reveal the problem of building an accurate dynamic model for an AUV. The research study also explored the experiments conducted on the classification of the fuzzy qualitative state transformation type according to gradient direction of system variables in a state transformation. However, in an effort to determine the sampling time in the qualitative process of quantitative information of system variables, an adaptive sampling time selection method based on the fuzzy qualitative state of system variables is researched. The fuzzy qualitative model of "BEAVE" experimental prototype was established and implemented along with the proposed experiment method. The results validate the proposed method can accurately describe fuzzy qualitative behavior for AUV different motions.

  12. Qualitative Economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fast, Michael; Clark II, Woodrow W

                         This book is about science -- specifically, the science of economics. Or lack thereof is more accurate. The building of any science, let alone economics, is grounded in the understanding of what is beneath the "surface" of economics. Science, and hence economics, should...... be concerned with formulating ideas that express theories which produce descriptions of how to understand phenomenon and real world experiences.                       Economics must become a science, because the essence of economics in terms of human actions, group interactions and communities are in need...... of scientific inquiry. Academics and scholars need a scientific perspective that can hypothesize, theorize document, understand and analyze human dynamics from the individual to more societal interactions. And that is what qualitative economics does; it can make economics into becoming a science. The economic...

  13. Effects of land use systems on soil erosion in a sloping Mediterranean watershed in Cyprus: From qualitative assessments to quantitative models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuma, Hakan; Bruggeman, Adriana; Camera, Corrado; Zoumides, Christos

    2015-04-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions, water catchment sediment yield as a result of water erosion is difficult to model. Applicability of quantitative, process-based soil erosion models at a catchment scale is often problematic due to large data requirements and difficulty of describing all erosion and sediment transport processes. On the other hand, qualitative models require less data and include almost all evident erosion processes, which make them especially suited for watershed erosion assessments. The objective of this study is to compare water erosion estimates of the quantitative PESERA model with qualitative assessments obtained by WOCAT mapping methodology. The PESERA model simulates soil loss based on land cover, soil, climate and vegetation data, while the WOCAT methodology is based on expert observations per land use systems. This study is conducted in the Peristerona Watershed in Cyprus. The study area is 106.4 km2 and has a mean local slope higher than 40% for the mountainous upstream area and less than 8% for plain. Sixteen different land cover types with varying intensity of agriculture were distinguished during the WOCAT field assessment. WOCAT methodology ranked the land cover "complex cultivation" as the most degraded (degree: evident signs of water erosion, extent: 50% of the area, rate: moderately increasing in time),"agriculture, significant area natural vegetation" as less degraded (degree: evident signs of water erosion, extent: 30% of the area, rate: decreasing slowly in time) and "forests" the least degraded (some signs of water erosion, extent 5% of the area, rate: decreasing slowly in time). The classified WOCAT units will be compared with the erosion estimates obtained by the PESERA model. This study provides a linkage between qualitative soil erosion methods with quantitative models and helps to translate the outcomes of the former into latter.

  14. Reply to the comment of S. Rayne on "QSAR model reproducibility and applicability: A case study of rate constants of hydroxyl radical reaction models applied to polybrominated diphenyl ethers and (benzo-)triazoles".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramatica, Paola; Kovarich, Simona; Roy, Partha Pratim

    2013-07-30

    We appreciate the interest of Dr. Rayne on our article and we completely agree that the dataset of (benzo-)triazoles, which were screened by the hydroxyl radical reaction quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model, was not only composed of benzo-triazoles but also included some simpler triazoles (without the condensed benzene ring), such as the chemicals listed by Dr. Rayne, as well as some related heterocycles (also few not aromatic). We want to clarify that in this article (as well as in other articles in which the same dataset was screened), for conciseness, the abbreviations (B)TAZs and BTAZs were used as general (and certainly too simplified) notations meaning an extended dataset of benzo-triazoles, triazoles, and related compounds. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Additive Manufacturing: Reproducibility of Metallic Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konda Gokuldoss Prashanth

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the properties of five different metals/alloys (Al-12Si, Cu-10Sn and 316L—face centered cubic structure, CoCrMo and commercially pure Ti (CP-Ti—hexagonal closed packed structure fabricated by selective laser melting. The room temperature tensile properties of Al-12Si samples show good consistency in results within the experimental errors. Similar reproducible results were observed for sliding wear and corrosion experiments. The other metal/alloy systems also show repeatable tensile properties, with the tensile curves overlapping until the yield point. The curves may then follow the same path or show a marginal deviation (~10 MPa until they reach the ultimate tensile strength and a negligible difference in ductility levels (of ~0.3% is observed between the samples. The results show that selective laser melting is a reliable fabrication method to produce metallic materials with consistent and reproducible properties.

  16. Reproducibility of scoring emphysema by HRCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinen, A.; Partanen, K.; Rytkoenen, H.; Vanninen, R. [Kuopio Univ. Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Clinical Radiology; Erkinjuntti-Pekkanen, R. [Kuopio Univ. Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Pulmonary Diseases

    2002-04-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the reproducibility of three visual scoring methods of emphysema and compared these methods with pulmonary function tests (VC, DLCO, FEV1 and FEV%) among farmer's lung patients and farmers. Material and Methods: Three radiologists examined high-resolution CT images of farmer's lung patients and their matched controls (n=70) for chronic interstitial lung diseases. Intraobserver reproducibility and interobserver variability were assessed for three methods: severity, Sanders' (extent) and Sakai. Pulmonary function tests as spirometry and diffusing capacity were measured. Results: Intraobserver -values for all three methods were good (0.51-0.74). Interobserver varied from 0.35 to 0.72. The Sanders' and the severity methods correlated strongly with pulmonary function tests, especially DLCO and FEV1. Conclusion: The Sanders' method proved to be reliable in evaluating emphysema, in terms of good consistency of interpretation and good correlation with pulmonary function tests.

  17. Reproducibility of electroretinograms recorded with DTL electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, M; Lachapelle, P; Dumont, M

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the use of the DTL fiber electrode yields stable and reproducible electroretinographic recordings. To do so, luminance response function, derived from dark-adapted electroretinograms, was obtained from both eyes of 10 normal subjects at two recording sessions spaced by 7-14 days. The data thus generated was used to calculate Naka-Rushton Vmax and k parameters and values obtained at the two recording sessions were compared. Our results showed that there was no significant difference in the values of Vmax and k calculated from the data generated at the two recording sessions. The above clearly demonstrate that the use of the DTL fiber electrode does not jeopardize, in any way, the stability and reproducibility of ERG responses.

  18. Repeatability and Reproducibility of Virtual Subjective Refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    To establish the repeatability and reproducibility of a virtual refraction process using simulated retinal images. With simulation software, aberrated images corresponding with each step of the refraction process were calculated following the typical protocol of conventional subjective refraction. Fifty external examiners judged simulated retinal images until the best sphero-cylindrical refraction and the best visual acuity were achieved starting from the aberrometry data of three patients. Data analyses were performed to assess repeatability and reproducibility of the virtual refraction as a function of pupil size and aberrometric profile of different patients. SD values achieved in three components of refraction (M, J0, and J45) are lower than 0.25D in repeatability analysis. Regarding reproducibility, we found SD values lower than 0.25D in the most cases. When the results of virtual refraction with different pupil diameters (4 and 6 mm) were compared, the mean of differences (MoD) obtained were not clinically significant (less than 0.25D). Only one of the aberrometry profiles with high uncorrected astigmatism shows poor results for the M component in reproducibility and pupil size dependence analysis. In all cases, vision achieved was better than 0 logMAR. A comparison between the compensation obtained with virtual and conventional subjective refraction was made as an example of this application, showing good quality retinal images in both processes. The present study shows that virtual refraction has similar levels of precision as conventional subjective refraction. Moreover, virtual refraction has also shown that when high low order astigmatism is present, the refraction result is less precise and highly dependent on pupil size.

  19. Data Identifiers and Citations Enable Reproducible Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmes, C.

    2011-12-01

    Modern science often involves data processing with tremendous volumes of data. Keeping track of that data has been a growing challenge for data center. Researchers who access and use that data don't always reference and cite their data sources adequately for consumers of their research to follow their methodology or reproduce their analyses or experiments. Recent research has led to recommendations for good identifiers and citations that can help address this problem. This paper will describe some of the best practices in data identifiers, reference and citation. Using a simplified example scenario based on a long term remote sensing satellite mission, it will explore issues in identifying dynamic data sets and the importance of good data citations for reproducibility. It will describe the difference between granule and collection level identifiers, using UUIDs and DOIs to illustrate some recommendations for developing identifiers and assigning them during data processing. As data processors create data products, the provenance of the input products and precise steps that led to their creation are recorded and published for users of the data to see. As researchers access the data from an archive, they can use the provenance to help understand the genesis of the data, which could have effects on their usage of the data. By citing the data on publishing their research, others can retrieve the precise data used in their research and reproduce the analyses and experiments to confirm the results. Describing the experiment to a sufficient extent to reproduce the research enforces a formal approach that lends credibility to the results, and ultimately, to the policies of decision makers depending on that research.

  20. Tissue Doppler imaging reproducibility during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougault, V; Nottin, S; Noltin, S; Doucende, G; Obert, P

    2008-05-01

    Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) is an echocardiographic technique used during exercising to improve the accuracy of a cardiovascular diagnostic. The validity of TDI requires its reproducibility, which has never been challenged during moderate to maximal intensity exercising. The present study was specifically designed to assess the transmitral Doppler and pulsed TDI reproducibility in 19 healthy men, who had undergone two identical semi-supine maximal exercise tests on a cycle ergometer. Systolic (S') and diastolic (E') tissue velocities at the septal and lateral walls as well as early transmitral velocities (E) were assessed during exercise up to maximal effort. The data were compared between the two tests at 40 %, 60 %, 80 % and 100 % of maximal aerobic power. Despite upper body movements and hyperventilation, good quality echocardiographic images were obtained in each case. Regardless of exercise intensity, no differences were noticed between the two tests for all measurements. The variation coefficients for Doppler variables ranged from 3 % to 9 % over the transition from rest to maximal exercise. The random measurement error was, on average, 5.8 cm/s for E' and 4.4 cm/s for S'. Overall, the reproducibility of TDI was acceptable. Tissue Doppler imaging can be used to accurately evaluate LV diastolic and/or systolic function for this range of exercise intensity.

  1. How to Write a Reproducible Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, D. B.

    2016-12-01

    The geosciences have undergone a computational revolution in recent decades, to the point where almost all modern research relies heavily on software and code. Despite this profound change in the research methods employed by geoscientists, the reporting of computational results has changed very little in academic journals. This lag has led to something of a reproducibility crisis, whereby it is impossible to replicate and verify most of today's published computational results. While it is tempting to decry the slow response of journals and funding agencies in the face of this crisis, there are very few examples of reproducible research upon which to base new communication standards. In an attempt to address this deficiency, this presentation will describe a procedure for reporting computational results that was employed in a recent Journal of Climate paper. The procedure was developed to be consistent with recommended computational best practices and seeks to minimize the time burden on authors, which has been identified as the most important barrier to publishing code. It should provide a starting point for geoscientists looking to publish reproducible research, and could be adopted by journals as a formal minimum communication standard.

  2. Tools and techniques for computational reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolo, Stephen R; Frampton, Michael B

    2016-07-11

    When reporting research findings, scientists document the steps they followed so that others can verify and build upon the research. When those steps have been described in sufficient detail that others can retrace the steps and obtain similar results, the research is said to be reproducible. Computers play a vital role in many research disciplines and present both opportunities and challenges for reproducibility. Computers can be programmed to execute analysis tasks, and those programs can be repeated and shared with others. The deterministic nature of most computer programs means that the same analysis tasks, applied to the same data, will often produce the same outputs. However, in practice, computational findings often cannot be reproduced because of complexities in how software is packaged, installed, and executed-and because of limitations associated with how scientists document analysis steps. Many tools and techniques are available to help overcome these challenges; here we describe seven such strategies. With a broad scientific audience in mind, we describe the strengths and limitations of each approach, as well as the circumstances under which each might be applied. No single strategy is sufficient for every scenario; thus we emphasize that it is often useful to combine approaches.

  3. Reproducibility of magnetic resonance perfusion imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomeng Zhang

    Full Text Available Dynamic MR biomarkers (T2*-weighted or susceptibility-based and T1-weighted or relaxivity-enhanced have been applied to assess tumor perfusion and its response to therapies. A significant challenge in the development of reliable biomarkers is a rigorous assessment and optimization of reproducibility. The purpose of this study was to determine the measurement reproducibility of T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-MRI and T2*-weighted dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC-MRI with two contrast agents (CA of different molecular weight (MW: gadopentetate (Gd-DTPA, 0.5 kDa and Gadomelitol (P792, 6.5 kDa. Each contrast agent was tested with eight mice that had subcutaneous MDA-MB-231 breast xenograft tumors. Each mouse was imaged with a combined DSC-DCE protocol three times within one week to achieve measures of reproducibility. DSC-MRI results were evaluated with a contrast to noise ratio (CNR efficiency threshold. There was a clear signal drop (>95% probability threshold in the DSC of normal tissue, while signal changes were minimal or non-existent (<95% probability threshold in tumors. Mean within-subject coefficient of variation (wCV of relative blood volume (rBV in normal tissue was 11.78% for Gd-DTPA and 6.64% for P792. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC of rBV in normal tissue was 0.940 for Gd-DTPA and 0.978 for P792. The inter-subject correlation coefficient was 0.092. Calculated K(trans from DCE-MRI showed comparable reproducibility (mean wCV, 5.13% for Gd-DTPA, 8.06% for P792. ICC of K(trans showed high intra-subject reproducibility (ICC = 0.999/0.995 and inter-subject heterogeneity (ICC = 0.774. Histograms of K(trans distributions for three measurements had high degrees of overlap (sum of difference of the normalized histograms <0.01. These results represent homogeneous intra-subject measurement and heterogeneous inter-subject character of biological population, suggesting that perfusion MRI could be an imaging biomarker to

  4. Properties of galaxies reproduced by a hydrodynamic simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Vogelsberger, Mark; Springel, Volker; Torrey, Paul; Sijacki, Debora; Xu, Dandan; Snyder, Gregory F; Bird, Simeon; Nelson, Dylan; Hernquist, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Previous simulations of the growth of cosmic structures have broadly reproduced the 'cosmic web' of galaxies that we see in the Universe, but failed to create a mixed population of elliptical and spiral galaxies due to numerical inaccuracies and incomplete physical models. Moreover, because of computational constraints, they were unable to track the small scale evolution of gas and stars to the present epoch within a representative portion of the Universe. Here we report a simulation that starts 12 million years after the Big Bang, and traces 13 billion years of cosmic evolution with 12 billion resolution elements in a volume of $(106.5\\,{\\rm Mpc})^3$. It yields a reasonable population of ellipticals and spirals, reproduces the distribution of galaxies in clusters and statistics of hydrogen on large scales, and at the same time the metal and hydrogen content of galaxies on small scales.

  5. An Evaluation Model of Quantitative and Qualitative Fuzzy Multi-Criteria Decision-Making Approach for Location Selection of Transshipment Ports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Feng Ding

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of container logistics centre as home bases for merchandise transportation has become increasingly important. The container carriers need to select a suitable centre location of transshipment port to meet the requirements of container shipping logistics. In the light of this, the main purpose of this paper is to develop a fuzzy multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM model to evaluate the best selection of transshipment ports for container carriers. At first, some concepts and methods used to develop the proposed model are briefly introduced. The performance values of quantitative and qualitative subcriteria are discussed to evaluate the fuzzy ratings. Then, the ideal and anti-ideal concepts and the modified distance measure method are used in the proposed model. Finally, a step-by-step example is illustrated to study the computational process of the quantitative and qualitative fuzzy MCDM model. The proposed approach has successfully accomplished our goal. In addition, the proposed fuzzy MCDM model can be empirically employed to select the best location of transshipment port for container carriers in the future study.

  6. Qualitative Analysis of the Goodwin Model of the Growth Cycle || Análisis cualitativo del modelo de Goodwin de ciclos de crecimiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serebriakov, Vladimir

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Goodwin's model is a set of ordinary differential equations and is a well-known model of the growth cycle. However, its four constants require an extensive numerical study of its two differential equations to identify all possible unsteady state behaviors, i.e. phase portraits, which corresponds to infinitely many combinations of numerical values of the constants. Qualitative interpretation of Goodwin's model solves these problems by replacing all numerical constants and all derivatives by trends (increasing, constant and decreasing. The model has two variables - the employment rate V, and the labour share U. A solution of the qualitative Goodwin's model is a scenario. An example of a Goodwin's scenario is - V is increasing more and more rapidly, U is decreasing and the decrease is slowing down. The complete set of all possible 41 Goodwin's scenarios and 168 time transitions among them are given. This result qualitatively represents all possible unsteady state Goodwin's behaviours. It is therefore possible to predict all possible future behaviours if a current behaviour is known/chosen. A prediction example is presented in details. No prior knowledge of qualitative model theory is required. || El modelo de Goodwin es un conjunto de ecuaciones diferenciales ordinarias y resulta un modelo bien conocido para ciclos de crecimiento. Sin embargo, sus cuatro constantes requieren de un extenso estudio numérico de sus dos ecuaciones diferenciales para identificar todos los posibles comportamientos de estado no estacionario, i.e. retratos de fase, que corresponden a infinitamente muchas combinaciones de valores numéricos de las constantes. La interpretación cualitativa del modelo de Goodwin resuelve estos problemas reemplazando todas las constantes numéricas y todas las derivadas por tendencias (creciente, constante y decreciente. El modelo consiste en dos variables: la tasa de empleabilidad V y la repartición del valor agregado U. Una solución del

  7. Fluctuation-Driven Neural Dynamics Reproduce Drosophila Locomotor Patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Maesani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The neural mechanisms determining the timing of even simple actions, such as when to walk or rest, are largely mysterious. One intriguing, but untested, hypothesis posits a role for ongoing activity fluctuations in neurons of central action selection circuits that drive animal behavior from moment to moment. To examine how fluctuating activity can contribute to action timing, we paired high-resolution measurements of freely walking Drosophila melanogaster with data-driven neural network modeling and dynamical systems analysis. We generated fluctuation-driven network models whose outputs-locomotor bouts-matched those measured from sensory-deprived Drosophila. From these models, we identified those that could also reproduce a second, unrelated dataset: the complex time-course of odor-evoked walking for genetically diverse Drosophila strains. Dynamical models that best reproduced both Drosophila basal and odor-evoked locomotor patterns exhibited specific characteristics. First, ongoing fluctuations were required. In a stochastic resonance-like manner, these fluctuations allowed neural activity to escape stable equilibria and to exceed a threshold for locomotion. Second, odor-induced shifts of equilibria in these models caused a depression in locomotor frequency following olfactory stimulation. Our models predict that activity fluctuations in action selection circuits cause behavioral output to more closely match sensory drive and may therefore enhance navigation in complex sensory environments. Together these data reveal how simple neural dynamics, when coupled with activity fluctuations, can give rise to complex patterns of animal behavior.

  8. Open and reproducible global land use classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüst, Daniel; Václavík, Tomáš; Pross, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Researchers led by the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental research (UFZ) developed a new world map of land use systems based on over 30 diverse indicators (http://geoportal.glues.geo.tu-dresden.de/stories/landsystemarchetypes.html) of land use intensity, climate and environmental and socioeconomic factors. They identified twelve land system archetypes (LSA) using a data-driven classification algorithm (self-organizing maps) to assess global impacts of land use on the environment, and found unexpected similarities across global regions. We present how the algorithm behind this analysis can be published as an executable web process using 52°North WPS4R (https://wiki.52north.org/bin/view/Geostatistics/WPS4R) within the GLUES project (http://modul-a.nachhaltiges-landmanagement.de/en/scientific-coordination-glues/). WPS4R is an open source collaboration platform for researchers, analysts and software developers to publish R scripts (http://www.r-project.org/) as a geo-enabled OGC Web Processing Service (WPS) process. The interoperable interface to call the geoprocess allows both reproducibility of the analysis and integration of user data without knowledge about web services or classification algorithms. The open platform allows everybody to replicate the analysis in their own environments. The LSA WPS process has several input parameters, which can be changed via a simple web interface. The input parameters are used to configure both the WPS environment and the LSA algorithm itself. The encapsulation as a web process allows integration of non-public datasets, while at the same time the publication requires a well-defined documentation of the analysis. We demonstrate this platform specifically to domain scientists and show how reproducibility and open source publication of analyses can be enhanced. We also discuss future extensions of the reproducible land use classification, such as the possibility for users to enter their own areas of interest to the system and

  9. Nonlinear sequential laminates reproducing hollow sphere assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idiart, Martín I.

    2007-07-01

    A special class of nonlinear porous materials with isotropic 'sequentially laminated' microstructures is found to reproduce exactly the hydrostatic behavior of 'hollow sphere assemblages'. It is then argued that this result supports the conjecture that Gurson's approximate criterion for plastic porous materials, and its viscoplastic extension of Leblond et al. (1994), may actually yield rigorous upper bounds for the hydrostatic flow stress of porous materials containing an isotropic, but otherwise arbitrary, distribution of porosity. To cite this article: M.I. Idiart, C. R. Mecanique 335 (2007).

  10. Response to Comment on "Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christopher J; Bahník, Štěpán; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bosco, Frank A; Chandler, Jesse; Chartier, Christopher R; Cheung, Felix; Christopherson, Cody D; Cordes, Andreas; Cremata, Edward J; Della Penna, Nicolas; Estel, Vivien; Fedor, Anna; Fitneva, Stanka A; Frank, Michael C; Grange, James A; Hartshorne, Joshua K; Hasselman, Fred; Henninger, Felix; van der Hulst, Marije; Jonas, Kai J; Lai, Calvin K; Levitan, Carmel A; Miller, Jeremy K; Moore, Katherine S; Meixner, Johannes M; Munafò, Marcus R; Neijenhuijs, Koen I; Nilsonne, Gustav; Nosek, Brian A; Plessow, Franziska; Prenoveau, Jason M; Ricker, Ashley A; Schmidt, Kathleen; Spies, Jeffrey R; Stieger, Stefan; Strohminger, Nina; Sullivan, Gavin B; van Aert, Robbie C M; van Assen, Marcel A L M; Vanpaemel, Wolf; Vianello, Michelangelo; Voracek, Martin; Zuni, Kellylynn

    2016-03-01

    Gilbert et al. conclude that evidence from the Open Science Collaboration's Reproducibility Project: Psychology indicates high reproducibility, given the study methodology. Their very optimistic assessment is limited by statistical misconceptions and by causal inferences from selectively interpreted, correlational data. Using the Reproducibility Project: Psychology data, both optimistic and pessimistic conclusions about reproducibility are possible, and neither are yet warranted.

  11. CRKSPH - A Conservative Reproducing Kernel Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontiere, Nicholas; Raskin, Cody D.; Owen, J. Michael

    2017-03-01

    We present a formulation of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) that utilizes a first-order consistent reproducing kernel, a smoothing function that exactly interpolates linear fields with particle tracers. Previous formulations using reproducing kernel (RK) interpolation have had difficulties maintaining conservation of momentum due to the fact the RK kernels are not, in general, spatially symmetric. Here, we utilize a reformulation of the fluid equations such that mass, linear momentum, and energy are all rigorously conserved without any assumption about kernel symmetries, while additionally maintaining approximate angular momentum conservation. Our approach starts from a rigorously consistent interpolation theory, where we derive the evolution equations to enforce the appropriate conservation properties, at the sacrifice of full consistency in the momentum equation. Additionally, by exploiting the increased accuracy of the RK method's gradient, we formulate a simple limiter for the artificial viscosity that reduces the excess diffusion normally incurred by the ordinary SPH artificial viscosity. Collectively, we call our suite of modifications to the traditional SPH scheme Conservative Reproducing Kernel SPH, or CRKSPH. CRKSPH retains many benefits of traditional SPH methods (such as preserving Galilean invariance and manifest conservation of mass, momentum, and energy) while improving on many of the shortcomings of SPH, particularly the overly aggressive artificial viscosity and zeroth-order inaccuracy. We compare CRKSPH to two different modern SPH formulations (pressure based SPH and compatibly differenced SPH), demonstrating the advantages of our new formulation when modeling fluid mixing, strong shock, and adiabatic phenomena.

  12. Indomethacin reproducibly induces metamorphosis in Cassiopea xamachana scyphistomae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrales-Arellano, Patricia; Islas-Flores, Tania; Thomé, Patricia E.

    2017-01-01

    Cassiopea xamachana jellyfish are an attractive model system to study metamorphosis and/or cnidarian–dinoflagellate symbiosis due to the ease of cultivation of their planula larvae and scyphistomae through their asexual cycle, in which the latter can bud new larvae and continue the cycle without differentiation into ephyrae. Then, a subsequent induction of metamorphosis and full differentiation into ephyrae is believed to occur when the symbionts are acquired by the scyphistomae. Although strobilation induction and differentiation into ephyrae can be accomplished in various ways, a controlled, reproducible metamorphosis induction has not been reported. Such controlled metamorphosis induction is necessary for an ensured synchronicity and reproducibility of biological, biochemical, and molecular analyses. For this purpose, we tested if differentiation could be pharmacologically stimulated as in Aurelia aurita, by the metamorphic inducers thyroxine, KI, NaI, Lugol’s iodine, H2O2, indomethacin, or retinol. We found reproducibly induced strobilation by 50 μM indomethacin after six days of exposure, and 10–25 μM after 7 days. Strobilation under optimal conditions reached 80–100% with subsequent ephyrae release after exposure. Thyroxine yielded inconsistent results as it caused strobilation occasionally, while all other chemicals had no effect. Thus, indomethacin can be used as a convenient tool for assessment of biological phenomena through a controlled metamorphic process in C. xamachana scyphistomae. PMID:28265497

  13. Indomethacin reproducibly induces metamorphosis in Cassiopea xamachana scyphistomae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Cabrales-Arellano

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cassiopea xamachana jellyfish are an attractive model system to study metamorphosis and/or cnidarian–dinoflagellate symbiosis due to the ease of cultivation of their planula larvae and scyphistomae through their asexual cycle, in which the latter can bud new larvae and continue the cycle without differentiation into ephyrae. Then, a subsequent induction of metamorphosis and full differentiation into ephyrae is believed to occur when the symbionts are acquired by the scyphistomae. Although strobilation induction and differentiation into ephyrae can be accomplished in various ways, a controlled, reproducible metamorphosis induction has not been reported. Such controlled metamorphosis induction is necessary for an ensured synchronicity and reproducibility of biological, biochemical, and molecular analyses. For this purpose, we tested if differentiation could be pharmacologically stimulated as in Aurelia aurita, by the metamorphic inducers thyroxine, KI, NaI, Lugol’s iodine, H2O2, indomethacin, or retinol. We found reproducibly induced strobilation by 50 μM indomethacin after six days of exposure, and 10–25 μM after 7 days. Strobilation under optimal conditions reached 80–100% with subsequent ephyrae release after exposure. Thyroxine yielded inconsistent results as it caused strobilation occasionally, while all other chemicals had no effect. Thus, indomethacin can be used as a convenient tool for assessment of biological phenomena through a controlled metamorphic process in C. xamachana scyphistomae.

  14. Heart rate variability reproducibility during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNarry, Melitta A; Lewis, Michael J

    2012-07-01

    The use of heart rate variability (HRV) parameters during exercise is not supported by appropriate reliability studies. In 80 healthy adults, ECG was recorded during three 6 min bouts of exercise, separated by 6 min of unloaded cycling. Two bouts were at a moderate intensity while the final bout was at a heavy exercise intensity. This protocol was repeated under the same conditions on three occasions, with a controlled start time (pre-determined at the first visit). Standard time and frequency domain indices of HRV were derived. Reliability was assessed by Bland–Altman plots, 95% limits of agreement and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). The sample size required to detect a mean difference ≥30% of the between-subject standard deviation was also estimated. There was no systematic change between days. All HRV parameters demonstrated a high degree of reproducibility during baseline (ICC range: 0.58–0.75), moderate (ICC: 0.58–0.85) and heavy intensity exercise (ICC range: 0.40–0.76). The reproducibility was slightly diminished during heavy intensity exercise relative to both unloaded baseline cycling and moderate exercise. This study indicates that HRV parameters can be reliably determined during exercise, and it underlines the importance of standardizing exercise intensity with regard to fitness levels if HRV is to be reliably determined.

  15. Consistent and reproducible positioning in longitudinal imaging for phenotyping genetically modified swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Emily; Dilger, Samantha K. N.; Stoyles, Nicholas; Judisch, Alexandra; Morgan, John; Sieren, Jessica C.

    2015-03-01

    Recent growth of genetic disease models in swine has presented the opportunity to advance translation of developed imaging protocols, while characterizing the genotype to phenotype relationship. Repeated imaging with multiple clinical modalities provides non-invasive detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of disease to accomplish these goals; however, longitudinal scanning requires repeatable and reproducible positioning of the animals. A modular positioning unit was designed to provide a fixed, stable base for the anesthetized animal through transit and imaging. Post ventilation and sedation, animals were placed supine in the unit and monitored for consistent vitals. Comprehensive imaging was performed with a computed tomography (CT) chest-abdomen-pelvis scan at each screening time point. Longitudinal images were rigidly registered, accounting for rotation, translation, and anisotropic scaling, and the skeleton was isolated using a basic thresholding algorithm. Assessment of alignment was quantified via eleven pairs of corresponding points on the skeleton with the first time point as the reference. Results were obtained with five animals over five screening time points. The developed unit aided in skeletal alignment within an average of 13.13 +/- 6.7 mm for all five subjects providing a strong foundation for developing qualitative and quantitative methods of disease tracking.

  16. Modeling noisy resonant system response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Patrick Thomas; Walrath, David Edwin

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a theory-based model replicating empirical acoustic resonant signals is presented and studied to understand sources of noise present in acoustic signals. Statistical properties of empirical signals are quantified and a noise amplitude parameter, which models frequency and amplitude-based noise, is created, defined, and presented. This theory-driven model isolates each phenomenon and allows for parameters to be independently studied. Using seven independent degrees of freedom, this model will accurately reproduce qualitative and quantitative properties measured from laboratory data. Results are presented and demonstrate success in replicating qualitative and quantitative properties of experimental data.

  17. Qualitative and simultaneous quantitative analysis of cimetidine polymorphs by ultraviolet-visible and shortwave near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and multivariate calibration models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuyan; Li, Xiangling; Xu, Kailin; Zou, Huayu; Li, Hui; Liang, Bing

    2015-02-01

    The object of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of applying ultraviolet-visible and shortwave near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-vis-SWNIR DRS) coupled with chemometrics in qualitative and simultaneous quantitative analysis of drug polymorphs, using cimetidine as a model drug. Three polymorphic forms (A, B and D) and a mixed crystal (M1) of cimetidine, obtained by preparation under different crystallization conditions, were characterized by microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and infrared spectroscopy (IR). The discriminant models of four forms (A, B, D and M1) were established by discriminant partial least squares (PLS-DA) using different pretreated spectra. The R and RMSEP of samples in the prediction set by discriminant model with original spectra were 0.9959 and 0.1004. Among the quantitative models of binary mixtures (A and D) established by partial least squares (PLS) and least squares-support vector machine (LS-SVM) with different pretreated spectra, the LS-SVM models based on original and MSC spectra had better prediction effect with a R of 1.0000 and a RMSEP of 0.0134 for form A, and a R of 1.0000 and a RMSEP of 0.0024 for form D. For ternary mixtures, the established PLS quantitative models based on normalized spectra had relatively better prediction effect for forms A, B and D with R of 0.9901, 0.9820 and 0.9794 and RMSEP of 0.0471, 0.0529 and 0.0594, respectively. This research indicated that UV-vis-SWNIR DRS can be used as a simple, rapid, nondestructive qualitative and quantitative method for the analysis of drug polymorphs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Role Models and Teachers: medical students perception of teaching-learning methods in clinical settings, a qualitative study from Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasuriya-Illesinghe, Vathsala; Nazeer, Ishra; Athauda, Lathika; Perera, Jennifer

    2016-02-09

    Medical education research in general, and those focusing on clinical settings in particular, have been a low priority in South Asia. This explorative study from 3 medical schools in Sri Lanka, a South Asian country, describes undergraduate medical students' experiences during their final year clinical training with the aim of understanding the teaching-learning experiences. Using qualitative methods we conducted an exploratory study. Twenty eight graduates from 3 medical schools participated in individual interviews. Interview recordings were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative content analysis method. Emergent themes reveled 2 types of teaching-learning experiences, role modeling, and purposive teaching. In role modelling, students were expected to observe teachers while they conduct their clinical work, however, this method failed to create positive learning experiences. The clinical teachers who predominantly used this method appeared to be 'figurative' role models and were not perceived as modelling professional behaviors. In contrast, purposeful teaching allowed dedicated time for teacher-student interactions and teachers who created these learning experiences were more likely to be seen as 'true' role models. Students' responses and reciprocations to these interactions were influenced by their perception of teachers' behaviors, attitudes, and the type of teaching-learning situations created for them. Making a distinction between role modeling and purposeful teaching is important for students in clinical training settings. Clinical teachers' awareness of their own manifest professional characterizes, attitudes, and behaviors, could help create better teaching-learning experiences. Moreover, broader systemic reforms are needed to address the prevailing culture of teaching by humiliation and subordination.

  19. Efficient and reproducible identification of mismatch repair deficient colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joost, Patrick; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Halvarsson, Britta;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The identification of mismatch-repair (MMR) defective colon cancer is clinically relevant for diagnostic, prognostic and potentially also for treatment predictive purposes. Preselection of tumors for MMR analysis can be obtained with predictive models, which need to demonstrate ease...... of application and favorable reproducibility. METHODS: We validated the MMR index for the identification of prognostically favorable MMR deficient colon cancers and compared performance to 5 other prediction models. In total, 474 colon cancers diagnosed ≥ age 50 were evaluated with correlation between...... and efficiently identifies MMR defective colon cancers with high sensitivity and specificity. The model shows stable performance with low inter-observer variability and favorable performance when compared to other MMR predictive models....

  20. Iterative Multistep Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Space Method for Solving Strongly Nonlinear Oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banan Maayah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new algorithm called multistep reproducing kernel Hilbert space method is represented to solve nonlinear oscillator’s models. The proposed scheme is a modification of the reproducing kernel Hilbert space method, which will increase the intervals of convergence for the series solution. The numerical results demonstrate the validity and the applicability of the new technique. A very good agreement was found between the results obtained using the presented algorithm and the Runge-Kutta method, which shows that the multistep reproducing kernel Hilbert space method is very efficient and convenient for solving nonlinear oscillator’s models.

  1. Reproducibility and reusability of scientific software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamir, Lior

    2017-01-01

    Information science and technology has been becoming an integral part of astronomy research, and due to the consistent growth in the size and impact of astronomical databases, that trend is bound to continue. While software is a vital part information systems and data analysis processes, in many cases the importance of the software and the standards of reporting on the use of source code has not yet elevated in the scientific communication process to the same level as other parts of the research. The purpose of the discussion is to examine the role of software in the scientific communication process in the light of transparency, reproducibility, and reusability of the research, as well as discussing software in astronomy in comparison to other disciplines.

  2. PSYCHOLOGY. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available. Replication effects were half the magnitude of original effects, representing a substantial decline. Ninety-seven percent of original studies had statistically significant results. Thirty-six percent of replications had statistically significant results; 47% of original effect sizes were in the 95% confidence interval of the replication effect size; 39% of effects were subjectively rated to have replicated the original result; and if no bias in original results is assumed, combining original and replication results left 68% with statistically significant effects. Correlational tests suggest that replication success was better predicted by the strength of original evidence than by characteristics of the original and replication teams.

  3. Poor reproducibility of allergic rhinitis SNP associations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Nilsson

    Full Text Available Replication of reported associations is crucial to the investigation of complex disease. More than 100 SNPs have previously been reported as associated with allergic rhinitis (AR, but few of these have been replicated successfully. To investigate the general reproducibility of reported AR-associations in candidate gene studies, one Swedish (352 AR-cases, 709 controls and one Singapore Chinese population (948 AR-cases, 580 controls were analyzed using 49 AR-associated SNPs. The overall pattern of P-values indicated that very few of the investigated SNPs were associated with AR. Given published odds ratios (ORs most SNPs showed high power to detect an association, but no correlations were found between the ORs of the two study populations or with published ORs. None of the association signals were in common to the two genome-wide association studies published in AR, indicating that the associations represent false positives or have much lower effect-sizes than reported.

  4. Is Grannum grading of the placenta reproducible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Mary; Ryan, John; Brennan, Patrick C.; Higgins, Mary; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M.

    2009-02-01

    Current ultrasound assessment of placental calcification relies on Grannum grading. The aim of this study was to assess if this method is reproducible by measuring inter- and intra-observer variation in grading placental images, under strictly controlled viewing conditions. Thirty placental images were acquired and digitally saved. Five experienced sonographers independently graded the images on two separate occasions. In order to eliminate any technological factors which could affect data reliability and consistency all observers reviewed images at the same time. To optimise viewing conditions ambient lighting was maintained between 25-40 lux, with monitors calibrated to the GSDF standard to ensure consistent brightness and contrast. Kappa (κ) analysis of the grades assigned was used to measure inter- and intra-observer reliability. Intra-observer agreement had a moderate mean κ-value of 0.55, with individual comparisons ranging from 0.30 to 0.86. Two images saved from the same patient, during the same scan, were each graded as I, II and III by the same observer. A mean κ-value of 0.30 (range from 0.13 to 0.55) indicated fair inter-observer agreement over the two occasions and only one image was graded consistently the same by all five observers. The study findings confirmed the lack of reproducibility associated with Grannum grading of the placenta despite optimal viewing conditions and highlight the need for new methods of assessing placental health in order to improve neonatal outcomes. Alternative methods for quantifying placental calcification such as a software based technique and 3D ultrasound assessment need to be explored.

  5. Qualitative Research Process

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, Dewan Mahboob

    2011-01-01

    This article provides with an overview of the qualitative research methods. Over last few decades, qualitative research is getting very popular in the fields of business, sociology, psychology and others. This article, in its introduction, gives a general idea about the qualitative research. Then it discusses the main differences between qualitative and quantitative research methods. The article also discusses about the ethical issues important for qualitative research. Lastly it discusses ab...

  6. Qualitative research in health

    OpenAIRE

    Ligia Regina Franco Sansigolo Kerr; Carl Kendall

    2014-01-01

    Qualitative research and health has become extremely popular in the last 30 years. Since the 80’s, more and more health professionals have engaged in qualitative research. Discriminating a “qualitative research” from quantitative research, though, is a misnomer, since all research is at least part qualitative. After all, when epidemiologists or biostatisticians count something, that category is a qualitative “something”.

  7. A 3-mode, Variable Velocity Jet Model for HH 34

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raga, A.; Noriega-Crespo, A.

    1998-01-01

    Variable ejection velocity jet models can qualitatively explain the appearance of successive working surfaces in Herbig-Haro (HH) jets. This paper presents an attempt to explore which features of the HH 34 jet can indeed be reproduced by such a model.

  8. A Study of Long-Term fMRI Reproducibility Using Data-Driven Analysis Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaomu; Panych, Lawrence P; Chou, Ying-Hui; Chen, Nan-Kuei

    2014-12-01

    The reproducibility of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is important for fMRI-based neuroscience research and clinical applications. Previous studies show considerable variation in amplitude and spatial extent of fMRI activation across repeated sessions on individual subjects even using identical experimental paradigms and imaging conditions. Most existing fMRI reproducibility studies were typically limited by time duration and data analysis techniques. Particularly, the assessment of reproducibility is complicated by a fact that fMRI results may depend on data analysis techniques used in reproducibility studies. In this work, the long-term fMRI reproducibility was investigated with a focus on the data analysis methods. Two spatial smoothing techniques, including a wavelet-domain Bayesian method and the Gaussian smoothing, were evaluated in terms of their effects on the long-term reproducibility. A multivariate support vector machine (SVM)-based method was used to identify active voxels, and compared to a widely used general linear model (GLM)-based method at the group level. The reproducibility study was performed using multisession fMRI data acquired from eight healthy adults over 1.5 years' period of time. Three regions-of-interest (ROI) related to a motor task were defined based upon which the long-term reproducibility were examined. Experimental results indicate that different spatial smoothing techniques may lead to different reproducibility measures, and the wavelet-based spatial smoothing and SVM-based activation detection is a good combination for reproducibility studies. On the basis of the ROIs and multiple numerical criteria, we observed a moderate to substantial within-subject long-term reproducibility. A reasonable long-term reproducibility was also observed from the inter-subject study. It was found that the short-term reproducibility is usually higher than the long-term reproducibility. Furthermore, the results indicate that brain

  9. Activation as an overlooked factor in the BDI-II: a factor model based on core symptoms and qualitative aspects of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Joël; Keller, Ferdinand; Läge, Damian

    2014-09-01

    An adequate assessment of depression has been of concern to many researchers over the last half-century. These efforts have brought forth a manifold of depression rating scales, of which the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is 1 of the most commonly used self-assessment scales. Since its revision, the item structure of the BDI-II has been examined in many factor analytic studies, yet it has not been possible to achieve a consensus about the underlying factor structure. Recent findings from a nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis (Bühler, Keller, & Läge, 2012) of the German norming sample of the BDI-II emphasized a structure with different qualitative aspects of depression, which suggested that the existing factor models do not adequately represent the data. The NMDS results were reviewed, and on the basis of these findings, a different factor model is proposed. In contrast to the common factor models in the literature, the presented model includes an additional factor, which is associated with the activation level of the BDI-II symptoms. The model was evaluated with a 2nd sample of patients diagnosed with a primary affective disorder (N = 569) and obtained good fit indices that even exceeded the fit of the most reliable factor model (Ward, 2006) described in the literature so far. Furthermore, emphasis is placed on the methodological question of how factor models may be derived from the results of NMDS analyses. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. The Health Belief Model: A Qualitative Study to Understand High-risk Sexual Behavior in Chinese Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianhong; Lei, Yunxiao; Wang, Honghong; He, Guoping; Williams, Ann Bartley

    2016-01-01

    The Health Belief Model (HBM) has been widely used to explain rationales for health risk-taking behaviors. Our qualitative study explored the applicability of the HBM to understand high-risk sexual behavior in Chinese men who have sex with men (MSM) and to elaborate each component of the model. HIV knowledge and perception of HIV prevalence contributed to perceived susceptibility. An attitude of treatment optimism versus hard life in reality affected perceived severity. Perceived barriers included discomfort using condoms and condom availability. Perceived benefits included prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted illnesses. Sociocultural cues for Chinese MSM were elaborated according to each component. The results demonstrated that the HBM could be applied to Chinese MSM. When used with this group, it provided information to help develop a population- and disease-specific HBM scale. Results of our study also suggested behavioral interventions that could be used with Chinese MSM to increase condom use.

  11. Reproducing an extreme flood with uncertain post-event information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Andino, Diana; Beven, Keith; Halldin, Sven; Xu, Chong-Yu; Reynolds, José Eduardo; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano

    2017-07-01

    Studies for the prevention and mitigation of floods require information on discharge and extent of inundation, commonly unavailable or uncertain, especially during extreme events. This study was initiated by the devastating flood in Tegucigalpa, the capital of Honduras, when Hurricane Mitch struck the city. In this study we hypothesized that it is possible to estimate, in a trustworthy way considering large data uncertainties, this extreme 1998 flood discharge and the extent of the inundations that followed from a combination of models and post-event measured data. Post-event data collected in 2000 and 2001 were used to estimate discharge peaks, times of peak, and high-water marks. These data were used in combination with rain data from two gauges to drive and constrain a combination of well-known modelling tools: TOPMODEL, Muskingum-Cunge-Todini routing, and the LISFLOOD-FP hydraulic model. Simulations were performed within the generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) uncertainty-analysis framework. The model combination predicted peak discharge, times of peaks, and more than 90 % of the observed high-water marks within the uncertainty bounds of the evaluation data. This allowed an inundation likelihood map to be produced. Observed high-water marks could not be reproduced at a few locations on the floodplain. Identifications of these locations are useful to improve model set-up, model structure, or post-event data-estimation methods. Rainfall data were of central importance in simulating the times of peak and results would be improved by a better spatial assessment of rainfall, e.g. from radar data or a denser rain-gauge network. Our study demonstrated that it was possible, considering the uncertainty in the post-event data, to reasonably reproduce the extreme Mitch flood in Tegucigalpa in spite of no hydrometric gauging during the event. The method proposed here can be part of a Bayesian framework in which more events can be added into the analysis as

  12. Towards interoperable and reproducible QSAR analyses: Exchange of datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spjuth Ola

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background QSAR is a widely used method to relate chemical structures to responses or properties based on experimental observations. Much effort has been made to evaluate and validate the statistical modeling in QSAR, but these analyses treat the dataset as fixed. An overlooked but highly important issue is the validation of the setup of the dataset, which comprises addition of chemical structures as well as selection of descriptors and software implementations prior to calculations. This process is hampered by the lack of standards and exchange formats in the field, making it virtually impossible to reproduce and validate analyses and drastically constrain collaborations and re-use of data. Results We present a step towards standardizing QSAR analyses by defining interoperable and reproducible QSAR datasets, consisting of an open XML format (QSAR-ML which builds on an open and extensible descriptor ontology. The ontology provides an extensible way of uniquely defining descriptors for use in QSAR experiments, and the exchange format supports multiple versioned implementations of these descriptors. Hence, a dataset described by QSAR-ML makes its setup completely reproducible. We also provide a reference implementation as a set of plugins for Bioclipse which simplifies setup of QSAR datasets, and allows for exporting in QSAR-ML as well as old-fashioned CSV formats. The implementation facilitates addition of new descriptor implementations from locally installed software and remote Web services; the latter is demonstrated with REST and XMPP Web services. Conclusions Standardized QSAR datasets open up new ways to store, query, and exchange data for subsequent analyses. QSAR-ML supports completely reproducible creation of datasets, solving the problems of defining which software components were used and their versions, and the descriptor ontology eliminates confusions regarding descriptors by defining them crisply. This makes is easy to join

  13. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the students’ perceptions to the use of 3D electronic models in problem-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Ming Wong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Faculty of Dentistry of the University of Hong Kong has introduced innovative blended problem-based learning (PBL with the aid of 3D electronic models (e-models to Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS curriculum. Statistical results of pre- and post-semester questionnaire surveys illustrated compatibility of e-models in PBL settings. The students’ importance ratings of two objectives “Complete assigned tasks on time” and “Active listener”, and twenty-two facilitator evaluation items including critical thinking and group problem-solving skills had increased significantly. The students’ PBL preparation behavior, attentions to problem understanding, problem analysis, and learning resource quality were also found to be related to online support of e-models and its software. Qualitative analysis of open-ended questions with visual text analytic software “Leximancer” improved validity of statistical results. Using e-model functions in treatment planning, problem analysis and giving instructions provided a method of informative communication. Therefore, it is critical for the faculty to continuously provide facilitator training and quality online e-model resources to the students.

  14. Propuesta de Investigación Cualitativa: un modelo para ayudar a investigadores noveles Qualitative Research proposal: a model to help novice researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina G. Vivar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Los profesionales de enfermería contribuyen de modo importante, por medio de la investigación, a extender y actualizar su propio cuerpo de conocimientos con la intención de mejorar la calidad de los cuidados de enfermería. A los estudiantes y a los investigadores noveles, sin embargo, les puede resultar difícil comenzar la investigación y puede que necesiten supervisión a lo largo del proceso investigador. Este artículo se centra en la praxis para diseñar una propuesta de investigación cualitativa al presentar un ejemplo/modelo, con el propósito de que pueda ser beneficioso para aquellos principiantes a la hora de utilizar la metodología cualitativa.Nurses make an important contribution to extending and updating knowledge through research with the purpose of improving the quality of nursing care. Students and novice researchers, however, may find it difficult to initiate investigation and may require supervision during the research process. This paper focuses on the practicality of designing a qualitative research proposal by presenting an example/model, in the hope that it may be of benefit to beginners using a qualitative methodology.

  15. Are classifications of proximal radius fractures reproducible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    dos Santos João BG

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fractures of the proximal radius need to be classified in an appropriate and reproducible manner. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of the three most widely used classification systems. Methods Elbow radiographs images of patients with proximal radius fractures were classified according to Mason, Morrey, and Arbeitsgemeinschaft für osteosynthesefragen/Association for the Study of Internal Fixation (AO/ASIF classifications by four observers with different experience with this subject to assess their intra- and inter-observer agreement. Each observer analyzed the images on three different occasions on a computer with numerical sequence randomly altered. Results We found that intra-observer agreement of Mason and Morrey classifications were satisfactory (κ = 0.582 and 0.554, respectively, while the AO/ASIF classification had poor intra-observer agreement (κ = 0.483. Inter-observer agreement was higher in the Mason (κ = 0.429-0.560 and Morrey (κ = 0.319-0.487 classifications than in the AO/ASIF classification (κ = 0.250-0.478, which showed poor reliability. Conclusion Inter- and intra-observer agreement of the Mason and Morey classifications showed overall satisfactory reliability when compared to the AO/ASIF system. The Mason classification is the most reliable system.

  16. The reproducible radio outbursts of SS Cygni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Altamirano, D.; O'Brien, T. J.; Page, K. L.; Templeton, M. R.; Körding, E. G.; Knigge, C.; Rupen, M. P.; Fender, R. P.; Heinz, S.; Maitra, D.; Markoff, S.; Migliari, S.; Remillard, R. A.; Russell, D. M.; Sarazin, C. L.; Waagen, E. O.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of our intensive radio observing campaign of the dwarf nova SS Cyg during its 2010 April outburst. We argue that the observed radio emission was produced by synchrotron emission from a transient radio jet. Comparing the radio light curves from previous and subsequent outbursts of this system (including high-resolution observations from outbursts in 2011 and 2012) shows that the typical long and short outbursts of this system exhibit reproducible radio outbursts that do not vary significantly between outbursts, which is consistent with the similarity of the observed optical, ultraviolet and X-ray light curves. Contemporaneous optical and X-ray observations show that the radio emission appears to have been triggered at the same time as the initial X-ray flare, which occurs as disc material first reaches the boundary layer. This raises the possibility that the boundary region may be involved in jet production in accreting white dwarf systems. Our high spatial resolution monitoring shows that the compact jet remained active throughout the outburst with no radio quenching.

  17. The reproducible radio outbursts of SS Cygni

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, T D; Sivakoff, G R; Altamirano, D; O'Brien, T J; Page, K L; Templeton, M R; Koerding, E G; Knigge, C; Rupen, M P; Fender, R P; Heinz, S; Maitra, D; Markoff, S; Migliari, S; Remillard, R A; Russell, D M; Sarazin, C L; Waagen, E O

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of our intensive radio observing campaign of the dwarf nova SS Cyg during its 2010 April outburst. We argue that the observed radio emission was produced by synchrotron emission from a transient radio jet. Comparing the radio light curves from previous and subsequent outbursts of this system (including high-resolution observations from outbursts in 2011 and 2012) shows that the typical long and short outbursts of this system exhibit reproducible radio outbursts that do not vary significantly between outbursts, which is consistent with the similarity of the observed optical, ultraviolet and X-ray light curves. Contemporaneous optical and X-ray observations show that the radio emission appears to have been triggered at the same time as the initial X-ray flare, which occurs as disk material first reaches the boundary layer. This raises the possibility that the boundary region may be involved in jet production in accreting white dwarf systems. Our high spatial resolution monitoring shows th...

  18. Reproducing the entropy structure in galaxy groups

    CERN Document Server

    Finoguenov, A; Tornatore, L; Böhringer, H

    2003-01-01

    We carry out a comparison between observations and hydrodynamic simulations of entropy profiles of groups and clusters of galaxies. We use the Tree+SPH GADGET code to simulate four halos of sizes in the M_500 = 1.0 - 16.e13 h^-1 Msun range, corresponding to poor groups up to Virgo-like clusters. We concentrate on the effect of introducing radiative cooling, star formation, and a variety of non-gravitational heating schemes on the entropy structure and the stellar fraction. We show that all the simulations result in a correct entropy profile for the Virgo-like cluster. With the heating energy budget of ~0.7 keV/particle injected at z_h=3, we are also able to reproduce the entropy profiles of groups. We obtain the flat entropy cores as a combined effect of preheating and cooling, while we achieve the high entropy at outskirts by preheating. The resulting baryon fraction locked into stars is in the 25-30% range, compared to 35-40% in the case of no preheating. Heating at higher redshift, z_h=9, strongly delays t...

  19. Reproducibility of neuroimaging analyses across operating systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatard, Tristan; Lewis, Lindsay B; Ferreira da Silva, Rafael; Adalat, Reza; Beck, Natacha; Lepage, Claude; Rioux, Pierre; Rousseau, Marc-Etienne; Sherif, Tarek; Deelman, Ewa; Khalili-Mahani, Najmeh; Evans, Alan C

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging pipelines are known to generate different results depending on the computing platform where they are compiled and executed. We quantify these differences for brain tissue classification, fMRI analysis, and cortical thickness (CT) extraction, using three of the main neuroimaging packages (FSL, Freesurfer and CIVET) and different versions of GNU/Linux. We also identify some causes of these differences using library and system call interception. We find that these packages use mathematical functions based on single-precision floating-point arithmetic whose implementations in operating systems continue to evolve. While these differences have little or no impact on simple analysis pipelines such as brain extraction and cortical tissue classification, their accumulation creates important differences in longer pipelines such as subcortical tissue classification, fMRI analysis, and cortical thickness extraction. With FSL, most Dice coefficients between subcortical classifications obtained on different operating systems remain above 0.9, but values as low as 0.59 are observed. Independent component analyses (ICA) of fMRI data differ between operating systems in one third of the tested subjects, due to differences in motion correction. With Freesurfer and CIVET, in some brain regions we find an effect of build or operating system on cortical thickness. A first step to correct these reproducibility issues would be to use more precise representations of floating-point numbers in the critical sections of the pipelines. The numerical stability of pipelines should also be reviewed.

  20. A qualitative exploration of experiences of overweight young and older adults. An application of the integrated behaviour model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Annaleise; Mullan, Barbara; Todd, Jemma

    2014-04-01

    While rates of obesity continue to increase, weight-loss interventions to date have not been hugely successful. The purpose of this study was to explore the specific factors that are relevant to weight control in overweight and obese young adults compared to older adults, within the context of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). A qualitative methodology with purposive sampling was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 young adults and older adults who were currently overweight or obese. The research was informed by thematic analysis. A mixed deductive-inductive approach that was structured around but not limited to TPB constructs was applied. Themes mapped onto the TPB behaviour well, with additional themes of motivation, and knowledge and experience emerging. Differences across groups included motivators to weight loss (e.g. appearance and confidence for young adults, health for older adults), importance of social influences, and perceptions of control (e.g. availability and cost for young adults, age and energy for older adults). Similarities across groups included attitudes towards being overweight and losing weight, and the value of preparation and establishment of a healthy routine. Finally, across both groups, knowledge and confidence in ability to lose weight appeared adequate, despite failed attempts to do so. The different experiences identified for younger and older adults can be used to inform future tailored weight-loss interventions that are relevant to these age groups, and the TPB could provide a useful framework. Additional intervention strategies, such as improving behavioural routine and improving self-regulation also warrant further investigation.

  1. Reproducibility of corpus cavernosum electromyography in healthy young man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, X.; Frantzen, J.; Holsheimer, J.; Meuleman, E.

    2005-01-01

    Research on reproducibility of corpus cavernosum electromyography (CC-EMG) is relevant because reproducible signals indicate a biological phenomenon and not an artefact. Reproducible signals are also required to use CC-EMG as a diagnostic tool for erectile dysfunction. The aim of this study was to a

  2. Experiences of Community-Living Older Adults Receiving Integrated Care Based on the Chronic Care Model : A Qualitative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoorenberg, Sophie L. W.; Wynia, Klaske; Fokkens, Andrea S.; Slotman, Karin; Kremer, Hubertus P. H.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Integrated care models aim to solve the problem of fragmented and poorly coordinated care in current healthcare systems. These models aim to be patient-centered by providing continuous and coordinated care and by considering the needs and preferences of patients. The objective of this stu

  3. Systematic Methodology for Reproducible Optimizing Batch Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonné, Dennis; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents a systematic methodology for rapid acquirement of discrete-time state space model representations of batch processes based on their historical operation data. These state space models are parsimoniously parameterized as a set of local, interdependent models. The present....... This controller may also be used for Optimizing control. The modeling and control performance is demonstrated on a fed-batch protein cultivation example. The presented methodologies lend themselves directly for application as Process Analytical Technologies (PAT)....

  4. Qualitative Tourism Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buda, Dorina; Martini, Annaclaudia; Garcia, Luis-Manuel; Lowry, Linda

    Conducting qualitative research in tourism studies entails engaging with an entire approach, a set of methods that shape project design, conceptual frameworks, data analysis, and anticipated outcomes. Standard qualitative methods are individual interviews, focus groups and ethnography. Solicited

  5. Ratio-scaling of listener preference of multichannel reproduced sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choisel, Sylvain; Wickelmaier, Florian

    2005-01-01

    , stereo and various multichannel formats) served as stimuli. On each trial, the task of the subjects was to choose the format they preferred, proceeding through all the possible pairs of the eight reproduction modes. This experiment was replicated with four types of programme material (pop and classical......-trivial assumption in the case of complex spatial sounds. In the present study the Bradley-Terry-Luce (BTL) model was employed to investigate the unidimensionality of preference judgments made by 40 listeners on multichannel reproduced sound. Short musical excerpts played back in eight reproduction modes (mono...... music). As a main result, the BTL model was found to predict the choice frequencies well. This implies that listeners were able to integrate the complex nature of the sounds into a unidimensional preference judgment. It further implies the existence of a preference scale on which the reproduction modes...

  6. The Vienna LTE simulators - Enabling reproducibility in wireless communications research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehlführer Christian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, we introduce MATLAB-based link and system level simulation environments for UMTS Long-Term Evolution (LTE. The source codes of both simulators are available under an academic non-commercial use license, allowing researchers full access to standard-compliant simulation environments. Owing to the open source availability, the simulators enable reproducible research in wireless communications and comparison of novel algorithms. In this study, we explain how link and system level simulations are connected and show how the link level simulator serves as a reference to design the system level simulator. We compare the accuracy of the PHY modeling at system level by means of simulations performed both with bit-accurate link level simulations and PHY-model-based system level simulations. We highlight some of the currently most interesting research questions for LTE, and explain by some research examples how our simulators can be applied.

  7. Reversible and Reproducible Giant Universal Electroresistance Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SYED Rizwan; ZHANG Sen; YU Tian; ZHAO Yong-Gang; ZHANG Shu-Feng; HAN Xiu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    After the prediction of the giant electroresistance effect, much work has been carried out to find this effect in practical devices. We demonstrate a novel way to obtain a large electroresistance (ER) effect in the multilayer system at room temperature. The current-in-plane (CIP) electric transport measurement is performed on the multilayer structure consisting of (011)-Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3(PMN-PT)/Ta/Al-O/metal. It is found that the resistance of the top metallic layer shows a hysteretic behavior as a function electric field, which corresponds well with the substrate polarization versus electric Reid (P-E) loop. This reversible hysteretic R-E behavior is independent of the applied magnetic field as well as the magnetic structure of the top metallic layer and keeps its memory state. This novel memory effect is attributed to the polarization reversal induced electrostatic potential, which is felt throughout the multilayer stack and is enhanced by the dielectric Al-O layer producing unique hysteretic, reversible, and reproducible resistance switching behavior. This novel universal electroresistance effect will open a new gateway to the development of future multiferroic memory devices operating at room temperature.%After the prediction of the giant electroresistance effect,much work has been carried out to find this effect in practical devices.We demonstrate a novel way to obtain a large electroresistance (ER) effect in the multilayer system at room temperature.The current-in-plane (CIP) electric transport measurement is performed on the multilayer structure consisting of (011)-Pb(Mg1/3 Nb2/3) O3-PbTiO3 (PMN-PT)/Ta/Al-O/metal.It is found that the resistance of the top metallic layer shows a hysteretic behavior as a function electric field,which corresponds well with the substrate polarization versus electric field (P-E) loop.This reversible hysteretic R-E behavior is independent of the applied magnetic field as well as the magnetic structure of the top metallic

  8. The qualitative research proposal

    OpenAIRE

    H Klopper

    2008-01-01

    Qualitative research in the health sciences has had to overcome many prejudices and a number of misunderstandings, but today qualitative research is as acceptable as quantitative research designs and is widely funded and published. Writing the proposal of a qualitative study, however, can be a challenging feat, due to the emergent nature of the qualitative research design and the description of the methodology as a process. Even today, many sub-standard proposals at post-graduate evaluation c...

  9. Qualitative risk assessment in a data-scarce environment: a model to assess the impact of control measures on spread of African Swine Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Barbara; Dhollander, Sofie; Salman, Mo; Koenen, Frank

    2011-04-01

    In the absence of data, qualitative risk assessment frameworks have proved useful to assess risks associated with animal health diseases. As part of a scientific opinion for the European Commission (EC) on African Swine Fever (ASF), a working group of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) assessed the risk of ASF remaining endemic in Trans Caucasus Countries (TCC) and the Russian Federation (RF) and the risk of ASF becoming endemic in the EU if disease were introduced. The aim was to develop a tool to evaluate how current control or preventive measures mitigate the risk of spread and giving decision makers the means to review how strengthening of surveillance and control measures would mitigate the risk of disease spread. Based on a generic model outlining disease introduction, spread and endemicity in a region, the impact of risk mitigation measures on spread of disease was assessed for specific risk questions. The resulting hierarchical models consisted of key steps containing several sub-steps. For each step of the risk pathways risk estimates were determined by the expert group based on existing data or through expert opinion elicitation. Risk estimates were combined using two different combination matrices, one to combine estimates of independent steps and one to combine conditional probabilities. The qualitative risk assessment indicated a moderate risk that ASF will remain endemic in current affected areas in the TCC and RF and a high risk of spread to currently unaffected areas. If introduced into the EU, ASF is likely to be controlled effectively in the production sector with high or limited biosecurity. In the free range production sector, however, there is a moderate risk of ASF becoming endemic due to wild boar contact, non-compliance with animal movement bans, and difficult access to all individual pigs upon implementation of control measures. This study demonstrated the advantages of a systematic framework to assist an expert panel to carry out a

  10. Prion pathogenesis is faithfully reproduced in cerebellar organotypic slice cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeppe Falsig

    Full Text Available Prions cause neurodegeneration in vivo, yet prion-infected cultured cells do not show cytotoxicity. This has hampered mechanistic studies of prion-induced neurodegeneration. Here we report that prion-infected cultured organotypic cerebellar slices (COCS experienced progressive spongiform neurodegeneration closely reproducing prion disease, with three different prion strains giving rise to three distinct patterns of prion protein deposition. Neurodegeneration did not occur when PrP was genetically removed from neurons, and a comprehensive pharmacological screen indicated that neurodegeneration was abrogated by compounds known to antagonize prion replication. Prion infection of COCS and mice led to enhanced fodrin cleavage, suggesting the involvement of calpains or caspases in pathogenesis. Accordingly, neurotoxicity and fodrin cleavage were prevented by calpain inhibitors but not by caspase inhibitors, whereas prion replication proceeded unimpeded. Hence calpain inhibition can uncouple prion replication from its neurotoxic sequelae. These data validate COCS as a powerful model system that faithfully reproduces most morphological hallmarks of prion infections. The exquisite accessibility of COCS to pharmacological manipulations was instrumental in recognizing the role of calpains in neurotoxicity, and significantly extends the collection of tools necessary for rigorously dissecting prion pathogenesis.