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Sample records for model protein lysozyme

  1. Poly lactic acid based injectable delivery systems for controlled release of a model protein, lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tahami, Khaled; Meyer, Amanda; Singh, Jagdish

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the critical formulation parameters (i.e., polymer concentration, polymer molecular weight, and solvent nature) affecting the controlled delivery of a model protein, lysozyme, from injectable polymeric implants. The conformational stability and biological activity of the released lysozyme were also investigated. Three formulations containing 10%, 20%, and 30% (w/v) poly lactic acid (PLA) in triacetin were investigated. It was found that increasing polymer concentration in the formulations led to a lower burst effect and a slower release rate. Formulation with a high molecular weight polymer showed a greater burst effect as compared to those containing low molecular weight. Conformational stability and biological activity of released samples were studied by differential scanning calorimeter and enzyme activity assay, respectively. The released samples had significantly (P solution kept at same conditions). Increasing polymer concentration increased both the conformational stability and the biological activity of released lysozyme. In conclusion, phase sensitive polymer-based delivery systems were able to deliver a model protein, lysozyme, in a conformationally stable and biologically active form at a controlled rate over an extended period.

  2. Pyroelectricity in globular protein lysozyme films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, A.; Noor, M. R.; Haq, E. U.; Silien, C.; Soulimane, T.; Tofail, S. A. M.

    2018-03-01

    Pyroelectricity is the ability of certain non-centrosymmetric materials to generate an electric charge in response to a change in temperature and finds use in a range of applications from burglar alarms to thermal imaging. Some biological materials also exhibit pyroelectricity but the examples of the effect are limited to fibrous proteins, polypeptides, and tissues and organs of animals and plants. Here, we report pyroelectricity in polycrystalline aggregate films of lysozyme, a globular protein.

  3. Electrostatic interactions in protein adsorption probed by comparing lysozyme and succinylated lysozyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der M.; Norde, W.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of electrostatic interactions on protein adsorption was studied by comparing the adsorption of lysozyme and succinylated lysozyme at silica surfaces. The succinylation affects the charge of the protein, but also the stability. Although changes in stability can have an influence on

  4. Laser ablation of the lysozyme protein: a model system for soft materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Matei, Andreea; Constantinescu, Catalin

    .3 1015 molecules per pulse. This is perhaps one of the highest ablation yields ever measured. Films with a significant number of intact lysozyme molecules have been produced by PLD (pulsed laser deposition) and MAPLE (Matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation). The deposition of intact molecules...... is expected in MAPLE, but is surprising in PLD, where a high degree of thermal fragmentation is typically required for generation of a sufficient amount of volatile decomposition products that drive the transfer of molecules to the film substrate. The experimental results will be discussed based...

  5. Laser ablation of the protein lysozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela; Amoruso, Salvatore

    produced thin films of average thickness up to 300 nm, which not only contained a significant amount of intact molecules, but also maintained the bioactivity. These films were produced by a nanosecond laser in the UV regime at 355 nm with 2 J/cm2. The surprising fact that these molecules can be transferred......Lysozyme is a well-known protein, which is used in food processing because of its bactericidal properties. The mass (14307 amu) is in the range in which it easily can be monitored by mass spectrometric methods, for example by MALDI (Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization). We have recently...... to a substrate as intact molecules by the violent laser impact ( up to 50 mJ/pulse) has not yet been understood. One issue is that up to 150 ng/pulse is removed by the laser, and much of the material is ejected from the target in relatively large chunks. We have explored as well the excitation mechanics by laser...

  6. The direct piezoelectric effect in the globular protein lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, A.; Noor, M. R.; Sweeney, J.; Casey, V.; Kholkin, A. L.; Silien, C.; Gandhi, A. A.; Soulimane, T.; Tofail, S. A. M.

    2017-10-01

    Here, we present experimental evidence of the direct piezoelectric effect in the globular protein, lysozyme. Piezoelectric materials are employed in many actuating and sensing applications because they can convert mechanical energy into electrical energy and vice versa. Although originally studied in inorganic materials, several biological materials including amino acids and bone, also exhibit piezoelectricity. The exact mechanisms supporting biological piezoelectricity are not known, nor is it known whether biological piezoelectricity conforms strictly to the criteria of classical piezoelectricity. The observation of piezoelectricity in protein crystals presented here links biological piezoelectricity with the classical theory of piezoelectricity. We quantify the direct piezoelectric effect in monoclinic and tetragonal aggregate films of lysozyme using conventional techniques based on the Berlincourt Method. The largest piezoelectric effect measured in a crystalline aggregate film of lysozyme was approximately 6.5 pC N-1. These findings raise fundamental questions as to the possible physiological significance of piezoelectricity in lysozyme and the potential for technical applications.

  7. Towards absolute quantification of allergenic proteins in food--lysozyme in wine as a model system for metrologically traceable mass spectrometric methods and certified reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryar, Adam; Pritchard, Caroline; Burkitt, William; Walker, Michael; O'Connor, Gavin; Burns, Duncan Thorburn; Quaglia, Milena

    2013-01-01

    Current routine food allergen quantification methods, which are based on immunochemistry, offer high sensitivity but can suffer from issues of specificity and significant variability of results. MS approaches have been developed, but currently lack metrological traceability. A feasibility study on the application of metrologically traceable MS-based reference procedures was undertaken. A proof of concept involving proteolytic digestion and isotope dilution MS for quantification of protein allergens in a food matrix was undertaken using lysozyme in wine as a model system. A concentration of lysozyme in wine of 0.95 +/- 0.03 microg/g was calculated based on the concentrations of two peptides, confirming that this type of analysis is viable at allergenically meaningful concentrations. The challenges associated with this promising method were explored; these included peptide stability, chemical modification, enzymatic digestion, and sample cleanup. The method is suitable for the production of allergen in food certified reference materials, which together with the achieved understanding of the effects of sample preparation and of the matrix on the final results, will assist in addressing the bias of the techniques routinely used and improve measurement confidence. Confirmation of the feasibility of MS methods for absolute quantification of an allergenic protein in a food matrix with results traceable to the International System of Units is a step towards meaningful comparison of results for allergen proteins among laboratories. This approach will also underpin risk assessment and risk management of allergens in the food industry, and regulatory compliance of the use of thresholds or action levels when adopted.

  8. Characterizing protein activities on the lysozyme and nanodiamond complex prepared for bio applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perevedentseva, E; Cai, P-J; Chiu, Y-C; Cheng, C-L

    2011-02-01

    Recently, nanodiamond particles have attracted increasing attention as a promising nanomaterial for its biocompatibility, easy functionalization and conjugation with biomolecules, and its superb physical/chemical properties. Nanodiamonds are mainly used as markers for cell imaging, using its fluorescence or Raman signals for detection, and as carriers for drug delivery. For the success of these applications, the biomolecule associated with the nanodiamond has to retain its functionality. In this work, the protein activities of egg white lysozyme adsorbed on nanodiamond particles of different sizes is investigated. The lysozyme nanodiamond complex is used here as a protein model for analyzing its structural conformation changes and, correspondingly, its enzymatic activity after the adsorption. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) is used for the analysis of the sensitive protein secondary structure. To access the activities of the adsorbed lysozyme, a fluorescence-based assay is used. The process of adsorption is also analyzed using UV-visible spectroscopic measurements in combination with analysis of nanodiamond properties with FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, and ζ-potential measurements. It is found that the activity of lysozyme upon adsorption depends on the nanodiamond's size and surface properties, and that the nanodiamond particles can be selected and treated, which do not alter the lysozyme functional properties. Such nanodiamonds can be considered convenient nanoparticles for various bioapplications.

  9. Interaction of lysozyme protein with different sized silica nanoparticles and their resultant structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Indresh, E-mail: iykumarindresh288@gmail.com; Aswal, V. K. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kohlbrecher, J. [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 PSI Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-05-23

    The interaction of model protein-lysozyme with three different sized anionic silica nanoparticles has been studied by UV-vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The surface area and curvature of the nanoparticles change with size, which significantly influence their interaction with protein. The lysozyme adsorbs on the surface of the nanoparticles due to electrostatic attraction and leads to the phase transformation from one phase (clear) to two-phase (turbid) of the nanoparticle-protein system. The dominance of lysozyme induced short-range attraction over long-range electrostatic repulsion between nanoparticles is responsible for phase transformation and modeled by the two-Yukawa potential. The magnitude of the attractive interaction increases with the size of the nanoparticles as a result the phase transformation commences relatively at lower concentration of lysozyme. The structure of the nanoparticle-protein system in two-phase is characterized by the diffusion limited aggregate type of mass fractal morphology.

  10. Structural basis of protein oxidation resistance: a lysozyme study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Girod

    Full Text Available Accumulation of oxidative damage in proteins correlates with aging since it can cause irreversible and progressive degeneration of almost all cellular functions. Apparently, native protein structures have evolved intrinsic resistance to oxidation since perfectly folded proteins are, by large most robust. Here we explore the structural basis of protein resistance to radiation-induced oxidation using chicken egg white lysozyme in the native and misfolded form. We study the differential resistance to oxidative damage of six different parts of native and misfolded lysozyme by a targeted tandem/mass spectrometry approach of its tryptic fragments. The decay of the amount of each lysozyme fragment with increasing radiation dose is found to be a two steps process, characterized by a double exponential evolution of their amounts: the first one can be largely attributed to oxidation of specific amino acids, while the second one corresponds to further degradation of the protein. By correlating these results to the structural parameters computed from molecular dynamics (MD simulations, we find the protein parts with increased root-mean-square deviation (RMSD to be more susceptible to modifications. In addition, involvement of amino acid side-chains in hydrogen bonds has a protective effect against oxidation Increased exposure to solvent of individual amino acid side chains correlates with high susceptibility to oxidative and other modifications like side chain fragmentation. Generally, while none of the structural parameters alone can account for the fate of peptides during radiation, together they provide an insight into the relationship between protein structure and susceptibility to oxidation.

  11. Anisotropy of the Coulomb Interaction between Folded Proteins: Consequences for Mesoscopic Aggregation of Lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ho Yin; Lankevich, Vladimir; Vekilov, Peter G.; Lubchenko, Vassiliy

    2012-01-01

    Toward quantitative description of protein aggregation, we develop a computationally efficient method to evaluate the potential of mean force between two folded protein molecules that allows for complete sampling of their mutual orientation. Our model is valid at moderate ionic strengths and accounts for the actual charge distribution on the surface of the molecules, the dielectric discontinuity at the protein-solvent interface, and the possibility of protonation or deprotonation of surface residues induced by the electric field due to the other protein molecule. We apply the model to the protein lysozyme, whose solutions exhibit both mesoscopic clusters of protein-rich liquid and liquid-liquid separation; the former requires that protein form complexes with typical lifetimes of approximately milliseconds. We find the electrostatic repulsion is typically lower than the prediction of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory. The Coulomb interaction in the lowest-energy docking configuration is nonrepulsive, despite the high positive charge on the molecules. Typical docking configurations barely involve protonation or deprotonation of surface residues. The obtained potential of mean force between folded lysozyme molecules is consistent with the location of the liquid-liquid coexistence, but produces dimers that are too short-lived for clusters to exist, suggesting lysozyme undergoes conformational changes during cluster formation. PMID:22768950

  12. Size-dependent interaction of silica nanoparticles with lysozyme and bovine serum albumin proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Indresh; Aswal, Vinod K.; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of three different sized (diameter 10, 18, and 28 nm) anionic silica nanoparticles with two model proteins—cationic lysozyme [molecular weight (MW) 14.7 kDa)] and anionic bovine serum albumin (BSA) (MW 66.4 kDa) has been studied by UV-vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The adsorption behavior of proteins on the nanoparticles, measured by UV-vis spectroscopy, is found to be very different for lysozyme and BSA. Lysozyme adsorbs strongly on the nanoparticles and shows exponential behavior as a function of lysozyme concentration irrespective of the nanoparticle size. The total amount of adsorbed lysozyme, as governed by the surface-to-volume ratio, increases on lowering the size of the nanoparticles for a fixed volume fraction of the nanoparticles. On the other hand, BSA does not show any adsorption for all the different sizes of the nanoparticles. Despite having different interactions, both proteins induce similar phase behavior where the nanoparticle-protein system transforms from one phase (clear) to two phase (turbid) as a function of protein concentration. The phase behavior is modified towards the lower concentrations for both proteins with increasing the nanoparticle size. DLS suggests that the phase behavior arises as a result of the nanoparticles' aggregation on the addition of proteins. The size-dependent modifications in the interaction potential, responsible for the phase behavior, have been determined by SANS data as modeled using the two-Yukawa potential accounting for the repulsive and attractive interactions in the systems. The protein-induced interaction between the nanoparticles is found to be short-range attraction for lysozyme and long-range attraction for BSA. The magnitude of attractive interaction irrespective of protein type is enhanced with increase in the size of the nanoparticles. The total (attractive+repulsive) potential leading to two-phase formation is found to be

  13. Phase behavior of mixtures of oppositely charged nanoparticles: Heterogeneous Poisson-Boltzmann cell model applied to lysozyme and succinylated lysozyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Lindhoud, S.; Vries, de R.J.; Stuart, M.A.C.

    2006-01-01

    We study the phase behavior of mixtures of oppositely charged nanoparticles, both theoretically and experimentally. As an experimental model system we consider mixtures of lysozyme and lysozyme that has been chemically modified in such a way that its charge is nearly equal in magnitude but opposite

  14. Analysis of two lysozyme genes and antimicrobial functions of their recombinant proteins in Asian seabass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui Hong Fu

    Full Text Available Lysozymes are important proteins of the innate immune system for the defense against bacterial infection. We cloned and analyzed chicken-type (c-type and goose-type (g-type lysozymes from Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer. The deduced amino acid sequence of the c-type lysozyme contained 144 residues and possessed typical structure residues, conserved catalytic residues (Glu(50 and Asp(67 and a "GSTDYGIFQINS" motif. The deduced g-type lysozyme contained 187 residues and possessed a goose egg white lysozyme (GEWL domain containing three conserved catalytic residues (Glu(71, Asp(84, Asp(95 essential for catalytic activity. Real time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR revealed that the two lysozyme genes were constitutively expressed in all the examined tissues. The c-type lysozyme was most abundant in liver, while the g-type lysozyme was predominantly expressed in intestine and weakly expressed in muscle. The c-type and g-type transcripts were up-regulated in the kidney, spleen and liver in response to a challenge with Vibrio harveyi. The up-regulation of the c-type lysozyme was much stronger than that of the g-type lysozyme in kidney and spleen. The recombinant proteins of the c-type and g-type lysozymes showed lytic activities against the bacterial pathogens Vibrio harveyi and Photobacterium damselae in a dosage-dependent manner. We identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the two lysozyme genes. There were significant associations of these polymorphisms with resistance to the big belly disease. These results suggest that the c- and g-type genes play an important role in resistance to bacterial pathogens in fish. The SNP markers in the two genes associated with the resistance to bacterial pathogens may facilitate the selection of Asian seabass resistant to bacterial diseases.

  15. The antibacterial protein lysozyme identified as the termite egg recognition pheromone.

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    Kenji Matsuura

    Full Text Available Social insects rely heavily on pheromone communication to maintain their sociality. Egg protection is one of the most fundamental social behaviours in social insects. The recent discovery of the termite-egg mimicking fungus 'termite-ball' and subsequent studies on termite egg protection behaviour have shown that termites can be manipulated by using the termite egg recognition pheromone (TERP, which strongly evokes the egg-carrying and -grooming behaviours of workers. Despite the great scientific and economic importance, TERP has not been identified because of practical difficulties. Herein we identified the antibacterial protein lysozyme as the TERP. We isolated the target protein using ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and the MALDI-TOF MS analysis showed a molecular size of 14.5 kDa. We found that the TERP provided antibacterial activity against a gram-positive bacterium. Among the currently known antimicrobial proteins, the molecular size of 14.5 kDa limits the target to lysozyme. Termite lysozymes obtained from eggs and salivary glands, and even hen egg lysozyme, showed a strong termite egg recognition activity. Besides eggs themselves, workers also supply lysozyme to eggs through frequent egg-grooming, by which egg surfaces are coated with saliva containing lysozyme. Reverse transcript PCR analysis showed that mRNA of termite lysozyme was expressed in both salivary glands and eggs. Western blot analysis confirmed that lysozyme production begins in immature eggs in queen ovaries. This is the first identification of proteinaceous pheromone in social insects. Researchers have focused almost exclusively on hydrocarbons when searching for recognition pheromones in social insects. The present finding of a proteinaceous pheromone represents a major step forward in, and result in the broadening of, the search for recognition pheromones. This novel function of lysozyme as a termite pheromone illuminates the profound influence

  16. Model-free methods of analyzing domain motions in proteins from simulation : A comparison of normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation of lysozyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayward, S.; Kitao, A.; Berendsen, H.J.C.

    Model-free methods are introduced to determine quantities pertaining to protein domain motions from normal mode analyses and molecular dynamics simulations, For the normal mode analysis, the methods are based on the assumption that in low frequency modes, domain motions can be well approximated by

  17. Pulsed laser deposition of the lysozyme protein: an unexpected “Inverse MAPLE” process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Matei, Andreea; Constantinescu, Catalin

    2012-01-01

    Films of organic materials are commonly deposited by laser assisted methods, such as MAPLE (matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation), where a few percent of the film material in the target is protected by a light-absorbing volatile matrix. Another possibility is to irradiate the dry organic...... the ejection and deposition of lysozyme. This can be called an “inverse MAPLE” process, since the ratio of “matrix” to film material in the target is 10:90, which is inverse of the typical MAPLE process where the film material is dissolved in the matrix down to several wt.%. Lysozyme is a well-known protein...

  18. A more clear insight of the lysozyme crystal composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Ulrich, J. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Zentrum fuer Ingenieurswissenschaften, Verfahrenstechnik/TVT, 06099 Halle Saale (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    Crystallization can be used as a purification method for proteins. Lysozyme was chosen as a model substance. Changing crystallization conditions will lead as shown to different lysozyme crystal morphologies with different properties. Beside others, lysozyme crystals can show a Tetragonal, High Temperature and Low Temperature Orthorhombic crystal morphology. Experiments such as conductivity measurements, pH tests, chloride detection tests, experiments using methylene blue as a dye and dissolution experiments were carried out to investigate the composition of the lysozyme crystals. It is proven that lysozyme crystals are made up of the initial buffer solution components: lysozyme (the protein), water which is part of the crystal lattice, salt ions which are attached to the protein molecule and voids filled with the buffer solution containing the crystallization agent (e.g. salt). Interesting dissolution behaviours of the lysozyme crystals were observed which are not described so far elsewhere (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Pulsed electric field (PEF)-induced aggregation between lysozyme, ovalbumin and ovotransferrin in multi-protein system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li; Zhao, Wei; Yang, Ruijin; Yan, Wenxu

    2015-05-15

    The aggregation of multi-proteins is of great interest in food processing and a good understanding of the formation of aggregates during PEF processing is needed for the application of the process to pasteurize protein-based foods. The aggregates formation of a multi-protein system (containing ovalbumin, ovotransferrin and lysozyme) was studied through turbidity, size exclusion chromatography and SDS-PAGE patterns for interaction studies and binding forces. Results from size exclusion chromatography indicated that there was no soluble aggregates formed during PEF processing. The existence of lysozyme was important to form insoluble aggregates in the chosen ovalbumin solution. The results of SDS-PAGE patterns indicated that lysozyme was prone to precipitate, and was relatively the higher component of aggregates. Citric acid could be effective in inhibiting lysozyme from interacting with other proteins during PEF processing. Blocking the free sulphydryl by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) did not affect aggregation inhibition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Importance of the CMAP Correction to the CHARMM22 Protein Force Field: Dynamics of Hen Lysozyme

    OpenAIRE

    Buck, Matthias; Bouguet-Bonnet, Sabine; Pastor, Richard W.; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2005-01-01

    The recently developed CMAP correction to the CHARMM22 force field (C22) is evaluated from 25 ns molecular dynamics simulations on hen lysozyme. Substantial deviations from experimental backbone root mean-square fluctuations and N-H NMR order parameters obtained in the C22 trajectories (especially in the loops) are eliminated by the CMAP correction. Thus, the C22/CMAP force field yields improved dynamical and structural properties of proteins in molecular dynamics simulations.

  1. Small-angle neutron scattering study of differences in phase behavior of silica nanoparticles in the presence of lysozyme and bovine serum albumin proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Indresh; Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2014-03-01

    The differences in phase behavior of anionic silica nanoparticles (88 Å) in the presence of two globular proteins [cationic lysozyme (molecular weight (MW) 14.7 kD) and anionic bovine serum albumin (BSA) (MW 66.4 kD)] have been studied by small-angle neutron scattering. The measurements were carried out on a fixed concentration (1 wt %) of Ludox silica nanoparticles with varying concentrations of proteins (0-5 wt %) at pH = 7. It is found that, despite having different natures (opposite charges), both proteins can render to the same kind of aggregation of silica nanoparticles. However, the concentration regions over which the aggregation is observed are widely different for the two proteins. Lysozyme with very small amounts (e.g., 0.01 wt %) leads to the aggregation of silica nanoparticles. On the other hand, silica nanoparticles coexist with BSA as independent entities at low protein concentrations and turn to aggregates at high protein concentrations (>1 wt %). In the case of lysozyme, the charge neutralization by the protein on the nanoparticles gives rise to the protein-mediated aggregation of the nanoparticles. The nanoparticle aggregates coexist with unaggregated nanoparticles at low protein concentrations, whereas, they coexist with a free protein at higher protein concentrations. For BSA, the nonadsorbing nature of the protein produces the depletion force that causes the aggregation of the nanoparticles at higher protein concentrations. The evolution of the interaction is modeled by the two Yukawa potential, taking account of both attractive and repulsive terms of the interaction in these systems. The nanoparticle aggregation is found to be governed by the short-range attraction for lysozyme and the long-range attraction for BSA. The aggregates are characterized by the diffusion limited aggregate type of mass fractal morphology.

  2. Evaluation of lysozyme, complement C3, and total protein in different developmental stages of Caspian kutum (Rutilus frisii kutum K.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollahi Razieh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, non–specific immune parameters in fertilized eggs, eyed embryos, larvae 10, 25, 50, 60, and 70 days post hatch (DPH, and female broodstock of Caspian kutum, Rutilus frisii kutum (Kamensky, were evaluated. The lysozyme activity, complement C3, and total protein levels were measured with the turbidimetric, immunoturbidimetric, and Bradford methods, respectively. The results showed that lysozyme levels decreased from levels noted in the fertilized eggs until the larvae were 10 days old. Subsequently, significant increases in lysozyme levels were observed until 70 DPH. An increasing trend of complement component C3 was noted from the levels in fertilized eggs to 10 DPH, following which it decreased significantly. Total protein levels differed significantly in early developmental stages of Caspian kutum. The higher values of complement component C3 than of lysozyme in the early life stages could be indicative of the former’s more fundamental role.

  3. Interaction of lysozyme with a tear film lipid layer model: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wizert, Alicja; Iskander, D Robert; Cwiklik, Lukasz

    2017-12-01

    The tear film is a thin multilayered structure covering the cornea. Its outermost layer is a lipid film underneath of which resides on an aqueous layer. This tear film lipid layer (TFLL) is itself a complex structure, formed by both polar and nonpolar lipids. It was recently suggested that due to tear film dynamics, TFLL contains inhomogeneities in the form of polar lipid aggregates. The aqueous phase of tear film contains lachrymal-origin proteins, whereby lysozyme is the most abundant. These proteins can alter TFLL properties, mainly by reducing its surface tension. However, a detailed nature of protein-lipid interactions in tear film is not known. We investigate the interactions of lysozyme with TFLL in molecular details by employing coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. We demonstrate that lysozyme, due to lateral restructuring of TFLL, is able to penetrate the tear lipid film embedded in inverse micellar aggregates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Lactoferrin, myeloperoxidase, lysozyme and eosinophil cationic protein in exudate in delayed type hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, A; Bisgaard, H; Christensen, J D

    1988-01-01

    allergic patients with nickel challenge in the chamber medium showed a time-dependent increase of mononuclear cells, eosinophils and basophils and a concomitant decrease of polymorphonuclear granulocytes, characteristic of a combined specific and unspecific inflammation. The morphology of the exudate...... in contact allergic patients exposed to nickel showed a dominance of polymorphonuclear granulocytes throughout the study period, while mononuclear cells, eosinophils and basophils were detected at a much lower quantity and with a considerable delay. Further, we studied the kinetics of the leucocyte granule...... proteins: lactoferrin, myeloperoxidase, lysozyme and eosinophil cationic protein in exudate fluid in a parallel test. A significant higher flux was found for all during the second day of allergen exposure compared to contact allergic patients without allergen challenge as well as normal volunteers...

  5. An improved 96-well turbidity assay for T4 lysozyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Tasha B; Nguyen, Thao P; Watt, Terry J

    2015-01-01

    T4 lysozyme (T4L) is an important model system for investigating the relationship between protein structure and function. Despite being extensively studied, a reliable, quantitative activity assay for T4L has not been developed. Here, we present an improved T4L turbidity assay as well as an affinity-based T4L expression and purification protocol. This assay is designed for 96-well format and utilizes conditions amenable for both T4L and other lysozymes. This protocol enables easy, efficient, and quantitative characterization of T4L variants and allows comparison between different lysozymes. Our method: •Is applicable for all lysozymes, with enhanced sensitivity for T4 lysozyme compared to other 96-well plate turbidity assays;•Utilizes standardized conditions for comparing T4 lysozyme variants and other lysozymes; and•Incorporates a simplified expression and purification protocol for T4 lysozyme.

  6. The Effects of the Recombinant CCR5 T4 Lysozyme Fusion Protein on HIV-1 Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingwen Jin

    Full Text Available Insertion of T4 lysozyme (T4L into the GPCR successfully enhanced GPCR protein stability and solubilization. However, the biological functions of the recombinant GPCR protein have not been analyzed.We engineered the CCR5-T4L mutant and expressed and purified the soluble recombinant protein using an E.coli expression system. The antiviral effects of this recombinant protein in THP-1 cell lines, primary human macrophages, and PBMCs from different donors were investigated. We also explored the possible mechanisms underlying the observed antiviral effects.Our data showed the biphasic inhibitory and promotion effects of different concentrations of soluble recombinant CCR5-T4L protein on R5 tropic human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 infection in THP-1 cell lines, human macrophages, and PBMCs from clinical isolates. We demonstrated that soluble recombinant CCR5-T4L acts as a HIV-1 co-receptor, interacts with wild type CCR5, down-regulates the surface CCR5 expression in human macrophages, and interacts with CCL5 to inhibit macrophage migration. Using binding assays, we further determined that recombinant CCR5-T4L and [125I]-CCL5 compete for the same binding site on wild type CCR5.Our results suggest that recombinant CCR5-T4L protein marginally promotes HIV-1 infection at low concentrations and markedly inhibits infection at higher concentrations. This recombinant protein may be helpful in the future development of anti-HIV-1 therapeutic agents.

  7. Imaging transport phenomena during lysozyme protein crystal growth by the hanging drop technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethia Gupta, Anamika; Gupta, Rajive; Panigrahi, P. K.; Muralidhar, K.

    2013-06-01

    The present study reports the transport process that occurs during the growth of lysozyme protein crystals by the hanging drop technique. A rainbow schlieren technique has been employed for imaging changes in salt concentration. A one dimensional color filter is used to record the deflection of the light beam. An optical microscope and an X-ray crystallography unit are used to characterize the size, tetragonal shape and Bravais lattice constants of the grown crystals. A parametric study on the effect of drop composition, drop size, reservoir height and number of drops on the crystal size and quality is reported. Changes in refractive index are not large enough to create a meaningful schlieren image in the air gap between the drop and the reservoir. However, condensation of fresh water over the reservoir solution creates large changes in the concentration of NaCl, giving rise to clear color patterns in the schlieren images. These have been analyzed to obtain salt concentration profiles near the free surface of the reservoir solution as a function of time. The diffusion of fresh water into the reservoir solution at the early stages of crystal growth followed by the mass flux of salt from the bulk solution towards the free surface has been recorded. The overall crystal growth process can be classified into two regimes, as demarcated by the changes in slope of salt concentration within the reservoir. The salt concentration in the reservoir equilibrates at long times when the crystallization process is complete. Thus, transport processes in the reservoir emerge as the route to monitor protein crystal growth in the hanging drop configuration. Results show that crystal growth rate is faster for a higher lysozyme concentration, smaller drops, and larger reservoir heights.

  8. The interaction of the protein lysozyme with bacteria E. coli observed using nanodiamond labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perevedentseva, Elena; Cheng, C-Y; Chung, P-H; Tu, J-S; Hsieh, Y-H; Cheng, C-L

    2007-01-01

    The application of a nanometre-sized diamond in Raman-detectable biolabelling is demonstrated in this study. The interaction of a lysozyme-nanodiamond complex with bacteria E. coli was observed via Raman mapping using the diamond Raman signal as the labelling marker. The results are compared with scanning electron microscope observations, and the adsorbed lysozyme's functionality is analysed. High antibacterial activity of lysozyme-nanodiamond complex was observed, equivalent to active lysozyme in solution. The results suggest that nanodiamond labelling can be effective and that it can be applied in ambient conditions without complicated sample pre-treatments

  9. The interaction of the protein lysozyme with bacteria E. coli observed using nanodiamond labelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perevedentseva, Elena; Cheng, C-Y; Chung, P-H; Tu, J-S; Hsieh, Y-H; Cheng, C-L [Department of Physics, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China)

    2007-08-08

    The application of a nanometre-sized diamond in Raman-detectable biolabelling is demonstrated in this study. The interaction of a lysozyme-nanodiamond complex with bacteria E. coli was observed via Raman mapping using the diamond Raman signal as the labelling marker. The results are compared with scanning electron microscope observations, and the adsorbed lysozyme's functionality is analysed. High antibacterial activity of lysozyme-nanodiamond complex was observed, equivalent to active lysozyme in solution. The results suggest that nanodiamond labelling can be effective and that it can be applied in ambient conditions without complicated sample pre-treatments.

  10. Protein dynamics by neutron scattering: The protein dynamical transition and the fragile-to-strong dynamical crossover in hydrated lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magazù, Salvatore; Migliardo, Federica; Benedetto, Antonio; Vertessy, Beata

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The role played by the instrumental energy resolution in neutron scattering is presented. • The effect of natural bioprotectants on protein dynamics is shown. • A connection between the protein dynamical transition and the fragile-to-strong dynamical crossover is formulated. - Abstract: In this work Elastic Incoherent Neutron Scattering (EINS) results on lysozyme water mixtures in absence and in presence of bioprotectant systems are presented. The EINS data have been collected by using the IN13 and the IN10 spectrometers at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL, Grenoble, France) allowing to evaluate the temperature behaviour of the mean square displacement and of the relaxation time for the investigated systems. The obtained experimental findings together with theoretical calculations allow to put into evidence the role played by the spectrometer resolution and to clarify the connexion between the registered protein dynamical transition, the system relaxation time, and the instrumental energy resolution

  11. Crystallization and evaluation of hen egg-white lysozyme crystals for protein pH titration in the crystalline state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Wakari; Yagi, Daichi; Ishikawa, Takuya; Ohnishi, Yuki; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo

    2008-05-01

    To observe the ionized status of the amino acid residues in proteins at different pH (protein pH titration in the crystalline state) by neutron diffraction, hen egg-white lysozyme was crystallized over a wide pH range (2.5-8.0). Crystallization phase diagrams at pH 2.5, 6.0 and 7.5 were determined. At pH diagram, and at pH > 4.5 the border shifted to the right (higher precipitant concentration). The qualities of these crystals were characterized using the Wilson plot method. The qualities of all crystals at different pH were more or less equivalent (B-factor values within 25-40). It is expected that neutron diffraction analysis of these crystals of different pH provides equivalent data in quality for discussions of protein pH titration in the crystalline state of hen egg-white lysozyme.

  12. Adsorption of lysozyme unto silica and polystyrene surfaces in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-04-11

    Apr 11, 2011 ... surfaces were well fitted by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model with maximum adsorption .... following reasons: (1) Lysozyme is a globular protein with ... vigorously for 1 h to attain equilibrium adsorption and allowed to.

  13. Metal ions-binding T4 lysozyme as an intramolecular protein purification tag compatible with X-ray crystallography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bouřa, Evžen; Bäumlová, Adriana; Chalupská, Dominika; Dubánková, Anna; Klíma, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 6 (2017), s. 1116-1123 ISSN 0961-8368 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ17-07058Y; GA MŠk LO1302 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : phage T4 * lysozyme * endolysin * histidine tag * protein purification * crystal structure Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 2.523, year: 2016

  14. Crystallization and evaluation of hen egg-white lysozyme crystals for protein pH titration in the crystalline state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Wakari; Yagi, Daichi; Ishikawa, Takuya; Ohnishi, Yuki; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo

    2008-01-01

    Hen egg-white lysozyme was crystallized over a wide pH range (2.5–8.0) and the quality of the crystals was characterized. Crystallization phase diagrams at pH 2.5, 6.0 and 7.5 were determined To observe the ionized status of the amino acid residues in proteins at different pH (protein pH titration in the crystalline state) by neutron diffraction, hen egg-white lysozyme was crystallized over a wide pH range (2.5–8.0). Crystallization phase diagrams at pH 2.5, 6.0 and 7.5 were determined. At pH < 4.5 the border between the metastable region and the nucleation region shifted to the left (lower precipitant concentration) in the phase diagram, and at pH > 4.5 the border shifted to the right (higher precipitant concentration). The qualities of these crystals were characterized using the Wilson plot method. The qualities of all crystals at different pH were more or less equivalent (B-factor values within 25–40). It is expected that neutron diffraction analysis of these crystals of different pH provides equivalent data in quality for discussions of protein pH titration in the crystalline state of hen egg-white lysozyme

  15. Pulse radiolysis studies of intramolecular electron transfer in model peptides and proteins. 7. Trp -> TyrO radical transformation in hen egg-white lysozyme. Effects of pH, temperature, Trp62 oxidation and inhibitor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bobrowski, K.; Holcman, J.; Poznanski, J.

    1997-01-01

    Intramolecular long-range electron transfer (LRET) in hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) accompanying Trp --> TyrO radical transformation was investigated in aqueous solution by pulse radiolysis as a function of pH (5.2-7.4) and temperature (283-328K). The reaction was induced by highly selective...... below its denaturation temperature. Selective oxidation by ozone of the Trp62 indole side-chain in HEWL to N'-formylkynurenine (NFKyn62-HEWL) caused a large drop in the initial yield of Trp(.) radicals, G(Trp(.))(i). This was accompanied by a relatively small decrease in k(5) but selective oxidation...

  16. Bio-templated CdSe quantum dots green synthesis in the functional protein, lysozyme, and biological activity investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qisui; Li, Song; Liu, Peng; Min, Xinmin

    2012-01-01

    Bifunctional fluorescence (CdSe Quantum Dots) – protein (Lysozyme) nanocomposites were synthesized at room temperature by a protein-directed, solution-phase, green-synthetic method. Fluorescence (FL) and absorption spectra showed that CdSe QDs were prepared successfully with Lyz. The average particle size and crystalline structure of QDs were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. With attenuated total reflection-fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra and thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, it was confirmed that there is interaction between QDs and amide I, amide II groups in Lyz. FL polarization was measured and FL imaging was done to monitor whether QDs could be responsible for possible changes in the conformation and activity of Lyz. Interestingly, the results showed Lyz still retain the biological activity after formation of QDs, but the secondary structure of the Lyz was changed. And the advantage of this synthesis method is producing excellent fluorescent QDs with specifically biological function. -- Highlights: ► Lysozyme-directed green synthesis of CdSe quantum dots. ► Lysozyme still retain the biological activity after formation of CdSe. ► The method is the production of fluorescent QDs with highly specific and functions.

  17. Fluorinated ionic liquids for protein drug delivery systems: Investigating their impact on the structure and function of lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Márcia; Vieira, Nicole S M; Rebelo, Luís Paulo N; Araújo, João M M; Pereiro, Ana B; Archer, Margarida

    2017-06-30

    Since the approval of recombinant human insulin by FDA in 1982, more than 200 proteins are currently available for pharmaceutical use to treat a wide range of diseases. However, innovation is still required to develop effective approaches for drug delivery. Our aim is to investigate the potential use of fluorinated ionic liquids (FILs) as drug delivery systems (DDS) for therapeutic proteins. Some initial parameters need to be assessed before further studies can proceed. This work evaluates the impact of FILs on the stability, function, structure and aggregation state of lysozyme. Different techniques were used for this purpose, which included differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF), spectrophotometric assays, circular dichroism (CD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM). Ionic liquids composed of cholinium-, imidazolium- or pyridinium- derivatives were combined with different anions and analysed at different concentrations in aqueous solutions (below and above the critical aggregation concentration, CAC). The results herein presented show that the addition of ionic liquids had no significant effect on the stability and hydrolytic activity of lysozyme. Moreover, a distinct behaviour was observed in DLS experiments for non-surfactant and surfactant ionic liquids, with the latter encapsulating the protein at concentrations above the CAC. These results encourage us to further study ionic liquids as promising tools for DDS of protein drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of mobile phone use on salivary concentrations of protein, amylase, lipase, immunoglobulin A, lysozyme, lactoferrin, peroxidase and C-reactive protein of the parotid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemipour, M S; Yarbakht, M; Gholamhosseinian, A; Famori, H

    2014-05-01

    The possibility of side effects associated with the electromagnetic waves emitted from mobile phones is a controversial issue. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of mobile phone use on parotid gland salivary concentrations of protein, amylase, lipase, immunoglobulin A, lysozyme, lactoferrin, peroxidase and C-reactive protein. Stimulated salivary samples were collected simultaneously from both parotid glands of 86 healthy volunteers. Salivary flow rate and salivary concentrations of proteins, amylase, lipase, lysozyme, lactoferrin, peroxidase, C-reactive protein and immunoglobulin A, were measured. Data were analysed using t-tests and one-way analyses of variance. Salivary flow rate and parotid gland salivary concentrations of protein were significantly higher on the right side compared to the left in those that predominantly held mobile phones on the right side. In addition, there was a decrease in concentrations of amylase, lipase, lysozyme, lactoferrin and peroxidase. The side of dominant mobile phone use was associated with differences in salivary flow rate and parotid gland salivary concentrations, in right-dominant users. Although mobile phone use influenced salivary composition, the relationship was not significant.

  19. Expression and prognostic significance of lysozyme in male breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serra, Carlos; Baltasar, Aniceto; Medrano, Justo; Vizoso, Francisco; Alonso, Lorena; Rodríguez, Juan C; González, Luis O; Fernández, María; Lamelas, María L; Sánchez, Luis M; García-Muñiz, José L

    2002-01-01

    Lysozyme, one of the major protein components of human milk that is also synthesized by a significant percentage of breast carcinomas, is associated with lesions that have a favorable outcome in female breast cancer. Here we evaluate the expression and prognostic value of lysozyme in male breast cancer (MBC). Lysozyme expression was examined by immunohistochemical methods in a series of 60 MBC tissue sections and in 15 patients with gynecomastia. Staining was quantified using the HSCORE (histological score) system, which considers both the intensity and the percentage of cells staining at each intensity. Prognostic value of lysozyme was retrospectively evaluated by multivariate analysis taking into account conventional prognostic factors. Lysozyme immunostaining was negative in all cases of gynecomastia. A total of 27 of 60 MBC sections (45%) stained positively for this protein, but there were clear differences among them with regard to the intensity and percentage of stained cells. Statistical analysis showed that lysozyme HSCORE values in relation to age, tumor size, nodal status, histological grade, estrogen receptor status, metastasis and histological type did not increase the statistical significance. Univariate analysis confirmed that both nodal involvement and lysozyme values were significant predictors of short-term relapse-free survival. Multivariate analysis, according to Cox's regression model, also showed that nodal status and lysozyme levels were significant independent indicators of short-term relapse-free survival. Tumor expression of lysozyme is associated with lesions that have an unfavorable outcome in male breast cancer. This milk protein may be a new prognostic factor in patients with breast cancer

  20. Aptamer-Based Electrochemical Sensing of Lysozyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Vasilescu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein analysis and quantification are required daily by thousands of laboratories worldwide for activities ranging from protein characterization to clinical diagnostics. Multiple factors have to be considered when selecting the best detection and quantification assay, including the amount of protein available, its concentration, the presence of interfering molecules, as well as costs and rapidity. This is also the case for lysozyme, a 14.3-kDa protein ubiquitously present in many organisms, that has been identified with a variety of functions: antibacterial activity, a biomarker of several serious medical conditions, a potential allergen in foods or a model of amyloid-type protein aggregation. Since the design of the first lysozyme aptamer in 2001, lysozyme became one of the most intensively-investigated biological target analytes for the design of novel biosensing concepts, particularly with regards to electrochemical aptasensors. In this review, we discuss the state of the art of aptamer-based electrochemical sensing of lysozyme, with emphasis on sensing in serum and real samples.

  1. New sub-family of lysozyme-like proteins shows no catalytic activity: crystallographic and biochemical study of STM3605 protein from Salmonella Typhimurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalska, Karolina; Brown, Roslyn N.; Li, Hui; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Niemann, George; Heffron, Fred; Cort, John R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2013-03-01

    Phage viruses that infect prokaryotes integrate their genome into the host chromosome; thus, microbial genomes typically contain genetic remnants of both recent and ancient phage infections. Often phage genes occur in clusters of atypical G+C content that reflect integration of the foreign DNA. However, some phage genes occur in isolation without other phage gene neighbors, probably resulting from horizontal gene transfer. In these cases, the phage gene product is unlikely to function as a component of a mature phage particle, and instead may have been co-opted by the host for its own benefit. The product of one such gene from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, STM3605, encodes a protein with modest sequence similarity to phage-like lysozyme (N-acetylmuramidase) but appears to lack essential catalytic residues that are strictly conserved in all lysozymes. Close homologs in other bacteria share this characteristic. The structure of the STM3605 protein was characterized by X-ray crystallography, and functional assays showed that it is a stable, folded protein whose structure closely resembles lysozyme. However, this protein is unlikely to hydrolyze peptidoglycan. Instead, STM3605 is presumed to have evolved an alternative function because it shows some lytic activity and partitions to micelles.

  2. Protein crowding in solution, frozen and freeze-dried states: small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering study of lysozyme/sorbitol/water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Susan; Khodadadi, Sheila; Clark, Nicholas; McAuley, Arnold; Cristiglio, Viviana; Theyencheri, Narayanan; Curtis, Joseph; Shalaev, Evgenyi

    2015-03-01

    For effective preservation, proteins are often stored as frozen solutions or in glassy states using a freeze-drying process. However, aggregation is often observed after freeze-thaw or reconstitution of freeze-dried powder and the stability of the protein is no longer assured. In this study, small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering (SANS and SAXS) have been used to investigate changes in protein-protein interaction distances of a model protein/cryoprotectant system of lysozyme/sorbitol/water, under representative pharmaceutical processing conditions. The results demonstrate the utility of SAXS and SANS methods to monitor protein crowding at different stages of freezing and drying. The SANS measurements of solution samples showed at least one protein interaction peak corresponding to an interaction distance of ~ 90 Å. In the frozen state, two protein interaction peaks were observed by SANS with corresponding interaction distances at 40 Å as well as 90 Å. On the other hand, both SAXS and SANS data for freeze-dried samples showed three peaks, suggesting interaction distances ranging from ~ 15 Å to 170 Å. Possible interpretations of these interaction peaks will be discussed, as well as the role of sorbitol as a cryoprotectant during the freezing and drying process.

  3. High-pressure protein crystallography of hen egg-white lysozyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Nagae, Takayuki [Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Watanabe, Nobuhisa, E-mail: nobuhisa@nagoya-u.jp [Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    The crystal structure of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) was analyzed under pressures of up to 950 MPa. The high pressure modified the conformation of the molecule and induced a novel phase transition in the tetragonal crystal of HEWL. Crystal structures of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) determined under pressures ranging from ambient pressure to 950 MPa are presented. From 0.1 to 710 MPa, the molecular and internal cavity volumes are monotonically compressed. However, from 710 to 890 MPa the internal cavity volume remains almost constant. Moreover, as the pressure increases to 950 MPa, the tetragonal crystal of HEWL undergoes a phase transition from P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 to P4{sub 3}. Under high pressure, the crystal structure of the enzyme undergoes several local and global changes accompanied by changes in hydration structure. For example, water molecules penetrate into an internal cavity neighbouring the active site and induce an alternate conformation of one of the catalytic residues, Glu35. These phenomena have not been detected by conventional X-ray crystal structure analysis and might play an important role in the catalytic activity of HEWL.

  4. Study of ethanol-lysozyme interactions using neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, M.S.; Mason, S.A.; McIntyre, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Single-crystal neutron diffraction has been used to observe the interactions between deuterated ethanol (CD3CD2OH) and lysozyme in triclinic crystals of hen egg white lysozyme soaked in 25% (v/v) ethanol solutions. A total of 6047 observed reflections to a resolution of 2 A were used, and 13 possible ethanol sites were identified. The three highest occupied sites are close to locations for bromoethanol found in an earlier study by Yonath et al. [Yonath, A., Podjarny, A., Honig, B., Traub, W., Sielecki, A., Herzberg, O., and Moult, J. (1978) Biophys. Struct. Mech. 4, 27-36]. Structure refinements including a model for the flat solvent lead to a final crystallographic agreement factor of 0.097. Comparison with earlier neutron studies on triclinic lysozyme showed that neither the molecular structure nor the thermal motions were affected significantly by the ethanol. A detailed analysis of the ethanol-lysozyme contacts showed 61% of these to be with hydrophobic sites, in agreement with the dominant hydrophobic nature of ethanol. This, together with the fact that the molecular structure of lysozyme is not perturbed, suggests a model for denaturation of lysozyme by alcohol, which proceeds via a dehydration of the protein at high alcohol concentration

  5. Pulsed laser deposition of lysozyme: the dependence on shot numbers and the angular distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Constantinescu, C.; Matei, A.; Schou, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    The ejection of molecules from a pressed solid target of lysozyme induced by laser ablation in the UV-regime at a wavelength of 355 nm was investigated. The ablation studies were carried out in vacuum at a laser fluence of 2 J/cm2 for which a significant fraction of proteins remains intact....... This was verified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) spectrometry of thin films deposited on silicon substrates. The deposition rate of lysozyme was found to decrease with the number of shots and was correlated with increasing thermal damage of the lysozyme. This was monitored by measurements...... of the optical reflectivity of dry lysozyme. The angular distribution of the mass deposition can be fitted well by Anisimov’s hydrodynamic model. The total deposited yield over the entire hemisphere from direct laser ablation of lysozyme was estimated from this model and found to be three orders of magnitude...

  6. Size versus polarizability in protein-ligand interactions: binding of noble gases within engineered cavities in phage T4 lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillin, M L; Breyer, W A; Griswold, I J; Matthews, B W

    2000-09-29

    To investigate the relative importance of size and polarizability in ligand binding within proteins, we have determined the crystal structures of pseudo wild-type and cavity-containing mutant phage T4 lysozymes in the presence of argon, krypton, and xenon. These proteins provide a representative sample of predominantly apolar cavities of varying size and shape. Even though the volumes of these cavities range up to the equivalent of five xenon atoms, the noble gases bind preferentially at highly localized sites that appear to be defined by constrictions in the walls of the cavities, coupled with the relatively large radii of the noble gases. The cavities within pseudo wild-type and L121A lysozymes each bind only a single atom of noble gas, while the cavities within mutants L133A and F153A have two independent binding sites, and the L99A cavity has three interacting sites. The binding of noble gases within two double mutants was studied to characterize the additivity of binding at such sites. In general, when a cavity in a protein is created by a "large-to-small" substitution, the surrounding residues relax somewhat to reduce the volume of the cavity. The binding of xenon and, to a lesser degree, krypton and argon, tend to expand the volume of the cavity and to return it closer to what it would have been had no relaxation occurred. In nearly all cases, the extent of binding of the noble gases follows the trend xenon>krypton>argon. Pressure titrations of the L99A mutant have confirmed that the crystallographic occupancies accurately reflect fractional saturation of the binding sites. The trend in noble gas affinity can be understood in terms of the effects of size and polarizability on the intermolecular potential. The plasticity of the protein matrix permits repulsion due to increased ligand size to be more than compensated for by attraction due to increased ligand polarizability. These results have implications for the mechanism of general anesthesia, the migration

  7. Mechanisms of hydrogen exchange in proteins from nuclear magnetic resonance studies of individual tryptophan indole NH hydrogens in lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedin, R.E.; Delepierre, M.; Dobson, C.M.; Poulsen, F.M.

    1982-01-01

    The individual rates of solvent exchange of the six tryptophan indole NH hydrogens of lysozyme in 2 H 2 O have been measured over a wide range of temperatures by using 1 H NMR. Two distinct mechanisms for exchange have been identified, one characterized by a high activation energy and the other by a much lower activation energy. The high-energy process has been shown to be associated directly with the cooperative thermal unfolding of the protein and is the dominant mechanism for exchange of the most slowly exchanging hydrogen even 15 0 C below the denaturation temperature. Rate constants and activation energies for the folding and unfolding reactions were obtained from the experimental exchange rates. At low temperatures, a lower activation energy mechanism is dominant for all hydrogens, and this can be associated with local fluctuations in the protein structure which allow access of solvent. The relative exchange rates and activation energies can only qualitatively be related to the different environments of the residues in the crystal structure. There is provisional evidence that a mechanism intermediate between these two extremes may be significant for some hydrogens under restricted conditions

  8. The extracytoplasmic function sigma factor SigV plays a key role in the original model of lysozyme resistance and virulence of Enterococcus faecalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Le Jeune

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterococcus faecalis is one of the leading agents of nosocomial infections. To cause diseases, pathogens or opportunistic bacteria have to adapt and survive to the defense systems encountered in the host. One of the most important compounds of the host innate defense response against invading microorganisms is lysozyme. It is found in a wide variety of body fluids, as well as in cells of the innate immune system. Lysozyme could act either as a muramidase and/or as a cationic antimicrobial peptide. Like Staphylococcus aureus, E. faecalis is one of the few bacteria that are completely lysozyme resistant. RESULTS: This study revealed that oatA (O-acetyl transferase and dlt (D-Alanylation of lipoteicoic acids genes contribute only partly to the lysozyme resistance of E. faecalis and that a specific transcriptional regulator, the extracytoplasmic function SigV sigma factor plays a key role in this event. Indeed, the sigV single mutant is as sensitive as the oatA/dltA double mutant, and the sigV/oatA/dltA triple mutant displays the highest level of lysozyme sensitivity suggesting synergistic effects of these genes. In S. aureus, mutation of both oatA and dlt genes abolishes completely the lysozyme resistance, whereas this is not the case in E. faecalis. Interestingly SigV does not control neither oatA nor dlt genes. Moreover, the sigV mutants clearly showed a reduced capacity to colonize host tissues, as they are significantly less recovered than the parental JH2-2 strain from organs of mice subjected to intravenous or urinary tract infections. CONCLUSIONS: This work led to the discovery of an original model of lysozyme resistance mechanism which is obviously more complex than those described for other Gram positive pathogens. Moreover, our data provide evidences for a direct link between lysozyme resistance and virulence of E. faecalis.

  9. Effect of ethanol as a co-solvent on the aerosol performance and stability of spray-dried lysozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Shuying; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Mu, Huiling

    2016-01-01

    In the spray drying process, organic solvents can be added to facilitate drying, accommodate certain functional excipients, and modify the final particle characteristics. In this study, lysozyme was used as a model pharmaceutical protein to study the effect of ethanol as a co...... the spray drying process. The enzymatic activities of the spray-dried lysozyme showed no significant impact of ethanol; however, the lysozyme enzymatic activity was ca. 25% lower compared to the starting material. In conclusion, the addition of ethanol as a co-solvent in the spray drying feed for lysozyme......-solvent on the stability and aerosol performance of spray-dried protein. Lysozyme was dissolved in solutions with various ratios of ethanol and water, and subsequently spray-dried. A change from spherical particles into wrinkled and folded particles was observed upon increasing the ratio of ethanol in the feed...

  10. Binding of Lysozyme to Spherical Poly(styrenesulfonate Gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Andersson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyelectrolyte gels are useful as carriers of proteins and other biomacromolecules in, e.g., drug delivery. The rational design of such systems requires knowledge about how the binding and release are affected by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between the components. To this end we have investigated the uptake of lysozyme by weakly crosslinked spherical poly(styrenesulfonate (PSS microgels and macrogels by means of micromanipulator assisted light microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS in an aqueous environment. The results show that the binding process is an order of magnitude slower than for cytochrome c and for lysozyme binding to sodium polyacrylate gels under the same conditions. This is attributed to the formation of very dense protein-rich shells in the outer layers of the microgels with low permeability to the protein. The shells in macrogels contain 60 wt % water and nearly charge stoichiometric amounts of lysozyme and PSS in the form of dense complexes of radius 8 nm comprising 30–60 lysozyme molecules. With support from kinetic modelling results we propose that the rate of protein binding and the relaxation rate of the microgel are controlled by the protein mass transport through the shell, which is strongly affected by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. The mechanism explains, in turn, an observed dependence of the diffusion rate on the apparent degree of crosslinking of the networks.

  11. Enterococcus faecalis zinc-responsive proteins mediate bacterial defence against zinc overload, lysozyme and oxidative stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Abrantes, Marta; Kok, Jan; de Fatima Silva Lopes, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Two Enterococcus faecalis genes encoding the P-type ATPase EF1400 and the putative SapB protein EF0759 were previously shown to be strongly upregulated in the presence of high concentrations of zinc. In the present work, we showed that a Zn(2+)-responsive DNA-binding motif (zim) is present in the

  12. A systematic method for analysing the protein hydration structure of T4 lysozyme

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kysilka, Jiří; Vondrášek, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 10 (2013), s. 479-487 ISSN 0952-3499 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/0725; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11020 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0427 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : protein hydration structure * water * X-ray crystallography * cluster algorithm * interaction enthalpy Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.337, year: 2013

  13. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of lysozyme in renal proximal tubules of the frog Rana temporaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Seliverstova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of protein reabsorption in the kidney of lower vertebrates remains insufficiently investigated in spite of raising interest to the amphibian and fish kidneys as a useful model for physiological and pathophysiological examinations. In the present study, we examined the renal tubular uptake and the internalization rote of lysozyme after its intravenous injection in the wintering frog Rana temporaria using immunohisto- and immunocytochemistry and specific markers for some endocytic compartments. The distinct expression of megalin and cubilin in the proximal tubule cells of lysozyme-injected frogs was revealed whereas kidney tissue of control animals showed no positive immunoreactivity. Lysozyme was detected in the apical endocytic compartment of the tubular cells and colocalized with clathrin 10 min after injection. After 20 min, lysozyme was located in the subapical compartment negative to clathrin (endosomes, and intracellular trafficking of lysozyme was coincided with the distribution of megalin and cubilin. However, internalized protein was retained in the endosomes and did not reach lysosomes within 30 min after treatment that may indicate the inhibition of intracellular trafficking in hibernating frogs. For the first time, we provided the evidence that lysozyme is filtered through the glomeruli and absorbed by receptor-mediated clathrin-dependent endocytosis in the frog proximal tubule cells. Thus, the protein uptake in the amphibian mesonephros is mediated by megalin and cubilin that confirms a critical role of endocytic receptors in the renal reabsorption of proteins in amphibians as in mammals.

  14. Polymorphism of Lysozyme Condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Mohammad S; Byington, Michael C; Conrad, Jacinta C; Vekilov, Peter G

    2017-10-05

    Protein condensates play essential roles in physiological processes and pathological conditions. Recently discovered mesoscopic protein-rich clusters may act as crucial precursors for the nucleation of ordered protein solids, such as crystals, sickle hemoglobin polymers, and amyloid fibrils. These clusters challenge settled paradigms of protein condensation as the constituent protein molecules present features characteristic of both partially misfolded and native proteins. Here we employ the antimicrobial enzyme lysozyme and examine the similarities between mesoscopic clusters, amyloid structures, and disordered aggregates consisting of chemically modified protein. We show that the mesoscopic clusters are distinct from the other two classes of aggregates. Whereas cluster formation and amyloid oligomerization are both reversible, aggregation triggered by reduction of the intramolecular S-S bonds is permanent. In contrast to the amyloid structures, protein molecules in the clusters retain their enzymatic activity. Furthermore, an essential feature of the mesoscopic clusters is their constant radius of less than 50 nm. The amyloid and disordered aggregates are significantly larger and rapidly grow. These findings demonstrate that the clusters are a product of limited protein structural flexibility. In view of the role of the clusters in the nucleation of ordered protein solids, our results suggest that fine-tuning the degree of protein conformational stability is a powerful tool to control and direct the pathways of protein condensation.

  15. Self-assembly dynamics for the transition of a globular aggregate to a fibril network of lysozyme proteins via a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Pandey

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The self-organizing dynamics of lysozymes (an amyloid protein with 148 residues with different numbers of protein chains, Nc = 1,5,10, and 15 (concentration 0.004 – 0.063 is studied by a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation with knowledge-based residue-residue interactions. The dynamics of an isolated lysozyme (Nc = 1 is ultra-slow (quasi-static at low temperatures and becomes diffusive asymptotically on raising the temperature. In contrast, the presence of interacting proteins leads to concentration induced protein diffusion at low temperatures and concentration-tempering sub-diffusion at high temperatures. Variation of the radius of gyration of the protein with temperature shows a systematic transition from a globular structure (at low T to a random coil (high T conformation when the proteins are isolated. The crossover from globular to random coil becomes sharper upon increasing the protein concentration (i.e. with Nc = 5,10, with larger Rg at higher temperatures and concentration; Rg becomes smaller on adding more protein chains (e.g. Nc = 15 a non-monotonic response to protein concentration. Analysis of the structure factor (S(q provides an estimate of the effective dimension (D ≥ 3, globular conformation at low temperature, and D ∼ 1.7, random coil, at high temperatures of the isolated protein. With many interacting proteins, the morphology of the self-assembly varies with scale, i.e. at the low temperature (T = 0.015, D ∼ 2.9 on the scale comparable to the radius of gyration of the protein, and D ∼ 2.3 at the large scale over the entire sample. The global network of fibrils appears at high temperature (T = 0.021 with D ∼ 1.7 (i.e. a random coil morphology at large scale involving tenuous distribution of micro-globules (at small scales.

  16. Control of Electrostatic Interactions Between F-Actin And Genetically Modified Lysozyme in Aqueous Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, L.K.; Xian, W.; Guaqueta, C.; Strohman, M.; Vrasich, C.R.; Luijten, E.; Wong, G.C.L.

    2009-01-01

    The aim for deterministic control of the interactions between macroions in aqueous media has motivated widespread experimental and theoretical work. Although it has been well established that like-charged macromolecules can aggregate under the influence of oppositely charged condensing agents, the specific conditions for the stability of such aggregates can only be determined empirically. We examine these conditions, which involve an interplay of electrostatic and osmotic effects, by using a well defined model system composed of F-actin, an anionic rod-like polyelectrolyte, and lysozyme, a cationic globular protein with a charge that can be genetically modified. The structure and stability of actin-lysozyme complexes for different lysozyme charge mutants and salt concentrations are examined by using synchrotron x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. We provide evidence that supports a structural transition from columnar arrangements of F-actin held together by arrays of lysozyme at the threefold interstitial sites of the actin sublattice to marginally stable complexes in which lysozyme resides at twofold bridging sites between actin. The reduced stability arises from strongly reduced partitioning of salt between the complex and the surrounding solution. Changes in the stability of actin-lysozyme complexes are of biomedical interest because their formation has been reported to contribute to the persistence of airway infections in cystic fibrosis by sequestering antimicrobials such as lysozyme. We present x-ray microscopy results that argue for the existence of actin-lysozyme complexes in cystic fibrosis sputum and demonstrate that, for a wide range of salt conditions, charge-reduced lysozyme is not sequestered in ordered complexes while retaining its bacterial killing activity.

  17. Larger red-shift in optical emissions obtained from the thin films of globular proteins (BSA, lysozyme) – polyelectrolyte (PAA) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukdar, Hrishikesh [Physical Sciences Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Vigyan Path, Paschim Boragaon, Garchuk, Guwahati 781035, Assam (India); Kundu, Sarathi, E-mail: sarathi.kundu@gmail.com [Physical Sciences Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Vigyan Path, Paschim Boragaon, Garchuk, Guwahati 781035, Assam (India); Basu, Saibal [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2016-09-30

    Graphical abstract: Thin films of protein-polyelectrolyte complexes show larger red-shift in optical emission. - Highlights: • Globular proteins (lysozyme and BSA) and polyelectrolyte (sodium polyacrylic acid) are used to form protein-polyelectrolyte complexes (PPC). • Larger red-shift in optical emission is obtained from the thin films of PPC. • Red-shift is not obtained from the solution of PPC and pure protein thin films. • Larger red-shift from PPC films is due to the energy dissipation as non-radiative form through interactions with nearby atoms. • Red-shift in optical emission is independent on the thickness of the PPC film. - Abstract: Globular proteins (lysozyme and BSA) and polyelectrolyte (sodium polyacrylic acid) are used to form protein-polyelectrolyte complexes (PPC). Out-of-plane structures of ≈30–60 nm thick PPC films and their surface morphologies have been studied by using X-ray reflectivity and atomic force microscopy, whereas optical behaviors of PPC and protein conformations have been studied by using UV–vis, photoluminescence and FTIR spectroscopy respectively. Our study reveals that thin films of PPC show a larger red-shift of 23 and 16 nm in the optical emissions in comparison to that of pure protein whereas bulk PPC show a small blue-shift of ≈3 nm. A small amount of peak-shift is found to occur due to the heat treatment or concentration variation of the polyelectrolyte/protein in bulk solution but cannot produce such film thickness independent larger red-shift. Position of the emission peak remains nearly unchanged with the film thickness. Mechanism for such larger red-shift has been proposed.

  18. Influence of lysozyme on the precipitation of calcium carbonate: a kinetic and morphologic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro; Dominguez-Vera, Jose M.; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan M.

    2003-05-01

    Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the interactions between proteins and mineral surfaces, among them a combination of electrostatic, stereochemical interactions and molecular recognition between the protein and the crystal surface. To identify the mechanisms of interaction in the lysozyme-calcium carbonate model system, the effect of this protein on the precipitation kinetics and morphology of calcite crystals was examined. The solution chemistry and morphology of the solid were monitored over time in a set of time-series free-drift experiments in which CaCO 3 was precipitated from solution in a closed system at 25°C and 1 atm total pressure, in the presence and absence of lysozyme. The precipitation of calcite was preceded by the precipitation of a metastable phase that later dissolved and gave rise to calcite as the sole phase. With increasing lysozyme concentration, the nucleation of both the metastable phase and calcite occurred at lower Ω calcite, indicating that lysozyme favored the nucleation of both phases. Calcite growth rate was not affected by the presence of lysozyme, at least at protein concentrations ranging from 0 mg/mL to 10 mg/mL. Lysozyme modified the habit of calcite crystals. The degree of habit modification changed with protein concentration. At lower concentrations of lysozyme, the typical rhombohedral habit of calcite crystals was modified by the expression of {110} faces, which resulted from the preferential adsorption of protein on these faces. With increasing lysozyme concentration, the growth of {110}, {100}, and finally {001} faces was sequentially inhibited. This adsorption sequence may be explained by an electrostatic interaction between lysozyme and calcite, in which the inhibition of the growth of {110}, {100}, and {001} faces could be explained by a combined effect of the density of carbonate groups in the calcite face and the specific orientation (perpendicular) of these carbonate groups with respect to the calcite

  19. A zinc complex of heparan sulfate destabilises lysozyme and alters its conformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, Ashley J.; Hussain, Rohanah; Cosentino, Cesare; Guerrini, Marco; Siligardi, Giuliano; Yates, Edwin A.; Rudd, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Zinc–heparan sulfate complex destabilises lysozyme, a model amyloid protein. ► Addition of zinc, without heparan sulfate, stabilises lysozyme. ► Heparan sulfate cation complexes provide alternative protein folding routes. -- Abstract: The naturally occurring anionic cell surface polysaccharide heparan sulfate is involved in key biological activities and is implicated in amyloid formation. Following addition of Zn–heparan sulfate, hen lysozyme, a model amyloid forming protein, resembled β-rich amyloid by far UV circular dichroism (increased β-sheet: +25%), with a significantly reduced melting temperature (from 68 to 58 °C) by fluorescence shift assay. Secondary structure stability of the Zn–heparan sulfate complex with lysozyme was also distinct from that with heparan sulfate, under stronger denaturation conditions using synchrotron radiation circular dichroism. Changing the cation associated with heparan sulfate is sufficient to alter the conformation and stability of complexes formed between heparan sulfate and lysozyme, substantially reducing the stability of the protein. Complexes of heparan sulfate and cations, such as Zn, which are abundant in the brain, may provide alternative folding routes for proteins.

  20. Theoretical study of phase behaviour of DLVO model for lysozyme and γ-crystalline aqueous electrolyte solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Melnyk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mean spherical approximation (MSA, second-order Barker-Henderson (BH perturbation theory and thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT for associating fluids in combination with BH perturbation theory are applied to the study of the structural properties and phase behaviour of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO model of lysozyme and γ-cristalline aqueous electrolyte solutions. Predictions of the MSA for the structure factors are in good agreement with the corresponding computer simulation predictions. The agreement between theoretical results for the liquid-gas phase diagram and the corresponding results of the experiment and computer simulation is less satisfactory, with predictions of the combined BH-TPT approach being the most accurate.

  1. Raman mapping of mannitol/lysozyme particles produced via spray drying and single droplet drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajander, Jari Pekka; Matero, Sanni; Sloth, Jakob; Wan, Feng; Rantanen, Jukka; Yang, Mingshi

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of a model protein on the solid state of a commonly used bulk agent in spray-dried formulations. A series of lysozyme/mannitol formulations were spray-dried using a lab-scale spray dryer. Further, the surface temperature of drying droplet/particles was monitored using the DRYING KINETICS ANALYZER™ (DKA) with controllable drying conditions mimicking the spray-drying process to estimate the drying kinetics of the lysozyme/mannitol formulations. The mannitol polymorphism and the spatial distribution of lysozyme in the particles were examined using X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD) and Raman microscopy. Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis was used for analyzing the Raman microscopy data. XRPD results indicated that a mixture of β-mannitol and α-mannitol was produced in the spray-drying process which was supported by the Raman analysis, whereas Raman analysis indicated that a mixture of α-mannitol and δ-mannitol was detected in the single particles from DKA. In addition Raman mapping indicated that the presence of lysozyme seemed to favor the appearance of α-mannitol in the particles from DKA evidenced by close proximity of lysozyme and mannitol in the particles. It suggested that the presence of lysozyme tend to induce metastable solid state forms upon the drying process.

  2. Driving force behind adsorption-induced protein unfolding: a time-resolved X-ray reflectivity study on lysozyme adsorbed at an air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Yohko F; Uruga, Tomoya; Tanida, Hajime; Toyokawa, Hidenori; Terada, Yasuko; Takagaki, Masafumi; Yamada, Hironari

    2009-01-06

    Time-resolved X-ray reflectivity measurements for lysozyme (LSZ) adsorbed at an air/water interface were performed to study the mechanism of adsorption-induced protein unfolding. The time dependence of the density profile at the air/water interface revealed that the molecular conformation changed significantly during adsorption. Taking into account previous work using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, we propose that the LSZ molecules initially adsorbed on the air/water interface have a flat unfolded structure, forming antiparallel beta-sheets as a result of hydrophobic interactions with the gas phase. In contrast, as adsorption continues, a second layer forms in which the molecules have a very loose structure having random coils as a result of hydrophilic interactions with the hydrophilic groups that protrude from the first layer.

  3. The Antimicrobial Peptide Lysozyme Is Induced after Multiple Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Klüter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial peptide lysozyme is an important factor of innate immunity and exerts high potential of antibacterial activity. In the present study we evaluated the lysozyme expression in serum of multiple injured patients and subsequently analyzed their possible sources and signaling pathways. Expression of lysozyme was examined in blood samples of multiple trauma patients from the day of trauma until 14 days after trauma by ELISA. To investigate major sources of lysozyme, its expression and regulation in serum samples, different blood cells, and tissue samples were analysed by ELISA and real-time PCR. Neutrophils and hepatocytes were stimulated with cytokines and supernatant of Staphylococcus aureus. The present study demonstrates the induction and release of lysozyme in serum of multiple injured patients. The highest lysozyme expression of all tested cells and tissues was detected in neutrophils. Stimulation with trauma-related factors such as interleukin-6 and S. aureus induced lysozyme expression. Liver tissue samples of patients without trauma show little lysozyme expression compared to neutrophils. After stimulation with bacterial fragments, lysozyme expression of hepatocytes is upregulated significantly. Toll-like receptor 2, a classic receptor of Gram-positive bacterial protein, was detected as a possible target for lysozyme induction.

  4. 1H NMR studies of human lysozyme: Spectral assignment and comparison with hen lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redfield, C.; Dobson, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    Complete main-chain (NH and αCH) 1 H NMR assignments are reported for the 130 residues of human lysozyme, along with extensive assignments for side-chain protons. Analysis of 2-D NOESY experiments shows that the regions of secondary structure for human lysozyme in solution are essentially identical with those found previously in a similar study of hen lysozyme and are in close accord with the structure of the protein reported previously from x-ray diffraction studies in the crystalline state. Comparison of the chemical shifts, spin-spin coupling constants, and hydrogen exchange behavior are also consistent with closely similar structures for the two proteins in solution. In a number of cases specific differences in the NMR parameters between hen and human lysozymes can be correlated with specific differences observed in the crystal structures

  5. Controlled Release of Lysozyme from Double-Walled Poly(Lactide-Co-Glycolide (PLGA Microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezaul H. Ansary

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Double-walled microspheres based on poly(lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA are potential delivery systems for reducing a very high initial burst release of encapsulated protein and peptide drugs. In this study, double-walled microspheres made of glucose core, hydroxyl-terminated poly(lactide-co-glycolide (Glu-PLGA, and carboxyl-terminated PLGA were fabricated using a modified water-in-oil-in-oil-in-water (w1/o/o/w2 emulsion solvent evaporation technique for the controlled release of a model protein, lysozyme. Microspheres size, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, lysozyme in vitro release profiles, bioactivity, and structural integrity, were evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM images revealed that double-walled microspheres comprising of Glu-PLGA and PLGA with a mass ratio of 1:1 have a spherical shape and smooth surfaces. A statistically significant increase in the encapsulation efficiency (82.52% ± 3.28% was achieved when 1% (w/v polyvinyl alcohol (PVA and 2.5% (w/v trehalose were incorporated in the internal and external aqueous phase, respectively, during emulsification. Double-walled microspheres prepared together with excipients (PVA and trehalose showed a better control release of lysozyme. The released lysozyme was fully bioactive, and its structural integrity was slightly affected during microspheres fabrication and in vitro release studies. Therefore, double-walled microspheres made of Glu-PLGA and PLGA together with excipients (PVA and trehalose provide a controlled and sustained release for lysozyme.

  6. Correlates between Models of Virulence for Mycobacterium tuberculosis among Isolates of the Central Asian Lineage: a Case for Lysozyme Resistance Testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casali, Nicola; Clark, Simon O.; Hooper, Richard; Williams, Ann; Velji, Preya; Gonzalo, Ximena

    2015-01-01

    Virulence factors (VFs) contribute to the emergence of new human Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, are lineage dependent, and are relevant to the development of M. tuberculosis drugs/vaccines. VFs were sought within M. tuberculosis lineage 3, which has the Central Asian (CAS) spoligotype. Three isolates were selected from clusters previously identified as dominant in London, United Kingdom. Strain-associated virulence was studied in guinea pig, monocyte-derived macrophage, and lysozyme resistance assays. Whole-genome sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis, and a literature review contributed to the identification of SNPs of interest. The animal model revealed borderline differences in strain-associated pathogenicity. Ex vivo, isolate C72 exhibited statistically significant differences in intracellular growth relative to C6 and C14. SNP candidates inducing lower fitness levels included 123 unique nonsynonymous SNPs, including three located in genes (lysX, caeA, and ponA2) previously identified as VFs in the laboratory-adapted reference strain H37Rv and shown to confer lysozyme resistance. C72 growth was most affected by lysozyme in vitro. A BLAST search revealed that all three SNPs of interest (C35F, P76Q, and P780R) also occurred in Tiruvallur, India, and in Uganda. Unlike C72, however, no single isolate identified through BLAST carried all three SNPs simultaneously. CAS isolates representative of three medium-sized human clusters demonstrated differential outcomes in models commonly used to estimate strain-associated virulence, supporting the idea that virulence varies within, not just across, M. tuberculosis lineages. Three VF SNPs of interest were identified in two additional locations worldwide, which suggested independent selection and supported a role for these SNPs in virulence. The relevance of lysozyme resistance to strain virulence remains to be established. PMID:25776753

  7. Antimicrobial activity of lysozyme with special relevance to milk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    Dec 29, 2008 ... Lysozyme is among the minor milk proteins that has attracted increased .... while there is a general agreement that surface attachment polymers and ..... and form aggregates as a result of electrostatic and hydrophobic ...... conformational changes and antimicrobial activity of lysozyme upon reduction of its ...

  8. Modeling growth of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris DSM 3922 type strain vegetative cells in the apple juice with nisin and lysozyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celenk Molva

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the effect of storage temperature on A. acidoterrestris DSM 3922 cells (105 CFU/mL was examined during growth in reconstituted apple juice (pH 3.8, °Brix 11.3 containing nisin (0–100 IU/mL and lysozyme (0–100 mg/L. The growth curves were obtained at three temperatures of 27, 35 and 43 °C using absorbance data (OD600 nm. Based on the results, the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs of nisin were found as 10 IU/mL at all tested temperatures. On the other hand, increasing the temperature decreased the amount of lysozyme for growth inhibition. The MICs of lysozyme were found as 10, 2.5 and 1.25 mg/L at 27, 35 and 43 °C, respectively. At selected non-inhibitory doses, nisin (1.25–5 IU/mL and lysozyme (0.3–2.5 mg/L prolonged the lag time compared to the controls at the corresponding temperatures. In addition, there was a strong linear relationship between the lag time and lysozyme concentrations at 27 and 35 °C (R2 > 0.98. The results of this study demonstrated that both nisin and lysozyme could be used to inhibit the growth of A. acidoterrestris cells in the apple juice. The results also indicated that the growth parameters were variable depending on the storage temperature and the type of the antimicrobial agent used in the apple juice.

  9. Solvent freeze out crystallization of lysozyme from a lysozyme-ovalbumin mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Borbon, V.; Ulrich, J. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Zentrum fuer Ingenieurwissenschaft, Verfahrenstechnik/TVT, 06099 Halle Saale (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    Hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) crystallization conditions from an ovalbumin-lysozyme mixture were found by screening tests and further located in pseudo-phase diagrams. This information was used to set up the initial conditions for the solvent freeze out (SFO) process. The process uses the freezing of ice to create the supersaturation for the proteins to crystallize out of the solution. The crystallization of HEWL (15 mg/mL) out of a lysozyme-ovalbumin mixture (1.7 mg/mL) is carried out by SFO. Under the reported conditions, a crystallization yield of 69 % was obtained. A mean crystal size of 77.8 {mu}m was enhanced in a crystallization time of 15.1 h. The lysozyme nature of the crystals is proven by SDS PAGE and enzymatic activity tests. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Raman mapping of mannitol/lysozyme particles produced via spray drying and single droplet drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pekka Pajander, Jari; Matero, Sanni Elina; Sloth, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to investigate the effect of a model protein on the solid state of a commonly used bulk agent in spray-dried formulations. METHODS: A series of lysozyme/mannitol formulations were spray-dried using a lab-scale spray dryer. Further, the surface temperature of drying droplet....../particles was monitored using the DRYING KINETICS ANALYZER™ (DKA) with controllable drying conditions mimicking the spray-drying process to estimate the drying kinetics of the lysozyme/mannitol formulations. The mannitol polymorphism and the spatial distribution of lysozyme in the particles were examined using X......-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD) and Raman microscopy. Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis was used for analyzing the Raman microscopy data. RESULTS: XRPD results indicated that a mixture of β-mannitol and α-mannitol was produced in the spray-drying process which was supported by the Raman analysis...

  11. Lysozymes in the animal kingdom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the animal kingdom, three major distinct lysozyme types have been ... reveals that c-type lysozymes are predominantly present in the phylum of the Chordata and in different classes of the Arthropoda. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  12. Production, crystallization and X-ray characterization of chemically glycosylated hen egg-white lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López-Jaramillo, F. J.; Pérez-Banderas, F.; Hernández-Mateo, F.; Santoyo-González, F.

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility of glycosylation post-purification has been demonstrated by introducing glucose into the model protein lysozyme via a novel reaction that is compatible with biological samples. The crystallization of glycoproteins is one of the challenges to be confronted by the crystallographic community in the frame of what is known as glycobiology. The state of the art for the crystallization of glycoproteins is not promising and removal of the carbohydrate chains is generally suggested since they are flexible and a source of heterogeneity. In this paper, the feasibility of introducing glucose into the model protein hen egg-white lysozyme via a post-purification glycosylation reaction that may turn any protein into a model glycoprotein whose carbohydrate fraction can be manipulated is demonstrated

  13. Dynamics of hydration in hen egg white lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterpone, F; Ceccarelli, M; Marchi, M

    2001-08-10

    We investigate the hydration dynamics of a small globular protein, hen egg-white lysozyme. Extensive simulations (two trajectories of 9 ns each) were carried out to identify the time-scales and mechanism of water attachment to this protein. The location of the surface and integral water molecules in lysozyme was also investigated. Three peculiar temporal scales of the hydration dynamics can be discerned: two among these, with sub-nanosecond mean residence time, tau(w), are characteristic of surface hydration water; the slower time-scale (tau(w) approximately 2/3 ns) is associated with buried water molecules in hydrophilic pores and in superficial clefts. The computed tau(w) values in the two independent runs fall in a similar range and are consistent with each other, thus adding extra weight to our result. The tau(w) of surface water obtained from the two independent trajectories is 20 and 24 ps. In both simulations only three water molecules are bound to lysozyme for the entire length of the trajectories, in agreement with nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion estimates. Locations other than those identified in the protein crystal are found to be possible for these long-residing water molecules. The dynamics of the hydration water molecules observed in our simulations implies that each water molecule visits a multitude of residues during the lifetime of its bound with the protein. The number of residues seen by a single water molecule increases with the time-scale of its residence time and, on average, is equal to one only for the water molecules with shorter residence time. Thus, tau(w) values obtained from inelastic neutron scattering and based on jump-diffusion models are likely not to account for the contribution of water molecules with longer residence time. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme in water/sugar solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerbret, A. [Department of Food Science, Cornell University, 101 Stocking Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Affouard, F. [Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Materiaux Moleculaires, UMR CNRS 8024, Universite Lille I, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)], E-mail: frederic.affouard@univ-lille1.fr; Bordat, P. [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique et de Physico-Chimie Moleculaire, UMR 5624, Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, 64000 Pau (France); Hedoux, A.; Guinet, Y.; Descamps, M. [Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Materiaux Moleculaires, UMR CNRS 8024, Universite Lille I, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2008-04-18

    Structural and dynamical properties of the solvent at the protein/solvent interface have been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme in trehalose, maltose and sucrose solutions. Results are discussed in the framework of the bioprotection phenomena. The analysis of the relative concentration of water oxygen atoms around lysozyme suggests that lysozyme is preferentially hydrated. When comparing the three sugars, trehalose is seen more excluded than maltose and sucrose. The preferential exclusion of sugars from the protein surface induces some differences in the behavior of trehalose and maltose, particularly at 50 and 60 wt% concentrations, that are not observed experimentally in binary sugar/mixtures. The dynamical slowing down of the solvent is suggested to mainly arise from the homogeneity of the water/sugar matrices controlled by the percolation of the sugar hydrogen bonds networks. Furthermore, lysozyme strongly increases relaxation times of solvent molecules at the protein/solvent interface.

  15. In Vitro Effect of Lysozyme on Albumin Deposition to Hydrogel Contact Lens Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei Omali, Negar; Subbaraman, Lakshman N; Heynen, Miriam; Fadli, Zohra; Coles-Brennan, Chantal; Jones, Lyndon W

    2017-11-01

    Albumin deposition on contact lenses could be detrimental to contact lens (CL) wear because this may increase the risk of bacterial binding and reduce comfort. Lysozyme deposition on selected lens materials would reduce albumin deposition on lenses. This study aims to determine if lysozyme deposition on CLs could act as a barrier against subsequent albumin adsorption, using an in vitro model. Six hydrogel CL materials (etafilcon A, polymacon, nelfilcon A, omafilcon A, ocufilcon B, and nesofilcon A) were evaluated. Four CLs of each type were soaked in lysozyme solution for 16 hours at 37°C. Lysozyme-coated lenses were then placed in vials with 1.5 mL of artificial tear solution containing I-labeled albumin for 16 hours at 37°C with shaking. Four uncoated lenses of each type were used as controls. Lenses soaked in radiolabeled albumin were rinsed in a phosphate-buffered saline solution, and radioactive counts were measured directly on lenses using a gamma counter. Albumin uptake on lenses was measured using a calibration curve by plotting radioactive counts versus protein concentration. Results are reported as mean ± SD. Lysozyme-coated etafilcon A lenses exhibited lower levels of deposited albumin than uncoated etafilcon A lenses (58 ± 12 vs. 84 ± 5 ng/lens; P albumin adsorption between control (uncoated) and lysozyme-coated polymacon (105 ± 10 vs. 110 ± 34 ng/lens), nelfilcon A (51 ± 7 vs. 42 ± 20 ng/lens), omafilcon A (90 ± 20 vs. 80 ± 38 ng/lens), ocufilcon B (87 ± 20 vs. 115 ± 50 ng/lens), and nesofilcon A (170 ± 29 vs. 161 ± 10 ng/lens) lens materials (P > .05). Uncoated nesofilcon A lenses deposited the highest amount of albumin when compared with other uncoated lenses (P albumin, which may potentially be beneficial to CL wearers.

  16. Lysozymes in the animal kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callewaert, Lien; Michiels, Chris W

    2010-03-01

    Lysozymes (EC 3.2.1.17) are hydrolytic enzymes, characterized by their ability to cleave the beta-(1,4)-glycosidic bond between N-acetylmuramic acid and N-acetylglucosamine in peptidoglycan, the major bacterial cell wall polymer. In the animal kingdom, three major distinct lysozyme types have been identified--the c-type (chicken or conventional type), the g-type (goose-type) and the i-type (invertebrate type) lysozyme. Examination of the phylogenetic distribution of these lysozymes reveals that c-type lysozymes are predominantly present in the phylum of the Chordata and in different classes of the Arthropoda. Moreover, g-type lysozymes (or at least their corresponding genes) are found in members of the Chordata, as well as in some bivalve mollusks belonging to the invertebrates. In general, the latter animals are known to produce i-type lysozymes. Although the homology in primary structure for representatives of these three lysozyme types is limited, their three-dimensional structures show striking similarities. Nevertheless, some variation exists in their catalytic mechanisms and the genomic organization of their genes. Regarding their biological role, the widely recognized function of lysozymes is their contribution to antibacterial defence but, additionally, some lysozymes (belonging to different types) are known to function as digestive enzymes.

  17. The dissolution phenomenon of lysozyme crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Ulrich, J. [Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Thermal Separation Processes, Centre of Engineering Science, Halle/Saale (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Dissolution studies on lysozyme crystals were carried out since the observed dissolution pattern look different from non-protein dissolved crystals. The Tetragonal, High Temperature and Low Temperature Orthorhombic morphologies, crystallized using sodium chloride, were chosen and the influence of different pH, salt and protein concentration on their dissolution was investigated. An increase in pH and/or salt concentration can modify the dissolution behaviour. The pattern of the crystals during the dissolution process will, therefore, develop differently. Frequently a skeleton like crystal pattern followed by a falling apart of the crystals is observed. The multi-component character of the lysozyme crystal (protein, water, buffer, salt) as well as ''solvatomorphism'' gives first insights in the phenomena happening in the dissolution process. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Salt-specific effects in lysozyme solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Janc

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of additions of low-molecular-mass salts on the properties of aqueous lysozyme solutions are examined by using the cloud-point temperature, T_{cloud}, measurements. Mixtures of protein, buffer, and simple salt in water are studied at pH=6.8 (phosphate buffer and pH=4.6 (acetate buffer. We show that an addition of buffer in the amount above I_{buffer} = 0.6 mol dm^{-3} does not affect the T_{cloud} values. However, by replacing a certain amount of the buffer electrolyte by another salt, keeping the total ionic strength constant, we can significantly change the cloud-point temperature. All the salts de-stabilize the solution and the magnitude of the effect depends on the nature of the salt. Experimental results are analyzed within the framework of the one-component model, which treats the protein-protein interaction as highly directional and of short-range. We use this approach to predict the second virial coefficients, and liquid-liquid phase diagrams under conditions, where T_{cloud} is determined experimentally.

  19. Influence of lysozyme complexation with purified Aldrich humic acid on lysozyme activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Tan, W.F.; Wang, M.X.; Liu, F.; Weng, L.P.; Norde, W.; Koopal, L.K.

    2012-01-01

    Humic acid is an important component of dissolved organic matter and in two previous papers it has been shown that purified Aldrich humic acid (PAHA) forms strong complexes with the oppositely charged protein lysozyme (LSZ). The complexation and aggregation of enzymes with humic acids may lead to

  20. The Protein Model Portal

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Konstantin; Kiefer, Florian; Kopp, J?rgen; Battey, James N. D.; Podvinec, Michael; Westbrook, John D.; Berman, Helen M.; Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    Structural Genomics has been successful in determining the structures of many unique proteins in a high throughput manner. Still, the number of known protein sequences is much larger than the number of experimentally solved protein structures. Homology (or comparative) modeling methods make use of experimental protein structures to build models for evolutionary related proteins. Thereby, experimental structure determination efforts and homology modeling complement each other in the exploratio...

  1. Preferential interactions and the effect of protein PEGylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Louise Stenstrup; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Kasimova, Marina Robertovna

    2015-01-01

    enthalpy was decreased to half the value for PEGylated lysozyme. The ratio between calorimetric and van't Hoff enthalpy suggests that our PEGylated lysozyme is a dimer. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The PEGylated model protein displayed similar stability responses to the addition of preferentially active...

  2. Modeling complexes of modeled proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anishchenko, Ivan; Kundrotas, Petras J; Vakser, Ilya A

    2017-03-01

    Structural characterization of proteins is essential for understanding life processes at the molecular level. However, only a fraction of known proteins have experimentally determined structures. This fraction is even smaller for protein-protein complexes. Thus, structural modeling of protein-protein interactions (docking) primarily has to rely on modeled structures of the individual proteins, which typically are less accurate than the experimentally determined ones. Such "double" modeling is the Grand Challenge of structural reconstruction of the interactome. Yet it remains so far largely untested in a systematic way. We present a comprehensive validation of template-based and free docking on a set of 165 complexes, where each protein model has six levels of structural accuracy, from 1 to 6 Å C α RMSD. Many template-based docking predictions fall into acceptable quality category, according to the CAPRI criteria, even for highly inaccurate proteins (5-6 Å RMSD), although the number of such models (and, consequently, the docking success rate) drops significantly for models with RMSD > 4 Å. The results show that the existing docking methodologies can be successfully applied to protein models with a broad range of structural accuracy, and the template-based docking is much less sensitive to inaccuracies of protein models than the free docking. Proteins 2017; 85:470-478. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. ISOLATION AND PURIFICATION OF LYSOZYME FROM THE HEN EGG WHITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was the development of the method of lysozyme isolation from hen egg proteins. Lysozyme was isolated by differential heat denaturation of proteins with changing of the medium pH value, followed by neutralization, dialysis and additional purification by gel chromatography on Sephadex G-50. Activity was determined by bacteriolytic method (with Micrococcus lysodeikticus 4698 as a substrate. The enzyme purity and molecular mass were determined using SDS-electrophoresis and massspectrometry. The method of lysozyme isolation from hen egg proteins with the enzyme yield of 3.2 ± 0.2% and bacteriolytic activity of 22 025 ± 1 500 U/mg is modified. According to electrophoresis data, the isolated enzyme is characterized by high degree of purity (~95–98% and is comparable with lysozyme of AppliChem company by main physical and chemical characteristics. The obtaining product is stored in a crystalline form at low temperature (–24 оC for 9 months. The proposed method allows obtaining active and stable lysozyme with high purity from hen egg protein in laboratory conditions for the usage in biotechnology.

  4. Penetration and fusion of phospholipid vesicles by lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.; Kim, H.

    1989-01-01

    The lysozyme-induced fusion of phosphatidylserine/phosphatidylethanolamine vesicles as studied at a wide range of pH is found to correlate well with the binding of this protein to the vesicles. An identical 6000 molecular weight segment of lysozyme at the N-terminal region is found to be protected from tryptic digestion when initially incubated with vesicles at several pH values. Only this segment is labeled by dansyl chloride, which is partitioned into the bilayer. These results suggest the penetration of one segment of lysozyme into the bilayer. Photoactivated labeling of the membrane-penetrating segment of lysozyme with 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-([ 125 I]iodophenyl)diazirine ([ 125 I]TID) and subsequent identification of the labeled residues by Edman degradation and gamma-ray counting indicate that four amino acids from the N-terminal are located outside the hydrophobic core of the bilayer. Although treatment of the membrane-embedded segment with aminopeptidase failed to cleave any amino acids from the N-terminal, it appears that a loop of lysozyme segment near the N-terminal penetrates into the bilayer at acidic pH. A helical wheel diagram shows that the labeling is done mainly on one surface of the alpha-helix. The penetration kinetics as studied by time-dependent [ 125 I]TID labeling coincide with the fusion kinetics, strongly suggesting that the penetration of the lysozyme segment into the vesicles is the cause of the fusion

  5. Penetration and fusion of phospholipid vesicles by lysozyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.; Kim, H. (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul)

    1989-10-01

    The lysozyme-induced fusion of phosphatidylserine/phosphatidylethanolamine vesicles as studied at a wide range of pH is found to correlate well with the binding of this protein to the vesicles. An identical 6000 molecular weight segment of lysozyme at the N-terminal region is found to be protected from tryptic digestion when initially incubated with vesicles at several pH values. Only this segment is labeled by dansyl chloride, which is partitioned into the bilayer. These results suggest the penetration of one segment of lysozyme into the bilayer. Photoactivated labeling of the membrane-penetrating segment of lysozyme with 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(({sup 125}I)iodophenyl)diazirine (({sup 125}I)TID) and subsequent identification of the labeled residues by Edman degradation and gamma-ray counting indicate that four amino acids from the N-terminal are located outside the hydrophobic core of the bilayer. Although treatment of the membrane-embedded segment with aminopeptidase failed to cleave any amino acids from the N-terminal, it appears that a loop of lysozyme segment near the N-terminal penetrates into the bilayer at acidic pH. A helical wheel diagram shows that the labeling is done mainly on one surface of the alpha-helix. The penetration kinetics as studied by time-dependent ({sup 125}I)TID labeling coincide with the fusion kinetics, strongly suggesting that the penetration of the lysozyme segment into the vesicles is the cause of the fusion.

  6. Surface morphology of thin lysozyme films produced by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purice, Andreea; Schou, Jørgen; Pryds, Nini

    2007-01-01

    Thin films of the protein, lysozyme, have been deposited by the matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique. Frozen targets of 0.3-1.0 wt.% lysozyme dissolved in ultrapure water were irradiated by laser light at 355 mn with a fluence of 2 J/cm(2). The surface quality of the thin....... The concentration of lysozyme in the ice matrix apparently does not play any significant role for the morphology of the film. The morphology obtained with MAPLE has been compared with results for direct laser irradiation of a pressed lysozyme sample (i.e. pulsed laser deposition (PLD)). (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All...

  7. Amino acids and glycine ethyl ester as new crystallization reagents for lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Len; Shiraki, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades, amino acids and amino-acid derivatives have been applied in various fields of protein chemistry. The potential use of amino acids and their derivatives as new precipitating agents is described. Several amino acids and their derivatives are prominent additives in the field of protein chemistry. This study reports the use of charged amino acids and glycine ethyl ester as precipitants in protein crystallization, using hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) as a model. A discussion of the crystallization of HEWL using these reagents as precipitating agents is given

  8. Complexation of lysozyme with adsorbed PtBS-b-SCPI block polyelectrolyte micelles on silver surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagiannopoulos, Aristeidis; Christoulaki, Anastasia; Spiliopoulos, Nikolaos; Vradis, Alexandros; Toprakcioglu, Chris; Pispas, Stergios

    2015-01-20

    We present a study of the interaction of the positively charged model protein lysozyme with the negatively charged amphiphilic diblock polyelectrolyte micelles of poly(tert-butylstyrene-b-sodium (sulfamate/carboxylate)isoprene) (PtBS-b-SCPI) on the silver/water interface. The adsorption kinetics are monitored by surface plasmon resonance, and the surface morphology is probed by atomic force microscopy. The micellar adsorption is described by stretched-exponential kinetics, and the micellar layer morphology shows that the micelles do not lose their integrity upon adsorption. The complexation of lysozyme with the adsorbed micellar layers depends on the micelles arrangement and density in the underlying layer, and lysozyme follows the local morphology of the underlying roughness. When the micellar adsorbed amount is small, the layers show low capacity in protein complexation and low resistance in loading. When the micellar adsorbed amount is high, the situation is reversed. The adsorbed layers both with or without added protein are found to be irreversibly adsorbed on the Ag surface.

  9. Effects of Purification on the Crystallization of Lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Felecia L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Van Der Woerd, Mark; Pusey, Marc L.

    1996-01-01

    We have additionally purified a commercial lysozyme preparation by cation exchange chromatography, followed by recrystallization. This material is 99.96% pure with respect to macromolecular impurities. At basic pH, the purified lysozyme gave only tetragonal crystals at 20 C. Protein used directly from the bottle, prepared by dialysis against distilled water, or which did not bind to the cation exchange column had considerably altered crystallization behavior. Lysozyme which did not bind to the cation exchange column was subsequently purified by size exclusion chromatography. This material gave predominately bundles of rod-shaped crystals with some small tetragonal crystals at lower pHs. The origin of the bundled rod habit was postulated to be a thermally dependent tetragonal- orthorhombic change in the protein structure. This was subsequently ruled out on the basis of crystallization behavior and growth rate experiments. This suggests that heterogeneous forms of lysozyme may be responsible. These results demonstrate three classes of impurities: (1) small molecules, which may be removed by dialysis; (2) macromolecules, which are removable by chromatographic techniques; and (3) heterogeneous forms of the protein, which can be removed in this case by cation exchange chromatography. Of these, heterogeneous forms of the lysozyme apparently have the greatest affect on its crystallization behavior.

  10. Positron annihilation studies in lysozyme and catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohilla, Y.; Singh, K.P.; Roy Choudhury, S.; Jain, P.C.

    1992-01-01

    Positron annihilation studies have been carried out in two enzymes, lysozyme and catalase. Temperature dependence of the positron lifetimes in these two enzymes has been investigated. The results explained in terms of the free volume model and fluctuations between different conformational micro states of enzyme structures provide a new insight into the mechanism of bio-activity of these enzymes. (author). 15 refs., 4 figs

  11. The Protein Model Portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Konstantin; Kiefer, Florian; Kopp, Jürgen; Battey, James N D; Podvinec, Michael; Westbrook, John D; Berman, Helen M; Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2009-03-01

    Structural Genomics has been successful in determining the structures of many unique proteins in a high throughput manner. Still, the number of known protein sequences is much larger than the number of experimentally solved protein structures. Homology (or comparative) modeling methods make use of experimental protein structures to build models for evolutionary related proteins. Thereby, experimental structure determination efforts and homology modeling complement each other in the exploration of the protein structure space. One of the challenges in using model information effectively has been to access all models available for a specific protein in heterogeneous formats at different sites using various incompatible accession code systems. Often, structure models for hundreds of proteins can be derived from a given experimentally determined structure, using a variety of established methods. This has been done by all of the PSI centers, and by various independent modeling groups. The goal of the Protein Model Portal (PMP) is to provide a single portal which gives access to the various models that can be leveraged from PSI targets and other experimental protein structures. A single interface allows all existing pre-computed models across these various sites to be queried simultaneously, and provides links to interactive services for template selection, target-template alignment, model building, and quality assessment. The current release of the portal consists of 7.6 million model structures provided by different partner resources (CSMP, JCSG, MCSG, NESG, NYSGXRC, JCMM, ModBase, SWISS-MODEL Repository). The PMP is available at http://www.proteinmodelportal.org and from the PSI Structural Genomics Knowledgebase.

  12. The Anti-sigma Factor RsiV Is a Bacterial Receptor for Lysozyme: Co-crystal Structure Determination and Demonstration That Binding of Lysozyme to RsiV Is Required for σV Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Hastie

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available σ factors provide RNA polymerase with promoter specificity in bacteria. Some σ factors require activation in order to interact with RNA polymerase and transcribe target genes. The Extra-Cytoplasmic Function (ECF σ factor, σV, is encoded by several Gram-positive bacteria and is specifically activated by lysozyme. This activation requires the proteolytic destruction of the anti-σ factor RsiV via a process of regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP. In many cases proteases that cleave at site-1 are thought to directly sense a signal and initiate the RIP process. We previously suggested binding of lysozyme to RsiV initiated the proteolytic destruction of RsiV and activation of σV. Here we determined the X-ray crystal structure of the RsiV-lysozyme complex at 2.3 Å which revealed that RsiV and lysozyme make extensive contacts. We constructed RsiV mutants with altered abilities to bind lysozyme. We find that mutants that are unable to bind lysozyme block site-1 cleavage of RsiV and σV activation in response to lysozyme. Taken together these data demonstrate that RsiV is a receptor for lysozyme and binding of RsiV to lysozyme is required for σV activation. In addition, the co-structure revealed that RsiV binds to the lysozyme active site pocket. We provide evidence that in addition to acting as a sensor for the presence of lysozyme, RsiV also inhibits lysozyme activity. Thus we have demonstrated that RsiV is a protein with multiple functions. RsiV inhibits σV activity in the absence of lysozyme, RsiV binds lysozyme triggering σV activation and RsiV inhibits the enzymatic activity of lysozyme.

  13. Crystallization of Hevamine, an Enzyme with Lysozyme/Chitinase Activity from Hevea brasiliensis Latex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROZEBOOM, HJ; BUDIANI, A; BEINTEMA, JJ

    1990-01-01

    Hevamine, an enzyme with both lysozyme and chitinase activity, was isolated and purified from Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree) latex. The enzyme (molecular weight 29,000) is homologous to certain “pathogenesis-related” proteins from plants, but not to hen egg-white or phage T4 lysozyme. To

  14. Thermodynamic Exploration of Eosin-Lysozyme Binding: A Physical Chemistry and Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Andrew J.; Hartsell, Lydia R.; Krueger, Brent P.; Pikaart, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a modular pair of experiments for use in the undergraduate physical chemistry and biochemistry laboratories. Both experiments examine the thermodynamics of the binding of a small molecule, eosin Y, to the protein lysozyme. The assay for binding is the quenching of lysozyme fluorescence by eosin through resonant energy transfer. In…

  15. Production of active lysozyme films by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation at 355 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purice, Andreea; Schou, Jørgen; Kingshott, P.

    2007-01-01

    Thin lysozyme films have been produced in a dry environment by MAPLE (matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation) from a water ice matrix irradiated by laser light at 355 nm above the absorption threshold of the protein. A significant part of the lysozyme molecules are transferred to the film without...

  16. Modified lysozymes as novel broad spectrum natural antimicrobial agents in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminlari, Ladan; Hashemi, Marjan Mohammadi; Aminlari, Mahmoud

    2014-06-01

    In recent years much attention and interest have been directed toward application of natural antimicrobial agents in foods. Some naturally occurring proteins such as lactoperoxidase, lactoferrin, and lysozyme have received considerable attention and are being considered as potential antimicrobial agents in foods. Lysozyme kills bacteria by hydrolyzing the peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall of certain bacterial species, hence its application as a natural antimicrobial agent has been suggested. However, limitations in the action of lysozyme against only Gram-positive bacteria have prompted scientists to extend the antimicrobial effects of lysozyme by several types of chemical modifications. During the last 2 decades extensive research has been directed toward modification of lysozyme in order to improve its antimicrobial properties. This review will report on the latest information available on lysozyme modifications and examine the applicability of the modified lysozymes in controlling growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in foods. The results of modifications of lysozyme using its conjugation with different small molecule, polysaccharides, as well as modifications using proteolytic enzymes will be reviewed. These types of modifications have not only increased the functional properties of lysozyme (such as solubility and heat stability) but also extended the antimicrobial activity of lysozyme. Many examples will be given to show that modification can decrease the count of Gram-negative bacteria in bacterial culture and in foods by as much as 5 log CFU/mL and in some cases essentially eliminated Escherichia coli. In conclusion this review demonstrates that modified lysozymes are excellent natural food preservatives, which can be used in food industry. The subject described in this review article can lead to the development of methods to produce new broad-spectrum natural antimicrobial agents, based on modification of chicken egg white lysozyme, which

  17. Variable Lysozyme Transport Dynamics on Oxidatively Functionalized Polystyrene Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moringo, Nicholas A; Shen, Hao; Tauzin, Lawrence J; Wang, Wenxiao; Bishop, Logan D C; Landes, Christy F

    2017-10-17

    Tuning protein adsorption dynamics at polymeric interfaces is of great interest to many biomedical and material applications. Functionalization of polymer surfaces is a common method to introduce application-specific surface chemistries to a polymer interface. In this work, single-molecule fluorescence microscopy is utilized to determine the adsorption dynamics of lysozyme, a well-studied antibacterial protein, at the interface of polystyrene oxidized via UV exposure and oxygen plasma and functionalized by ligand grafting to produce varying degrees of surface hydrophilicity, surface roughness, and induced oxygen content. Single-molecule tracking indicates lysozyme loading capacities, and surface mobility at the polymer interface is hindered as a result of all functionalization techniques. Adsorption dynamics of lysozyme depend on the extent and the specificity of the oxygen functionalities introduced to the polystyrene surface. Hindered adsorption and mobility are dominated by hydrophobic effects attributed to water hydration layer formation at the functionalized polystyrene surfaces.

  18. A novel electrochemical aptamer-antibody sandwich assay for lysozyme detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña, Cristina; Hayat, Akhtar; Mishra, Rupesh; Vasilescu, Alina; del Valle, Manel; Marty, Jean-Louis

    2015-06-21

    In this paper, we have reported a novel electrochemical aptamer-antibody based sandwich biosensor for the detection of lysozyme. In the sensing strategy, an anti-lysozyme aptamer was immobilized onto the carbon electrode surface by covalent binding via diazonium salt chemistry. After incubating with a target protein (lysozyme), a biotinylated antibody was used to complete the sandwich format. The subsequent additions of avidin-alkaline phosphatase as an enzyme label, and a 1-naphthyl phosphate substrate (1-NPP) allowed us to determine the concentration of lysozyme (Lys) via Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV) of the generated enzyme reaction product, 1-naphthol. Using this strategy, a wide detection range from 5 fM to 5 nM was obtained for a target lysozyme, with a detection limit of 4.3 fM. The control experiments were carried out by using bovine serum albumin (BSA), cytochrome c and casein. The results showed that the proposed biosensor had good specificity, stability and reproducibility for lysozyme analysis. In addition, the biosensor was applied for detecting lysozyme in spiked wine samples, and very good recovery rates were obtained in the range from 95.2 to 102.0% for lysozyme detection. This implies that the proposed sandwich biosensor is a promising analytical tool for the analysis of lysozyme in real samples.

  19. MUCOADHESIVE GEL WITH IMMOBILIZED LYSOZYME: PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dekina S. S.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of non-covalent immobilized lysozyme, as well as physico-chemical and biochemical properties of obtained mucoadhesive gel was the aim of the research. Lysozyme activity was determined by bacteriolytic method (Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells acetone powder was a substrate. Lysozyme immobilization was conducted by the method of entrapment in gel. Enzyme carrier interaction was studied by viscometric, spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric methods. Mucoadhesive gel with immobilized lysozyme, possessing antiinflammatory and antimicrobial activities, was prepared. Due to immobilization, protein-polymer complex with the original enzymatic activity was formed. The product is characterized by high mucoadhesive properties, quantitative retaining of protein and bacteriolytic activity, prolonged release of the enzyme, improved biochemical characteristics (extended pH-activity profile, stability in acidic medium and during storage for 2 years, and it is perspective for further studies. The proposed method for lysozyme immobilization in the carboxymethyl cellulose sodium salt gel allows to obtain a stable, highly efficient product, with high adhesive properties for attachment to the mucous membranes, that is promising for use in biomedicine.

  20. A comparative study for adsorption of lysozyme from aqueous samples onto Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles using different ionic liquids as modifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamran, Sedigheh; Absalan, Ghodratollah; Asadi, Mozaffar

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, nanoparticles of Fe3O4 as well as their modified forms with different ionic liquids (IL-Fe3O4) were prepared and used for adsorption of lysozyme. The mean size and the surface morphology of the nanoparticles were characterized by TEM, XRD and FTIR techniques. Adsorption studies of lysozyme were performed under different experimental conditions in batch system on different modified magnetic nanoparticles such as, lysozyme concentration, pH of the solution, and contact time. Experimental results were obtained under the optimum operational conditions of pH 9.0 and a contact time of 10 min when initial protein concentrations of 0.05-2.0 mg mL(-1) were used. The isotherm evaluations revealed that the Langmuir model attained better fits to the equilibrium data than the Freundlich model. The maximum obtained adsorption capacities were 370.4, 400.0 500.0 and 526.3 mg of lysozyme for adsorption onto Fe3O4 and modified magnetic nanoparticles by [C4MIM][Br], [C6MIM][Br] and [C8MIM][Br] per gram of adsorbent, respectively. The Langmuir adsorption constants were 0.004, 0.019, 0.024 and 0.012 L mg(-1) for adsorptions of lysozyme onto Fe3O4 and modified magnetic nanoparticles by [C4MIM][Br], [C6MIM][Br] and [C8MIM][Br], respectively. The adsorption capacity of lysozyme was found to be dependent on its chemical structure, pH of the solution, temperature and type of ionic liquid as modifier. The applicability of two kinetic models including pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order model was estimated. Furthermore, the thermodynamic parameters were calculated. Protein could desorb from IL-Fe3O4 nanoparticles by using NaCl solution at pH 9.5 and was reused.

  1. Complex coacervate core micelles with a lysozyme-modified corona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danial, Maarten; Klok, Harm-Anton; Norde, Willem; Stuart, Martien A Cohen

    2007-07-17

    This paper describes the preparation, characterization, and enzymatic activity of complex coacervate core micelles (C3Ms) composed of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(N-methyl-2-vinyl pyridinium iodide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PQ2VP-PEO) to which the antibacterial enzyme lysozyme is end-attached. C3Ms were prepared by polyelectrolyte complex formation between PAA and mixtures containing different ratios of aldehyde and hydroxyl end-functionalized PQ2VP-PEO. This resulted in the formation of C3Ms containing 0-40% (w/w) of the aldehyde end-functionalized PQ2VP-PEO block copolymer (PQ2VP-PEO-CHO). Chemical conjugation of lysozyme was achieved via reductive amination of the aldehyde groups, which are exposed at the surface of the C3M, with the amine groups present in the side chains of the lysine residues of the protein. Dynamic and static light scattering indicated that the conjugation of lysozyme to C3Ms prepared using 10 and 20% (w/w) PQ2VP-PEO-CHO resulted in the formation of unimicellar particles. Multimicellar aggregates, in contrast, were obtained when lysozyme was conjugated to C3Ms prepared using 30 or 40% (w/w) PQ2VP-PEO-CHO. The enzymatic activity of the unimicellar lysozyme-C3M conjugates toward the hydrolysis of the bacterial substrate Micrococcus lysodeikticus was comparable to that of free lysozyme. For the multimicellar particles, in contrast, significantly reduced enzymatic rates of hydrolysis, altered circular dichroism, and red-shifted tryptophan fluorescence spectra were measured. These results are attributed to the occlusion of lysozyme in the interior of the multimicellar conjugates.

  2. [Lysozyme in the treatment of juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis. A new concept in its etiopathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamar-Ríos, J

    1990-01-01

    The A. inform about the results achieved with lysozyme chlorhydrate in the treatment of 15 patients with juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis. The lysozyme is an electropositive enzyme which synthesis is related to the degree of proteins and vitamin B complex ingestion. Lysozyme is a component of the immunitary inespecific system, serving to prevent against HPV-DNA at the level of the secretory film of the mucociliary apparatus of the respiratory mucous membrane. Furthermore, lysozyme hydrolyzes the mucopolysaccharide of the connective tissue and inhibits the virus-DNA replication. 100-300 mgr daily during 30-60 days simultaneously with hyperproteic diet and vitamin B complex (after correction of the nutrimental deficiencies) brought about the evanishment of papillomatosis. The A. suggest that the predisposition to infection by virus DNA is primarily of immunitary origin, because of lysozyme deficiency, and secondary due to a low intake of proteins and vitamin B complex.

  3. Adsorption of lysozyme to phospholipid and meibomian lipid monolayer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgil, Poonam; Torres, Margaux; Millar, Thomas J

    2006-03-15

    It is believed that a lipid layer forms the outer layer of the pre-ocular tear film and this layer helps maintain tear film stability by lowering its surface tension. Proteins of the aqueous layer of the tear film (beneath the lipid layer) may also contribute to reducing surface tension by adsorbing to, or penetrating the lipid layer. The purpose of this study was to compare the penetration of lysozyme, a tear protein, into films of meibomian lipids and phospholipids held at different surface pressures to determine if lysozyme were part of the surface layer of the tear film. Films of meibomian lipids or phospholipids were spread onto the surface of a buffered aqueous subphase. Films were compressed to particular pressures and lysozyme was injected into the subphase. Changes in surface pressure were monitored to determine adsorption or penetration of lysozyme into the surface film. Lysozyme penetrated a meibomian lipid film at all pressures tested (max=20 mN/m). It also penetrated phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylserine or phosphatidylethanolamine lipid films up to a pressure of 20 mN/m. It was not able to penetrate a phosphatidylcholine film at pressures >or=10 mN/m irrespective of the temperature being at 20 or 37 degrees C. However, it was able to penetrate it at very low pressures (<10 mN/m). Epifluorescence microscopy showed that the protein either adsorbs to or penetrates the lipid layer and the pattern of mixing depended upon the lipid at the surface. These results indicate that lysozyme is present at the surface of the tear film where it contributes to decreasing the surface tension by adsorbing and penetrating the meibomian lipids. Thus it helps to stabilize the tear film.

  4. A calorimetric study of the interactions in the aqueous solutions of lysozyme in the presence of denaturing cosolvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castronuovo, Giuseppina; Niccoli, Marcella

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A thermodynamic method is reported to monitor the chemical denaturation of lysozyme. ► The enthalpic interaction coefficients are very useful parameters to gain information about the mechanism through which two hydrated molecules interact in solution. ► Hypotheses are proposed about the mechanism underlying the denaturation of lysozyme induced by high concentrations of urea or ethanol. - Abstract: A thermodynamic method is reported to monitor the chemical denaturation of lysozyme. Heats of dilution of the protein in concentrated aqueous solutions of urea or ethanol have been determined at 298.15 K by flow microcalorimetry. The pairwise enthalpic interaction coefficients of the protein in the different solvent media are derived. These parameters allow to gain information about the influence of the cosolvents on the interactions acting between two interacting hydrated molecules of lysozyme, hence on the denaturation process. At increasing urea concentration, up to about 6 mol kg −1 , the values of the interaction coefficients are large and negative and remain almost unaltered. The invariance of the coefficients underlines that, even in highly concentrated urea, the hydration shell of the protein is such to maintain essentially unaltered the native conformation. At higher urea concentrations, a sudden change in the sign of the coefficients monitors the variation in the interactions between two hydrated denatured protein molecules. The same trend is found when ethanol is the cosolvent. At increasing concentration of the cosolvent, coefficients are, at first, almost invariant. After that, denaturation occurs, detected as a jump toward much more negative values. The results obtained are rationalized on the basis of those previously found for small model molecules in concentrated solutions of urea or ethanol. The thermodynamic framework allows useful comments to be made on the possible mode of action of the two cosolvents on the stability of proteins

  5. A calorimetric study of the interactions in the aqueous solutions of lysozyme in the presence of denaturing cosolvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castronuovo, Giuseppina, E-mail: giuseppina.castronuovo@unina.it [Department of Chemistry, University Federico II of Naples, Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 80126 Naples (Italy); Niccoli, Marcella [Department of Chemistry, University Federico II of Naples, Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 80126 Naples (Italy)

    2012-09-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A thermodynamic method is reported to monitor the chemical denaturation of lysozyme. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enthalpic interaction coefficients are very useful parameters to gain information about the mechanism through which two hydrated molecules interact in solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypotheses are proposed about the mechanism underlying the denaturation of lysozyme induced by high concentrations of urea or ethanol. - Abstract: A thermodynamic method is reported to monitor the chemical denaturation of lysozyme. Heats of dilution of the protein in concentrated aqueous solutions of urea or ethanol have been determined at 298.15 K by flow microcalorimetry. The pairwise enthalpic interaction coefficients of the protein in the different solvent media are derived. These parameters allow to gain information about the influence of the cosolvents on the interactions acting between two interacting hydrated molecules of lysozyme, hence on the denaturation process. At increasing urea concentration, up to about 6 mol kg{sup -1}, the values of the interaction coefficients are large and negative and remain almost unaltered. The invariance of the coefficients underlines that, even in highly concentrated urea, the hydration shell of the protein is such to maintain essentially unaltered the native conformation. At higher urea concentrations, a sudden change in the sign of the coefficients monitors the variation in the interactions between two hydrated denatured protein molecules. The same trend is found when ethanol is the cosolvent. At increasing concentration of the cosolvent, coefficients are, at first, almost invariant. After that, denaturation occurs, detected as a jump toward much more negative values. The results obtained are rationalized on the basis of those previously found for small model molecules in concentrated solutions of urea or ethanol. The thermodynamic framework allows useful comments to be made on

  6. Complex coacervates of hyaluronic acid and lysozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Water, Jorrit J.; Schack, Malthe M.; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    stoichiometry was determined using solution depletion and isothermal titration calorimetry. The binding stoichiometry of lysozyme to hyaluronic acid (870 kDa) determined by solution depletion was found to be 225.9 ± 6.6 mol, or 0.1 bound lysozyme molecules per hyaluronic acid monomer. This corresponded well...... with that obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry of 0.09 bound lysozyme molecules per hyaluronic acid monomer. The complexation did not alter the secondary structure of lysozyme measured by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy overlap analysis and had no significant impact on the Tm of lysozyme determined...

  7. Covalent immobilization of lysozyme on ethylene vinyl alcohol films for nonmigrating antimicrobial packaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriel-Galet, V; Talbert, J N; Hernandez-Munoz, P; Gavara, R; Goddard, J M

    2013-07-10

    The objective of this study was to develop a new antimicrobial film, in which lysozyme was covalently attached onto two different ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymers (EVOH 29 and EVOH 44). The EVOH surface was modified with UV irradiation treatment to generate carboxylic acid groups, and lysozyme was covalently attached to the functionalized polymer surface. Surface characterization of control and modified films was performed using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and dye assay. The value of protein loading after attachment on the surface was 8.49 μg protein/cm(2) and 5.74 μg protein/cm(2) for EVOH 29 and EVOH 44, respectively, after 10 min UV irradiation and bioconjugation. The efficacy of the EVOH-lysozyme films was assessed using Micrococcus lysodeikticus. The antimicrobial activity of the films was tested against Listeria monocytogenes and was similar to an equivalent amount of free enzyme. The reduction was 1.08 log for EVOH 29-lysozyme, 0.95 log for EVOH 44-lysozyme, and 1.34 log for free lysozyme. This work confirmed the successful use of lysozyme immobilization on the EVOH surface for antimicrobial packaging.

  8. Computational study of aggregation mechanism in human lysozyme[D67H].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmeshkumar Patel

    Full Text Available Aggregation of proteins is an undesired phenomena that affects both human health and bioengineered products such as therapeutic proteins. Finding preventative measures could be facilitated by a molecular-level understanding of dimer formation, which is the first step in aggregation. Here we present a molecular dynamics (MD study of dimer formation propensity in human lysozyme and its D67H variant. Because the latter protein aggregates while the former does not, they offer an ideal system for testing the feasibility of the proposed MD approach which comprises three stages: i partially unfolded conformers involved in dimer formation are generated via high-temperature MD simulations, ii potential dimer structures are searched using docking and refined with MD, iii free energy calculations are performed to find the most stable dimer structure. Our results provide a detailed explanation for how a single mutation (D67H turns human lysozyme from non-aggregating to an aggregating protein. Conversely, the proposed method can be used to identify the residues causing aggregation in a protein, which can be mutated to prevent it.

  9. Molecular structure, dynamics and hydration studies of soybean storage proteins and model systems by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakalis, L.T.

    1989-01-01

    The potential of high-resolution 13 C NMR for the characterization of soybean storage proteins was explored. The spectra of a commercial soy protein isolate as well as those of alkali-denatured 7S and 11S soybean globulins were well resolved and tentatively assigned. Relaxation measurements indicated fast motion for several side chains and the protein backbone. Protein fractions (11S and 7S) were also investigated at various states of molecular association. The large size of the multisubunit soybean storage proteins affected adversely both the resolution and the sensitivity of their 13 C NMR spectra. A comparison of 17 O and 2 H NMR relaxation rates of water in solutions of lysozyme (a model system) as a function of concentration, pH and magnetic field suggested that only 17 O monitors directly the hydration of lysozyme. Analysis of 17 O NMR lysozyme hydration data in terms of a two-state, fast-exchange, anisotropic model resulted in hydration parameters which are consistent with the protein's physico-chemical properties. The same model was applied to the calculation of the amount and mobility of bound water in soy protein dispersions by means of 17 O NMR relaxation measurements as a function of protein concentration. The protein concentration dependences of 1 H transverse NMR relaxation measurements at various pH and ionic strength values were fitted by a viral expansion. The interpretation of the data was based on the effects of protein aggregation, salt binding and protein group ionization on the NMR measurements. In all cases, relaxation rates showed a linear dependence on protein activity

  10. Interactions of cisplatin analogues with lysozyme: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Giarita; De Benedictis, Ilaria; Malfitano, Annamaria; Morelli, Giancarlo; Novellino, Ettore; Marasco, Daniela

    2017-10-01

    The biophysical characterization of drug binding to proteins plays a key role in structural biology and in the discovery and optimization of drug discovery processes. The search for optimal combinations of biophysical techniques that can correctly and efficiently identify and quantify binding of metal-based drugs to their final target is challenging, due to the physicochemical properties of these agents. Different cisplatin derivatives have shown different citotoxicities in most common cancer lines, suggesting that they exert their biological activity via different mechanisms of action. Here we carried out a comparative analysis, by studying the behaviours of three Pt-compounds under the same experimental conditions and binding assays to properly deepen the determinants of the different MAOs. Indeed we compared the results obtained using surface plasmon resonance, isothermal titration calorimetry, fluorescence spectroscopy and thermal shift assays based on circular dichroism experiments in the characterization of the formation of adducts obtained upon reaction of cisplatin, carboplatin and iodinated analogue of cisplatin, cis-Pt (NH 3 ) 2 I 2 , with the model protein hen egg white lysozyme, both at neutral and acid pHs. Further we reasoned on the applicability of employed techniques for the study the thermodynamics and kinetics of the reaction of a metallodrug with a protein and to reveal which information can be obtained using a combination of these analyses. Data were discussed on the light of the existing structural data collected on the platinated protein.

  11. Immunological response in egg-sensitive adults challenged with cheese containing or not containing lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Filippo; Iaconelli, Amerigo; Fiorentini, Lucia; Zito, Francesco; Donati, Maria Benedett; De Cristofaro, Maria Laura; Piva, Gianfranco; Mingrone, Geltrude

    2012-12-01

    Lysozyme is an enzyme that hydrolyzes bacterial peptidoglicans. For this reason, it is used in cheese manufacturing in order to prevent a defect of long-ripened hard cheese called "late blowing" due to the outgrowth of spores of Clostridium tyrobutyricum and Clostridium butyricum. Moreover, germination of Listeria monocytogenes spores into vegetative cells is also sensitive to lysozyme. The enzyme can be an allergenic molecule, and for this reason there are concerns about its use in food industry. The immunological and clinical response of consumption of lysozyme-containing cheese has been evaluated in 25 egg-sensitive subjects with or without lysozyme sensitization. A total of 25 egg-sensitive subjects were enrolled in this study. All the subjects were already treated for egg-sensitization and presented a positive skin prick test. All the subjects had a body mass index ≤ 25 kg/m(2) and were in the age range of 20-50 years. Each subject was studied twice and received randomly 30 g of Grana Padano (containing lysozyme) or TrentinGrana cheese (lysozyme-free) of two different aging periods: 16 or 24 months. A washout period of 1 week between each cheese intake was adopted. Blood samples were taken in fasting conditions and 1 hour after cheese intake and IgA, total IgE, and lysozyme-, ovomucoid-, and ovalbumin-specific IgE were measured. No adverse reactions were observed in both groups of patients after cheese samples were given. Lysozyme did not determine any variation of specific IgE compared with basal level. In lysozyme-sensitive patients a significant relationship between IgA and lysozyme-specific IgE was observed when lysozyme-containing cheese was given, confirming that lysozyme can pass the gut barrier. Neither adverse events nor immunological responses were observed after ingestion of cheese containing lysozyme. However, the immunological properties of peptides deriving from cheese protein hydrolysis need to be clarified, as does the effect of lysozyme on

  12. Partial molar volume of proteins studied by the three-dimensional reference interaction site model theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Takashi; Kovalenko, Andriy; Hirata, Fumio

    2005-04-14

    The three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) theory is applied to the analysis of hydration effects on the partial molar volume of proteins. For the native structure of some proteins, the partial molar volume is decomposed into geometric and hydration contributions using the 3D-RISM theory combined with the geometric volume calculation. The hydration contributions are correlated with the surface properties of the protein. The thermal volume, which is the volume of voids around the protein induced by the thermal fluctuation of water molecules, is directly proportional to the accessible surface area of the protein. The interaction volume, which is the contribution of electrostatic interactions between the protein and water molecules, is apparently governed by the charged atomic groups on the protein surface. The polar atomic groups do not make any contribution to the interaction volume. The volume differences between low- and high-pressure structures of lysozyme are also analyzed by the present method.

  13. Modeling Mercury in Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively non-toxic, other forms such as Hg2+ and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg2+ can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg2+ to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intra-protein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confers mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multi-scale model of environmental mercury cycling.

  14. Protein buffering in model systems and in whole human saliva.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lamanda

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to quantify the buffer attributes (value, power, range and optimum of two model systems for whole human resting saliva, the purified proteins from whole human resting saliva and single proteins. Two model systems, the first containing amyloglucosidase and lysozyme, and the second containing amyloglucosidase and alpha-amylase, were shown to provide, in combination with hydrogencarbonate and di-hydrogenphosphate, almost identical buffer attributes as whole human resting saliva. It was further demonstrated that changes in the protein concentration as small as 0.1% may change the buffer value of a buffer solution up to 15 times. Additionally, it was shown that there was a protein concentration change in the same range (0.16% between saliva samples collected at the time periods of 13:00 and others collected at 9:00 am and 17:00. The mode of the protein expression changed between these samples corresponded to the change in basic buffer power and the change of the buffer value at pH 6.7. Finally, SDS Page and Ruthenium II tris (bathophenantroline disulfonate staining unveiled a constant protein expression in all samples except for one 50 kDa protein band. As the change in the expression pattern of that 50 kDa protein band corresponded to the change in basic buffer power and the buffer value at pH 6.7, it was reasonable to conclude that this 50 kDa protein band may contain the protein(s belonging to the protein buffer system of human saliva.

  15. Application of TZERO calibrated modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry to characterize model protein formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badkar, Aniket; Yohannes, Paulos; Banga, Ajay

    2006-02-17

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using T(ZERO) modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) as a novel technique to characterize protein solutions using lysozyme as a model protein and IgG as a model monoclonal antibody. MDSC involves the application of modulated heating program, along with the standard heating program that enables the separation of overlapping thermal transitions. Although characterization of unfolding transitions for protein solutions requires the application of high sensitive DSC, separation of overlapping transitions like aggregation and other exothermic events may be possible only by use of MDSC. A newer T(ZERO) calibrated MDSC model from TA instruments that has improved sensitivity than previous models was used. MDSC analysis showed total, reversing and non-reversing heat flow signals. Total heat flow signals showed a combination of melting endotherms and overlapping exothermic events. Under the operating conditions used, the melting endotherms were seen in reversing heat flow signal while the exothermic events were seen in non-reversing heat flow signal. This enabled the separation of overlapping thermal transitions, improved data analysis and decreased baseline noise. MDSC was used here for characterization of lysozyme solutions, but its feasibility for characterizing therapeutic protein solutions needs further assessment.

  16. Serum lysozyme determinations, April-June 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, S C; Lamphere, J P; Jablon, S

    1963-04-18

    Serum lysozyme levels were determined on 670 consecutive subjects seen for regularly scheduled clinic examinations of the Adult Health Study in Hiroshima. Serum lysozyme levels were found to vary significantly with the absolute peripheral granulocyte count, age, sex, and month of study. A high level of correlation also was noted between serum lysozyme and diabetes mellitus. This was at least in part attributable to greater average age in patients with diabetes. Suggestive relationship was established between serum lysozyme levels, respiratory diseases, and tuberculosis. These changes are believed to reflect active inflammation with excessive destruction of granulocytes and parenchymal tissues in those patients with the more acute processes. No relationship was found between serum lysozyme and previous exposure to ionizing radiation. These studies indicate that the serum lysozyme level may be useful in the study of the kinetics of leukopoiesis, the aging process, and in the detection of subtle inflammatory processes. 21 references, 5 tables.

  17. Validation of cold plasma treatment for protein inactivation: a surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, C; Leduc, A; Barbeau, J; Saoudi, B; Yahia, L'H; Crescenzo, G De

    2006-01-01

    Gas plasma is being proposed as an interesting and promising tool to achieve sterilization. The efficacy of gas plasma to destroy bacterial spores (the most resistant living microorganisms) has been demonstrated and documented over the last ten years. In addition to causing damage to deoxyribonucleic acid by UV radiation emitted by excited species originating from the plasma, gas plasma has been shown to promote erosion of the microorganism in addition to possible oxidation reactions within the microorganism. In this work, we used lysozyme as a protein model to assess the effect of gas plasma on protein inactivation. Lysozyme samples have been subjected to the flowing afterglow of a gas discharge achieved in a nitrogen-oxygen mixture. The efficiency of this plasma treatment on lysozyme has been tested by two different assays. These are an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor assay. The two methods showed that exposure to gas plasma can abrogate lysozyme interactions with lysozyme-specific antibodies, more likely by destroying the epitopes responsible for the interaction. More specifically, two SPR-based assays were developed since our ELISA approach did not allow us to discriminate between background and low, but still intact, quantities of lysozyme epitope after plasma treatment. Our SPR results clearly demonstrated that significant protein destruction or desorption was achieved when amounts of lysozyme less than 12.5 ng had been deposited in polystyrene 96-well ELISA plates. At higher lysozyme amounts, traces of available lysozyme epitopes were detected by SPR through indirect measurements. Finally, we demonstrated that a direct SPR approach in which biosensor-immobilized lysozyme activity is directly measured prior and after plasma treatment is more sensitive, and thus, more appropriate to define plasma treatment efficacy with more certainty

  18. Validation of cold plasma treatment for protein inactivation: a surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, C.; Leduc, A.; Barbeau, J.; Saoudi, B.; Yahia, L'H.; DeCrescenzo, G.

    2006-08-01

    Gas plasma is being proposed as an interesting and promising tool to achieve sterilization. The efficacy of gas plasma to destroy bacterial spores (the most resistant living microorganisms) has been demonstrated and documented over the last ten years. In addition to causing damage to deoxyribonucleic acid by UV radiation emitted by excited species originating from the plasma, gas plasma has been shown to promote erosion of the microorganism in addition to possible oxidation reactions within the microorganism. In this work, we used lysozyme as a protein model to assess the effect of gas plasma on protein inactivation. Lysozyme samples have been subjected to the flowing afterglow of a gas discharge achieved in a nitrogen-oxygen mixture. The efficiency of this plasma treatment on lysozyme has been tested by two different assays. These are an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor assay. The two methods showed that exposure to gas plasma can abrogate lysozyme interactions with lysozyme-specific antibodies, more likely by destroying the epitopes responsible for the interaction. More specifically, two SPR-based assays were developed since our ELISA approach did not allow us to discriminate between background and low, but still intact, quantities of lysozyme epitope after plasma treatment. Our SPR results clearly demonstrated that significant protein destruction or desorption was achieved when amounts of lysozyme less than 12.5 ng had been deposited in polystyrene 96-well ELISA plates. At higher lysozyme amounts, traces of available lysozyme epitopes were detected by SPR through indirect measurements. Finally, we demonstrated that a direct SPR approach in which biosensor-immobilized lysozyme activity is directly measured prior and after plasma treatment is more sensitive, and thus, more appropriate to define plasma treatment efficacy with more certainty.

  19. Potential toxicity and affinity of triphenylmethane dye malachite green to lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Fei; Li, Xiu-Nan; Diao, Jian-Xiong; Sun, Ye; Zhang, Li; Ma, Lin; Yang, Xin-Ling; Zhang, Li; Sun, Ying

    2012-04-01

    Malachite green is a triphenylmethane dye that is used extensively in many industrial and aquacultural processes, generating environmental concerns and health problems to human being. In this contribution, the complexation between lysozyme and malachite green was verified by means of computer-aided molecular modeling, steady state and time-resolved fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) approaches. The precise binding patch of malachite green in lysozyme has been identified from molecular modeling and ANS displacement, Trp-62, Trp-63, and Trp-108 residues of lysozyme were earmarked to possess high-affinity for this dye, the principal forces in the lysozyme-malachite green adduct are hydrophobic and π-π interactions. Steady state fluorescence proclaimed the complex of malachite green with lysozyme yields quenching through static type, which substantiates time-resolved fluorescence measurements that lysozyme-malachite green conjugation formation has an affinity of 10(3)M(-1). Moreover, via molecular modeling and also CD data, we can safely arrive at a conclusion that the polypeptide chain of lysozyme partially destabilized upon complexation with malachite green. The data emerged here will help to further understand the toxicological action of malachite green in human body. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide on amyloid fibrillogenesis in lysozyme: Evidence from photophysical and imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anirban; Bhattacharya, Subhash Chandra; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2018-02-01

    Many proteins can abnormally fold to form pathological amyloid deposits/aggregates that are responsible for various degenerative disorders called amyloidosis. Here we have examined the anti-amyloidogenic potency of an ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide, using lysozyme as a model system. Thioflavin T fluorescence assay demonstrated that the ionic liquid suppressed the formation of lysozyme fibrils significantly. This observation was further confirmed by the Congo red assay. Fluorescence microscopy, intrinsic fluorescence studies, nile red fluorescence assay, ANS binding assay and circular dichroism studies also testified diminishing of the fibrillogenesis in the presence of ionic liquid. Formation of amyloid fibrils was also characterized by α to β conformational transition. From far-UV circular dichroism studies it was observed that the β-sheet content of the lysozyme samples decreased in the presence of the ionic liquid which in turn implied that fibrillogenesis was supressed by the ionic liquid. Atomic force microscopy imaging unequivocally established that the ionic liquid attenuated fibrillogenesis in lysozyme. These results may be useful for the development of more effective therapeutics for amyloidosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Coassembly of Lysozyme and Amphiphilic Biomolecules Driven by Unimer-Aggregate Equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yuanyuan; Ma, Xiaoteng; Cai, Yaqian; Liu, Li; Zhao, Hanying

    2018-04-12

    Synthesis and self-assembly of bioconjugates composed of proteins and synthetic molecules have been widely studied because of the potential applications in medicine, biotechnology, and nanotechnology. One of the challenging research studies in this area is to develop organic solvent-free approaches to the synthesis and self-assembly of amphiphilic bioconjugates. In this research, dialysis-assisted approach, a method based on unimer-aggregate equilibrium, was applied in the coassembly of lysozyme and conjugate of cholesterol and glutathione (Ch-GSH). In phosphate buffer solution, amphiphilic Ch-GSH conjugate self-assembles into vesicles, and the vesicle solution is dialyzed against lysozyme solution. Negatively charged Ch-GSH unimers produced in the unimer-vesicle exchange equilibrium, diffuse across the dialysis membrane and have electrostatic interaction with positively charged lysozyme, resulting in the formation of Ch-GSH-lysozyme bioconjugate. Above a critical concentration, the three-component bioconjugate molecules self-assemble into bioactive vesicles.

  2. The association of lysozyme with casein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, de A.L.; Walstra, P.; Geurts, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    The association of hen eggs’ lysozyme with caseins was studied by using three casein substrates: (I) solutions of the various caseins, (II) artificially made casein micelles of various compositions and (III) caseins adsorbed onto soya-oil emulsion droplets. In solution, lysozyme associated most

  3. Chemical denaturation of globular proteins at the air/water interface: an x-ray and neutron reflectometry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perriman, A.W.; Henderson, M.J.; White, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: X-ray and neutron reflectometry has been used to probe the equilibrium surface structure of hen egg white lysozyme (lysozyme) and bovine β -lactoglobulin (β -lactoglobulin) under denaturing conditions at the air-water interface. This was achieved by performing experiments on 10 mg mL -1 protein solutions containing increasing concentrations of the chemical denaturant guanidinium hydrochloride (G.HCl). For solutions containing no G.HCl, the surface structure of the proteins was represented by a two-layer model with total thicknesses of 48 Angstroms and 38 Angstroms for lysozyme and β -lactoglobulin, respectively. The total volume of a single protein molecule and the associated water molecules was evaluated to be approximately 45 (0.3) nm 3 for lysozyme, and 60 (0.3) nm 3 for β-lactoglobulin. The thickness dimensions and the total volumes compared favourably with the crystal dimensions of 45 x 30 x 30 Angstroms (40.5 nm 3 ),1 and 36 x 36 x 36 Angstroms (47 nm 3 ) 2 for lysozyme and β -lactoglobulin, respectively. This comparison suggests that when no denaturant was present, the structures of lysozyme and β -lactoglobulin were near to their native conformations at the air-water interface. The response to the presence of the chemical denaturant was different for each protein. The surface layer of β-lactoglobulin expanded at very low concentrations (0.2 mol dm -3 ) of G.HCl. In contrast, the lysozyme layer contracted. At higher concentrations, unfolding of both the proteins led to the formation of a third diffuse layer. In general, lysozyme appeared to be less responsive to the chemical denaturant, which is most likely a result of the higher disulfide content of lysozyme. A protocol allowing quantitative thermodynamic analysis of the contribution from the air-water interface to the chemical denaturation of a protein was developed

  4. Isolation and characterization of a c-type lysozyme from the nurse shark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds Vaughan, Nichole; Smith, Sylvia L

    2013-12-01

    Lysozyme is a ubiquitous antibacterial enzyme that occurs in numerous invertebrate and vertebrate species. Three forms have been described c-type, g-type and i-type which differ in primary structure. Shark lysozyme has not been characterized; here we report on the isolation and characterization of lysozyme from unstimulated shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum) leukocytes and provide amino acid sequence data across the highly conserved active site of the molecule identifying it to be a c-type lysozyme. A leukocyte lysate was applied either (a) to the first of two sequential DE-52 cellulose columns or alternatively, (b) to a DEAE-Sepharose column. Lysozyme activity in lysate and active fractions was identified by zones of lysis of Micrococcus lysodeikticus cell walls on lysoplates and zones of growth inhibition in agar diffusion assays using Planococcus citreus as the target organism. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed a 14 kDa protein which was identified as lysozyme by mass spectroscopic analysis of peptides, reactivity against anti-HEWL antibodies on a Western blot, hydrolysis of M. lysodeikticus cell walls, and inhibition of growth of P. citreus on AU-gel blots in which the area of growth inhibition correlated to a 14 kDa protein. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [ACID-BASE MODULATION OF LYSOZYME ACTIVITY IN MEDIUM FOR CULTIVATION OF ENTEROBACTERIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andryuschenko, S V; Perunova, N B

    2015-01-01

    Determination of modulating effect of acid-base state of medium for cultivation of enterobacteria on activity of C-type lysozyme. Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) strain for protein expression, Escherichia coli K12 MG1655 model strain, Escherichia coli No. 242 strain, isolated from intestine biotope; 2 Klebsiella pneumoniae strains, one of those contained plasmid homologue of periplasmatic lysozyme inhibitor gene pliC; 1 typical Salmonella enterica ATCC 14028 strain and a Micrococcus luteus ATCC 15307 strain as a control--served as material for the study. The bacteria were cultivated for 24 hours in 2 ml of liquid medium LB at 37 degrees C, 250 rpm. Determination of antilysozyme activity (ALA) was carried out by a photonepehlometrical method according to O.V. Bukharin et al. (1999) with alterations. All the studied microorganisms, including Micrococcus luteus, at the specified conditions 24 hours after cultivation were established to change the pH of the liquid nutrient medium LB from the initial value of 6.6 ± 0.1 to 8.2 ± 0.2 units. ALA determination in the cultivation medium without buffer correction was accompanied by a decline of lysozyme activity at an order of magnitude. The effect was absent during ALA measurement by a standard technique. The local shift of acid-base state of biotope under the conditions of buffer system insufficiency results in a reversible alteration of antimicrobial activity of muramidase, that among other non-specific factors of the environment determines the background of interactions on the level of associative symbiosis. This aspect should be taken into consideration during development of models, that are close to real conditions of microsymbiocenotical interactions.

  6. Label-Free Aptasensor for Lysozyme Detection Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionisia Ortiz-Aguayo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This research develops a label-free aptamer biosensor (aptasensor based on graphite-epoxy composite electrodes (GECs for the detection of lysozyme protein using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS technique. The chosen immobilization technique was based on covalent bonding using carbodiimide chemistry; for this purpose, carboxylic moieties were first generated on the graphite by electrochemical grafting. The detection was performed using [Fe(CN6]3−/[Fe(CN6]4− as redox probe. After recording the frequency response, values were fitted to its electric model using the principle of equivalent circuits. The aptasensor showed a linear response up to 5 µM for lysozyme and a limit of detection of 1.67 µM. The sensitivity of the established method was 0.090 µM−1 in relative charge transfer resistance values. The interference response by main proteins, such as bovine serum albumin and cytochrome c, has been also characterized. To finally verify the performance of the developed aptasensor, it was applied to wine analysis.

  7. Label-Free Aptasensor for Lysozyme Detection Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Aguayo, Dionisia; Del Valle, Manel

    2018-01-26

    This research develops a label-free aptamer biosensor (aptasensor) based on graphite-epoxy composite electrodes (GECs) for the detection of lysozyme protein using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) technique. The chosen immobilization technique was based on covalent bonding using carbodiimide chemistry; for this purpose, carboxylic moieties were first generated on the graphite by electrochemical grafting. The detection was performed using [Fe(CN)₆] 3- /[Fe(CN)₆] 4- as redox probe. After recording the frequency response, values were fitted to its electric model using the principle of equivalent circuits. The aptasensor showed a linear response up to 5 µM for lysozyme and a limit of detection of 1.67 µM. The sensitivity of the established method was 0.090 µM -1 in relative charge transfer resistance values. The interference response by main proteins, such as bovine serum albumin and cytochrome c, has been also characterized. To finally verify the performance of the developed aptasensor, it was applied to wine analysis.

  8. Fourier transform infrared studies in solid egg white lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivzi, T.Z.

    1994-12-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy is the most recent addition to the arsenal of bioanalytical techniques capable of providing information about the secondary structure of proteins in a variety of environments. FTIR spectra have been obtained in solid egg white lysozyme. The spectra display the usual amide I, II and III bands. Secondary structural information obtained from the spectra after applying resolution enhancement techniques to the amide I band has been found consistent with the x-ray crystallographic data of the protein and also to the spectroscopic data of the protein in aqueous solution. (author). 17 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs

  9. Effective interactions in lysozyme aqueous solutions: a small-angle neutron scattering and computer simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramo, M C; Caccamo, C; Costa, D; Pellicane, G; Ruberto, R; Wanderlingh, U

    2012-01-21

    We report protein-protein structure factors of aqueous lysozyme solutions at different pH and ionic strengths, as determined by small-angle neutron scattering experiments. The observed upturn of the structure factor at small wavevectors, as the pH increases, marks a crossover between two different regimes, one dominated by repulsive forces, and another one where attractive interactions become prominent, with the ensuing development of enhanced density fluctuations. In order to rationalize such experimental outcome from a microscopic viewpoint, we have carried out extensive simulations of different coarse-grained models. We have first studied a model in which macromolecules are described as soft spheres interacting through an attractive r(-6) potential, plus embedded pH-dependent discrete charges; we show that the uprise undergone by the structure factor is qualitatively predicted. We have then studied a Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) model, in which only central interactions are advocated; we demonstrate that this model leads to a protein-rich/protein-poor coexistence curve that agrees quite well with the experimental counterpart; experimental correlations are instead reproduced only at low pH and ionic strengths. We have finally investigated a third, "mixed" model in which the central attractive term of the DLVO potential is imported within the distributed-charge approach; it turns out that the different balance of interactions, with a much shorter-range attractive contribution, leads in this latter case to an improved agreement with the experimental crossover. We discuss the relationship between experimental correlations, phase coexistence, and features of effective interactions, as well as possible paths toward a quantitative prediction of structural properties of real lysozyme solutions. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  10. Biomimetic mineralization of calcium carbonate/carboxymethylcellulose microspheres for lysozyme immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Zheng; Zhang Juan; Ma Yunzi; Song Siyue; Gu Wei

    2012-01-01

    Porous calcium carbonate/carboxymethylcellulose (CaCO 3 /CMC) microspheres were prepared by the biomimetic mineralization method for lysozyme immobilization via adsorption. The size and morphology of CaCO 3 /CMC microspheres were characterized by transmitted electron microscopy (TEM) and zeta potential measurement. The lysozyme immobilization was verified by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The effects of pHs and temperatures on lysozyme adsorption were investigated as well. It was revealed that CaCO 3 /CMC microspheres could immobilize lysozyme efficiently via electrostatic interactions and a maximum adsorption capacity of 450 mg/g was achieved at pH 9.2 and 25 °C. Moreover, it was found that the adsorption process fitted well with the Langmuir isothermal model. In addition, UV, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic studies showed that lysozyme maintained its original secondary structure during the adsorption/desorption process. Our study therefore demonstrated that CaCO 3 /CMC microsphere can be used as a cost-effective and efficient support for lysozyme immobilization. - Graphical abstract: CaCO 3 /CMC microsphere was prepared by a facile biomimetic mineralization method and can be used as an efficient and cost-effective support for lysozyme immobilization. Highlights: ► CaCO 3 /CMC microspheres were prepared by the biomimetic mineralization method. ► Lysozyme was efficiently immobilized to CaCO 3 /CMC microspheres via adsorption. ► A maximum adsorption capacity of 450 mg/g was obtained at pH 9.2 and 25 °C. ► The original secondary structure of lysozyme was maintained upon immobilization.

  11. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and phylogeny of first caudata g-type lysozyme in axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haining; Gao, Jiuxiang; Lu, Yiling; Guang, Huijuan; Cai, Shasha; Zhang, Songyan; Wang, Yipeng

    2013-11-01

    Lysozymes are key proteins that play important roles in innate immune defense in many animal phyla by breaking down the bacterial cell-walls. In this study, we report the molecular cloning, sequence analysis and phylogeny of the first caudate amphibian g-lysozyme: a full-length spleen cDNA library from axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum). A goose-type (g-lysozyme) EST was identified and the full-length cDNA was obtained using RACE-PCR. The axolotl g-lysozyme sequence represents an open reading frame for a putative signal peptide and the mature protein composed of 184 amino acids. The calculated molecular mass and the theoretical isoelectric point (pl) of this mature protein are 21523.0 Da and 4.37, respectively. Expression of g-lysozyme mRNA is predominantly found in skin, with lower levels in spleen, liver, muscle, and lung. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that caudate amphibian g-lysozyme had distinct evolution pattern for being juxtaposed with not only anura amphibian, but also with the fish, bird and mammal. Although the first complete cDNA sequence for caudate amphibian g-lysozyme is reported in the present study, clones encoding axolotl's other functional immune molecules in the full-length cDNA library will have to be further sequenced to gain insight into the fundamental aspects of antibacterial mechanisms in caudate.

  12. Influence of polymers on lysozyme molecules association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gromovoy T. Yu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Study of lysozyme molecules behaviour at immobilization in gelatin and carboxymethyl cellulose sodium salt solutions by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI. Methods. Determination of the activity of lysozyme, both free and entrapped in gelatin and carboxymethyl cellulose sodium salt (Na-CMC solutions, was conducted by bacteriolytic method. The enzyme interaction with polymers was confirmed by viscometry and mass-spectrometry methods. Results. The occurrence of lysozyme associates in aqueous solution in monomeric and oligomeric forms was shown. A non-valent interaction of the enzyme with solutions of polymers results in the dissociation of oligomeric associates into subunits, which depends on the support nature and mass ratio of lysozyme to polymer. The quantitative retention of immobilized lysozyme hydrolytic activity was established, which favours obtaining mucoadhesive film forms with bacteriolytic action. Conclusions. The lysozyme immobilization by non-valent interactions in gelatin solution and Na-CMC solutions causes dissociation of the enzyme oligomeric structures; a stronger lysozyme coupling with NaCMC was noted.

  13. The Preventive Effect of L-Lysine on Lysozyme Glycation in Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Mirmiranpour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lysozyme is a bactericidal enzyme whose structure and functions change in diabetes. Chemical chaperones are small molecules including polyamines (e.g. spermine, amino acids (e.g. L-lysine and polyols (e.g. glycerol. They can improve protein conformation in several stressful conditions such as glycation. In this study, the authors aimed to observe the effect of L-lysine as a chemical chaperone on structure and function of glycated lysozyme. In this study, in vitro and in vivo effects of L-lysine on lysozyme glycation were investigated. Lysozyme was incubated with glucose and/or L-lysine, followed by an investigation of its structure by electrophoresis, fluorescence spectroscopy, and circular dichroism spectroscopy and also assessment of its bactericidal activity against M. lysodeikticus. In the clinical trial, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM were randomly divided into two groups of 25 (test and control. All patients received metformin and glibenclamide for a three months period. The test group was supplemented with 3 g/day of L-lysine. The quantity and activity of lysozyme and other parameters were then measured. Among the test group, L-lysine was found to reduce the advanced glycation end products (AGEs in the sera of patients with T2DM and in vitro condition. This chemical chaperone reversed the alteration in lysozyme structure and function due to glycation and resulted in increased lysozyme activity. Structure and function of glycated lysozyme are significantly improved by l-lysine; therefore it can be considered an effective therapeutic supplementation in T2DM, decreasing the risk of infection in these patients.

  14. The PMDB Protein Model Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrignanò, Tiziana; De Meo, Paolo D'Onorio; Cozzetto, Domenico; Talamo, Ivano Giuseppe; Tramontano, Anna

    2006-01-01

    The Protein Model Database (PMDB) is a public resource aimed at storing manually built 3D models of proteins. The database is designed to provide access to models published in the scientific literature, together with validating experimental data. It is a relational database and it currently contains >74 000 models for ∼240 proteins. The system is accessible at and allows predictors to submit models along with related supporting evidence and users to download them through a simple and intuitive interface. Users can navigate in the database and retrieve models referring to the same target protein or to different regions of the same protein. Each model is assigned a unique identifier that allows interested users to directly access the data. PMID:16381873

  15. Molecular Characterization of a Lysozyme Gene and Its Altered Expression Profile in Crowded Beet Webworm (Loxostege sticticalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailong Kong

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that insects living in high-density populations exhibit an increase in immune function to counter a higher risk of disease. This phenomenon, known as density-dependent prophylaxis, has been experimentally tested in a number of insect species. Although density-dependent prophylaxis is especially prevalent in insects exhibiting density-dependent phase polyphenism, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. Our previous study demonstrated that the antibacterial activity of lysozyme is important for this process in the beet webworm Loxostege sticticalis. In this study, a lysozyme cDNA from L. sticticalis was cloned and characterized. The full-length cDNA is 1078 bp long and contains an open reading frame of 426 bp that encodes 142 amino acids. The deduced protein possesses structural characteristics of a typical c-type lysozyme and clusters with c-type lysozymes from other Lepidoptera. LsLysozyme was found to be expressed throughout all developmental stages, showing the highest level in pupae. LsLysozyme was also highly expressed in the midgut and fat body. Elevated LsLysozyme expression was observed in L. sticticalis larvae infected by Beauveria bassiana and in larvae reared under crowding conditions. In addition, the expression level of LsLysozyme in infected larvae reared at a density of 10 larvae per jar was significantly higher compared to those reared at a density of l or 30 larvae per jar. These results suggest that larval crowding affects the gene expression profile of this lysozyme. This study provides additional insight into the expression of an immune-associated lysozyme gene and helps us to better understand the immune response of L. sticticalis under crowding conditions.

  16. Obtaining of lysozyme spherulitic forms at ambient temperature using pyrrolidinium octanoat as ionic liquid additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Simona ŞTEFAN

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyrrolidinium octanoate carboxylate (Py+CnH2n+1COO-; PyO in abbreviation was used as additive for advanced crystallization of Lysozyme protein, to investigate the impact of protic ionic liquid on the protein crystal morphology. The ionic liquid was synthesized by acidic-base Brönsted neutralization, and its purity was checked by HPLC. The protein crystallization was made through the method of vapour diffusion with hanging drops. Crystallization experiments of Lysozyme with the addition of PyO were performed at 0.4 M PyO and respectively 1.6 M. The morphological of spherulitic forms of Lysozyme in aqueous solutions of PyO protic ionic liquid was investigated by optical microscopy after trials were incubated at ambient temperature (18-20°C, in various growth periods (3 days and 1 week. Hanging-drop vapour diffusion crystallization experiments with the addition of 0.4 M of PyO show that Lysozyme crystallized in type I spherulitic form. This is assumed to be a result of heterogeneous nucleation, with thin needles radially growing outwardfrom a more or less spherical particle. Hanging-drop vapour diffusioncrystallization experiments revealed that the addition of 1.6 M of PyO led to a second type of spherulitic form of the Lysozyme.

  17. Zero-order release of lysozyme from (poly)ethylene glycol)/poly(butylene terephthalate) matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, J.M.; Radersma, R.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Dijkstra, Pieter J.; Feijen, Jan; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2000-01-01

    Protein release from a series of biodegradable poly(ether ester) multiblock copolymers, based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(butylene terephthalate) (PBT) was investigated. Lysozyme-containing PEG/PBT films and microspheres were prepared using an emulsion technique. Proteins were

  18. Specific delivery of captopril to the kidney with the prodrug captopril-lysozyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, R.J; Moolenaar, Frits; de Zeeuw, D; Meijer, D.K F

    Low-molecular-weight proteins (LMWPs) accumulate in the proximal tubular cells of the kidney, which makes these proteins interesting tools for renal drug targeting. We studied this approach using the LMWP lysozyme as a carrier for the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril. Captopril was

  19. Macromolecular complexes of lysozyme with kappa carrageenan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonov, Y.A.; Zhuravleva, I.L.; Cardinaels, R.; Moldenaers, P.

    2018-01-01

    We present a structural study of the complexation and binding of lysozyme (Lys) with kappa carrageenan (kCG) by means of turbidity measurements, phase analysis, dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering, differential scanning microcalorimetry (DSMC), confocal laser scanning (CLSM) microscopy,

  20. Removal of model proteins by means of low-pressure inductively coupled plasma discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kylian, O; Rauscher, H; Gilliland, D; Bretagnol, F; Rossi, F

    2008-01-01

    Surgical instruments are intended to come into direct contact with the patients' tissues and thus interact with their first immune defence system. Therefore they have to be cleaned, sterilized and decontaminated, in order to prevent any kind of infections and inflammations or to exclude the possibility of transmission of diseases. From this perspective, the removal of protein residues from their surfaces constitutes new challenges, since certain proteins exhibit high resistance to commonly used sterilization and decontamination techniques and hence are difficult to remove without inducing major damages to the object treated. Therefore new approaches must be developed for that purpose and the application of non-equilibrium plasma discharges represents an interesting option. The possibility to effectively remove model proteins (bovine serum albumin, lysozyme and ubiquitin) from surfaces of different materials (Si wafer, glass, polystyrene and gold) by means of inductively coupled plasma discharges sustained in different argon containing mixtures is demonstrated and discussed in this paper

  1. Removal of model proteins by means of low-pressure inductively coupled plasma discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kylian, O; Rauscher, H; Gilliland, D; Bretagnol, F; Rossi, F [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Via E Fermi 2749, 21027 Ispra (Italy)], E-mail: francois.rossi@jrc.it

    2008-05-07

    Surgical instruments are intended to come into direct contact with the patients' tissues and thus interact with their first immune defence system. Therefore they have to be cleaned, sterilized and decontaminated, in order to prevent any kind of infections and inflammations or to exclude the possibility of transmission of diseases. From this perspective, the removal of protein residues from their surfaces constitutes new challenges, since certain proteins exhibit high resistance to commonly used sterilization and decontamination techniques and hence are difficult to remove without inducing major damages to the object treated. Therefore new approaches must be developed for that purpose and the application of non-equilibrium plasma discharges represents an interesting option. The possibility to effectively remove model proteins (bovine serum albumin, lysozyme and ubiquitin) from surfaces of different materials (Si wafer, glass, polystyrene and gold) by means of inductively coupled plasma discharges sustained in different argon containing mixtures is demonstrated and discussed in this paper.

  2. White shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) recombinant lysozyme has antibacterial activity against Gram negative bacteria: Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahemolyticus and Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-la-Re-Vega, Enrique; García-Galaz, Alfonso; Díaz-Cinco, Martha E; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R

    2006-03-01

    C-type lysozyme has been described as an antibacterial component of the shrimp innate defence system. We determined quantitatively the antibacterial activity of white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) recombinant lysozyme against three Gram negative bacteria: Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahemolyticus and Vibrio cholerae, using a turbidimetric assay with live bacteria and differential bacterial viable count after interaction with the protein. In conclusion, the antibacterial activity of recombinant shrimp lysozyme against Vibrio sp. is at least equal to the values against the Gram positive M. luteus and more active against the shrimp pathogens V. alginolyticus and V. parahemolyticus.

  3. Protein crystals as scanned probes for recognition atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickremasinghe, Nissanka S; Hafner, Jason H

    2005-12-01

    Lysozyme crystal growth has been localized at the tip of a conventional silicon nitride cantilever through seeded nucleation. After cross-linking with glutaraldehyde, lysozyme protein crystal tips image gold nanoparticles and grating standards with a resolution comparable to that of conventional tips. Force spectra between the lysozyme crystal tips and surfaces covered with antilysozyme reveal an adhesion force that drops significantly upon blocking with free lysozyme, thus confirming that lysozyme crystal tips can detect molecular recognition interactions.

  4. Simulated x-ray scattering of protein solutions using explicit-solvent models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sanghyun; Bardhan, Jaydeep P.; Makowski, Lee; Roux, Benoit

    2009-01-01

    X-ray solution scattering shows new promise for the study of protein structures, complementing crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance. In order to realize the full potential of solution scattering, it is necessary to not only improve experimental techniques but also develop accurate and efficient computational schemes to relate atomistic models to measurements. Previous computational methods, based on continuum models of water, have been unable to calculate scattering patterns accurately, especially in the wide-angle regime which contains most of the information on the secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures. Here we present a novel formulation based on the atomistic description of water, in which scattering patterns are calculated from atomic coordinates of protein and water. Without any empirical adjustments, this method produces scattering patterns of unprecedented accuracy in the length scale between 5 and 100 A, as we demonstrate by comparing simulated and observed scattering patterns for myoglobin and lysozyme.

  5. Activity and conformation of lysozyme in molecular solvents, protic ionic liquids (PILs) and salt-water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaya, Emmy C; Separovic, Frances; Drummond, Calum J; Greaves, Tamar L

    2016-09-21

    Improving protein stabilisation is important for the further development of many applications in the pharmaceutical, specialty chemical, consumer product and agricultural sectors. However, protein stabilization is highly dependent on the solvent environment and, hence, it is very complex to tailor protein-solvent combinations for stable protein maintenance. Understanding solvent features that govern protein stabilization will enable selection or design of suitable media with favourable solution environments to retain protein native conformation. In this work the structural conformation and activity of lysozyme in 29 solvent systems were investigated to determine the role of various solvent features on the stability of the enzyme. The solvent systems consisted of 19 low molecular weight polar solvents and 4 protic ionic liquids (PILs), both at different water content levels, and 6 aqueous salt solutions. Small angle X-ray scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy were used to investigate the tertiary and secondary structure of lysozyme along with the corresponding activity in various solvation systems. At low non-aqueous solvent concentrations (high water content), the presence of solvents and salts generally maintained lysozyme in its native structure and enhanced its activity. Due to the presence of a net surface charge on lysozyme, electrostatic interactions in PIL-water systems and salt solutions enhanced lysozyme activity more than the specific hydrogen-bond interactions present in non-ionic molecular solvents. At higher solvent concentrations (lower water content), solvents with a propensity to exhibit the solvophobic effect, analogous to the hydrophobic effect in water, retained lysozyme native conformation and activity. This solvophobic effect was observed particularly for solvents which contained hydroxyl moieties. Preferential solvophobic effects along with bulky chemical structures were postulated to result in less

  6. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly ...

  7. Coarse-grain modelling of protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baaden, Marc; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we review recent advances towards the modelling of protein-protein interactions (PPI) at the coarse-grained (CG) level, a technique that is now widely used to understand protein affinity, aggregation and self-assembly behaviour. PPI models of soluble proteins and membrane proteins are

  8. Molecular Insight into Human Lysozyme and Its Ability to Form Amyloid Fibrils in High Concentrations of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate: A View from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Jafari

    Full Text Available Changes in the tertiary structure of proteins and the resultant fibrillary aggregation could result in fatal heredity diseases, such as lysozyme systemic amyloidosis. Human lysozyme is a globular protein with antimicrobial properties with tendencies to fibrillate and hence is known as a fibril-forming protein. Therefore, its behavior under different ambient conditions is of great importance. In this study, we conducted two 500000 ps molecular dynamics (MD simulations of human lysozyme in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS at two ambient temperatures. To achieve comparative results, we also performed two 500000 ps human lysozyme MD simulations in pure water as controls. The aim of this study was to provide further molecular insight into all interactions in the lysozyme-SDS complexes and to provide a perspective on the ability of human lysozyme to form amyloid fibrils in the presence of SDS surfactant molecules. SDS, which is an anionic detergent, contains a hydrophobic tail with 12 carbon atoms and a negatively charged head group. The SDS surfactant is known to be a stabilizer for helical structures above the critical micelle concentration (CMC [1]. During the 500000 ps MD simulations, the helical structures were maintained by the SDS surfactant above its CMC at 300 K, while at 370 K, human lysozyme lost most of its helices and gained β-sheets. Therefore, we suggest that future studies investigate the β-amyloid formation of human lysozyme at SDS concentrations above the CMC and at high temperatures.

  9. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of a New C-type Lysozyme Gene from Yak Mammary Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Feng Jiang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Milk lysozyme is the ubiquitous enzyme in milk of mammals. In this study, the cDNA sequence of a new chicken-type (c-type milk lysozyme gene (YML, was cloned from yak mammary gland tissue. A 444 bp open reading frames, which encodes 148 amino acids (16.54 kDa with a signal peptide of 18 amino acids, was sequenced. Further analysis indicated that the nucleic acid and amino acid sequences identities between yak and cow milk lysozyme were 89.04% and 80.41%, respectively. Recombinant yak milk lysozyme (rYML was produced by Escherichia coli BL21 and Pichia pastoris X33. The highest lysozyme activity was detected for heterologous protein rYML5 (M = 1,864.24 U/mg, SD = 25.75 which was expressed in P. pastoris with expression vector pPICZαA and it clearly inhibited growth of Staphylococcus aureus. Result of the YML gene expression using quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that the YML gene was up-regulated to maximum at 30 day postpartum, that is, comparatively high YML can be found in initial milk production. The phylogenetic tree indicated that the amino acid sequence was similar to cow kidney lysozyme, which implied that the YML may have diverged from a different ancestor gene such as cow mammary glands. In our study, we suggest that YML be a new c-type lysozyme expressed in yak mammary glands that plays a role as host immunity.

  10. A Proposed Model for Protein Crystal Nucleation and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    How does one take a molecule, strongly asymmetric in both shape and charge distribution, and assemble it into a crystal? We propose a model for the nucleation and crystal growth process for tetragonal lysozyme, based upon fluorescence, light, neutron, and X-ray scattering data, size exclusion chromatography experiments, dialysis kinetics, AFM, and modeling of growth rate data, from this and other laboratories. The first species formed is postulated to be a 'head to side' dimer. Through repeating associations involving the same intermolecular interactions this grows to a 4(sub 3) helix structure, that in turn serves as the basic unit for nucleation and subsequent crystal growth. High salt attenuates surface charges while promoting hydrophobic interactions. Symmetry facilitates subsequent helix-helix self-association. Assembly stability is enhanced when a four helix structure is obtained, with each bound to two neighbors. Only two unique interactions are required. The first are those for helix formation, where the dominant interaction is the intermolecular bridging anion. The second is the anti-parallel side-by-side helix-helix interaction, guided by alternating pairs of symmetry related salt bridges along each side. At this stage all eight unique positions of the P4(sub3)2(sub 1),2(sub 1) unit cell are filled. The process is one of a) attenuating the most strongly interacting groups, such that b) the molecules begin to self-associate in defined patterns, so that c) symmetry is obtained, which d) propagates as a growing crystal. Simple and conceptually obvious in hindsight, this tells much about what we are empirically doing when we crystallize macromolecules. By adjusting the growth parameters we are empirically balancing the intermolecular interactions, preferentially attenuating the dominant strong (for lysozyme the charged groups) while strengthening the lesser strong (hydrophobic) interactions. In the general case for proteins the lack of a singularly defined

  11. Lysozyme-loaded lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles: preparation, characterization and colloidal stability evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devrim, Burcu; Kara, Aslı; Vural, İmran; Bozkır, Asuman

    2016-11-01

    Lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles (LPNPs) are polymeric nanoparticles enveloped by lipid layers, which have emerged as a potent therapeutic nanocarrier alternative to liposomes and polymeric nanoparticles. The aim of this work was to develop, characterize and evaluate LPNPs to deliver a model protein, lysozyme. Lysozyme-loaded LPNPs were prepared by using the modified w/o/w double-emulsion-solvent-evaporation method. Poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) was used as polymeric core material and tripalmitin:lechitin mixture was used to form a lipid shell around the LPNPs. LPNPs were evaluated for particle size distribution, zeta potential, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, stability and cytotoxicity. The DLS measurement results showed that the particle size of LPNPs ranged from 58.04 ± 1.95 nm to 2009.00 ± 0.52 nm. The AFM and TEM images of LPNPs demonstrate that LPNPs are spherical in shape. The protein-loading capacity of LPNPs ranged from 5.81% to 60.32%, depending on the formulation parameters. LPNPs displayed a biphasic drug release pattern with a burst release within 1 h, followed by sustained release afterward. Colloidal stability results of LPNPs in different media showed that particle size and zeta potential values of particles did not change significantly in all media except of FBS 100% for 120 h. Finally, the results of a cellular uptake study showed that LPNPs were significantly taken up by 83.3% in L929 cells. We concluded that the LPNPs prepared with PCL as polymeric core material and tripalmitin:lechitin mixture as lipid shell should be a promising choice for protein delivery.

  12. Automated protein structure modeling with SWISS-MODEL Workspace and the Protein Model Portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    Comparative protein structure modeling is a computational approach to build three-dimensional structural models for proteins using experimental structures of related protein family members as templates. Regular blind assessments of modeling accuracy have demonstrated that comparative protein structure modeling is currently the most reliable technique to model protein structures. Homology models are often sufficiently accurate to substitute for experimental structures in a wide variety of applications. Since the usefulness of a model for specific application is determined by its accuracy, model quality estimation is an essential component of protein structure prediction. Comparative protein modeling has become a routine approach in many areas of life science research since fully automated modeling systems allow also nonexperts to build reliable models. In this chapter, we describe practical approaches for automated protein structure modeling with SWISS-MODEL Workspace and the Protein Model Portal.

  13. Automated Protein Structure Modeling with SWISS-MODEL Workspace and the Protein Model Portal

    OpenAIRE

    Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    Comparative protein structure modeling is a computational approach to build three-dimensional structural models for proteins using experimental structures of related protein family members as templates. Regular blind assessments of modeling accuracy have demonstrated that comparative protein structure modeling is currently the most reliable technique to model protein structures. Homology models are often sufficiently accurate to substitute for experimental structures in a wide variety of appl...

  14. Crystallization, data collection and phasing of two digestive lysozymes from Musca domestica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marana, S. R.; Cançado, F. C. [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Valério, A. A. [Centro de Biologia Molecular e Estrutural (CeBiMe), Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron (LNLS), CP 6192, Campinas, SP 13084-971 (Brazil); Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas (Brazil); Ferreira, C.; Terra, W. R. [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Barbosa, J. A. R. G., E-mail: joao@lnls.br [Centro de Biologia Molecular e Estrutural (CeBiMe), Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron (LNLS), CP 6192, Campinas, SP 13084-971 (Brazil); Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas (Brazil); Departamento de Genética e Evolução, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas (Brazil); Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2006-08-01

    The digestive lysozymes 1 and 2 from M. domestica were crystallized by vapour diffusion. The crystallographic data were processed to a maximum resolution of 1.9 Å in both cases. Lysozymes are mostly known for their defensive role against bacteria, but in several animals lysozymes have a digestive function. Here, the initial crystallographic characterization of two digestive lysozymes from Musca domestica are presented. The proteins were crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of ammonium sulfate or PEG/2-propanol as the precipitant. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 1.9 Å using synchrotron radiation. The lysozyme 1 and 2 crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1} (unit-cell parameters a = 36.52, b = 79.44, c = 45.20 Å, β = 102.97°) and the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 (unit-cell parameters a = 73.90, b = 96.40, c = 33.27 Å), respectively. The crystal structures were solved by molecular replacement and structure refinement is in progress.

  15. Binding and Inhibitory Effect of the Dyes Amaranth and Tartrazine on Amyloid Fibrillation in Lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anirban; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2017-02-16

    Interaction of two food colorant dyes, amaranth and tartrazine, with lysozyme was studied employing multiple biophysical techniques. The dyes exhibited hypochromic changes in the presence of lysozyme. The intrinsic fluorescence of lysozyme was quenched by both dyes; amaranth was a more efficient quencher than tartrazine. The equilibrium constant of amaranth was higher than that of tartarzine. From FRET analysis, the binding distances for amaranth and tartrazine were calculated to be 4.51 and 3.93 nm, respectively. The binding was found to be dominated by non-polyelectrolytic forces. Both dyes induced alterations in the microenvironment surrounding the tryptophan and tyrosine residues of the protein, with the alterations being comparatively higher for the tryptophans than the tyrosines. The interaction caused significant loss in the helicity of lysozyme, the change being higher with amaranth. The binding of both dyes was exothermic. The binding of amaranth was enthalpy driven, while that of tartrazine was predominantly entropy driven. Amaranth delayed lysozyme fibrillation at 25 μM, while tartrazine had no effect even at 100 μM. Nevertheless, both dyes had a significant inhibitory effect on fibrillogenesis. The present study explores the potential antiamyloidogenic property of these azo dyes used as food colorants.

  16. Laser ablation of lysozyme with UV, visible and infrared femto- and nanosecond pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela; Matei, Andreea

    Lysozyme is an interesting molecule for laser ablation of organic materials, because the ablation has been comprehensively studied, it is a medium heavy molecule with a mass of 14305 Da, which can be detected by standard techniques, and because it is used as a bactericidal protein in the food...... industry. Lysozyme molecules do not absorb energy for wavelengths above 310 nm, but nevertheless there is a strong mass loss by ablation for laser irradiation in the visible regime. The total ablation yield of lysozyme at 355 nm and at 2 J/cm2 is about 155 µg/pulse, possibly one of the highest ablation...... the ablation process for different wavelengths and time duration. Measurements for 6-7-ns laser ablation were carried out at DTU on Risø Campus, while measurements with pulses of 300 fs were carried out at the University of Naples in a similar setup. For all wavelengths except at nanosecond laser pulses at 355...

  17. Chronopotentiometric sensing of specific interactions between lysozyme and the DNA aptamer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ostatná, Veronika; Vargová, Veronika; Kekedy-Nagy, L.; Černocká, Hana; Ferapontova, E.E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 114, APR2017 (2017), s. 42-47 ISSN 1567-5394 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00956S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : self-assembled monolayers * protein interactions * lysozyme Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 3.346, year: 2016

  18. Investigation of factors affecting the stability of lysozyme spray dried from ethanol-water solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Shuying; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Mu, Huiling

    2017-01-01

    -ethanol mixtures. The effect of formulation additives (trehalose, Tween 20 and phosphate-buffered saline) and processing conditions (inlet temperature and storage time of lysozyme in the feed solution before the spray drying process) on the protein bioactivity was investigated. The results showed...

  19. Modified denatured lysozyme effectively solubilizes fullerene c60 nanoparticles in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepi, Marialuisa; Politi, Jane; Dardano, Principia; Amoresano, Angela; De Stefano, Luca; Monti, Daria Maria; Notomista, Eugenio

    2017-08-01

    Fullerenes, allotropic forms of carbon, have very interesting pharmacological effects and engineering applications. However, a very low solubility both in organic solvents and water hinders their use. Fullerene C60, the most studied among fullerenes, can be dissolved in water only in the form of nanoparticles of variable dimensions and limited stability. Here the effect on the production of C60 nanoparticles by a native and denatured hen egg white lysozyme, a highly basic protein, has been systematically studied. In order to obtain a denatured, yet soluble, lysozyme derivative, the four disulfides of the native protein were reduced and exposed cysteines were alkylated by 3-bromopropylamine, thus introducing eight additional positive charges. The C60 solubilizing properties of the modified denatured lysozyme proved to be superior to those of the native protein, allowing the preparation of biocompatible highly homogeneous and stable C60 nanoparticles using lower amounts of protein, as demonstrated by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy studies. This lysozyme derivative could represent an effective tool for the solubilization of other carbon allotropes.

  20. The Effect of Ethylene Glycol, Glycine Betaine, and Urea on Lysozyme Thermal Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Nordstrom, Anna R.

    2010-01-01

    The four-week student project described in this article is an extension of protein thermal denaturation experiments to include effects of added cosolutes ethylene glycol, glycine betaine, and urea on the unfolding of lysozyme. The transition temperatures and van't Hoff enthalpies for unfolding are evaluated for six concentrations of each cosolute,…

  1. Pluronic-lysozyme conjugates as anti-adhesive and antibacterial bifunctional polymers for surface coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muszanska, A.K.; Busscher, H.J.; Herrmann, A.; Mei, van der H.C.; Norde, W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the preparation and characterization of polymer protein conjugates composed of a synthetic triblock copolymer with a central polypropylene oxide (PPO) block and two terminal polyethylene oxide (PEO) segments, Pluronic F-127, and the antibacterial enzyme lysozyme attached to the

  2. The Antimicrobial Peptide Lysozyme Is Induced after Multiple Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Klüter, Tim; Fitschen-Oestern, Stefanie; Lippross, Sebastian; Weuster, Matthias; Mentlein, Rolf; Steubesand, Nadine; Neunaber, Claudia; Hildebrand, Frank; Pufe, Thomas; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Beyer, Andreas; Seekamp, Andreas; Varoga, Deike

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide lysozyme is an important factor of innate immunity and exerts high potential of antibacterial activity. In the present study we evaluated the lysozyme expression in serum of multiple injured patients and subsequently analyzed their possible sources and signaling pathways. Expression of lysozyme was examined in blood samples of multiple trauma patients from the day of trauma until 14 days after trauma by ELISA. To investigate major sources of lysozyme, its expression ...

  3. Short-time dynamics of lysozyme solutions with competing short-range attraction and long-range repulsion: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riest, Jonas; Nägele, Gerhard; Liu, Yun; Wagner, Norman J.; Godfrin, P. Douglas

    2018-02-01

    Recently, atypical static features of microstructural ordering in low-salinity lysozyme protein solutions have been extensively explored experimentally and explained theoretically based on a short-range attractive plus long-range repulsive (SALR) interaction potential. However, the protein dynamics and the relationship to the atypical SALR structure remain to be demonstrated. Here, the applicability of semi-analytic theoretical methods predicting diffusion properties and viscosity in isotropic particle suspensions to low-salinity lysozyme protein solutions is tested. Using the interaction potential parameters previously obtained from static structure factor measurements, our results of Monte Carlo simulations representing seven experimental lysoyzme samples indicate that they exist either in dispersed fluid or random percolated states. The self-consistent Zerah-Hansen scheme is used to describe the static structure factor, S(q), which is the input to our calculation schemes for the short-time hydrodynamic function, H(q), and the zero-frequency viscosity η. The schemes account for hydrodynamic interactions included on an approximate level. Theoretical predictions for H(q) as a function of the wavenumber q quantitatively agree with experimental results at small protein concentrations obtained using neutron spin echo measurements. At higher concentrations, qualitative agreement is preserved although the calculated hydrodynamic functions are overestimated. We attribute the differences for higher concentrations and lower temperatures to translational-rotational diffusion coupling induced by the shape and interaction anisotropy of particles and clusters, patchiness of the lysozyme particle surfaces, and the intra-cluster dynamics, features not included in our simple globular particle model. The theoretical results for the solution viscosity, η, are in qualitative agreement with our experimental data even at higher concentrations. We demonstrate that semi

  4. Synergistic cytotoxicity and mechanism of caffeine and lysozyme on hepatoma cell line HepG2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongchao; Li, Jingjuan; Cui, Lin; Ren, Yanqing; Niu, Liying; Wang, Xinguo; Huang, Yun; Cui, Lijian

    2018-03-01

    The influences of caffeine, lysozyme and the joint application of them on the hepatoma cell line HepG2 proliferation inhibition and cell apoptosis were observed by 3-(4, 5-dimethyl-2-thiazyl)-2, 5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay and Hoechst 33342, which showed the proliferation inhibition rate of the joint application on HepG2 cells was 47.21%, significantly higher than caffeine or lysozyme, and the joint application promoted the apoptosis of HepG2 cells obviously. Van't Hoff classical thermodynamics formula, the Föster theory of non-radiation energy transfer and fluorescence phase diagram were used to manifest that the process of lysozyme binding to caffeine followed a two-state model, which was spontaneous at low temperature driven by enthalpy change, and the predominant intermolecular force was hydrogen bonding or Van der Waals force to stabilize caffeine-lysozyme complex with the distance 5.86 nm. The attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectra indicated that caffeine decreased the relative contents of α-helix and β-turn, which inferred the structure of lysozyme tended to be "loose". Synchronous fluorescence spectra and ultraviolet spectra supported the above conclusion. The amino acid residues in the cleft of lysozyme were exposed and electropositivity was increased attributing to the loose structure, which were conducive to increasing caffeine concentration on the HepG2 cell surface by electrostatic interaction to show synergistic effect. The great quantities of microvilli on the liver cancer cell membrane surface, is beneficial for the lysozyme-caffeine compound to aggregate on cell surface to increase the concentration of caffeine to play stronger physiological role by electrostatic effect.

  5. Ultra-sensitive quantification of lysozyme based on element chelate labeling and capillary electrophoresis–inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, MingWei; Wu, WeiHua; Ruan, YaJuan; Huang, LiMei; Wu, Zujian; Cai, Yong; Fu, FengFu

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: An ultra-sensitive method for the determination of lysozyme was developed based on the Gd 3+ chelate labeling and CE–ICP–MS. The proposed method has an extremely low detection limit of 3.89 attomole and has been successfully used to detect lysozyme in saliva sample, showing excellent reliability. The success of the present method provides a new possibility for biological assays and clinical diagnoses. -- Highlights: •An ultra-sensitive method for detecting lysozyme based on CE–ICP–MS was described. •The proposed method has an extremely low detection limit of 3.89 attomole. •It can be used to detect trace lysozyme in saliva sample with a satisfied recovery. •The method provides a new potential for sensitive detection of low-abundant proteins. -- Abstract: In this study, an ultra-sensitive method for the quantification of lysozyme based on the Gd 3+ diethylenetriamine-N,N,N′,N″,N″-pentaacetic acid labeling and capillary electrophoresis–inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CE–ICP–MS) was described. The Gd 3+ -tagged lysozyme was effectively separated by capillary electrophoresis (CE) and sensitively determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP–MS). Based on the gadolinium-tagging and CE–ICP–MS, the lysozyme was determined within 12 min with an extremely low detection limit of 3.89 attomole (3.89 × 10 −11 mol L −1 for 100 nL of sample injection) and a RSD < 6% (n = 5). The proposed method has been successfully used to detect lysozyme in saliva samples with a recovery of 91–106%, suggesting that our method is sensitive and reliable. The success of the present method provides a new potential for the biological assays and sensitive detection of low-abundant proteins

  6. Patchy proteins, anions and the Hofmeister series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, Mikael; Jungwirth, Pavel [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Flemingovo namesti 2, 16610 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Center for Complex Molecular Systems and Biomolecules, Flemingovo namesti 2, 16610 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)], E-mail: mikael.lund@uochb.cas.cz

    2008-12-10

    We investigate specific anion binding to a range of patchy protein models and use our results to probe protein-protein interactions for aqueous lysozyme solutions. Our molecular simulation studies show that the ion-protein interaction mechanism and strength largely depend on the nature of the interfacial amino acid residues. Via direct ion pairing, small anions interact with charged side-chains while larger anions are attracted to non-polar residues due to several solvent assisted mechanisms. Incorporating ion and surface specificity into a mesoscopic model for protein-protein interactions we calculate the free energy of interaction between lysozyme molecules in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride and sodium iodide. In agreement with experiment, our finding is that 'salting out' follows the reverse Hofmeister series for pH below the iso-electric point and the direct series for pH above pI.

  7. Lysozyme and succinylated lysozyme as adsorbates and emulsifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der M.

    2005-01-01

    Many food products are emulsions, i.e., a system of two immiscible liquids of which the one is finely dispersed in the other. In many emulsions, a monolayer of protein molecules in the liquid/liquid interface prevents coalescence of the droplets. Therefore, in the formation of a protein-stabilized

  8. Electromagnetic Fields Effects on the Secondary Structure of Lysozyme and Bioprotective Effectiveness of Trehalose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Calabrò

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available FTIR spectroscopy was used to investigate the effects of extremely low frequency (50 Hz electromagnetic field and of microwaves at 900 MHz on the secondary structure of a typical protein, the lysozyme, evaluating the bioprotective effectiveness of trehalose. Lysozyme in D2O solution (60 mg/ml was exposed to 50 Hz frequency electromagnetic field at 180 μT. The FTIR spectra indicated an increase of CH2 group at 1921 and 1853 cm−1 after 3 h of exposure. Such effect was not observed after the addition of trehalose (150 mg/mL at the same exposure conditions. Lysozyme dissolved in D2O at the concentration of 100 mg/mL was exposed up to 4 h to 900 MHz mobile phone microwaves at 25 mA/m. A significant increase in intensity of the amide I vibration band in the secondary structure of the protein was observed after 4 h exposure to microwaves. This effect was inhibited by the presence of trehalose at the concentration of 150 mg/mL. Fourier self-deconvolution spectral analysis of lysozyme in D2O solution after exposure to microwaves revealed an increase in intensity of the conformational components of amide I mode, particularly of β-sheet and turn that can be attributed to disorder and unfolding processes of the protein.

  9. Regular arrangement of periodates bound to lysozyme

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondráček, Jan; Weiss, M.S.; Brynda, Jiří; Fiala, J.; Jursík, F.; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Jenner, L.B.; Sedláček, Juraj

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 61, Pt9 (2005), s. 1181-1189 ISSN 0907-4449 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : hen egg white lysozyme * periodate * epitaxy Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.401, year: 2005

  10. Hydrophobic nano-carrier for lysozyme adsorption

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1 polymer in pH 7.0 phosphate buffer at ... lysozyme concentration, temperature and ionic strength are varied and .... tions at initial and final adsorption medium were measured ... ties such as very high specific surface area, low mass transfer.

  11. Effects of modified β-cyclodextrin on thermal stability and conformation of lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiyama, Tadashi; Satoh, Megumi; Tateishi, Takahiro; Nojiri, Tomoaki; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Kimura, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Effects of cyclodextrin on stability and conformation of lysozyme were clarified. ► The CD influences the hydrophobic interaction of lysozyme by the inclusion. ► The CD relatively destabilized the folded state by stabilizing the unfolded state. ► The destabilization depends on the concentration and the substituent of CD. ► The conformation of lysozyme was more spread at unfolded state by inclusion of CD. - Abstract: Effects of cyclic oligosaccharide cyclodextrin (CD) on stability and conformation of lysozyme were clarified thermodynamically and rheologically by DSC, viscosity, and circular dichroism measurements. The modified β-CD relatively destabilized the folded state of lysozyme by stabilizing the unfolded state due to inclusion of hydrophobic part into the hydrophobic interior of CD. The order of higher destabilization effect was acetyl-β-CD > methyl-β-CD > hydroxypropyl-β-CD. Apparent number of bound CD to unfolded state for methyl-, hydroxypropyl-, and acetyl-β-CD is 6.7 ± 0.7, 4.2 ± 1.1, and 18.6 ± 4.3 and the binding constant is 5.5 ± 0.8, 6.7 ± 2.4, and 4.4 ± 1.2 L mol −1 , respectively. The viscosity for unfolded state was increased with an increase in the each modified β-CD concentration, suggesting that the inclusion of CD on a part of hydrophobic core at unfolded state leads to break the hydrophobic core, then lysozyme would be more spread structure. The substituent of CD can accelerate instability by directly breaking hydrogen bond and/or can restrain instability by increase in hydrophobic interaction. The fact that the each modified CDs has different destabilization effect shows a possibility to control the stability of protein by the substitution of CD.

  12. A comparative study on the aggregating effects of guanidine thiocyanate, guanidine hydrochloride and urea on lysozyme aggregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emadi, Saeed, E-mail: emadi@iasbs.ac.ir; Behzadi, Maliheh

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Lysozyme aggregated in guanidine thiocyanate (1.0 and 2.0 M). • Lysozyme aggregated in guanidine hydrochloride (4 and 5 M). • Lysozyme did not aggregated at any concentration (0.5–5 M) of urea. • Unfolding pathway is more important than unfolding per se in aggregation. - Abstract: Protein aggregation and its subsequent deposition in different tissues culminate in a diverse range of diseases collectively known as amyloidoses. Aggregation of hen or human lysozyme depends on certain conditions, namely acidic pH or the presence of additives. In the present study, the effects on the aggregation of hen egg-white lysozyme via incubation in concentrated solutions of three different chaotropic agents namely guanidine thiocyanate, guanidine hydrochloride and urea were investigated. Here we used three different methods for the detection of the aggregates, thioflavin T fluorescence, circular dichroism spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Our results showed that upon incubation with different concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0 M) of the chemical denaturants, lysozyme was aggregated at low concentrations of guanidine thiocyanate (1.0 and 2.0 M) and at high concentrations of guanidine hydrochloride (4 and 5 M), although no fibril formation was detected. In the case of urea, no aggregation was observed at any concentration.

  13. Release of proteins via ion exchange from albumin-heparin microspheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwon, Glen S.; Bae, You Han; Cremers, H.F.M.; Cremers, Harry; Feijen, Jan; Kim, Sung Wan

    1992-01-01

    Albumin-heparin and albumin microspheres were prepared as ion exchange gels for the controlled release of positively charged polypeptides and proteins. The adsorption isotherms of chicken egg and human lysozyme, as model proteins, on microspheres were obtained. An adsorption isotherm of chicken egg

  14. Formation of Silica-Lysozyme Composites Through Co-Precipitation and Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela B. van den Heuvel

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between silica and proteins are crucial for the formation of biosilica and the production of novel functional hybrid materials for a range of industrial applications. The proteins control both precipitation pathway and the properties of the resulting silica–organic composites. Here, we present data on the formation of silica–lysozyme composites through two different synthesis approaches (co-precipitation vs. adsorption and show that the chemical and structural properties of these composites, when analyzed using a combination of synchrotron-based scattering (total scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering, spectroscopic, electron microscopy, and potentiometric methods vary dramatically. We document that while lysozyme was not incorporated into nor did its presence alter the molecular structure of silica, it strongly enhanced the aggregation of silica particles due to electrostatic and potentially hydrophobic interactions, leading to the formation of composites with characteristics differing from pure silica. The differences increased with increasing lysozyme content for both synthesis approaches. Yet, the absolute changes differ substantially between the two sets of composites, as lysozyme did not just affect aggregation during co-precipitation but also particle growth and likely polymerization during co-precipitation. Our results improve the fundamental understanding of how organic macromolecules interact with dissolved and nanoparticulate silica and how these interactions control the formation pathway of silica–organic composites from sodium silicate solutions, a widely available and cheap starting material.

  15. Formation of Silica-Lysozyme Composites Through Co-Precipitation and Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Daniela B.; Stawski, Tomasz M.; Tobler, Dominique J.; Wirth, Richard; Peacock, Caroline L.; Benning, Liane G.

    2018-04-01

    Interactions between silica and proteins are crucial for the formation of biosilica and the production of novel functional hybrid materials for a range of industrial applications. The proteins control both precipitation pathway and the properties of the resulting silica-organic composites. Here we present data on the formation of silica-lysozyme composites through two different synthesis approaches (co-precipitation vs. adsorption) and show that the chemical and structural properties of these composites, when analyzed using a combination of synchrotron-based scattering (total scattering and SAXS), spectroscopic, electron microscopy and potentiometric methods vary dramatically. We document that while lysozyme was not incorporated into nor did its presence alter the molecular structure of silica, it strongly enhanced the aggregation of silica particles due to electrostatic and potentially hydrophobic interactions, leading to the formation of composites with characteristics differing from pure silica. The differences increased with increasing lysozyme content for both synthesis approaches. Yet, the absolute changes differ substantially between the two sets of composites, as lysozyme did not just affect aggregation during co-precipitation but also particle growth and likely polymerization during co-precipitation. Our results improve the fundamental understanding of how organic macromolecules interact with dissolved and nanoparticulate silica and how these interactions control the formation pathway of silica-organic composites from sodium silicate solutions, a widely available and cheap starting material.

  16. Effects of dissolving microneedle fabrication parameters on the activity of encapsulated lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhraei Lahiji, Shayan; Jang, Yoojung; Ma, Yonghao; Dangol, Manita; Yang, Huisuk; Jang, Mingyu; Jung, Hyungil

    2018-05-30

    Dissolving microneedle (DMN) is referred to a microscale needle that encapsulates drug(s) within a biodegradable polymer matrix and delivers it into the skin in a minimally invasive manner. Although vast majority of studies have emphasized DMN as an efficient drug delivery system, the activity of DMN-encapsulated proteins or antigens can be significantly affected due to a series of thermal, physical and chemical stress factors during DMN fabrication process and storage period. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of DMN fabrication parameters including polymer type, polymer concentration, fabrication and storage temperature, and drying conditions on the activity of the encapsulated therapeutic proteins by employing lysozyme (LYS) as a model protein. Our results indicate that a combination of low temperature fabrication, mild drying condition, specific polymer concentration, and addition of protein stabilizer can maintain the activity of encapsulated LYS up to 99.8 ± 3.8%. Overall, findings of this study highlight the importance of optimizing DMN fabrication parameters and paves way for the commercialization of an efficient delivery system for therapeutics. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Electron loss from multiply protonated lysozyme ions in high energy collisions with molecular oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvelplund, P; Nielsen, SB; Sørensen, M

    2001-01-01

    We report on the electron loss from multiply protonated lysozyme ions Lys-Hn(n)+ (n = 7 - 17) and the concomitant formation of Lys-Hn(n+1)+. in high-energy collisions with molecular oxygen (laboratory kinetic energy = 50 x n keV). The cross section for electron loss increases with the charge state...... of the precursor from n = 7 to n = 11 and then remains constant when n increases further. The absolute size of the cross section ranges from 100 to 200 A2. The electron loss is modeled as an electron transfer process between lysozyme cations and molecular oxygen....

  18. Evaluating protein incorporation and release in electrospun composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Tonye; Matos, Jeffrey; Collins, George; Arinzeh, Treena Livingston

    2015-10-01

    Electrospun polymer/ceramic composites have gained interest for use as scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. In this study, we investigated methods to incorporate Platelet Derived Growth Factor-BB (PDGF-BB) in electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) or PCL prepared with polyethylene oxide (PEO), where both contained varying levels (up to 30 wt %) of ceramic composed of biphasic calcium phosphates, hydroxyapatite (HA)/β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP). Using a model protein, lysozyme, we compared two methods of protein incorporation, adsorption and emulsion electrospinning. Adsorption of lysozyme on scaffolds with ceramic resulted in minimal release of lysozyme over time. Using emulsion electrospinning, lysozyme released from scaffolds containing a high concentration of ceramic where the majority of the release occurred at later time points. We investigated the effect of reducing the electrostatic interaction between the protein and the ceramic on protein release with the addition of the cationic surfactant, cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). In vitro release studies demonstrated that electrospun scaffolds prepared with CTAB released more lysozyme or PDGF-BB compared with scaffolds without the cationic surfactant. Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on composite scaffolds containing PDGF-BB incorporated through emulsion electrospinning expressed higher levels of osteogenic markers compared to scaffolds without PDGF-BB, indicating that the bioactivity of the growth factor was maintained. This study revealed methods for incorporating growth factors in polymer/ceramic scaffolds to promote osteoinduction and thereby facilitate bone regeneration. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Ethylenediaminetetraacetate and lysozyme improves antimicrobial activities of ovotransferrin against Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, K Y; Mendoncam, A F; Ismail, H; Ahn, D U

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of EDTA, lysozyme, or the combination of EDTA and lysozyme on the antibacterial activity of ovotransferrin against Escherichia coli O157:H7. Ovotransferrin solutions (20 mg/mL) containing 100 mM NaHCO3 (OS) with added EDTA (2.0 or 2.5 mg/mL), lysozyme (1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 mg/mL), or both were prepared. The antibacterial activities of OS, OSE (OS+EDTA), or OSL (OS+lysozyme) against E. coli O157:H7 in model systems were investigated by turbidity and viability tests. In addition, OSE, OSL, or OSEL (OS+EDTA+lysozyme) was applied to irradiated pork chops and commercial hams to determine whether the solutions had antibacterial activity on meat products. The effect of the initial cell population on the antibacterial activity of OSE, OSL, and OSEL was determined. Ethylenediaminetetraacetate at 2 mg/mL plus OS induced a reduction of approximately 3 to 4 log in viable E. coli O157:H7 cells in brain heart infusion broth media, and 1 mg/mL of lysozyme plus OS resulted in a reduction of approximately 0.5 to 1.0 log during a 36-h incubation at 35 degrees C. However, neither OSE nor OSEL showed a significant antibacterial effect on pork chops and hams during storage at 10 degrees C. The initial cell number in media did not affect the antibacterial activity of OSE or OSEL against E. coli O157:H7. This study demonstrates that combinations of ovotransferrin, NaHCO3, and EDTA have the potential to control E. coli O157:H7.

  20. Probabilistic approach to lysozyme crystal nucleation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Ivaylo L; Hodzhaoglu, Feyzim V; Koleva, Dobryana P

    2015-09-01

    Nucleation of lysozyme crystals in quiescent solutions at a regime of progressive nucleation is investigated under an optical microscope at conditions of constant supersaturation. A method based on the stochastic nature of crystal nucleation and using discrete time sampling of small solution volumes for the presence or absence of detectable crystals is developed. It allows probabilities for crystal detection to be experimentally estimated. One hundred single samplings were used for each probability determination for 18 time intervals and six lysozyme concentrations. Fitting of a particular probability function to experimentally obtained data made possible the direct evaluation of stationary rates for lysozyme crystal nucleation, the time for growth of supernuclei to a detectable size and probability distribution of nucleation times. Obtained stationary nucleation rates were then used for the calculation of other nucleation parameters, such as the kinetic nucleation factor, nucleus size, work for nucleus formation and effective specific surface energy of the nucleus. The experimental method itself is simple and adaptable and can be used for crystal nucleation studies of arbitrary soluble substances with known solubility at particular solution conditions.

  1. Behavior of lysozyme adsorbed onto biological liquid crystal lipid monolayer at the air/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaolong; Shi, Ruixin; Hao, Changchun; Chen, Huan; Zhang, Lei; Li, Junhua; Xu, Guoqing; Sun, Runguang

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between proteins and lipids is one of the basic problems of modern biochemistry and biophysics. The purpose of this study is to compare the penetration degree of lysozyme into 1,2-diapalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethano-lamine (DPPE) by analyzing the data of surface pressure-area (π-A) isotherms and surface pressure-time (π-T) curves. Lysozyme can penetrate into both DPPC and DPPE monolayers because of the increase of surface pressure at an initial pressure of 15 mN/m. However, the changes of DPPE are larger than DPPC, indicating stronger interaction of lysozyme with DPPE than DPPC. The reason may be due to the different head groups and phase state of DPPC and DPPE monolayers at the surface pressure of 15 mN/m. Atomic force microscopy reveals that lysozyme was absorbed by DPPC and DPPE monolayers, which leads to self-aggregation and self-assembly, forming irregular multimers and conical multimeric. Through analysis, we think that the process of polymer formation is similar to the aggregation mechanism of amyloid fibers. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21402114 and 11544009), the Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province of China (Grant No. 2016JM2010), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. GK201603026), and the National University Science and Technology Innovation Project of China (Grant No. 201610718013).

  2. A Mesoscopic Model for Protein-Protein Interactions in Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Mikael; Jönsson, Bo

    2003-01-01

    Protein self-association may be detrimental in biological systems, but can be utilized in a controlled fashion for protein crystallization. It is hence of considerable interest to understand how factors like solution conditions prevent or promote aggregation. Here we present a computational model describing interactions between protein molecules in solution. The calculations are based on a molecular description capturing the detailed structure of the protein molecule using x-ray or nuclear ma...

  3. Interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with lysozyme amyloid fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdovinová, Veronika [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Tomašovičová, Natália, E-mail: nhudak@saske.sk [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Batko, Ivan; Batková, Marianna; Balejčíková, Lucia [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Garamus, Vasyl M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht: Zentrum fr Material, und Kstenforschung GmbH, Max-Plank-Strae 1, Geesthacht 216502 (Germany); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Physics Department, Taras Shevchenko Kyiv National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, 01601 Kyiv (Ukraine); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kopčanský, Peter [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia)

    2017-06-01

    This work is devoted to the structural study of complex solutions of magnetic nanoparticles with lysozyme amyloid fibrils due to possible ordering of such system by applying the external magnetic field. The interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with amyloid fibrils has been followed by atomic force microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. It has been observed that magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) adsorb to lysozyme amyloid fibrils. It was found that MNPs alter amyloids structures, namely the diameter of lysozyme amyloid fibrils is increased whereas the length of fibrils is decreased. In the same time MNPs do not change the helical pitch significantly. - Highlights: • Solution of MNPs with lysozyme amyloid fibrils was characterized by AFM and SAXS. • MNPs adsorb to lysozyme amyloid fibrils. • Diameter and size of lysozyme amyloid fibrils change due to doping with MNPs.

  4. Technology Optimization of Lysozyme's Fresh Maintaining Effect on Apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun-Hong, Liu; Kun-Yu, Wang

    2016-10-03

    Lysozyme is a kind of alkaline globin, which functions well in the degradation of the cell wall of microbe. Currently, lysozyme is widely used in various fields, such as medicine, fruit, and vegetable industry, dairy industry, and so on. Therefore, the exploitation and utilization of lysozyme is of significant economic benefit. Taking apple as material, weight loss ratio and reducing sugar content as objectives, this paper studied the fresh-keeping effect of lysozyme. Influential factors, lysozyme concentration, soaking time, modified temperature, and reaction time were discussed in detail. The results showed that reducing sugar content was 2.043% and the weight loss ratio was the minimum in the presence of soaking time of 2 min, modified temperature of 65 °C, reaction time of 4 d, and lysozyme concentration of 0.5 g/L. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  5. Recognition of lysozyme using surface imprinted bacterial cellulose nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylan, Yeşeren; Tamahkar, Emel; Denizli, Adil

    2017-11-01

    Here, we developed the lysozyme imprinted bacterial cellulose (Lyz-MIP/BC) nanofibers via the surface imprinting strategy that was designed to recognize lysozyme. This study includes the molecular imprinting method onto the surface of bacterial cellulose nanofibers in the presence of lysozyme by metal ion coordination, as well as further characterizations methods FTIR, SEM and contact angle measurements. The maximum lysozyme adsorption capacity of Lyz-MIP/BC nanofibers was found to be 71 mg/g. The Lyz-MIP/BC nanofibers showed high selectivity for lysozyme towards bovine serum albumin and cytochrome c. Overall, the Lyz-MIP/BC nanofibers hold great potential for lysozyme recognition due to the high binding capacity, significant selectivity and excellent reusability.

  6. Rapid localized crystallization of lysozyme by laser trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuyama, Ken-Ichi; Chang, Kai-Di; Tu, Jing-Ru; Masuhara, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Teruki

    2018-02-28

    Confining protein crystallization to a millimetre size was achieved within 0.5 h after stopping 1 h intense trapping laser irradiation, which shows excellent performance in spatial and temporal controllability compared to spontaneous nucleation. A continuous-wave near-infrared laser beam is tightly focused into a glass/solution interfacial layer of a supersaturated buffer solution of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL). The crystallization is not observed during laser trapping, but initiated by stopping the laser irradiation. The generated crystals are localized densely in a circular area with a diameter of a few millimetres around the focal spot and show specific directions of the optical axes of the HEWL crystals. To interpret this unique crystallization, we propose a mechanism that nucleation and the subsequent growth take place in a highly concentrated domain consisting of HEWL liquid-like clusters after turning off laser trapping.

  7. Chemical modification of lysine residues in lysozyme may dramatically influence its amyloid fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshedi, Dina; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Nemat-Gorgani, Mohsen

    2010-04-01

    Studies on the aggregation of mutant proteins have provided new insights into the genetics of amyloid diseases and the role of the net charge of the protein on the rate, extent, and type of aggregate formation. In the present work, hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) was employed as the model protein. Acetylation and (separately) citraconylation were employed to neutralize the charge on lysine residues. Acetylation of the lysine residues promoted amyloid formation, resulting in more pronounced fibrils and a dramatic decline in the nucleation time. In contrast, citraconylation produced the opposite effect. In both cases, native secondary and tertiary structures appeared to be retained. Studies on the effect of pH on aggregation suggested greater possibilities for amorphous aggregate formation rather than fibrillation at pH values closer to neutrality, in which the protein is known to take up a conformation more similar to its native form. This is in accord with reports in the literature suggesting that formation of amorphous aggregates is more favored under relatively more native conditions. pH 5 provided a critical environment in which a mixture of amorphous and fibrillar structures were observed. Use of Tango and Aggrescan software which describe aggregation tendencies of different parts of a protein structure suggested critical importance of some of the lysine residues in the aggregation process. Results are discussed in terms of the importance of the net charge in control of protein-protein interactions leading to aggregate formation and possible specific roles of lysine residues 96 and 97. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Tetragonal Lysozyme Interactions Studied by Site Directed Mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Lisa; Karr, Laurel J.; Nadarajah, Arunan; Pusey, Marc

    1999-01-01

    A number of recent experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth proceeds by the addition of aggregates, formed by reversible self association of the solute molecules in the bulk solution. Periodic bond chain and atomic force microscopy studies have indicated that the probable growth unit is at minimum a 43 tetramer, and most likely an octamer composed of two complete turns about the 43 axis. If these results are correct, then there are intermolecular interactions which are only formed in the solution and others only formed at the joining of the growth unit to the crystal surface. We have set out to study these interactions, and the correctness of this hypothesis, using site directed mutagenesis of specific amino acid residues involved in the different bonds. We had initially expressed wild type lysozyme in S. cervasiae with yields of approximately 5 mg/L, which were eventually raised to approximately 40 mg/L. We are now moving the expression to the Pichia system, with anticipated yields of 300 to (3)500 mg/L, comparable to what can be obtained from egg whites. An additional advantage of using recombinant protein is the greater genetic homogeneity of the material obtained and the absence of any other contaminating egg proteins. The first mutation experiments are TYR 23 (Registered) PHE or ALA and ASN 113 (Registered) ALA or ASP. Both TYR 23 and ASN 113 form part of the postulated dimerization intermolecular binding site which lead to the formation of the 43 helix. Tyrosine also participates in an intermolecular hydrogen bond with ARG 114. The results of these and subsequent experiments will be discussed.

  9. Reversible aggregation of lysozyme in a biodegradable amphiphilic multiblock copolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Weert, Marco; van Dijkhuizen-Radersma, Riemke; Bezemer, Jeroen M; Hennink, Wim E; Crommelin, Daan J A

    2002-07-01

    Lysozyme-loaded poly(ethylene glycol terephthalate)-poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEGT/PBT) films were prepared using a water-in-oil emulsification solvent evaporation method. Infrared spectroscopic analysis of the dried films indicated the presence of non-covalent lysozyme aggregates in the polymer matrix. The use of methanol to enhance the drying rate of the films increased the relative amount of aggregates. Surprisingly, quantitative in-vitro release of fully active, non-aggregated lysozyme was observed, indicating that lysozyme forms reversible aggregates during encapsulation in PEGT/PBT films.

  10. A modified Poisson-Boltmann model including charge regulation for the adsorption of ionizable polyelectrolytes to charged interfaces, applied to lysozyme adsorption on silica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Veen, van der M.; Norde, W.

    2005-01-01

    The equilibrium adsorption of polyelectrolytes with multiple types of ionizable groups is described using a modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation including charge regulation of both the polymer and the interface. A one-dimensional mean-field model is used in which the electrostatic potential is

  11. [Partially unfolded state of lysozyme with a developed secondary structure in dimethylsulfoxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timchenko, A A; Kirkitadze, M D; Prokhorov, D A; Potekhin, S A; Serdiuk, I N

    1996-06-01

    The conformation of a chicken egg lysozyme molecule (dimensions, stoichiometry of its associates, and the degree of helicity) in DMSO was studied by small-angle neutron scattering, dynamic light scattering, and optical rotatory dispersion in the visible region of the spectrum. At high DMSO concentrations (70%), the protein was shown to exist as a dimer. The monomer molecules in the dimer adopt a partially unfolded conformation, with dimensions substantially greater than those in the native state and a high content of secondary structure (the degree of helicity is close to that of native lysozyme). This approach provides a unique possibility to assess the compactness of molecules in associates, which may be very useful in studying protein self-organization.

  12. Spectroscopic determination of lysozyme conformational changes in the presence of trehalose and guanidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreca, Davide; Laganà, Giuseppina; Ficarra, Silvana; Gattuso, Giuseppe; Magazù, Salvatore; La Torre, Roberto; Tellone, Ester; Bellocco, Ersilia

    2013-06-01

    The bioprotective action of the disaccharide trehalose has been studied against the well-known denaturating agent, guanidine hydrochloride. The results indicated a direct influence of trehalose on both enzymatic activity and conformational changes of lysozyme, as shown by the decrease of the inactivation rate constant of about 1.48-fold and the loss of α-helix structure of lysozyme. In addition, ESI-MS hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange experiments allowed us to correlate the structural and dynamic features of the protein in the presence of the two additives, highlighting as trehalose remarkably influenced this exchange by decreasing local protein environment changes and solvent accessibility to the amide peptide backbone, as further evidenced by circular dichroism and (1)H NMR measurements.

  13. Multi-component adsorption model for pellicle formation: the influence of salivary proteins and non-salivary phospho proteins on the binding of histatin 5 onto hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, A; Margolis, H C; Yao, Y; Grogan, J; Oppenheim, F G

    2006-02-01

    The acquired enamel pellicle formed by selective adsorption of proteins in whole saliva is a protective integument on the tooth surface. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the formation of human acquired enamel pellicle using an in vitro hydroxyapatite (HA) model and 3H-histatin 5 to allow accurate measurement of histatin 5 binding in a multi-component experimental system. A binary system was employed by mixing 3H-histatin 5 with one unlabeled protein prior to incubation with HA or by first incubating 3H-histatin 5 with the HA which had been pre-coated with one of a panel of unlabeled proteins (human albumin, salivary amylase, lysozyme, acidic PIFs, statherin, the N-terminal fragment of statherin, and egg yolk phosvitin). A ternary system was employed by mixing 3H-histatin 5 with HA sequentially pre-coated with two different unlabeled proteins, including recombinant histatin 1. The results showed that only salivary statherin and egg yolk phosvitin promote histatin 5 adsorption significantly. The amount of histatin 5 adsorbed was also found to increase as a function of the amount of phosvitin and statherin used to pre-coat HA up to a maximum level that was two- to four-fold greater than that observed on untreated HA. These data suggest that specific protein-protein interactions may play important roles in pellicle formation in vivo.

  14. Label-Free Aptasensor for Lysozyme Detection Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Dionisia Ortiz-Aguayo; Manel del Valle

    2018-01-01

    This research develops a label-free aptamer biosensor (aptasensor) based on graphite-epoxy composite electrodes (GECs) for the detection of lysozyme protein using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) technique. The chosen immobilization technique was based on covalent bonding using carbodiimide chemistry; for this purpose, carboxylic moieties were first generated on the graphite by electrochemical grafting. The detection was performed using [Fe(CN)6]3−/[Fe(CN)6]4− as redox probe. Afte...

  15. Interaction between lysozyme and humic acid in layer-by-layer assemblies: Effects of pH and ionic strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, W.F.; Norde, W.; Koopal, L.K.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between protein and soluble organic matter is studied through layer-by-layer assembly of lysozyme (LSZ) and purified Aldrich humic acid (PAHA) at a solid surface (2-D) and in solution (3-D). By bringing a silica surface in alternating contact with solutions of LSZ and PAHA a

  16. Interaction between lysozyme and humic acid in layer-by-layer assemblies : Effects of pH and ionic strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Wenfeng; Norde, Willem; Koopal, Luuk K.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between protein and soluble organic matter is studied through layer-by-layer assembly of lysozyme (LSZ) and purified Aldrich humic acid (PAHA) at a solid surface (2-D) and in solution (3-D). By bringing a silica surface in alternating contact with solutions of LSZ and PAHA a

  17. Antimicrobial activity of lysozyme with special relevance to milk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review discusses the antimicrobial activity of lysozyme with special emphasis on milk's lysozyme, and attempts to shed some light on the recent advances elucidating the mechanism of its antimicrobial activity against sensitive microorganisms as well as the means used by some bacteria to resist such an activity.

  18. Adsorption of lysozyme unto silica and polystyrene surfaces in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption capacity of lysozyme (chicken egg white) from aqueous solutions unto silica and polystyrene interfaces was studied at varying lysozyme concentrations and ionic strength. The studies revealed an increase in adsorption capacity with increase in concentration and with maximum adsorption densities of 1.34 ...

  19. Immobilization of lysozyme on cotton fabrics; synthesis, characterication, and activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The antimicrobial activity of lysozyme derives from the hydrolysis of the bacterial cell wall polysaccharide at the glycosidic bond that links N-acetyl-glucosamine and N-acetyl-muramic acid. Maintaining the activity of lysozyme while bound to a cellulose substrate is a goal toward developing enzyme...

  20. The disruptive effect of lysozyme on the bacterial cell wall explored by an in-silico structural outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primo, Emiliano D; Otero, Lisandro H; Ruiz, Francisco; Klinke, Sebastián; Giordano, Walter

    2018-01-01

    The bacterial cell wall, a structural unit of peptidoglycan polymer comprised of glycan strands consisting of a repeating disaccharide motif [N-acetylglucosamine (NAG) and N-acetylmuramylpentapeptide (NAM pentapeptide)], encases bacteria and provides structural integrity and protection. Lysozymes are enzymes that break down the bacterial cell wall and disrupt the bacterial life cycle by cleaving the linkage between the NAG and NAM carbohydrates. Lab exercises focused on the effects of lysozyme on the bacterial cell wall are frequently incorporated in biochemistry classes designed for undergraduate students in diverse fields as biology, microbiology, chemistry, agronomy, medicine, and veterinary medicine. Such exercises typically do not include structural data. We describe here a sequence of computer tasks designed to illustrate and reinforce both physiological and structural concepts involved in lysozyme effects on the bacterial cell-wall structure. This lab class usually lasts 3.5 hours. First, the instructor presents introductory concepts of the bacterial cell wall and the effect of lysozyme on its structure. Then, students are taught to use computer modeling to visualize the three-dimensional structure of a lysozyme in complex with bacterial cell-wall fragments. Finally, the lysozyme inhibitory effect on a bacterial culture is optionally proposed as a simple microbiological assay. The computer lab exercises described here give students a realistic understanding of the disruptive effect of lysozymes on the bacterial cell wall, a crucial component in bacterial survival. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 46(1):83-90, 2018. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. The active site of hen egg-white lysozyme: flexibility and chemical bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Held, Jeanette, E-mail: jeanette.netzel@uni-bayreuth.de; Smaalen, Sander van [University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Chemical bonding at the active site of lysozyme is analyzed on the basis of a multipole model employing transferable multipole parameters from a database. Large B factors at low temperatures reflect frozen-in disorder, but therefore prevent a meaningful free refinement of multipole parameters. Chemical bonding at the active site of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) is analyzed on the basis of Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules [QTAIM; Bader (1994 ▶), Atoms in Molecules: A Quantum Theory. Oxford University Press] applied to electron-density maps derived from a multipole model. The observation is made that the atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) of HEWL at a temperature of 100 K are larger than ADPs in crystals of small biological molecules at 298 K. This feature shows that the ADPs in the cold crystals of HEWL reflect frozen-in disorder rather than thermal vibrations of the atoms. Directly generalizing the results of multipole studies on small-molecule crystals, the important consequence for electron-density analysis of protein crystals is that multipole parameters cannot be independently varied in a meaningful way in structure refinements. Instead, a multipole model for HEWL has been developed by refinement of atomic coordinates and ADPs against the X-ray diffraction data of Wang and coworkers [Wang et al. (2007), Acta Cryst. D63, 1254–1268], while multipole parameters were fixed to the values for transferable multipole parameters from the ELMAM2 database [Domagala et al. (2012), Acta Cryst. A68, 337–351] . Static and dynamic electron densities based on this multipole model are presented. Analysis of their topological properties according to the QTAIM shows that the covalent bonds possess similar properties to the covalent bonds of small molecules. Hydrogen bonds of intermediate strength are identified for the Glu35 and Asp52 residues, which are considered to be essential parts of the active site of HEWL. Furthermore, a series of weak C

  2. The active site of hen egg-white lysozyme: flexibility and chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, Jeanette; Smaalen, Sander van

    2014-01-01

    Chemical bonding at the active site of lysozyme is analyzed on the basis of a multipole model employing transferable multipole parameters from a database. Large B factors at low temperatures reflect frozen-in disorder, but therefore prevent a meaningful free refinement of multipole parameters. Chemical bonding at the active site of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) is analyzed on the basis of Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules [QTAIM; Bader (1994 ▶), Atoms in Molecules: A Quantum Theory. Oxford University Press] applied to electron-density maps derived from a multipole model. The observation is made that the atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) of HEWL at a temperature of 100 K are larger than ADPs in crystals of small biological molecules at 298 K. This feature shows that the ADPs in the cold crystals of HEWL reflect frozen-in disorder rather than thermal vibrations of the atoms. Directly generalizing the results of multipole studies on small-molecule crystals, the important consequence for electron-density analysis of protein crystals is that multipole parameters cannot be independently varied in a meaningful way in structure refinements. Instead, a multipole model for HEWL has been developed by refinement of atomic coordinates and ADPs against the X-ray diffraction data of Wang and coworkers [Wang et al. (2007), Acta Cryst. D63, 1254–1268], while multipole parameters were fixed to the values for transferable multipole parameters from the ELMAM2 database [Domagala et al. (2012), Acta Cryst. A68, 337–351] . Static and dynamic electron densities based on this multipole model are presented. Analysis of their topological properties according to the QTAIM shows that the covalent bonds possess similar properties to the covalent bonds of small molecules. Hydrogen bonds of intermediate strength are identified for the Glu35 and Asp52 residues, which are considered to be essential parts of the active site of HEWL. Furthermore, a series of weak C

  3. Molecular packing, hydrogen bonding, and fast dynamics in lysozyme/trehalose/glycerol and trehalose/glycerol glasses at low hydration

    OpenAIRE

    Lerbret, Adrien; Affouard, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Water and glycerol are well-known to facilitate the structural relaxation of amorphous protein matrices. However, several studies evidenced that they may also limit fast ($\\sim$ pico-nanosecond, ps-ns) and small-amplitude ($\\sim$ \\AA ) motions of proteins, which govern their stability in freeze-dried sugar mixtures. To determine how they interact with proteins and sugars in glassy matrices and, thereby, modulate their fast dynamics, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of lysozyme...

  4. [Enthalpy stabilization of chicken egg lysozyme in aqueous dimethylsulfoxide solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovrigin, E L; Kirkitadze, M D; Potekhin, S A

    1996-01-01

    Scanning microcalorimetry data have been used to plot the dependences of the denaturation enthalpy of hen egg lysozyme on dimethylsulfoxide concentration at fixed temperatures. It has been shown that at dimethylsulfoxide concentrations below 40% (v/v) the enthalpy does not depend on pH of the medium. An increase of dimethylsulfoxide concentrations in this range leads to a linear growth of enthalpy. The rate of enthalpy growth decreases with the temperature increase. The denaturation enthalpy begins to considerably depend on pH at dimethylsulfoxide concentrations more than 40%. Spectroscopy data indicate that conformational changes occur in the protein in this range of concentrations already at room temperature, whereas according to scanning microcalorimetry, they take place at much higher temperatures. This difference is probably due to a decrease of the real temperature of protein melting below room temperature and a very inhibited character of the denaturational transition. This results in a decrease of calorimetric enthalpy at acidic pH owing to incomplete protein renaturation upon calorimeter cooling to the starting point.

  5. Purification and Characterization of Recombinant Human Lysozyme from Eggs of Transgenic Chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanyu Wu

    Full Text Available Transgenic chickens as bioreactors have several advantages, such as the simple establishment procedure, correct glycosylation profile of expressed proteins, etc. Lysozyme is widely used in food industry, livestock farming, and medical field as a replacement of antibiotics because of its antibacterial and complement system-modulating activity. In this study, we used RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence to detect the expression of recombinant human lysozyme (rhLY in the transgenic chicken. We demonstrated that the transgene of rhLY was genetically stable across different generations. We next optimized the purification procedure of rhLY from the transgenic eggs by utilizing two steps of cation-exchange chromatography and one gel-filtration chromatography. About 6 mg rhLY with the purity exceeding 90% was obtained from ten eggs, and the purification efficiency was about 75%. The purified rhLY had similar physicochemical and biological properties in molecular mass and antibacterial activity compared to the commercial human lysozyme. Additionally, both of them exhibited thermal stability at 60°C and tolerated an extensive pH range of 2 to 11. In conclusion, our study proved that the transgenic chickens we have previously generated were genetically stable and suitable for the production of active rhLY. We also provided a pipeline for purifying the recombinant proteins from transgenic eggs, which could be useful for other studies.

  6. Study of a photo-induced lysozyme-riboflavin bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, I.; Silva, E.

    1985-01-01

    Irradiation of lysozyme in the presence of riboflavin results in the formation of a lysozyme-riboflavin adduct. Reduction and carboxymethylation of the four disulfide bonds as well as the chemical modification of the Tyr residues and the photochemical alteration of the His residue in lysozyme, do not affect the formation of the photo-induced lysozyme-riboflavin bond. When the lysozyme-riboflavin adduct was subjected to mild acid hydrolysis and ion exchange chromatography, the retention of a compound containing 14 C-riboflavin was observed. Free 14 C-ribboflavin, on the contrary is not retained by the column. The photo-oxidation of free Trp in the presence of 14 C-riboflavin, gave a compound which bound to the ion exchange resin like the above-mentioned derivative. The photo-oxidation of the Trp residues in lysozyme and in peptides obtained from lysozyme showed very high quantum yields, and these values were directly related to the incorporation of 14 C-riboflavin in these samples. (orig.)

  7. Study of a photo-induced lysozyme-riboflavin bond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrer, I; Silva, E

    1985-01-01

    Irradiation of lysozyme in the presence of riboflavin results in the formation of a lysozyme-riboflavin adduct. Reduction and carboxymethylation of the four disulfide bonds as well as the chemical modification of the Tyr residues and the photochemical alteration of the His residue in lysozyme, do not affect the formation of the photo-induced lysozyme-riboflavin bond. When the lysozyme-riboflavin adduct was subjected to mild acid hydrolysis and ion exchange chromatography, the retention of a compound containing /sup 14/C-riboflavin was observed. Free /sup 14/C-riboflavin, on the contrary is not retained by the column. The photo-oxidation of free Trp in the presence of /sup 14/C-riboflavin, gave a compound which bound to the ion exchange resin like the above-mentioned derivative. The photo-oxidation of the Trp residues in lysozyme and in peptides obtained from lysozyme showed very high quantum yields, and these values were directly related to the incorporation of /sup 14/C-riboflavin in these samples.

  8. Biospecific protein immobilization for rapid analysis of weak protein interactions using self-interaction nanoparticle spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengali, Aditya N; Tessier, Peter M

    2009-10-01

    "Reversible" protein interactions govern diverse biological behavior ranging from intracellular transport and toxic protein aggregation to protein crystallization and inactivation of protein therapeutics. Much less is known about weak protein interactions than their stronger counterparts since they are difficult to characterize, especially in a parallel format (in contrast to a sequential format) necessary for high-throughput screening. We have recently introduced a highly efficient approach of characterizing protein self-association, namely self-interaction nanoparticle spectroscopy (SINS; Tessier et al., 2008; J Am Chem Soc 130:3106-3112). This approach exploits the separation-dependent optical properties of gold nanoparticles to detect weak self-interactions between proteins immobilized on nanoparticles. A limitation of our previous work is that differences in the sequence and structure of proteins can lead to significant differences in their affinity to adsorb to nanoparticle surfaces, which complicates analysis of the corresponding protein self-association behavior. In this work we demonstrate a highly specific approach for coating nanoparticles with proteins using biotin-avidin interactions to generate protein-nanoparticle conjugates that report protein self-interactions through changes in their optical properties. Using lysozyme as a model protein that is refractory to characterization by conventional SINS, we demonstrate that surface Plasmon wavelengths for gold-avidin-lysozyme conjugates over a range of solution conditions (i.e., pH and ionic strength) are well correlated with lysozyme osmotic second virial coefficient measurements. Since SINS requires orders of magnitude less protein and time than conventional methods (e.g., static light scattering), we envision this approach will find application in large screens of protein self-association aimed at either preventing (e.g., protein aggregation) or promoting (e.g., protein crystallization) these

  9. Growth and optical microscopy observation of the lysozyme crystals

    OpenAIRE

    R.Vlokh; L.Marsel; I.Teslyuk; O.G.Vlokh

    2001-01-01

    The little single lysozyme crystals in the capillary after 15 days of growth process with average size 0.1´0.1´0.16mm3 were obtained. It was shown that lysozyme crystals are optically anisotropical and birefringence along a axis is Dn=(2.2±0.5)´10-3 in visible spectrum region. From the measurements of crystallographic angles follows that on the {001} faces angles equal a=81o, b=99o. On the sexangle faces angles equal e=100o, f=140o and g=120o. On the base of obtained results the lysozyme crys...

  10. Lysozyme complexes with thermo- and pH-responsive PNIPAM-b-PAA block copolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pippa, Natassa [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy (Greece); Meristoudi, Anastasia; Pispas, Stergios, E-mail: pispas@eie.gr [National Hellenic Research Foundation, Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute (Greece); Demetzos, Costas [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy (Greece)

    2017-02-15

    Lysozyme is an enzyme responsible for the damage of bacterial cell walls and is abundant in a number of secretions such as tears and human milk. In the present study, we investigated the structure, the physicochemical characteristics, and the temperature-responsiveness of lysozyme complexes with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-b-poly(acrylic acid) block polyelectrolyte in aqueous media. A gamut of light-scattering techniques and fluorescence spectroscopy were used in order to examine the complexation process, as well as the structure, solution behavior, and temperature response of the nanosized complexes. The concentration of copolymer polyelectrolyte was kept constant. The values of the scattering intensity, I{sub 90}, which is proportional to the mass of the species in solution, increased gradually as a function of C{sub LYS,} providing proof of the occurring complexation, while the size of the nanostructures decreased. The structure of the complexes became more open as the C{sub LYS} increased. The increase of the salinity did not affect the structural characteristics of the supramolecular nanoparticulate aggregates. On the other hand, the physicochemical and structural characteristics of the complexes changed upon increasing temperature, and the changes depended on the initial ratio block polyelectrolyte/lysozyme. The knowledge on developing block polyelectrolyte/protein complexes through electrostatic interactions, obtained from this investigation, may be applied to the design of nutraceuticals.

  11. Microwave-radiation-induced molecular structural rearrangement of hen egg-white lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anang K.; Burada, P. S.; Bhattacharya, Susmita; Bag, Sudipta; Bhattacharya, Amitabha; Dasgupta, Swagata; Roy, Anushree

    2018-05-01

    We have investigated the nonthermal effect of 10 GHz/22 dBm microwave radiation on hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) over different irradiation times, ranging from 2 min to 1 h. To ensure a control over the radiation parameters, a pair of microwave rectangular waveguides is used to irradiate the samples. Optical spectroscopic measurements, which include UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and far UV CD spectroscopy, reveal the exposure of the buried tryptophan (Trp) residues of the native molecule between 15 and 30 min of radiation. The higher duration of the perturbation leads to a compact structure of the protein and Trp residues are buried again. Interestingly, we do not find any change in the secondary structure of the protein even for 1 h duration of radiation. The relaxation dynamics of the irradiated molecules also has been discussed. We have shown that the molecules relax to their native configuration in 7-8 h after the radiation field is turned off. The structural rearrangement over the above timescale has further been probed by a model calculation, based on a modified Langevin equation. Our coarse-grained simulation approach utilizes the mean of atomic positions and net atomic charge of each amino acid of native HEWL to mimic the initial conformation of the molecule. The modified positions of the residues are then calculated for the given force fields. The simulation results reveal the nonmonotonous change in overall size of the molecule, as observed experimentally. The radiation parameters used in our experiments are very similar to those of some of the electronic devices we often come across. Thus, we believe that the results of our studies on a simple protein structure may help us in understanding the effect of radiation on complex biological systems as well.

  12. Relationship between β-relaxation and structural stability of lysozyme: Microscopic insight on thermostabilization mechanism by trehalose from Raman spectroscopy experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hédoux, Alain, E-mail: alain.hedoux@univ-lille1.fr; Paccou, Laurent; Guinet, Yannick [Université Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille France, USTL UMET UMR 8207 F-59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2014-06-14

    Raman investigations were carried out in the low-frequency and amide I regions on lysozyme aqueous solutions in absence and presence of trehalose. Raman spectroscopy gives the unique opportunity to analyze the protein and solvent dynamics in the low-frequency range while monitoring the unfolding process by capturing the spectrum of the amide I band. From the analysis of the quasielastic intensity, a dynamic change is firstly observed in a highly hydrated protein, around 70 °C, and interpreted in relation with the denaturation mechanism of the protein. The use of heavy water and partly deuterated trehalose gives clear information on protein–trehalose interactions in the native state of lysozyme (at room temperature) and during the thermal denaturation process of lysozyme. At room temperature, it was found that trehalose is preferentially excluded from the protein surface, and has a main effect on the tetrahedral local order of water molecules corresponding to a stiffening of the H-bond network in the solvent. The consequence is a significant reduction of the amplitude of fast relaxational motions, inducing a less marked dynamic transition shifted toward the high temperatures. Upon heating, interaction between trehalose and lysozyme is detected during the solvent penetration within the protein, i.e., while the native globular state softens into a molten globule (MG) state. Addition of trehalose reduces the protein flexibility in the MG state, improving the structural stability of the protein, and inhibiting the protein aggregation.

  13. Use of lysozyme from chicken egg white as a nitrite replacer in an Italian-type chicken sausage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalaka Sandun Abeyrathne

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sodium or potassium nitrite is widely used as a curing agent in sausages and other cured meat products. Nitrite has strong antimicrobial and antioxidant effects and generates cured meat color. Nitrite, however, can react with secondary or tertiary amines in meat to form carcinogenic, teratogenic and mutagenic N-nitroso compounds. Several findings have been suggested that high consumption of processed meat may increase the risk of cancer, and emphasized that dietary nitrosamines are positively associated with cancer. Lysozyme is one of the major egg proteins that have antimicrobial and antioxidant characteristics. Therefore, lysozyme can be used in meat processing to prevent microbial growth and oxidative degradation in meat products during storage. This study is focused on evaluating the antimicrobial and antioxidant effects of lysozyme extracted from egg white as a replacer of nitrite in a cooked Italian-type chicken sausage. Methods: Four curing treatments including 100% nitrite (control, 100% lysozyme (treatment 1, 25% nitrite + 75% lysozyme (treatment 2 and 50% nitrite + 50% lysozyme (treatment 3 were used to prepare Italian-type chicken sausage samples. Recipe was developed with 64% (w/w meat, 17% (w/w binder (bread crumble, 12% (w/w ice, 4% (w/w vegetable oil, 2% (w/w salt, 1% (w/w spices (chili, black pepper, cardamom. Prepared samples were cooked in an 80 °C smoke house to a core temperature of 65 °C and cooled in cold water to 20-25 °C subsequently packed in polyethylene and stored in a freezer (-18 °C. The antimicrobial effect lysozyme was tested using Escherichia coli and Salmonella. The growth of these pathogens at 0, 3 and 5 days of storage of spore inoculation was determined. The antioxidant activity of lysozyme was determined using the TBARS value during the 25 d storage period. The redness (a*, lightness (L*, and yellowness (b* of sausages were analyzed using a Minolta color meter (CR 410, Konica Minolta Inc

  14. 21 CFR 862.1490 - Lysozyme (muramidase) test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... serum, plasma, leukocytes, and urine. Lysozyme measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of monocytic leukemia and kidney disease. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt...

  15. Dielectric and gravimetric studies of water binding to lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone, S.

    1996-01-01

    Time domain dielectric spectroscopy and hydration isotherm measurements as a function of temperature have been applied to hydrated lysozyme powder. Two dielectric dispersions were identified, the first centred at approximately 8 MHz and a second above 1 GHz. The higher dispersion is considered to be the result of rotational relaxation of water molecules bound to the enzyme. In this case the results indicate the existence of a population of 32 water molecules per lysozyme molecule which are irrotationally bound to the lysozyme structure. A larger population of water molecules is relatively free to respond to the electric field and exhibits a dipole moment close to that of vapour phase water molecules. Multi-temperature hydration isotherm measurements are used to calculate enthalpies and entropies associated with the binding of water to lysozyme. Discontinuities both in dielectric and in thermodynamic characteristics in the range 10-14% hydration are interpreted as a re-ordering of the water structure on the enzyme surface

  16. Experimental determination and thermodynamic modeling of phase equilibrium and protein partitioning in aqueous two-phase systems containing biodegradable salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Brenda; Malpiedi, Luciana Pellegrini; Tubío, Gisela; Nerli, Bibiana; Alcântara Pessôa Filho, Pedro de

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Binodal data of systems (water + polyethyleneglycol + sodium) succinate are reported. ► Pitzer model describes the phase equilibrium of systems formed by polyethyleneglycol and biodegradable salts satisfactorily. ► This simple thermodynamic framework was able to predict the partitioning behaviour of model proteins acceptably well. - Abstract: Phase diagrams of sustainable aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) formed by polyethyleneglycols (PEGs) of different average molar masses (4000, 6000, and 8000) and sodium succinate are reported in this work. Partition coefficients (Kps) of seven model proteins: bovine serum albumin, catalase, beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-amylase, lysozyme, pepsin, urease and trypsin were experimentally determined in these systems and in ATPSs formed by the former PEGs and other biodegradable sodium salts: citrate and tartrate. An extension of Pitzer model comprising long and short-range term contributions to the excess Gibbs free energy was used to describe the (liquid + liquid) equilibrium. Comparison between experimental and calculated tie line data showed mean deviations always lower than 3%, thus indicating a good correlation. The partition coefficients were modeled by using the same thermodynamic approach. Predicted and experimental partition coefficients correlated quite successfully. Mean deviations were found to be lower than the experimental uncertainty for most of the assayed proteins.

  17. Use of europium ions for SAD phasing of lysozyme at the Cu Kα wavelength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, Balakrishnan; Velmurugan, Devadasan

    2012-01-01

    Europium(III) ions bound to the surface of hen egg-white lysozyme were found to exhibit good anomalous signal facilitating SAD phasing using laboratory-source data and automated model building. The europium ion-binding sites were observed up to the 15σ level. Europium is shown to be a good anomalous scatterer in SAD phasing for solving the structure of biological macromolecules. The large value of the anomalous contribution of europium, f′′ = 11.17 e − , at the Cu Kα wavelength is an advantage in de novo phasing and automated model building. Tetragonal crystals of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) incorporating europium(III) chloride (50 mM) were obtained which diffracted to a resolution of 2.3 Å at a wavelength of 1.54 Å (Cu Kα). The master data set (360° frames) was split and analyzed for anomalous signal-to-noise ratio, multiplicity, completeness, SAD phasing and automated building. The structure solution and model building of the split data sets were carried out using phenix.autosol and phenix.autobuild. The contributions of the Eu ions to SAD phasing using in-house data collection are discussed. This study revealed successful lysozyme phasing by SAD using laboratory-source data involving Eu ions, which are mainly coordinated by the side chains of Asn46, Asp52 and Asp101 together with some water molecules

  18. Fibrous polymer grafted magnetic chitosan beads with strong poly(cation-exchange) groups for single step purification of lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayramoglu, Gulay; Tekinay, Turgay; Ozalp, V Cengiz; Arica, M Yakup

    2015-05-15

    Lysozyme is an important polypetide used in medical and food applications. We report a novel magnetic strong cation exchange beads for efficient purification of lysozyme from chicken egg white. Magnetic chitosan (MCHT) beads were synthesized via phase inversion method, and then grafted with poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (p(GMA)) via the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). Epoxy groups of the grafted polymer, were modified into strong cation-exchange groups (i.e., sulfonate groups) in the presence of sodium sulfite. The MCTH and MCTH-g-p(GMA)-SO3H beads were characterized by ATR-FTIR, SEM, and VSM. The sulphonate groups content of the modified MCTH-g-p(GMA)-4 beads was found to be 0.53mmolg(-1) of beads by the potentiometric titration method. The MCTH-g-p(GMA)-SO3H beads were first used as an ion-exchange support for adsorption of lysozyme from aqueous solution. The influence of different experimental parameters such as pH, contact time, and temperature on the adsorption process was evaluated. The maximum adsorption capacity was found to be 208.7mgg(-1) beads. Adsorption of lysozyme on the MCTH-g-p(GMA)-SO3H beads fitted to Langmuir isotherm model and followed the pseudo second-order kinetic. More than 93% of the adsorbed lysozyme was desorbed using Na2CO3 solution (pH 11.0). The purity of the lysozyme was checked by HPLC and SDS gel electrophoresis. In addition, the MCTH-g-p(GMA)-SO3H beads prepared in this work showed promising potential for separation of various anionic molecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Laser ablation dynamics and production of thin films of lysozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela; Matei, Andreea

    at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) produced thin films of average thickness up to 300 nm, which not only contained a significant amount of intact molecules, but also maintained the bioactivity. These films were produced by a nanosecond laser in the UV regime at 355 nm with 2 J/cm2. The surprising fact......Lysozyme is a well-known protein, which is used in food processing because of its bacteriocidal properties. The mass (14307 u) is in the range, in which it easily can be controlled by mass spectrometric methods, for example by MALDI (Matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation). We have recently...... that these molecules can be transferred to a substrate as intact molecules by the violent laser impact ( ~up to 50 mJ/pulse) has not yet been understood. One issue is that up to 150 ng/pulse is removed by the laser, and much of the material is ejected from the target in relatively large chunks. We have continued...

  20. Laser ablation dynamics and production of thin films of lysozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Schou, Jørgen; Amoruso, S.

    produced thin films of average thickness up to 300 nm, which not only contained a significant amount of intact molecules, but also maintained the bioactivity. These films were produced by a nanosecond laser in the UV regime at 355 nm with 2 J/cm2. The surprising fact that these molecules can be transferred......Lysozyme is a well-known protein, which is used in food processing because of its bactericidal properties. The mass (14307 amu) is in the range in which it easily can be monitored by mass spectrometric methods, for example by MALDI (Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization). We have recently...... to a substrate as intact molecules by the violent laser impact (~up to 50 mJ/pulse) has not yet been understood. One issue is that up to 150 ng/pulse is removed by the laser, and much of the material is ejected from the target in relatively large chunks. We have explored as well the excitation mechanics by laser...

  1. Disorder in Protein Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarage, James Braun, II

    1990-01-01

    Methods have been developed for analyzing the diffuse x-ray scattering in the halos about a crystal's Bragg reflections as a means of determining correlations in atomic displacements in protein crystals. The diffuse intensity distribution for rhombohedral insulin, tetragonal lysozyme, and triclinic lysozyme crystals was best simulated in terms of exponential displacement correlation functions. About 90% of the disorder can be accounted for by internal movements correlated with a decay distance of about 6A; the remaining 10% corresponds to intermolecular movements that decay in a distance the order of size of the protein molecule. The results demonstrate that protein crystals fit into neither the Einstein nor the Debye paradigms for thermally fluctuating crystalline solids. Unlike the Einstein model, there are correlations in the atomic displacements, but these correlations decay more steeply with distance than predicted by the Debye-Waller model for an elastic solid. The observed displacement correlations are liquid -like in the sense that they decay exponentially with the distance between atoms, just as positional correlations in a liquid. This liquid-like disorder is similar to the disorder observed in 2-D crystals of polystyrene latex spheres, and similar systems where repulsive interactions dominate; hence, these colloidal crystals appear to provide a better analogy for the dynamics of protein crystals than perfectly elastic lattices.

  2. Functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes by microwave irradiation for lysozyme attachment: comparison of covalent and adsorption methods by kinetics of thermal inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes-Camacho, Daniel; Velázquez, Enrique F.; Rodríguez-Félix, Dora E.; Castillo-Ortega, Mónica; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.; del Castillo-Castro, Teresa

    2017-12-01

    Proteins suffer changes in their tertiary structure when they are immobilized, and enzymatic activity is affected due to the low biocompatibility of some supporting materials. In this work immobilization of lysozyme on carbon nanotubes previously functionalized by microwave irradiation was studied. The effectiveness of the microwave-assisted acid treatment of carbon nanotubes was evaluated by XPS, TEM, Raman and FTIR spectroscopy. The carboxylic modification of nanotube surfaces by this fast, simple and feasible method allowed the physical adsorption and covalent linking of active lysozyme onto the carbonaceous material. Thermal inactivation kinetics, thermodynamic parameters and storage stability were studied for adsorbed and covalent enzyme complexes. A major stability was found for lysozyme immobilized by the covalent method, the activation energy for inactivation of the enzyme was higher for the covalent method and it was stable after 50 d of storage at 4 °C. The current study highlights the effect of protein immobilization method on the biotechnological potential of nanostructured biocatalysts.

  3. Structural and functional characterization of proteins adsorbed on hydrophilized polylactide-co-glycolide microfibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasita R

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rajesh Vasita, Dhirendra S KattiDepartment of Biological Sciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, IndiaBackground: Hydrophobic biopolymers such as polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA, 85:15 have been extensively explored as scaffolding materials for tissue engineering applications. More recently, electrospun microfiber-based and nanofiber-based scaffolds of PLGA have received increased attention because they act as physical mimics of the fibrillar extracellular matrix. However, the hydrophobicity of the PLGA microfiber surface can limit its use in biomedical applications. Therefore, in a previous study, we fabricated Pluronic® F-108 (PF-108-blended PLGA microfibrous scaffolds that alleviated the hydrophobicity associated with PLGA by enriching the surface of microfibers with the ethylene oxide units present in PF-108.Methods: In this study, we report the influence of the extent of surface enrichment of PLGA microfibers on their interaction with two model proteins, ie, bovine serum albumin (BSA and lysozyme. BSA and lysozyme were adsorbed onto PLGA microfiber meshes (unmodified and modified and studied for the amount, secondary structure conformation, and bioactivity of released protein.Results: Irrespective of the type of protein, PF-108-blended PLGA microfibers showed significantly greater protein adsorption and release than the unblended PLGA samples. However, in comparison with BSA, lysozyme showed a 7–9-fold increase in release. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies for secondary structure determination demonstrated that irrespective of type of microfiber surface (unblended or blended, adsorbed BSA and lysozyme did not show any significant change in secondary structure (α-helical content as compared with BSA and/or lysozyme in the free powder state. Further, the bioactivity assay of lysozyme released from blended PLGA microfiber meshes demonstrated 80%–85% bioactivity, indicating that

  4. Purification of Egg White Lysozyme from Indonesian Kampung Chicken and Ducks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Wulandari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Egg white lysozyme (EWL has considerably a wide functional protein exhibiting antibacterial activity mainly against Gram-positive bacteria. The EWL is widely applied in food industry and is considerably safe. Despite its high potency, EWL of Indonesian poultry has never been studied and exploited. This study was aimed to purify EWL from two Indonesian poultry: kampung chicken and Cihateup duck, and compared to egg of commercial laying hens. The eggs in this study were obtained from field laboratory of Faculty of Animal Science, Bogor Agricultural University (IPB and classified in AA quality based on the interior quality. First attempt to purify the EWL was performed by using ethanol precipitation yielding purified EWL which was still contaminated by other proteins, hence designated as partially purified EWL. Final concentrations of partially purified EWL of kampung chicken, commercial laying hens, and Cihateup duck were about 5800, 5400, and 5500 μg/mL, respectively. To confirm whether the use of ethanol in the purification affecting EWL antibacterial activities, the activities were examined against Staphylococcus aureus. It demonstrated that the partially purified EWL exhibited ability to inhibit S. aureus at 6 and 26 h suggesting that the method was feasible as it did not interfere EWL antibacterial activities. Yet, based on SDS-Page, purity was the issue in ethanol precipitation method. Further attempt using ion exchange chromatography at pH 10 successfully purified lysozyme as indicated by a single band corresponding to lysozyme size (~14 kD free from bands of other proteins. Altogether, a single step of ion exchange chromatography is sufficient and promising to isolate EWL from Indonesian poultry for various industrial purposes.

  5. Probing protein-lipid interactions by FRET between membrane fluorophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusova, Valeriya M.; Gorbenko, Galyna P.; Deligeorgiev, Todor; Gadjev, Nikolai

    2016-09-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful fluorescence technique that has found numerous applications in medicine and biology. One area where FRET proved to be especially informative involves the intermolecular interactions in biological membranes. The present study was focused on developing and verifying a Monte-Carlo approach to analyzing the results of FRET between the membrane-bound fluorophores. This approach was employed to quantify FRET from benzanthrone dye ABM to squaraine dye SQ-1 in the model protein-lipid system containing a polycationic globular protein lysozyme and negatively charged lipid vesicles composed of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. It was found that acceptor redistribution between the lipid bilayer and protein binding sites resulted in the decrease of FRET efficiency. Quantification of this effect in terms of the proposed methodology yielded both structural and binding parameters of lysozyme-lipid complexes.

  6. Prediction of thermodynamic instabilities of protein solutions from simple protein–protein interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Agostino, Tommaso; Solana, José Ramón; Emanuele, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We propose a model of effective protein–protein interaction embedding solvent effects. ► A previous square-well model is enhanced by giving to the interaction a free energy character. ► The temperature dependence of the interaction is due to entropic effects of the solvent. ► The validity of the original SW model is extended to entropy driven phase transitions. ► We get good fits for lysozyme and haemoglobin spinodal data taken from literature. - Abstract: Statistical thermodynamics of protein solutions is often studied in terms of simple, microscopic models of particles interacting via pairwise potentials. Such modelling can reproduce the short range structure of protein solutions at equilibrium and predict thermodynamics instabilities of these systems. We introduce a square well model of effective protein–protein interaction that embeds the solvent’s action. We modify an existing model [45] by considering a well depth having an explicit dependence on temperature, i.e. an explicit free energy character, thus encompassing the statistically relevant configurations of solvent molecules around proteins. We choose protein solutions exhibiting demixing upon temperature decrease (lysozyme, enthalpy driven) and upon temperature increase (haemoglobin, entropy driven). We obtain satisfactory fits of spinodal curves for both the two proteins without adding any mean field term, thus extending the validity of the original model. Our results underline the solvent role in modulating or stretching the interaction potential

  7. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Therapeutic Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Harvey; Chow, Timothy W

    2017-09-01

    Biologics or therapeutic proteins are becoming increasingly important as treatments for disease. The most common class of biologics are monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Recently, there has been an increase in the use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling in the pharmaceutical industry in drug development. We review PBPK models for therapeutic proteins with an emphasis on mAbs. Due to their size and similarity to endogenous antibodies, there are distinct differences between PBPK models for small molecules and mAbs. The high-level organization of a typical mAb PBPK model consists of a whole-body PBPK model with organ compartments interconnected by both blood and lymph flows. The whole-body PBPK model is coupled with tissue-level submodels used to describe key mechanisms governing mAb disposition including tissue efflux via the lymphatic system, elimination by catabolism, protection from catabolism binding to the neonatal Fc (FcRn) receptor, and nonlinear binding to specific pharmacological targets of interest. The use of PBPK modeling in the development of therapeutic proteins is still in its infancy. Further application of PBPK modeling for therapeutic proteins will help to define its developing role in drug discovery and development. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Newly identified invertebrate-type lysozyme (Splys-i) in mud crab (Scylla paramamosain) exhibiting muramidase-deficient antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Zhao, Shu; Fang, Wen-Hong; Zhou, Jun-Fang; Zhang, Jing-Xiao; Ma, Hongyu; Lan, Jiang-Feng; Li, Xin-Cang

    2017-09-01

    Lysozymes are widely distributed immune effectors exerting muramidase activity against the peptidoglycan of the bacterial cell wall to trigger cell lysis. However, some invertebrate-type (i-type) lysozymes deficient of muramidase activity still exhibit antimicrobial activity. To date, the mechanism underlying the antimicrobial effect of muramidase-deficient i-type lysozymes remains unclear. Accordingly, this study characterized a novel i-type lysozyme, Splys-i, in the mud crab Scylla paramamosain. Splys-i shared the highest identity with the Litopenaeus vannamei i-type lysozyme (Lvlys-i2, 54% identity) at the amino acid level. Alignment analysis and 3D structure comparison show that Splys-i may be a muramidase-deficient i-type lysozyme because it lacks the two conserved catalytic residues (Glu and Asp) that are necessary for muramidase activity. Splys-i is mainly distributed in the intestine, stomach, gills, hepatopancreas, and hemocytes, and it is upregulated by Vibrio harveyi or Staphylococcus aureus challenge. Recombinant Splys-i protein (rSplys-i) can inhibit the growth of Gram-negative bacteria (V. harveyi, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahemolyticus, and Escherichia coli), Gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Bacillus megaterium), and the fungus Candida albicans to varying degrees. In this study, two binding assays and a bacterial agglutination assay were conducted to elucidate the potential antimicrobial mechanisms of Splys-i. Results demonstrated that rSplys-i could bind to all nine aforementioned microorganisms. It also exhibited a strong binding activity to lipopolysaccharide from E. coli and lipoteichoic acid and peptidoglycan (PGN) from S. aureus but a weak binding activity to PGN from B. subtilis and β-glucan from fungi. Moreover, rSplys-i could agglutinate these nine types of microorganisms in the presence of Ca 2+ at different protein concentrations. These results suggest that the binding activity and its triggered

  9. Genetic control of the humoral immune response to avian egg white lysozymes in the chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    Chickens from two closely related sublines, GHs-B6 and GHs-B13, differing serologically at the major histocompatibility complex, were significantly different in their humoral response to three avian egg white lysozymes. Specific antisera levels were measured by radioimmunoassay using 125 I-labeled lysozymes. Antibodies elicited in response to these lysozymes are assumed to be directed against sites on these lysozymes where their amino acid sequence differs from that of the recipient G. domesticus egg white lysozyme (HEL). GHs-B6 birds produced a high level of antibody in response to immunization of turkey (TEL), pheasant (PhL) and guinea hen (GHL) lysozymes. GHs-B13 birds produced no detectable antibody to TEL, were intermediate in their response to PhL and equaled the antibody production of GHs-B6 birds in response to GHL. Antisera to each lysozyme were examined for crossreactivity with all other lysozymes by use of a competitive binding assay

  10. Antimicrobial Membranes of Bio-Based PA 11 and HNTs Filled with Lysozyme Obtained by an Electrospinning Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Bugatti

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Bio-based membranes were obtained using Polyamide 11 (PA11 from renewable sources and a nano-hybrid composed of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs filled with lysozyme (50 wt % of lysozyme, as a natural antimicrobial molecule. Composites were prepared using an electrospinning process, varying the nano-hybrid loading (i.e., 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 wt %. The morphology of the membranes was investigated through SEM analysis and there was found to be a narrow average fiber diameter (0.3–0.5 μm. The mechanical properties were analyzed and correlated to the nano-hybrid content. Controlled release of lysozyme was followed using UV spectrophotometry and the release kinetics were found to be dependent on HNTs–lysozyme loading. The experimental results were analyzed by a modified Gallagher–Corrigan model. The application of the produced membranes, as bio-based pads, for extending the shelf life of chicken slices has been tested and evaluated.

  11. Fast loop modeling for protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiong; Nguyen, Son; Shang, Yi; Xu, Dong; Kosztin, Ioan

    2015-03-01

    X-ray crystallography is the main method for determining 3D protein structures. In many cases, however, flexible loop regions of proteins cannot be resolved by this approach. This leads to incomplete structures in the protein data bank, preventing further computational study and analysis of these proteins. For instance, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of structure-function relationship require complete protein structures. To address this shortcoming, we have developed and implemented an efficient computational method for building missing protein loops. The method is database driven and uses deep learning and multi-dimensional scaling algorithms. We have implemented the method as a simple stand-alone program, which can also be used as a plugin in existing molecular modeling software, e.g., VMD. The quality and stability of the generated structures are assessed and tested via energy scoring functions and by equilibrium MD simulations. The proposed method can also be used in template-based protein structure prediction. Work supported by the National Institutes of Health [R01 GM100701]. Computer time was provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  12. Models of crk adaptor proteins in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Emily S; Park, Morag

    2012-05-01

    The Crk family of adaptor proteins (CrkI, CrkII, and CrkL), originally discovered as the oncogene fusion product, v-Crk, of the CT10 chicken retrovirus, lacks catalytic activity but engages with multiple signaling pathways through their SH2 and SH3 domains. Crk proteins link upstream tyrosine kinase and integrin-dependent signals to downstream effectors, acting as adaptors in diverse signaling pathways and cellular processes. Crk proteins are now recognized to play a role in the malignancy of many human cancers, stimulating renewed interest in their mechanism of action in cancer progression. The contribution of Crk signaling to malignancy has been predominantly studied in fibroblasts and in hematopoietic models and more recently in epithelial models. A mechanistic understanding of Crk proteins in cancer progression in vivo is still poorly understood in part due to the highly pleiotropic nature of Crk signaling. Recent advances in the structural organization of Crk domains, new roles in kinase regulation, and increased knowledge of the mechanisms and frequency of Crk overexpression in human cancers have provided an incentive for further study in in vivo models. An understanding of the mechanisms through which Crk proteins act as oncogenic drivers could have important implications in therapeutic targeting.

  13. Investigation of protein distribution in solid lipid particles and its impact on protein release using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Philip C.; Birch, Ditlev; Saarinen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain new insights into protein distribution in solid lipid microparticles (SLMs) and subsequent release mechanisms using a novel label-free chemical imaging method, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. Lysozyme-loaded SLMs were prepared using...... in the solid lipid matrix, which required full lipolysis of the entire matrix to release lysozyme completely. Therefore, SLMs with lysozyme incorporated in an aqueous solution released lysozyme much faster than with lysozyme incorporated as a solid. In conclusion, CARS microscopy was an efficient and non......-destructive method for elucidating the distribution of lysozyme in SLMs. The interpretation of protein distribution and release during lipolysis enabled elucidation of protein release mechanisms. In future, CARS microscopy analysis could facilitate development of a wide range of protein-lipid matrices with tailor...

  14. Production of human lactoferrin and lysozyme in the milk of transgenic dairy animals: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Caitlin A; Maga, Elizabeth A; Murray, James D

    2015-08-01

    Genetic engineering, which was first developed in the 1980s, allows for specific additions to animals' genomes that are not possible through conventional breeding. Using genetic engineering to improve agricultural animals was first suggested when the technology was in the early stages of development by Palmiter et al. (Nature 300:611-615, 1982). One of the first agricultural applications identified was generating transgenic dairy animals that could produce altered or novel proteins in their milk. Human milk contains high levels of antimicrobial proteins that are found in low concentrations in the milk of ruminants, including the antimicrobial proteins lactoferrin and lysozyme. Lactoferrin and lysozyme are both part of the innate immune system and are secreted in tears, mucus, and throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Due to their antimicrobial properties and abundance in human milk, multiple lines of transgenic dairy animals that produce either human lactoferrin or human lysozyme have been developed. The focus of this review is to catalogue the different lines of genetically engineered dairy animals that produce either recombinant lactoferrin or lysozyme that have been generated over the years as well as compare the wealth of research that has been done on the in vitro and in vivo effects of the milk they produce. While recent advances including the development of CRISPRs and TALENs have removed many of the technical barriers to predictable and efficient genetic engineering in agricultural species, there are still many political and regulatory hurdles before genetic engineering can be used in agriculture. It is important to consider the substantial amount of work that has been done thus far on well established lines of genetically engineered animals evaluating both the animals themselves and the products they yield to identify the most effective path forward for future research and acceptance of this technology.

  15. The Protein Model Portal--a comprehensive resource for protein structure and model information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Juergen; Roth, Steven; Arnold, Konstantin; Kiefer, Florian; Schmidt, Tobias; Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    The Protein Model Portal (PMP) has been developed to foster effective use of 3D molecular models in biomedical research by providing convenient and comprehensive access to structural information for proteins. Both experimental structures and theoretical models for a given protein can be searched simultaneously and analyzed for structural variability. By providing a comprehensive view on structural information, PMP offers the opportunity to apply consistent assessment and validation criteria to the complete set of structural models available for proteins. PMP is an open project so that new methods developed by the community can contribute to PMP, for example, new modeling servers for creating homology models and model quality estimation servers for model validation. The accuracy of participating modeling servers is continuously evaluated by the Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn (CAMEO) project. The PMP offers a unique interface to visualize structural coverage of a protein combining both theoretical models and experimental structures, allowing straightforward assessment of the model quality and hence their utility. The portal is updated regularly and actively developed to include latest methods in the field of computational structural biology. Database URL: http://www.proteinmodelportal.org.

  16. The Protein Model Portal—a comprehensive resource for protein structure and model information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Juergen; Roth, Steven; Arnold, Konstantin; Kiefer, Florian; Schmidt, Tobias; Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    The Protein Model Portal (PMP) has been developed to foster effective use of 3D molecular models in biomedical research by providing convenient and comprehensive access to structural information for proteins. Both experimental structures and theoretical models for a given protein can be searched simultaneously and analyzed for structural variability. By providing a comprehensive view on structural information, PMP offers the opportunity to apply consistent assessment and validation criteria to the complete set of structural models available for proteins. PMP is an open project so that new methods developed by the community can contribute to PMP, for example, new modeling servers for creating homology models and model quality estimation servers for model validation. The accuracy of participating modeling servers is continuously evaluated by the Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn (CAMEO) project. The PMP offers a unique interface to visualize structural coverage of a protein combining both theoretical models and experimental structures, allowing straightforward assessment of the model quality and hence their utility. The portal is updated regularly and actively developed to include latest methods in the field of computational structural biology. Database URL: http://www.proteinmodelportal.org PMID:23624946

  17. Effect of intracrystalline water on micro-Vickers hardness in tetragonal hen egg-white lysozyme single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, H; Kawamoto, H; Tachibana, M; Kojima, K

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical properties of high quality tetragonal hen egg-white lysozyme single crystals which are one type of protein crystal were investigated by the indentation method. The indentation marks were clearly observed on the crystal surface and no elastic recovery of them occurred. The value of the micro-Vickers hardness in the wet condition was estimated to be about 20 MPa at room temperature. The hardness greatly depended on the amount of intracrystalline water (mobile water) contained in the crystals. The hardness increased with increasing evaporation time to air at room temperature. It reached the maximum at about 260 MPa, which is 13 times as much as that in the wet condition. The origin of such a change in hardness was explained in terms of the dislocation mechanisms in lysozyme single crystals

  18. Hydration dynamics near a model protein surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of water dynamics from dilute to very high concentration solutions of a prototypical hydrophobic amino acid with its polar backbone, N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA), is studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation for both the completely deuterated and completely hydrogenated leucine monomer. We observe several unexpected features in the dynamics of these biological solutions under ambient conditions. The NALMA dynamics shows evidence of de Gennes narrowing, an indication of coherent long timescale structural relaxation dynamics. The translational water dynamics are analyzed in a first approximation with a jump diffusion model. At the highest solute concentrations, the hydration water dynamics is significantly suppressed and characterized by a long residential time and a slow diffusion coefficient. The analysis of the more dilute concentration solutions takes into account the results of the 2.0M solution as a model of the first hydration shell. Subtracting the first hydration layer based on the 2.0M spectra, the translational diffusion dynamics is still suppressed, although the rotational relaxation time and residential time are converged to bulk-water values. Molecular dynamics analysis shows spatially heterogeneous dynamics at high concentration that becomes homogeneous at more dilute concentrations. We discuss the hydration dynamics results of this model protein system in the context of glassy systems, protein function, and protein-protein interfaces

  19. Modeling protein structures: construction and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, C S; Cohen, F E

    1993-06-01

    Although no general solution to the protein folding problem exists, the three-dimensional structures of proteins are being successfully predicted when experimentally derived constraints are used in conjunction with heuristic methods. In the case of interleukin-4, mutagenesis data and CD spectroscopy were instrumental in the accurate assignment of secondary structure. In addition, the tertiary structure was highly constrained by six cysteines separated by many residues that formed three disulfide bridges. Although the correct structure was a member of a short list of plausible structures, the "best" structure was the topological enantiomer of the experimentally determined conformation. For many proteases, other experimentally derived structures can be used as templates to identify the secondary structure elements. In a procedure called modeling by homology, the structure of a known protein is used as a scaffold to predict the structure of another related protein. This method has been used to model a serine and a cysteine protease that are important in the schistosome and malarial life cycles, respectively. The model structures were then used to identify putative small molecule enzyme inhibitors computationally. Experiments confirm that some of these nonpeptidic compounds are active at concentrations of less than 10 microM.

  20. Predicting Protein Secondary Structure with Markov Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Paul; Larsen, Simon; Thomsen, Claus

    2004-01-01

    we are considering here, is to predict the secondary structure from the primary one. To this end we train a Markov model on training data and then use it to classify parts of unknown protein sequences as sheets, helices or coils. We show how to exploit the directional information contained...... in the Markov model for this task. Classifications that are purely based on statistical models might not always be biologically meaningful. We present combinatorial methods to incorporate biological background knowledge to enhance the prediction performance....

  1. Studies on isolation and partial purification of lysozyme from egg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-01-05

    Jan 5, 2009 ... nine species of lovebirds, and many different colour var- ieties. Their scientific name Agapornis comes from the. Greek Agapa meaning, “Love” and ornis meaning “bird”. This paper describes the isolation, partial purification and determination of molecular weight of lysozyme of Agapor- nis sp. egg white.

  2. Expression of T4 Lysozyme Gene (gene e) in Streptococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pL2 plasmid isolated from E. coli was introduced into S. salivarius subsp. thermophilus and Lactococcus lactis cells by electro-transformation. The lysozyme enzymes expressing by these bacteria were found to be active on Micrococcus luteus cells and thereby preventing their growth on assay plates. Thermostability of ...

  3. Complex coacervate core micelles with a lysozyme-modified corona

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danial, Maarten; Klok, Harm-Anton; Norde, Willem; Stuart, Martien A. Cohen

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the preparation, characterization, and enzymatic activity of complex coacervate core micelles (C3Ms) composed of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(N-methyl-2-vinyl pyridinium iodide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PQ2VP-PEO) to which the antibacterial enzyme lysozyme is end-attached.

  4. Effect of urea on protein-ligand association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanian, Lora; Son, Ikbae; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2017-12-01

    We combine experimental and theoretical approaches to investigate the influence of a cosolvent on a ligand-protein association event. We apply fluorescence measurements to determining the affinity of the inhibitor tri-N-acetylglucosamine [(GlcNAc) 3 ] for lysozyme at urea concentrations ranging from 0 to 8M. Notwithstanding that, at room temperature and neutral pH, lysozyme retains its native conformation up to the solubility limit of urea, the affinity of (GlcNAc) 3 for the protein steadily decreases as the concentration of urea increases. We analyze the urea dependence of the binding free energy within the framework of a simplified statistical thermodynamics-based model that accounts for the excluded volume effect and direct solute-solvent interactions. The analysis reveals that the detrimental action of urea on the inhibitor-lysozyme binding originates from competition between the free energy contributions of the excluded volume effect and direct solute-solvent interactions. The free energy contribution of direct urea-solute interactions narrowly overcomes the excluded volume contribution thereby resulting in urea weakening the protein-ligand association. More broadly, the successful application of the simple model employed in this work points to the possibility of its use in quantifying the stabilizing/destabilizing action of individual cosolvents on biochemical folding and binding reactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Protein Folding: Search for Basic Physical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Y. Torshin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available How a unique three-dimensional structure is rapidly formed from the linear sequence of a polypeptide is one of the important questions in contemporary science. Apart from biological context of in vivo protein folding (which has been studied only for a few proteins, the roles of the fundamental physical forces in the in vitro folding remain largely unstudied. Despite a degree of success in using descriptions based on statistical and/or thermodynamic approaches, few of the current models explicitly include more basic physical forces (such as electrostatics and Van Der Waals forces. Moreover, the present-day models rarely take into account that the protein folding is, essentially, a rapid process that produces a highly specific architecture. This review considers several physical models that may provide more direct links between sequence and tertiary structure in terms of the physical forces. In particular, elaboration of such simple models is likely to produce extremely effective computational techniques with value for modern genomics.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary x-ray structure analysis of the egg-white lysozyme from a Taiwanese Soft-Shelled Turtle (Tri onyx Sinensis Wiegmann)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siritapetawee, Jaruwan; Thammasirirak, Sompong; Yuvaniyama, Jirudon

    2005-10-01

    Lysozyme has been purified from the egg-white of a Taiwanese soft-shelled turtle. This soft-shelled turtle ' s egg-white lysozyme migrated on 12.5% SDS-PAGE at about 14.8 kDa. The lysozyme has been crystallized using the sitting drop vapor diffusion technique and 30% (w/v) polyethylene glycol 8000 in 0.1 M sodium cacodylate, p H 6.5 containing 0.2 M ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. One of the crystals diffracted X rays beyond 2 angstrom unit resolution and belonged to the orthorhombic, space group P212121, with unit cell dimensions of a = 37.8 angstrom unit, b = 55.6 angstrom unit, and c 72.2 angstrom unit and one molecule of the enzyme per asymmetric unit. The data were collected to 1.9 angstrom resolution with an R merge of 4.6%, suitable for high resolution structure analysis. The single-crystal X-ray structure of lysozyme has been initially phased with the Molecular Replacement technique using pheasant egg-white lysozyme (PDB ID 1GHL) as a search template. Model rebuilding and refinement are in progress

  7. Use of Lysozyme as a Feed Additive on Rumen Fermentation and Methane Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf A. Biswas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the effect of lysozyme addition on in vitro rumen fermentation and to identify the lysozyme inclusion rate for abating methane (CH4 production. An in vitro ruminal fermentation technique was done using a commercial concentrate to rice straw ratio of 8:2 as substrate. The following treatments were applied wherein lysozyme was added into 1 mg dry matter substrate at different levels of inclusion: Without lysozyme, 2,000, 4,000, and 8,000 U lysozyme. Results revealed that, lysozyme addition had a significant effect on pH after 24 h of incubation, with the highest pH (p<0.01 observed in 8,000 U lysozyme, followed by the 4,000 U, 2,000 U, and without lysozyme. The highest amounts of acetic acid, propionic acid (p<0.01 and total volatile fatty acid (TVFA (p<0.05 were found in 8,000 U after 24 h of incubation. The CH4 concentration was the lowest in the 8,000 U and the highest in the without lysozyme addition after 24 h of incubation. There was no significant differences in general bacteria, methanogen, or protozoan DNA copy number. So far, addition of lysozyme increased the acetate, propionate, TVFA, and decreased CH4 concentration. These results suggest that lysozyme supplementation may improve in vitro rumen fermentation and reduce CH4 emission.

  8. Growth of thin films of low molecular weight proteins by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matei, Andreea; Schou, Jørgen; Constantinescu, C.

    2011-01-01

    Thin films of lysozyme and myoglobin grown by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) from a water ice matrix have been investigated. The deposition rate of these two low molecular weight proteins (lysozyme: 14307 amu and myoglobin: 17083 amu) exhibits a maximum of about 1–2 ng/cm2 per....... The results for lysozyme demonstrate that the fragmentation rate of the proteins during the MAPLE process is not influenced by the pH of the water solution prior to freezing....

  9. Impact of lysozyme on stability mechanism of nanozirconia aqueous suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szewczuk-Karpisz, Katarzyna, E-mail: k.szewczuk-karpisz@wp.pl; Wiśniewska, Małgorzata

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Adsorption and stabilization-destabilization properties of lysozyme (LSZ) in the nanozirconia-biopolymer solution system were determined. • The stability measurements were performed using turbidimetric method. • Lysozyme macromolecules undergo adsorption on the ZrO{sub 2} surface under electrostatic adsorbent-adsorbate attraction, i.e. at pH 6 and 9. • The biopolymer adsorption impact on the zirconia stability varies at different pH values. - Abstract: The effect of lysozyme (LSZ) presence on the zirconium(IV) oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) aqueous suspension stability was examined. The applied zirconia contains mesopores (with a diameter about 30 nm) and its mean particle size is about 100 nm. To determine the stability mechanism of ZrO{sub 2} suspension in the biopolymer presence, the adsorption and electrokinetic (surface charge density and zeta potential) measurements were performed in the pH range 3–10. The lysozyme adsorption on the nanozirconia surface proceeds mainly through electrostatic forces. Under solid-polymer repulsion conditions, there is no adsorption of lysozyme (pH < 6, C{sub NaCl} 0.01 mol/dm{sup 3}). The increase of solution ionic strength to 0.2 mol/dm{sup 3} causes screening of unfavourable forces and biopolymer adsorption becomes possible. The LSZ addition to the ZrO{sub 2} suspension influences its stability. At pH 3, 4.6 and 7.6, slight improvement of the system stability was obtained. In turn, at pH 9 considerable destabilization of nanozirconia particles covered by polymeric layers occurs.

  10. Modeling disordered regions in proteins using Rosetta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Yu-Ruei Wang

    Full Text Available Protein structure prediction methods such as Rosetta search for the lowest energy conformation of the polypeptide chain. However, the experimentally observed native state is at a minimum of the free energy, rather than the energy. The neglect of the missing configurational entropy contribution to the free energy can be partially justified by the assumption that the entropies of alternative folded states, while very much less than unfolded states, are not too different from one another, and hence can be to a first approximation neglected when searching for the lowest free energy state. The shortcomings of current structure prediction methods may be due in part to the breakdown of this assumption. Particularly problematic are proteins with significant disordered regions which do not populate single low energy conformations even in the native state. We describe two approaches within the Rosetta structure modeling methodology for treating such regions. The first does not require advance knowledge of the regions likely to be disordered; instead these are identified by minimizing a simple free energy function used previously to model protein folding landscapes and transition states. In this model, residues can be either completely ordered or completely disordered; they are considered disordered if the gain in entropy outweighs the loss of favorable energetic interactions with the rest of the protein chain. The second approach requires identification in advance of the disordered regions either from sequence alone using for example the DISOPRED server or from experimental data such as NMR chemical shifts. During Rosetta structure prediction calculations the disordered regions make only unfavorable repulsive contributions to the total energy. We find that the second approach has greater practical utility and illustrate this with examples from de novo structure prediction, NMR structure calculation, and comparative modeling.

  11. Protein Simulation Data in the Relational Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Andrew M; Daggett, Valerie

    2012-10-01

    High performance computing is leading to unprecedented volumes of data. Relational databases offer a robust and scalable model for storing and analyzing scientific data. However, these features do not come without a cost-significant design effort is required to build a functional and efficient repository. Modeling protein simulation data in a relational database presents several challenges: the data captured from individual simulations are large, multi-dimensional, and must integrate with both simulation software and external data sites. Here we present the dimensional design and relational implementation of a comprehensive data warehouse for storing and analyzing molecular dynamics simulations using SQL Server.

  12. Lysozyme and bilirubin bind to ACE and regulate its conformation and shedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, Sergei M.; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Akinbi, Henry T.; Nesterovitch, Andrew B.; Epshtein, Yuliya; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Kryukova, Olga V.; Piegeler, Tobias; Golukhova, Elena Z.; Schwartz, David E.; Dull, Randal O.; Minshall, Richard D.; Kost, Olga A.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) hydrolyzes numerous peptides and is a critical participant in blood pressure regulation and vascular remodeling. Elevated tissue ACE levels are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. Blood ACE concentrations are determined by proteolytic cleavage of ACE from the endothelial cell surface, a process that remains incompletely understood. In this study, we identified a novel ACE gene mutation (Arg532Trp substitution in the N domain of somatic ACE) that increases blood ACE activity 7-fold and interrogated the mechanism by which this mutation significantly increases blood ACE levels. We hypothesized that this ACE mutation disrupts the binding site for blood components which may stabilize ACE conformation and diminish ACE shedding. We identified the ACE-binding protein in the blood as lysozyme and also a Low Molecular Weight (LMW) ACE effector, bilirubin, which act in concert to regulate ACE conformation and thereby influence ACE shedding. These results provide mechanistic insight into the elevated blood level of ACE observed in patients on ACE inhibitor therapy and elevated blood lysozyme and ACE levels in sarcoidosis patients. PMID:27734897

  13. Cross-linked lysozyme crystal templated synthesis of Au nanoparticles as high-performance recyclable catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Miao; Liu Xia; Qi Wei; Su Rongxin; Huang Renliang; Yu Yanjun; He Zhimin; Wang Libing

    2013-01-01

    Bio-nanomaterials fabricated using a bioinspired templating technique represent a novel class of composite materials with diverse applications in biomedical, electronic devices, drug delivery, and catalysis. In this study, Au nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized within the solvent channels of cross-linked lysozyme crystals (CLLCs) in situ without the introduction of extra chemical reagents or physical treatments. The as-prepared AuNPs-in-protein crystal hybrid materials are characterized by light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analyses. Small AuNPs with narrow size distribution reveal the restriction effects of the porous structure in the lysozyme crystals. These composite materials are proven to be active heterogeneous catalysts for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol. These catalysts can be easily recovered and reused at least 20 times because of the physical stability and macro-dimension of CLLCs. This work is the first to use CLLCs as a solid biotemplate for the preparation of recyclable high-performance catalysts. (paper)

  14. Local pH at the surface of hen egg white lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otosu, Takuhiro; Kobayashi, Kaito; Yamaguchi, Shoichi

    2018-02-01

    The microenvironment at the surface of hen-egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) was examined by analyzing the change in pKa of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) upon binding to the N-terminus of HEWL. The result showed that the local pH at the HEWL surface is higher than the bulk pH. Furthermore, the data showed that the difference between the local and bulk pH becomes larger with decreasing pH, suggesting HEWL repels more protons at lower pH. Because the local pH affects the protonation states of functional amino-acids at the protein surface, the results provide the fundamental insight into the microenvironment at the protein surface.

  15. In-line Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy as a versatile process analytical technology for preparative protein chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Großhans, Steffen; Rüdt, Matthias; Sanden, Adrian; Brestrich, Nina; Morgenstern, Josefine; Heissler, Stefan; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2018-04-27

    Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) is a well-established spectroscopic method in the analysis of small molecules and protein secondary structure. However, FTIR is not commonly applied for in-line monitoring of protein chromatography. Here, the potential of in-line FTIR as a process analytical technology (PAT) in downstream processing was investigated in three case studies addressing the limits of currently applied spectroscopic PAT methods. A first case study exploited the secondary structural differences of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and lysozyme to selectively quantify the two proteins with partial least squares regression (PLS) giving root mean square errors of cross validation (RMSECV) of 2.42 g/l and 1.67 g/l, respectively. The corresponding Q 2 values are 0.92 and, respectively, 0.99, indicating robust models in the calibration range. Second, a process separating lysozyme and PEGylated lysozyme species was monitored giving an estimate of the PEGylation degree of currently eluting species with RMSECV of 2.35 g/l for lysozyme and 1.24 g/l for PEG with Q 2 of 0.96 and 0.94, respectively. Finally, Triton X-100 was added to a feed of lysozyme as a typical process-related impurity. It was shown that the species could be selectively quantified from the FTIR 3D field without PLS calibration. In summary, the proposed PAT tool has the potential to be used as a versatile option for monitoring protein chromatography. It may help to achieve a more complete implementation of the PAT initiative by mitigating limitations of currently used techniques. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Frequency Dependent Non- Thermal Effects of Oscillating Electric Fields in the Microwave Region on the Properties of a Solvated Lysozyme System: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelios Floros

    Full Text Available The use of microwaves in every day's applications raises issues regarding the non thermal biological effects of microwaves. In this work we employ molecular dynamics simulations to advance further the dielectric studies of protein solutions in the case of lysozyme, taking into consideration possible frequency dependent changes in the structural and dynamic properties of the system upon application of electric field in the microwave region. The obtained dielectric spectra are identical with those derived in our previous work using the Fröhlich-Kirkwood approach in the framework of the linear response theory. Noticeable structural changes in the protein have been observed only at frequencies near its absorption maximum. Concerning Cα position fluctuations, different frequencies affected different regions of the protein sequence. Furthermore, the influence of the field on the kinetics of protein-water as well as on the water-water hydrogen bonds in the first hydration shell has been studied; an extension of the Luzar-Chandler kinetic model was deemed necessary for a better fit of the applied field results and for the estimation of more accurate hydrogen bond lifetime values.

  17. Effects of mannose, fructose, and fucose on the structure, stability, and hydration of lysozyme in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahim, Abdoul; Peters, Günther H.J.; Jalkanen, Karl J.

    2013-01-01

    The bio-protective properties of monosaccharaides, namely mannose, fructose and fucose, on the stability and dynamical properties of the NMR determined hen egg-white lysozyme structure have been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature in aqueous solution and in...... of the solvent and sugar distributions around lysozyme was used to investigate the interfacial solvent and sugar structure near the protein surface.......The bio-protective properties of monosaccharaides, namely mannose, fructose and fucose, on the stability and dynamical properties of the NMR determined hen egg-white lysozyme structure have been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature in aqueous solution and in 7...... and 13 wt % concentrations of the three sugars. Results are discussed in the framework of the bio-protective phenomena. The three sugars show similar bio-protective behaviours at room temperature (300 K) in the concentration range studied as shown by the small RMSDs of the resulting MD structures from...

  18. Markov state models of protein misfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirur, Anshul; De Sancho, David; Best, Robert B.

    2016-02-01

    Markov state models (MSMs) are an extremely useful tool for understanding the conformational dynamics of macromolecules and for analyzing MD simulations in a quantitative fashion. They have been extensively used for peptide and protein folding, for small molecule binding, and for the study of native ensemble dynamics. Here, we adapt the MSM methodology to gain insight into the dynamics of misfolded states. To overcome possible flaws in root-mean-square deviation (RMSD)-based metrics, we introduce a novel discretization approach, based on coarse-grained contact maps. In addition, we extend the MSM methodology to include "sink" states in order to account for the irreversibility (on simulation time scales) of processes like protein misfolding. We apply this method to analyze the mechanism of misfolding of tandem repeats of titin domains, and how it is influenced by confinement in a chaperonin-like cavity.

  19. On the characterization of intermediates in the isodesmic aggregation pathway of hen lysozyme at alkaline pH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Ravi

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation leading to formation of amyloid fibrils is a symptom of several diseases like Alzheimer's, type 2 diabetes and so on. Elucidating the poorly understood mechanism of such phenomena entails the difficult task of characterizing the species involved at each of the multiple steps in the aggregation pathway. It was previously shown by us that spontaneous aggregation of hen-eggwhite lysozyme (HEWL at room temperature in pH 12.2 is a good model to study aggregation. Here in this paper we investigate the growth kinetics, structure, function and dynamics of multiple intermediate species populating the aggregation pathway of HEWL at pH 12.2. The different intermediates were isolated by varying the HEWL monomer concentration in the 300 nM-0.12 mM range. The intermediates were characterized using techniques like steady-state and nanosecond time-resolved fluorescence, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Growth kinetics of non-fibrillar HEWL aggregates were fitted to the von Bertalanffy equation to yield a HEWL concentration independent rate constant (k = (6.6 ± 0.6 × 10(-5 s(-1. Our results reveal stepwise changes in size, molecular packing and enzymatic activity among growing HEWL aggregates consistent with an isodesmic aggregation model. Formation of disulphide bonds that crosslink the monomers in the aggregate appear as a unique feature of this aggregation. AFM images of multiple amyloid fibrils emanating radially from amorphous aggregates directly confirmed that on-pathway fibril formation was feasible under isodesmic polymerization. The isolated HEWL aggregates are revealed as polycationic protein nanoparticles that are robust at neutral pH with ability to take up non-polar molecules like ANS.

  20. Ultrasonic acoustic levitation for fast frame rate X-ray protein crystallography at room temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Soichiro Tsujino; Takashi Tomizaki

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the data acquisition rate of X-ray diffraction images for macromolecular crystals at room temperature at synchrotrons has the potential to significantly accelerate both structural analysis of biomolecules and structure-based drug developments. Using lysozyme model crystals, we demonstrated the rapid acquisition of X-ray diffraction datasets by combining a high frame rate pixel array detector with ultrasonic acoustic levitation of protein crystals in liquid droplets. The rapid spinn...

  1. Surface charge effects in protein adsorption on nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramesh, M; Shimoni, O; Ostrikov, K; Prawer, S; Cervenka, J

    2015-03-19

    Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins (bovine serum albumin and lysozyme) of different properties (charge, molecular weight and rigidity), the main driving mechanism responsible for the protein binding to the charged nanoparticles was identified. Electrostatic interactions were found to dominate the protein adsorption dynamics, attachment and conformation. We developed a simple electrostatic model that can qualitatively explain the observed adsorption behaviour based on charge-induced pH modifications near the charged nanoparticle surfaces. Under neutral conditions, the local pH around the positively and negatively charged nanodiamonds becomes very high (11-12) and low (1-3) respectively, which has a profound impact on the protein charge, hydration and affinity to the nanodiamonds. Small proteins (lysozyme) were found to form multilayers with significant conformational changes to screen the surface charge, while larger proteins (albumin) formed monolayers with minor conformational changes. The findings of this study provide a step forward toward understanding and eventually predicting nanoparticle interactions with biofluids.

  2. Solving protein nanocrystals by cryo-EM diffraction: Multiple scattering artifacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Ganesh [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Basu, Shibom [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Liu, Haiguang [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States); Zuo, Jian-Min [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Spence, John C.H., E-mail: spence@asu.edu [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The maximum thickness permissible within the single-scattering approximation for the determination of the structure of perfectly ordered protein microcrystals by transmission electron diffraction is estimated for tetragonal hen-egg lysozyme protein crystals using several approaches. Multislice simulations are performed for many diffraction conditions and beam energies to determine the validity domain of the required single-scattering approximation and hence the limit on crystal thickness. The effects of erroneous experimental structure factor amplitudes on the charge density map for lysozyme are noted and their threshold limits calculated. The maximum thickness of lysozyme permissible under the single-scattering approximation is also estimated using R-factor analysis. Successful reconstruction of density maps is found to result mainly from the use of the phase information provided by modeling based on the protein data base through molecular replacement (MR), which dominates the effect of poor quality electron diffraction data at thicknesses larger than about 200 Å. For perfectly ordered protein nanocrystals, a maximum thickness of about 1000 Å is predicted at 200 keV if MR can be used, using R-factor analysis performed over a subset of the simulated diffracted beams. The effects of crystal bending, mosaicity (which has recently been directly imaged by cryo-EM) and secondary scattering are discussed. Structure-independent tests for single-scattering and new microfluidic methods for growing and sorting nanocrystals by size are reviewed. - Highlights: • Validity domain of single-scattering approximation for protein electron diffraction is assessed • Electron Diffraction for tetragonal hen-egg lysozyme is simulated using multislice. • Bias from the use of phase information in modeling by molecular replacement (MR) is evaluated. • We find an approximate upper thickness limit, if MR is used, of 100 nm. • A 35% error in structure factor magnitudes may be

  3. The influence of different pathogens on the lysozyme activity into tissues of rat oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Levitsky

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine action of the different pathogens on the lysozyme activity into tissues of oral cavity and serum. Methods: The lysozyme activities was determined into oral mucosa cheek, tongue gum and serum of 158 white rats (11 series experiments. The pathogens were used: atropine, protamine sulfat, indometacyn, bee poison, hydrasine sulfat, cytostatic cyclofosfan, lincomycin, lipopolysaccharide, composition of antibiotic and omeprasol for ACBT Results: The  whole of pathogens decreased lysozyme activity (mean in 1,6-2,5 times into oral tissues and on 16 % into serum. The specific lowering of lysozyme activities (Δ%/mg pathogen was low most for lipopolysaccharide, especially after oral application usage (exceeding was in tens times. Conclusion: The lysozyme activity lowering may play significant role in pathogenesis of stomatologic diseases/ Lipopolysaccharide (LPS send lysozyme activity lowering most especially after oral application. Probably, the antilysozyme action of pathogens realize by LPS. The stomatogenic factor in pathogenesis and profilactic of noninfection diseases is important.

  4. Interaction of anthraquinone dyes with lysozyme: Evidences from spectroscopic and docking studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paramaguru, G.; Kathiravan, A.; Selvaraj, S.; Venuvanalingam, P. [School of Chemistry, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Renganathan, R., E-mail: rrengas@gmail.com [School of Chemistry, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2010-03-15

    The interaction between lysozyme and anthraquinone dyes such as Alizarin Red S, Acid blue 129 and Uniblue was studied using steady state, time resolved fluorescence measurements and docking studies. Addition of anthraquinone dyes effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of lysozyme. Fluorescence quenching of lysozyme by dyes has revealed the formation of complex. The number of binding sites (n) and binding constant (K) for all the three dyes was calculated by relevant fluorescence quenching data. Based on Foerster's non-radiative energy transfer theory, distance (r{sub 0}) between the donor (lysozyme) and acceptor (dyes) as well as the critical energy transfer distance (R{sub 0}) has also been calculated. The interaction between dyes and lysozyme occurs through static quenching mechanism as confirmed by time resolved spectroscopy. The conformational change of lysozyme has been analyzed using synchronous fluorescence measurement. Finally, docking studies revealed that specific interactions were observed with the residue of Trp 62.

  5. Interaction of anthraquinone dyes with lysozyme: Evidences from spectroscopic and docking studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paramaguru, G.; Kathiravan, A.; Selvaraj, S.; Venuvanalingam, P.; Renganathan, R.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between lysozyme and anthraquinone dyes such as Alizarin Red S, Acid blue 129 and Uniblue was studied using steady state, time resolved fluorescence measurements and docking studies. Addition of anthraquinone dyes effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of lysozyme. Fluorescence quenching of lysozyme by dyes has revealed the formation of complex. The number of binding sites (n) and binding constant (K) for all the three dyes was calculated by relevant fluorescence quenching data. Based on Foerster's non-radiative energy transfer theory, distance (r 0 ) between the donor (lysozyme) and acceptor (dyes) as well as the critical energy transfer distance (R 0 ) has also been calculated. The interaction between dyes and lysozyme occurs through static quenching mechanism as confirmed by time resolved spectroscopy. The conformational change of lysozyme has been analyzed using synchronous fluorescence measurement. Finally, docking studies revealed that specific interactions were observed with the residue of Trp 62.

  6. ABCC-JNIH adult health study: Hiroshima. Serum lysozyme determinations, April-June 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, S C; Lamphere, J P; Jablon, S

    1961-01-01

    Serum lysozyme levels were determined on 670 consecutive subjects seen for regularly scheduled clinic examinations of the Adult Health Study in Hiroshima. Serum lysozyme levels were found to vary significantly with the absolute peripheral granulocyte count, age, sex, and month of study. A high level of correlation also was noted between serum lysozyme and diabetes mellitus. This was at least in part attributable to greater average age in patients with diabetes. A suggestive relationship was established between serum lysozyme levels, respiratory diseases, and tuberculosis. These changes are believed to reflect active inflammation with excessive destruction of granulocytes and parenchymal tissues in those patients with the more acute processes. No relationship was found between serum lysozyme and previous exposure to ionizing radiation. These studies indicate that the serum lysozyme level may be useful in the study of the kinetics of leukopoiesis, the aging process, and in the detection of subtle inflammatory processes.

  7. Serum lysozyme activity in coeliac disease: a possible aid to athe diagnosis of malignant change.

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, B T; Ukabam, S O; Barry, R E; Read, A E

    1981-01-01

    Serum lysozyme activities were measured in 34 control subjects, 13 untreated adult coeliac patients, 21 adult coeliac patients on gluten-free diet, and eight coeliac patients with a histiocytic lymphoma. Serum lysozyme activities were raised in three untreated patients, three patients treated with a gluten-free diet, and in only two patients with coeliac disease and lymphoma. Serum lysozyme estimations cannot be recommended as an aid to the diagnosis of lymphoma in patients with coeliac disease.

  8. The interaction of lysozyme with caffeine, theophylline and theobromine in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Mei; Tang, Bo-Ping; Wang, Yan-Qing

    2010-10-01

    The interactions of lysozyme with caffeine (Caf), theophylline (Tph) and theobromine (Tbr) were investigated using UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra techniques. The results revealed that Caf (Tph or Tbr) caused the fluorescence quenching of lysozyme by the formation of Caf (Tph or Tbr)-lysozyme complex. The binding constants (K(A)) and thermodynamic parameters (ΔG°, ΔH°, ΔS°) at two different temperatures, the binding locality, and the binding power were obtained. The results showed that the process of binding Caf (Tph or Tbr) to lysozyme was a spontaneous molecular interaction procedure and the hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions play a major role in stabilizing the complex; The distance r between donor (lysozyme) and acceptor (Caf, Tph or Tbr) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The effect of Caf (Tph or Tbr) on the conformation of lysozyme was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra techniques. The results showed that the binding of Caf (Tph or Tbr) to lysozyme induced some micro-environmental and conformational changes in lysozyme and disturbed the environment of the polypeptide of lysozyme.

  9. Prevention of Bacterial Contamination of a Silica Matrix Containing Entrapped β-Galactosidase through the Action of Covalently Bound Lysozymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available β-galactosidase was successfully encapsulated within an amino-functionalised silica matrix using a “fish-in-net” approach and molecular imprinting technique followed by covalent binding of lysozyme via a glutaraldehyde-based method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy were used to characterise the silica matrix hosting the two enzymes. Both encapsulated β-galactosidase and bound lysozyme exhibited high enzymatic activities and outstanding operational stability in model reactions. Moreover, enzyme activities of the co-immobilised enzymes did not obviously change relative to enzymes immobilised separately. In antibacterial tests, bound lysozyme exhibited 95.5% and 89.6% growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC (American type culture collection 653 and Escherichia coli ATCC 1122, respectively. In milk treated with co-immobilised enzymes, favourable results were obtained regarding reduction of cell viability and high lactose hydrolysis rate. In addition, when both co-immobilised enzymes were employed to treat milk, high operational and storage stabilities were observed. The results demonstrate that the use of co-immobilised enzymes holds promise as an industrial strategy for producing low lactose milk to benefit people with lactose intolerance.

  10. Lysozyme-immobilized electrospun PAMA/PVA and PSSA-MA/PVA ion-exchange nanofiber for wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonglairoum, Prasopchai; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2014-08-27

    Abstract This research was aimed to develop the lysozyme immobilized ion-exchange nanofiber mats for wound healing. To promote the healing process, the PSSA-MA/PVA and PAMA ion-exchange nanofiber mats were fabricated to mimic the extracellular matrix structure using electrospinning process followed by thermally crosslinked. Lysozyme was immobilized on the ion-exchane nanofibers by an adsorption method. The ion-exchange nanofibers were investigated using SEM, FTIR and XRPD. Moreover, the lysozyme-immobilized ion-exchange nanofibers were further investigated for lysozyme content and activity, lysozyme release and wound healing activity. The fiber diameters of the mats were in the nanometer range. Lysozyme was gradually absorbed into the PSSA-MA/PVA nanofiber with higher extend than that is absorbed on the PAMA/PVA nanofiber and exhibited higher activity than lysozyme-immobilized PAMA/PVA nanofiber. The total contents of lysozyme on the PSSA-MA/PVA and PAMA/PVA nanofiber were 648 and 166 µg/g, respectively. FTIR and lysozyme activity results confirmed the presence of lysozyme on the nanofiber mats. The lysozyme was released from the PSSA-MA/PVA and PAMA/PVA nanofiber in the same manner. The lysozyme-immobilized PSSA-MA/PVA nanofiber mats and lysozyme-immobilized PAMA/PVA nanofiber mats exhibited significantly faster healing rate than gauze and similar to the commercial antibacterial gauze dressing. These results suggest that these nanofiber mats could provide the promising candidate for wound healing application.

  11. A hidden markov model derived structural alphabet for proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camproux, A C; Gautier, R; Tufféry, P

    2004-06-04

    Understanding and predicting protein structures depends on the complexity and the accuracy of the models used to represent them. We have set up a hidden Markov model that discretizes protein backbone conformation as series of overlapping fragments (states) of four residues length. This approach learns simultaneously the geometry of the states and their connections. We obtain, using a statistical criterion, an optimal systematic decomposition of the conformational variability of the protein peptidic chain in 27 states with strong connection logic. This result is stable over different protein sets. Our model fits well the previous knowledge related to protein architecture organisation and seems able to grab some subtle details of protein organisation, such as helix sub-level organisation schemes. Taking into account the dependence between the states results in a description of local protein structure of low complexity. On an average, the model makes use of only 8.3 states among 27 to describe each position of a protein structure. Although we use short fragments, the learning process on entire protein conformations captures the logic of the assembly on a larger scale. Using such a model, the structure of proteins can be reconstructed with an average accuracy close to 1.1A root-mean-square deviation and for a complexity of only 3. Finally, we also observe that sequence specificity increases with the number of states of the structural alphabet. Such models can constitute a very relevant approach to the analysis of protein architecture in particular for protein structure prediction.

  12. Validation of the GROMOS force-field parameter set 45A3 against nuclear magnetic resonance data of hen egg lysozyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, T. A. [ETH Hoenggerberg Zuerich, Laboratory of Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Daura, X. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, InstitucioCatalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats and Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (Spain); Oostenbrink, C. [ETH Hoenggerberg Zuerich, Laboratory of Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Smith, L. J. [University of Oxford, Oxford Centre for Molecular Sciences, Central Chemistry Laboratory (United Kingdom); Gunsteren, W. F. van [ETH Hoenggerberg Zuerich, Laboratory of Physical Chemistry (Switzerland)], E-mail: wfvgn@igc.phys.chem.ethz.ch

    2004-12-15

    The quality of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of proteins depends critically on the biomolecular force field that is used. Such force fields are defined by force-field parameter sets, which are generally determined and improved through calibration of properties of small molecules against experimental or theoretical data. By application to large molecules such as proteins, a new force-field parameter set can be validated. We report two 3.5 ns molecular dynamics simulations of hen egg white lysozyme in water applying the widely used GROMOS force-field parameter set 43A1 and a new set 45A3. The two MD ensembles are evaluated against NMR spectroscopic data NOE atom-atom distance bounds, {sup 3}J{sub NH{alpha}} and {sup 3}J{sub {alpha}}{sub {beta}} coupling constants, and {sup 1}5N relaxation data. It is shown that the two sets reproduce structural properties about equally well. The 45A3 ensemble fulfills the atom-atom distance bounds derived from NMR spectroscopy slightly less well than the 43A1 ensemble, with most of the NOE distance violations in both ensembles involving residues located in loops or flexible regions of the protein. Convergence patterns are very similar in both simulations atom-positional root-mean-square differences (RMSD) with respect to the X-ray and NMR model structures and NOE inter-proton distances converge within 1.0-1.5 ns while backbone {sup 3}J{sub HN{alpha}}-coupling constants and {sup 1}H- {sup 1}5N order parameters take slightly longer, 1.0-2.0 ns. As expected, side-chain {sup 3}J{sub {alpha}}{sub {beta}}-coupling constants and {sup 1}H- {sup 1}5N order parameters do not reach full convergence for all residues in the time period simulated. This is particularly noticeable for side chains which display rare structural transitions. When comparing each simulation trajectory with an older and a newer set of experimental NOE data on lysozyme, it is found that the newer, larger, set of experimental data agrees as well with each of the

  13. Validation of the GROMOS force-field parameter set 45A3 against nuclear magnetic resonance data of hen egg lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, T. A.; Daura, X.; Oostenbrink, C.; Smith, L. J.; Gunsteren, W. F. van

    2004-01-01

    The quality of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of proteins depends critically on the biomolecular force field that is used. Such force fields are defined by force-field parameter sets, which are generally determined and improved through calibration of properties of small molecules against experimental or theoretical data. By application to large molecules such as proteins, a new force-field parameter set can be validated. We report two 3.5 ns molecular dynamics simulations of hen egg white lysozyme in water applying the widely used GROMOS force-field parameter set 43A1 and a new set 45A3. The two MD ensembles are evaluated against NMR spectroscopic data NOE atom-atom distance bounds, 3 J NHα and 3 J αβ coupling constants, and 1 5N relaxation data. It is shown that the two sets reproduce structural properties about equally well. The 45A3 ensemble fulfills the atom-atom distance bounds derived from NMR spectroscopy slightly less well than the 43A1 ensemble, with most of the NOE distance violations in both ensembles involving residues located in loops or flexible regions of the protein. Convergence patterns are very similar in both simulations atom-positional root-mean-square differences (RMSD) with respect to the X-ray and NMR model structures and NOE inter-proton distances converge within 1.0-1.5 ns while backbone 3 J HNα -coupling constants and 1 H- 1 5N order parameters take slightly longer, 1.0-2.0 ns. As expected, side-chain 3 J αβ -coupling constants and 1 H- 1 5N order parameters do not reach full convergence for all residues in the time period simulated. This is particularly noticeable for side chains which display rare structural transitions. When comparing each simulation trajectory with an older and a newer set of experimental NOE data on lysozyme, it is found that the newer, larger, set of experimental data agrees as well with each of the simulations. In other words, the experimental data converged towards the theoretical result

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane vesicles triggered by human mucosal fluid and lysozyme can prime host tissue surfaces for bacterial adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Maria Emiliano Metruccio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of human morbidity and mortality that often targets epithelial surfaces. Host immunocompromise, or the presence of indwelling medical devices, including contact lenses, can predispose to infection. While medical devices are known to accumulate bacterial biofilms, it is not well understood why resistant epithelial surfaces become susceptible to P. aeruginosa. Many bacteria, including P. aeruginosa, release Outer Membrane Vesicles (OMVs in response to stress that can fuse with host cells to alter their function. Here, we tested the hypothesis that mucosal fluid can trigger OMV release to compromise an epithelial barrier. This was tested using tear fluid and corneal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. After 1 h both human tear fluid, and the tear component lysozyme, greatly enhanced OMV release from P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 compared to PBS controls (~100 fold. TEM and SDS-PAGE showed tear fluid and lysozyme-induced OMVs were similar in size and protein composition, but differed from biofilm-harvested OMVs, the latter smaller with fewer proteins. Lysozyme-induced OMVs were cytotoxic to human corneal epithelial cells in vitro and murine corneal epithelium in vivo. OMV exposure in vivo enhanced Ly6G/C expression at the corneal surface, suggesting myeloid cell recruitment, and primed the cornea for bacterial adhesion (~4-fold, P < 0.01. Sonication disrupted OMVs retained cytotoxic activity, but did not promote adhesion, suggesting the latter required OMV-mediated events beyond cell killing. These data suggest that mucosal fluid induced P. aeruginosa OMVs could contribute to loss of epithelial barrier function during medical device-related infections.

  15. Size Exclusion Chromatography Studies of the Initial Self-Association Steps of Chicken Egg White Lysozyme Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Felecia; Donovan, David; Pusey, Marc

    2000-01-01

    Nucleation is one of the least understood aspects of crystallogenesis. In the case of macromolecule nucleation, this understanding is further hampered by uncertainty over what precisely is being discussed. We define the process of solute self-association (aggregation, oligomerization, interaction, clustering, etc.) whereby n-mers (n > or = 2) having a crystallographic or nascent crystallographic arrangement leading to the critical nucleus reversibly form in the solution, to be part of the nucleation process. This reversible self-association process is a fundamental part of the nucleation process, and occurs as a function of the solute concentration. In the case of chicken egg white lysozyme, a considerable body of experimental evidence leads us to the conclusion that it also forms the crystal growth units. Size exclusion chromatography is a simple and direct method for determining the equilibrium constants for the self-association process. A Pharmacia FPLC system was used to provide accurate solution flow rates. The column, injection valve, and sample loop were all mounted within a temperature-controlled chamber. Chromatographically re-purified lysozyme was first dialyzed against the column equilibration buffer, with injection onto the column after several hours pre-incubation at the running temperature. Preliminary experiments, were carried out using a Toyopearl HW-50F column (1 x 50cm), equilibrated with 0.1 M sodium acetate, 5% sodium chloride, pH 4.6, at 15C. Protein concentrations from 0.1 to 4 mg/ml were employed (C(sub sat) = 1.2 mg/ml). The data from several different protein preparations consistently shows a progressively decreasing elution volume with increasing protein concentration, indicating that reversible self-association is occurring. The dotted line indicates the monomeric lysozyme elution volume. However, lysozyme interacts with the column matrix in these experiments, which complicates data analysis.Accordingly, we are testing silica-based HPLC

  16. Model for calculation of electrostatic contribution into protein stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundrotas, Petras; Karshikoff, Andrey

    2003-03-01

    Existing models of the denatured state of proteins consider only one possible spatial distribution of protein charges and therefore are applicable to a limited number of cases. In this presentation a more general framework for the modeling of the denatured state is proposed. It is based on the assumption that the titratable groups of an unfolded protein can adopt a quasi-random distribution, restricted by the protein sequence. The model was tested on two proteins, barnase and N-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L9. The calculated free energy of denaturation, Δ G( pH), reproduces the experimental data essentially better than the commonly used null approximation (NA). It was demonstrated that the seemingly good agreement with experimental data obtained by NA originates from the compensatory effect between the pair-wise electrostatic interactions and the desolvation energy of the individual sites. It was also found that the ionization properties of denatured proteins are influenced by the protein sequence.

  17. Off-resonance R1ρ relaxation outside of the fast exchange limit: An experimental study of a cavity mutant of T4 lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korzhnev, Dmitry M.; Orekhov, Vladislav Yu.; Dahlquist, Frederick W.; Kay, Lewis E.

    2003-01-01

    An 15 N off-resonance R 1ρ spin relaxation study of an L99A point mutant of T4 lysozyme is presented. Previous CPMG-based relaxation dispersion studies of exchange in this protein have established that the molecule interconverts between a populated ground state and an excited state (3.4%) with an exchange rate constant of 1450 s -1 at 25 deg. C. It is shown that for the majority of residues in this protein the offset dependence of the R 1ρ relaxation rates cannot be well fit using models which are only valid in the fast exchange regime. In contrast, a recently derived expression by Trott and Palmer (J. Magn. Reson., 154, 157-160, 2002) which is valid over a wider window of exchange than other relations, is shown to fit the data well. Values of (signed) chemical shift differences between exchanging sites have been extracted and are in reasonable agreement with shift differences measured using CPMG methods. A set of simulations is presented which help establish the exchange regimes that are best suited to analysis by off-resonance R 1ρ techniques

  18. Effects of prolonged running in the heat and cool environments on selected physiological parameters and salivary lysozyme responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur S. Ibrahim

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: This study found similar lysozyme responses between both hot and cool trials. Thus, room/ambient temperature did not affect lysozyme responses among recreational athletes. Nevertheless, the selected physiological parameters were significantly affected by room temperature.

  19. In silico modeling of the yeast protein and protein family interaction network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, K.-I.; Kahng, B.; Kim, D.

    2004-03-01

    Understanding of how protein interaction networks of living organisms have evolved or are organized can be the first stepping stone in unveiling how life works on a fundamental ground. Here we introduce an in silico ``coevolutionary'' model for the protein interaction network and the protein family network. The essential ingredient of the model includes the protein family identity and its robustness under evolution, as well as the three previously proposed: gene duplication, divergence, and mutation. This model produces a prototypical feature of complex networks in a wide range of parameter space, following the generalized Pareto distribution in connectivity. Moreover, we investigate other structural properties of our model in detail with some specific values of parameters relevant to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, showing excellent agreement with the empirical data. Our model indicates that the physical constraints encoded via the domain structure of proteins play a crucial role in protein interactions.

  20. Characterization of different substituted carboxymethyl starch microgels and their interactions with lysozyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Zhang

    Full Text Available A carboxymethyl starch (CMS microgel system was prepared for the control of uptaking and releasing proteins (lysozyme. The physicochemical properties of microgels in various degrees of substitution (DS were determined by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA, swelling degree, and rheological analysis. The microgel particle size mostly ranged from 25 µm to 45 µm. The result obtained from the TGA studies indicated that carboxymethylation decreased the thermal stability of starch, but crosslinking increased the thermal stability of CMS. The CMS microgels showed typical pH sensitivity, and the swelling degree of microgel increased with the increasing of DS and pH, because of the large amounts of carboxyl group ionization. The samples (2.25% could behave as viscoelastic solids since the storage modulus was larger than the loss modulus over the entire frequency range. The protein uptake increased with increasing pH and DS at low salt concentration. The optimal pH shifted to lower pH with increasing ionic strength. The saturated protein uptake decreased with increasing ionic strength at each pH. The protein was easily released from the microgel with high pH and high salt concentration.

  1. Molecular characterization, transcriptional profiling, and antibacterial potential of G-type lysozyme from seahorse (Hippocampus abdominalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jiyeon; Wan, Qiang; Bathige, S D N K; Lee, Jehee

    2016-11-01

    Lysozymes are a family of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of bacterial cell wall, acting as antimicrobial effectors of the innate immune system. In the present study, an ortholog of goose-type lysozyme (ShLysG) from the big-belly seahorse (Hippocampus abdominalis) was identified and characterized structurally and functionally. The full-length cDNA sequence (1213 bp) of ShLysG is comprised of an open reading frame made up of 552 bp, encoding a polypeptide of 184 amino acid (aa) with a predicted molecular mass of 20 kDa. In silico analysis of ShLysG revealed the absence of signal peptide and the presence of a characteristic bacterial soluble lytic transglycosylase (SLT) domain bearing three catalytic residues (Glu 71 , Asp 84 , and Asp 95 ) and seven N-acetyl-d-glucosamine binding sites (Glu 71 , Asp 95 , Tyr 98 , His 99 , Ile 117 , Tyr 145 , and Asn 146 ). Homology analysis demonstrated that the aa sequence of ShLysG shared 60.7-67.4% identity and 72.6-79.3% similarity with the orthologs of other teleosts. Phylogenetic analysis of ShLysG indicated a closest relationship with the ortholog from Gadus morhua. In healthy seahorse, ShLysG mRNA showed a constitutive expression in all the tissues examined, with the highest expression in kidney and the least expression in liver. The ShLysG mRNA levels were also shown significant elevation upon the bacterial and pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMPs) challenges. Furthermore, lytic activities of ShLysG recombinant protein were detected against several Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial species. Taken together, these results suggest that ShLysG might possess a potential immune defensive role against invading microbial pathogens in seahorse. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Suppressive effects of lysozyme on polyphosphate-mediated vascular inflammatory responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jiwoo [College of Pharmacy, CMRI, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, BK21 Plus KNU Multi-Omics Based Creative Drug Research Team, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566 (Korea, Republic of); Ku, Sae-Kwang [Department of Anatomy and Histology, College of Korean Medicine, Daegu Haany University, Gyeongsan 38610 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Suyeon [College of Pharmacy, CMRI, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, BK21 Plus KNU Multi-Omics Based Creative Drug Research Team, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jong-Sup, E-mail: baejs@knu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, CMRI, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, BK21 Plus KNU Multi-Omics Based Creative Drug Research Team, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-10

    Lysozyme, found in relatively high concentration in blood, saliva, tears, and milk, protects us from the ever-present danger of bacterial infection. Previous studies have reported proinflammatory responses of endothelial cells to the release of polyphosphate(PolyP). In this study, we examined the anti-inflammatory responses and mechanisms of lysozyme and its effects on PolyP-induced septic activities in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mice. The survival rates, septic biomarker levels, behavior of human neutrophils, and vascular permeability were determined in PolyP-activated HUVECs and mice. Lysozyme suppressed the PolyP-mediated vascular barrier permeability, upregulation of inflammatory biomarkers, adhesion/migration of leukocytes, and activation and/or production of nuclear factor-κB, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6. Furthermore, lysozyme demonstrated protective effects on PolyP-mediated lethal death and the levels of the related septic biomarkers. Therefore, these results indicated the therapeutic potential of lysozyme on various systemic inflammatory diseases, such as sepsis or septic shock. -- Highlights: •PolyP is shown to be an important mediator of vascular inflammation. •Lysozyme inhibited PolyP-mediated hyperpermeability. •Lysozyme inhibited PolyP-mediated septic response. •Lysozyme reduced PolyP-induced septic mortality.

  3. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry and Macromolecular Visualization for the Interaction of Lysozyme and Its Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chin-Chuan; Jensen, Drake; Boyle, Tiffany; O'Brien, Leah C.; De Meo, Cristina; Shabestary, Nahid; Eder, Douglas J.

    2015-01-01

    To provide a research-like experience to upper-division undergraduate students in a biochemistry teaching laboratory, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is employed to determine the binding constants of lysozyme and its inhibitors, N-acetyl glucosamine trimer (NAG[subscript 3]) and monomer (NAG). The extremely weak binding of lysozyme/NAG is…

  4. Isolation and partial purification of lysozyme from saliva of Bali cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    About 100 μg/ml lysozyme of 14.2 kDa, determined through sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), per 4800 μg/ml saliva was obtained. Based on turbidity assay of Staphylococcus aureus, it was revealed that inhibition activities of 40 μg/ml isolated lysozyme were comparable to 800 μg/ml ...

  5. The effects of xylitol and sorbitol on lysozyme- and peroxidase-related enzymatic and candidacidal activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bum-Soo; Chang, Ji-Youn; Kim, Yoon-Young; Kho, Hong-Seop

    2015-07-01

    To investigate whether xylitol and sorbitol affect enzymatic and candidacidal activities of lysozyme, the peroxidase system, and the glucose oxidase-mediated peroxidase system. Xylitol and sorbitol were added to hen egg-white lysozyme, bovine lactoperoxidase, glucose oxidase-mediated peroxidase, and whole saliva in solution and on hydroxyapatite surfaces. The enzymatic activities of lysozyme, peroxidase, and glucose oxidase-mediated peroxidase were determined by the turbidimetric method, the NbsSCN assay, and production of oxidized o-dianisidine, respectively. Candidacidal activities were determined by comparing colony forming units using Candida albicans ATCC strains 10231, 11006, and 18804. While xylitol and sorbitol did not affect the enzymatic activity of hen egg-white lysozyme both in solution and on hydroxyapatite surfaces, they did inhibit the enzymatic activity of salivary lysozyme significantly in solution, but not on the surfaces. Xylitol and sorbitol enhanced the enzymatic activities of both bovine lactoperoxidase and salivary peroxidase significantly in a dose-dependent manner in solution, but not on the surfaces. Sorbitol, but not xylitol, inhibited the enzymatic activity of glucose oxidase-mediated peroxidase significantly. Both xylitol and sorbitol did not affect candidacidal activities of hen egg-white lysozyme, the bovine lactoperoxidase system, or the glucose oxidase-mediated bovine lactoperoxidase system. Xylitol and sorbitol inhibited salivary lysozyme activity, but enhanced both bovine lactoperoxidase and salivary peroxidase activities significantly in solution. Xylitol and sorbitol did not augment lysozyme- and peroxidase-related candidacidal activities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of lysozyme films produced by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purice, Andreea; Schou, Jørgen; Kingshott, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Thin lysozyme films of thickness up to more than 100 nm have been produced in a dry environment by MAPLE (matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation) from a water ice matrix. Analysis of the films demonstrates that a significant part of the lysozyme molecules is transferred to the substrate without...

  7. Suppressive effects of lysozyme on polyphosphate-mediated vascular inflammatory responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jiwoo; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Lee, Suyeon; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Lysozyme, found in relatively high concentration in blood, saliva, tears, and milk, protects us from the ever-present danger of bacterial infection. Previous studies have reported proinflammatory responses of endothelial cells to the release of polyphosphate(PolyP). In this study, we examined the anti-inflammatory responses and mechanisms of lysozyme and its effects on PolyP-induced septic activities in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mice. The survival rates, septic biomarker levels, behavior of human neutrophils, and vascular permeability were determined in PolyP-activated HUVECs and mice. Lysozyme suppressed the PolyP-mediated vascular barrier permeability, upregulation of inflammatory biomarkers, adhesion/migration of leukocytes, and activation and/or production of nuclear factor-κB, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6. Furthermore, lysozyme demonstrated protective effects on PolyP-mediated lethal death and the levels of the related septic biomarkers. Therefore, these results indicated the therapeutic potential of lysozyme on various systemic inflammatory diseases, such as sepsis or septic shock. -- Highlights: •PolyP is shown to be an important mediator of vascular inflammation. •Lysozyme inhibited PolyP-mediated hyperpermeability. •Lysozyme inhibited PolyP-mediated septic response. •Lysozyme reduced PolyP-induced septic mortality.

  8. Enhancement of nucleation during hanging drop protein crystallization using HF treatment of cover glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yun-Zhu; Yin, Da-Chuan; Lu, Qin-Qin; Wang, Xi-Kai; Liu, Jun [Key Laboratory for Space Bioscience and Biotechnology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072, Shaanxi (China)

    2010-02-15

    We examined a simple approach, i.e., etching cover glasses using hydrofluoric acid (HF), to determine whether cover glass treatment enhances nucleation in hanging drop protein crystallization. Hen egg white lysozyme and proteinase K were used as the model proteins. We found that the treatment increased the success rate of crystallization. The results indicated that the simple treatment, which is easy to adopt without changing much in the hanging drop method, can be utilized as an alternative method to enhance protein crystallization screens (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Prediction of protein-protein interactions between viruses and human by an SVM model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Guangyu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several computational methods have been developed to predict protein-protein interactions from amino acid sequences, but most of those methods are intended for the interactions within a species rather than for interactions across different species. Methods for predicting interactions between homogeneous proteins are not appropriate for finding those between heterogeneous proteins since they do not distinguish the interactions between proteins of the same species from those of different species. Results We developed a new method for representing a protein sequence of variable length in a frequency vector of fixed length, which encodes the relative frequency of three consecutive amino acids of a sequence. We built a support vector machine (SVM model to predict human proteins that interact with virus proteins. In two types of viruses, human papillomaviruses (HPV and hepatitis C virus (HCV, our SVM model achieved an average accuracy above 80%, which is higher than that of another SVM model with a different representation scheme. Using the SVM model and Gene Ontology (GO annotations of proteins, we predicted new interactions between virus proteins and human proteins. Conclusions Encoding the relative frequency of amino acid triplets of a protein sequence is a simple yet powerful representation method for predicting protein-protein interactions across different species. The representation method has several advantages: (1 it enables a prediction model to achieve a better performance than other representations, (2 it generates feature vectors of fixed length regardless of the sequence length, and (3 the same representation is applicable to different types of proteins.

  10. The research methods and model of protein turnover in animal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xilin; Yang Feng

    2002-01-01

    The author discussed the concept and research methods of protein turnover in animal body. The existing problems and the research results of animal protein turnover in recent years were presented. Meanwhile, the measures to improve the models of animal protein turnover were analyzed

  11. Mechanical Modeling and Computer Simulation of Protein Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigozhin, Maxim B.; Scott, Gregory E.; Denos, Sharlene

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, science education and modern technology are bridged to teach students at the high school and undergraduate levels about protein folding and to strengthen their model building skills. Students are guided from a textbook picture of a protein as a rigid crystal structure to a more realistic view: proteins are highly dynamic…

  12. Completion of autobuilt protein models using a database of protein fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowtan, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Two developments in the process of automated protein model building in the Buccaneer software are described: the use of a database of protein fragments in improving the model completeness and the assembly of disconnected chain fragments into complete molecules. Two developments in the process of automated protein model building in the Buccaneer software are presented. A general-purpose library for protein fragments of arbitrary size is described, with a highly optimized search method allowing the use of a larger database than in previous work. The problem of assembling an autobuilt model into complete chains is discussed. This involves the assembly of disconnected chain fragments into complete molecules and the use of the database of protein fragments in improving the model completeness. Assembly of fragments into molecules is a standard step in existing model-building software, but the methods have not received detailed discussion in the literature

  13. A population-based study of salivary lysozyme concentrations and candidal counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, C K; Dodds, M W; Zuo, P; Johnson, D A

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between salivary lysozyme concentration and oral candida load was examined in 595 adults. Unstimulated whole saliva, and citrate-stimulated parotid and submandibular/sublingual saliva were collected from each participant. Candida colony-forming units (c.f.u.) in unstimulated whole saliva were determined. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for lysozyme using commercially available antibodies was developed. This assay showed a linear relation of salivary lysozyme concentrations from 0.5 to 4.0 ng/ml. Significant negative relations were observed between lysozyme concentration and flow rate: r = -0.16 (p candida counts (r = 0.18: p candida in whole saliva revealed that lysozyme concentrations were higher in the high candida (> or = 1000 c.f.u./ml) group than in the zero and moderate candida categories in stimulated parotid saliva (p candida load increases.

  14. Comparison of the thermal stabilization of proteins by oligosaccharides and monosaccharide mixtures: Measurement and analysis in the context of excluded volume theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, Ilyas; Minton, Allen P; Islam, Asimul; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan

    2018-06-01

    The thermal stability of apo α-lactalbumin (α-LA) and lysozyme was measured in the presence of mixtures of glucose, fructose, and galactose. Mixtures of these monosaccharides in the appropriate stoichiometric ratio were found to have a greater stabilizing effect on each of the two proteins than equal weight/volume concentrations of di- tri- and tetrasaccharides with identical subunit composition (sucrose, trehalose, raffinose, and stachyose). The excluded volume model for the effect of a single saccharide on the stability of a protein previously proposed by Beg et al. [Biochemistry 54 (2015) 3594] was extended to treat the case of saccharide mixtures. The extended model predicts quantitatively the stabilizing effect of all monosaccharide mixtures on α-LA and lysozyme reported here, as well as previously published results obtained for ribonuclease A [Biophys. Chem. 138 (2008) 120] to within experimental uncertainty. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Discrete persistent-chain model for protein binding on DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Pui-Man; Zhen, Yi

    2011-04-01

    We describe and solve a discrete persistent-chain model of protein binding on DNA, involving an extra σ(i) at a site i of the DNA. This variable takes the value 1 or 0, depending on whether or not the site is occupied by a protein. In addition, if the site is occupied by a protein, there is an extra energy cost ɛ. For a small force, we obtain analytic expressions for the force-extension curve and the fraction of bound protein on the DNA. For higher forces, the model can be solved numerically to obtain force-extension curves and the average fraction of bound proteins as a function of applied force. Our model can be used to analyze experimental force-extension curves of protein binding on DNA, and hence deduce the number of bound proteins in the case of nonspecific binding. ©2011 American Physical Society

  16. Lysozyme's lectin-like characteristics facilitates its immune defense function

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ruiyan

    2017-06-06

    Interactions between human lysozyme (HL) and the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Klebsiella pneumoniae O1, a causative agent of lung infection, were identified by surface plasmon resonance. To characterize the molecular mechanism of this interaction, HL binding to synthetic disaccharides and tetrasaccharides representing one and two repeating units, respectively, of the O-chain of this LPS were studied. pH-dependent structural rearrangements of HL after interaction with the disaccharide were observed through nuclear magnetic resonance. The crystal structure of the HL-tetrasaccharide complex revealed carbohydrate chain packing into the A, B, C, and D binding sites of HL, which primarily occurred through residue-specific, direct or water-mediated hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts. Overall, these results support a crucial role of the Glu35/Asp53/Trp63/Asp102 residues in HL binding to the tetrasaccharide. These observations suggest an unknown glycan-guided mechanism that underlies recognition of the bacterial cell wall by lysozyme and may complement the HL immune defense function.

  17. Lysozyme's lectin-like characteristics facilitates its immune defense function

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ruiyan; Wu, Lisha; Eckert, Thomas; Burg-Roderfeld, Monika; Rojas-Macias, Miguel A.; Lü tteke, Thomas; Krylov, Vadim B.; Argunov, Dmitry A.; Datta, Aritreyee; Markart, Philipp; Guenther, Andreas; Norden, Bengt; Schauer, Roland; Bhunia, Anirban; Enani, Mushira Abdelaziz; Billeter, Martin; Scheidig, Axel J.; Nifantiev, Nikolay E.; Siebert, Hans-Christian

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between human lysozyme (HL) and the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Klebsiella pneumoniae O1, a causative agent of lung infection, were identified by surface plasmon resonance. To characterize the molecular mechanism of this interaction, HL binding to synthetic disaccharides and tetrasaccharides representing one and two repeating units, respectively, of the O-chain of this LPS were studied. pH-dependent structural rearrangements of HL after interaction with the disaccharide were observed through nuclear magnetic resonance. The crystal structure of the HL-tetrasaccharide complex revealed carbohydrate chain packing into the A, B, C, and D binding sites of HL, which primarily occurred through residue-specific, direct or water-mediated hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts. Overall, these results support a crucial role of the Glu35/Asp53/Trp63/Asp102 residues in HL binding to the tetrasaccharide. These observations suggest an unknown glycan-guided mechanism that underlies recognition of the bacterial cell wall by lysozyme and may complement the HL immune defense function.

  18. Protein adsorption on nanoparticles: model development using computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Qing; Hall, Carol K

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption of proteins on nanoparticles results in the formation of the protein corona, the composition of which determines how nanoparticles influence their biological surroundings. We seek to better understand corona formation by developing models that describe protein adsorption on nanoparticles using computer simulation results as data. Using a coarse-grained protein model, discontinuous molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to investigate the adsorption of two small proteins (Trp-cage and WW domain) on a model nanoparticle of diameter 10.0 nm at protein concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 5 mM. The resulting adsorption isotherms are well described by the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Kiselev models, but not by the Elovich, Fowler–Guggenheim and Hill–de Boer models. We also try to develop a generalized model that can describe protein adsorption equilibrium on nanoparticles of different diameters in terms of dimensionless size parameters. The simulation results for three proteins (Trp-cage, WW domain, and GB3) on four nanoparticles (diameter  =  5.0, 10.0, 15.0, and 20.0 nm) illustrate both the promise and the challenge associated with developing generalized models of protein adsorption on nanoparticles. (paper)

  19. Lysozyme binding ability toward psychoactive stimulant drugs: Modulatory effect of colloidal metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonu, Vikash K; Islam, Mullah Muhaiminul; Rohman, Mostofa Ataur; Mitra, Sivaprasad

    2016-10-01

    The interaction and binding behavior of the well-known psychoactive stimulant drugs theophylline (THP) and theobromine (THB) with lysozyme (LYS) was monitored by in-vitro fluorescence titration and molecular docking calculations under physiological condition. The quenching of protein fluorescence on addition of the drugs is due to the formation of protein-drug complex in the ground state in both the cases. However, the binding interaction is almost three orders of magnitude stronger in THP, which involves mostly hydrogen bonding interaction in comparison with THB where hydrophobic binding plays the predominant role. The mechanism of fluorescence quenching (static type) remains same also in presence of gold and silver nanoparticles (NPs); however, the binding capacity of LYS with the drugs changes drastically in comparison with that in aqueous buffer medium. While the binding affinity of LYS to THB increases ca. 100 times in presence of both the NPs, it is seen to decrease drastically (by almost 1000 fold) for THP. This significant modulation in binding behavior indicates that the drug transportation capacity of LYS can be controlled significantly with the formation protein-NP noncovalent assembly system as an efficient delivery channel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Volume properties and spectroscopy: A terahertz Raman investigation of hen egg white lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Paola; Perticaroli, Stefania; Comez, Lucia; Giugliarelli, Alessandra; Paolantoni, Marco; Fioretto, Daniele; Morresi, Assunta

    2013-12-01

    The low frequency depolarized Raman spectra of 100 mg/ml aqueous solutions of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) have been collected in the 25-85 °C range. Short and long exposures to high temperatures have been used to modulate the competition between the thermally induced reversible and irreversible denaturation processes. A peculiar temperature evolution of spectra is evidenced under prolonged exposure of the protein solution at temperatures higher than 65 °C. This result is connected to the self-assembling of polypeptide chains and testifies the sensitivity of the technique to the properties of both protein molecule and its surrounding. Solvent free spectra have been obtained after subtraction of elastic and solvent components and assigned to a genuine vibrational contribution of hydrated HEWL. A straight similarity is observed between the solvent-free THz Raman feature and the vibrational density of states as obtained by molecular dynamics simulations; according to this, we verify the relation between this spectroscopic observable and the effective protein volume, and distinguish the properties of this latter respect to those of the hydration shell in the pre-melting region.

  1. The Timing of cotE Expression Affects Bacillus subtilis Spore Coat Morphology but Not Lysozyme Resistance▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Teresa; Serrano, Mónica; Steil, Leif; Völker, Uwe; Moran, Charles P.; Henriques, Adriano O.

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis of structural components and morphogenetic factors required for the assembly of the Bacillus subtilis spore coat is governed by a mother cell-specific transcriptional cascade. The first two temporal classes of gene expression, which involve RNA polymerase sigma σE factor and the ancillary regulators GerR and SpoIIID, are deployed prior to engulfment of the prespore by the mother cell. The two last classes rely on σK, whose activation follows engulfment completion, and GerE. The cotE gene codes for a morphogenetic protein essential for the assembly of the outer coat layer and spore resistance to lysozyme. cotE is expressed first from a σE-dependent promoter and, in a second stage, from a promoter that additionally requires SpoIIID and that remains active under σK control. CotE localizes prior to engulfment completion close to the surface of the developing spore, but formation of the outer coat is a late, σK-controlled event. We have transplanted cotE to progressively later classes of mother cell gene expression. This created an early class of mutants in which cotE is expressed prior to engulfment completion and a late class in which expression of cotE follows the complete engulfment of the prespore. Mutants of the early class assemble a nearly normal outer coat structure, whereas mutants of the late class do not. Hence, the early expression of CotE is essential for outer coat assembly. Surprisingly, however, all mutants were fully resistant to lysozyme. The results suggest that CotE has genetically separable functions in spore resistance to lysozyme and spore outer coat assembly. PMID:17172339

  2. The influence of lysozyme on mannitol polymorphism in freeze-dried and spray-dried formulations depends on the selection of the drying process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grohganz, Holger; Lee, Yan-Ying; Rantanen, Jukka

    2013-01-01

    Freeze-drying and spray-drying are often applied drying techniques for biopharmaceutical formulations. The formation of different solid forms upon drying is often dependent on the complex interplay between excipient selection and process parameters. The purpose of this study was to investigate...... the influence of the chosen drying method on the solid state form. Mannitol-lysozyme solutions of 20mg/mL, with the amount of lysozyme varying between 2.5% and 50% (w/w) of total solid content, were freeze-dried and spray-dried, respectively. The resulting solid state of mannitol was analysed by near......-dried formulations an increase in protein concentration resulted in a shift from ß-mannitol to a-mannitol. An increase in final drying temperature of the freeze-drying process towards the temperature of the spray-drying process did not lead to significant changes. It can thus be concluded that it is the drying...

  3. Oral sensitization to food proteins: A Brown Norway rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippels, L.M.J.; Penninks, A.H.; Spanhaak, S.; Houben, G.F.

    1998-01-01

    Background: Although several in vivo antigenicity assays using parenteral immunization are operational, no adequate enteral sensitization models are available to study food allergy and allergenicity of food proteins. Objective: This paper describes the development of an enteral model for food

  4. Modulating Protein Adsorption on Oxygen Plasma Modified Polysiloxane Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marletta, G.

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper we report the study on the adsorption behaviour of three model globular proteins, Human Serum Albumin, Lactoferrin and Egg Chicken Lysozyme onto both unmodified surfaces of a silicon-based polymer and the corresponding plasma treated surfaces. In particular, thin films of hydrophobic polysiloxane (about 90 degree of static water contact angle, WCA) were converted by oxygen plasma treatment at reduced pressure into very hydrophilic phases of SiOx (WCA less than 5 degree). The kinetics of protein adsorption processes were investigated by QCM-D technique, while the chemical structure and topography of the protein adlayer have been studied by Angular resolved-XPS and AFM respectively. It turned out that Albumin and Lysozyme exhibited the opposite preferential adsorption respectively onto the hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, while Lactoferrin did not exhibit significant differences. The observed protein behaviour are discussed both in terms of surface-dependent parameters, including surface free energy and chemical structure, and in terms of protein-dependent parameters, including charge as well as the average molecular orientation in the adlayers. Finally, some examples of differential adsorption behaviour of the investigated proteins are reported onto nanopatterned polysiloxane surfaces consisting of hydrophobic nanopores surrounded by hydrophilic (plasma-treated) matrix and the reverse

  5. Models of protein-ligand crystal structures: trust, but verify.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deller, Marc C; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    X-ray crystallography provides the most accurate models of protein-ligand structures. These models serve as the foundation of many computational methods including structure prediction, molecular modelling, and structure-based drug design. The success of these computational methods ultimately depends on the quality of the underlying protein-ligand models. X-ray crystallography offers the unparalleled advantage of a clear mathematical formalism relating the experimental data to the protein-ligand model. In the case of X-ray crystallography, the primary experimental evidence is the electron density of the molecules forming the crystal. The first step in the generation of an accurate and precise crystallographic model is the interpretation of the electron density of the crystal, typically carried out by construction of an atomic model. The atomic model must then be validated for fit to the experimental electron density and also for agreement with prior expectations of stereochemistry. Stringent validation of protein-ligand models has become possible as a result of the mandatory deposition of primary diffraction data, and many computational tools are now available to aid in the validation process. Validation of protein-ligand complexes has revealed some instances of overenthusiastic interpretation of ligand density. Fundamental concepts and metrics of protein-ligand quality validation are discussed and we highlight software tools to assist in this process. It is essential that end users select high quality protein-ligand models for their computational and biological studies, and we provide an overview of how this can be achieved.

  6. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance studies of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Jiri

    2002-03-25

    The combination of advanced high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques with high-pressure capability represents a powerful experimental tool in studies of protein folding. This review is organized as follows: after a general introduction of high-pressure, high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of proteins, the experimental part deals with instrumentation. The main section of the review is devoted to NMR studies of reversible pressure unfolding of proteins with special emphasis on pressure-assisted cold denaturation and the detection of folding intermediates. Recent studies investigating local perturbations in proteins and the experiments following the effects of point mutations on pressure stability of proteins are also discussed. Ribonuclease A, lysozyme, ubiquitin, apomyoglobin, alpha-lactalbumin and troponin C were the model proteins investigated.

  7. How crystallisation of turkey lysozyme is affected by contamination with hen lysozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishøy, T.; Larsen, S.

    In this project, lipid monolayers at air/water interfaces and lipid-bilayer membranes are used as templates for studying the interaction of peptides and amphiphilic proteins with lipid aggregates. This experimental investigation is related to modelstudies of biological membrane structure and -fun......In this project, lipid monolayers at air/water interfaces and lipid-bilayer membranes are used as templates for studying the interaction of peptides and amphiphilic proteins with lipid aggregates. This experimental investigation is related to modelstudies of biological membrane structure...

  8. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Wenjun, E-mail: wjzheng@buffalo.edu; Glenn, Paul [Department of Physics, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States)

    2015-01-21

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant—while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  9. Predicting nucleic acid binding interfaces from structural models of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Iris; Shazman, Shula; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2012-02-01

    The function of DNA- and RNA-binding proteins can be inferred from the characterization and accurate prediction of their binding interfaces. However, the main pitfall of various structure-based methods for predicting nucleic acid binding function is that they are all limited to a relatively small number of proteins for which high-resolution three-dimensional structures are available. In this study, we developed a pipeline for extracting functional electrostatic patches from surfaces of protein structural models, obtained using the I-TASSER protein structure predictor. The largest positive patches are extracted from the protein surface using the patchfinder algorithm. We show that functional electrostatic patches extracted from an ensemble of structural models highly overlap the patches extracted from high-resolution structures. Furthermore, by testing our pipeline on a set of 55 known nucleic acid binding proteins for which I-TASSER produces high-quality models, we show that the method accurately identifies the nucleic acids binding interface on structural models of proteins. Employing a combined patch approach we show that patches extracted from an ensemble of models better predicts the real nucleic acid binding interfaces compared with patches extracted from independent models. Overall, these results suggest that combining information from a collection of low-resolution structural models could be a valuable approach for functional annotation. We suggest that our method will be further applicable for predicting other functional surfaces of proteins with unknown structure. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A study of the interaction between malachite green and lysozyme by steady-state fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Fei; Liu, Wei; Liu, Feng; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Sun, Ying

    2009-09-01

    The interaction of a N-methylated diaminotriphenylmethane dye, malachite green, with lysozyme was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopic techniques under physiological conditions. The binding parameters have been evaluated by fluorescence quenching methods. The results revealed that malachite green caused the fluorescence quenching of lysozyme through a static quenching procedure. The thermodynamic parameters like DeltaH and DeltaS were calculated to be -15.33 kJ mol(-1) and 19.47 J mol(-1) K(-1) according to van't Hoff equation, respectively, which proves main interaction between malachite green and lysozyme is hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bond contact. The distance r between donor (lysozyme) and acceptor (malachite green) was obtained to be 3.82 nm according to Frster's theory. The results of synchronous fluorescence, UV/vis and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra showed that binding of malachite green with lysozyme can induce conformational changes in lysozyme. In addition, the effects of common ions on the constants of lysozyme-malachite green complex were also discussed.

  11. An electron microscopy study of the diversity of Streptococcus sanguinis cells induced by lysozyme in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yuqing; Li, Li; Li, Wei; Zhou, Xuedong; Lu, Junjun

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial virulence could be altered by the antimicrobial agents of the host. Our aim was to identify the damage and survival of Streptococcus sanguinis induced by lysozymes in vitro and to analyse the potential of oral microorganisms to shirk host defences, which cause infective endocarditis. S. sanguinis ATCC 10556 received lysozyme at concentrations of 12.5, 25, 50 and 100 microg/ml. Cells were examined by electron microscopy. The survival was assessed by colony counting and construction of a growth curve. Challenged by lysozymes, cells mainly exhibited cell wall damage, which seemed to increase with increasing lysozyme concentration and longer incubation period in the presence of ions. Cells with little as well as apparent lesion were observed under the same treatment set, and anomalous stick and huge rotund bodies were occasionally observed. After the removal of the lysozyme, some damaged cells could be reverted to its original form with brain heart infusion (BHI), and their growth curve was similar to the control cells. After further incubation in BHI containing lysozyme, S. sanguinis cell damage stopped progressing, and their growth curve was also similar to the control cells. The results suggested that the S. sanguinis lesions caused by the lysozyme in the oral cavity may be nonhomogeneous and that some damaged cells could self-repair and survive. It also indicated that S. sanguinis with damaged cell walls may survive and be transmitted in the bloodstream.

  12. Surface Plasmon Resonance based sensing of lysozyme in serum on Micrococcus lysodeikticus-modified graphene oxide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilescu, Alina; Gáspár, Szilveszter; Gheorghiu, Mihaela; David, Sorin; Dinca, Valentina; Peteu, Serban; Wang, Qian; Li, Musen; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2017-03-15

    Lysozyme is an enzyme found in biological fluids, which is upregulated in leukemia, renal diseases as well as in a number of inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. We present here the development of a novel lysozyme sensing concept based on the use of Micrococcus lysodeikticus whole cells adsorbed on graphene oxide (GO)-coated Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) interfaces. M. lysodeikticus is a typical enzymatic substrate for lysozyme. Unlike previously reported sensors which are based on the detection of lysozyme through bioaffinity interactions, the bioactivity of lysozyme will be used here for sensing purposes. Upon exposure to lysozyme containing serum, the integrity of the bacterial cell wall is affected and the cells detach from the GO based interfaces, causing a characteristic decrease in the SPR signal. This allows sensing the presence of clinically relevant concentrations of lysozyme in undiluted serum samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Preparation and preliminary characterization of crystallizing fluorescent derivatives of chicken egg white lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, John P.; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2001-11-01

    Fluorescence is one of the most versatile and powerful tools for the study of macromolecules. While most proteins are intrinsically fluorescent, working at crystallization concentrations require the use of covalently prepared derivatives added as tracers. This approach requires derivatives that do not markedly affect the crystal packing. We have prepared fluorescent derivatives of chicken egg white lysozyme with probes bound to one of two different sites on the protein molecule. Lucifer yellow and 5-(2-aminoethyl)aminonapthalene-1-sulfonic acid (EDANS) have been attached to the side chain carboxyl of Asp 101 using a carbodiimide coupling procedure. Asp 101 lies within the active site cleft, and it is believed that the probes are "buried" within that cleft. Lucifer yellow and EDANS probes with iodoacetamide reactive groups have been bound to His 15, located on the "back side" of the molecule relative to the active site. All the derivatives fluoresce in the solution and the crystalline states. Fluorescence characterization has focused on determination of binding effects on the probe quantum yield, lifetime, absorption and emission spectra, and quenching by added solutes. Quenching studies show that, as postulated, the Asp 101-bound probes are partially sheltered from the bulk solution by their location within the active site cleft. Probes bound to His 15 have quenching constants about equal to those for the free probes, indicating that this site is highly exposed to the bulk solution.

  14. Hierarchical Conformational Analysis of Native Lysozyme Based on Sub-Millisecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang

    Full Text Available Hierarchical organization of free energy landscape (FEL for native globular proteins has been widely accepted by the biophysics community. However, FEL of native proteins is usually projected onto one or a few dimensions. Here we generated collectively 0.2 milli-second molecular dynamics simulation trajectories in explicit solvent for hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL, and carried out detailed conformational analysis based on backbone torsional degrees of freedom (DOF. Our results demonstrated that at micro-second and coarser temporal resolutions, FEL of HEWL exhibits hub-like topology with crystal structures occupying the dominant structural ensemble that serves as the hub of conformational transitions. However, at 100 ns and finer temporal resolutions, conformational substates of HEWL exhibit network-like topology, crystal structures are associated with kinetic traps that are important but not dominant ensembles. Backbone torsional state transitions on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to beyond microseconds were found to be associated with various types of molecular interactions. Even at nanoseconds temporal resolution, the number of conformational substates that are of statistical significance is quite limited. These observations suggest that detailed analysis of conformational substates at multiple temporal resolutions is both important and feasible. Transition state ensembles among various conformational substates at microsecond temporal resolution were observed to be considerably disordered. Life times of these transition state ensembles are found to be nearly independent of the time scales of the participating torsional DOFs.

  15. Corn Storage Protein - A Molecular Genetic Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messing, Joachim [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2013-05-31

    Corn is the highest yielding crop on earth and probably the most valuable agricultural product of the United States. Because it converts sun energy through photosynthesis into starch and proteins, we addressed energy savings by focusing on protein quality. People and animals require essential amino acids derived from the digestion of proteins. If proteins are relatively low in certain essential amino acids, the crop becomes nutritionally defective and has to be supplemented. Such deficiency affects meat and fish production and countries where corn is a staple. Because corn seed proteins have relatively low levels of lysine and methionine, a diet has to be supplemented with soybeans for the missing lysine and with chemically synthesized methionine. We therefore have studied genes expressed during maize seed development and their chromosomal organization. A critical technical requirement for the understanding of the molecular structure of genes and their positional information was DNA sequencing. Because of the length of sequences, DNA sequencing methods themselves were insufficient for this type of analysis. We therefore developed the so-called “DNA shotgun sequencing” strategy, where overlapping DNA fragments were sequenced in parallel and used to reconstruct large DNA molecules via overlaps. Our publications became the most frequently cited ones during the decade of 1981-1990 and former Associate Director of Science for the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Patricia M. Dehmer presented our work as one of the great successes of this program. A major component of the sequencing strategy was the development of bacterial strains and vectors, which were also used to develop the first biotechnology crops. These crops possessed new traits thanks to the expression of foreign genes in plants. To enable such expression, chimeric genes had to be constructed using our materials and methods by the industry. Because we made our materials and methods freely available to

  16. Modelling Protein Dynamics on the Microsecond Time Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siuda, Iwona Anna

    Recent years have shown an increase in coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics simulations, providing structural and dynamic details of large proteins and enabling studies of self-assembly of biological materials. It is not easy to acquire such data experimentally, and access is also still limited...... in atomistic simulations. During her PhD studies, Iwona Siuda used MARTINI CG models to study the dynamics of different globular and membrane proteins. In several cases, the MARTINI model was sufficient to study conformational changes of small, purely alpha-helical proteins. However, in studies of larger......ELNEDIN was therefore proposed as part of the work. Iwona Siuda’s results from the CG simulations had biological implications that provide insights into possible mechanisms of the periplasmic leucine-binding protein, the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium pump, and several proteins from the saposin-like proteins...

  17. Characterization of dry globular proteins and protein fibrils by synchrotron radiation vacuum UV circular dichroism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nesgaard, Lise W.; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Andersen, Christian Beyschau

    2008-01-01

    Circular dichroism using synchrotron radiation (SRCD) can extend the spectral range down to approximately 130 nm for dry proteins, potentially providing new structural information. Using a selection of dried model proteins, including alpha-helical, beta-sheet, and mixed-structure proteins, we...... with previously published theoretical calculations related to pi-orbital transitions. We also show that drying does not lead to large changes in the secondary structure and does not induce orientational artifacts. In combination with principal component analysis, our SRCD data allow us to distinguish between two...... different types of protein fibrils, highlighting that bona fide fibrils formed by lysozyme are structurally more similar to the nonclassical fibrillar aggregates formed by the SerADan peptide than with the amyloid formed by alpha-synuclein. Thus, despite the lack of direct structural conclusions...

  18. Preventing disulfide bond formation weakens non-covalent forces among lysozyme aggregates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Ravi

    Full Text Available Nonnative disulfide bonds have been observed among protein aggregates in several diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cataract and so on. The molecular mechanism by which formation of such bonds promotes protein aggregation is poorly understood. Here in this work we employ previously well characterized aggregation of hen eggwhite lysozyme (HEWL at alkaline pH to dissect the molecular role of nonnative disulfide bonds on growth of HEWL aggregates. We employed time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy, atomic force microscopy and single-molecule force spectroscopy to quantify the size, morphology and non-covalent interaction forces among the aggregates, respectively. These measurements were performed under conditions when disulfide bond formation was allowed (control and alternatively when it was prevented by alkylation of free thiols using iodoacetamide. Blocking disulfide bond formation affected growth but not growth kinetics of aggregates which were ∼50% reduced in volume, flatter in vertical dimension and non-fibrillar in comparison to control. Interestingly, single-molecule force spectroscopy data revealed that preventing disulfide bond formation weakened the non-covalent interaction forces among monomers in the aggregate by at least ten fold, thereby stalling their growth and yielding smaller aggregates in comparison to control. We conclude that while constrained protein chain dynamics in correctly disulfide bonded amyloidogenic proteins may protect them from venturing into partial folded conformations that can trigger entry into aggregation pathways, aberrant disulfide bonds in non-amyloidogenic proteins (like HEWL on the other hand, may strengthen non-covalent intermolecular forces among monomers and promote their aggregation.

  19. Effect of histatin-5 and lysozyme on the ability of Streptococcus mutans to form biofilms in in vitro conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyściak, Wirginia; Jurczak, Anna; Piątkowski, Jakub; Kościelniak, Dorota; Gregorczyk-Maga, Iwona; Kołodziej, Iwona; Papież, Monika A; Olczak-Kowalczyk, Dorota

    2015-09-20

    The mechanisms of adhesion to solid surfaces enable S. mutans to colonize oral cavities and form biofilms, which play an important role in caries development. Additional properties enabling the survival of S. mutans in the oral cavity include its ability to survive in acidic environments and specific interactions with other microorganisms inhabiting this ecosystem. The aim of this study was to determine the antibacterial activity of saliva histatin-5 (peptide) and lysozyme (protein) against S. mutans and L. rhamnosus, as representatives of physiological flora. The study involved strains of physiological (L. rhamnosus) and cariogenic (S. mutans) flora isolated from one patient with diagnosed early caries of the deciduous teeth. It was proved that the presence of probiotic L. rhamnosus bacteria in the environment had a negative impact on the ability of S. mutans to produce biofilm. Moreover, the antibacterial activity of histatin-5 was confirmed, and it inhibited S. mutans growth at concentrations of 27.2 μg/ml and 54.4 μg/ml, both individually and in a mixture with lysozyme (in a total concentration of 54.4 μg/ml). The data obtained constitute a promising result due to their potential future application in the prevention and early diagnosis of caries.

  20. Effect of histatin-5 and lysozyme on the ability of Streptococcus mutans to form biofilms in in vitro conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirginia Krzyściak

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of adhesion to solid surfaces enable S. mutans to colonize oral cavities and form biofilms, which play an important role in caries development. Additional properties enabling the survival of S. mutans in the oral cavity include its ability to survive in acidic environments and specific interactions with other microorganisms inhabiting this ecosystem.The aim of this study was to determine the antibacterial activity of saliva histatin-5 (peptide and lysozyme (protein against S. mutans and L. rhamnosus, as representatives of physiological flora.The study involved strains of physiological (L. rhamnosus and cariogenic (S. mutans flora isolated from one patient with diagnosed early caries of the deciduous teeth.It was proved that the presence of probiotic L. rhamnosus bacteria in the environment had a negative impact on the ability of S. mutans to produce biofilm. Moreover, the antibacterial activity of histatin-5 was confirmed, and it inhibited S. mutans growth at concentrations of 27.2 μg/ml and 54.4 μg/ml, both individually and in a mixture with lysozyme (in a total concentration of 54.4 μg/ml.The data obtained constitute a promising result due to their potential future application in the prevention and early diagnosis of caries.

  1. Comparative carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance study at 67. 9 MHz on lysozyme (human and egg-white) and. cap alpha. -lactalbumin (human and bovine) in their native and denatured state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Binst, G; Biesemans, M [Brussels Univ. (Belgium). Faculte des Sciences

    1975-01-01

    A first detailed comparison of the /sup 13/C spectra at high field of two lysozymes (human and egg-white) and two ..cap alpha..-lactalbumins (human and bovine milk) is presented. Assignments were made on most of the resonance peaks in the aliphatic and aromatic regions of the denatured proteins. The relative peak intensities clearly demonstrate the differences in the amino acid composition of the related proteins. The broadening and the complexity of the spectra of the native proteins reflect the non equivalence of the chemical groups in the folded conformation. The usefulness of /sup 13/C nmr spectroscopy in the study of the interaction between small molecules and proteins was tested on N-acteyl-glucosamine in the presence of lysozyme.

  2. Modeling of axonal endoplasmic reticulum network by spastic paraplegia proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalçın, Belgin; Zhao, Lu; Stofanko, Martin; O'Sullivan, Niamh C; Kang, Zi Han; Roost, Annika; Thomas, Matthew R; Zaessinger, Sophie; Blard, Olivier; Patto, Alex L; Sohail, Anood; Baena, Valentina; Terasaki, Mark; O'Kane, Cahir J

    2017-07-25

    Axons contain a smooth tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network that is thought to be continuous with ER throughout the neuron; the mechanisms that form this axonal network are unknown. Mutations affecting reticulon or REEP proteins, with intramembrane hairpin domains that model ER membranes, cause an axon degenerative disease, hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). We show that Drosophila axons have a dynamic axonal ER network, which these proteins help to model. Loss of HSP hairpin proteins causes ER sheet expansion, partial loss of ER from distal motor axons, and occasional discontinuities in axonal ER. Ultrastructural analysis reveals an extensive ER network in axons, which shows larger and fewer tubules in larvae that lack reticulon and REEP proteins, consistent with loss of membrane curvature. Therefore HSP hairpin-containing proteins are required for shaping and continuity of axonal ER, thus suggesting roles for ER modeling in axon maintenance and function.

  3. Gradient elution behavior of proteins in hydrophobic interaction chromatography with U-shaped retention factor curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creasy, Arch; Lomino, Joseph; Barker, Gregory; Khetan, Anurag; Carta, Giorgio

    2018-04-27

    Protein retention in hydrophobic interaction chromatography is described by the solvophobic theory as a function of the kosmostropic salt concentration. In general, an increase in salt concentration drives protein partitioning to the hydrophobic surface while a decrease reduces it. In some cases, however, protein retention also increases at low salt concentrations resulting in a U-shaped retention factor curve. During gradient elution the salt concentration is gradually decreased from a high value thereby reducing the retention factor and increasing the protein chromatographic velocity. For these conditions, a steep gradient can overtake the protein in the column, causing it to rebind. Two dynamic models, one based on the local equilibrium theory and the other based on the linear driving force approximation, are presented. We show that the normalized gradient slope determines whether the protein elutes in the gradient, partially elutes, or is trapped in the column. Experimental results are presented for two different monoclonal antibodies and for lysozyme on Capto Phenyl (High Sub) resin. One of the mAbs and lysozyme exhibit U-shaped retention factor curves and for each, we determine the critical gradient slope beyond which 100% recovery is no longer possible. Elution with a reverse gradient is also demonstrated at low salt concentrations for these proteins. Understanding this behavior has implications in the design of gradient elution since the gradient slope impacts protein recovery. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. An Integrated Framework Advancing Membrane Protein Modeling and Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca F Alford

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins are critical functional molecules in the human body, constituting more than 30% of open reading frames in the human genome. Unfortunately, a myriad of difficulties in overexpression and reconstitution into membrane mimetics severely limit our ability to determine their structures. Computational tools are therefore instrumental to membrane protein structure prediction, consequently increasing our understanding of membrane protein function and their role in disease. Here, we describe a general framework facilitating membrane protein modeling and design that combines the scientific principles for membrane protein modeling with the flexible software architecture of Rosetta3. This new framework, called RosettaMP, provides a general membrane representation that interfaces with scoring, conformational sampling, and mutation routines that can be easily combined to create new protocols. To demonstrate the capabilities of this implementation, we developed four proof-of-concept applications for (1 prediction of free energy changes upon mutation; (2 high-resolution structural refinement; (3 protein-protein docking; and (4 assembly of symmetric protein complexes, all in the membrane environment. Preliminary data show that these algorithms can produce meaningful scores and structures. The data also suggest needed improvements to both sampling routines and score functions. Importantly, the applications collectively demonstrate the potential of combining the flexible nature of RosettaMP with the power of Rosetta algorithms to facilitate membrane protein modeling and design.

  5. Model systems for understanding absorption tuning by opsin proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Brøndsted

    2009-01-01

    This tutorial review reports on model systems that have been synthesised and investigated for elucidating how opsin proteins tune the absorption of the protonated retinal Schiff base chromophore. In particular, the importance of the counteranion is highlighted. In addition, the review advocates...... is avoided, and it becomes clear that opsin proteins induce blueshifts in the chromophore absorption rather than redshifts....

  6. Comparative Study of Elastic Network Model and Protein Contact Network for Protein Complexes: The Hemoglobin Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall topology and interfacial interactions play key roles in understanding structural and functional principles of protein complexes. Elastic Network Model (ENM and Protein Contact Network (PCN are two widely used methods for high throughput investigation of structures and interactions within protein complexes. In this work, the comparative analysis of ENM and PCN relative to hemoglobin (Hb was taken as case study. We examine four types of structural and dynamical paradigms, namely, conformational change between different states of Hbs, modular analysis, allosteric mechanisms studies, and interface characterization of an Hb. The comparative study shows that ENM has an advantage in studying dynamical properties and protein-protein interfaces, while PCN is better for describing protein structures quantitatively both from local and from global levels. We suggest that the integration of ENM and PCN would give a potential but powerful tool in structural systems biology.

  7. Study of the components of quality in SO2-free wines obtained by innovative vinification protocols. Evaluation of the pre-fermentative addition of lysozyme and oenological tannins.

    OpenAIRE

    Sonni, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    The research performed during the PhD candidature was intended to evaluate the quality of white wines, as a function of the reduction in SO2 use during the first steps of the winemaking process. In order to investigate the mechanism and intensity of interactions occurring between lysozyme and the principal macro-components of musts and wines, a series of experiments on model wine solutions were undertaken, focusing attention on the polyphenols, SO2, oenological tannins, pectines, ethanol, ...

  8. An Efficient Null Model for Conformational Fluctuations in Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Tim Philipp; Borg, Mikael; Bottaro, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    Protein dynamics play a crucial role in function, catalytic activity, and pathogenesis. Consequently, there is great interest in computational methods that probe the conformational fluctuations of a protein. However, molecular dynamics simulations are computationally costly and therefore are often...... limited to comparatively short timescales. TYPHON is a probabilistic method to explore the conformational space of proteins under the guidance of a sophisticated probabilistic model of local structure and a given set of restraints that represent nonlocal interactions, such as hydrogen bonds or disulfide...... on conformational fluctuations that is in correspondence with experimental measurements. TYPHON provides a flexible, yet computationally efficient, method to explore possible conformational fluctuations in proteins....

  9. Immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins: the use of animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinks, Vera; Jiskoot, Wim; Schellekens, Huub

    2011-10-01

    Immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins lowers patient well-being and drastically increases therapeutic costs. Preventing immunogenicity is an important issue to consider when developing novel therapeutic proteins and applying them in the clinic. Animal models are increasingly used to study immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins. They are employed as predictive tools to assess different aspects of immunogenicity during drug development and have become vital in studying the mechanisms underlying immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins. However, the use of animal models needs critical evaluation. Because of species differences, predictive value of such models is limited, and mechanistic studies can be restricted. This review addresses the suitability of animal models for immunogenicity prediction and summarizes the insights in immunogenicity that they have given so far.

  10. Isolation and partial purification of lysozyme from saliva of Bali Cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SND

    2012-01-26

    Jan 26, 2012 ... 2Faculty of Mathematics and Life Sciences, Mataram University, Jl. Majapahit No. ... The method adopted for isolation of the lysozyme was from Su and ... Vis spectrophotometer (Shimadzu UV-160, Japan) using a BSA.

  11. Renaturation of reduced hen egg white lysozyme containing two blocked sulfhydryl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, A.S.; Taniuchi, H.

    1980-10-01

    Formation of native lysozyme from the reduced form involves many pathways in two processes: incorrect pairing of half-cystine residues by oxidation and rearrangement of disulfide (SS) bonds. The energy barrier against suflhydryl (SH)-disulfide interchange of the native or nativelike species thus formed causes accumulation of these species. For example, the enzymatically active isomers containing three presumably native SS bonds and one open SS bond may be thermodynamically favorable over the nonnative isomers and can be formed from reduced lysozyme or lysozyme containing scrambled SS bonds by nonobligatory and flexible pathways. As an extension of these observations formation of nativelike species from reduced lysozyme containing the average of two carboxymethyl (CM)-cysteine was investigated.

  12. Investigating the Interaction of Fe Nanoparticles with Lysozyme by Biophysical and Molecular Docking Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Aghili

    Full Text Available Herein, the interaction of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL with iron nanoparticle (Fe NP was investigated by spectroscopic and docking studies. The zeta potential analysis revealed that addition of Fe NP (6.45±1.03 mV to HEWL (8.57±0.54 mV can cause to greater charge distribution of nanoparticle-protein system (17.33±1.84 mV. In addition, dynamic light scattering (DLS study revealed that addition of Fe NP (92.95±6.11 nm to HEWL (2.68±0.37 nm increases suspension potential of protein/nanoparticle system (51.17±3.19 nm. Fluorescence quenching studies reveled that both static and dynamic quenching mechanism occur and hydrogen bond and van der Waals interaction give rise to protein-NP system. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy of HEWL in the presence of Fe NP showed that the emission maximum wavelength of tryptophan (Trp residues undergoes a red-shift. ANS fluorescence data indicated a dramatic exposure of hydrophobic residues to the solvent. The considerable reduction in melting temperature (T(m of HEWL after addition of Fe NP determines an unfavorable interaction system. Furthermore circular dichoroism (CD experiments demonstrated that, the secondary structure of HEWL has not changed with increasing Fe NP concentrations; however, some conformational changes occur in tertiary structure of HEWL. Moreover, protein-ligand docking study confirmed that the Fe NP forms hydrogen bond contacts with HEWL.

  13. Metal-chelating active packaging film enhances lysozyme inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Maxine J; Decker, Eric A; Goddard, Julie M

    2014-07-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that metal chelators enhance the antimicrobial activity of lysozyme. This study examined the effect of metal-chelating active packaging film on the antimicrobial activity of lysozyme against Listeria monocytogenes. Polypropylene films were surface modified by photoinitiated graft polymerization of acrylic acid (PP-g-PAA) from the food contact surface of the films to impart chelating activity based on electrostatic interactions. PP-g-PAA exhibited a carboxylic acid density of 113 ± 5.4 nmol cm(-2) and an iron chelating activity of 53.7 ± 9.8 nmol cm(-2). The antimicrobial interaction of lysozyme and PP-g-PAA depended on growth media composition. PP-g-PAA hindered lysozyme activity at low ionic strength (2.48-log increase at 64.4 mM total ionic strength) and enhanced lysozyme activity at moderate ionic strength (5.22-log reduction at 120 mM total ionic strength). These data support the hypothesis that at neutral pH, synergy between carboxylate metal-chelating films (pKa(bulk) 6.45) and lysozyme (pI 11.35) is optimal in solutions of moderate to high ionic strength to minimize undesirable charge interactions, such as lysozyme absorption onto film. These findings suggest that active packaging, which chelates metal ions based on ligand-specific interactions, in contrast to electrostatic interactions, may improve antimicrobial synergy. This work demonstrates the potential application of metal-chelating active packaging films to enhance the antimicrobial activity of membrane-disrupting antimicrobials, such as lysozyme.

  14. Expression and Activity of Lysozyme in Apis Mellifera Carnica Brood Infested with Varroa Destructor

    OpenAIRE

    Zaobidna Ewa A.; Żółtowska Krystyna; Łopieńska-Biernat Elżbieta

    2017-01-01

    Varroa destructor is a parasitic mite that attacks the honey bee, and previous studies have suggested that parasitosis caused by this mite is accompanied by immunosuppresion in the host. In this study, the effect of mite infestation on the expression of the lysozyme-1 (lys-1) gene and lysozyme activity in Apis mellifera carnica was determined. The experiment was carried out on the five developmental stages of honey bee workers and drones. Developmental and gender-related differences in gene e...

  15. Combined pulmonary involvement in hereditary lysozyme amyloidosis with associated pulmonary sarcoidosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Cormac; Deegan, Alexander P; Garvey, John F; McDonnell, Timothy J

    2013-12-17

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disorder of unknown cause which can affect any organ system. Autosomal dominant lysozyme amyloidosis is a very rare form of hereditary amyloidosis. The Arg64 variant is extraordinarily rare with each family showing a particular pattern of organ involvement, however while Sicca syndrome, gastrointestinal involvement and renal failure are common, lymph node involvement is very rare. In this case report we describe the first reported case of sarcoidosis in association with hereditary lysozyme amyloidosis.

  16. Binding free energy analysis of protein-protein docking model structures by evERdock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Kitao, Akio

    2018-03-14

    To aid the evaluation of protein-protein complex model structures generated by protein docking prediction (decoys), we previously developed a method to calculate the binding free energies for complexes. The method combines a short (2 ns) all-atom molecular dynamics simulation with explicit solvent and solution theory in the energy representation (ER). We showed that this method successfully selected structures similar to the native complex structure (near-native decoys) as the lowest binding free energy structures. In our current work, we applied this method (evERdock) to 100 or 300 model structures of four protein-protein complexes. The crystal structures and the near-native decoys showed the lowest binding free energy of all the examined structures, indicating that evERdock can successfully evaluate decoys. Several decoys that show low interface root-mean-square distance but relatively high binding free energy were also identified. Analysis of the fraction of native contacts, hydrogen bonds, and salt bridges at the protein-protein interface indicated that these decoys were insufficiently optimized at the interface. After optimizing the interactions around the interface by including interfacial water molecules, the binding free energies of these decoys were improved. We also investigated the effect of solute entropy on binding free energy and found that consideration of the entropy term does not necessarily improve the evaluations of decoys using the normal model analysis for entropy calculation.

  17. Effect of Irradiation on the Mixture of Egg White Proteins Responsible for Foaming Property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xian De Liu; Rong Xiu Han; Dong-Il Jin; Soo-Kee Lee; Cheo-Run Jo

    2009-01-01

    Irradiation of egg white increased foaming ability significantly. To investigate the protein modification by irradiation responsible for the increase of foaming ability, 3 major egg white proteins were purchased and mixed (7.7 g/L ovalbumin, 1.8 g/L ovotransferrin, 0.5 g/L lysozyme) as a model system and irradiated at 0, 2.5, and 5 kGy. The different protein expressions were evaluated using 2-D electrophoresis and it was found that ovotransferrin was cleaved by irradiation and molecular weight and isoelectric point were changed. In addition, many uncharacterized proteins were found and it indicated that irradiation modified proteins randomly but mainly fragmentation was observed. Therefore, it can be concluded that protein fragmentation of 3 major egg white proteins responsible for foaming ability may be the main reason for the improvement of foaming ability

  18. Fabrication of Sericin/Agrose Gel Loaded Lysozyme and Its Potential in Wound Dressing Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meirong Yang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Sericin is a biomaterial resource for its significant biodegradability, biocompatibility, hydrophilicity, and reactivity. Designing a material with superabsorbent, antiseptic, and non-cytotoxic wound dressing properties is advantageous to reduce wound infection and promote wound healing. Herein, we propose an environment-friendly strategy to obtain an interpenetrating polymer network gel through blending sericin and agarose and freeze-drying. The physicochemical characterizations of the sericin/agarose gel including morphology, porosity, swelling behavior, crystallinity, secondary structure, and thermal property were well characterized. Subsequently, the lysozyme loaded sericin/agarose composite gel was successfully prepared by the solution impregnation method. To evaluate the potential of the lysozyme loaded sericin/agarose gel in wound dressing application, we analyzed the lysozyme loading and release, antimicrobial activity, and cytocompatibility of the resulting gel. The results showed the lysozyme loaded composite gel had high porosity, excellent water absorption property, and good antimicrobial activities against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Also, the lysozyme loaded gel showed excellent cytocompatibility on NIH3T3 and HEK293 cells. So, the lysozyme loaded sericin/agarose gel is a potential alternative biomaterial for wound dressing.

  19. A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models.

    KAUST Repository

    Carbajo, Daniel

    2012-08-02

    BACKGROUND: Increasingly, biologists and biochemists use computational tools to design experiments to probe the function of proteins and/or to engineer them for a variety of different purposes. The most effective strategies rely on the knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the protein of interest. However it is often the case that an experimental structure is not available and that models of different quality are used instead. On the other hand, the relationship between the quality of a model and its appropriate use is not easy to derive in general, and so far it has been analyzed in detail only for specific application. RESULTS: This paper describes a database and related software tools that allow testing of a given structure based method on models of a protein representing different levels of accuracy. The comparison of the results of a computational experiment on the experimental structure and on a set of its decoy models will allow developers and users to assess which is the specific threshold of accuracy required to perform the task effectively. CONCLUSIONS: The ModelDB server automatically builds decoy models of different accuracy for a given protein of known structure and provides a set of useful tools for their analysis. Pre-computed data for a non-redundant set of deposited protein structures are available for analysis and download in the ModelDB database. IMPLEMENTATION, AVAILABILITY AND REQUIREMENTS: Project name: A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models. Project home page: http://bl210.caspur.it/MODEL-DB/MODEL-DB_web/MODindex.php.Operating system(s): Platform independent. Programming language: Perl-BioPerl (program); mySQL, Perl DBI and DBD modules (database); php, JavaScript, Jmol scripting (web server). Other requirements: Java Runtime Environment v1.4 or later, Perl, BioPerl, CPAN modules, HHsearch, Modeller, LGA, NCBI Blast package, DSSP, Speedfill (Surfnet) and PSAIA. License: Free. Any restrictions to use by

  20. A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajo, Daniel; Tramontano, Anna

    2012-08-02

    Increasingly, biologists and biochemists use computational tools to design experiments to probe the function of proteins and/or to engineer them for a variety of different purposes. The most effective strategies rely on the knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the protein of interest. However it is often the case that an experimental structure is not available and that models of different quality are used instead. On the other hand, the relationship between the quality of a model and its appropriate use is not easy to derive in general, and so far it has been analyzed in detail only for specific application. This paper describes a database and related software tools that allow testing of a given structure based method on models of a protein representing different levels of accuracy. The comparison of the results of a computational experiment on the experimental structure and on a set of its decoy models will allow developers and users to assess which is the specific threshold of accuracy required to perform the task effectively. The ModelDB server automatically builds decoy models of different accuracy for a given protein of known structure and provides a set of useful tools for their analysis. Pre-computed data for a non-redundant set of deposited protein structures are available for analysis and download in the ModelDB database. IMPLEMENTATION, AVAILABILITY AND REQUIREMENTS: Project name: A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models. Project home page: http://bl210.caspur.it/MODEL-DB/MODEL-DB_web/MODindex.php.Operating system(s): Platform independent. Programming language: Perl-BioPerl (program); mySQL, Perl DBI and DBD modules (database); php, JavaScript, Jmol scripting (web server). Other requirements: Java Runtime Environment v1.4 or later, Perl, BioPerl, CPAN modules, HHsearch, Modeller, LGA, NCBI Blast package, DSSP, Speedfill (Surfnet) and PSAIA. License: Free. Any restrictions to use by non-academics: No.

  1. A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models.

    KAUST Repository

    Carbajo, Daniel; Tramontano, Anna

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasingly, biologists and biochemists use computational tools to design experiments to probe the function of proteins and/or to engineer them for a variety of different purposes. The most effective strategies rely on the knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the protein of interest. However it is often the case that an experimental structure is not available and that models of different quality are used instead. On the other hand, the relationship between the quality of a model and its appropriate use is not easy to derive in general, and so far it has been analyzed in detail only for specific application. RESULTS: This paper describes a database and related software tools that allow testing of a given structure based method on models of a protein representing different levels of accuracy. The comparison of the results of a computational experiment on the experimental structure and on a set of its decoy models will allow developers and users to assess which is the specific threshold of accuracy required to perform the task effectively. CONCLUSIONS: The ModelDB server automatically builds decoy models of different accuracy for a given protein of known structure and provides a set of useful tools for their analysis. Pre-computed data for a non-redundant set of deposited protein structures are available for analysis and download in the ModelDB database. IMPLEMENTATION, AVAILABILITY AND REQUIREMENTS: Project name: A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models. Project home page: http://bl210.caspur.it/MODEL-DB/MODEL-DB_web/MODindex.php.Operating system(s): Platform independent. Programming language: Perl-BioPerl (program); mySQL, Perl DBI and DBD modules (database); php, JavaScript, Jmol scripting (web server). Other requirements: Java Runtime Environment v1.4 or later, Perl, BioPerl, CPAN modules, HHsearch, Modeller, LGA, NCBI Blast package, DSSP, Speedfill (Surfnet) and PSAIA. License: Free. Any restrictions to use by

  2. A computational model of the LGI1 protein suggests a common binding site for ADAM proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Leonardi

    Full Text Available Mutations of human leucine-rich glioma inactivated (LGI1 gene encoding the epitempin protein cause autosomal dominant temporal lateral epilepsy (ADTLE, a rare familial partial epileptic syndrome. The LGI1 gene seems to have a role on the transmission of neuronal messages but the exact molecular mechanism remains unclear. In contrast to other genes involved in epileptic disorders, epitempin shows no homology with known ion channel genes but contains two domains, composed of repeated structural units, known to mediate protein-protein interactions.A three dimensional in silico model of the two epitempin domains was built to predict the structure-function relationship and propose a functional model integrating previous experimental findings. Conserved and electrostatic charged regions of the model surface suggest a possible arrangement between the two domains and identifies a possible ADAM protein binding site in the β-propeller domain and another protein binding site in the leucine-rich repeat domain. The functional model indicates that epitempin could mediate the interaction between proteins localized to different synaptic sides in a static way, by forming a dimer, or in a dynamic way, by binding proteins at different times.The model was also used to predict effects of known disease-causing missense mutations. Most of the variants are predicted to alter protein folding while several other map to functional surface regions. In agreement with experimental evidence, this suggests that non-secreted LGI1 mutants could be retained within the cell by quality control mechanisms or by altering interactions required for the secretion process.

  3. Fabrication of electrospun polyacrylonitrile ion-exchange membranes for application in lysozyme adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Ion exchange (IEX chromatography is commonly used in separation and purification systems. However, micropore blockage within its resin structure can easily lead to a reduction in the effectiveness of purification. To tackle this problem, we adopted the concept of membrane separation by combining electrospinning techniques with rapid alkaline hydrolysis to prepare a weak acid IEX nanofibrous membrane (AEA-COOH, consisting of polyethyleneterephthalate (PET meltblown fabric as a supporting layer, with upper and lower IEX layers consisting of polyacrylonitrile (PAN nanofibrous membranes. To determine the characteristics of the AEA-COOH membrane, we used the commercial product Sartobind© C IEX membrane as the standard of comparison. Results showed that the base weight and thickness of AEACOOH were 33 and 64%, relative to Sartobind© C membrane. The thermo-degradable temperature of AEA-COOH membrane (320°C was far higher than that of Sartobind© C (115°C, indicating high thermal stability. Finally, comparisons between the lysozyme adsorption rates and capacity of various IEX membranes confirmed that AEA-COOH was lighter, thinner, faster, possessing higher protein adsorption efficiency than Sartobind© C membrane.

  4. Surface charge effects in protein adsorption on nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramesh, M.; Shimoni, O.; Ostrikov, K.; Prawer, S.; Cervenka, J.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins (bovine serum albumin and lysozyme) of different properties (charge, molecular weight and rigidity), the main driving mechanism responsible for the protein binding to the charged nanoparticles was identified. Electrostatic interactions were found to dominate the protein adsorption dynamics, attachment and conformation. We developed a simple electrostatic model that can qualitatively explain the observed adsorption behaviour based on charge-induced pH modifications near the charged nanoparticle surfaces. Under neutral conditions, the local pH around the positively and negatively charged nanodiamonds becomes very high (11-12) and low (1-3) respectively, which has a profound impact on the protein charge, hydration and affinity to the nanodiamonds. Small proteins (lysozyme) were found to form multilayers with significant conformational changes to screen the surface charge, while larger proteins (albumin) formed monolayers with minor conformational changes. The findings of this study provide a step forward toward understanding and eventually predicting nanoparticle interactions with biofluids.Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins

  5. Molecular modeling of protein materials: case study of elastin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarakanova, Anna; Buehler, Markus J

    2013-01-01

    Molecular modeling of protein materials is a quickly growing area of research that has produced numerous contributions in fields ranging from structural engineering to medicine and biology. We review here the history and methods commonly employed in molecular modeling of protein materials, emphasizing the advantages for using modeling as a complement to experimental work. We then consider a case study of the protein elastin, a critically important ‘mechanical protein’ to exemplify the approach in an area where molecular modeling has made a significant impact. We outline the progression of computational modeling studies that have considerably enhanced our understanding of this important protein which endows elasticity and recoil to the tissues it is found in, including the skin, lungs, arteries and the heart. A vast collection of literature has been directed at studying the structure and function of this protein for over half a century, the first molecular dynamics study of elastin being reported in the 1980s. We review the pivotal computational works that have considerably enhanced our fundamental understanding of elastin's atomistic structure and its extraordinary qualities—focusing on two in particular: elastin's superb elasticity and the inverse temperature transition—the remarkable ability of elastin to take on a more structured conformation at higher temperatures, suggesting its effectiveness as a biomolecular switch. Our hope is to showcase these methods as both complementary and enriching to experimental approaches that have thus far dominated the study of most protein-based materials. (topical review)

  6. Protein Structure Classification and Loop Modeling Using Multiple Ramachandran Distributions

    KAUST Repository

    Najibi, Seyed Morteza

    2017-02-08

    Recently, the study of protein structures using angular representations has attracted much attention among structural biologists. The main challenge is how to efficiently model the continuous conformational space of the protein structures based on the differences and similarities between different Ramachandran plots. Despite the presence of statistical methods for modeling angular data of proteins, there is still a substantial need for more sophisticated and faster statistical tools to model the large-scale circular datasets. To address this need, we have developed a nonparametric method for collective estimation of multiple bivariate density functions for a collection of populations of protein backbone angles. The proposed method takes into account the circular nature of the angular data using trigonometric spline which is more efficient compared to existing methods. This collective density estimation approach is widely applicable when there is a need to estimate multiple density functions from different populations with common features. Moreover, the coefficients of adaptive basis expansion for the fitted densities provide a low-dimensional representation that is useful for visualization, clustering, and classification of the densities. The proposed method provides a novel and unique perspective to two important and challenging problems in protein structure research: structure-based protein classification and angular-sampling-based protein loop structure prediction.

  7. Protein Structure Classification and Loop Modeling Using Multiple Ramachandran Distributions

    KAUST Repository

    Najibi, Seyed Morteza; Maadooliat, Mehdi; Zhou, Lan; Huang, Jianhua Z.; Gao, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the study of protein structures using angular representations has attracted much attention among structural biologists. The main challenge is how to efficiently model the continuous conformational space of the protein structures based on the differences and similarities between different Ramachandran plots. Despite the presence of statistical methods for modeling angular data of proteins, there is still a substantial need for more sophisticated and faster statistical tools to model the large-scale circular datasets. To address this need, we have developed a nonparametric method for collective estimation of multiple bivariate density functions for a collection of populations of protein backbone angles. The proposed method takes into account the circular nature of the angular data using trigonometric spline which is more efficient compared to existing methods. This collective density estimation approach is widely applicable when there is a need to estimate multiple density functions from different populations with common features. Moreover, the coefficients of adaptive basis expansion for the fitted densities provide a low-dimensional representation that is useful for visualization, clustering, and classification of the densities. The proposed method provides a novel and unique perspective to two important and challenging problems in protein structure research: structure-based protein classification and angular-sampling-based protein loop structure prediction.

  8. Model of a DNA-protein complex of the architectural monomeric protein MC1 from Euryarchaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Paquet

    Full Text Available In Archaea the two major modes of DNA packaging are wrapping by histone proteins or bending by architectural non-histone proteins. To supplement our knowledge about the binding mode of the different DNA-bending proteins observed across the three domains of life, we present here the first model of a complex in which the monomeric Methanogen Chromosomal protein 1 (MC1 from Euryarchaea binds to the concave side of a strongly bent DNA. In laboratory growth conditions MC1 is the most abundant architectural protein present in Methanosarcina thermophila CHTI55. Like most proteins that strongly bend DNA, MC1 is known to bind in the minor groove. Interaction areas for MC1 and DNA were mapped by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR data. The polarity of protein binding was determined using paramagnetic probes attached to the DNA. The first structural model of the DNA-MC1 complex we propose here was obtained by two complementary docking approaches and is in good agreement with the experimental data previously provided by electron microscopy and biochemistry. Residues essential to DNA-binding and -bending were highlighted and confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that the Arg25 side-chain was essential to neutralize the negative charge of two phosphates that come very close in response to a dramatic curvature of the DNA.

  9. Roles of beta-turns in protein folding: from peptide models to protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelino, Anna Marie C; Gierasch, Lila M

    2008-05-01

    Reverse turns are a major class of protein secondary structure; they represent sites of chain reversal and thus sites where the globular character of a protein is created. It has been speculated for many years that turns may nucleate the formation of structure in protein folding, as their propensity to occur will favor the approximation of their flanking regions and their general tendency to be hydrophilic will favor their disposition at the solvent-accessible surface. Reverse turns are local features, and it is therefore not surprising that their structural properties have been extensively studied using peptide models. In this article, we review research on peptide models of turns to test the hypothesis that the propensities of turns to form in short peptides will relate to the roles of corresponding sequences in protein folding. Turns with significant stability as isolated entities should actively promote the folding of a protein, and by contrast, turn sequences that merely allow the chain to adopt conformations required for chain reversal are predicted to be passive in the folding mechanism. We discuss results of protein engineering studies of the roles of turn residues in folding mechanisms. Factors that correlate with the importance of turns in folding indeed include their intrinsic stability, as well as their topological context and their participation in hydrophobic networks within the protein's structure.

  10. Computational Modeling of Complex Protein Activity Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schivo, Stefano; Leijten, Jeroen; Karperien, Marcel; Post, Janine N.; Prignet, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Because of the numerous entities interacting, the complexity of the networks that regulate cell fate makes it impossible to analyze and understand them using the human brain alone. Computational modeling is a powerful method to unravel complex systems. We recently described the development of a

  11. Exploiting conformational ensembles in modeling protein-protein interactions on the proteome scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzu, Guray; Gursoy, Attila; Nussinov, Ruth; Keskin, Ozlem

    2013-01-01

    Cellular functions are performed through protein-protein interactions; therefore, identification of these interactions is crucial for understanding biological processes. Recent studies suggest that knowledge-based approaches are more useful than ‘blind’ docking for modeling at large scales. However, a caveat of knowledge-based approaches is that they treat molecules as rigid structures. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) offers a wealth of conformations. Here, we exploited ensemble of the conformations in predictions by a knowledge-based method, PRISM. We tested ‘difficult’ cases in a docking-benchmark dataset, where the unbound and bound protein forms are structurally different. Considering alternative conformations for each protein, the percentage of successfully predicted interactions increased from ~26% to 66%, and 57% of the interactions were successfully predicted in an ‘unbiased’ scenario, in which data related to the bound forms were not utilized. If the appropriate conformation, or relevant template interface, is unavailable in the PDB, PRISM could not predict the interaction successfully. The pace of the growth of the PDB promises a rapid increase of ensemble conformations emphasizing the merit of such knowledge-based ensemble strategies for higher success rates in protein-protein interaction predictions on an interactome-scale. We constructed the structural network of ERK interacting proteins as a case study. PMID:23590674

  12. Markov dynamic models for long-timescale protein motion.

    KAUST Repository

    Chiang, Tsung-Han

    2010-06-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a well-established method for studying protein motion at the atomic scale. However, it is computationally intensive and generates massive amounts of data. One way of addressing the dual challenges of computation efficiency and data analysis is to construct simplified models of long-timescale protein motion from MD simulation data. In this direction, we propose to use Markov models with hidden states, in which the Markovian states represent potentially overlapping probabilistic distributions over protein conformations. We also propose a principled criterion for evaluating the quality of a model by its ability to predict long-timescale protein motions. Our method was tested on 2D synthetic energy landscapes and two extensively studied peptides, alanine dipeptide and the villin headpiece subdomain (HP-35 NleNle). One interesting finding is that although a widely accepted model of alanine dipeptide contains six states, a simpler model with only three states is equally good for predicting long-timescale motions. We also used the constructed Markov models to estimate important kinetic and dynamic quantities for protein folding, in particular, mean first-passage time. The results are consistent with available experimental measurements.

  13. Markov dynamic models for long-timescale protein motion.

    KAUST Repository

    Chiang, Tsung-Han; Hsu, David; Latombe, Jean-Claude

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a well-established method for studying protein motion at the atomic scale. However, it is computationally intensive and generates massive amounts of data. One way of addressing the dual challenges of computation efficiency and data analysis is to construct simplified models of long-timescale protein motion from MD simulation data. In this direction, we propose to use Markov models with hidden states, in which the Markovian states represent potentially overlapping probabilistic distributions over protein conformations. We also propose a principled criterion for evaluating the quality of a model by its ability to predict long-timescale protein motions. Our method was tested on 2D synthetic energy landscapes and two extensively studied peptides, alanine dipeptide and the villin headpiece subdomain (HP-35 NleNle). One interesting finding is that although a widely accepted model of alanine dipeptide contains six states, a simpler model with only three states is equally good for predicting long-timescale motions. We also used the constructed Markov models to estimate important kinetic and dynamic quantities for protein folding, in particular, mean first-passage time. The results are consistent with available experimental measurements.

  14. Are animal models predictive for human postmortem muscle protein degradation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenfellner, Bianca; Zissler, Angela; Steinbacher, Peter; Monticelli, Fabio C; Pittner, Stefan

    2017-11-01

    A most precise determination of the postmortem interval (PMI) is a crucial aspect in forensic casework. Although there are diverse approaches available to date, the high heterogeneity of cases together with the respective postmortal changes often limit the validity and sufficiency of many methods. Recently, a novel approach for time since death estimation by the analysis of postmortal changes of muscle proteins was proposed. It is however necessary to improve the reliability and accuracy, especially by analysis of possible influencing factors on protein degradation. This is ideally investigated on standardized animal models that, however, require legitimization by a comparison of human and animal tissue, and in this specific case of protein degradation profiles. Only if protein degradation events occur in comparable fashion within different species, respective findings can sufficiently be transferred from the animal model to application in humans. Therefor samples from two frequently used animal models (mouse and pig), as well as forensic cases with representative protein profiles of highly differing PMIs were analyzed. Despite physical and physiological differences between species, western blot analysis revealed similar patterns in most of the investigated proteins. Even most degradation events occurred in comparable fashion. In some other aspects, however, human and animal profiles depicted distinct differences. The results of this experimental series clearly indicate the huge importance of comparative studies, whenever animal models are considered. Although animal models could be shown to reflect the basic principles of protein degradation processes in humans, we also gained insight in the difficulties and limitations of the applicability of the developed methodology in different mammalian species regarding protein specificity and methodic functionality.

  15. Protein carbonylation, protein aggregation and neuronal cell death in a murine model of multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Anushka

    Many studies have suggested that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of both multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Yet, the mechanism by which oxidative stress leads to tissue damage in these disorders is unclear. Recent work from our laboratory has revealed that protein carbonylation, a major oxidative modification caused by severe and/or chronic oxidative stress conditions, is elevated in MS and EAE. Furthermore, protein carbonylation has been shown to alter protein structure leading to misfolding/aggregation. These findings prompted me to hypothesize that carbonylated proteins, formed as a consequence of oxidative stress and/or decreased proteasomal activity, promote protein aggregation to mediate neuronal apoptosis in vitro and in EAE. To test this novel hypothesis, I first characterized protein carbonylation, protein aggregation and apoptosis along the spinal cord during the course of myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55 peptide-induced EAE in C57BL/6 mice [Chapter 2]. The results show that carbonylated proteins accumulate throughout the course of the disease, albeit by different mechanisms: increased oxidative stress in acute EAE and decreased proteasomal activity in chronic EAE. I discovered not only that there is a temporal correlation between protein carbonylation and apoptosis but also that carbonyl levels are significantly higher in apoptotic cells. A high number of juxta-nuclear and cytoplasmic protein aggregates containing the majority of the oxidized proteins are also present during the course of EAE, which seems to be due to reduced autophagy. In chapter 3, I show that when gluthathione levels are reduced to those in EAE spinal cord, both neuron-like PC12 (nPC12) cells and primary neuronal cultures accumulate carbonylated proteins and undergo cell death (both by necrosis and apoptosis). Immunocytochemical and biochemical studies also revealed a temporal

  16. Photomonomerization of pyrimidine dimers by indoles and proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; Huang, C.W.; Hinman, L.; Gordon, M.P.; Deranleau, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    Model systems for the study of photoreactivation have been developed that utilize a variety of indole derivatives. These systems can split uracil cis-syn cyclobutadipyrimidine, either free or in RNA, when irradiated at wavelengths absorbed only by the indole moiety. The ability of indole compounds to split dimers is closely related to their electronic properties. Those of high electron-donor capacity such as indole, 3-methylindole, indole-3-acetic acid, 5-hydroxytryptophan and tryptophan are good photosensitizers, with efficacy in that order. Indoles with electron-withdrawing substituents such as indole-3-carboxylic acid, indole-3-aldehyde and oxindole are inactive in the monomerization reaction. These findings support the proposed mechanism that the photosensitized monomerization occurs as a result of electron transfer from the excited indole molecules to the pyrimidine bases. Proteins containing fully exposed tryptophan residues (chicken egg white lysozyme and bovine diisopropylphosphoryltrypsin) also cause the splitting of the /sup 14/C-labeled dimers under the same conditions. In the case of lysozyme the quantum yield of monomerization is similar to that of free tryptophan. Much of the monomerization ability of lysozyme was lost after the solvent-available tryptophan had been oxidized by treatment with N-bromosuccinimide. Bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A, a protein devoid of tryptophan, failed to exhibit photosensitized monomerization of uracil dimers. The biological implication of these reactions involving a protein with an exposed tryptophan residue is discussed. Although indoles are able to split the dimers in RNA, they fail to photoreactivate uv-damaged TMV-RNA. Indole-3-acetic acid, 3-methylindole and 5-hydroxytryptophan rapidly inactive viral RNA when irradiated at 313 nm, possibly because of side reactions.

  17. Modelling responses of broiler chickens to dietary balanced protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eits, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    Protein is an important nutrient for growing broiler chickens, as it affects broiler performance, feed cost as well as nitrogen excretion. The objective of this dissertation was to develop a growth model for broiler chickens that could be easily used by practical nutritionists. The model should

  18. Exercise increases lactoferrin, but decreases lysozyme in salivary granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillum, Trevor; Kuennen, Matthew; McKenna, Zachary; Castillo, Micaela; Jordan-Patterson, Alex; Bohnert, Caitlin

    2017-05-01

    Intracellular lactoferrin (Lac) and lysozyme (Lys) content play an important role in regulating inflammation and promoting host protection. While exercise has demonstrated an increase in Lac and Lys concentration in exocrine solutions, little is known regarding intracellular concentration changes in response to exercise. To quantify intracellular Lac and Lys concentration before and after exercise in salivary CD45 + CD15 + cells. 11 males (20.3 ± 0.8 years, 57.2 ± 7.6 mL/kg/min V̇O 2pk , 11.1 ± 3.9% body fat) ran for 45 min at 75% of VO 2pk . 12 mL of stimulated saliva were collected pre and immediately post exercise. Saliva was filtered through a 30-µm filter before analysis of leukocytes (CD45 + ) and granulocytes (CD45 + CD15 + ) using flow cytometry. Median fluorescent intensity (MFI) of Lac increased from pre (64,268 ± 46,036 MFI) to post (117,134 ± 88,115 MFI) exercise (p exercise (pre: 16,933 ± 8249; post: 11,616 ± 6875) (p exercise. Conversely, the exercise-associated decrease of intracellular Lys content could be the cause of increased Lys in exocrine solutions.

  19. In vitro study of proteins surface activity by tritium probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernysheva, M.G.; Badun, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    A new technique for in vitro studies of biomacromolecules interactions, their adsorption at aqueous/organic liquid interfaces and distribution in the bulk of liquid/liquid systems was developed. The method includes (1) tritium labeling of biomolecules by tritium thermal activation method and (2) scintillation phase step with organic phase, which can be concerned as a model of cellular membrane. Two globular proteins lysozyme and human serum albumin tested. We have determined the conditions of tritium labeling when labeled by-products can be easy separated by means of dialysis and size-exclusion chromatography. Scintillation phase experiments were conducted for three types of organic liquids. Thus, the influences of the nature of organic phase on proteins adsorption and its distribution in the bulk of aqueous/organic liquid system were determined. It was found that proteins possess high surface activity at aqueous/organic liquid interface. Furthermore, values of hydrophobicity of globular proteins were found by the experiment. (author)

  20. The evolution of the protein synthesis system. I - A model of a primitive protein synthesis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, H.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1977-01-01

    A model is developed to describe the evolution of the protein synthesis system. The model is comprised of two independent autocatalytic systems, one including one gene (A-gene) and two activated amino acid polymerases (O and A-polymerases), and the other including the addition of another gene (N-gene) and a nucleotide polymerase. Simulation results have suggested that even a small enzymic activity and polymerase specificity could lead the system to the most accurate protein synthesis, as far as permitted by transitions to systems with higher accuracy.

  1. Bayesian Proteoform Modeling Improves Protein Quantification of Global Proteomic Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Datta, Susmita; Payne, Samuel H.; Kang, Jiyun; Bramer, Lisa M.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Metz, Thomas O.; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.; Tardiff, Mark F.; McDermott, Jason E.; Pounds, Joel G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2014-12-01

    As the capability of mass spectrometry-based proteomics has matured, tens of thousands of peptides can be measured simultaneously, which has the benefit of offering a systems view of protein expression. However, a major challenge is that with an increase in throughput, protein quantification estimation from the native measured peptides has become a computational task. A limitation to existing computationally-driven protein quantification methods is that most ignore protein variation, such as alternate splicing of the RNA transcript and post-translational modifications or other possible proteoforms, which will affect a significant fraction of the proteome. The consequence of this assumption is that statistical inference at the protein level, and consequently downstream analyses, such as network and pathway modeling, have only limited power for biomarker discovery. Here, we describe a Bayesian model (BP-Quant) that uses statistically derived peptides signatures to identify peptides that are outside the dominant pattern, or the existence of multiple over-expressed patterns to improve relative protein abundance estimates. It is a research-driven approach that utilizes the objectives of the experiment, defined in the context of a standard statistical hypothesis, to identify a set of peptides exhibiting similar statistical behavior relating to a protein. This approach infers that changes in relative protein abundance can be used as a surrogate for changes in function, without necessarily taking into account the effect of differential post-translational modifications, processing, or splicing in altering protein function. We verify the approach using a dilution study from mouse plasma samples and demonstrate that BP-Quant achieves similar accuracy as the current state-of-the-art methods at proteoform identification with significantly better specificity. BP-Quant is available as a MatLab ® and R packages at https://github.com/PNNL-Comp-Mass-Spec/BP-Quant.

  2. Thermodynamics and binding mechanism of polyphenon-60 with human lysozyme elucidated by calorimetric and spectroscopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasmeen, Shama; Riyazuddeen

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermodynamics of the binding of Lys with polypenone-60 were studied. • The binding was found to be exothermic. • Polyphenon-60 quenches the fluorescence of Lys through static quenching. • Polyphenon-60 binds to Lys through hydrogen binding. • Conformational changes of Lys were studied using circular dichorism. - Abstract: Protein-drug interaction offer information of the structural features that determine the therapeutic effectiveness of drug and have become an attractive research field in life science, chemistry, and clinical medicine. Interaction of pharmacologically important antioxidant drug polyphenon-60 with human lysozyme (Lys) at physiological pH 7.4 has been studied by using calorimetric and various spectroscopic techniques. UV–visible spectroscopy results indicate the complex formation between Lys and polyphenon-60. The binding constant, quenching mechanism and the number of binding sites were determined by the fluorescence quenching spectra of Lys in presence of polyphenon-60. Fluorescence data indicate that the polyphenon-60 interact with Lys through static quenching mechanism with binding affinity of 2.9 × 10 4 M −1 . The average binding distance between drug and Lys was found to be 2.89 nm on the basis of the theory of Förster's energy transfer. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data reveals the thermodynamic investigations which suggest that the interaction of Lys and polyphenon-60 through exothermic process and enthalpy driven and also explore that the polyphenon-60 binds in both sites of Lys with high and low affinity. Hydrogen bonding (high affinity) and hydrophobic interactions (low affinity) are the major forces in stabilizing the drug protein complex. Far-UV CD and FTIR results deciphere the conformational alterations in the secondary structure of Lys.

  3. Construction of a biodynamic model for Cry protein production studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Mtz, Ana Karin; Pérez-Guevara, Fermín

    2014-12-01

    Mathematical models have been used from growth kinetic simulation to gen regulatory networks prediction for B. thuringiensis culture. However, this culture is a time dependent dynamic process where cells physiology suffers several changes depending on the changes in the cell environment. Therefore, through its culture, B. thuringiensis presents three phases related with the predominance of three major metabolic pathways: vegetative growth (Embded-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway), transition (γ-aminobutiric cycle) and sporulation (tricarboxylic acid cycle). There is not available a mathematical model that relates the different stages of cultivation with the metabolic pathway active on each one of them. Therefore, in the present study, and based on published data, a biodynamic model was generated to describe the dynamic of the three different phases based on their major metabolic pathways. The biodynamic model is used to study the interrelation between the different culture phases and their relationship with the Cry protein production. The model consists of three interconnected modules where each module represents one culture phase and its principal metabolic pathway. For model validation four new fermentations were done showing that the model constructed describes reasonably well the dynamic of the three phases. The main results of this model imply that poly-β-hydroxybutyrate is crucial for endospore and Cry protein production. According to the yields of dipicolinic acid and Cry from poly-β-hydroxybutyrate, calculated with the model, the endospore and Cry protein production are not just simultaneous and parallel processes they are also competitive processes.

  4. A generative, probabilistic model of local protein structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Mardia, Kanti V.; Taylor, Charles C.

    2008-01-01

    Despite significant progress in recent years, protein structure prediction maintains its status as one of the prime unsolved problems in computational biology. One of the key remaining challenges is an efficient probabilistic exploration of the structural space that correctly reflects the relative...... conformational stabilities. Here, we present a fully probabilistic, continuous model of local protein structure in atomic detail. The generative model makes efficient conformational sampling possible and provides a framework for the rigorous analysis of local sequence-structure correlations in the native state...

  5. Validation of protein models by a neural network approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fantucci Piercarlo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development and improvement of reliable computational methods designed to evaluate the quality of protein models is relevant in the context of protein structure refinement, which has been recently identified as one of the bottlenecks limiting the quality and usefulness of protein structure prediction. Results In this contribution, we present a computational method (Artificial Intelligence Decoys Evaluator: AIDE which is able to consistently discriminate between correct and incorrect protein models. In particular, the method is based on neural networks that use as input 15 structural parameters, which include energy, solvent accessible surface, hydrophobic contacts and secondary structure content. The results obtained with AIDE on a set of decoy structures were evaluated using statistical indicators such as Pearson correlation coefficients, Znat, fraction enrichment, as well as ROC plots. It turned out that AIDE performances are comparable and often complementary to available state-of-the-art learning-based methods. Conclusion In light of the results obtained with AIDE, as well as its comparison with available learning-based methods, it can be concluded that AIDE can be successfully used to evaluate the quality of protein structures. The use of AIDE in combination with other evaluation tools is expected to further enhance protein refinement efforts.

  6. Fast Proton Titration Scheme for Multiscale Modeling of Protein Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Andre Azevedo Reis; Lund, Mikael; da Silva, Fernando Luís Barroso

    2010-10-12

    Proton exchange between titratable amino acid residues and the surrounding solution gives rise to exciting electric processes in proteins. We present a proton titration scheme for studying acid-base equilibria in Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations where salt is treated at the Debye-Hückel level. The method, rooted in the Kirkwood model of impenetrable spheres, is applied on the three milk proteins α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and lactoferrin, for which we investigate the net-charge, molecular dipole moment, and charge capacitance. Over a wide range of pH and salt conditions, excellent agreement is found with more elaborate simulations where salt is explicitly included. The implicit salt scheme is orders of magnitude faster than the explicit analog and allows for transparent interpretation of physical mechanisms. It is shown how the method can be expanded to multiscale modeling of aqueous salt solutions of many biomolecules with nonstatic charge distributions. Important examples are protein-protein aggregation, protein-polyelectrolyte complexation, and protein-membrane association.

  7. DockQ: A Quality Measure for Protein-Protein Docking Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar Basu

    Full Text Available The state-of-the-art to assess the structural quality of docking models is currently based on three related yet independent quality measures: Fnat, LRMS, and iRMS as proposed and standardized by CAPRI. These quality measures quantify different aspects of the quality of a particular docking model and need to be viewed together to reveal the true quality, e.g. a model with relatively poor LRMS (>10Å might still qualify as 'acceptable' with a descent Fnat (>0.50 and iRMS (<3.0Å. This is also the reason why the so called CAPRI criteria for assessing the quality of docking models is defined by applying various ad-hoc cutoffs on these measures to classify a docking model into the four classes: Incorrect, Acceptable, Medium, or High quality. This classification has been useful in CAPRI, but since models are grouped in only four bins it is also rather limiting, making it difficult to rank models, correlate with scoring functions or use it as target function in machine learning algorithms. Here, we present DockQ, a continuous protein-protein docking model quality measure derived by combining Fnat, LRMS, and iRMS to a single score in the range [0, 1] that can be used to assess the quality of protein docking models. By using DockQ on CAPRI models it is possible to almost completely reproduce the original CAPRI classification into Incorrect, Acceptable, Medium and High quality. An average PPV of 94% at 90% Recall demonstrating that there is no need to apply predefined ad-hoc cutoffs to classify docking models. Since DockQ recapitulates the CAPRI classification almost perfectly, it can be viewed as a higher resolution version of the CAPRI classification, making it possible to estimate model quality in a more quantitative way using Z-scores or sum of top ranked models, which has been so valuable for the CASP community. The possibility to directly correlate a quality measure to a scoring function has been crucial for the development of scoring functions for

  8. Stability and activity of lysozyme in stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric protic ionic liquid (PIL)-water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaya, Emmy C.; Separovic, Frances; Drummond, Calum J.; Greaves, Tamar L.

    2018-05-01

    There has been a substantial increase in enzyme applications within the biochemical and pharmaceutical industries, for example, as industrial biocatalysts. However, enzymes have narrow marginal stability which makes them prone to become inactive and/or denature with a slight change in the solvent environment. Typically industrial applications require harsher solvent environments than enzyme native environments, and hence there is a need to understand solvent-protein interactions in order to develop strategies to maintain, or enhance, the enzymatic activity under industrially relevant solvent conditions. Previously we have shown that protic ionic liquids (PILs) with water can have a stabilising effect on lysozyme, with a large variation dependent on which PIL ions are present, and the water concentration [E. C. Wijaya et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 18(37), 25926-25936 (2016)]. Here we extend on this work using non-stoichiometric aqueous PIL solvents to investigate, and isolate, the role of pH and ionicity on enzymes. We have used the PILs ethylammonium nitrate (EAN) and ethanolammonium formate (EOAF) since our previous work has identified these as good solvents for lysozyme. Solvent libraries were made from these two PILs with an additional precursor acid or base to modify the acidity/basicity of the neutral stoichiometric PIL, and with water added, to have solutions with 4-17 mol. % of the PIL ions in water. Molar ratios of base:acid were varied between 1:1.05 and 2:1 for EAN and 1:1.25 and 2:1 for EOAF, which enabled from highly basic to highly acidic solutions to be obtained. This was to modify the acidity/basicity of the neutral stoichiometric PILs, without the addition of buffers. The structure and stability of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) were explored under these solvent conditions using synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and activity assays. The radius of gyration and Kratky plots obtained from the SAXS data

  9. Physical degradation of proteins in well-defined fluid flows studied within a four-roll apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, S; Krause, H J; Weber, C; Peukert, W

    2011-12-01

    In most applications of biotechnology and downstream processing proteins are exposed to fluid stresses in various flow configurations which often lead to the formation of unwanted protein aggregates. In this paper we present physical degradation experiments for proteins under well-defined flow conditions in a four-roll apparatus. The flow field was characterized numerically by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and experimentally by particle image velocimetry (PIV). The local shear strain rate as well as the local shear and elongation rate was used to characterize the hydrodynamic stress environment acting on the proteins. Lysozyme was used as a model protein and subjected to well-defined fluid stresses in high and low stress environment. By using in situ turbidity measurements during stressing the aggregate formation was monitored directly in the fluid flow. An increase in absorbance at 350 nm was attributed to a higher content of visible particles (>1 µm). In addition to lysozyme, the formation of aggregates was confirmed for two larger proteins (bovine serum albumin and alcohol dehydrogenase). Thus, the presented experimental setup is a helpful tool to monitor flow-induced protein aggregation with high reproducibility. For instance, screening experiments for formulation development of biopharmaceuticals for fill and finish operations can be performed in the lab-scale in a short time-period if the stress distributions in the application are transferred and applied in the four-roll mill. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. From the Protein's Perspective: The Benefits and Challenges of Protein Structure-Based Pharmacophore Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, M.P.A.; McGuire, R; Roumen, L.; de Esch, I.J.P.; de Vlieg, J; Klomp, J.P.G; de Graaf, C.

    2011-01-01

    A pharmacophore describes the arrangement of molecular features a ligand must contain to efficaciously bind a receptor. Pharmacophore models are developed to improve molecular understanding of ligand-protein interactions, and can be used as a tool to identify novel compounds that fulfil the

  11. Interaction of Lysozyme with Rhodamine B: A combined analysis of spectroscopic & molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, Sabera; Satish, Lakkoji; Kesh, Sandeep; Chaudhary, Yatendra S; Sahoo, Harekrushna

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of Rhodamine B (RB) with Lysozyme (Lys) was investigated by different optical spectroscopic techniques such as absorption, fluorescence, and circular-dichroism (CD), along with molecular docking studies. The fluorescence results (including steady-state and time-resolved mode) revealed that the addition of RB effectively causes strong quenching of intrinsic fluorescence in Lysozyme and mostly, by the static quenching mechanism. Different binding and thermodynamic parameters were calculated at different temperatures and the binding constant value was found to be 2963.54Lmol(-1) at 25°C. The average distance (r0) was found to be 3.31nm according to Förster's theory of non-radiative energy transfer between Lysozyme and RB. The conformational change in Lysozyme during interaction with RB was confirmed from absorbance, synchronous fluorescence, and circular dichroism measurements. Finally, molecular docking studies were done to confirm that the dye binds with Lysozyme. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Expression and Activity of Lysozyme in Apis Mellifera Carnica Brood Infested with Varroa Destructor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaobidna Ewa A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Varroa destructor is a parasitic mite that attacks the honey bee, and previous studies have suggested that parasitosis caused by this mite is accompanied by immunosuppresion in the host. In this study, the effect of mite infestation on the expression of the lysozyme-1 (lys-1 gene and lysozyme activity in Apis mellifera carnica was determined. The experiment was carried out on the five developmental stages of honey bee workers and drones. Developmental and gender-related differences in gene expression and lysozyme activity were observed in a Varroa destructor-infested brood. The relative expression of the lys-1 gene increased in a infested worker brood and decreased in a drone brood except for P3 pupae. In the final stage of development, the lys-1 gene expression was significantly lower in infested newly emerged workers and drones. Changes in the relative expression of the lys-1 gene in infested individuals was poorly manifested at the level of enzyme activity, whereas at the two final stages of development (P5 and I there was a positive correlation between relative lys-1 expression and lysozyme activity in infested bees of both genders (r=0.988, r=0.999, respectively. The results of this study indicate that V. destructor influences the lysozyme-linked immune response in bees.

  13. Synthesis of Ag{sub 2}S nanorods by biomimetic method in the lysozyme matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Dezhi, E-mail: dezhiqin@163.com; Zhang, Li; He, Guoxu; Zhang, Qiuxia

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Firstly, Ag{sub 2}S nanorods were synthesized by biomimetic method in the lysozyme solutions. • The study of the interaction between Ag{sup +} and the lysozyme. • Discussion of possible formation mechanism of Ag{sub 2}S nanorods. • The synthesis process of lyso-conjugated Ag{sub 2}S nanocrystals is facile, effective and environment friendly. - Abstract: Ag{sub 2}S nanorods were successfully synthesized by biomimetic route in the lysozyme solution at physiological temperature and atmospheric pressure. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images revealed that the prepared nanorods are uniform and monodisperse with homogeneous size about 50 nm in diameter and 150 nm in length. The optical property of Ag{sub 2}S nanocrystals was studied by the ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, the results show that the products exhibit well-defined emission at 471 nm and 496 nm excited by 292 nm. The interaction of Ag{sup +}/Ag{sub 2}S with the lysozyme was investigated through Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, which shows that the cooperation effect of the lysozyme and Ag{sup +} could be responsible for the formation of as obtained Ag{sub 2}S nanorods.

  14. A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbajo Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasingly, biologists and biochemists use computational tools to design experiments to probe the function of proteins and/or to engineer them for a variety of different purposes. The most effective strategies rely on the knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the protein of interest. However it is often the case that an experimental structure is not available and that models of different quality are used instead. On the other hand, the relationship between the quality of a model and its appropriate use is not easy to derive in general, and so far it has been analyzed in detail only for specific application. Results This paper describes a database and related software tools that allow testing of a given structure based method on models of a protein representing different levels of accuracy. The comparison of the results of a computational experiment on the experimental structure and on a set of its decoy models will allow developers and users to assess which is the specific threshold of accuracy required to perform the task effectively. Conclusions The ModelDB server automatically builds decoy models of different accuracy for a given protein of known structure and provides a set of useful tools for their analysis. Pre-computed data for a non-redundant set of deposited protein structures are available for analysis and download in the ModelDB database. Implementation, availability and requirements Project name: A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models. Project home page: http://bl210.caspur.it/MODEL-DB/MODEL-DB_web/MODindex.php. Operating system(s: Platform independent. Programming language: Perl-BioPerl (program; mySQL, Perl DBI and DBD modules (database; php, JavaScript, Jmol scripting (web server. Other requirements: Java Runtime Environment v1.4 or later, Perl, BioPerl, CPAN modules, HHsearch, Modeller, LGA, NCBI Blast package, DSSP, Speedfill (Surfnet and PSAIA. License: Free. Any

  15. Oxidized epigallocatechin gallate inhibited lysozyme fibrillation more strongly than the native form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting An

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, the most abundant flavanoid in green tea, is currently being evaluated in the clinic due to its benefits in the treatment of amyloid disorders. Its anti-amyloidogenic effect has been attributed to direct interaction of the intact molecule with misfolded polypeptides. In addition, antioxidant activity is also involved in the anti-amyloidogenic role. The detailed molecular mechanism is still unclear and requires further investigation. In the present study, the kinetics of EGCG oxidation and the anti-amyloidogenic effect of the resultant oxidation substances have been examined. The results indicate that EGCG degrades in a medium at pH 8.0 with a half-life less than 2 h. By utilizing lysozyme as an in vitro model, the oxidized EGCG demonstrates a more potent anti-amyloidogenic capacity than the intact molecule, as shown by ThT and ANS fluorescence, TEM determination, and hemolytic assay. The oxidized EGCG also has a stronger disruptive effect on preformed fibrils than the native form. Ascorbic acid eliminates the disruptive role of native EGCG on the fibrils, suggesting that oxidation is a prerequisite in fibril disruption. The results of this work demonstrate that oxidized EGCG plays a more important role than the intact molecule in anti-amyloidogenic activity. These insights into the action of EGCG may provide a novel route to understand the anti-amyloidogenic activity of natural polyphenols.

  16. A pH- and temperature-responsive bioresorbable injectable hydrogel based on polypeptide block copolymers for the sustained delivery of proteins in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turabee, Md Hasan; Thambi, Thavasyappan; Duong, Huu Thuy Trang; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Lee, Doo Sung

    2018-02-27

    Sustained delivery of protein therapeutics is limited owing to the fragile nature of proteins. Despite its great potential, delivery of proteins without any loss of bioactivity remains a challenge in the use of protein therapeutics in the clinic. To surmount this shortcoming, we report a pH- and temperature-responsive in situ-forming injectable hydrogel based on comb-type polypeptide block copolymers for the controlled delivery of proteins. Polypeptide block copolymers, composed of hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG), temperature-responsive poly(γ-benzyl-l-glutamate) (PBLG), and pH-responsive oligo(sulfamethazine) (OSM), exhibit pH- and temperature-induced sol-to-gel transition behavior in aqueous solutions. Polypeptide block copolymers were synthesized by combining N-carboxyanhydride-based ring-opening polymerization and post-functionalization of the chain-end using N-hydroxy succinimide ester activated OSM. The physical properties of polypeptide-based hydrogels were tuned by varying the composition of temperature- and pH-responsive PBLG and OSM in block copolymers. Polypeptide block copolymers were non-toxic to human embryonic kidney cells at high concentrations (2000 μg mL -1 ). Subcutaneous administration of polypeptide block copolymer sols formed viscoelastic gel instantly at the back of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The in vivo gels exhibited sustained degradation and were found to be bioresorbable in 6 weeks without any noticeable inflammation at the injection site. Anionic characteristics of hydrogels allow efficient loading of a cationic model protein, lysozyme, through electrostatic interaction. Lysozyme-loaded polypeptide block copolymer sols readily formed a viscoelastic gel in vivo and sustained lysozyme release for at least a week. Overall, the results demonstrate an elegant approach to control the release of certain charged proteins and open a myriad of therapeutic possibilities in protein therapeutics.

  17. Hierarchical organization in aggregates of protein molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Kyhle, Anders; Sørensen, Alexis Hammer

    1997-01-01

    of the solution and the density of protein are varied shows the existence of specific growth processes resulting in different branch-like structures. The resulting structures are strongly influenced by the shape of each protein molecule. Lysozyme and ribonuclease are found to form spherical structures...

  18. Anomalous diffusion in neutral evolution of model proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Erik D.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2015-06-01

    Protein evolution is frequently explored using minimalist polymer models, however, little attention has been given to the problem of structural drift, or diffusion. Here, we study neutral evolution of small protein motifs using an off-lattice heteropolymer model in which individual monomers interact as low-resolution amino acids. In contrast to most earlier models, both the length and folded structure of the polymers are permitted to change. To describe structural change, we compute the mean-square distance (MSD) between monomers in homologous folds separated by n neutral mutations. We find that structural change is episodic, and, averaged over lineages (for example, those extending from a single sequence), exhibits a power-law dependence on n . We show that this exponent depends on the alignment method used, and we analyze the distribution of waiting times between neutral mutations. The latter are more disperse than for models required to maintain a specific fold, but exhibit a similar power-law tail.

  19. HIV-specific probabilistic models of protein evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Nickle

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Comparative sequence analyses, including such fundamental bioinformatics techniques as similarity searching, sequence alignment and phylogenetic inference, have become a mainstay for researchers studying type 1 Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1 genome structure and evolution. Implicit in comparative analyses is an underlying model of evolution, and the chosen model can significantly affect the results. In general, evolutionary models describe the probabilities of replacing one amino acid character with another over a period of time. Most widely used evolutionary models for protein sequences have been derived from curated alignments of hundreds of proteins, usually based on mammalian genomes. It is unclear to what extent these empirical models are generalizable to a very different organism, such as HIV-1-the most extensively sequenced organism in existence. We developed a maximum likelihood model fitting procedure to a collection of HIV-1 alignments sampled from different viral genes, and inferred two empirical substitution models, suitable for describing between-and within-host evolution. Our procedure pools the information from multiple sequence alignments, and provided software implementation can be run efficiently in parallel on a computer cluster. We describe how the inferred substitution models can be used to generate scoring matrices suitable for alignment and similarity searches. Our models had a consistently superior fit relative to the best existing models and to parameter-rich data-driven models when benchmarked on independent HIV-1 alignments, demonstrating evolutionary biases in amino-acid substitution that are unique to HIV, and that are not captured by the existing models. The scoring matrices derived from the models showed a marked difference from common amino-acid scoring matrices. The use of an appropriate evolutionary model recovered a known viral transmission history, whereas a poorly chosen model introduced phylogenetic

  20. Dye-Affinity Nanofibrous Membrane for Adsorption of Lysozyme: Preparation and Performance Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Sheng-Shih Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyacrylonitrile (PAN nanofibrous membrane was prepared by an electrospinning technique. After heat treatment and alkaline hydrolysis, the weak ion exchange membrane was grafted with chitosan molecule and then covalently immobilized with a Cibacron Blue F3GA (CB. Fibre diameter, porosity and pore size of the membrane and immobilized dye density were characterized. Furthermore, the membrane was applied to evaluate the binding performance of lysozyme under various operating parameters (pH, chitosan mass per volume ratio, dye concentration, ionic strength and temperature in batch mode. The experimental results were directly applied to purify lysozyme from chicken egg white by membrane chromatography. The results showed that the capture efficiency, recovery yield and purification factor were 90 and 87 %, and 47-fold, respectively, in a single step. The binding capacity remained consistent after five repeated cycles of adsorption-desorption operations. This work demonstrates that the dye-affinity nanofibrous membrane holds great potential for purification of lysozyme from real feedstock.

  1. Preclinical models used for immunogenicity prediction of therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinks, Vera; Weinbuch, Daniel; Baker, Matthew; Dean, Yann; Stas, Philippe; Kostense, Stefan; Rup, Bonita; Jiskoot, Wim

    2013-07-01

    All therapeutic proteins are potentially immunogenic. Antibodies formed against these drugs can decrease efficacy, leading to drastically increased therapeutic costs and in rare cases to serious and sometimes life threatening side-effects. Many efforts are therefore undertaken to develop therapeutic proteins with minimal immunogenicity. For this, immunogenicity prediction of candidate drugs during early drug development is essential. Several in silico, in vitro and in vivo models are used to predict immunogenicity of drug leads, to modify potentially immunogenic properties and to continue development of drug candidates with expected low immunogenicity. Despite the extensive use of these predictive models, their actual predictive value varies. Important reasons for this uncertainty are the limited/insufficient knowledge on the immune mechanisms underlying immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins, the fact that different predictive models explore different components of the immune system and the lack of an integrated clinical validation. In this review, we discuss the predictive models in use, summarize aspects of immunogenicity that these models predict and explore the merits and the limitations of each of the models.

  2. Modelling Transcapillary Transport of Fluid and Proteins in Hemodialysis Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Pietribiasi

    Full Text Available The kinetics of protein transport to and from the vascular compartment play a major role in the determination of fluid balance and plasma refilling during hemodialysis (HD sessions. In this study we propose a whole-body mathematical model describing water and protein shifts across the capillary membrane during HD and compare its output to clinical data while evaluating the impact of choosing specific values for selected parameters.The model follows a two-compartment structure (vascular and interstitial space and is based on balance equations of protein mass and water volume in each compartment. The capillary membrane was described according to the three-pore theory. Two transport parameters, the fractional contribution of large pores (αLP and the total hydraulic conductivity (LpS of the capillary membrane, were estimated from patient data. Changes in the intensity and direction of individual fluid and solute flows through each part of the transport system were analyzed in relation to the choice of different values of small pores radius and fractional conductivity, lymphatic sensitivity to hydraulic pressure, and steady-state interstitial-to-plasma protein concentration ratio.The estimated values of LpS and αLP were respectively 10.0 ± 8.4 mL/min/mmHg (mean ± standard deviation and 0.062 ± 0.041. The model was able to predict with good accuracy the profiles of plasma volume and serum total protein concentration in most of the patients (average root-mean-square deviation < 2% of the measured value.The applied model provides a mechanistic interpretation of fluid transport processes induced by ultrafiltration during HD, using a minimum of tuned parameters and assumptions. The simulated values of individual flows through each kind of pore and lymphatic absorption rate yielded by the model may suggest answers to unsolved questions on the relative impact of these not-measurable quantities on total vascular refilling and fluid balance.

  3. Sub-terahertz spectroscopy reveals that proteins influence the properties of water at greater distances than previously detected

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sushko, Oleksandr; Dubrovka, Rostyslav; Donnan, Robert S., E-mail: r.donnan@qmul.ac.uk [School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-07

    The initial purpose of the study is to systematically investigate the solvation properties of different proteins in water solution by terahertz (THz) radiation absorption. Transmission measurements of protein water solutions have been performed using a vector network analyser-driven quasi-optical bench covering the WR-3 waveguide band (0.220–0.325 THz). The following proteins, ranging from low to high molecular weight, were chosen for this study: lysozyme, myoglobin, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Absorption properties of solutions were studied at different concentrations of proteins ranging from 2 to 100 mg/ml. The concentration-dependent absorption of protein molecules was determined by treating the solution as a two-component model first; then, based on protein absorptivity, the extent of the hydration shell is estimated. Protein molecules are shown to possess a concentration-dependent absorptivity in water solutions. Absorption curves of all three proteins sharply peak towards a dilution-limit that is attributed to the enhanced flexibility of protein and amino acid side chains. An alternative approach to the determination of hydration shell thickness is thereby suggested, based on protein absorptivity. The proposed approach is independent of the absorption of the hydration shell. The derived estimate of hydration shell thickness for each protein supports previous findings that protein-water interaction dynamics extends beyond 2-3 water solvation-layers as predicted by molecular dynamics simulations and other techniques such as NMR, X-ray scattering, and neutron scattering. According to our estimations, the radius of the dynamic hydration shell is 16, 19, and 25 Å, respectively, for lysozyme, myoglobin, and BSA proteins and correlates with the dipole moment of the protein. It is also seen that THz radiation can serve as an initial estimate of the protein hydrophobicity.

  4. Sub-terahertz spectroscopy reveals that proteins influence the properties of water at greater distances than previously detected

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sushko, Oleksandr; Dubrovka, Rostyslav; Donnan, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The initial purpose of the study is to systematically investigate the solvation properties of different proteins in water solution by terahertz (THz) radiation absorption. Transmission measurements of protein water solutions have been performed using a vector network analyser-driven quasi-optical bench covering the WR-3 waveguide band (0.220–0.325 THz). The following proteins, ranging from low to high molecular weight, were chosen for this study: lysozyme, myoglobin, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Absorption properties of solutions were studied at different concentrations of proteins ranging from 2 to 100 mg/ml. The concentration-dependent absorption of protein molecules was determined by treating the solution as a two-component model first; then, based on protein absorptivity, the extent of the hydration shell is estimated. Protein molecules are shown to possess a concentration-dependent absorptivity in water solutions. Absorption curves of all three proteins sharply peak towards a dilution-limit that is attributed to the enhanced flexibility of protein and amino acid side chains. An alternative approach to the determination of hydration shell thickness is thereby suggested, based on protein absorptivity. The proposed approach is independent of the absorption of the hydration shell. The derived estimate of hydration shell thickness for each protein supports previous findings that protein-water interaction dynamics extends beyond 2-3 water solvation-layers as predicted by molecular dynamics simulations and other techniques such as NMR, X-ray scattering, and neutron scattering. According to our estimations, the radius of the dynamic hydration shell is 16, 19, and 25 Å, respectively, for lysozyme, myoglobin, and BSA proteins and correlates with the dipole moment of the protein. It is also seen that THz radiation can serve as an initial estimate of the protein hydrophobicity

  5. Lysozyme as an alternative to antibiotics improves growth performance and small intestinal morphology in nursery pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, W T; Wells, J E

    2013-07-01

    Lysozyme is a 1,4-β-N-acetylmuramidase that has antimicrobial properties. The objective of this experiment was to determine if lysozyme in nursery diets improved growth performance and gastrointestinal health of pigs weaned from the sow at 24 d of age. Two replicates of 96 pigs (192 total; 96 males, 96 females) were weaned from the sow at 24 d of age, blocked by BW and gender, and then assigned to 1 of 24 pens (4 pigs/pen). Each block was randomly assigned 1 of 3 dietary treatments for 28 d: control (two 14-d phases), control + antibiotics (carbadox/copper sulfate), or control + lysozyme (100 mg/kg diet). Pigs were weighed and blood sampled on d 0, 14, and 28 of treatment. Blood was analyzed for plasma urea nitrogen (PUN) and IgA. At 28 d, pigs were killed, and samples of jejunum and ileum were collected and fixed for intestinal morphology measurements. An additional jejunum sample was taken from the 12 pigs with the median BW per treatment to determine transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). Pigs consuming antibiotics or lysozyme grew at a faster rate than control pigs (0.433 ± 0.009 and 0.421 ± 0.008 vs. 0.398 ± 0.008 kg/d, respectively; P 0.48), but G:F was improved in pigs consuming antibiotics or lysozyme (0.756 ± 0.014, 0.750 ± 0.021, and 0.695 ± 0.019 kg/kg; P 0.48). Dietary treatment did not affect TER (P > 0.37), but gilts had lower TER compared with barrows (P 0.53). However, jejunum villi height was increased and crypt depth was decreased in pigs consuming antibiotics or lysozyme (P pigs weaned from the sow at 24 d of age.

  6. DockQ: A Quality Measure for Protein-Protein Docking Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sankar

    2016-01-01

    The state-of-the-art to assess the structural quality of docking models is currently based on three related yet independent quality measures: Fnat, LRMS, and iRMS as proposed and standardized by CAPRI. These quality measures quantify different aspects of the quality of a particular docking model and need to be viewed together to reveal the true quality, e.g. a model with relatively poor LRMS (>10Å) might still qualify as 'acceptable' with a descent Fnat (>0.50) and iRMS (iRMS to a single score in the range [0, 1] that can be used to assess the quality of protein docking models. By using DockQ on CAPRI models it is possible to almost completely reproduce the original CAPRI classification into Incorrect, Acceptable, Medium and High quality. An average PPV of 94% at 90% Recall demonstrating that there is no need to apply predefined ad-hoc cutoffs to classify docking models. Since DockQ recapitulates the CAPRI classification almost perfectly, it can be viewed as a higher resolution version of the CAPRI classification, making it possible to estimate model quality in a more quantitative way using Z-scores or sum of top ranked models, which has been so valuable for the CASP community. The possibility to directly correlate a quality measure to a scoring function has been crucial for the development of scoring functions for protein structure prediction, and DockQ should be useful in a similar development in the protein docking field. DockQ is available at http://github.com/bjornwallner/DockQ/ PMID:27560519

  7. Protein homology model refinement by large-scale energy optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hahnbeom; Ovchinnikov, Sergey; Kim, David E; DiMaio, Frank; Baker, David

    2018-03-20

    Proteins fold to their lowest free-energy structures, and hence the most straightforward way to increase the accuracy of a partially incorrect protein structure model is to search for the lowest-energy nearby structure. This direct approach has met with little success for two reasons: first, energy function inaccuracies can lead to false energy minima, resulting in model degradation rather than improvement; and second, even with an accurate energy function, the search problem is formidable because the energy only drops considerably in the immediate vicinity of the global minimum, and there are a very large number of degrees of freedom. Here we describe a large-scale energy optimization-based refinement method that incorporates advances in both search and energy function accuracy that can substantially improve the accuracy of low-resolution homology models. The method refined low-resolution homology models into correct folds for 50 of 84 diverse protein families and generated improved models in recent blind structure prediction experiments. Analyses of the basis for these improvements reveal contributions from both the improvements in conformational sampling techniques and the energy function.

  8. Stochastic lattice model of synaptic membrane protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiwei; Kahraman, Osman; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2017-05-01

    Neurotransmitter receptor molecules, concentrated in synaptic membrane domains along with scaffolds and other kinds of proteins, are crucial for signal transmission across chemical synapses. In common with other membrane protein domains, synaptic domains are characterized by low protein copy numbers and protein crowding, with rapid stochastic turnover of individual molecules. We study here in detail a stochastic lattice model of the receptor-scaffold reaction-diffusion dynamics at synaptic domains that was found previously to capture, at the mean-field level, the self-assembly, stability, and characteristic size of synaptic domains observed in experiments. We show that our stochastic lattice model yields quantitative agreement with mean-field models of nonlinear diffusion in crowded membranes. Through a combination of analytic and numerical solutions of the master equation governing the reaction dynamics at synaptic domains, together with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we find substantial discrepancies between mean-field and stochastic models for the reaction dynamics at synaptic domains. Based on the reaction and diffusion properties of synaptic receptors and scaffolds suggested by previous experiments and mean-field calculations, we show that the stochastic reaction-diffusion dynamics of synaptic receptors and scaffolds provide a simple physical mechanism for collective fluctuations in synaptic domains, the molecular turnover observed at synaptic domains, key features of the observed single-molecule trajectories, and spatial heterogeneity in the effective rates at which receptors and scaffolds are recycled at the cell membrane. Our work sheds light on the physical mechanisms and principles linking the collective properties of membrane protein domains to the stochastic dynamics that rule their molecular components.

  9. Two duplicated chicken-type lysozyme genes in disc abalone Haliotis discus discus: molecular aspects in relevance to structure, genomic organization, mRNA expression and bacteriolytic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Bathige, S D N K; Kasthuri, Saranya Revathy; Wan, Qiang; Whang, Ilson; Lee, Jehee

    2013-08-01

    Lysozymes are crucial antibacterial proteins that are associated with catalytic cleavage of peptidoglycan and subsequent bacteriolysis. The present study describes the identification of two lysozyme genes from disc abalone Haliotis discus discus and their characterization at sequence-, genomic-, transcriptional- and functional-levels. Two cDNAs and BAC clones bearing lysozyme genes were isolated from abalone transcriptome and BAC genomic libraries, respectively and sequences were determined. Corresponding deduced amino acid sequences harbored a chicken-type lysozyme (LysC) family profile and exhibited conserved characteristics of LysC family members including active residues (Glu and Asp) and GS(S/T)DYGIFQINS motif suggested that they are LysC counterparts in disc abalone and designated as abLysC1 and abLysC2. While abLysC1 represented the homolog recently reported in Ezo abalone [1], abLysC2 shared significant identity with LysC homologs. Unlike other vertebrate LysCs, coding sequence of abLysCs were distributed within five exons interrupted by four introns. Both abLysCs revealed a broader mRNA distribution with highest levels in mantle (abLysC1) and hepatopancreas (abLysC2) suggesting their likely main role in defense and digestion, respectively. Investigation of temporal transcriptional profiles post-LPS and -pathogen challenges revealed induced-responses of abLysCs in gills and hemocytes. The in vitro muramidase activity of purified recombinant (r) abLysCs proteins was evaluated, and findings indicated that they are active in acidic pH range (3.5-6.5) and over a broad temperature range (20-60 °C) and influenced by ionic strength. When the antibacterial spectra of (r)abLysCs were examined, they displayed differential activities against both Gram positive and Gram negative strains providing evidence for their involvement in bacteriolytic function in abalone physiology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The influence of lysozyme on mannitol polymorphism in freeze-dried and spray-dried formulations depends on the selection of the drying process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohganz, Holger; Lee, Yan-Ying; Rantanen, Jukka; Yang, Mingshi

    2013-04-15

    Freeze-drying and spray-drying are often applied drying techniques for biopharmaceutical formulations. The formation of different solid forms upon drying is often dependent on the complex interplay between excipient selection and process parameters. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the chosen drying method on the solid state form. Mannitol-lysozyme solutions of 20mg/mL, with the amount of lysozyme varying between 2.5% and 50% (w/w) of total solid content, were freeze-dried and spray-dried, respectively. The resulting solid state of mannitol was analysed by near-infrared spectroscopy in combination with multivariate analysis and further, results were verified with X-ray powder diffraction. It was seen that the prevalence of the mannitol polymorphic form shifted from β-mannitol to δ-mannitol with increasing protein concentration in freeze-dried formulations. In spray-dried formulations an increase in protein concentration resulted in a shift from β-mannitol to α-mannitol. An increase in final drying temperature of the freeze-drying process towards the temperature of the spray-drying process did not lead to significant changes. It can thus be concluded that it is the drying process in itself, rather than the temperature, that leads to the observed solid state changes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A novel C-type lysozyme from Mytilus galloprovincialis: insight into innate immunity and molecular evolution of invertebrate C-type lysozymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Wang

    Full Text Available A c-type lysozyme (named as MgCLYZ gene was cloned from the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. Blast analysis indicated that MgCLYZ was a salivary c-type lysozyme which was mainly found in insects. The nucleotide sequence of MgCLYZ was predicted to encode a polypeptide of 154 amino acid residues with the signal peptide comprising the first 24 residues. The deduced mature peptide of MgCLYZ was of a calculated molecular weight of 14.4 kD and a theoretical isoelectric point (pI of 8.08. Evolution analysis suggested that bivalve branch of the invertebrate c-type lysozymes phylogeny tree underwent positive selection during evolution. By quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR analysis, MgCLYZ transcript was widely detected in all examined tissues and responded sensitively to bacterial challenge in hemocytes and hepatopancreas. The optimal temperature and pH of recombinant MgCLYZ (rMgCLYZ were 20°C and 4, respectively. The rMgCLYZ displayed lytic activities against Gram-positive bacteria including Micrococcus luteus and Staphyloccocus aureus, and Gram-negative bacteria including Vibrio anguillarum, Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas putida, Proteus mirabilis and Bacillus aquimaris. These results suggest that MgCLYZ perhaps play an important role in innate immunity of M. galloprovincialis, and invertebrate c-type lysozymes might be under positive selection in a species-specific manner during evolution for undergoing adaptation to different environment and diverse pathogens.

  12. A modeling strategy for G-protein coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kahler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell responses can be triggered via G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs that interact with small molecules, peptides or proteins and transmit the signal over the membrane via structural changes to activate intracellular pathways. GPCRs are characterized by a rather low sequence similarity and exhibit structural differences even for functionally closely related GPCRs. An accurate structure prediction for GPCRs is therefore not straightforward. We propose a computational approach that relies on the generation of several independent models based on different template structures, which are subsequently refined by molecular dynamics simulations. A comparison of their conformational stability and the agreement with GPCR-typical structural features is then used to select a favorable model. This strategy was applied to predict the structure of the herpesviral chemokine receptor US28 by generating three independent models based on the known structures of the chemokine receptors CXCR1, CXCR4, and CCR5. Model refinement and evaluation suggested that the model based on CCR5 exhibits the most favorable structural properties. In particular, the GPCR-typical structural features, such as a conserved water cluster or conserved non-covalent contacts, are present to a larger extent in the model based on CCR5 compared to the other models. A final model validation based on the recently published US28 crystal structure confirms that the CCR5-based model is the most accurate and exhibits 80.8% correctly modeled residues within the transmembrane helices. The structural agreement between the selected model and the crystal structure suggests that our modeling strategy may also be more generally applicable to other GPCRs of unknown structure.

  13. Models of protein and amino acid requirements for cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Orlindo Tedeschi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Protein supply and requirements by ruminants have been studied for more than a century. These studies led to the accumulation of lots of scientific information about digestion and metabolism of protein by ruminants as well as the characterization of the dietary protein in order to maximize animal performance. During the 1980s and 1990s, when computers became more accessible and powerful, scientists began to conceptualize and develop mathematical nutrition models, and to program them into computers to assist with ration balancing and formulation for domesticated ruminants, specifically dairy and beef cattle. The most commonly known nutrition models developed during this period were the National Research Council (NRC in the United States, Agricultural Research Council (ARC in the United Kingdom, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA in France, and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO in Australia. Others were derivative works from these models with different degrees of modifications in the supply or requirement calculations, and the modeling nature (e.g., static or dynamic, mechanistic, or deterministic. Circa 1990s, most models adopted the metabolizable protein (MP system over the crude protein (CP and digestible CP systems to estimate supply of MP and the factorial system to calculate MP required by the animal. The MP system included two portions of protein (i.e., the rumen-undegraded dietary CP - RUP - and the contributions of microbial CP - MCP as the main sources of MP for the animal. Some models would explicitly account for the impact of dry matter intake (DMI on the MP required for maintenance (MPm; e.g., Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System - CNCPS, the Dutch system - DVE/OEB, while others would simply account for scurf, urinary, metabolic fecal, and endogenous contributions independently of DMI. All models included milk yield and its components in estimating MP required for lactation

  14. Lessons from Animal Models of Cytoplasmic Intermediate Filament Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Magin, Thomas M

    Cytoplasmic intermediate filaments (IFs) represent a major cytoskeletal network contributing to cell shape, adhesion and migration as well as to tissue resilience and renewal in numerous bilaterians, including mammals. The observation that IFs are dispensable in cultured mammalian cells, but cause tissue-specific, life-threatening disorders, has pushed the need to investigate their function in vivo. In keeping with human disease, the deletion or mutation of murine IF genes resulted in highly specific pathologies. Epidermal keratins, together with desmin, are essential to protect corresponding tissues against mechanical force but also participate in stabilizing cell adhesion and in inflammatory signalling. Surprisingly, other IF proteins contribute to tissue integrity to a much lesser extent than anticipated, pointing towards their role in stress situations. In support, the overexpression of small chaperones or the interference with inflammatory signalling in several settings has been shown to rescue severe tissue pathologies that resulted from the expression of mutant IF proteins. It stills remains an open issue whether the wide range of IF disorders share similar pathomechanisms. Moreover, we lack an understanding how IF proteins participate in signalling processes. Now, with a large number of mouse models in hand, the next challenge will be to develop organotypic cell culture models to dissect pathomechanisms at the molecular level, to employ Crispr/Cas-mediated genome engineering to optimize models and, finally, to combine available animal models with medicinal chemistry for the development of molecular therapies.

  15. Protein Functionalized Nanodiamond Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu YL

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various nanoscale elements are currently being explored for bio-applications, such as in bio-images, bio-detection, and bio-sensors. Among them, nanodiamonds possess remarkable features such as low bio-cytotoxicity, good optical property in fluorescent and Raman spectra, and good photostability for bio-applications. In this work, we devise techniques to position functionalized nanodiamonds on self-assembled monolayer (SAMs arrays adsorbed on silicon and ITO substrates surface using electron beam lithography techniques. The nanodiamond arrays were functionalized with lysozyme to target a certain biomolecule or protein specifically. The optical properties of the nanodiamond-protein complex arrays were characterized by a high throughput confocal microscope. The synthesized nanodiamond-lysozyme complex arrays were found to still retain their functionality in interacting with E. coli.

  16. Protein deposition on a lathe-cut silicone hydrogel contact lens material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Lakshman N; Woods, Jill; Teichroeb, Jonathan H; Jones, Lyndon

    2009-03-01

    To determine the quantity of total protein, total lysozyme, and the conformational state of lysozyme deposited on a novel, lathe-cut silicone hydrogel (SiHy) contact lens material (sifilcon A) after 3 months of wear. Twenty-four subjects completed a prospective, bilateral, daily-wear, 9-month clinical evaluation in which the subjects were fitted with a novel, custom-made, lathe-cut SiHy lens material. The lenses were worn for three consecutive 3-month periods, with lenses being replaced after each period of wear. After 3 months of wear, the lenses from the left eye were collected and assessed for protein analysis. The total protein deposited on the lenses was determined by a modified Bradford assay, total lysozyme using Western blotting and the lysozyme activity was determined using a modified micrococcal assay. The total protein recovered from the custom-made lenses was 5.3 +/- 2.3 microg/lens and the total lysozyme was 2.4 +/- 1.2 microg/lens. The denatured lysozyme found on the lenses was 1.9 +/- 1.0 microg/lens and the percentage of lysozyme denatured was 80 +/- 10%. Even after 3 months of wear, the quantity of protein and the conformational state of lysozyme deposited on these novel lens materials was very similar to that found on similar surface-coated SiHy lenses after 2 to 4 weeks of wear. These results indicate that extended use of the sifilcon A material is not deleterious in terms of the quantity and quality of protein deposited on the lens.

  17. A comparison of the adsorption of saliva proteins and some typical proteins onto the surface of hydroxyapatite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawasaki, K; Kambara, M; Matsumura, H; Norde, W

    2003-01-01

    Adsorption of protein from saliva on hydroxyapatite was compared with adsorption of several typical proteins with different electric charges, i.e. lysozyme, human serum albumin, beta-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin. Adsorbed amounts of these proteins were determined and electrophoretic mobilities of

  18. A comparison of the adsorption of saliva proteins and some typical proteins onto the surface of hydroxyapatite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawasaki, K.; Kambara, M.; Matsumura, H.; Norde, W.

    2003-01-01

    Adsorption of protein from saliva on hydroxyapatite was compared with adsorption of several typical proteins with different electric charges, i.e. lysozyme, human serum albumin, @b-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin. Adsorbed amounts of these proteins were determined and electrophoretic mobilities of

  19. A simple quantitative model of macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding: Application to the murine prion protein(121-231)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergasa-Caceres, Fernando; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2013-06-01

    A model of protein folding kinetics is applied to study the effects of macromolecular crowding on protein folding rate and stability. Macromolecular crowding is found to promote a decrease of the entropic cost of folding of proteins that produces an increase of both the stability and the folding rate. The acceleration of the folding rate due to macromolecular crowding is shown to be a topology-dependent effect. The model is applied to the folding dynamics of the murine prion protein (121-231). The differential effect of macromolecular crowding as a function of protein topology suffices to make non-native configurations relatively more accessible.

  20. DeepQA: Improving the estimation of single protein model quality with deep belief networks

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Renzhi; Bhattacharya, Debswapna; Hou, Jie; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    Background Protein quality assessment (QA) useful for ranking and selecting protein models has long been viewed as one of the major challenges for protein tertiary structure prediction. Especially, estimating the quality of a single protein model, which is important for selecting a few good models out of a large model pool consisting of mostly low-quality models, is still a largely unsolved problem. Results We introduce a novel single-model quality assessment method DeepQA based on deep belie...

  1. SynechoNET: integrated protein-protein interaction database of a model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Woo-Yeon; Kang, Sungsoo; Kim, Byoung-Chul; Oh, Jeehyun; Cho, Seongwoong; Bhak, Jong; Choi, Jong-Soon

    2008-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria are model organisms for studying photosynthesis, carbon and nitrogen assimilation, evolution of plant plastids, and adaptability to environmental stresses. Despite many studies on cyanobacteria, there is no web-based database of their regulatory and signaling protein-protein interaction networks to date. Description We report a database and website SynechoNET that provides predicted protein-protein interactions. SynechoNET shows cyanobacterial domain-domain interactio...

  2. Exploration of Protein Conformational Change with PELE and Meta-Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossins, Benjamin P; Hosseini, Ali; Guallar, Victor

    2012-03-13

    Atomistic molecular simulation methods are now able to explore complex protein or protein-ligand dynamical space in a tractable way with methods such as meta-dynamics or adaptive biasing force. However, many of these methods either require a careful selection of reaction coordinates or the knowledge of an initial pathway of some kind. Thus, it is important that effective methods are developed to produce this pathway data in an efficient fashion. PELE, a proven protein-ligand sampling code, has been developed to provide rapid protein sampling in highly flexible cases, using a reduced network model eigen problem approach. The resulting method is able to rapidly sample configuration space with very general driving information. When applied to ubiquitin, PELE was able to reproduce RMSD and average force data found in molecular dynamics simulations. PELE was also applied to explore the opening/closing transition of T4 lysozyme. A meta-dynamics exploration using a low energy pathway validated that the configurations explored by PELE represent the most populated regions of phase space. PELE and meta-dynamics explorations also discovered a low free energy region where a large cross-domain helix of T4 lysozyme is broken in two. There is previous NMR evidence for the validity of this unfolded helix region.

  3. Mechanistic pathways of recognition of a solvent-inaccessible cavity of protein by a ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Jagannath; Pandit, Subhendu; Dandekar, Bhupendra; Vallurupalli, Pramodh

    One of the puzzling questions in the realm of protein-ligand recognition is how a solvent-inaccessible hydrophobic cavity of a protein gets recognized by a ligand. We address the topic by simulating, for the first time, the complete binding process of benzene from aqueous media to the well-known buried cavity of L99A T4 Lysozyme at an atomistic resolution. Our multiple unbiased microsecond-long trajectories, which were completely blind to the location of target binding site, are able to unequivocally identify the kinetic pathways along which benzene molecule meanders across the solvent and protein and ultimately spontaneously recognizes the deeply buried cavity of L99A T4 Lysozyme at an accurate precision. Our simulation, combined with analysis based on markov state model and free energy calculation, reveals that there are more than one distinct ligand binding pathways. Intriguingly, each of the identified pathways involves the transient opening of a channel of the protein prior to ligand binding. The work will also decipher rich mechanistic details on unbinding kinetics of the ligand as obtained from enhanced sampling techniques.

  4. Protein model discrimination using mutational sensitivity derived from deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkar, Bharat V; Tripathi, Arti; Sahoo, Anusmita; Bajaj, Kanika; Goswami, Devrishi; Chakrabarti, Purbani; Swarnkar, Mohit K; Gokhale, Rajesh S; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2012-02-08

    A major bottleneck in protein structure prediction is the selection of correct models from a pool of decoys. Relative activities of ∼1,200 individual single-site mutants in a saturation library of the bacterial toxin CcdB were estimated by determining their relative populations using deep sequencing. This phenotypic information was used to define an empirical score for each residue (RankScore), which correlated with the residue depth, and identify active-site residues. Using these correlations, ∼98% of correct models of CcdB (RMSD ≤ 4Å) were identified from a large set of decoys. The model-discrimination methodology was further validated on eleven different monomeric proteins using simulated RankScore values. The methodology is also a rapid, accurate way to obtain relative activities of each mutant in a large pool and derive sequence-structure-function relationships without protein isolation or characterization. It can be applied to any system in which mutational effects can be monitored by a phenotypic readout. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Protein folding simulations: from coarse-grained model to all-atom model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Wenfei; Wang, Jun; Qin, Meng; Wu, Lei; Yan, Zhiqiang; Xu, Weixin; Zuo, Guanghong; Wang, Wei

    2009-06-01

    Protein folding is an important and challenging problem in molecular biology. During the last two decades, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has proved to be a paramount tool and was widely used to study protein structures, folding kinetics and thermodynamics, and structure-stability-function relationship. It was also used to help engineering and designing new proteins, and to answer even more general questions such as the minimal number of amino acid or the evolution principle of protein families. Nowadays, the MD simulation is still undergoing rapid developments. The first trend is to toward developing new coarse-grained models and studying larger and more complex molecular systems such as protein-protein complex and their assembling process, amyloid related aggregations, and structure and motion of chaperons, motors, channels and virus capsides; the second trend is toward building high resolution models and explore more detailed and accurate pictures of protein folding and the associated processes, such as the coordination bond or disulfide bond involved folding, the polarization, charge transfer and protonate/deprotonate process involved in metal coupled folding, and the ion permeation and its coupling with the kinetics of channels. On these new territories, MD simulations have given many promising results and will continue to offer exciting views. Here, we review several new subjects investigated by using MD simulations as well as the corresponding developments of appropriate protein models. These include but are not limited to the attempt to go beyond the topology based Gō-like model and characterize the energetic factors in protein structures and dynamics, the study of the thermodynamics and kinetics of disulfide bond involved protein folding, the modeling of the interactions between chaperonin and the encapsulated protein and the protein folding under this circumstance, the effort to clarify the important yet still elusive folding mechanism of protein BBL

  6. Functional Micrococcus lysodeikticus layers deposited by laser technique for the optical sensing of lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Valentina; Zaharie-Butucel, Diana; Stanica, Luciana; Brajnicov, Simona; Marascu, Valentina; Bonciu, Anca; Cristocea, Andra; Gaman, Laura; Gheorghiu, Mihaela; Astilean, Simion; Vasilescu, Alina

    2018-02-01

    Whole cell optical biosensors, made by immobilizing whole algal, bacterial or mammalian cells on various supports have found applications in several fields, from ecology and ecotoxicity testing to biopharmaceutical production or medical diagnostics. We hereby report the deposition of functional bacterial layers of Micrococcus lysodeikticus (ML) via Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) on poly(diallyldimethylamonium) (PDDA)-coated-glass slides and their application as an optical biosensor for the detection of lysozyme in serum. Lysozyme is an enzyme upregulated in inflammatory diseases and ML is an enzymatic substrate for this enzyme. The MAPLE-deposited bacterial interfaces were characterised by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Fourier-Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman and optical microscopy and were compared with control interfaces deposited via layer-by-layer on the same substrate. After MAPLE deposition and coating with graphene oxide (GO), ML-modified interfaces retained their functionality and sensitivity to lysozyme's lytic action. The optical biosensor detected lysozyme in undiluted serum in the clinically relevant range up to 10μgmL -1 , in a fast and simple manner. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Encapsulation on Antimicrobial Activity of Herbal Extracts with Lysozyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Matouskova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance of microorganisms to antibiotics has increased. The use of natural components with antimicrobial properties can be of great significance to reduce this problem. The presented work is focused on the study of the effect of encapsulation of selected plant and animal antimicrobial substances (herbs, spices, lysozyme and nisin on their activity and stability. Antimicrobial components were packaged into liposomes and polysaccharide particles (alginate, chitosan and starch. Antimicrobial activity was tested against two Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus and two Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens bacteria. Encapsulation was successful in all types of polysaccharide particles and liposomes. The prepared particles exhibited very good long-term stability, especially in aqueous conditions. Antimicrobial activity was retained in all types of particles. Liposomes with encapsulated herb and spice extracts exhibited very good inhibitory effect against all tested bacterial strains. Most of herbal extracts had very good antimicrobial effect against the tested Gram-negative bacterial strains, while Gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive to lysozyme particles. Thus, particles with co-encapsulated herbs and lysozyme are more active against different types of bacteria, and more stable and more effective during long-term storage. Particles with encapsulated mixture of selected plant extracts and lysozyme could be used as complex antimicrobial preparation with controlled release in the production of food and food supplements, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries.

  8. Targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1- casein gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Targeting an exogenous gene into a favorable gene locus and for expression under endogenous regulators is an ideal method in mammary gland bioreactor research. For this purpose, a gene targeting vector was constructed to targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1-casein gene locus. In this case, the ...

  9. Complexation of lysozyme with sodium caseinate and micellar casein in aqueous buffered solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonov, Y.A.; Moldenaers, P.; Cardinaels, R.M.

    We present an extended structural and morphological study of the complexation of lysozyme (Lys) with sodium caseinate (SC) and micellar casein (MC) by means of turbidity measurements, phase analysis, dynamic, static and electrophoretic light scattering, bright-field and confocal laser scanning

  10. Targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1- casein gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... Targeting an exogenous gene into a favorable gene locus and for expression under endogenous regulators is ... case, the expression of human lysozyme could be regulated by the endogenous cis-element of αs1- casein gene in .... Mouse mammary epithelial C127 cells (Cell Bank, Chinese. Academy of ...

  11. THE PRIMARY STRUCTURE OF HEVAMINE, AN ENZYME WITH LYSOZYME CHITINASE ACTIVITY FROM HEVEA-BRASILIENSIS LATEX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JEKEL, PA; HARTMANN, JBH; BEINTEMA, JJ

    1991-01-01

    The primary structure of hevamine, an enzyme with lysozyme/chitinase activity from Hevea brasiliensis latex, has been determined predominantly with conventional non-automatic methods. The positions of three disulfide bridges have been determined. The sequence has about 60% identity with that of a

  12. [Inactivating Effect of Heat-Denatured Lysozyme on Murine Norovirus in Bread Fillings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Michiko; Yasuda, Yuka; Takahashi, Hajime; Takeuchi, Akira; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the viability of murine norovirus strain 1 (MNV-1), a surrogate for human norovirus, in bread fillings used for making stuffed buns and pastries. The inactivating effect of heat-denatured lysozyme, which was recently reported to have an antiviral effect, on MNV-1 contaminating the bread fillings was also examined. MNV-1 was inoculated into two types of fillings (chocolate cream, marmalade jam) at 4.5 log PFU/g, and the bread fillings were stored at 4℃ for 5 days. MNV-1 remained viable in the bread fillings during storage. However, addition of 1% heat-denatured lysozyme to the fillings resulted in a decrease of MNV-1 infectivity immediately after inoculation, in both fillings. On the fifth day of storage, MNV-1 infectivity was decreased by 1.2 log PFU/g in chocolate cream and by 0.9 log PFU/g in marmalade jam. Although the mechanism underlying the anti-norovirus effect of heat-denatured lysozyme has not been clarified, our results suggest that heat-denatured lysozyme can be used as an inactivating agent against norovirus in bread fillings.

  13. Susceptibility of bifidobacteria to lysozyme as a possible selection criterion for probiotic bifidobacterial strains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rada, V.; Šplíchal, Igor; Rocková, S.; Grmanová, M.; Vlková, E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 3 (2010), s. 451-455 ISSN 0141-5492 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/07/0572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Bifidobacteria * human milk * Lysozyme Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.768, year: 2010

  14. Lysozyme-magnesium aluminum silicate microparticles: Molecular interaction, bioactivity and release studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanjanakawinkul, Watchara; Medlicott, Natalie J.; Rades, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the adsorption behavior of lysozyme (LSZ) onto magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS) at various pHs and to characterize the LSZ–MAS microparticles obtained from the molecular interaction between LSZ and MAS. The results showed that LSZ could be bound...

  15. Reduced Position Effect in Mature Transgenic Plants Conferred by the Chicken Lysozyme Matrix-Associated Region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlynárová, Ľudmila; Loonen, Annelies; Heldens, Jos; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Keizer, Paul; Stiekema, Willem J.; Nap, Jan-Peter

    1994-01-01

    Matrix-associated regions may be useful for studying the role of chromatin architecture in transgene activity of transformed plants. The chicken lysozyme A element was shown to have specific affinity for tobacco nuclear matrices, and its influence on the variability of transgene expression in

  16. Complex formation in mixtures of lysozyme-stabilized emulsions and human saliva

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silletti, E.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Norde, W.; Aken, van G.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the interaction between human unstimulated saliva and lysozyme-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions (10 wt/wt% oil phase, 10 mM NaCl, pH 6.7), to reveal the driving force for flocculation of these emulsions. Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) showed formation of

  17. Magnetic cation exchange isolation of lysozyme from native hen egg white

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafařík, Ivo; Maděrová, Zdeňka; Tokar, O.; Šafaříková, Miroslava

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 45, - (2007), s. 355-359 ISSN 1330-9862 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1P05OC053 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : magnetic separation * lysozyme * hen egg white Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 0.906, year: 2007

  18. Antimicrobial lysozyme-containing starch microgel to target and inhibit amylase-producing microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Kadam, S.; Abee, T.; Slaghek, T.M.; Timmermans, J.W.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Norde, W.; Kleijn, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the release of lysozyme from oxidized starch microgels and subsequently test its antimicrobial activity. The gels are made of oxidized potato starch polymers, which are chemically cross-linked by sodium trimetaphosphate (STMP). The microgel is negatively charged

  19. Biofilm formation and transcriptome analysis of Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus in response to lysozyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imke Grimm

    Full Text Available Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus is a commensal bacterium of the human gastrointestinal tract, and a pathogen causing infective endocarditis and other biofilm-associated infections via exposed collagen. This study focuses on the characterization of the biofilm formation and collagen adhesion of S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus under different conditions. In this study, it has been observed that the isolate UCN 34 is resistant to 20 mg/ml lysozyme in BHI medium, whereas the strain BAA-2069 builds more biofilm in the presence of lysozyme compared to in a control of BHI without lysozyme. A transcriptome analysis with whole genome microarrays of these two isolates in BHI medium with lysozyme compared to control without lysozyme revealed changes in gene expression levels. In the isolate BAA-2069, 67 genes showed increased expression in the presence of lysozyme, while in the isolate UCN 34, 165 genes showed increased expression and 30 genes showed decreased expression through lysozyme treatment. Products of genes which were higher expressed are in involved in transcription and translation, in cell-wall modification, in hydrogen peroxide resistance and in bacterial immunity. Furthermore, the adhesion ability of different strains of S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus to collagen type I and IV was analyzed. Thereby, we compared the adhesion of 46 human isolates with 23 isolates from animals. It was shown that the adhesion ability depends significantly on whether the isolate was isolated from human or animal. For example, high adhesion ability was observed for strain UCN 34 isolated from an infective endocarditis patient, whereas strain DSM 16831 isolated from koala feces adhered only marginally to collagen. Full genome microarray analysis of these two strains revealed strain-dependent gene expression due to adhesion. The expression of 25 genes of a transposon and 15 genes of a phage region in strain DSM 16831 were increased, which

  20. Evaluating the antimicrobial activity of Nisin, Lysozyme and Ethylenediaminetetraacetate incorporated in starch based active food packaging film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sugandha; Bharti, Anoop

    2015-06-01

    The pleothera of micro organisms obtained from contaminated food cultured in a starch broth was effectively tested against antibacterial agents, i.e. nisin, lysozyme and chelating agent EDTA. A variety of combination treatments of these antimicrobial agents and their incorporation in Starch based active packaging film according to their permissibility standards was done. 4 variables of Nisin concentration (ranging from 0 to 750 IU/ml), 3 variables of lysozyme concentration (ranging from 0 to 500 IU/ml) and 3 variables of EDTA concentration from (0 to 20 μM) were chosen. Bacterial inhibition by combination of different levels of different factors without antimicrobial films was evaluated using a liquid incubation method. The samples were assayed for turbidity at interval of 2, 4 and 24 h to check effectiveness of combined effects of antimicrobial agents which proved a transitory bactericidal effect for short incubation times. Zone of Inhibition was observed in the antimicrobial films prepared by agar diffusion method. Statistical analysis of experimental data for their antimicrobial spectrum was carried out by multi regression analysis and ANOVA using Design-Expert software to plot the final equation in terms of coded factors as antimicrobial agents. The experimental data indicated that the model was highly significant. Results were also evaluated graphically using response surface showing interactions between two factors, keeping other factor fixed at values at the center of domain. Synergy was also determined among antibacterial agents using the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index which was observed to be 0.56 supporting the hypothesis that nisin and EDTA function as partial synergistically. The presented work aimed to screen in quick fashion the combinatorial effect of three antimicrobial agents and evaluating their efficacy in anti microbial film development.

  1. Arginine-aromatic interactions and their effects on arginine-induced solubilization of aromatic solutes and suppression of protein aggregation

    KAUST Repository

    Shah, Dhawal; Li, Jianguo; Shaikh, Abdul Rajjak; Rajagopalan, Raj

    2011-01-01

    We examine the interaction of aromatic residues of proteins with arginine, an additive commonly used to suppress protein aggregation, using experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. An aromatic-rich peptide, FFYTP (a segment of insulin), and lysozyme and insulin are used as model systems. Mass spectrometry shows that arginine increases the solubility of FFYTP by binding to the peptide, with the simulations revealing the predominant association of arginine to be with the aromatic residues. The calculations further show a positive preferential interaction coefficient, Γ XP, contrary to conventional thinking that positive Γ XP's indicate aggregation rather than suppression of aggregation. Simulations with lysozyme and insulin also show arginine's preference for aromatic residues, in addition to acidic residues. We use these observations and earlier results reported by us and others to discuss the possible implications of arginine's interactions with aromatic residues on the solubilization of aromatic moieties and proteins. Our results also highlight the fact that explanations based purely on Γ XP, which measures average affinity of an additive to a protein, could obscure or misinterpret the underlying molecular mechanisms behind additive-induced suppression of protein aggregation. © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  2. Arginine-aromatic interactions and their effects on arginine-induced solubilization of aromatic solutes and suppression of protein aggregation

    KAUST Repository

    Shah, Dhawal

    2011-09-21

    We examine the interaction of aromatic residues of proteins with arginine, an additive commonly used to suppress protein aggregation, using experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. An aromatic-rich peptide, FFYTP (a segment of insulin), and lysozyme and insulin are used as model systems. Mass spectrometry shows that arginine increases the solubility of FFYTP by binding to the peptide, with the simulations revealing the predominant association of arginine to be with the aromatic residues. The calculations further show a positive preferential interaction coefficient, Γ XP, contrary to conventional thinking that positive Γ XP\\'s indicate aggregation rather than suppression of aggregation. Simulations with lysozyme and insulin also show arginine\\'s preference for aromatic residues, in addition to acidic residues. We use these observations and earlier results reported by us and others to discuss the possible implications of arginine\\'s interactions with aromatic residues on the solubilization of aromatic moieties and proteins. Our results also highlight the fact that explanations based purely on Γ XP, which measures average affinity of an additive to a protein, could obscure or misinterpret the underlying molecular mechanisms behind additive-induced suppression of protein aggregation. © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  3. Predicting turns in proteins with a unified model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Song

    Full Text Available MOTIVATION: Turns are a critical element of the structure of a protein; turns play a crucial role in loops, folds, and interactions. Current prediction methods are well developed for the prediction of individual turn types, including α-turn, β-turn, and γ-turn, etc. However, for further protein structure and function prediction it is necessary to develop a uniform model that can accurately predict all types of turns simultaneously. RESULTS: In this study, we present a novel approach, TurnP, which offers the ability to investigate all the turns in a protein based on a unified model. The main characteristics of TurnP are: (i using newly exploited features of structural evolution information (secondary structure and shape string of protein based on structure homologies, (ii considering all types of turns in a unified model, and (iii practical capability of accurate prediction of all turns simultaneously for a query. TurnP utilizes predicted secondary structures and predicted shape strings, both of which have greater accuracy, based on innovative technologies which were both developed by our group. Then, sequence and structural evolution features, which are profile of sequence, profile of secondary structures and profile of shape strings are generated by sequence and structure alignment. When TurnP was validated on a non-redundant dataset (4,107 entries by five-fold cross-validation, we achieved an accuracy of 88.8% and a sensitivity of 71.8%, which exceeded the most state-of-the-art predictors of certain type of turn. Newly determined sequences, the EVA and CASP9 datasets were used as independent tests and the results we achieved were outstanding for turn predictions and confirmed the good performance of TurnP for practical applications.

  4. Covalent immobilization of lysozyme onto woven and knitted crimped polyethylene terephthalate grafts to minimize the adhesion of broad spectrum pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Meslmani, Bassam M.; Mahmoud, Gihan F.; Leichtweiß, Thomas; Strehlow, Boris; Sommer, Frank O.; Lohoff, Michael D.; Bakowsky, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Graft-associated infections entirely determine the short-term patency of polyethylene terephthalate PET cardiovascular graft. We attempted to enzymatically inhibit the initial bacterial adhesion to PET grafts using lysozyme. Lysozyme was covalently immobilized onto woven and knitted forms of crimped PET grafts by the end-point method. Our figures of merit revealed lysozyme immobilization yield of 15.7 μg/cm"2, as determined by the Bradford assay. The activity of immobilized lysozyme on woven and knitted PET manifested 58.4% and 55.87% using Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells, respectively. Noteworthy, the adhesion of vein catheter-isolated Staphylococcus epidermidis decreased by 6- to 8-folds and of Staphylococcus aureus by 11- to 12-folds, while the Gram-negative Escherichia coli showed only a decrease by 3- to 4-folds. The anti-adhesion efficiency was specific for bacterial cells and no significant effect was observed on adhesion and growth of L929 cells. In conclusion, immobilization of lysozyme onto PET grafts can inhibit the graft-associated infection. - Highlights: • Lysozyme was covalently immobilized on crimped polyethylene terephthalate (PET). • The activity of immobilized lysozyme was meaningfully reduced. • The maintained activity significantly declined the adhesion of Gram-positive stains. • The enzymatic anti-adhesion efficiency reported lesser extent against Gram-negative. • The anti-bacterial activity displayed no significant effect on cells compatibility.

  5. Covalent immobilization of lysozyme onto woven and knitted crimped polyethylene terephthalate grafts to minimize the adhesion of broad spectrum pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Meslmani, Bassam M., E-mail: almeslmanib@yahoo.com [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, Marburg University, Ketzerbach 63, 35037 Marburg (Germany); Mahmoud, Gihan F., E-mail: mahmoudg@staff.uni-marburg.de [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, Marburg University, Ketzerbach 63, 35037 Marburg (Germany); Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Helwan University, Ain Helwan, 11795 Cairo (Egypt); Leichtweiß, Thomas, E-mail: Thomas.Leichtweiss@phys.Chemie.uni-giessen.de [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 58, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Strehlow, Boris, E-mail: strehlo4@staff.uni-marburg.de [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, Marburg University, Ketzerbach 63, 35037 Marburg (Germany); Sommer, Frank O., E-mail: sommerf@med.uni-marburg.de [Institute for Medical Microbiology and Hospital Hygiene, Marburg University, Hans Meerwein Str 2, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Lohoff, Michael D., E-mail: lohoff@med.uni-marburg.de [Institute for Medical Microbiology and Hospital Hygiene, Marburg University, Hans Meerwein Str 2, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Bakowsky, Udo, E-mail: ubakowsky@aol.com [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, Marburg University, Ketzerbach 63, 35037 Marburg (Germany)

    2016-01-01

    Graft-associated infections entirely determine the short-term patency of polyethylene terephthalate PET cardiovascular graft. We attempted to enzymatically inhibit the initial bacterial adhesion to PET grafts using lysozyme. Lysozyme was covalently immobilized onto woven and knitted forms of crimped PET grafts by the end-point method. Our figures of merit revealed lysozyme immobilization yield of 15.7 μg/cm{sup 2}, as determined by the Bradford assay. The activity of immobilized lysozyme on woven and knitted PET manifested 58.4% and 55.87% using Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells, respectively. Noteworthy, the adhesion of vein catheter-isolated Staphylococcus epidermidis decreased by 6- to 8-folds and of Staphylococcus aureus by 11- to 12-folds, while the Gram-negative Escherichia coli showed only a decrease by 3- to 4-folds. The anti-adhesion efficiency was specific for bacterial cells and no significant effect was observed on adhesion and growth of L929 cells. In conclusion, immobilization of lysozyme onto PET grafts can inhibit the graft-associated infection. - Highlights: • Lysozyme was covalently immobilized on crimped polyethylene terephthalate (PET). • The activity of immobilized lysozyme was meaningfully reduced. • The maintained activity significantly declined the adhesion of Gram-positive stains. • The enzymatic anti-adhesion efficiency reported lesser extent against Gram-negative. • The anti-bacterial activity displayed no significant effect on cells compatibility.

  6. Building alternate protein structures using the elastic network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingyi; Sharp, Kim A

    2009-02-15

    We describe a method for efficiently generating ensembles of alternate, all-atom protein structures that (a) differ significantly from the starting structure, (b) have good stereochemistry (bonded geometry), and (c) have good steric properties (absence of atomic overlap). The method uses reconstruction from a series of backbone framework structures that are obtained from a modified elastic network model (ENM) by perturbation along low-frequency normal modes. To ensure good quality backbone frameworks, the single force parameter ENM is modified by introducing two more force parameters to characterize the interaction between the consecutive carbon alphas and those within the same secondary structure domain. The relative stiffness of the three parameters is parameterized to reproduce B-factors, while maintaining good bonded geometry. After parameterization, violations of experimental Calpha-Calpha distances and Calpha-Calpha-Calpha pseudo angles along the backbone are reduced to less than 1%. Simultaneously, the average B-factor correlation coefficient improves to R = 0.77. Two applications illustrate the potential of the approach. (1) 102,051 protein backbones spanning a conformational space of 15 A root mean square deviation were generated from 148 nonredundant proteins in the PDB database, and all-atom models with minimal bonded and nonbonded violations were produced from this ensemble of backbone structures using the SCWRL side chain building program. (2) Improved backbone templates for homology modeling. Fifteen query sequences were each modeled on two targets. For each of the 30 target frameworks, dozens of improved templates could be produced In all cases, improved full atom homology models resulted, of which 50% could be identified blind using the D-Fire statistical potential. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Modeling of human factor Va inactivation by activated protein C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bravo Maria

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because understanding of the inventory, connectivity and dynamics of the components characterizing the process of coagulation is relatively mature, it has become an attractive target for physiochemical modeling. Such models can potentially improve the design of therapeutics. The prothrombinase complex (composed of the protease factor (FXa and its cofactor FVa plays a central role in this network as the main producer of thrombin, which catalyses both the activation of platelets and the conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin, the main substances of a clot. A key negative feedback loop that prevents clot propagation beyond the site of injury is the thrombin-dependent generation of activated protein C (APC, an enzyme that inactivates FVa, thus neutralizing the prothrombinase complex. APC inactivation of FVa is complex, involving the production of partially active intermediates and “protection” of FVa from APC by both FXa and prothrombin. An empirically validated mathematical model of this process would be useful in advancing the predictive capacity of comprehensive models of coagulation. Results A model of human APC inactivation of prothrombinase was constructed in a stepwise fashion by analyzing time courses of FVa inactivation in empirical reaction systems with increasing number of interacting components and generating corresponding model constructs of each reaction system. Reaction mechanisms, rate constants and equilibrium constants informing these model constructs were initially derived from various research groups reporting on APC inactivation of FVa in isolation, or in the presence of FXa or prothrombin. Model predictions were assessed against empirical data measuring the appearance and disappearance of multiple FVa degradation intermediates as well as prothrombinase activity changes, with plasma proteins derived from multiple preparations. Our work integrates previously published findings and through the cooperative

  8. The Natural Antimicrobial Enzyme Lysozyme is Up-Regulated in Gastrointestinal Inflammatory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Rubio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cells that line the mucosa of the human gastrointestinal tract (GI, that is, oral cavity, oesophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and rectum are constantly challenged by adverse micro-environmental factors, such as different pH, enzymes, and bacterial flora. With exception of the oral cavity, these microenvironments also contain remnant cocktails of secreted enzymes and bacteria from upper organs along the tract. The density of the GI bacteria varies, from 103/mL near the gastric outlet, to 1010/mL at the ileocecal valve, to 1011 to 1012/mL in the colon. The total microbial population (ca. 1014 exceeds the total number of cells in the tract. It is, therefore, remarkable that despite the prima facie inauspicious mixture of harmful secretions and bacteria, the normal GI mucosa retains a healthy state of cell renewal. To counteract the hostile microenvironment, the GI epithelia react by speeding cell exfoliation (the GI mucosa has a turnover time of two to three days, by increasing peristalsis, by eliminating bacteria through secretion of plasma cell-immunoglobulins and by increasing production of natural antibacterial compounds, such as defensin-5 and lysozyme. Only recently, lysozyme was found up-regulated in Barrett’s oesophagitis, chronic gastritis, gluten-induced atrophic duodenitis (coeliac disease, collagenous colitis, lymphocytic colitis, and Crohn’s colitis. This up-regulation is a response directed to the special types of bacteria recently detected in these diseases. The aim of lysozyme up-regulation is to protect individual mucosal segments to chronic inflammation. The molecular mechanisms connected to the crosstalk between the intraluminal bacterial flora and the production of lysozyme released by the GI mucosae, are discussed. Bacterial resistance continues to exhaust our supply of commercial antibiotics. The potential use of lysozyme to treat infectious diseases is receiving much attention.

  9. Protein-protein interaction networks identify targets which rescue the MPP+ cellular model of Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Harriet; Ryan, Brent J.; Jackson, Brendan; Whitmore, Alan; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are complex multifactorial disorders characterised by the interplay of many dysregulated physiological processes. As an exemplar, Parkinson’s disease (PD) involves multiple perturbed cellular functions, including mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation in preferentially-sensitive dopamine neurons, a selective pathophysiology recapitulated in vitro using the neurotoxin MPP+. Here we explore a network science approach for the selection of therapeutic protein targets in the cellular MPP+ model. We hypothesised that analysis of protein-protein interaction networks modelling MPP+ toxicity could identify proteins critical for mediating MPP+ toxicity. Analysis of protein-protein interaction networks constructed to model the interplay of mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation (key aspects of MPP+ toxicity) enabled us to identify four proteins predicted to be key for MPP+ toxicity (P62, GABARAP, GBRL1 and GBRL2). Combined, but not individual, knockdown of these proteins increased cellular susceptibility to MPP+ toxicity. Conversely, combined, but not individual, over-expression of the network targets provided rescue of MPP+ toxicity associated with the formation of autophagosome-like structures. We also found that modulation of two distinct proteins in the protein-protein interaction network was necessary and sufficient to mitigate neurotoxicity. Together, these findings validate our network science approach to multi-target identification in complex neurological diseases.

  10. Trade-off between positive and negative design of protein stability: from lattice models to real proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orly Noivirt-Brik

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Two different strategies for stabilizing proteins are (i positive design in which the native state is stabilized and (ii negative design in which competing non-native conformations are destabilized. Here, the circumstances under which one strategy might be favored over the other are explored in the case of lattice models of proteins and then generalized and discussed with regard to real proteins. The balance between positive and negative design of proteins is found to be determined by their average "contact-frequency", a property that corresponds to the fraction of states in the conformational ensemble of the sequence in which a pair of residues is in contact. Lattice model proteins with a high average contact-frequency are found to use negative design more than model proteins with a low average contact-frequency. A mathematical derivation of this result indicates that it is general and likely to hold also for real proteins. Comparison of the results of correlated mutation analysis for real proteins with typical contact-frequencies to those of proteins likely to have high contact-frequencies (such as disordered proteins and proteins that are dependent on chaperonins for their folding indicates that the latter tend to have stronger interactions between residues that are not in contact in their native conformation. Hence, our work indicates that negative design is employed when insufficient stabilization is achieved via positive design owing to high contact-frequencies.

  11. Multiscale modeling and simulation of microtubule-motor-protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong; Blackwell, Robert; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, M. D.; Shelley, Michael J.

    2015-12-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins self-organize into biologically important assemblies including the mitotic spindle and the centrosomal microtubule array. Outside of cells, microtubule-motor mixtures can form novel active liquid-crystalline materials driven out of equilibrium by adenosine triphosphate-consuming motor proteins. Microscopic motor activity causes polarity-dependent interactions between motor proteins and microtubules, but how these interactions yield larger-scale dynamical behavior such as complex flows and defect dynamics is not well understood. We develop a multiscale theory for microtubule-motor systems in which Brownian dynamics simulations of polar microtubules driven by motors are used to study microscopic organization and stresses created by motor-mediated microtubule interactions. We identify polarity-sorting and crosslink tether relaxation as two polar-specific sources of active destabilizing stress. We then develop a continuum Doi-Onsager model that captures polarity sorting and the hydrodynamic flows generated by these polar-specific active stresses. In simulations of active nematic flows on immersed surfaces, the active stresses drive turbulent flow dynamics and continuous generation and annihilation of disclination defects. The dynamics follow from two instabilities, and accounting for the immersed nature of the experiment yields unambiguous characteristic length and time scales. When turning off the hydrodynamics in the Doi-Onsager model, we capture formation of polar lanes as observed in the Brownian dynamics simulation.

  12. Modeling of allergen proteins found in sea food products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataly Galán-Freyle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Shellfish are a source of food allergens, and their consumption is the cause of severe allergic reactions in humans. Tropomyosins, a family of muscle proteins, have been identified as the major allergens in shellfish and mollusks species. Nevertheless, few experimentally determined three-dimensional structures are available in the Protein Data Base (PDB. In this study, 3D models of several homologous of tropomyosins present in marine shellfish and mollusk species (Chaf 1, Met e1, Hom a1, Per v1, and Pen a1 were constructed, validated, and their immunoglobulin E binding epitopes were identified using bioinformatics tools. All protein models for these allergens consisted of long alpha-helices. Chaf 1, Met e1, and Hom a1 had six conserved regions with sequence similarities to known epitopes, whereas Per v1 and Pen a1 contained only one. Lipophilic potentials of identified epitopes revealed a high propensity of hydrophobic amino acids in the immunoglobulin E binding site. This information could be useful to design tropomyosin-specific immunotherapy for sea food allergies.

  13. Multiscale modeling and simulation of microtubule–motor-protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong; Blackwell, Robert; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, M. D.; Shelley, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins self-organize into biologically important assemblies including the mitotic spindle and the centrosomal microtubule array. Outside of cells, microtubule-motor mixtures can form novel active liquid-crystalline materials driven out of equilibrium by adenosine triphosphate–consuming motor proteins. Microscopic motor activity causes polarity-dependent interactions between motor proteins and microtubules, but how these interactions yield larger-scale dynamical behavior such as complex flows and defect dynamics is not well understood. We develop a multiscale theory for microtubule-motor systems in which Brownian dynamics simulations of polar microtubules driven by motors are used to study microscopic organization and stresses created by motor-mediated microtubule interactions. We identify polarity-sorting and crosslink tether relaxation as two polar-specific sources of active destabilizing stress. We then develop a continuum Doi-Onsager model that captures polarity sorting and the hydrodynamic flows generated by these polar-specific active stresses. In simulations of active nematic flows on immersed surfaces, the active stresses drive turbulent flow dynamics and continuous generation and annihilation of disclination defects. The dynamics follow from two instabilities, and accounting for the immersed nature of the experiment yields unambiguous characteristic length and time scales. When turning off the hydrodynamics in the Doi-Onsager model, we capture formation of polar lanes as observed in the Brownian dynamics simulation. PMID:26764729

  14. Multiscale modeling and simulation of microtubule-motor-protein assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong; Blackwell, Robert; Glaser, Matthew A; Betterton, M D; Shelley, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins self-organize into biologically important assemblies including the mitotic spindle and the centrosomal microtubule array. Outside of cells, microtubule-motor mixtures can form novel active liquid-crystalline materials driven out of equilibrium by adenosine triphosphate-consuming motor proteins. Microscopic motor activity causes polarity-dependent interactions between motor proteins and microtubules, but how these interactions yield larger-scale dynamical behavior such as complex flows and defect dynamics is not well understood. We develop a multiscale theory for microtubule-motor systems in which Brownian dynamics simulations of polar microtubules driven by motors are used to study microscopic organization and stresses created by motor-mediated microtubule interactions. We identify polarity-sorting and crosslink tether relaxation as two polar-specific sources of active destabilizing stress. We then develop a continuum Doi-Onsager model that captures polarity sorting and the hydrodynamic flows generated by these polar-specific active stresses. In simulations of active nematic flows on immersed surfaces, the active stresses drive turbulent flow dynamics and continuous generation and annihilation of disclination defects. The dynamics follow from two instabilities, and accounting for the immersed nature of the experiment yields unambiguous characteristic length and time scales. When turning off the hydrodynamics in the Doi-Onsager model, we capture formation of polar lanes as observed in the Brownian dynamics simulation.

  15. A feature-based approach to modeling protein-protein interaction hot spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyu-il; Kim, Dongsup; Lee, Doheon

    2009-05-01

    Identifying features that effectively represent the energetic contribution of an individual interface residue to the interactions between proteins remains problematic. Here, we present several new features and show that they are more effective than conventional features. By combining the proposed features with conventional features, we develop a predictive model for interaction hot spots. Initially, 54 multifaceted features, composed of different levels of information including structure, sequence and molecular interaction information, are quantified. Then, to identify the best subset of features for predicting hot spots, feature selection is performed using a decision tree. Based on the selected features, a predictive model for hot spots is created using support vector machine (SVM) and tested on an independent test set. Our model shows better overall predictive accuracy than previous methods such as the alanine scanning methods Robetta and FOLDEF, and the knowledge-based method KFC. Subsequent analysis yields several findings about hot spots. As expected, hot spots have a larger relative surface area burial and are more hydrophobic than other residues. Unexpectedly, however, residue conservation displays a rather complicated tendency depending on the types of protein complexes, indicating that this feature is not good for identifying hot spots. Of the selected features, the weighted atomic packing density, relative surface area burial and weighted hydrophobicity are the top 3, with the weighted atomic packing density proving to be the most effective feature for predicting hot spots. Notably, we find that hot spots are closely related to pi-related interactions, especially pi . . . pi interactions.

  16. Analysis and Ranking of Protein-Protein Docking Models Using Inter-Residue Contacts and Inter-Molecular Contact Maps

    KAUST Repository

    Oliva, Romina; Chermak, Edrisse; Cavallo, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    In view of the increasing interest both in inhibitors of protein-protein interactions and in protein drugs themselves, analysis of the three-dimensional structure of protein-protein complexes is assuming greater relevance in drug design. In the many cases where an experimental structure is not available, protein-protein docking becomes the method of choice for predicting the arrangement of the complex. However, reliably scoring protein-protein docking poses is still an unsolved problem. As a consequence, the screening of many docking models is usually required in the analysis step, to possibly single out the correct ones. Here, making use of exemplary cases, we review our recently introduced methods for the analysis of protein complex structures and for the scoring of protein docking poses, based on the use of inter-residue contacts and their visualization in inter-molecular contact maps. We also show that the ensemble of tools we developed can be used in the context of rational drug design targeting protein-protein interactions.

  17. Analysis and Ranking of Protein-Protein Docking Models Using Inter-Residue Contacts and Inter-Molecular Contact Maps

    KAUST Repository

    Oliva, Romina

    2015-07-01

    In view of the increasing interest both in inhibitors of protein-protein interactions and in protein drugs themselves, analysis of the three-dimensional structure of protein-protein complexes is assuming greater relevance in drug design. In the many cases where an experimental structure is not available, protein-protein docking becomes the method of choice for predicting the arrangement of the complex. However, reliably scoring protein-protein docking poses is still an unsolved problem. As a consequence, the screening of many docking models is usually required in the analysis step, to possibly single out the correct ones. Here, making use of exemplary cases, we review our recently introduced methods for the analysis of protein complex structures and for the scoring of protein docking poses, based on the use of inter-residue contacts and their visualization in inter-molecular contact maps. We also show that the ensemble of tools we developed can be used in the context of rational drug design targeting protein-protein interactions.

  18. Simulation studies of protein-induced bilayer deformations, and lipid-induced protein tilting, on a mesoscopic model for lipid bilayers with embedded proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venturoli, M.; Smit, B.; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena

    2005-01-01

    membranes. Here we present a mesoscopic model for lipid bilayers with embedded proteins, which we have studied with the help of the dissipative particle dynamics simulation technique. Because hydrophobic matching is believed to be one of the main physical mechanisms regulating lipid-protein interactions......-induced protein tilt, with the hydrophobic mismatch ( positive and negative) between the protein hydrophobic length and the pure lipid bilayer hydrophobic thickness. The protein-induced bilayer perturbation was quantified in terms of a coherence length, xi(P), of the lipid bilayer hydrophobic thickness pro. le...... for positive values of mismatch; a dependence on the protein size appears as well. In the case of large model proteins experiencing extreme mismatch conditions, in the region next to the so-called lipid annulus, there appears an undershooting ( or overshooting) region where the bilayer hydrophobic thickness...

  19. Microwave-assisted acid and base hydrolysis of intact proteins containing disulfide bonds for protein sequence analysis by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiz, Bela; Li, Liang

    2010-09-01

    Controlled hydrolysis of proteins to generate peptide ladders combined with mass spectrometric analysis of the resultant peptides can be used for protein sequencing. In this paper, two methods of improving the microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis process are described to enable rapid sequencing of proteins containing disulfide bonds and increase sequence coverage, respectively. It was demonstrated that proteins containing disulfide bonds could be sequenced by MS analysis by first performing hydrolysis for less than 2 min, followed by 1 h of reduction to release the peptides originally linked by disulfide bonds. It was shown that a strong base could be used as a catalyst for microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis, producing complementary sequence information to that generated by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. However, using either acid or base hydrolysis, amide bond breakages in small regions of the polypeptide chains of the model proteins (e.g., cytochrome c and lysozyme) were not detected. Dynamic light scattering measurement of the proteins solubilized in an acid or base indicated that protein-protein interaction or aggregation was not the cause of the failure to hydrolyze certain amide bonds. It was speculated that there were some unknown local structures that might play a role in preventing an acid or base from reacting with the peptide bonds therein. 2010 American Society for Mass Spectrometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A study of quality measures for protein threading models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rychlewski Leszek

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of protein structures is one of the fundamental challenges in biology today. To fully understand how well different prediction methods perform, it is necessary to use measures that evaluate their performance. Every two years, starting in 1994, the CASP (Critical Assessment of protein Structure Prediction process has been organized to evaluate the ability of different predictors to blindly predict the structure of proteins. To capture different features of the models, several measures have been developed during the CASP processes. However, these measures have not been examined in detail before. In an attempt to develop fully automatic measures that can be used in CASP, as well as in other type of benchmarking experiments, we have compared twenty-one measures. These measures include the measures used in CASP3 and CASP2 as well as have measures introduced later. We have studied their ability to distinguish between the better and worse models submitted to CASP3 and the correlation between them. Results Using a small set of 1340 models for 23 different targets we show that most methods correlate with each other. Most pairs of measures show a correlation coefficient of about 0.5. The correlation is slightly higher for measures of similar types. We found that a significant problem when developing automatic measures is how to deal with proteins of different length. Also the comparisons between different measures is complicated as many measures are dependent on the size of the target. We show that the manual assessment can be reproduced to about 70% using automatic measures. Alignment independent measures, detects slightly more of the models with the correct fold, while alignment dependent measures agree better when selecting the best models for each target. Finally we show that using automatic measures would, to a large extent, reproduce the assessors ranking of the predictors at CASP3. Conclusions We show that given a

  1. Scoring predictive models using a reduced representation of proteins: model and energy definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogolari, Federico; Pieri, Lidia; Dovier, Agostino; Bortolussi, Luca; Giugliarelli, Gilberto; Corazza, Alessandra; Esposito, Gennaro; Viglino, Paolo

    2007-03-23

    Reduced representations of proteins have been playing a keyrole in the study of protein folding. Many such models are available, with different representation detail. Although the usefulness of many such models for structural bioinformatics applications has been demonstrated in recent years, there are few intermediate resolution models endowed with an energy model capable, for instance, of detecting native or native-like structures among decoy sets. The aim of the present work is to provide a discrete empirical potential for a reduced protein model termed here PC2CA, because it employs a PseudoCovalent structure with only 2 Centers of interactions per Amino acid, suitable for protein model quality assessment. All protein structures in the set top500H have been converted in reduced form. The distribution of pseudobonds, pseudoangle, pseudodihedrals and distances between centers of interactions have been converted into potentials of mean force. A suitable reference distribution has been defined for non-bonded interactions which takes into account excluded volume effects and protein finite size. The correlation between adjacent main chain pseudodihedrals has been converted in an additional energetic term which is able to account for cooperative effects in secondary structure elements. Local energy surface exploration is performed in order to increase the robustness of the energy function. The model and the energy definition proposed have been tested on all the multiple decoys' sets in the Decoys'R'us database. The energetic model is able to recognize, for almost all sets, native-like structures (RMSD less than 2.0 A). These results and those obtained in the blind CASP7 quality assessment experiment suggest that the model compares well with scoring potentials with finer granularity and could be useful for fast exploration of conformational space. Parameters are available at the url: http://www.dstb.uniud.it/~ffogolari/download/.

  2. The state of immunological reactivity and nonspecific protection factor (lysozyme in children with reactive arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Savvo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. An improvement of diagnostics and prognostication of ReA clinical course in children on the base of studying the immunological reactivity and non-specific protection factor (lysozyme.Materials and methods. Examination of children took place in the municipal children’s cardiorheumatologic department of MHPI “Kharkov municipal children’s clinical hospital № 24" and municipal children’s polyclinic of the Kharkov city (№ 1, 2, 7, 12, 13, 14, 23.40 children with ReA underwent immunological examinations, detection of sIgA in the saliva and lysozyme in the blood serum in acute period and in 9–12 months after the beginning of disease. 19 children (47,5 % – 2–6 years old, 21 children (52,5 %. – 7–14 years old. Boys – 22 (55,0 %, girls – 18 (45,0 %. The mean age of children in group was 7,2±0,32. The control group included 32 healthy children. The mean age of children in group was 7,4±0,54.The ReA diagnosis was set according to the order of Ukrainian MHP of 19.07.2005 № 362 “Protocol of diagnostics and treatment of disease of musculoskeletal system and connective tissue in children ICD-D М00-М25 arthropathies”.Immunological examinations included the study of indices of cellular, humoral, monocytic-phagocytic links of immunity, content of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, detection of sIgA and index of nonspecific protection factor (lysozyme.Assessment of results of researches was carried out using STATISTICА program for Windows (version 10.0, Microsoft Excel 2012, MATLAB 2015a.Results. In the ReA acute period in children was observed depression of T-system on the background of activation of immunity B-system as the reliable decrease of СD8, СD25 and increase of СD21. There was revealed an increase of IL-6, increase of phagocytic number, spontaneous NBT-test and spontaneous neutrophils activity index.The sIgA level reliably exceeded the standard. At determination of lysozyme the blood serum of patients with ReA in acute

  3. Computer simulations and theoretical aspects of the depletion interaction in protein-oligomer mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncina, M; Rescic, J; Kalyuzhnyi, Yu V; Vlachy, V

    2007-07-21

    The depletion interaction between proteins caused by addition of either uncharged or partially charged oligomers was studied using the canonical Monte Carlo simulation technique and the integral equation theory. A protein molecule was modeled in two different ways: either as (i) a hard sphere of diameter 30.0 A with net charge 0, or +5, or (ii) as a hard sphere with discrete charges (depending on the pH of solution) of diameter 45.4 A. The oligomers were pictured as tangentially jointed, uncharged, or partially charged, hard spheres. The ions of a simple electrolyte present in solution were represented by charged hard spheres distributed in the dielectric continuum. In this study we were particularly interested in changes of the protein-protein pair-distribution function, caused by addition of the oligomer component. In agreement with previous studies we found that addition of a nonadsorbing oligomer reduces the phase stability of solution, which is reflected in the shape of the protein-protein pair-distribution function. The value of this function in protein-protein contact increases with increasing oligomer concentration, and is larger for charged oligomers. The range of the depletion interaction and its strength also depend on the length (number of monomer units) of the oligomer chain. The integral equation theory, based on the Wertheim Ornstein-Zernike approach applied in this study, was found to be in fair agreement with Monte Carlo results only for very short oligomers. The computer simulations for a model mimicking the lysozyme molecule (ii) are in qualitative agreement with small-angle neutron experiments for lysozyme-dextran mixtures.

  4. Using the Relevance Vector Machine Model Combined with Local Phase Quantization to Predict Protein-Protein Interactions from Protein Sequences

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    Ji-Yong An

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel computational method known as RVM-LPQ that combines the Relevance Vector Machine (RVM model and Local Phase Quantization (LPQ to predict PPIs from protein sequences. The main improvements are the results of representing protein sequences using the LPQ feature representation on a Position Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM, reducing the influence of noise using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA, and using a Relevance Vector Machine (RVM based classifier. We perform 5-fold cross-validation experiments on Yeast and Human datasets, and we achieve very high accuracies of 92.65% and 97.62%, respectively, which is significantly better than previous works. To further evaluate the proposed method, we compare it with the state-of-the-art support vector machine (SVM classifier on the Yeast dataset. The experimental results demonstrate that our RVM-LPQ method is obviously better than the SVM-based method. The promising experimental results show the efficiency and simplicity of the proposed method, which can be an automatic decision support tool for future proteomics research.

  5. Mass Spectrometry Coupled Experiments and Protein Structure Modeling Methods

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    Lee Sael

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available With the accumulation of next generation sequencing data, there is increasing interest in the study of intra-species difference in molecular biology, especially in relation to disease analysis. Furthermore, the dynamics of the protein is being identified as a critical factor in its function. Although accuracy of protein structure prediction methods is high, provided there are structural templates, most methods are still insensitive to amino-acid differences at critical points that may change the overall structure. Also, predicted structures are inherently static and do not provide information about structural change over time. It is challenging to address the sensitivity and the dynamics by computational structure predictions alone. However, with the fast development of diverse mass spectrometry coupled experiments, low-resolution but fast and sensitive structural information can be obtained. This information can then be integrated into the structure prediction process to further improve the sensitivity and address the dynamics of the protein structures. For this purpose, this article focuses on reviewing two aspects: the types of mass spectrometry coupled experiments and structural data that are obtainable through those experiments; and the structure prediction methods that can utilize these data as constraints. Also, short review of current efforts in integrating experimental data in the structural modeling is provided.

  6. The Feasibility of Bulk Crystallization as an Industrial Purification and Production Technique for Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Russell A.; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Johns, Michael R.; Pusey, Marc L.; White, Edward T.

    1998-01-01

    Bulk crystallization in stirred vessels is used industrially for the recovery and purification of many inorganic and organic materials. Although much has been written on the crystallization of proteins for X-ray diffraction analysis, very little has been reported on the application of bulk crystallization in stirred vessels. In this study, a 1-liter, seeded, stirred, batch crystallizer was used with ovalbumin as a model protein to test the feasibility of this crystallization method as a recovery and purification process for proteins. Results were obtained for ovalbumin solubility, nucleation thresholds, crystal breakage and crystal growth kinetics in bulk solution under a range of operating conditions of pH and ammonium sulphate concentration (Judge et al., 1996). Experiments were also performed to determine the degree of purification that can be achieved by the crystallization of ovalbumin from a mixture of proteins. The effect of the presence of these proteins upon the ovalbumin crystal growth kinetics was also investigated (Judge et al., 1995). All of these aspects are essential for the design of bulk crystallization processes which have not previously been reported for proteins. Results from a second study that investigated the effect of structurally different proteins on the solubility, crystal growth rates and crystal purity of chicken egg white lysozyme are also presented (Judge et al., 1997). In this case face growth rates were measured using lysozyme purified by liquid chromatography and the effect of the addition of specific protein impurities were observed on the (110) and (101) crystal faces. In these two studies the results are presented to show the feasibility and purifying ability of crystallization as a production process for proteins.

  7. Elevated pressure improves the extraction and identification of proteins recovered from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue surrogates.

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    Carol B Fowler

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Proteomic studies of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues are frustrated by the inability to extract proteins from archival tissue in a form suitable for analysis by 2-D gel electrophoresis or mass spectrometry. This inability arises from the difficulty of reversing formaldehyde-induced protein adducts and cross-links within FFPE tissues. We previously reported the use of elevated hydrostatic pressure as a method for efficient protein recovery from a hen egg-white lysozyme tissue surrogate, a model system developed to study formalin fixation and histochemical processing.In this study, we demonstrate the utility of elevated hydrostatic pressure as a method for efficient protein recovery from FFPE mouse liver tissue and a complex multi-protein FFPE tissue surrogate comprised of hen egg-white lysozyme, bovine carbonic anhydrase, bovine ribonuclease A, bovine serum albumin, and equine myoglobin (55∶15∶15∶10∶5 wt%. Mass spectrometry of the FFPE tissue surrogates retrieved under elevated pressure showed that both the low and high-abundance proteins were identified with sequence coverage comparable to that of the surrogate mixture prior to formaldehyde treatment. In contrast, non-pressure-extracted tissue surrogate samples yielded few positive and many false peptide identifications. Studies with soluble formalin-treated bovine ribonuclease A demonstrated that pressure modestly inhibited the rate of reversal (hydrolysis of formaldehyde-induced protein cross-links. Dynamic light scattering studies suggest that elevated hydrostatic pressure and heat facilitate the recovery of proteins free of formaldehyde adducts and cross-links by promoting protein unfolding and hydration with a concomitant reduction in the average size of the protein aggregates.These studies demonstrate that elevated hydrostatic pressure treatment is a promising approach for improving the recovery of proteins from FFPE tissues in a form suitable for proteomic analysis.

  8. Elevated Pressure Improves the Extraction and Identification of Proteins Recovered from Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Surrogates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Carol B.; Chesnick, Ingrid E.; Moore, Cedric D.; O'Leary, Timothy J.; Mason, Jeffrey T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Proteomic studies of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues are frustrated by the inability to extract proteins from archival tissue in a form suitable for analysis by 2-D gel electrophoresis or mass spectrometry. This inability arises from the difficulty of reversing formaldehyde-induced protein adducts and cross-links within FFPE tissues. We previously reported the use of elevated hydrostatic pressure as a method for efficient protein recovery from a hen egg-white lysozyme tissue surrogate, a model system developed to study formalin fixation and histochemical processing. Principal Findings In this study, we demonstrate the utility of elevated hydrostatic pressure as a method for efficient protein recovery from FFPE mouse liver tissue and a complex multi-protein FFPE tissue surrogate comprised of hen egg-white lysozyme, bovine carbonic anhydrase, bovine ribonuclease A, bovine serum albumin, and equine myoglobin (55∶15∶15∶10∶5 wt%). Mass spectrometry of the FFPE tissue surrogates retrieved under elevated pressure showed that both the low and high-abundance proteins were identified with sequence coverage comparable to that of the surrogate mixture prior to formaldehyde treatment. In contrast, non-pressure-extracted tissue surrogate samples yielded few positive and many false peptide identifications. Studies with soluble formalin-treated bovine ribonuclease A demonstrated that pressure modestly inhibited the rate of reversal (hydrolysis) of formaldehyde-induced protein cross-links. Dynamic light scattering studies suggest that elevated hydrostatic pressure and heat facilitate the recovery of proteins free of formaldehyde adducts and cross-links by promoting protein unfolding and hydration with a concomitant reduction in the average size of the protein aggregates. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that elevated hydrostatic pressure treatment is a promising approach for improving the recovery of proteins from FFPE tissues in a form

  9. Interaction of the chaperone calreticulin with proteins and peptides of different structural classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, K; Sandhu, N; Jørgensen, C S

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of calreticulin with native and denatured forms and polypeptides in proteolytic digests of proteins representing structural classes of all-alpha-helix (hemoglobin, serum albumin), all-beta-sheet (IgG) and alpha-helix + beta-sheets (lysozyme, ovalbumin) was investigated. The binding...... of calreticulin to denatured proteins was found to depend on conformation and structural class of the protein. No interaction was observed with the native proteins, whereas binding was seen for the denatured proteins, the order of interaction being lysozyme = IgG > ovalbumin >> hemoglobin = serum albumin....... Moreover, the interaction between calreticulin and the heat-denatured proteins depended on the temperature and time used for denaturation and the degree of proteolytic fragmentation. Calreticulin bound well to peptides in proteolytic digests from protease K or chymotrypsin treatment of lysozyme, Ig...

  10. [The estimation of systemic chemotherapy treatment administered in breast cancer on lysozyme activity in tears--preliminary report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowska, Katarzyna; Jurowski, Piotr; Wieckowska-Szakiel, Marzena; Rózalska, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Estimation of cytostatics influence used in breast cancer treatment on lysozyme activity in human tears depend on time of treatment. 8 women were treated at the base of chemotherapy schema: docetaxel with doxorubicin and 4 women treated with schema CMF: cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil. Lysozyme activity in tears was assessed by measurement of diameter zone of Micrococcus lysodeicticus growth inhibition. It was revealed that both chemotherapy schema caused statistically significant reduction of diameter zone of M. lysodeicticus growth inhibition, after first and second course of chemotherapy treatment. After second chemotherapy course CMF schema induced loss of lysozyme activity in patient's tears (zero mm of M. lysodeicticus diameter zone growth inhibition). Systemic chemotherapy administered in breast cancer induce reduction of lysozyme activity in tears, that may cause higher morbidity of ocular surface infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria.

  11. Cloning the human lysozyme cDNA: Inverted Alu repeat in the mRNA and in situ hybridization for macrophages and Paneth cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, L.P.; Keshav, S.; Gordon, S.

    1988-01-01

    Lysozyme is a major secretory product of human and rodent macrophages and a useful marker for myelomonocytic cells. Based on the known human lysozyme amino acid sequence, oligonucleotides were synthesized and used as probes to screen a phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-treated U937 cDNA library. A full-length human lysozyme cDNA clone, pHL-2, was obtained and characterized. Sequence analysis shows that human lysozyme, like chicken lysozyme, has in 18-amino-acid-long signal peptide, but unlike the chicken lysozyme cDNA, the human lysozyme cDNA has a >1-kilobase-long 3' nontranslated sequence. Interestingly, within this 3' region, an inverted repeat of the Alu family of repetitive sequences was discovered. In RNA blot analyses, DNA probes prepared from pHL-2 can be used to detect lysozyme mRNA not only from human but also from mouse and rat. Moreover, by in situ hybridization, complementary RNA transcripts have been used as probes to detect lysozyme mRNA in mouse macrophages and Paneth cells. This human lysozyme cDNA clone is therefore likely to be a useful molecular probe for studying macrophage distribution and gene expression

  12. Green Fluorescent Protein as a Model for Protein Crystal Growth Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agena, Sabine; Smith, Lori; Karr, Laurel; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from jellyfish Aequorea Victoria has become a popular marker for e.g. mutagenesis work. Its fluorescent property, which originates from a chromophore located in the center of the molecule, makes it widely applicable as a research too]. GFP clones have been produced with a variety of spectral properties, such as blue and yellow emitting species. The protein is a single chain of molecular weight 27 kDa and its structure has been determined at 1.9 Angstrom resolution. The combination of GFP's fluorescent property, the knowledge of its several crystallization conditions, and its increasing use in biophysical and biochemical studies, all led us to consider it as a model material for macromolecular crystal growth studies. Initial preparations of GFP were from E.coli with yields of approximately 5 mg/L of culture media. Current yields are now in the 50 - 120 mg/L range, and we hope to further increase this by expression of the GFP gene in the Pichia system. The results of these efforts and of preliminary crystal growth studies will be presented.

  13. Model to predict inhomogeneous protein-sugar distribution in powders prepared by spray drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasmeijer, Niels; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Hinrichs, Wouter L. J.

    2016-01-01

    A protein can be stabilized by spray drying an aqueous solution of the protein and a sugar, thereby incorporating the protein into a glassy sugar matrix. For optimal stability, the protein should be homogeneously distributed inside the sugar matrix. The aim of this study was to develop a model that

  14. Mobility of lysozyme inside oxidized starch polymer microgels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Kleijn, J.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Slaghek, T.; Timmermans, J.; Norde, W.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the mobility of protein molecules inside oxidized potato starch polymer (OPSP) microgel particles (spherical, 10-20 m in diameter). This provides relevant information for controlled uptake and release applications of such systems. The mobility of Alexa-488

  15. Effect of hydroxyapatite-containing microspheres embedded into three-dimensional magnesium phosphate scaffolds on the controlled release of lysozyme and in vitro biodegradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee JM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Jongman Lee, Hui-suk YunPowder and Ceramics Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon, Republic of KoreaAbstract: The functionality of porous three-dimensional (3D magnesium phosphate (MgP scaffold was investigated for the development of a novel protein delivery system and biomimetic bone tissue engineering scaffold. This enhancement can be achieved by incorporation of hydroxyapatite (HA-containing polymeric microspheres (MSs into a bulk MgP matrix, and a paste-extruding deposition (PED system. In this work, the amount of MS and HA was precisely controlled when manufacturing MS-embedded MgP (MS/MgP composite scaffolds. The main influence was researched in terms of in vitro lysozyme-release, in vitro biodegradation, mechanical properties, and in vitro calcification. The controlled release of lysozyme was indicated, while showing graded release patterns according to HA content. The composite scaffolds degraded gradually with MS content and degradation time. Due to the effect of HA inclusion, the higher HA-containing MS/MgP scaffolds could, not only delay the biodegradation process but also, compensate for the possible loss of mechanical properties. In this regard, it is reasonable to confirm the inverse relationship between biodegradation and corresponding compressive properties. In order to encourage bioactivity and osteoconductivity, the MS/MgP composite scaffolds were subjected to simulated body fluid treatment. Calcium deposition was, in turn, improved with increasing MS and HA content over time. This quantitative result was also proved using morphological and elemental analysis. In summary, a significant transformation of a monolithic MgP scaffold was directed toward a multifunctional bone tissue engineering scaffold equipped with controlled protein delivery, biodegradability, and bioactivity.Keywords: protein delivery, bone tissue engineering

  16. Complex nature of serum lysozyme activity: evidence of thermolability in inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, M; Mitchell, W D; Eastwood, M [Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (UK)

    1978-01-01

    In patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, alterations in serum storage temperature produced significant changes in serum lysozyme activity (SLA) as measured by the lysoplate method. This was not the case in healthy controls or in a group with other gastrointestinal disorders. Electrophoretic separation of serum revealed two components of lysozyme-type lytic activity but only one in extracts of gut mucosa, leucocytes, and egg white. The major lytic component of serum migrated towards the cathode and reacted with specific antilysozyme serum, but the minor component which migrated towards the anode did not. Although the cause of this anionic lytic activity is uncertain, it contributes to total serum activity as estimated by any method utilizing the lysis of Micrococcus lysodeikticus, and may possibly be related to the observed thermolability.

  17. Leukocytes respiratory burst and lysozyme level in pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus Holmberg, 1887

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    JS. Abreu

    Full Text Available Innate immune responses are useful to determine the health status of fish and to evaluate the effect of immunomodulatory substances in fish farming. Leukocytes respiratory burst was measured in pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus using chemiluminescence assay and nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT reduction assay. The nitroblue tetrazolium reduction seemed more adequate than chemiluminescence assay for leukocytes oxidative burst determination, since it was difficult to isolate the blood leucocytes for chemiluminescence assay. Plasma and serum lysozyme were measured using a turbidimetric assay. The heating of serum and plasma samples (56 ºC for 30 minutes for complement system inactivation darkened the plasma samples and interfered in the results. The lysozyme activity in serum was higher than in plasma, suggesting that serum samples are more appropriate for the analysis. This study established protocols that can be useful tools in the study of immune mechanisms of the tropical fish pacu.

  18. Model test on the relationship feed energy and protein ratio to the production and quality of milk protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartanto, R.; Jantra, M. A. C.; Santosa, S. A. B.; Purnomoadi, A.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to find an appropriate relationship model between the feed energy and protein ratio with the amount of production and quality of milk proteins. This research was conducted at Getasan Sub-district, Semarang Regency, Central Java Province, Indonesia using 40 samples (Holstein Friesian cattle, lactation period II-III and lactation month 3-4). Data were analyzed using linear and quadratic regressions, to predict the production and quality of milk protein from feed energy and protein ratio that describe the diet. The significance of model was tested using analysis of variance. Coefficient of determination (R2), residual variance (RV) and root mean square prediction error (RMSPE) were reported for the developed equations as an indicator of the goodness of model fit. The results showed no relationship in milk protein (kg), milk casein (%), milk casein (kg) and milk urea N (mg/dl) as function of CP/TDN. The significant relationship was observed in milk production (L or kg) and milk protein (%) as function of CP/TDN, both in linear and quadratic models. In addition, a quadratic change in milk production (L) (P = 0.003), milk production (kg) (P = 0.003) and milk protein concentration (%) (P = 0.026) were observed with increase of CP/TDN. It can be concluded that quadratic equation was the good fitting model for this research, because quadratic equation has larger R2, smaller RV and smaller RMSPE than those of linear equation.

  19. Distribution, transition and thermodynamic stability of protein conformations in the denaturant-induced unfolding of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Liujiao; Ji, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Extensive and intensive studies on the unfolding of proteins require appropriate theoretical model and parameter to clearly illustrate the feature and characteristic of the unfolding system. Over the past several decades, four approaches have been proposed to describe the interaction between proteins and denaturants, but some ambiguity and deviations usually occur in the explanation of the experimental data. In this work, a theoretical model was presented to show the dependency of the residual activity ratio of the proteins on the molar denaturant concentration. Through the characteristic unfolding parameters ki and Δmi in this model, the distribution, transition and thermodynamic stability of protein conformations during the unfolding process can be quantitatively described. This model was tested with the two-state unfolding of bovine heart cytochrome c and the three-state unfolding of hen egg white lysozyme induced by both guanidine hydrochloride and urea, the four-state unfolding of bovine carbonic anhydrase b induced by guanidine hydrochloride and the unfolding of some other proteins induced by denaturants. The results illustrated that this model could be used accurately to reveal the distribution and transition of protein conformations in the presence of different concentrations of denaturants and to evaluate the unfolding tendency and thermodynamic stability of different conformations. In most denaturant-induced unfolding of proteins, the unfolding became increasingly hard in next transition step and the proteins became more unstable as they attained next successive stable conformation. This work presents a useful method for people to study the unfolding of proteins and may be used to describe the unfolding and refolding of other biopolymers induced by denaturants, inducers, etc.

  20. Hidden Markov model-derived structural alphabet for proteins: the learning of protein local shapes captures sequence specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camproux, A C; Tufféry, P

    2005-08-05

    Understanding and predicting protein structures depend on the complexity and the accuracy of the models used to represent them. We have recently set up a Hidden Markov Model to optimally compress protein three-dimensional conformations into a one-dimensional series of letters of a structural alphabet. Such a model learns simultaneously the shape of representative structural letters describing the local conformation and the logic of their connections, i.e. the transition matrix between the letters. Here, we move one step further and report some evidence that such a model of protein local architecture also captures some accurate amino acid features. All the letters have specific and distinct amino acid distributions. Moreover, we show that words of amino acids can have significant propensities for some letters. Perspectives point towards the prediction of the series of letters describing the structure of a protein from its amino acid sequence.

  1. A Low-Cost Inkjet-Printed Aptamer-Based Electrochemical Biosensor for the Selective Detection of Lysozyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niazul Islam Khan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, inkjet-printing has gained increased popularity in applications such as flexible electronics and disposable sensors, as well as in wearable sensors because of its multifarious advantages. This work presents a novel, low-cost immobilization technique using inkjet-printing for the development of an aptamer-based biosensor for the detection of lysozyme, an important biomarker in various disease diagnosis. The strong affinity between the carbon nanotube (CNT and the single-stranded DNA is exploited to immobilize the aptamers onto the working electrode by printing the ink containing the dispersion of CNT-aptamer complex. The inkjet-printing method enables aptamer density control, as well as high resolution patternability. Our developed sensor shows a detection limit of 90 ng/mL with high target selectivity against other proteins. The sensor also demonstrates a shelf-life for a reasonable period. This technology has potential for applications in developing low-cost point-of-care diagnostic testing kits for home healthcare.

  2. Different Analytical Approaches in Assessing Antibacterial Activity and the Purity of Commercial Lysozyme Preparations for Dairy Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Pellegrino

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Hen egg-white lysozyme (LSZ is currently used in the food industry to limit the proliferation of lactic acid bacteria spoilage in the production of wine and beer, and to inhibit butyric acid fermentation in hard and extra hard cheeses (late blowing caused by the outgrowth of clostridial spores. The aim of this work was to evaluate how the enzyme activity in commercial preparations correlates to the enzyme concentration and can be affected by the presence of process-related impurities. Different analytical approaches, including turbidimetric assay, SDS-PAGE and HPLC were used to analyse 17 commercial preparations of LSZ marketed in different countries. The HPLC method adopted by ISO allowed the true LSZ concentration to be determined with accuracy. The turbidimetric assay was the most suitable method to evaluate LSZ activity, whereas SDS-PAGE allowed the presence of other egg proteins, which are potential allergens, to be detected. The analytical results showed that the purity of commercially available enzyme preparations can vary significantly, and evidenced the effectiveness of combining different analytical approaches in this type of control.

  3. Cryoprotection properties of salts of organic acids: a case study for a tetragonal crystal of HEW lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujacz, Grzegorz; Wrzesniewska, Blanka; Bujacz, Anna

    2010-07-01

    Currently, the great majority of the data that are used for solving macromolecular structures by X-ray crystallography are collected at cryogenic temperatures. Selection of a suitable cryoprotectant, which ensures crystal stability at low temperatures, is critical for the success of a particular diffraction experiment. The effectiveness of salts of organic acids as potential cryoprotective agents is presented in the following work. Sodium formate, acetate, malonate and citrate were tested, as were sodium potassium tartrate and acetate in the form of potassium and ammonium salts. For each salt investigated, the minimal concentration that was required for successful cryoprotection was determined over the pH range 4.5-9.5. The cryoprotective ability of these organic salts depends upon the number of carboxylic groups; the lowest concentration required for cryoprotection was observed at neutral pH. Case-study experiments conducted using the tetragonal form of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) confirmed that salts of organic acids can successfully act as cryoprotective agents of protein crystals grown from high concentrations of inorganic salts. When crystals are grown from solutions containing a sufficient concentration of organic acid salts no additional cryoprotection is needed as the crystals can safely be frozen directly from the crystallizing buffers.

  4. Stereochemical criteria for prediction of the effects of proline mutations on protein stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanika Bajaj

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available When incorporated into a polypeptide chain, proline (Pro differs from all other naturally occurring amino acid residues in two important respects. The phi dihedral angle of Pro is constrained to values close to -65 degrees and Pro lacks an amide hydrogen. Consequently, mutations which result in introduction of Pro can significantly affect protein stability. In the present work, we describe a procedure to accurately predict the effect of Pro introduction on protein thermodynamic stability. Seventy-seven of the 97 non-Pro amino acid residues in the model protein, CcdB, were individually mutated to Pro, and the in vivo activity of each mutant was characterized. A decision tree to classify the mutation as perturbing or nonperturbing was created by correlating stereochemical properties of mutants to activity data. The stereochemical properties including main chain dihedral angle phi and main chain amide H-bonds (hydrogen bonds were determined from 3D models of the mutant proteins built using MODELLER. We assessed the performance of the decision tree on a large dataset of 163 single-site Pro mutations of T4 lysozyme, 74 nsSNPs, and 52 other Pro substitutions from the literature. The overall accuracy of this algorithm was found to be 81% in the case of CcdB, 77% in the case of lysozyme, 76% in the case of nsSNPs, and 71% in the case of other Pro substitution data. The accuracy of Pro scanning mutagenesis for secondary structure assignment was also assessed and found to be at best 69%. Our prediction procedure will be useful in annotating uncharacterized nsSNPs of disease-associated proteins and for protein engineering and design.

  5. Stereochemical criteria for prediction of the effects of proline mutations on protein stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Kanika; Madhusudhan, M S; Adkar, Bharat V; Chakrabarti, Purbani; Ramakrishnan, C; Sali, Andrej; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2007-12-01

    When incorporated into a polypeptide chain, proline (Pro) differs from all other naturally occurring amino acid residues in two important respects. The phi dihedral angle of Pro is constrained to values close to -65 degrees and Pro lacks an amide hydrogen. Consequently, mutations which result in introduction of Pro can significantly affect protein stability. In the present work, we describe a procedure to accurately predict the effect of Pro introduction on protein thermodynamic stability. Seventy-seven of the 97 non-Pro amino acid residues in the model protein, CcdB, were individually mutated to Pro, and the in vivo activity of each mutant was characterized. A decision tree to classify the mutation as perturbing or nonperturbing was created by correlating stereochemical properties of mutants to activity data. The stereochemical properties including main chain dihedral angle phi and main chain amide H-bonds (hydrogen bonds) were determined from 3D models of the mutant proteins built using MODELLER. We assessed the performance of the decision tree on a large dataset of 163 single-site Pro mutations of T4 lysozyme, 74 nsSNPs, and 52 other Pro substitutions from the literature. The overall accuracy of this algorithm was found to be 81% in the case of CcdB, 77% in the case of lysozyme, 76% in the case of nsSNPs, and 71% in the case of other Pro substitution data. The accuracy of Pro scanning mutagenesis for secondary structure assignment was also assessed and found to be at best 69%. Our prediction procedure will be useful in annotating uncharacterized nsSNPs of disease-associated proteins and for protein engineering and design.

  6. Resonance scattering spectra of micrococcus lysodeikticus and its application to assay of lysozyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhi-Liang; Huang, Guo-Xia

    2007-02-01

    Several methods, including turbidimetric and colorimetric methods, have been reported for the detection of lysozyme activity. However, there is no report about the resonance scattering spectral (RSS) assay, which is based on the catalytic effect of lysozyme on the hydrolysis of micrococcus lysodeikticus (ML) and its resonance scattering effect. ML has 5 resonance scattering peaks at 360 400, 420, 470, and 520 nm with the strongest one at 470 nm. The concentration of ML in the range of 2.0x10(6)-9.3x10(8) cells/ml is proportional to the RS intensity at 470 nm (I(470 nm)). A new catalytic RSS method has been proposed for 0.24-40.0 U/ml (or 0.012-2.0 mug/ml) lysozyme activity, with a detection limit (3sigma) of 0.014 U/ml (or 0.0007 microg/ml). Saliva samples were assayed by this method, and it is in agreement with the results of turbidimetric method. The slope, intercept and the correlation coefficient of the regression analysis of the 2 assays were 0.9665, -87.50, and 0.9973, respectively. The assay has high sensitivity and simplicity.

  7. Prophenoloxidase system, lysozyme and protease inhibitor distribution in the common cuttlefish Sepia officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pabic, Charles; Safi, Georges; Serpentini, Antoine; Lebel, Jean-Marc; Robin, Jean-Paul; Koueta, Noussithé

    2014-01-01

    The immune system of cephalopods remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to determine the specific activity of immune enzymes in epithelial barriers, circulatory and digestive systems of the common cuttlefish Sepia officinalis. Three enzyme groups with putative functions in immunity were investigated: phenoloxidases (POs), lysozymes and protease inhibitors (PIs). Consistent with a role in immunity, highest PO activities were found in the integument as well as the respiratory and circulatory organs under zymogenic (proPO) and active form. Surprisingly, high PO activities were also found in the digestive gland and its appendages. Similarly, high lysozyme activities were detected in the integument and circulatory organs, but also in the posterior salivary glands, highlighting the implication of this antibacterial enzyme group in most tissues exposed to the environment but also within the circulatory system. Albeit highest in digestive organs, the ubiquitous detection of PI activity in assayed compartments suggests immune function(s) in a wide range of tissues. Our study reports proPO/PO, lysozyme and PI distributions in S. officinalis body compartments for the first time, and thus provides the fundamental basis for a better understanding of the humoral immune system in cephalopods as well as invertebrates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of guar gum conjugation on functional, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of egg white lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdani, Afshan Mumtaz; Wani, Idrees Ahmed; Bhat, Naseer Ahmad; Siddiqi, Raushid Ahmad

    2018-02-01

    This study was undertaken to analyze the effect of conjugation of egg-white lysozyme with guar gum. Lysozyme is an antimicrobial polypeptide that can be used for food preservation. Its antibacterial activity is limited to gram positive bacteria. Conjugation with polysaccharides like guar gum may broaden its activity against gram negatives. Conjugate was developed through Maillard reaction. Assays carried out included sugar estimation, SDS-PAGE, GPC, color, FT-IR, DSC, thermal stability, solubility, emulsifying, foaming and antioxidant activity. In addition, antimicrobial activity of the conjugate was determined against two gram positive (Staphyllococcus aureus and Enterococcus) and two gram negative pathogens (E. coli and Salmonella). Results showed higher functional properties of lysozyme-guar gum conjugate. The antioxidant properties increased from 2.02-35.80% (Inhibition of DPPH) and 1.65-4.93AAE/g (reducing power) upon guar gum conjugation. Conjugate significantly inhibited gram negative bacteria and the antibacterial activity also increased significantly against gram positive pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of correlations between sites in models of protein sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, B.G.; Lapedes, A.; Liu, L.C.

    1998-01-01

    A criterion based on conditional probabilities, related to the concept of algorithmic distance, is used to detect correlated mutations at noncontiguous sites on sequences. We apply this criterion to the problem of analyzing correlations between sites in protein sequences; however, the analysis applies generally to networks of interacting sites with discrete states at each site. Elementary models, where explicit results can be derived easily, are introduced. The number of states per site considered ranges from 2, illustrating the relation to familiar classical spin systems, to 20 states, suitable for representing amino acids. Numerical simulations show that the criterion remains valid even when the genetic history of the data samples (e.g., protein sequences), as represented by a phylogenetic tree, introduces nonindependence between samples. Statistical fluctuations due to finite sampling are also investigated and do not invalidate the criterion. A subsidiary result is found: The more homogeneous a population, the more easily its average properties can drift from the properties of its ancestor. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  10. Clearing of suspensions of Micrococcus lysodeikticus catalysed by lysozymes from hen, goose, and turkey egg whites, human milk, and phage T4. Assessment of potential as signal generators for homogeneous enzyme immunoassays for urinary steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Delwyn G; Blackwell, Leonard F

    2007-01-01

    Lysozymes (3.2.1.17) from goose (Anser anser) egg white, turkey (Melagris gallopavo) egg white, phage T4 and human milk were compared with hen egg white lysozyme in their ability to clear a suspension of Micrococcus lysodeikticus. All of the lysozymes, except hen egg white lysozyme, catalysed the clearing of the Micrococcus lysodeikticus suspension in a biphasic fashion. Compared to hen egg white lysozyme, the total absorbance or transmission change over 5 and 20 minutes was less in all cases, except for human lysozyme. Human lysozyme was, therefore, a potential alternative, more rapid signal generator for the measurement of urinary estrone glucuronide excretion rates because of its structural similarity to hen egg white lysozyme. The apparent K(M) values for hen egg white lysozyme increased with the enzyme concentration.

  11. Investigation on Secondary Structure Perturbations of Proteins Embedded in Solid Lipid Matrices as a Novel Indicator of their Biological Activity upon In Vitro Release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeeshan, Farrukh; Tabbassum, Misbah; Jorgensen, Lene

    2018-01-01

    encased in solid lipid matrices as a novel indicator of their stability upon in vitro release. Model proteins namely catalase and lysozyme were incorporated into lipid namely Precirol® AT05 (glycerol palmitostearate, melting point 58°C) at 30% w/w loading using melting and mixing and wet granulation...... aggregation for catalase which was increased using wet granulation. The biological activity of catalase was statistically different from that of control and was affected by the incorporation method and was found to be in alignment with ATR spectral changes and extent of aggregation. In conclusion, ATR...

  12. Denatured state is critical in determining the properties of model proteins designed on different folds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amatori, Andrea; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Tiana, Guido

    2008-01-01

    The thermodynamics of proteins designed on three common folds (SH3, chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 [CI2], and protein G) is studied with a simplified C alpha, model and compared with the thermodynamics of proteins designed on random-generated folds. The model allows to design sequences to fold within a...

  13. Protein modelling of triterpene synthase genes from mangrove plants using Phyre2 and Swiss-model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyuni, M.; Wati, R.; Sulistiyono, N.; Hayati, R.; Sumardi; Oku, H.; Baba, S.; Sagami, H.

    2018-03-01

    Molecular cloning of five oxidosqualene cyclases (OSC) genes from Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, Kandelia candel, and Rhizophora stylosa had previously been cloned, characterized, and encoded mono and -multi triterpene synthases. The present study analyzed protein modelling of triterpene synthase genes from mangrove using Phyre2 and Swiss-model. The diversity was noted within protein modelling of triterpene synthases using Phyre2 from sequence identity (38-43%) and residue (696-703). RsM2 was distinguishable from others for template structure; it used lanosterol synthase as a template (PDB ID: w6j.1.A). By contrast, other genes used human lanosterol synthase (1w6k.1.A). The predicted bind sites were correlated with the product of triterpene synthase, the product of BgbAS was β-amyrin, while RsM1 contained a significant amount of β-amyrin. Similarly BgLUS and KcMS, both main products was lupeol, on the other hand, RsM2 with the outcome of taraxerol. Homology modelling revealed that 696 residues of BgbAS, BgLUS, RsM1, and RsM2 (91-92% of the amino acid sequence) had been modelled with 100% confidence by the single highest scoring template using Phyre2. This coverage was higher than Swiss-model (85-90%). The present study suggested that molecular cloning of triterpene genes provides useful tools for studying the protein modelling related regulation of isoprenoids biosynthesis in mangrove forests.

  14. Self-organized critical model for protein folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moret, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    The major factor that drives a protein toward collapse and folding is the hydrophobic effect. At the folding process a hydrophobic core is shielded by the solvent-accessible surface area of the protein. We study the fractal behavior of 5526 protein structures present in the Brookhaven Protein Data Bank. Power laws of protein mass, volume and solvent-accessible surface area are measured independently. The present findings indicate that self-organized criticality is an alternative explanation for the protein folding. Also we note that the protein packing is an independent and constant value because the self-similar behavior of the volumes and protein masses have the same fractal dimension. This power law guarantees that a protein is a complex system. From the analyzed data, q-Gaussian distributions seem to fit well this class of systems.

  15. Classification of proteins: available structural space for molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Antonina

    2012-01-01

    The wealth of available protein structural data provides unprecedented opportunity to study and better understand the underlying principles of protein folding and protein structure evolution. A key to achieving this lies in the ability to analyse these data and to organize them in a coherent classification scheme. Over the past years several protein classifications have been developed that aim to group proteins based on their structural relationships. Some of these classification schemes explore the concept of structural neighbourhood (structural continuum), whereas other utilize the notion of protein evolution and thus provide a discrete rather than continuum view of protein structure space. This chapter presents a strategy for classification of proteins with known three-dimensional structure. Steps in the classification process along with basic definitions are introduced. Examples illustrating some fundamental concepts of protein folding and evolution with a special focus on the exceptions to them are presented.

  16. A Practical Teaching Course in Directed Protein Evolution Using the Green Fluorescent Protein as a Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruller, Roberto; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Silva, Artur; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz; Ward, Richard John

    2011-01-01

    Protein engineering is a powerful tool, which correlates protein structure with specific functions, both in applied biotechnology and in basic research. Here, we present a practical teaching course for engineering the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from "Aequorea victoria" by a random mutagenesis strategy using error-prone polymerase…

  17. High-resolution crystal structure of an engineered human beta2-adrenergic G protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherezov, Vadim; Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Hanson, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of eukaryotic signal transduction proteins that communicate across the membrane. We report the crystal structure of a human beta2-adrenergic receptor-T4 lysozyme fusion protein bound to t...

  18. A model in which heat shock protein 90 targets protein-folding clefts: rationale for a new approach to neuroprotective treatment of protein folding diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, William B; Morishima, Yoshihiro; Gestwicki, Jason E; Lieberman, Andrew P; Osawa, Yoichi

    2014-11-01

    In an EBM Minireview published in 2010, we proposed that the heat shock protein (Hsp)90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery played a major role in determining the selection of proteins that have undergone oxidative or other toxic damage for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. The proposal was based on a model in which the Hsp90 chaperone machinery regulates signaling by modulating ligand-binding clefts. The model provides a framework for thinking about the development of neuroprotective therapies for protein-folding diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and the polyglutamine expansion disorders, such as Huntington's disease (HD) and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Major aberrant proteins that misfold and accumulate in these diseases are "client" proteins of the abundant and ubiquitous stress chaperone Hsp90. These Hsp90 client proteins include tau (AD), α-synuclein (PD), huntingtin (HD), and the expanded glutamine androgen receptor (polyQ AR) (SBMA). In this Minireview, we update our model in which Hsp90 acts on protein-folding clefts and show how it forms a rational basis for developing drugs that promote the targeted elimination of these aberrant proteins. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  19. Visualization of protein folding funnels in lattice models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio B Oliveira

    Full Text Available Protein folding occurs in a very high dimensional phase space with an exponentially large number of states, and according to the energy landscape theory it exhibits a topology resembling a funnel. In this statistical approach, the folding mechanism is unveiled by describing the local minima in an effective one-dimensional representation. Other approaches based on potential energy landscapes address the hierarchical structure of local energy minima through disconnectivity graphs. In this paper, we introduce a metric to describe the distance between any two conformations, which also allows us to go beyond the one-dimensional representation and visualize the folding funnel in 2D and 3D. In this way it is possible to assess the folding process in detail, e.g., by identifying the connectivity between conformations and establishing the paths to reach the native state, in addition to regions where trapping may occur. Unlike the disconnectivity maps method, which is based on the kinetic connections between states, our methodology is based on structural similarities inferred from the new metric. The method was developed in a 27-mer protein lattice model, folded into a 3×3×3 cube. Five sequences were studied and distinct funnels were generated in an analysis restricted to conformations from the transition-state to the native configuration. Consistent with the expected results from the energy landscape theory, folding routes can be visualized to probe different regions of the phase space, as well as determine the difficulty in folding of the distinct sequences. Changes in the landscape due to mutations were visualized, with the comparison between wild and mutated local minima in a single map, which serves to identify different trapping regions. The extension of this approach to more realistic models and its use in combination with other approaches are discussed.

  20. Membrane Compartmentalization Reducing the Mobility of Lipids and Proteins within a Model Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldsø, Heidi; Reddy, Tyler; Fowler, Philip W; Duncan, Anna L; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-09-01

    The cytoskeleton underlying cell membranes may influence the dynamic organization of proteins and lipids within the bilayer by immobilizing certain transmembrane (TM) proteins and forming corrals within the membrane. Here, we present coarse-grained resolution simulations of a biologically realistic membrane model of asymmetrically organized lipids and TM proteins. We determine the effects of a model of cytoskeletal immobilization of selected membrane proteins using long time scale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. By introducing compartments with varying degrees of restraints within the membrane models, we are able to reveal how compartmentalization caused by cytoskeletal immobilization leads to reduced and anomalous diffusional mobility of both proteins and lipids. This in turn results in a reduced rate of protein dimerization within the membrane and of hopping of membrane proteins between compartments. These simulations provide a molecular realization of hierarchical models often invoked to explain single-molecule imaging studies of membrane proteins.

  1. Global optimization of proteins using a dynamical lattice model: Ground states and energy landscapes

    OpenAIRE

    Dressel, F.; Kobe, S.

    2004-01-01

    A simple approach is proposed to investigate the protein structure. Using a low complexity model, a simple pairwise interaction and the concept of global optimization, we are able to calculate ground states of proteins, which are in agreement with experimental data. All possible model structures of small proteins are available below a certain energy threshold. The exact lowenergy landscapes for the trp cage protein (1L2Y) is presented showing the connectivity of all states and energy barriers.

  2. Toward a rigorous network of protein-protein interactions of the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabra, S.R.; Joachimiak, M.P.; Petzold, C.J.; Zane, G.M.; Price, M.N.; Gaucher, S.; Reveco, S.A.; Fok, V.; Johanson, A.R.; Batth, T.S.; Singer, M.; Chandonia, J.M.; Joyner, D.; Hazen, T.C.; Arkin, A.P.; Wall, J.D.; Singh, A.K.; Keasling, J.D.

    2011-05-01

    Protein–protein interactions offer an insight into cellular processes beyond what may be obtained by the quantitative functional genomics tools of proteomics and transcriptomics. The aforementioned tools have been extensively applied to study E. coli and other aerobes and more recently to study the stress response behavior of Desulfovibrio 5 vulgaris Hildenborough, a model anaerobe and sulfate reducer. In this paper we present the first attempt to identify protein-protein interactions in an obligate anaerobic bacterium. We used suicide vector-assisted chromosomal modification of 12 open reading frames encoded by this sulfate reducer to append an eight amino acid affinity tag to the carboxy-terminus of the chosen proteins. Three biological replicates of the 10 ‘pulled-down’ proteins were separated and analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Replicate agreement ranged between 35% and 69%. An interaction network among 12 bait and 90 prey proteins was reconstructed based on 134 bait-prey interactions computationally identified to be of high confidence. We discuss the biological significance of several unique metabolic features of D. vulgaris revealed by this protein-protein interaction data 15 and protein modifications that were observed. These include the distinct role of the putative carbon monoxide-induced hydrogenase, unique electron transfer routes associ