WorldWideScience

Sample records for model programs examines

  1. Modeling an integrative physical examination program for the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Scott G

    2006-10-01

    Current policies governing the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs physical examination programs are out of step with current evidence-based medical practice. Replacing periodic and other routine physical examination types with annual preventive health assessments would afford our service members additional health benefit at reduced cost. Additionally, the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs repeat the physical examination process at separation and have been unable to reconcile their respective disability evaluation systems to reduce duplication and waste. A clear, coherent, and coordinated strategy to improve the relevance and utility of our physical examination programs is long overdue. This article discusses existing physical examination programs and proposes a model for a new integrative physical examination program based on need, science, and common sense.

  2. Evaluation of breast self-examination program using Health Belief Model in female students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Moodi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer has been considered as a major health problem in females, because of its high incidence in recent years. Due to the role of breast self-examination (BSE in early diagnosis and prevention of morbidity and mortality rate of breast cancer, promoting student knowledge, capabilities and attitude are required in this regard. This study was conducted to evaluation BSE education in female University students using Health Belief Model. Methods: In this semi-experimental study, 243 female students were selected using multi-stage randomized sampling in 2008. The data were collected by validated and reliable questionnaire (43 questions before intervention and one week after intervention. The intervention program was consisted of one educational session lasting 120 minutes by lecturing and showing a film based on HBM constructs. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS (version11.5 using statistical paired t-test and ANOVA at the significant level of α = 0.05. Results: 243 female students aged 20.6 ± 2.8 years old were studied. Implementing the educational program resulted in increased knowledge and HBM (perceived susceptibility, severity, benefit and barrier scores in the students (p ≤ 0.01. Significant increases were also observed in knowledge and perceived benefit after the educational program (p ≤ 0.05. ANOVA statistical test showed significant difference in perceived benefit score in students of different universities (p = 0.05. Conclusions: Due to the positive effects of education on increasing knowledge and attitude of university students about BSE, the efficacy of the HBM in BSE education for female students was confirmed.

  3. Evaluation of breast self-examination program using Health Belief Model in female students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodi, Mitra; Mood, Mahdi Baladi; Sharifirad, Gholam Reza; Shahnazi, Hossein; Sharifzadeh, Gholamreza

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer has been considered as a major health problem in females, because of its high incidence in recent years. Due to the role of breast self-examination (BSE) in early diagnosis and prevention of morbidity and mortality rate of breast cancer, promoting student knowledge, capabilities and attitude are required in this regard. This study was conducted to evaluation BSE education in female University students using Health Belief Model. In this semi-experimental study, 243 female students were selected using multi-stage randomized sampling in 2008. The data were collected by validated and reliable questionnaire (43 questions) before intervention and one week after intervention. The intervention program was consisted of one educational session lasting 120 minutes by lecturing and showing a film based on HBM constructs. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS (version11.5) using statistical paired t-test and ANOVA at the significant level of α = 0.05. 243 female students aged 20.6 ± 2.8 years old were studied. Implementing the educational program resulted in increased knowledge and HBM (perceived susceptibility, severity, benefit and barrier) scores in the students (p ≤ 0.01). Significant increases were also observed in knowledge and perceived benefit after the educational program (p ≤ 0.05). ANOVA statistical test showed significant difference in perceived benefit score in students of different universities (p = 0.05). Due to the positive effects of education on increasing knowledge and attitude of university students about BSE, the efficacy of the HBM in BSE education for female students was confirmed.

  4. Development of Web-Based Examination System Using Open Source Programming Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abass, Olalere A.; Olajide, Samuel A.; Samuel, Babafemi O.

    2017-01-01

    The traditional method of assessment (examination) is often characterized by examination questions leakages, human errors during marking of scripts and recording of scores. The technological advancement in the field of computer science has necessitated the need for computer usage in majorly all areas of human life and endeavors, education sector…

  5. Stokes examines NASA program management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leath, Audrey T.

    As NASA gears up for another attempt at redesigning Space Station Freedom, some in Congress are wondering whether the space agency has learned any lessons from a number of costly past mistakes. Louis Stokes (D-Ohio), the new chairman of the House Appropriations Veterans Affairs, Housing and Urban Development, and Independent Agencies Subcommittee, held a hearing on March 17 to examine unanticipated cost growth in a variety of projects, including the space toilet, the advanced turbo pump for the shuttle, and the Mars Observer, as well as the space station. Stokes seemed well-suited to this oversight role, asking well-informed and probing questions rather than accusatory ones. The witnesses, NASA head Daniel Goldin and many of his top managers (most of whom were not in their present positions when the projects were initiated), analyzed past errors and offered useful measures for avoiding similar problems in the future.

  6. Examining the usefulness of a Family Empowerment Program guided by the Illness Beliefs Model for families caring for a child with thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacharasin, Chintana; Phaktoop, Maneerat; Sananreangsak, Siriyupa

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to design, implement, and evaluate a Family Empowerment Program (FEP), guided by the Illness Beliefs Model. Participants included 25 Thai family members who were the primary caregivers of a child with thalassemia. In Phase I, data were collected from participants using individual in-depth interviews and focus groups before involvement in the FEP. In Phase II, 12 hr of FEP sessions were offered to groups of participants. Content analysis of the audiotaped FEP sessions is reported in this article. Family caregivers reported that the FEP helped them share beliefs and experiences related to caring for their child with thalassemia, make decisions related to families' problems/needs and beliefs, provide each other mutual social support, and develop increased ability to manage care for their chronically ill child through sharing information and learning from other family caregivers about family functioning, family management, and family relationships. Future research is needed to examine the FEP intervention under more controlled conditions with measures that include family functioning and child health outcomes.

  7. Programming Models in HPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipman, Galen M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-13

    These are the slides for a presentation on programming models in HPC, at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Parallel Computing Summer School. The following topics are covered: Flynn's Taxonomy of computer architectures; single instruction single data; single instruction multiple data; multiple instruction multiple data; address space organization; definition of Trinity (Intel Xeon-Phi is a MIMD architecture); single program multiple data; multiple program multiple data; ExMatEx workflow overview; definition of a programming model, programming languages, runtime systems; programming model and environments; MPI (Message Passing Interface); OpenMP; Kokkos (Performance Portable Thread-Parallel Programming Model); Kokkos abstractions, patterns, policies, and spaces; RAJA, a systematic approach to node-level portability and tuning; overview of the Legion Programming Model; mapping tasks and data to hardware resources; interoperability: supporting task-level models; Legion S3D execution and performance details; workflow, integration of external resources into the programming model.

  8. Modeling EERE deployment programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, K. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hostick, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Belzer, D. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Livingston, O. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge for future research.

  9. Model-Driven Constraint Programming

    CERN Document Server

    Chenouard, Raphael; Soto, Ricardo; 10.1145/1389449.1389479

    2010-01-01

    Constraint programming can definitely be seen as a model-driven paradigm. The users write programs for modeling problems. These programs are mapped to executable models to calculate the solutions. This paper focuses on efficient model management (definition and transformation). From this point of view, we propose to revisit the design of constraint-programming systems. A model-driven architecture is introduced to map solving-independent constraint models to solving-dependent decision models. Several important questions are examined, such as the need for a visual highlevel modeling language, and the quality of metamodeling techniques to implement the transformations. A main result is the s-COMMA platform that efficiently implements the chain from modeling to solving constraint problems

  10. A Java program to test homogeneity of samples and examine sampling completeness

    OpenAIRE

    WenJun Zhang

    2011-01-01

    A Java program to test the homogeneity of samples and examine sampling completeness was presented in this study. The program was based on the model of Coleman et al. (1982) for random placement hypothesis and the algorithm of Zhang et al. (1999). The program was used to test samples' homogeneity and examine sampling completeness for four arthropod sampling data sets.

  11. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, K. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hostick, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Belzer, D. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Livingston, O. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-11-01

    This report compiles information and conclusions gathered as part of the “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs” project. The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge in which future research is needed.

  12. Los Alamos Programming Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergen, Benjamin Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-07

    This is the PDF of a powerpoint presentation from a teleconference on Los Alamos programming models. It starts by listing their assumptions for the programming models and then details a hierarchical programming model at the System Level and Node Level. Then it details how to map this to their internal nomenclature. Finally, a list is given of what they are currently doing in this regard.

  13. Examining the Perceptions of Brand Images Regarding Competing MBA Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Timothee; Falgoust, Dexter; Thomas, Kerry, Jr.; Budden, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    In today's economic environment, it is crucial to create a strong, consistent brand image within a graduate business program. This study examines the perceptions that students at Southeastern Louisiana University hold about its MBA program and the MBA programs of its main competitors. A focus group was conducted to identify competitors and factors…

  14. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.

    2007-11-08

    The purpose of this report is to compile information and conclusions gathered as part of three separate tasks undertaken as part of the overall project, “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs,” sponsored by the Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation office within the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address improvements to modeling in the near term, and note gaps in knowledge where future research is needed.

  15. Self-Care Education Programs Based on a Trans-Theoretical Model in Women Referring to Health Centers: Breast Self-Examination Behavior in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahremani, Leila; mousavi, Zakiyeh; Kaveh, Mohammad Hossein; Ghaem, Haleh

    2016-12-01

    Background: Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers and a major public health problem in developing countries. However, early detection and treatment may be achieved by breast self-examination (BSE). Despite the importance of BSE in reducing the incidence of breast cancer and esultant deaths, the disease continues to be the most common cause of cancer death among women in Iran.This study aimed to determine the effects of self-care education on performance of BSE among women referring to health centers in our country. Materials and Methods: This quasiexperimental interventional study with pretest/posttest control group design was conducted on 168 women referred to health centers. The data were collected using a validated researcher-made questionnaire including demographic variables and trans-theoretical model constructs as well as a checklist assessing BSE behavior. The instruments were administered to groups with and without self-care education before, a week after, and 10 weeks after the intervention. Then, the data were entered into the SPSS statistical software (version 19) and analyzed using independent sample t-tests, paired sample t-test, repeated measures ANOVA, Chi-square, and Friedman tests (pbreast cancer.

  16. Perception of peer physical examination in two Australian osteopathy programs

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughan, Brett; Grace, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Background Peer physical examination (PPE) is an efficient and practical educational approach whereby students can practise their examination skills on each other before commencing clinical practice with actual patients. Little is known about the use of PPE in osteopathy education. Methods Students in Year 1 of the osteopathy programs at Victoria University (Melbourne, Australia) and Southern Cross University (Lismore, Australia) completed the Examining Fellow Students and the Peer Physical E...

  17. Introducing Program Evaluation Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca GÂRBOAN

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Programs and project evaluation models can be extremely useful in project planning and management. The aim is to set the right questions as soon as possible in order to see in time and deal with the unwanted program effects, as well as to encourage the positive elements of the project impact. In short, different evaluation models are used in order to minimize losses and maximize the benefits of the interventions upon small or large social groups. This article introduces some of the most recently used evaluation models.

  18. Neurolinguistic Programming Examined: Imagery, Sensory Mode, and Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, Donald K.; Daniell, Jennifer

    1984-01-01

    Tested Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP) assumptions by examining intercorrelations among response times of students (N=64) for extracting visual, auditory, and kinesthetic information from alphabetic images. Large positive intercorrelations were obtained, the only outcome not compatible with NLP. Good visualizers were significantly better in…

  19. Examining Evaluation System of an English Language Program in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si-hong, Li

    2007-01-01

    In the field of EFL, effective language evaluation is receiving more and more attention. However, in many Chinese EFL situations, the evaluation of language development is still considered to be product-oriented. It is the purpose of this article to examine an evaluation system of an English language program offered by a university in Yunnan…

  20. TMI-2 information and examination program 1981 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-04-01

    The Department of Energy's Technical Information and Examination Program at Three Mile Island Unit 2 continued the research and development work begun on the Island in 1979. The work concentrated in seven major areas: instrumentation and electrical components; radiation and environment; off-site core examination; radioactive waste technology development; configuration and document control; waste immobilization; and reactor evaluation. Research and development work associated with the program aims toward communicating applicable information to the nuclear community. The program seeks to assist in resolving specific problems at TMI-2 and to stimulate interest in specific work activities, thus ensuring that the entire nuclear industry avails itself of the maximum amount of information possible.

  1. Utility of a grief services program for medical examiners' offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Ryan S; Aurelius, Michelle B; Barickman, Nancy; Lathrop, Sarah L

    2013-03-01

    Medical examiner/coroner's (ME/C) offices investigate sudden, violent, and unexpected deaths, leaving those close to the deceased suffering traumatic loss with little in terms of support and counseling. We investigated a grief services program (GSP) at the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator (OMI) to better understand the needs of bereaved individuals, identify the services provided, and propose our findings as a model for others. A total of 1085 contacts occurred over 1 year, with the majority occurring at OMI (60.5%), followed by telephone (23.1%). Support was primarily provided to those suffering a loss due to homicide (28.8%) and suicide (26.1%). The roles grief counselors play in the setting of a GSP and ME/C office are multiple. Given the frequent utilization of OMI's GSP and diverse reasons for visits, it is apparent there is a need for GSPs at ME/C offices, particularly given the traumatic nature of deaths investigated by ME/Cs. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. Structured physical examination data: a modeling challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doupi, P; van Ginneken, A M

    2001-01-01

    The success of systems facilitating collection of structured data by clinicians is largely dependent on the flexibility of the interface. The Open Record for CAre (ORCA) makes use of a generic model to support knowledge-based structured data entry for a variety of medical domains. An endeavor undertaken recently aimed to cover the broader area of Physical Examination by expanding the contents of the knowledge base. The model was found to be adequately expressive for supporting this task. Maintaining the balance between flexibility of the interface and constraints dictated by reliable retrieval, however, proved to be a considerable challenge. In this paper we illustrate through specific examples the effect of this trade off on the modeling process, together with the rationale for the chosen solutions and suggestions for future research focus.

  3. Wellness: A Developmental Programming Model for Residence Halls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Mark J.

    1985-01-01

    Demonstrates how a Wellness model can be an effective vehicle for promoting developmental programs in residence halls. The Wellness model is examined in terms of marketing, student development theory, and balanced programming. (BL)

  4. Statistical modeling of program performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Karpenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A task of evaluation of program performance often occurs in the process of design of computer systems or during iterative compilation. A traditional way to solve this problem is emulation of program execution on the target system. A modern alternative approach to evaluation of program performance is based on statistical modeling of program performance on a computer under investigation. This statistical method of modeling program performance called Velocitas was introduced in this work. The method and its implementation in the Adaptor framework were presented. Investigation of the method's effectiveness showed high adequacy of program performance prediction.

  5. DRDC Mentoring Program: An Examination of Program Design and Program Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    partie par la sélection de mentors aptes à transmettre leurs connaissances à des gens en début de carrière. Recommandations En somme, il est on ne peut...their partners. A couple of general comments about the program were provided as well. Meetings that occurred in a social setting worked best for one

  6. Examination of a University-Affiliated Safe Ride Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieck, D. Joseph; Slagle, David M.

    2010-01-01

    A university-affiliated safe ride program was evaluated to determine whether these programs can reduce drunk-driving related costs. Data was collected from 187 safe ride passengers during three nights of operation. Among the passengers, 93% were enrolled at a local University, 31% were younger than 21, and 40% reported a prior alcohol-related…

  7. Examining Internationalization in U.S. Counseling Psychology Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Erica J.; Gerstein, Lawrence H.; Aegisdottir, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather more information about the process of internationalization in U.S. counseling psychology programs. Participants included 26 training directors and 83 doctoral students, representing 32 of the 63 APA-accredited counseling psychology programs. Results suggested that the presence of international training…

  8. Healthy Weigh (El camino saludable) phase 1: a retrospective critical examination of program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frable, Pamela Jean; Dart, Lyn; Bradley, Patricia J

    2006-07-01

    Healthy Weigh (El camino saludable) is an obesity prevention program for low-income, predominantly Hispanic and African American families in an urban community in Tarrant County, Texas. Healthy Weigh Phase 1 was a successful community-campus partnership that took place in summer (June-August) and fall (September-November) 2003. The program met stated objectives and extensively engaged students from several health disciplines in service learning. This article describes what we learned about the evaluation of the program by examining the phase 1 evaluation process. Family environments are important intervention settings for establishing life-long dietary practices. Available in English and Spanish, Healthy Weigh Phase 1 helped families that were at risk for overweight and obesity to adopt healthy eating, physical activity, and weight management patterns. Analysis of a program logic model and formative evaluation data identified evaluation questions that could have improved the phase 1 evaluation process. Questions were categorized according to Donabedian's structure-process-outcome framework, and potential benefits of each question were identified. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Framework for Program Evaluation in Public Health standards were used to judge the overall quality of the phase 1 evaluation process. The phase 1 evaluation process successfully assessed the program's effects and generally met evaluation standards. Our critical examination also highlighted structure and process evaluation issues with potential for strengthening future interventions, community partnerships, and program outcomes. Lessons learned influenced the phase 2 grant activities. Most importantly, we learned that involvement of program participants as full partners in program design, evaluation, and implementation is essential. Our understanding and practice of program evaluation evolved as Healthy Weigh became a true community-based participatory research endeavor.

  9. 75 FR 15495 - Agency Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP)) Activities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP)) Activities... (CPEP).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans...

  10. 78 FR 6848 - Agency Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program) Activities Under OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program) Activities Under OMB....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans Satisfaction...

  11. Examination of Alternative Models of Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldag, Ramon J.; Brief, Arthur P.

    1978-01-01

    Researchers have generally assumed overall job satisfaction to be an additive function of weighted job satisfaction facet scores. This paper considers the linear compensatory model as well as two nonlinear alternatives. Available from: Ramon J. Aldag, University of Wisconsin, 1155 Observatory Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706. (Author)

  12. Dynamic programming models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Denardo, Eric V

    2003-01-01

    Introduction to sequential decision processes covers use of dynamic programming in studying models of resource allocation, methods for approximating solutions of control problems in continuous time, production control, more. 1982 edition.

  13. Oral Anatomy Laboratory Examinations in a Physical Therapy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizio, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    The process of creating and administering traditional tagged anatomy laboratory examinations is time consuming for instructors and limits laboratory access for students. Depending on class size and the number of class, sections, creating, administering, and breaking down a tagged laboratory examination may involve one to two eight-hour days.…

  14. Oral Anatomy Laboratory Examinations in a Physical Therapy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizio, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    The process of creating and administering traditional tagged anatomy laboratory examinations is time consuming for instructors and limits laboratory access for students. Depending on class size and the number of class, sections, creating, administering, and breaking down a tagged laboratory examination may involve one to two eight-hour days.…

  15. 75 FR 61998 - Programs for Specific Positions and Examinations (Miscellaneous)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ... licensure requirements for incumbent administrative law judges who are covered under the Administrative Law... published a final rule at 72 FR 12947, to revise the Administrative Law Judge Program. These revisions included a requirement for incumbent administrative law judges (ALJs) to ``possess a professional...

  16. 78 FR 71987 - Programs for Specific Positions and Examinations (Miscellaneous)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    ... a final rule to eliminate the licensure requirement for incumbent administrative law judges. DATES... (CFR), to revise the Administrative Law Judge Program. These revisions included a requirement for incumbent administrative law judges (ALJs) to ``. . . possess a professional license to practice law and...

  17. Program Evaluation of "Young at Heart": Examining Elderly Volunteers' Generativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jean Pearson; Reifman, Alan; Mulsow, Miriam; Feng, Du

    2003-01-01

    Elderly volunteers in the Young at Heart child care program (n=14), Meals on Wheels (n=14), other volunteer activities (n=24), and nonvolunteers (n=49) were compared. Although child-care volunteers were expected to score highest in generativity, volunteers in other activities did, followed by Young at Heart volunteers. (Contains 10 references.)…

  18. Examining Community-Engaged Scholarship in Public Administration Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norvell, Katrina Herndon

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to broaden the understanding of the role that academic professions play in shaping the values and attitudes of faculty toward CES. This study explored faculty perceptions regarding the factors that encourage or dissuade them in the pursuit of CES within public administration programs. As a framework for research, a conceptual…

  19. An examination of program integrity and recidivism of a cognitive-behavioral program for incarcerated youth in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmond, P.; Overbeek, G.; Brugman, D.

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined whether the cognitive behavioral program EQUIP for incarcerated youth would reduce recidivism and whether higher levels of program integrity - the extent to which a program is implemented as intended - would strengthen the effectiveness of EQUIP on recidivism. Program inte

  20. Implementing the objective structured clinical examination in a geriatrics fellowship program-a 3-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelino-Silva, Thiago J; Gil, Luiz A; Suemoto, Claudia K; Kikuchi, Elina L; Lin, Sumika M; Farias, Luciana L; Jacob-Filho, Wilson

    2012-07-01

    The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) appears to be an effective alternative for assessing not only medical knowledge, but also clinical skills, including effective communication and physical examination skills. The purpose of the current study was to implement an OSCE model in a geriatrics fellowship program and to compare the instrument with traditional essay examination. Seventy first- and second-year geriatric fellows were initially submitted to a traditional essay examination and scored from 0 to 10 by a faculty member. The same fellows subsequently underwent an OSCE with eight 10-minute stations covering a wide range of essential aspects of geriatric knowledge. Each OSCE station had an examiner responsible for its evaluation according to a predefined checklist. Checklist items were classified for analysis purposes as clinical knowledge items (CKI) and communication skills items (CSI); fellow responses were scored from 0 to 10.Although essay examinations took from 30 to 45 minutes to complete, 180-200 minutes were required to evaluate fellows using the proposed OSCE method. Fellows scored an average of 6.2 ± 1.2 on the traditional essay examination and 6.6 ± 1.0 on the OSCE (P OSCE scores indicated that average performance on CKI was lower than the average on CSI (6.4 ± 1.1 vs. 8.4 ± 1.1; P examination was similar to their performance on CKI (P = .13). Second-year fellows performed better than first-year fellows on the essay examination (P OSCE was successfully implemented as an educational strategy during a geriatrics fellowship program. Combining different testing modalities may provide the best assessment of competence for various domains of knowledge, skills, and behavior.

  1. Examining the Small Renewable Energy Power (SREP) Program in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sovacool, Benjamin K., E-mail: bsovacool@nus.edu.sg [Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore, 469C Bukit Timah Road, Singapore 259772 (Singapore); Drupady, Ira Martina [Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore, 469C Bukit Timah Road, Singapore 259772 (Singapore)

    2011-11-15

    The Small Renewable Energy Power (SREP) Program was the premier policy mechanism implemented by the national government to promote small-scale renewable electricity in Malaysia from 2001 to 2010. However, it managed meet less than 3 percent of its original goal by 2005. This study investigates what happened. More specifically, using a qualitative semi-structured interview approach with data presented in a narrative format, it answers the following five questions: (1) What are the primary energy policy and security challenges facing Malaysia? (2) What were the drivers behind the SREP in Malaysia? (3) What were the major benefits arising from the SREP? (4) What were the significant challenges to implementation? (5) What lessons or insights does the SREP offer for the study of energy policy design and implementation more generally? We find that the SREP failed to achieve its targets due to capacity caps, a lengthy approval process, lack of monitoring, exclusion of stakeholders, and few (if any) pre-feasibility studies. Other factors explaining its poor performance include opposition from the national utility Tenaga Nasional Berhad and electricity tariffs unmatched with true production costs. - Highlights: > The Small Renewable Energy Power Program aimed to install 500 MW by 2005. > It installed only 12 MW by December 2005. > This study investigates why the SREP failed to achieve its targets.

  2. 49 CFR 452.9 - Elements of a continuous examination program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Elements of a continuous examination program. 452... Elements of a continuous examination program. (a) Examinations required by § 452.7 must conform to the... established or industry accepted pass/fail criteria to determine whether a container has any deficiency...

  3. Model Checker for Java Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Willem

    2007-01-01

    Java Pathfinder (JPF) is a verification and testing environment for Java that integrates model checking, program analysis, and testing. JPF consists of a custom-made Java Virtual Machine (JVM) that interprets bytecode, combined with a search interface to allow the complete behavior of a Java program to be analyzed, including interleavings of concurrent programs. JPF is implemented in Java, and its architecture is highly modular to support rapid prototyping of new features. JPF is an explicit-state model checker, because it enumerates all visited states and, therefore, suffers from the state-explosion problem inherent in analyzing large programs. It is suited to analyzing programs less than 10kLOC, but has been successfully applied to finding errors in concurrent programs up to 100kLOC. When an error is found, a trace from the initial state to the error is produced to guide the debugging. JPF works at the bytecode level, meaning that all of Java can be model-checked. By default, the software checks for all runtime errors (uncaught exceptions), assertions violations (supports Java s assert), and deadlocks. JPF uses garbage collection and symmetry reductions of the heap during model checking to reduce state-explosion, as well as dynamic partial order reductions to lower the number of interleavings analyzed. JPF is capable of symbolic execution of Java programs, including symbolic execution of complex data such as linked lists and trees. JPF is extensible as it allows for the creation of listeners that can subscribe to events during searches. The creation of dedicated code to be executed in place of regular classes is supported and allows users to easily handle native calls and to improve the efficiency of the analysis.

  4. Using Implementation and Program Theory to Examine Communication Strategies in National Wildlife Federation's Backyard Wildlife Habitat Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Dain; Dann, Shari L.

    2004-01-01

    Our evaluative approach used implementation theory and program theory, adapted from Weiss (1998) to examine communication processes and results for a national wildlife habitat stewardship education program. Using a mail survey of 1427 participants certified in National Wildlife Federation's (NWF) Backyard Wildlife Habitat (BWH) program and a study…

  5. Examining incentive design strategies for worksite wellness program engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Gregory J; Heltemes, Kevin J; Drew, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    The objective was to examine employee engagement in worksite wellness activities at 2 large US companies that differed in engagement strategy and incentive plan. Inclusion criteria were US employees aged 18 to 65 who were eligible to receive wellness benefits throughout 2012. Company B's incentive was twice the dollar value of Company A's and produced higher engagement rates for the health assessment (HA; 26.1% vs. 24.4%, Pemployees who completed the HA and the biometric screening, 44.6% (N=2,309) at Company A engaged in at least 1 coaching session compared to 8.9% (N=594) at Company B. Fewer employees at Company A with high-risk cholesterol engaged in coaching compared to Company B (44.6% vs. 54.9%, P=.009). However, more Company A employees with high-risk blood pressure engaged in coaching compared to Company B (41.3% vs. 34.8%, P=.053). Company A engaged more obese employees compared to Company B (43.7% vs. 13.9%, Pengagement engaged high-risk employees in coaching, and engaged a high proportion of employees not at high risk, but who can still be at risk for chronic diseases.

  6. Program Analysis as Model Checking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mads Chr.

    and abstract interpretation. Model checking views the program as a finite automaton and tries to prove logical properties over the automaton model, or present a counter-example if not possible — with a focus on precision. Abstract interpretation translates the program semantics into abstract semantics...... problems as the other by a reformulation. This thesis argues that there is even a convergence on the practical level, and that a generalisation of the formalism of timed automata into lattice automata captures key aspects of both methods; indeed model checking timed automata can be formulated in terms...... of an abstract interpretation. For the generalisation to lattice automata to have benefit it is important that efficient tools exist. This thesis presents multi-core tools for efficient and scalable reachability and Büchi emptiness checking of timed/lattice automata. Finally, a number of case studies...

  7. Support for Career Development in Youth: Program Models and Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekinda, Megan A.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines four influential programs--Citizen Schools, After School Matters, career academies, and Job Corps--to demonstrate the diversity of approaches to career programming for youth. It compares the specific program models and draws from the evaluation literature to discuss strengths and weaknesses of each. The article highlights…

  8. Examining the Factors Associated with Paid Employment of Clients Enrolled in First Episode of Psychosis Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn S. Dewa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is one of the most debilitating mental disorders. For a significant portion of individuals who suffer from this disorder, onset occurs in young adulthood, arresting important social and educational development that is necessary for future successful labor force participation. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature about clients enrolled in first episode psychosis programs and psychosocial outcomes by examining the factors associated with paid employment among young adults who have experienced their first psychotic episodes. In this paper, we consider the association of socioeconomic factors to employment. Our results suggest that in addition to treatment, socioeconomic factors such as receipt of public disability benefits and educational attainment are associated with employment status. These results can help to inform future directions for the enhancement of psychosocial programs in FEP models to promote paid employment.

  9. "PERLE bedside-examination-course for candidates in state examination" - Developing a training program for the third part of medical state examination (oral examination with practical skills).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthaus, Anne; Schmidt, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Einführung: Viele Studierende haben Fragen und Beratungsbedarf bei der Vorbereitung für das letzte mündliche Examen. Um sie bei den Examensvorbereitungen zu begleiten und praktische Hilfestellung zu geben, wurde von Tutorinnen und Tutoren des SkillsLabs Perle- „Praxis ERfahren und LErnen“ der FAU Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg ein neues Kursmodell konzipiert.Ziele: Der Kurs soll den Studierenden helfen, sich mit der Prüfungssituation vertraut zu machen und Sicherheit zu erlangen. So ist die Auseinandersetzung mit dieser spezifischen Situation in einem geschützten Rahmen möglich. Außerdem findet eine Anwendung und eine Vertiefung von Softskills statt. Kurskonzept: Dieser Kurs ist angelehnt an das OSCE Modell (Objective Structured Clinical Examination), einem Fallbasierten Lern- und Prüfungsmodell. Anhand von Fallbeispielen wiederholen und vertiefen die Studierenden bereits gelerntes Wissen. Dabei werden sie von erfahrenen Tutoren begleitet, die Hilfestellung zu fachspezifischen und organisatorischen Fragen wie Kleiderordnung und Verhaltensweisen geben.Auswertung des Kurses: Der Kurs wurde von den Teilnehmern am Ende jedes Kurses evaluiert. Anhand der Evaluation wird der Kurs stetig weiterentwickelt. Im März, April und Oktober 2015 fanden sechs Kurse mit in Summe 84 Teilnehmern statt. 76 Fragebögen (91%) wurden vollständig ausgefüllt und ausgewertet.Diskussion: Als Stärken des Kurses sind ein guter Tutoren-Teilnehmer Schlüssel mit 1:4 (1 Tutor betreut 4 Teilnehmer), die Interaktivität des Kurses und die hohe Flexibilität auf die einzelne Gruppe eingehen zu können, zu nennen. Schwächen sind der limitierte Zeitrahmen und die bisher nicht erhobene Leistungsüberprüfung vor und nach dem Kurs. Schlussfolgerung: Dieser Artikel zeigt im Sinne eines „best practice“-Beispiels eine Möglichkeit auf, niederschwellig und mit geringen Kosten eine Vorbereitung für das praktische Examen anzubieten.

  10. Examining an important urban transportation management tool: subarea modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueming CHEN

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available At present, customized subarea models have been widely used in local transportation planning throughout the United States. The biggest strengths of a subarea model lie in its more detailed and accurate modeling outputs which better meet local planning requirements. In addition, a subarea model can substantially reduce database size and model running time. In spite of these advantages, subarea models remain quite weak in maintaining consistency with a regional model, modeling transit projects, smart growth measures, air quality conformity, and other areas. Both opportunities and threats exist for subarea modeling. In addition to examining subarea models, this paper introduces the decision-making process in choosing a proper subarea modeling approach (windowing versus focusing and software package. This study concludes that subarea modeling will become more popular in the future. More GIS applications, travel surveys, transit modeling, microsimulation software utilization, and other modeling improvements are expected to be incorporated into the subarea modeling process.

  11. PCXMC, a Monte Carlo program for calculating patient doses in medical x-ray examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapiovaara, M.; Siiskonen, T.

    2008-11-15

    PCXMC is a Monte Carlo program for calculating patients' organ doses and effective doses in medical x-ray examinations. The organs and tissues considered in the program are: active bone marrow, adrenals, brain, breasts, colon (upper and lower large intestine), extrathoracic airways, gall bladder, heart, kidneys, liver, lungs, lymph nodes, muscle, oesophagus, oral mucosa, ovaries, pancreas, prostate, salivary glands, skeleton, skin, small intestine, spleen, stomach, testicles, thymus, thyroid, urinary bladder and uterus. The program calculates the effective dose with both the present tissue weighting factors of ICRP Publication 103 (2007) and the old tissue weighting factors of ICRP Publication 60 (1991). The anatomical data are based on the mathematical hermaphrodite phantom models of Cristy and Eckerman (1987), which describe patients of six different ages: new-born, 1, 5, 10, 15-year-old and adult patients. Some changes are made to these phantoms in order to make them more realistic for external irradiation conditions and to enable the calculation of the effective dose according to the new ICRP Publication 103 tissue weighting factors. The phantom sizes are adjustable to mimic patients of an arbitrary weight and height. PCXMC allows a free adjustment of the x-ray beam projection and other examination conditions of projection radiography and fluoroscopy

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of Elderly Health Examination Program: The Example of Hypertension Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-Hwa Deng

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The National Health Insurance (NHI and social welfare agencies have implemented the Elderly Health Examination Program (EHEP for years. No study has ever attempted to evaluate whether this program is cost-effective. The purposes of this study were, firstly, to understand the prevalence and incidence rates of hypertension and, secondly, to estimate the cost and effectiveness of the EHEP, focusing on hypertension screening. The data sources were: (1 hypertension and clinical information derived from the 1996 and 1997 EHEP, which was used to generate prevalence and incidence rates of hypertension; and (2 claim data of the NHI that included treatment costs of stroke patients (in-and outpatients. Hypothetical models were used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the hypertension screening program in various conditions. Sensitivity analysis was also employed to evaluate the effect of each estimation indicator on the cost and effectiveness of the hypertension screening program. A total of 28.3% of the elderly population in Kaohsiung (25,174 of 88,812 participated in the 1996 EHEP; 14,915 of them participated in the following 1997 EHEP, with a retention rate of 59.3%. Criteria from the Sixth Report of the Joint National Committee on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC VI (systolic blood pressure/diastolic blood pressure ≥ 160/95mmHg or taking antihypertensive drugs were used; we found that prevalence and incidence rates of hypertension were 24.6% and 6.6%, respectively. Hypertension rates are increasing in the aging process as shown in both prevalence and incidence models. In comparison with non-participants, the prevalence model indicates that each hypertension patient who had attended the EHEP not only saved NT$34,570–34,890 in medical and associated costs, but also increased their lifespan by 128 days. The present findings suggest that the EHEP is a cost-effective program with health and social welfare policy

  13. A Subgroup Analysis of Predictors to Certification Examination Success in Differing Principal Preparation Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmore, Elaine L.

    This study addresses the factors of Graduate Record Examination scores (GRE), race, gender, and undergraduate grade point average (GPA) as predictors of principal certification examination success at a large urban university. The university has three programs that lead to a masters degree and principal certification. The regular program consists…

  14. An Examination of the Concept and Role of Program Monitoring and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood-Fabre, Liese

    This paper examines the concepts of program monitoring and program evaluation in the literature, and offers working definitions based on two dimensions of measurement: focus (what questions are addressed) and timing (how often the measures are taken). Focus can be on inputs to the program or outcomes from it; timing can be one-shot or continuous.…

  15. An Examination of Program Selection Criteria for Part-Time MBA Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colburn, Michael; Fox, Daniel E.; Westerfelt, Debra Kay

    2011-01-01

    Prospective graduate students select a graduate program as a result of a multifaceted decision-making process. This study examines the selection criteria that part-time MBA students used in selecting a program at a private university. Further, it analyzes the methods by which the students first learned of the MBA program. The authors posed the…

  16. Support for career development in youth: program models and evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekinda, Megan A

    2012-01-01

    This article examines four influential programs-Citizen Schools, After School Matters, career academies, and Job Corps-to demonstrate the diversity of approaches to career programming for youth. It compares the specific program models and draws from the evaluation literature to discuss strengths and weaknesses of each. The article highlights three key lessons derived from the models that have implications for career development initiatives more generally: (1) career programming can and should be designed for youth across a broad age range, (2) career programming does not have to come at the expense of academic training or preparation for college, and (3) program effectiveness depends on intentional design and high-quality implementation.

  17. Examining a Model of Life Satisfaction among Unemployed Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Ryan D.; Bott, Elizabeth M.; Allan, Blake A.; Torrey, Carrie L.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined a model of life satisfaction among a diverse sample of 184 adults who had been unemployed for an average of 10.60 months. Using the Lent (2004) model of life satisfaction as a framework, a model was tested with 5 hypothesized predictor variables: optimism, job search self-efficacy, job search support, job search…

  18. Modeling the effects of study abroad programs on college students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvin H. Yu; Garry E. Chick; Duarte B. Morais; Chung-Hsien Lin

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the possibility of modeling the effects of a study abroad program on students from a university in the northeastern United States. A program effect model was proposed after conducting an extensive literature review and empirically examining a sample of 265 participants in 2005. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA),...

  19. APPLYING LOGISTIC REGRESSION MODEL TO THE EXAMINATION RESULTS DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutam Saha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The binary logistic regression model is used to analyze the school examination results(scores of 1002 students. The analysis is performed on the basis of the independent variables viz.gender, medium of instruction, type of schools, category of schools, board of examinations andlocation of schools, where scores or marks are assumed to be dependent variables. The odds ratioanalysis compares the scores obtained in two examinations viz. matriculation and highersecondary.

  20. An Examination of Need-Satisfaction Models of Job Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salancik, Gerald R.; Pfeffer, Jeffrey

    1977-01-01

    An examination of need-satisfaction models indicates that they are frequently formulated so as to be almost impossible to refute, and the research testing them has been beset with consistency and priming artifacts. (Author/IRT)

  1. Post-irradiation examination and R and D programs using irradiated fuels at KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Yong Bum; Min, Duck Kee; Kim, Eun Ka and others

    2000-12-01

    This report describes the Post-Irradiation Examination(PIE) and R and D programs using irradiated fuels at KAERI. The objectives of post-irradiation examination (PIE) for the PWR irradiated fuels, CANDU fuels, HANARO fuels and test fuel materials are to verify the irradiation performance and their integrity as well as to construct a fuel performance data base. The comprehensive utilization program of the KAERI's post-irradiation examination related nuclear facilities such as Post-Irradiation Examination Facility (PIEF), Irradiated Materials Examination Facility (IMEF) and HANARO is described.

  2. Optimizing Violence Prevention Programs: An Examination of Program Effectiveness among Urban High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompkins, Amanda C.; Chauveron, Lisa M.; Harel, Ofer; Perkins, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: While demand for youth violence prevention programs increases, the ability of the school-day schedule to accommodate their time requirements has diminished. Viable school-based prevention programs must strike a balance between brevity and effectiveness. This article reports results from an effectiveness trial of a 12-session…

  3. Examining the Nelson-Siegel Class of Term Structure Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.D. de Pooter (Michiel)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper I examine various extensions of the Nelson and Siegel (1987) model with the purpose of fitting and forecasting the term structure of interest rates. As expected, I find that using more flexible models leads to a better in-sample fit of the term structure. However, I show th

  4. Examining Elementary Social Studies Marginalization: A Multilevel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitchett, Paul G.; Heafner, Tina L.; Lambert, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing data from the National Center for Education Statistics Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS), a multilevel model (Hierarchical Linear Model) was developed to examine the association of teacher/classroom and state level indicators on reported elementary social studies instructional time. Findings indicated that state testing policy was a…

  5. Free for All: A Case Study Examining Implementation Factors of One-to-One Device Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Sarah K.; Rennie, Ellie

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant investment in school one-to-one device programs, little is known about which aspects of program implementation work and why. Through a comparison of two implementation models, adopter-diffusion and saturation, and using existing data from the One Laptop per Child Australia laptop program, we explored how factors of…

  6. 77 FR 69549 - Proposed Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans.... This notice solicits comments on the Veteran experience in taking the Compensation and Pension... on the collection of information through the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS) at...

  7. Impact of a weekly reading program on orthopedic surgery residents' in-training examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weglein, Daniel G; Gugala, Zbigniew; Simpson, Suzanne; Lindsey, Ronald W

    2015-05-01

    In response to a decline in individual residents' performance and overall program performance on the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination (OITE), the authors' department initiated a daily literature reading program coupled with weekly tests on the assigned material. The goal of this study was to assess the effect of the reading program on individual residents' scores and the training program's OITE scores. The reading program consisted of daily review articles from the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, followed by a weekly written examination consisting of multiple-choice or fill-in-the-blank questions. All articles were selected and all questions were written by the departmental chair. A questionnaire was given to assess residents' perceptions of the weekly tests. As a result of implementing the reading program for a 10-month period, residents' subsequent performance on the OITE significantly improved (mean score increase, 4, Porthopedic surgery residents.

  8. Examining Inclusion of Evidence-Based Practice on Social Work Training Program Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wike, Traci L.; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Grady, Melissa D.

    2013-01-01

    Websites represent a visible medium for social work programs to communicate information about social work research, academics, and professional training priorities, including evidence-based practice (EBP). However, few studies have examined the content of social work program websites. This exploratory study aimed to answer the question: Are EBP…

  9. Examining Nontraditional Graduate Students' Academic Writing Experiences in an Accelerated Adult Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crite, Charles E., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The academic writing competencies of nontraditional graduate students enrolled in accelerated graduate programs have become a growing concern for many higher learning educators in those programs. The purpose of this nonexperimental quantitative study was to examine the writing experiences that impacted nontraditional graduate students enrolled in…

  10. Alternative models of DSM-5 PTSD: Examining diagnostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Siobhan; Hansen, Maj; Elklit, Ask; Yong Chen, Yoke; Raudzah Ghazali, Siti; Shevlin, Mark

    2017-09-09

    The factor structure of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been extensively debated with evidence supporting the recently proposed seven-factor Hybrid model. However, despite myriad studies examining PTSD symptom structure few have assessed the diagnostic implications of these proposed models. This study aimed to generate PTSD prevalence estimates derived from the 7 alternative factor models and assess whether pre-established risk factors associated with PTSD (e.g., transportation accidents and sexual victimisation) produce consistent risk estimates. Seven alternative models were estimated within a confirmatory factor analytic framework using the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5). Data were analysed from a Malaysian adolescent community sample (n = 481) of which 61.7% were female, with a mean age of 17.03 years. The results indicated that all models provided satisfactory model fit with statistical superiority for the Externalising Behaviours and seven-factor Hybrid models. The PTSD prevalence estimates varied substantially ranging from 21.8% for the DSM-5 model to 10.0% for the Hybrid model. Estimates of risk associated with PTSD were inconsistent across the alternative models, with substantial variation emerging for sexual victimisation. These findings have important implications for research and practice and highlight that more research attention is needed to examine the diagnostic implications emerging from the alternative models of PTSD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. An Assessment of ORNL PIE Capabilities for the AGR Program Capsule Post Irradiation Examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL

    2006-09-01

    ORNL has facilities and experienced staff that can execute +the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) task. While the specific PIE breakdown needs to be more formally defined, the basic outline is clear and the existing capabilities can be assessed within the needs of the tasks defined in the program plan. A one-to-one correspondence between the program plan tasks and the current ORNL PIE status was conducted and while some shortcomings were identified, the general capability is available. Specific upgrade needs were identified and reviewed. A path forward was formulated. Building 3525 is available for this work and this building is currently receiving renewed attention from management so that it will be in good working order prior to the expected PIE start date. This building is equipped with the tools necessary for PIEs of this nature, but the long hiatus in coated particle fuel work has left it with aging analysis tools. This report identified several of these tools and rough estimates of what would be required to update and replace them. In addition, other ORNL buildings are available to support Building 3525 in specialized tasks along with the normal laboratory infrastructure. Before the AGR management embarks on any equipment development effort, the PIE tasks should be updated against current program (modeling and data) needs and better defined so that the items to be measured, their measurement uncertainties, and thru-put needs can be reviewed. A Data Task Matrix (DTM) should be prepared so that the program data needs can be compared against the identified PIE tasks and what is practical in the hot cell environment to make sure nothing is overlooked. Finally, thought should be given to the development of standardized equipment designs between sites to avoid redundant design efforts and different measurement techniques. This is a potentially cost saving effort that can also avoid data inconsistencies.

  12. Considering Student Voices: Examining the Experiences of Underrepresented Students in Intervention Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibau, Gina Sanchez

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative studies that examine the experiences of underrepresented minority students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields are comparatively few. This study explores the self-reported experiences of underrepresented graduate students in the biomedical sciences of a large, midwestern, urban university. Document analysis of interview transcripts from program evaluations capture firsthand accounts of student experiences and reveal the need for a critical examination of current intervention programs designed to reverse the trend of underrepresentation in the biomedical sciences. Findings point to themes aligned around the benefits and challenges of program components, issues of social adjustment, the utility of supportive relationships, and environmental impacts.

  13. A New Model for Training in Periodontal Examinations Using Manikins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heym, Richard; Krause, Sebastian; Hennessen, Till; Pitchika, Vinay; Ern, Christina; Hickel, Reinhard

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and test models for training dental students in periodontal examinations using manikins that had distinct anatomical designs but were indistinguishable in external appearance. After four models were tested for inter- and intra-examiner reliability by two experienced dentists, 26 additional models were produced. The models were tested by 35 dental students at a dental school in Germany in 2014. The testing involved completing a periodontal examination that included probing depths, gingival recessions, and furcation involvements. The primary purpose of the study was to determine whether the models could be used as a tool for periodontal examination training by the students. Levels of agreement (students and dentists) and Kappa statistics (dentists) were calculated using absolute (±0 mm) and tolerable difference (±1 mm). Over the span of two weeks, the dentists' reliability with preset values for probing depths, gingival recessions, and furcation involvements ranged from 0.29 to 0.38, 0.52 to 0.61, and 0.54 to 0.57, respectively, under absolute difference and from 0.86 to 0.90, 0.96 to 0.99, and 0.62 to 0.73, respectively, under tolerable difference. The students' proportions of agreement for probing depths and gingival recessions under absolute vs. tolerable difference were 34.8% vs. 79.9% and 71.9% vs. 94.4%, respectively. The students frequently scored values higher than the preset values, overestimated furcation involvements, and failed to differentiate the levels of furcations. The models used did not pose any systematic or technical difficulties in the pilot study. Students were unable to measure furcation involvements with acceptable agreement. Thus, these models could be used for student periodontal examination training.

  14. Alternative models of DSM-5 PTSD: Examining diagnostic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, Siobhan; Hansen, Maj; Elklit, Ask

    2017-01-01

    The factor structure of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been extensively debated with evidence supporting the recently proposed seven-factor Hybrid model. However, despite myriad studies examining PTSD symptom structure few have assessed the diagnostic implications of these proposed...... estimated within a confirmatory factor analytic framework using the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5). Data were analysed from a Malaysian adolescent community sample (n=481) of which 61.7% were female, with a mean age of 17.03 years. The results indicated that all models provided satisfactory model fit...... with statistical superiority for the Externalizing Behaviours and seven-factor Hybrid models. The PTSD prevalence estimates varied substantially ranging from 21.8% for the DSM-5 model to 10.0% for the Hybrid model. Estimates of risk associated with PTSD were inconsistent across the alternative models...

  15. 75 FR 2594 - Proposed Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans... comments on the Veteran experience in taking the Compensation and Pension examination at individual CPEP... through the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS) at http://www.Regulations.gov ; or to Mary...

  16. Use of NBME and USMLE Examinations to Evaluate Medical Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Reed G.

    1993-01-01

    Criteria are presented for determining whether licensure and/or achievement test results should be used for making various types of comparisons and judgments about medical education programs. The United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) and National Board of Medical Examiners tests (NBME) are then considered as data sources. (Author/MSE)

  17. Wave equation modelling using Julia programming language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ahreum; Ryu, Donghyun; Ha, Wansoo

    2016-04-01

    Julia is a young high-performance dynamic programming language for scientific computations. It provides an extensive mathematical function library, a clean syntax and its own parallel execution model. We developed 2d wave equation modeling programs using Julia and C programming languages and compared their performance. We used the same modeling algorithm for the two modeling programs. We used Julia version 0.3.9 in this comparison. We declared data type of function arguments and used inbounds macro in the Julia program. Numerical results showed that the C programs compiled with Intel and GNU compilers were faster than Julia program, about 18% and 7%, respectively. Taking the simplicity of dynamic programming language into consideration, Julia can be a novel alternative of existing statically typed programming languages.

  18. Synthetic models of distributed memory parallel programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poplawski, D.A. (Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (USA). Dept. of Computer Science)

    1990-09-01

    This paper deals with the construction and use of simple synthetic programs that model the behavior of more complex, real parallel programs. Synthetic programs can be used in many ways: to construct an easily ported suite of benchmark programs, to experiment with alternate parallel implementations of a program without actually writing them, and to predict the behavior and performance of an algorithm on a new or hypothetical machine. Synthetic programs are constructed easily from scratch, from existing programs, and can even be constructed using nothing but information obtained from traces of the real program's execution.

  19. Examination of Self-Determination within the Sport Education Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Dana J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of the Sport Education Model (SEM) on students' self-determined motivation and underlying psychological need(s) in physical education. A total of 182 Year-9 students were engaged in 20 lesson units of volleyball, using either the SEM or a traditional approach. Data was collected using a…

  20. Examining Response to Intervention (RTI) Models in Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epler, Pam, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    Response to Intervention (RTI) is an intervention model designed to assist all students regardless of their academic ability. It seeks to assist students who are struggling in academics by providing them with targeted assistance in the form of tutoring, pull-out services, and differentiated classroom instruction. "Examining Response to…

  1. A Unified Approach to Modeling and Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Møller-Pedersen, Birger

    2010-01-01

    of this paper is to go back to the future and get inspiration from SIMULA and propose a unied approach. In addition to reintroducing the contributions of SIMULA and the Scandinavian approach to object-oriented programming, we do this by discussing a number of issues in modeling and programming and argue3 why we......SIMULA was a language for modeling and programming and provided a unied approach to modeling and programming in contrast to methodologies based on structured analysis and design. The current development seems to be going in the direction of separation of modeling and programming. The goal...

  2. An Examination of Extended a-Rescaling Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Zhan-Yuan; DUAN Chun-Gui; HE Zhen-Min

    2001-01-01

    The extended x-rescaling model can explain the quark's nuclear effect very well. Weather it can also explain the gluon's nuclear effect should be investigated further. Associated J/ψ and γ production with large PT is a very clean channel to probe the gluon distribution in proton or nucleus. In this paper, using the extended x-rescaling model, the PT distribution of the nuclear effect factors of p + Fe → J/Ψ + γ+ X process is calculated and discussed. Comparing our theoretical results with the future experimental data, the extended x-rescaling model can be examined.``

  3. Energy efficiency in nonprofit agencies: Creating effective program models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Prindle, B.; Scherr, M.I.; White, D.L.

    1990-08-01

    Nonprofit agencies are a critical component of the health and human services system in the US. It has been clearly demonstrated by programs that offer energy efficiency services to nonprofits that, with minimal investment, they can educe their energy consumption by ten to thirty percent. This energy conservation potential motivated the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to conceive a project to help states develop energy efficiency programs for nonprofits. The purpose of the project was two-fold: (1) to analyze existing programs to determine which design and delivery mechanisms are particularly effective, and (2) to create model programs for states to follow in tailoring their own plans for helping nonprofits with energy efficiency programs. Twelve existing programs were reviewed, and three model programs were devised and put into operation. The model programs provide various forms of financial assistance to nonprofits and serve as a source of information on energy efficiency as well. After examining the results from the model programs (which are still on-going) and from the existing programs, several replicability factors'' were developed for use in the implementation of programs by other states. These factors -- some concrete and practical, others more generalized -- serve as guidelines for states devising program based on their own particular needs and resources.

  4. Examining Variations in Fourth-Grade Children's Participation in School Breakfast and Lunch Programs by Student and Program Demographics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinn, Caroline H.; Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Finney, Christopher J.; Hitchcock, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Analyses were conducted to examine variations in fourth-grade children's participation in school-breakfast and school-lunch programs by weekday, month, socioeconomic status, absenteeism, gender, and school-breakfast location. Methods: Fourth-grade children were participants in a dietary-reporting validation study during either…

  5. A Type Graph Model for Java Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Arend; Zambon, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    In this report we present a type graph that models all executable constructs of the Java programming language. Such a model is useful for any graph-based technique that relies on a representation of Java programs as graphs. The model can be regarded as a common representation to which all Java

  6. A Type Graph Model for Java Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Arend; Zambon, Eduardo; Lee, D.; Lopes, A.; Poetzsch-Heffter, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we present a type graph that models all executable constructs of the Java programming language. Such a model is useful for any graph-based technique that relies on a representation of Java programs as graphs. The model can be regarded as a common representation to which all Java syntax

  7. A Type Graph Model for Java Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Arend; Zambon, Eduardo; Lee, D.; Lopes, A.; Poetzsch-Heffter, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we present a type graph that models all executable constructs of the Java programming language. Such a model is useful for any graph-based technique that relies on a representation of Java programs as graphs. The model can be regarded as a common representation to which all Java syntax

  8. A Type Graph Model for Java Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Arend; Zambon, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    In this report we present a type graph that models all executable constructs of the Java programming language. Such a model is useful for any graph-based technique that relies on a representation of Java programs as graphs. The model can be regarded as a common representation to which all Java synta

  9. Introduction to an open source internet-based testing program for medical student examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon-Hwan

    2009-12-20

    The author developed a freely available open source internet-based testing program for medical examination. PHP and Java script were used as the programming language and postgreSQL as the database management system on an Apache web server and Linux operating system. The system approach was that a super user inputs the items, each school administrator inputs the examinees' information, and examinees access the system. The examinee's score is displayed immediately after examination with item analysis. The set-up of the system beginning with installation is described. This may help medical professors to easily adopt an internet-based testing system for medical education.

  10. Examining subgrid models of supermassive black holes in cosmological simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Sutter, P M

    2010-01-01

    While supermassive black holes (SMBHs) play an important role in galaxy and cluster evolution, at present they can only be included in large-scale cosmological simulation via subgrid techniques. However, these subgrid models have not been studied in a systematic fashion. Using a newly-developed fast, parallel spherical overdensity halo finder built into the simulation code FLASH, we perform a suite of dark matter-only cosmological simulations to study the effects of subgrid model choice on relations between SMBH mass and dark matter halo mass and velocity dispersion. We examine three aspects of SMBH subgrid models: the choice of initial black hole seed mass, the test for merging two black holes, and the frequency of applying the subgrid model. We also examine the role that merging can play in determining the relations, ignoring the complicating effects of SMBH-driven accretion and feedback. We find that the choice of subgrid model can dramatically affect the black hole merger rate, the cosmic SMBH mass densit...

  11. Transactional Models Between Personality and Alcohol Involvement: A Further Examination

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Although correlated changes between personality and alcohol involvement have been shown, the functional relation between these constructs is also of theoretical and clinical interest. Using bivariate latent difference score models, we examined transactional relations (i.e., personality predicting changes in alcohol involvement, which in turn predicts changes in personality) across two distinct but overlapping developmental time frames (i.e., across college and during young adulthood) using tw...

  12. Mental Models and Programming Aptitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspersen, Michael Edelgaard; Bennedsen, Jens; Larsen, Kasper Dalgaard

    2007-01-01

    Predicting the success of students participating in introductory programming courses has been an active research area for more than 25 years. Until recently, no variables or tests have had any significant predictive power. However, Dehnadi and Bornat claim to have found a simple test...... for programming aptitude to cleanly separate programming sheep from non-programming goats. We briefly present their theory and test instrument. We have repeated their test in our local context in order to verify and perhaps generalise their findings, but we could not show that the test predicts students' success...... in our introductory program-ming course. Based on this failure of the test instrument, we discuss various explanations for our differing results and suggest a research method from which it may be possible to generalise local results in this area. Furthermore, we discuss and criticize Dehnadi and Bornat...

  13. Differential program evaluation model in child protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalayants, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly attention has been focused to the degree to which social programs have effectively and efficiently delivered services. Using the differential program evaluation model by Tripodi, Fellin, and Epstein (1978) and by Bielawski and Epstein (1984), this paper described the application of this model to evaluating a multidisciplinary clinical consultation practice in child protection. This paper discussed the uses of the model by demonstrating them through the four stages of program initiation, contact, implementation, and stabilization. This organizational case study made a contribution to the model by introducing essential and interrelated elements of a "practical evaluation" methodology in evaluating social programs, such as a participatory evaluation approach; learning, empowerment and sustainability; and a flexible individualized approach to evaluation. The study results demonstrated that by applying the program development model, child-protective administrators and practitioners were able to evaluate the existing practices and recognize areas for program improvement.

  14. Currency Arbitrage Detection Using a Binary Integer Programming Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soon, Wanmei; Ye, Heng-Qing

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we examine the use of a new binary integer programming (BIP) model to detect arbitrage opportunities in currency exchanges. This model showcases an excellent application of mathematics to the real world. The concepts involved are easily accessible to undergraduate students with basic knowledge in Operations Research. Through this…

  15. Mathematical Programming Models in Educational Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, James F.

    This document begins by defining and discussing educational planning. A brief overview of mathematical programing with an explanation of the general linear programing model is then provided. Some recent applications of mathematical programing techniques to educational planning problems are reviewed, and their implications for educational research…

  16. A Parallel Programming Model With Sequential Semantics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Parallel programming is more difficult than sequential programming in part because of the complexity of reasoning, testing, and debugging in the...context of concurrency. In the thesis, we present and investigate a parallel programming model that provides direct control of parallelism in a notation

  17. Action Plan to Improve State Examination Results. Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Program. Cienfuegos, 2008-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina Núñez Martínez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: the analysis of the state examination results in the 21 programs of the Health Technology undergraduate studies in the province of Cienfuegos during the 2008-2010 academic years showed four programs with largest number of failing students. Among them, Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation had the highest failure rates in the 2009-2010 academic year. Objective: to implement an action plan to improve academic performance of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation students on the theoretical exercise of the state examination. Methods: a before-after intervention study was conducted from September 2008 to July 2012. It included 52 students who failed the written state examination and 100% of the students who took the exam in the 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 academic years to whom the plan was applied. Results: an improvement plan validated by experts was developed. It included actions that had an impact on low academic performance on the theoretical exercise of the state examination, as well as on the shortcomings of the design and implementation of the evaluation system. The quality of results on state examinations improved after putting the action plan into practice. Conclusion: this action plan allowed changing the unfavorable performance on state examinations in the Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation program during the 2008-2010 period.

  18. BUILDING MATHEMATICAL MODELS IN DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIANA RODICA PATER

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In short, we can say that dynamic programming is a method of optimization of systems, using their mathematical representation in phases or sequences or as we say, periods. Such systems are common in economic studies at the implementation of programs on the most advanced techniques, such as for example that involving cosmic navigation. Another concept that is involved in the study of dynamic programs is the economic horizon (number of periods or phases that a dynamic program needs. This concept often leads to the examination of the convergence of certain variables on infinite horizon. In many cases from the real economy by introducing updating, dynamic programs can be made convergent.

  19. Examining Clinical Judgment in an Adaptive Intervention Design: The Fast Track Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierman, Karen L.; Nix, Robert L.; Maples, Jerry J.; Murphy, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    Although clinical judgment is often used in assessment and treatment planning, rarely has research examined its reliability, validity, or impact in practice settings. This study tailored the frequency of home visits in a prevention program for aggressive-disruptive children (n = 410; 56% minority) on the basis of 2 kinds of clinical judgment:…

  20. Early Language Learning for All: Examination of a Prekindergarten French Program in an Inclusion Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regalla, Michele; Peker, Hilal

    2015-01-01

    This preliminary study examined a prekindergarten multimodal French program conducted for students in an inclusion charter school. Due to the age and varied ability levels of the students, media such as video and songs combined with kinesthetic activities served as the primary instructional approach. Data on children's ability to understand and…

  1. Peer-Reviewed Research and Individualized Education Programs (IEPS): An Examination of Intent and Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etscheidt, Susan; Curran, Christina M.

    2010-01-01

    The reauthorized Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requires Individualized Education Program (IEP) teams to base the selection of special education, related services, and supplementary aids and services on peer-reviewed research (PRR) to the extent practicable. This article examines the intended purpose of the PRR provision and…

  2. Benefits of Informal Learning Environments: A Focused Examination of STEM-Based Program Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denson, Cameron D.; Austin Stallworth, Chandra; Hailey, Christine; Householder, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines STEM-based informal learning environments for underrepresented students and reports on the aspects of these programs that are beneficial to students. This qualitative study provides a nuanced look into informal learning environments and determines what is unique about these experiences and makes them beneficial for students. We…

  3. Using Methodological Triangulation to Examine the Effectiveness of a Mentoring Program for Online Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Michelle; Stewart, Jennifer; Van Gorder, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this quasi-experimental mixed methods study, we examined the effectiveness of a faculty-to-faculty mentoring program to increase student success rates in online courses at an American university. Over one semester, 24 faculty mentees worked with 6 faculty mentors on improving course organization and implementing student engagement techniques.…

  4. University-Based Evaluation Training Programs in the United States 1980-2008: An Empirical Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVelle, John M.; Donaldson, Stewart I.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation practice has grown in leaps and bounds in recent years. In contrast, the most recent survey data suggest that there has been a sharp decline in the number and strength of preservice evaluation training programs in the United States. In an effort to further understand this curious trend, an alternative methodology was used to examine the…

  5. Examination of the Empirical Research Environment of Program Evaluation: Methodology and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal, Yonatan

    2010-01-01

    The study dealt with a research environment in which the treatment effect is heterogeneous, and in which individuals use their assessments of the treatment effect to decide whether or not to enroll in an intervention program. In this article, a new methodology is proposed for examining the validity of the specified research environment in a given…

  6. Clinical Psychology Program Improvement on the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templer, Donald I.; Tyler, Lori; Nelson, Adam A.; Winstanley, Scott; Chicota, Cammy

    2004-01-01

    The present study was conducted in the context of previous research on the validity, correlates, and stability over time of clinical psychology program graduate scores on the national licensing exam, the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP). The purpose of the present study was to determine the characteristics of programs…

  7. "School within a School": Examining Implementation Barriers in a Spanish/English Transitional Bilingual Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNicolo, Christina Passos

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the ways that general education and bilingual teachers make sense of a Spanish/English transitional bilingual program housed at one elementary school in a Midwestern school district. An in-depth examination of perceptions and attitudes unmasks key factors regarding the implementation and interpretation of bilingual programs…

  8. Preliminary Examination of Adolescent Spending in a Contingency Management-Based Smoking-Cessation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Dana A.; Nich, Charla; Schepis, Ty S.; Smith, Anne E.; Liss, Thomas B.; McFetridge, Amanda K.; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra

    2010-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) utilizing monetary incentives is efficacious in enhancing abstinence in an adolescent smoking-cessation program, but how adolescents spend their money has not been examined. We assessed spending habits of 38 adolescent smokers in a CM-based smoking-cessation project prior to quitting and during treatment using a…

  9. Using Methodological Triangulation to Examine the Effectiveness of a Mentoring Program for Online Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Michelle; Stewart, Jennifer; Van Gorder, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this quasi-experimental mixed methods study, we examined the effectiveness of a faculty-to-faculty mentoring program to increase student success rates in online courses at an American university. Over one semester, 24 faculty mentees worked with 6 faculty mentors on improving course organization and implementing student engagement techniques.…

  10. Assessment of Primary Representational Systems with Neurolinguistic Programming: Examination of Preliminary Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Fred J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Reviews the inconsistent findings of studies on neurolinguistic programing and recommends some areas that should be examined to verify various claims. Discusses methods of assessing client's primary representational systems, including predicate usage and eye movements, and suggests that more reliable methods of assessing PRS must be found. (JAC)

  11. A Public Education Program in Self-Examination for Orofacial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabau, John C.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Instruction in self-examination for early detection of orofacial cancer was given to more than 450 persons at the Erie County (New York) Fair to familiarize the public with the technique. Results of followup studies of participants and program experience suggest that it is feasible to implement the instruction on a large scale. (MF)

  12. A Public Education Program in Self-Examination for Orofacial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabau, John C.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Instruction in self-examination for early detection of orofacial cancer was given to more than 450 persons at the Erie County (New York) Fair to familiarize the public with the technique. Results of followup studies of participants and program experience suggest that it is feasible to implement the instruction on a large scale. (MF)

  13. Applied Integer Programming Modeling and Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Der-San; Dang, Yu

    2011-01-01

    An accessible treatment of the modeling and solution of integer programming problems, featuring modern applications and software In order to fully comprehend the algorithms associated with integer programming, it is important to understand not only how algorithms work, but also why they work. Applied Integer Programming features a unique emphasis on this point, focusing on problem modeling and solution using commercial software. Taking an application-oriented approach, this book addresses the art and science of mathematical modeling related to the mixed integer programming (MIP) framework and

  14. Visual Teaching Model for Introducing Programming Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehane, Ronald; Sherman, Steven

    2014-01-01

    This study examines detailed usage of online training videos that were designed to address specific course problems that were encountered in an online computer programming course. The study presents the specifics of a programming course where training videos were used to provide students with a quick start path to learning a new programming…

  15. Research on teacher education programs: logic model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Xiaoxia A; Poon, Rebecca C; Nunes, Nicole L; Stone, Elisa M

    2013-02-01

    Teacher education programs in the United States face increasing pressure to demonstrate their effectiveness through pupils' learning gains in classrooms where program graduates teach. The link between teacher candidates' learning in teacher education programs and pupils' learning in K-12 classrooms implicit in the policy discourse suggests a one-to-one correspondence. However, the logical steps leading from what teacher candidates have learned in their programs to what they are doing in classrooms that may contribute to their pupils' learning are anything but straightforward. In this paper, we argue that the logic model approach from scholarship on evaluation can enhance research on teacher education by making explicit the logical links between program processes and intended outcomes. We demonstrate the usefulness of the logic model approach through our own work on designing a longitudinal study that focuses on examining the process and impact of an undergraduate mathematics and science teacher education program.

  16. Examining of the Collision Breakup Model between Geostationary Orbit Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Hidehiro; Hanada, Toshiya; Akahoshi, Yasuhiro; Yasaka, Tetsuo; Harada, Shoji

    This paper will examine the applicability of the hypervelocity collision model included in the NASA standard breakup model 2000 revision to low-velocity collisions possible in space, especially in the geosynchronous regime. The analytic method used in the standard breakup model will be applied to experimental data accumulated through low-velocity impact experiments performed at Kyushu Institute of Technology at a velocity about 300m/s and 800m/s. The projectiles and target specimens used were aluminum solid balls and aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels with face sheets of carbon fiber reinforced plastic, respectively. Then, we have found that a kind of lower boundary exists on fragment area-to-mass distribution at a smaller characteristic length range. This paper will describe the theoretical derivation of lower boundary and propose another modification on fragment area-to-mass distribution and it will conclude that the hypervelocity collision model in the standard breakup model can be applied to low-velocity collisions possible with some modifications.

  17. Preparing the Next Generation of Earth Scientists: An Examination of 25 Federal Earth Science Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, A. M.; Goldstein, A.; Manduca, C. A.; Pyle, E. J.; Asher, P. M.; White, L. D.; Riggs, E. M.; Cozzens, S.; Glickson, D.

    2013-12-01

    Federal agencies play a key role in educating the next generation of earth scientists, offering programs that attract students to the field, support them through formal education, and provide training for an earth science career. In a time of reduced budgets, it is important for federal agencies to invest in education programs that are effective. A National Research Council committee examined 25 federal earth science education programs and described ways to evaluate the success of these programs and opportunities for leveraging federal education resources. Although the programs cover a wide range of objectives and audiences, they are part of a system of opportunities and experiences that attract individuals to the field and prepare them for employment. In this conceptual framework, individuals become aware of earth science, then engage in learning about the Earth and the nature of earth science, and finally prepare for a career by acquiring specialized knowledge, skills, and expertise and by exploring different employment options. The federal education programs considered in this report provide a range of opportunities for raising awareness of earth science (e.g., USDA 4-H Club), nurturing that interest to engage students in the field (e.g., USGS Youth Internship Program), and preparing students for earth science careers (NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates, DOE Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships). These efforts can also contribute toward the development of a robust earth science workforce by connecting programs and providing pathways for students to move through informal and formal education to careers. The conceptual framework shows how the various education opportunities fit together and where connections are needed to move students along earth science pathways. The framework can also be used by federal agencies to identify gaps, overlaps, and imbalances in existing programs; to identify potential partners in other agencies or organizations

  18. Examination of program exposure across intervention delivery modes: face-to-face versus internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mummery W Kerry

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been increasing interest in the ability of the internet to produce behaviour change. The focus of this study was to describe program exposure across three intervention groups from a randomised trial (RT comparing traditional face-to-face, internet-mediated (combined internet plus face-to-face, and internet-only program delivery. Methods Baseline and immediately post-intervention survey data, and exposure rates from participants that commenced the RT were included (n = 192. Exposure was defined as either face-to-face attendance, website usage, or a combination of both for the internet-mediated group. Characteristics of participants who were exposed to at least 75% of the program material were explored. Descriptive analysis and logistical regression were used to examine differences between groups for program exposure. Results All groups showed decrease in program exposure over time. Differences were also observed (χ2 = 10.37, p Conclusion These results suggest that the internet groups were as effective as the face-to-face delivery mode in engaging participants in the program material. However, different delivery methods may be more useful to different sub-populations. It is important to explore which target groups that internet-based programs are best suited, in order to increase their impact.

  19. Model Checking JAVA Programs Using Java Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelund, Klaus; Pressburger, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a translator called JAVA PATHFINDER from JAVA to PROMELA, the "programming language" of the SPIN model checker. The purpose is to establish a framework for verification and debugging of JAVA programs based on model checking. This work should be seen in a broader attempt to make formal methods applicable "in the loop" of programming within NASA's areas such as space, aviation, and robotics. Our main goal is to create automated formal methods such that programmers themselves can apply these in their daily work (in the loop) without the need for specialists to manually reformulate a program into a different notation in order to analyze the program. This work is a continuation of an effort to formally verify, using SPIN, a multi-threaded operating system programmed in Lisp for the Deep-Space 1 spacecraft, and of previous work in applying existing model checkers and theorem provers to real applications.

  20. Examination of 1D Solar Cell Model Limitations Using 3D SPICE Modeling: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, W. E.; Olson, J. M.; Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.

    2012-06-01

    To examine the limitations of one-dimensional (1D) solar cell modeling, 3D SPICE-based modeling is used to examine in detail the validity of the 1D assumptions as a function of sheet resistance for a model cell. The internal voltages and current densities produced by this modeling give additional insight into the differences between the 1D and 3D models.

  1. Examining Student Achievement and Curriculum in a Nursing Program at a Midwestern Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sandra E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the pathway model of a nursing curriculum and evaluate the relationship and predictive ability of demographic and academic variables on the success or failure of those taking the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN®) and to determine the impact of noncognitive role…

  2. Computer simulation modeling of abnormal behavior: a program approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, K D; Freese, M R; Rowe, P B

    1984-07-01

    A need for modeling abnormal behavior on a comprehensive, systematic basis exists. Computer modeling and simulation tools offer especially good opportunities to establish such a program of studies. Issues concern deciding which modeling tools to use, how to relate models to behavioral data, what level of modeling to employ, and how to articulate theory to facilitate such modeling. Four levels or types of modeling, two qualitative and two quantitative, are identified. Their properties are examined and interrelated to include illustrative applications to the study of abnormal behavior, with an emphasis on schizophrenia.

  3. A Model for Slicing JAVA Programs Hierarchically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bi-Xin Li; Xiao-Cong Fan; Jun Pang; Jian-Jun Zhao

    2004-01-01

    Program slicing can be effectively used to debug, test, analyze, understand and maintain objectoriented software. In this paper, a new slicing model is proposed to slice Java programs based on their inherent hierarchical feature. The main idea of hierarchical slicing is to slice programs in a stepwise way, from package level, to class level, method level, and finally up to statement level. The stepwise slicing algorithm and the related graph reachability algorithms are presented, the architecture of the Java program Analyzing Tool (JATO) based on hierarchical slicing model is provided, the applications and a small case study are also discussed.

  4. An examination of science teachers' learning in a laboratory-based professional development program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiehl, Melissa Lynn

    Professional development generally refers to the collection of activities that systematically increase teachers' knowledge of academic subjects and advance teachers' understanding of instructional strategies. Given the complexity of the reform initiatives for science education in the United States of America as set forth by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the National Science Education Standards (NRC, 1996), professional development might provide a bridge for aligning teacher practice with national standards (Loucks-Horsley, 1995). However, the current model of professional growth, focused largely on expanding a repertoire of skills, is not adequate (Little, 1993). Understanding teacher learning theory and utilizing research on pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) could be the differentiating factor for science teacher professional development; if utilized in design and evaluation, they may promote both knowing science in context and knowing how to tailor science learning to the needs of students (Shulman, 1987). The purpose of this study was to investigate how the Laboratory Science Teacher Professional Development Program (LSTPD), a three year professional development model that immerses teachers in learning science content through inquiry, impacts teachers' learning and classroom practice. It first aimed to analyze teacher learning and PCK; second, it examined their views on professional development; and third, whether they anticipate adapting their practice to include facets of their laboratory experience. Participants were teachers in their second or third year of participation in LSTPD. The study followed a qualitative case study design and made use of in-depth interviews and observations to examine teachers' knowledge, beliefs, and practice. The study drew on a constructivist framework. Findings demonstrated that teachers' understanding of content, inquiry, and science as a living enterprise were greatly increased, and that

  5. Geometric Modeling Application Interface Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-01

    Manual IDEF-Extended ( IDEFIX ) Integrated Information Support System (IISS), ICAM Project 6201, Contract F33615-80-C-5155, December 1985. Interim...Differential Geometry of Curves and Surfaces, M. P. de Carmo, Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1976. IDEFIX Readers Reference, D. Appleton Company, December 1985...Modeling. IDEFI -- IDEF Information Modeling. IDEFIX -- IDEF Extended Information Modeling. IDEF2 -- IDEF Dynamics Modeling. IDSS -- Integrated Decision

  6. The language of worry: examining linguistic elements of worry models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geronimi, Elena M C; Woodruff-Borden, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Despite strong evidence that worry is a verbal process, studies examining linguistic features in individuals with generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) are lacking. The aim of the present study is to investigate language use in individuals with GAD and controls based on GAD and worry theoretical models. More specifically, the degree to which linguistic elements of the avoidance and intolerance of uncertainty worry models can predict diagnostic status was analysed. Participants were 19 women diagnosed with GAD and 22 control women and their children. After participating in a diagnostic semi-structured interview, dyads engaged in a free-play interaction where mothers' language sample was collected. Overall, the findings provided evidence for distinctive linguistic features of individuals with GAD. That is, after controlling for the effect of demographic variables, present tense, future tense, prepositions and number of questions correctly classified those with GAD and controls such that a considerable amount of the variance in diagnostic status was explained uniquely by language use. Linguistic confirmation of worry models is discussed.

  7. Preliminary examination of a couple-based eating disorder prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Ana L; Perez, Marisol; Taylor, Aaron

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate a new dissonance-based prevention program that is based on the dual pathway model of eating disorders within the context of an individual's romantic relationship. A total of 209 dating couples participated in a couple-based prevention program or an assessment-only condition and completed measures of body dissatisfaction, thin-ideal internalization, disordered eating, negative affect, and relationship satisfaction at two time points (approximately one week apart) and approximately half of the sample completed 1-month follow-up measures. The prevention program significantly reduced several key risk factors for eating disorders such as environmental pressures to be thin, internalization of the thin and athletic ideals, state body dissatisfaction, and actual-ideal body discrepancy. Initial support was found for the inclusion of couples in eating disorder prevention programs as a successful way of addressing the thin ideal and its detrimental effects for women.

  8. An Approach to Examining the Proximal and Intermediate Outcomes of an Intensive Family Preservation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Kristin Duppong; Griffith, Annette; Ingram, Stephanie; Bolivar, Claudine; Mason, W. Alex; Trout, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of the Boys Town In-Home Family Program (BT-IHFP) on parenting skills, family functioning, and child behavior for at-risk families involved with child protective services. The BT-IHFP is designed as a home-based, family-centered alternative to out-of-home placement with the goal of improving family functioning,…

  9. Examining Asymmetrical Relationships of Organizational Learning Antecedents: A Theoretical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ery Tri Djatmika

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Global era is characterized by highly competitive advantage market demand. Responding to the challenge of rapid environmental changes, organizational learning is becoming a strategic way and solution to empower people themselves within the organization in order to create a novelty as valuable positioning source. For research purposes, determining the influential antecedents that affect organizational learning is vital to understand research-based solutions given for practical implications. Accordingly, identification of variables examined by asymmetrical relationships is critical to establish. Possible antecedent variables come from organizational and personal point of views. It is also possible to include a moderating one. A proposed theoretical model of asymmetrical effects of organizational learning and its antecedents is discussed in this article.

  10. Developing an Innovative Customer Relationship Management Model for Better Health Examination Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyu JrJung

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available People emphasize on their own health and wish to know more about their conditions. Chronic diseases now take up to 50 percent of top 10 causes of death. As a result, the health-care industry has emerged and kept thriving. This work adopts an innovative customer-oriented business model since most clients are proactive and spontaneous in taking the “distinguished” health examination programs. We adopt the soft system dynamics methodology (SSDM to develop and to evaluate the steps of introducing customer relationship management model into a case health examination organization. Quantitative results are also presented for a case physical examination center and to assess the improved efficiency. The case study shows that the procedures developed here could provide a better service.

  11. Developing a Customer Relationship Management Model for Better Health Examination Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyu Jr-Jung

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available People emphasize on their own health and wish to know more about their conditions. Chronic diseases now take up to 50 percent of top 10 causes of death. As a result, the health-care industry has emerged and kept thriving. This work adopts a customer-oriented business model since most clients are proactive and spontaneous in taking the “distinguished” health examination programs. We adopt the soft system dynamics methodology (SSDM to develop and to evaluate the steps of introducing customer relationship management model into a case health examination organization. Quantitative results are also presented for a case physical examination center and to assess the improved efficiency. The case study shows that the procedures developed here could provide a better service.

  12. Proposal of Enhanced Extreme Programming Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rizwan Jameel Qureshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme programming is one of the commonly used agile methodologies in software development. It is very responsive to changing requirements even in the late phases of the project. However, quality activities in extreme programming phases are implemented sequentially along with the activities that work on the functional requirements. This reduces the agility to deliver increments continuously and makes an inverse relationship between quality and agility. Due to this relationship, extreme programming does not consume enough time on making extensive documentation and robust design. To overcome these issues, an enhanced extreme programming model is proposed. Enhanced extreme programming introduces parallelism in the activities' execution through putting quality activities into a separate execution line. In this way, the focus on delivering increments quickly is achieved without affecting the quality of the final output. In enhanced extreme programming, the quality concept is extended to include refinement of all phases of classical extreme programming and creating architectural design based on the refined design documents.

  13. Putting the pieces together: an integrated model of program implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkel, Cady; Mauricio, Anne M; Schoenfelder, Erin; Sandler, Irwin N

    2011-03-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that variability in implementation of prevention programs is related to the outcomes achieved by these programs. However, while implementation has been conceptualized as a multidimensional construct, few studies examine more than a single dimension, and no theoretical framework exists to guide research on the effects of implementation. We seek to address this need by proposing a theoretical model of the relations between the dimensions of implementation and outcomes of prevention programs that can serve to guide future implementation research. In this article, we focus on four dimensions of implementation, which we conceptualize as behaviors of program facilitators (fidelity, quality of delivery, and adaptation) and behaviors of participants (responsiveness) and present the evidence supporting these as predictors of program outcomes. We then propose a theoretical model by which facilitator and participant dimensions of implementation influence participant outcomes. Finally, we provide recommendations and directions for future implementation research.

  14. Integer Programming Models for Computational Biology Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giuseppe Lancia

    2004-01-01

    The recent years have seen an impressive increase in the use of Integer Programming models for the solution of optimization problems originating in Molecular Biology. In this survey, some of the most successful Integer Programming approaches are described, while a broad overview of application areas being is given in modern Computational Molecular Biology.

  15. Examining the Leisure Constraints Affecting International Collegiate Students’ Participation in Intramural Sport Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongwook Cho

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A primary objective of United States’ higher education institutions is the production of well-balanced citizens. Aside from awarded degrees, other primary offerings include leisure opportunities, from campus recreation programs. Campus recreation through intramural sport programs offers students an opportunity to participate in sport and physical fitness activities on campus with and against other collegiate students. Recognizing the continuous increase in collegiate enrollment of international students, many of them are challenged by the various barriers they face in their collegiate experience in regard to education, social relationships, cultural and economic differences, and ethnic discrimination. The current study examines the relationship between leisure constraints (intrapersonal, interpersonal and structural and participation in intramural sport programs among 198 international students. Analyses indicate that structural constraints were the highest leisure constraint in intramural sport programs among international students. Leisure constraints in intramural sport programs were also observed by the participants based on past participation experience, sex and age. As professionals seek to increase awareness of recreation and intramural sport participation rates among international students, the current study provides insight into strategic options and marketing opportunities that can be enveloped to limit the leisure constraints that influence international students’ participation.

  16. EXAMINATION OF CONSTRAINTS ON PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROGRAMS PARTICIPATION TO INDIVIDUALS WITH AUTISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail AYDIN

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine perceptions of constraints on physical activity participation among people with autism. This qualitative study was conducted on 9 different family of people with autism who participating in physical activity program. The data were collected by using semi - structured interview form. The literature review was done with the purpose of preparing the interview questions and creating conceptual framework. A semi - structured form was developed that consists of 7 items and 7 themes. The data were collected by using face to face interview methods. The descriptive analyses were used to analyze the collected data. The analysis indicated that the most important co nstraints were the economical factors on physical activity participation. The most important reason for this occurring was the lack of such programs in the public schools or in institutions. In addition to, this services carried by only the private sector was the other important factor that affected this reason. Analysis also revealed that central government policies of individuals with autism was insufficient for the participation in such programs in the state (government contact and also does not meet t heir needs. As a result, economic difficulties of individuals with autism to participate in physical activity programs was considered the most important constraints. However, it can be concluded that state (government policies were inadequate that in the social life of individuals with autism use their potential in educational activities that support participation in physical activity programs .

  17. Resident clinical duties while preparing for the ABR core examination: position statement of the Association of Program Directors in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStigter, Kristen K; Mainiero, Martha B; Janower, Murray L; Resnik, Charles S

    2012-11-01

    Historically, diagnostic radiology residents have been allowed time off from clinical duties to study for the ABR oral board examination. This practice has resulted in a disruptive "board frenzy" at many programs. The new ABR examination structure gives programs an opportunity to evaluate this practice. This position statement of the Association of Program Directors in Radiology describes the rationale behind a recommendation of no time off from clinical service before the ABR core examination.

  18. Data-Generating Program for ASKA Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi-Dechesh, A.; Cheng, T. K.

    1985-01-01

    Carrier plate assemblies of NASA Space Shuttle thermal protection system provided for easy access to protected vital parts of Shuttle. Each assembly mounted on substructure with fasteners through holes in protective tiles. Automatic System of Kinematic Analysis (ASKA) finite-element program evaluates these assemblies. PLATEFORT computer program developed as data generator for ASKA modeling. PLATEFORT greatly reduces amount of time and data required for building ASKA model of these assemblies.

  19. Enhancing Extension Program Effectiveness by Examining Regional Differences in High Water Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-wen Huang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Competition for water sources in urban areas of Florida has increased due to increased population and human activities. High water users have been identified as a specific group on which Extension should focus water conservation education due to their low awareness of water issues and active landscape water use. In order to ensure the effectiveness of Extension programs targeting high water users statewide, this study sought to explore regional differences in water conservation behavior engagement within Florida high water users. An online survey was conducted to capture responses of high water users (N = 932 in three distinct regions for this comparative study. Respondents were asked to indicate their current engagement in water use behavior, application of water conservation strategies, and likelihood of engaging in water conservation and related societal behaviors. Regional differences were found in all four examined constructs. The findings imply Extension educators should tailor educational programs to regional audiences’ behavior patterns instead of designing statewide programs to ensure program effectiveness

  20. Marketing for a Web-Based Master's Degree Program in Light of Marketing Mix Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Cheng-Chang

    2012-01-01

    The marketing mix model was applied with a focus on Web media to re-strategize a Web-based Master's program in a southern state university in U.S. The program's existing marketing strategy was examined using the four components of the model: product, price, place, and promotion, in hopes to repackage the program (product) to prospective students…

  1. Marketing for a Web-Based Master's Degree Program in Light of Marketing Mix Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Cheng-Chang

    2012-01-01

    The marketing mix model was applied with a focus on Web media to re-strategize a Web-based Master's program in a southern state university in U.S. The program's existing marketing strategy was examined using the four components of the model: product, price, place, and promotion, in hopes to repackage the program (product) to prospective students…

  2. A multilingual programming model for coupled systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, E. T.; Larson, J. W.; Norris, B.; Tobis, M.; Steder, M.; Jacob, R. L.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Wisconsin; Univ. of Chicago; The Australian National Univ.

    2008-01-01

    Multiphysics and multiscale simulation systems share a common software requirement-infrastructure to implement data exchanges between their constituent parts-often called the coupling problem. On distributed-memory parallel platforms, the coupling problem is complicated by the need to describe, transfer, and transform distributed data, known as the parallel coupling problem. Parallel coupling is emerging as a new grand challenge in computational science as scientists attempt to build multiscale and multiphysics systems on parallel platforms. An additional coupling problem in these systems is language interoperability between their constituent codes. We have created a multilingual parallel coupling programming model based on a successful open-source parallel coupling library, the Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT). This programming model's capabilities reach beyond MCT's native Fortran implementation to include bindings for the C++ and Python programming languages. We describe the method used to generate the interlanguage bindings. This approach enables an object-based programming model for implementing parallel couplings in non-Fortran coupled systems and in systems with language heterogeneity. We describe the C++ and Python versions of the MCT programming model and provide short examples. We report preliminary performance results for the MCT interpolation benchmark. We describe a major Python application that uses the MCT Python bindings, a Python implementation of the control and coupling infrastructure for the community climate system model. We conclude with a discussion of the significance of this work to productivity computing in multidisciplinary computational science.

  3. An Examination of University Supervision in a Physical Education Teacher Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Steven; Grenier, Michelle A.; Channell, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to analyze university supervision from the perspective of student teachers (STs), and to examine postlesson conference discourse between STs and university supervisors (USs) to determine if STs perspectives on supervisory models aligned with what actually occurred. Determining STs expectations and desires…

  4. Summer Study-Abroad Program as Experiential Learning: Examining Similarities and Differences in International Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Kenneth J.; Garland, Michelle E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how the study-abroad experience enhances intercultural communication competence. This study used Bennett's (1986, 1993) model of ethnorelative typology of acceptance, adaptation, and integration to explore intercultural communication competency. Central to intercultural communication competency is intercultural sensitivity and…

  5. Econometric Model Evaluation: Implications for Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge, Richard S.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The problem associated with evaluating an econometric model using values outside those used in the model estimation is illustrated in the evaluations of a residential load management program during each of two successive years. Analysis reveals that attention must be paid to this problem. (Author/TJH)

  6. Programming Models for Heterogeneous Multicore Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    Badia, F.D. Igual, J. Labarta, R. Mayo and E.S. Quintana- Orti . “An extension of the StarSs Programming Model for Platforms with Multiple GPUs...R. Mayo, J.M. Perez, J. Planas, E.S. Quintana- Orti . “A Proposal to Extend the OpenMP Tasking Model for Heterogeneous Architectures ” LNCS Vol. 5568

  7. Application of Item Analysis to Assess Multiple-Choice Examinations in the Mississippi Master Cattle Producer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Jane A.; Karisch, Brandi B.

    2013-01-01

    Item analysis can serve as a useful tool in improving multiple-choice questions used in Extension programming. It can identify gaps between instruction and assessment. An item analysis of Mississippi Master Cattle Producer program multiple-choice examination responses was performed to determine the difficulty of individual examinations, assess the…

  8. Examining the Effect of Social Values Education Program Being Applied to Nursery School Students upon Acquiring Social Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapsaglam, Özkan; Ömeroglu, Esra

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted in an attempt to develop Social Values Education Program aimed at nursery school students and examine the effect of Social Values Education Program upon the social skill acquisition of nursery school students. The effect of the education program that was developed within the scope of the study upon the social skill…

  9. Medical Knowledge Assessment by Hematology and Medical Oncology In-Training Examinations Are Better Than Program Director Assessments at Predicting Subspecialty Certification Examination Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collichio, Frances A; Hess, Brian J; Muchmore, Elaine A; Duhigg, Lauren; Lipner, Rebecca S; Haist, Steven; Hawley, Janine L; Morrison, Carol A; Clayton, Charles P; Raymond, Marilyn J; Kayoumi, Karen M; Gitlin, Scott D

    2017-09-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System requires training programs to demonstrate that fellows are achieving competence in medical knowledge (MK), as part of a global assessment of clinical competency. Passing American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) certification examinations is recognized as a metric of MK competency. This study examines several in-training MK assessment approaches and their ability to predict performance on the ABIM Hematology or Medical Oncology Certification Examinations. Results of a Hematology In-Service Examination (ISE) and an Oncology In-Training Examination (ITE), program director (PD) ratings, demographic variables, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), and ABIM Internal Medicine (IM) Certification Examination were compared. Stepwise multiple regression and logistic regression analyses evaluated these assessment approaches as predictors of performance on the Hematology or Medical Oncology Certification Examinations. Hematology ISE scores were the strongest predictor of Hematology Certification Examination scores (β = 0.41) (passing odds ratio [OR], 1.012; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.008-1.015), and the Oncology ITE scores were the strongest predictor of Medical Oncology Certification Examination scores (β = 0.45) (passing OR, 1.013; 95 % CI, 1.011-1.016). PD rating of MK was the weakest predictor of Medical Oncology Certification Examination scores (β = 0.07) and was not significantly predictive of Hematology Certification Examination scores. Hematology and Oncology ITEs are better predictors of certification examination performance than PD ratings of MK, reinforcing the effectiveness of ITEs for competency-based assessment of MK.

  10. Program Partitioning using Dynamic Trust Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Dan; Probst, Christian W.; Jensen, Christian D.;

    2006-01-01

    -based scenarios. Language-based technologies have been suggested to support developers of those applications---the \\$\\backslash\\$emph{Decentralized Label Model} and \\$\\backslash\\$emph{Secure Program Partitioning} allow to annotate programs with security specifications, and to partition the annotated program...... across a set of hosts, obeying both the annotations and the trust relation between the principals. The resulting applications guarantee \\$\\backslash\\$emph{by construction} that safety and confidentiality of both data and computations are ensured. In this work, we develop a generalised version...

  11. Retention models for programmed gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello, G; Moretti, P; Vezzani, S

    2009-03-06

    The models proposed by many authors for the prediction of retention times and temperatures, peak widths, retention indices and separation numbers in programmed temperature and pressure gas chromatography by starting from preliminary measurements of the retention in isothermal and isobaric conditions are reviewed. Several articles showing the correlation between retention data and thermodynamic parameters and the determination of the optimum programming rate are reported. The columns of different polarity used for the experimental measurement and the main equations, mathematical models and calculation procedures are listed. An empirical approach was used in the early models, followed by the application of thermodynamic considerations, iterative calculation procedures and statistical methods, based on increased computing power now available. Multiple column arrangements, simultaneous temperature and pressure programming, applications of two-dimensional and fast chromatography are summarised.

  12. Examining Learning Through Modeling in K-6 Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louca, Loucas T.; Zacharia, Zacharias C.

    2015-04-01

    Despite the abundance of research in Modeling-based Learning (MbL) in science education, to date there is only limited research on MbL practices among K-6 novice modelers. More specifically, there is no information on how young/novice modelers' modeling enactments look so that researchers and educators have an idea of what should be expected from these novice/young modelers while engaged in MbL. Our purpose in this study was to investigate the ways in which K-6 novice modelers can engage in MbL in science, in rich modeling contexts, which feature various modeling media and tools. Using data from a variety of contexts, modeling means and tools and different student ages, we seek to develop, from the ground up, detailed descriptions of the modeling practices that K-6 students follow when involved in MbL. While using the modeling phases (e.g., construction of a model, evaluation of a model), along with their associated practices, as described in the literature for older learners and expert modelers as our basis, we followed ground research approaches to develop the descriptions of student-centered MbL. Our findings revealed that novice modelers enact certain MbL phases in a different manner than those described in the literature for older learners and/or expert modelers. We found that not only do the content and context of the various modeling phases differ, but also the sequence of these modeling phases and their associated practices, are different from those already described in the literature. Finally, we discuss how rich descriptions of MbL discourse can ultimately inform teachers and researchers about ways in which learning in science through MbL can be supported.

  13. Can physical therapists deliver a pain coping skills program? An examination of training processes and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Christina; Lewis, Prudence; Bennell, Kim L; Ahamed, Yasmin; Crough, Denae; Jull, Gwendolen A; Kenardy, Justin; Nicholas, Michael K; Keefe, Francis J

    2014-10-01

    Physical therapists are well established as providers of treatments for common, painful, and disabling conditions, such as knee osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, they are well placed to deliver treatments that integrate physical and psychosocial elements. Attention is usually given to outcomes of such programs, but few studies have examined the processes and outcomes of training physical therapists to deliver such treatments. The aim of this study was to describe the processes in training physical therapists: (1) to deliver a standardized pain coping skills treatment and (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of that training. This study was an analysis of data relating to therapist performance in a randomized clinical trial. Eleven physical therapists were trained to deliver a 10-session pain coping skills training program for people with knee OA as part of a randomized controlled trial (N=222). The initial training was provided in a workshop format and included extensive, ongoing supervision by a psychologist and rigorous use of well-defined performance criteria to assess competence. Adherence to the program, ratings of performance, and use of advanced skills were all measured against these criteria in a sample (n=74, 10%) of the audio recordings of the intervention sessions. Overall, the physical therapists achieved a very high standard of treatment delivery, with 96.6% adherence to the program and mean performance ratings all in the satisfactory range. These results were maintained throughout the intervention and across all sessions. Only 10% of the delivered sessions were analyzed, and the physical therapists who took part in the study were a self-selected group. This study demonstrated that a systematic approach to training and accrediting physical therapists to deliver a standardized pain coping skills program can result in high and sustained levels of adherence to the program. Training fidelity was achieved in this group of motivated clinicians, but the supervision

  14. Model Checking with Probabilistic Tabled Logic Programming

    CERN Document Server

    Gorlin, Andrey; Smolka, Scott A

    2012-01-01

    We present a formulation of the problem of probabilistic model checking as one of query evaluation over probabilistic logic programs. To the best of our knowledge, our formulation is the first of its kind, and it covers a rich class of probabilistic models and probabilistic temporal logics. The inference algorithms of existing probabilistic logic-programming systems are well defined only for queries with a finite number of explanations. This restriction prohibits the encoding of probabilistic model checkers, where explanations correspond to executions of the system being model checked. To overcome this restriction, we propose a more general inference algorithm that uses finite generative structures (similar to automata) to represent families of explanations. The inference algorithm computes the probability of a possibly infinite set of explanations directly from the finite generative structure. We have implemented our inference algorithm in XSB Prolog, and use this implementation to encode probabilistic model...

  15. Internet banking acceptance model: Cross-market examination

    OpenAIRE

    Alsajjan, B; Dennis, C.

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes a revised technology acceptance model to measure consumers’ acceptance of Internet banking, the Internet Banking Acceptance Model (IBAM). Data was collected from 618 university students in the United Kingdom and Saudi Arabia. The results suggest the importance of attitude, such that attitude and behavioral intentions emerge as a single factor, denoted as “attitudinal intentions” (AI). Structural equation modeling confirms the fit of the model, in which per...

  16. Majoring in Information Systems: An Examination of Role Model Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Asli Y.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of role models on individuals' academic and career development and success has been widely acknowledged in the literature. The purpose of this study was to understand the influence of role models on students' decisions to major in information systems (IS). Utilizing a model derived from the social cognitive career theory, we…

  17. Academic program models for undergraduate biomedical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Shankar M

    2014-01-01

    There is a proliferation of medical devices across the globe for the diagnosis and therapy of diseases. Biomedical engineering (BME) plays a significant role in healthcare and advancing medical technologies thus creating a substantial demand for biomedical engineers at undergraduate and graduate levels. There has been a surge in undergraduate programs due to increasing demands from the biomedical industries to cover many of their segments from bench to bedside. With the requirement of multidisciplinary training within allottable duration, it is indeed a challenge to design a comprehensive standardized undergraduate BME program to suit the needs of educators across the globe. This paper's objective is to describe three major models of undergraduate BME programs and their curricular requirements, with relevant recommendations to be applicable in institutions of higher education located in varied resource settings. Model 1 is based on programs to be offered in large research-intensive universities with multiple focus areas. The focus areas depend on the institution's research expertise and training mission. Model 2 has basic segments similar to those of Model 1, but the focus areas are limited due to resource constraints. In this model, co-op/internship in hospitals or medical companies is included which prepares the graduates for the work place. In Model 3, students are trained to earn an Associate Degree in the initial two years and they are trained for two more years to be BME's or BME Technologists. This model is well suited for the resource-poor countries. All three models must be designed to meet applicable accreditation requirements. The challenges in designing undergraduate BME programs include manpower, facility and funding resource requirements and time constraints. Each academic institution has to carefully analyze its short term and long term requirements. In conclusion, three models for BME programs are described based on large universities, colleges, and

  18. Examining relational empowerment for elementary school students in a yPAR program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhout, Regina Day; Collins, Charles; Ellison, Erin Rose

    2014-06-01

    This paper joins relational empowerment, youth empowerment, and Bridging Multiple Worlds frameworks to examine forms of relational empowerment for children in two intermediary institutions-school and a youth participatory action research after-school program (yPAR ASP). Participants were twelve children, most of whom were Latina/o and from im/migrant families, enrolled in a yPAR ASP for 2 years. A mixed-method approach was utilized; we analyzed children's interviews, self-defined goals, and their social networks to examine their experiences of relational empowerment. We conclude that children experienced each of the five relational empowerment factors-collaborative competence, bridging social divisions, facilitating others' empowerment, mobilizing networks, and passing on a legacy-in the yPAR ASP setting, and some factors in school. These experiences, however, were more pronounced in the yPAR ASP setting. Additionally, social network analyses revealed that a small but meaningful percentage of actors bridged worlds, especially home and family, but by year 2, also school and the yPAR ASP. Finally, most helpers for school-based goals came from school, but a sizable number came from family, friends, and home worlds, and by year 2, also came from the yPAR ASP. Implications range from theoretical to methodological development, including the use of social network analysis as a tool to descriptively examine relational power in context.

  19. Breast self-examination practices and the effect of a planned training program in Western Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donmez, Yelda Candan; Dolgun, Eda; Yavuz, Meryem

    2012-01-01

    This cross-sectional and descriptive study was aimed to evaluate women breast self-examination (BSE) practice and effects of a planned educational programme for breast cancer and BSE. The samples of the study consisted 266 women. The study data were collected by a questionnaire in six months periods as two times in a month in which the periods were defined and announced to all women. After that all the women were informed about BSE. The statue of performing BSE of women (n=146) was evaluated. They were interviewed on phone after 6 months. The collected data were analyzed by using statistical SPSS program. The average age of women was 35.68±7.54. It is also determined that (61.3%) had no knowledge about BSE, (87.6%) had examined clinical breast examination (CBE) in a year and half of them (50.8%) never practiced BSE, (29.0%) had BSE regularly every month. Concerning the status of BSE practice before the education and after the education significant difference is found statistically (pbreast cancer and BSE for raising awareness among women.

  20. Sex differences in developmental programming models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Catherine E; Ozanne, Susan E

    2013-01-01

    The theory of developmental programming suggests that diseases such as the metabolic syndrome may be 'programmed' by exposure to adverse stimuli during early development. The developmental programming literature encompasses the study of a wide range of suboptimal intrauterine environments in a variety of species and correlates these with diverse phenotypic outcomes in the offspring. At a molecular level, a large number of variables have been measured and suggested as the basis of the programmed phenotype. The range of both dependent and independent variables studied often makes the developmental programming literature complex to interpret and the drawing of definitive conclusions difficult. A common, though under-explored, theme of many developmental programming models is a sex difference in offspring outcomes. This holds true across a range of interventions, including dietary, hypoxic, and surgical models. The molecular and phenotypic outcomes of adverse in utero conditions are often more prominent in male than female offspring, although there is little consideration given to the basis for this observation in most studies. We review the evidence that maternal energy investment in male and female conceptuses may not be equal and may be environment dependent. It is suggested that male and female development could be viewed as separate processes from the time of conception, with differences in both timing and outcomes.

  1. Modern statistical models for forensic fingerprint examinations: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Joshua; Champod, Christophe; Lennard, Chris; Roux, Claude

    2013-10-10

    Over the last decade, the development of statistical models in support of forensic fingerprint identification has been the subject of increasing research attention, spurned on recently by commentators who claim that the scientific basis for fingerprint identification has not been adequately demonstrated. Such models are increasingly seen as useful tools in support of the fingerprint identification process within or in addition to the ACE-V framework. This paper provides a critical review of recent statistical models from both a practical and theoretical perspective. This includes analysis of models of two different methodologies: Probability of Random Correspondence (PRC) models that focus on calculating probabilities of the occurrence of fingerprint configurations for a given population, and Likelihood Ratio (LR) models which use analysis of corresponding features of fingerprints to derive a likelihood value representing the evidential weighting for a potential source.

  2. Examining the Effectiveness of a Case Management Program for Custodial Grandparent Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenora Campbell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have identified complex needs of custodial grandparent families and lack of access to needed resources such as housing, financial and legal assistance, and health care. Case management links these families with needed services while helping them develop skills to promote their health and well-being. This paper describes a case management program for custodial grandparent families using a nurse-social worker case management team. data were collected from 50 grandparents and 33 children using surveys and semi-structured instruments. Physical and mental health outcomes were measured using Short Form-12 Health Survey (SF 12 to measure the perceived quality of health for grandparents and the Child Behavior Checklist to measure the emotional and behavioral functioning of grandchildren. Grandparents more positively perceived their mental health after participating in the program. Perceptions about physical health were generally the same before and after the program. Grandparents' reported that many grandchildren had emotional and behavioral problems in the clinical range. These findings highlight the need for further research on the mental health needs of children being parented by grandparents as well as determining effective models and interventions to minimize adverse effects of parenting on grandparents.

  3. Examination of Lifestyle Behaviors and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in University Students Enrolled in Kinesiology Degree Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many, Gina M; Lutsch, Andrea; Connors, Kimberly E; Shearer, Jane; Brown, Haley C; Ash, Garrett; Pescatello, Linda S; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Barfield, Whitney; Dubis, Gabriel; Houmard, Joseph A; Hoffman, Eric P; Hittel, Dustin S

    2016-04-01

    Preventing physical inactivity and weight gain during college is critical in decreasing lifelong obesity and associated disease risk. As such, we sought to compare cardiometabolic risk factors and lifestyle behaviors between college students enrolled in kinesiology and non-kinesiology degree programs to assess whether health and exercise degree programs may influence health behaviors and associated disease risk outcomes. Anthropometrics, fasting blood glucose, insulin, lipid profiles and HbA1c%, blood pressure, and peak oxygen consumption (V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak) were assessed in 247 healthy college students. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin sensitivity (HOMA) was calculated using glucose and insulin levels. Self-reported physical activity from the Paffenbarger questionnaire was collected to estimate the average caloric expenditure due to different types of physical activities. Despite no significant differences in body mass index or waist circumference between groups, kinesiology majors presented with ∼20% lower fasting insulin levels and HOMA (p = 0.01; p Kinesiology majors reported increased weekly participation in vigorous-intensity sport and leisure activities and, on average, engaged in >300 metabolic equivalent-h·wk, whereas non-kinesiology majors engaged in kinesiology degree programs display improved healthy behaviors and associated outcomes (parameters of glucose homeostasis). Practical outcomes of this research indicate that implementing components of a comprehensive kinesiology curriculum encourages improved health behaviors and associated cardiometabolic risk factors.

  4. Examining the Fidelity of Climate model via Shadowing Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, H.; Smith, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Fully fledged climate models provide the best available simulations for reflecting the future, yet we have scant insight into their fidelity, in particular as to the duration into the future at which the real world should be expected to evolve in a manner today's models cannot foresee. We know now that our best available models are not adequate for many sought after purposes. To throw some light on the maximum fidelity expected from a given generation of models, and thereby aid both policy making and model development, we can test the weaknesses of a model as a dynamical system to get an informed idea of its potential applicability at various lead times. Shadowing times reflect the duration on which a GCM reflects the observations; extracting the shortcomings of the model which limit shadowing times allows informed speculation regarding the fidelity of the model in the future. More specifically, the relevant phenomena limiting model fidelity can be learned by identifying the reasons models cannot shadow; the time scales on which feedbacks on the system (which are not active in the model) are likely to result in model irrelevance can be discerned. The methodology is developed in the "low dimensional laboratory" of relatively simple dynamical systems, for example Lorenz 95 systems. The results are presented in Lorenz 95 systems, high dimensional fluid dynamical simulations of rotating annulus and GCMs. There are severe limits on the light shadowing experiments can shine on GCM predictions. Never the less, they appear to be one of the brightest lights we can shine to illuminate the likely fidelity of GCM extrapolations into the future.

  5. Examining Pedestrian Injury Severity Using Alternative Disaggregate Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abay, Kibrom Araya

    2013-01-01

    to the choice of these models. The empirical analysis reveals that detailed road user characteristics such as crime history of drivers and momentary activities of road users at the time of the accident provides an interesting insight in the injury severity analysis. Likewise, the alternative analytical...... specification of the models reveals that some of the conventionally employed fixed parameters injury severity models could underestimate the effect of some important behavioral attributes of the accidents. For instance, the standard ordered logit model underestimated the marginal effects of some...

  6. Integrate models of ultrasonics examination for NDT expertise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmon, P.; Lhemery, A.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Raillon, R.

    1996-12-31

    For several years, the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) has developed a system called CIVA for multiple-technique NDE data acquisition and processing. Modeling tools for ultrasonic non-destructive testing have been developed and implemented within this allowing direct comparison between measured and predicted results. These models are not only devoted to laboratory uses bus also must be usable by ultrasonic operators without special training in simulation techniques. Therefore, emphasis has been on finding the best compromise between as accurate as possible quantitative predictions and ease, simplicity and speed, crucial requirements in the industrial context. This approach has led us to develop approximate models for the different phenomena involved in ultrasonic inspections: radiation, transmission through interfaces, propagation, scattering by defects and boundaries, reception etc. Two main models have been implemented, covering the most commonly encountered NDT configurations. At first, these two models are shortly described. Then, two examples of their applications are shown. Based on the same underlying theories, specific modeling tools are proposed to industrial partners to answer special requirements. To illustrate this, an example is given of a software used a tool to help experts`s interpretation during on-site french PWR vessel inspections. Other models can be implemented in CIVA when some assumptions made in the previous models Champ-Sons and Mephisto are not fulfilled, e. g., when less-conventional testing configurations are concerned. We briefly presents as an example a modeling study of echoes arising from cladded steel surfaces achieved in the laboratory. (authors). 13 refs.

  7. STEW A Nonlinear Data Modeling Computer Program

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, H

    2000-01-01

    A nonlinear data modeling computer program, STEW, employing the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, has been developed to model the experimental sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu(n,f) and sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U(n,f) cross sections. This report presents results of the modeling of the sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu(n,f) and sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U(n,f) cross-section data. The calculation of the fission transmission coefficient is based on the double-humped-fission-barrier model of Bjornholm and Lynn. Incident neutron energies of up to 5 MeV are considered.

  8. STEW: A Nonlinear Data Modeling Computer Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.

    2000-03-04

    A nonlinear data modeling computer program, STEW, employing the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, has been developed to model the experimental {sup 239}Pu(n,f) and {sup 235}U(n,f) cross sections. This report presents results of the modeling of the {sup 239}Pu(n,f) and {sup 235}U(n,f) cross-section data. The calculation of the fission transmission coefficient is based on the double-humped-fission-barrier model of Bjornholm and Lynn. Incident neutron energies of up to 5 MeV are considered.

  9. Logic integer programming models for signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haus, Utz-Uwe; Niermann, Kathrin; Truemper, Klaus; Weismantel, Robert

    2009-05-01

    We propose a static and a dynamic approach to model biological signaling networks, and show how each can be used to answer relevant biological questions. For this, we use the two different mathematical tools of Propositional Logic and Integer Programming. The power of discrete mathematics for handling qualitative as well as quantitative data has so far not been exploited in molecular biology, which is mostly driven by experimental research, relying on first-order or statistical models. The arising logic statements and integer programs are analyzed and can be solved with standard software. For a restricted class of problems the logic models reduce to a polynomial-time solvable satisfiability algorithm. Additionally, a more dynamic model enables enumeration of possible time resolutions in poly-logarithmic time. Computational experiments are included.

  10. Examination of the New Tech Model as a Holistic Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley-Levine, Jill; Mosier, Gina

    2017-01-01

    Using the Degrees of Democracy Framework (Woods & Woods, 2012), we examined eight New Tech (NT) high schools to determine the extent to which they demonstrated characteristics of holistic democracy. We collected qualitative data, including observations and interviews during the fourth year of implementation. Findings indicated that the eight…

  11. Examining Tatooine: Atmospheric Models of Neptune-Like Circumbinary Planets

    CERN Document Server

    May, E M

    2016-01-01

    Circumbinary planets experience a time varying irradiation pattern as they orbit their two host stars. In this work, we present the first detailed study of the atmospheric effects of this irradiation pattern on known and hypothetical gaseous circumbinary planets. Using both a one-dimensional Energy Balance Model and a three-dimensional General Circulation Model, we look at the temperature differences between circumbinary planets and their equivalent single-star cases in order to determine the nature of the atmospheres of these planets. We find that for circumbinary planets on stable orbits around their host stars, temperature differences are on average no more than 1.0% in the most extreme cases. Based on detailed modeling with the General Circulation Model, we find that these temperature differences are not large enough to excite circulation differences between the two cases. We conclude that gaseous circumbinary planets can be treated as their equivalent single-star case in future atmospheric modeling effor...

  12. Examining the types and payments of the disabilities of the insurants in the national farmers' health insurance program in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hung-Hao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In contrast to the considerable body of literature concerning the disabilities of the general population, little information exists pertaining to the disabilities of the farm population. Focusing on the disability issue to the insurants in the Farmers' Health Insurance (FHI program in Taiwan, this paper examines the associations among socio-demographic characteristics, insured factors, and the introduction of the national health insurance program, as well as the types and payments of disabilities among the insurants. Methods A unique dataset containing 1,594,439 insurants in 2008 was used in this research. A logistic regression model was estimated for the likelihood of received disability payments. By focusing on the recipients, a disability payment and a disability type equation were estimated using the ordinary least squares method and a multinomial logistic model, respectively, to investigate the effects of the exogenous factors on their received payments and the likelihood of having different types of disabilities. Results Age and different job categories are significantly associated with the likelihood of receiving disability payments. Compared to those under age 45, the likelihood is higher among recipients aged 85 and above (the odds ratio is 8.04. Compared to hired workers, the odds ratios for self-employed and spouses of farm operators who were not members of farmers' associations are 0.97 and 0.85, respectively. In addition, older insurants are more likely to have eye problems; few differences in disability types are related to insured job categories. Conclusions Results indicate that older farmers are more likely to receive disability payments, but the likelihood is not much different among insurants of various job categories. Among all of the selected types of disability, a highest likelihood is found for eye disability. In addition, the introduction of the national health insurance program decreases the

  13. Bulk Electrical Cable Non-Destructive Examination Methods for Nuclear Power Plant Cable Aging Management Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, Samuel W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jones, Anthony M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hartman, Trenton S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This Pacific Northwest National Laboratory milestone report describes progress to date on the investigation of nondestructive test methods focusing particularly on bulk electrical test methods that provide key indicators of cable aging and damage. The work includes a review of relevant literature as well as hands-on experimental verification of inspection capabilities. As nuclear power plants consider applying for second, or subsequent, license renewal to extend their operating period from 60 years to 80 years, it is important to understand how the materials installed in plant systems and components will age during that time and develop aging management programs to assure continued safe operation under normal and design basis events (DBE). Normal component and system tests typically confirm the cables can perform their normal operational function. The focus of the cable test program, however, is directed toward the more demanding challenge of assuring the cable function under accident or DBE. The industry has adopted 50% elongation at break (EAB) relative to the un-aged cable condition as the acceptability standard. All tests are benchmarked against the cable EAB test. EAB, however, is a destructive test so the test programs must apply an array of other nondestructive examination (NDE) tests to assure or infer the overall set of cable’s system integrity. Assessment of cable integrity is further complicated in many cases by vendor’s use of dissimilar material for jacket and insulation. Frequently the jacket will degrade more rapidly than the underlying insulation. Although this can serve as an early alert to cable damage, direct test of the cable insulation without violating the protective jacket becomes problematic. This report addresses the range of bulk electrical NDE cable tests that are or could be practically implemented in a field-test situation with a particular focus on frequency domain reflectometry (FDR). The FDR test method offers numerous advantages

  14. Understanding science teacher enhancement programs: Essential components and a model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Samuel Albert

    Researchers and practioners alike recognize that "the national goal that every child in the United States has access to high-quality school education in science and mathematics cannot be realized without the availability of effective professional development of teachers" (Hewson, 1997, p. 16). Further, there is a plethora of reports calling for the improvement of professional development efforts (Guskey & Huberman, 1995; Kyle, 1995; Loucks-Horsley, Hewson, Love, & Stiles, 1997). In this study I analyze a successful 3-year teacher enhancement program, one form of professional development, to: (1) identify essential components of an effective teacher enhancement program; and (2) create a model to identify and articulate the critical issues in designing, implementing, and evaluating teacher enhancement programs. Five primary sources of information were converted into data: (1) exit questionnaires, (2) exit surveys, (3) exit interview transcripts, (4) focus group transcripts, and (5) other artifacts. Additionally, a focus group was used to conduct member checks. Data were analyzed in an iterative process which led to the development of the list of essential components. The Components are categorized by three organizers: Structure (e.g., science research experience, a mediator throughout the program), Context (e.g., intensity, collaboration), and Participant Interpretation (e.g., perceived to be "safe" to examine personal beliefs and practices, actively engaged). The model is based on: (1) a 4-year study of a successful teacher enhancement program; (2) an analysis of professional development efforts reported in the literature; and (3) reflective discussions with implementors, evaluators, and participants of professional development programs. The model consists of three perspectives, cognitive, symbolic interaction, and organizational, representing different viewpoints from which to consider issues relevant to the success of a teacher enhancement program. These

  15. Examining Pedestrian Injury Severity Using Alternative Disaggregate Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abay, Kibrom Araya

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the injury severity of pedestrians considering detailed road user characteristics and alternative model specification using a high-quality Danish road accident data. Such detailed and alternative modeling approach helps to assess the sensitivity of empirical inferences...... to the choice of these models. The empirical analysis reveals that detailed road user characteristics such as crime history of drivers and momentary activities of road users at the time of the accident provides an interesting insight in the injury severity analysis. Likewise, the alternative analytical...

  16. Examination of a Theoretical Model of Streaming Potential Coupling Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Luong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seismoelectric effects and streaming potentials play an important role in geophysical applications. The key parameter for those phenomena is the streaming potential coupling coefficient, which is, for example, dependent on the zeta potential of the interface of the porous rocks. Comparison of an existing theoretical model to experimental data sets from available published data for streaming potentials has been performed. However, the existing experimental data sets are based on samples with dissimilar fluid conductivity, pH of pore fluid, temperature, and sample compositions. All those dissimilarities may cause the observed deviations. To critically assess the models, we have carried out streaming potential measurement as a function of electrolyte concentration and temperature for a set of well-defined consolidated samples. The results show that the existing theoretical model is not in good agreement with the experimental observations when varying the electrolyte concentration, especially at low electrolyte concentration. However, if we use a modified model in which the zeta potential is considered to be constant over the electrolyte concentration, the model fits the experimental data well in a whole range of concentration. Also, for temperature dependence, the comparison shows that the theoretical model is not fully adequate to describe the experimental data but does describe correctly the increasing trend of the coupling coefficient as function of temperature.

  17. An examination of stress, coping, and adaptation in nurses in a recovery and monitoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Marie Katherine; Taylor, Kathleen P; Marcus-Aiyeku, Ulanda; Krause-Parello, Cheryl A

    2012-10-01

    Addiction rates in nurses are higher than in the general population. The relationship between stress, coping, and adaptation in nurses (N = 82) enrolled in a recovery and monitoring program in the state of New Jersey was examined. Social support, a variable tested as a mediator of this relationship, was also examined. Participants completed the Perceived Stress Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, and Psychological General Well-Being Index. Negative relationships were found between stress and social support and stress and well-being, and a positive relationship was found between social support and well-being (all ps social support. The findings of this research suggest that, to assist nurses, an increased awareness of stress and its injurious effects on overall well-being must be identified so proactive measures can be implemented to prevent potential untoward consequences. Ultimately, methods to strengthen social support and social networks will enhance the probability of sustained recovery, relapse prevention, and safe reentry into nursing practice. Implications for behavioral health providers and health care practitioners are discussed.

  18. An Action Research Project: Development of a Pre-Licensure Examination Review Course for Emergency Medical Technician Program Graduates at a Rural Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Daryl

    2013-01-01

    This action research project examined how "Efficiency in Learning" ("EL") strategies, "Appreciative Inquiry" ("AI") and the "Interactive Model of Program Planning" ("IMPP") could be used to discern the content and preferred pedagogical approaches in the development of a pre-licensure…

  19. ZATPAC: a model consortium evaluates teen programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Kathryn; Murphy, Dana; Parsons, Chris

    2009-09-01

    How do we advance the environmental literacy of young people, support the next generation of environmental stewards and increase the diversity of the leadership of zoos and aquariums? We believe it is through ongoing evaluation of zoo and aquarium teen programming and have founded a consortium to pursue those goals. The Zoo and Aquarium Teen Program Assessment Consortium (ZATPAC) is an initiative by six of the nation's leading zoos and aquariums to strengthen institutional evaluation capacity, model a collaborative approach toward assessing the impact of youth programs, and bring additional rigor to evaluation efforts within the field of informal science education. Since its beginning in 2004, ZATPAC has researched, developed, pilot-tested and implemented a pre-post program survey instrument designed to assess teens' knowledge of environmental issues, skills and abilities to take conservation actions, self-efficacy in environmental actions, and engagement in environmentally responsible behaviors. Findings from this survey indicate that teens who join zoo/aquarium programs are already actively engaged in many conservation behaviors. After participating in the programs, teens showed a statistically significant increase in their reported knowledge of conservation and environmental issues and their abilities to research, explain, and find resources to take action on conservation issues of personal concern. Teens also showed statistically significant increases pre-program to post-program for various conservation behaviors, including "I talk with my family and/or friends about things they can do to help the animals or the environment," "I save water...," "I save energy...," "When I am shopping I look for recycled products," and "I help with projects that restore wildlife habitat."

  20. PDDP, A Data Parallel Programming Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen H. Warren

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available PDDP, the parallel data distribution preprocessor, is a data parallel programming model for distributed memory parallel computers. PDDP implements high-performance Fortran-compatible data distribution directives and parallelism expressed by the use of Fortran 90 array syntax, the FORALL statement, and the WHERE construct. Distributed data objects belong to a global name space; other data objects are treated as local and replicated on each processor. PDDP allows the user to program in a shared memory style and generates codes that are portable to a variety of parallel machines. For interprocessor communication, PDDP uses the fastest communication primitives on each platform.

  1. A Linguistic Model in Component Oriented Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crăciunean, Daniel Cristian; Crăciunean, Vasile

    2016-12-01

    It is a fact that the component-oriented programming, well organized, can bring a large increase in efficiency in the development of large software systems. This paper proposes a model for building software systems by assembling components that can operate independently of each other. The model is based on a computing environment that runs parallel and distributed applications. This paper introduces concepts as: abstract aggregation scheme and aggregation application. Basically, an aggregation application is an application that is obtained by combining corresponding components. In our model an aggregation application is a word in a language.

  2. An Examination of Operational Availability in Life Cycle Cost Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    Systems. Kenneth E. Marks, H. Garrison Massey, and Brent D. Bradley. Rand No. R-2287-AF. Santa Monica CA: The Rand Corporation, October 1978. AD...AFB OH, September 1982. AD A123045. Bryan, Noreen S.; Jacqueline J. Rosen; and Nancey T. Marland. "A New Life Cycle Cost Model: Flexible, Interactive

  3. An Examination of a Model of Anti-Pollution Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Osamu

    1981-01-01

    Reports results of a study in which Japanese female undergraduates (N=118) responded to an environmental concern scale based upon a model of anti-pollution behavior focusing on: approach to information, confidence in science and technology, appreciation of natural beauty, causes, consequences, and purchasing and coping behaviors. (DC)

  4. The NIAID Radiation Countermeasures Program business model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafer, Nathaniel; Maidment, Bert W; Hatchett, Richard J

    2010-12-01

    The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Radiation/Nuclear Medical Countermeasures Development Program has developed an integrated approach to providing the resources and expertise required for the research, discovery, and development of radiation/nuclear medical countermeasures (MCMs). These resources and services lower the opportunity costs and reduce the barriers to entry for companies interested in working in this area and accelerate translational progress by providing goal-oriented stewardship of promising projects. In many ways, the radiation countermeasures program functions as a "virtual pharmaceutical firm," coordinating the early and mid-stage development of a wide array of radiation/nuclear MCMs. This commentary describes the radiation countermeasures program and discusses a novel business model that has facilitated product development partnerships between the federal government and academic investigators and biopharmaceutical companies.

  5. Examining the Sensory Profiles of At-Risk Youth Participating in a Pre-employment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Kwan Shea Ph.D., OTR/L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to use Dunn’s model of sensory processing to investigate the sensory profiles of youth participating in a community-based occupational therapy pre-employment program. The youth participants had been involved in the juvenile justice system and were placed on probation. The studyanalyzed data from the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile (AASP questionnaires (Brown & Dunn, 2002 completed by 79 youth participants. Analysis of the participants’ scores on the AASP showed statistically significant differences from the norm in two quadrants; the delinquent youth scored lower in Sensation Seeking and higher in Sensation Avoiding. The delinquent youth participants demonstrated a high prevalence of atypical sensory processing patterns. Implications for further investigation and practice are discussed.

  6. Reading, Learning, and Growing: An Examination of the Benefits of Common Book Programs for First-Year Students' Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Krista M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the continued growth of common book reading programs on college and university campuses, little is known about the benefits of such programs on first-year students' development. Using a multi-institutional survey of undergraduates attending six large, public universities (n = 1,237), the present study examined relationships between…

  7. A Comparative Cross-Cultural Examination of Community Art Education Programs in South Korea and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ryan; Kim, Junghee

    2014-01-01

    The authors conducted comparative cross-cultural research to examine a select group of the available and more noteworthy art education organizations and their programs after observing significant differences in the community art education programs offered in Tucson, Arizona, and Anyang, South Korea. The study reports several major differences…

  8. Relations between Prestige Rankings of Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs and Scores on the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, James M.; Ryan, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the relationship between "U.S. News and World Report" 2008 rankings of clinical psychology doctoral programs and scores earned by graduates on the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP). For the top 25 programs, relationship between ranking and EPPP scores was not significant, r[subscript s] = -0.28. EPPP scores…

  9. Relations between Prestige Rankings of Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs and Scores on the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, James M.; Ryan, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the relationship between "U.S. News and World Report" 2008 rankings of clinical psychology doctoral programs and scores earned by graduates on the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP). For the top 25 programs, relationship between ranking and EPPP scores was not significant, r[subscript s] = -0.28. EPPP scores…

  10. 46 CFR 176.620 - Description of the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... program, or if a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) is used during the program, the preliminary exam step may... two underwater surveys. If an underwater ROV is used as the predominate method to examine the vessel's... using an ROV must be at least 80 percent. ...

  11. The Relationship between Physical Therapist Assistant Faculty Characteristics and Program Outcomes on the National Physical Therapy Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Malorie Kosht

    2009-01-01

    Background. There is a paucity of published literature regarding the correlation between faculty characteristics and outcomes on the National Physical Therapy Examination for Physical Therapist Assistants (NPTE-PTA). Purpose. To determine if there was a relationship between faculty characteristics in PTA educational programs and program outcomes…

  12. Diversity Inclusion in 4-H Youth Programs: Examining the Perceptions among West Virginia 4-H Youth Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVergne, Douglas D.

    2013-01-01

    The study reported here sought to examine the perceptions of 4-H youth professionals towards diversity inclusion in 4-H youth programs. A majority of professionals positively reported that there are benefits for youth of color and youth with disabilities in 4-H youth programs. Respondents indicated that the lack of information about 4-H youth…

  13. Exploring the Alignment between Post-Secondary Education Programs and Earnings: An Examination of 2005 Ontario Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Kristyn; Walters, David

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the influence that field of study and level of post-secondary education have on the earnings of recent graduates in Ontario. Graduates of trades, community college, and university programs are compared. Results suggest that graduates of applied and technical programs obtain higher earnings within two years of graduation than…

  14. An Examination of Pre-service Classroom Teaching Programs in terms of Gifted Education in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda DEMİRHAN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been recently given importance that programs are prepared in consideration of individual differences of children with the need for special education. Even if it is especially thought that children with the need for special education are just physically or mentally disabled, one should recognize children whom we can actually call 'gifted' for them to be able to adapt to the classroom environment. Provided that the first-, second- and third-grade students are nominated by the classroom teachers as of the academic year of 2016-2017, they will be able to receive education at Science-Art Centers. Therefore, classroom teachers undertake an important task for identifying gifted children. Can teachers having such a great responsibility be trained to have that competence? The main purpose of this study is to investigate to what extent the subject 'gifted students' is included in the teaching plan during the eight-term education of pre-service classroom teachers. For this purpose, the websites of 193 universities registered to the Council of Higher Education were identified to examine 70 universities with a classroom teaching program. According to the findings, there is a course called 'special education' that handles the topics related to the gifted in 68 of those 70 universities, and in the rest, there is no course titled either 'special education' or 'gifted'. When the special education course is investigated, it is seen that objectives concerning the gifted take the last places and the contents addressing the gifted takes the third place. According to the learning acquisitions of the special education course, 'knowing about the characteristics of gifted children and educational applications for them' comes across as one of the least addressed topics.

  15. The Rasch Model: Its Use by the National Board of Medical Examiners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Paul R.; Schumacher, Charles F.

    1984-01-01

    The National Board of Medical Examiners uses the Rasch model to calibrate test items, maintain item banks, equate scores, and monitor the consistency of examiner item response patterns. The model is also being used in the study of patient management problems examinations, standard-setting, and computer-based examinations. (Author/BS)

  16. Bulk Electrical Cable Non-Destructive Examination Methods for Nuclear Power Plant Cable Aging Management Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, Samuel W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jones, Anthony M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hartman, Trenton S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This Pacific Northwest National Laboratory milestone report describes progress to date on the investigation of nondestructive test methods focusing particularly on bulk electrical test methods that provide key indicators of cable aging and damage. The work includes a review of relevant literature as well as hands-on experimental verification of inspection capabilities. As nuclear power plants consider applying for second, or subsequent, license renewal to extend their operating period from 60 years to 80 years, it is important to understand how the materials installed in plant systems and components will age during that time and develop aging management programs to assure continued safe operation under normal and design basis events (DBE). Normal component and system tests typically confirm the cables can perform their normal operational function. The focus of the cable test program, however, is directed toward the more demanding challenge of assuring the cable function under accident or DBE. The industry has adopted 50% elongation at break (EAB) relative to the un-aged cable condition as the acceptability standard. All tests are benchmarked against the cable EAB test. EAB, however, is a destructive test so the test programs must apply an array of other nondestructive examination (NDE) tests to assure or infer the overall set of cable’s system integrity. Assessment of cable integrity is further complicated in many cases by vendor’s use of dissimilar material for jacket and insulation. Frequently the jacket will degrade more rapidly than the underlying insulation. Although this can serve as an early alert to cable damage, direct test of the cable insulation without violating the protective jacket becomes problematic. This report addresses the range of bulk electrical NDE cable tests that are or could be practically implemented in a field-test situation with a particular focus on frequency domain reflectometry (FDR). The FDR test method offers numerous advantages

  17. Examining the Relationship between Physical Models and Students' Science Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alison Riley

    Scientists engage with practices like model development and use, data analysis and interpretation, explanation construction, and argumentation in order to expand the frontiers of science, so it can be inferred that students' engagement with science practices may help them deepen their own science understanding. As one of three dimensions on which the Next Generation Science Standards is built, science practices are recognized as an important component of science instruction. However, the contexts in which these practices happen are under-researched. Furthermore, research on science practices among students tends to focus on one or two practices in isolation when, in reality, students and scientists tend to engage with multiple overlapping practices. This study focused on identifying and characterizing multiple science practices as eighth and ninth-grade Earth Science students participated in a small group collaborative problem solving activity both with and without the use of a physical model. This study found a range of sophistication in the observed science practices as well as a relationship between the frequency of those practices and the accuracy of the groups' outcomes. Based on this relationship, groups were assigned to one of three categories. Further analysis revealed that model use varied among the three categories of groups. Comparisons across these three group categories suggest that there may be a bootstrapping relationship between students' engagement with science practices and the development of their content understanding. This metaphor of bootstrapping is used to represent how students may develop deeper science content understanding through engagement with science practices and concurrently develop greater facility with science practices as they learn science content. Implications are presented for curriculum designers, teachers and teacher educators. These include recommendations for curriculum design that encourage structured opportunities for

  18. Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    AA NUREG -0711,Rev. 2 Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model 20081009191 I i m To] Bi U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Office of...Material As of November 1999, you may electronically access NUREG -series publications and other NRC records at NRC’s Public Electronic Reading Room at...http://www.nrc.qov/readinq-rm.html. Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG -series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant

  19. A Qualitative Examination of Challenges Influencing Doctoral Students in an Online Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to investigate the challenges faced by students in completion of an online doctoral program at the University of Liverpool, Online Doctoral Business Administration program. We analyse the responses of 91 doctoral students in an online DBA program. Based on the exploratory qualitative study themes were developed…

  20. Individual plant examination program: Perspectives on reactor safety and plant performance. Parts 2--5: Final report; Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This report provides perspectives gained by reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals pertaining to 108 nuclear power plant units. IPEs are probabilistic analyses that estimate the core damage frequency (CDF) and containment performance for accidents initiated by internal events. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviewed the IPE submittals with the objective of gaining perspectives in three major areas: (1) improvements made to individual plants as a result of their IPEs and the collective results of the IPE program, (2) plant-specific design and operational features and modeling assumptions that significantly affect the estimates of CDF and containment performance, and (3) strengths and weaknesses of the models and methods used in the IPEs. These perspectives are gained by assessing the core damage and containment performance results, including overall CDF, accident sequences, dominant contributions to component failure and human error, and containment failure modes. Methods, data, boundary conditions, and assumptions used in the IPEs are considered in understanding the differences and similarities observed among the various types of plants. This report is divided into three volumes containing six parts. Part 1 is a summary report of the key perspectives gained in each of the areas identified above, with a discussion of the NRC`s overall conclusions and observations. Part 2 discusses key perspectives regarding the impact of the IPE Program on reactor safety. Part 3 discusses perspectives gained from the IPE results regarding CDF, containment performance, and human actions. Part 4 discusses perspectives regarding the IPE models and methods. Part 5 discusses additional IPE perspectives. Part 6 contains Appendices A, B and C which provide the references of the information from the IPEs, updated PRA results, and public comments on draft NUREG-1560 respectively.

  1. Genetic Programming for Automatic Hydrological Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadalawada, Jayashree; Babovic, Vladan

    2017-04-01

    One of the recent challenges for the hydrologic research community is the need for the development of coupled systems that involves the integration of hydrologic, atmospheric and socio-economic relationships. This poses a requirement for novel modelling frameworks that can accurately represent complex systems, given, the limited understanding of underlying processes, increasing volume of data and high levels of uncertainity. Each of the existing hydrological models vary in terms of conceptualization and process representation and is the best suited to capture the environmental dynamics of a particular hydrological system. Data driven approaches can be used in the integration of alternative process hypotheses in order to achieve a unified theory at catchment scale. The key steps in the implementation of integrated modelling framework that is influenced by prior understanding and data, include, choice of the technique for the induction of knowledge from data, identification of alternative structural hypotheses, definition of rules, constraints for meaningful, intelligent combination of model component hypotheses and definition of evaluation metrics. This study aims at defining a Genetic Programming based modelling framework that test different conceptual model constructs based on wide range of objective functions and evolves accurate and parsimonious models that capture dominant hydrological processes at catchment scale. In this paper, GP initializes the evolutionary process using the modelling decisions inspired from the Superflex framework [Fenicia et al., 2011] and automatically combines them into model structures that are scrutinized against observed data using statistical, hydrological and flow duration curve based performance metrics. The collaboration between data driven and physical, conceptual modelling paradigms improves the ability to model and manage hydrologic systems. Fenicia, F., D. Kavetski, and H. H. Savenije (2011), Elements of a flexible approach

  2. A multi-level examination of how the organizational context relates to readiness to implement prevention and evidence-based programming in community settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilenski, Sarah M; Olson, Jonathan R; Schulte, Jill A; Perkins, Daniel F; Spoth, Richard

    2015-02-01

    Prior theoretical and empirical research suggests that multiple aspects of an organization's context are likely related to a number of factors, from their interest and ability to adopt new programming, to client outcomes. A limited amount of the prior research has taken a more community-wide perspective by examining factors that associate with community readiness for change, leaving how these findings generalize to community organizations that conduct prevention or positive youth development programs unknown. Thus for the current study, we examined how the organizational context of the Cooperative Extension System (CES) associates with current attitudes and practices regarding prevention and evidence-based programming. Attitudes and practices have been found in the empirical literature to be key indicators of an organization's readiness to adopt prevention and evidence-based programming. Based on multi-level mixed models, results indicate that organizational management practices distinct from program delivery may affect an organization's readiness to adopt and implement new prevention and evidence-based youth programs, thereby limiting the potential public health impact of evidence-based programs. Openness to change, openness of leadership, and communication were the strongest predictors identified within this study. An organization's morale was also found to be a strong predictor of an organization's readiness. The findings of the current study are discussed in terms of implications for prevention and intervention.

  3. A Multi-level Examination of how the Organizational Context Relates to Readiness to Implement Prevention and Evidence-Based Programming in Community Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilenski, Sarah M.; Olson, Jonathan R.; Schulte, Jill A.; Perkins, Daniel F.; Spoth, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Prior theoretical and empirical research suggests that multiple aspects of an organization’s context are likely related to a number of factors, from their interest and ability to adopt new programming, to client outcomes. A limited amount of the prior research has taken a more community-wide perspective by examining factors that associate with community readiness for change, leaving how these findings generalize to community organizations that conduct prevention or positive youth development programs unknown. Thus for the current study, we examined how the organizational context of the Cooperative Extension System (CES) associates with current attitudes and practices regarding prevention and evidence-based programming. Attitudes and practices have been found in the empirical literature to be key indicators of an organization’s readiness to adopt prevention and evidence-based programming. Based on multi-level mixed models, results indicate that organizational management practices distinct from program delivery may affect an organization’s readiness to adopt and implement new prevention and evidence-based youth programs, thereby limiting the potential public health impact of evidence-based programs. Openness to change, openness of leadership, and communication were the strongest predictors identified within this study. An organization’s morale was also found to be a strong predictor of an organization’s readiness. The findings of the current study are discussed in terms of implications for prevention and intervention. PMID:25463014

  4. Program Factors That Influence American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination Performance: A Multi-Institutional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jerry J; Gifford, Edward D; Moazzez, Ashkan; Sidwell, Richard A; Reeves, Mark E; Hartranft, Thomas H; Inaba, Kenji; Jarman, Benjamin T; Are, Chandrakanth; Galante, Joseph M; Amersi, Farin; Smith, Brian R; Melcher, Marc L; Nelson, M Timothy; Donahue, Timothy; Jacobsen, Garth; Arnell, Tracey D; Lee, Steven; Neville, Angela; de Virgilio, Christian

    2015-01-01

    To determine the influence of program strategies, such as program directors' (PD) attitudes about the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) and approach to ABSITE preparation, on residents' ABSITE performance. A 17-item questionnaire was sent to PDs at surgical residency programs. The questions were designed to elicit information regarding the educational curriculum, remediation protocols, and opinions relating to the ABSITE. Main outcome measure was categorical resident ABSITE percentile scores from the January 2014 examination. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student t-test, analysis of variance, and linear regression as appropriate. The study was carried out at general surgery residency programs across the country. In total, 15 general surgery residency PDs participated in the study. The PD response rate was 100%. All 460 resident ABSITE scores from the 15 programs were obtained. In total, 10 programs (67%) identified as university affiliated, 4 programs (27%) as independent academic, and 1 program (7%) as hybrid. The mean number of residents per program was 30.7 (range: 15-57). In total, 14 PDs (93%) indicated that an ABSITE review curriculum was in place and 13 PDs (87%) indicated they had a remediation protocol for residents with low ABSITE scores (with differing thresholds of factors associated with higher ABSITE scores included tracking resident reading throughout the year (median 63rd percentile with tracking vs 59th percentile without, p = 0.040) and the type of remediation (by PD: 77th percentile, by PD and faculty: 57th percentile, faculty only: 64th percentile, with Surgical Education and Self-Assessment Program (SESAP): 63rd percentile, outside review course: 43rd percentile; p Factors not significantly associated with ABSITE performance included number of structured educational hours per week and frequency of ABSITE review sessions. Program factors appear to significantly influence ABSITE performance. Programs where

  5. The Development of a Cultural-Based Educational Program to Enhance Breast Self-Examination (BSE Self-Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanita Juanita

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To develop the educational program which is appropriate with Islamic culture in order to enhance BSE self-efficacy of nursing students and thus promote BSE practice. Method: This study is a development research study which is consisting of three phases including: 1 reviewing several existing BSE educational programs; 2 program design based on SCT and Islamic culture; and 3 program validation by three experts. Result: Based on previous studies, the most appropriate theory to enhance self-efficacy was Social Cognitive Theory (SCT because this theory provides several strategies to increase the self-efficacy. Further, the program that used Islamic culture was more appropriate to increase BSE practice among Muslim women. As a result, the newly developed program was developed used SCT and Islamic culture. This program was comprised of four sessions including: 1 exploring Islamic mandate on prevention and individual responsibility in health promotion, and culture-related beliefs toward BSE, 2 health education by conducting lecturing session and watching a video about BSE procedures, 3 BSE training activities including BSE demonstration and return demonstration, 4 follow-up by conducting a meeting. Conclusion: The cultural-based educational program for enhancing BSE self-efficacy and promoting BSE is a program using multifaceted methods. It designed based on a review of the literature from previous studies and were supported by research findings on experimental studies in other population. Keywords: Cultural, Educational program development, Breast self-examination, Self-efficacy.

  6. Python Program to Select HII Region Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Clare; Lamarche, Cody; Vishwas, Amit; Stacey, Gordon J.

    2016-01-01

    HII regions are areas of singly ionized Hydrogen formed by the ionizing radiaiton of upper main sequence stars. The infrared fine-structure line emissions, particularly Oxygen, Nitrogen, and Neon, can give important information about HII regions including gas temperature and density, elemental abundances, and the effective temperature of the stars that form them. The processes involved in calculating this information from observational data are complex. Models, such as those provided in Rubin 1984 and those produced by Cloudy (Ferland et al, 2013) enable one to extract physical parameters from observational data. However, the multitude of search parameters can make sifting through models tedious. I digitized Rubin's models and wrote a Python program that is able to take observed line ratios and their uncertainties and find the Rubin or Cloudy model that best matches the observational data. By creating a Python script that is user friendly and able to quickly sort through models with a high level of accuracy, this work increases efficiency and reduces human error in matching HII region models to observational data.

  7. Recruitment Strategies Aiming to Attract Females into Undergraduate Engineering Programs: Examining Their Role and Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howenstine, Julie Anne

    2013-01-01

    By 2009, the percentage of women who graduated with general undergraduate degrees had increased to almost 58% of all students who completed 4-year degree programs (National Center for Education Statistics, 2009a). These percentages, however, have not been reflected in the enrollment rates of females into undergraduate engineering programs. In…

  8. A Study Examining the Dimensionality of Core Competencies Measure in Teacher Preparation Programs: Challenges and Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizil, Ruhan Circi; Briggs, Derek; Seidel, Kent; Green, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    The evidence that teacher preparation programs have an impact on teacher quality is often limited. Progress in research on this topic will remain rather limited in its influence on practice until more proximal measures of teacher education outcomes can be established. The dearth of variables to measure the impact of teacher preparation programs on…

  9. Does Teaching Experience Matter? Examining Biology Teachers' Prior Knowledge for Teaching in an Alternative Certification Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrichsen, Patricia J.; Abell, Sandra K.; Pareja, Enrique M.; Brown, Patrick L.; Lankford, Deanna M.; Volkmann, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Alternative certification programs (ACPs) have been proposed as a viable way to address teacher shortages, yet we know little about how teacher knowledge develops within such programs. The purpose of this study was to investigate prior knowledge for teaching among students entering an ACP, comparing individuals with teaching experience to those…

  10. Examining the Association between the "Imagination Library" Early Childhood Literacy Program and Kindergarten Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiei, Shahin; Bush, Andrew J.; Sell, Marie; Imig, Doug

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated participation in the "Imagination Library" early childhood literacy enrichment program and children's pre-literacy and pre-numeracy skills at kindergarten entry in an urban school district. Previous studies have demonstrated that program participation is associated with greater early childhood reading practices.…

  11. Turning Policy into Practice: Examining the Relationship between Policy, Research, and Program Development in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolucci, Catherine; Jennings, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the relationship between policy, research, and program development in mathematics teacher education. In particular, it considers the influences of policy and research along with social, economic, and cultural factors in the conceptualization and development of an undergraduate mathematics teacher education program in…

  12. Are There Alternatives in Reading Textbooks? An Examination of Three Beginning Reading Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert, Elfrieda H.; Martin, Leigh Ann; Menon, Shailaja

    2005-01-01

    The first-grade components of three textbook programs--mainstream basal, combined phonics and literature, and phonics emphasis--were compared on cognitive load (e.g., number of different words) and linguistic content (e.g., number of monosyllabic, simple vowel words). Three levels of three components of a program--literature anthologies, decodable…

  13. Does Teaching Experience Matter? Examining Biology Teachers' Prior Knowledge for Teaching in an Alternative Certification Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrichsen, Patricia J.; Abell, Sandra K.; Pareja, Enrique M.; Brown, Patrick L.; Lankford, Deanna M.; Volkmann, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Alternative certification programs (ACPs) have been proposed as a viable way to address teacher shortages, yet we know little about how teacher knowledge develops within such programs. The purpose of this study was to investigate prior knowledge for teaching among students entering an ACP, comparing individuals with teaching experience to those…

  14. Individual plant examination program: Perspectives on reactor safety and plant performance. Part 6, appendices A, B, and C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This report provides perspectives gained by reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals pertaining to 108 nuclear power plant units. IPEs are probabilistic analyses that estimate the core damage frequency (CDF) and containment performance for accidents initiated by internal events (including internal flooding, but excluding internal fire). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, reviewed the WE submittals with the objective of gaining perspectives in three major areas: (1) improvements made to individual plants as a result of their IPEs and the collective results of the IPE program, (2) plant-specific design and operational features and modeling assumptions that significantly affect the estimates of CDF and containment performance, and (3) strengths and weaknesses of the models and methods used in the IPEs. These perspectives are gained by assessing the core damage and containment performance results, including overall CDF, accident sequences, dominant contributions to component failure and human error, and containment failure modes. In particular, these results are assessed in relation to the design and operational characteristics of the various reactor and containment types, and by comparing the IPEs to probabilistic risk assessment characteristics. Methods, data, boundary conditions, and assumptions used in the IPEs are considered in understanding the differences and similarities observed among the various types of plants.

  15. A Linear Programming Model to Optimize Various Objective Functions of a Foundation Type State Support Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzke, Orville R.

    The purpose of this study was to formulate a linear programming model to simulate a foundation type support program and to apply this model to a state support program for the public elementary and secondary school districts in the State of Iowa. The model was successful in producing optimal solutions to five objective functions proposed for…

  16. Stochastic linear programming models, theory, and computation

    CERN Document Server

    Kall, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This new edition of Stochastic Linear Programming: Models, Theory and Computation has been brought completely up to date, either dealing with or at least referring to new material on models and methods, including DEA with stochastic outputs modeled via constraints on special risk functions (generalizing chance constraints, ICC’s and CVaR constraints), material on Sharpe-ratio, and Asset Liability Management models involving CVaR in a multi-stage setup. To facilitate use as a text, exercises are included throughout the book, and web access is provided to a student version of the authors’ SLP-IOR software. Additionally, the authors have updated the Guide to Available Software, and they have included newer algorithms and modeling systems for SLP. The book is thus suitable as a text for advanced courses in stochastic optimization, and as a reference to the field. From Reviews of the First Edition: "The book presents a comprehensive study of stochastic linear optimization problems and their applications. … T...

  17. Motivations and reasons for women attending a Breast Self-Examination training program: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Chiun-Sheng

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is a major threat to Taiwanese women's health. Despite the controversy surrounding the effectiveness of breast self-examination (BSE in reducing mortality, BSE is still advocated by some health departments. The aim of the study is to provide information about how women decide to practice BSE and their experiences through the training process. Sixty-six women aged 27-50 were recruited. Methods A descriptive study was conducted using small group and individual in-depth interviews to collect data, and using thematic analysis and constant comparison techniques for data analysis. Results It was found that a sense of self-security became an important motivator for entering BSE training. The satisfaction in obtaining a sense of self-security emerged as the central theme. Furthermore, a ladder motivation model was developed to explain the participants' motivations for entering BSE training. The patterns of motivation include opportunity taking, clarifying confusion, maintaining health, and illness monitoring, which were connected with the risk perception for breast cancer. Conclusions We recognize that the way women decide to attend BSE training is influenced by personal and social factors. Understanding the different risk assessments women rely on in making their health decisions is essential. This study will assist researchers and health professionals to gain a better understanding of alternative ways to deal with breast health, and not to be limited by the recommendations of the health authorities.

  18. Examining the Link between Program Implementation and Behavior Outcomes in the Lifestyle Education for Activity Program (LEAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Ruth P.; Ward, Dianne; Felton, Gwen M.; Dowda, Marsha; Pate, Russell R.

    2006-01-01

    Lifestyle Education for Activity Program (LEAP) was a comprehensive, school-based intervention designed to promote physical activity in high school girls. The intervention focused on changes in instructional practices and the school environment to affect personal, social, and environmental factors related to physical activity. Multiple process…

  19. Suggestion Program and Model Installation Program - Duplication of Effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    REPORTNUMBER88-26- TITL SUGESIONPROGAM ND ODE INSALLTIO PRGRAM -DULICTIO OF EFFORT AUTHR(S)MAJR DOALD . TOWBRDGEUSA FACUTY DVISRMAOR SEVE L.HANSN, CSC/824STU...NIP Evaluation Process............................ 13 FIGURE 3--USAF MIP Growth................................... 17 0. p.r vip I -.# EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...the study centers on program processes for submitting and evaluating proposals. The Suggestion Program and MIP processes are similar in that they both

  20. Examination and Implementation of a Proposal for a Ph.D. Program in Administrative Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    recommendation; and the Graduate Management Admission Test ( GMAT ) scores or the Graduate Record Examination Test (GRE). Non-native English students must...personal essays; letters of recommendation; and the G.aduate Management Admission Test ( GMAT ) scores or the Graduate Record Examination Test (GRE

  1. Knowledge and Intentions of Ninth-Grade Girls after a Breast Self-Examination Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogletree, Roberta J.; Hammig, Bart; Drolet, Judy C.; Birch, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer ranks as the second-leading cause of death for women. Until recently the American Cancer Society advocated teaching breast self-examination (BSE) procedures. The Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, active in the fight against breast cancer, continues to support educational efforts to teach breast self-examination skills to…

  2. Knowledge and Intentions of Ninth-Grade Girls after a Breast Self-Examination Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogletree, Roberta J.; Hammig, Bart; Drolet, Judy C.; Birch, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer ranks as the second-leading cause of death for women. Until recently the American Cancer Society advocated teaching breast self-examination (BSE) procedures. The Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, active in the fight against breast cancer, continues to support educational efforts to teach breast self-examination skills to…

  3. Examining Intercultural Growth for Business Students in Short-Term Study Abroad Programs: Too Good to Be True?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullekson, Nicole L.; Tucker, Mary L.; Coombs, Garth, Jr.; Wright, Scott B.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in ethnocentrism, intercultural communication apprehension, international awareness and activities were examined in business students participating in a 16-day consulting program abroad and compared to a control group of students at the home university. Anticipated changes in the study abroad students were found; however, when compared to…

  4. Examining the Permanence of the Effect of an Empathy Program for the Acquisition of Empathy Skills on Gifted Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedim Bal, Pervin

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the permanence of the effect of an Empathy Training Program, administered 8 months ago on gifted adolescents studying in 6th and 7th grades. The sample of this study consisted of 60 students with IQ scores of above 130 and studied in Enderun Gifted Children Center. Bryant's Empathy Scale for Children was administered to…

  5. Examining the Efficacy of a Brief Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (Brief MBSR) Program on Psychological Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen-Cico, Dessa; Possemato, Kyle; Cheon, Sanghyeon

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to examine potential psychological health benefits of participating in a brief (5-week) mindfulness-based stress reduction (brief MBSR) program integrated into an academic course. Participants: Participants were 119 undergraduate students (treatment: "n" = 72; control: "n" = 47) enrolled…

  6. Examination of Sign Language Education According to the Opinions of Members from a Basic Sign Language Certification Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akmese, Pelin Pistav

    2016-01-01

    Being hearing impaired limits one's ability to communicate in that it affects all areas of development, particularly speech. One of the methods the hearing impaired use to communicate is sign language. This study, a descriptive study, intends to examine the opinions of individuals who had enrolled in a sign language certification program by using…

  7. Examining the Perceptions of Secondary School General Education Administrators Regarding the Supervision and Management of Special Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation includes a report of the results of a quantitative and qualitative research project that examined the perceptions of 58 secondary general education administrators regarding the supervision and management of special education programs in their buildings. Data were gathered through an online survey that requested participants to…

  8. Examining Intercultural Growth for Business Students in Short-Term Study Abroad Programs: Too Good to Be True?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullekson, Nicole L.; Tucker, Mary L.; Coombs, Garth, Jr.; Wright, Scott B.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in ethnocentrism, intercultural communication apprehension, international awareness and activities were examined in business students participating in a 16-day consulting program abroad and compared to a control group of students at the home university. Anticipated changes in the study abroad students were found; however, when compared to…

  9. Effects of Two Testicular Cancer Education Programs on Self-Examination Knowledge and Attitudes among College-Aged Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Phillip J.; McDermott, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    This study compared instructional outcomes of two education programs about testicular cancer and testicular self-examination. Instruction facilitated by a former testicular cancer patient was compared to information provided by printed materials. There was no difference in information dissemination, but possible differences in attitude resulted.…

  10. Effects of Two Testicular Cancer Education Programs on Self-Examination Knowledge and Attitudes among College-Aged Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Phillip J.; McDermott, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    This study compared instructional outcomes of two education programs about testicular cancer and testicular self-examination. Instruction facilitated by a former testicular cancer patient was compared to information provided by printed materials. There was no difference in information dissemination, but possible differences in attitude resulted.…

  11. Ready from Day One: An Examination of One Principal Preparation Program's Redesign in Collaboration with Local School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, W. Sean; Valadez, Albert

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a newly implemented model of principal preparation at a public university in the southwestern United States. The authors begin by identifying a number of innovative practices currently being carried out within educational administration programs across the United States. Informed by the context of these national models, the…

  12. Human factors engineering program review model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is performing nuclear power plant design certification reviews based on a design process plan that describes the human factors engineering (HFE) program elements that are necessary and sufficient to develop an acceptable detailed design specification and an acceptable implemented design. There are two principal reasons for this approach. First, the initial design certification applications submitted for staff review did not include detailed design information. Second, since human performance literature and industry experiences have shown that many significant human factors issues arise early in the design process, review of the design process activities and results is important to the evaluation of an overall design. However, current regulations and guidance documents do not address the criteria for design process review. Therefore, the HFE Program Review Model (HFE PRM) was developed as a basis for performing design certification reviews that include design process evaluations as well as review of the final design. A central tenet of the HFE PRM is that the HFE aspects of the plant should be developed, designed, and evaluated on the basis of a structured top-down system analysis using accepted HFE principles. The HFE PRM consists of ten component elements. Each element in divided into four sections: Background, Objective, Applicant Submittals, and Review Criteria. This report describes the development of the HFE PRM and gives a detailed description of each HFE review element.

  13. The Use of Molecular Modeling Programs in Medicinal Chemistry Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Marc W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes and evaluates the use of a molecular modeling computer program (Alchemy II) in a pharmaceutical education program. Provided are the hardware requirements and basic program features as well as several examples of how this program and its features have been applied in the classroom. (GLR)

  14. Neural Network Program Package for Prosody Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Santarius

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available This contribution describes the programme for one part of theautomatic Text-to-Speech (TTS synthesis. Some experiments (for example[14] documented the considerable improvement of the naturalness ofsynthetic speech, but this approach requires completing the inputfeature values by hand. This completing takes a lot of time for bigfiles. We need to improve the prosody by other approaches which useonly automatically classified features (input parameters. Theartificial neural network (ANN approach is used for the modeling ofprosody parameters. The program package contains all modules necessaryfor the text and speech signal pre-processing, neural network training,sensitivity analysis, result processing and a module for the creationof the input data protocol for Czech speech synthesizer ARTIC [1].

  15. Analysis of Breast Self-Examination Practice Using Fishbein's Model of Behavioral Intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Deborah A.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which Fishbein's Model of Behavioral Intentions was able to predict breast self-examination behavior. A questionnaire was administered to 350 women who were classified according to frequency of breast self-examination. Results are set forth. Implications for health educators are considered. (MT)

  16. An Examination of Job Skills Posted on Internet Databases: Implications for Information Systems Degree Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xia; Liu, Lai C.; Koong, Kai S.; Lu, June

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of 300 information technology job postings in two Internet databases identified the following skill categories: programming languages (Java, C/C++, and Visual Basic were most frequent); website development (57% sought SQL and HTML skills); databases (nearly 50% required Oracle); networks (only Windows NT or wide-area/local-area networks);…

  17. Who Stays and for How Long: Examining Attrition in Canadian Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeClou, Lindsay

    2016-01-01

    Attrition from Canadian graduate programs is a point of concern on a societal, institutional, and individual level. To improve retention in graduate school, a better understanding of what leads to withdrawal needs to be reached. This paper uses logistic regression and discrete-time survival analysis with time-varying covariates to analyze data…

  18. Do driver training programs reduce crashes and traffic violations? — A critical examination of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond C. Peck

    2011-03-01

    There is no evidence or reason to believe that merely lengthening the number of hours on the road will increase effectiveness. Programs directed toward attitude change and risk taking better address the underlying cause of the elevated crash risk of young drivers but these behaviors are notoriously resistant to modification in young people.

  19. Examination of Individual Differences in Participation in Outplacement Program Activities after a Job Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowan, Mary A.; Nassar-McMillan, Sylvia C.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the relationship among age, gender, and race relative to participation in self-awareness, action-oriented, and training activities after a job loss. Main effects were found for gender and for Age x Employment status. Implications of the study for outplacement programs, along with study limitations and future research directions, are…

  20. A Feminist Poststructuralist Examination into the President's Challenge Physical Fitness Awards Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domangue, Elizabeth A.; Solmon, Melinda A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this viewpoint is to systematically synthesise the intersection of research that focuses on poststructuralism as related to a physical education discourse (namely President's Challenge Physical Fitness Awards Program). A feminist poststructuralist framework will be used to investigate the ways in which the hegemonic design of…

  1. New Teacher Perceptions of Inclusive Practices: An Examination of Contemporary Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleas, Eleftherios Kyprianos

    2015-01-01

    This article details a sequential explanatory mixed-method study into the perceptions of 44 new teachers regarding inclusive practices from their teacher education program, as well as their relative intent to utilize them in their practice. The purpose of this study was to determine the self-perceived capacity of the next generation of teachers…

  2. Examining Advanced Placement Program Access and Equity for Low-Income, Latino, and English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Castellanos, Oscar

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Placement (AP) program was initiated during the early 1950's in response to growing concerns regarding the educational needs of high ability secondary school students. The Advanced Placement "Status Quo" (AP Status Quo) framework suggests that there has been an emphasis on preparing a few students while excluding the majority of…

  3. Examining Students' Perceptions of Globalization and Study Abroad Programs at HBCUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Stevon; Bukenya, James O.; Thomas, Terrence

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to explore students' perceptions of globalization and the study abroad programs at HBCUs (historically black colleges and universities). Recent statistics reveal that in spite of the current growth in the number of US students receiving academic credit for their overseas academic experience, less than one percent of…

  4. Competency-Based Education in Three Pilot Programs: Examining Implementation and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Jennifer L.; Lewis, Matthew W.; Santibanez, Lucrecia; Faxon-Mills, Susannah; Rudnick, Mollie; Stecher, Brian M.; Hamilton, Laura S.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation created the Project Mastery grant program to support competency-based education initiatives in large school systems that serve a high proportion of disadvantaged youth. Competency-based education meets students where they are academically, provides students with opportunities for choice, and awards…

  5. Examination of Individual Differences in Participation in Outplacement Program Activities after a Job Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowan, Mary A.; Nassar-McMillan, Sylvia C.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the relationship among age, gender, and race relative to participation in self-awareness, action-oriented, and training activities after a job loss. Main effects were found for gender and for Age x Employment status. Implications of the study for outplacement programs, along with study limitations and future research directions, are…

  6. Competency-Based Education in Three Pilot Programs: Examining Implementation and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Jennifer L.; Lewis, Matthew W.; Santibanez, Lucrecia; Faxon-Mills, Susannah; Rudnick, Mollie; Stecher, Brian M.; Hamilton, Laura S.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation created the Project Mastery grant program to support competency-based education initiatives in large school systems that serve a high proportion of disadvantaged youth. Competency-based education meets students where they are academically, provides students with opportunities for choice, and awards…

  7. Examining the Preliminary Efficacy of a Dating Violence Prevention Program for Hispanic Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa Maria; Guerra, Jessica E.; Cummings, Amanda A.; Pino, Karen; Becerra, Maria M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the preliminary efficacy of a dating violence (DV) prevention program for Cuban American adolescents ("JOVEN"/YOUTH: "Juntos Opuestos a la Violence Entre Novios"/Together Against Dating Violence). A randomized-controlled experimental design with a delayed condition was used to evaluate…

  8. The development of a competency-based group health teaching performance examination model for BSN graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Chun-Yi; Chung, Ue-Lin

    2008-12-01

    Under the current nursing education system in Taiwan, a fair and objective evaluation of group health teaching competency has been lacking for a long time. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish a competency-based group health teaching performance examination model for baccalaureate graduates. Action research was the main research methodology used in this study. The research consisted of two phases. In the first phase, a development committee was established. Based on routine discussions, literature reviews and realistic cases, a draft examination model with quasi-clinical situation model content and procedure was developed. Examination Facility Preparations, Simulated Scenarios and Client Recruitments, Examination Result Evaluation (evaluated by teachers) and Learning Guidelines were also prepared. This draft was reviewed twice for expert opinion, a pilot test was done and both the draft and pilot testing were reviewed again before the draft was finalized. The second phase involved refining the examination model by actually practicing the completed draft examination model in a simulated group-teaching setting in order to examine the model's reliability and validity. Fifteen people were involved in this experiment: three nursing personnel each having at least two years' clinical and teaching experience; three nursing students who did not have actual clinical experience and had not taken the course of teaching principles; three senior teachers; and six virtual patients. The responses from the nursing personnel, nursing students, teachers, and virtual patients who participated in the testing were gathered and integrated to refine the model. The model has content, expert and discriminative validity. The reliability of the model was proven by the high consistency in administration and scoring of the model by clinical examiners. This examination model is not only applicable for the proof of students' credit point exemption, but also as an alternative

  9. 46 CFR 115.650 - Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... tagged at one-foot intervals, or any other acoustic or electronic positioning system approved by the OCMI... the third party examiner are recorded; and (7) Use appropriate equipment, such as a clear box,...

  10. A culturally sensitive Transition Assistance Program for stroke caregivers: Examining caregiver mental health and stroke rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Perrin, MS

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study developed and implemented the Transition Assistance Program (TAP for stroke caregivers. The program is composed of (1 skill development, (2 education, and (3 supportive problem solving. Sixty-one dyads (n = 122 participated: thirty-nine from Puerto Rico and twenty-two from Texas. Participants were randomly assigned to the TAP treatment or a control group. As caregiver satisfaction with the TAP increased, strain and depression decreased, and caregivers reported a very high rate of program satisfaction (9.5 out of 10. The TAP effectively reduced caregiver strain at the 3-month follow-up. When controlling for baseline differences, we found that the treatment group had lower depression (p = 0.07 than the control group at follow-up and that the TAP may have had a preventative effect on depression for caregivers who had not been depressed at discharge, although this visual trend did not reach statistical significance. Among veterans with low functioning at baseline, veterans whose caregivers had received the TAP improved in functioning more than did veterans whose caregivers had been in the control group, although this visual trend was not significant. Functioning in veterans with stroke was also significantly linked to caregiver satisfaction with the TAP. The findings from the current study warrant further evaluation of the TAP intervention.

  11. An Examination of a Skills-Based Leadership Coaching Course in an MBA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Deborah; Johnson, Lisa; Forbes, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    For many years, educators have tried to modify master of business administration (MBA) curricula to better prepare students for professional careers. Success in this endeavor may require educators to focus on a well-defined set of business-relevant skills. In this study, the authors examined the impact of a skillsbased course on leadership…

  12. Examining Student Feedback in Writing Assessment: Validation Inquiry in a Writing Placement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getchell, Kristen M.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the use of student feedback as support in a validation study of university writing placement practices. Using interviews with seventeen incoming first year students, this study examined student experiences constructing and submitting writing portfolios as opposed to taking a timed essay test. Also, this study…

  13. An Examination of a Skills-Based Leadership Coaching Course in an MBA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Deborah; Johnson, Lisa; Forbes, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    For many years, educators have tried to modify master of business administration (MBA) curricula to better prepare students for professional careers. Success in this endeavor may require educators to focus on a well-defined set of business-relevant skills. In this study, the authors examined the impact of a skillsbased course on leadership…

  14. A Critical Examination of Movement Content Knowledge Courses in Physical Education Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Insook; Lee, Yun Soo; Ward, Phillip; Li, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Despite increasing policy emphasis on improving teacher quality, little is known about how teachers acquire their movement content knowledge in physical education teacher education (PETE). To address this question we examined: (a) movement content courses designed to teach K-12 physical education content in the PETE curriculum, (b) the purpose of…

  15. Between Language as Problem and Resource: Examining Teachers' Language Orientations in Dual-Language Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga, Christian E.

    2016-01-01

    Using a case study methodology, the article examines the language practices of two third-grade bilingual, dual-language education teachers as they prepare their students for their state's standardized assessment. Findings revealed that both teachers taught in between the contradicting tensions of the language-as-problem and -resource orientations…

  16. Examining the Consulting Physician Model to Enhance the School Nurse Role for Children with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kristin D.; Moonie, Sheniz; Sterling, David A.; Gillespie, Kathleen N.; Kurz, Richard S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's "Strategies for Addressing Asthma Within a Coordinated School Health Program" recommends a consulting physician for schools to help manage asthma. The literature examines the effects when a school nurse is present, but the addition of a consulting physician is not well understood. The…

  17. Examining the Consulting Physician Model to Enhance the School Nurse Role for Children with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kristin D.; Moonie, Sheniz; Sterling, David A.; Gillespie, Kathleen N.; Kurz, Richard S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's "Strategies for Addressing Asthma Within a Coordinated School Health Program" recommends a consulting physician for schools to help manage asthma. The literature examines the effects when a school nurse is present, but the addition of a consulting physician is not well understood. The…

  18. Graduate Student Placement: An Examination of Experience and Career Barriers in a Student Affairs Professional Preparation Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy B Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This quantitative descriptive study examined the job placement success and challenges of graduate students in a higher education and student affairs professional preparation program at a mid-size public institution in the U.S. Specifically, this study investigated the impact of curricular standards in the form of supervised practice (i.e., internships and graduate assistantships on the job placement rate of recent alumni. In addition, perceived barriers in the job search process were investigated and examined comparatively by gender. Findings suggest that current curricular standards may not be sufficient for successful placement and that men and women do not differ significantly with respect to perceived barriers in their job search process. Implications for practice include a re-evaluation of curricular standards for student affairs professional preparation programs and a greater understanding of what factors and barriers contribute to successful graduate student placement.

  19. A Review of Peter Senge's Examination of Learning Organizations: Implications for Vocational Special Needs Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonser, Renee L.; Damme, Susan R.

    1993-01-01

    Total quality management fits naturally with service to vocational-technical special needs students. Conception of the institution as a learning organization requires core competencies: shared vision, personal mastery, mental models, team learning, and systems thinking. (JOW)

  20. Context Matters for Social-Emotional Learning: Examining Variation in Program Impact by Dimensions of School Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Meghan P; Cappella, Elise; O'Connor, Erin E; McClowry, Sandee G

    2015-09-01

    This paper examines whether three dimensions of school climate-leadership, accountability, and safety/respect-moderated the impacts of the INSIGHTS program on students' social-emotional, behavioral, and academic outcomes. Twenty-two urban schools and N = 435 low-income racial/ethnic minority students were enrolled in the study and received intervention services across the course of 2 years, in both kindergarten and first grade. Intervention effects on math and reading achievement were larger for students enrolled in schools with lower overall levels of leadership, accountability, and safety/respect at baseline. Program impacts on disruptive behaviors were greater in schools with lower levels of accountability at baseline; impacts on sustained attention were greater in schools with lower levels of safety/respect at baseline. Implications for Social-Emotional Learning program implementation, replication, and scale-up are discussed.

  1. An Examination of Extension Professionals’ Demographic and Personal Characteristics Toward Fostering Diversity-Inclusive 4-H Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas D. LaVergne

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available 4-H youth professionals’ attitudes about the perceptions of diversity inclusion in their programs are variables that may have an influence on the number of youths that enroll in 4-H. This study examines the impact of Extension professionals’ demographic and personal characteristics on their perceptions of the benefits of diversity inclusion, perceived barriers to diversity inclusion, and proposed solutions to increase diversity inclusion in 4-H youth programs. Using a web-based questionnaire, the researchers employed a nonproportional stratified random sampling technique, and 117 Extension professionals participated. Through comparative analysis, the researcher found statistically significant differences existed in professionals’ perceptions toward the benefits of diversity inclusion, the perceived barriers toward diversity inclusion, and the proposed solutions to increase diversity inclusion in 4-H programs. Additional research should be conducted to understand better why these differences exist.

  2. Program evaluation of a model to integrate internationally educated health professionals into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Alison; Dawes, Diana; Murphy, Susan; Parker, Gillian; Loveridge, Brenda

    2013-10-11

    The demand for health professionals continues to increase, partially due to the aging population and the high proportion of practitioners nearing retirement. The University of British Columbia (UBC) has developed a program to address this demand, by providing support for internationally trained Physiotherapists in their preparation for taking the National Physiotherapy competency examinations.The aim was to create a program comprised of the educational tools and infrastructure to support internationally educated physiotherapists (IEPs) in their preparation for entry to practice in Canada and, to improve their pass rate on the national competency examination. The program was developed using a logic model and evaluated using program evaluation methodology. Program tools and resources included educational modules and curricular packages which were developed and refined based on feedback from clinical experts, IEPs and clinical physical therapy mentors. An examination bank was created and used to include test-enhanced education. Clinical mentors were recruited and trained to provide clinical and cultural support for participants. The IEP program has recruited 124 IEPs, with 69 now integrated into the Canadian physiotherapy workforce, and more IEPs continuing to apply to the program. International graduates who participated in the program had an improved pass rate on the national Physiotherapy Competency Examination (PCE); participation in the program resulted in them having a 28% (95% CI, 2% to 59%) greater possibility of passing the written section than their counterparts who did not take the program. In 2010, 81% of all IEP candidates who completed the UBC program passed the written component, and 82% passed the clinical component. The program has proven to be successful and sustainable. This program model could be replicated to support the successful integration of other international health professionals into the workforce.

  3. Examining the Effectiveness of a Preceptorship on Clinical Competence for Senior Nursing Students in a Baccalaureate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Leslee H.

    2009-01-01

    Preceptorships are models of training in which a nurse, referred to as a preceptor, is assigned to one nursing student, for the purpose of facilitating learning in the clinical setting. There is a problem in the lack of documented evidence of the effectiveness of preceptorship programs in the education of nursing students, particularly the…

  4. Programming models for energy-aware systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haitao

    Energy efficiency is an important goal of modern computing, with direct impact on system operational cost, reliability, usability and environmental sustainability. This dissertation describes the design and implementation of two innovative programming languages for constructing energy-aware systems. First, it introduces ET, a strongly typed programming language to promote and facilitate energy-aware programming, with a novel type system design called Energy Types. Energy Types is built upon a key insight into today's energy-efficient systems and applications: despite the popular perception that energy and power can only be described in joules and watts, real-world energy management is often based on discrete phases and modes, which in turn can be reasoned about by type systems very effectively. A phase characterizes a distinct pattern of program workload, and a mode represents an energy state the program is expected to execute in. Energy Types is designed to reason about energy phases and energy modes, bringing programmers into the optimization of energy management. Second, the dissertation develops Eco, an energy-aware programming language centering around sustainability. A sustainable program built from Eco is able to adaptively adjusts its own behaviors to stay on a given energy budget, avoiding both deficit that would lead to battery drain or CPU overheating, and surplus that could have been used to improve the quality of the program output. Sustainability is viewed as a form of supply and demand matching, and a sustainable program consistently maintains the equilibrium between supply and demand. ET is implemented as a prototyped compiler for smartphone programming on Android, and Eco is implemented as a minimal extension to Java. Programming practices and benchmarking experiments in these two new languages showed that ET can lead to significant energy savings for Android Apps and Eco can efficiently promote battery awareness and temperature awareness in real

  5. Predicting Examination Performance Using an Expanded Integrated Hierarchical Model of Test Emotions and Achievement Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putwain, Dave; Deveney, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine an expanded integrative hierarchical model of test emotions and achievement goal orientations in predicting the examination performance of undergraduate students. Achievement goals were theorised as mediating the relationship between test emotions and performance. 120 undergraduate students completed…

  6. A comprehensive examination of the model underlying acceptance and commitment therapy for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vowles, Kevin E; Sowden, Gail; Ashworth, Julie

    2014-05-01

    The therapeutic model underlying Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is reasonably well-established as it applies to chronic pain. Several studies have examined measures of single ACT processes, or subsets of processes, and have almost uniformly indicated reliable relations with patient functioning. To date, however, no study has performed a comprehensive examination of the entire ACT model, including all of its component processes, as it relates to functioning. The present study performed this examination in 274 individuals with chronic pain presenting for an assessment appointment. Participants completed a battery of self-report questionnaires, assessing multiple aspects of the ACT model, as well as pain intensity, disability, and emotional distress. Initial exploratory factor analyses examined measures of the ACT model and measures of patient functioning separately with each analysis identifying three factors. Next, the fit of a model including ACT processes on the one hand and patient functioning on the other was examined using Structural Equation Modeling. Overall model fit was acceptable and indicated moderate correlations among the ACT processes themselves, as well as significant relations with pain intensity, emotional distress, and disability. These analyses build on the existing literature by providing, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive evaluation of the ACT theoretical model in chronic pain to date. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. A Model Program for Dental Assisting Education in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Industrial Education.

    Intended to provide assistance for developing new programs and improving existing ones, the guide was constructed by dental assisting instructors and other professional participants in a 196 5 workshop conference. Elements of the model program were derived from a statistical analysis of California junior colleg e programs in dental assisting and…

  8. Evaluating Vocational Programs: A Three Dimensional Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Sharaf N.; Nejad, Mahmoud

    The traditional methods of assessing the academic programs in the liberal arts are inappropriate for evaluating vocational and technical programs. In traditional academic disciplines, assessment of instruction is conducted in two fashions: student evaluation at the end of a course and institutional assessment of its goals and mission. Because of…

  9. Examining the Preliminary Efficacy of a Dating Violence Prevention Program for Hispanic Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa Maria; Guerra, Jessica E.; Cummings, Amanda A.; Pino, Karen; Becerra, Maria M.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the preliminary efficacy of a dating violence (DV) prevention program for Cuban American adolescents (JOVEN/YOUTH: Juntos Opuestos a la Violence Entre Novios/Together Against Dating Violence). A randomized-controlled experimental design with a delayed condition was used to evaluate the effects on DV victimization and perpetration (N = 82). Self-administrated assessments were completed at baseline, 1 week, 3 months, and 12 months after the intervention to assess for psychological victimization and perpetration and physical and sexual victimization and perpetration. Effect sizes were estimated, and generalized estimating equations were generated to test intervention effects over time and potential gender interactions. The intervention had medium to strong effects on DV victimization and perpetration for male participants but not for females. However, intervention effects were not statistically significant over time. More research is needed to enhance intervention effects of JOVEN on DV outcomes and to evaluate these effects among a larger and more diverse sample. PMID:26260135

  10. Examining the Sustainability of an Evidence-Based Preschool Curriculum: The REDI Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford DeRousie, Rebecca M.; Bierman, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which an evidence-based preschool curriculum (Head Start REDI) was sustained by 20 teachers during the year following a randomized controlled efficacy trial, when teachers were no longer required by the research project to implement the curriculum. Two quantitative measures of sustainability (teacher ratings, REDI coach ratings) and a qualitative measure (teacher interview) were collected and compared. Sustainability varied by the specific curriculum component, with higher rates of sustainability for the social-emotional component (Preschool PATHS) than for the language and literacy components. Estimates of sustainability were affected by the method of measurement, with REDI coach ratings and qualitative teacher interviews more closely aligned than teacher ratings. Responses from qualitative interviews identified the main factors that teachers thought affected sustainability. Teacher responses suggest that efforts to promote sustainability are best targeted at reducing barriers, such as competing demands, rather than simply highlighting the benefits of the new curriculum. PMID:22408287

  11. Building an advanced climate model: Program plan for the CHAMMP (Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics) Climate Modeling Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    The issue of global warming and related climatic changes from increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has received prominent attention during the past few years. The Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics (CHAMMP) Climate Modeling Program is designed to contribute directly to this rapid improvement. The goal of the CHAMMP Climate Modeling Program is to develop, verify, and apply a new generation of climate models within a coordinated framework that incorporates the best available scientific and numerical approaches to represent physical, biogeochemical, and ecological processes, that fully utilizes the hardware and software capabilities of new computer architectures, that probes the limits of climate predictability, and finally that can be used to address the challenging problem of understanding the greenhouse climate issue through the ability of the models to simulate time-dependent climatic changes over extended times and with regional resolution.

  12. The Effects of a Model-Based Physics Curriculum Program with a Physics First Approach: A Causal-Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ling L.; Fulmer, Gavin W.; Majerich, David M.; Clevenstine, Richard; Howanski, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of a model-based introductory physics curriculum on conceptual learning in a Physics First (PF) Initiative. This is the first comparative study in physics education that applies the Rasch modeling approach to examine the effects of a model-based curriculum program combined with PF in the United…

  13. Mantis: Predicting System Performance through Program Analysis and Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Chun, Byung-Gon; Lee, Sangmin; Maniatis, Petros; Naik, Mayur

    2010-01-01

    We present Mantis, a new framework that automatically predicts program performance with high accuracy. Mantis integrates techniques from programming language and machine learning for performance modeling, and is a radical departure from traditional approaches. Mantis extracts program features, which are information about program execution runs, through program instrumentation. It uses machine learning techniques to select features relevant to performance and creates prediction models as a function of the selected features. Through program analysis, it then generates compact code slices that compute these feature values for prediction. Our evaluation shows that Mantis can achieve more than 93% accuracy with less than 10% training data set, which is a significant improvement over models that are oblivious to program features. The system generates code slices that are cheap to compute feature values.

  14. Evolutionary Model to Traditional Culture and Program Organization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-xiao; JIN Wei-xing; YANG De-qin

    2006-01-01

    To study the relationship between the evolutions of Chinese Traditional Culture (CTC) and program organization, an outline of the CTC is generalized by reviewing literature, and which is also compartmentalized into two aspects according to economic philosophy views: traditional philosophy aspect and value judgment. Based on three dimensions, which are the philosophy aspect (P), program organization model (P), and value judgment from economic philosophy views (V), and this evolution sequence, the CTC's influence on the program organization model in the evolution is discussed; then the cultural spatial evolution model for program organization based on the three dimensions (PPV) is constructed. From analyzing the plane matrix of P-P and empirical investigating on the organizational model of construction enterprises, it is found that the ancient Chinese government organizational model still has prevailing influence on the modern program organizational model in China.

  15. Deadlock Detection in Basic Models of MPI Synchronization Communication Programs

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Ming-xue

    2007-01-01

    A model of MPI synchronization communication programs is presented and its three basic simplified models are also defined. A series of theorems and methods for deciding whether deadlocks will occur among the three models are given and proved strictly. These theories and methods for simple models' deadlock detection are the necessary base for real MPI program deadlock detection. The methods are based on a static analysis through programs and with runtime detection in necessary cases and they are able to determine before compiling whether it will be deadlocked for two of the three basic models. For another model, some deadlock cases can be found before compiling and others at runtime. Our theorems can be used to prove the correctness of currently popular MPI program deadlock detection algorithms. Our methods may decrease codes that those algorithms need to change to MPI source or profiling interface and may detects deadlocks ahead of program execution, thus the overheads can be reduced greatly.

  16. Vouchers for Day Care of Children: Evaluating a Program Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Michael D.

    1989-01-01

    Examined effects of a pilot voucher program on the price, supply, and quality of day care. Findings offered no conclusive evidence concerning expected benefits. Discusses vouchers' potential for easing the day care crisis. (RJC)

  17. Training Program for Cardiology Residents to Perform Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Examination with Portable Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Vicente N; Mancuso, Frederico J N; Campos, Orlando; De Paola, Angelo A; Carvalho, Antonio C; Moises, Valdir A

    2015-10-01

    Training requirements for general cardiologists without echocardiographic expertise to perform focused cardiac ultrasound (FCU) with portable devices have not yet been defined. The objective of this study was to evaluate a training program to instruct cardiology residents to perform FCU with a hand-carried device (HCD) in different clinical settings. Twelve cardiology residents were subjected to a 50-question test, 4 lectures on basic echocardiography and imaging interpretation, the supervised interpretation of 50 echocardiograms and performance of 30 exams using HCD. After this period, they repeated the written test and were administered a practical test comprising 30 exams each (360 patients) in different clinical settings. They reported on 15 parameters and a final diagnosis; their findings were compared to the HCD exam of a specialist in echocardiography. The proportion of correct answers on the theoretical test was higher after training (86%) than before (51%; P = 0.001). The agreement was substantial among the 15 parameters analyzed (kappa ranging from 0.615 to 0.891; P < 0.001). The percentage of correct interpretation was lower for abnormal (75%) than normal (95%) items, for valve abnormalities (85%) compared to other items (92%) and for graded scale (87%) than for dichotomous (95%) items (P < 0.0001, for all). For the final diagnoses, the kappa value was higher than 0.941 (P < 0.001; 95% CI [0.914, 0.955]). The training proposed enabled residents to perform FCU with HCD, and their findings were in good agreement with those of a cardiologist specialized in echocardiography. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Examining neural correlates of skill acquisition in a complex videogame training program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchika S Prakash

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Acquisition of complex skills is a universal feature of human behavior that has been conceptualized as a process that starts with intense resource dependency, requires effortful cognitive control, and ends in relative automaticity on the multi-faceted task. The present study examined the effects of different theoretically-based training strategies on cortical recruitment during acquisition of complex videogame skills. Seventy-five participants were recruited and assigned to one of three training groups: Fixed Emphasis Training (FET, in which participants practiced the game, Hybrid Variable Priority Training (HVT, in which participants practiced using a combination of part-task training and variable priority training, or a Control group that received limited game play. After 30 hours of training, game data indicated a significant advantage for the two training groups relative to the control group. The HVT group demonstrated enhanced benefits of training, as indexed by an improvement in overall game score and a reduction in cortical recruitment post-training. Specifically, while both groups demonstrated a significant reduction of activation in attentional control areas, namely the right middle frontal gyrus, right superior frontal gyrus, and the ventral medial prefrontal cortex, participants in the control group continued to engage these areas post-training, suggesting a sustained reliance on attentional regions during challenging task demands. The HVT group showed a further reduction in neural resources post-training compared to the FET group in these cognitive control regions, along with reduced activation in the motor and sensory cortices and the posteromedial cortex. Findings suggest that training, specifically one that emphasizes cognitive flexibility can reduce the attentional demands of a complex cognitive task, along with reduced reliance on the motor network.

  19. Determinants of success for computerized cognitive behavior therapy: examination of an insomnia program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Norah; Walsh, Kate; Lewycky, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated plausible moderators of outcome in a 6-week computerized treatment for insomnia. Using secondary data from two randomized controlled trials, participants were 228 adults with chronic insomnia. Participants received computerized treatment from their homes. Outcomes were assessed using a sleep diary, as well as several standardized self-report scales. Using linear mixed models with SPSS, treatment was largely robust to comorbid conditions, education, age, and gender. Results showed that psychiatric comorbidity and education moderated the impact of treatment on fatigue and that sleep symptom comorbidity moderated the impact of treatment on maladaptive attitudes about sleep. Implications of these findings are that more widespread use of computerized treatment for insomnia may be warranted.

  20. Examining the Longitudinal Biliterate Trajectory of Emerging Bilingual Learners in a Paired Literacy Instructional Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Wendy; Butvilofsky, Sandra; Escamilla, Kathy; Hopewell, Susan; Tolento, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines the biliteracy results of Spanish-English emerging bilingual students who participated in a K-5 paired literacy model in a large school district in Oregon. Spanish and English reading and writing data show longitudinal gains in students' biliterate development, demonstrating the potential of the model in developing…

  1. An Examination of Pre-Service Mathematics Teachers' Approaches to Construct and Solve Mathematical Modelling Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukova-Guzel, Esra

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the approaches displayed by pre-service mathematics teachers in their experiences of constructing mathematical modelling problems and the extent to which they perform the modelling process when solving the problems they construct. This case study was carried out with 35 pre-service teachers taking the Mathematical Modelling…

  2. Examining the Bifactor IRT Model for Vertical Scaling in K-12 Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepfler, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, educational policy trends have shifted to a focus on examining students' growth from kindergarten through twelfth grade (K-12). One way states can track students' growth is with a vertical scale. Presently, every state that uses a vertical scale bases the scale on a unidimensional IRT model. These models make a…

  3. Simultaneous and Delayed Video Modeling: An Examination of System Effectiveness and Student Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber-Doughyt, Teresa; Patton, Scott E.; Brennan, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness of simultaneous and delayed video modeling when used by three middle-school students with moderate intellectual disabilities was examined. Alternating between modeling systems, students were taught to use the public library computer to locate specific book call numbers and use the Dewey Decimal Classification System to locate…

  4. Clinical Psychology Ph.D. Program Admissions: Differential Values as a Function of Program Characteristics and the Implications of the Mentor-Model Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Jesse A.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this research were to 1) examine the qualities for which applicants are selected for entrance into clinical psychology Ph.D. programs, and 2) investigate the prevalence and impact of the mentor-model approach to admissions on multiple domains of programs and the field at large. Fifty Directors of Clinical Training (DCTs) provided data…

  5. Clinical Psychology Ph.D. Program Admissions: Differential Values as a Function of Program Characteristics and the Implications of the Mentor-Model Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Jesse A.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this research were to 1) examine the qualities for which applicants are selected for entrance into clinical psychology Ph.D. programs, and 2) investigate the prevalence and impact of the mentor-model approach to admissions on multiple domains of programs and the field at large. Fifty Directors of Clinical Training (DCTs) provided data…

  6. Modeling Activities in the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Sciences Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Schwartz, Stephen E.

    2009-03-01

    The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Science Program (ASP) conducts research pertinent to radiative forcing of climate change by atmospheric aerosols. The program consists of approximately 40 highly interactive peer-reviewed research projects that examine aerosol properties and processes and the evolution of aerosols in the atmosphere. Principal components of the program are instrument development, laboratory experiments, field studies, theoretical investigations, and modeling. The objectives of the Program are to 1) improve the understanding of aerosol processes associated with light scattering and absorption properties and interactions with clouds that affect Earth's radiative balance and to 2) develop model-based representations of these processes that enable the effects of aerosols on Earth's climate system to be properly represented in global-scale numerical climate models. Although only a few of the research projects within ASP are explicitly identified as primarily modeling activities, modeling actually comprises a substantial component of a large fraction of ASP research projects. This document describes the modeling activities within the Program as a whole, the objectives and intended outcomes of these activities, and the linkages among the several modeling components and with global-scale modeling activities conducted under the support of the Department of Energy's Climate Sciences Program and other aerosol and climate research programs.

  7. Application of model bread baking in the examination of arabinoxylan-protein complexes in rye bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buksa, Krzysztof

    2016-09-01

    The changes in molecular mass of arabinoxylan (AX) and protein caused by bread baking process were examined using a model rye bread. Instead of the normal flour, the dough contained starch, water-extractable AX and protein which were isolated from rye wholemeal. From the crumb of selected model breads, starch was removed releasing AX-protein complexes, which were further examined by size exclusion chromatography. On the basis of the research, it was concluded that optimum model mix can be composed of 3-6% AX and 3-6% rye protein isolate at 94-88% of rye starch meaning with the most similar properties to low extraction rye flour. Application of model rye bread allowed to examine the interactions between AX and proteins. Bread baked with a share of AX, rye protein and starch, from which the complexes of the highest molar mass were isolated, was characterized by the strongest structure of the bread crumb.

  8. The Actiotope Model of Giftedness: A Useful Model for Examining Gifted Education in China's Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Weiguo

    2012-01-01

    In March 1978, under the suggestion of Chinese-born Nobel Prize laureate Tsung-Dao Lee, China launched its first gifted education program at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC). Based on nominations and interviews, 21 gifted students aged 11-16 were enrolled in USTC and comprised a special class. Five years later, the early…

  9. Integer Programming Model for Maximum Clique in Graph

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Xi-bo; YANG You; ZENG Xin-hai

    2005-01-01

    The maximum clique or maximum independent set of graph is a classical problem in graph theory. Combined with Boolean algebra and integer programming, two integer programming models for maximum clique problem,which improve the old results were designed in this paper. Then, the programming model for maximum independent set is a corollary of the main results. These two models can be easily applied to computer algorithm and software, and suitable for graphs of any scale. Finally the models are presented as Lingo algorithms, verified and compared by several examples.

  10. Efficient Global Programming Model for Discriminant Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.ANGULAKSHMI

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional statistical analysis includes the capacity to systematically assign individuals to groups. We suggest alternative assignment procedures, utilizing a set of interrelated goal programming formulations. This paper represents an effort to suggest ways by which the discriminant problem might reasonably be addressed via straightforward linear goal programming formulations. Simple and direct, such formulations may ultimately compete with conventional approaches - free of the classical assumptions and possessing a stronger intuitive appeal. We further demonstrate via simple illustration the potential of these procedures to play a significant part in addressing the discriminant problem, and indicate fundamental ideas that lay the foundation for other more sophisticated approaches.

  11. Examination of Solubility Models for the Determination of Transition Metals within Liquid Alkali Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Isler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The experimental solubility of transition metals in liquid alkali metal was compared to the modeled solubility calculated using various equations for solubility. These equations were modeled using the enthalpy calculations of the semi-empirical Miedema model and various entropy calculations. The accuracy of the predicted solubility compared to the experimental data is more dependent on which liquid alkali metal is being examined rather than the transition metal solute examined. For liquid lithium the calculated solubility by the model was generally larger than experimental values, while for liquid cesium the modeling solubility was significantly smaller than the experimental values. For liquid sodium, potassium, and rubidium the experimental solubilities were within the range calculated by this study. Few data approached the predicted temperature dependence of solubility and instead most data exhibited a less pronounced temperature dependence.

  12. Development and Implementation of a Program Management Maturity Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartwig, Laura; Smith, Matt

    2008-12-15

    In 2006, Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) announced an updatedvision statement for the organization. The vision is “To be the most admired team within the NNSA [National Nuclear Security Administration] for our relentless drive to convert ideas into the highest quality products and services for National Security by applying the right technology, outstanding program management and best commercial practices.” The challenge to provide outstanding program management was taken up by the Program Management division and the Program Integration Office (PIO) of the company. This article describes how Honeywell developed and deployed a program management maturity model to drive toward excellence.

  13. Organizational analysis of three community support program models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, B; Greenley, J R

    1986-06-01

    Little attention has been paid to the organizational and administrative characteristics of effective community support programs for the chronic mentally ill. The authors analyzed three successful support programs in Wisconsin that employ three different models of service delivery: one provides services through caseworkers who carry specialized caseloads, another through local nonprofessionals who work with a centrally located program coordinator, and the third through a team of various mental health workers. Each program has tailored its organizational process to suit the types of clients it sees, the size of its catchment area, and the availability of other professional resources. The interrelated strengths and weaknesses of each model are discussed.

  14. Designing Academic Leadership Minor Programs: Emerging Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Lamine; Gerhardt, Kris

    2017-01-01

    With a growing number of leadership programs in universities and colleges in North America, leadership educators and researchers are engaged in a wide ranging dialogue to propose clear processes, content, and designs for providing academic leadership education. This research analyzes the curriculum design of 52 institutions offering a "Minor…

  15. Model checking abstract state machines with answer set programming

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Answer Set Programming (ASP) is a logic programming paradigm that has been shown as a useful tool in various application areas due to its expressive modelling language. These application areas include Bourided Model Checking (BMC). BMC is a verification technique that is recognized for its strong ability of finding errors in computer systems. To apply BMC, a system needs to be modelled in a formal specification language, such as the widely used formalism of Abstract State Machines (ASMs). In ...

  16. "To Be a Scientist Sometimes You Have to Break Down Stuff about Animals": Examining the Normative Scientific Practices of a Summer Herpetological Program for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Catherine Marie

    2016-01-01

    When studying informal science programs, researchers often overlook the opportunities enabled and constrained in each program and the practices reinforced for participants. In this case study, I examined the normative scientific practices reinforced in one-week-long "Herpetology" (the study of reptiles and amphibians) program for…

  17. "To Be a Scientist Sometimes You Have to Break Down Stuff about Animals": Examining the Normative Scientific Practices of a Summer Herpetological Program for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Catherine Marie

    2016-01-01

    When studying informal science programs, researchers often overlook the opportunities enabled and constrained in each program and the practices reinforced for participants. In this case study, I examined the normative scientific practices reinforced in one-week-long "Herpetology" (the study of reptiles and amphibians) program for…

  18. FAMULATUR PLUS - A successful model for improving students' physical examination skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerg, Achim; Öchsner, Wolfgang; Traue, Harald; Jerg-Bretzke, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction/Project description: Several studies have revealed insufficient physical examination skills among medical students, both with regard to the completeness of the physical examination and the accuracy of the techniques used. FAMULATUR PLUS was developed in response to these findings. As part of this practice-oriented instructional intervention, physical examination skills should be taught through examination seminars and problem-oriented learning approaches. In order to ensure practical relevance, all courses are integrated into a 30-day clinical traineeship in the surgery or internal medicine department of a hospital (FAMULATUR PLUS). Research question: Does participation in the FAMULATUR PLUS project lead to a more optimistic self-assessment of examination skills and/or improved performance of the physical examination? Methodology: A total of 49 medical students participated in the study. The inclusion criteria were as follows: enrollment in the clinical studies element of their degree program at the University of Ulm and completion of the university course in internal medicine examinations. Based on their personal preferences, students were assigned to either the intervention (surgery/internal medicine; n=24) or the control group (internal medicine; n=25). All students completed a self-assessment of their physical examination skills in the form of a questionnaire. However, practical examination skills were only assessed in the students in the intervention group. These students were asked to carry out a general physical examination of the simulation patient, which was recorded and evaluated in a standardized manner. In both instances, data collection was carried out prior to and after the intervention. Results: The scores arising from the student self-assessment in the intervention (IG) and control groups (CG) improves significantly in the pre-post comparison, with average scores increasing from 3.83 (±0.72; IG) and 3.54 (±0.37; CG) to 1.92 (±0

  19. FAMULATUR PLUS – A successful model for improving students' physical examination skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerg, Achim; Öchsner, Wolfgang; Traue, Harald; Jerg-Bretzke, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction/Project description: Several studies have revealed insufficient physical examination skills among medical students, both with regard to the completeness of the physical examination and the accuracy of the techniques used. FAMULATUR PLUS was developed in response to these findings. As part of this practice-oriented instructional intervention, physical examination skills should be taught through examination seminars and problem-oriented learning approaches. In order to ensure practical relevance, all courses are integrated into a 30-day clinical traineeship in the surgery or internal medicine department of a hospital (FAMULATUR PLUS). Research question: Does participation in the FAMULATUR PLUS project lead to a more optimistic self-assessment of examination skills and/or improved performance of the physical examination? Methodology: A total of 49 medical students participated in the study. The inclusion criteria were as follows: enrollment in the clinical studies element of their degree program at the University of Ulm and completion of the university course in internal medicine examinations. Based on their personal preferences, students were assigned to either the intervention (surgery/internal medicine; n=24) or the control group (internal medicine; n=25). All students completed a self-assessment of their physical examination skills in the form of a questionnaire. However, practical examination skills were only assessed in the students in the intervention group. These students were asked to carry out a general physical examination of the simulation patient, which was recorded and evaluated in a standardized manner. In both instances, data collection was carried out prior to and after the intervention. Results: The scores arising from the student self-assessment in the intervention (IG) and control groups (CG) improves significantly in the pre-post comparison, with average scores increasing from 3.83 (±0.72; IG) and 3.54 (±0.37; CG) to 1.92 (±0

  20. ALREST High Fidelity Modeling Program Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-18

    Gases and Mixtures of Redlich - Kwong and Peng- Robinson Fluids Assumed pdf Model based on k- ε-g Model in NASA/LaRc Vulcan code Level Set model...Potential Attractiveness Of Liquid Hydrocarbon Engines For Boost Applications • Propensity Of Hydrocarbon Engines For Combustion Instability • Air

  1. Examination of costs for a lay health educator-delivered translation of the Diabetes Prevention Program in senior centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukowski, Rebecca A; Pope, Rebecca A; Love, Sharhonda; Lensing, Shelly; Felix, Holly C; Prewitt, T Elaine; West, Delia

    2013-10-01

    Older adults in the U.S. have high rates of obesity. Despite the demonstrated efficacy of lifestyle interventions among older adults, lifestyle interventions are not widely implemented in community settings. Program delivery by lay health educators (LHEs) might support greater dissemination because of lower delivery cost and greater accessibility. We examined the costs of a LHE-delivered translation of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) evidence-based lifestyle intervention for older adults in Arkansas senior centers. This examination of costs used data from a cluster randomized control trial (conducted 2008-2010) in which 7 senior centers (116 participants) were randomized to implement a LHE-delivered 12-session translation of the DPP lifestyle intervention. We compiled direct lifestyle intervention implementation costs, including training, recruitment, materials, and ongoing intervention implementation support. Weight loss data (at 4-month follow-up) were collected from participants. Participant weight loss averaged 3.7kg at 4-months. The total estimated cost to implement the lifestyle intervention is $2731 per senior center, or $165 per participant. The implementation cost per kilogram lost is $45. A LHE-delivered DPP translation in senior centers is effective in achieving weight loss at low cost and offers promise for the dissemination of this evidence-based intervention. © 2013.

  2. Effects of a training program about breast cancer and breast self-examination among female students at Taif University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desouky, Dalia E; Taha, Azza A

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in Saudi women. It is spreading three times faster in the Kingdom than in other countries. One-third of breast cancers are preventable through healthy life styles. This study aimed to assess the impact of a training program on breast cancer and breast self-examination (BSE) among female students at Taif University. This study was carried out using a pre-post test design on a sample of female university students from seven colleges in Taif University (Faculty of Science, Faculty of Economics and Management, Faculty of Art, Faculty of Education, Faculty of Medicine, Faculty of Pharmacy, and the Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences) in the academic year 2012-2013. None of the participants had ever practiced BSE before training, and only 16% of them believed that BSE is necessary, whereas 8.7% were willing to teach others BSE. There was limited knowledge of breast cancer. After the training program, a significant improvement was observed in all knowledge items, and 83.6% of the students practiced BSE compared with 0% practice before training. This study showed the effectiveness of the intervention program in improving students' knowledge of breast cancer and their practice of BSE. Thus, campaigns focusing on females in this age group should be carried out in the Saudi society.

  3. EXAMINING THE MOVEMENTS OF MOBILE NODES IN THE REAL WORLD TO PRODUCE ACCURATE MOBILITY MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANWEER ALAM

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available All communication occurs through a wireless median in an ad hoc network. Ad hoc networks are dynamically created and maintained by the individual nodes comprising the network. Random Waypoint Mobility Model is a model that includes pause times between changes in destination and speed. To produce a real-world environment within which an ad hoc network can be formed among a set of nodes, there is a need for the development of realistic, generic and comprehensive mobility models. In this paper, we examine the movements of entities in the real world and present the production of mobility model in an ad hoc network.

  4. An examination of the tripartite model of anxiety and depression and its application to youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, J; Ettelson, R

    2001-09-01

    The ability to differentiate anxiety and depression has been a topic of discussion in the adult and youth literatures for several decades. The tripartite model of anxiety and depression proposed by L. A. Clark and D. Watson (1991) has helped focus the discussion. In the tripartite model, anxiety is characterized by elevated levels of physiological hyperarousal (PH), depression is characterized by low levels of positive affect (PA), and negative affect (NA) or generalized emotional distress is common to both. The advent of the model led to the development of measures of tripartite constructs and subsequent validity studies. The tripartite model and resultant activity concerning the model was largely devoted to adult samples. However. those interested in anxiety and depression among youth are now incorporating the tripartite model in their work. This paper examines the current influence of the tripartite model in the youth literature, especially with regard to measuring anxiety and depression.

  5. The Trauma Outcome Process Assessment Model: A Structural Equation Model Examination of Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Susan E.; Callahan, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    This investigation sought to operationalize a comprehensive theoretical model, the Trauma Outcome Process Assessment, and test it empirically with structural equation modeling. The Trauma Outcome Process Assessment reflects a robust body of research and incorporates known ecological factors (e.g., family dynamics, social support) to explain…

  6. Consideration of an applied model of public health program infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavinghouze, René; Snyder, Kimberly; Rieker, Patricia; Ottoson, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Systemic infrastructure is key to public health achievements. Individual public health program infrastructure feeds into this larger system. Although program infrastructure is rarely defined, it needs to be operationalized for effective implementation and evaluation. The Ecological Model of Infrastructure (EMI) is one approach to defining program infrastructure. The EMI consists of 5 core (Leadership, Partnerships, State Plans, Engaged Data, and Managed Resources) and 2 supporting (Strategic Understanding and Tactical Action) elements that are enveloped in a program's context. We conducted a literature search across public health programs to determine support for the EMI. Four of the core elements were consistently addressed, and the other EMI elements were intermittently addressed. The EMI provides an initial and partial model for understanding program infrastructure, but additional work is needed to identify evidence-based indicators of infrastructure elements that can be used to measure success and link infrastructure to public health outcomes, capacity, and sustainability.

  7. An examination of the tripartite model of anxiety and depression in an outpatient sample of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dia, David A; Harrington, Donna; Silverman, Wendy K

    2010-07-01

    Anxiety and depressive disorders are the most common mental health problems for adolescents; understanding their etiology and course is necessary for developing effective prevention and treatment programs. The tripartite model of anxiety and depression was evaluated in a random, clinical sample of 185 adolescents, with an average age of 15.09 years (SD = 1.9), with 58.4% males (n = 108). Survey packets were mailed to participants (61% response rate). Two models were evaluated: (a) Model one fit adequately, however, modification indices and prior research and theory suggested adding paths between anxiety and depression. (b) Model two tested paths between anxiety and depression; this revised model fit the data well, suggesting a relationship from anxiety to depression. Further, physiological hyperarousal may be a distinct component for anxiety and negative affectivity may be a general risk factor for anxiety and depression in adolescents. The findings that different factors contribute to the cause of anxiety and depression have implications for practice.

  8. Enhancing empowerment in eating disorder prevention: Another examination of the REbeL peer education model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breithaupt, Lauren; Eickman, Laura; Byrne, Catherine E; Fischer, Sarah

    2016-06-11

    Previously validated eating disorder (ED) prevention programs utilize either a targeted or universal approach. While both approaches have shown to be efficacious, implementing either style of program within a school setting remains a challenge. The current study describes an enhanced version of REbeL, a module based, continuous ED prevention program which utilizes a self-selection model of prevention in high school settings. The purpose of this study was to determine if an enhanced empowerment model of REbeL could increase feelings of empowerment and reduce eating disorder risk. We also aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention. High school peer-educators self-selected into the semi-manualized dissonance based intervention. Following feedback from a pilot trailed, enhanced peer-led group activities, designed to critique the thin ideal and designed to empower macro-changes in societal structures that emphasize the thin ideal, were added. The study (N=83) indicates that the program appears to be effective at reducing eating disorder risk factors and increasing empowerment. Participants reported reductions in body checking and internalization of the thin ideal.

  9. An Educational Exercise Examining the Role of Model Attributes on the Creation and Alteration of CAD Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael D.; Diwakaran, Ram Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Computer-aided design (CAD) is a ubiquitous tool that today's students will be expected to use proficiently for numerous engineering purposes. Taking full advantage of the features available in modern CAD programs requires that models are created in a manner that allows others to easily understand how they are organized and alter them in an…

  10. An Educational Exercise Examining the Role of Model Attributes on the Creation and Alteration of CAD Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael D.; Diwakaran, Ram Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Computer-aided design (CAD) is a ubiquitous tool that today's students will be expected to use proficiently for numerous engineering purposes. Taking full advantage of the features available in modern CAD programs requires that models are created in a manner that allows others to easily understand how they are organized and alter them in an…

  11. A model inter-comparison study to examine limiting factors in modelling Australian tropical savannas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Whitley

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Savanna ecosystems are one of the most dominant and complex terrestrial biomes that derives from a distinct vegetative surface comprised of co-dominant tree and grass populations. While these two vegetation types co-exist functionally, demographically they are not static, but are dynamically changing in response to environmental forces such as annual fire events and rainfall variability. Modelling savanna environments with the current generation of terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs has presented many problems, particularly describing fire frequency and intensity, phenology, leaf biochemistry of C3 and C4 photosynthesis vegetation, and root water uptake. In order to better understand why TBMs perform so poorly in savannas, we conducted a model inter-comparison of 6 TBMs and assessed their performance at simulating latent energy (LE and gross primary productivity (GPP for five savanna sites along a rainfall gradient in northern Australia. Performance in predicting LE and GPP was measured using an empirical benchmarking system, which ranks models by their ability to utilise meteorological driving information to predict the fluxes. On average, the TBMs performed as well as a multi-linear regression of the fluxes against solar radiation, temperature and vapour pressure deficit, but were outperformed by a more complicated nonlinear response model that also included the leaf area index (LAI. This identified that the TBMs are not fully utilising their input information effectively in determining savanna LE and GPP, and highlights that savanna dynamics cannot be calibrated into models and that there are problems in underlying model processes. We identified key weaknesses in a model's ability to simulate savanna fluxes and their seasonal variation, related to the representation of vegetation by the models and root water uptake. We underline these weaknesses in terms of three critical areas for development. First, prescribed tree-rooting depths must be

  12. A model inter-comparison study to examine limiting factors in modelling Australian tropical savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Rhys; Beringer, Jason; Hutley, Lindsay B.; Abramowitz, Gab; De Kauwe, Martin G.; Duursma, Remko; Evans, Bradley; Haverd, Vanessa; Li, Longhui; Ryu, Youngryel; Smith, Benjamin; Wang, Ying-Ping; Williams, Mathew; Yu, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    The savanna ecosystem is one of the most dominant and complex terrestrial biomes, deriving from a distinct vegetative surface comprised of co-dominant tree and grass populations. While these two vegetation types co-exist functionally, demographically they are not static but are dynamically changing in response to environmental forces such as annual fire events and rainfall variability. Modelling savanna environments with the current generation of terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) has presented many problems, particularly describing fire frequency and intensity, phenology, leaf biochemistry of C3 and C4 photosynthesis vegetation, and root-water uptake. In order to better understand why TBMs perform so poorly in savannas, we conducted a model inter-comparison of six TBMs and assessed their performance at simulating latent energy (LE) and gross primary productivity (GPP) for five savanna sites along a rainfall gradient in northern Australia. Performance in predicting LE and GPP was measured using an empirical benchmarking system, which ranks models by their ability to utilise meteorological driving information to predict the fluxes. On average, the TBMs performed as well as a multi-linear regression of the fluxes against solar radiation, temperature and vapour pressure deficit but were outperformed by a more complicated nonlinear response model that also included the leaf area index (LAI). This identified that the TBMs are not fully utilising their input information effectively in determining savanna LE and GPP and highlights that savanna dynamics cannot be calibrated into models and that there are problems in underlying model processes. We identified key weaknesses in a model's ability to simulate savanna fluxes and their seasonal variation, related to the representation of vegetation by the models and root-water uptake. We underline these weaknesses in terms of three critical areas for development. First, prescribed tree-rooting depths must be deep enough

  13. Service systems concepts, modeling, and programming

    CERN Document Server

    Cardoso, Jorge; Poels, Geert

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief explores the internal workings of service systems. The authors propose a lightweight semantic model for an effective representation to capture the essence of service systems. Key topics include modeling frameworks, service descriptions and linked data, creating service instances, tool support, and applications in enterprises.Previous books on service system modeling and various streams of scientific developments used an external perspective to describe how systems can be integrated. This brief introduces the concept of white-box service system modeling as an approach to mo

  14. Examination of Modeling Languages to Allow Quantitative Analysis for Model-Based Systems Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    model of the system (Friendenthal, Moore and Steiner 2008, 17). The premise is that maintaining a logical and consistent model can be accomplished...Standard for Exchange of Product data (STEP) subgroup of ISO, and defines a standard data format for certain types of SE information ( Johnson 2006...search.credoreference.com/content/entry/encyccs/formal_languages/0. Friedenthal, Sanford, Alan Moore, and Rick Steiner . 2008. A Practical Guide to SysML

  15. Identifying an appropriate measurement modeling approach for the Mini-Mental State Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubright, Jonathan D; Nandakumar, Ratna; Karlawish, Jason

    2016-02-01

    The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) is a 30-item, dichotomously scored test of general cognition. A number of benefits could be gained by modeling the MMSE in an item response theory (IRT) framework, as opposed to the currently used classical additive approach. However, the test, which is built from groups of items related to separate cognitive subdomains, may violate a key assumption of IRT: local item independence. This study aimed to identify the most appropriate measurement model for the MMSE: a unidimensional IRT model, a testlet response theory model, or a bifactor model. Local dependence analysis using nationally representative data showed a meaningful violation of the local item independence assumption, indicating multidimensionality. In addition, the testlet and bifactor models displayed superior fit indices over a unidimensional IRT model. Statistical comparisons showed that the bifactor model fit MMSE respondent data significantly better than the other models considered. These results suggest that application of a traditional unidimensional IRT model is inappropriate in this context. Instead, a bifactor model is suggested for future modeling of MMSE data as it more accurately represents the multidimensional nature of the scale. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. Model-Checking Real-Time Control Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, T. K.; Kristoffersen, K. J.; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for automatic verification of real-time control programs running on LEGO(R) RCX(TM) bricks using the verification tool UPPALL. The control programs, consisting of a number of tasks running concurrently, are automatically translated into the mixed automata model...

  17. Credibilistic programming an introduction to models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    It provides fuzzy programming approach to solve real-life decision problems in fuzzy environment. Within the framework of credibility theory, it provides a self-contained, comprehensive and up-to-date presentation of fuzzy programming models, algorithms and applications in portfolio analysis.

  18. The Gold Medal Fitness Program: A Model for Teacher Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jan; Konza, Deslea; Hearne, Doug; Okely, Tony

    2008-01-01

    Background: Following the 2000 Sydney Olympics, the NSW Premier, Mr Bob Carr, launched a school-based initiative in NSW government primary schools called the "Gold Medal Fitness Program" to encourage children to be fitter and more active. The Program was introduced into schools through a model of professional development, "Quality…

  19. Training program for energy conservation in new-building construction. Volume IV. Energy conservation technology: advanced course for plan examiners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    A Model Code for Energy Conservation in New Building Construction has been developed by those national organizations primarily concerned with the development and promulgation of model codes. The technical provisions are based on ASHRAE Standard 90-75 and are intended for use by state and local officials. This manual contains a more in-depth training in the review techniques and concepts required by the plan examiners and code officials in administering the code for conventional (buildings of 3 stories or less) construction.

  20. Using the Kaleidoscope Career Model to Examine Generational Differences in Work Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sherry E.; Forret, Monica L.; Carraher, Shawn M.; Mainiero, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine, utilising the Kaleidoscope Career Model, whether members of the Baby Boom generation and Generation X differ in their needs for authenticity, balance, and challenge. Design/methodology/approach: Survey data were obtained from 982 professionals located across the USA. Correlations, t-tests, and…

  1. Sport Education and Extracurricular Sport Participation: An Examination Using the Trans-Contextual Model of Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallhead, Tristan L.; Hagger, Martin; Smith, Derek T.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we used the trans-contextual model of motivation (TCM) to examine the effect of Sport Education (SE) on students' participation in a voluntary lunch recess sport club. A total of 192 participants (ages 9-14 years) completed measures of the TCM constructs before and after a 12-week SE intervention period. Participants had the…

  2. Examining a model of dispositional mindfulness, body comparison, and body satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Pieternel; Barelds, Dick P. H.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the links between dispositional mindfulness, body comparison, and body satisfaction. It was expected that mindfulness would be associated with less body comparison and more body satisfaction. Two models were tested: one exploring body comparison as a mediator between mindf

  3. Does Model Matter? Examining Change across Time for Youth in Group Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Elizabeth M. Z.; Seifert, Heather; Wagner, H. Ryan; Burns, Barbara J.; Murray, Maureen

    2017-01-01

    Group homes are a frequently used but controversial treatment setting for youth with mental health problems. Within the relatively sparse literature on group homes, there is some evidence that some models of treatment may be associated with more positive outcomes for youth. This article explores this possibility by examining differences across…

  4. Examining a model of dispositional mindfulness, body comparison, and body satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Pieternel; Barelds, Dick P. H.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the links between dispositional mindfulness, body comparison, and body satisfaction. It was expected that mindfulness would be associated with less body comparison and more body satisfaction. Two models were tested: one exploring body comparison as a mediator between mindf

  5. Educational productivity in higher education : An examination of part of the Walberg Educational Productivity Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, M.; Jansen, E. P. W. A.

    Several factors in the H. J. Walberg Educational Productivity Model, which assumes that 9 factors affect academic achievement, were examined with a limited sample of 1st-year students in the University of Groningen. Information concerning 8 of these factors - grades, motivation, age, prior

  6. College Students Coping with Interpersonal Stress: Examining a Control-Based Model of Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiro, Mary Jo; Bettis, Alexandra H.; Compas, Bruce E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The ways that college students cope with stress, particularly interpersonal stress, may be a critical factor in determining which students are at risk for impairing mental health disorders. Using a control-based model of coping, the present study examined associations between interpersonal stress, coping strategies, and symptoms.…

  7. Structure of Anxiety and Depression in Urban Youth: An Examination of the Tripartite Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Sharon F.; McCreary, Beth T.; Joiner, Thomas E.; Schmidt, Norman B.; Ialongo, Nicolas S.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the validity of the tripartite model of anxiety and depression (L. A. Clark & D. Watson, 1991) in a community epidemiological sample of 467 urban African American youth. Participants completed the Baltimore How I Feel (N. S. Ialongo, S. G. Kellam, & J. Poduska, 1999), a measure of anxiety and depressive…

  8. Examining Factors Affecting Science Achievement of Hong Kong in PISA 2006 Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Terence Yuk Ping; Lau, Kwok Chi

    2014-01-01

    This study uses hierarchical linear modeling to examine the influence of a range of factors on the science performances of Hong Kong students in PISA 2006. Hong Kong has been consistently ranked highly in international science assessments, such as Programme for International Student Assessment and Trends in International Mathematics and Science…

  9. Examining a model of dispositional mindfulness, body comparison, and body satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Pieternel; Barelds, Dick P. H.

    The present study examined the links between dispositional mindfulness, body comparison, and body satisfaction. It was expected that mindfulness would be associated with less body comparison and more body satisfaction. Two models were tested: one exploring body comparison as a mediator between

  10. Sport Education and Extracurricular Sport Participation: An Examination Using the Trans-Contextual Model of Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallhead, Tristan L.; Hagger, Martin; Smith, Derek T.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we used the trans-contextual model of motivation (TCM) to examine the effect of Sport Education (SE) on students' participation in a voluntary lunch recess sport club. A total of 192 participants (ages 9-14 years) completed measures of the TCM constructs before and after a 12-week SE intervention period. Participants had the…

  11. Educational productivity in higher education : An examination of part of the Walberg Educational Productivity Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, M.; Jansen, E. P. W. A.

    2007-01-01

    Several factors in the H. J. Walberg Educational Productivity Model, which assumes that 9 factors affect academic achievement, were examined with a limited sample of 1st-year students in the University of Groningen. Information concerning 8 of these factors - grades, motivation, age, prior achieveme

  12. An Examination of Family Communication within the Core and Balance Model of Family Leisure Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kevin M.; Freeman, Patti A.; Zabriskie, Ramon B.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine family communication within the core and balance model of family leisure functioning. The study was conducted from a youth perspective of family leisure and family functioning. The sample consisted of youth (N= 95) aged 11 - 17 from 25 different states in the United States. Path analyses indicated that…

  13. Using the Kaleidoscope Career Model to Examine Generational Differences in Work Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sherry E.; Forret, Monica L.; Carraher, Shawn M.; Mainiero, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine, utilising the Kaleidoscope Career Model, whether members of the Baby Boom generation and Generation X differ in their needs for authenticity, balance, and challenge. Design/methodology/approach: Survey data were obtained from 982 professionals located across the USA. Correlations, t-tests, and…

  14. The MAP program: building the digital terrain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.H. Twito; R.W. Mifflin; R.J. McGaughey

    1987-01-01

    PLANS, a software package for integrated timber-harvest planning, uses digital terrain models to provide the topographic data needed to fit harvest and transportation designs to specific terrain. MAP, an integral program in the PLANS package, is used to construct the digital terrain models required by PLANS. MAP establishes digital terrain models using digitizer-traced...

  15. Program Models for Mental Health Treatment of Refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaranson, James M.; Bamford, Pauline

    This paper presents the approach used by the Technical Assistance Center (TAC) of the University of Minnesota's Refugee Assistance Program in Mental Health for identifying successful and culturally sensitive mental health service delivery models. It divides these into four categories: the psychiatric model; the community mental health model; the…

  16. Genetic programming-based chaotic time series modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟; 吴智铭; 杨根科

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a Genetic Programming-Based Modeling (GPM) algorithm on chaotic time series. GP is used here to search for appropriate model structures in function space, and the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm is used for Nonlinear Parameter Estimation (NPE) of dynamic model structures. In addition, GPM integrates the results of Nonlinear Time Series Analysis (NTSA) to adjust the parameters and takes them as the criteria of established models. Experiments showed the effectiveness of such improvements on chaotic time series modeling.

  17. What Works Clearinghouse Quick Review: "A Model for Success: CART's Linked Learning Program Increases College Enrollment"

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The study, "A Model for Success: CART's Linked Learning Program Increases College Enrollment" examined whether students who enrolled in courses at a high school that combined academics and technical education had higher college enrollment rates than students who did not. The research described in this report does not meet What Works…

  18. Modelling of windmill induction generators in dynamic simulation programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akhmatov, Vladislav; Knudsen, Hans

    1999-01-01

    . It is shown that it is possible to include a transient model in dynamic stability programs and thus obtain correct results also in dynamic stability programs. A mechanical model of the shaft system has also been included in the generator model...... with and without a model of the mechanical shaft. The reason for the discrepancies are explained, and it is shown that the phenomenon is due partly to the presence of DC offset currents in the induction machine stator, and partly to the mechanical shaft system of the wind turbine and the generator rotor......For AC networks with large amounts of induction generators-in case of e.g. windmills-the paper demonstrates a significant discrepancy in the simulated voltage recovery after faults in weak networks, when comparing result obtained with dynamic stability programs and transient programs, respectively...

  19. Time Aquatic Resources Modeling and Analysis Program (STARMAP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Colorado State University has received funding from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for its Space-Time Aquatic Resources Modeling and Analysis Program...

  20. Applying Model Checking to Industrial-Sized PLC Programs

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079190; Darvas, Daniel; Blanco Vinuela, Enrique; Tournier, Jean-Charles; Bliudze, Simon; Blech, Jan Olaf; Gonzalez Suarez, Victor M

    2015-01-01

    Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) are embedded computers widely used in industrial control systems. Ensuring that a PLC software complies with its specification is a challenging task. Formal verification has become a recommended practice to ensure the correctness of safety-critical software but is still underused in industry due to the complexity of building and managing formal models of real applications. In this paper, we propose a general methodology to perform automated model checking of complex properties expressed in temporal logics (\\eg CTL, LTL) on PLC programs. This methodology is based on an intermediate model (IM), meant to transform PLC programs written in various standard languages (ST, SFC, etc.) to different modeling languages of verification tools. We present the syntax and semantics of the IM and the transformation rules of the ST and SFC languages to the nuXmv model checker passing through the intermediate model. Finally, two real cases studies of \\CERN PLC programs, written mainly in th...

  1. Examining Human Behavior in Video Games: The Development of a Computational Model to Measure Aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Richard; Annetta, Leonard; Hoston, Douglas; Shapiro, Marina; Matthews, Benjamin

    2017-04-11

    Video games with violent content have raised considerable concern in popular media and within academia. Recently, there has been considerable attention regarding the claim of the relationship between aggression and video game play. The authors of this study propose the use of a new class of tools developed via computational models to allow examination of the question; is there is a relationship between violent video games and aggression. The purpose of this study is to computationally model and compare the General Aggression Model with the Diathesis Mode of Aggression related to the play of violent content in video games. A secondary purpose is to provide a method of measuring and examining individual aggression arising from video game play. Total participants examined for this study are N=1065. This study occurs in three phases. Phase 1 is the development and quantification of the profile combination of traits via latent class profile analysis. Phase 2 is the training of the artificial neural network. Phase 3 is the comparison of each model as a computational model with and without the presence of video game violence. Results suggest that a combination of environmental factors and genetic predispositions trigger aggression related to video games.

  2. Training program for energy conservation in new building construction. Volume III. Energy conservation technology for plan examiners and code administrators. Energy Conservation Technology Series 200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    Under the sponsorship of the United States Department of Energy, a Model Code for Energy Conservation in New Building Construction has been developed by those national organizations primarily concerned with the development and promulgation of model codes. The technical provisions are based on ASHRAE Standard 90-75 and are intended for use by state and local officials. The subject of regulation of new building construction to assure energy conservation is recognized as one in which code officials have not had previous exposure. It was also determined that application of the model code would be made at varying levels by officials with both a specific requirement for knowledge and a differing degree of prior training in the state-of-the-art. Therefore, a training program and instructional materials were developed for code officials to assist them in the implementation and enforcement of energy efficient standards and codes. The training program for Energy Conservation Tehnology for Plan Examiners and Code Administrators (ECT Series 200) is presented.

  3. “PERLE bedside-examination-course for candidates in state examination” – Developing a training program for the third part of medical state examination (oral examination with practical skills)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthaus, Anne; Schmidt, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In preparation for the state examination, many students have open questions and a need for advice. Tutors of the Skills Lab PERLE-„Praxis ERfahren und Lernen“ (experiencing and learning practical skills) have developed a new course concept to provide support and practical assistance for the examinees. Objectives: The course aims to familiarize the students with the exam situation in order to gain more confidence. This enables the students to experience a confrontation with the specific situation of the exam in a protected environment. Furthermore, soft skills are utilized and trained. Concept of the course: The course was inspired by the OSCE-model (Objective Structured Clinical Examination), an example for case-based learning and controlling. Acquired knowledge can be revised and extended through the case studies. Experienced tutors provide assistance in discipline-specific competencies, and help in organizational issues such as dress code and behaviour. Evaluation of the course: An evaluation was conducted by the attending participants after every course. Based on this assessment, the course is constantly being developed. In March, April and October 2015 six courses, with a total of 84 participants, took place. Overall 76 completed questionnaires (91%) were analysed. Discussion: Strengths of the course are a good tutor-participants-ratio with 1:4 (1 Tutor provides guidance for 4 participants), the interactivity of the course, and the high flexibility in responding to the group's needs. Weaknesses are the tight schedule, and the currently not yet performed evaluation before and after the course. Conclusion: In terms of “best practise”, this article shows an example of how to offer low-cost and low-threshold preparation for the state examination. PMID:27579355

  4. “PERLE bedside-examination-course for candidates in state examination” – Developing a training program for the third part of medical state examination (oral examination with practical skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthaus, Anne

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In preparation for the state examination, many students have open questions and a need for advice. Tutors of the Skills Lab PERLE-„Praxis ERfahren und Lernen“ (experiencing and learning practical skills have developed a new course concept to provide support and practical assistance for the examinees.Objectives: The course aims to familiarize the students with the exam situation in order to gain more confidence. This enables the students to experience a confrontation with the specific situation of the exam in a protected environment. Furthermore, soft skills are utilized and trained.Concept of the course: The course was inspired by the OSCE-model (Objective Structured Clinical Examination, an example for case-based learning and controlling. Acquired knowledge can be revised and extended through the case studies. Experienced tutors provide assistance in discipline-specific competencies, and help in organizational issues such as dress code and behaviour.Evaluation of the course: An evaluation was conducted by the attending participants after every course. Based on this assessment, the course is constantly being developed. In March, April and October 2015 six courses, with a total of 84 participants, took place. Overall 76 completed questionnaires (91% were analysed.Discussion: Strengths of the course are a good tutor-participants-ratio with 1:4 (1 Tutor provides guidance for 4 participants, the interactivity of the course, and the high flexibility in responding to the group's needs. Weaknesses are the tight schedule, and the currently not yet performed evaluation before and after the course.Conclusion: In terms of “best practise”, this article shows an example of how to offer low-cost and low-threshold preparation for the state examination.

  5. Identifying strengths and weaknesses in the utilization of Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) in a nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliam, Paula L; Botwinski, Carol A

    2012-01-01

    Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) is used in nursing to assess students' transfer of classroom and laboratory learning experiences into simulated clinical practice. OSCE is a performance-based exam in which students are observed demonstrating a multitude of clinical behaviors. The purpose of this study was to identify strengths and weaknesses in the utilization of OSCE in this nursing program with 60 full-time students ages 21 to 23. An evaluation methodology was used for this study. Interviews were conducted with two groups: faculty facilitators of OSCE and standardized patients (SPs). Areas of focus were: data collection of students' performance, SP selection and training, and modification of the Nursing Interview Interaction Scale (NIIS). It was found that with appropriate SP selection and training, utilization of appropriate tools, and good data collection, OSCE can offer a valid and reliable means of testing nursing students' clinical competencies.

  6. Preservice Teacher Preparation in International Contexts: A Case-Study Examination of the International Student Teacher Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. James Jacob

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the teacher preparation experiences of preservice teachers in six international contexts: China, Fiji, Kiribati, Mexico, Samoa, and Tonga. More specifically, it looks at the value-added components in an international teacher education program, with an emphasis on effective teaching and employability. Theoretically the study is based on Straus and Corbin’s (1998a substantive grounded theory and Patton’s (1997 Theory of Action Framework. Verbal and non-verbal forms of feedback were identified as essential aspects of the international preservice training experience. Cultural diversity, teaching English as a second language, collaboration, and exposure to a different educational system were identified among several components as advantages to individuals who conduct their preservice teacher training in international settings.

  7. Self-efficacy, physical activity, and aerobic fitness in middle school children: examination of a pedometer intervention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Dana; Cowan, Patricia; Graff, Carolyn; Perlow, Michael; Rice, Pamela; Richey, Phyllis; Sanchez, Zoila

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity in children has been associated with a number of health benefits. Unfortunately, physical inactivity continues to increase. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among self-efficacy levels, physical activity, aerobic fitness, and body composition (relative body mass index [RBMI]) and to determine whether a school-based pedometer intervention program would improve those variables. The sample consisted of 116 rural 11- to 13-year-old students. Weakly positive correlations between self-efficacy, physical activity, and aerobic fitness and weakly correlated inverse relationships between self-efficacy, physical activity, aerobic fitness and RBMI were found. There was no statistical significance between the intervention and control group when analyzing outcome variables. These findings suggest that those with optimal RBMI levels have higher self-efficacy, physical activity and aerobic fitness levels. Although not statistically significant, the intervention group had greater improvements in mean self-efficacy scores, aerobic fitness levels, and RBMI.

  8. Discrete Event Simulation Models for CT Examination Queuing in West China Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Li; Liu, Hangjiang; Liao, Huchang; Tang, Shijun; Shi, Yingkang; Guo, Huili

    2016-01-01

    In CT examination, the emergency patients (EPs) have highest priorities in the queuing system and thus the general patients (GPs) have to wait for a long time. This leads to a low degree of satisfaction of the whole patients. The aim of this study is to improve the patients' satisfaction by designing new queuing strategies for CT examination. We divide the EPs into urgent type and emergency type and then design two queuing strategies: one is that the urgent patients (UPs) wedge into the GPs' queue with fixed interval (fixed priority model) and the other is that the patients have dynamic priorities for queuing (dynamic priority model). Based on the data from Radiology Information Database (RID) of West China Hospital (WCH), we develop some discrete event simulation models for CT examination according to the designed strategies. We compare the performance of different strategies on the basis of the simulation results. The strategy that patients have dynamic priorities for queuing makes the waiting time of GPs decrease by 13 minutes and the degree of satisfaction increase by 40.6%. We design a more reasonable CT examination queuing strategy to decrease patients' waiting time and increase their satisfaction degrees.

  9. Photovoltaic subsystem marketing and distribution model: programming manual. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-07-01

    Complete documentation of the marketing and distribution (M and D) computer model is provided. The purpose is to estimate the costs of selling and transporting photovoltaic solar energy products from the manufacturer to the final customer. The model adjusts for the inflation and regional differences in marketing and distribution costs. The model consists of three major components: the marketing submodel, the distribution submodel, and the financial submodel. The computer program is explained including the input requirements, output reports, subprograms and operating environment. The program specifications discuss maintaining the validity of the data and potential improvements. An example for a photovoltaic concentrator collector demonstrates the application of the model.

  10. Photovoltaic subsystem marketing and distribution model: programming manual. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-07-01

    Complete documentation of the marketing and distribution (M and D) computer model is provided. The purpose is to estimate the costs of selling and transporting photovoltaic solar energy products from the manufacturer to the final customer. The model adjusts for the inflation and regional differences in marketing and distribution costs. The model consists of three major components: the marketing submodel, the distribution submodel, and the financial submodel. The computer program is explained including the input requirements, output reports, subprograms and operating environment. The program specifications discuss maintaining the validity of the data and potential improvements. An example for a photovoltaic concentrator collector demonstrates the application of the model.

  11. Examining the Effects of Two Computer Programming Learning Strategies: Self-Explanation versus Reading Questions and Answers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Lee

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The study described here explored the differential effects of two learning strategies, self-explanation and reading questions and answers, on learning the computer programming language JavaScript. Students’ test performance and perceptions of effectiveness toward the two strategies were examined. An online interactive tutorial instruction implementing worked-examples and multimedia learning principles was developed for this study. Participants were 147 high school students (ages 14 to 18 of a computer introductory course in six periods which were randomly divided into two groups (n = 78; n = 69 of three periods each. The two groups alternated learning strategies to learn five lessons. Students’ prerequisite knowledge of XHTML and motivation to learn computer programming languages were measured before starting the tutorial. Students largely expressed their preference toward self-explanation over reading questions and answers. They thought self-explanation incurred much more work yet was more effective. However, the two learning strategies did not have differential effects on students’ test performance. The seeming discrepancy arising from students’ preferred strategy and their test performance was discussed in the areas of familiar versus new strategy, difficulty of learning materials and testing method, and experimental duration.

  12. DNA computation model to solve 0-1 programming problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengyue; Yin, Zhixiang; Liu, Bo; Xu, Jin

    2004-01-01

    0-1 programming problem is an important problem in opsearch with very widespread applications. In this paper, a new DNA computation model utilizing solution-based and surface-based methods is presented to solve the 0-1 programming problem. This model contains the major benefits of both solution-based and surface-based methods; including vast parallelism, extraordinary information density and ease of operation. The result, verified by biological experimentation, revealed the potential of DNA computation in solving complex programming problem.

  13. Do great teams think alike? An examination of team mental models and their impact on team performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Aimee K; Scott, Daniel J; AbdelFattah, Kareem R

    2017-05-01

    Team mental models represent the shared understanding of team members within their relevant environment. Thus, team mental models should have a substantial impact on a team's ability to engage in purposeful and coordinated action. We sought to examine the impact of shared team mental models on team performance and to investigate if team mental models increase over time as teams continue to work together. New surgery interns were assigned randomly to 1 of 10 teams. Each team participated in one unique simulation every day for 5 days, each followed by video-based debriefing with a facilitator. Participants also completed independently a concept similarity tool validated previously in nonmedical team literature to assess team mental models. All performances were video recorded and evaluated with a scenario-specific team performance tool by a single, blinded junior surgeon under an institutional review board-approved protocol. Changes in performance and team mental models over time were assessed with paired samples t tests. Regression analysis was used to examine the extent to which team mental models predicted team performance. Thirty interns (age 27; 77% men) participated in the training program. Percentage of items achieved (x¯ ± SD) on the performance evaluation was 39 ± 20, 51 ± 14, 22 ± 17, 63 ± 14, and 77 ± 25 for Days 1-5, respectively. Team mental models were 30 ± 5, 28 ± 6, 27 ± 8, 26 ± 7, and 25 ± 6 for Days 1-5 respectively, such that larger values corresponded to greater differences in team mental models. Paired sample t tests indicated that both average performance and team mental models similarity improved from the first to last day (P team mental models predicted team performance on Days 2-5 (all P team mental models among the teams leads to better team performance. Additionally, the increase in team mental models over time suggests that engaging in team-based simulation may catalyze the process by which surgery

  14. A program of research in environmental modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical framework for the interpretation of satellite measurements of stratospheric temperature and trace gases is provided. This problem is quite complicated since the distributions of trace gases are dependent on dynamics and photochemistry. Therefore, the problem was attacked with models employing varying degrees of photochemical and dynamical complexity. The relationship between dynamics and trace gas transport and wave transience, dissipation and critical levels and the net (permanent) transport of trace gases, the role of photochemistry in trace gas transport, photochemistry and dynamics and altering the mean-zonal distribution of stratospheric ozone, and approximations to simplify the interpretation of observations and General Circulation Models are discussed.

  15. Examining rainfall and cholera dynamics in Haiti using statistical and dynamic modeling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Marisa C; Kujbida, Gregory; Tuite, Ashleigh R; Fisman, David N; Tien, Joseph H

    2013-12-01

    Haiti has been in the midst of a cholera epidemic since October 2010. Rainfall is thought to be associated with cholera here, but this relationship has only begun to be quantitatively examined. In this paper, we quantitatively examine the link between rainfall and cholera in Haiti for several different settings (including urban, rural, and displaced person camps) and spatial scales, using a combination of statistical and dynamic models. Statistical analysis of the lagged relationship between rainfall and cholera incidence was conducted using case crossover analysis and distributed lag nonlinear models. Dynamic models consisted of compartmental differential equation models including direct (fast) and indirect (delayed) disease transmission, where indirect transmission was forced by empirical rainfall data. Data sources include cholera case and hospitalization time series from the Haitian Ministry of Public Health, the United Nations Water, Sanitation and Health Cluster, International Organization for Migration, and Hôpital Albert Schweitzer. Rainfall data was obtained from rain gauges from the U.S. Geological Survey and Haiti Regeneration Initiative, and remote sensing rainfall data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission. A strong relationship between rainfall and cholera was found for all spatial scales and locations examined. Increased rainfall was significantly correlated with increased cholera incidence 4-7 days later. Forcing the dynamic models with rainfall data resulted in good fits to the cholera case data, and rainfall-based predictions from the dynamic models closely matched observed cholera cases. These models provide a tool for planning and managing the epidemic as it continues.

  16. Predictors of breast self - examination among female teachers in Ethiopia using health belief model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birhane, Negussie; Mamo, Abebe; Girma, Eshetu; Asfaw, Shifera

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is by far the most frequent cancer of women. It is the second leading cause of death in women worldwide. Approximately one out of eight women develops breast cancer all over the world. Majority of cases of cancer of the breast are detected by women themselves, stressing the importance of breast self-examination. The main objective of this study was to assess predictors of breast self-examination among female teachers in Kafa Zone, South West part of Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was conducted among randomly selected 315 female teachers. Self administered a structured questionnaire including socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge about breast cancer and perception of teachers on breast self examination using the Champion's revised Health Belief Model sub scales used as data collection instrument. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to identify independent predictors of breast self -examination performance. Three hundred and fifteen female teachers were participated in this study. Their mean age was 33 SD [±7] years. Only 52 (16.5 %) participants ever heard about breast self examination and from those who heard about breast self examination 38 (73.07 %) of them ever performed breast self examination. After controlling for possible confounding factors, the result showed that knowledge towards breast self examination, perceived susceptibility, perceived severity and the net perceived benefit were found to be the major predictors of breast self examination. This study revealed that breast self examination performance among female teachers was very low. Therefore, behavior change communication and interventions that emphasize different domains that increase the perceived threat to breast cancer as well as on the benefits of breast self-examination to increase the perception of the teachers in an integrated manner may be the most effective strategies that should be considered by the health offices and educational offices. These

  17. CoMD Implementation Suite in Emerging Programming Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-09-23

    CoMD-Em is a software implementation suite of the CoMD [4] proxy app using different emerging programming models. It is intended to analyze the features and capabilities of novel programming models that could help ensure code and performance portability and scalability across heterogeneous platforms while improving programmer productivity. Another goal is to provide the authors and venders with some meaningful feedback regarding the capabilities and limitations of their models. The actual application is a classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation using either the Lennard-Jones method (LJ) or the embedded atom method (EAM) for primary particle interaction. The code can be extended to support alternate interaction models. The code is expected ro run on a wide class of heterogeneous hardware configurations like shard/distributed/hybrid memory, GPU's and any other platform supported by the underlying programming model.

  18. Geometric model of robotic arc welding for automatic programming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Geometric information is important for automatic programming of arc welding robot. Complete geometric models of robotic arc welding are established in this paper. In the geometric model of weld seam, an equation with seam length as its parameter is introduced to represent any weld seam. The method to determine discrete programming points on a weld seam is presented. In the geometric model of weld workpiece, three class primitives and CSG tree are used to describe weld workpiece. Detailed data structure is presented. In pose transformation of torch, world frame, torch frame and active frame are defined, and transformation between frames is presented. Based on these geometric models, an automatic programming software package for robotic arc welding, RAWCAD, is developed. Experiments show that the geometric models are practical and reliable.

  19. An examination of how women and underrepresented racial/ethnic minorities experience barriers in biomedical research and medical programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraverty, Devasmita

    Women in medicine and biomedical research often face challenges to their retention, promotion, and advancement to leadership positions (McPhillips et al., 2007); they take longer to advance their careers, tend to serve at less research-intensive institutions and have shorter tenures compared to their male colleagues (White, McDade, Yamagata, & Morahan, 2012). Additionally, Blacks and Hispanics are the two largest minority groups that are vastly underrepresented in medicine and biomedical research in the United States (AAMC, 2012; NSF, 2011). The purpose of this study is to examine specific barriers reported by students and post-degree professionals in the field through the following questions: 1. How do women who are either currently enrolled or graduated from biomedical research or medical programs define and make meaning of gender-roles as academic barriers? 2. How do underrepresented groups in medical schools and biomedical research institutions define and make meaning of the academic barriers they face and the challenges these barriers pose to their success as individuals in the program? These questions were qualitatively analyzed using 146 interviews from Project TrEMUR applying grounded theory. Reported gender-role barriers were explained using the "Condition-Process-Outcome" theoretical framework. About one-third of the females (across all three programs; majority White or Black between 25-35 years of age) reported gender-role barriers, mostly due to poor mentoring, time constraints, set expectations and institutional barriers. Certain barriers act as conditions, causing gender-role issues, and gender-role issues influence certain barriers that act as outcomes. Strategies to overcome barriers included interventions mostly at the institutional level (mentor support, proper specialty selection, selecting academia over medicine). Barrier analysis for the two largest URM groups indicated that, while Blacks most frequently reported racism, gender barriers

  20. A new model for programming software in body sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de A Barbosa, Talles M G; Sene, Iwens G; da Rocha, Adson F; de O Nascimento, Francisco A A; Carvalho, Joao L A; Carvalho, Hervaldo S

    2007-01-01

    A Body Sensor Network (BSN) must be designed to work autonomously. On the other hand, BSNs need mechanisms that allow changes in their behavior in order to become a clinically useful tool. The purpose of this paper is to present a new programming model that will be useful for programming BSN sensor nodes. This model is based on an intelligent intermediate-level compiler. The main purpose of the proposed compiler is to increase the efficiency in system use, and to increase the lifetime of the application, considering its requirements, hardware possibilities and specialist knowledge. With this model, it is possible to maintain the autonomous operation capability of the BSN and still offer tools that allow users with little grasp on programming techniques to program these systems.

  1. Sudden infant death syndrome prevention: a model program for NICUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Sherri L; Lipke, Bethann; LeMura, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Health care providers' opinions can influence how parents place their infant to sleep. Neonatal nurses can improve how they teach and model safe infant sleep practices to parents. To increase neonatal nurses' knowledge, a sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) prevention program was implemented. Program components included a computerized teaching tool, a crib card, sleep sacks, and discharge instructions. Initial program evaluation showed that 98 percent of infants slept supine and 93 percent slept in sleep sacks in open cribs. However, nurses continued to swaddle some infants with blankets to improve thermoregulation. To increase nursing compliance in modeling safe infant sleep practices, Halo SleepSack Swaddles were provided for nurses to use in place of a blanket to regulate infant temperature. Recent data show that 100 percent of infants in open cribs are now sleeping supine wearing a Halo Swaddle or a traditional Halo SleepSack. This model program can easily be replicated to enhance neonatal nurses' knowledge about SIDS prevention.

  2. Evaluation of a skin self examination attitude scale using an item response theory model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djaja, Ngadiman; Youl, Pip; Aitken, Joanne; Janda, Monika

    2014-12-24

    The Skin Self-Examination Attitude Scale (SSEAS) is a brief measure that allows for the assessment of attitudes in relation to skin self-examination. This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the SSEAS using Item Response Theory (IRT) methods in a large sample of men ≥ 50 years in Queensland, Australia. A sample of 831 men (420 intervention and 411 control) completed a telephone assessment at the 13-month follow-up of a randomized-controlled trial of a video-based intervention to improve skin self-examination (SSE) behaviour. Descriptive statistics (mean, standard deviation, item-total correlations, and Cronbach's alpha) were compiled and difficulty parameters were computed with Winsteps using the polytomous Rasch Rating Scale Model (RRSM). An item person (Wright) map of the SSEAS was examined for content coverage and item targeting. The SSEAS have good psychometric properties including good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.80), fit with the model and no evidence for differential item functioning (DIF) due to experimental trial grouping was detected. The present study confirms the SSEA scale as a brief, useful and reliable tool for assessing attitudes towards skin self-examination in a population of men 50 years or older in Queensland, Australia. The 8-item scale shows unidimensionality, allowing levels of SSE attitude, and the item difficulties, to be ranked on a single continuous scale. In terms of clinical practice, it is very important to assess skin cancer self-examination attitude to identify people who may need a more extensive intervention to allow early detection of skin cancer.

  3. White Matter Abnormalities and Animal Models Examining a Putative Role of Altered White Matter in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyun Xu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder affecting about 1% of the population worldwide. Although the dopamine (DA hypothesis is still keeping a dominant position in schizophrenia research, new advances have been emerging in recent years, which suggest the implication of white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia. In this paper, we will briefly review some of recent human studies showing white matter abnormalities in schizophrenic brains and altered oligodendrocyte-(OL- and myelin-related genes in patients with schizophrenia and will consider abnormal behaviors reported in patients with white matter diseases. Following these, we will selectively introduce some animal models examining a putative role of white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia. The emphasis will be put on the cuprizone (CPZ model. CPZ-fed mice show demyelination and OLs loss, display schizophrenia-related behaviors, and have higher DA levels in the prefrontal cortex. These features suggest that the CPZ model is a novel animal model of schizophrenia.

  4. Examination of a sociocultural model of excessive exercise among male and female adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James; Halliwell, Emma

    2010-06-01

    There is substantial evidence that sociocultural pressures and body image disturbances can lead to disordered eating, yet few studies have examined their impact on excessive exercise. The study adapted a sociocultural model for disordered eating to predict excessive exercise using data from boys and girls in early adolescence (N=421). Perceived sociocultural pressures to lose weight and build muscle, body image disturbance and appearance investment were associated with a compulsive need to exercise. Adolescents' investment in appearance and body image disturbance fully mediated the relationship between sociocultural pressures and a compulsive need for exercise. There was no support for the meditational model in predicting adolescents' frequency or duration of exercise. Results support the sociocultural model as an explanatory model for excessive exercise, but suggest appearance investment and body image disturbance are important mediators of sociocultural pressures. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cross-cultural examination of the tripartite model with children: data from the Barretstown studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, G; Laurent, J; Joiner, T E; Catanzaro, S J; MacLachlan, M

    2001-10-01

    The Positive and Negative Affect Scale for Children (PANAS-C) and the Physiological Hyperarousal Scale for Children (PH-C) were administered to a group of 240 children from European countries to determine their utility in examining the tripartite model of anxiety and depression in a cross-cultural sample. Most of the children (n = 196) had been diagnosed with a medical illness; the remainder were siblings of these youngsters (n = 44). Only slight variations were noted in items between this sample and samples from the United States. Despite these minor differences, 3 distinct scales measuring the positive affect, negative affect, and physiological hyperarousal constructs of the tripartite model were identified. These findings illustrate that the PH-PANAS-C provides a useful measure of the tripartite model in a cross-cultural sample of youth. The findings also demonstrate that the tripartite model is generalizable to a cross-cultural milieu.

  6. Describing, using 'recognition cones'. [parallel-series model with English-like computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhr, L.

    1973-01-01

    A parallel-serial 'recognition cone' model is examined, taking into account the model's ability to describe scenes of objects. An actual program is presented in an English-like language. The concept of a 'description' is discussed together with possible types of descriptive information. Questions regarding the level and the variety of detail are considered along with approaches for improving the serial representations of parallel systems.

  7. Examining the dimensional structure models of secondary traumatic stress based on DSM-5 symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordeno, Imelu G; Go, Geraldine P; Yangson-Serondo, April

    2017-02-01

    Latent factor structure of Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS) has been examined using Diagnostic Statistic Manual-IV (DSM-IV)'s Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) nomenclature. With the advent of Diagnostic Statistic Manual-5 (DSM-5), there is an impending need to reexamine STS using DSM-5 symptoms in light of the most updated PTSD models in the literature. The study investigated and determined the best fitted PTSD models using DSM-5 PTSD criteria symptoms. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted to examine model fit using the Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale in 241 registered and practicing Filipino nurses (166 females and 75 males) who worked in the Philippines and gave direct nursing services to patients. Based on multiple fit indices, the results showed the 7-factor hybrid model, comprising of intrusion, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, externalizing behavior, anxious arousal, and dysphoric arousal factors has excellent fit to STS. This model asserts that: (1) hyperarousal criterion needs to be divided into anxious and dysphoric arousal factors; (2) symptoms characterizing negative and positive affect need to be separated to two separate factors, and; (3) a new factor would categorize externalized, self-initiated impulse and control-deficit behaviors. Comparison of nested and non-nested models showed Hybrid model to have superior fit over other models. The specificity of the symptom structure of STS based on DSM-5 PTSD criteria suggests having more specific interventions addressing the more elaborate symptom-groupings that would alleviate the condition of nurses exposed to STS on a daily basis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Exploring Student Persistence in STEM Programs: A Motivational Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Rebecca A.; Aulls, Mark W.; Dedic, Helena; Hubbard, Kyle; Hall, Nathan C.

    2015-01-01

    To address continually decreasing enrollment and rising attrition in post-secondary STEM degree (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) programs, particularly for women, the present study examines the utility of motivation and emotion variables to account for persistence and achievement in science in male and female students…

  9. Evaluation of the cost effectiveness model being developed for the component improvement programs of the Air Force and the Navy

    OpenAIRE

    Crowder, Gerald L.

    1992-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis examines the Cost Effectiveness Analysis (CEA) model used by the Air Force to assist with the decision making process of their Component Improvement Program (CIP). The emphasis was on studying the model for its use in the Naval Component Improvement Program. With an example provided by General Electric, a sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the cost drivers of the model. For the example, the major cost driver...

  10. Integration of a Multizone Airflow Model into a Thermalsimulation Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Sørensen, Karl Grau; Heiselberg, Per

    2007-01-01

    a methodology adopted from water distribution network that automatically sets up the independent loops and is easy to implement into a computer program. Finally an example of verification of the model is given which demonstrates the ability of the models to accurately predict the airflow of a simple multizone...

  11. A Novel Nonlinear Programming Model for Distribution Protection Optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zambon, Eduardo; Bossois, Débora Z.; Garcia, Berilhes B.; Azeredo, Elias F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a novel nonlinear binary programming model designed to improve the reliability indices of a distribution network. This model identifies the type and location of protection devices that should be installed in a distribution feeder and is a generalization of the classical optimizat

  12. Diet models with linear goal programming: impact of achievement functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerdessen, J.C.; Vries, de J.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Diet models based on goal programming (GP) are valuable tools in designing diets that comply with nutritional, palatability and cost constraints. Results derived from GP models are usually very sensitive to the type of achievement function that is chosen. This paper aims to pr

  13. Details of Programming a Model of Children's Counting in ACTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Mary S.; Greeno, James G.

    Presented is an introduction to the operation and mechanics of the ACTP production system, a version of Anderson's (1976) ACT system. ACTP is already in use modeling geometry theorem proving and counting of a set of objects, and has been identified as a potentially useful programing framework for developing models of the cognitive processes used…

  14. Human Behavior Model Based Control Program for ACC Mobile Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu Pozna

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Present work is a part of the ACC autonomous car project. This paper will focuson the control program architecture. To design this architecture we will start from thehuman driver behavior model. Using this model we have constructed a three level controlprogram. Preliminary results are presented.

  15. A Primary Prevention Program: Teaching Models I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlan, Nancy T; Tschiderer, Patricia A.

    Two teaching models of a service delivery program designed to prevent speech-language problems in lower socioeconomic children were compared. Specific goals included increasing mothers' awareness of the sensory input to which infants are responsive and increasing mothers' abilities to read infant nonverbal signals. In Model 1, two speech-language…

  16. Modeling the complete Otto cycle: Preliminary version. [computer programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, F. J.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of the equations and the computer program being developed to model the complete Otto cycle. The program incorporates such important features as: (1) heat transfer, (2) finite combustion rates, (3) complete chemical kinetics in the burned gas, (4) exhaust gas recirculation, and (5) manifold vacuum or supercharging. Changes in thermodynamic, kinetic and transport data as well as model parameters can be made without reprogramming. Preliminary calculations indicate that: (1) chemistry and heat transfer significantly affect composition and performance, (2) there seems to be a strong interaction among model parameters, and (3) a number of cycles must be calculated in order to obtain steady-state conditions.

  17. Use of a business excellence model to improve conservation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Simon; Groombridge, Jim

    2010-12-01

    The current shortfall in effectiveness within conservation biology is illustrated by increasing interest in "evidence-based conservation," whose proponents have identified the need to benchmark conservation initiatives against actions that lead to proven positive effects. The effectiveness of conservation policies, approaches, and evaluation is under increasing scrutiny, and in these areas models of excellence used in business could prove valuable. Typically, conservation programs require years of effort and involve rigorous long-term implementation processes. Successful balance of long-term efforts alongside the achievement of short-term goals is often compromised by management or budgetary constraints, a situation also common in commercial businesses. "Business excellence" is an approach many companies have used over the past 20 years to ensure continued success. Various business excellence evaluations have been promoted that include concepts that could be adapted and applied in conservation programs. We describe a conservation excellence model that shows how scientific processes and results can be aligned with financial and organizational measures of success. We applied the model to two well-documented species conservation programs. In the first, the Po'ouli program, several aspects of improvement were identified, such as more authority for decision making in the field and better integration of habitat management and population recovery processes. The second example, the black-footed ferret program, could have benefited from leadership effort to reduce bureaucracy and to encourage use of best-practice species recovery approaches. The conservation excellence model enables greater clarity in goal setting, more-effective identification of job roles within programs, better links between technical approaches and measures of biological success, and more-effective use of resources. The model could improve evaluation of a conservation program's effectiveness and may be

  18. SPSS and SAS programming for the testing of mediation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, William N; Benuzillo, Jose G; Carrico, Mineh S

    2004-01-01

    Mediation modeling can explain the nature of the relation among three or more variables. In addition, it can be used to show how a variable mediates the relation between levels of intervention and outcome. The Sobel test, developed in 1990, provides a statistical method for determining the influence of a mediator on an intervention or outcome. Although interactive Web-based and stand-alone methods exist for computing the Sobel test, SPSS and SAS programs that automatically run the required regression analyses and computations increase the accessibility of mediation modeling to nursing researchers. To illustrate the utility of the Sobel test and to make this programming available to the Nursing Research audience in both SAS and SPSS. The history, logic, and technical aspects of mediation testing are introduced. The syntax files sobel.sps and sobel.sas, created to automate the computation of the regression analysis and test statistic, are available from the corresponding author. The reported programming allows the user to complete mediation testing with the user's own data in a single-step fashion. A technical manual included with the programming provides instruction on program use and interpretation of the output. Mediation modeling is a useful tool for describing the relation between three or more variables. Programming and manuals for using this model are made available.

  19. Is the Closet Door Still Closed in 2014? A CIPP Model Program Evaluation of Preservice Diversity Training Regarding LGBT Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this program evaluation was to examine the four components of the CIPP evaluation model (Context, Input, Process, and Product evaluations) in the diversity training program conceptualization and design delivered to College of Education K-12 preservice teachers at a large university in the southeastern United States (referred to in…

  20. Is the Closet Door Still Closed in 2014? A CIPP Model Program Evaluation of Preservice Diversity Training Regarding LGBT Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this program evaluation was to examine the four components of the CIPP evaluation model (Context, Input, Process, and Product evaluations) in the diversity training program conceptualization and design delivered to College of Education K-12 preservice teachers at a large university in the southeastern United States (referred to in…

  1. Examining the Support Peer Supporters Provide Using Structural Equation Modeling: Nondirective and Directive Support in Diabetes Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitt, Sarah D; Ayala, Guadalupe X; Cherrington, Andrea L; Horton, Lucy A; Safford, Monika M; Soto, Sandra; Tang, Tricia S; Fisher, Edwin B

    2017-04-17

    Little research has examined the characteristics of peer support. Pertinent to such examination may be characteristics such as the distinction between nondirective support (accepting recipients' feelings and cooperative with their plans) and directive (prescribing "correct" choices and feelings). In a peer support program for individuals with diabetes, this study examined (a) whether the distinction between nondirective and directive support was reflected in participants' ratings of support provided by peer supporters and (b) how nondirective and directive support were related to depressive symptoms, diabetes distress, and Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Three hundred fourteen participants with type 2 diabetes provided data on depressive symptoms, diabetes distress, and HbA1c before and after a diabetes management intervention delivered by peer supporters. At post-intervention, participants reported how the support provided by peer supporters was nondirective or directive. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), correlation analyses, and structural equation modeling examined the relationships among reports of nondirective and directive support, depressive symptoms, diabetes distress, and measured HbA1c. CFA confirmed the factor structure distinguishing between nondirective and directive support in participants' reports of support delivered by peer supporters. Controlling for demographic factors, baseline clinical values, and site, structural equation models indicated that at post-intervention, participants' reports of nondirective support were significantly associated with lower, while reports of directive support were significantly associated with greater depressive symptoms, altogether (with control variables) accounting for 51% of the variance in depressive symptoms. Peer supporters' nondirective support was associated with lower, but directive support was associated with greater depressive symptoms.

  2. Prediction of breast self-examination in a sample of Iranian women: an application of the Health Belief Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghamolaei Teamur

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iranian women, many of whom live in small cities, have limited access to mammography and clinical breast examinations. Thus, breast self examination (BSE becomes an important and necessary approach to detecting this disease in its early stages in order to limit its resultant morbidity and mortality. This study examined constructs arising from the Health Belief Model as predictors of breast self examination behavior in a sample of women living in Bandar Abbas, Iran. Methods This study was conducted in eight health centers located in Bandar Abbas, Iran. The sample consisted of 240 eligible women who were selected from referrals to the centers. The inclusion criteria were as follows: aged 30 years and over; and able to read and write Farsi. Women with breast cancer, who were pregnant, or breast feeding, were excluded from the study. Data were collected by using a self administered questionnaire which included demographic characteristics and Champion's Health Belief Model Scale. This instrument measures the concepts of disease susceptibility (3 items, seriousness (6 items, benefits (4 items, barriers (8 items and self-efficacy (10 items. Results The subjects' mean age was 37.2 (SD = 6.1 years. Just under a third of the subjects (31.7% had performed BSE in the past and 7.1% of them performed it at least monthly. Perceived benefits and perceived self-efficacy of the women who performed BSE were significantly higher compared with women who did not practice BSE (p 2 = 0.52. Conclusion Findings from this study indicated that perceived barriers and perceived self-efficacy could be predictors of BSE behavior among the sample of women. Therefore, BSE training programs that emphasize self-efficacy and address perceived barriers are recommended.

  3. Collapsing Factors in Multitrait-Multimethod Models: Examining Consequences of a Mismatch Between Measurement Design and Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eGeiser

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Models of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA are frequently applied to examine the convergent validity of scores obtained from multiple raters or methods in so-called multitrait-multimethod (MTMM investigations. Many applications of CFA-MTMM and similarly structured models result in solutions in which at least one method (or specific factor shows non-significant loading or variance estimates. Eid et al. (2008 distinguished between MTMM measurement designs with interchangeable (randomly selected versus structurally different (fixed methods and showed that each type of measurement design implies specific CFA-MTMM measurement models. In the current study, we hypothesized that some of the problems that are commonly seen in applications of CFA-MTMM models may be due to a mismatch between the underlying measurement design and fitted models. Using simulations, we found that models with M method factors (where M is the total number of methods and unconstrained loadings led to a higher proportion of solutions in which at least one method factor became empirically unstable when these models were fit to data generated from structurally different methods. The simulations also revealed that commonly used model goodness-of-fit criteria frequently failed to identify incorrectly specified CFA-MTMM models. We discuss implications of these findings for other complex CFA models in which similar issues occur, including nested (bifactor and latent state-trait models.

  4. Collapsing factors in multitrait-multimethod models: examining consequences of a mismatch between measurement design and model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiser, Christian; Bishop, Jacob; Lockhart, Ginger

    2015-01-01

    Models of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) are frequently applied to examine the convergent validity of scores obtained from multiple raters or methods in so-called multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) investigations. Many applications of CFA-MTMM and similarly structured models result in solutions in which at least one method (or specific) factor shows non-significant loading or variance estimates. Eid et al. (2008) distinguished between MTMM measurement designs with interchangeable (randomly selected) vs. structurally different (fixed) methods and showed that each type of measurement design implies specific CFA-MTMM measurement models. In the current study, we hypothesized that some of the problems that are commonly seen in applications of CFA-MTMM models may be due to a mismatch between the underlying measurement design and fitted models. Using simulations, we found that models with M method factors (where M is the total number of methods) and unconstrained loadings led to a higher proportion of solutions in which at least one method factor became empirically unstable when these models were fit to data generated from structurally different methods. The simulations also revealed that commonly used model goodness-of-fit criteria frequently failed to identify incorrectly specified CFA-MTMM models. We discuss implications of these findings for other complex CFA models in which similar issues occur, including nested (bifactor) and latent state-trait models. PMID:26283977

  5. Validating an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) as a Method for Selecting Foreign Medical Graduates for a Pre-Internship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robert; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A study supported use of the objective structured clinical examination for screening foreign medical graduates (n=67) wishing to enter a preinternship program in at the University of Toronto. However, it also showed that appropriate training for the candidates was the internship, not preinternship, program. (MSE)

  6. An Evaluation Study of an Executive Master of Business Administration (EMBA) Program in an Urban City: Examining the Transfer of Knowledge and Leadership Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hye Lim

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of the Executive Master of Business Administration (EMBA) degree program in terms of transfer of knowledge and leadership practices. Based on a review of literature related to adult learning theories, EMBA programs, the importance of evaluation practices, and leadership practices, this study was designed to…

  7. Constellation Program Life-cycle Cost Analysis Model (LCAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Andy; Rose, Heidi; Wood, James

    2008-01-01

    The Constellation Program (CxP) is NASA's effort to replace the Space Shuttle, return humans to the moon, and prepare for a human mission to Mars. The major elements of the Constellation Lunar sortie design reference mission architecture are shown. Unlike the Apollo Program of the 1960's, affordability is a major concern of United States policy makers and NASA management. To measure Constellation affordability, a total ownership cost life-cycle parametric cost estimating capability is required. This capability is being developed by the Constellation Systems Engineering and Integration (SE&I) Directorate, and is called the Lifecycle Cost Analysis Model (LCAM). The requirements for LCAM are based on the need to have a parametric estimating capability in order to do top-level program analysis, evaluate design alternatives, and explore options for future systems. By estimating the total cost of ownership within the context of the planned Constellation budget, LCAM can provide Program and NASA management with the cost data necessary to identify the most affordable alternatives. LCAM is also a key component of the Integrated Program Model (IPM), an SE&I developed capability that combines parametric sizing tools with cost, schedule, and risk models to perform program analysis. LCAM is used in the generation of cost estimates for system level trades and analyses. It draws upon the legacy of previous architecture level cost models, such as the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) Architecture Cost Model (ARCOM) developed for Simulation Based Acquisition (SBA), and ATLAS. LCAM is used to support requirements and design trade studies by calculating changes in cost relative to a baseline option cost. Estimated costs are generally low fidelity to accommodate available input data and available cost estimating relationships (CERs). LCAM is capable of interfacing with the Integrated Program Model to provide the cost estimating capability for that suite of tools.

  8. The Effect of Breast Self Examination Educational Program on the Knowledge and Performance of Women in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nooshin Yoshany

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Breast cancer is the most common cancer and one of the major causes of cancer deaths in women. Early diagnosis leads to significant reduction of mortality from breast cancer, in other words it can increase the lifespan of people with this cancer. This study aimed to determine the effect of education on knowledge and performance of 20-60 year old women in Yazd city about Breast Self Examination (BSE. Materials & Methods: In this study, 100 women aged from 20 to 60 years old who referred to Yazd health centers were selected. They were matched in terms of cultural, social, and economical aspects. In this quasi-experimental study, data was collected through administration of questionnaires before and after training in two stages. The collected information were then analyzed using the statistical software SPSS (version 18 by T-tests and ANOVA. The significance level was set at 0.05. Results: The results of statistical analyses revealed a significant difference between participants' knowledge and performance scores before and after training (0.05> p. In this study, age, marital status, education level, history of breastfeeding, and its duration had a significant relationship with  participants' knowledge; also, positive family history of breast cancer had a significant relationship with their performance (0.05> p. Between the subjects' performance was a significant difference in two groups with negative and positive family history of Brest cancer before and after two months of educational program. (0.05> p. Conclusion: According to the achieved results and the positive impact of education on the increase of knowledge and performance, educational programs in the field of breast cancer and its screening methods are recommended to be held for all age groups. In order to promote women's health from puberty to menopause more attention should be paid to the follow-up and training.

  9. An Examination of Concussion Injury Rates in Various Models of Football Helmets in NCAA Football Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryan Moran; Tracey Covassin

    2015-01-01

    While newer, advanced helmet models have been designed with the intentions of decreasing concussions, very little research exists on injury rates in various football helmets at the collegiate level. The aim of this study was to examine concussion injury rates in various models of football helmets in collegiate football athletes. In addition, to compare injury rates of newer, advanced football helmets to older, traditional helmets among collegiate football athletes, a total of 209 concussions and 563,701 AEs (athlete-exposures) among 2,107 collegiate football athletes in seven helmet models were included in the analyses. Concussion injury rates revealed that the Riddell Revolution~ had the highest rate of 0.41 concussions per 1,000 AEs. The Schutt ION 4DTM helmet had the lowest rate of 0.25 concussions per 1,000 AEs. These newer helmet models did not significantly differ from one another (P = 0.74), however, all models significantly differed from the older, traditional helmet model (P 〈 0.001). The findings of this study suggest that concussion rates do not differ between newer and more advanced helmet models. More importantly, there are currently no helmets available to prevent concussions from occurring in football athletes.

  10. Use of interactive teaching methods in tobacco cessation program and examine it by using objective structured clinical exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Kevin; Pandve, Harshal T.; Debnath, Dhrubajyoti J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tobacco addiction is an important public health issue. It is important for health professional to counsel the tobacco users for cessation. Aim: To enhance communication skills of MBBS (Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery) students in counseling of tobacco users by using interactive teaching methods and examine it by using OSCE. Materials and Methods: It was a before and after comparison study. Communication skills of students were examined by standardized patients (investigators) by objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) method before and after intervention. All the students were trained to enhance the communication skills by role play, interactive session, anecdotes. Statistical analysis was done by using Paired t-test. Results: The difference in scores at all the 3 stations before and after the intervention and also global scores before and after the intervention was statistically highly significant (P = 0.0001). Conclusion and Recommendation: Communication skills of students in counseling tobacco users improved after they were given role play, interactive session, anecdotes. Similar model can be used to improve the communication/counseling skills in other important health hazards. PMID:24083278

  11. Using Virtual ATE Model to Migrate Test Programs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓明; 杨乔林

    1995-01-01

    Bacause of high development costs of IC (Integrated Circuit)test programs,recycling existing test programs from one kind of ATE (Automatic Test Equipment) to another or generating directly from CAD simulation modules to ATE is more and more valuable.In this paper,a new approach to migrating test programs is presented.A virtual ATE model based on object-oriented paradigm is developed;it runs Test C++ (an intermediate test control language) programs and TeIF(Test Inftermediate Format-an intermediate pattern),migrates test programs among three kinds of ATE (Ando DIC8032,Schlumberger S15 and GenRad 1732) and generates test patterns from two kinds of CAD 9Daisy and Panda) automatically.

  12. [Cancer screening in Hungary: World Bank supported model programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodó, M; Döbrössy, L; Liszka, G; Ottó, S; Péter, Z

    1997-07-13

    Since 1995, a model cancer screening program has been in operation in Hungary, the overall purpose of which is to promote the establishment of effective and efficient screening programs by means of adapting the internationally agreed principles of organized screening to the needs and opportunities in Hungary. The establishment and operation of a national population-based cancer registration system is an other aim of the Program. The model program--financed partly from a loan from the World Bank, partly from local funds provided by the Government of Hungary--is to develop standard procedure for cervical, breast and colorectal screening and to end up with tested recommendations for introduction of organized screening of proved effectiveness, integrated into the health care system, on country-wide service bases in Hungary.

  13. Modeling and prioritizing demand response programs in power markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aalami, H.A.; Moghaddam, M. Parsa; Yousefi, G.R. [Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran)

    2010-04-15

    One of the responsibilities of power market regulator is setting rules for selecting and prioritizing demand response (DR) programs. There are many different alternatives of DR programs for improving load profile characteristics and achieving customers' satisfaction. Regulator should find the optimal solution which reflects the perspectives of each DR stakeholder. Multi Attribute Decision Making (MADM) is a proper method for handling such optimization problems. In this paper, an extended responsive load economic model is developed. The model is based on price elasticity and customer benefit function. Prioritizing of DR programs can be realized by means of Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) method. Considerations of ISO/utility/customer regarding the weighting of attributes are encountered by entropy method. An Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) is used for selecting the most effective DR program. Numerical studies are conducted on the load curve of the Iranian power grid in 2007. (author)

  14. Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Mellor-Crummey

    2008-02-29

    Rice University's achievements as part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing include: (1) design and implemention of cafc, the first multi-platform CAF compiler for distributed and shared-memory machines, (2) performance studies of the efficiency of programs written using the CAF and UPC programming models, (3) a novel technique to analyze explicitly-parallel SPMD programs that facilitates optimization, (4) design, implementation, and evaluation of new language features for CAF, including communication topologies, multi-version variables, and distributed multithreading to simplify development of high-performance codes in CAF, and (5) a synchronization strength reduction transformation for automatically replacing barrier-based synchronization with more efficient point-to-point synchronization. The prototype Co-array Fortran compiler cafc developed in this project is available as open source software from http://www.hipersoft.rice.edu/caf.

  15. Report of the 2014 Programming Models and Environments Summit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heroux, Michael [US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Lethin, Richard [US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-09-19

    Programming models and environments play the essential roles in high performance computing of enabling the conception, design, implementation and execution of science and engineering application codes. Programmer productivity is strongly influenced by the effectiveness of our programming models and environments, as is software sustainability since our codes have lifespans measured in decades, so the advent of new computing architectures, increased concurrency, concerns for resilience, and the increasing demands for high-fidelity, multi-physics, multi-scale and data-intensive computations mean that we have new challenges to address as part of our fundamental R&D requirements. Fortunately, we also have new tools and environments that make design, prototyping and delivery of new programming models easier than ever. The combination of new and challenging requirements and new, powerful toolsets enables significant synergies for the next generation of programming models and environments R&D. This report presents the topics discussed and results from the 2014 DOE Office of Science Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Programming Models & Environments Summit, and subsequent discussions among the summit participants and contributors to topics in this report.

  16. Re-examining concepts of occupation and occupation-based models: occupational therapy and community development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclair, Leanne L

    2010-02-01

    A growing body of literature supports the role of occupational therapists in community development. Using a community development approach, occupational therapists respond to community-identified occupational needs. They work to build local resources and capacities and self-sustaining programs that foster change within the community and potentially beyond. The purpose of this paper is to highlight some key issues related to occupational therapy practice in community development. The definitions and classifications of occupation focus primarily on the individual and fail to elaborate on the shared occupations of a community. As well, occupation-based models of practice are not easily applied to occupational therapy practice in community development. In order for occupational therapy to articulate its role in community development, greater heed needs to be given to the definition and categorization of occupation, occupation-based models of practice, and their application to communities.

  17. Selection of asset investment models by hospitals: examination of influencing factors, using Switzerland as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, Bernhard

    2016-10-01

    Hospitals are responsible for a remarkable part of the annual increase in healthcare expenditure. This article examines one of the major cost drivers, the expenditure for investment in hospital assets. The study, conducted in Switzerland, identifies factors that influence hospitals' investment decisions. A suggestion on how to categorize asset investment models is presented based on the life cycle of an asset, and its influencing factors defined based on transaction cost economics. The influence of five factors (human asset specificity, physical asset specificity, uncertainty, bargaining power, and privacy of ownership) on the selection of an asset investment model is examined using a two-step fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis. The research shows that outsourcing-oriented asset investment models are particularly favored in the presence of two combinations of influencing factors: First, if technological uncertainty is high and both human asset specificity and bargaining power of a hospital are low. Second, if assets are very specific, technological uncertainty is high and there is a private hospital with low bargaining power, outsourcing-oriented asset investment models are favored too. Using Qualitative Comparative Analysis, it can be demonstrated that investment decisions of hospitals do not depend on isolated influencing factors but on a combination of factors. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. From Mice to Men: research models of developmental programming

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Developmental programming can be defined as a response to a specific challenge to the mammalian organism during a critical developmental time window that alters the trajectory of development with persistent effects on offspring phenotype and predisposition to future illness. We focus on the need for studies in relevant, well-characterized animal models in the context of recent research discoveries on the challenges, mechanisms and outcomes of developmental programming. We discuss commonalitie...

  19. Research on the Business English training model within MBA program

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Yankovskaya; Olga Neklyudova

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a brief summary of the research on the Business English training model within MBA program students. This study is devoted to the problem of developing a professional foreign language communicative competency of MBA program participants. A particular feature of additional MBA qualification is its international status which presupposes that its graduates (mid-level and top managers) should realize their professional tasks in a foreign language. The analysis of literary ...

  20. Deterministic Consistency: A Programming Model for Shared Memory Parallelism

    OpenAIRE

    Aviram, Amittai; Ford, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    The difficulty of developing reliable parallel software is generating interest in deterministic environments, where a given program and input can yield only one possible result. Languages or type systems can enforce determinism in new code, and runtime systems can impose synthetic schedules on legacy parallel code. To parallelize existing serial code, however, we would like a programming model that is naturally deterministic without language restrictions or artificial scheduling. We propose "...

  1. An Adaptive Neural Network Model for Nonlinear Programming Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-sun Zhang; Xin-jian Zhuo; Zhu-jun Jing

    2002-01-01

    In this paper a canonical neural network with adaptively changing synaptic weights and activation function parameters is presented to solve general nonlinear programming problems. The basic part of the model is a sub-network used to find a solution of quadratic programming problems with simple upper and lower bounds. By sequentially activating the sub-network under the control of an external computer or a special analog or digital processor that adjusts the weights and parameters, one then solves general nonlinear programming problems. Convergence proof and numerical results are given.

  2. Revisiting the Leadership Scale for Sport: Examining Factor Structure Through Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Weisheng; Rodriguez, Fernando M; Won, Doyeon

    2016-10-01

    This study examines the factor structure of the shortened version of the Leadership Scale for Sport, through a survey of 201 collegiate swimmers at National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II and III institutions, using both exploratory structural equation modeling and confirmatory factor analysis. Both exploratory structural equation modeling and confirmatory factor analysis showed that a five-factor solution fit the data adequately. The sizes of factor loadings on target factors substantially differed between the confirmatory factor analysis and exploratory structural equation modeling solutions. In addition, the inter-correlations between factors of the Leadership Scale for Sport and the correlations with athletes' satisfaction were found to be inflated in the confirmatory factor analysis solution. Overall, the findings provide evidence of the factorial validity of the shortened Leadership Scale for Sport.

  3. Supplementary Educational Models in Canadian Neurosurgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Won Hyung A; Chan, Sonny; Sutherland, Garnette R

    2017-03-01

    The proposed implementation of work hour restrictions has presented a significant challenge of maintaining the quality of resident education and ensuring adequate hands-on experience that is essential for novice surgeons. To maintain the level of resident surgical competency, revision of the apprentice model of surgical education to include supplementary educational methods, such as laboratory and virtual reality (VR) simulations, have become frequent topics of discussion. We aimed to better understand the role of supplementary educational methods in Canadian neurosurgery residency training. An online survey was sent to program directors of all 14 Canadian neurosurgical residency programs and active resident members of the Canadian Neurosurgical Society (N=85). We asked 16 questions focusing on topics of surgeon perception, current implementation and barriers to supplementary educational models. Of the 99 surveys sent, 8 out of 14 (57%) program directors and 37 out of 85 (44%) residents completed the survey. Of the 14 neurosurgery residency programs across Canada, 7 reported utilizing laboratory-based teaching within their educational plan, while only 3 programs reported using VR simulation as a supplementary teaching method. The biggest barriers to implementing supplementary educational methods were resident availability, lack of resources, and cost. Work-hour restrictions threaten to compromise the traditional apprentice model of surgical training. The potential value of supplementary educational methods for surgical education is evident, as reported by both program directors and residents across Canada. However, availability and utilization of laboratory and VR simulations are limited by numerous factors such as time constrains and lack of resources.

  4. Framing patient consent for student involvement in pelvic examination: a dual model of autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson-Stevens, Andrew; Davies, Myfanwy M; Jones, Rhiain; Chik, Aiman D Pawan; Robbé, Iain J; Fiander, Alison N

    2013-11-01

    Patient consent has been formulated in terms of radical individualism rather than shared benefits. Medical education relies on the provision of patient consent to provide medical students with the training and experience to become competent doctors. Pelvic examination represents an extreme case in which patients may legitimately seek to avoid contact with inexperienced medical students particularly where these are male. However, using this extreme case, this paper will examine practices of framing and obtaining consent as perceived by medical students. This paper reports findings of an exploratory qualitative study of medical students and junior doctors. Participants described a number of barriers to obtaining informed consent. These related to misunderstandings concerning student roles and experiences and insufficient information on the nature of the examination. Participants reported perceptions of the negative framing of decisions on consent by nursing staff where the student was male. Potentially coercive practices of framing of the decision by senior doctors were also reported. Participants outlined strategies they adopted to circumvent patients' reasons for refusal. Practices of framing the information used by students, nurses and senior doctors to enable patients to decide about consent are discussed in the context of good ethical practice. In the absence of a clear ethical model, coercion appears likely. We argue for an expanded model of autonomy in which the potential tension between respecting patients' autonomy and ensuring the societal benefit of well-trained doctors is recognised. Practical recommendations are made concerning information provision and clear delineations of student and patient roles and expectations.

  5. Programming biological models in Python using PySB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Carlos F; Muhlich, Jeremy L; Bachman, John A; Sorger, Peter K

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical equations are fundamental to modeling biological networks, but as networks get large and revisions frequent, it becomes difficult to manage equations directly or to combine previously developed models. Multiple simultaneous efforts to create graphical standards, rule-based languages, and integrated software workbenches aim to simplify biological modeling but none fully meets the need for transparent, extensible, and reusable models. In this paper we describe PySB, an approach in which models are not only created using programs, they are programs. PySB draws on programmatic modeling concepts from little b and ProMot, the rule-based languages BioNetGen and Kappa and the growing library of Python numerical tools. Central to PySB is a library of macros encoding familiar biochemical actions such as binding, catalysis, and polymerization, making it possible to use a high-level, action-oriented vocabulary to construct detailed models. As Python programs, PySB models leverage tools and practices from the open-source software community, substantially advancing our ability to distribute and manage the work of testing biochemical hypotheses. We illustrate these ideas using new and previously published models of apoptosis.

  6. Confirmatory factor analysis for the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire: Evidence supporting a three-factor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jennifer; Prescott, Tim; Muncer, Steven

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the goodness-of-fit of a one factor model with the four factor model proposed by Fairburn (2008) and the three factor model proposed by Peterson and colleagues (2007) for the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q 6.0) (Fairburn and Beglin, 1994). Using a cross-sectional design, the EDE-Q was completed by 569 adults recruited from universities and eating disorder charities in the UK. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was carried out for both the student and non-student groups. CFA indicated that Peterson et al.'s (2007) three factor model was the best fit for both groups within the current data sample. Acceptable levels of internal reliability were observed and there was clear evidence for a hierarchical factor of eating disorder. The results of this study provide support for the three factor model of the EDE-Q suggested by Peterson and colleagues (2007) in that this model was appropriate for both the student and non-student sample populations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluating mepindolol in a test model of examination anxiety in students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krope, P; Kohrs, A; Ott, H; Wagner, W; Fichte, K

    1982-03-01

    The effect of a single dose of beta-blocker (5 or 10 mg mepindolol) during a written examination was investigated in two double-blind studies (N : 49 and 55 students, respectively). The question was whether the beta-blocker would in comparison to placebo diminish examination anxiety and improve the performance of highly complex tasks, while leaving the performance of less complex tasks unchanged. A reduction in examination anxiety after beta-blocker intake could not be demonstrated with a multi-level test model (which included the parameters self-rated anxiety, motor behaviour, task performance and physiology), although pulse rates were lowered significantly. An improvement in performance could not be observed, while - by the same token - the performance was not impaired by the beta-blocker. A hypothesis according to which a beta-blocker has an anxiolytic effect and improves performance, dependent on the level of habitual examination anxiety, was tested post hoc, but could not be confirmed. Ten of the subjects treated with 10 mg mepindolol, complained of different side effects, including dizziness, fatigue and headache.

  8. Evaluation of an occupational health educational program based on alumni perceptions in Iran: Structural equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehralizadeh, Semira; Dehdashti, Alireza; Kashani, Masoud Motalebi

    2017-07-26

    Evaluating educational program can improve the quality of education that learners receive. The present study evaluated undergraduate occupational health educational program at Medical sciences university of Semnan, Iran, focused on the associations between alumni perceptions of learning environment and outcomes in occupational health program. cross-sectional questionnaire survey was carried out among alumni of occupational health enrolled in an undergraduate program. We asked alumni to rate their perceptions of the items based on a Likert four-point scale. The associations between alumni perceptions of educational program and curriculum, faculty, institutional resources and learning outcomes were modeled and described using structural equation modeling procedures. Descriptive perception indicated low evaluations for administration systems, practical and research based courses and the number of faculty members. Results indicated a structural model of the evaluation variables of curriculum, faculty qualification, and institutional resources significantly predict undergraduate educational program outcomes. Curriculum had direct and indirect effects on learning outcomes mediated by faculty. study findings highlight the usefulness of structural equation modeling approach with which to examine linking between variables of learning process and learning outcomes. Surveys among alumni permit to provide data to reassess the learning environment in the light of professional competencies needed for occupational health graduates.

  9. LOCA simulation in the national research universal reactor program: postirradiation examination results for the third materials experiment (MT-3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rausch, W.N.

    1984-04-01

    A series of in-reactor experiments were conducted using full-length 32-rod pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel bundles as part of the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation Program. The third materials experiment (MT-3) was the sixth in the series of thermal-hydraulic and materials deformation/rutpure experiments conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The main objective of the experiment was to evaluate ballooning and rupture during active two-phase cooling in the temperature range from 1400 to 1500/sup 0/F (1030 to 1090 K). The 12 test rods in the center of the 32-rod bundle were initially pressurized to 550 psi (3.8 MPa) to insure rupture in the correct temperature range. All 12 of the rods ruptured, with an average peak bundle strain of approx. 55%. The UKAEA also funded destructive postirradiation examination (PIE) of several of the ruptured rods from the MT-3 experiment. This report describes the work performed and presents the PIE results. Information obtained during the PIE included cladding thickness measurements metallography, and particle size analysis of the cracked and broken fuel pellets.

  10. Genetic programming-based chaotic time series modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟; 吴智铭; 杨根科

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a Genetic Programming-Based Modeling(GPM)algorithm on chaotic time series. GP is used here to search for appropriate model structures in function space,and the Particle Swarm Optimization(PSO)algorithm is used for Nonlinear Parameter Estimation(NPE)of dynamic model structures. In addition,GPM integrates the results of Nonlinear Time Series Analysis(NTSA)to adjust the parameters and takes them as the criteria of established models.Experiments showed the effectiveness of such improvements on chaotic time series modeling.

  11. Program Exit Examinations in Nursing Education: Using a Value Added Assessment as a Measure of the Impact of a New Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Tama; Hancock, Dawson

    2008-01-01

    To become a registered nurse in the United States, one must pass the National Council License Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). To address the growing national nursing shortage, nurse preparation programs must better prepare students to pass this national licensure examination. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a new…

  12. SISP : Simplified Interface for Stochastic Programming Establishing a hard link between mathematical programming modeling languages and SMPS codes

    CERN Document Server

    Condevaux Lanloy, Christian; King, A J

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this article is to propose a general approach to link a stochastic programming enabler to a mathematical programming modeling language. Modelers often choose to formulate their problems in well- tested, general purpose modeling languages such as GAMS and AMPL, but these modeling languages do not currently implement a natural syntax for stochastic programming. Specialized stochastic programming tools are available to efficiently generate and solve large-scale stochastic programs, but they lack many of the convenient features of the modeling languages. The lack of a well developed link between these tools and modeling languages prevents many modelers from accessing a powerful and convenient technique to take into account uncertainties. As an attempt to fill this gap, we will present SISP (Simplified Interface for Stochastic Programming), an interface between Algebraic Modeling Languages and specialized Stochastic Programming solvers, also known as SP solvers. 12 Refs.

  13. Physical properties of the benchmark models program supercritical wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansberry, Bryan E.; Durham, Michael H.; Bennett, Robert M.; Turnock, David L.; Silva, Walter A.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of the Benchmark Models Program is to provide data useful in the development and evaluation of aeroelastic computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. To that end, a series of three similar wing models are being flutter tested in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. These models are designed to simultaneously acquire model response data and unsteady surface pressure data during wing flutter conditions. The supercritical wing is the second model of this series. It is a rigid semispan model with a rectangular planform and a NASA SC(2)-0414 supercritical airfoil shape. The supercritical wing model was flutter tested on a flexible mount, called the Pitch and Plunge Apparatus, that provides a well-defined, two-degree-of-freedom dynamic system. The supercritical wing model and associated flutter test apparatus is described and experimentally determined wind-off structural dynamic characteristics of the combined rigid model and flexible mount system are included.

  14. A model technology transfer program for independent operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeling, L.G.

    1996-08-01

    In August 1992, the Energy Research Center (ERC) at the University of Kansas was awarded a contract by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a technology transfer regional model. This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program.

  15. ICU early physical rehabilitation programs: financial modeling of cost savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Robert K; Mayhew, Christopher R; Korupolu, Radha; Mantheiy, Earl C; Friedman, Michael A; Palmer, Jeffrey B; Needham, Dale M

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the potential annual net cost savings of implementing an ICU early rehabilitation program. Using data from existing publications and actual experience with an early rehabilitation program in the Johns Hopkins Hospital Medical ICU, we developed a model of net financial savings/costs and presented results for ICUs with 200, 600, 900, and 2,000 annual admissions, accounting for both conservative- and best-case scenarios. Our example scenario provided a projected financial analysis of the Johns Hopkins Medical ICU early rehabilitation program, with 900 admissions per year, using actual reductions in length of stay achieved by this program. U.S.-based adult ICUs. Financial modeling of the introduction of an ICU early rehabilitation program. Net cost savings generated in our example scenario, with 900 annual admissions and actual length of stay reductions of 22% and 19% for the ICU and floor, respectively, were $817,836. Sensitivity analyses, which used conservative- and best-case scenarios for length of stay reductions and varied the per-day ICU and floor costs, across ICUs with 200-2,000 annual admissions, yielded financial projections ranging from -$87,611 (net cost) to $3,763,149 (net savings). Of the 24 scenarios included in these sensitivity analyses, 20 (83%) demonstrated net savings, with a relatively small net cost occurring in the remaining four scenarios, mostly when simultaneously combining the most conservative assumptions. A financial model, based on actual experience and published data, projects that investment in an ICU early rehabilitation program can generate net financial savings for U.S. hospitals. Even under the most conservative assumptions, the projected net cost of implementing such a program is modest relative to the substantial improvements in patient outcomes demonstrated by ICU early rehabilitation programs.

  16. An Examination of Doctoral Preparation Information in the United States: A Content Analysis of Counselor Education Doctoral Program Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hongryun; Mulit, Cynthia J.; Visalli, Kelsea M.

    2016-01-01

    Counselor Education (CE) program websites play a role in program fit by helping prospective students learn about the profession, search for programs and apply for admission. Using the 2014 "ACA Code of Ethics'" nine categories of orientation content as its framework, this study explored the information provided on the 63…

  17. On the Feasibility of a Unified Modelling and Programming Paradigm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxthausen, Anne Elisabeth; Peleska, Jan

    2016-01-01

    , in particular for complex cyber-physical systems or systems of systems. Though modelling, programming, and verification will certainly become more closely integrated in the future, we do not expect a single formalism to become universally applicable and accepted by the development and verification communities......In this article, the feasibility of a unified modelling and programming paradigm is discussed from the perspective of large scale system development and verification in collaborative development environments. We motivate the necessity to utilise multiple formalisms for development and verification...

  18. Transforming PLC Programs into Formal Models for Verification Purposes

    CERN Document Server

    Darvas, D; Blanco, E

    2013-01-01

    Most of CERN’s industrial installations rely on PLC-based (Programmable Logic Controller) control systems developed using the UNICOS framework. This framework contains common, reusable program modules and their correctness is a high priority. Testing is already applied to find errors, but this method has limitations. In this work an approach is proposed to transform automatically PLC programs into formal models, with the goal of applying formal verification to ensure their correctness. We target model checking which is a precise, mathematical-based method to check formalized requirements automatically against the system.

  19. Model-based automated testing of critical PLC programs.

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández Adiego, B; Tournier, J-C; González Suárez, V M; Bliudze, S

    2014-01-01

    Testing of critical PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) programs remains a challenging task for control system engineers as it can rarely be automated. This paper proposes a model based approach which uses the BIP (Behavior, Interactions and Priorities) framework to perform automated testing of PLC programs developed with the UNICOS (UNified Industrial COntrol System) framework. This paper defines the translation procedure and rules from UNICOS to BIP which can be fully automated in order to hide the complexity of the underlying model from the control engineers. The approach is illustrated and validated through the study of a water treatment process.

  20. Building enterprise reuse program--A model-based approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅宏; 杨芙清

    2002-01-01

    Reuse is viewed as a realistically effective approach to solving software crisis. For an organization that wants to build a reuse program, technical and non-technical issues must be considered in parallel. In this paper, a model-based approach to building systematic reuse program is presented. Component-based reuse is currently a dominant approach to software reuse. In this approach, building the right reusable component model is the first important step. In order to achieve systematic reuse, a set of component models should be built from different perspectives. Each of these models will give a specific view of the components so as to satisfy different needs of different persons involved in the enterprise reuse program. There already exist some component models for reuse from technical perspectives. But less attention is paid to the reusable components from a non-technical view, especially from the view of process and management. In our approach, a reusable component model--FLP model for reusable component--is introduced. This model describes components from three dimensions (Form, Level, and Presentation) and views components and their relationships from the perspective of process and management. It determines the sphere of reusable components, the time points of reusing components in the development process, and the needed means to present components in terms of the abstraction level, logic granularity and presentation media. Being the basis on which the management and technical decisions are made, our model will be used as the kernel model to initialize and normalize a systematic enterprise reuse program.

  1. A Qualitative Study to Examine Perceptions and Barriers to Appropriate Gestational Weight Gain among Participants in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women Infants and Children Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loan Pham Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Women of reproductive age are particularly at risk of obesity because of excessive gestational weight gain (GWG and postpartum weight retention, resulting in poor health outcomes for both mothers and infants. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine perceptions and barriers to GWG among low-income women in the WIC program to inform the development of an intervention study. Eleven focus groups were conducted and stratified by ethnicity, and each group included women of varying age, parity, and prepregnancy BMI ranges. Participants reported receiving pressure from spouse and family members to “eat for two” among multiple barriers to appropriate weight gain during pregnancy. Participants were concerned about gaining too much weight but had minimal knowledge of weight gain goals during pregnancy. Receiving regular weight monitoring was reported, but participants had inconsistent discussions about weight gain with healthcare providers. Most were not aware of the IOM guidelines nor the fact that gestational weight gain goals differed by prepregnancy weight status. Results of these focus groups analyses informed the design of a pregnancy weight tracker and accompanying educational handout for use in an intervention study. These findings suggest an important opportunity for GWG education in all settings where pregnant women are seen.

  2. Using the Single Prolonged Stress Model to Examine the Pathophysiology of PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimenez R. Souza

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The endurance of memories of emotionally arousing events serves the adaptive role of minimizing future exposure to danger and reinforcing rewarding behaviors. However, following a traumatic event, a subset of individuals suffers from persistent pathological symptoms such as those seen in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Despite the availability of pharmacological treatments and evidence-based cognitive behavioral therapy, a considerable number of PTSD patients do not respond to the treatment, or show partial remission and relapse of the symptoms. In controlled laboratory studies, PTSD patients show deficient ability to extinguish conditioned fear. Failure to extinguish learned fear could be responsible for the persistence of PTSD symptoms such as elevated anxiety, arousal, and avoidance. It may also explain the high non-response and dropout rates seen during treatment. Animal models are useful for understanding the pathophysiology of the disorder and the development of new treatments. This review examines studies in a rodent model of PTSD with the goal of identifying behavioral and physiological factors that predispose individuals to PTSD symptoms. Single prolonged stress (SPS is a frequently used rat model of PTSD that involves exposure to several successive stressors. SPS rats show PTSD-like symptoms, including impaired extinction of conditioned fear. Since its development by the Liberzon lab in 1997, the SPS model has been referred to by more than 200 published papers. Here we consider the findings of these studies and unresolved questions that may be investigated using the model.

  3. Sharing, caring, and surveilling: an actor-partner interdependence model examination of Facebook relational maintenance strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Bree

    2013-12-01

    Abstract Relational maintenance is connected to high quality friendships. Friendship maintenance behaviors may occur online via social networking sites. This study utilized an Actor-Partner Interdependence Model to examine how Facebook maintenance and surveillance affect friendship quality. Bryant and Marmo's (2012) Facebook maintenance scale was evaluated, revealing two factors: sharing and caring. Facebook surveillance was also measured. For friendship satisfaction and liking, significant positive actor and partner effects emerged for caring; significant negative actor, partner, and interaction effects emerged for sharing; and significant positive actor effects emerged for surveillance. For friendship closeness, significant positive actor effects emerged for caring and surveillance.

  4. Examining faking on personality inventories using unfolding item response theory models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherbaum, Charles A; Sabet, Jennifer; Kern, Michael J; Agnello, Paul

    2013-01-01

    A concern about personality inventories in diagnostic and decision-making contexts is that individuals will fake. Although there is extensive research on faking, little research has focused on how perceptions of personality items change when individuals are faking or responding honestly. This research demonstrates how the delta parameter from the generalized graded unfolding item response theory model can be used to examine how individuals' perceptions about personality items might change when responding honestly or when faking. The results indicate that perceptions changed from honest to faking conditions for several neuroticism items. The direction of the change varied, indicating that faking can operate to increase or decrease scores within a personality factor.

  5. Cognitive mechanisms of visuomotor transformation in movement imitation: examining predictions based on models of apraxia and motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravenhorst, Robynne M; Walter, Charles B

    2009-11-01

    When we observe a movement and then reproduce it, how is this visual input transformed into motor output? Studies on stroke patients with apraxia suggest that there may be two distinct routes used for gesture imitation; an indirect route that recruits stored movement memories (motor programs) and a direct route that bypasses them. The present study examined 30 healthy adults ages 18-80 (mean age=44.0 years, SD=19.5) to learn how motor programs are recruited or bypassed in movement imitation depending upon task conditions (whether familiar letters or novel shapes are imitated) and perceptual factors (whether shapes or letters are perceived). Subjects were asked to imitate the movements of a model who formed shapes and letters on a sheer mesh screen, and to report whether they perceived the task as a shape or a letter. Movements were recorded using a Vicon motion analysis system, and subsequently analyzed to determine the degree of difference between the demonstrated and produced movements. As predicted, letter perception on the letter tasks resulted in increased temporal error when the demonstrated stroke order conflicted with subjects' habitual pattern of letter formation. No such interference effects were observed when the letter tasks were perceived as shapes. These findings are discussed in the context of current theories on imitation, and implications for rehabilitation and motor re-learning are presented.

  6. Interpersonal Proximity and Impression Formation: A Partial Examination of Hall's Proxemic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesch, Frederick E

    1979-02-01

    Interpersonal proximity was examined as a cue in impression formation by varying factorially four interpersonal distances (2', 3 1/4', 5 1/2', 9 1/2'), sex of S (48 male and 48 female American college students), and sex of C (three male and three female students). Interpersonal proximity in the interview situation did not directly affect Ss' impressions of the Cs as measured by the Gough and Heilbrun Adjective Check List and Schutz's FIRO-B test. Although the four distances operationalized two of the interpersonal distance zones in Hall's normative model of human spatial behavior, Ss did not report the expected differences in the experiences of these two zones. The implications of the present findings for the limited role of interpersonal proximity as a cue in impression formation and for Hall's model are discussed.

  7. Examining Teacher Outcomes of the School-Wide Positive Behavior Support Model in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari-Anne Sørlie

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Research on teacher outcomes of the School-Wide Positive Behavior Support (SWPBS model has been scarce. The present study adds to the knowledge base by examining the effects of the Norwegian version of SWPBS (N-PALS on school staffs’ behavior management practices and on their individual and collective efficacy. Questionnaire data were collected from staff and students (Grades 4-7 at four measurement points across four successive school years in 28 intervention schools and 20 comparison schools. Using longitudinal multilevel analyses, indications of positive 3-year main effects of the N-PALS model were observed for staff-reported collective efficacy, self-efficacy, and positive behavior support practices. The intervention effects as measured by Cohen’s d ranged from .14 to .91. The effects on student perceptions of teachers’ behavior management strategies were, however, not consistent with the positive staff ratings. Results are discussed in relation to prior research, future research, and study limitations.

  8. EVALUASI PROGRAM KONSELING DI SMP KOTA MALANG: DISCREPANCY MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Nanda Eka Saputra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk  mengetahui kesenjangan antara performansi program konseling di SMP Kota Malang dengan standar yang telah ditentukan. Penelitian ini menggunakan standar dari Guidelines for Performance Based Professional School Counselor Evaluation. Standar tersebut berbunyi “konselor sekolah professional melaksanakan konseling pada siswa secara individual dan kelompok yang teridentifikasi kebutuhan dan masalahnya dan memerlukan bantuan”. Penelitian ini adalah penelitian evaluasi. Evaluasi yang dilakukan dalam penelitian ini menggunakan discrepancy model. Pendekatan yang digunakan adalah pendekatan sistem yang difokuskan pada perencanaan, pelaksanaan, dan evaluasi program konseling. Berdasarkan analisis hasil evaluasi, program konseling di SMP Kota Malang masih jauh dari standar. Hasil penelitian ini merekomendasikan kepada konselor untuk memperbaiki kualitas pelaksanaan program konseling, sehingga memberikan pengaruh positif bagi siswa.

  9. COMPLEX PROGRAMS FOR MODELING HIGHWAY: PARK, PROFILE AND COMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Iu. Smirnov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main part of developing computer-aided design of roads are simulation systems to see the road in action. Modeling of the functioning of the road in such a simulation system - this test road design in the computer. This article describes three modules: PARK, PROFILE, COMPOSITION and comprising a set of process simulation programs functioning road. A significant increase in the accuracy of simulation results provides software parks established normative reference database of technical and economic parameters of vehicles belonging to the stream. Completeness framework allows continuous adjustment and constant up-dating of the parameters types of cars in different scales calculation excludes construction and operating costs in justifying economic calculations optimality design solutions and increases the reliability of evaluating the effectiveness of capital investments in the construction and reconstruction of roads. Optimization of the design solutions in general, as a single continuous sequence of combinations of elements contributes to road profile program that analyzes the geometric elements of the plan, longitudinal section, compressing the geometry information of the way for the subsequent modeling of the functioning of the road. Program PROFILE (and built on its basis BASIS program, PROFILE is a nexus between the projecting programs and programs that simulate traffic. Transport and road performance computer modeled for a particular stream of automobile. Technical and economic parameters of vehicles belonging to the flow (up to 20, which is sufficient for practical and research tasks and their percentage in the flow of the program selects COMPOSITION regulatory reference framework articulated earlier PARK module and writes them to a working file for their subsequent use module RIDE.

  10. A comprehensive operational semantics of the SCOOP programming model

    CERN Document Server

    Morandi, Benjamin; Meyer, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    Operational semantics has established itself as a flexible but rigorous means to describe the meaning of programming languages. Oftentimes, it is felt necessary to keep a semantics small, for example to facilitate its use for model checking by avoiding state space explosion. However, omitting many details in a semantics typically makes results valid for a limited core language only, leaving a wide gap towards any real implementation. In this paper we present a full-fledged semantics of the concurrent object-oriented programming language SCOOP (Simple Concurrent Object-Oriented Programming). The semantics has been found detailed enough to guide an implementation of the SCOOP compiler and runtime system, and to detect and correct a variety of errors and ambiguities in the original informal specification and prototype implementation. In our formal specification, we use abstract data types with preconditions and axioms to describe the state, and introduce a number of special run-time operations to model the runti...

  11. Menu variations for diabetes mellitus patients using Goal Programming model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhoruri, Atmini; Lestari, Dwi; Ratnasari, Eminugroho

    2017-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) was a chronic metabolic disease characterized by higher than normal blood glucose level (normal blood glucose level = = 80 -120 mg/dl). In this study, type 2 DM which mostly caused by unhealthy eating habits would be investigated. Related to eating habit, DM patients needed dietary menu planning with an extracare regarding their nutrients intake (energy, protein, fat and carbohydrate). Therefore, the measures taken were by organizing nutritious dietary menu for diabetes mellitus patients. Dietary menu with appropriate amount of nutrients was organized by considering the amount of calories, proteins, fats and carbohydrates. In this study, Goal Programming model was employed to determine optimal dietary menu variations for diabetes mellitus patients by paying attention to optimal expenses. According to the data obtained from hospitals in Yogyakarta, optimal menu variations would be analyzed by using Goal Programming model and would be completed by using LINGO computer program.

  12. Examining CAM use disclosure using the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith, Jennifer; Thorburn, Sheryl; Tippens, Kimberly M

    2013-10-01

    To improve understanding of factors that may influence disclosure of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in the U.S. Cross-sectional survey. Data are from the 2001 Health Care Quality Survey (HCQS), a nationally representative study of adults aged 18 and older living in the continental United States. Using the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use, we conducted multivariate logistic regressions to identify factors associated with disclosing CAM use among the sub-sample of recent CAM users (n=1995). Disclosure of CAM use. Most CAM users (71.0%) disclosed their use of CAM to their doctors. Contextual, individual, and health behavior factors were associated with CAM use disclosure. Of particular interest, disclosure was significantly more likely among those who perceived high quality relationships with their providers (AOR=1.59, CI: 1.01, 2.49) and among those who had a regular source of medical care (AOR=1.54, CI: 1.03, 2.29). The odds of disclosure were also higher among those who used practitioner-provided CAM, with (AOR=2.02, CI: 1.34, 3.06) or without (AOR=1.52, CI: 1.05, 2.20) concurrent herbal medicine use, compared to those who used herbal medicines only. The Behavioral Model of Health Services Use is a useful framework for examining factors that may influence disclosure of CAM use. Further research should examine these relationships using more comprehensive measures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A preliminary model of work during initial examination and treatment planning appointments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, J Y; Torres-Urquidy, M H; Schleyer, T; Monaco, V

    2009-01-10

    Objective This study's objective was to formally describe the work process for charting and treatment planning in general dental practice to inform the design of a new clinical computing environment.Methods Using a process called contextual inquiry, researchers observed 23 comprehensive examination and treatment planning sessions during 14 visits to 12 general US dental offices. For each visit, field notes were analysed and reformulated as formalised models. Subsequently, each model type was consolidated across all offices and visits. Interruptions to the workflow, called breakdowns, were identified.Results Clinical work during dental examination and treatment planning appointments is a highly collaborative activity involving dentists, hygienists and assistants. Personnel with multiple overlapping roles complete complex multi-step tasks supported by a large and varied collection of equipment, artifacts and technology. Most of the breakdowns were related to technology which interrupted the workflow, caused rework and increased the number of steps in work processes.Conclusion Current dental software could be significantly improved with regard to its support for communication and collaboration, workflow, information design and presentation, information content, and data entry.

  14. Examining Equity Sensitivity: An Investigation Using the Big Five and HEXACO Models of Personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, Hayden J R; Bourdage, Joshua S; Ogunfowora, Babatunde; Nguyen, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    The construct of equity sensitivity describes an individual's preference about his/her desired input to outcome ratio. Individuals high on equity sensitivity tend to be more input oriented, and are often called "Benevolents." Individuals low on equity sensitivity are more outcome oriented, and are described as "Entitleds." Given that equity sensitivity has often been described as a trait, the purpose of the present study was to examine major personality correlates of equity sensitivity, so as to inform both the nature of equity sensitivity, and the potential processes through which certain broad personality traits may relate to outcomes. We examined the personality correlates of equity sensitivity across three studies (total N = 1170), two personality models (i.e., the Big Five and HEXACO), the two most common measures of equity sensitivity (i.e., the Equity Preference Questionnaire and Equity Sensitivity Inventory), and using both self and peer reports of personality (in Study 3). Although results varied somewhat across samples, the personality variables of Conscientiousness and Honesty-Humility, followed by Agreeableness, were the most robust predictors of equity sensitivity. Individuals higher on these traits were more likely to be Benevolents, whereas those lower on these traits were more likely to be Entitleds. Although some associations between Extraversion, Openness, and Neuroticism and equity sensitivity were observed, these were generally not robust. Overall, it appears that there are several prominent personality variables underlying equity sensitivity, and that the addition of the HEXACO model's dimension of Honesty-Humility substantially contributes to our understanding of equity sensitivity.

  15. Distributed Lag Models: Examining Associations Between the Built Environment and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jonggyu; Sánchez, Brisa N; Berrocal, Veronica J; Sanchez-Vaznaugh, Emma V

    2016-01-01

    Built environment factors constrain individual level behaviors and choices, and thus are receiving increasing attention to assess their influence on health. Traditional regression methods have been widely used to examine associations between built environment measures and health outcomes, where a fixed, prespecified spatial scale (e.g., 1 mile buffer) is used to construct environment measures. However, the spatial scale for these associations remains largely unknown and misspecifying it introduces bias. We propose the use of distributed lag models (DLMs) to describe the association between built environment features and health as a function of distance from the locations of interest and circumvent a-priori selection of a spatial scale. Based on simulation studies, we demonstrate that traditional regression models produce associations biased away from the null when there is spatial correlation among the built environment features. Inference based on DLMs is robust under a range of scenarios of the built environment. We use this innovative application of DLMs to examine the association between the availability of convenience stores near California public schools, which may affect children's dietary choices both through direct access to junk food and exposure to advertisement, and children's body mass index z scores.

  16. A bifactor model of disgust proneness: examination of the Disgust Emotion Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Bunmi O; Ebesutani, Chad; Reise, Steven P

    2015-04-01

    The current research evaluated a bifactor model for the Disgust Emotion Scale (DES) in three samples: N = 1,318 nonclinical participants, N = 152 clinic-referred patients, and N = 352 nonclinical participants. The primary goals were to (a) use bifactor modeling to examine the latent structure of the DES and in turn (b) evaluate whether the DES should be scored as a unidimensional scale or whether subscales should also be interpreted. Results suggested that a bifactor model fit the DES data well and that all DES items were strongly influenced by a general disgust proneness dimension and by five content dimensions. Moreover, model-based reliability analyses suggested that scoring a general disgust dimension is justified despite the confirmed multidimensional structure. However, subscales were found to be unreliable after controlling for the general disgust factor with the potential exception of the Mutilation/Death and Animals subscale. Subsequent analysis also showed that only the general disgust factor robustly predicted an obsessive-compulsive disorder symptom latent factor-a clinical condition closely related to disgust proneness; latent variables representing DES domains displayed weak relations with an obsessive-compulsive disorder factor above and beyond the general disgust factor. Implications for better understanding the structure of DES responses and its use in clinical research are discussed.

  17. Model forest program: Year in review, 1992-1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    As part of the Green Plan, introduced by the Federal Government in late 1990, a network of model forests was developed to demonstrate the concept of sustainable forest management in practical terms on a working scale. This annual report describes the competitive site selection process, the forests involved in the project, program milestones, the operation of model forests, and highlights of the project. Financial data is included.

  18. Program Demand Cost Model for Alaskan Schools. Eighth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Michael; Mearig, Tim; Coffee, Nathan

    The State of Alaska Department of Education has created a handbook for establishing budgets for the following three types of construction projects: new schools or additions; renovations; and combined new work and renovations. The handbook supports a demand cost model computer program that includes detailed renovation cost data, itemized by…

  19. Duals for classical inventory models via generalized geometric programming

    OpenAIRE

    Carlton H. Scott; Thomas R. Jefferson; Soheila Jorjani

    2004-01-01

    Inventory problems generally have a structure that can be exploited for computational purposes. Here, we look at the duals of two seemingly unrelated inventory models that suggest an interesting duality between discrete time optimal control and optimization over an ordered sequence of variables. Concepts from conjugate duality and generalized geometric programming are used to establish the duality.

  20. Application of Logic Models in a Large Scientific Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Christine M.; Head, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    It is the purpose of this article to discuss the development and application of a logic model in the context of a large scientific research program within the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). CSIRO is Australia's national science agency and is a publicly funded part of Australia's innovation system. It conducts…

  1. Universal Instructional Design as a Model for Educational Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higbee, Jeanne L.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes Universal Instructional Design as an inclusive pedagogical model for use in educational programs, whether provided by traditional educational institutions, community-based initiatives, or workplace literacy projects. For the benefit of public relations specialists and classroom educators alike, the article begins with a…

  2. The Diversity Challenge: A Collection of Model Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellander, Gustavo A., Ed.; Prochaska, Fred, Ed.

    Model programs designed to promote diversity within the West Valley-Mission Community College District (WVMCCD) in California are discussed and described in this report. First, an introductory chapter, "The Importance of Cultural Issues to Higher Education," by Gustavo A. Mellander and Fred Prochaska, reviews the diversity recommendations of the…

  3. DISTRIBUTED APPROACH to WEB PAGE CATEGORIZATION USING MAPREDUCE PROGRAMMING MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Malarvizhi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The web is a large repository of information and to facilitate the search and retrieval of pages from it,categorization of web documents is essential. An effective means to handle the complexity of information retrieval from the internet is through automatic classification of web pages. Although lots of automatic classification algorithms and systems have been presented, most of the existing approaches are computationally challenging. In order to overcome this challenge, we have proposed a parallel algorithm, known as MapReduce programming model to automatically categorize the web pages. This approach incorporates three concepts. They are web crawler, MapReduce programming model and the proposed web page categorization approach. Initially, we have utilized web crawler to mine the World Wide Web and the crawled web pages are then directly given as input to the MapReduce programming model. Here the MapReduce programming model adapted to our proposed web page categorization approach finds the appropriate category of the web page according to its content. The experimental results show that our proposed parallel web page categorization approach achieves satisfactory results in finding the right category for any given web page.

  4. A Context-Adaptive Model for Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Brian K.

    1990-01-01

    Presents an adaptable, context-sensitive model for ESL/EFL program evaluation, consisting of seven steps that guide an evaluator through consideration of relevant issues, information, and design elements. Examples from an evaluation of the Reading for Science and Technology Project at the University of Guadalajara, Mexico are given. (31…

  5. Application of Logic Models in a Large Scientific Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Christine M.; Head, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    It is the purpose of this article to discuss the development and application of a logic model in the context of a large scientific research program within the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). CSIRO is Australia's national science agency and is a publicly funded part of Australia's innovation system. It conducts…

  6. The Arctic Climate Modeling Program: Professional Development for Rural Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Kathryn Berry

    2010-01-01

    The Arctic Climate Modeling Program (ACMP) offered yearlong science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) professional development to teachers in rural Alaska. Teacher training focused on introducing youth to workforce technologies used in Arctic research. Due to challenges in making professional development accessible to rural teachers, ACMP…

  7. A Model for Using Triadic Supervision in Counselor Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Gerard; Hein, Serge F.; Getz, Hildy

    2009-01-01

    The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (2001) has approved the use of triadic supervision as an alternative to individual supervision in clinical instruction. However, literature describing this mode of supervision is very limited. A model for triadic supervision is described, including presession planning,…

  8. Advanced parallel programming models research and development opportunities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Zhaofang.; Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2004-07-01

    There is currently a large research and development effort within the high-performance computing community on advanced parallel programming models. This research can potentially have an impact on parallel applications, system software, and computing architectures in the next several years. Given Sandia's expertise and unique perspective in these areas, particularly on very large-scale systems, there are many areas in which Sandia can contribute to this effort. This technical report provides a survey of past and present parallel programming model research projects and provides a detailed description of the Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) programming model. The PGAS model may offer several improvements over the traditional distributed memory message passing model, which is the dominant model currently being used at Sandia. This technical report discusses these potential benefits and outlines specific areas where Sandia's expertise could contribute to current research activities. In particular, we describe several projects in the areas of high-performance networking, operating systems and parallel runtime systems, compilers, application development, and performance evaluation.

  9. Solving linear integer programming problems by a novel neural model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalieri, S

    1999-02-01

    The paper deals with integer linear programming problems. As is well known, these are extremely complex problems, even when the number of integer variables is quite low. Literature provides examples of various methods to solve such problems, some of which are of a heuristic nature. This paper proposes an alternative strategy based on the Hopfield neural network. The advantage of the strategy essentially lies in the fact that hardware implementation of the neural model allows for the time required to obtain a solution so as not depend on the size of the problem to be solved. The paper presents a particular class of integer linear programming problems, including well-known problems such as the Travelling Salesman Problem and the Set Covering Problem. After a brief description of this class of problems, it is demonstrated that the original Hopfield model is incapable of supplying valid solutions. This is attributed to the presence of constant bias currents in the dynamic of the neural model. A demonstration of this is given and then a novel neural model is presented which continues to be based on the same architecture as the Hopfield model, but introduces modifications thanks to which the integer linear programming problems presented can be solved. Some numerical examples and concluding remarks highlight the solving capacity of the novel neural model.

  10. Some theoretical models and constructs generic to substance abuse prevention programs for adolescents: possible relevance and limitations for problem gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Richard I

    2003-01-01

    For the past several years the author and his colleagues have explored the area of how social psychological constructs and theoretical models can be applied to the prevention of health threatening behaviors in adolescents. In examining the need for the development of gambling prevention programs for adolescents, it might be of value to consider the application of such constructs and theoretical models as a foundation to the development of prevention programs in this emerging problem behavior among adolescents. In order to provide perspective to the reader, the present paper reviews the history of various psychosocial models and constructs generic to programs directed at prevention of substance abuse in adolescents. A brief history of some of these models, possibly most applicable to gambling prevention programs, are presented. Social inoculation, reasoned action, planned behavior, and problem behavior theory, are among those discussed. Some deficits of these models, are also articulated. How such models may have relevance to developing programs for prevention of problem gambling in adolescents is also discussed. However, the inherent differences between gambling and more directly health threatening behaviors such as substance abuse must, of course, be seriously considered in utilizing such models. Most current gambling prevention programs have seldom been guided by theoretical models. Developers of gambling prevention programs should consider theoretical foundations, particularly since such foundations not only provide a guide for programs, but may become critical tools in evaluating their effectiveness.

  11. Supporting universal prevention programs: a two-phased coaching model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kimberly D; Darney, Dana; Domitrovich, Celene; Keperling, Jennifer Pitchford; Ialongo, Nicholas S

    2013-06-01

    Schools are adopting evidence-based programs designed to enhance students' emotional and behavioral competencies at increasing rates (Hemmeter et al. in Early Child Res Q 26:96-109, 2011). At the same time, teachers express the need for increased support surrounding implementation of these evidence-based programs (Carter and Van Norman in Early Child Educ 38:279-288, 2010). Ongoing professional development in the form of coaching may enhance teacher skills and implementation (Noell et al. in School Psychol Rev 34:87-106, 2005; Stormont et al. 2012). There exists a need for a coaching model that can be applied to a variety of teacher skill levels and one that guides coach decision-making about how best to support teachers. This article provides a detailed account of a two-phased coaching model with empirical support developed and tested with coaches and teachers in urban schools (Becker et al. 2013). In the initial universal coaching phase, all teachers receive the same coaching elements regardless of their skill level. Then, in the tailored coaching phase, coaching varies according to the strengths and needs of each teacher. Specifically, more intensive coaching strategies are used only with teachers who need additional coaching supports, whereas other teachers receive just enough support to consolidate and maintain their strong implementation. Examples of how coaches used the two-phased coaching model when working with teachers who were implementing two universal prevention programs (i.e., the PATHS curriculum and PAX Good Behavior Game [PAX GBG]) provide illustrations of the application of this model. The potential reach of this coaching model extends to other school-based programs as well as other settings in which coaches partner with interventionists to implement evidence-based programs.

  12. Best-fit model of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis of the 2010 Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part I clinical decision-making cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champlain, André F De

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the fit of a number of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis models to the 2010 Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part I (MCCQE1) clinical decision-making (CDM) cases. The outcomes of this study have important implications for a range of domains, including scoring and test development. The examinees included all first-time Canadian medical graduates and international medical graduates who took the MCCQE1 in spring or fall 2010. The fit of one- to five-factor exploratory models was assessed for the item response matrix of the 2010 CDM cases. Five confirmatory factor analytic models were also examined with the same CDM response matrix. The structural equation modeling software program Mplus was used for all analyses. Out of the five exploratory factor analytic models that were evaluated, a three-factor model provided the best fit. Factor 1 loaded on three medicine cases, two obstetrics and gynecology cases, and two orthopedic surgery cases. Factor 2 corresponded to pediatrics, and the third factor loaded on psychiatry cases. Among the five confirmatory factor analysis models examined in this study, three- and four-factor lifespan period models and the five-factor discipline models provided the best fit. The results suggest that knowledge of broad disciplinary domains best account for performance on CDM cases. In test development, particular effort should be placed on developing CDM cases according to broad discipline and patient age domains; CDM testlets should be assembled largely using the criteria of discipline and age.

  13. How to Conduct a Qualitative Program Evaluation in the Light of Eisner’s Educational Connoisseurship and Criticism Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Yüksel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe quantitative methodologies have been traditionally employed in the educational research so far. However, as long as with the appreciation and widespread use of the qualitative methodologies in many disciplines, many different educational areas have started to be examined in terms of qualitative research aspects. Particularly, the qualitative evaluation of the education programs has received considerable interest and there have been recently some attempts to develop a qualitative methodology for evaluating educational programs based upon the tenets of program evaluation. The evaluators have underlined the benefits of qualitative methods to boost the information shared with decision-makers and policy makers. The most inclusive endeavour has been carried out by Eisner. Eisner’s program evaluation model presents the role of educational connoisseurship and criticism in educational evaluation in terms of qualitative evaluation. This study aims at examining how a qualitative program evaluation is conducted in relation with the Eisner’s evaluation model.

  14. Propeller aircraft interior noise model: User's manual for computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilby, E. G.; Pope, L. D.

    1985-01-01

    A computer program entitled PAIN (Propeller Aircraft Interior Noise) has been developed to permit calculation of the sound levels in the cabin of a propeller-driven airplane. The fuselage is modeled as a cylinder with a structurally integral floor, the cabin sidewall and floor being stiffened by ring frames, stringers and floor beams of arbitrary configurations. The cabin interior is covered with acoustic treatment and trim. The propeller noise consists of a series of tones at harmonics of the blade passage frequency. Input data required by the program include the mechanical and acoustical properties of the fuselage structure and sidewall trim. Also, the precise propeller noise signature must be defined on a grid that lies in the fuselage skin. The propeller data are generated with a propeller noise prediction program such as the NASA Langley ANOPP program. The program PAIN permits the calculation of the space-average interior sound levels for the first ten harmonics of a propeller rotating alongside the fuselage. User instructions for PAIN are given in the report. Development of the analytical model is presented in NASA CR 3813.

  15. Programming Models for Concurrency and Real-Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitek, Jan

    Modern real-time applications are increasingly large, complex and concurrent systems which must meet stringent performance and predictability requirements. Programming those systems require fundamental advances in programming languages and runtime systems. This talk presents our work on Flexotasks, a programming model for concurrent, real-time systems inspired by stream-processing and concurrent active objects. Some of the key innovations in Flexotasks are that it support both real-time garbage collection and region-based memory with an ownership type system for static safety. Communication between tasks is performed by channels with a linear type discipline to avoid copying messages, and by a non-blocking transactional memory facility. We have evaluated our model empirically within two distinct implementations, one based on Purdue’s Ovm research virtual machine framework and the other on Websphere, IBM’s production real-time virtual machine. We have written a number of small programs, as well as a 30 KLOC avionics collision detector application. We show that Flexotasks are capable of executing periodic threads at 10 KHz with a standard deviation of 1.2us and have performance competitive with hand coded C programs.

  16. A Multi-Scale Modeling and Experimental Program for the Dynamic Mechanical Response of Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-09

    Invited talk at the department of Biomedical Illustration and Visualization, UIC, (2014). Joseph Orgel (11) "How Collagen Structure and...A Multi-Scale Modeling and Experimental Program for the Dynamic Mechanical Response of Tissue We study the mechanical properties of collagen , which...and experiments to examine the theoretical results. The atomistic structure of collagen is determined by Xray diffraction, which provides the

  17. Examining the Efficiency of Models Using Tangent Coordinates or Principal Component Scores in Allometry Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigirli, Deniz; Ercan, Ilker

    2015-09-01

    Most of the studies in medical and biological sciences are related to the examination of geometrical properties of an organ or organism. Growth and allometry studies are important in the way of investigating the effects of diseases and the environmental factors effects on the structure of the organ or organism. Thus, statistical shape analysis has recently become more important in the medical and biological sciences. Shape is all geometrical information that remains when location, scale and rotational effects are removed from an object. Allometry, which is a relationship between size and shape, plays an important role in the development of statistical shape analysis. The aim of the present study was to compare two different models for allometry which includes tangent coordinates and principal component scores of tangent coordinates as dependent variables in multivariate regression analysis. The results of the simulation study showed that the model constructed by taking tangent coordinates as dependent variables is more appropriate than the model constructed by taking principal component scores of tangent coordinates as dependent variables, for all sample sizes.

  18. Modeling using clinical examination indicators predicts interstitial lung disease among patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Song, Wuqi; Wu, Jing; Li, Zhangming; Mu, Fengyun; Li, Yang; Huang, He; Zhu, Wenliang

    2017-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a severe extra-articular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that is well-defined as a chronic systemic autoimmune disease. A proportion of patients with RA-associated ILD (RA-ILD) develop pulmonary fibrosis (PF), resulting in poor prognosis and increased lifetime risk. We investigated whether routine clinical examination indicators (CEIs) could be used to identify RA patients with high PF risk. A total of 533 patients with established RA were recruited in this study for model building and 32 CEIs were measured for each of them. To identify PF risk, a new artificial neural network (ANN) was built, in which inputs were generated by calculating Euclidean distance of CEIs between patients. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis indicated that the ANN performed well in predicting the PF risk (Youden index = 0.436) by only incorporating four CEIs including age, eosinophil count, platelet count, and white blood cell count. A set of 218 RA patients with healthy lungs or suffering from ILD and a set of 87 RA patients suffering from PF were used for independent validation. Results showed that the model successfully identified ILD and PF with a true positive rate of 84.9% and 82.8%, respectively. The present study suggests that model integration of multiple routine CEIs contributes to identification of potential PF risk among patients with RA.

  19. Modelling of food intake in Brazil and Germany: Examining the effects of self-construals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Elizabeth; Kühnen, Ulrich; Hermans, Roel C J; Lippke, Sonia

    2015-12-01

    The current research focused on the influence of informational eating norms on people's food intake, and examined whether this influence was moderated by participants' self-construal levels. In two experiments, a two (intake norm manipulation: low vs. high) by two (self-construal manipulation: interdependent versus independent) between-participant factorial design was used. The studies were conducted in Brazil (Experiment 1) and in Germany (Experiment 2) as participants' self-construal levels differ between these countries. In Experiment 1, results indicated that participants exposed to a high-intake norm ate more than participants exposed to a low-intake norm. However, self-construal was not found to moderate the influence of food intake norms on participants' intake. In Experiment 2, replicating the results of Experiment 1, exposure to a high-intake norm increased participants' food intake, but self-construals again did not moderate modelling effects on food intake. Although differences in individuals' self-construal were found between both countries, they did not affect the magnitude of modelling effects on eating. Our studies provide evidence for cross-cultural similarity in the extent to which Brazilian and German female young adults are vulnerable to modelling effects on food intake, independent on their self-construal.

  20. Their Portfolios, Our Role: Examining a Community College Teacher Education Digital Portfolio Program from the Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisir, Jean Y.; Hachey, Alyse C.; Theilheimer, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    In the of Fall 2006, our large, urban community college implemented digital portfolio development for all of the preservice early childhood educators registered in the infant-toddler and preschool-early elementary programs. Three years after implementation of the program, we conducted survey research to assess our students' perceptions of their…

  1. Examining Guidelines for School-Based Breakfast Programs in Canada: A Systematic Review of the Grey Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Katelyn M; Kirkpatrick, Sharon I; Hanning, Rhona M; Stapleton, Jackie; Leatherdale, Scott T

    2017-02-01

    School breakfast programs are widespread and serve varying objectives regarding youth health promotion. Evidence-based guidelines for breakfast programs may be important in maximizing their effectiveness related to student outcomes, yet it is unclear what is available in Canada. A systematic review was conducted to identify and compare Canadian guidelines related to breakfast programs. Data sources included grey literature databases, customized search engines, targeted websites, and content expert consultations. Eligible guidelines met the following criteria: government and nongovernment sources at the federal and provincial/territorial levels, current version, and intended for program coordinators. Recommendations for program delivery were extracted, categorized, and mapped onto the 4 environments outlined in the ANGELO framework, and they were classified as "common" or "inconsistent" across guidelines. Fifteen sets of guidelines were included. No guidelines were available from federal or territorial governments and 4 provincial governments. There were few references to peer-reviewed literature within the guidelines and despite many common recommendations for program delivery, conflicting recommendations were also identified. Potential barriers to program participation, including a lack of consideration of allergies and other dietary restrictions, were identified. Future research should identify how guidelines are implemented and evaluate what effect their implementation has on program delivery and student outcomes.

  2. Gstat: a program for geostatistical modelling, prediction and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pebesma, Edzer J.; Wesseling, Cees G.

    1998-01-01

    Gstat is a computer program for variogram modelling, and geostatistical prediction and simulation. It provides a generic implementation of the multivariable linear model with trends modelled as a linear function of coordinate polynomials or of user-defined base functions, and independent or dependent, geostatistically modelled, residuals. Simulation in gstat comprises conditional or unconditional (multi-) Gaussian sequential simulation of point values or block averages, or (multi-) indicator sequential simulation. Besides many of the popular options found in other geostatistical software packages, gstat offers the unique combination of (i) an interactive user interface for modelling variograms and generalized covariances (residual variograms), that uses the device-independent plotting program gnuplot for graphical display, (ii) support for several ascii and binary data and map file formats for input and output, (iii) a concise, intuitive and flexible command language, (iv) user customization of program defaults, (v) no built-in limits, and (vi) free, portable ANSI-C source code. This paper describes the class of problems gstat can solve, and addresses aspects of efficiency and implementation, managing geostatistical projects, and relevant technical details.

  3. Hybrid programming model for implicit PDE simulations on multicore architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Kaushik, Dinesh K.

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of programming modern multicore processor based clusters is rapidly rising, with GPUs adding further demand for fine-grained parallelism. This paper analyzes the performance of the hybrid (MPI+OpenMP) programming model in the context of an implicit unstructured mesh CFD code. At the implementation level, the effects of cache locality, update management, work division, and synchronization frequency are studied. The hybrid model presents interesting algorithmic opportunities as well: the convergence of linear system solver is quicker than the pure MPI case since the parallel preconditioner stays stronger when hybrid model is used. This implies significant savings in the cost of communication and synchronization (explicit and implicit). Even though OpenMP based parallelism is easier to implement (with in a subdomain assigned to one MPI process for simplicity), getting good performance needs attention to data partitioning issues similar to those in the message-passing case. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Sexual and reproductive health needs of young people : a study examining the fit between needs and current programming responses in India

    OpenAIRE

    Kolencherry, Shuby

    2004-01-01

    The study intended to explore the magnitude and characteristics of sexual and reproductive health risks of young people in Gujarat, India. In particular, the study examined the fit between sexual and reproductive health needs and the existing programming responses in terms of policies, programs and access to health care services. The study is based on empirical research and Social Cognitive Theory framework. The investigation was conceived in the context following the International Conference...

  5. PDDP: A data parallel programming model. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, K.H.

    1995-06-01

    PDDP, the Parallel Data Distribution Preprocessor, is a data parallel programming model for distributed memory parallel computers. PDDP impelments High Performance Fortran compatible data distribution directives and parallelism expressed by the use of Fortran 90 array syntax, the FORALL statement, and the (WRERE?) construct. Distribued data objects belong to a global name space; other data objects are treated as local and replicated on each processor. PDDP allows the user to program in a shared-memory style and generates codes that are portable to a variety of parallel machines. For interprocessor communication, PDDP uses the fastest communication primitives on each platform.

  6. Development of SPAWM: selection program for available watershed models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yongdeok; Roesner, Larry A

    2014-01-01

    A selection program for available watershed models (also known as SPAWM) was developed. Thirty-three commonly used watershed models were analyzed in depth and classified in accordance to their attributes. These attributes consist of: (1) land use; (2) event or continuous; (3) time steps; (4) water quality; (5) distributed or lumped; (6) subsurface; (7) overland sediment; and (8) best management practices. Each of these attributes was further classified into sub-attributes. Based on user selected sub-attributes, the most appropriate watershed model is selected from the library of watershed models. SPAWM is implemented using Excel Visual Basic and is designed for use by novices as well as by experts on watershed modeling. It ensures that the necessary sub-attributes required by the user are captured and made available in the selected watershed model.

  7. SMART - a computer program for modelling stellar atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Aret, Anna; Poolamäe, Raivo; Sapar, Lili

    2013-01-01

    Program SMART (Spectra and Model Atmospheres by Radiative Transfer) has been composed for modelling atmospheres and spectra of hot stars (O, B and A spectral classes) and studying different physical processes in them (Sapar & Poolam\\"ae 2003, Sapar et al. 2007). Line-blanketed models are computed assuming plane-parallel, static and horizontally homogeneous atmosphere in radiative, hydrostatic and local thermodynamic equilibrium. Main advantages of SMART are its shortness, simplicity, user friendliness and flexibility for study of different physical processes. SMART successfully runs on PC both under Windows and Linux.

  8. Using the Stereotype Content Model to examine group depictions in Fascism: An Archival Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Federica; Volpato, Chiara; Fiske, Susan T

    2010-04-01

    The Stereotype Content Model (SCM) suggests potentially universal intergroup depictions. If universal, they should apply across history in archival data. Bridging this gap, we examined social groups descriptions during Italy's Fascist era. In Study 1, articles published in a Fascist magazine- La Difesa della Razza -were content analyzed, and results submitted to correspondence analysis. Admiration prejudice depicted ingroups; envious and contemptuous prejudices depicted specific outgroups, generally in line with SCM predictions. No paternalistic prejudice appeared; historical reasons might explain this finding. Results also fit the recently developed BIAS Map of behavioral consequences. In Study 2, ninety-six undergraduates rated the content-analysis traits on warmth and competence, without knowing their origin. They corroborated SCM's interpretations of the archival data.

  9. A critical examination of the maximum velocity of shortening used in simulation models of human movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domire, Zachary J; Challis, John H

    2010-12-01

    The maximum velocity of shortening of a muscle is an important parameter in musculoskeletal models. The most commonly used values are derived from animal studies; however, these values are well above the values that have been reported for human muscle. The purpose of this study was to examine the sensitivity of simulations of maximum vertical jumping performance to the parameters describing the force-velocity properties of muscle. Simulations performed with parameters derived from animal studies were similar to measured jump heights from previous experimental studies. While simulations performed with parameters derived from human muscle were much lower than previously measured jump heights. If current measurements of maximum shortening velocity in human muscle are correct, a compensating error must exist. Of the possible compensating errors that could produce this discrepancy, it was concluded that reduced muscle fibre excursion is the most likely candidate.

  10. The active learning hypothesis of the job-demand-control model: an experimental examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusser, Jan Alexander; Schulz-Hardt, Stefan; Mojzisch, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The active learning hypothesis of the job-demand-control model [Karasek, R. A. 1979. "Job Demands, Job Decision Latitude, and Mental Strain: Implications for Job Redesign." Administration Science Quarterly 24: 285-307] proposes positive effects of high job demands and high job control on performance. We conducted a 2 (demands: high vs. low) × 2 (control: high vs. low) experimental office workplace simulation to examine this hypothesis. Since performance during a work simulation is confounded by the boundaries of the demands and control manipulations (e.g. time limits), we used a post-test, in which participants continued working at their task, but without any manipulation of demands and control. This post-test allowed for examining active learning (transfer) effects in an unconfounded fashion. Our results revealed that high demands had a positive effect on quantitative performance, without affecting task accuracy. In contrast, high control resulted in a speed-accuracy tradeoff, that is participants in the high control conditions worked slower but with greater accuracy than participants in the low control conditions.

  11. Examining school-based bullying interventions using multilevel discrete time hazard modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Stephanie L; Wagaman, M Alex; Geiger, Jennifer Mullins; Bermudez-Parsai, Monica; Hedberg, E C

    2012-10-01

    Although schools have been trying to address bullying by utilizing different approaches that stop or reduce the incidence of bullying, little remains known about what specific intervention strategies are most successful in reducing bullying in the school setting. Using the social-ecological framework, this paper examines school-based disciplinary interventions often used to deliver consequences to deter the reoccurrence of bullying and aggressive behaviors among school-aged children. Data for this study are drawn from the School-Wide Information System (SWIS) with the final analytic sample consisting of 1,221 students in grades K - 12 who received an office disciplinary referral for bullying during the first semester. Using Kaplan-Meier Failure Functions and Multi-level discrete time hazard models, determinants of the probability of a student receiving a second referral over time were examined. Of the seven interventions tested, only Parent-Teacher Conference (AOR = 0.65, p connection between the students' mesosystems as well as utilizing disciplinary strategies that take into consideration student's microsystem roles.

  12. Examining Factors Affecting Science Achievement of Hong Kong in PISA 2006 Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Terence Yuk Ping; Lau, Kwok Chi

    2014-10-01

    This study uses hierarchical linear modeling to examine the influence of a range of factors on the science performances of Hong Kong students in PISA 2006. Hong Kong has been consistently ranked highly in international science assessments, such as Programme for International Student Assessment and Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study; therefore, an exploration of the factors that affect science performances of Hong Kong students can give a lens to examine how science education can be improved in Hong Kong and other countries. The analyses reveal that student backgrounds as male, at higher grade levels, and born in mainland (when in the same grade) are associated with better science performance. Among the attitudinal factors, enjoyment of science and self-efficacy in science play important roles in scientific achievements. Most of the parental factors, on the other hand, are not having significant impacts on achievement after student attitudes are taken into account, with only parents' value of science having a small effect. School student intake is found to be a strong predictor of school average achievement, as well as a major mediator of the effects of school enrollment size and school socio-economic status. The findings differ from recently reported results, which suggested that school enrollment size was associated with achievement. This study also points out the problems of the use of science instruction time as a school-level variable to explain science achievement in Hong Kong.

  13. Examining Accumulated Emotional Traits in Suicide Blogs With an Emotion Topic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Fuji; Kang, Xin; Quan, Changqin

    2016-09-01

    Suicide has been a major cause of death throughout the world. Recent studies have proved a reliable connection between the emotional traits and suicide. However, detection and prevention of suicide are mostly carried out in the clinical centers, which limit the effective treatments to a restricted group of people. To assist detecting suicide risks among the public, we propose a novel method by exploring the accumulated emotional information from people's daily writings (i.e., Blogs), and examining these emotional traits that are predictive of suicidal behaviors. A complex emotion topic model is employed to detect the underlying emotions and emotion-related topics in the Blog streams, based on eight basic emotion categories and five levels of emotion intensities. Since suicide is caused through an accumulative process, we propose three accumulative emotional traits, i.e., accumulation, covariance, and transition of the consecutive Blog emotions, and employ a generalized linear regression algorithm to examine the relationship between emotional traits and suicide risk. Our experiment results suggest that the emotion transition trait turns to be more discriminative of the suicide risk, and that the combination of three traits in linear regression would generate even more discriminative predictions. A classification of the suicide and nonsuicide Blog articles in our additional experiment verifies this result. Finally, we conduct a case study of the most commonly mentioned emotion-related topics in the suicidal Blogs, to further understand the association between emotions and thoughts for these authors.

  14. Examining School-Based Bullying Interventions Using Multilevel Discrete Time Hazard Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagaman, M. Alex; Geiger, Jennifer Mullins; Bermudez-Parsai, Monica; Hedberg, E. C.

    2014-01-01

    Although schools have been trying to address bulling by utilizing different approaches that stop or reduce the incidence of bullying, little remains known about what specific intervention strategies are most successful in reducing bullying in the school setting. Using the social-ecological framework, this paper examines school-based disciplinary interventions often used to deliver consequences to deter the reoccurrence of bullying and aggressive behaviors among school-aged children. Data for this study are drawn from the School-Wide Information System (SWIS) with the final analytic sample consisting of 1,221 students in grades K – 12 who received an office disciplinary referral for bullying during the first semester. Using Kaplan-Meier Failure Functions and Multi-level discrete time hazard models, determinants of the probability of a student receiving a second referral over time were examined. Of the seven interventions tested, only Parent-Teacher Conference (AOR=0.65, pbullying and aggressive behaviors. By using a social-ecological framework, schools can develop strategies that deter the reoccurrence of bullying by identifying key factors that enhance a sense of connection between the students’ mesosystems as well as utilizing disciplinary strategies that take into consideration student’s microsystem roles. PMID:22878779

  15. Immune modelling and programming of a mobile robot demo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Tao; CAI Zi-xing; HE Han-gen

    2006-01-01

    An artificial immune system was modelled with self/non-self selection to overcome abnormity in a mobile robot demo. The immune modelling includes the innate immune modelling and the adaptive immune modelling. The self/non-self selection includes detection and recognition, and the self/non-self detection is based on the normal model of the demo. After the detection, the non-self recognition is based on learning unknown non-self for the adaptive immunization. The learning was designed on the neural network or on the learning mechanism from examples. The last step is elimination of all the non-self and failover of the demo. The immunization of the mobile robot demo is programmed with Java to test effectiveness of the approach. Some worms infected the mobile robot demo, and caused the abnormity. The results of the immunization simulations show that the immune program can detect 100% worms,recognize all known Worms and most unknown worms, and eliminate the worms. Moreover, the damaged files of the mobile robot demo can all be repaired through the normal model and immunization. Therefore, the immune modelling of the mobile robot demo is effective and programmable in some anti-worms and abnormity detection applications.

  16. Petascale computation performance of lightweight multiscale cardiac models using hybrid programming models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Bernard J; Fitch, Blake G; Pitman, Michael C; Rice, John J; Reumann, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Future multiscale and multiphysics models must use the power of high performance computing (HPC) systems to enable research into human disease, translational medical science, and treatment. Previously we showed that computationally efficient multiscale models will require the use of sophisticated hybrid programming models, mixing distributed message passing processes (e.g. the message passing interface (MPI)) with multithreading (e.g. OpenMP, POSIX pthreads). The objective of this work is to compare the performance of such hybrid programming models when applied to the simulation of a lightweight multiscale cardiac model. Our results show that the hybrid models do not perform favourably when compared to an implementation using only MPI which is in contrast to our results using complex physiological models. Thus, with regards to lightweight multiscale cardiac models, the user may not need to increase programming complexity by using a hybrid programming approach. However, considering that model complexity will increase as well as the HPC system size in both node count and number of cores per node, it is still foreseeable that we will achieve faster than real time multiscale cardiac simulations on these systems using hybrid programming models.

  17. Longitudinal Examination of Resilience after Traumatic Brain Injury: A Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwitz, Jennifer H; Sima, Adam P; Kreutzer, Jeffrey S; Dreer, Laura E; Bergquist, Thomas F; Zafonte, Ross; Johnson-Greene, Douglas; Felix, Elizabeth R

    2017-07-19

    To evaluate the trajectory of resilience during the first year following a moderate-severe TBI, factors associated with resilience at 3, 6 and 12-months post-injury, and changing relationships over time between resilience and other factors. Longitudinal analysis of an observational cohort. Five inpatient rehabilitation centers. Patients with TBI (N = 195) enrolled in the resilience module of the TBI Model Systems study with data collected at 3, 6, and 12-month follow-up. Not applicable. Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. Initially, resilience levels appeared to be stable during the first year post-injury. Individual growth curve models were used to examine resilience over time in relation to demographic, psychosocial, and injury characteristics. After adjusting for these characteristics, resilience actually declined over time. Higher levels of resilience were related to non-minority status, absence of pre-injury substance abuse, lower anxiety and disability level, and greater life satisfaction. Resilience is a construct that is relevant to understanding brain injury outcomes and has potential value in planning clinical interventions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Aerosol penetration of leak pathways : an examination of the available data and models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Dana Auburn

    2009-04-01

    Data and models of aerosol particle deposition in leak pathways are described. Pathways considered include capillaries, orifices, slots and cracks in concrete. The Morewitz-Vaughan criterion for aerosol plugging of leak pathways is shown to be applicable only to a limited range of particle settling velocities and Stokes numbers. More useful are sampling efficiency criteria defined by Davies and by Liu and Agarwal. Deposition of particles can be limited by bounce from surfaces defining leak pathways and by resuspension of particles deposited on these surfaces. A model of the probability of particle bounce is described. Resuspension of deposited particles can be triggered by changes in flow conditions, particle impact on deposits and by shock or vibration of the surfaces. This examination was performed as part of the review of the AP1000 Standard Combined License Technical Report, APP-GW-GLN-12, Revision 0, 'Offsite and Control Room Dose Changes' (TR-112) in support of the USNRC AP1000 Standard Combined License Pre-Application Review.

  19. Examining the justification of superposition model of FePc ; A DMC study

    CERN Document Server

    Ichibha, Tom; Hongo, Kenta; Maezono, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    We have applied CASSCF-DMC to evaluate relative stabilities of the possible electronic configurations of an isolated FePc under $D_{4h}$ symmetry. It predicts $A_{2g}$ ground state, supporting preceding DFT studies,[J. Chem. Phys. 114, 9780 (2001), Appl. Phys. 95, 165 (2009), Phys. Rev. B 85, 235129 (2012)] with confidence overcoming the ambiguity about exchange-correlation (XC) functionals. By comparing DMC with several XC, we clarified the importance of the short range exchange to describe the relative stability. We examined why the predicted $A_{2g}$ is excluded from possible ground states in the recent ligand field based model.[J. Chem. Phys. 138, 244308 (2013)] Simplified assumptions made in the superposition model [Rep. Prog. Phys. 52, 699 (1989)] are identified to give unreasonably less energy gain for $A_{2g}$ when compared with the reality. The state is found to have possible reasons for the stabilization, reducing the occupations from an unstable anti-bonding orbital, preventing double occupancies i...

  20. Original article Rehabilitation model program for seriously ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Kegye

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Patients receiving cancer treatment start lifestyle changes mostly at the end of the treatment during the rehabilitation period. Most often, the first step is a dietary change and physical exercises built into the daily routine. Patients who do this in groups led by qualified therapists and based on professional counseling can build more effective and more permanent changes into their life. To develop a complex rehabilitation program which, in the short term, aims to familiarize patients with a lifestyle which harmonizes the physical, mental, spiritual and social spheres of life and, in the long term, to build it into their everyday life in order to ameliorate the physical and mental state and reduce the psychological symptoms and the isolation of patients. The physical component focuses on diet and exercise. The psycho-social-spiritual support focuses on discovering inner sources of strength, developing active coping mechanisms and helping to achieve more open communication. Participants and procedure In February and March 2011, 8 patients treated for malignant tumors participated in the model program. The components of the model program were psychotherapy, physiotherapy, cancer consultation, nutrition counseling, creative activities and walking. Results During the period of the model program the isolation of the patients decreased and their social support and ability of coping with the illness ameliorated. They reported an ease in anxiety and depression in their everyday activities. According to feedback, their communication with each other, with the staff and with their relatives became more open. Altogether this had advantageous effects on the functioning of the ward and the mood of the staff. Conclusions The rehabilitation program confirmed that beside individual psycho-social support, beneficial and economic psycho-social support can be provided for the patients in group form along with the most effective assignment of the

  1. Inspiring science achievement: a mixed methods examination of the practices and characteristics of successful science programs in diverse high schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scogin, Stephen C.; Cavlazoglu, Baki; LeBlanc, Jennifer; Stuessy, Carol L.

    2017-08-01

    While the achievement gap in science exists in the US, research associated with our investigation reveals some high school science programs serving diverse student bodies are successfully closing the gap. Using a mixed methods approach, we identified and investigated ten high schools in a large Southwestern state that fit the definition of "highly successful, highly diverse". By conducting interviews with science liaisons associated with each school and reviewing the literature, we developed a rubric identifying specific characteristics associated with successful science programs. These characteristics and practices included setting high expectations for students, providing extensive teacher support for student learning, and utilizing student-centered pedagogy. We used the rubric to assess the successful high school science programs and compare them to other high school science programs in the state (i.e., less successful and less diverse high school science programs). Highly successful, highly diverse schools were very different in their approach to science education when compared to the other programs. The findings from this study will help schools with diverse students to strengthen hiring practices, enhance teacher support mechanisms, and develop student-focused strategies in the classroom that increase science achievement.

  2. From Mice to Men: research models of developmental programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabadán-Diehl, C; Nathanielsz, P

    2013-02-01

    Developmental programming can be defined as a response to a specific challenge to the mammalian organism during a critical developmental time window that alters the trajectory of development with persistent effects on offspring phenotype and predisposition to future illness. We focus on the need for studies in relevant, well-characterized animal models in the context of recent research discoveries on the challenges, mechanisms and outcomes of developmental programming. We discuss commonalities and differences in general principles of developmental programming as they apply to several species, including humans. The consequences of these differences are discussed. Obesity, metabolic disorders and cardiovascular diseases are associated with the highest percentage of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although many of the causes are associated with lifestyle, high-energy diets and lack of physical activity, recent evidence has linked developmental programming to the epidemic of metabolic diseases. A better understanding of comparative systems physiology of mother, fetus and neonate using information provided by rapid advances in molecular biology has the potential to improve the lifetime health of future generations by providing better women's health, diagnostic tools and preventative and therapeutic interventions in individuals exposed during their development to programming influences.

  3. Characterization and modeling of fast programming bits in flash EEPROM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkansah, F.; Hatalis, M.; Olasupo, K.

    2000-11-01

    The effects of flash EEPROM floating gate (FG) morphology on the generation and density of fast programming bits in a 2Mbit flash EEPROM array has been characterized. These fast programming bits exhibit identical subthreshold characteristics similar to that of a normal bit after UV erase, thus establishing that the initial charge stored on the FG of both fast and normal bit is the same. Experimental results clearly indicates that the fast programming phenomena result from an interaction of the programming process with the FG polysilicon microstructure. An in-depth experimentation previously reported, reveals that the FG poly deposition and doping processes are crucial for controlling the desired Fowler-Nordheim tunneling. A correlation is established between the fast bit density observed in the memory arrays, the FG polysilicon grain size and tunneling field enhancement factor μ( Rc). A compact model of the fast programming bit memory threshold voltage as a function of the effective FG polysilicon grain area factor Geff, and tunneling field enhancement factor μ( Rc) has been developed for the first time.

  4. The FITS model office ergonomics program: a model for best practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chim, Justine M Y

    2014-01-01

    An effective office ergonomics program can predict positive results in reducing musculoskeletal injury rates, enhancing productivity, and improving staff well-being and job satisfaction. Its objective is to provide a systematic solution to manage the potential risk of musculoskeletal disorders among computer users in an office setting. A FITS Model office ergonomics program is developed. The FITS Model Office Ergonomics Program has been developed which draws on the legislative requirements for promoting the health and safety of workers using computers for extended periods as well as previous research findings. The Model is developed according to the practical industrial knowledge in ergonomics, occupational health and safety management, and human resources management in Hong Kong and overseas. This paper proposes a comprehensive office ergonomics program, the FITS Model, which considers (1) Furniture Evaluation and Selection; (2) Individual Workstation Assessment; (3) Training and Education; (4) Stretching Exercises and Rest Break as elements of an effective program. An experienced ergonomics practitioner should be included in the program design and implementation. Through the FITS Model Office Ergonomics Program, the risk of musculoskeletal disorders among computer users can be eliminated or minimized, and workplace health and safety and employees' wellness enhanced.

  5. The Athletic Prevention Programming and Leadership Education (APPLE) Model: Developing Substance Abuse Prevention Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Grossman, Susan J.; Gieck, Joe; Fang, Wei Li; Freedman, Alan

    1993-01-01

    Alcohol and other drug (AOD) abuse affects every sector of society, and student-athletes are no exception. Because many factors affecting athletes do not affect other students, athletic departments commonly approach prevention through AOD education. Different educational approaches are described in this article, particularly the Athletic Prevention Programming and Leadership Education (APPLE) model. Project APPLE is designed to enable an athletic department to systematically analyze its AOD p...

  6. Identifying barriers to mental health system improvements: an examination of community participation in assertive community treatment programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakefield Patricia A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrating the best available evidence into program standards is essential if system-wide improvements in the delivery of community-based mental health services are to be achieved. Since the beginning of the Assertive Community Treatment (ACT program movement, program standards have included a role for the community. In particular, ACT program standards have sought to ensure that members of the local community are involved in governance and that former clients participate in service delivery as "Peer Support Specialists". This paper reports on the extent to which ACT program standards related to community participation have been implemented and identifies barriers to full compliance. Methods Qualitative and quantitative data were collected through a telephone survey of ACT Program Coordinators in Ontario, Canada, using a census sample of the existing 66 ACT programs. A thematic approach to content analysis was used to analyze respondents' qualitative comments. Quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 and included means, frequencies, independent t-tests and Pearson Correlations. Results An 85% response rate was achieved. Of the 33 program standards, the two that received the lowest perceived compliance ratings were the two standards directly concerning community participation. Specifically, the standard to have a functioning Community Advisory Body and the standard requiring the inclusion of a Peer Support Specialist. The three major themes that emerged from the survey data with respect to the barriers to fully implementing the Community Advisory Body were: external issues; standard related issues; and, organizational/structural related issues. The three major themes concerning barriers to implementing the Peer Support Specialist role were: human resource related issues; organizational/structural related issues; and, standard related issues. Conclusions The reasons for low compliance of ACT programs with community

  7. THE SEPARATION OF URANIUM ISOTOPES BY GASEOUS DIFFUSION: A LINEAR PROGRAMMING MODEL,

    Science.gov (United States)

    URANIUM, ISOTOPE SEPARATION), (*GASEOUS DIFFUSION SEPARATION, LINEAR PROGRAMMING ), (* LINEAR PROGRAMMING , GASEOUS DIFFUSION SEPARATION), MATHEMATICAL MODELS, GAS FLOW, NUCLEAR REACTORS, OPERATIONS RESEARCH

  8. Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Dandan [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Hong, Tianzhen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yan, Da [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Wang, Chuang [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China)

    2012-06-01

    This technical report presented the methodologies, processes, and results of comparing three Building Energy Modeling Programs (BEMPs) for load calculations: EnergyPlus, DeST and DOE-2.1E. This joint effort, between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA and Tsinghua University, China, was part of research projects under the US-China Clean Energy Research Center on Building Energy Efficiency (CERC-BEE). Energy Foundation, an industrial partner of CERC-BEE, was the co-sponsor of this study work. It is widely known that large discrepancies in simulation results can exist between different BEMPs. The result is a lack of confidence in building simulation amongst many users and stakeholders. In the fields of building energy code development and energy labeling programs where building simulation plays a key role, there are also confusing and misleading claims that some BEMPs are better than others. In order to address these problems, it is essential to identify and understand differences between widely-used BEMPs, and the impact of these differences on load simulation results, by detailed comparisons of these BEMPs from source code to results. The primary goal of this work was to research methods and processes that would allow a thorough scientific comparison of the BEMPs. The secondary goal was to provide a list of strengths and weaknesses for each BEMP, based on in-depth understandings of their modeling capabilities, mathematical algorithms, advantages and limitations. This is to guide the use of BEMPs in the design and retrofit of buildings, especially to support China’s building energy standard development and energy labeling program. The research findings could also serve as a good reference to improve the modeling capabilities and applications of the three BEMPs. The methodologies, processes, and analyses employed in the comparison work could also be used to compare other programs. The load calculation method of each program was analyzed and compared to

  9. On the Feasibility of a Unified Modelling and Programming Paradigm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxthausen, Anne Elisabeth; Peleska, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the feasibility of a unified modelling and programming paradigm is discussed from the perspective of large scale system development and verification in collaborative development environments. We motivate the necessity to utilise multiple formalisms for development and verification......, in particular for complex cyber-physical systems or systems of systems. Though modelling, programming, and verification will certainly become more closely integrated in the future, we do not expect a single formalism to become universally applicable and accepted by the development and verification communities....... It is illustrated by means of a case study from the railway domain, how this can be achieved, using concepts from the theory of institutions. This also enables the utilisation of verification tools in different formalisms, despite the fact that these tools are usually developed for one specific formal method....

  10. Summary of multi-core hardware and programming model investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Levenhagen, Michael J.

    2008-05-01

    This report summarizes our investigations into multi-core processors and programming models for parallel scientific applications. The motivation for this study was to better understand the landscape of multi-core hardware, future trends, and the implications on system software for capability supercomputers. The results of this study are being used as input into the design of a new open-source light-weight kernel operating system being targeted at future capability supercomputers made up of multi-core processors. A goal of this effort is to create an agile system that is able to adapt to and efficiently support whatever multi-core hardware and programming models gain acceptance by the community.

  11. EVALUASI PROGRAM PEMBELAJARAN IPA SMP MENGGUNAKAN MODEL COUNTENANCE STAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astin Lukum

    2015-06-01

    THE EVALUATION OF SCIENCE TEACHING ON JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL USING STAKE’S COUNTENANCE MODEL Abstract The purpose of the study was to describe the science learning program on junior high school in Bone Bolanga district based on the Regulation of Minister of Education and Culture of the Republic of Indonesia, Number 65 of 2013 about Processing Standard of Primary and Secondary Education. This study used Stake’s Countanance evaluation model. The data were collected using observation, interview and documentation techniques. The conclusion was: (1 the planning of science learning was categorized fair (68%, it was found that lesson plan was not in accordance with the learning processing standard. (2 The implementation of science learning was categorized fair (57%, that unconformitted with learning processing implementation standard. (3 Student learning outcomes have not met the completeness of minimum criteria (KKM that categorized enough (65% and (4 There were the contingency of planing learning proces and outcome. Keywords: Program Evaluation, Stake's Countenance, Science Learning

  12. A Hybrid Program Projects Selection Model for Nonprofit TV Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuei-Lun Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study develops a hybrid multiple criteria decision making (MCDM model to select program projects for nonprofit TV stations on the basis of managers’ perceptions. By the concept of balanced scorecard (BSC and corporate social responsibility (CSR, we collect criteria for selecting the best program project. Fuzzy Delphi method, which can lead to better criteria selection, is used to modify criteria. Next, considering the interdependence among the selection criteria, analytic network process (ANP is then used to obtain the weights of them. To avoid calculation and additional pairwise comparisons of ANP, technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS is used to rank the alternatives. A case study is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model.

  13. Final Report: Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellor-Crummey, John [William Marsh Rice University

    2011-09-13

    As part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing, Rice University collaborated with project partners in the design, development and deployment of language, compiler, and runtime support for parallel programming models to support application development for the “leadership-class” computer systems at DOE national laboratories. Work over the course of this project has focused on the design, implementation, and evaluation of a second-generation version of Coarray Fortran. Research and development efforts of the project have focused on the CAF 2.0 language, compiler, runtime system, and supporting infrastructure. This has involved working with the teams that provide infrastructure for CAF that we rely on, implementing new language and runtime features, producing an open source compiler that enabled us to evaluate our ideas, and evaluating our design and implementation through the use of benchmarks. The report details the research, development, findings, and conclusions from this work.

  14. Using Runtime Analysis to Guide Model Checking of Java Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelund, Klaus; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes how two runtime analysis algorithms, an existing data race detection algorithm and a new deadlock detection algorithm, have been implemented to analyze Java programs. Runtime analysis is based on the idea of executing the program once. and observing the generated run to extract various kinds of information. This information can then be used to predict whether other different runs may violate some properties of interest, in addition of course to demonstrate whether the generated run itself violates such properties. These runtime analyses can be performed stand-alone to generate a set of warnings. It is furthermore demonstrated how these warnings can be used to guide a model checker, thereby reducing the search space. The described techniques have been implemented in the b e grown Java model checker called PathFinder.

  15. From Safety Critical Java Programs to Timed Process Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bent; Luckow, Kasper Søe; Thomsen, Lone Leth

    2015-01-01

    built and the tools have been used to analyse a number of systems for properties such as worst case execution time, schedulability and energy optimization [12–14,19,34,36,38]. In this paper we will elaborate on the theoretical underpinning of the translation from Java programs to timed automata models...... frameworks, we have in recent years pursued an agenda of translating hard-real-time embedded safety critical programs written in the Safety Critical Java Profile [33] into networks of timed automata [4] and subjecting those to automated analysis using the UPPAAL model checker [10]. Several tools have been...... and briefly summarize some of the results based on this translation. Furthermore, we discuss future work, especially relations to the work in [16,24] as Java recently has adopted first class higher order functions in the form of lambda abstractions....

  16. Unifying Model-Based and Reactive Programming within a Model-Based Executive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian C.; Gupta, Vineet; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Real-time, model-based, deduction has recently emerged as a vital component in AI's tool box for developing highly autonomous reactive systems. Yet one of the current hurdles towards developing model-based reactive systems is the number of methods simultaneously employed, and their corresponding melange of programming and modeling languages. This paper offers an important step towards unification. We introduce RMPL, a rich modeling language that combines probabilistic, constraint-based modeling with reactive programming constructs, while offering a simple semantics in terms of hidden state Markov processes. We introduce probabilistic, hierarchical constraint automata (PHCA), which allow Markov processes to be expressed in a compact representation that preserves the modularity of RMPL programs. Finally, a model-based executive, called Reactive Burton is described that exploits this compact encoding to perform efficIent simulation, belief state update and control sequence generation.

  17. Using the theory of planned behavior to examine pharmacists' intention to utilize a prescription drug monitoring program database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Marc L; Barner, Jamie C; Brown, Carolyn M; Shepherd, Marvin D; Strassels, Scott; Novak, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) are state-operated electronic databases that contain patients' controlled drug histories. Most states provide these data to pharmacists via online web portals to combat prescription drug abuse and diversion. The objectives of this study were to: 1) explore the theory of planned behavior's (TPB) utility in predicting Texas pharmacists' intention to utilize an online accessible PDMP; 2) to determine the contribution of each construct, attitude (A), subjective norm (SN) and perceived behavioral control (PBC) in predicting pharmacists' intention; and 3) test whether the addition of perceived obligation (PO) is significantly related to pharmacists' intention. A cross-sectional, 36-item questionnaire was developed from focus groups and literature of pharmacists' views regarding prescription drug abuse. A total of 998 practicing Texas community pharmacists were surveyed to collect data on their intention to utilize a PDMP database. Descriptive statistics, multivariate and hierarchical logistic regression analyses were used to address the study objectives. The response rate was 26.2% (261/998). TPB constructs were significant predictors of pharmacists' high intention to utilize the PDMP. Pharmacists with positive attitudes were almost twice as likely to have high intention (odds ratio [OR] = 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2-2.8). SN was the strongest predictor of pharmacists' high intention (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.4-3.3). Pharmacists with high PBC were also twice as likely to have high intention (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.2-3.0). Additionally, pharmacists' PO contributed to the prediction of high intention (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.0-3.1) above that explained by the TPB model constructs (X(2) = 4.14, P intention to utilize a PDMP database. Interventions that address pharmacists' A, SN, PBC, and PO may be valuable to increase pharmacists' high intention. Pharmacists' utilization of PDMPs may lead to a decrease in the morbidity and

  18. Optimizing Marine Corps Personnel Assignments Using an Integer Programming Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    would assist the Monitors in the assignment process. Though these studies contain very thorough analyses, they differ from the approach taken in this...thesis in that they do not look into using a low cost, yet very efficient, decision modeling approach of integer programming as a method of...2012 BAH Rates-with Dependents. Defense Travel Mangement Office. (2011, December). 2012 BAH Rates-without Dependents. M ileage C ost 1 Per D iem

  19. Examining Equity Sensitivity: An Investigation Using the Big Five and HEXACO Models of Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayden J. R. Woodley

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The construct of equity sensitivity describes an individual’s preference about his/her desired input to outcome ratio. Individuals high on equity sensitivity tend to be more input oriented, and are often called Benevolents. Individuals low on equity sensitivity are more outcome oriented, and are described as Entitleds. Given that equity sensitivity has often been described as a trait, the purpose of the present study was to examine major personality correlates of equity sensitivity, so as to inform both the nature of equity sensitivity, and the potential processes through which certain broad personality traits may relate to outcomes. We examined the personality correlates of equity sensitivity across three studies (total N = 1170, two personality models (i.e., the Big Five and HEXACO, the two most common measures of equity sensitivity (i.e., the Equity Preference Questionnaire and Equity Sensitivity Inventory, and using both self and peer reports of personality (in Study 3. Although results varied somewhat across samples, the personality variables of Conscientiousness and Honesty-Humility, followed by Agreeableness, were the most robust predictors of equity sensitivity. Individuals higher on these traits were more likely to be Benevolents, whereas those lower on these traits were more likely to be Entitleds. Although some associations between Extraversion, Openness, and Neuroticism and equity sensitivity were observed, these were generally not robust. Overall, it appears that there are several prominent personality variables underlying equity sensitivity, and that the addition of the HEXACO model’s dimension of Honesty-Humility substantially contributes to our understanding of equity sensitivity.

  20. Psychological diagnostics in the talent development program of the German Soccer Association: A stepwise procedure to examine the relevance of personality characteristics in talented soccer players

    OpenAIRE

    Feichtinger, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Sport psychological training and coaching has become increasingly relevant in the context of youth promotion programs in soccer. Likewise, numerous sport psychologists are integrated into support frameworks at clubs and associations. Scientifically sound diagnostics of personality characteristics can be regarded as an important foundation for the optimization of such sport psychological work. The present dissertation examined the relevance of psychological personality characteristics in talen...