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Sample records for model processed cheese

  1. How cheese is processed

    Science.gov (United States)

    This column continues the theme of "How Is It Processed?" with a focus on cheese. A fun fact is that it takes 10 pounds of milk to make one pound of cheese. Production of cheese is described in this column, as well as the effects of processing on the final properties of this popular food....

  2. Time-Delay Artificial Neural Network Computing Models for Predicting Shelf Life of Processed Cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Sumit Goyal; Gyanendra Kumar Goyal

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the capability of Time–delay artificial neural network models for predicting shelf life of processed cheese. Datasets were divided into two subsets (30 for training and 6 for validation). Models with single and multi layers were developed and compared with each other. Mean Square Error, Root Mean Square Error, Coefficient of Determination and Nash -
    Sutcliffo Coefficient were used as performance evaluators, Time- delay model predicted the shelf life of...

  3. The Effect of Sterilization on Size and Shape of Fat Globules in Model Processed Cheese Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Tremlová

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Model cheese samples from 4 independent productions were heat sterilized (117 °C, 20 minutes after the melting process and packing with an aim to prolong their durability. The objective of the study was to assess changes in the size and shape of fat globules due to heat sterilization by using image analysis methods. The study included a selection of suitable methods of preparation mounts, taking microphotographs and making overlays for automatic processing of photographs by image analyser, ascertaining parameters to determine the size and shape of fat globules and statistical analysis of results obtained. The results of the experiment suggest that changes in shape of fat globules due to heat sterilization are not unequivocal. We found that the size of fat globules was significantly increased (p < 0.01 due to heat sterilization (117 °C, 20 min, and the shares of small fat globules (up to 500 μm2, or 100 μm2 in the samples of heat sterilized processed cheese were decreased. The results imply that the image analysis method is very useful when assessing the effect of technological process on the quality of processed cheese quality.

  4. Structure, Meltability, and Firmness of Process Cheese Containing White Cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Kalab, Miloslav; Modler, H. Wayne; Caric, Marijana; Milanovic, Spasenija

    1991-01-01

    White cheese made by coagulating heated milk (90"C) with a 2.5% citric acid solution to pH 5.5 consists of casein particles having a characteristic core-and-shell ultrastructure. The presence of this White cheese in process cheese can be detected by transmission electron microscopy on the basis of the core-and-shell ultrastructure which is stable during cheese processing. White cheese additions may be detected at levels equal to or higher than 8%. White cheese, which does not melt alone wh...

  5. Factors affecting variation of different measures of cheese yield and milk nutrient recovery from an individual model cheese-manufacturing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolat-Gotet, C; Cecchinato, A; De Marchi, M; Bittante, G

    2013-01-01

    Cheese yield (CY) is the most important technological trait of milk, because cheese-making uses a very high proportion of the milk produced worldwide. Few studies have been carried out at the level of individual milk-producing animals due to a scarcity of appropriate procedures for model-cheese production, the complexity of cheese-making, and the frequent use of the fat and protein (or casein) contents of milk as a proxy for cheese yield. Here, we report a high-throughput cheese manufacturing process that mimics all phases of cheese-making, uses 1.5-L samples of milk from individual animals, and allows the simultaneous processing of 15 samples per run. Milk samples were heated (35°C for 40 min), inoculated with starter culture (90 min), mixed with rennet (51.2 international milk-clotting units/L of milk), and recorded for gelation time. Curds were cut twice (10 and 15 min after gelation), separated from the whey, drained (for 30 min), pressed (3 times, 20 min each, with the wheel turned each time), salted in brine (for 60 min), weighed, and sampled. Whey was collected, weighed, and sampled. Milk, curd, and whey samples were analyzed for pH, total solids, fat content, and protein content, and energy content was estimated. Three measures of percentage cheese yield (%CY) were calculated: %CY(CURD), %CY(SOLIDS), and %CY(WATER), representing the ratios between the weight of fresh curd, the total solids of the curd, and the water content of the curd, respectively, and the weight of the milk processed. In addition, 3 measures of daily cheese yield (dCY, kg/d) were defined, considering the daily milk yield. Three measures of nutrient recovery (REC) were computed: REC(FAT), REC(PROTEIN), and REC(SOLIDS), which represented the ratio between the weights of the fat, protein, and total solids in the curd, respectively, and the corresponding components in the milk. Energy recovery, REC(ENERGY), represented the energy content of the cheese compared with that in the milk. This

  6. 21 CFR 133.169 - Pasteurized process cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pasteurized process cheese. 133.169 Section 133...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.169 Pasteurized process cheese. (a)(1) Pasteurized process cheese is...

  7. Proteolysis in soft cheese, studied on Meshanger cheese and cheese models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noomen, A.

    1978-01-01

    Enzymes predominantly responsible for the primary degradation of protein in soft cheese and for the related changes in consistency were studied. Reconstructed Noordhollandse Meshanger cheese and preserved simulated soft cheeses of different composition were used as models in the

  8. 21 CFR 133.171 - Pasteurized process pimento cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pasteurized process pimento cheese. 133.171... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.171 Pasteurized process pimento cheese. Pasteurized process...

  9. The quality of processed cheeses and cheese analogues the same brand domestic and foreign production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Bezeková

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Processed cheeses belong to Slovakia favorite dairy products. Processed cheeses are made from natural cheeses. In recent years the trend is to replace natural cheeses with other raw materials of non-dairy nature. The composition of the processed cheese analogues is not in many countries defined by legislation. The objective of this study was to determine and compare chemical properties (fat, dry matter, fat in dry matter, NaCl two samples of processed cheeses (C, D - Veselá krava and two samples cheese analogues (A, B - Kiri the same brand domestic and foreign production. The evaluated was taste of processed cheeses and cheese analogues, too. Chemical analysis and sensory analysis were repeated four times. The results of chemical analysis shows that all rated samples processed cheeses made on Slovakia fulfilled demands declared (dry matter and fat in dry matter as producers provided on the label. The most commonly fluctuate content of NaCl from 1 to 1.24 g.100g-1. The higher coefficient of variation in the determination of NaCl (3.88% was found in processed cheeses made in France. Processed cheese and cheese analogues made in France had not specified parameters for dry matter and fat in dry matter on the label. For production cheese analogues Kiri made in Slovakia was used different raw material than Kiri made in France. The taste of products was determined by descriptors - salty, slightly sweet, milky, buttery-creamy, fatty, sour, bitter, and unknown. The interesting that Kiri made in Slovakia had stronger milky and buttery-creamy taste than cheese analogue Kiri made in France. Significant differences were found in the slighty sweet taste of processed cheeses, the most points won processed cheese Veselá krava made in Slovakia.

  10. Protein substitution to produce a processed cheese with high ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hoida A.M. El-Shazly

    KEYWORDS. Processed cheese;. Branched chain amino acids;. Ras cheese;. Kariesh cheese;. Protein replacement;. Chemical and sensory analysis;. Liver;. Brain; ... Effect of 2.5%, 5% and 10% protein-replacement cheese formulas was evaluated among .... and Robbins [22] using HPLC equipment Wallac fluorometer.

  11. Characterization of a processed cheese spread produced from fresh cheese (quesito antioqueño

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edinson Eliecer Bejarano Toro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Processed products are made from mixes of fresh and ripened cheeses; the use of cheeses with a short shelf-life in the development of processed cheeses is an alternative for the dairy industry. A processed cheese spread was made using only a soft and fatty fresh cheese that had been stored for 25 days. The primary materials were the fresh cheese, water, and emulsifying salts (sodium citrate (E-331 and sodium phosphate (E-450, using a STEPHAN® Universal Machine (UMSK 24E with indirect vapor injection and equipped with rasping and cutting blades. The resulting cheese (A was compared with a commercial cheese (B for compositional, physicochemical, and sensorial characteristics. The cheeses were similar except for the fat in dry matter (FDM, with values of 54.50% and 47.21%, respectively. Sensorially, there were significant differences (P0.05. Cheese A provided, in mg per 100 g of product, 935.823 for phenylalanine, 1003.070 for isoleucine, 2041.420 for leucine, 475.337 for methionine, 119.300 for tryptophan, and 758.347 for valine. Producing processed cheeses with only fresh cheese is possible, resulting in a product that is similar to others that are currently on the market with typical characteristics that are accepted by consumers.

  12. Microstructure and textural and viscoelastic properties of model processed cheese with different dry matter and fat in dry matter content

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černíková, M.; Nebesářová, Jana; Salek, R. N.; Řiháčková, L.; Buňka, F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 6 (2017), s. 4300-4307 ISSN 0022-0302 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : processed cheese * texture * rheology * scanning electron microscopy Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment OBOR OECD: 2.11 Other engineering and technologies Impact factor: 2.474, year: 2016

  13. 7 CFR 58.737 - Pasteurized process cheese food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pasteurized process cheese food. 58.737 Section 58.737... Finished Products § 58.737 Pasteurized process cheese food. Shall conform to the provisions of the Definitions and Standards of Identity for Pasteurized Process Cheese Food and Related Products, Food and Drug...

  14. 7 CFR 58.736 - Pasteurized process cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pasteurized process cheese. 58.736 Section 58.736... Finished Products § 58.736 Pasteurized process cheese. Shall conform to the provisions of the Definitions and Standards of Identity for Pasteurized Process Cheese and Related Products, Food and Drug...

  15. Statistical Analysis of Industrial processed Cheese puffs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper studied and fit a Multivariate linear regression model to the relationship between the response variables; Weight and Bulk density on one hand, and the predictor variables; Temperature, Moisture content before extrusion and Moisture content after extrusion on the other hand, of Cheese puffs product, ...

  16. 21 CFR 133.173 - Pasteurized process cheese food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pasteurized process cheese food. 133.173 Section 133.173 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific...

  17. Artisanal Sonoran cheese (Cocido cheese): an exploration of its production process, chemical composition and microbiological quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas-González, Paúl F; Heredia-Castro, Priscilia Y; Méndez-Romero, José I; Hernández-Mendoza, Adrián; Reyes-Díaz, Ricardo; Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda; González-Córdova, Aarón F

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to explore and document the production process of artisanal Cocido cheese and to determine its chemical composition and microbiological quality, considering samples from six dairies and four retailers. Cocido cheese is a semi-hard (506-555 g kg -1 of moisture), medium fat (178.3-219.1 g kg -1 ), pasta filata-type cheese made from raw whole cow's milk. The production process is not standardized and therefore the chemical and microbiological components of the sampled cheeses varied. Indicator microorganisms significantly decreased (P cheese. Salmonella spp. were not found during the production process, and both Listeria monocytogenes and staphylococcal enterotoxin were absent in the final cheeses. This study provides more information on one of the most popular artisanal cheeses with high cultural value and economic impact in northwestern Mexico. In view of the foregoing, good manufacturing practices need to be implemented for the manufacture of Cocido cheese. Also, it is of utmost importance to make sure that the heat treatment applied for cooking the curd ensures a phosphatase-negative test, otherwise it would be necessary to pasteurize milk. Nevertheless, since Cocido cheese is a non-ripened, high-moisture product, it is a highly perishable product that could present a health risk if not properly handled. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Effect of lupine as cheese base substitution on technological and nutritional properties of processed cheese analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Rezik Azab; Salama, Wafaa Mohammed; Farahat, Azza Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Healthy foods have been met with marked success in the last two decades. Lupine flours, protein concentrates, and isolates can be applied as a substance for enriching different kinds of food systems such as bakery products, lupine pasta, ice cream, milk substitutes. Imitation processed cheese is made from mixtures of dairy and/or non dairy proteins and fat/oils and is variously labeled analogue, artificial, extruded, synthetic and/or filled. Processed cheese can be formulated using different types of cheese with different degree of maturation, flavorings, emulsifying, salts, and/or several ingredients of non-dairy components. Non-dairy ingredients have been used in processed cheese for many dietary and economic reasons. In this study, lupine paste was used to substitute 25, 50, 75 and 100% of cheese in base formula of processed cheese analogue (PCA). Matured Ras cheese (3 months old) was manufactured using fresh cow milk. Soft cheese curd was manufactured using fresh buffalo skim milk. Emulsifying salts S9s and Unsalted butter were used. Lupine termis paste was prepared by soaking the seeds in tap water for week with changing the water daily, and then boiled in water for 2 hrs, cooled and peeled. The peeled seeds were minced, blended to get very fine paste and kept frozen until used. Lupine paste was used to substitute 25, 50, 75 and 100% of cheese in base formula of processed cheese analogue (PCA). The obtained PCA were analysed when fresh and during storage up to 3 months at 5±2°C for chemical composition, physical and sensory properties. The histopathological effect of lupines on alloxan diabetic albino rats and nutritional parameters were also investigated. Incorporation of lupine paste in PCA increased the ash and protein contents while meltability and penetration values of resultant products were decreased. Adding lupine in PSA formula had relatively increased the oil index and firmness of products. Feeding rats a balanced diet containing processed cheese

  19. The formation of polycyclic hydrocarbons during smoking process of cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Akpinar-Bayizit

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The smoking process determines the characteristic flavour, odour, colour and texture of several cheese varieties. Some smoke compounds are known to have bacteriostatic and antioxidant effects, and may act as preservatives. Smoked cheese is appreciated by consumers due to its sensorial properties. However, with smoking process there is a risk of formation of toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. This review emphasises the occurrence of polycyclic hydrocarbons on smoked cheeses and their health impacts.

  20. Microflora of processed cheese and the factors affecting it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buňková, Leona; Buňka, František

    2017-07-24

    The basic raw materials for the production of processed cheese are natural cheese which is treated by heat with the addition of emulsifying salts. From a point of view of the melting temperatures used (and the pH-value of the product), the course of processed cheese production can be considered "pasteurisation of cheese." During the melting process, the majority of vegetative forms of microorganisms, including bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae, are inactivated. The melting temperatures are not sufficient to kill the endospores, which survive the process but are often weakened. From a microbiological point of view, the biggest contamination problem of processed cheese is caused by gram-positive spore-forming rod-shaped bacteria of the genera Bacillus, Geobacillus, and Clostridium. Other factors affecting the shelf-life and quality of processed cheese are mainly the microbiological quality of the raw materials used, strict hygienic conditions during the manufacturing process as well as the type of packaging materials and storage conditions. The quality of processed cheese is not only dependent on the ingredients used but also on other parameters such as the value of water activity of the processed cheese, its pH-value, the presence of salts and emulsifying salts and the amount of fat in the product.

  1. A high-throughput cheese manufacturing model for effective cheese starter screening.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bachmann, H.; Kruijswijk, Z.; Molenaar, D.; Kleerebezem, M.; van Hylckama Vlieg, J.E.T.

    2009-01-01

    Cheese making is a process in which enzymatic coagulation of milk is followed by protein separation, carbohydrate removal, and an extended bacterial fermentation. The number of variables in this complex process that influence cheese quality is so large that the developments of new manufacturing

  2. A high-throughput cheese manufacturing model for effective cheese starter culture screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bachmann, H.; Kruijswijk, Z.; Molenaar, D.; Kleerebezem, M.; Hylckama Vlieg, van J.E.T.

    2009-01-01

    Cheese making is a process in which enzymatic coagulation of milk is followed by protein separation, carbohydrate removal, and an extended bacterial fermentation. The number of variables in this complex process that influence cheese quality is so large that the developments of new manufacturing

  3. Development of volatile compounds in processed cheese during storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunesen, Lars Oddershede; Lund, Pia; Sørensen, J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this work teas to study tire impact of storage conditions, such as light and temperature, on the development of volatile compounds to processed cheese. Cheese in glass containers was stored at 5, 20 or 37 degreesC in light or darkness for up to 1 yr. Dynamic headspace and gas...

  4. Use of Experimental Design for Peuhl Cheese Process Optimization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work points out the use of experimental design for peulh cheese making process optimisation. Peulh cheese, a milk coagulum, well-known in certain West African countries (e.g. Benin), is unfortunately ill-known in Côte d'Ivoire (Ivory Coast). However, it could be a transformation way of milk. This work consisting in use ...

  5. Characterization of energy use and performance of global cheese processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Tengfang; Flapper, Joris; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2009-01-01

    The global cheese-making industry processes approximately one quarter of total raw milk production to create a variety of consumer cheeses, and cheese processing can be very energy-intensive. Characterizing energy usage in existing cheese markets and plants can provide baseline information to allow comparisons of energy performance of individual plants and systems. In this paper, we analyzed energy data compiled through extensive literature reviews on cheese-making across various countries and regions. The study has found that the magnitudes of average final energy intensity exhibited significant variations, ranging from 4.9 to 8.9 MJ per kg cheese across a few countries. In addition, the final energy intensity of individual plants exhibited even more significant variations, ranging from 1.8 to 68.2 MJ per kg of cheese from the countries in this study. These significant differences have indicated large potential energy savings' opportunities in the sector. The paper also indicates that there are positive association between implementation of energy measures and the decreasing trends of specific energy consumption over time, and suggests that developing and promulgating an energy-benchmarking framework including a process step approach and efficiency measures should be recommended for evaluating energy performance and improving energy efficiency in cheese-making industry.

  6. Application of low intensity ultrasonics to cheese manufacturing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedito, J; Carcel, J A; Gonzalez, R; Mulet, A

    2002-05-01

    Ultrasound has been used to non-destructively assess the quality of many foods such as meat, fish, vegetables and dairy products. This paper addresses the applications of low intensity ultrasonics in the cheese manufacturing processes and highlights the areas where ultrasonics could be successfully implemented in the future. The decrease of ultrasonic attenuation during the renneting process can be used to determine the optimum cut time for cheese making. The ultrasonic velocity increases during maturation for those types of cheese that become harder during this manufacturing stage, thus being an indicator of the maturity degree. Moreover, ultrasonic measurements could be linked to sensory parameters. From the ultrasonic velocity measurements at two different temperatures, it is possible to assess cheese composition, thus allowing an improvement in the quality and uniformity of cheese commercialization. In addition, in pulse-echo mode it is possible to detect cracked pieces due to abnormal fermentations and also to assess the distance of the crack from the surface.

  7. Process energy efficiency improvement in Wisconsin cheese plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehr, S.; Mitchell, J.; Reinemann, D.; Klein, S.; Reindl, D.

    1997-01-01

    Costs for the energy involved in cheese making has a major impact on profit. Although industrial cheese plants differ in size, production equipment, and the manner in which whey is processed, there are common elements in most plants. This paper evaluates several process integration opportunities at two representative cheese plants in Wisconsin. Pinch analysis is used to help assess the heat recovery potential for the major thermal processes in the plants. The potential of using packaged cheese as a thermal storage medium to allow electrical demand shifting in the cold storage warehouse is evaluated and shown to be feasible. Three major conservation measures are identified with a total cost savings of $130,000 to $160,000 annually

  8. Quantitative microbial risk assessment for Staphylococcus aureus in natural and processed cheese in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heeyoung; Kim, Kyunga; Choi, Kyoung-Hee; Yoon, Yohan

    2015-09-01

    This study quantitatively assessed the microbial risk of Staphylococcus aureus in cheese in Korea. The quantitative microbial risk assessment was carried out for natural and processed cheese from factory to consumption. Hazards for S. aureus in cheese were identified through the literature. For exposure assessment, the levels of S. aureus contamination in cheeses were evaluated, and the growth of S. aureus was predicted by predictive models at the surveyed temperatures, and at the time of cheese processing and distribution. For hazard characterization, a dose-response model for S. aureus was found, and the model was used to estimate the risk of illness. With these data, simulation models were prepared with @RISK (Palisade Corp., Ithaca, NY) to estimate the risk of illness per person per day in risk characterization. Staphylococcus aureus cell counts on cheese samples from factories and markets were below detection limits (0.30-0.45 log cfu/g), and pert distribution showed that the mean temperature at markets was 6.63°C. Exponential model [P=1 - exp(7.64×10(-8) × N), where N=dose] for dose-response was deemed appropriate for hazard characterization. Mean temperature of home storage was 4.02°C (log-logistic distribution). The results of risk characterization for S. aureus in natural and processed cheese showed that the mean values for the probability of illness per person per day were higher in processed cheese (mean: 2.24×10(-9); maximum: 7.97×10(-6)) than in natural cheese (mean: 7.84×10(-10); maximum: 2.32×10(-6)). These results indicate that the risk of S. aureus-related foodborne illness due to cheese consumption can be considered low under the present conditions in Korea. In addition, the developed stochastic risk assessment model in this study can be useful in establishing microbial criteria for S. aureus in cheese. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Vivi Raundahl; Lucey, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    The initial step in the manufacture of most cheese varieties involves enzymatic hydrolysis of one of the milk proteins, κ-casein. The enzyme involved is called rennet. During the primary stage, κ-casein is cleaved by rennet at the Phe105–Met106 bond, resulting in a reduction in both the net...

  10. 40 CFR 405.60 - Applicability; description of the natural and processed cheese subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... natural and processed cheese subcategory. 405.60 Section 405.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Natural and Processed Cheese Subcategory § 405.60 Applicability; description of the natural and processed cheese subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the...

  11. Fate of Lactococcus lactis starter cultures during late ripening in cheese models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggirello, Marianna; Cocolin, Luca; Dolci, Paola

    2016-10-01

    The presence of Lactococcus lactis, commonly employed as starter culture, was, recently, highlighted and investigated during late cheese ripening. Thus, the main goal of the present study was to assess the persistence and viability of this microorganism throughout manufacturing and ripening of model cheeses. Eight commercial starters, constituted of L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris, were inoculated in pasteurized milk in order to manufacture miniature cheeses, ripened for six months. Samples were analysed at different steps (milk after inoculum, curd after cutting, curd after pressing and draining, cheese immediately after salting and cheese at 7, 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 days of ripening) and submitted to both culture-dependent (traditional plating on M17) and -independent analysis (reverse transcription-quantitative PCR). On the basis of direct RNA analysis, L. lactis populations were detected in all miniature cheeses up to the sixth month of ripening, confirming the presence of viable cells during the whole ripening process, including late stages. Noteworthy, L. lactis was detected by RT-qPCR in cheese samples also when traditional plating failed to indicate its presence. This discrepancy could be explain with the fact that lactococci, during ripening process, enter in a stressed physiological state (viable not culturable, VNC), which might cause their inability to grow on synthetic medium despite their viability in cheese matrix. Preliminary results obtained by "resuscitation" assays corroborated this hypothesis and 2.5% glucose enrichment was effective to recover L. lactis cells in VNC state. The capability of L. lactis to persist in late ripening, and the presence of VNC cells which are known to shift their catabolism to peptides and amino acids consumption, suggests a possible technological role of this microorganism in cheese ripening with a possible impact on flavour formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  12. Processes that contribute to radiocesium decontamination of feta cheese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappas, C.P.; Assimakopoulos, P.A.; Ioannides, K.G.; Pakou, A.A.; Mantzios, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    In a series of experiments, the transfer of radiocesium from ovine milk to feta cheese was investigated through modifications of the standard cheese making procedure. All variations explored showed no significant change in the percentage of radiocesium transfer and the milk-to-cheese transfer coefficient was determined as f=.79 plus/minus .04 L.kg-1. It is concluded that cesium, like the rest of the alkali metals, remains in the water phase and thus follows very closely the distribution of moisture into the products of cheese making. The possibility of radiocesium decontamination of mature feta during the customary storage of the product in brine was also explored in a second series of experiments. The theoretical model employed in the analysis of cesium transport from feta to brine is presented in the Appendix to this paper. Predictions of the model were validated by experiments. A procedure is thus proposed for decontaminating mature feta during storage through successive replacements of the storage medium. Nomograms are presented for the determination of the optimum time interval between changes of the brine and the radiocesium concentration remaining in the feta. Changes in the properties of the product induced by the proposed treatment were also investigated with respect to composition, taste, and overall quality

  13. Modeling structure-sensory texture relations in semi-hard cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, T. J. Timo; Schreurs, P. J. G. Piet; Luyten, J. M. J. G. Hannemieke; Meijer, H. E. H. Han

    2015-01-01

    Product and process design in the food industry often still remains a very empirical activity. This will not lead to leap changes in product functionality or composition. We aim at developing quantitative models which relate the microstructure of semi-hard cheese to sensory texture. With these models we want to design more resource efficient process routes and healthier options for full fat semi-hard cheese. In this paper the role of multi-scale simulations using a Finite Element Method in developing these models will be discussed.

  14. Microstructure of cheese: Processing, technological and microbiological considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Cláudia I.; Gomes, Ana M. P.; Malcata, F. Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Cheese is a classical dairy product, which is strongly judged by its appearance and texture; hence, a renewed interest in its microstructure has been on the rise, as sophisticated techniques of analysis become more and more informative and widely available. Processing parameters that affect microstructure play a dominant role upon the features exhibited by the final product as perceived by the consumer; rational relationships between microstructure (which includes biochem...

  15. Dynamics of bacterial communities during the ripening process of different Croatian cheese types derived from raw ewe's milk cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuka, Mirna Mrkonjić; Wallisch, Stefanie; Engel, Marion; Welzl, Gerhard; Havranek, Jasmina; Schloter, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communities play an important role in cheese ripening and determine the flavor and taste of different cheese types to a large extent. However, under adverse conditions human pathogens may colonize cheese samples during ripening and may thus cause severe outbreaks of diarrhoea and other diseases. Therefore in the present study we investigated the bacterial community structure of three raw ewe's milk cheese types, which are produced without the application of starter cultures during ripening from two production sites based on fingerprinting in combination with next generation sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Overall a surprisingly high diversity was found in the analyzed samples and overall up to 213 OTU97 could be assigned. 20 of the major OTUs were present in all samples and include mostly lactic acid bacteria (LAB), mainly Lactococcus, and Enterococcus species. Abundance and diversity of these genera differed to a large extent between the 3 investigated cheese types and in response to the ripening process. Also a large number of non LAB genera could be identified based on phylogenetic alignments including mainly Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcacae. Some species belonging to these two families could be clearly assigned to species which are known as potential human pathogens like Staphylococcus saprophyticus or Salmonella spp. However, during cheese ripening their abundance was reduced. The bacterial genera, namely Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Leuconostoc, Bifidobacterium, Brevibacterium, Corynebacterium, Clostridium, Staphylococcus, Thermoanerobacterium, E. coli, Hafnia, Pseudomonas, Janthinobacterium, Petrotoga, Kosmotoga, Megasphaera, Macrococcus, Mannheimia, Aerococcus, Vagococcus, Weissella and Pediococcus were identified at a relative low level and only in selected samples. Overall the microbial composition of the used milk and the management of the production units determined the bacterial community composition for all cheese types to a

  16. Dynamics of Bacterial Communities during the Ripening Process of Different Croatian Cheese Types Derived from Raw Ewe's Milk Cheeses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuka, Mirna Mrkonjić; Wallisch, Stefanie; Engel, Marion; Welzl, Gerhard; Havranek, Jasmina; Schloter, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communities play an important role in cheese ripening and determine the flavor and taste of different cheese types to a large extent. However, under adverse conditions human pathogens may colonize cheese samples during ripening and may thus cause severe outbreaks of diarrhoea and other diseases. Therefore in the present study we investigated the bacterial community structure of three raw ewe's milk cheese types, which are produced without the application of starter cultures during ripening from two production sites based on fingerprinting in combination with next generation sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Overall a surprisingly high diversity was found in the analyzed samples and overall up to 213 OTU97 could be assigned. 20 of the major OTUs were present in all samples and include mostly lactic acid bacteria (LAB), mainly Lactococcus, and Enterococcus species. Abundance and diversity of these genera differed to a large extent between the 3 investigated cheese types and in response to the ripening process. Also a large number of non LAB genera could be identified based on phylogenetic alignments including mainly Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcacae. Some species belonging to these two families could be clearly assigned to species which are known as potential human pathogens like Staphylococcus saprophyticus or Salmonella spp. However, during cheese ripening their abundance was reduced. The bacterial genera, namely Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Leuconostoc, Bifidobacterium, Brevibacterium, Corynebacterium, Clostridium, Staphylococcus, Thermoanerobacterium, E. coli, Hafnia, Pseudomonas, Janthinobacterium, Petrotoga, Kosmotoga, Megasphaera, Macrococcus, Mannheimia, Aerococcus, Vagococcus, Weissella and Pediococcus were identified at a relative low level and only in selected samples. Overall the microbial composition of the used milk and the management of the production units determined the bacterial community composition for all cheese types to a

  17. Dynamics of bacterial communities during the ripening process of different Croatian cheese types derived from raw ewe's milk cheeses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Mrkonjić Fuka

    Full Text Available Microbial communities play an important role in cheese ripening and determine the flavor and taste of different cheese types to a large extent. However, under adverse conditions human pathogens may colonize cheese samples during ripening and may thus cause severe outbreaks of diarrhoea and other diseases. Therefore in the present study we investigated the bacterial community structure of three raw ewe's milk cheese types, which are produced without the application of starter cultures during ripening from two production sites based on fingerprinting in combination with next generation sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Overall a surprisingly high diversity was found in the analyzed samples and overall up to 213 OTU97 could be assigned. 20 of the major OTUs were present in all samples and include mostly lactic acid bacteria (LAB, mainly Lactococcus, and Enterococcus species. Abundance and diversity of these genera differed to a large extent between the 3 investigated cheese types and in response to the ripening process. Also a large number of non LAB genera could be identified based on phylogenetic alignments including mainly Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcacae. Some species belonging to these two families could be clearly assigned to species which are known as potential human pathogens like Staphylococcus saprophyticus or Salmonella spp. However, during cheese ripening their abundance was reduced. The bacterial genera, namely Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Leuconostoc, Bifidobacterium, Brevibacterium, Corynebacterium, Clostridium, Staphylococcus, Thermoanerobacterium, E. coli, Hafnia, Pseudomonas, Janthinobacterium, Petrotoga, Kosmotoga, Megasphaera, Macrococcus, Mannheimia, Aerococcus, Vagococcus, Weissella and Pediococcus were identified at a relative low level and only in selected samples. Overall the microbial composition of the used milk and the management of the production units determined the bacterial community composition for all

  18. Monitoring the ripening process of Cheddar cheese based on hydrophilic component profiling using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, H; Sakai, Y; Koishihara, H; Abe, F; Bamba, T; Fukusaki, E

    2013-01-01

    We proposed an application methodology that combines metabolic profiling with multiple appropriate multivariate analyses and verified it on the industrial scale of the ripening process of Cheddar cheese to make practical use of hydrophilic low-molecular-weight compound profiling using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to design optimal conditions and quality monitoring of the cheese ripening process. Principal components analysis provided an overview of the effect of sodium chloride content and kind of lactic acid bacteria starter on the metabolic profile in the ripening process of Cheddar cheese and orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis unveiled the difference in characteristic metabolites. When the sodium chloride contents were different (1.6 and 0.2%) but the same lactic acid bacteria starter was used, the 2 cheeses were classified by orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis from their metabolic profiles, but were not given perfect discrimination. Not much difference existed in the metabolic profile between the 2 cheeses. Compounds including lactose, galactose, lactic acid, 4-aminobutyric acid, and phosphate were identified as contents that differed between the 2 cheeses. On the other hand, in the case of the same salt content of 1.6%, but different kinds of lactic acid bacteria starter, an excellent distinctive discrimination model was obtained, which showed that the difference of lactic acid bacteria starter caused an obvious difference in metabolic profiles. Compounds including lactic acid, lactose, urea, 4-aminobutyric acid, galactose, phosphate, proline, isoleucine, glycine, alanine, lysine, leucine, valine, and pyroglutamic acid were identified as contents that differed between the 2 cheeses. Then, a good sensory prediction model for "rich flavor," which was defined as "thick and rich, including umami taste and soy sauce-like flavor," was constructed based on the metabolic profile during ripening using partial least

  19. Changes in isoflavones concentrations in cheese during processing and ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Křížová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine possible changes in isoflavones concentration in cheese made from either control or isoflavone-enriched milk during manufacturing and ripening. The experiment was carried out on four high-yielding lactating Holstein cows that were divided into two groups with similar mean milk yield. The control group of cows was fed a diet based on extruded rapeseed cake (C while the experimental group of animals was fed a diet based on extruded full-fat soya (S. The experiment was carried out in the form of a cross-over design and was divided into 2 periods of 14 days (a 10-d preliminary period and a 4-d experimental period. Cows were fed individually twice daily ad libitum the diet based on maize silage, lucerne hay and supplemental mixture. In each period 20 kg of morning milk was collected from each group for cheese processing. After pasteurisation (65 °C, 30 min. a total of 5 kg of milk from each sample in each period was weighed out to make cheese with a low-heated curd. Cheeses were salted in 20% solution of NaCl for 3.5 h and allowed to ripen for 90 days at 15 °C. During technological processing samples were taken to determine isoflavones content. Data concerning the nutrients intake, milk yield and concentration of isoflavones were analysed by means of multifactor analysis of variance using the GLM procedure of the Statgraphics 7.0 package. Average daily isoflavones intake in S (1284.7 mg/d was higher than in C (2.9 mg/d, P < 0.001. Milk yield expressed in 4% FCM did not differ significantly between groups (P > 0.05. Concentration of daidzein, genistein and glycitein in pasteurised full fat milk was similar in both groups. Milk from S group had higher concentration of equol (26.7 µg/L in comparison to C group (4.0 µg/L. After processing cheese in C contained 32.1 µg/kg daidzein and 5.6 µg/kg of equol while cheese in S contained 17.5 µg/kg of daidzein and 24.3 µg/kg of equol. During a 90-day ripening

  20. Preparation of fresh cheese from caprine milk as a model for the reduction of allergenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomotake, Hiroyuki; Katagiri, Mitsuaki; Fujita, Masaru; Yamato, Masayuki

    2009-06-01

    Fresh cheese was prepared from caprine milk by isoelectric precipitation as a model experiment for reducing the allergenicity of milk. After acidic precipitation of casein, the beta-lactoglobulin content in curd was determined by ELISA using monoclonal antibody (MAb-beta209). The beta-lactoglobulin content was very high in the fresh cheese obtained from heat-treated (85 degrees C) bovine or caprine milk, while that obtained from untreated milk contained none of this protein. Taking it into account that caprine milk has only a small amount of alpha(s1)-casein, one of the major bovine milk allergens, the caprine fresh cheese sterilized after processing by precipitation may be useful as a protein source of low allergenicity.

  1. Evaluation of microbial hazards during creamy cream cheese processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Żukowska

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work was to identify the potential microbial hazards that may occur during the manufacturing process of creamy cream cheese, and to present the means of their elimination or minimization. The analysis demonstrated that among the most crucial stages that should be particularly monitored are: the quality of raw materials, the control of pasteurization and souring parameters as well as temperature of product packaging, ensuring proper storage conditions of the finished product and hygiene throughout the production. Of these, the most critical step in the entire process (critical control points - CCP is a heat treatment process which is pasteurization. On the basis of the analysis, it can be concluded that the monitoring of such a process and consistent adherence to Operational Pre-Condition Pro-grams at the thermisation and centrifuging and later packaging, can help guarantee a safe product and its long shelf life.

  2. Effect of vacuum-condensed or ultrafiltered milk on pasteurized process cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, M R; Mistry, V V

    2005-09-01

    Milk was concentrated by ultrafiltration (UF) or vacuum condensing (CM) and milks with 2 levels of protein: 4.5% (UF1 and CM1) and 6.0% (UF2 and CM2) for concentrates and a control with 3.2% protein were used for manufacturing 6 replicates of Cheddar cheese. For manufacturing pasteurized process cheese, a 1:1 blend of shredded 18- and 30-wk Cheddar cheese, butter oil, and disodium phosphate (3%) was heated and pasteurized at 74 degrees C for 2 min with direct steam injection. The moisture content of the resulting process cheeses was 39.4 (control), 39.3 (UF1), 39.4 (UF2), 39.4 (CM1), and 40.2% (CM2). Fat and protein contents were influenced by level and method of concentration of cheese milk. Fat content was the highest in control (35.0%) and the lowest in UF2 (31.6%), whereas protein content was the lowest in control (19.6%) and the highest in UF2 (22.46%). Ash content increased with increase in level of concentration of cheese milk with no effect of method of concentration. Meltability of process cheeses decreased with increase in level of concentration and was higher in control than in the cheeses made with concentrated milk. Hardness was highest in UF cheeses (8.45 and 9.90 kg for UF1 and UF2) followed by CM cheeses (6.27 and 9.13 kg, for CM1 and CM2) and controls (3.94 kg). Apparent viscosity of molten cheese at 80 degrees C was higher in the 6.0% protein treatments (1043 and 1208 cp, UF2 and CM2) than in 4.5% protein treatments (855 and 867 cp, UF1 and CM1) and in control (557 cp). Free oil in process cheeses was influenced by both level and method of concentration with control (14.3%) being the lowest and CM2 (18.9%) the highest. Overall flavor, body and texture, and acceptability were higher for process cheeses made with the concentrates compared with control. This study demonstrated that the application of concentrated milks (UF or CM) for Cheddar cheese making has an impact on pasteurized process cheese characteristics.

  3. THE STUDY OF FISH SUPPLEMENT AND BUTTERFAT SUBSTITUTE EFFECT ON EXPIRY DATE OF PROCESSED CHEESE PRODUCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NATALIYA LOTYSH

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The sector of functional products has top-priority meaning – it is the most convenient and natural form of introduction and enrichment of the human organism with vitamins, mineral substances, microelements and other components. Attraction into the branch of raw materials of non-milk origin – fish supplements and substitutes of butterfat – served the basis of technology development of processed cheese products of combined content, which in accordance with acting terminology are called processed cheese products. The technology of processed cheese products allows easily regulating their content by introduction of corresponding supplement that facilitates obtainment of product with set properties and content. Inclusion of meat and fish as the raw materials in the processed cheese content results in enrichment of the product with macro- and microelements, unsaturated fatty acids, except for regulation of fatty acid content of cheese products is executed by substitution of butterfat by butterfat substitute.

  4. Development of technology for production of reduced fat processed cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Torres Silva e Alves

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An increasing share of foods with reduced fat has been observed in the diet of the Brazilian population, a trend also seen in many other countries. In this context, our-aim was to study the manufacturing parameters and to develop a process to produce a spreadable processed cheese (requeijão cremoso with reduced fat content. In the first stage of this study, modifications were performed in the traditional manufacturing process of requeijão cremoso with regular fat content to produce a reduced fat product. During the second stage of this study, two reduced fat cheeses, with and withoutthe addition of whey protein concentrate (WPC were developed, both using JOHA S9 and JOHA PZ as emulsifying salts, resulting in four different formulations. The amounts of cream and water used in both products were calculated in order to obtain a final product with 10% fat and 33% total solids. The product which presented the best results was produced with curd obtained by direct acidification of skimmed milk heated at 68-70 ºC, using 1,3% emulsifying salt JOHA S9 in the melting process and 2% WPC 34% as a partial fat substitute, both calculated as a percentage of the amountof curd used as raw material. It was also important to add WPC 34% to the product at the first cooking step of the process (70 ºC, in order to obtain a final product withthe typical spreadable texture of the traditional requeijão cremoso.

  5. From theory to practice: itinerary of Reasons’ Swiss Cheese Model

    OpenAIRE

    Larouzée, Justin; Guarnieri, Franck

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Since the early 1990s, the Swiss Cheese Model (SCM) of the English psychologist James Reason has established itself as a reference model in the etiology, investigation or prevention of organizational accidents in many productive systems (transportation, energy, healthcare …). Based on the observation that it’s still today widely used, this article intends to revert to the history and the theoretical background of the SCM. By doing so, the article focuses on the collabo...

  6. One approach in using multivariate statistical process control in analyzing cheese quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilija Djekic

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to investigate possibility of using multivariate statistical process control in analysing cheese quality parameters. Two cheese types (white brined cheeses and soft cheese from ultra-filtered milk were selected and analysed for several quality parameters such as dry matter, milk fat, protein contents, pH, NaCl, fat in dry matter and moisture in non-fat solids. The obtained results showed significant variations for most of the quality characteristics which were examined among the two types of cheese. The only stable parameter in both types of cheese was moisture in non-fat solids. All of the other cheese quality characteristics were characterized above or below control limits for most of the samples. Such results indicated a high instability and variations within cheese production. Although the use of statistical process control is not mandatory in the dairy industry, it might provide benefits to organizations in improving quality control of dairy products.

  7. Swiss-cheese models and the Dyer-Roeder approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Pierre

    2014-06-01

    In view of interpreting the cosmological observations precisely, especially when they involve narrow light beams, it is crucial to understand how light propagates in our statistically homogeneous, clumpy, Universe. Among the various approaches to tackle this issue, Swiss-cheese models propose an inhomogeneous spacetime geometry which is an exact solution of Einstein's equation, while the Dyer-Roeder approximation deals with inhomogeneity in an effective way. In this article, we demonstrate that the distance-redshift relation of a certain class of Swiss-cheese models is the same as the one predicted by the Dyer-Roeder approach, at a well-controlled level of approximation. Both methods are therefore equivalent when applied to the interpretation of, e.g., supernova obervations. The proof relies on completely analytical arguments, and is illustrated by numerical results.

  8. Optimal growth of Lactobacillus casei in a Cheddar cheese ripening model system requires exogenous fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, W S; Budinich, M F; Ward, R; Broadbent, J R; Steele, J L

    2012-04-01

    Flavor development in ripening Cheddar cheese depends on complex microbial and biochemical processes that are difficult to study in natural cheese. Thus, our group has developed Cheddar cheese extract (CCE) as a model system to study these processes. In previous work, we found that CCE supported growth of Lactobacillus casei, one of the most prominent nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) species found in ripening Cheddar cheese, to a final cell density of 10(8) cfu/mL at 37°C. However, when similar growth experiments were performed at 8°C in CCE derived from 4-mo-old cheese (4mCCE), the final cell densities obtained were only about 10(6) cfu/mL, which is at the lower end of the range of the NSLAB population expected in ripening Cheddar cheese. Here, we report that addition of Tween 80 to CCE resulted in a significant increase in the final cell density of L. casei during growth at 8°C and produced concomitant changes in cytoplasmic membrane fatty acid (CMFA) composition. Although the effect was not as dramatic, addition of milk fat or a monoacylglycerol (MAG) mixture based on the MAG profile of milk fat to 4mCCE also led to an increased final cell density of L. casei in CCE at 8°C and changes in CMFA composition. These observations suggest that optimal growth of L. casei in CCE at low temperature requires supplementation with a source of fatty acids (FA). We hypothesize that L. casei incorporates environmental FA into its CMFA, thereby reducing its energy requirement for growth. The exogenous FA may then be modified or supplemented with FA from de novo synthesis to arrive at a CMFA composition that yields the functionality (i.e., viscosity) required for growth in specific conditions. Additional studies utilizing the CCE model to investigate microbial contributions to cheese ripening should be conducted in CCE supplemented with 1% milk fat. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Foci of contamination of Listeria monocytogenes in different cheese processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, G; Magalhães, R; Carneiro, L; Santos, I; Silva, J; Ferreira, V; Hogg, T; Teixeira, P

    2013-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous bacterium widely distributed in the environment that can cause a severe disease in humans when contaminated foods are ingested. Cheese has been implicated in sporadic cases and in outbreaks of listeriosis worldwide. Environmental contamination, in several occasions by persistent strains, has been considered an important source of finished product contamination. The objectives of this research were to (i) evaluate the presence of L. monocytogenes within the factory environments and cheeses of three processing plants, artisanal producer of raw ewe's milk cheeses (APC), small-scale industrial cheese producer (SSI) and industrial cheese producer (ICP) each producing a distinct style of cheese, all with history of contamination by L. monocytogenes (ii) and identify possible sources of contamination using different typing methods (arsenic and cadmium susceptibility, geno-serotyping, PFGE). The presence of markers specific for 3 epidemic clones (ECI-ECIII) of L. monocytogenes was also investigated. Samples were collected from raw milk (n = 179), whey (n = 3), cheese brining solution (n = 7), cheese brine sludge (n = 505), finished product (n = 3016), and environment (n = 2560) during, at least, a four-year period. Listeria monocytogenes was detected in environmental, raw milk and cheese samples, respectively, at 15.4%, 1.1% and 13.6% in APC; at 8.9%, 2.9% and 3.4% in SSI; and at 0%, 21.1% and 0.2% in ICP. Typing of isolates revealed that raw ewe's milk and the dairy plant environment are important sources of contamination, and that some strains persisted for at least four years in the environment. Although cheeses produced in the three plants investigated were never associated with any case or outbreak of listeriosis, some L. monocytogenes belonging to specific PFGE types that caused disease (including putative epidemic clone strains isolated from final products) were found in this study. © 2013.

  10. Characterization and Application of Antilisterial Enterocins on Model Fresh Cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Susana C; Ross, R Paul; Stanton, Catherine; Silva, Célia C G

    2017-08-01

    Enterococcus faecalis strains isolated from an artisanal cheese were selected based on enterocin production against Listeria monocytogenes. The strains formed biofilms and presented high hydrophobic character and good autoaggregation and coaggregation capacity with L. monocytogenes. Strains L3A21M3 and L3B1K3 presented high survival under gastrointestinal conditions, were able to adhere to human intestinal cells (Caco-2 and HT-29), and blocked the adhesion and invasion of L. monocytogenes. The antilisterial activity of enterocins was not affected by pH (2 to 12), heating (100°C), and chemical and surfactant agents. However, strains L3A21M3 and L3A21M8 produced thermolabile enterocins, which were also sensible to extreme pH values. Enterocins exhibited a bacteriostatic mode of action against L. monocytogenes, and maximum production was observed during the stationary phase. Common enterocin structural genes were not detected by PCR amplification with specific primers, although an exhaustive screening was not performed. The enterocin produced by the L3B1K3 strain was purified and applied to model cheeses contaminated with L. monocytogenes. This enterocin reduced survival of L. monocytogenes on fresh cheeses in a dose-dependent manner. The highest dose tested (2,048 arbitrary units per g of cheese) was effective in reducing the pathogen counts to undetectable values throughout storage (6 to 72 h). These results suggest that these strains have great potential to be used as biopreservatives in the food industry and also as probiotics, with the potential to prevent L. monocytogenes gastrointestinal infection.

  11. Modeling the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in soft blue-white cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosshaug, Per Sand; Detmer, Ann; Ingmer, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a predictive model simulating growth over time of the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes in a soft blue-white cheese. The physicochemical properties in a matrix such as cheese are essential controlling factors influencing the growth of L. monocytogene...... production and retail conditions showed that the number of L. monocytogenes cells increases 3 to 3.5 log within the shelf life of the cheese....

  12. [Sanitary and technologic evaluation of the rural processing of fresh goat cheese in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, L; Sierra, C

    1988-12-01

    A sanitary and technological diagnosis of the goat cheese rural process was carried out. The purpose was to obtain more information for the planning of a program aimed to the improvement of this small agroindustry. Samples of milk, curdle, dry abomasum, rennet, water and cheese of 10% of the small industries of two rural villages in two agricultural seasons, were taken. Moreover, dilutions of the utensils and goat udders were prepared. The samples were subjected to microbiological analysis of mesophilic aerobic bacteria count, most probable number of total and fecal coliforms, and detection of Staphylococcus aureus coagulase (+), Salmonella typhi and Brucella melitensis. Proximate chemical analysis and determinations of sodium chloride and titratible acidity in milk, cheese, dry abomasum and rennet, were carried out. Goat milk was also subjected to analysis of density. It was found that significant sanitary failures are present during th whole goat cheese process, although the highest bacteria contamination occurred at the milking, curdling and filling stages. These are characterized by excessive handling and absolute lack of hygiene. The pathogen B. melitensis was absent; therefore the causes of poisoning were attributed to the toxin produced by S. aureus and to the significant count of fecal coliforms found in the goat cheese. Even though the goats are fed under a poor feeding system, the milk presented a normal physical and chemical composition. Nevertheless, protein and fat matter losses occur during cheese preparation, as a result of handling practices and lack of process control.

  13. Bacterial dynamics in model cheese systems, aiming at safety and quality of Portuguese-style traditional ewe's cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Cláudia I; Graça, João A; Ogando, Natacha S; Gomes, Ana M P; Malcata, F Xavier

    2009-11-01

    An experiment using model ewe's milk cheeses was designed to characterize microbial interactions that arise in actual raw milk cheese environments. These model cheeses were manufactured according to Portuguese artisanal practices, except that the microbial load and biodiversity were fully controlled: single potential pathogens and spoilage bacteria, or a combination thereof, were combined at various initial inoculum levels in sterilized raw ewe's milk with several lactic acid bacteria (LAB) normally found in traditional cheeses. Viable microbial counts were monitored throughout a 60-day ripening period. Two alternative mathematical approaches were used to fit the experimental data generated in terms of population dynamics: percent of inhibition and D-values. These were able to explain the complex competitive interactions between the contaminant microorganisms and the LAB adventitious populations. In general, the tested LAB were less able to inhibit contaminants present in combination and in higher concentrations. Lactococcus lactis, with its strong acidifying potential, was the most effective factor in controlling the unwanted bacterial population, especially single Staphylococcus aureus. The two lactobacilli studied, especially Lactobacillus brevis, were shown to be less effective; Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua were the contaminants least inhibited by the LAB.

  14. High-fat spreadable processed cheese for people with high blood cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Zeid, N A

    1993-05-01

    Part of the raw cheese base used for manufacturing high-fat processed cheese spread was replaced by cows' (C) or buffalo (B) butter residue at levels of up to 20%. These residues were produced during the conversion of butter to butter oil by traditional moderate (T) or severe (M) heat treatments. The hypocholesterolaemic properties of butter residues incorporated into processed cheese were tested with rats (serum and liver cholesterol) and human beings (serum cholesterol). When rats were given the control cheese with no butter residue there were significant increases in both serum and liver cholesterol compared with rats given stock diet. However, when part of the raw cheese base was replaced by butter residue these rises were reduced by amounts proportional to the level of butter residue. The hypocholesterolaemic properties of the residues were in order CT > BT, CM > BM, and incorporations of 10% CT, 15% BT, 15% CM and 20% BM were found to nullify the hypercholesterolaemic effects of control cheese and restore cholesterol levels to their normal values. A small human trial gave similar results. Incorporation of butter residue slightly affected the chemical composition of the cheeses. Fat content and pH were little different; however, cheeses with butter residue tended to have higher total protein but lower soluble protein, tyrosine and tryptophan, and total volatile fatty acids. Rheological properties were not altered significantly. Incorporation of butter residue improved the organoleptic properties, particularly flavour intensity. Storage at 5 degrees C for 2 months did not alter the organoleptic properties and changes in chemical composition followed the normal pattern.

  15. Development of Yeast Populations during Processing and Ripening of Blue Veined Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison M. Knox

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Varieties of blue veined cheese were analyzed regularly during different stages of manufacturing and ripening to determine the origin of contaminating the yeasts present in them, their population diversity and development until the end of the storage. Yeast diversity and development in the inner and outer core of the cheeses during ripening were also compared. Air samples revealed few if any yeasts whereas the samples in contact with the equipment and the surroundings revealed high number of yeasts, implicating it as the possible main source of post-pasteurization contamination, as very few yeasts were isolated from the milk and cheese making process itself. Samples from the inner and outer core of the maturing cheeses had typical survival curves. The number of yeasts on the outer core was about a 100-fold more than of those in the inner core. The most abundant yeasts isolated from the environment and ripening cheeses were identified as Debaryomyces hansenii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Trichosporon beigelii, Candida versatilis and Cryptococcus albidus, while the yeasts Candida zeylanoides and Dekkera anomala were additionally isolated from the environment. Yeasts were present in high number, making their occurrence in blue-veined cheeses meaningful.

  16. Innovative application of the moisture analyzer for determination of dry mass content of processed cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Małgorzata; Janas, Sławomir; Woźniak, Magdalena

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this work was the presentation of an alternative method of determination of the total dry mass content in processed cheese. The authors claim that the presented method can be used in industry's quality control laboratories for routine testing and for quick in-process control. For the test purposes both reference method of determination of dry mass in processed cheese and moisture analyzer method were used. The tests were carried out for three different kinds of processed cheese. In accordance with the reference method, the sample was placed on a layer of silica sand and dried at the temperature of 102 °C for about 4 h. The moisture analyzer test required method validation, with regard to drying temperature range and mass of the analyzed sample. Optimum drying temperature of 110 °C was determined experimentally. For Hochland cream processed cheese sample, the total dry mass content, obtained using the reference method, was 38.92%, whereas using the moisture analyzer method, it was 38.74%. An average analysis time in case of the moisture analyzer method was 9 min. For the sample of processed cheese with tomatoes, the reference method result was 40.37%, and the alternative method result was 40.67%. For the sample of cream processed cheese with garlic the reference method gave value of 36.88%, and the alternative method, of 37.02%. An average time of those determinations was 16 min. Obtained results confirmed that use of moisture analyzer is effective. Compliant values of dry mass content were obtained for both of the used methods. According to the authors, the fact that the measurement took incomparably less time for moisture analyzer method, is a key criterion of in-process control and final quality control method selection.

  17. Modelling and predicting growth of psycrotolerant pseudomonads in milk and cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Rios, Veronica; Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Rosshaug, Per Sand

    2015-01-01

    /Bioscreen C model included the effect of temperature, pH, NaCl/aw, lactic, sorbic acid and their interaction (Le Marc et al., 2002). Then, the reference growth rate parameter (μref) was fitted to a total of 35 μmax-values from cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. Results: The new models were...... temperature storage conditions. Conclusions: The present study developed and validated mathematical models to predict growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in chilled milk and cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. The cottage cheese model can be used to evaluate the effect of product reformulations...

  18. Foodborne Pathogens Prevention and Sensory Attributes Enhancement in Processed Cheese via Flavoring with Plant Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayel, Ahmed A; Hussein, Heba; Sorour, Noha M; El-Tras, Wael F

    2015-12-01

    Cheese contaminations with foodborne bacterial pathogens, and their health outbreaks, are serious worldwide problems that could happen from diverse sources during cheese production or storage. Plants, and their derivatives, were always regarded as the potential natural and safe antimicrobial alternatives for food preservation and improvement. The extracts from many plants, which are commonly used as spices and flavoring agents, were evaluated as antibacterial agents against serious foodborne pathogens, for example Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli O157:H7, using qualitative and quantitative assaying methods. Dairy-based media were also used for evaluating the practical application of plant extracts as antimicrobial agents. Most of the examined plant extracts exhibited remarkable antibacterial activity; the extracts of cinnamon, cloves, garden cress, and lemon grass were the most powerful, either in synthetic or in dairy-based media. Flavoring processed cheese with plant extracts resulted in the enhancement of cheese sensory attributes, for example odor, taste, color, and overall quality, especially in flavored samples with cinnamon, lemon grass, and oregano. It can be concluded that plant extracts are strongly recommended, as powerful and safe antibacterial and flavoring agents, for the preservation and sensory enhancement of processed cheese. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Modelling and predicting growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in milk and cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Rios, Veronica; Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Rosshaug, Per Sand

    growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads and shelf-life of chilled cottage cheese and of milk at constant and dynamic storage temperatures. The developed models and the applied methodology is likely to be applicable for shelf-life assessment of other types of fermented or unripened dairy products as well......Mathematical models were developed and evaluated for growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in chilled milk and cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. The mathematical models include the effect of temperature, pH, NaCl, lactic acid and sorbic acid. A simplified cardinal parameter growth model...... was developed based on growth in broth. Subsequently, the reference growth rate parameter (μref at 25 °C) was fitted to a total of 35 growth rates from cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. Growth rate models for milk and cottage cheese were evaluated by comparison with data from literature and new...

  20. Modelling and predicting growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in milk and cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Rios, Veronica; Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Rosshaug, Per Sand

    experiments. Growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in heat-treated milk resulted in a bias factor (Bf) of 1.08 and an accuracy factor (Af) of 1.32, whereas the calibrated model for growth rates in cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing and in raw milk resulted in Bf of 1.08 and Af of 1......Mathematical models were developed and evaluated for growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in chilled milk and cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. The mathematical models include the effect of temperature, pH, NaCl, lactic acid and sorbic acid. A simplified cardinal parameter growth model...... was developed based on growth in broth. Subsequently, the reference growth rate parameter (μref at 25 °C) was fitted to a total of 35 growth rates from cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. Growth rate models for milk and cottage cheese were evaluated by comparison with data from literature and new...

  1. Dynamics of staphylococcal enterotoxin production in model experiments simulating the fresh cheese environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Necidová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of internal factors (pH, NaCl and external factors (temperature, incubation time on the ability of Staphylococcus aureus to grow and to produce staphylococcal enterotoxins SEA, SEB, and SEC. The fresh cheese environment was modelled in Brain Heart Infusion Broth media and food matrices (pasteurized milk from retail outlets by internal and external factors (pH = 4.5 and 5.5, 2% NaCl, and t = 8 °C and 15 °C. The counts of enterotoxigenic strains of S. aureus at baseline, i.e. at the time of inoculation of model samples, corresponded to those encountered in the production of fresh cheeses as a result of post-pasteurization contamination. Enumeration of S. aureus was performed in accordance with EN ISO 6888-1, using agar medium. Staphylococcal enterotoxins were detected by the enzyme-linked fluorescence assay. The pH (4.5 and refrigeration temperature (8 °C used prevented S. aureus from achieving the critical count of 105 cfu·ml-1 specified in Commission Regulation (EC No. 2073/2005. The highest rates of enterotoxin production were recorded for enterotoxin A. The growth curves of S. aureus derived from model experiments were compared with the growth curve generated by a predictive microbiology program - Pathogen Modelling Program. The results of this study proved the Pathogen Modelling Program to be suitable for use in the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points system in the process of the fresh cheese production to help manufacturers prevent the growth of S. aureus and enterotoxin production.

  2. Modelling the growth of Listeria monocytogenes on the surface of smear- or mould-ripened cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sol eSchvartzman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface-ripened cheeses are matured by means of manual or mechanical technologies posing a risk of cross-contamination, if any cheeses are contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. In predictive microbiology, primary models are used to describe microbial responses, such as growth rate over time and secondary models explain how those responses change with environmental factors. In this way, primary models were used to assess the growth rate of L. monocytogenes during ripening of the cheeses and the secondary models to test how much the growth rate was affected by either the pH and/or the water activity (aw of the cheeses. The two models combined can be used to predict outcomes. The purpose of these experiments was to test three primary (the modified Gompertz equation, the Baranyi and Roberts model and the Logistic model and three secondary (the Cardinal model, the Ratowski model and the Presser model mathematical models in order to define which combination of models would best predict the growth of L. monocytogenes on the surface of artificially contaminated surface-ripened cheeses. Growth on the surface of the cheese was assessed and modelled. The primary models were firstly fitted to the data and the effects of pH and aw on the growth rate (μmax were incorporated and assessed one by one with the secondary models. The Logistic primary model by itself did not show a better fit of the data among the other primary models tested, but the inclusion of the Cardinal secondary model improved the final fit. The aw was not related to the growth of Listeria. This study suggests that surface-ripened cheese should be separately regulated within EU microbiological food legislation and results expressed as counts per surface area rather than per gram.

  3. 21 CFR 133.174 - Pasteurized process cheese food with fruits, vegetables, or meats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., vegetables, or meats. 133.174 Section 133.174 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... with fruits, vegetables, or meats. (a) Pasteurized process cheese food with fruits, vegetables, or meats, or mixtures of these is the food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and...

  4. 21 CFR 133.180 - Pasteurized process cheese spread with fruits, vegetables, or meats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., vegetables, or meats. 133.180 Section 133.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... with fruits, vegetables, or meats. (a) Pasteurized process cheese spread with fruits, vegetables, or meats, or mixtures of these is a food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is...

  5. 21 CFR 133.170 - Pasteurized process cheese with fruits, vegetables, or meats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., or meats. 133.170 Section 133.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... fruits, vegetables, or meats. (a) Unless a definition and standard of identity specifically applicable is established by another section of this part, a pasteurized process cheese with fruits, vegetables, or meats...

  6. Debaryomyces hansenii strains differ in their production of flavor compounds in a cheese-surface model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gori, Klaus; Sørensen, Louise Marie; Petersen, Mikael Agerlin

    2012-01-01

    Flavor production among12 strains of Debaryomyces hansenii when grown on a simple cheese model mimicking a cheese surface was investigated by dynamic headspace sampling followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The present study confirmed that D. hansenii possess the ability to produce...... important cheese flavor compounds, primarily branched-chain aldehydes and alcohols, and thus important for the final cheese flavor. Quantification of representative aldehydes (2-Methylpropanal, 3-Methylbutanal) and alcohols (2-Methyl-1-propanol, 3-Methyl-1-butanol, and 3-Methyl-3-buten-1-ol) showed...... that the investigated D. hansenii strains varied significantly with respect to production of these flavor compounds. Contrary to the alcohols (2-Methyl-1-propanol,3-Methyl-1-butanol, and3-Methyl-3-buten-1-ol), the aldehydes (2-Methylpropanal, 3-Methylbutanal) were produced by the D. hansenii strains in concentrations...

  7. Use of a miniature laboratory fresh cheese model for investigating antimicrobial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tassell, M L; Ibarra-Sánchez, L A; Takhar, S R; Amaya-Llano, S L; Miller, M J

    2015-12-01

    Hispanic-style fresh cheeses, such as queso fresco, have relatively low salt content, high water activity, and near neutral pH, which predisposes them to growth of Listeria monocytogenes. Biosafety constraints limit the incorporation of L. monocytogenes into cheeses manufactured via traditional methods in challenge studies, so few have focused on in situ testing of novel antimicrobials in fresh cheeses. We have developed a modular, miniaturized laboratory-scale queso fresco model for testing the incorporation of novel antilisterials. We have demonstrated the assessment of the antilisterials nisin and ferulic acid, alone and in combination, at various levels. Our results support the inhibitory effects of ferulic acid in cheese, against both L. monocytogenes and its common surrogate Listeria innocua, and we provide preliminary evaluation of its consumer acceptability. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Emulsifying salt increase stability of cheese emulsions during holding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anni Bygvrå; Sijbrandij, Anna G.; Varming, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    of sodium and phosphate in foods makes production of cheese powder without or with minimal amounts of emulsifying salts desirable. The present work uses a centrifugation method to characterize stability of model cheese feeds. Stability of cheese feed with emulsifying salt increased with holding time at 60°C......In cheese powder production, cheese is mixed and melted with water and emulsifying salt to form an emulsion (cheese feed) which is required to remain stable at 60°C for 1h and during further processing until spray drying. Addition of emulsifying salts ensures this, but recent demands for reduction......, especially when no stirring was applied. No change in stability during holding was observed in cheese feeds without emulsifying salt. This effect is suggested to be due to continued exerted functionality of the emulsifying salt, possibly through reorganizations of the mineral balance....

  9. Assessing environmental impacts using a comparative LCA of industrial and artisanal production processes: "Minas Cheese" case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elbert Muller Nigri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study uses the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA methodology to evaluate and compare the environmental impacts caused by both the artisanal and the industrial manufacturing processes of "Minas cheese". This is a traditional cheese produced in the state of Minas Gerais (Brazil, and it is considered a "cultural patrimony" in the country. The high participation of artisanal producers in the market justifies this research, and this analysis can help the identification of opportunities to improve the environmental performance of several stages of the production system. The environmental impacts caused were also assessed and compared. The functional unit adopted was 1 kilogram (Kg of cheese. The system boundaries considered were the production process, conservation of product (before sale, and transport to consumer market. The milk production process was considered similar in both cases, and therefore it was not included in the assessment. The data were collected through interviews with the producers, observation, and a literature review; they were ordered and processed using the SimaPro 7 LCA software. According to the impact categories analyzed, the artisanal production exerted lower environmental impacts. This can be justified mainly because the industrial process includes the pasteurization stage, which uses dry wood as an energy source and refrigeration.

  10. Activity of 30 different cheeses on cholesterol plasma levels and Oxidative Balance Risk Index (OBRI) in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelli, Umberto; Bondiolotti, Gianpietro; Battelli, Giovanna; Zanoni, Giuseppe; Finco, Annarosa; Recchia, Martino

    2015-01-01

    Cheese is considered to increase the total cholesterol levels (CH) due to the high-saturated fat content. New models are needed to measure the relationship between cholesterol and cheese. Thirty different cheeses produced in Val Brembana, Italy ("furmai da mut", "caprino" and "stracchino"), were added to the diet of 30 groups of 4 rats. Cheeses were analyzed to differentiate the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the cholesterol content (Ch(f)). The body weight, CH, urine volume and oxidative balance were measured. Three new indexes in relation to CH were calculated: OI (oxidative index), PI (protective index) and OBRI (oxidative balance risk index). None of the cheeses increased CH. Some of the "furmai de mut" were significantly decreasing CH and improved the oxidative balance. Ch(f) was not affecting the CH levels in plasma. In terms of VOCs, the acetic acid content was correlated (p cheese can reduce significantly CH levels and improve the antioxidant capacity.

  11. Modelling the influence of metabolite diffusion on non-starter lactic acid bacteria growth in ripening Cheddar cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czárán, Tamás; Rattray, Fergal P.; Møller, Cleide O.de A.

    2018-01-01

    The influence of metabolite diffusion within the cheese matrix on growth of non-starter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) during Cheddar cheese ripening was mathematically modelled. The model was calibrated at a realistic range of diffusion of metabolites and the decay and growth parameters...

  12. Use of a metagenetic approach to monitor the bacterial microbiota of "Tomme d'Orchies" cheese during the ripening process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceugniez, Alexandre; Taminiau, Bernard; Coucheney, Françoise; Jacques, Philippe; Delcenserie, Véronique; Daube, Georges; Drider, Djamel

    2017-04-17

    The study of microbial ecosystems in artisanal foodstuffs is important to complete in order to unveil its diversity. The number of studies performed on dairy products has increased during the last decade, particularly those performed on milk and cheese derivative products. In this work, we investigated the bacterial content of "Tomme d'Orchies" cheese, an artisanal pressed and uncooked French cheese. To this end, a metagenetic analysis, using Illumina technology, was utilized on samples taken from the surface and core of the cheese at 0, 1, 3, 14 and 21days of ripening process. In addition to the classical microbiota found in cheese, various strains likely from environmental origin were identified. A large difference between the surface and the core content was observed within samples withdrawn during the ripening process. The main species encountered in the core of the cheese were Lactococcus spp. and Streptococcus spp., with an inversion of this ratio during the ripening process. Less than 2.5% of the whole population was composed of strains issued from environmental origin, as Lactobacillales, Corynebacterium and Brevibacterium. In the core, about 85% of the microbiota was attributed to the starters used for the cheese making. In turn, the microbiota of the surface contained less than 30% of these starters and interestingly displayed more diversity. The predominant genus was Corynebacterium sp., likely originating from the environment. The less abundant microbiota of the surface was composed of Bifidobacteria, Brevibacterium and Micrococcales. To summarize, the "Tomme d'Orchies" cheese displayed a high diversity of bacterial species, especially on the surface, and this diversity is assumed to arise from the production environment and subsequent ripening process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. OPTIMIZATION OF PROCESS EXTRACTION OF LUPINE CHEESE WHEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Shishatskii

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The urgency of the job is showed. These words of the academician A.G. Khramtsov that breakthrough technology in the dairy industry is the use of whey as a solvent for the extraction of target components of plant raw materials and obtaining valu-able milk-plant extract. The problem of optimization to determine the input factors for the effective management of process of extraction. Optimization of parameters of the process was carried out experimental-statistical methods in several stages. At the first stage built regression model that adequately describes the dependence of the selected output parameter from the studied factors. A full factorial experiment (PFA type 23, composed planning matrix, decorated in a table. The experiments were conducted in a double-repetition. The number of experiments in the centre of the plan selected taking into account a possible transition to the planning of the second order. The plan PFA type 23 gives the possibility to calculate 8 regression coefficients and construct the equation of the first order. The results of calculation of confidence errors presented in the table. Statistical processing of experimental data allowed determining the regression coefficients, check their significance, to assess the reproducibility of experiments and to establish the adequacy of the obtained regression equations of the second order on three criteria. The second stage was to optimize the parameters of extraction. Statement of a problem of optimization recorded analytically. To solve this problem we use the method of the Lagrange multipliers. According to calculated by the algorithm is composed of a system of equations containing partial derivatives of the objective function for all independent variables and undetermined Lagrange multiplier. Optimal recognized the results obtained on the 10-step optimization, providing the maximum output of extractive substances. The obtained optimal conditions of extraction. The third stage was

  14. The Swiss cheese model of safety incidents: are there holes in the metaphor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perneger Thomas V

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reason's Swiss cheese model has become the dominant paradigm for analysing medical errors and patient safety incidents. The aim of this study was to determine if the components of the model are understood in the same way by quality and safety professionals. Methods Survey of a volunteer sample of persons who claimed familiarity with the model, recruited at a conference on quality in health care, and on the internet through quality-related websites. The questionnaire proposed several interpretations of components of the Swiss cheese model: a slice of cheese, b hole, c arrow, d active error, e how to make the system safer. Eleven interpretations were compatible with this author's interpretation of the model, 12 were not. Results Eighty five respondents stated that they were very or quite familiar with the model. They gave on average 15.3 (SD 2.3, range 10 to 21 "correct" answers out of 23 (66.5% – significantly more than 11.5 "correct" answers that would expected by chance (p Conclusion The interpretations of specific features of the Swiss cheese model varied considerably among quality and safety professionals. Reaching consensus about concepts of patient safety requires further work.

  15. Modeling the Growth of Listeria monocytogenes in Soft Blue-White Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detmer, Ann; Ingmer, Hanne; Larsen, Marianne Halberg

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a predictive model simulating growth over time of the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes in a soft blue-white cheese. The physicochemical properties in a matrix such as cheese are essential controlling factors influencing the growth of L. monocytogenes. We developed a predictive tertiary model of the bacterial growth of L. monocytogenes as a function of temperature, pH, NaCl, and lactic acid. We measured the variations over time of the physicochemical properties in the cheese. Our predictive model was developed based on broth data produced in previous studies. New growth data sets were produced to independently calibrate and validate the developed model. A characteristic of this tertiary model is that it handles dynamic growth conditions described in time series of temperature, pH, NaCl, and lactic acid. Supplying the model with realistic production and retail conditions showed that the number of L. monocytogenes cells increases 3 to 3.5 log within the shelf life of the cheese. PMID:22983971

  16. Modelling and predicting growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in milk and cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Rios, Veronica; Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Gkogka, Elissavet

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models were developed and evaluated for growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in chilled milk and in cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. The mathematical models include the effect of temperature, pH, NaCl, lactic acid and sorbic acid. A simplified cardinal parameter growth...... rate model was developed based on growth in broth. Subsequently, the reference growth rate parameter μref25°C-broth of 1.031/h was calibrated by fitting the model to a total of 35 growth rates from cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. This resulted in a μref25°C-cottage cheese value of 0.621/h...... with cultured cream dressing and in non-heated milk (n=26) resulted in Bf of 1.08 and Af of 1.43 (μref25°C-cottage cheese). Lag phase models were developed by using relative lag times and data from both the present study and from literature. The acceptable simulation zone method showed the developed models...

  17. Nonstarter Lactobacillus strains as adjunct cultures for cheese making: in vitro characterization and performance in two model cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggiler-Marcó, M; Capra, M L; Quiberoni, A; Vinderola, G; Reinheimer, J A; Hynes, E

    2007-10-01

    Nonstarter lactic acid bacteria are the main uncontrolled factor in today's industrial cheese making and may be the cause of quality inconsistencies and defects in cheeses. In this context, adjunct cultures of selected lactobacilli from nonstarter lactic acid bacteria origin appear as the best alternative to indirectly control cheese biota. The objective of the present work was to study the technological properties of Lactobacillus strains isolated from cheese by in vitro and in situ assays. Milk acidification kinetics and proteolytic and acidifying activities were assessed, and peptide mapping of trichloroacetic acid 8% soluble fraction of milk cultures was performed by liquid chromatography. In addition, the tolerance to salts (NaCl and KCl) and the phage-resistance were investigated. Four strains were selected for testing as adjunct cultures in cheese making experiments at pilot plant scale. In in vitro assays, most strains acidified milk slowly and showed weak to moderate proteolytic activity. Fast strains decreased milk pH to 4.5 in 8 h, and continued acidification to 3.5 in 12 h or more. This group consisted mostly of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains. Approximately one-third of the slow strains, which comprised mainly Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Lactobacillus curvatus, were capable to grow when milk was supplemented with glucose and casein hydrolysate. Peptide maps were similar to those of lactic acid bacteria considered to have a moderate proteolytic activity. Most strains showed salt tolerance and resistance to specific phages. The Lactobacillus strains selected as adjunct cultures for cheese making experiments reached 10(8) cfu/g in soft cheeses at 7 d of ripening, whereas they reached 10(9) cfu/g in semihard cheeses after 15 d of ripening. In both cheese varieties, the adjunct culture population remained at high counts during all ripening, in some cases overcoming or equaling primary starter. Overall

  18. Evaluation of the parameters effects on the bio-ethanol production process from Ricotta Cheese Whey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sansonetti, Sascha; Curcio, Stefano; Calabrò, Vincenza

    2010-01-01

    The work consists of an experimental analysis to evaluate the effects of the variables temperature (T), pH, agitation rate (K) and initial lactose concentration (L) on the batch fermentation process of Ricotta Cheese Whey (RCW) into bio-ethanol by using the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus. A central...... composite design, constituted by 26 runs, has been carried out, and the effects of the parameters have been evaluated. Eventually, once eliminated the negligible effects, Response Surface Methodology (RSM) has been applied to optimize the four parameters values in RCW fermentation process. After...

  19. Combining Individual-Based Modeling and Food Microenvironment Descriptions To Predict the Growth of Listeria monocytogenes on Smear Soft Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier, Rachel; Hezard, Bernard; Lintz, Adrienne; Stahl, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    An individual-based modeling (IBM) approach was developed to describe the behavior of a few Listeria monocytogenes cells contaminating smear soft cheese surface. The IBM approach consisted of assessing the stochastic individual behaviors of cells on cheese surfaces and knowing the characteristics of their surrounding microenvironments. We used a microelectrode for pH measurements and micro-osmolality to assess the water activity of cheese microsamples. These measurements revealed a high variability of microscale pH compared to that of macroscale pH. A model describing the increase in pH from approximately 5.0 to more than 7.0 during ripening was developed. The spatial variability of the cheese surface characterized by an increasing pH with radius and higher pH on crests compared to that of hollows on cheese rind was also modeled. The microscale water activity ranged from approximately 0.96 to 0.98 and was stable during ripening. The spatial variability on cheese surfaces was low compared to between-cheese variability. Models describing the microscale variability of cheese characteristics were combined with the IBM approach to simulate the stochastic growth of L. monocytogenes on cheese, and these simulations were compared to bacterial counts obtained from irradiated cheeses artificially contaminated at different ripening stages. The simulated variability of L. monocytogenes counts with the IBM/microenvironmental approach was consistent with the observed one. Contrasting situations corresponding to no growth or highly contaminated foods could be deduced from these models. Moreover, the IBM approach was more effective than the traditional population/macroenvironmental approach to describe the actual bacterial behavior variability. PMID:23872572

  20. Inhibition of Clostridium botulinum in Model Reduced-Sodium Pasteurized Prepared Cheese Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Kathleen A; Mu, Ming; LeVine, Brian; Rossi, Frank

    2017-09-01

    The 1986 Food Research Institute-Tanaka et al. model predicts the safety of shelf-stable process cheese spread formulations using the parameters of moisture, pH, NaCl, and disodium phosphate (DSP) to inhibit toxin production by Clostridium botulinum. Although this model is very reliable for predicting safety for standard-of-identity spreads, the effects of additional factors have not been considered. The objective of this study was to create a predictive model to include the interactive effect of moisture, pH, fat, sorbic acid, and potassium-based replacements for NaCl and DSP to reflect modern reduced-sodium recipes. Eighty formulations were identified using a central composite design targeting seven factors: 50 to 60% moisture, pH 5.4 to 6.2, 0 to 0.2% sorbic acid, 10 to 30% fat, 1.7 to 2.4% NaCl, 0.8 to 1.6% DSP, and 0 to 50% potassium replacement for sodium salts. Samples were inoculated with proteolytic C. botulinum spores at 3 log spores per g, hot filled into sterile vials, and stored anaerobically at 27°C. Samples were assayed at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 8.5, 17.5, 26, and 40 weeks for the presence of botulinum toxin using the mouse bioassay. A parametric survival model was fit to the censored time-to-toxin data. All linear, quadratic, and pairwise effects were considered for model fit. As hypothesized, the effects of pH, sorbate, moisture, DSP, and NaCl were highly significant (P < 0.001). Fat concentration and potassium replacement effects were significant at P < 0.021 and P < 0.057, respectively. The model consistently predicted the safety failure of the toxic samples, but it also predicted failure for some samples that were not toxic. This model is an adjunct to existing models by adding the factors of potassium salts, fat, and sorbic acid to predict the botulinal safety of prepared process cheese products but is not intended to be a substitute for formulation evaluation by a competent process authority.

  1. Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius Thermophilic Esterase EST2's Activity in Milk and Cheese Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandrich, L.; Manco, M.; Rossie, M.; Floris, E.; Jansen-van den Bosch, T.; Smit, G.; Wouters, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the behavior of thermophilic esterase EST2 from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius in milk and cheese models. The pure enzyme was used to compare the EST2 hydrolytic activity to the activity of endogenous esterase EstA from Lactococcus lactis. The results

  2. The effect of individual phosphate emulsifying salts and their selected binary mixtures on hardness of processed cheese spreads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František Buňka

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false CS JA X-NONE The aim of this work was to observe the effects of emulsifying salts composed of trisodium citrate and sodium phosphates with different chain length (disodium phosphate (DSP, tetrasodium diphosphate (TSPP, pentasodium triphosphate (PSTP and sodium salts of polyphosphates with 5 different mean length (n ≈ 5, 9, 13, 20, 28 on hardness of processed cheese spreads. Hardness of processed cheese spreads with selected binary mixtures of the above mentioned salts were also studied. Measurements were performed after 2, 9 and 30 days of storage at 6 °C. Hardness of processed cheese increased with increase in chain length of individually used phosphates.  Majority of applied binary mixtures of emulsifying salts had not significant influence on hardness charges in processed cheese spreads. On the other hand, a combination of phosphates salts (DSP with TSPP was found, which had specific effect on hardness of processed cheese spreads. Textural properties of samples with trisodium citrate were similar compared to samples with DSP.

  3. RESEARCHES REGARDING THE MICROBIOLOGIC PARAMETERS VALUE FROM RAW MILK USED IN TELEMEA CHEESE TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDRA SULER

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available An important faze for food quality control is verification of microbiological parameters of food products. In this way is assuring the prevention of alimentation toxicological infections to consumer, avoiding the technological and economical losses as well as increasing the products conservation period. In this paper are presents the microbiological exam results from raw milk used in Telemea cheese technological process, for 5 stations studied. The determinations were made on 2 series with 57 samples each of them, prelevated in reception fase, in summer and winter season.

  4. Transport phenomena in a model cheese: the influence of the charge and shape of solutes on diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J V C; Peixoto, P D S; Lortal, S; Floury, J

    2013-10-01

    During cheese ripening, microorganisms grow as immobilized colonies, metabolizing substrates present in the matrix and generating products from enzymatic reactions. Local factors that limit the rates of diffusion, either within the general cheese matrix or near the colonies, may influence the metabolic activity of the bacteria during ripening, affecting the final quality of the cheese. The objective of this study was to determine the diffusion coefficients of solutes as a function of their different physicochemical characteristics (size, charge, and shape) in an ultrafiltrate (UF) model cheese (based on ultrafiltered milk) to enable better understanding of the ripening mechanisms. Diffusion coefficients of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextrans (4 kDa to 2 MDa) and FITC-labeled dairy proteins (α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and BSA) were measured using the technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). This study showed that macromolecules up to 2 MDa and proteins could diffuse through the UF model cheese. The larger FITC-dextrans were not more hindered by the structure of the UF model cheese compared with the smaller ones. Any decrease in the diffusion coefficients of solutes was related only to their hydrodynamic radii. The FITC-dextran diffusion data were fitted to an obstruction model, resulting in a constant obstruction factor (k ~0.42). Diffusion in the model cheese was sensitive to the physicochemical characteristics of the solute. The FITC-dairy proteins studied (rigid and negatively charged molecules) were hindered to a greater degree than the FITC-dextrans (flexible and charge-neutral molecules) in the UF model cheese. The existence of steric and electrostatic interactions between the protein matrix of the UF model cheese and the FITC-dairy proteins could explain the decrease in diffusion compared with FITC-dextrans. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A new study of the kinetics of curd production in the process of cheese manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Susana Vargas; Torres, Maykel González; Guerrero, Francisco Quintanilla; Talavera, Rogelio Rodríguez

    2017-11-01

    We studied the role played by temperature and rennet concentration in the coagulation process for cheese manufacture and the evaluation of their kinetics. We concluded that temperature is the main factor that determines the kinetics. The rennet concentration was unimportant probably due to the fast action of the enzyme chymosin. The Dynamic light scattering technique allowed measuring the aggregate's size and their formation kinetics. The volume fraction of solids was determined from viscosity measurements, showing profiles that are in agreement with the size profiles. The results indicate that the formation of the aggregates for rennet cheese is strongly dependent on temperature and rennet concentration. The results revealed that at 35·5 °C the volume fraction of solids has the maximum slope, indicating that at this temperature the curd is formed rapidly. The optimal temperature throughout the process was established. Second-order kinetics were obtained for the process. We observed a quadratic dependence between the rennet volume and the volume fraction of solids (curd), thereby indicating that the kinetics of the curd production should be of order two.

  6. Physical and processing properties of milk, butter, and cheddar cheese from cows fed supplemental fish meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramis, C A; Wang, H; McBride, B W; Wright, T C; Hill, A R

    2003-08-01

    Physical, chemical, sensory and processing properties of milk produced by feeding a rumen-undegradable fish meal protein supplement to Holstein cows were investigated. The supplement contained (as fed basis) 25% soft-white wheat, 60% herring meal, and 15% feather meal. The total fat level in the milk decreased to 2.43%. For both pasteurized and ultra-high temperature processed drinking milk, no difference was found between fish meal (FM) milk and control milk in terms of color, flavor and flavor stability; in particular, no oxidized flavor was observed. Cheddar cheese made from FM milk ripened faster after 3 mo of ripening and developed a more desirable texture and stronger Cheddar flavor. The yield efficiencies for FM and control cheese, 94.4 (+/- 2.44 SE) and 96.4 (+/- 2.26 SE), respectively, were not different. Relative to controls, average fat globule size was smaller in FM milk and churning time of FM cream was longer. FM butter had softer texture and better cold spreadability, and butter oils from FM enriched milk had lower dropping points compared to control butter oil (average 32.89 versus 34.06 degrees C). These differences in physical properties of butter fat were greater than expected considering that iodine values were not different. This study demonstrates the feasibility of producing high quality products from milk naturally supplemented with FM, but the results also show that dietary changes affect processing properties.

  7. Stochastic modelling of Listeria monocytogenes single cell growth in cottage cheese with mesophilic lactic acid bacteria from aroma producing cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Dalgaard, Paw

    2015-01-01

    . 2014. Modelling the effect of lactic acid bacteria from starter- and aroma culture on growth of Listeria monocytogenes in cottage cheese. International Journal of Food Microbiology. 188, 15-25]. Growth of L. monocytogenes single cells, using lag time distributions corresponding to three different......A stochastic model was developed for simultaneous growth of low numbers of Listeria monocytogenes and populations of lactic acid bacteria from the aroma producing cultures applied in cottage cheese. During more than two years, different batches of cottage cheese with aroma culture were analysed...

  8. Effect of different concentrations of nisin on starter culture of model Cheeses manufactured from ultrafiltrated milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh Mohammadi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nisin is a natural preservative produced by strains of Lactococcuslactis subsp. Lactis, has been approved for use in food by the Joint Food and Agricultural Organization/World Health Organization (FAO/WHO Committee on Food Additives and has been awarded generally recognized as safe (GRAS. It remains the only bacteriocin allowed in food as an addedpreservative. Nisin has a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity againstgram-positive bacteria, thus one of the problems associated with nisin application is inhibition of starter culture and prevention of ripening, which is required for development of cheese characteristics during ripening. In the current study, the effects of different concentrations of nisin and temperature on growth and activity of lactic acid bacteria in model cheeses manufactured from ultrafiltrated milk was evaluated. Cheese samples were supplemented with nisin at concentrations of 0, 2, 4 and 6 µg/g and stored at 8 and 25 °C up to 60 days. Microbiological and physico-chemical properties of the cheese samples were analyzedat 0, 1, 8, 15, 30, 45 and 60 days. Results showed that addition of nisin at concentrations of 4 and 6 µg/g affects (p

  9. Lactobacillus casei strains isolated from cheese reduce biogenic amine accumulation in an experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Martínez, Noelia; Sánchez-Llana, Esther; Díaz, María; Fernández, María; Martin, Maria Cruz; Ladero, Victor; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2012-07-02

    Tyramine and histamine are the biogenic amines (BAs) most commonly found in cheese, in which they appear as a result of the microbial enzymatic decarboxylation of tyrosine and histidine respectively. Given their toxic effects, their presence in high concentrations in foods should be avoided. In this work, samples of three cheeses (Zamorano, Cabrales and Emmental) with long ripening periods, and that often have high BA concentrations, were screened for the presence of BA-degrading lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Seventeen isolates were found that were able to degrade tyramine and histamine in broth culture. All 17 isolates were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as belonging to Lactobacillus casei. They were typed by plasmid S1-PFGE and genomic macrorestriction-PFGE analysis. Two strains (L. casei 4a and 5b) associated with high degradation rates for both BAs were selected to test how this ability might affect histamine and tyramine accumulation in a Cabrales-like mini-cheese manufacturing model. The quantification of BAs and the monitoring of the strains' growth over ripening were undertaken by RP-HPLC and qPCR respectively. Both strains were found to reduce histamine and tyramine accumulation. These two strains might be suitable for use as adjunct cultures for reducing the presence of BAs in cheese. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. 21 CFR 133.10 - Notice to manufacturers, packers, and distributors of pasteurized blended cheese, pasteurized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of pasteurized blended cheese, pasteurized process cheese, cheese food, cheese spread, and related... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS General Provisions § 133.10 Notice to manufacturers, packers, and distributors of pasteurized blended cheese, pasteurized...

  11. Modelling the effect of lactic acid bacteria from starter- and aroma culture on growth of Listeria monocytogenes in cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Eklöw, Annelie; Dalgaard, Paw

    2014-01-01

    Four mathematical models were developed and validated for simultaneous growth of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria from added cultures and Listeria monocytogenes, during chilled storage of cottage cheese with freshor cultured cream dressing. The mathematical models include the effect of temperature...... cheese to improvemodel performance. The inhibiting effect of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria from added cultures on growth of L. monocytogenes was efficiently modelled using the Jameson approach. The new models appropriately predicted the maximum population density of L. monocytogenes in cottage cheese......- and accuracy factors and with the concept of acceptable simulation zone. Evaluation of predicted growth rates of L. monocytogenes in cottage cheese with fresh- or cultured cream dressing resulted in bias-factors (Bf) of 1.07–1.10with corresponding accuracy factor (Af) values of 1.11 to 1.22. Lactic acid...

  12. Growth of Lactobacillus paracasei ATCC 334 in a cheese model system: a biochemical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinich, M F; Perez-Díaz, I; Cai, H; Rankin, S A; Broadbent, J R; Steele, J L

    2011-11-01

    Growth of Lactobacillus paracasei ATCC 334, in a cheese-ripening model system based upon a medium prepared from ripening Cheddar cheese extract (CCE) was evaluated. Lactobacillus paracasei ATCC 334 grows in CCE made from cheese ripened for 2 (2mCCE), 6 (6mCCE), and 8 (8mCCE) mo, to final cell densities of 5.9×10(8), 1.2×10(8), and 2.1×10(7)cfu/mL, respectively. Biochemical analysis and mass balance equations were used to determine substrate consumption patterns and products formed in 2mCCE. The products formed included formate, acetate, and D-lactate. These data allowed us to identify the pathways likely used and to initiate metabolic flux analysis. The production of volatiles during growth of Lb. paracasei ATCC 334 in 8mCCE was monitored to evaluate the metabolic pathways utilized by Lb. paracasei during the later stages of ripening Cheddar cheese. The 2 volatiles detected at high levels were ethanol and acetate. The remaining detected volatiles are present in significantly lower amounts and likely result from amino acid, pyruvate, and acetyl-coenzyme A metabolism. Carbon balance of galactose, lactose, citrate, and phosphoserine/phosphoserine-containing peptides in terms of D-lactate, acetate, and formate are in agreement with the amounts of substrates observed in 2mCCE; however, this was not the case for 6mCCE and 8mCCE, suggesting that additional energy sources are utilized during growth of Lb. paracasei ATCC 334 in these CCE. This study provides valuable information on the biochemistry and physiology of Lb. paracasei ATCC 334 in ripening cheese. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Growth, survival, and peptidolytic activity of Lactobacillus plantarum I91 in a hard-cheese model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamini, C V; Peralta, G H; Milesi, M M; Hynes, E R

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we studied the growth, survival, and peptidolytic activity of Lactobacillus plantarum I91 in a hard-cheese model consisting of a sterile extract of Reggianito cheese. To assess the influence of the primary starter and initial proteolysis level on these parameters, we prepared the extracts with cheeses that were produced using 2 different starter strains of Lactobacillus helveticus 138 or 209 (Lh138 or Lh209) at 3 ripening times: 3, 90, and 180 d. The experimental extracts were inoculated with Lb. plantarum I91; the control extracts were not inoculated and the blank extracts were heat-treated to inactivate enzymes and were not inoculated. All extracts were incubated at 34°C for 21 d, and then the pH, microbiological counts, and proteolysis profiles were determined. The basal proteolysis profiles in the extracts of young cheeses made with either strain tested were similar, but many differences between the proteolysis profiles of the extracts of the Lh138 and Lh209 cheeses were found when riper cheeses were used. The pH values in the blank and control extracts did not change, and no microbial growth was detected. In contrast, the pH value in experimental extracts decreased, and this decrease was more pronounced in extracts obtained from either of the young cheeses and from the Lh209 cheese at any stage of ripening. Lactobacillus plantarum I91 grew up to 8 log during the first days of incubation in all of the extracts, but then the number of viable cells decreased, the extent of which depended on the starter strain and the age of the cheese used for the extract. The decrease in the counts of Lb. plantarum I91 was observed mainly in the extracts in which the pH had diminished the most. In addition, the extracts that best supported the viability of Lb. plantarum I91 during incubation had the highest free amino acids content. The effect of Lb. plantarum I91 on the proteolysis profile of the extracts was marginal. Significant changes in the content of free

  14. Quantity of selected probiotic cultures in semi-hard cheese with low-cooking curd during the maturation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovayová, Viera; Dudriková, E; Rimárová, K; Siegfried, L

    2015-08-01

    The work studies the survival of added selected probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus (S1), Lactobacillus casei (S2), and Lactobacillus plantarum96 (S3) in semi-hard cheese with low-cooking curd during the maturation process. Cheeses were made according to the standard procedure (Polyfood SI 050 device). Probiotic lactobacilli strains Lactobacillus acidophilus (S1), Lactobacillus casei (S2), and Lactobacillus plantarum96 (S3) used in this study were added into the milk before the renneting process. The manufactured cheeses were matured for 6 months at the temperature of 10 °C. Cheese samples were taken for pH and titratable acidity measurements, lactobacilli enumeration, and chemical analysis at 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 days of maturation. At the end of the experiment (180 days) the cheese samples were analyzed also for the amount of lactic acid and protein contents. Initial numbers of lactobacilli inoculated into the milk (10(8) CFU mL(-1)) decreased during the first 2 weeks of maturation and reached from 2.15 10(7) CFU g(-1) in S1 cheese to 4.32 10(7) CFU g(-1) in S3 cheese. The number of Lactobacillus acidophilus strain bacteria at the beginning of the maturation period was 2.47.10(7) CFU g(-1) and declined until day 120 of maturation to the number of 0.45 10(6) CFU g(-1). In the last month of the experiment day 180 the viable cell numbers started to rise up to the final number of 0.41 10(7) CFU g(-1). The numbers of Lactobacillus plantarum96 varied around 10(8) CFU g(-1) during the whole period of the experiment. According to our results it was detected that in all experimental cheeses, the used probiotic lactobacilli reached the values above 10(6) CFU g(-1). Thus the legislated and therapeutic minimum limits set for the products containing probiotic bacteria for human diet were fulfilled.

  15. THE VISCOSITY OF PROCESSED CHEESE SAUCES DEPENDING ON ADDITION TYPE AND CONCENTRATION OF 1-MONOGLYCERIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahula Janiš

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study viscosity of processed cheese sauces with 1-monoglycerides (MAG addition. Six types of 1-monoglycerides (1-monocaprin, C10:0; 1-monolaurin, C12:0; 1-monomyristin, C14:0; 1-monopalmitin, C16:0; 1-monostearin, C18:0; 1-monoolein, C18:1 in concentration of 0.25 and 0.50% w/w were used. Control samples were prepared without MAG but with lecithin. The lowest values of viscosity were found in control samples. The viscosity increased with extending of chain fatty acid in the molecule of monoglycerides. The highest viscosity was found in samples with 1-monomyristin.doi:10.5219/183

  16. BIOHYDROGEN FROM CHEESE WHEY TREATMENT IN AN AnSBBR: ACHIEVING PROCESS STABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. F. Lima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAn AnSBBR (anaerobic sequencing batch reactor containing biomass immobilized on an inert support with liquid phase recirculation, containing a 3.5 L working volume, treated 1.5 L of cheese whey wastewater in 3 and 4 h cycles at 30 ºC to produce biohydrogen. From startup the bioreactor presented process instability. To overcome this problem the following measures were taken, however without success: adaptation of the biomass with uncontaminated easily degradable substrates, pH control at very low levels, and a different form of inoculation (natural fermentation of the feed medium. The problem was solved by cooling the feed medium to 4 ºC to prevent acidification in the storage container, by eliminating nutrient supplementation to prevent possible formation of H2S by sulfate-reducing bacteria and by periodic washing of the support material to improve the food/microorganism ratio. Hence, stable hydrogen production could be achieved with minimal presence of methane (36% H2; 62% CO2; 2% CH4 and the AnSBBR fed with cheese whey (influent concentration of 4070 mgCOD.L-1 and 3240 mgCarbohydrate.L-1 and applied volumetric organic loading of 14.6 gCOD.L-1.d-1 presented improved productivity and yield indicators compared to pure lactose and other reactor configurations, reaching values of 420 NmLH2.L-1.d-1 and 0.60 molH2.molCarbohydrate-1 in the steady-state phase (conversions of carbohydrates and COD were 98% and 30%, respectively.

  17. Artisanal cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artisanal cheese, which is handmade in small batches, differs from mass-produced cheese because of the milk and procedures used. Artisanal cheese is made from the milk of pasture-fed cows, sheep, or goats instead of conventionally-fed cows, and is affected by plants eaten, stage of lactation, and s...

  18. Variability of bacterial biofilms of the "tina" wood vats used in the ragusano cheese-making process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licitra, G; Ogier, J C; Parayre, S; Pediliggieri, C; Carnemolla, T M; Falentin, H; Madec, M N; Carpino, S; Lortal, S

    2007-11-01

    Ragusano cheese is a "protected denomination of origin" cheese made in the Hyblean region of Sicily from raw milk using traditional wooden tools, without starter. To explore the Ragusano bacterial ecosystem, molecular fingerprinting was conducted at different times during the ripening and biofilms from the wooden vats called "tinas" were investigated. Raw milks collected at two farm sites, one on the mountain and one at sea level, were processed to produce Ragusano cheese. Raw milk, curd before and after cooking, curd at stretching time (cheese 0 time), and cheese samples (4 and 7 months) were analyzed by PCR-temporal temperature gel electrophoresis (PCR-TTGE) and by classical enumeration microbiology. With the use of universal primers, PCR-TTGE revealed many differences between the raw milk profiles, but also notable common bands identified as Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus lactis, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, and Enterococcus faecium. After the stretching, TTGE profiles revealed three to five dominant species only through the entire process of ripening. In the biofilms of the two tinas used, one to five species were detected, S. thermophilus being predominant in both. Biofilms from five other tinas were also analyzed by PCR-TTGE, PCR-denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis, specific PCR tests, and sequencing, confirming the predominance of lactic acid bacteria (S. thermophilus, L. lactis, and L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis) and the presence of a few high-GC-content species, like coryneform bacteria. The spontaneous acidification of raw milks before and after contact with the five tinas was followed in two independent experiments. The lag period before acidification can be up to 5 h, depending on the raw milk and the specific tina, highlighting the complexity of this natural inoculation system.

  19. Distribution and stability of Aflatoxin M1 during processing and ripening of traditional white pickled cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruc, H H; Cibik, R; Yilmaz, E; Kalkanli, O

    2006-02-01

    The distribution of aflatoxin M(1) (AFM(1)) has been studied between curd, whey, cheese and pickle samples of Turkish white pickled cheese produced according to traditional techniques and its stability studied during the ripening period. Cheeses were produced in three cheese-making trials using raw milk that was artificially contaminated with AFM(1) at the levels of 50, 250 and 750 ng/l and allowed to ripen for three months. AFM(1) determinations were carried out at intervals by LC with fluorescence detection after immunoaffinity column clean-up. During the syneresis of the cheese a proportionately high concentration of AFM(1) remained in curd and for each trial the level was 3.6, 3.8 and 4.0 times higher than levels in milk. At the end of the ripening, the distribution of AFM(1) for cheese/whey + brine samples was 0.9, 1.0 and 1.3 for first, second and third spiking respectively indicating that nearly half of the AFM(1) remained in cheese. It has been found that only 2-4% of the initial spiking of AFM(1) transferred into the brine solution. During the ripening period AFM(1) levels remained constant suggesting that AFM(1) was quite stable during manufacturing and ripening.

  20. Contribution of lactic acid bacteria esterases to the release of fatty acids in miniature ewe's milk cheese models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeijón Mukdsi, María C; Medina, Roxana B; Katz, Marta B; Pivotto, Rodolfo; Gatti, Patricia; González, Silvia N

    2009-02-11

    The present work evaluates the contribution of esterase activities of lactic acid bacteria isolated from ewe's dairy products to the release of free fatty acids (FFA) in ewe's milk cheese models. At 60 days of ripening, single-strain cheeses Ov 409 and Ov 421 showed high levels of total FFA (3075 and 2494.62 mg/kg, respectively). Cheeses Ov 227-Ov 409 and Ov 421-Ov 409 presented high percentages of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). The highest levels of volatile free fatty acids (VFFA) were detected in cheeses Ov 409, Ov 421-Ov 409, and Ov 421-Ov 227. Studies on esterase activities showed that these strains hydrolyzed alpha-naphthyl derivatives of fatty acids from C2 to C6, mainly associated with the wall-membrane fraction. The results showed that the strains studied contributed to the release of FFA during ripening of ewe's milk cheese models. The increase of SCFA throughout ripening involves the action of esterases of starter strains.

  1. Texture profile in processed cheese: influence of the use of milk protein concentrates and whey protein concentrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisson Borges Souza

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The techno-functional properties of proteins related with the molecular characteristics are facilitated by partial unfolding of structures. From these interactions, the medium pH is presented as a major interferer in intensity and type of reaction that takes place. The intensity of denaturation and interaction of different proteins occur in different forms and intensity accordingly to the pH value of the medium in which they are located. This study aimed to verify the influence of interactions between whey protein concentrate/milk protein concentrate on the evolution of the texture profile of processed cheese at different pH values. We have analyzed samples of commercial whey protein concentrate (WPC and milk protein concentrate (MPC using 112.5g/kg processed cheese. The results were interpreted in terms of texture profile. It was also possible to optimize the different proportions of WPC and MPC, and pH value change the parameters of texture for creamy processed cheese and the pH was also an influencing factor in this optimization.

  2. Effect of inulin on physico-chemical, sensory, fatty acid profile and microstructure of processed cheese spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Apurba; Kanawjia, Suresh Kumar; Singh, Mukesh Pratap

    2017-07-01

    To develop a functional processed cheese spread (PCS) different levels of inulin (0, 4, 6 and 8%) addition into PCS was studied with its physico-chemical, sensory and fatty acid profile and micro-structural quality. As the level of inulin addition increased moisture, a w and titratable acidity, decreased. At the highest level of inulin addition (8%) sensory panelists reported a significant decrease in total sensory score. PCS with 6% insulin was found to have optimum from quantity. The addition of inulin in cheese spread decreased both total saturated fatty acid and unsaturated fatty acid and in unsaturated fatty acid, mono unsaturated fatty acid decreased; however, polyunsaturated fatty acids increased as compared to the control. Scanning Electron Micrograph of PCS containing insulin showed uniform distribution of insulin with diameter ranged 4-10 µm in the protein matrix.

  3. Listeria monocytogenes in Gorgonzola cheese: Study of the behaviour throughout the process and growth prediction during shelf life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalzini, Elena; Cosciani-Cunico, Elena; Monastero, Paola; Bernini, Valentina; Neviani, Erasmo; Bellio, Alberto; Decastelli, Lucia; Losio, Marina-Nadia; Daminelli, Paolo; Varisco, Giorgio

    2017-12-04

    As reported on RASFF's portal, in the first 9months of 2016, a total of 13 "alerts/information for attention" were issued concerning the presence of Listeria monocytogenes in mould cheeses throughout Europe. This study analyzes the behaviour of L. monocytogenes in Gorgonzola cheese, a typical Italian soft blue-veined cheese, when contaminated at different time points. In the first challenge test, the pasteurized milk was contaminated and the complete cheese manufacture (cheesemaking, ripening) and shelf life was simulated. After a decrease during the first days of the cheesemaking, the pH remained constant for 35days (5weeks) and then it increased rapidly reaching the final values of 6.8±0.02 in the core and 5.8±0.4 on the rind. At the same time, the pathogen concentration decreased (about 2logCFU/g), although during the last week a rapid pathogen growth was observed after the rise in pH values. When the cheese was stored at thermal abuse condition (8-12°C), the pathogen concentration on the rind was 4.8±0.3 log CFU/g and after 66days (about 9weeks) no significant difference (p>0.05) was observed; whereas, a growth from 5.4±0.4 to 7.1±0.5logCFU/g was observed in the core. A second challenge test was performed using three batches of commercial slices of Gorgonzola cheese inoculated by L. monocytogenes and stored at 8°C. The maximum specific growth rates (μ max , 1/h) of L. monocytogenes estimated ranged from 0.007 to 0.061. The square root model was used to predict the μ max at others temperature and to establish the time necessary to reach the European critical legal limit of 2logCFU/g, in different storage scenarios. The predictions obtained in this study can be applied to any time-temperature profile, and in particular to the conditions to which the product is most likely to be subject in normal use, up to its final consumption. This study can be considered a valuable contribution also aimed at supporting the monitoring surveys carried out by officers of

  4. Life cycle assessment of cheese production process in a small-sized dairy industry in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Hudson Carlos Maia; Maranduba, Henrique Leonardo; de Almeida Neto, José Adolfo; Rodrigues, Luciano Brito

    2017-02-01

    Current research identifies, analyzes, and suggests improvements for minimizing environmental impacts in the manufacture of cheese using the life cycle assessment. Data collection and development of the inventory were performed in a small-sized dairy industry in Brazil. A cradle-to-gate approach was conducted based on the primary data from cheese production and secondary data from databases. The ReCiPe method was used for the impact assessment, considering the categories climate change, ozone depletion, terrestrial acidification, freshwater eutrophication, photochemical oxidant formation, particulate matter formation, water depletion, and fossil depletion. A sensitivity analysis was performed including evaluations of different fuels for generating thermal energy, strategies for cleaning of dairy plant and utensils, variations in the way of cheese production based on the fat content, and production percentage changes. The results showed that the skimmed milk and thermal energy productions, electricity usage, and water consumptions were the main elementary flows. The pallet residues showed the best to be used as fuel for thermal energy. Detergent combinations did not influence the impact categories. There was a direct relationship between fat content range (20 to 30%) and the contribution in six impact categories. Changes from 20% in cheese allocation factor influenced the impact assessment results. LCA allowed identifying the main elementary flow of cheese production, providing valuable information with the potential to verify opportunities for on-site improvements.

  5. Fatty acid composition of buffalo milk yellow cheese after technological processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, S.; Nacheva, I.; Miteva, D.

    2010-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of buffalo milk yellow cheese in fresh condition and after combining of two technological approaches – lyophilization and gamma sterilization with 1, 2 and 4 kGy, aiming at a prolongation of its shelf life, was investigated. The fat extraction from the milk samples was realized by the method of Roese-Gottlieb. The analysis of the fatty acids was made with the aid of gas chromatograph Shimadzu 2010. Minimal changes in the fatty acid composition of the buffalo milk yellow cheese after freeze-drying and gamma ray treatment were established

  6. Fatty Acid Composition of Buffalo Milk Yellow Cheese after Technological Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, S.; Nacheva, I.; Miteva, D.

    2010-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of buffalo milk yellow cheese in fresh condition and after combining of two technological approaches – lyophilization and gamma sterilization with 1, 2 and 4 kGy, aiming at a prolongation of its shelf life, was investigated. The fat extraction from the milk samples was realized by the method of Roese-Gottlieb. The analysis of the fatty acids was made with the aid of gas chromatograph Shimadzu 2010. Minimal changes in the fatty acid composition of the buffalo milk yellow cheese after freeze-drying and gamma ray treatment were established

  7. Modelling the effect of lactic acid bacteria from starter- and aroma culture on growth of Listeria monocytogenes in cottage cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Eklöw, Annelie; Dalgaard, Paw

    2014-10-01

    Four mathematical models were developed and validated for simultaneous growth of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria from added cultures and Listeria monocytogenes, during chilled storage of cottage cheese with fresh- or cultured cream dressing. The mathematical models include the effect of temperature, pH, NaCl, lactic- and sorbic acid and the interaction between these environmental factors. Growth models were developed by combining new and existing cardinal parameter values. Subsequently, the reference growth rate parameters (μref at 25°C) were fitted to a total of 52 growth rates from cottage cheese to improve model performance. The inhibiting effect of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria from added cultures on growth of L. monocytogenes was efficiently modelled using the Jameson approach. The new models appropriately predicted the maximum population density of L. monocytogenes in cottage cheese. The developed models were successfully validated by using 25 growth rates for L. monocytogenes, 17 growth rates for lactic acid bacteria and a total of 26 growth curves for simultaneous growth of L. monocytogenes and lactic acid bacteria in cottage cheese. These data were used in combination with bias- and accuracy factors and with the concept of acceptable simulation zone. Evaluation of predicted growth rates of L. monocytogenes in cottage cheese with fresh- or cultured cream dressing resulted in bias-factors (Bf) of 1.07-1.10 with corresponding accuracy factor (Af) values of 1.11 to 1.22. Lactic acid bacteria from added starter culture were on average predicted to grow 16% faster than observed (Bf of 1.16 and Af of 1.32) and growth of the diacetyl producing aroma culture was on average predicted 9% slower than observed (Bf of 0.91 and Af of 1.17). The acceptable simulation zone method showed the new models to successfully predict maximum population density of L. monocytogenes when growing together with lactic acid bacteria in cottage cheese. 11 of 13 simulations of L

  8. THERMOPHYSICAL PROPERTIES AND WATER ACTIVITY OF TRANSFERRED CHEESE (UF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Dalvi Esfahan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Few data are available on the thermophysical properties of cheese in the ripening process.The main objective of this work was to investigate the effects of brining and temperature on the thermophysical properties, i.e., thermal conductivity, specific heat, density and water activity of UF cheese and finally we measure surface heat transfer coefficient .Then we develop models for thermophysical properties based on physical and multiple regression concept .

  9. Bitter taste – cheese failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Kirin

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Bitter taste is serous and very often cheese failure in modern cheesemaking process. In this paper the sources and bitter taste development in cheese will be presented. Bitterness in cheese is linked to bitter compounds development during cheese ripening. Most of the bitter compounds come from bitter peptides, the mechanism of theirs development being due to proteasepeptidase system of the cured enzymes and the milk cultures as well as other proteases present in cheese. By the action of curd enzymes, the milk protein - casein - is firstly degraded into high molecular weight compounds possessing no bitter taste. Those compounds are then degraded, by milk protease cultures, to hydrophobic bitter peptides of low molecular weight further degraded, by bacterial endopeptidase during cheese ripening, to bitter peptides and amino acids. In the case when no balance exists, between bitter compounds development and breakdown by lactic acid bacteria peptidase, an accumulation of bitter peptides occurs thus having an influence on cheese bitterness. During cheese ripening naturally occurring milk protease – plasmin, and thermostable proteases of raw milk microflora are also involved in proteolytic process. Fat cheese lipases, initiated by lipase originating from psychrotrophic bacteria in raw milk as well as other cheese lipases, are also associated with bitter taste generation. The other sources of bitterness come from the forages, the medicament residues as well as washing and disinfecting agents. In order to eliminate these failures a special care should be taken in milk quality as well as curd and milk culture selection. At this point technological norms and procedures, aimed to maintain the proteolysis balance during cheese ripening, should be adjusted, thus eliminating the bitter taste of the cheese.

  10. Bacteriological studies on Limburger cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Erian, A.F.M.

    1969-01-01

    A study has been made of the ripening process of Limburger cheese, including microbiological investigations of the surface flora and chemical analyses of the cheese during the different stages of ripening. The microbial flora was studied both qualitatively and quantitatively. In addition to the

  11. Habit Formation in Natural Cheese Consumption An Approach Based on Dynamic Demand Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    WAKABAYASHI, Katsufumi

    2010-01-01

    In expectation of growing cheese consumption, natural cheese production is being increased to reduce surplus milk and create high added value in raw milk. Other studies found positive trends in cheese consumption. However, those studies neither clarified recent trends, nor distinguished natural cheese from processed cheese. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the structure of natural cheese consumption, focusing on habit formation. We test structural changes in cheese demand using dynamic...

  12. Fed-batch bioreactor process with recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing on cheese whey

    OpenAIRE

    Rech, Rosane; Ayub, Marco Antônio Záchia

    2006-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain W303 was transformed with two yeast integrative plasmids containing Kluyveromyces lactis LAC4 and LAC12 genes that codify beta-galactosidase and lactose permease respectively. The BLR030 recombinant strain was selected due to its growth and beta-galactosidase production capacity. Different culture media based on deproteinized cheese whey (DCW) were tested and the best composition (containing DCW, supplemented with yeast extract 1 %, and peptone 3 % (w/v)) was c...

  13. Using cheese whey for hydrogen and methane generation in a two-stage continuous process with alternative pH controlling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venetsaneas, Nikolaos; Antonopoulou, Georgia; Stamatelatou, Katerina; Kornaros, Michael; Lyberatos, Gerasimos

    2009-08-01

    This study focuses on the exploitation of cheese whey as a source for hydrogen and methane, in a two-stage continuous process. Mesophilic fermentative hydrogen production from undiluted cheese whey was investigated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24 h. Alkalinity addition (NaHCO(3)) or an automatic pH controller were used, to maintain the pH culture at a constant value of 5.2. The hydrogen production rate was 2.9+/-0.2 L/Lreactor/d, while the yield of hydrogen produced was approximately 0.78+/-0.05 mol H(2)/mol glucose consumed, with alkalinity addition, while the respective values when using pH control were 1.9+/-0.1 L/Lreactor/d and 0.61+/-0.04 mol H(2)/mol glucose consumed. The corresponding yields of hydrogen produced were 2.9 L of H(2)/L cheese whey and 1.9 L of H(2)/L cheese whey, respectively. The effluent from the hydrogenogenic reactor was further digested to biogas in a continuous mesophilic anaerobic bioreactor. The anaerobic digester was operated at an HRT of 20 d and produced approximately 1L CH(4)/d, corresponding to a yield of 6.7 L CH(4)/L of influent. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) elimination reached 95.3% demonstrating that cheese whey could be efficiently used for hydrogen and methane production, in a two-stage process.

  14. Optimising the wagashie (A traditional cottage cheese) process and sensory quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, Akua B.

    2016-07-01

    Wagashie is a traditional West African cottage cheese produced by the Fulani who are semi-nomadic. It is a good protein source and can replace fish or meat in the diet of low income families in Africa. However, it is a product with high moisture content (60%) which is favourable for the growth of microorganisms and thus has a short shelf life of 3 days; it also has a bland taste with limited patronage. This research was therefore carried out to re-engineer wagashie for a larger market with a focus on improving its sensory quality, safety and shelf life. A brief survey was carried out to confirm the wagashie production procedure and identify retailers and producers for collection of samples. The safety of market samples of fresh and fried wagashie samples were determined by assaying for various indicator and pathogenic microorganisms including aerobic mesophiles, Yeast and moulds, coliform bacterin, F coli, Staphylococcus aurcus Bacillus cercus, Salmonella spp, Enterococcus, Enterobacteriaceae. Studies were also carried out to replace the traditional coagulant of milk which involves the use of plant extract of Sodom apple (Calotropis procera) with commercial rennet used in industrial cheese production and ferment fresh milk used in the preparation. The traditional method of preparation was also standardised to improve its sensory quality. The process variables of wagashie, which are salt concentration, coagulant and fermentation time, were thus optimised using the Box Behnken design which is a response surface methodology and an affective testing was carried out to evaluate the consumer preference of the product with a nine-point hedonic scale. The sensory profile of the 'wagashie' samples were described by a Quantitative Descriptive Analysis by a trained 13 member panel. They evaluated the wagashie samples for desirable and undesirable attributes of wagashie. The rheology of 'wagashie which involves Texture Profile Analysis (TPA) with a texture

  15. Biofilm Formation and Disinfectant Susceptibility of Persistent and Nonpersistent Listeria monocytogenes Isolates from Gorgonzola Cheese Processing Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Annalisa; Bertolotti, Luigi; Brito, Luisa; Civera, Tiziana

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the biofilm-forming ability and/or the disinfectant susceptibility accounted for the persistence of Listeria monocytogenes in Gorgonzola cheese processing plants. For this purpose, a set of 16 L. monocytogenes isolates collected in the 2004-2007 period was analyzed, including 11 persistent isolates collected in different years, within the collection period, and displaying identical or highly correlated pulsotypes. The evaluation of biofilm-forming ability was assessed using crystal violet (CV) staining and the enumeration of viable cells on stainless steel coupons (SSC). Absorbance values obtained with CV staining for persistent and nonpersistent isolates were not significantly different (rm-ANOVA p > 0.05) and the cell counts from nonpersistent isolates showed to be higher compared with persistent isolates (rm-ANOVA p  0.05). A greater influence of organic matter on MS could explain why P3 was efficient in reducing to effective levels the majority of the isolates at the lowest concentration suggested by the manufacturer (0.2% [v/v]), while the same purpose required a higher concentration (1% [v/v]) of MS. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the persistence of these isolates in Gorgonzola cheese processing plants was linked neither to the biofilm-forming ability nor to their susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide-based disinfectants; therefore, other factors should contribute to the persistent colonization of the dairies.

  16. Effect of flaxseed supplementation rate and processing on the production, fatty acid profile, and texture of milk, butter, and cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeffner, S P; Qu, Y; Just, J; Quezada, N; Ramsing, E; Keller, M; Cherian, G; Goddick, L; Bobe, G

    2013-02-01

    Health and nutrition professionals advise consumers to limit consumption of saturated fatty acids and increase the consumption of foods rich in n-3 fatty acids. Researchers have previously reported that feeding extruded flaxseed, which is high in C18:3n-3, improves the fatty acid profile of milk and dairy products to less saturated fatty acids and to more C18:3n-3. Fat concentrations in milk and butter decreased when cows were fed higher concentrations of extruded flaxseed. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal rate of flaxseed supplementation for improving the fatty acid profile without decreasing production characteristics of milk and dairy products. By using a double 5 × 5 Latin square design, 10 mid- to late-lactation Holstein cows were fed extruded (0, 0.91, 1.81, and 2.72 kg/d) and ground (1.81 kg/d) flaxseed as a top dressing for 2-wk periods each. At the end of each 2-wk treatment period, milk and serum samples were taken. Milk was subsequently manufactured into butter and fresh Mozzarella cheese. Increasing supplementation rates of extruded flaxseed improved the fatty acid profile of milk, butter, and cheese gradually to less saturated and atherogenic fatty acids and to more C18:3n-3 by increasing concentrations of C18:3n-3 in serum. The less saturated fatty acid profile was associated with decreased hardness and adhesiveness of refrigerated butter, which likely cause improved spreadability. Supplementation rates of extruded flaxseed did not affect dry matter intake of the total mixed ration, milk composition, and production of milk, butter, or cheese. Flaxseed processing did not affect production, fatty acid profile of milk, or texture of butter and cheese. Feeding up to 2.72 kg/d of extruded flaxseed to mid- to late-lactation Holstein cows may improve nutritional and functional properties of milk fat without compromising production parameters. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Stochastic modelling of Listeria monocytogenes single cell growth in cottage cheese with mesophilic lactic acid bacteria from aroma producing cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Dalgaard, Paw

    2015-07-02

    A stochastic model was developed for simultaneous growth of low numbers of Listeria monocytogenes and populations of lactic acid bacteria from the aroma producing cultures applied in cottage cheese. During more than two years, different batches of cottage cheese with aroma culture were analysed for pH, lactic acid concentration and initial concentration of lactic acid bacteria. These data and bootstrap sampling were used to represent product variability in the stochastic model. Lag time data were estimated from observed growth data (lactic acid bacteria) and from literature on L. monocytogenes single cells. These lag time data were expressed as relative lag times and included in growth models. A stochastic model was developed from an existing deterministic growth model including the effect of five environmental factors and inter-bacterial interaction [Østergaard, N.B, Eklöw, A and Dalgaard, P. 2014. Modelling the effect of lactic acid bacteria from starter- and aroma culture on growth of Listeria monocytogenes in cottage cheese. International Journal of Food Microbiology. 188, 15-25]. Growth of L. monocytogenes single cells, using lag time distributions corresponding to three different stress levels, was simulated. The simulated growth was subsequently compared to growth of low concentrations (0.4-1.0 CFU/g) of L. monocytogenes in cottage cheese, exposed to similar stresses, and in general a good agreement was observed. In addition, growth simulations were performed using population relative lag time distributions for L. monocytogenes as reported in literature. Comparably good predictions were obtained as for the simulations performed using lag time data for individual cells of L. monocytogenes. Therefore, when lag time data for individual cells are not available, it was suggested that relative lag time distributions for L. monocytogenes can be used as a qualified default assumption when simulating growth of low concentrations of L. monocytogenes. Copyright

  18. Retrospective analysis of a listeria monocytogenes contamination episode in raw milk goat cheese using quantitative microbial risk assessment tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhalle, L; Ellouze, M; Yde, M; Clinquart, A; Daube, G; Korsak, N

    2012-12-01

    In 2005, the Belgian authorities reported a Listeria monocytogenes contamination episode in cheese made from raw goat's milk. The presence of an asymptomatic shedder goat in the herd caused this contamination. On the basis of data collected at the time of the episode, a retrospective study was performed using an exposure assessment model covering the production chain from the milking of goats up to delivery of cheese to the market. Predictive microbiology models were used to simulate the growth of L. monocytogenes during the cheese process in relation with temperature, pH, and water activity. The model showed significant growth of L. monocytogenes during chilling and storage of the milk collected the day before the cheese production (median increase of 2.2 log CFU/ml) and during the addition of starter and rennet to milk (median increase of 1.2 log CFU/ml). The L. monocytogenes concentration in the fresh unripened cheese was estimated to be 3.8 log CFU/g (median). This result is consistent with the number of L. monocytogenes in the fresh cheese (3.6 log CFU/g) reported during the cheese contamination episode. A variance-based method sensitivity analysis identified the most important factors impacting the cheese contamination, and a scenario analysis then evaluated several options for risk mitigation. Thus, by using quantitative microbial risk assessment tools, this study provides reliable information to identify and control critical steps in a local production chain of cheese made from raw goat's milk.

  19. Phage Biodiversity in Artisanal Cheese Wheys Reflects the Complexity of the Fermentation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahony, Jennifer; Moscarelli, Angelo; Kelleher, Philip; Lugli, Gabriele A; Ventura, Marco; Settanni, Luca; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2017-03-16

    Dairy fermentations constitute a perfect "breeding ground" for bacteriophages infecting starter cultures, particularly strains of Lactococcus lactis. In modern fermentations, these phages typically belong to one of three groups, i.e., the 936, P335, and c2 phage groups. Traditional production methods present fewer chemical and physical barriers to phage proliferation compared to modern production systems, while the starter cultures used are typically complex, variable, and undefined. In the current study, a variety of cheese whey, animal-derived rennet, and vat swab samples from artisanal cheeses produced in Sicily were analysed for the presence of lactococcal phages to assess phage diversity in such environments. The complete genomes of 18 representative phage isolates were sequenced, allowing the identification of 10 lactococcal 949 group phages, six P087 group phages, and two members of the 936 group phages. The genetic diversity of these isolates was examined using phylogenetic analysis as well as a focused analysis of the receptor binding proteins, which dictate specific interactions with the host-encoded receptor. Thermal treatments at 63 °C and 83 °C indicate that the 949 phages are particularly sensitive to thermal treatments, followed by the P087 and 936 isolates, which were shown to be much less sensitive to such treatments. This difference may explain the relatively low frequency of isolation of the so-called "rare" 949 and P087 group phages in modern fermentations.

  20. Phage Biodiversity in Artisanal Cheese Wheys Reflects the Complexity of the Fermentation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Mahony

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Dairy fermentations constitute a perfect “breeding ground” for bacteriophages infecting starter cultures, particularly strains of Lactococcus lactis. In modern fermentations, these phages typically belong to one of three groups, i.e., the 936, P335, and c2 phage groups. Traditional production methods present fewer chemical and physical barriers to phage proliferation compared to modern production systems, while the starter cultures used are typically complex, variable, and undefined. In the current study, a variety of cheese whey, animal-derived rennet, and vat swab samples from artisanal cheeses produced in Sicily were analysed for the presence of lactococcal phages to assess phage diversity in such environments. The complete genomes of 18 representative phage isolates were sequenced, allowing the identification of 10 lactococcal 949 group phages, six P087 group phages, and two members of the 936 group phages. The genetic diversity of these isolates was examined using phylogenetic analysis as well as a focused analysis of the receptor binding proteins, which dictate specific interactions with the host-encoded receptor. Thermal treatments at 63 °C and 83 °C indicate that the 949 phages are particularly sensitive to thermal treatments, followed by the P087 and 936 isolates, which were shown to be much less sensitive to such treatments. This difference may explain the relatively low frequency of isolation of the so-called “rare” 949 and P087 group phages in modern fermentations.

  1. Thermal properties of selected cheeses samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika BOŽIKOVÁ

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The thermophysical parameters of selected cheeses (processed cheese and half hard cheese are presented in the article. Cheese is a generic term for a diverse group of milk-based food products. Cheese is produced throughout the world in wide-ranging flavors, textures, and forms. Cheese goes during processing through the thermal and mechanical manipulation, so thermal properties are one of the most important. Knowledge about thermal parameters of cheeses could be used in the process of quality evaluation. Based on the presented facts thermal properties of selected cheeses which are produced by Slovak producers were measured. Theoretical part of article contains description of cheese and description of plane source method which was used for thermal parameters detection. Thermophysical parameters as thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and volume specific heat were measured during the temperature stabilisation. The results are presented as relations of thermophysical parameters to the temperature in temperature range from 13.5°C to 24°C. Every point of graphic relation was obtained as arithmetic average from measured values for the same temperature. Obtained results were statistically processed. Presented graphical relations were chosen according to the results of statistical evaluation and also according to the coefficients of determination for every relation. The results of thermal parameters are in good agreement with values measured by other authors for similar types of cheeses.

  2. Thermo-fluid-dynamic modelling of a cold store for cheese maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferruccio Giametta

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, drying tests on fresh cheeses were carried out in a cold store equipped with a Munters MG90 dehumidifier that controls the humidity of the room air. In this system, the condensation/drainage stage is omitted since the humid room air is directed out of the cold store (process air and the dried air is introduced by the dehumidifier inside the cold store. Eight air temperature probes were introduced in the store; two probes (HOBO U12-012, 1 HOBO – Onset Computer Corporation, Cape Cod, MA, USA were also introduced and used to measure relative humidity and temperature together with an anemometer to analyse any changes in thermal and fluid dynamics in the cell environment. COMSOL multiphysics software (Comsol Group, Stockolm, Sweden was used to simulate the store environment based on the finite elements method. This allowed us to compare and discuss the experimental data collected and the results obtained by the thermo- fluid-dynamic simulation.

  3. Transcriptomic response of Debaryomyces hansenii during mixed culture in a liquid model cheese medium with Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Reine; Bonnarme, Pascal; Irlinger, Françoise; Frey-Klett, Pascale; Onésime, Djamila; Aubert, Julie; Loux, Valentin; Beckerich, Jean-Marie

    2018-01-02

    Yeasts play a crucial role in cheese ripening. They contribute to the curd deacidification, the establishment of acid-sensitive bacterial communities, and flavour compounds production via proteolysis and catabolism of amino acids (AA). Negative yeast-yeast interaction was observed between the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica 1E07 (YL1E07) and the yeast Debaryomyces hansenii 1L25 (DH1L25) in a model cheese but need elucidation. YL1E07 and DH1L25 were cultivated in mono and co-cultures in a liquid synthetic medium (SM) mimicking the cheese environment and the growth inhibition of DH1L25 in the presence of YL1E07 was reproduced. We carried out microbiological, biochemical (lactose, lactate, AA consumption and ammonia production) and transcriptomic analyses by microarray technology to highlight the interaction mechanisms. We showed that the DH1L25 growth inhibition in the presence of YL1E07 was neither due to the ammonia production nor to the nutritional competition for the medium carbon sources between the two yeasts. The transcriptomic study was the key toward the comprehension of yeast-yeast interaction, and revealed that the inhibition of DH1L25 in co-culture is due to a decrease of the mitochondrial respiratory chain functioning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Fed-batch bioreactor process with recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing on cheese whey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rech

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain W303 was transformed with two yeast integrative plasmids containing Kluyveromyces lactis LAC4 and LAC12 genes that codify beta-galactosidase and lactose permease respectively. The BLR030 recombinant strain was selected due to its growth and beta-galactosidase production capacity. Different culture media based on deproteinized cheese whey (DCW were tested and the best composition (containing DCW, supplemented with yeast extract 1 %, and peptone 3 % (w/v was chosen for bioreactor experiments. Batch, and fed-batch cultures with linear ascending feeding for 25 (FB25, 35 (FB35, and 50 (FB50 hours, were performed. FB35 and FB50 produced the highest beta-galactosidase specific activities (around 1,800 U/g cells, and also the best productivities (180 U/L.h. Results show the potential use of fed-batch cultures of recombinant S. cerevisiae on industrial applications using supplemented whey as substrate.

  5. Fate of Listeria monocytogenes and members of the Enterobacteriaceae group along the processing line of 'Wara' a Southwestern Nigeria soft cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adetunji, V O; Chen, J

    2010-12-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the survivability of Listeria monocytogenes and members of the Enterobacteriaceae group of organisms during the processing and storage of wara, a southwestern Nigerian un-ripened soft cheese. Pasteurized milk inoculated with L. monocytogenes at 10(1) or 10(2) CFU/ml was used to process the cheese. Samples were taken along the processing steps and throughout a five-day storage period at 15 and 28 degrees C for populations of L. monocytogenes and Enterobacteriaceae. On the fourth storage day, portions of the control cheese (not inoculated with L. monocytogenes) were fried in vegetable oil, mimicking the practice of southwestern Nigerian cheese processors. The results indicated that L. monocytogenes, at both inoculation levels, did not survive the processing of wara. In samples initially inoculated with 10(1) CFU/ml of L. monocytogenes, the Enterobacteriaceae counts increased from 3.35-3.48 Log10 CFU/g on the first day of storage to 7.63-8.46 Log10 CFU/g at 28 degrees C and 5.41-6.34 Log10 CFU/g at 15 degrees C after storage for 5 days. The populations of the Enterobacteriaceae group increased with the extension of storage time in the contaminated, as well as the control cheeses. Overall, the survival of Enterobacteriaceae responded to storage temperatures. Frying significantly reduced the populations of Enterobacteriaceae. The study suggests that wara can serve as a vehicle to transmit illness if its microbial quality is not appropriately managed.

  6. Comparative inhibitory effects of Thymus vulgaris L. essential oil against Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes and mesophilic starter co-culture in cheese-mimicking models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Rayssa Julliane; de Souza, Geanny Targino; Honório, Vanessa Gonçalves; de Sousa, Jossana Pereira; da Conceição, Maria Lúcia; Maganani, Marciane; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we assessed the effects of Thymus vulgaris L. essential oil (TVEO) on Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes, pathogenic bacteria frequently associated with fresh or low-ripened cheeses (e.g., Brazilian coalho cheese), and on a starter co-culture comprising Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris, which are commonly used for the production of different cheeses. To measure these effects, we determined the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and assessed bacterial cell viability over time in (coalho) cheese-based broth and in a semi-solid (coalho) cheese model at 10 °C. The MIC for TVEO was 2.5 μL/mL against S. aureus and L. monocytogenes, while the MIC was 1.25 μL/mL against the starter co-culture. The TVEO (5 and 2.5 μL/mL) sharply reduced the viable counts of all assayed bacteria in cheese broth over 24 h; although, at 5 μL/mL, TVEO more severely affected the viability of the starter co-culture compared with pathogenic bacteria. The addition of 1.25 μL/g of TVEO in the semi-solid cheese model did not reduce the viable counts of all assayed bacteria. At 2.5 μL/g, TVEO slightly decreased the viable counts of S. aureus, L. monocytogenes and Lactococcus spp. in the semi-solid cheese model over 72 h. The final counts of Lactococcus spp. in a semi-solid cheese model containing 2.5 μL/mL TVEO were lower than those of pathogenic bacteria under the same conditions. These results suggest that the doses of TVEO used to control pathogenic bacteria in fermented dairy products, especially in low-ripened cheeses, should be cautiously considered for potential negative effects on the growth and survival of starter cultures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hybrid model for an enzymatic reactor: hydrolysis of cheese whey proteins by alcalase immobilized in agarose gel particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ruy; Resende, Mariam M; Giordano, Raquel L C; Giordano, Roberto C

    2003-01-01

    Cheese whey proteolysis, carried out by immobilized enzymes, can either change or evidence functional properties of the produced peptides, increasing the potential applications of this byproduct of the dairy industry. Optimization and scale-up of the enzymatic reactor relies on its mathematical model-a set of mass balance equations, with reaction rates usually given by Michaelis-Menten-like kinetics; no information about the distribution of peptides' molecular sizes is supplied. In this article, a hybrid model of a batch enzymatic reactor is presented, consisting of differential mass balances coupled to a "neural-kinetic model," which provides the molecular weight distributions of the resulting peptides.

  8. Predicting and Modelling the Growth of Potentially Pathogenic Bacteria in Coalho Cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Valdenice Gomes; de Oliveira Arruda, Maria Digian; Dantas Duarte, Francisca Nayara; de Sousa, Janaína Maria Batista; da Costa Lima, Maiara; da Conceição, Maria Lúcia; Schaffner, Donald W; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2017-07-01

    Coalho is a semihard medium- to high-moisture cheese produced in various states in the northeastern region of Brazil. This study was conducted to predict the growth kinetics (maximum growth rate, Grmax) of Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, and Staphylococcus aureus using the ComBase predictor with various combinations of temperature, pH, and water activity (a w ) in commercial Coalho cheese samples. The growth of two antibiotic-resistant derivative strains of L. monocytogenes (parental strains ATCC 19115 and ATCC 7644) and S. aureus (parental strains ATCC 13565 and ATCC 19095) was measured in commercial Coalho cheese samples during 14 days of storage as a function of the initial contamination level (3 and 5 log CFU/g) and storage temperature (7.5 and 12°C). The highest Grmax values predicted by ComBase under the various conditions of temperature, pH, and a w were for L. monocytogenes (0.006 to 0.065 log CFU/g/h) and S. aureus (0.003 to 0.048 log CFU/g/h). The Grmax values predicted by ComBase for E. coli and Salmonella were 0.007 to 0.026 and 0.008 to 0.041 log CFU/g/h, respectively. An experimental challenge in Coalho cheese revealed that the populations of all tested antibiotic-resistant derivative strains of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus increased (>0.5 log CFU/g) by day 14 of storage at 7.5 or 12°C. L. monocytogenes and S. aureus had higher Grmax values in cheese samples stored at 12°C than those stored at 7.5°C. The ComBase growth predictions under the temperature, pH, and a w conditions in commercial Coalho cheese samples were generally fail-safe for predicting the growth of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus in the actual product. These results indicate that Coalho cheese has pH and a w characteristics that allow the growth of E. coli, L. monocytogenes, Salmonella, and S. aureus. These cheeses are typically stored at temperatures that do not prevent the growth of these bacteria.

  9. Improvements in the Flavour of Soy Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Ahmad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of biochemical and technological similarities and dissimilarities between soy cheese and Cheddar cheese is presented to provide guidelines for the improvements in the flavour of soy cheese. Processing technology as well as the final product of soy cheese have many similarities with Cheddar in terms of appearance, texture, mouth feel, chemical nature, biochemical processes, etc. Soy protein has many useful amino acids like Asp, Ile, Leu, Met, Phe, Trp, Tyr, Val, etc., which are precursors of flavouring compounds and the right choice of microbial cultures is necessary to benefit from them. Using low levels of sodium chloride, without the use of ethanol, and introducing new milk cheese starter and non-starter cultures like Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis (formerly L. lactis ssp. lactis biovar. diacetylactis, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus casei, Streptococcus lactis var. maltigenes and Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris that enhance flavour will be helpful to improve the flavour of soy cheese.

  10. Manufacture of Cheddar cheese using probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum K25 and its cholesterol-lowering effects in a mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Xue; Liu, Chunhong; Li, Changying; Li, Shengyu; Li, Tiezhu; Li, Da; Zhao, Yujuan; Yang, Zhennai

    2013-01-01

    The probiotic adjunct Lactobacillus plantarum K25 was inoculated into milk to produce probiotic cheese. The effect of Lb. plantarum K25 on cheese composition, microbiological growth and survival during the manufacturing and ripening period, primary and secondary proteolysis during cheese ripening, and the in vivo cholesterol-lowering ability of the probiotic cheese were investigated. The results showed that the use of adjunct Lb. plantarum K25 in Cheddar cheese did not affect the cheese components including moisture, protein, fat, salt content and the pH value of cheese. During the whole ripening period, the probiotic adjunct maintained its viability, suggesting the effectiveness of Cheddar cheese as a vehicle for delivery of probiotic bacteria. No significant differences were observed in water-soluble nitrogen, 70 % ethanol-soluble nitrogen, 5 % phosphotungstic acid-soluble nitrogen, free amino acids and urea-PAGE patterns between the control and probiotic cheeses. Assessment of the in vivo cholesterol-lowering property of cheese with Lb. plantarum K25 showed that the levels of serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides decreased significantly, and the level of serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased in mice fed with the probiotic cheese. The results indicated the potential function as a dietary item of the probiotic cheese with Lb. plantarum K25 to reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

  11. 21 CFR 133.155 - Mozzarella cheese and scamorza cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mozzarella cheese and scamorza cheese. 133.155... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.155 Mozzarella cheese and scamorza cheese. (a) Description. (1...

  12. Evaluation of Natural Food Preservatives in Domestic and Imported Cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-Young; Han, Noori; Kim, Sun-Young; Yoo, Mi-Young; Paik, Hyun-Dong; Lim, Sang-Dong

    2016-01-01

    In milk and milk products, a number of organic acids naturally occur. We investigated the contents of some naturally occurred food preservatives (sorbic acid, benzoic acid, propionic acid, nitrite, and nitrate) contained in domestic and imported cheeses to establish the standard for the allowable range of food preservatives content in cheese. 8 kinds of domestic precheeses (n=104), 16 kinds of domestic cured cheeses (n=204) and 40 kinds of imported cheeses (n=74) were collected. Each domestic cheese was aged for a suitable number of months and stored for 2 mon at 5℃ and 10℃. No preservatives were detected in domestic soft and fresh cheeses, except cream cheese. In case of semi-hard cheeses, 2-5 mg/kg of benzoic acid was detected after 1-2 mon of aging. In imported cheeses, only benzoic acid and propionic acid were detected. The average benzoic acid and propionic acid contents in semi-hard cheese were 8.73 mg/kg and 18.78 mg/kg, respectively. Specifically, 1.16 mg/kg and 6.80 mg/kg of benzoic acid and propionic acid, respectively, were contained in soft cheese, 3.27 mg/kg and 2.84 mg/kg, respectively, in fresh cheese, 1.87 mg/kg and not detected, respectively, in hard cheese, and 2.07 mg/kg and 182.26 mg/kg, respectively, in blended processed cheese.

  13. Hydrogen production from cheese whey by catalytic steam reforming: Preliminary study using lactose as a model compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remón, J.; Laseca, M.; García, L.; Arauzo, J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Steam reforming of lactose: a promising strategy for cheese whey management. • Thermodynamic and experimental analyses of the effect of the operating conditions. • Reaction pathway showing the formation of the most important gas and liquid products. • Technical/energetic assessment: H 2 rich gas, C-free liquid and neutral energy process. - Abstract: Cheese whey is a yellowish liquid by-product of the cheese making process. Owing to its high BOD and COD values, this feedstock should not be directly discharged into the environment without appropriate treatment. Before dealing with real cheese whey, this work addresses the production of a rich hydrogen gas from lactose (the largest organic constituent of this waste) by catalytic steam reforming. This reforming process has been theoretically and experimentally studied. The theoretical study examines the effect of the temperature (300–600 °C), lactose concentration (1–10 wt.%) and N 2 (0–80 cm 3 STP/min) and liquid flow (0.1–0.5 mL/min) rates on the thermodynamic composition of the gas. The results show that the temperature and lactose concentration exerted the greatest influence on the thermodynamics. The experimental study, conducted in a fixed bed reactor using a Ni-based catalyst, considers the effect of the temperature (300–600 °C), lactose concentration (1–10 wt.%) and spatial time (4–16 g catalyst min/g lactose) on the global lactose conversion, product distribution on a carbon basis (gas, liquid and solid) and the compositions of the gas and liquid phases. Complete lactose conversion was achieved under all the experimental conditions. The carbon converted into gas, liquid and solid was 2–97%, 0–66% and 0–94%, respectively. The gas phase was made up of a mixture of H 2 (0–70 vol.%), CO 2 (20–70 vol.%), CO (2–34 vol.%) and CH 4 (0–3 vol.%). The liquid phase consisted of a mixture of aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, sugars, furans, alcohols and phenols

  14. Domestic cooked cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Kirin

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The research results of sensory properties, chemical and microbiological quality of domestic cooked cheese, which is produced around Bjelovar region, are presented in this paper.Domestic cooked cheese is Croatian autochthonous cheese produced in wider north-western region of Croatia (Bilogora, Lika, Banovina, Gorski Kotar and around Zagreb, and therefore should be registered as Protected Denomination of Origin (PDO and/or Protected Geographical Indication (PGI. Sensory properties, chemical and microbiological analyses were performed on 16 samples (7 non-smoked and 9 smoked cheeses. All cheese samples were produced according to tradition. Significant unevenness was determined in sensory, chemical and microbiological quality. Domestic cooked cheese can be classified as soft cheese according to dry matter content, and as semi-hard cheese according to water content in non fat cheese matter. According to fat content in dry matter, domestic cooked cheese can be classified as fat cheese. Standardization elements are proposed.

  15. Interaction of starter cultures and nonstarter lactic acid bacteria in the cheese environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaya, J; Barzideh, Z; LaPointe, G

    2017-12-20

    The microbiota of ripening cheese is dominated by lactic acid bacteria, which are either added as starters and adjunct cultures or originate from the production and processing environments (nonstarter or NSLAB). After curd formation and pressing, starters reach high numbers, but their viability then decreases due to lactose depletion, salt addition, and low pH and temperature. Starter autolysis releases cellular contents, including nutrients and enzymes, into the cheese matrix. During ripening, NSLAB may attain cell densities up to 8 log cfu per g after 3 to 9 mo. Depending on the species and strain, their metabolic activity may contribute to defects or inconsistency in cheese quality and to the development of typical cheese flavor. The availability of gene and genome sequences has enabled targeted detection of specific cheese microbes and their gene expression over the ripening period. Integrated systems biology is needed to combine the multiple perspectives of post-genomics technologies to elucidate the metabolic interactions among microorganisms. Future research should delve into the variation in cell physiology within the microbial populations, because spatial distribution within the cheese matrix will lead to microenvironments that could affect localized interactions of starters and NSLAB. Microbial community modeling can contribute to improving the efficiency and reduce the cost of food processes such as cheese ripening. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in Idiazabal cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrese, E; Arroyo-Izaga, M

    2012-01-01

    Raw-milk cheese has been identified in risk assessment as a food of greater concern to public health due to listeriosis. To determine the prevalence and levels of Listeria monocytogenes in semi-hard Idiazabal cheese manufactured by different producers in the Basque Country at consumer level. A total of 51 Idiazabal cheese samples were obtained from 10 separate retail establishments, chosen by stratified random sampling. Samples were tested using the official standard ISO procedure 11290-1 for detection and enumeration methods. All cheese samples tested negative for L. monocytogenes. However, 9.8% tested positive for Listeria spp., different from L. monocytogenes. Positive samples came from two brands, two were natural and three were smoked. The presence of Listeria spss. suggests that the cheese making process and the hygiene whether at milking or during cheese making could be insufficient.

  17. Start-up and operating costs for artisan cheese companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Andrea; Durham, Catherine A; Meunier-Goddik, Lisbeth

    2014-01-01

    Lack of valid economic data for artisan cheese making is a serious impediment to developing a realistic business plan and obtaining financing. The objective of this study was to determine approximate start-up and operating costs for an artisan cheese company. In addition, values are provided for the required size of processing and aging facilities associated with specific production volumes. Following in-depth interviews with existing artisan cheese makers, an economic model was developed to predict costs based on input variables such as production volume, production frequency, cheese types, milk types and cost, labor expenses, and financing. Estimated values for start-up cost for processing and aging facility ranged from $267,248 to $623,874 for annual production volumes of 3,402 kg (7,500 lb) and 27,216 kg (60,000 lb), respectively. First-year production costs ranged from $65,245 to $620,094 for the above-mentioned production volumes. It is likely that high start-up and operating costs remain a significant entry barrier for artisan cheese entrepreneurs. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors affecting proteolytic action of Lactococcus lactis in cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Youssef, Y.B.

    1992-01-01

    Model cheeses were developed to study the behaviour of proteolytic agents involved in cheese maturation under conditions that closely resemble those in normal cheese. The models were applied to study protein breakdown by Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris HP , as a

  19. bomasa for Cheese

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'The .~1uc{ywa~· conducted to investigate the activity and storage stability of crude pepsin extractfor use ~ rennet . substitute in cheese processing. The conditio,!s.tested were; regions of the abom~a, fresh versus dry abomasa; drying methods; maceration temPeratures (3re, 24~2ff>C Or 1 ~5"C).' 1,1U1Ceration pH 1-6 for 6 ...

  20. Formation of acrylamide in cheese bread

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Rikke Susanne Vingborg; Sobrinho, Luis Gualberto De Andrade; Granby, Kit

    2008-01-01

    of cheese added, and addition of 23.7 g cheese resulted in 958 ppb acrylamide. For an o/w rapeseed oil emulsion as a food model heated under conditions similar to those persisting inside bread during baking, it was further shown that acrylamide formation also occurred in absence of reducing sugars....... In contrast, acrylamide was not observed in Pao de queijo a traditional Brazilian bread product made from fermented cassava flour, fresh eggs and a mixture of Brazilian Gouda type cheese and Mozzarella cheese pointing towards a role of eggs in protection against acrylamide formation....

  1. Modeling of Helicopter Pilot Misperception During Overland Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    into obstacles in the terrain. The Navy Safety Center has adopted James Reason’s Swiss cheese model for understanding the underlying process that...results in mishaps (Reason, 2000). The Swiss cheese model relates a system to a stack of slices of Swiss cheese . Each slice of cheese is a layer of...participant has more time to stray off course, fatigue, or leg heading or timing was forgotten or not as fresh in the mind compared to earlier in the

  2. Cheese Classification, Characterization, and Categorization: A Global Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almena-Aliste, Montserrat; Mietton, Bernard

    2014-02-01

    Cheese is one of the most fascinating, complex, and diverse foods enjoyed today. Three elements constitute the cheese ecosystem: ripening agents, consisting of enzymes and microorganisms; the composition of the fresh cheese; and the environmental conditions during aging. These factors determine and define not only the sensory quality of the final cheese product but also the vast diversity of cheeses produced worldwide. How we define and categorize cheese is a complicated matter. There are various approaches to cheese classification, and a global approach for classification and characterization is needed. We review current cheese classification schemes and the limitations inherent in each of the schemes described. While some classification schemes are based on microbiological criteria, others rely on descriptions of the technologies used for cheese production. The goal of this review is to present an overview of comprehensive and practical integrative classification models in order to better describe cheese diversity and the fundamental differences within cheeses, as well as to connect fundamental technological, microbiological, chemical, and sensory characteristics to contribute to an overall characterization of the main families of cheese, including the expanding world of American artisanal cheeses.

  3. Kinetic Behavior of on Various Cheeses under Constant and Dynamic Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed kinetic models to predict the growth of pathogenic Escherichia coli on cheeses during storage at constant and changing temperatures. A five-strain mixture of pathogenic E. coli was inoculated onto natural cheeses (Brie and Camembert and processed cheeses (sliced Mozzarella and sliced Cheddar at 3 to 4 log CFU/g. The inoculated cheeses were stored at 4, 10, 15, 25, and 30°C for 1 to 320 h, with a different storage time being used for each temperature. Total bacteria and E. coli cells were enumerated on tryptic soy agar and MacConkey sorbitol agar, respectively. E. coli growth data were fitted to the Baranyi model to calculate the maximum specific growth rate (μmax; log CFU/g/h, lag phase duration (LPD; h, lower asymptote (log CFU/g, and upper asymptote (log CFU/g. The kinetic parameters were then analyzed as a function of storage temperature, using the square root model, polynomial equation, and linear equation. A dynamic model was also developed for varying temperature. The model performance was evaluated against observed data, and the root mean square error (RMSE was calculated. At 4°C, E. coli cell growth was not observed on any cheese. However, E. coli growth was observed at 10°C to 30°C with a μmax of 0.01 to 1.03 log CFU/g/h, depending on the cheese. The μmax values increased as temperature increased, while LPD values decreased, and μmax and LPD values were different among the four types of cheese. The developed models showed adequate performance (RMSE = 0.176–0.337, indicating that these models should be useful for describing the growth kinetics of E. coli on various cheeses.

  4. Determination of lead and cadmium contaminations in UF-Cheese and yoghurt produced in Esfahan and GolpayeganPegah Dairy Processing Establishments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Jaberi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Milk is a complicated liquid that contains necessary components for the growth of mammalian neonate. Milk can get polluted by heavy metals such as lead and cadmium. In this study, the concentrations of lead and cadmium were measured in 12 yoghurt and 12 UF cheese samples produced in each of the Isfahan and Golpayegan-Pegah Dairy Processing Establishments. The samples were analyzed using atomic absorption spectrometry by furnace according to AOAC instruction. According to the results, lead concentrations (Mean ± SD in yoghurt and UF cheese samples produced in Isfahan and Golpayegan-Pegah were estimated at 54.96 ± 35.21, 61.65 ± 19.62, 105.38 ± 59.09, 141.94 ± 63.44 μg/Kg, respectively. In the case of cadmium, the concentrations were determined as 19.03 ± 1.23, 16.84 ± 8.08, 53.79 ± 19.29, 37.67 ± 22.58 μg/Kg, respectively. Results revealed a significant difference (P≥0.05 in lead and cadmium concentrations among the cheese samples of the two Dairy Processing Establishments. However, lead and cadmium concentrations in all samples were within the international approved limit (200 ppb.

  5. Farm to Fork Quantitative Risk Assessment of Listeria monocytogenes Contamination in Raw and Pasteurized Milk Cheese in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Uma; Cummins, Enda; Valero, Antonio; Walsh, Des; Dalmasso, Marion; Jordan, Kieran; Duffy, Geraldine

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to model and quantify the level of Listeria monocytogenes in raw milk cheese (RMc) and pasteurized milk cheese (PMc) from farm to fork using a Bayesian inference approach combined with a quantitative risk assessment. The modeling approach included a prediction of contamination arising from the farm environment as well from cross-contamination within the cheese-processing facility through storage and subsequent human exposure. The model predicted a high concentration of L. monocytogenes in contaminated RMc (mean 2.19 log10 CFU/g) compared to PMc (mean -1.73 log10 CFU/g). The mean probability of illness (P1 for low-risk population, LR) and (P2 for high-risk population, HR, e.g., immunocompromised) adult Irish consumers following exposure to contaminated cheese was 7 × 10(-8) (P1 ) and 9 × 10(-4) (P2 ) for RMc and 7 × 10(-10) (P1 ) and 8 × 10(-6) (P2 ) for PMc, respectively. In addition, the model was used to evaluate performance objectives at various stages, namely, the cheese making and ripening stages, and to set a food safety objective at the time of consumption. A scenario analysis predicted various probabilities of L. monocytogenes contamination along the cheese-processing chain for both RMc and PMc. The sensitivity analysis showed the critical factors for both cheeses were the serving size of the cheese, storage time, and temperature at the distribution stage. The developed model will allow food processors and policymakers to identify the possible routes of contamination along the cheese-processing chain and to reduce the risk posed to human health. © 2015 Society for Risk Analysis.

  6. Effect of milk composition and coagulation traits on Grana Padano cheese yield under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretto, Denis; De Marchi, Massimo; Penasa, Mauro; Cassandro, Martino

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of chemical composition, coagulation properties, pH, and titratable acidity (TA, SH°/50 ml) of vat milk on Grana Padano cheese yield (CY) under field conditions. Twelve cheese-making sessions were carried out from February to December 2009 in a dairy cooperative of Grana Padano Consortium (Italy), for a total of 96 vats of milk processed. For each vat, samples of raw milk were collected and analysed for quality traits (fat, protein, and casein contents), pH, TA, and milk coagulation properties (MCP), measured as rennet coagulation time (RCT, min), curd-firming time (k(20), min), and curd firmness (a(30), mm). Cheese yield was expressed as kilograms of cheese per 100 kg milk transformed, and was measured after 2 d of drainage. Fat, protein, and casein contents were positively and strongly correlated with CY (coefficients of correlation, r = 0.72, 0.88, and 0.84, respectively; P Coagulation properties were moderately and significantly (P milk that coagulated earlier and had stronger a(30) was associated to greater CY. Cheese yield was analysed with a model that accounted for fixed effects of cheese-making day, fat and protein content, TA, and a(30). Significance was found for all the effects (P Milk characterised by high values of a(30) resulted in higher CY than milk with low values of a 30, indicating that MCP could be used as indicators of cheese-making efficiency. Future research should investigate the relationships between MCP and quality of cheese, and explore the feasibility of including MCP in multiple component milk pricing system for Grana Padano cheese production.

  7. 7 CFR 58.711 - Cheddar, colby, washed or soaked curd, granular or stirred curd cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... stirred curd cheese. 58.711 Section 58.711 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... soaked curd, granular or stirred curd cheese. Cheese, used in the manufacture of pasteurized process cheese products should possess a pleasing and desirable taste and odor consistent with the age of the...

  8. Fungal diversity of "Tomme d'Orchies" cheese during the ripening process as revealed by a metagenomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceugniez, Alexandre; Taminiau, Bernard; Coucheney, Françoise; Jacques, Philippe; Delcenserie, Véronique; Daube, Georges; Drider, Djamel

    2017-10-03

    Tomme d'Orchies is an artisanal pressed and uncooked cheese produced and marketed in the north of France. This study aimed at showing the fungal microbiota evolution of this cheese using a metagenetic based Illumina technology targeting the ITS2 domain of 5.8S fungal rDNAs. To this end, samples were taken from the rind and the core of different cheeses, after 0, 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21days of ripening. The data underpinned the prevalence of Yarrowia lipolytica and Galactomyces geotrichum for both microbiotas. Unusual species including Clavispora lusitaniae, Kazachstania unispora and Cladosporium cladosporioides were also detected, but their origins remain to be ascertained. The metagenomic revealed also the presence of Kluyveromyces and Debaryomyces species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Discrimination of commercial cheeses from fatty acid profiles and phytosterol contents obtained by GC and PCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Sook; Lee, Ji Hyun; Han, Kyoung Moon; Kim, Ji Won; Cho, Sooyeul; Kim, Jinho

    2014-01-15

    In this study, a method for discriminating natural mozzarella cheese from cheese substitutes, using fatty acid profiles, phytosterol contents, and statistical comparison, was developed. A total of 27 cheeses were evaluated: eight natural mozzarella cheeses (NMCs), four imitation mozzarella cheeses (IMCs), 12 processed cheeses (PCs) and three mixed cheeses (MCs) composed of NMCs and IMCs. The fatty acid composition of the NMC class was distinct from those of the IMC and MC classes, but statistically similar (pIMCs, but similar (pIMCs, but discrimination between the NMCs and the PCs could not be achieved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Addition of whey protein to fresh cheese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rafael Arce-Méndez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work has been conducted in order to assess the effect of adding whey protein (WP to fresh cheese. The yield, proximal chemical composition, tryptophan content,and texture and consumer sensorial acceptance were obtained. The study was conducted at a cheese factory located in San Carlos, Costa Rica, in 2011. The protein obtained from whey was added during the cheese manufacturing process, before adding the microbial rennet; and four enrichment levels were evaluated, including one control. The supplemented cheese showed an acceptance rating between 6.8 and 7.1. Products with 75 and 120 g of added whey protein per kilogram of milk showed no significant differences versus non-supplemented cheese, while the preference towards the cheese with 150 g WP/kg was less than that of the control (p<0.05. A cluster analysis revealed the existence of two consumer groups: one, accounting for 65% of the members of the panel, whose preference was unaffected by the protein supplemented; and, the other group where the added protein affected their liking negatively. Adding whey protein to the cheese resulted in a significant increase in yield and in the protein-to-water ratio, as well as a reduction in fat content (p<0.05. Nevertheless, there were structural changes in the cheese that caused the reduction of certain texture properties, generating changes in their sensory properties that reduced the preference of a representative group of consumers towards the product.

  11. Cheese / Eero Epner

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Epner, Eero, 1978-

    2004-01-01

    Fotoajakirjast "Cheese". Fotograafia uurimisest, fotoajaloo läbikirjutatusest Eestis. Samas "Cheese'i" toimetaja Tiit Lepp ajakirja erainitsiatiivil väljaandmisest, Eesti Kultuurkapitali ebapiisavast ja määramatust toetusest

  12. Origin of disinfection by-products in cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardador, Maria Jose; Gallego, Mercedes; Prados, Francisco; Fernández-Salguero, José

    2017-06-01

    The disinfection of water, equipment and surfaces in a cheese factory is one of the factors that can originate disinfection by-products (DBPs) in cheese. This research has focused on studying cheese factories in order to evaluate the individual contribution of each step of the cheese-making process that can contribute to the presence of DBPs in cheese. Ten factories were selected according to their salting processes (brine or dry salting). Each factory was monitored by the collection of six representative samples (factory water supply, brine solution, milk, whey, curd and cheese) in which the concentrations of up to eight chemicals were detected. The study shows that contact with brine solutions containing significant levels of DBPs is the main source of these chemicals in cheese. A minor factor is the pasteurised milk used in their manufacture.

  13. The science of cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    The book describes the science of cheese in everyday language. The first chapters cover milk, mammals, and principles of cheesemaking and aging, along with lactose intolerance and raw milk cheese. Succeeding chapters deal with a category of cheese along with a class of compounds associated with it...

  14. 7 CFR 58.714 - Cream cheese, Neufchatel cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cream cheese, Neufchatel cheese. 58.714 Section 58.714 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.714 Cream cheese, Neufchatel cheese. These cheeses when mixed with other foods, or used for...

  15. Factors affecting consumers' preferences for and purchasing decisions regarding pasteurized and raw milk specialty cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonna, A; Durham, C; Meunier-Goddik, L

    2011-10-01

    Eight hundred ninety consumers at a local food festival were surveyed about their specialty cheese purchasing behavior and asked to taste and rate, through nonforced choice preference, 1 of 4 cheese pairs (Cheddar and Gouda) made from pasteurized and raw milks. The purpose of the survey was to examine consumers' responses to information on the safety of raw milk cheeses. The associated consumer test provided information about specialty cheese consumers' preferences and purchasing behavior. Half of the consumers tested were provided with cheese pairs that were identified as being made from unpasteurized and pasteurized milk. The other half evaluated samples that were identified only with random 3-digit codes. Overall, more consumers preferred the raw milk cheeses than the pasteurized milk cheeses. A larger portion of consumers indicated preferences for the raw milk cheese when the cheeses were labeled and thus they knew which samples were made from raw milk. Most of the consumers tested considered the raw milk cheeses to be less safe or did not know if raw milk cheeses were less safe. After being informed that the raw milk cheeses were produced by a process approved by the FDA (i.e., 60-d ripening), most consumers with concerns stated that they believed raw milk cheeses to be safe. When marketing cheese made from raw milk, producers should inform consumers that raw milk cheese is produced by an FDA-approved process. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Producing specific milks for speciality cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoni, G; Calamari, L; Maianti, M G

    2001-05-01

    Protected denomination of origin (PDO) cheeses have distinctive sensorial characteristics. They can be made only from raw milk possessing specific features, which is processed through the 'art' of the cheesemaker. In general, the distinctive sensorial traits of PDO cheese cannot be achieved under different environmental-production conditions for two main reasons: (1) some milk features are linked to specific animal production systems; (2) cheese ripening is affected by the interaction between milk (specific) and the traditional technology applied to the transformation process (non-specific). Also, the environment for a good ripening stage can be quite specific and not reproducible. With reference to milk, factors of typicality are species and/or breed, pedoclimatic conditions, animal management system and feeding. Other factors that influence cheese quality are milk treatments, milk processing and the ripening procedures. The technology applied to most cheeses currently known as PDO utilizes only raw milk, rennet and natural lactic acid bacteria, so that milk must be, at its origin, suitable for processing. The specific milk characteristics that ensure a high success rate for PDO cheeses are high protein content and good renneting properties, appropriate fat content with appropriate fatty acid composition and the presence of chemical flavours originating from local feeds. Moreover, an appropriate microflora is also of major importance. The factors that contribute to achieving milk suitable for transformation into PDO cheese are genetics, age, lactation stage, season and climate, general management and health conditions, milking and particularly feeding, which affect nutrient availability, endocrine response and health status, and also the presence of microbes and chemical substances which enrich or reduce the milk-cheese quality. Many of these factors are regulated by the Producer Associations. However, the secret of the success of PDO cheeses is the combination of

  17. Water mobility and thermal properties of smoked soft cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Maria Baranowska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the present study was to characterize the functional parameters of smoked soft cheese, with the emphasis on the behavior of water and milk fat, as analyzed by DSC, which was used to directly measure the melting/freezing phase transitions in the cheese. This study was complemented by NMR measurements of the organization and distribution of the aqueous phase within the emulsions constituting the cheese. The smoked and unsmoked cheeses were characterized by similar compositions in terms of protein (19.08-19.12 g∙100 g-1, fat (18.86-19.02 g∙100 g-1, and water content (59.86-60.27 g∙100 g-1. The water activity was higher in the unsmoked cheese (aw = 0.9736 than in the smoked cheese (aw = 0.9615. This result was confirmed by DSC (higher ice melting enthalpy and NMR (higher T1 value measurements. The smoking process led to differences in the distribution and binding of water to the lipid-protein matrix of the cheese. There was more non-freezed bound water in the smoked cheese which resulted in a more fragile and loosened structure in the smoked cheese than the unsmoked, which manifested in lower values of stretching and meltability. The meltability of the mozzarella smoked cheese was 1.5 times less than that of the unsmoked cheese (tube test and Schreiber test.

  18. Sensory Profile and Consumers’ Liking of Functional Ovine Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillo, Antonella; Albenzio, Marzia

    2015-01-01

    The present research was undertaken to evaluate the sensory profile and consumers’ liking of functional ovine cheese containing probiotic cultures. Ovine cheese was made from ewe’s milk by animals reared in extensive conditions; cheesemaking trials were performed by using rennet paste containing probiotic cells. Experimental cheeses were denoted: cheese manufactured using lamb rennet paste without probiotic (C), cheese manufactured using lamb rennet paste containing a mix of Bifidobacterium lactis and Bifidobacterium longum (BB), and cheese manufactured using lamb rennet paste containing Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA). Ovine cheese containing probiotic strains highlighted a more intense proteolysis and a greater level of short chain free fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid due to the metabolic activity of the adjunct microflora. The sensorial profile of ovine cheese showed lower humidity and gumminess in cheeses containing probiotics as a consequence of differences in the maturing process; furthermore, probiotic cheeses scored higher ratings for salty and pungent attributes. An interaction effect of probiotic, gender, and age of the consumers was detected in the perceived and the expected liking. The higher rate of expected liking in all experimental cheeses is attributed to the information given, regarding not only the presence of probiotic strains but also the farming conditions and cheesemaking technology. PMID:28231229

  19. Anaerobic co-digestion of cheese whey and the screened liquid fraction of dairy manure in a single continuously stirred tank reactor process: Limits in co-substrate ratios and organic loading rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Carlos; Muñoz, Noelia; Rico, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of cheese whey and the screened liquid fraction of dairy manure was investigated with the aim of determining the treatment limits in terms of the cheese whey fraction in feed and the organic loading rate. The results of a continuous stirred tank reactor that was operated with a hydraulic retention time of 15.6 days showed that the co-digestion process was possible with a cheese whey fraction as high as 85% in the feed. The efficiency of the process was similar within the range of the 15-85% cheese whey fraction. To study the effect of the increasing loading rate, the HRT was progressively shortened with the 65% cheese whey fraction in the feed. The reactor efficiency dropped as the HRT decreased but enabled a stable operation over 8.7 days of HRT. At these operating conditions, a volumetric methane production rate of 1.37 m(3) CH4 m(-3) d(-1) was achieved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Moldy Cheese: Is It Unsafe to Eat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrition and healthy eating If a piece of cheese has mold growing on it, should I throw the cheese away? Answers from Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D. Soft cheeses, such as cottage cheese, cream cheese and ricotta ...

  1. The nonlinear effect of somatic cell count on milk composition, coagulation properties, curd firmness modeling, cheese yield, and curd nutrient recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbo, T; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Bittante, G; Cecchinato, A

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between somatic cell count (SCC) in milk and several milk technological traits at the individual cow level. In particular, we determined the effects of very low to very high SCC on traits related to (1) milk yield and composition; (2) coagulation properties, including the traditional milk coagulation properties (MCP) and the new curd firming model parameters; and (3) cheese yield and recovery of milk nutrients in the curd (or loss in the whey). Milk samples from 1,271 Brown Swiss cows from 85 herds were used. Nine coagulation traits were measured: 3 traditional MCP [rennet coagulation time (RCT, min), curd firming rate (k20, min), and curd firmness after 30 min (a30, mm)] and 6 new curd firming and syneresis traits [potential asymptotic curd firmness at infinite time (CFP, mm), curd firming instant rate constant (kCF, % × min(-1)), syneresis instant rate constant (kSR, % × min(-1)), rennet coagulation time estimated using the equation (RCTeq, min), maximum curd firmness achieved within 45 min (CFmax, mm), and time at achievement of CFmax (tmax, min)]. The observed cheese-making traits included 3 cheese yield traits (%CYCURD, %CYSOLIDS, and %CYWATER, which represented the weights of curd, total solids, and water, respectively, as a percentage of the weight of the processed milk) and 4 nutrient recoveries in the curd (RECFAT, RECPROTEIN, RECSOLIDS, and RECENERGY, which each represented the percentage ratio between the nutrient in the curd and milk). Data were analyzed using a linear mixed model with the fixed effects of days in milk, parity, and somatic cell score (SCS), and the random effect of herd-date. Somatic cell score had strong influences on casein number and lactose, and also affected pH; these were traits characterized by a quadratic pattern of the data. The results also showed a negative linear relationship between SCS and milk yield. Somatic cell score influenced almost all of the tested

  2. Development of parmesan cheese production from local cow milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliwarga, Lienda; Christianti, Elisabeth Novi; Lazarus, Chrisella

    2017-05-01

    Parmesan cheese is one of the dairy products which is used in various foods, such as pasta, bakery product, and pizza. It has a hard texture due to aging process for at least two years. Long aging period inhibited the production of parmesan cheese while consumer demands were increasing gradually. This research was conducted to figure out the effect of starter culture and rennet dose to the production of parmesan cheese. This research consists of (1) pasteurization of 1,500 ml milk at 73°C; and (2) main cheese making process that comprised of fermentation process and the addition of rennet. In latter stage, milk was converted into curd. Variations were made for the dose of bacteria culture and rennet. Both variables correlated to the fermentation time and characteristics of the produced cheese. The analysis of the produced cheese during testing stage included measured protein and cheese yield, whey pH, water activity, and moisture content. Moreover, an organoleptic test was done in a qualitative manner. The results showed that the dose of bacteria culture has a significant effect to the fermentation time, protein yield, and cheese yield. Meanwhile, rennet dose significantly affected cheese yield, pH of whey, and water activity. The highest protein yield (93.1%) was obtained at 0.6 ml of culture and 0.5 ml of rennet while the maximum cheese yield (6.81%) was achieved at 0.4 ml of culture and 0.1 ml of rennet. The water activity of produced cheeses was lower compared to the water activity of common parmesan cheese (ca. 0.6). For the organoleptic test, 0.4 ml of bacterial culture and 0.5 ml of rennet produced the most preferred cheese flavor compared to other variations.

  3. Mexican chihuahua cheese: sensory profiles of young cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hekken, D L; Drake, M A; Corral, F J Molina; Prieto, V M Guerrero; Gardea, A A

    2006-10-01

    Sensory profiles of fresh semihard Chihuahua cheese produced in the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua were developed to characterize the flavors and textures of this traditionally made Hispanic-style cheese. Multiple allotments of Chihuahua cheese, 9 brands made with raw milk (RM) and 5 brands made with pasteurized milk (PM), were obtained within 3 d of manufacture from 12 different cheese plants throughout Chihuahua, México. Cheeses were shipped overnight to Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania, and flavor analyses were conducted within 14 to 18 d after manufacture. Four brands (2 RM and 2 PM cheeses) were then selected and multiple allotments were shipped at 3 distinct seasons over a 1-yr period for evaluation of flavor and texture. Microbial analysis was conducted prior to testing to ensure product safety. Descriptive analyses of cheese flavors and textures were conducted with panelists trained to use a universal or product-specific Spectrum intensity scale, respectively. Sensory profiles of cheeses varied among the different manufacturers. The most prominent flavor attributes were salty, sour, diacetyl, cooked, whey, bitter, and milk-fat. The RM cheeses had more intense sour, bitter, and prickle scores than the PM cheeses. Many cheese texture attributes were similar, but RM cheeses were perceived as softer than PM cheeses. As the demand for Hispanic-style cheeses increases, defining and understanding the sensory attributes of traditionally made Mexican cheeses provides guidance to cheese manufacturers as new ways are explored to improve the production and shelf life of the cheeses.

  4. Tracing and inhibiting growth of Staphylococcus aureus in barbecue cheese production after product recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johler, S; Zurfluh, K; Stephan, R

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcal food poisoning is one of the most prevalent causes of foodborne intoxication worldwide. It is caused by ingestion of enterotoxins formed by Staphylococcus aureus during growth in the food matrix. Following a recall of barbecue cheese due to the detection of staphylococcal enterotoxins in Switzerland in July 2015, we analyzed the production process of the respective dairy. Although most cheese-making processes involve acidification to inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria, barbecue cheese has to maintain a pH >6.0 to prevent undesired melting of the cheese. In addition, the dairy decided to retain the traditional manual production process of the barbecue cheese. In this study, therefore, we aimed to (1) trace Staph. aureus along the barbecue cheese production process, and (2) develop a sustainable strategy to inhibit growth of Staph. aureus and decrease the risk of staphylococcal food poisoning without changing the traditional production process. To this end, we traced Staph. aureus in a step-wise blinded process analysis on 4 different production days using spa (Staphylococcus protein A gene) typing, DNA microarray profiling, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. We subsequently selected a new starter culture and used a model cheese production including a challenge test assay to assess its antagonistic effect on Staph. aureus growth, as well as its sensory and technological implications. We detected Staph. aureus in 30% (37/124) of the collected samples taken from the barbecue cheese production at the dairy. This included detection of Staph. aureus in the final product on all 4 production days, either after enrichment or using quantitative detection. We traced 2 enterotoxigenic Staph. aureus strains (t073/CC45 and t282/CC45) colonizing the nasal cavity and the forearms of the cheesemakers to the final product. In the challenge test assay, we were able to show that the new starter culture inhibited growth of Staph. aureus while meeting

  5. Production of Cheese Kaçkavall from Cows Milk at Milk Industries in Kosova

    OpenAIRE

    , Shukri Maxhuni

    2016-01-01

    Milk processing in Kaçkavall cheese takes very important place in productivity of dairy, in the same time takes very important roll in domestic economy as well as nutritive for humankind. This study is done to research the technology for production of Kaçkaval cheese, (This types of cheese is classified to hard group of cheeses) with a little milk to produce 1kg cheese (Until now we need 10 liters of milk to produce 1 kg. of this kind of cheese), after research and analyses of physical-chemic...

  6. A 100-Year Review: Cheese production and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M E

    2017-12-01

    In the beginning, cheese making in the United States was all art, but embracing science and technology was necessary to make progress in producing a higher quality cheese. Traditional cheese making could not keep up with the demand for cheese, and the development of the factory system was necessary. Cheese quality suffered because of poor-quality milk, but 3 major innovations changed that: refrigeration, commercial starters, and the use of pasteurized milk for cheese making. Although by all accounts cold storage improved cheese quality, it was the improvement of milk quality, pasteurization of milk, and the use of reliable cultures for fermentation that had the biggest effect. Together with use of purified commercial cultures, pasteurization enabled cheese production to be conducted on a fixed time schedule. Fundamental research on the genetics of starter bacteria greatly increased the reliability of fermentation, which in turn made automation feasible. Demand for functionality, machinability, application in baking, and more emphasis on nutritional aspects (low fat and low sodium) of cheese took us back to the fundamental principles of cheese making and resulted in renewed vigor for scientific investigations into the chemical, microbiological, and enzymatic changes that occur during cheese making and ripening. As milk production increased, cheese factories needed to become more efficient. Membrane concentration and separation of milk offered a solution and greatly enhanced plant capacity. Full implementation of membrane processing and use of its full potential have yet to be achieved. Implementation of new technologies, the science of cheese making, and the development of further advances will require highly trained personnel at both the academic and industrial levels. This will be a great challenge to address and overcome. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Physicochemical Quality of Traditional Burduf Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Pop

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is the assessmentof the quality control of raw milk and traditional burduf cheese obtained fromcow milk mixed with 10% sheep milk. Appreciation of the integrity and freshness assessmentof milk (cow and sheep was tested by physico-chemical analysis.On theshelf-live were determined the physico-chemical parameters in cheese samples. Theantibiotics residues were tested of the milk samples with portable analyser,model Rosa Charm Reader. Theresults of physico-chemical determinations for the milk and cheese samples werewithin the maximum permissible by data legislation. Regardingthe content of antibiotics, the results were negative both for cow milk and forsheep milk. The sensorycharacteristics of burduf cheese are influenced by the different types of milk.

  8. Microstructure, physicochemistry, microbial populations and aroma compounds of ripened Cantal cheeses

    OpenAIRE

    De Freitas, Isabelle; Pinon, Nicolas; Lopez, Christelle; Thierry, Anne; Maubois, Jean-Louis; Lortal, Sylvie

    2005-01-01

    International audience; In spite of its high production (18000 T yearly), very few studies have been devoted to Cantal, a French AOC ("Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée") cheese variety whose making process is close to that of Cheddar. To improve the knowledge of this type of cheese, two ripened Cantal cheeses issued from raw milk and two different industrial processes were biochemically, physicochemically, structurally and microbiologically characterised through the analysis of both cheese sec...

  9. 21 CFR 133.128 - Cottage cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cottage cheese. 133.128 Section 133.128 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.128 Cottage cheese. (a) Cottage cheese is the soft uncured cheese prepared by mixing cottage...

  10. 21 CFR 133.133 - Cream cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cream cheese. 133.133 Section 133.133 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.133 Cream cheese. (a) Description. (1) Cream cheese is the soft, uncured cheese prepared by...

  11. ASSESSMENT OF LOCAL METHODS OF PROCESSING FOR THE PRESERVATION OF THE PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES AND MICROBIOLOGICAL QUALITY OF TWO LOCAL CHEESES IN ILORIN, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolanle Kudirat Saliu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nigerian locally produced cheese from milk, commonly known as wara is highly nutritious and highly prone to attack by spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms. Moist heat treatment and salting alone are the common methods used for processing. This study assessed the efficacy of these local processing methods in preserving the physicochemical properties and microbiological quality of wara. Samples were purchased from open markets in Ilorin; processed by boiling in water and with addition of salt; and stored at room temperature (28±2oC to mimic the local method. The samples were observed at 24 hrs interval for a period of 96 hrs, for changes in pH, color, odor and texture. Microbiological analysis was done following standard methods. The pH of most of the samples increased while the color, odor and texture deteriorated within 48 hrs of storage. The cheese samples were preserved most by boiling with salt. Many spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms were isolated. The bacterial isolates were Lactobaccillus acidophilus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris, Enterococcus feacalis, Aerobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella, Aerococcus, Micrococcus and Streptococcus spp.; while the fungi were Aspergillus flavus, A. fumigatus, A. flavus, Candida tropicalis, Rhizopus arrhizus, Penicillium and Mucor spp. Some of the microorganisms were eliminated during treatments, others survived while some contaminated the samples during storage. Though boiling of wara with salt was shown to improve its keeping quality compared to other methods studied, further treatments such as frying, drying, and roasting; as well as storage at low temperature may significantly increase the shelf life.

  12. Microbiological quality of sliced and block mozzarella cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Fontanetti Marinheiro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to verify the microbiological quality of mozzarella cheese sold in retail markets of Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Forty samples of mozzarella cheese were analyzed, comprising 20 samples of block cheese and 20 of sliced cheese. The cheese samples were analyzed for thermotolerant coliform counts and coagulase positive staphylococci counts, and presence of Salmonella spp and Listeria monocytogenes. The percentage of 12,5% and 5% of the sliced and block cheese samples analyzed, respectively, exceeded the microbiological standards accepted by Brazilian legislation. These results indicate the need for a better product monitoring and more concern with hygiene and sanitary practices during industrial process.

  13. Process modeling style

    CERN Document Server

    Long, John

    2014-01-01

    Process Modeling Style focuses on other aspects of process modeling beyond notation that are very important to practitioners. Many people who model processes focus on the specific notation used to create their drawings. While that is important, there are many other aspects to modeling, such as naming, creating identifiers, descriptions, interfaces, patterns, and creating useful process documentation. Experience author John Long focuses on those non-notational aspects of modeling, which practitioners will find invaluable. Gives solid advice for creating roles, work produ

  14. Product and Process Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, Ian T.; Gani, Rafiqul

    This book covers the area of product and process modelling via a case study approach. It addresses a wide range of modelling applications with emphasis on modelling methodology and the subsequent in-depth analysis of mathematical models to gain insight via structural aspects of the models....... These approaches are put into the context of life cycle modelling, where multiscale and multiform modelling is increasingly prevalent in the 21st century. The book commences with a discussion of modern product and process modelling theory and practice followed by a series of case studies drawn from a variety...... to biotechnology applications, food, polymer and human health application areas. The book highlights to important nature of modern product and process modelling in the decision making processes across the life cycle. As such it provides an important resource for students, researchers and industrial practitioners....

  15. Whey cheese: membrane technology to increase yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Francisco; González, Pablo; Muro, Claudia

    2016-02-01

    Sweet cheese whey has been used to obtain whey cheese without the addition of milk. Pre-treated whey was concentrated by nanofiltration (NF) at different concentration ratios (2, 2.5 and 2.8) or by reverse osmosis (RO) (2-3 times). After the concentration, whey was acidified with lactic acid until a final pH of 4.6-4.8, and heated to temperatures between 85 and 90 °C. The coagulated fraction (supernatant) was collected and freely drained over 4 h. The cheese-whey yield and protein, fat, lactose and ash recoveries in the final product were calculated. The membrane pre-concentration step caused an increase in the whey-cheese yield. The final composition of products was compared with traditional cheese-whey manufacture products (without membrane concentration). Final cheese yields found were to be between 5 and 19.6%, which are higher than those achieved using the traditional 'Requesón' process.

  16. Effect of temperature, pH, and water activity on Mucor spp. growth on synthetic medium, cheese analog and cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin-Sardin, Stéphanie; Rigalma, Karim; Coroller, Louis; Jany, Jean-Luc; Coton, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    The Mucor genus includes a large number of ubiquitous fungal species. In the dairy environment, some of them play a technological role providing typical organoleptic qualities to some cheeses while others can cause spoilage. In this study, we compared the effect of relevant abiotic factors for cheese production on the growth of six strains representative of dairy technological and contaminant species as well as of a non cheese related strain (plant endophyte). Growth kinetics were determined for each strain in function of temperature, water activity and pH on synthetic Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA), and secondary models were fitted to calculate the corresponding specific cardinal values. Using these values and growth kinetics acquired at 15 °C on cheese agar medium (CA) along with three different cheese types, optimal growth rates (μopt) were estimated and consequently used to establish a predictive model. Contrarily to contaminant strains, technological strains showed higher μopt on cheese matrices than on PDA. Interestingly, lag times of the endophyte strain were strongly extended on cheese related matrices. This study offers a relevant predictive model of growth that may be used for better cheese production control but also raises the question of adaptation of some Mucor strains to the cheese. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. H, C, N and S stable isotopes and mineral profiles to objectively guarantee the authenticity of grated hard cheeses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camin, Federica; Wehrens, Ron; Bertoldi, Daniela; Bontempo, Luana; Ziller, Luca; Perini, Matteo; Nicolini, Giorgio; Nocetti, Marco; Larcher, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Random Forest model based on δ 13 C, δ 2 H, δ 15 N, δ 34 S and the content of Sr, Cu, Mo, Re, Na, U, Bi, Ni, Fe, Mn, Ga, Se, Er, Dy, Pb, Li, usable for the protection of PDO Parmigiano Reggiano cheese from mislabelling. The correct classification rate in cross-validation is 98.6%. Highlights: ► The isotopic and elemental profile of over 260 hard cheese samples are discussed. ► Two validated and immediately applicable statistical models are presented. ► One model is able to predict the origin of seven types of European hard cheeses. ► The other one allows to discriminate the PDO Parmigiano Reggiano cheese from imitators. ► The most significant variables are δ 13 C, δ 2 H, δ 15 N, δ 34 S and the content of 16 elements. - Abstract: In compliance with the European law (EC No. 510/2006), geographical indications and designations of origin for agricultural products and foodstuffs must be protected against mislabelling. This is particularly important for PDO hard cheeses, as Parmigiano Reggiano, that can cost up to the double of the no-PDO competitors. This paper presents two statistical models, based on isotopic and elemental composition, able to trace the origin of cheese also in grated and shredded forms, for which it is not possible to check the logo fire-marked on the rind. One model is able to predict the origin of seven types of European hard cheeses (in a validation step, 236 samples out of 240 are correctly recognised) and the other specifically to discriminate the PDO Parmigiano Reggiano cheese from 9 European and 2 extra-European imitators (260 out of 264 correct classifications). Both models are based on Random Forests. The most significant variables for cheese traceability common in both models are δ 13 C, δ 2 H, δ 15 N, δ 34 S and Sr, Cu, Mo, Re, Na, U, Bi, Ni, Fe, Mn, Ga, Se, and Li. These variables are linked not only to geography, but also to cow diet and cheese making processes.

  18. Standard Model processes

    CERN Document Server

    Mangano, M.L.; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Alekhin, S.; Badger, S.; Bauer, C.W.; Becher, T.; Bertone, V.; Bonvini, M.; Boselli, S.; Bothmann, E.; Boughezal, R.; Cacciari, M.; Carloni Calame, C.M.; Caola, F.; Campbell, J.M.; Carrazza, S.; Chiesa, M.; Cieri, L.; Cimaglia, F.; Febres Cordero, F.; Ferrarese, P.; D'Enterria, D.; Ferrera, G.; Garcia i Tormo, X.; Garzelli, M.V.; Germann, E.; Hirschi, V.; Han, T.; Ita, H.; Jäger, B.; Kallweit, S.; Karlberg, A.; Kuttimalai, S.; Krauss, F.; Larkoski, A.J.; Lindert, J.; Luisoni, G.; Maierhöfer, P.; Mattelaer, O.; Martinez, H.; Moch, S.; Montagna, G.; Moretti, M.; Nason, P.; Nicrosini, O.; Oleari, C.; Pagani, D.; Papaefstathiou, A.; Petriello, F.; Piccinini, F.; Pierini, M.; Pierog, T.; Pozzorini, S.; Re, E.; Robens, T.; Rojo, J.; Ruiz, R.; Sakurai, K.; Salam, G.P.; Salfelder, L.; Schönherr, M.; Schulze, M.; Schumann, S.; Selvaggi, M.; Shivaji, A.; Siodmok, A.; Skands, P.; Torrielli, P.; Tramontano, F.; Tsinikos, I.; Tweedie, B.; Vicini, A.; Westhoff, S.; Zaro, M.; Zeppenfeld, D.; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-06-22

    This report summarises the properties of Standard Model processes at the 100 TeV pp collider. We document the production rates and typical distributions for a number of benchmark Standard Model processes, and discuss new dynamical phenomena arising at the highest energies available at this collider. We discuss the intrinsic physics interest in the measurement of these Standard Model processes, as well as their role as backgrounds for New Physics searches.

  19. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in European cheeses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Rios, Veronica; Dalgaard, Paw

    2017-01-01

    Both in Europe and worldwide cheese has caused important outbreaks of listeriosis and can be a vehicle for transmission of Listeria monocytogenes to consumers. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted using scientific literature and European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) reports...... to summarize available data on the prevalence of L. monocytogenes in different types of cheeses produced in Europe. Meta-analysis models were used to estimate mean prevalence of the pathogen and to compare prevalence among types of cheeses (fresh, ripened, veined, smear and brined) and cheeses produced using.......5-1.1%). The prevalence differed among types of cheeses including fresh (0.8%; CI: 0.3-1.9%), ripened (2.0%; CI: 0.8-4.9%), veined (2.4%; CI: 0.9-6.3%), smear (5.1%; CI: 1.9-13.1%) and brined (11.8%; CI: 3.5-33.3%). Mean prevalence of L. monocytogenes in soft/semi-soft cheeses were not significantly different (P > 0...

  20. Bioconversion of Cheese Waste (Whey)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert, G.W.

    1998-03-11

    The US dairy industry produces 67 billion pounds of cheese whey annually. A waste by-product of cheese production, whey consists of water, milk sugar (lactose), casein (protein), and salts amounting to about 7% total solids. Ultrafiltration is used to concentrate cheese whey into a protein-rich foodstuff; however, it too produces a waste stream, known as ''whey permeate,'' (rejected water, lactose, and salts from the membrane). Whey permeate contains about 4.5% lactose and requires treatment to reduce the high BOD (biological oxygen demand) before disposal. Ab Initio, a small business with strong chemistry and dairy processing background, desired help in developing methods for bioconversion of whey permeate lactose into lactic acid. Lactic acid is an organic acid primarily used as an acidulant in the food industry. More recently it has been used to produce polylactic acid, a biodegradable polymer and as a new method to treat meat carcasses to combat E. coli bacteria. Conversion of whey permeate to lactic acid is environmentally sound because it produces a valued product from an otherwise waste stream. FM&T has expertise in bioconversion processes and analytical techniques necessary to characterize biomass functions. The necessary engineering and analytical services for pilot biomass monitoring, process development, and purification of crude lactic acid were available at this facility.

  1. Bioconversion of Cheese Waste (Whey)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohnert, G.W.

    1998-01-01

    The US dairy industry produces 67 billion pounds of cheese whey annually. A waste by-product of cheese production, whey consists of water, milk sugar (lactose), casein (protein), and salts amounting to about 7% total solids. Ultrafiltration is used to concentrate cheese whey into a protein-rich foodstuff; however, it too produces a waste stream, known as ''whey permeate,'' (rejected water, lactose, and salts from the membrane). Whey permeate contains about 4.5% lactose and requires treatment to reduce the high BOD (biological oxygen demand) before disposal. Ab Initio, a small business with strong chemistry and dairy processing background, desired help in developing methods for bioconversion of whey permeate lactose into lactic acid. Lactic acid is an organic acid primarily used as an acidulant in the food industry. More recently it has been used to produce polylactic acid, a biodegradable polymer and as a new method to treat meat carcasses to combat E. coli bacteria. Conversion of whey permeate to lactic acid is environmentally sound because it produces a valued product from an otherwise waste stream. FM and T has expertise in bioconversion processes and analytical techniques necessary to characterize biomass functions. The necessary engineering and analytical services for pilot biomass monitoring, process development, and purification of crude lactic acid were available at this facility

  2. The use of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy to predict cheese yield and nutrient recovery or whey loss traits from unprocessed bovine milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferragina, A; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Cecchinato, A; Bittante, G

    2013-01-01

    Cheese yield is an important technological trait in the dairy industry in many countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectral analysis of fresh unprocessed milk samples for predicting cheese yield and nutrient recovery traits. A total of 1,264 model cheeses were obtained from 1,500-mL milk samples collected from individual Brown Swiss cows. Individual measurements of 7 new cheese yield-related traits were obtained from the laboratory cheese-making procedure, including the fresh cheese yield, total solid cheese yield, and the water retained in curd, all as a percentage of the processed milk, and nutrient recovery (fat, protein, total solids, and energy) in the curd as a percentage of the same nutrient contained in the milk. All individual milk samples were analyzed using a MilkoScan FT6000 over the spectral range from 5,000 to 900 wavenumber × cm(-1). Two spectral acquisitions were carried out for each sample and the results were averaged before data analysis. Different chemometric models were fitted and compared with the aim of improving the accuracy of the calibration equations for predicting these traits. The most accurate predictions were obtained for total solid cheese yield and fresh cheese yield, which exhibited coefficients of determination between the predicted and measured values in cross-validation (1-VR) of 0.95 and 0.83, respectively. A less favorable result was obtained for water retained in curd (1-VR=0.65). Promising results were obtained for recovered protein (1-VR=0.81), total solids (1-VR=0.86), and energy (1-VR=0.76), whereas recovered fat exhibited a low accuracy (1-VR=0.41). As FTIR spectroscopy is a rapid, cheap, high-throughput technique that is already used to collect standard milk recording data, these FTIR calibrations for cheese yield and nutrient recovery highlight additional potential applications of the technique in the dairy industry, especially for monitoring cheese

  3. Thermus and the Pink Discoloration Defect in Cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Lisa; O'Sullivan, Daniel J; Daly, David; O'Sullivan, Orla; Burdikova, Zuzana; Vana, Rostislav; Beresford, Tom P; Ross, R Paul; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; McSweeney, Paul L H; Giblin, Linda; Sheehan, Jeremiah J; Cotter, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    A DNA sequencing-based strategy was applied to study the microbiology of Continental-type cheeses with a pink discoloration defect. The basis for this phenomenon has remained elusive, despite decades of research. The bacterial composition of cheese containing the defect was compared to that of control cheese using 16S rRNA gene and shotgun metagenomic sequencing as well as quantitative PCR (qPCR). Throughout, it was apparent that Thermus , a carotenoid-producing genus, was present at higher levels in defect-associated cheeses than in control cheeses. Prompted by this finding and data confirming the pink discoloration to be associated with the presence of a carotenoid, a culture-based approach was employed, and Thermus thermophilus was successfully cultured from defect-containing cheeses. The link between Thermus and the pinking phenomenon was then established through the cheese defect equivalent of Koch's postulates when the defect was recreated by the reintroduction of a T. thermophilus isolate to a test cheese during the manufacturing process. IMPORTANCE Pink discoloration in cheese is a defect affecting many cheeses throughout the world, leading to significant financial loss for the dairy industry. Despite decades of research, the cause of this defect has remained elusive. The advent of high-throughput, next-generation sequencing has revolutionized the field of food microbiology and, with respect to this study, provided a means of testing a possible microbial basis for this defect. In this study, a combined 16S rRNA, whole-genome sequencing, and quantitative PCR approach was taken. This resulted in the identification of Thermus , a carotenoid-producing thermophile, in defect-associated cheeses and the recreation of the problem in cheeses to which Thermus was added. This finding has the potential to lead to new strategies to eliminate this defect, and our method represents an approach that can be employed to investigate the role of microbes in other food defects

  4. Rapid assessment of selected free amino acids during Edam cheese ripening by near infrared spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Mlček

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on rapid determination of free amino acids produced during the ripening of cheese, by using near infrared spectroscopy. Analyses of 96 samples of Edam cheese (30% and 45% of fat in dry matter were performed at monthly intervals up to the ripening age of 6 months. In total, 19 amino acids were analysed with infrared spectrometer using two different methods, either in the regime of reflectance in the integrating sphere of the apparatus or using a fibre optic apparatus with the fibre optic probe. Reference data based on high-performance liquid chromatography were used for calibration of the spectrophotometer. Calibration models were developed using a partial least square algorithm and tested by means of cross-validation. When measured with the integrating sphere and with the probe, the values of correlation coefficients ranged from 0.835 to 0.993 and from 0.739 to 0.995, respectively. Paired t-test did not show significant differences between the reference and predicted values (P < 0.05. The results of this new calibration method showed the possibility of near infrared technology for fast determination of free amino acids, which occur during the ripening of Edam cheese. The content of free amino acids allow us to prepare Edam cheese quickly and efficiently for sale or to prepare the material for processed cheese.

  5. Construction and potential application of controlled autolytic systems for Lactobacillus casei in cheese manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yi; Kong, Jian

    2013-07-01

    The rapid release of intracellular enzymes into the curd by the autolysis of lactic acid bacteria starters is universally recognized as a critical biological process to accelerate cheese ripening. Lactobacillus casei is typically the dominant nonstarter lactic acid bacterium in the ripening cheese. In this study, two controlled autolytic systems were established in L. casei BL23, based on the exploitation of the autolysins sourced from Lactococcus lactis (AcmA) and Enterococcus faecalis (AtlA). The lysis abilities of the systems were demonstrated both in broth and a model cheese, in which a fivefold increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity was detected in the curd with sufficient viable starter cells being maintained, indicating that they could lead to the timely release of intracellular enzymes.

  6. Feasibility of cheese production and whey valorization in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Problems associated with perishability and distribution of local milk and milk products by small-scale producers in the Adamawa province of Cameroon, justified development of an easy process for producing pressed-dough cheese and flavoured whey. Production from raw milk was technically profitable with mean cheese ...

  7. Improving quality of some types of cheese by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallam, E.M.E.A

    2010-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation as a food preservation technique has been recognized for many years as a means to reduce food losses, improve food safety, and extend shelf life. Furthermore, irradiation can be an effective way of reducing the incidence of food borne disease and treating a variety of potential problems in food supplies. The treatment of food with ionizing radiation is one of the most thoroughly researched techniques available to the food processing industry. In view of the afore mentioned the objective of this study were to study the effect of irradiation time and dose on Ras cheese quality, investigate the effect of irradiation after ripening on cheese quality and possibility of prolonging the shelf-life of Ras cheese, study the effect of irradiation dose on Kareish cheese quality and its shelf- life and to monitor the chemical, microbiological and sensory changes during ripening and storage of Ras and Kareish cheeses .The results of this study will be presented in three parts: Part I: Effect of irradiation dose and time on some properties of Ras cheese:Part II: Effect of irradiation on some properties during storage of ripened Ras cheese.Part III: Effect of irradiation on the quality and shelf-life of Kareish cheese: It could be concluded that irradiation caused a significant reduction of cheese ripening indices, and count of total viable,proteolytic, lipolytic bacteria and mould and yeast. Using irradiation doses of 3 and 4 kGy were able to stop the ripening factors and these safety dose were used to prevent the ripened Ras cheese irradiation of ripened Ras cheese has been prolonged the shelf-life of Ras cheese to about 32 months compared with control cheese, which showed only 18 months. The obtained results revealed that the best irradiation treatment was at the end of ripening period. Also safety irradiation of Kareish cheese has been prolonged the shelf-life of Kareish cheese to about 54 days compared with 12 days only control cheese.

  8. WWTP Process Tank Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jesper

    solution of the Navier-Stokes equations in a multiphase scheme. After a general introduction to the activated sludge tank as a system, the activated sludge tank model is gradually setup in separate stages. The individual sub-processes that are often occurring in activated sludge tanks are initially......-process models, the last part of the thesis, where the integrated process tank model is tested on three examples of activated sludge systems, is initiated. The three case studies are introduced with an increasing degree of model complexity. All three cases are take basis in Danish municipal wastewater treatment...... plants. The first case study involves the modeling of an activated sludge tank undergoing a special controlling strategy with the intention minimizing the sludge loading on the subsequent secondary settlers during storm events. The applied model is a two-phase model, where the sedimentation of sludge...

  9. Hot topic: Antilisterial activity by endolysin PlyP100 in fresh cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tassell, Maxwell L; Ibarra-Sánchez, Luis A; Hoepker, Garrett P; Miller, Michael J

    2017-04-01

    Our objective was to assess the antimicrobial efficacy of a Listeria bacteriophage endolysin that may address limitations of current antilisterial processes for fresh cheeses. Listeria monocytogenes is highly problematic in the manufacture and processing of ready-to-eat foods due to its environmental persistence and its ability to grow under refrigerated storage. Special care must be taken to prevent listerial contamination during the production of fresh cheeses, as their delicate flavor and texture are incompatible with many of the antimicrobial processes and additives commonly used for other foods. Bacteriophage-derived cell wall hydrolytic enzymes, known as endolysins, comprise one possible intervention that may not suffer from the high strain specificity of their parent bacteriophages or the development of resistant strains. We recombinantly expressed endolysin PlyP100 and compared its lytic activity in vitro across several environmental parameters and target organisms, then incorporated it into a fresh cheese model challenged with a cocktail of L. monocytogenes. We show that PlyP100 demonstrates optimal activity under pH and salt concentrations consistent with a low-acid food matrix such as fresh cheese. Furthermore, we show that PlyP100 exhibits target specificity for gram-positive organisms with directly crosslinked peptidoglycan and displays considerable inhibitory activity against L. monocytogenes in fresh cheese for at least 4 wk under refrigerated storage. As PlyP100 demonstrates considerable promise for preventing the propagation of L. monocytogenes in fresh cheeses, this novel preservation method could help safeguard consumer health and the market expansion of an otherwise high-risk food with few other viable preservatives. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of peracetic acid on biofilms formed by Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated from a Brazilian cheese processing plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Hwa In Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to investigate the effect of peracetic acid (PAA, 0.5% on adherent cells of three strains of Listeria monocytogenes strains belonging to serotypes 4b and 1/2b that had been previously isolated from the environment of a Brazilian cheese plant. The assays were conducted using polystyrene microplates and stainless steel coupons and the adhered cells were treated with PAA for 60, 120 and 180 s. On stainless steel, biofilms were partially inactivated by PAA after 60 s and almost 100% of the cells were damaged within 180 s using epifluorescence microscopy with LIVE/DEAD® staining. On polystyrene microplates, PAA decreased (P<0.05 biofilm biomass produced by the three L. monocytogenes isolates at 60 s, when compared with controls (no PAA treatment. However, PAA did not completely eliminate L. monocytogenes cells on polystyrene microplates (decreasing 1.8-2.5 log cycles after treatment with PAA for 180 s. The correct concentration and contact time of PAA is critical for eliminating biofilms formed by L. monocytogenes on stainless steel surfaces, although further studies are needed for defining efficient PAA treatments to remove adherent cells of this pathogen on plastic polymers.

  11. An iterative sensory procedure to select odor-active associations in complex consortia of microorganisms: application to the construction of a cheese model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaïti, C; Irlinger, F; Spinnler, H E; Engel, E

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate an iterative procedure based on odor assessment to select odor-active associations of microorganisms from a starting association of 82 strains (G1), which were chosen to be representative of Livarot cheese biodiversity. A 3-step dichotomous procedure was applied to reduce the starting association G1. At each step, 3 methods were used to evaluate the odor proximity between mother (n strains) and daughter (n/2 strains) associations: a direct assessment of odor dissimilarity using an original bidimensional scale system and 2 indirect methods based on comparisons of odor profile or hedonic scores. Odor dissimilarity ratings and odor profile gave reliable and sometimes complementary criteria to select G3 and G4 at the first iteration, G31 and G42 at the second iteration, and G312 and G421 at the final iteration. Principal component analysis of odor profile data permitted the interpretation at least in part, of the 2D multidimensional scaling representation of the similarity data. The second part of the study was dedicated to 1) validating the choice of the dichotomous procedure made at each iteration, and 2) evaluating together the magnitude of odor differences that may exist between G1 and its subsequent simplified associations. The strategy consisted of assessing odor similarity between the 13 cheese models by comparing the contents of their odor-active compounds. By using a purge-and-trap gas chromatography-olfactory/mass spectrometry device, 50 potent odorants were identified in models G312, G421, and in a typical Protected Denomination of Origin Livarot cheese. Their contributions to the odor profile of both selected model cheeses are discussed. These compounds were quantified by purge and trap-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in the 13 products and the normalized data matrix was transformed to a between-product distance matrix. This instrumental assessment of odor similarities allowed validation of the choice

  12. Ripening for improving the quality of inoculated cheese Rhizopus oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARTINI PANGASTUTI

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Estikomah SA, Sutarno, Pangastuti A 2010. Ripening for improving the quality of inoculated cheese Rhizopus oryzae. Nusantara Bioscience 2: 1-6. Cheese is dairy product resulted from fermented milk in which the fermentation process can be done by lactic acid bacteria or fungus. Rhizopus oryzae is able to produce lactic acid, protease and lipase. The ripening process changes the taste and texture. The purpose of this study is ripening to improve the quality of inoculated cheese R. oryzae. In this research the ripening was conducted the concentration variation of temperature (5oC, 10oC, 15oC, and time (7 days, 14 days. The procedure of research consisted of two steps, namely un-ripened cheese preparation followed by ripening cheese preparation. Cheese produced in this study analyzed the value of pH, fat content, protein content, amino acid levels and identification of microbe with ANOVA then followed by DMRT at 5% level of significance. Data results were analyzed with the like’s nonparametric statistical test, followed by Fridman Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test (WSRT at 5% level significance. The results showed that the preferred ripened cheese panelist was at a temperature of 15oC for 14 days. Ripening conditions affect pH, fat content, protein content and do not affect the levels of amino acids that formed ripened cheese. The best quality ripened cheese i.e. at a temperature of 15°C for 14 days, had a pH value of 4.40, the highest protein content of 9.78%, and fat content of 35.02%. The results of identified microbe in un-ripened cheese and ripened cheese include Enterococcus hirae (Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis, and Aspergillus sp.

  13. 21 CFR 133.106 - Blue cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blue cheese. 133.106 Section 133.106 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.106 Blue cheese. (a) Description. (1) Blue cheese is the food prepared by the procedure set...

  14. 21 CFR 133.164 - Nuworld cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nuworld cheese. 133.164 Section 133.164 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.164 Nuworld cheese. (a) Description. (1) Nuworld cheese is the food prepared by the...

  15. 21 CFR 133.108 - Brick cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Brick cheese. 133.108 Section 133.108 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.108 Brick cheese. (a) Description. (1) Brick cheese is the food prepared from dairy...

  16. 21 CFR 133.138 - Edam cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Edam cheese. 133.138 Section 133.138 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.138 Edam cheese. (a) Description. (1) Edam cheese is the food prepared by the procedure set...

  17. 21 CFR 133.118 - Colby cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Colby cheese. 133.118 Section 133.118 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.118 Colby cheese. (a) Colby cheese is the food prepared from milk and other ingredients...

  18. 21 CFR 133.141 - Gorgonzola cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gorgonzola cheese. 133.141 Section 133.141 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.141 Gorgonzola cheese. (a) Description. (1) Gorgonzola cheese is the food prepared...

  19. 21 CFR 133.152 - Limburger cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limburger cheese. 133.152 Section 133.152 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.152 Limburger cheese. (a) Description. (1) Limburger cheese is the food prepared by one of...

  20. 21 CFR 133.183 - Romano cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Romano cheese. 133.183 Section 133.183 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.183 Romano cheese. (a) Romano cheese is the food prepared from cow's milk or sheep's milk or...

  1. 21 CFR 133.142 - Gouda cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gouda cheese. 133.142 Section 133.142 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.142 Gouda cheese. Gouda cheese conforms to the definition and standard of identity and...

  2. 21 CFR 133.113 - Cheddar cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cheddar cheese. 133.113 Section 133.113 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.113 Cheddar cheese. (a) Description. (1) Cheddar cheese is the food prepared by the...

  3. 21 CFR 133.140 - Gammelost cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gammelost cheese. 133.140 Section 133.140 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.140 Gammelost cheese. (a) Description. (1) Gammelost cheese is the food prepared from nonfat...

  4. 21 CFR 133.162 - Neufchatel cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neufchatel cheese. 133.162 Section 133.162 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.162 Neufchatel cheese. (a) Description. (1) Neufchatel cheese is the soft uncured...

  5. 21 CFR 133.149 - Gruyere cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gruyere cheese. 133.149 Section 133.149 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.149 Gruyere cheese. (a) Description. (1) Gruyere cheese is the food prepared by the...

  6. Model Process Control Language

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MPC (Model Process Control) language enables the capture, communication and preservation of a simulation instance, with sufficient detail that it can be...

  7. Business Model Process Configurations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taran, Yariv; Nielsen, Christian; Thomsen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    strategic preference, as part of their business model innovation activity planned. Practical implications – This paper aimed at strengthening researchers and, particularly, practitioner’s perspectives into the field of business model process configurations. By insuring an [abstracted] alignment between......Purpose – The paper aims: 1) To develop systematically a structural list of various business model process configuration and to group (deductively) these selected configurations in a structured typological categorization list. 2) To facilitate companies in the process of BM innovation......, by developing (inductively) an ontological classification framework, in view of the BM process configurations typology developed. Design/methodology/approach – Given the inconsistencies found in the business model studies (e.g. definitions, configurations, classifications) we adopted the analytical induction...

  8. 21 CFR 133.153 - Monterey cheese and monterey jack cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monterey cheese and monterey jack cheese. 133.153... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.153 Monterey cheese and monterey jack cheese. (a) Description...

  9. Biosphere Process Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Schmitt

    2000-05-25

    To evaluate the postclosure performance of a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) will be conducted. Nine Process Model Reports (PMRs), including this document, are being developed to summarize the technical basis for each of the process models supporting the TSPA model. These reports cover the following areas: (1) Integrated Site Model; (2) Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport; (3) Near Field Environment; (4) Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport; (5) Waste Package Degradation; (6) Waste Form Degradation; (7) Saturated Zone Flow and Transport; (8) Biosphere; and (9) Disruptive Events. Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs) contain the more detailed technical information used to support TSPA and the PMRs. The AMRs consists of data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documentation that will be used to defend the applicability of each process model for evaluating the postclosure performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository system. This documentation will ensure the traceability of information from its source through its ultimate use in the TSPA-Site Recommendation (SR) and in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis processes. The objective of the Biosphere PMR is to summarize (1) the development of the biosphere model, and (2) the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) developed for use in TSPA. The Biosphere PMR does not present or summarize estimates of potential radiation doses to human receptors. Dose calculations are performed as part of TSPA and will be presented in the TSPA documentation. The biosphere model is a component of the process to evaluate postclosure repository performance and regulatory compliance for a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The biosphere model describes those exposure pathways in the biosphere by which radionuclides released from a potential repository could reach a human receptor

  10. Biosphere Process Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, J.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the postclosure performance of a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) will be conducted. Nine Process Model Reports (PMRs), including this document, are being developed to summarize the technical basis for each of the process models supporting the TSPA model. These reports cover the following areas: (1) Integrated Site Model; (2) Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport; (3) Near Field Environment; (4) Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport; (5) Waste Package Degradation; (6) Waste Form Degradation; (7) Saturated Zone Flow and Transport; (8) Biosphere; and (9) Disruptive Events. Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs) contain the more detailed technical information used to support TSPA and the PMRs. The AMRs consists of data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documentation that will be used to defend the applicability of each process model for evaluating the postclosure performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository system. This documentation will ensure the traceability of information from its source through its ultimate use in the TSPA-Site Recommendation (SR) and in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis processes. The objective of the Biosphere PMR is to summarize (1) the development of the biosphere model, and (2) the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) developed for use in TSPA. The Biosphere PMR does not present or summarize estimates of potential radiation doses to human receptors. Dose calculations are performed as part of TSPA and will be presented in the TSPA documentation. The biosphere model is a component of the process to evaluate postclosure repository performance and regulatory compliance for a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The biosphere model describes those exposure pathways in the biosphere by which radionuclides released from a potential repository could reach a human receptor

  11. Performance Evaluation Milk Cheese, Depending on Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andra Suler

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Transformation of milk in Telemea cheese is a complex process based on proteins concentration with a variable percent of fat and mineral substances and elimination of lactose and water in important quantity. The transformation of milk in different assortments of cheese is an important argument for developing of this production (stability in storage, long time conservation, easy transportation and human diet diversification.The research was effectuated in 5 processing Telemea cheese unit, in 2 seasons, summer and winter. Were made 15 determinations for each unit and period and dates obtained were interpreted by statistical methods. paper abstract will be written with Times New Roman 10 pt., justify. It will contain maximum 200 words.

  12. Production of fresh Cheddar cheese curds with controlled postacidification and enhanced flavor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Gelais, D; Lessard, J; Champagne, C P; Vuillemard, J-C

    2009-05-01

    Cheddar cheese in curd form is very popular in eastern Canada. It is retailed immediately after cheese manufacturing and can be maintained at room temperature for 24 h to provide better texture and mouthfeel. Subsequently, the cheese curds must be stored at 4 degrees C. The shelf life is generally 3 d. In this study, Cheddar cheese curds were produced by adding a high diacetyl flavor-producing strain (Lactococcus diacetylactis) to a thermophilic-based starter. The objective was to achieve both postacidification stability to increase the shelf life and enhanced flavor. The addition of L. diacetylactis increased processing time but did not affect cheese composition or the evolution of proteolysis and texture. During cheese manufacturing, streptococci became the dominant microflora in all cheeses, whereas populations of Lactococcus cremoris and L. diacetylactis decreased. During cheese storage, viable counts of L. diacetylactis and Streptococcus thermophilus increased but the counts of L. cremoris decreased. During cheese manufacturing and storage, the concentrations of lactic acid and diacetyl increased rapidly in cheeses produced with L. diacetylactis. Citric acid and galactose contents remained high in cheese made without L. diacetylactis. Sensory evaluation indicated that cheeses containing the L. diacetylactis strain were more flavorful and also had less sourness and could be stored at 4 degrees C for up to 7 d.

  13. Behaviour of Listeria monocytogenes during the manufacture and ripening of Manchego and Chihuahua Mexican cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano-López, C; Hernández-Sánchez, H

    2000-12-05

    The ability of Listeria monocytogenes to survive the Mexican Manchego and Chihuahua cheese-making processes and its persistence during the ripening stages of both cheeses was examined. Commercial pasteurized and homogenized whole milk was inoculated with Listeria monocytogenes (strain ATCC 19114) to a level between 2 x 10(6) and 9 x 10(6) CFU/ml. The milk was used to make Mexican Manchego and Chihuahua cheeses in a 25-l vat. Mexican Manchego cheese was ripened for 5 days and Chihuahua cheese for 6 weeks at 12 degrees C and 85% RH. Listeria present in the cheese was enumerated by diluting samples in sterile 0.1% peptone water and plating on Oxford agar. Duplicate samples were taken at each step of the manufacturing process. During the first week of ripening samples were taken daily from both cheeses. For Chihuahua cheese, samples were taken weekly after the first week of the ripening stage. During the manufacture of Mexican Manchego cheese, Listeria counts remained relatively constant at 10(6) CFU/ml, while with Chihuahua cheese there was a one log decrease in numbers (10(6) to 10(5) CFU/ml). After pressing both curds overnight, numbers of bacteria decreased in Mexican Manchego cheese to 8.2 x 10(5) but increased in Chihuahua cheese from 1.7 x 10(5) to 1.2 x 10(6) CFU/ml. During the ripening stage, counts of Listeria remained constant in both cheeses. However, since the Chihuahua cheese ripening stage is about 6 weeks, the number of bacteria decreased from 2 x 10(6) to 4 x 10(4) CFU/g. The results show that Listeria monocytogenes is able to survive the manufacture and ripening processes of both Mexican cheeses.

  14. Effect of biodegradable starch packing on storage of processed cheese/ Efeito de embalagem biodegradável de amido no armazenamento de queijo processado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Victória Eiras Grossmann

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing interest in the utilization of renewable resources for the production of food packaging. Among the biopolymers, starches from several sources have been considered as one of the most promising material for this purpose; and the reasons for this are that starches are biodegradable, inexpensive and available in all world. This work had the objective of evaluate the effect of yam starch biodegradable packaging on storage (30 days / 4oC of comercial-processed cheese and to compare with conventional packaging. The results showed that conventional packaging presented the better behavior on weight and water activity retention of samples during all storage time than starch packaging. Considering microbiological counts, only control samples (unpackaged showed contamination. Titratable acidity and pH of packaged samples did not differ for starch or conventional package (Tukey test, p ? 0.05 during all storage time. Considering the presented results, yam starch could be used as an alternative to package processed cheese, but more studies have to be done to improve starch films as a water vapor barrier.Há um interesse crescente no emprego de matérias-primas provenientes de recursos renováveis para a produção de embalagens para alimentos. Dentre os biopolímeros mais promissores para este fim estão os amidos de diversas fontes botânicas, que são biodegradáveis, têm custo baixo e estão disponíveis em todo o mundo. Assim sendo, este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar o efeito de embalagens biodegradáveis de amido de inhame no armazenamento (30 dias / 4oc de queijo processado obtido de fonte comercial, e comparar o seu desempenho com o de embalagens convencionais. Os resultados obtidos mostraram que a embalagem convencional foi mais eficaz na retenção do peso e atividade de água das amostras do que a embalagem de amido. Quanto à contagem microbiana, apenas as amostras não embaladas apresentaram contaminação. A acidez

  15. Characterization of major and trace minerals, fatty acid composition, and cholesterol content of Protected Designation of Origin cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuelian, C L; Currò, S; Penasa, M; Cassandro, M; De Marchi, M

    2017-05-01

    Cheese provides essential nutrients for human nutrition and health, such as minerals and fatty acids (FA). Its composition varies according to milk origin (e.g., species and breed), rearing conditions (e.g., feeding and management), and cheese-making technology (e.g., coagulation process, addition of salt, ripening period). In recent years, cheese production has increased worldwide. Italy is one of the main producers and exporters of cheese. This study aimed to describe mineral, FA, and cholesterol content of 133 samples from 18 commercial cheeses from 4 dairy species (buffalo, cow, goat, and sheep) and from 3 classes of moisture content (hard, 45%). Mineral concentrations of cheese samples were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, and FA and cholesterol contents were determined by gas chromatography. Moisture and species had a significant effect on almost all traits: the highest levels of Na, Ca, and Fe were found in cheeses made from sheep milk; the greatest level of Cu was found in cow milk cheese, the lowest amount of K was found in buffalo milk cheese, and the lowest amount of Zn was found in goat cheeses. In all samples, Cr and Pb were not detected (below the level of detection). In general, total fat, protein, and minerals significantly increased when the moisture decreased. Buffalo and goat cheeses had the highest saturated FA content, and sheep cheeses showed the highest content of unsaturated and polyunsaturated FA, conjugated linoleic acid, and n-3 FA. Goat and sheep cheeses achieved higher proportions of minor FA than did cow and buffalo cheeses. Buffalo cheese exhibited the lowest cholesterol level. Our results confirm that cheese mineral content is mainly affected by the cheese-making process, whereas FA profile mainly reflects the FA composition of the source milk. This study allowed the characterization of mineral and FA composition and cholesterol content and revealed large variability among different commercial

  16. Foam process models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffat, Harry K.; Noble, David R.; Baer, Thomas A. (Procter & Gamble Co., West Chester, OH); Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2008-09-01

    In this report, we summarize our work on developing a production level foam processing computational model suitable for predicting the self-expansion of foam in complex geometries. The model is based on a finite element representation of the equations of motion, with the movement of the free surface represented using the level set method, and has been implemented in SIERRA/ARIA. An empirically based time- and temperature-dependent density model is used to encapsulate the complex physics of foam nucleation and growth in a numerically tractable model. The change in density with time is at the heart of the foam self-expansion as it creates the motion of the foam. This continuum-level model uses an homogenized description of foam, which does not include the gas explicitly. Results from the model are compared to temperature-instrumented flow visualization experiments giving the location of the foam front as a function of time for our EFAR model system.

  17. Proteolysis of prato type cheese produced using ultrafiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spadoti Leila Maria

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of milk ultrafiltration technology for cheese manufacture presents several advantages. However, it also influences proteolysis and, consequently, cheese ripening. The effects of five different processing methods for Prato cheese were evaluated with respect to the time evolution of the extent and depth of proteolysis indexes (EPI and DPI. The following treatments (T for cheese production were studied: T1 - without ultrafiltration (standard; T2, T3, T4 and T5 - using milk concentrated by ultrafiltration (UFCM and respectively: T2 - without pre-fermentation of the UFCM; T3 - pre-fermentation of 10% of the UFCM; T4 - pre-fermentation of 20% of the UFCM, and T5 - pre-fermentation of 20% of the UFCM plus indirect heating. Treatments affected the EPI and DPI of the cheeses (T1 lower values for EPI and DPI and T4 higher values for EPI and DPI. The time influenced the extent and depth of proteolysis indexes.

  18. Pulsed-light inactivation of pathogenic and spoilage bacteria on cheese surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proulx, J; Hsu, L C; Miller, B M; Sullivan, G; Paradis, K; Moraru, C I

    2015-09-01

    Cheese products are susceptible to postprocessing cross-contamination by bacterial surface contamination during slicing, handling, or packaging, which can lead to food safety issues and significant losses due to spoilage. This study examined the effectiveness of pulsed-light (PL) treatment on the inactivation of the spoilage microorganism Pseudomonas fluorescens, the nonenterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 (nonpathogenic surrogate of Escherichia coli O157:H7), and Listeria innocua (nonpathogenic surrogate of Listeria monocytogenes) on cheese surface. The effects of inoculum level and cheese surface topography and the presence of clear polyethylene packaging were evaluated in a full factorial experimental design. The challenge microorganisms were grown to early stationary phase and subsequently diluted to reach initial inoculum levels of either 5 or 7 log cfu/slice. White Cheddar and process cheeses were cut into 2.5×5 cm slices, which were spot-inoculated with 100 µL of bacterial suspension. Inoculated cheese samples were exposed to PL doses of 1.02 to 12.29 J/cm(2). Recovered survivors were enumerated by standard plate counting or the most probable number technique, as appropriate. The PL treatments were performed in triplicate and data were analyzed using a general linear model. Listeria innocua was the least sensitive to PL treatment, with a maximum inactivation level of 3.37±0.2 log, followed by P. fluorescens, with a maximum inactivation of 3.74±0.8 log. Escherichia coli was the most sensitive to PL, with a maximum reduction of 5.41±0.1 log. All PL inactivation curves were nonlinear, and inactivation reached a plateau after 3 pulses (3.07 J/cm(2)). The PL treatments through UV-transparent packaging and without packaging consistently resulted in similar inactivation levels. This study demonstrates that PL has strong potential for decontamination of the cheese surface. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc

  19. The language of cheese-ripening cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gori, Klaus; Jespersen, Lene

    2010-01-01

    Microbial interactions are of importance for the establishment and growth of cheese ripening cultures. An interesting aspect of microbial interactions is cell-cell communication, often referred to as quorum sensing; the process in which micro-organisms communicate with signalling molecules and co......-ordinate gene expression in a cell density dependent manner. Little is known about quorum sensing in foods. However, as quorum sensing is expected to be a general phenomenon in micro-organisms, it is likely to be of importance for micro-organisms in foods. An example of a food product where quorum sensing could...... be of importance is surface ripened cheeses. The present review focuses on our findings on quorum sensing systems in cheese ripening cultures. The main focus is on the group of bacterial non-species-specific signalling molecules referred to as autoinducer-2 (AI-2) in smear bacteria as well as alcohol...

  20. Fontes de contaminação por Staphylococcus aureus na linha de processamento de queijo prato Identification of main sources of contamination with Staphylococcus aureus in Prato cheese manufacturing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.G. Assumpção

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de identificar as principais fontes de contaminação por Staphylococcus aureus e Staphylococcus produtores de coagulase (SC+, avaliou-se o processo de fabricação de queijo prato em um laticínio de Lavras, MG, durante os meses de outubro de 2000 a abril de 2001. As análises microbiológicas foram feitas no leite cru, no leite pasteurizado resfriado, nas mãos e antebraços dos funcionários, na salmoura, na água de imersão das fôrmas e no queijo embalado. Contagens elevadas de SC+ e de S. aureus (4x10³ a 4,8x10(6 UFC/ml e 4x10³ a 3,3x10(5 UFC/ml, respectivamente foram encontradas em quatro avaliações no leite cru. Após a pasteurização, as contagens foram reduzidas a In order to identify the main sources of contamination with Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus coagulase positive (SC+, a manufacture process of prato cheese in a plant located in Lavras, State of Minas Gerais, was evaluated five times from October/2000 to April/2001. Raw and pasteurized milk, hand and forearms of cheese makers, brine, hoops flushing water and cheeses were analyzed for SC+ and S. aureus. High counts of SC+ and S. aureus (4x10³ to 4.8x10(6 CFU/ml and 4x10³ to 3.3x10(5 CFU/ml, respectively were found in raw milk in four evaluations, but they decreased to values lower than 1 CFU/ml after pasteurization. In three evaluations, counts of SC+ in prato cheese samples were above legal limits (10(4, 10(5 and 2.3x10(5 CFU/g. The hoops flushing water and brine were not important contamination sources, both with counts lower than 1CFU/ml. The cheese makers probably were the main source of contamination, since high counts in cheese were correlated to high counts in their hands (4x10² CFU/cm² or forearms (4.7x10² and 3.3x10³ CFU/cm².

  1. Packaging conditions hindering fungal growth on cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Væggemose; Haasum, Iben

    1997-01-01

    Fungal contamination is one of the most important quality deteriorating factors on cheese. During the last 5 years we have studied in detail the underlying factors controlling these unwanted processes in a collaborative project financed by the Danish Dairy Board and the Ministry of Agriculture. R...

  2. 40 CFR 405.50 - Applicability; description of the cottage cheese and cultured cream cheese subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... cottage cheese and cultured cream cheese subcategory. 405.50 Section 405.50 Protection of Environment... SOURCE CATEGORY Cottage Cheese and Cultured Cream Cheese Subcategory § 405.50 Applicability; description of the cottage cheese and cultured cream cheese subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are...

  3. 21 CFR 133.181 - Provolone cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Provolone cheese. 133.181 Section 133.181 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.181 Provolone cheese. (a) Description. (1) Provolone, a pasta filata or stretched curd-type...

  4. Potential of Lactobacillus curvatus LFC1 to produce slits in Cheddar cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcellato, D; Johnson, M E; Houck, K; Skeie, S B; Mills, D A; Kalanetra, K M; Steele, J L

    2015-08-01

    Defects in Cheddar cheese resulting from undesired gas production are a sporadic problem that results in significant financial losses in the cheese industry. In this study, we evaluate the potential of a facultatively heterofermentative lactobacilli, Lactobacillus curvatus LFC1, to produce slits, a gas related defect in Cheddar cheese. The addition of Lb. curvatus LFC1 to cheese milk at log 3 CFU/ml resulted in the development of small slits during the first month of ripening. Chemical analyses indicated that the LFC1 containing cheeses had less galactose and higher levels of lactate and acetate than the control cheeses. The composition the cheese microbiota was examined through a combination of two culture independent approaches, 16S rRNA marker gene sequencing and automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis; the results indicated that no known gas producers were present and that high levels of LFC1 was the only significant difference between the cheese microbiotas. A ripening cheese model system was utilized to examine the metabolism of LFC1 under conditions similar to those present in cheeses that exhibited the slit defect. The combined cheese and model system results indicate that when Lb. curvatus LFC1 was added to the cheese milk at log 3 CFU/ml it metabolized galactose to lactate, acetate, and CO2. For production of sufficient CO2 to result in the formation of slits there needs to be sufficient galactose and Lb. curvatus LFC1 present in the cheese matrix. To our knowledge, facultatively heterofermentative lactobacilli have not previously been demonstrated to result in gas-related cheese defects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Researches Regarding Microbiological Parameters Values of Telemea Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andra Suler

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this paper were microbiological parameters which characterized the Telemea cheese for each season, assessment of technologies and thus assortment defects as well as projection of hygienic solution for obtaining qualitative products according to actual standards. We studied 5 units of Telemea cheese processing replaced in different area. For obtaining concrete results we used STAS methodologies and analyze procedure was based on observation, mathematical estimation and experiments (in lab and processing units.

  6. Typicality and Geographical Origin Markers of Protected Origin Cheese from The Netherlands Revealed by PTR-MS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galle, S.A.; Koot, A.H.; Soukoulis, C.; Cappellin, L.; Biasioli, F.; Alewijn, M.; Ruth, van S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Volatile fingerprints of 30 cumin cheese samples of artisanal farmers' cheese of Leiden with EU Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) and 29 cumin cheese samples of varying commercial Dutch brands without PDO protection were used to develop authentication models. The headspace concentrations of the

  7. Antioxidant activity and nutrient release from polyphenol-enriched cheese in a simulated gastrointestinal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamothe, Sophie; Langlois, Ariane; Bazinet, Laurent; Couillard, Charles; Britten, Michel

    2016-03-01

    Green tea polyphenols are recognized for their antioxidant properties and their effects on lipid digestion kinetics. Polyphenols are sensitive to degradation in the intestinal environment. Interactions with dairy proteins could modulate the stability and biological activity of polyphenols during digestion. The objective of this study was to evaluate the release of nutrients (polyphenols, fatty acids and peptides) and the antioxidant activity in polyphenol-enriched cheese containing different levels of calcium in a simulated gastrointestinal environment. The relationship between cheese matrix texture, matrix degradation and nutrient release during digestion was also studied. Green tea extract was added to milk at 0% or 0.1%, and cheeses were produced on a laboratory scale. The level of available calcium was adjusted to low (Ca(low)), regular (Ca(reg)) or high (Ca(high)) during the salting step of the cheese-making process. Cheeses were subjected to simulated digestion. The rate and extent of fatty acid release were 21% lower for Ca(low) cheese than for Ca(reg) and Ca(high) cheeses. The greater adhesiveness of Ca(low) cheese, which resulted in lower rates of matrix degradation and proteolysis, contributed to the reduced rate of lipolysis. The presence of green tea extract in cheese reduced the release of free fatty acids at the end of digestion by 7%. The addition of green tea extract increased cheese hardness but did not influence matrix degradation or proteolysis profiles. The formation of complexes between tea polyphenols and proteins within the cheese matrix resulted in a more than twofold increase in polyphenol recovery in the intestinal phase compared with the control (tea polyphenol extract incubated with polyphenol-free cheese). Antioxidant activity was 14% higher in the digest from polyphenol-enriched cheese than in the control. These results suggest that cheese is an effective matrix for the controlled release of nutrients and for the protection of green

  8. Cheese and cardiovascular health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerpsted, Julie Bousgaard

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the number one cause of mortality worldwide. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is a well-known risk factor of CVD which increases after the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA). Cheese is a dietary product commonly consumed in Western countries and known...

  9. Lipids in cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipids are present in cheese at levels above 20 percent and are analyzed by several techniques. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy are used to examine the microstructure, gas chromatography is employed to look at fatty acid composition, and differential scanning cal...

  10. Assessment of the Indicators Atherogenic Index and Lipid Preventive Score of White Brine Cheese by Buffalo Milk after Technological Processing and Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, S.; Nacheva, I.; Miteva, D.

    2011-01-01

    The present investigation had the objective to study the changes in the atherogenic index - AI and the lipid preventive score - LPS as nutritious indicators for assessment of the risk of cardio-vascular diseases, on the basis of the fatty acid composition of white brine cheese by buffalo milk after applying of two methods of preservation – freeze-drying and dry gamma sterilization with 2 and 4 kGy. The analysis was made with the aid of gas chromatograph SHIMADZU 2010. The lyophilized cheese is characterized by a comparatively low AI - 2.59 after lyophilization and is preserved during storage - 2.55. After lyophilization the LPS of the cheese was the highest – 103.70, while after irradiation a decrease of its value was observed up to 97.73 with 2 kGy and 96.91 with 4 kGy. Key words: white brine cheese by buffalo milk, atherogenic index, lipid preventive score, freeze-drying - lyophilization, gamma sterilization

  11. Assessment of the indicators atherogenic index and lipid preventive score of white brine cheese by buffalo milk after technological processing and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, S.; Nacheva, I.; Miteva, D.

    2011-01-01

    The present investigation had the objective to study the changes in the atherogenic index - AI and the lipid preventive score - LPS as nutritious indicators for assessment of the risk of cardio-vascular diseases, on the basis of the fatty acid composition of white brine cheese by buffalo milk after applying of two methods of preservation – freeze-drying and dry gamma sterilization with 2 and 4 kGy. The analysis was made with the aid of gas chromatograph SHIMADZU 2010. The lyophilized cheese is characterized by a comparatively low AI - 2.59 after lyophilization and is preserved during storage - 2.55. After lyophilization the LPS of the cheese was the highest – 103.70, while after irradiation a decrease of its value was observed up to 97.73 with 2 kGy and 96.91 with 4 kGy. Key words: white brine cheese by buffalo milk, atherogenic index, lipid preventive score, freeze-drying - lyophilization, gamma sterilization

  12. Microbiological changes throughout ripening of Keş cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seval Sevgi Kirdar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbiological changes in Keş cheese, traditional Turkish raw cow’s milk cheese made without the addition of starter culture, were studied during 90 days of ripening. Physico-chemical parameters, pH, salt content and water activity (aw, as important parameters for microbial growth, were also determined. Lactic acid bacteria were predominant microbial group. The time of ripening significantly influenced the count of total aerobic mesophilic bacteria, psychrophilic bacteria, mould (P<0.05, Lactobacillus spp. and Lactococcus spp. (P<0.01 which increased during ripening. E. coli and coagulase-positive staphylococci were not detected. The counts of Enterococcus spp. (P<0.05, Staphylococcus-Micrococcus spp., Enterobactericeae and coliform bacteria decreased throughout ripening of Keş cheese, which was connected to the physico-chemical parameters. Water activity significantly decreased (P<0.05, while the salt content increased (P<0.01 during ripening of Keş cheese. The obtained results will contribute to the establishment of the microbiological quality standards for Keş cheese and give necessary information for formation of autochthonous starter culture, which will help to understand ripening process of sour dried cheeses and improve the traditional farmhouse cheese production.

  13. Survivability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus during the Preparation of Soy Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Mei Liu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a new probiotic soy cheese on the basis of chinese sufu. The soy cheese was made from soymilk fermented with soy cheese bacterial starter cultures (DH1 and GH4 and L. rhamnosus 6013. After ripening, probiotic soy cheese sensory scores (standard SB/T 10170-93 were compared to the control. The changes in pH, bacterial growth and the survivability of the potential probiotic L. rhamnosus 6013 during fermentation and storage at 10 °C were examined. After 6 h of fermentation, L. rhamnosus 6013 was capable of growing in soymilk as high as 108–109 CFU/mL. After being stored for 30 days at 10 °C, slight decrease in pH and the viable counts of the strain was noticed. The viable counts of L. rhamnosus 6013, DH1 and GH4 were 107, 106 and 106 CFU/g, respectively, after storage for 30 days. The levels of stachyose, raffinose and sucrose in soy cheese were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. The results indicated that L. rhamnosus 6013 could utilize the soybean oligosaccharides as carbon sources. In addition, 2–4 % of NaCl had little effect on the survivability of L. rhamnosus 6013. It indicated that L. rhamnosus 6013 could withstand the technological processing of soy cheese and had no negative effect on the fermentation and the sensory properties of the soy cheese.

  14. Modified atmospheric conditions controlling fungal growth on cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Væggemose

    1997-01-01

    a competitive advantage over other fungi in moist conditions with high carbon dioxide levels, such as inside a roquefort cheese or in gas tight grain storage. The key to success in food packaging is to recognise the food ecosystem, as it enables us to identify which micro......Effective control of fungal growth on cheese under storage conditions is of great concern for the dairy industry. Therefore we designed a research project together with the Danish dairy industry on modelling fungal growth on cheese as affected by the combined effect of storage conditions (O2 and CO...

  15. CMB seen through random Swiss Cheese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavinto, Mikko; Räsänen, Syksy

    2015-01-01

    We consider a Swiss Cheese model with a random arrangement of Lemaȋtre-Tolman-Bondi holes in ΛCDM cheese. We study two kinds of holes with radius r b =50 h −1  Mpc, with either an underdense or an overdense centre, called the open and closed case, respectively. We calculate the effect of the holes on the temperature, angular diameter distance and, for the first time in Swiss Cheese models, shear of the CMB . We quantify the systematic shift of the mean and the statistical scatter, and calculate the power spectra. In the open case, the temperature power spectrum is three orders of magnitude below the linear ISW spectrum. It is sensitive to the details of the hole, in the closed case the amplitude is two orders of magnitude smaller. In contrast, the power spectra of the distance and shear are more robust, and agree with perturbation theory and previous Swiss Cheese results. We do not find a statistically significant mean shift in the sky average of the angular diameter distance, and obtain the 95% limit |Δ D A / D-bar A |∼< 10 −4 . We consider the argument that areas of spherical surfaces are nearly unaffected by perturbations, which is often invoked in light propagation calculations. The closed case is consistent with this at 1σ, whereas in the open case the probability is only 1.4%

  16. CMB seen through random Swiss Cheese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavinto, Mikko; Räsänen, Syksy, E-mail: mikko.lavinto@helsinki.fi, E-mail: syksy.rasanen@iki.fi [Physics Department, University of Helsinki and Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-10-01

    We consider a Swiss Cheese model with a random arrangement of Lemaȋtre-Tolman-Bondi holes in ΛCDM cheese. We study two kinds of holes with radius r{sub b}=50 h{sup −1} Mpc, with either an underdense or an overdense centre, called the open and closed case, respectively. We calculate the effect of the holes on the temperature, angular diameter distance and, for the first time in Swiss Cheese models, shear of the CMB . We quantify the systematic shift of the mean and the statistical scatter, and calculate the power spectra. In the open case, the temperature power spectrum is three orders of magnitude below the linear ISW spectrum. It is sensitive to the details of the hole, in the closed case the amplitude is two orders of magnitude smaller. In contrast, the power spectra of the distance and shear are more robust, and agree with perturbation theory and previous Swiss Cheese results. We do not find a statistically significant mean shift in the sky average of the angular diameter distance, and obtain the 95% limit |Δ D{sub A}/ D-bar {sub A}|∼< 10{sup −4}. We consider the argument that areas of spherical surfaces are nearly unaffected by perturbations, which is often invoked in light propagation calculations. The closed case is consistent with this at 1σ, whereas in the open case the probability is only 1.4%.

  17. CMB seen through random Swiss Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavinto, Mikko; Räsänen, Syksy

    2015-10-01

    We consider a Swiss Cheese model with a random arrangement of Lemaȋtre-Tolman-Bondi holes in ΛCDM cheese. We study two kinds of holes with radius rb=50 h-1 Mpc, with either an underdense or an overdense centre, called the open and closed case, respectively. We calculate the effect of the holes on the temperature, angular diameter distance and, for the first time in Swiss Cheese models, shear of the CMB . We quantify the systematic shift of the mean and the statistical scatter, and calculate the power spectra. In the open case, the temperature power spectrum is three orders of magnitude below the linear ISW spectrum. It is sensitive to the details of the hole, in the closed case the amplitude is two orders of magnitude smaller. In contrast, the power spectra of the distance and shear are more robust, and agree with perturbation theory and previous Swiss Cheese results. We do not find a statistically significant mean shift in the sky average of the angular diameter distance, and obtain the 95% limit |Δ DA/bar DA|lesssim 10-4. We consider the argument that areas of spherical surfaces are nearly unaffected by perturbations, which is often invoked in light propagation calculations. The closed case is consistent with this at 1σ, whereas in the open case the probability is only 1.4%.

  18. Segmentation of Parmigiano Reggiano dairies according to cheese-making technology and relationships with the aspect of the cheese curd surface at the moment of its extraction from the cheese vat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucchetti, G; Gatti, M; Nocetti, M; Reverberi, P; Bianchi, A; Galati, F; Petroni, A

    2014-03-01

    Parmigiano Reggiano cheese dairies develop specific cheese-making strategies to adapt the variable characteristics of raw, not standardized milk to the final goal of obtaining cheese consistent with the standard. Analyzing 1,175 cheese-making reports from 30 out of 383 dairies associated with the Parmigiano Reggiano Consortium in 2010 and 2011, 4 groups of Parmigiano Reggiano dairies using specific cheese-making technologies were discriminated by means of multiple linear discriminant analysis. Cheese makers manage cheese-making practices to obtain curd with different roughness properties, classified according to jargon words such as "rigata" and "giusta" or synonyms, because they believe that the roughness of the cheese curd surface immediately after the extraction from the vat is associated with different whey-draining properties and to the final outcome of the cheese. The aspect of the surfaces of the curds produced by the 4 groups of dairies was different according to the technology applied by each group. Cutting of the coagulum when it is still soft for a longer time and faster cooking of the cheese curd grains were associated with a less rough appearance of the surface of the curd, whereas under the opposite conditions, cutting the coagulum when it is firm for a shorter time, led to a curd with a rougher surface. These findings partially support the traditional feeling of Parmigiano Reggiano cheese makers, who consider the curd surface aspect one of the main drivers for their technological choices; to date, however, no data are provided about correlation between the aspect of the curd and the quality of the ripened cheese. If a sufficiently strong correlation could be demonstrated by the future development of the research, the operational effectiveness of Parmigiano Reggiano dairies will be able to largely benefit from the availability of sound and early process markers. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  19. Trace elements content in cheese, cream and butter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Bilandžić

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Trace elements were determined in five types of cheese, cream and butter using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. In cheese samples trace elements were measured as follows (mg/kg: Al 0.01-3.93, Co<0.005, Cr 0.005-1.66, Li 0.008-0.056, Mn 0.068-5.37, Mo 0.003-0.225, Ni 0.01-0.163 and Sr 0.085-3.49. There were significant differences considering the concentrations of Mn, Cr and Al (p<0.01, all among the analysed dairy products. There were no significant differences in Sr, Mo, Ni and Li levels among products. The highest levels were found in following products (mg/kg: 4.23 Mn in semi-hard fat cheese, 2.43 Sr in cream cheese, 0.18 Mo in cream, 0.14 Ni and 0.028 Li in melted cheese, 1.13 Cr and 3.87 Al in butter. The trace element con¬centrations measured in cheeses and butter varied compared to the literature data. Concentrations of Al, Cr, Mn and Mo found in cheeses and Mn and Ni in butter were in line with contents reported in other countries. These results may demonstrate differences in production processes between countries. The estimated daily intakes (EDIs calculated for Cr, Mn, Mo and Ni in cheeses showed a low contribution (0.59-3.38 % to the reference values for the permitted daily exposure (PDE for these elements. However, the high contribution of Al concentrations (56 and 124 % to PTWI (provisional maximum tolerable daily intake calculated in fresh and melted cheese may pose a health risk to consumers.

  20. Autochthonous cheeses of Bosnia and Herzegovina

    OpenAIRE

    Zlatan Sarić; Sonja Bijeljac

    2003-01-01

    Despite the migration of people towards cities, autochthonous cheeses in Bosnia and Herzegovina survived. Technologies of these cheeses are simple and adapted to humble mountain limitations. Geographical occasions and rich mountain pastures created a certain participation of ewe's milk cheeses. Communicative isolation of hilly-mountain regions resulted in "closed" cheese production in small households. Autochthonous cheeses in Bosnia and Herzegovina have various origins. Different cheeses are...

  1. Parmigiano Reggiano cheese and bone health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampaloni, Barbara; Bartolini, Elisa; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2011-09-01

    Osteoporosis is a multifactorial disease characterized by loss of bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue, which leads to a consequent increase in the risk of skeletal fractures. Diet awakes a critical interest in osteoporosis, because it is one of the few determinants that can be safely modified. A healthy well balanced nutrition can play an important role in prevention and pathogenesis of osteoporosis, but also in support of a pharmacological therapy. Numerous evidences have already established that dietary calcium, proteins and vitamin D are essential nutrients for achieved peak bone mass and maintaining skeletal health.Dairy products, by providing both calcium and proteins, represent the optimal source of highly bioavailable nutrients for bone health. Among dairy foods in particular cheese results one of the major source of calcium in the adults western diet and also in the Italian adults diet.Parmigiano Reggiano cheese is an homemade Italian food whose denomination "Protected Designation of Origin" is linked to an artisanal manufacturing process in limited geographic area of Northern Italy and is an optimal source of essential nutrients for acquisition and maintenance of bone health. Parmigiano Reggiano is a cheese easy digested, for the presence of ready to use proteins and lipids, lactose free, rich in calcium, with possible prebiotic and probiotic effect. On the basis of its nutritional characteristics and of its easy digestibility Parmigiano Reggiano cheese is recommended in all feeding age groups.

  2. Cardiometabolic Effects of Cheese Intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorning, Tanja Kongerslev

    In several countries, the dietary guidelines for preventing CVD focus on reducing the intake of saturated fat. A high cheese intake in particular may however not be associated with CVD risk, despite a high content of saturated fat. This could be due to a reduced digestibility of fat in cheese....... The aim of this PhD thesis was to investigate how the fat content of the cheese-matrix and the cheese ripening duration affect cardiometabolic risk markers and fecal fat excretion. The thesis is based on three intervention studies, two in pigs and one in humans. The results suggested that fat content...... of cheese-matrix may influence the HDL-cholesterol response, while the ripening duration may affect the level of free fatty acids and insulin in the blood. Furthermore the results showed that a diet with saturated fat in cheese or meat caused a higher HDL-cholesterol, but not LDL-cholesterol, compared...

  3. Light propagation in Swiss-cheese cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szybka, Sebastian J.

    2011-01-01

    We study the effect of inhomogeneities on light propagation. The Sachs equations are solved numerically in the Swiss-cheese models with inhomogeneities modeled by the Lemaitre-Tolman solutions. Our results imply that, within the models we study, inhomogeneities may partially mimic the accelerated expansion of the Universe provided the light propagates through regions with lower than the average density. The effect of inhomogeneities is small and full randomization of the photons' trajectories reduces it to an insignificant level.

  4. Quality Assessment of Cheese in Markets of Tirana City

    OpenAIRE

    YLLKA ALLARAJ; NEFAIL BIBA; ANJEZA COKU; ELDA ÇUKA

    2014-01-01

    Mycological control of cheese is considered an important process related to food safety. Food borne disease in our days remains an important issue for public health because they causes infection to the consumers and an important economic damage. A mycological survey of different kind of cheeses sold at five big markets in Tirana is conducted during March - Septembre 2013, in order to identify if potentially toxicological and pathogenic fungi were or were not present. A total 140 samples of c...

  5. Temperature and relative humidity influence the ripening descriptors of Camembert-type cheeses throughout ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq-Perlat, M-N; Sicard, M; Perrot, N; Trelea, I C; Picque, D; Corrieu, G

    2015-02-01

    Ripening descriptors are the main factors that determine consumers' preferences of soft cheeses. Six descriptors were defined to represent the sensory changes in Camembert cheeses: Penicillium camemberti appearance, cheese odor and rind color, creamy underrind thickness and consistency, and core hardness. To evaluate the effects of the main process parameters on these descriptors, Camembert cheeses were ripened under different temperatures (8, 12, and 16°C) and relative humidity (RH; 88, 92, and 98%). The sensory descriptors were highly dependent on the temperature and RH used throughout ripening in a ripening chamber. All sensory descriptor changes could be explained by microorganism growth, pH, carbon substrate metabolism, and cheese moisture, as well as by microbial enzymatic activities. On d 40, at 8°C and 88% RH, all sensory descriptors scored the worst: the cheese was too dry, its odor and its color were similar to those of the unripe cheese, the underrind was driest, and the core was hardest. At 16°C and 98% RH, the odor was strongly ammonia and the color was dark brown, and the creamy underrind represented the entire thickness of the cheese but was completely runny, descriptors indicative of an over ripened cheese. Statistical analysis showed that the best ripening conditions to achieve an optimum balance between cheese sensory qualities and marketability were 13±1°C and 94±1% RH. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Consumers’ attitude and opinion towards different types of fresh cheese: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Pereira de BARROS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fresh cheese stands out for its tradition and widespread consumption in Brazil. However, there is a lack of information on motivation towards the consumption of available fresh cheeses in the Brazilian market. Focus group sessions were used to explore consumers’ attitude and opinion about fresh cheese. Products with different characteristics were used to stimulate discussion among participants including cheese with “no added salt”, the claim “contains probiotic microorganisms” and products processed with goat milk. The salt content played an important role on the consumer intention to purchase of fresh cheese. Participants stated that they would consume cheese without salt only by following a medical prescription. However, the subjects declared that they would buy reduced salt cheese if such reduction would not compromise the flavor. The meaning of the claim “contains probiotic microorganisms” was often declared as unknown during the discussion. However, they would buy a probiotic product. In addition, it was mentioned that a premium price would be paid for such functional cheese. Participants declared that would buy goat cheese. Nevertheless, to pay a higher price over the conventional one was a controversial and debatable issue among consumers. Results revealed important implications for the development of marketing strategies for fresh cheese.

  7. Derivation of multivariate indices of milk composition, coagulation properties, and individual cheese yield in dairy sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, M G; Serdino, J; Gaspa, G; Urgeghe, P; Ibba, I; Contu, M; Fresi, P; Macciotta, N P P

    2016-06-01

    Milk composition and its technological properties are traits of interest for the dairy sheep industry because almost all milk produced is processed into cheese. However, several variables define milk technological properties and a complex correlation pattern exists among them. In the present work, we measured milk composition, coagulation properties, and individual cheese yields in a sample of 991 Sarda breed ewes in 47 flocks. The work aimed to study the correlation pattern among measured variables and to obtain new synthetic indicators of milk composition and cheese-making properties. Multivariate factor analysis was carried out on individual measures of milk coagulation parameters; cheese yield; fat, protein, and lactose percentages; somatic cell score; casein percentage; NaCl content; pH; and freezing point. Four factors that were able to explain about 76% of the original variance were extracted. They were clearly interpretable: the first was associated with composition and cheese yield, the second with udder health status, the third with coagulation, and the fourth with curd characteristics. Factor scores were then analyzed by using a mixed linear model that included the fixed effect of parity, lambing month, and lactation stage, and the random effect of flock-test date. The patterns of factor scores along lactation stages were coherent with their technical meaning. A relevant effect of flock-test date was detected, especially on the 2 factors related to milk coagulation properties. Results of the present study suggest the existence of a simpler latent structure that regulates relationships between variables defining milk composition and coagulation properties in sheep. Heritability estimates for the 4 extracted factors were from low to moderate, suggesting potential use of these new variables as breeding goals. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Consumption of Iron-Fortified Cheese and Lipid Peroxidation in Females

    OpenAIRE

    Giunti, Gene J.

    1994-01-01

    Dairy products are important sources of calcium and other nutrients but are a poor source of dietary iron. Cheese comprises a substantial portion of dairy food consumption and has been determined an appropriate medium for iron-fortification. However, iron may promote the potentially harmful process in food and biological systems known as lipid peroxidation. Therefore, the safety of consuming iron-fortified cheese was examined. Commercial-scale batches of Cheddar cheese were iron-fortified ...

  9. Indigenous strains of Lactobacillus isolated from the Istrian cheese as potential starter cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Nataša Hulak; Ana Žgomba Maksimović; Ana Kaić; Andrea Skelin; Mirna Mrkonjić Fuka

    2016-01-01

    Istrian ewe’s milk cheese is an autochthonous product that is manufactured for generations on small family farms in the Croatian peninsula Istria. Traditional Istrian cheese is made from unpasteurized ewe’s milk, without the addition of starter cultures. Consequently, the specific flavour and texture of the Istrian cheese is owed to metabolic processes of indigenous microflora of which Lactobacillus species play pivotal role. Characterisation and selection of indigenous lactobacilli may resul...

  10. Microbial ecology of artisanal italian cheese: Molecular microbial characterization by culture-independent method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombo, E.; Scarpellini, M.; Franzatti, L.; Dioguardi, L.

    2009-01-01

    Present study will treat the next topics: ecology of the natural and man made environments and functional diversity of bacteria. The microbial communities in artisanal goat cheeses produced in mountain pastures (typical farms) in Piemonte mountain (North of Italy) change a lot during precessing and ripening time. Moreover cheese microbial ecosystems are different in each small dairy because adventitious microflora can come from the environment and contamination the milk before the cheese making process and the product during manufacture and ripening. (Author)

  11. Physical sample structure as predictive factor in growth modeling of Listeria innocua in a white cheese model system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Sandie M.; Bertram, Hanne C.; Andersen, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    2 relaxation parameters (relaxation times constants, relative areas and width of peaks) and their applicability as predictive factors for maximum specific growth rate, √μmax and log-increase in 6 weeks of L. innocua was evaluated by polynomial modeling. Inclusion of NMR parameters was able...

  12. 21 CFR 133.165 - Parmesan and reggiano cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Parmesan and reggiano cheese. 133.165 Section 133...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.165 Parmesan and reggiano cheese. (a) Parmesan cheese, reggiano cheese...

  13. Potential of anticlostridial Lactobacillus isolated from cheese to prevent blowing defects in semihard cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Pia; Vogensen,, F. K.; Nielsen, E. W

    2010-01-01

    Five anticlostridial Lactobacillus strains isolated from cheese were selected for a mixed adjunct culture. Cheese with the mixed adjunct culture (experimental) and without (control) was made in triplicate and ripened as vacuum-packed and surface-ripened cheese. Cheese gross composition was similar....... Excessive gas formation occurred only in control cheeses. In contrast to control cheeses, the experimental cheeses were dominated by the added adjunct Lactobacillus strains (repetitive-PCR). Casein breakdown was not influenced, however, the total amount of amino acids and pH was slightly lower...... in the experimental cheeses. Anticlostridial nonstarter Lactobacillus strains have potential as protective adjunct cultures against blowing defects in cheese....

  14. GREENSCOPE: Sustainable Process Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA researchers are responding to environmental problems by incorporating sustainability into process design and evaluation. EPA researchers are also developing a tool that allows users to assess modifications to existing and new chemical processes to determine whether changes in...

  15. Survival of lactic acid and propionibacteria in low- and full-fat Dutch-type cheese during human digestion ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinovic, A; Brede, M E; Vegarud, G E; Østlie, H M; Narvhus, J; Skeie, S B

    2016-05-01

    The survival of selected bacteria in semi-hard experimental cheeses was studied after exposure to human gastric and duodenal juices in an ex vivo model. Experimental cheeses (10 and 28% fat) were supplemented with different strains of Lactobacillus sp. and Propionibacterium sp. and ripened for 7 and 70 weeks. After digestion, greater numbers of the adjunct bacteria we rerecorded in the 7-week-old cheeses compared to the well-matured cheeses (70 weeks). The bacterial survival was strain dependent, and influenced by the fat content of the cheese. Lactobacilli showed better survival, especially when in low-fat cheeses. The strains of propionibacteria also survived well during the digestion of the low-fat cheeses. The results confirmed that cheese can potentially be a good carrier matrix for bacteria to the intestine. In addition, it has been shown that different strains present in cheese have different abilities to survive the conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. Younger cheese was indicated to be a better carrier, possibly because the bacteria present in those cheeses have had shorter exposure to the stress conditions occurring in cheese during prolonged maturation. Cheese can function as a suitable vehicle for the delivery of a variety of food-related micro-organisms to the intestine. Young cheese as well as low-fat cheeses are better carrier matrixes than full-fat and/or more well-ripened cheeses. Most of the lactobacilli and all the propionibacteria survived well during digestion of the low-fat cheeses. This study also showed the ability of cheese lactobacilli and PAB to survive the severe conditions of GIT. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Auditory processing models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    The Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics will compile the techniques and applications of signal processing as they are used in the many varied areas of Acoustics. The Handbook will emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of signal processing in acoustics. Each Section of the Handbook...... will present topics on signal processing which are important in a specific area of acoustics. These will be of interest to specialists in these areas because they will be presented from their technical perspective, rather than a generic engineering approach to signal processing. Non-specialists, or specialists...

  17. Extra Cheese, Please! Mozzarella's Journey from Cow to Pizza [and] Teaching Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Chris

    This book traces Annabelle the dairy cow's milk from the farm to the top of a Friday night pizza. The book relates that when Annabelle gives birth to her calf she also begins to produce milk; the milk is then processed into cheese, and from the cheese, pizza is made (recipe included). The book features color photographs of the entire process which…

  18. Screening and selection of Lactobacillus strains for use as adjunct cultures in production of semi-hard cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonsson, Martin; Ardö, Ylva; Nilsson, Bengt Frans; Molin, Göran

    2002-08-01

    Thirty-three Lactobacillus strains were tested as adjuncts in a cheese model system. Eighteen strains originated from cheese (nine Lactobacillus spp. and nine Lb. paracasei/casei) and 15 from human intestinal mucosa (11 Lb. rhamnosus; three Lb. paracasei; one Lb. plantarum). Model cheeses weighing 120 g were made of cheese grains from full-scale production of washed curd semi-hard cheese (Herrgård). The model system was reproducible and similar to full-scale production with respect to moisture, salt content, pH and microbial flora. The model cheeses were sampled for aerobic and anaerobic plate count and viable counts of Lactobacillus and Lactococcus. The presence of adjuncts in the model cheeses was confirmed by typing isolates with Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD). The sensory properties of model cheeses were described. In a first trial 23 of the 33 adjuncts were re-isolated from the corresponding model cheeses after 9 or 13 weeks. Adjuncts of Lb. paracasei were re-isolated more frequently than adjuncts of Lb. rhamnosus. Nine strains were selected, on the basis of their ability to grow and be a dominating part of the microflora of model cheese with interesting sensory properties. These strains were further studied together with two commercial cultures. The sensory influences on model cheeses of six of the adjuncts were confirmed, and flavour scores were in the range of 2.9-7.1 for model cheeses with different adjuncts while the control had a flavour score of 5.6 (0-10 scale). Survival and growth of seven out of the nine strains correlated with the results of the first trial. Growth and influence on flavour of four adjunct cultures were confirmed in experimental cheese manufactured in a 400-1 open vat.

  19. COTTAGE CHEESE PRODUCTS WITH INGREDIENTS OF PLANT ORIGIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Golubeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Proposed the use of feijoa as a filler for cheese products. Distinctive at-sign feijoa is a high content of watersoluble compounds in the fruits of iodine. According to their content feijoa can match with seafood, no plant does not accumulate a large number of iodine compounds (about 0.2 1 mg per 100 g of product. Feijoa is very useful for people living in iodine deficiency regions, as well as for preventers of thyroid diseases. The rind of the fruit is rich in antioxidants. The technology of GUT-goad product feijoa. Feature of the technology is that the finished cheese is made in the form of a mixture of filler pureed fruit pulp and sugar in a ratio of 1: 1, and the powder dry skin. Objects of research a filler in the form of syrup (pineapple guava pulp and sugar and the rind of the fruit in the form of crushed dry cottage cheese. Compatible with cream cheese filling sensory determined by the following indicators appearance, consistency, color, smell, taste. Syrup dosage ranged from 1 to 10%, dry filler from 0.5 to 3.5%. A mixture of fillers were added to the finished curd product in the ratio of syrup fairies feijoa and dry powder peel 8: 1.5. Technological process of cottage cheese product is different from the traditional operations of preparation of fillers and incorporation in the finished cheese. Determined the antioxidant activity syrup feijoa 1,963 mg / dm3 . It was found that the cheese product is rich in antioxidants, iodine, which helps to eliminate free radicals from the body and strengthen health care. Herbal additive allows to obtain a product with a new taste characteristics. The shelf life of cottage cheese products 5 days.

  20. Kinetic model for an up-flow anaerobic packed bed bioreactor: Dairy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kinetic studies of anaerobic digestion process of cheese whey were conducted in a pilot-scale up-flow anaerobic packed bed bioreactor (UAPB). An influent COD concentration of 59419 mg/l was utilized at steady state condition. Logistic and Monod kinetic models were employed to describe microbial activities of cheese ...

  1. Physicochemical and microbiological evaluation of corrientes artisanal cheese during ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Myriam Vasek

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate some physical and chemical parameters (total solids, pH, acidity, fat, acid degree value of fat, salt, protein and nitrogen fractions and their effects on the beneficial (lactic acid bacteria: LAB and undesirable microbial populations (coliforms, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, moulds, and yeast during ripening of Artisanal Corrientes Cheese, an Argentinian cow's milk variety, to determine whether a longer ripening period than usual improve its hygienic-sanitary quality. The protein content was much higher than that of other cow's milk cheeses with similar values of fat. The larger peptides showed values three times higher in the 30 day-old cheese than those obtained in the beginning of the process. Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were detected (3.04 ± 1.48 log10 cfu/g of cheese, 2.21 ± 0.84 log10 MPN/g of cheese even at 15 and 30 days of ripening, respectively. The distribution of three hundred LAB strains classified to the genus level (lactococci:lactobacilli:leuconostocs was maintained during the ripening period. The high number of LAB in rennet may have contributed to the fermentation as a natural whey starter, unknown source of LAB for this specific cheese so far. The physicochemical changes that occur during ripening were not big enough to inhibit the growth of undesirable microorganisms.

  2. Biogas yield from Sicilian kitchen waste and cheese whey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Comparetti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the chemical composition of kitchen waste and cheese whey, as well as the biogas yield obtained from the Anaerobic Digestion (AD tests of these two raw materials. Since the separated waste collection is performed in the town of Marineo (Palermo, a sample of kitchen waste, different from food industry one and included in the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW, was collected from the mass stored at the households of this town. Moreover, a sample of cheese whey was collected in a Sicilian mini dairy plant, where sheep milk is processed. This investigation was carried out inside laboratory digesters of Aleksandras Stulginskis University (Lithuania. Total Solids (TS resulted 15.6% in kitchen waste and 6% in cheese whey, while both the raw materials showed a high content of organic matter, 91.1% and 79.1%, respectively. The biogas yield resulted 104.6 l kg–1 from kitchen waste and 30.6 l kg–1 from cheese whey. The biogas yield from TS resulted 672.6 l kg–1 using kitchen waste and 384.7 l kg–1 using cheese whey. The biogas yield from Volatile Solids (VS resulted 738.9 l kg–1 using kitchen waste and 410.3 l kg–1 using cheese whey.

  3. Assessing the yield, microstructure, and texture properties of miniature Chihuahua-type cheese manufactured with a phospholipase A1 and exopolysaccharide-producing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trancoso-Reyes, N; Gutiérrez-Méndez, N; Sepulveda, D R; Hernández-Ochoa, L R

    2014-02-01

    Chihuahua cheese or Mennonite cheese is one of the most popular and consumed cheeses in Mexico and by the Hispanic community in the United States. According to local producers the yield of Chihuahua cheese ranges from 9 to 9.5 kg of cheese from 100 kg of milk. Cheese yield is a crucial determinant of profitability in cheese-manufacturing plants; therefore, different methods have been developed to increase it. In this work, a miniature Chihuahua-type cheese model was used to assess the effect of a phospholipase A1 (PL-A1) and exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing bacteria (separately and in combination) on the yield, microstructure, and texture of cheese. Four different cheeses were manufactured: cheese made with PL-A1, cheese made with EPS-producing bacteria, cheese with both PL-A1 and EPS-producing bacteria, and a cheese control without PL-A1 or EPS-producing bacteria. The compositional analysis of cheese was carried out using methods of AOAC International (Washington, DC). The actual yield and moisture-adjusted yield were calculated for all cheese treatments. Texture profile analyses of cheeses were performed using a texture analyzer. Micrographs were obtained by electron scanning microscopy. Fifty panelists carried out sensorial analysis using ranking tests. Incorporation of EPS-producing bacteria in the manufacture of cheese increased the moisture content and water activity. In contrast, the addition of PL-A1 did not increase fat retention or cheese yield. The use of EPS alone improved the cheese yield by increasing water and fat retention, but also caused a negative effect on the texture and flavor of Chihuahua cheese. The use of EPS-producing bacteria in combination with PL-A1 improved the cheese yield and increased the moisture and fat content. The cheeses with the best flavor and texture were those manufactured with PL-A1 and the cheeses manufactured with the combination of PL-A1 and EPS-producing culture. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association

  4. INNOVATION PROCESS MODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JANUSZ K. GRABARA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Modelling phenomena in accordance with the structural approach enables one to simplify the observed relations and to present the classification grounds. An example may be a model of organisational structure identifying the logical relations between particular units and presenting the division of authority, work.

  5. Light-cone averages in a Swiss-cheese universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, Valerio; Kolb, Edward W.; Matarrese, Sabino

    2008-01-01

    We analyze a toy Swiss-cheese cosmological model to study the averaging problem. In our Swiss-cheese model, the cheese is a spatially flat, matter only, Friedmann-Robertson-Walker solution (i.e., the Einstein-de Sitter model), and the holes are constructed from a Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi solution of Einstein's equations. We study the propagation of photons in the Swiss-cheese model, and find a phenomenological homogeneous model to describe observables. Following a fitting procedure based on light-cone averages, we find that the expansion scalar is unaffected by the inhomogeneities (i.e., the phenomenological homogeneous model is the cheese model). This is because of the spherical symmetry of the model; it is unclear whether the expansion scalar will be affected by nonspherical voids. However, the light-cone average of the density as a function of redshift is affected by inhomogeneities. The effect arises because, as the universe evolves, a photon spends more and more time in the (large) voids than in the (thin) high-density structures. The phenomenological homogeneous model describing the light-cone average of the density is similar to the ΛCDM concordance model. It is interesting that, although the sole source in the Swiss-cheese model is matter, the phenomenological homogeneous model behaves as if it has a dark-energy component. Finally, we study how the equation of state of the phenomenological homogeneous model depends on the size of the inhomogeneities, and find that the equation-of-state parameters w 0 and w a follow a power-law dependence with a scaling exponent equal to unity. That is, the equation of state depends linearly on the distance the photon travels through voids. We conclude that, within our toy model, the holes must have a present size of about 250 Mpc to be able to mimic the concordance model

  6. Simulation of NaCl and KCl mass transfer during salting of Prato cheese in brine with agitation: a numerical solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bona

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The association of dietary NaCl with arterial hypertension has led to a reduction in the levels of this salt in cheeses. For salting, KCl has been used as a partial substitute for NaCl, which cannot be completely substituted without affecting product acceptability. In this study a sensorially adequate saline solution (NaCl/KCl was simultaneously diffused during salting of Prato cheese in brine with agitation. The simultaneous multicomponent diffusion during the process was modeled with Fick’s second generalized law. The system of partial differential equations formed was solved by the finite element method (FEM. In the experimental data concentration the deviation for NaCl was of 7.3% and for KCl of 5.4%, both of which were considered acceptable. The simulation of salt diffusion will allow control and modulation of salt content in Prato cheese, permitting the prediction of final content from initial conditions.

  7. Swiss cheese and a cheesy CMB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkenburg, Wessel

    2009-01-01

    It has been argued that the Swiss-Cheese cosmology can mimic Dark Energy, when it comes to the observed luminosity distance-redshift relation. Besides the fact that this effect tends to disappear on average over random directions, we show in this work that based on the Rees-Sciama effect on the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the Swiss-Cheese model can be ruled out if all holes have a radius larger than about 35 Mpc. We also show that for smaller holes, the CMB is not observably affected, and that the small holes can still mimic Dark Energy, albeit in special directions, as opposed to previous conclusions in the literature. However, in this limit, the probability of looking in a special direction where the luminosity of supernovae is sufficiently supressed becomes very small, at least in the case of a lattice of spherical holes considered in this paper

  8. Multi-enzyme Process Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrade Santacoloma, Paloma de Gracia

    The subject of this thesis is to develop a methodological framework that can systematically guide mathematical model building for better understanding of multi-enzyme processes. In this way, opportunities for process improvements can be identified by analyzing simulations of either existing...... features of the process and provides the information required to structure the process model by using a step-by-step procedure with the required tools and methods. In this way, this framework increases efficiency of the model development process with respect to time and resources needed (fast and effective...... in the scientific literature. Reliable mathematical models of such multi-catalytic schemes can exploit the potential benefit of these processes. In this way, the best outcome of the process can be obtained understanding the types of modification that are required for process optimization. An effective evaluation...

  9. Production technology and some quality parameters of Njeguši cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Mirecki

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Industrialization of agricultural production and depopulation of areas that are recognized by traditional products, reached its peak during the last few decades. This represents a significant risk that the technology of traditional agricultural products, especially cheeses, can go into oblivion. Njeguši cheese is one of the famous Montenegrin traditional dairy products which originates from the mountain Lovćen and its peripheral areas. Produced by traditional technology, it belongs to a group of full fat, hard cheeses. Owing to its characteristic, spicy taste and pleasant odour, Njeguši cheese can be compared with some of the most famous hard cheeses. Originally it is made from ewe’s milk, but also, cow’s, goat’s and their mixture in different proportions, are increasingly used, which may be the treat to the originality of Njeguši cheese. The present study offers a description of original Njeguši cheese technology, followed by analysis of the chemical quality of ewe’s milk, cheese and whey. Thereat milk, cheese and whey samples were taken from 5 households located at the place of cheese origin - the Njeguši village. Chemical quality of ewe’s milk, cheese and whey was determined by method of FTIR spectrophotometry. Milk fat in the dry matter and moisture in cheese non-fat basis were mathematically calculated. The average content of milk fat in ewe’s milk was 4.92 %, proteins 4.59 %, lactose 4.14 % and total solids non-fat 9.46 %. Accordingly, the analysed cheeses belonged to full fat, semi-hard cheese due to 51.73 % fat in total solids and 60.07 % moisture in non-fat basis. The only deviation from original technology was shortening of the ripening period. Apart from the main objective - the preservation of the original technology, this study could significantly contribute to the process of protection of origin of Njeguši cheese, because the technology of cheese fulfilled the requirements listed in the National Law on the

  10. Characterization of different native american physalis species and evaluation of their processing potential as jelly in combination with brie-type cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Nogueira CURI

    Full Text Available Abstract Faced with the need for greater knowledge of the different physalis species, the aim of this study was to characterize different Native American physalis species (Physalis peruviana L., Physalis pubescens L., Physalis angulata L., Physalis mínimos L. and Physalis ixocarpa Brot as to their physicochemical characteristics, bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity. Besides that, in order to increase their use and add even more value to this fruit, we also evaluate the influence of these different species on the physicochemical, rheological and sensory characteristics of physalis jelly. In addition, this study evaluated the sensory acceptance of the combination of physalis jellies obtained from different species with brie-type cheese. The Peruviana, Pubences and Angulata, are highlighted for being the nutritionally richest species, with the highest levels of phenolic compounds, vitamin C and antioxidant. Moreover, they stand out for originating the most widely sensory accepted jellies, either in pure form or in combination with brie-type cheese.

  11. Application of near infrared spectroscopy to estimate selected free amino acids and soluble nitrogen during cheese ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Mlček

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the estimation of tyrosine, tryptophan and soluble nitrogen in 288 samples of the Edam cheese using the Near Infrared Spectroscopy. For analyses, the apparatus NIR Nicolet Antaris was used working in the regime of reflectance (i.e. using an integrating sphere in combination with fibre optics (i.e. using a probe. For calibration, reference data from the UV spectrophotometer was used. Calibration models were developed using a PLS algorithm (least square method and tested by means of cross-validation. Correlation coefficients: R = 0.911, R = 0.929 and R = 0.959 for soluble nitrogen, tryptophan and tyrosine, respectively, were achieved during measuring in the integrating sphere; R = 0.807, R = 0.945, R = 0.928 were achieved for soluble nitrogen, tryptophan and tyrosine, respectively, during measuring by probe. The results of the study show that NIR technology is suitable for fast and approximate determination of the level of cheese ripening. This can be used for the evaluation of the material for the processed cheese production, or cheese sale in optimal level of ripening.

  12. Protected designation of cheese origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neven Antunac

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Croatia has completely adopted the EU set up criteria for protection of agricultural products and foodstuffs through the implementation of two Regulations: Quality of the Protected Denomination of Origin and Protected Geographical Indication (NN.80/05 and Traditional Speciality Guaranteed (NN. 127/05. According to the results obtained from the four years research period on the production characteristics of the Pag sheep, milk and the Pag cheese quality, the essential description for certification and quality control of any autochthonous cheese are shown. Additionally, regardless from the arranged criteria for protection, other legal regulations that cheeses have to comply with are also described.

  13. Flavour compound production by Yarrowia lipolytica, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Debaryomyces hansenii in a cheese-surface model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Louise Marie; Gori, Klaus; Petersen, Mikael Agerlin

    2011-01-01

    produced sulphides, furanes and short-chain ketones; Saccharomyces cerevisiae D7 primarily produced esters and Debaryomyces hansenii D18335 primarily produced branched-chain aldehydes and alcohols. For several of the detected flavour compounds, an increase in production was observed upon exposure to dairy......-relevant environmental stress conditions including high NaCl concentration and low temperature. The predominant yeasts on the cheese surface may be important for development of flavour, and thus the use of yeasts as ripening cultures have the potential to affect the flavour of cheese....

  14. Modeling of column apparatus processes

    CERN Document Server

    Boyadjiev, Christo; Boyadjiev, Boyan; Popova-Krumova, Petya

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a new approach for the modeling of chemical and interphase mass transfer processes in industrial column apparatuses, using convection-diffusion and average-concentration models. The convection-diffusion type models are used for a qualitative analysis of the processes and to assess the main, small and slight physical effects, and then reject the slight effects. As a result, the process mechanism can be identified. It also introduces average concentration models for quantitative analysis, which use the average values of the velocity and concentration over the cross-sectional area of the column. The new models are used to analyze different processes (simple and complex chemical reactions, absorption, adsorption and catalytic reactions), and make it possible to model the processes of gas purification with sulfur dioxide, which form the basis of several patents.

  15. Effects of supercritical fluid extraction pressure on chemical composition, microbial population, polar lipid profile, and microstructure of goat cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Macías, D; Laubscher, A; Castro, N; Argüello, A; Jiménez-Flores, R

    2013-03-01

    The consumer trend for healthier food choices and preferences for low-fat products has increased the interest in low-fat cheese and nutraceutical dairy products. However, consumer preference is still for delicious food. Low- and reduced-fat cheeses are not completely accepted because of their unappealing properties compared with full-fat cheeses. The method reported here provides another option to the conventional cheese-making process to obtain lower fat cheese. Using CO(2) as a supercritical fluid offers an alternative to reduce fat in cheese after ripening, while maintaining the initial characteristics and flavor. The aim of this experiment was to evaluate the effect of pressure (10, 20, 30, and 40 × 10(6) Pa) of supercritical CO(2) on the amount of fat extracted, microbial population, polar lipid profile, and microstructure of 2 varieties of goat cheese: Majorero, a protected denomination of origin cheese from Spain, and goat Gouda-type cheese. The amount of fat was reduced 50 to 57% and 48 to 55% for Majorero and goat Gouda-type cheeses, respectively. Higher contents (on a fat basis) of sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine were found in Majorero cheese compared with control and goat Gouda-type cheeses. The microbial population was reduced after supercritical fluid extraction in both cheeses, and the lethality was higher as pressure increased in Majorero cheese, most noticeably on lactococcus and lactobacillus bacteria. The Gouda-type cheese did not contain any lactobacilli. Micrographs obtained from confocal laser scanning microscopy showed a more open matrix and whey pockets in the Majorero control cheese. This could explain the ease of extracting fat and reducing the microbial counts in this cheese after treatment with supercritical CO(2). Supercritical fluid extraction with CO(2) has great potential in the dairy industry and in commercial applications. The Majorero cheese obtained after the supercritical fluid extraction treatment was an excellent

  16. Probiotic bacteria survive in Cheddar cheese and modify populations of other lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, B; Weimer, B C; Pinzon, J; Dao Kong, N; Rompato, G; Brothersen, C; McMahon, D J

    2014-06-01

    Starter lactic acid bacteria in Cheddar cheese face physico-chemical stresses during manufacture and ageing that alter their abilities to survive and to interact with other bacterial populations. Nonstarter bacteria are derived from milk handling, cheese equipment and human contact during manufacture. Probiotic bacteria are added to foods for human health benefits that also encounter physiological stresses and microbial competition that may mitigate their survival during ageing. We added probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis to full-fat, reduced-fat and low-fat Cheddar cheeses, aiming to study their survival over 270 days of ageing and to determine the role of the cheese matrix in their survival. Probiotic and other lactic acid bacterial populations were enumerated by quantitative PCR using primers specifically targeting the different bacterial genera or species of interest. Bifidobacteria were initially added at 10(6) CFU g(-1) cheese and survived variably in the different cheeses over the 270-day ageing process. Probiotic lactobacilli that were added at 10(7) CFU g(-1) cheese and incident nonstarter lactobacilli (initially at 10(8) CFU g(-1) cheese) increased by 10- to 100-fold over 270 days. Viable bacterial populations were differentiated using propidium monoazide followed by species-specific qPCR assays, which demonstrated that the starter and probiotic microbes survived over ageing, independent of cheese type. Addition of probiotic bacteria, at levels 100-fold below that of starter bacteria, modified starter and nonstarter bacterial levels. We demonstrated that starter lactococci, nonstarter lactobacilli and probiotic bacteria are capable of surviving throughout the cheesemaking and ageing process, indicating that delivery via hard cheeses is possible. Probiotic addition at lower levels may also alter starter and nonstarter bacterial survival. We applied qPCR to study

  17. UML in business process modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Marcinkowski

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Selection and proper application of business process modeling methods and techniques have a significant impact on organizational improvement capabilities as well as proper understanding of functionality of information systems that shall support activity of the organization. A number of business process modeling notations were popularized in practice in recent decades. Most significant of the notations include Business Process Modeling Notation (OMG BPMN and several Unified Modeling Language (OMG UML extensions. In this paper, the assessment whether one of the most flexible and strictly standardized contemporary business process modeling notations, i.e. Rational UML Profile for Business Modeling, enable business analysts to prepare business models that are all-embracing and understandable by all the stakeholders. After the introduction, methodology of research is discussed. Section 2 presents selected case study results. The paper is concluded with a summary.

  18. Characterization of volatiles in Beaten cheeses (bieno sirenje by SPME/GC-MC: Influence of geographical origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulejmani Erhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the volatile profiles of a type of economically important cheeses for the FYR Macedonian dairy sector were characterized. A total of eighteen samples belonged to 6 different geographical regions of Beaten cheese, including cheeses from Kumanovo, Tetovo, Struga, Resen, Veles and Radovish were comparatively studied for their volatile profiles. Sixty two volatile compounds were identified in the cheeses by solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and the results are discussed based on their chemical classes (18 esters, 13 ketones, 10 acids, 8 alcohols, 5 terpenes, and 8 miscellaneous compounds. Acids, esters and alcohols were the most abundant classes identified and were highly dependent on the geographical origin of cheeses. Beaten cheese from Struga had the highest levels of carboxylic acids, ketones, alcohols, esters and terpenes. The Beaten cheese from other geographical origin had low levels of volatiles probably from the effect of variable characteristics of used milk and different cheese making process which affects the biochemical processes. The results suggest that each cheese from different geographical regions had different volatiles profile and the manufacturing technique as well as the ripening stage of the cheeses played a major role on the volatile compounds’ distribution.

  19. Business Process Modeling: Perceived Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indulska, Marta; Green, Peter; Recker, Jan; Rosemann, Michael

    The process-centered design of organizations and information systems is globally seen as an appropriate response to the increased economic pressure on organizations. At the methodological core of process-centered management is process modeling. However, business process modeling in large initiatives can be a time-consuming and costly exercise, making it potentially difficult to convince executive management of its benefits. To date, and despite substantial interest and research in the area of process modeling, the understanding of the actual benefits of process modeling in academia and practice is limited. To address this gap, this paper explores the perception of benefits derived from process modeling initiatives, as reported through a global Delphi study. The study incorporates the views of three groups of stakeholders - academics, practitioners and vendors. Our findings lead to the first identification and ranking of 19 unique benefits associated with process modeling. The study in particular found that process modeling benefits vary significantly between practitioners and academics. We argue that the variations may point to a disconnect between research projects and practical demands.

  20. Chemical Process Modeling and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartusiak, R. Donald; Price, Randel M.

    1987-01-01

    Describes some of the features of Lehigh University's (Pennsylvania) process modeling and control program. Highlights the creation and operation of the Chemical Process Modeling and Control Center (PMC). Outlines the program's philosophy, faculty, technical program, current research projects, and facilities. (TW)

  1. Chapter 1: Standard Model processes

    OpenAIRE

    Becher, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This chapter documents the production rates and typical distributions for a number of benchmark Standard Model processes, and discusses new dynamical phenomena arising at the highest energies available at this collider. We discuss the intrinsic physics interest in the measurement of these Standard Model processes, as well as their role as backgrounds for New Physics searches.

  2. 21 CFR 133.116 - Low sodium cheddar cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Low sodium cheddar cheese. 133.116 Section 133.116... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.116 Low sodium cheddar cheese. Low sodium cheddar cheese is the food...

  3. 21 CFR 133.175 - Pasteurized cheese spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pasteurized cheese spread. 133.175 Section 133.175... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.175 Pasteurized cheese spread. Pasteurized cheese spread is the food...

  4. 21 CFR 133.160 - Muenster and munster cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Muenster and munster cheese. 133.160 Section 133...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.160 Muenster and munster cheese. (a) Description. (1) Muenster cheese...

  5. 21 CFR 133.186 - Sap sago cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sap sago cheese. 133.186 Section 133.186 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.186 Sap sago cheese. (a) Description. (1) Sap sago cheese is the food prepared by the...

  6. 21 CFR 133.154 - High-moisture jack cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false High-moisture jack cheese. 133.154 Section 133.154... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.154 High-moisture jack cheese. High-moisture jack cheese conforms to...

  7. 21 CFR 133.195 - Swiss and emmentaler cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Swiss and emmentaler cheese. 133.195 Section 133...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.195 Swiss and emmentaler cheese. (a) Description. (1) Swiss cheese...

  8. 21 CFR 133.111 - Caciocavallo siciliano cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Caciocavallo siciliano cheese. 133.111 Section 133...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.111 Caciocavallo siciliano cheese. (a) Caciocavallo siciliano cheese is...

  9. 21 CFR 133.167 - Pasteurized blended cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pasteurized blended cheese. 133.167 Section 133...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.167 Pasteurized blended cheese. Pasteurized blended cheese conforms to...

  10. 21 CFR 133.104 - Asiago old cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Asiago old cheese. 133.104 Section 133.104 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.104 Asiago old cheese. Asiago old cheese conforms to the definition and standard of...

  11. 21 CFR 133.103 - Asiago medium cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Asiago medium cheese. 133.103 Section 133.103 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.103 Asiago medium cheese. Asiago medium cheese conforms to the definition and...

  12. 21 CFR 133.121 - Low sodium colby cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Low sodium colby cheese. 133.121 Section 133.121... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.121 Low sodium colby cheese. Low sodium colby cheese is the food...

  13. Business process modeling in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Francisco; Garcia, Felix; Calahorra, Luis; Llorente, César; Gonçalves, Luis; Daniel, Christel; Blobel, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    The importance of the process point of view is not restricted to a specific enterprise sector. In the field of health, as a result of the nature of the service offered, health institutions' processes are also the basis for decision making which is focused on achieving their objective of providing quality medical assistance. In this chapter the application of business process modelling - using the Business Process Modelling Notation (BPMN) standard is described. Main challenges of business process modelling in healthcare are the definition of healthcare processes, the multi-disciplinary nature of healthcare, the flexibility and variability of the activities involved in health care processes, the need of interoperability between multiple information systems, and the continuous updating of scientific knowledge in healthcare.

  14. Modeling nuclear processes by Simulink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Nahrul Khair Alang Md

    2015-04-01

    Modelling and simulation are essential parts in the study of dynamic systems behaviours. In nuclear engineering, modelling and simulation are important to assess the expected results of an experiment before the actual experiment is conducted or in the design of nuclear facilities. In education, modelling can give insight into the dynamic of systems and processes. Most nuclear processes can be described by ordinary or partial differential equations. Efforts expended to solve the equations using analytical or numerical solutions consume time and distract attention from the objectives of modelling itself. This paper presents the use of Simulink, a MATLAB toolbox software that is widely used in control engineering, as a modelling platform for the study of nuclear processes including nuclear reactor behaviours. Starting from the describing equations, Simulink models for heat transfer, radionuclide decay process, delayed neutrons effect, reactor point kinetic equations with delayed neutron groups, and the effect of temperature feedback are used as examples.

  15. Modeling nuclear processes by Simulink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Nahrul Khair Alang Md, E-mail: nahrul@iium.edu.my [Faculty of Engineering, International Islamic University Malaysia, Jalan Gombak, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Modelling and simulation are essential parts in the study of dynamic systems behaviours. In nuclear engineering, modelling and simulation are important to assess the expected results of an experiment before the actual experiment is conducted or in the design of nuclear facilities. In education, modelling can give insight into the dynamic of systems and processes. Most nuclear processes can be described by ordinary or partial differential equations. Efforts expended to solve the equations using analytical or numerical solutions consume time and distract attention from the objectives of modelling itself. This paper presents the use of Simulink, a MATLAB toolbox software that is widely used in control engineering, as a modelling platform for the study of nuclear processes including nuclear reactor behaviours. Starting from the describing equations, Simulink models for heat transfer, radionuclide decay process, delayed neutrons effect, reactor point kinetic equations with delayed neutron groups, and the effect of temperature feedback are used as examples.

  16. A comparative study between inhibitory effect of L. lactis and nisin on important pathogenic bacteria in Iranian UF Feta cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Mirdamadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction : In the present study, the inhibitory effect of nisin-producing Lactococcus lactis during co-culture and pure standard nisin were assessed against selected foodborne pathogenes in growth medium and Iranian UF Feta cheese. In comparison L lactis, not only proves flavor but also plays a better role in microbial quality of Iranian UF Feta cheese as a model of fermented dairy products.   Materials and method s: L. lactis subsp. lactis as nisin producer strain, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus as pathogenic strains were inoculated in Ultra-Filtered Feta cheese. Growth curve of bacterial strains were studied by colony count method in growth medium and UF Feta cheese separately and during co-culture with L. lactis. Nisin production was determined by agar diffusion assay method against susceptible test strain and confirmed by RP-HPLC analysis method.   Results : Counts of L. monocytogenes decreased in cheese sample containing L. lactis and standard nisin, to 103 CFU/g after 7 days and it reached to undetectable level within 2 weeks. S. aureus counts remained at its initial number, 105 CFU/g, after 7 days then decreased to 104 CFU/g on day 14 and it was not detectable on day 28. E. coli numbers increased in both treatments after 7 days and then decreased to 104 CFU/g after 28 days. Despite the increasing number of E. coli in growth medium containing nisin, due to the synergistic effect of nisin and other metabolites produced by Lactococcus lactis and starter cultures, the number of E. coli decreased with slow rate . Discussion and conclusion : The results showed, L. monocytogenes was inhibited by L. lactis before entering the logarithmic phase during co-culture. S. aureus was also inhibited during co-culture, but it showed less sensitivity in comparison with L. monocytogenes. However, the number of E. coli remained steady in co-culture with L. lactis. Also, we found that, in all cheese samples, E

  17. Production of fresh probiotic cheese with addition of transglutaminase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinka Radošević

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to examine the influence of probiotic culture Lactobacillus acidophilus and enzyme transglutaminase (TG on quality and sensory properties of autochthonous fresh cheese from Zagreb region. Fresh, unpasteurized, skimmed milk was inoculated with TG at different temperatures and activation time (8 h at 11 ºC and 4 h at 25 ºC. Inactivation of the enzyme was carried out during the process of pasteurization (65ºC/30 min. The milk for fresh cheese production was further inoculated with mesophilic culture of lactic acid bacteria MM101 and probiotic strain Lactobacillus acidophilus LAC-1. Besides the trial samples with addition of TG and probiotic bacteria, control samples without addition of TG and probiotic were produced, as well as the samples without addition of TG but with probiotic bacteria addition. Samples of fresh cheese produced with addition of TG, especially in which TG was active at 11 ºC, had greater weight then samples produced without the enzyme addition. Therefore, their yield was also greater then yield of cheese produced without the addition of the enzyme. Furthermore, the samples of fresh cheese produced with addition of TG have shown lesser syneresis than other samples during 10 days of storage at 10 ºC. The same samples also had the best sensory properties. Metabolic activity of mesophilic culture MM101 and probiotic culture L. acidophilus LAC-1 has resulted in better taste and odour of fresh cheese. The viable cell number of probiotic strain L. acidophilus LAC-1 in prepared samples was around 5 x 106 cells/g after 10 days of storage at 10 ºC, which is higher than the minimal dose required for 27 probiotic products. Addition of transgultaminase contributed to better consistency and general appearance of produced fresh cheese.

  18. Nucleic acid-based approaches to investigate microbial-related cheese quality defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eO Sullivan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe microbial profile of cheese is a primary determinant of cheese quality. Microorganisms can contribute to aroma and taste defects, form biogenic amines, cause gas and secondary fermentation defects, and can contribute to cheese pinking and mineral deposition issues. These defects may be as a result of seasonality and the variability in the composition of the milk supplied, variations in cheese processing parameters, as well as the nature and number of the non-starter microorganisms which come from the milk or other environmental sources. Such defects can be responsible for production and product recall costs and thus represent a significant economic burden for the dairy industry worldwide. Traditional non-molecular approaches are often considered biased and have inherently slow turnaround times. Molecular techniques can provide early and rapid detection of defects that result from the presence of specific spoilage microbes and, ultimately, assist in enhancing cheese quality and reducing costs. Here we review the DNA-based methods that are available to detect/quantify spoilage bacteria, and relevant metabolic pathways, in cheeses and, in the process, highlight how these strategies can be employed to improve cheese quality and reduce the associated economic burden on cheese processors.

  19. Selection of dairy culture and changes of Podravec cheese acidity during production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Kirin

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The selection and characteristics of dairy culture play a basic role in all types of cheese production process. The most important characteristic is acidification ability i.e. lactic acid formation, which regulates manufacturing and maturing conditions of cheese, thus affecting its organoleptic characteristics as well. In this work the results on control of acidity increase in Podravec cheeseproduction are presented. In the production process, a technical culture as well as identical frozen and concentrated culture, with and without auxiliary Streptococcus thermophilus for direct milk inoculation, were used. It was established that the acidity, expressed as pH value, is more intensively developed in cheeses produced with culture for direct inoculation. This was especially evident in the first phases of production i.e. before cheese salting. During salting the acidity of cheeses, in both cases, was almoust identical. Cheeses produced with identical frozen culture and auxiliary Streptococcus thermophilus culture had more pronounced acidity before salting and lower after salting in comparison with cheeses with the mentioned two cultures. Organoleptic and other characteristics of mature cheeses were identical.

  20. Survival of cheese-ripening microorganisms in a dynamic simulator of the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adouard, Nadège; Magne, Laurent; Cattenoz, Thomas; Guillemin, Hervé; Foligné, Benoît; Picque, Daniel; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2016-02-01

    A mixture of nine microorganisms (six bacteria and three yeasts) from the microflora of surface-ripened cheeses were subjected to in vitro digestive stress in a three-compartment "dynamic gastrointestinal digester" (DIDGI). We studied the microorganisms (i) grown separately in culture medium only (ii) grown separately in culture medium and then mixed, (iii) grown separately in culture medium and then included in a rennet gel and (iv) grown together in smear-ripened cheese. The yeasts Geotrichum candidum, Kluyveromyces lactis and Debaryomyces hansenii, were strongly resistant to the whole DIDGI process (with a drop in viable cell counts of less than cheese-grown cultures. Ripening bacteria such as Hafnia alvei survived gastric stress less well when grown in cheese (with no viable cells after 90 min of exposure of the cheese matrix, compared with 6 CFU mL(-1) in lab cultures). The ability of Corynebacterium casei and Staphylococcus equorum to withstand digestive stress was similar for cheese and pure culture conditions. When grow in a cheese matrix, Brevibacterium aurantiacum and Arthrobacter arilaitensis were clearly more sensitive to the overall digestive process than when grown in pure cultures. Lactococcus lactis displayed poorer survival in gastric and duodenal compartments when it had been grown in cheese. In vivo experiments in BALB/c mice agreed with the DIDGI experiments and confirmed the latter's reliability. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Path modeling and process control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høskuldsson, Agnar; Rodionova, O.; Pomerantsev, A.

    2007-01-01

    and having three or more stages. The methods are applied to a process control of a multi-stage production process having 25 variables and one output variable. When moving along the process, variables change their roles. It is shown how the methods of path modeling can be applied to estimate variables......Many production processes are carried out in stages. At the end of each stage, the production engineer can analyze the intermediate results and correct process parameters (variables) of the next stage. Both analysis of the process and correction to process parameters at next stage should...... be performed regarding the foreseeable output property y, and with respect to an admissible range of correcting actions for the parameters of the next stage. In this paper the basic principles of path modeling is presented. The mathematics is presented for processes having only one stage, having two stages...

  2. Short communication: norbixin and bixin partitioning in Cheddar cheese and whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T J; Li, X E; Drake, M A

    2014-01-01

    The Cheddar cheese colorant annatto is present in whey and must be removed by bleaching. Chemical bleaching negatively affects the flavor of dried whey ingredients, which has established a need for a better understanding of the primary colorant in annatto, norbixin, along with cheese color alternatives. The objective of this study was to determine norbixin partitioning in cheese and whey from full-fat and fat-free Cheddar cheese and to determine the viability of bixin, the nonpolar form of norbixin, as an alternative Cheddar cheese colorant. Full-fat and fat-free Cheddar cheeses and wheys were manufactured from colored pasteurized milk. Three norbixin (4% wt/vol) levels (7.5, 15, and 30 mL of annatto/454 kg of milk) were used for full-fat Cheddar cheese manufacture, and 1 norbixin level was evaluated in fat-free Cheddar cheese (15 mL of annatto/454 kg of milk). For bixin incorporation, pasteurized whole milk was cooled to 55 °C, and then 60 mL of bixin/454 kg of milk (3.8% wt/vol bixin) was added and the milk homogenized (single stage, 8 MPa). Milk with no colorant and milk with norbixin at 15 mL/454 kg of milk were processed analogously as controls. No difference was found between the norbixin partition levels of full-fat and fat-free cheese and whey (cheese mean: 79%, whey: 11.2%). In contrast to norbixin recovery (9.3% in whey, 80% in cheese), 1.3% of added bixin to cheese milk was recovered in the homogenized, unseparated cheese whey, concurrent with higher recoveries of bixin in cheese (94.5%). These results indicate that fat content has no effect on norbixin binding or entrapment in Cheddar cheese and that bixin may be a viable alternative colorant to norbixin in the dairy industry. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Occurrence of foodborne pathogens and characterization of Staphylococcus aureus in cheese produced on farm-dairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengren, Asa; Fabricius, Ane; Guss, Bengt; Sylvén, Susanne; Lindqvist, Roland

    2010-12-15

    The objective of this study was to address knowledge gaps identified in an earlier risk assessment of Staphylococcus aureus and raw milk cheese. A survey of fresh and short-time ripened cheeses produced on farm-dairies in Sweden was conducted to investigate the occurrence and levels of S. aureus, Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli, to characterize S. aureus isolates with special emphasis on enterotoxin genes, antibiotic resistance, bio-typing and genetic variation, and to collect information related to production practices. In general, the hygienic quality of farm-dairy cheeses appeared to be of an acceptable microbiological quality, e.g. L. monocytogenes and staphylococcal enterotoxin were not detected in cheese samples. However, E. coli and enterotoxigenic S. aureus were frequently found in raw milk cheeses and sometimes at levels that are of concern, especially in fresh cheese. Interestingly, levels in raw milk fresh cheese were significantly lower when starter cultures were used. Up to five S. aureus colonies per cheese, if possible, were characterized and about 70% of isolates carried one or more enterotoxin genes, most common were sec and sea. The Ovine biotype (73%) was most common among isolates from goat milk cheese and the Human biotype (60%) from cow milk cheese. Of all isolates, 39% showed decreased susceptibility to penicillin, but the proportion of isolates from cows' cheese (66%) compared to isolates from goats' cheese (27%) was significantly higher. S. aureus isolates with different properties were detected in cheese from the same farm and, sometimes even the same cheese. Isolates with the same pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE)-pattern were detected on geographically distant dairies. This indicates that multiple sources and routes of contamination are important. To improve the safety of these products efforts to raise awareness of the importance of hygiene barriers and raw milk quality as well as improved process control can be

  4. Influence of selected lab cultures on the evolution of free amino acids, free fatty acids and Fiore Sardo cheese microflora during the ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangia, Nicoletta P; Murgia, Marco A; Garau, Giovanni; Sanna, Maria G; Deiana, Pietrino

    2008-04-01

    Fiore Sardo Protected Denomination of Origin is a traditional Sardinian (Italy) hard cheese produced exclusively from whole raw ovine milk and coagulated with lamb rennet paste. Currently, Fiore Sardo is still produced by shepherds at the farmhouse level without the addition of any starter culture and the cheese-making process is characterized by significant waste. The first objective of the present work was to investigate the autochthonous microflora present in milk and Fiore Sardo cheese in order to select lactic acid bacterial (LAB) cultures with suitable cheese-making attributes and, possibly reduce the production waste. Secondly, the ability of selected cultures to guarantee cheese healthiness and quality was tested in experimental cheese-making trials. In this study, we show that the typical lactic microflora of raw ewe's milk and Fiore Sardo cheese is mostly composed of mesophilic LAB such as Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei. Moreover, strains belonging to the species were selected for cheese-making attributes and used in experimental cheese-making trials carried out in different farms producing Fiore Sardo. The evolution of the cheese microflora, free amino acids and free fatty acids during the ripening showed that the experimental cheeses were characterized by a balanced ratio of the chemical constituents, by a reduced number of spoilage microorganisms and, remarkably, by the absence of production waste that were significant for the control cheeses.

  5. Inhibitory activity of Lactobacillus plantarum TF711 against Clostridium sporogenes when used as adjunct culture in cheese manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Lorena; Zárate, Victoria

    2015-05-01

    Bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria are of great interest to the food-processing industry as natural preservatives. This work aimed to investigate the efficacy of bacteriocin-producing Lactobacillus plantarum TF711, isolated from artisanal Tenerife cheese, in controlling Clostridium sporogenes during cheese ripening. Cheeses were made from pasteurised milk artificially contaminated with 10(4) spores m/l C. sporogenes. Experimental cheeses were manufactured with Lb. plantarum TF711 added at 1% as adjunct to commercial starter culture. Cheeses made under the same conditions but without Lb. plantarum TF711 served as controls. Evolution of microbiological parameters, pH and NaCl content, as well as bacteriocin production was studied throughout 45 d of ripening. Addition of Lb. plantarum TF711 did not bring about any significant change in starter culture counts, NaCl content and pH, compared with control cheese. In contrast, clostridial spore count in experimental cheeses were significantly lower than in control cheeses from 7 d onwards, reaching a maximum reduction of 2·2 log units on day 21. Inhibition of clostridia found in experimental cheeses was mainly attributed to plantaricin activity, which in fact was recovered from these cheeses.

  6. Chemometric analysis of proteolysis during ripening of Ragusano cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallico, V; McSweeney, P L H; Siebert, K J; Horne, J; Carpino, S; Licitra, G

    2004-10-01

    Chemometric modeling of peptide and free amino acid data was used to study proteolysis in Protected Denomination of Origin Ragusano cheese. Twelve cheeses ripened 3 to 7 mo were selected from local farmers and were analyzed in 4 layers: rind, external, middle, and internal. Proteolysis was significantly affected by cheese layer and age. Significant increases in nitrogen soluble in pH 4.6 acetate buffer and 12% trichloroacetic acid were found from rind to core and throughout ripening. Patterns of proteolysis by urea-PAGE showed that rind-to-core and age-related gradients of moisture and salt contents influenced coagulant and plasmin activities, as reflected in varying rates of hydrolysis of the caseins. Analysis of significant intercorrelations among chemical parameters revealed that moisture, more than salt content, had the largest single influence on rates of proteolysis. Lower levels of 70% ethanol-insoluble peptides coupled to higher levels of 70% ethanol-soluble peptides were found by reversed phase-HPLC in the innermost cheese layers and as the cheeses aged. Non-significant increases of individual free amino acids were found with cheese age and layer. Total free amino acids ranged from 14.3 mg/g (6.2% of total protein) at 3 mo to 22.0 mg/g (8.4% of total protein) after 7 mo. Glutamic acid had the largest concentration in all samples at each time and, jointly with lysine and leucine, accounted for 48% of total free amino acids. Principal components analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis of the data from reversed phase-HPLC chromatograms and free amino acids analysis showed that the peptide profiles were more useful in differentiating Ragusano cheese by age and farm origin than the amino acid data. Combining free amino acid and peptide data resulted in the best partial least squares regression model (R(2) = 0.976; Q(2) = 0.952) predicting cheese age, even though the peptide data alone led to a similarly precise prediction (R(2) = 0.961; Q(2) = 0.923). The

  7. Markov Decision Process Measurement Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMar, Michelle M

    2018-03-01

    Within-task actions can provide additional information on student competencies but are challenging to model. This paper explores the potential of using a cognitive model for decision making, the Markov decision process, to provide a mapping between within-task actions and latent traits of interest. Psychometric properties of the model are explored, and simulation studies report on parameter recovery within the context of a simple strategy game. The model is then applied to empirical data from an educational game. Estimates from the model are found to correlate more strongly with posttest results than a partial-credit IRT model based on outcome data alone.

  8. Quality evaluation of parmesan-type cheese: a chemometric approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Jaster

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Parmesan-type cheeses are the most consumed special cheeses in Brazil. It is generally sold in retail shops, either grated or in wedge-shaped pieces, and its quality varies considerably, which is reflected directly in its price. There is lack of processing standardization and, since the ripening period is fundamental for the quality of this hard, semi-fat cooked cheese, this stage seems to be the thin line between low and high quality products. It is important to note that the Italian Parmegiano Reggiano is matured for a period of twelve months, as well as its rival Grana Padano, and this long ripening period causes changes making them gourmet, highly-valued cheeses. In the present study, twelve different Parmesan-type cheeses were purchased from the Brazilian retail market and evaluated for microbiological, physicochemical, and instrumental parameters. Heterogeneous quality was confirmed by microbiological problems detected in the samples and physicochemical composition that did not meet current Brazilian specifications. The use of principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis made it possible to separate the samples into three distinct groups, mainly due to different acidity and moisture levels, water activity, and hardness values. The price per kg was also considered and was correlated with moisture, acidity, and texture.

  9. Soymilk-Cow's milk ACE-inhibiting enzyme modified cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Barkat; Khan, Kiran Yasmin; Majeed, Hamid; Abid, Muhammad; Xu, Lei; Wu, Fengfeng; Xu, Xueming

    2017-12-15

    In present study, we developed and optimized soymilk-cow's milk enzyme-modified cheese with angiotensin-I converting enzyme inhibitory activity. Bioactive peptide production was found to be a multivariable-dependent process. Maximum bioactivity of hydrolysates was obtained with prolonged curd proteolysis at an increased enzyme concentration. This bioactive cheese paste was subsequently spray-dried under different drying conditions to determine the powder sorption isotherm properties. Higher drying temperatures resulted in cheese powder with weak thermal stability and lower browning indices. Experiments aimed at optimizing thermal stability and physical properties revealed that optimal conditions for producing cheese powder were an inlet air temperature of 150°C, a feeding rate of 10%, and an air flow rate of 600Lh -1 . Moreover, in addition to flavour, the bioactive cheese powders produced from a combination of soymilk-cow's milk are of potential source and can be used in the dietary management of hypertension. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Simple Models for Process Control

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gorez, R.; Klán, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 2 (2011), s. 58-62 ISSN 0929-2268 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : process models * PID control * second order dynamics Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation

  11. Sanitary conditions of mozzarella and Minas frescal cheese production in northern Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Marangon Oliveira

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The cheese due its rich nutritional composition provides a favorable environment for the multiplication of many kinds of microorganisms. The excess of total and thermotolerant coliforms indicates contamination from environmental and fecal origin, respectively, which characterizes low microbiological quality and unsatisfactory hygienic-sanitary conditions during the cheese production process, besides the possibility of enteropathogens. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the hygienic condition of the production of Mozzarella and Minas Frescal cheeses, produced in Northern region of Paraná State, Brazil. Fifty samples were analyzed, of which 14 were of Mozzarella cheese and 36 were of Minas Frescal cheese covering the period from June 2011 to June 2016. The sanitary conditions of production were evaluated by counting the total and thermotolerant coliforms according to the methodology recommended by the Brazilian legislation. For the Mozzarella cheese, it was observed that all the samples presented counts according to the recommended standards for total and thermotolerant coliforms. However, it was observed that 55.6% of the Minas Frescal cheese samples were in disagreement with the standards established by the legislation for total coliforms, as well as 27.8% for thermotolerant coliforms. These results indicate that a considerable part of the Minas Frescal cheeses present unsatisfactory hygienic conditions during the stages of production, increasing consumer health risk. Therefore, it is necessary to adopt good practices of manufacturing, take corrective actions to fix the contamination problem and compliance with microbiological quality standards established and microbiological safety assurance.

  12. The accelerated ripening of cholesterol-reduced Cheddar cheese by crosslinked beta-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seon, K H; Ahn, J; Kwak, H S

    2009-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the influence of salt content on cholesterol-reduced Cheddar cheese obtained by a treatment with crosslinked beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) and to find if the ripening process was accelerated in cholesterol-reduced cheese. The crosslinked beta-CD used was made by adipic acid. A primary study indicated that the chemical and rheological properties were not changed by the salt addition and the composition of Cheddar cheese treated with crosslinked beta-CD was similar to untreated Cheddar cheese. Approximately 91 to 92% cholesterol reduction was observed in the cheeses that were treated using beta-CD. In a subsequent study, we found accelerated ripening by the crosslinked beta-CD based on the productions of short-chain free fatty acids and free amino acids. In rheological properties, elasticity, cohesiveness, and gumminess scores in the cholesterol-reduced Cheddar cheese were significantly greater at 5 wk ripening than those in the control at 4 mo ripening. At the early stage of ripening, most flavor properties such as rancidity, bitterness, and off-flavor in the cholesterol-reduced cheese were greater. With ripening, however, those scores changed to similar or lower scores than those in the control. The present study indicated that the crosslinked beta-CD treatment for cholesterol removal showed accelerated ripening effect on the properties of Cheddar cheese.

  13. Free amino acid content of goat's milk cheese made with animal rennet and plant coagulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellán, Adela; Cayuela, José María; Pino, Antonio; Martínez-Cachá, Adela; Salazar, Eva; Tejada, Luis

    2012-06-01

    Enzymes present in the flowers of Cynara cardunculus (cyprosins) are used in the production of some traditional Spanish and Portuguese cheeses, replacing animal rennet. The aim of this work was to study the changes that take place in free amino acids during the ripening of a goat's milk cheese (Murcia al Vino) manufactured with plant coagulant (PC) or animal rennet (AR). The total free amino acid (TFAA) concentration increased during ripening, with Ile, Val, Ala, Phe, Gaba, Arg and Lys representing more than 50% of the TFAA content at 60 days in both types of cheese. The TFAA concentration was significantly higher in cheeses made with PC (854 mg 100 g(-1) total solids (TS)) than those made with AR (735 mg 100 g(-1) TS). The concentration of most free amino acids, especially His, Ser, Gln, Thr, Ala, Met and Ile, was higher in the PC cheese. Cheese made using PC as coagulant presented higher contents of free amino acid throughout the ripening period than cheese made using AR. Therefore we can conclude that the use of PC to produce Murcia al Vino goat's cheese would accelerate the ripening process as a result of increased cyprosin proteolytic activity. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Complexity and Uniqueness of the Aromatic Profile of Smoked and Unsmoked Herreño Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Palencia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the volatile fraction of unsmoked and smoked Herreño cheese, a type of soft cheese from the Canary Islands, has been characterized for the first time. In order to evaluate if the position in the smokehouse could influence the volatile profile of the smoked variety, cheeses smoked at two different heights were studied. The volatile components were extracted by Solid Phase Microextraction using a divinylbenzene/carboxen/ polydimethylsiloxane fiber, followed by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. In total, 228 components were detected. The most numerous groups of components in the unsmoked Herreño cheese were hydrocarbons, followed by terpenes and sesquiterpenes, whereas acids and ketones were the most abundant. It is worth noticing the high number of aldehydes and ketones, and the low number of alcohols and esters in this cheese in relation to others, as well as the presence of some specific unsaturated hydrocarbons, terpenes, sesquiterpenes and nitrogenated derivatives. The smoking process enriches the volatile profile of Herreño cheese with ketones and diketones, methyl esters, aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes, hydrocarbons, terpenes, nitrogenated compounds, and especially with ethers and phenolic derivatives. Among these, methylindanones or certain terpenes like α-terpinolene, have not been detected previously in other types of smoked cheese. Lastly, the results obtained suggest a slightly higher smoking degree in the cheeses smoked at a greater height.

  15. Determination of moisture in cheese and cheese products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, R L; Vanderwarn, M A

    2001-01-01

    Variables related to oven-drying samples of cheese and cheese products to determine moisture content were examined to provide more efficient and reproducible methods. Over 6500 samples of cheese were analyzed in an effort to modify the current AOAC procedure. The gravity atmospheric oven was unsuitable for use in accurate moisture analysis because of wide temperature differentials within the oven cavity. Use of this for oven moisture determination resulted in higher variance, which corresponded to the high temperature variation within the oven. Cheese sample preparation using an Oster blender yielded consistently lower variance in final moisture content than did preparation of cheese samples with a hand grater, rotary grater, and plug and plunger. Sample size of 3 +/- 0.25 g maximized surface area-to-volume ratios and yielded a lower error in final moisture content because of better control of ambient weight loss rates. Use of combination of disposable 5.5 cm diameter aluminum sample pans with 5.5 cm diameter glass fiber filter pads for covers produced a smaller standard deviation for moisture analysis than did the AOAC pan and insert cover and filter paper covers. All pans must be pre-dried for at least 3 h at 100 degrees C, and the glass fiber covers should be pre-dried for 1 h under the same conditions. All dried pans and covers must be stored in a desiccator with active desiccant. Equipment upgrades from the existing AOAC standard methods provide safer more efficient methods of analysis.

  16. Model feedstock supply processing plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Bautin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The model of raw providing the processing enterprises entering into vertically integrated structure on production and processing of dairy raw materials, differing by an orientation on achievement of cumulative effect by the integrated structure acting as criterion function which maximizing is reached by optimization of capacities, volumes of deliveries of raw materials and its qualitative characteristics, costs of industrial processing of raw materials and demand for dairy production is developed.

  17. Proteolytic Activity in Reduced-Fat Cheddar Cheese Made with Lactic Acid Bacteria and Camel Chymosin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Mette Winther

    be the need of an extended ripening period to reach a similar cheese structure as in cheeses produced with BC. The aim of this project was to compensate for the lower proteolytic activity in cheese produced with CC compared to BC. Selection of dairy lactic acid bacteria (LAB) for cheese production with high...... for their ability to influence proteolysis and structure during cheese ripening. In an attempt to improve the screening methods and contribute to the development of a new classification system of Latcococcus lactic strains, the peptide profile formed by selected strains after growth in milk was analyzed...... mediated an increase in the total amount of amino acids as well as a shorter structure. A model system, used to study the retention of chymosin in a curd, showed that the retention of CC was less dependent on pH compared to BC, and the retention of CC was higher than BC in the pH interval 6...

  18. Microbial fuel cell coupled to biohydrogen reactor: a feasible technology to increase energy yield from cheese whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, J; Fuentes, L; Cabezas, A; Etchebehere, C

    2017-06-01

    An important pollutant produced during the cheese making process is cheese whey which is a liquid by-product with high content of organic matter, composed mainly by lactose and proteins. Hydrogen can be produced from cheese whey by dark fermentation but, organic matter is not completely removed producing an effluent rich in volatile fatty acids. Here we demonstrate that this effluent can be further used to produce energy in microbial fuel cells. Moreover, current production was not feasible when using raw cheese whey directly to feed the microbial fuel cell. A maximal power density of 439 mW/m 2 was obtained from the reactor effluent which was 1000 times more than when using raw cheese whey as substrate. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing showed that potential electroactive populations (Geobacter, Pseudomonas and Thauera) were enriched on anodes of MFCs fed with reactor effluent while fermentative populations (Clostridium and Lactobacillus) were predominant on the MFC anode fed directly with raw cheese whey. This result was further demonstrated using culture techniques. A total of 45 strains were isolated belonging to 10 different genera including known electrogenic populations like Geobacter (in MFC with reactor effluent) and known fermentative populations like Lactobacillus (in MFC with cheese whey). Our results show that microbial fuel cells are an attractive technology to gain extra energy from cheese whey as a second stage process during raw cheese whey treatment by dark fermentation process.

  19. Sato Processes in Default Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokholm, Thomas; Nicolato, Elisa

    In reduced form default models, the instantaneous default intensity is classically the modeling object. Survival probabilities are then given by the Laplace transform of the cumulative hazard defined as the integrated intensity process. Instead, recent literature has shown a tendency towards...

  20. Sato Processes in Default Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokholm, Thomas; Nicolato, Elisa

    2010-01-01

    In reduced form default models, the instantaneous default intensity is the classical modeling object. Survival probabilities are then given by the Laplace transform of the cumulative hazard defined as the integrated intensity process. Instead, recent literature tends to specify the cumulative...

  1. Microbiological quality of white local sheep cheese in Mosul city markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H.A. AL-Hamdany

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The soft white cheese is considered one of the most popular locally manufactured cheese in Iraq, a kind of traditional cheese that is mainly produced from sheep milk. It usually becomes available in the markets of Mosul between the months of February and July. To investigate the microbiological quality, 25 samples of white, soft, un-salted fresh locally produced sheep cheese were collected from the market in Mosul. These cheese samples were examined by the quantity method to determine the total viable bacterial counts (TVC and the total counts of coliform and Escherichia coli bacteria. The minimum, maximum and average results of the aforementioned bacterial counts were 1.0x106, 1.4x103, 1.4x102 CFU g-; 2.9x108, 6.0x107, 12.6x105 CFU g- and 18.0x107, 5.8x106, 3.1x105 CFU g-1, respectively. Corresponding to the ‘International Microbiological Reference Criteria’ for cheese, it could be clear from these results that the samples were highly contaminated. Hence, it can be concluded that the sanitary conditions were inadequate either during the milk production and cheese manufacturing process or throughout their distribution in the local market. Therefore, it is recommended to comply with the public health and sanitary measures during the process of local cheese production. In consequence, it is essential to follow the annual screening of local cheese in terms of bacterial counts to determine the degree of contamination and in order to develop a national standard microbiological criteria and quality control for local cheese.

  2. Case of contamination by Listeria monocytogenes in mozzarella cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Greco

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Following a Listeria monocytogenes detection in a mozzarella cheese sampled at a dairy plant in Lazio Region, further investigations have been conducted both by the competent Authority and the food business operatordairy factory (as a part of dairy factory HACCP control. In total, 90 dairy products, 7 brine and 64 environmental samples have been tested. The prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes was 24.4% in mozzarella cheese, and 9.4% in environmental samples, while brines were all negatives. Forty-seven strains of L. monocytogenes have been isolated, all belonging to 4b/4e serotype. In 12 of these, the macrorestriction profile has been determined by means of pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The profiles obtained with AscI enzyme showed a 100% similarity while those obtained with ApaI a 96.78% similarity. These characteristics of the isolated strains jointly with the production process of mozzarella cheese has allowed to hypothesise an environmental contamination.

  3. Command Process Modeling & Risk Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkat, Leila

    2011-01-01

    Commanding Errors may be caused by a variety of root causes. It's important to understand the relative significance of each of these causes for making institutional investment decisions. One of these causes is the lack of standardized processes and procedures for command and control. We mitigate this problem by building periodic tables and models corresponding to key functions within it. These models include simulation analysis and probabilistic risk assessment models.

  4. Modelling Hospital Materials Management Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Iannone

    2013-06-01

    integrated and detailed analysis and description model for hospital materials management data and tasks, which is able to tackle information from patient requirements to usage, from replenishment requests to supplying and handling activities. The model takes account of medical risk reduction, traceability and streamlined processes perspectives. Second, the paper translates this information into a business process model and mathematical formalization.The study provides a useful guide to the various relevant technology‐related, management and business issues, laying the foundations of an efficient reengineering of the supply chain to reduce healthcare costs and improve the quality of care.

  5. 7 CFR 58.433 - Cheese cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cheese cultures. 58.433 Section 58.433 Agriculture... Material § 58.433 Cheese cultures. Harmless microbial cultures used in the development of acid and flavor components in cheese shall have a pleasing and desirable taste and odor and shall have the ability to...

  6. The Brookhaven Process Optimization Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilati, D. A.; Sparrow, F. T.

    1979-01-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory Industry Model Program (IMP) has undertaken the development of a set of industry-specific process-optimization models. These models are to be used for energy-use projections, energy-policy analyses, and process technology assessments. Applications of the models currently under development show that system-wide energy impacts may be very different from engineering estimates, selected investment tax credits for cogeneration (or other conservation strategies) may have the perverse effect of increasing industrial energy use, and that a proper combination of energy taxes and investment tax credits is more socially desirable than either policy alone. A section is included describing possible extensions of these models to answer questions or address other systems (e.g., a single plant instead of an entire industry).

  7. Modeling of biopharmaceutical processes. Part 2: Process chromatography unit operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltenbrunner, Oliver; McCue, Justin; Engel, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Process modeling can be a useful tool to aid in process development, process optimization, and process scale-up. When modeling a chromatography process, one must first select the appropriate models that describe the mass transfer and adsorption that occurs within the porous adsorbent. The theoret......Process modeling can be a useful tool to aid in process development, process optimization, and process scale-up. When modeling a chromatography process, one must first select the appropriate models that describe the mass transfer and adsorption that occurs within the porous adsorbent...

  8. Development and application of a processing model for the Irish dairy industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, U; Lopez-Villalobos, N; Garrick, D J; Shalloo, L

    2010-11-01

    A processing-sector model was developed that simulates (i) milk collection, (ii) standardization, and (iii) product manufacture. The model estimates the product yield, net milk value, and component values of milk based on milk quantity, composition, product portfolio, and product values. Product specifications of cheese, butter, skim and whole milk powders, liquid milk, and casein are met through milk separation followed by reconstitution in appropriate proportions. Excess cream or skim milk are used in other product manufacture. Volume-related costs, including milk collection, standardization, and processing costs, and product-related costs, including processing costs per tonne, packaging, storage, distribution, and marketing, are quantified. Operating costs, incurred irrespective of milk received and processing activities, are included in the model on a fixed-rate basis. The net milk value is estimated as sale value less total costs. The component values of fat and protein were estimated from net milk value using the marginal rate of technical substitution. Two product portfolio scenarios were examined: scenario 1 was representative of the Irish product mix in 2000, in which 27, 39, 13, and 21% of the milk pool was processed into cheese (€ 3,291.33/t), butter (€ 2,766.33/t), whole milk powder (€ 2,453.33/t), and skim milk powder (€ 2,017.00/t), respectively, and scenario 2 was representative of the 2008 product mix, in which 43, 30, 14, and 13% was processed into cheese, butter, whole milk powder, and skim milk powder, respectively, and sold at the same market prices. Within both scenarios 3 milk compositions were considered, which were representative of (i) typical Irish Holstein-Friesian, (ii) Jersey, and (iii) the New Zealand strain of Holstein-Friesian, each of which had differing milk constituents. The effect each milk composition had on product yield, processing costs, total revenue, component values of milk, and the net value of milk was examined

  9. Environmental assessment of Ultra-High Pressure Homogenisation for milk and fresh cheese production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valsasina, Lucia; Pizzol, Massimo; Smetana, Sergiy

    2015-01-01

    Temperature (UHT) treatment and, at the same time, to lower energy consumptions through the combination of pasteurisation and homogenisation in a single process. Furthermore, the use of UHPH treated milk for the production of fresh cheese has been proven to increase shelf life days and increase yield...... This study provides an LCA of UHPH and UHT processing of milk and fresh cheese production from processing to end-of-life....

  10. Preliminary Discrimination of Cheese Adulteration by FT-IR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Cuibus

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes a preliminary study to compare some traditional Romanian cheeses and adulterated cheeses using Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR. For PLS model calibration (6 concentration levels and validation (5 concentration levels sets were prepared from commercial Dalia Cheese from different manufacturers by spiking it with palm oil at concentrations ranging 2-50 % and 5-40 %, respectively. Fifteen Dalia Cheese were evaluated as external set. The spectra of each sample, after homogenization, were acquired in triplicate using a FTIR Shimatsu Prestige 21 Spectrophotometer, with a horizontal diamond ATR accessory in the MIR region 4000-600 cm-1. Statistical methods as PLS were applied using MVC1 routines written for Matlab R2010a. As first step the optimal condition for PLS model were obtained using cross-validation on the Calibration set. Spectral region in 3873-652 cm-1, and 3 PLS-factors were stated as the best conditions and showed an R2 value of 0.9338 and a relative error in the calibration of 17.2%. Then validation set was evaluated, obtaining good recovery rates (108% and acceptable dispersion of the data (20%. The curve of actual vs. predicted values shows slope near to 1 and origin close to 0, with an R2 of 0.9695. When the external sample set was evaluated, samples F19, F21, F22 and F24, showed detectable levels of palm fats. The results proved that FTIR-PLS is a reliable non-destructive technique for a rapid quantification the level of adulteration in cheese.  The spectroscopic methods could assist the quality control authority, traders and the producers to discriminate the adulterated cheeses with palm oil.

  11. Acidogenic fermentation of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste and cheese whey for bio-plastic precursors recovery - Effects of process conditions during batch tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotto, Francesca; Lavagnolo, Maria Cristina; Pivato, Alberto; Cossu, Raffaello

    2017-12-01

    The problem of fossil fuels dependency is being addressed through sustainable bio-fuels and bio-products production worldwide. At the base of this bio-based economy there is the efficient use of biomass as non-virgin feedstock. Through acidogenic fermentation, organic waste can be valorised in order to obtain several precursors to be used for bio-plastic production. Some investigations have been done but there is still a lack of knowledge that must be filled before moving to effective full scale plants. Acidogenic fermentation batch tests were performed using food waste (FW) and cheese whey (CW) as substrates. Effects of nine different combinations of substrate to inoculum (S/I) ratio (2, 4, and 6) and initial pH (5, 7, and 9) were investigated for metabolites (acetate, butyrate, propionate, valerate, lactate, and ethanol) productions. Results showed that the most abundant metabolites deriving from FW fermentation were butyrate and acetate, mainly influenced by the S/I ratio (acetate and butyrate maximum productions of 21.4 and 34.5g/L, respectively, at S/I=6). Instead, when dealing with CW, lactate was the dominant metabolite significantly correlated with pH (lactate maximum production of 15.7g/L at pH = 9). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Neuroscientific model of motivational process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Il

    2013-01-01

    Considering the neuroscientific findings on reward, learning, value, decision-making, and cognitive control, motivation can be parsed into three sub processes, a process of generating motivation, a process of maintaining motivation, and a process of regulating motivation. I propose a tentative neuroscientific model of motivational processes which consists of three distinct but continuous sub processes, namely reward-driven approach, value-based decision-making, and goal-directed control. Reward-driven approach is the process in which motivation is generated by reward anticipation and selective approach behaviors toward reward. This process recruits the ventral striatum (reward area) in which basic stimulus-action association is formed, and is classified as an automatic motivation to which relatively less attention is assigned. By contrast, value-based decision-making is the process of evaluating various outcomes of actions, learning through positive prediction error, and calculating the value continuously. The striatum and the orbitofrontal cortex (valuation area) play crucial roles in sustaining motivation. Lastly, the goal-directed control is the process of regulating motivation through cognitive control to achieve goals. This consciously controlled motivation is associated with higher-level cognitive functions such as planning, retaining the goal, monitoring the performance, and regulating action. The anterior cingulate cortex (attention area) and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (cognitive control area) are the main neural circuits related to regulation of motivation. These three sub processes interact with each other by sending reward prediction error signals through dopaminergic pathway from the striatum and to the prefrontal cortex. The neuroscientific model of motivational process suggests several educational implications with regard to the generation, maintenance, and regulation of motivation to learn in the learning environment.

  13. Inhibition of Clostridium activities in silage and cheese using anticlostridial Lactobacillus Isolated from Danish semi-hard cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Pia

    and are of importance when selecting a mixture of the anticlostridial Lactobacillus strains for adjunct cultures to be used in silage and cheese. Heat resistance of nine anticlostridial Lb. paracasei strains was investigated using a submerged-coil apparatus. Seven of the nine strains survived pasteurisation (73¿C, 15...... of anticlostridial Lactobacillus strains in grass silage was evaluated in model scale using three different mixed adjunct cultures of anticlostridial Lb. paracasei strains. It was shown by using species specific PCR analysis that the added anticlostridial Lb. paracasei were able to grow and survive in grass silage......-hard cheeses of high quality, as protective adjunct cultures against clostridia activities in silage and cheese. Screening for anticlostridial activity among non-starter Lactobacillus isolates against selected Clostridium strains showed that almost half (44%) of the naturally occurring non...

  14. The influence of cheese composition and microstructure on the diffusion of macromolecules: A study using Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapeau, A L; Silva, Juliana V C; Schuck, Pierre; Thierry, Anne; Floury, Juliane

    2016-02-01

    In cheese technology, the diffusion phenomena are crucial during ripening. The technique of Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching was applied for the first time on real cheese, in order to investigate the relationships between molecular diffusion and the cheese composition and/or its microstructure. Measured effective diffusion coefficients in soft and hard cheese of a group of dextrans (10-500 kDa) were found to be in the same order of magnitude with values observed when using a comparable non-fat model cheese (∼ 0.1-20 μm(2) s(-1)). Diffusion of the dextrans was mainly dependent on the fraction of "free" aqueous phase present in the cheese, closely which is linked to cheese-making technology and ripening stage. Diffusion coefficients were modeled by a power law relationship as a function of dextran molecular weight, which allowed some study of the cheese microstructure. A tighter protein network will require some deformation of those flexible macromolecules with a higher molecular weight (>250 kDa), in order to diffuse through the pores of such cheese structures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cheese maturity assessment using ultrasonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedito, J; Carcel, J; Clemente, G; Mulet, A

    2000-02-01

    The relationship between Mahon cheese maturity and ultrasonic velocity was examined. Moisture and textural properties were used as maturity indicators. The ultrasonic velocity of the cheese varied between 1630 and 1740 m/s, increasing with the curing time mainly because of loss of water, which also produced an increase of the textural properties. Because of the nature of low-intensity ultrasonics, velocity was better related to those textural parameters that involved small displacements. Ultrasonic velocity decreased with increasing temperature because of the negative temperature coefficient of the ultrasonic velocity of fat and the melting of fat. These results highlight the potential use of ultrasonic velocity measurements to rapidly and nondestructively assess cheese maturity.

  16. Genomic Regions Affecting Cheese Making Properties Identified in Danish Holsteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Vivi Raundahl; Bertelsen, Henriette Pasgaard; Poulsen, Nina Aagaard

    The cheese renneting process is affected by a number of factors associated to milk composition and a number of Danish Holsteins has previously been identified to have poor milk coagulation ability. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify genomic regions affecting the technological proper...

  17. Process Models for Security Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floarea NASTASE

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model for an integrated security system, which can be implemented in any organization. It is based on security-specific standards and taxonomies as ISO 7498-2 and Common Criteria. The functionalities are derived from the classes proposed in the Common Criteria document. In the paper we present the process model for each functionality and also we focus on the specific components.

  18. Fate of Shiga toxin-producing and generic Escherichia coli during production and ripening of semihard raw milk cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, S; Hoffmann, W; Bockelmann, W; Hummerjohann, J; Stephan, R; Hammer, P

    2013-02-01

    The fate of 5 different Escherichia coli strains, including 3 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) strains, was analyzed during the production and ripening of semihard raw milk cheese. The strains, which were previously isolated from raw milk cheese, were spiked into raw milk before cheese production at 2 different levels (approximately 10(1) and 10(3) cfu/mL, respectively). Two cheese types were produced, which differed in cooking temperatures (40 and 46°C). The cheeses were sampled during manufacture and the 16-wk ripening period. An increase in E. coli counts of approximately 3.5 log(10) cfu/g occurred from raw milk to fresh cheese at d 1, which was attributed to a concentration effect during cheese production and growth of the strains. During ripening over 16 wk, a slow, continuous decrease was observed for all strains. However, significant differences were found between the E. coli strains at the applied spiking levels, whereas the inactivation was similar in the 2 different cheese types. The 2 generic E. coli strains survived at higher counts than did the 3 STEC strains. Nevertheless, only 1 of the 3 STEC strains showed significantly weaker survival at both spiking levels and in both cheese types. Six of 16 cheeses made from raw milk at a low spiking level contained more than 10 cfu/g of STEC at the end of the 16-wk ripening process. After enrichment, STEC were detected in almost all cheeses at both spiking levels. Particularly because of the low infectious dose of highly pathogenic STEC, even low colony counts in raw milk cheese are a matter of concern. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Studies on effect of oat and cheese incorporation on sensory and textural quality of short-dough type biscuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swapna, K S; Rao, K Jayaraj

    2016-03-01

    In view of their growing importance in human nutrition, incorporation of oats and cheese during the manufacture of short-dough type biscuits was studied. Rolled oats were incorporated at 25, 35 and 45 % of refined wheat flour in short-dough type biscuit formulation. Cheddar and processed cheese were used for flavouring purpose at three levels each, viz. 30, 40 and 50 % on flour basis. The dough exhibited less firmness on oats incorporation as indicated by lower firmness value (21.73 N) as against 25.05 N for control dough measured by Texture Analyser. Addition of cheese to the 25 % oat incorporated dough further reduced its firmness and altered its viscoelastic characteristics. Baking conditions for the oats and cheese incorporated biscuits were optimized as 165 °C for 25-27 min. Sensory evaluation results revealed that the biscuit made from 25 % oat incorporated dough scored highest in most of the sensory attributes including overall acceptability. Cheddar cheese and processed cheese levels were optimized at 30 and 40 % in oats-incorporated dough based on the sensory analysis of biscuits prepared from the dough samples. The moisture and β- glucan contents were 3.93 % and 0.62 %; 4.32 % and 0.60 % for cheddar cheese and processed cheese added biscuits, respectively. The spread ratios were higher in cheese incorporated biscuits than in oat incorporated biscuits. It was concluded that good quality cheese flavoured biscuits can be prepared by incorporating rolled oats in biscuit formulation along with cheddar or processed cheese.

  20. Reduced-fat Cheddar and Swiss-type cheeses harboring exopolysaccharide-producing probiotic Lactobacillus mucosae DPC 6426.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, P M; Burdíková, Z; Beresford, T; Auty, M A E; Fitzgerald, G F; Ross, R P; Sheehan, J J; Stanton, C

    2015-12-01

    Exopolysaccharide-producing Lactobacillus mucosae DPC 6426 was previously shown to have promising hypocholesterolemic activity in the atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein-E-deficient (apoE(-/-)) murine model. The aim of this study was to investigate the suitability of reduced-fat Cheddar and Swiss-type cheeses as functional (carrier) foods for delivery of this probiotic strain. All cheeses were manufactured at pilot-scale (500-L vats) in triplicate, with standard commercially available starters: for Cheddar, Lactococcus lactis; and for Swiss-type cheese, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus helveticus, and Propionibacterium freudenreichii. Lactobacillus mucosae DPC 6426 was used as an adjunct culture during cheese manufacture, at a level of ~10(6) cfu·mL(-1) cheese milk (subsequently present in the cheese curd at>10(7) cfu·g(-1)). The adjunct strain remained viable at >5×10(7) cfu·g(-1) in both Swiss-type and Cheddar cheeses following ripening for 6 mo. Sensory analysis revealed that the presence of the adjunct culture imparted a more appealing appearance in Swiss-type cheese, but had no significant effect on the sensory characteristics of Cheddar cheeses. Moreover, the adjunct culture had no significant effect on cheese composition, proteolysis, pH, or instrumentally quantified textural characteristics of Cheddar cheeses. These data indicate that low-fat Swiss-type and Cheddar cheeses represent suitable food matrices for the delivery of the hypocholesterolemic Lactobacillus mucosae DPC 6426 in an industrial setting. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of amino acid-decarboxylative microbiota throughout the ripening of an Italian PDO cheese produced using different manufacturing practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, M; Maifreni, M; Bartolomeoli, I; Rondinini, G

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the presence of biogenic amines (BAs) in Montasio cheese produced by using different cheese manufacturing practices. Three batches of Montasio cheese were made in the following way: batch A using raw milk and natural milk culture, batch B with thermized milk and natural milk culture and batch C with thermized milk and natural milk culture added of a commercial starter culture. During 120 days of ripening analyses were performed for microbial counts and BA content; indeed, the potential to produce BAs was screened in lactic acid bacteria and Enterobacteriaceae isolates. At the end of ripening, the total BA contents of cheeses from batches A, B and C were 166.3, 207.3 and 29.8 mg kg(-1), respectively. Amino acid decarboxylase activity was widespread among isolates. The BA content of Montasio cheese from the three batches was below the threshold proposed as potentially toxic. The highest BA content was found in cheese produced using thermized milk and natural milk culture; therefore, the thermal treatment of milk was not enough by itself to reduce the counts of decarboxylase-positive bacteria in cheese. The use of selected starters guaranteed a low BA content in Montasio cheese. The study of the effects of some technological processes on the incidence of decarboxylative microbiota in 'protected denomination of origin' cheeses could provide useful information on the hygienic risk related to their production.

  2. Mathematical modelling in economic processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Kravtsova

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In article are considered a number of methods of mathematical modelling of economic processes and opportunities of use of spreadsheets Excel for reception of the optimum decision of tasks or calculation of financial operations with the help of the built-in functions.

  3. Modeling of biopharmaceutical processes. Part 2: Process chromatography unit operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltenbrunner, Oliver; McCue, Justin; Engel, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Process modeling can be a useful tool to aid in process development, process optimization, and process scale-up. When modeling a chromatography process, one must first select the appropriate models that describe the mass transfer and adsorption that occurs within the porous adsorbent. The theoret...

  4. 21 CFR 133.144 - Granular and stirred curd cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Granular and stirred curd cheese. 133.144 Section... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.144 Granular and stirred curd cheese. (a) Description. (1...

  5. Quantification of pizza baking properties of different cheeses, and their correlation with cheese functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xixiu; Balaban, Murat O; Zhang, Lu; Emanuelsson-Patterson, Emma A C; James, Bryony

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the pizza baking properties and performance of different cheeses, including the browning and blistering, and to investigate the correlation to cheese properties (rheology, free oil, transition temperature, and water activity). The color, and color uniformity, of different cheeses (Mozzarella, Cheddar, Colby, Edam, Emmental, Gruyere, and Provolone) were quantified, using a machine vision system and image analysis techniques. The correlations between cheese appearance and attributes were also evaluated, to find that cheese properties including elasticity, free oil, and transition temperature influence the color uniformity of cheeses. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Investigating the Process of Process Modeling with Eye Movement Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pinggera, Jakob; Furtner, Marco; Martini, Markus; Sachse, Pierre; Reiter, Katharina; Zugal, Stefan; Weber, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Research on quality issues of business process models has recently begun to explore the process of creating process models by analyzing the modeler's interactions with the modeling environment. In this paper we aim to complement previous insights on the modeler's modeling behavior with data gathered by tracking the modeler's eye movements when engaged in the act of modeling. We present preliminary results and outline directions for future research to triangulate toward a more comprehensive un...

  7. Integrated Site Model Process Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, T.

    2000-01-01

    The Integrated Site Model (ISM) provides a framework for discussing the geologic features and properties of Yucca Mountain, which is being evaluated as a potential site for a geologic repository for the disposal of nuclear waste. The ISM is important to the evaluation of the site because it provides 3-D portrayals of site geologic, rock property, and mineralogic characteristics and their spatial variabilities. The ISM is not a single discrete model; rather, it is a set of static representations that provide three-dimensional (3-D), computer representations of site geology, selected hydrologic and rock properties, and mineralogic-characteristics data. These representations are manifested in three separate model components of the ISM: the Geologic Framework Model (GFM), the Rock Properties Model (RPM), and the Mineralogic Model (MM). The GFM provides a representation of the 3-D stratigraphy and geologic structure. Based on the framework provided by the GFM, the RPM and MM provide spatial simulations of the rock and hydrologic properties, and mineralogy, respectively. Functional summaries of the component models and their respective output are provided in Section 1.4. Each of the component models of the ISM considers different specific aspects of the site geologic setting. Each model was developed using unique methodologies and inputs, and the determination of the modeled units for each of the components is dependent on the requirements of that component. Therefore, while the ISM represents the integration of the rock properties and mineralogy into a geologic framework, the discussion of ISM construction and results is most appropriately presented in terms of the three separate components. This Process Model Report (PMR) summarizes the individual component models of the ISM (the GFM, RPM, and MM) and describes how the three components are constructed and combined to form the ISM

  8. Distribution of Penicillium commune isolates in cheese dairies mapped using secondary metabolite profiles, morphotypes, RAPD and AFLP fingerprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Flemming; Nielsen, A.B.; Skouboe, P.

    2003-01-01

    In an 8-year study of the diversity and distribution of Penicillium commune contaminants in two different cheese dairies, swab and air samples were taken from the production plants, the processing environment and contaminated cheeses. A total of 321 Penicillium commune isolates were characterized...

  9. Survival of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Minas frescal cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Frozi, Jesieli Braz; Domingues, Josiane Roberto; Esper, Luciana Maria Ramires; Corrêa da Rosa, Joel Maurício; Silva, Ana Luiza Sant’Anna da Costa; Gonzalez, Alice Gonçalves Martins

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 strains (isolated by cattle’s faeces and a reference strain, EDL933), were inoculated into pasteurized milk (102 and 103 cells.mL–1) to prepare the Minas frescal cheese. As control was used uninfected milk. Physicochemical and microbiological analyses were performed to milk and elaborated cheese. The O157:H7 strains were quantified in the stages of cheese processing and during 0, 2, 4, 5, 7, 10 and 15 storage days at 8 °C ...

  10. Proline iminopeptidase PepI overexpressing Lactobacillus casei as an adjunct starter in Edam cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navidghasemizad, Sahar; Takala, Timo M; Alatossava, Tapani; Saris, Per EJ

    2013-01-01

    In this study the growth of genetically modified Lactobacillus casei LAB6, overexpressing proline iminopeptidase PepI and its capacity to increase free proline was investigated during ripening of Edam cheese. The strain successfully survived 12 weeks of ripening period in cheese. The food-grade plasmid pLEB604, carrying the pepI gene, was stable, and PepI enzyme was active in LAB6 cells isolated at different stages of the ripening process. However, HPLC analyses indicated that Lb. casei LAB6 could not increase the amount of free proline in ripened cheese. PMID:23851577

  11. Children preferences of coloured fresh cheese prepared during an educational laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Tesini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Choices among young consumers are mainly driven by food preferences; in particular, a connection between appearance and acceptance of food has been highlighted, together with a general lack of knowledge of food processing. For these reasons, educational activities are important to increase scientific knowledge and awareness. The cheese-making educational laboratory described herein involved children, adolescents, and their parents/teachers in the preparation of fresh and naturally-coloured cheeses. At the end of the activity, both the colour preference and possible relation between preference and colour of cheese prepared were investigated administering a short questionnaire.

  12. Proline iminopeptidase PepI overexpressing Lactobacillus casei as an adjunct starter in Edam cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navidghasemizad, Sahar; Takala, Timo M; Alatossava, Tapani; Saris, Per Ej

    2013-01-01

    In this study the growth of genetically modified Lactobacillus casei LAB6, overexpressing proline iminopeptidase PepI and its capacity to increase free proline was investigated during ripening of Edam cheese. The strain successfully survived 12 weeks of ripening period in cheese. The food-grade plasmid pLEB604, carrying the pepI gene, was stable, and PepI enzyme was active in LAB6 cells isolated at different stages of the ripening process. However, HPLC analyses indicated that Lb. casei LAB6 could not increase the amount of free proline in ripened cheese.

  13. Physical, Chemical and Microbial Characteristic of Gouda Cheese Using Propolis (Apis milifera Liguistica as Coating Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilik Eka Radiati

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Gouda cheeses were coated with different coating materials consist of pliol, beeswax, and beeswax containing different concentration of propolis  by 0,2, 0,4 and 0,8%  and stored  during  ripening at 10oC period. The result showed that no different of moisture, fat and protein content, hardness, pH value of cheese products. The hydrolysis process at maturity caused decreasing of  pH value. Added propolis in the coating material could inhibited  mould and yeast growth significantly. Key words:  Gouda Cheese, propolis, edible coating

  14. Cheese and cardiovascular disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerpsted, Julie Bousgaard; Tholstrup, Tine

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently, the effect of dairy products on cardiovascular risk is a topic with much debate and conflicting results. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the existing literature regarding the effect of cheese intake and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Studies included...

  15. Complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium variabile DSM 44702 isolated from the surface of smear-ripened cheeses and insights into cheese ripening and flavor generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trost Eva

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Corynebacterium variabile is part of the complex microflora on the surface of smear-ripened cheeses and contributes to the development of flavor and textural properties during cheese ripening. Still little is known about the metabolic processes and microbial interactions during the production of smear-ripened cheeses. Therefore, the gene repertoire contributing to the lifestyle of the cheese isolate C. variabile DSM 44702 was deduced from the complete genome sequence to get a better understanding of this industrial process. Results The chromosome of C. variabile DSM 44702 is composed of 3, 433, 007 bp and contains 3, 071 protein-coding regions. A comparative analysis of this gene repertoire with that of other corynebacteria detected 1, 534 predicted genes to be specific for the cheese isolate. These genes might contribute to distinct metabolic capabilities of C. variabile, as several of them are associated with metabolic functions in cheese habitats by playing roles in the utilization of alternative carbon and sulphur sources, in amino acid metabolism, and fatty acid degradation. Relevant C. variabile genes confer the capability to catabolize gluconate, lactate, propionate, taurine, and gamma-aminobutyric acid and to utilize external caseins. In addition, C. variabile is equipped with several siderophore biosynthesis gene clusters for iron acquisition and an exceptional repertoire of AraC-regulated iron uptake systems. Moreover, C. variabile can produce acetoin, butanediol, and methanethiol, which are important flavor compounds in smear-ripened cheeses. Conclusions The genome sequence of C. variabile provides detailed insights into the distinct metabolic features of this bacterium, implying a strong adaption to the iron-depleted cheese surface habitat. By combining in silico data obtained from the genome annotation with previous experimental knowledge, occasional observations on genes that are involved in the complex

  16. PRODUCTION UNDER CONTROLLED CONDITIONS OF “CASU MARZU” CHEESE: EFFECT OF THE Piophila Casei COLONIZATION ON MICROBIAL AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF THE CHEESES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Coinu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the Piophila casei colonization under controlled conditions on “casu marzu”, a typical Sardinian sheep milk cheese. Three batches of two different kind of cheese (PO, holed paste and PC, firm paste were produced in duplicate (test and control. Test cheeses were exposed to the Piophila casei colonization in a conditioned store room, while control cheeses were suitably protected. All the samples were analyzed at 0, 10, 30, 60 and 90 days from the production. The pH and aw, the chemical composition and the microbiological parameters (food safety and process hygiene criteria were determined. The colonization was unhomogeneous between the batches: PO cheeses were more easily colonized and showed more intense proteolysis and lipolysis respect to PC cheeses. The microbiological parameters were strongly affected by the experimental process conditions. The authors discuss about the opportunity of a controlled production of “casu marzu” and the implications to the health of consumers.

  17. Animal models and conserved processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greek Ray

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The concept of conserved processes presents unique opportunities for using nonhuman animal models in biomedical research. However, the concept must be examined in the context that humans and nonhuman animals are evolved, complex, adaptive systems. Given that nonhuman animals are examples of living systems that are differently complex from humans, what does the existence of a conserved gene or process imply for inter-species extrapolation? Methods We surveyed the literature including philosophy of science, biological complexity, conserved processes, evolutionary biology, comparative medicine, anti-neoplastic agents, inhalational anesthetics, and drug development journals in order to determine the value of nonhuman animal models when studying conserved processes. Results Evolution through natural selection has employed components and processes both to produce the same outcomes among species but also to generate different functions and traits. Many genes and processes are conserved, but new combinations of these processes or different regulation of the genes involved in these processes have resulted in unique organisms. Further, there is a hierarchy of organization in complex living systems. At some levels, the components are simple systems that can be analyzed by mathematics or the physical sciences, while at other levels the system cannot be fully analyzed by reducing it to a physical system. The study of complex living systems must alternate between focusing on the parts and examining the intact whole organism while taking into account the connections between the two. Systems biology aims for this holism. We examined the actions of inhalational anesthetic agents and anti-neoplastic agents in order to address what the characteristics of complex living systems imply for inter-species extrapolation of traits and responses related to conserved processes. Conclusion We conclude that even the presence of conserved processes is

  18. Animal models and conserved processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greek, Ray; Rice, Mark J

    2012-09-10

    The concept of conserved processes presents unique opportunities for using nonhuman animal models in biomedical research. However, the concept must be examined in the context that humans and nonhuman animals are evolved, complex, adaptive systems. Given that nonhuman animals are examples of living systems that are differently complex from humans, what does the existence of a conserved gene or process imply for inter-species extrapolation? We surveyed the literature including philosophy of science, biological complexity, conserved processes, evolutionary biology, comparative medicine, anti-neoplastic agents, inhalational anesthetics, and drug development journals in order to determine the value of nonhuman animal models when studying conserved processes. Evolution through natural selection has employed components and processes both to produce the same outcomes among species but also to generate different functions and traits. Many genes and processes are conserved, but new combinations of these processes or different regulation of the genes involved in these processes have resulted in unique organisms. Further, there is a hierarchy of organization in complex living systems. At some levels, the components are simple systems that can be analyzed by mathematics or the physical sciences, while at other levels the system cannot be fully analyzed by reducing it to a physical system. The study of complex living systems must alternate between focusing on the parts and examining the intact whole organism while taking into account the connections between the two. Systems biology aims for this holism. We examined the actions of inhalational anesthetic agents and anti-neoplastic agents in order to address what the characteristics of complex living systems imply for inter-species extrapolation of traits and responses related to conserved processes. We conclude that even the presence of conserved processes is insufficient for inter-species extrapolation when the trait or response

  19. Model for amorphous aggregation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranks, Samuel D.; Ecroyd, Heath; van Sluyter, Steven; Waters, Elizabeth J.; Carver, John A.; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2009-11-01

    The amorphous aggregation of proteins is associated with many phenomena, ranging from the formation of protein wine haze to the development of cataract in the eye lens and the precipitation of recombinant proteins during their expression and purification. While much literature exists describing models for linear protein aggregation, such as amyloid fibril formation, there are few reports of models which address amorphous aggregation. Here, we propose a model to describe the amorphous aggregation of proteins which is also more widely applicable to other situations where a similar process occurs, such as in the formation of colloids and nanoclusters. As first applications of the model, we have tested it against experimental turbidimetry data of three proteins relevant to the wine industry and biochemistry, namely, thaumatin, a thaumatinlike protein, and α -lactalbumin. The model is very robust and describes amorphous experimental data to a high degree of accuracy. Details about the aggregation process, such as shape parameters of the aggregates and rate constants, can also be extracted.

  20. Effect of Incubation Time and Sucrose Addition on the Characteristics of Cheese Whey Yoghurt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhartadi, E.; Utami, R.; Nursiwi, A.; Sari, A. M.; Widowati, E.; Sanjaya, A. P.; Esnadewi, E. A.

    2017-04-01

    The effect of incubation time and concentration of sucrose addition on the characteristics of cheese whey yogurt (lactic acid content, pH, total lactic acid bacteria, antioxidant activity, viscosity) and sensory characteristics (color, odor, flavor, consistency, and overalls) were investigated. The cheese whey yogurt fermentation process was carried out for 24h and 36h with the addition of sucrose 8, 10, and 12% (w/w) of total solid, respectively. The results showed that the lactic acid content, total lactic acid bacteria, antioxidant activity, and viscosity of cheese whey yogurt were affected by the incubation time and sucrose addition. The level of pH of yogurt which was incubated at 24h and 36h were relatively in the same levels, which were 4.51 up to 4.63. Due the sensory characteristic of cheese whey yogurt the panellists gave the high score for the cheese whey yogurt which was incubated at 24h and sucrose addition 12% (w/w) of total solid. The cheese whey yogurt has 0.41% lactic acid content; pH 4.51; 7.09 log total lactic acid bacteria cells / ml; 5.78% antioxidant activity; and 5.97 cP viscosity. The best sensory and physico-chemical characteristic of cheese whey yogurt was achieved by 24h incubation time and 12% concentration of sucrose addition.

  1. Development of low fat UF cheese technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Miočinović

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The production procedure of low fat cheeses produced from ultrafiltered milk (UF cheese was developed in this study. The production procedure, that includes utilization of UF milk with 2 % of lactose, addition of 1.5 % inulin and salting with 2 % of mixed salt (NaCl/KCl in ratio 3:1 was defined based on the investigation that included the influence of coagulation parameters, different lactose content of UF milk, different inulin content, and different salt type and content on the properties of low fat UF cheeses. Presented production procedure enables the production of a product with satisfactory dietetic and functional properties. Reduced lactose content of UF milk contributes to stabilisation of pH value at an adequate level and achievement of acceptable texture properties of low fat UF cheeses. Defined inulin content (1.5 % improved cheese texture, as well as its functional properties, enabling the cheese produced to be marked as a “good source of fibre”. Reduced sodium content, due to partial substitution of NaCl with KCl, also contributes to the improvement of dietetic properties of cheeses. Low fat UF cheeses, produced according to defined production procedure, were analysed during 8 weeks of ripening and storage periods. Composition, pH values and proteolytic pattern were typical for brined cheeses. Uniform microstructure and acceptable sensory properties, especially the texture, confirm the validity of the developed production procedure of low fat UF cheeses from UF milk.

  2. Influence of ripening time on the amount of certain biogenic amines in rind and core of cow milk Livno cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonela Marijan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Determining the levels of biogenic amines in cheese except that it has significance for determining the nutritional value and hygienic accuracy, cheese as food can be used as a parameter to evaluate the conditions of production and/or ripening of products, and particularly in the selection of bacterial cultures. The purpose of this paper was to determine the effect of the ripening process on the amount of biogenic amines in cheese. For this purpose were conducted physico-chemical analysis, determination of biogenic amines and microbiological analysis. During the process of ripening Livno cheese from three different batches was taken one cheese from prime day and 9th, 20th, 29th, 50th, 60th and 105th day. From each cheese two samples were taken, one from the middle and one from the cheese rind. During 105th day of ripening Livno cheese, the presence of triptamin, ß-feniletlamine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermine and spermidine were determinated. The maximum total values of searched biogenic amines were found 105th day, in the middle 184.13 mg/kg and 76.26 mg/kg in the rind of cheese. With an indication that the largest share of value rep¬resent histamine with 43.9 % and tyramine with 38.2 % in the middle, respectively histamine with 31.6 % and tyramine with 31.5 % in the rind of cheese. The values of putrescine and spermine were in small ranges and they are not identified in all samples. The values of histamine and tyramine are almost a third more at 105th than 60th day. There was a significant difference between the middle and the rind of cheese in the values of biogenic amines. Correlation between biogenic amines and microorganisms has not been determined.

  3. Influence of small ruminant lentivirus infection on cheese yield in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka, Dorota; Czopowicz, Michał; Bagnicka, Emilia; Rzewuska, Magdalena; Strzałkowska, Nina; Kaba, Jarosław

    2015-02-01

    Three-year cohort study was carried out to investigate the influence of small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV) infection on cheese yield in goats. For this purpose records of milk yield, milk composition and cheese yield were collected in a dairy goat herd. Cheese yield was recorded as the amount of fresh cheese obtained from 1 kg milk. All goats were serologically tested for SRLV infection twice a year. The analysis included 247 records in total (71 for seropositive and 176 from seronegative individuals) and was carried out with the use of the four-level hierarchical linear model (α = 0·05). SRLV infection proved to be a statistically significant independent factor reducing cheese yield (P = 0·013)--when other covariates were held constant cheese yield was reduced by 4·6 g per each 1 kg milk in an infected goat compared with an uninfected goat. Other statistically significant covariates positively associated with cheese yield were protein contents, fat contents and the 3rd stage of lactation (P < 0·001 for all).

  4. Effect of pH and water activity on the growth limits of Listeria monocytogenes in a cheese matrix at two contamination levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schvartzman, M S; Belessi, C; Butler, F; Skandamis, P N; Jordan, K N

    2011-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can proliferate at the beginning of cheesemaking as the conditions favor growth. The objective of this study was to establish the growth limits of L. monocytogenes in a cheese matrix, in case of potential contamination of the milk prior to cheese manufacture. A semisoft laboratory scale model cheese system was made at different initial pH and water activity (a(w)) levels with a mix of two strains of L. monocytogenes. A factorial design of five pH values (5.6 to 6.5), four a(w) values (0.938 to 0.96), and two L. monocytogenes inoculation levels (1 to 20 CFU/ml and 500 to 1,000 CFU/ml) was carried out. Each combination was evaluated in six independent replicates. In order to determine if there was a dominant strain, isolated colonies from the cheeses were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The data relating to growth initiation were fitted to a logistic regression model. The a(w) of milk influenced the probability of growth initiation of L. monocytogenes at both low and high contamination levels. The pH, at the concentrations tested, had a lower effect on the probability of growth initiation. At pH 6.5 and a(w) of 0.99 for low contamination levels and pH 6.5 and a(w) of 0.97 for high contamination levels, increases in population of up to 4 and 2 log were observed at low and high contamination levels, respectively. This shows that if conditions are favorable for growth initiation at the early stages of the cheesemaking process, contamination of milk, even with low numbers, could lead to L. monocytogenes populations that exceed the European Union's microbiological limit of 100 CFU/g of cheese.

  5. Technological Strategies to Preserve Burrata Cheese Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Costa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Burrata cheese is a very perishable product due to microbial proliferation and undesirable sensory changes. In this work, a step-by-step optimization approach was used to design proper processing and packaging conditions for burrata in brine. In particular, four different steps were carried out to extend its shelf life. Different headspace gas compositions (MAP-1 30:70 CO2:N2; MAP-2 50:50 CO2:N2 and MAP-3 65:35 CO2:N2 were firstly tested. To further promote product preservation, a coating was also optimized. Then, antimicrobial compounds in the filling of the burrata cheese (lysozyme and Na2-EDTA and later in the coating (enzymatic complex and silver nanoparticles were analyzed. To evaluate the quality of the samples, in each step headspace gas composition, microbial population, and pH and sensory attributes were monitored during storage at 8 ± 1 °C. The results highlight that the antimicrobial compounds in the stracciatella, coating with silver nanoparticles, and packaging under MAP-3 represent effective conditions to guarantee product preservation, moving burrata shelf life from three days (control sample to ten days.

  6. ANOMALOUS BLUE COLOURING OF MOZZARELLA CHEESE INTENTIONALLY CONTAMINATED WITH PIGMENT PRODUCING STRAINS OF PSEUDOMONAS FLUORESCENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sechi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In summer 2010 a large outbreak of anomalous blue coloration of mozzarella cheese was recorded in Italy and some northern European countries. Official laboratory analysis and health authorities linked the outbreak to the contamination of processing water with strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens, although several expert raised the question of how to unequivocally link the blue coloring to the presence of the micro-organism. In an attempt to set-up a method to determine whether a given Pseudomonas spp. strain is responsible of the defect, an in vitro system for the evaluation of blue colouring of mozzarella cheese intentionally contaminated with strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens. was developed The system is aimed to ascertain whether P. fluorescens strains, isolated from mozzarella cheese with anomalous blue coloration, are able to reproduce the blue coloration under controlled experimental condition. 96 trials of experimental inoculation of mozzarella cheese in different preservation liquids, were conducted using various suspension of Pseudomonas spp. (P. fluorescens ATCC 13525, P. fluorescens CFBP 3150, one P. fluorescens field strain isolated from blue-colored mozzarella cheese and P. aeruginosa ATCC 10145 as positive control at different concentrations and incubated at different temperatures. Growth curve of all Pseudomonas spp. strains tested demonstrated that after three days of incubation the concentration was generally higher than 106 CFU/g of mozzarella cheese incubated in Tryptic Soy Broth (TSB, and higher than 105 CFU/g of mozzarella cheese incubated in preservation liquid. All mozzarella cheeses inoculated with the field strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens showed the characteristic anomalous blue coloration, which is often associated with Pseudomonas fluorescens contamination of water used during mozzarella cheesemaking. With the proposed system, which enabled a considerable amount of samples to be analysed under controlled experimental

  7. Yeast community in traditional Portuguese Serpa cheese by culture-dependent and -independent DNA approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves Dos Santos, Maria Teresa P; Benito, María José; Córdoba, María de Guía; Alvarenga, Nuno; Ruiz-Moyano Seco de Herrera, Santiago

    2017-12-04

    This study investigated the yeast community present in the traditional Portuguese cheese, Serpa, by culture-dependent and -independent methods. Sixteen batches of Serpa cheeses from various regional industries registered with the Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) versus non-PDO registered, during spring and winter, were used. Irrespective of the producer, the yeast counts were around 5log CFU/g in winter and, overall, were lower in spring. The yeast species identified at the end of ripening (30days), using PCR-RFLP analysis and sequencing of the 26S rRNA, mainly corresponded to Debaryomyces hansenii and Kluyveromyces marxianus, with Candida spp. and Pichia spp. present to a lesser extent. The culture-independent results, obtained using high-throughput sequencing analysis, confirmed the prevalence of Debaryomyces spp. and Kluyveromyces spp. but, also, that Galactomyces spp. was relevant for three of the five producers, which indicates its importance during the early stages of the cheese ripening process, considering it was not found among the dominant viable yeast species. In addition, differences between the identified yeast isolated from cheeses obtained from PDO and non-PDO registered industries, showed that the lack of regulation of the cheese-making practice, may unfavourably influence the final yeast microbiota. The new knowledge provided by this study of the yeast diversity in Serpa cheese, could be used to modify the cheese ripening conditions, to favour desirable yeast species. Additionally, the prevalent yeast isolates identified, Debaryomyces hansenii and Kluyveromyces spp., may have an important role during cheese ripening and in the final sensorial characteristics. Thus, the study of their technological and functional properties could be relevant, in the development of an autochthonous starter culture, to ensure final quality and safety of the cheese. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Invited review: Microbial evolution in raw-milk, long-ripened cheeses produced using undefined natural whey starters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Monica; Bottari, Benedetta; Lazzi, Camilla; Neviani, Erasmo; Mucchetti, Germano

    2014-02-01

    The robustness of the starter culture during cheese fermentation is enhanced by the presence of a rich consortium of microbes. Natural starters are consortia of microbes undoubtedly richer than selected starters. Among natural starters, natural whey starters (NWS) are the most common cultures currently used to produce different varieties of cheeses. Undefined NWS are typically used for Italian cooked, long-ripened, extra-hard, raw milk cheeses, such as Parmigiano Reggiano and Grana Padano. Together with raw milk microbiota, NWS are responsible for most cheese characteristics. The microbial ecology of these 2 cheese varieties is based on a complex interaction among starter lactic acid bacteria (SLAB) and nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB), which are characterized by their different abilities to grow in a changing substrate. This review aims to summarize the latest findings on Parmigiano Reggiano and Grana Padano to better understand the dynamics of SLAB, which mainly arise from NWS, and NSLAB, which mainly arise from raw milk, and their possible role in determining the characteristics of these cheeses. The review is presented in 4 main sections. The first summarizes the main microbiological and chemical properties of the ripened cheese as determined by cheese-making process variables, as these variables may affect microbial growth. The second describes the microbiota of raw milk as affected by specific milk treatments, from milking to the filling of the cheese milk vat. The third describes the microbiota of NWS, and the fourth reviews the knowledge available on microbial dynamics from curd to ripened cheese. As the dynamics and functionality of complex undefined NWS is one of the most important areas of focus in current food microbiology research, this review may serve as a good starting point for implementing future studies on microbial diversity and functionality of undefined cheese starter cultures. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association

  9. Mycotoxicogenic fungal inhibition by innovative cheese cover with aromatic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Armando; Librán, Celia M; Berruga, M Isabel; Zalacain, Amaya; Carmona, Manuel

    2013-03-30

    The use of aromatic plants and their extracts with antimicrobial properties may be compromised in the case of cheese, as some type of fungal starter is needed during its production. Penicillium verrucosum is considered a common cheese spoiler. The aim of this study was to evaluate the innovative use of certain aromatic plants as natural cheese covers in order to prevent mycotoxicogenic fungal growth (P. verrucosum). A collection of 12 essential oils (EOs) was obtained from various aromatic plants by solvent-free microwave extraction technology, and volatile characterisation of the EOs was carried out by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The most effective EOs against P. verrucosum were obtained from Anethum graveolens, Hyssopus officinalis and Chamaemelum nobile, yielding 50% inhibition of fungal growth at concentration values lower than 0.02 µL mL⁻¹. All EOs showed high volatile heterogeneity, with α-phellandrene, pinocamphone, isopinocamphone, α-pinene, camphene, 1,8-cineole, carvacrol and trans-anethole being found to be statistically significant in the antifungal model. The use of these aromatic plants as natural covers on cheese can satisfactorily inhibit the growth of some mycotoxicogenic fungal spoilers. Among the volatile compounds present, α- and β-phellandrene were confirmed as the most relevant in the inhibition. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Models of memory: information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysenck, M W

    1988-01-01

    A complete understanding of human memory will necessarily involve consideration of the active processes involved at the time of learning and of the organization and nature of representation of information in long-term memory. In addition to process and structure, it is important for theory to indicate the ways in which stimulus-driven and conceptually driven processes interact with each other in the learning situation. Not surprisingly, no existent theory provides a detailed specification of all of these factors. However, there are a number of more specific theories which are successful in illuminating some of the component structures and processes. The working memory model proposed by Baddeley and Hitch (1974) and modified subsequently has shown how the earlier theoretical construct of the short-term store should be replaced with the notion of working memory. In essence, working memory is a system which is used both to process information and to permit the transient storage of information. It comprises a number of conceptually distinct, but functionally interdependent components. So far as long-term memory is concerned, there is evidence of a number of different kinds of representation. Of particular importance is the distinction between declarative knowledge and procedural knowledge, a distinction which has received support from the study of amnesic patients. Kosslyn has argued for a distinction between literal representation and propositional representation, whereas Tulving has distinguished between episodic and semantic memories. While Tulving's distinction is perhaps the best known, there is increasing evidence that episodic and semantic memory differ primarily in content rather than in process, and so the distinction may be of less theoretical value than was originally believed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Identification of a particular cheese production by trace analysis with nuclear techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvini, A.; Stroppa, A.; Cagnazzo, M.; Pappalardo, P.; Borio, A.; Manera, S.

    2006-05-01

    The counterfeit of a product, in this case a type of cheese, is an economic damage for the trade-mark product. An identification of the product itself by quantification of trace elements could be done. Nuclear techniques are useful and give good results. Some elements are connected to the process so different productions could be identified. Thirty elements and 160 spectrums are analysed. The samples of the same kind of cheese come from different countries and different Italian producers (15 different productions).

  12. Identification of a particular cheese production by trace analysis with nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini, A; Stroppa, A; Cagnazzo, M; Pappalardo, P; Borio, A; Manera, S

    2006-01-01

    The counterfeit of a product, in this case a type of cheese, is an economic damage for the trade-mark product. An identification of the product itself by quantification of trace elements could be done. Nuclear techniques are useful and give good results. Some elements are connected to the process so different productions could be identified. Thirty elements and 160 spectrums are analysed. The samples of the same kind of cheese come from different countries and different Italian producers (15 different productions)

  13. Mathematical modeling of biological processes

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Avner

    2014-01-01

    This book on mathematical modeling of biological processes includes a wide selection of biological topics that demonstrate the power of mathematics and computational codes in setting up biological processes with a rigorous and predictive framework. Topics include: enzyme dynamics, spread of disease, harvesting bacteria, competition among live species, neuronal oscillations, transport of neurofilaments in axon, cancer and cancer therapy, and granulomas. Complete with a description of the biological background and biological question that requires the use of mathematics, this book is developed for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students with only basic knowledge of ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations; background in biology is not required. Students will gain knowledge on how to program with MATLAB without previous programming experience and how to use codes in order to test biological hypothesis.

  14. Modeling pellet impact drilling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalyov, A. V.; Ryabchikov, S. Ya; Isaev, Ye D.; Ulyanova, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    The paper describes pellet impact drilling which could be used to increase the drilling speed and the rate of penetration when drilling hard rocks. Pellet impact drilling implies rock destruction by metal pellets with high kinetic energy in the immediate vicinity of the earth formation encountered. The pellets are circulated in the bottom hole by a high velocity fluid jet, which is the principle component of the ejector pellet impact drill bit. The experiments conducted has allowed modeling the process of pellet impact drilling, which creates the scientific and methodological basis for engineering design of drilling operations under different geo-technical conditions.

  15. Control of Listeria monocytogenes in fresh cheese using protective lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, M C; Silva, C C G; Ribeiro, S C; Dapkevicius, M L N E; Rosa, H J D

    2014-11-17

    detected over the same period, in the absence of bacteriocin-producing LAB. The combination of two bacteriocin producing Enterococcus sp. optimized the reduction of L. monocytogenes counts in fresh cheese, reducing by approximately 5 log units after 7 days. The present work demonstrates that using bacteriocin-producing strains in the manufacture of fresh cheese might contribute to preventing the growth of undesirable pathogenic bacteria such as L. monocytogenes. A blend of two strains demonstrated great potential as a protective culture for the cheese making process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pasture quality and cheese traceability index of Ragusano PDO cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venera Copani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Iblei plateau (Sicily, Southern Italy the native dairy cattle breed Modicana during the spring season grazes exclusively on natural pastures for the production of the Ragusano protected denomination of origin cheese. Along the grazing season, herbage undergoes to changes on protein, fibre and moisture content, affecting quality parameters such as plant carotenoids concentration, involved in the colour and nutritional characteristics of dairy products and potential biomarkers for authenticating fed green pasture-based diets. The aim of this work was to assess whether the cheese traceability index, based on the carotenoids spectra data elaboration, could be related to seasonal variations of floral composition and pasture quality. Four herbage and cheese samples were collected every two weeks in two representative farms of this area, from March to May 2013. Pasture characteristics as pastoral vegetation composition and pastoral value were analysed using the methodology developed for pastoral resources studies. Traceability index showed a significant positive correlation with pasture moisture and crude protein content (r=0.729* and 0.853**, respectively, while it was negatively correlated with fibre content (r=–0.719*.

  17. From milk to cheese: Evolution of flavor fingerprint of milk, cream, curd, whey, ricotta, scotta, and ripened cheese obtained during summer Alpine pasture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, M; Bittante, G

    2018-02-14

    The role of each step of cheese and ricotta making in development of flavor of cheese and other dairy products is not yet well known. The objectives of this study were to characterize volatile organic compounds (VOC) in cheese and ricotta making with bulk milk from cows grazing in a highland area and to evaluate their evolution in the various dairy products and by-products obtained during the production processes. A group of 148 cows was grazed day and night on pasture from June to September. A total of 7 cheese-making sessions were carried out using the bulk milk collected every 2 wk during summer pasturing according to the artisanal procedure used for Malga cheese production. All milks, products, and by-products were sampled, and the VOC content of milk, cream, whey, ricotta, scotta (residual liquid), fresh cheeses, and cheeses ripened for 6 and 12 mo was determined by solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Forty-nine compounds were identified belonging to the following chemical families: alcohols (13), aldehydes (9), esters (8), free fatty acids (6), ketones (5), lactones (2), sulfurs (2), terpenes (2), phenol (1), and benzene (1). The results showed that the amounts of VOC in the various dairy products differed significantly. Comparisons between the VOC of 4 types of milk (whole evening, skim evening, whole morning, mixed in the vat) showed that the skimming process had the greatest effect, with about half of all the VOC analyzed affected, followed by time of milking (evening milking vs. morning milking) and mixing (skim evening milk mixed with whole morning milk). In general, among fresh products, cream had higher contents of fatty acids, sulfurs, and terpene volatile compounds than fresh cheese and ricotta, whereas ricotta showed a very high VOC amount compared with fresh cheese, probably due to its high processing temperature. The effects of the progressive nutrient depletion in milk during processing were investigated by comparing

  18. Integrated modelling in materials and process technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2008-01-01

    Integrated modelling of entire process sequences and the subsequent in-service conditions, and multiphysics modelling of the single process steps are areas that increasingly support optimisation of manufactured parts. In the present paper, three different examples of modelling manufacturing...... processes from the viewpoint of combined materials and process modelling are presented: solidification of thin walled ductile cast iron, integrated modelling of spray forming and multiphysics modelling of friction stir welding. The fourth example describes integrated modelling applied to a failure analysis...

  19. A visual analysis of the process of process modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claes, J.; Vanderfeesten, I.; Pinggera, J.; Reijers, H.A.; Weber, B.; Poels, G.

    2015-01-01

    The construction of business process models has become an important requisite in the analysis and optimization of processes. The success of the analysis and optimization efforts heavily depends on the quality of the models. Therefore, a research domain emerged that studies the process of process

  20. Socioeconomic diagnosis of cheese producers of Marajó, state of Pará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitória Nazaré Costa Seixas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to diagnose the socioeconomic conditions of cheese producers from three municipalities of Marajó Island, Pará state, Brazil. Manufacture process, hygienic-sanitary conditions in handmade cheese production and its commercialization were some features analysed for both cream-type and butter-type cheeses. During the survey, conducted from March to September 2012 questionnaires were applied to ten Marajó’s cheese producers. The cheese fabrication was characterized as a handmade process, employing family labor, most over ten years of experience. The production has a small scale, uses rudimentary technologies, lacks proper infrastructure for the processing of the product and has unsatisfactory hygienic-sanitary conditions. Commercialization is mainly by direct sale on the ship that travels to Belém city, capital of Pará state. Interviewed producers showed good reception to knowledge that can improve quality of the product, but they need a better guidance. In this context, the transfer of information is essential to sustain the production of these cheeses and preserve local culture, contributing to the economic and social development of producers regions.

  1. An Electronic Nose Based on Coated Piezoelectric Quartz Crystals to Certify Ewes’ Cheese and to Discriminate between Cheese Varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa S. R. Gomes

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available An electronic nose based on coated piezoelectric quartz crystals was used to distinguish cheese made from ewes’ milk, and to distinguish cheese varieties. Two sensors coated with Nafion and Carbowax could certify half the ewes’ cheese samples, exclude 32 cheeses made from cow’s milk and to classify half of the ewes’ cheese samples as possibly authentic. Two other sensors, coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone and triethanolamine clearly distinguished between Flamengo, Brie, Gruyère and Mozzarella cheeses. Brie cheeses were further separated according to their origin, and Mozzarella grated cheese also appeared clearly separated from non-grated Mozzarella.

  2. Effect of variety and maturation of cheese on supercritical fluid extraction efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Jessica L; Walker, John; Khalil, Hany; Jiménez-Flores, Rafael

    2008-07-09

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) has been utilized by the food industry in many applications to extract, fractionate, and recover compounds from various food matrices. However, little research has been conducted using SFE as an alternative process for producing reduced-fat cheese. Lipids in cheeses may be selectively extracted due to the nonpolar properties of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2), without leaving residual chemicals as is the case in solvent extraction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence on the extraction process due to cheese variety and protein breakdown by age. A Latin square design was utilized to test the extractability of lipids from Parmesan and Cheddar cheeses, aged young (9-10 months) or old (24 months). Extraction took place in a 500 mL SFE vessel using 100 g of grated cheese samples. The SFE parameters of the extraction were 350 bar, 35 degrees C, and supercritical carbon dioxide at a flow rate of 20 g/min for 55 min. Compositional analysis measured all treated samples and controls of total lipids, lipid profiling, total protein, protein/peptide analysis, moisture, ash, and pH. Cheese type was a major variable in fat extraction. The extraction in Cheddar showed an average fat reduction of 53.56% for young cheese, whereas that in old Cheddar was 47.90%. However, young Parmesan was reduced an average of 55.07%, but old Parmesan was reduced at 68.11%, measured on a dry basis. SFE extracted triglycerides and cholesterol, but did not remove phospholipids. This investigation introduces the observations of the effect of Cheddar and Parmesan varieties on SFE, offering data on the important parameters to consider in the design of SFE processes to reduce fat in cheese.

  3. The influence of ripening period length and season on the microbiological parameters of a traditional Brazilian cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria M. Cardoso

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The ripening process of Serro Minas cheese, one of the most popular cheeses produced with raw milk in Brazil, was studied over the course of 60 days of ripening during dry and rainy seasons. Brazilian legislation prohibits the production of cheese from raw milk unless it was submitted to a maturation period greater than 60 days. However Minas Serro cheese is sold within a few days of ripening. A total of 100 samples of Serro cheese were obtained from five farms; 50 samples were collected during the dry season (winter in Brazil and 50 samples were collected during the rainy season (summer in Brazil. From each farm, ten cheeses were collected during each season after two days of ripening. Our results showed high levels of total and fecal coliforms at the beginning of the ripening period (approximately 4 Log MPN/g with 3 days of ripening that decreased with 60 days of ripening reaching almost 1.5 Log MPN/g. Contamination by coagulase-positive staphylococci was reduced by the end of the ripening period. Salmonella spp. was not detected. The staphylococcal enterotoxins B and C were detected in 1% and 4% of the cheeses, respectively, after 30 days of ripening. These results suggest that the ripening process was not effective in eliminating staphylococcal enterotoxins from the cheese. However, none of the investigated strains of Staphylococcus spp. isolated from Serro cheese produced enterotoxins A, B, C or D. The high pathogen and coliform levels at the beginning of the ripening process for the cheese produced during both seasons indicate the need for improvement of the sanitation of the manufacturing conditions.

  4. Collapse models and perceptual processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghirardi, Gian Carlo; Romano, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    Theories including a collapse mechanism have been presented various years ago. They are based on a modification of standard quantum mechanics in which nonlinear and stochastic terms are added to the evolution equation. Their principal merits derive from the fact that they are mathematically precise schemes accounting, on the basis of a unique universal dynamical principle, both for the quantum behavior of microscopic systems as well as for the reduction associated to measurement processes and for the classical behavior of macroscopic objects. Since such theories qualify themselves not as new interpretations but as modifications of the standard theory they can be, in principle, tested against quantum mechanics. Recently, various investigations identifying possible crucial test have been discussed. In spite of the extreme difficulty to perform such tests it seems that recent technological developments allow at least to put precise limits on the parameters characterizing the modifications of the evolution equation. Here we will simply mention some of the recent investigations in this direction, while we will mainly concentrate our attention to the way in which collapse theories account for definite perceptual process. The differences between the case of reductions induced by perceptions and those related to measurement procedures by means of standard macroscopic devices will be discussed. On this basis, we suggest a precise experimental test of collapse theories involving conscious observers. We make plausible, by discussing in detail a toy model, that the modified dynamics can give rise to quite small but systematic errors in the visual perceptual process.

  5. Cheese consumption and prevalence of overweight and obesity in a Basque adult population: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegría-Lertxundi, Iker; Rocandio Pablo, Ana; Arroyo-Izaga, Marta

    2014-02-01

    Studies have reported a negative association between dairy product consumption and weight status. However, not as much research has focused on cheese; therefore, the aim of this study was to study the association between cheese intake and overweight and obesity in a representative Basque adult population. A food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was obtained from a random sample of 1081 adults (530 males and 551 females, 17-96 years old). Cheese consumption data were expressed as g/1000 kcal/day. The prevalence of overweight/obesity was higher in men (55.1%) than in women (35.4%) (p fresh and processed cheese demonstrated a higher prevalence of excess weight, compared with those with higher consumption. The confounding variables selected in multivariate analysis were: occupational status and age in both genders; and place of residence in men. In conclusion, negative associations were found between consumption of some types of cheese and overweight and obesity in this population.

  6. A decision-making tool to determine economic feasibility and break-even prices for artisan cheese operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Catherine A; Bouma, Andrea; Meunier-Goddik, Lisbeth

    2015-12-01

    Artisan cheese makers lack access to valid economic data to help them evaluate business opportunities and make important business decisions such as determining cheese pricing structure. The objective of this study was to utilize an economic model to evaluate the net present value (NPV), internal rate of return, and payback period for artisan cheese production at different annual production volumes. The model was also used to determine the minimum retail price necessary to ensure positive NPV for 5 different cheese types produced at 4 different production volumes. Milk type, cheese yield, and aging time all affected variable costs. However, aged cheeses required additional investment for aging space (which needs to be larger for longer aging times), as did lower yield cheeses (by requiring larger-volume equipment for pasteurization and milk handling). As the volume of milk required increased, switching from vat pasteurization to high-temperature, short-time pasteurization was necessary for low-yield cheeses before being required for high-yield cheeses, which causes an additional increase in investment costs. Because of these differences, high-moisture, fresh cow milk cheeses can be sold for about half the price of hard, aged goat milk cheeses at the largest production volume or for about two-thirds the price at the lowest production volume examined. For example, for the given model assumptions, at an annual production of 13,608kg of cheese (30,000 lb), a fresh cow milk mozzarella should be sold at a minimum retail price of $27.29/kg ($12.38/lb), whereas a goat milk Gouda needs a minimum retail price of $49.54/kg ($22.47/lb). Artisan cheese makers should carefully evaluate annual production volumes. Although larger production volumes decrease average fixed cost and improve production efficiency, production can reach volumes where it becomes necessary to sell through distributors. Because distributors might pay as little as 35% of retail price, the retail price needs

  7. Proteomic analysis of the adaptative response of Mucor spp. to cheese environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin-Sardin, Stéphanie; Jany, Jean-Luc; Artigaud, Sébastien; Pichereau, Vianney; Bernay, Benoît; Coton, Emmanuel; Madec, Stéphanie

    2017-02-10

    In the cheese industry context, Mucor species exhibit an ambivalent behavior as some species are essential "technological" organisms of some cheeses while others can be spoiling agents. Previously, we observed that cheese "technological" species exhibited higher optimal growth rates on cheese related matrices than on synthetic media. This growth pattern combined with morphological differences raise the question of their adaptation to cheese. In this study, using a comparative proteomic approach, we described the metabolic pathways of three Mucor strains considered as "technological" or "contaminant" in the cheese environment (M. lanceolatus UBOCC-A-109153, M. racemosus UBOCC-A-109155, M. circinelloides CBS 277-49) as well as a non-cheese related strain (M. endophyticus CBS 385-95). Overall, 15.8 to 19.0% of the proteomes showed a fold change ≥1.6 in Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA) versus Cheese Agar (CA), a cheese mimicking-medium. The 289 differentially expressed proteins identified by LC MS-MS analysis were mostly assigned to energy and amino-acid metabolisms in PDA whereas a higher diversity of biological processes was observed for cheese related strains in CA. Surprisingly, the vast majority (72.9%) of the over-accumulated proteins were different according to the considered medium and strain. These results strongly suggest that the observed better adaptative response of "technological" strains to cheese environment is mediated by species-specific proteins. The Mucor genus consists of a multitude of poorly known species. In the food context, few species are known for their positive role in the production of various food products, including cheese, while others are spoiling agents. The present study focused on the analysis of morphological and proteome differences of various Mucor spp. representative strains known as either positively (hereafter referred as "technological") or negatively (hereafter referred as "contaminant") associated with cheese or non-related to

  8. 21 CFR 133.123 - Cold-pack and club cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cold-pack and club cheese. 133.123 Section 133.123... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.123 Cold-pack and club cheese. (a)(1) Cold-pack cheese, club cheese, is...

  9. Exergy analysis of an industrial-scale ultrafiltrated (UF) cheese production plant: a detailed survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Farshid; Aghbashlo, Mortaza; Rafiee, Shahin

    2017-02-01

    In this study, a detailed exergy analysis of an industrial-scale ultrafiltrated (UF) cheese production plant was conducted based on actual operational data in order to provide more comprehensive insights into the performance of the whole plant and its main subcomponents. The plant included four main subsystems, i.e., steam generator (I), above-zero refrigeration system (II), Bactocatch-assisted pasteurization line (III), and UF cheese production line (IV). In addition, this analysis was aimed at quantifying the exergy destroyed in processing a known quantity of the UF cheese using the mass allocation method. The specific exergy destruction of the UF cheese production was determined at 2330.42 kJ/kg. The contributions of the subsystems I, II, III, and IV to the specific exergy destruction of the UF cheese production were computed as 1337.67, 386.18, 283.05, and 323.51 kJ/kg, respectively. Additionally, it was observed through the analysis that the steam generation system had the largest contribution to the thermodynamic inefficiency of the UF cheese production, accounting for 57.40 % of the specific exergy destruction. Generally, the outcomes of this survey further manifested the benefits of applying exergy analysis for design, analysis, and optimization of industrial-scale dairy processing plants to achieve the most cost-effective and environmentally-benign production strategies.

  10. Survival of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Minas frescal cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesieli Braz Frozi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC O157:H7 strains (isolated by cattle’s faeces and a reference strain, EDL933, were inoculated into pasteurized milk (102 and 103 cells.mL–1 to prepare the Minas frescal cheese. As control was used uninfected milk. Physicochemical and microbiological analyses were performed to milk and elaborated cheese. The O157:H7 strains were quantified in the stages of cheese processing and during 0, 2, 4, 5, 7, 10 and 15 storage days at 8 °C onto Sorbitol MacConkey Agar supplemented with potassium tellurite and cefixime (CT-SMAC. O157:H7 was not present in the pasteurised milk prior to the artificial inoculation. At the end of the processing the cheese had 10 to 100 times more STEC O157:H7 than the initial inoculum. During the storage, the Minas frescal cheese exhibited the largest population increase on the 4th and 5th day when inoculated with 102 and 103 cells.mL–1, respectively. Additionally, viable cells were found up to the 10th and 15th day, according to the amount of initial inoculum. This number of cells is able to cause infection in humans, and therefore, Minas frescal cheese, even when stored under refrigeration, is a potential vehicle of disease caused by STEC O157:H7.

  11. Dehydroacetic acid in cheese and cheese coating, results of official control in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scordino, Monica; Lazzaro, Francesco; Borzì, Marco A; Sabatino, Leonardo; Traulo, Pasqualino; Gagliano, Giacomo

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports the occurrence of dehydroacetic acid in cheese and cheese coatings collected in Italy during Agricultural Ministry Official control. Dehydroacetic acid is an antimicrobial substance not allowed to be used in EU countries as a food additive, with unknown effects on human health. Dehydroacetic acid was measured by a validated HPLC method according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC criteria in terms of specificity, linearity, precision and accuracy, limit of detection, and limit of quantification. The method was successfully applied to 129 samples of commercial cheese coatings and related treated cheeses collected in Italy during 2017. The overall results demonstrated that about 40% of the investigated cheese coatings contained dehydroacetic acid, ranging from 0.010% to 2.5% w/w, evidencing illicit employment of this substance. Moreover, about 25% of treated cheeses contained dehydroacetic acid, from 5 to 250 mg/Kg, proving transfer of this substance from crust to cheese.

  12. Effect of Pasteurization Temperature, Starter Culture, and Incubation Temperature on the Physicochemical Properties, Yield, Rheology, and Sensory Characteristics of Spreadable Goat Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia Frau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The local cheese factories currently use bovine commercial starter cultures, and the spreadable cheese process is not standardized. A detailed understanding of the effect of pasteurization temperature, starter culture, and incubation temperature must allow producers to optimize the process, increase cheese yield, and improve the quality of the final product. The main objective of the study was to describe the preparation method of spreadable goat cheese and investigate the effects of specific processing conditions (pasteurization temperature, starter culture, and incubation temperature on the composition, yield, rheology, and sensory characteristics of the final product. Results showed the impact of pasteurization temperature, starter culture, and incubation temperature on spreadable goat cheese. The results indicated that it is possible to improve cheese yield, rheological properties, and sensory analysis when milk is pasteurized at 75°C for 30 minutes; cheese yield can also be improved by lowering incubation temperature to 37°C. Cheeses made with autochthonous starter culture showed better sensory characteristics and higher pH compared to the cheeses made with commercial culture.

  13. Fortification of Cheddar cheese with vitamin D does not alter cheese flavor perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, B; Brothersen, C; McMahon, D J

    2011-07-01

    Currently, dietary guidelines for vitamin D consumption are under review, considering new information that >50% of the US population is vitamin D deficient, and may lead to a recommendation of a higher dietary intake of this vitamin. Vitamin D fortification of cheese aims to improve the current availability of fortified dairy foods beyond liquid milk. However, cheese is susceptible to undesirable flavor changes during long-term cheese ripening, and cheese bacteria and enzymes may degrade added vitamins. To test the retention of vitamin D(3) in Cheddar cheese curd, cheese milk was fortified initially during manufacture at a level of 150 IU/serving, using commercial sources that contained vitamin D(3) in powder, oil, or emulsion form, with and without homogenization of the fortified milk. When fortification was done directly to the cheese milk, we found that more than 80% vitamin D(3) was retained in cheese curd, irrespective of homogenization or form of fortification. Further, Cheddar cheese was fortified with the emulsion form of vitamin D(3) directly in cheese milk at 200 and 400 IU/serving to test stability and flavor changes. Vitamin D(3) fortified in this manner was stable for up to 9 mo in Cheddar cheese. Consumer acceptance and descriptive analysis of flavor profiles of cheese were also conducted and showed that vitamin D(3) fortified cheeses were equally liked by consumers, and cheese taste and flavor remained unaltered with vitamin D(3) addition even after aging for 9 mo. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Properties of spatial Cox process models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper

    Probabilistic properties of Cox processes of relevance for statistical modelling and inference are studied. Particularly, we study the most important classes of Cox processes, including log Gaussian Cox processes, shot noise Cox processes, and permanent Cox processes. We consider moment properties...... and point process operations such as thinning, displacements, and superpositioning. We also discuss how to simulate specific Cox processes....

  15. The Microfloras of Traditional Greek Cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litopoulou-Tzanetaki, Evanthia; Tzanetakis, Nikolaos

    2014-02-01

    Many traditional cheeses are made in Greece. Some of them are, in fact, types of the same cheese variety, whether or not they have different cheesemaking technologies, but are known by different local names. Twenty of them have been granted protected designation of origin status. In the 8th century BCE, Homer described a cheese thought to be the ancestor of feta, the main cheese manufactured in Greece from the ancient times until today. Meanwhile, various cheese types evolved through the centuries, and almost every area in Greece has its own cheesemaking tradition. Some cheese varieties are local, handcrafted products whose production has been handed down from generation to generation, and without interest in their continued production, these varieties will disappear. Other local varieties are made at small factories from pasteurized milk and commercial rennet and starter and are very different from the traditional versions. However, some milk producers still make their cheeses at home or at small dairies from raw milk, without any starter, or sometimes from thermized milk, with traditional yogurt as the starter. Their cheeses are the basis for the information presented in this review.

  16. Proteolysis and consistency of Meshanger cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de L.

    1978-01-01

    Proteolysis in Meshanger cheese, estimated by quantitative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is discussed. The conversion of α s1 -casein was proportional to rennet concentration in the cheese. Changes in consistency, after a maximum, were correlated to breakdown of

  17. Formation of acrylamide in cheese bread

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Rikke Susanne Vingborg; Sobrinho, Luis Gualberto De Andrade; Granby, Kit

    2008-01-01

    . In contrast, acrylamide was not observed in Pao de queijo a traditional Brazilian bread product made from fermented cassava flour, fresh eggs and a mixture of Brazilian Gouda type cheese and Mozzarella cheese pointing towards a role of eggs in protection against acrylamide formation....

  18. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE TEPEQUE CHEESE FROM “LA TIERRA CALIENTE” OF THE STATE OF MICHOACÁN: A CHEESE PRODUCED IN AN INTENSIVE SILVOPASTORAL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.D. Solís Méndez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work is to describe the characteristics of the Tepeque cheese from “La Tierra Caliente” of the State of Michoacán, Mexico. Its region of origin, manufacturing process, physico-chemical and microbiological characteristics, were investigated. In addition the changes that occurred in the milk and cheese due to the introduction of a feeding system based on the use of an intensive silvo-pastoral system (ISPS were described. The methodological approach consisted of field visits for data collection, semi-structured interviews to farmers in order to know the milk production systems and the cheese elaboration process. The physical (pH and density and chemical characteristics (protein, fat, lactose, non fat solids and added water of the milk used to elaborate the Tepeque cheese were determined. For the cheese the protein, fat, salt, moisture and ash contents and the pH were determined. The microbiological characteristics were determined for both milk and cheese, these included presence of mesophilic bacteria coliforms bacteria, yeast, fungus, Listeria spp. and Staphylococcus aureus. The field study was carried out in 2010; it was divided in two experimental periods of six months each, named rainfall season and dry season. Fifteen milk-cheese producers were sampled, eight of them practice the traditional milk production systems and seven the ISPS. It was observed that the Tepeque cheese is a dairy product of excellent quality from the point of view of its main nutritional components, it is made with good quality milk too and it has a long history and great tradition that is older than 300 years. On the other hand, the cheese elaborated with milk from the ISPS had higher fat content (P0.05. Finally, it was observed that the sanitary characteristics of the milk and cheese were deficient in both systems; this problem is attenuated with the maturing process of cheese since as the cheese matures the number of

  19. Investigation of enzyme modified cheese production by two species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-01-25

    Jan 25, 2010 ... Cheese curd which has been treated with enzymes to generate a concentrated cheese flavor is considered to be enzyme-modified cheese (EMC). EMCs provide the .... was brine salted and was kept for one month as the ripening period. For production of EMC, the cheese curd (65%), distilled water.

  20. 21 CFR 133.189 - Skim milk cheese for manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... harmless lactic-acid-producing bacteria, present in such milk or added thereto. Harmless artificial... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Skim milk cheese for manufacturing. 133.189... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.189 Skim milk cheese for manufacturing. (a) Skim milk cheese for...

  1. 21 CFR 133.124 - Cold-pack cheese food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cold-pack cheese food. 133.124 Section 133.124 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Cheese and Related Products § 133.124 Cold-pack cheese food. (a)(1) Cold-pack cheese food is the food...

  2. 7 CFR 58.439 - Cheese from unpasteurized milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cheese from unpasteurized milk. 58.439 Section 58.439... Procedures § 58.439 Cheese from unpasteurized milk. If the cheese is labeled as “heat treated... pasteurization. Cheese made from unpasteurized milk shall be cured for a period of 60 days at a temperature not...

  3. 7 CFR 58.732 - Cooling the packaged cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cooling the packaged cheese. 58.732 Section 58.732... Procedures § 58.732 Cooling the packaged cheese. After the containers are filled they shall be stacked, or... immediate progressive cooling of the individual containers of cheese. As a minimum the cheese should be...

  4. Cheese powder as an ingredient in emulsion sausages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xiang; Ruiz Carrascal, Jorge; Petersen, Mikael Agerlin

    2017-01-01

    modified their profile of volatile compounds. Blue cheese increased some ketones, alcohols, and esters, while brown cheese brought typical Maillard reaction compounds. Overall, addition of cheese powders to sausages enhanced the intensity of flavour traits. A mixture of hard and blue cheese powder showed...

  5. Swiss-Cheese Gravitino Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Aalok

    2014-06-01

    We present a phenomenological model which we show can be obtained as a local realization of large volume D 3 / D 7 μ-Split SUSY on a nearly special Lagrangian three-cycle embedded in the big divisor of a Swiss-Cheese Calabi-Yau [Mansi Dhuria, Aalok Misra, arxiv:arXiv:1207.2774 [hep-ph], Nucl. Phys. B867 (2013) 636-748]. After identification of the first generation of SM leptons and quarks with fermionic super-partners of four Wilson line moduli, we discuss the identification of gravitino as a potential dark matter candidate. We also show that it is possible to obtain a 125 GeV light Higgs in our setup.

  6. Cupola Furnace Computer Process Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seymour Katz

    2004-12-31

    The cupola furnace generates more than 50% of the liquid iron used to produce the 9+ million tons of castings annually. The cupola converts iron and steel into cast iron. The main advantages of the cupola furnace are lower energy costs than those of competing furnaces (electric) and the ability to melt less expensive metallic scrap than the competing furnaces. However the chemical and physical processes that take place in the cupola furnace are highly complex making it difficult to operate the furnace in optimal fashion. The results are low energy efficiency and poor recovery of important and expensive alloy elements due to oxidation. Between 1990 and 2004 under the auspices of the Department of Energy, the American Foundry Society and General Motors Corp. a computer simulation of the cupola furnace was developed that accurately describes the complex behavior of the furnace. When provided with the furnace input conditions the model provides accurate values of the output conditions in a matter of seconds. It also provides key diagnostics. Using clues from the diagnostics a trained specialist can infer changes in the operation that will move the system toward higher efficiency. Repeating the process in an iterative fashion leads to near optimum operating conditions with just a few iterations. More advanced uses of the program have been examined. The program is currently being combined with an ''Expert System'' to permit optimization in real time. The program has been combined with ''neural network'' programs to affect very easy scanning of a wide range of furnace operation. Rudimentary efforts were successfully made to operate the furnace using a computer. References to these more advanced systems will be found in the ''Cupola Handbook''. Chapter 27, American Foundry Society, Des Plaines, IL (1999).

  7. Quality and safety of artisan cheese produced in the serrana region of Santa Catarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giane Helenita Pontarolo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The serrano artisan cheese produced from raw milk of dairy cattle is a typical product of high-altitude farms in the states of Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul. However, marketing of the cheeses occurs illegally because they lack the minimum maturation period required for cheese produced from raw milk. The production of artisan cheeses is required to follow strict hygiene standards. This study aimed to test the quality and safety of cheeses that were produced in 31 farms of the Serrana region in Santa Catarina after 14 and 28 days of maturation. Coliform count was measured at 35 °C, and presence of other microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus, Listeria spp., and Salmonella spp. were also tested. Fat and protein percentages, acidity, salt content, and humidity were also evaluated. Data were subjected to statistical analyses using the SAS® software. After 14 and 28 days of maturation, 74.19% (23/31 and 64.52% (20/31 of samples, respectively, showed higher numbers of coliforms at 35 °C than those permissible by law. Higher than permissible numbers of E. coli were observed in 45.16% (14/31 and 48.39% (15/31 of the samples analyzed after 14 and 28 days of maturation, respectively. Coagulase-positive staphylococci values above 103 CFU/g were observed in 54.84% (17/31 and 51.61% (16/31 of cheese samples after 14 and 28 days of maturation, respectively. Contamination with Salmonella spp. was not detected. However, Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4b was isolated in 3.23% (1/31 and 6.45% (2/31 of samples after 14 and 28 days of maturation, respectively. The results of humidity tests classified the cheese samples into three categories: low, medium, and high humidity. Semi fat cheeses were predominant in both maturation periods, although the samples were classified in thin, semi fat, and fat cheeses. The main variations in the compositions of analyzed samples occurred for salt and acidity levels. The maturation process has not proven

  8. Evaluation of Coagulase-Positive Staphylococcus Aureus Contamination in Lighvan Cheese on Retail Stores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Salehi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive, non-sporulated, lack of capsule, immovable, aerobic and anaerobic and able to tolerate high levels of salt (up to 15 percent. Therefore, foods containing salt provides an ideal environment for bacterial growth. It is also one of the most important bacterial born of spoilable food products, especially in dairy products. Lighvan traditional cheese is consumed in many regions of Iran, especially consumption of these cheeses is very high in Tehran which in the manufacture of such cheeses, the unpasteurized and raw milk is used and the sanitary conditions during processing and subsequent storage are low. So, considering the importance of this issue in the release of poisoning, the coagulase-positive Staphylococcus aureus contamination in Lighvan cheese on Retail Stores was evaluated. Materials and Methods: In order to perform this study, 22 samples of traditional Lighvan cheese were collected randomly from Tehran stores and according to Iran national standards and by using of bird-parker, Cook Meat cultures and coagulase test were evaluated. Results: Total of 22 samples, 14 samples (63/6% were contaminated by S. aureus over standard and 5 (22/7% were contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus coagulase positive. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that sanitary conditions should be observed during the production and Use of pasteurized milk in cheese production.

  9. Listeriosis Outbreaks in British Columbia, Canada, Caused by Soft Ripened Cheese Contaminated from Environmental Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcott, Lynn; Naus, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Soft ripened cheese (SRC) caused over 130 foodborne illnesses in British Columbia (BC), Canada, during two separate listeriosis outbreaks. Multiple agencies investigated the events that lead to cheese contamination with Listeria monocytogenes (L.m.), an environmentally ubiquitous foodborne pathogen. In both outbreaks pasteurized milk and the pasteurization process were ruled out as sources of contamination. In outbreak A, environmental transmission of L.m. likely occurred from farm animals to personnel to culture solutions used during cheese production. In outbreak B, birds were identified as likely contaminating the dairy plant's water supply and cheese during the curd-washing step. Issues noted during outbreak A included the risks of operating a dairy plant in a farm environment, potential for transfer of L.m. from the farm environment to the plant via shared toilet facilities, failure to clean and sanitize culture spray bottles, and cross-contamination during cheese aging. L.m. contamination in outbreak B was traced to wild swallows defecating in the plant's open cistern water reservoir and a multibarrier failure in the water disinfection system. These outbreaks led to enhanced inspection and surveillance of cheese plants, test and release programs for all SRC manufactured in BC, improvements in plant design and prevention programs, and reduced listeriosis incidence. PMID:25918702

  10. Listeriosis Outbreaks in British Columbia, Canada, Caused by Soft Ripened Cheese Contaminated from Environmental Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine McIntyre

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft ripened cheese (SRC caused over 130 foodborne illnesses in British Columbia (BC, Canada, during two separate listeriosis outbreaks. Multiple agencies investigated the events that lead to cheese contamination with Listeria monocytogenes (L.m., an environmentally ubiquitous foodborne pathogen. In both outbreaks pasteurized milk and the pasteurization process were ruled out as sources of contamination. In outbreak A, environmental transmission of L.m. likely occurred from farm animals to personnel to culture solutions used during cheese production. In outbreak B, birds were identified as likely contaminating the dairy plant’s water supply and cheese during the curd-washing step. Issues noted during outbreak A included the risks of operating a dairy plant in a farm environment, potential for transfer of L.m. from the farm environment to the plant via shared toilet facilities, failure to clean and sanitize culture spray bottles, and cross-contamination during cheese aging. L.m. contamination in outbreak B was traced to wild swallows defecating in the plant’s open cistern water reservoir and a multibarrier failure in the water disinfection system. These outbreaks led to enhanced inspection and surveillance of cheese plants, test and release programs for all SRC manufactured in BC, improvements in plant design and prevention programs, and reduced listeriosis incidence.

  11. The 9-MilCA method as a rapid, partly automated protocol for simultaneously recording milk coagulation, curd firming, syneresis, cheese yield, and curd nutrients recovery or whey loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolat-Gotet, C; Cecchinato, A; Stocco, G; Bittante, G

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to propose and test a new laboratory cheesemaking procedure [9-mL milk cheesemaking assessment (9-MilCA)], which records 15 traits related to milk coagulation, curd firming, syneresis, cheese yield, and curd nutrients recovery or whey loss. This procedure involves instruments found in many laboratories (i.e., heaters and lacto-dynamographs), with an easy modification of the sample rack for the insertion of 10-mL glass tubes. Four trials were carried out to test the 9-MilCA procedure. The first trial compared 8 coagulation and curd firming traits obtained using regular or modified sample racks to process milk samples from 60 cows belonging to 5 breeds and 3 farms (480 tests). The obtained patterns exhibited significant but irrelevant between-procedure differences, with better repeatability seen for 9-MilCA. The second trial tested the reproducibility and repeatability of the 7 cheesemaking traits obtained using the 9-MilCA procedure on individual samples from 60 cows tested in duplicate in 2 instruments (232 tests). The method yielded very repeatable outcomes for all 7 tested cheese yield and nutrient recovery traits (repeatability >98%), with the exception of the fresh cheese yield (84%), which was affected by the lower repeatability (67%) of the water retained in the curd. In the third trial (96 tests), we found that using centrifugation in place of curd cooking and draining (as adopted in several published studies) reduced the efficiency of whey separation, overestimated all traits, and worsened the repeatability. The fourth trial compared 9-MilCA with a more complex model cheese-manufacturing process that mimics industry practices, using 1,500-mL milk samples (72 cows, 216 tests). The average results obtained from 9-MilCA were similar to those obtained from the model cheeses, with between-method correlations ranging from 78 to 99%, except for the water retained in the curd (r=54%). Our results indicate that new 9-MilCA method is a

  12. Evaluation of quality measurement of Olomouc cake of cheese (Olomoucké tvarůžky during ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Strnadová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Olomouc cake of cheese (Olomoucké tvarůžky is smear-ripened cheese, which is produced from sour industrial curd. Brevibacterium linens, which are added during the production process, are reproducing and make gold-yellow smear cover. The aim of this work was to assess the chemical analysis of the quality of Olomouc cake of cheese. Changes in chemical composition were evaluated during different stages of production and at the same time it was detected whether changes in chemical composition during the manufacturing process are same in spring as well as in summer, without statistically significant differences. Dry matter of Olomouc cake of cheese was ranged from 35 % to 39 %. The increase of dry matter during production is evident, but these changes were in the most cases not statistically signifiant (P > 0.05. The value of titratable acidity of the cheese considerably changes during the manufacturing process, it has a decreasing tendency. Titratable acidity of cheese after shaping was 106.64 (136.12 SH and at the end of life it was 49.91 (65.06 SH. These changes were very highly statistically significant (P 0.05 in cheese from summer period. Content of salt is increased from 5.30 % to 5.98 %, respectively 6.10 %. In spring period the oposite changes in most cases occured (P 0.05.

  13. Computer Aided Continuous Time Stochastic Process Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, N.R.; Madsen, Henrik; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2001-01-01

    A grey-box approach to process modelling that combines deterministic and stochastic modelling is advocated for identification of models for model-based control of batch and semi-batch processes. A computer-aided tool designed for supporting decision-making within the corresponding modelling cycle...

  14. No Swiss-cheese universe on the brane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gergely, Laszlo A.

    2005-01-01

    We study the possibility of brane-world generalization of the Einstein-Straus Swiss-cheese cosmological model. We find that the modifications induced by the brane-world scenario are excessively restrictive. At a first glance only the motion of the boundary is modified and the fluid in the exterior region is allowed to have pressure. The general relativistic Einstein-Straus model emerges in the low density limit. However by imposing that the central mass in the Schwarzschild voids is constant, a combination of the junction conditions and modified cosmological evolution leads to the conclusion that the brane is flat. Thus no generic Swiss-cheese universe can exist on the brane. The conclusion is not altered by the introduction of a cosmological constant in the FLRW regions. This shows that although allowed in the low density limit, the Einstein-Straus universe cannot emerge from cosmological evolution in the brane-world scenario

  15. Commercial ripening starter microorganisms inoculated into cheese milk do not successfully establish themselves in the resident microbial ripening consortia of a South german red smear cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerges, Stefanie; Mounier, Jérôme; Rea, Mary C; Gelsomino, Roberto; Heise, Valeska; Beduhn, Rüdiger; Cogan, Timothy M; Vancanneyt, Marc; Scherer, Siegfried

    2008-04-01

    Production of smear-ripened cheese critically depends on the surface growth of multispecies microbial consortia comprising bacteria and yeasts. These microorganisms often originate from the cheese-making facility and, over many years, have developed into rather stable, dairy-specific associations. While commercial smear starters are frequently used, it is unclear to what degree these are able to establish successfully within the resident microbial consortia. Thus, the fate of the smear starters of a German Limburger cheese subjected to the "old-young" smearing technique was investigated during ripening. The cheese milk was supplemented with a commercial smear starter culture containing Debaryomyces hansenii, Galactomyces geotrichum, Arthrobacter arilaitensis, and Brevibacterium aurantiacum. Additionally, the cheese surface was inoculated with an extremely stable in-house microbial consortium. A total of 1,114 yeast and 1,201 bacterial isolates were identified and differentiated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism, random amplified polymorphic DNA, repetitive PCR, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis analyses were used to type selected isolates below the species level. The D. hansenii starter strain was primarily found early in the ripening process. The G. geotrichum starter strain in particular established itself after relocation to a new ripening room. Otherwise, it occurred at low frequencies. The bacterial smear starters could not be reisolated from the cheese surface at all. It is concluded that none of the smear starter strains were able to compete significantly and in a stable fashion against the resident microbial consortia, a result which might have been linked to the method of application. This finding raises the issue of whether addition of starter microorganisms during production of this type of cheese is actually necessary.

  16. Process Correlation Analysis Model for Process Improvement Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-jin Choi

    2014-01-01

    software development process. However, in the current practice, correlations of process elements are often overlooked in the development of an improvement plan, which diminishes the efficiency of the plan. This is mainly attributed to significant efforts and the lack of required expertise. In this paper, we present a process correlation analysis model that helps identify correlations of process elements from the results of process assessment. This model is defined based on CMMI and empirical data of improvement practices. We evaluate the model using industrial data.

  17. Quantitation of Key Tastants and Re-engineering the Taste of Parmesan Cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmann, Hedda; Hofmann, Thomas

    2016-03-02

    Targeted quantitation of 65 candidate taste compounds and ranking on the basis of dose-over-threshold (DoT) factors, followed by taste re-engineering and omission experiments in aqueous solution as well as in a cheese-like model matrix, led to the identification of a total of 31 key tastants (amino acids, organic acids, fatty acids, biogenic amines, and minerals) with DoT factors ≥1.0 and a total of 15 subthreshold, but kokumi-enhancing, γ-glutamyl peptides in extraordinarily high concentrations of 20468 μmol/kg. Among the γ-glutamyl peptides, γ-Glu-Gly, γ-Glu-Ala, γ-Glu-Thr, γ-Glu-Asp, γ-Glu-Lys, γ-Glu-Glu, γ-Glu-Trp, γ-Glu-Gln, and γ-Glu-His have been identified for the first time in Parmesan cheese. The excellent match of the sensory profile of the taste recombinants and the authentic cheese demonstrated the identified taste compounds to be fully sufficient to create the characteristic taste profile of the Parmesan cheese. This molecular blueprint of a Parmesan's chemosensory signature might be a useful molecular target for visualizing analytically the changes in taste profiles throughout cheese manufacturing and opens new avenues for a more scientifically directed taste improvement of cheese by tailoring manufacturing parameters ("molecular food engineering").

  18. Analog modelling of obduction processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agard, P.; Zuo, X.; Funiciello, F.; Bellahsen, N.; Faccenna, C.; Savva, D.

    2012-04-01

    Obduction corresponds to one of plate tectonics oddities, whereby dense, oceanic rocks (ophiolites) are presumably 'thrust' on top of light, continental ones, as for the short-lived, almost synchronous Peri-Arabic obduction (which took place along thousands of km from Turkey to Oman in c. 5-10 Ma). Analog modelling experiments were performed to study the mechanisms of obduction initiation and test various triggering hypotheses (i.e., plate acceleration, slab hitting the 660 km discontinuity, ridge subduction; Agard et al., 2007). The experimental setup comprises (1) an upper mantle, modelled as a low-viscosity transparent Newtonian glucose syrup filling a rigid Plexiglas tank and (2) high-viscosity silicone plates (Rhodrosil Gomme with PDMS iron fillers to reproduce densities of continental or oceanic plates), located at the centre of the tank above the syrup to simulate the subducting and the overriding plates - and avoid friction on the sides of the tank. Convergence is simulated by pushing on a piston at one end of the model with velocities comparable to those of plate tectonics (i.e., in the range 1-10 cm/yr). The reference set-up includes, from one end to the other (~60 cm): (i) the piston, (ii) a continental margin containing a transition zone to the adjacent oceanic plate, (iii) a weakness zone with variable resistance and dip (W), (iv) an oceanic plate - with or without a spreading ridge, (v) a subduction zone (S) dipping away from the piston and (vi) an upper, active continental margin, below which the oceanic plate is being subducted at the start of the experiment (as is known to have been the case in Oman). Several configurations were tested and over thirty different parametric tests were performed. Special emphasis was placed on comparing different types of weakness zone (W) and the extent of mechanical coupling across them, particularly when plates were accelerated. Displacements, together with along-strike and across-strike internal deformation in all

  19. Cheese yield in Brazil: state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Cavalcanti SALES

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This literature review discusses the concepts and factors that influence industrial cheese yield and compiles the latest studies conducted in Brazil involving this theme. In seeking to support managerial decision-making, cheese yield can be measured at the end of processing or estimated prior to this. In research and industry, measuring and estimating yield can be evaluated under the effect of processing, from different proportions and characteristics of ingredients (mainly milk quality, to processing factors involving the steps of the actual production (handling of the raw material and the curd coagulation conditions, salting, maturation, etc. and the equipment. The number of Brazilian studies that have sought to answer questions about this topic in recent years was reasonable. The vast majority of them considered yield in its most basic aspect, which is obtained by measuring what was produced. Few studies used the perspective of prediction, indicating that there is room for a more empirical approach that allows for obtaining other types of answers regarding efficiency in the production of cheese, and which is shown as an opportunity for Brazilian research to advance.

  20. 21 CFR 133.184 - Roquefort cheese, sheep's milk blue-mold, and blue-mold cheese from sheep's milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Roquefort cheese, sheep's milk blue-mold, and blue-mold cheese from sheep's milk. 133.184 Section 133.184 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION..., sheep's milk blue-mold, and blue-mold cheese from sheep's milk. (a) Description. (1) Roquefort cheese...

  1. From business value model to coordination process model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fatemi, Hassan; Wieringa, Roelf J.; Poler, R.; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Sanchis, R.

    2009-01-01

    The increased complexity of business webs calls for modeling the collaboration of enterprises from different perspectives, in particular the business and process perspectives, and for mutually aligning these perspectives. Business value modeling and coordination process modeling both are necessary

  2. Business process modeling for processing classified documents using RFID technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koszela Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines the application of the processing approach to the functional description of the designed IT system supporting the operations of the secret office, which processes classified documents. The article describes the application of the method of incremental modeling of business processes according to the BPMN model to the description of the processes currently implemented (“as is” in a manual manner and target processes (“to be”, using the RFID technology for the purpose of their automation. Additionally, the examples of applying the method of structural and dynamic analysis of the processes (process simulation to verify their correctness and efficiency were presented. The extension of the process analysis method is a possibility of applying the warehouse of processes and process mining methods.

  3. Process correlation analysis model for process improvement identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Su-jin; Kim, Dae-Kyoo; Park, Sooyong

    2014-01-01

    Software process improvement aims at improving the development process of software systems. It is initiated by process assessment identifying strengths and weaknesses and based on the findings, improvement plans are developed. In general, a process reference model (e.g., CMMI) is used throughout the process of software process improvement as the base. CMMI defines a set of process areas involved in software development and what to be carried out in process areas in terms of goals and practices. Process areas and their elements (goals and practices) are often correlated due to the iterative nature of software development process. However, in the current practice, correlations of process elements are often overlooked in the development of an improvement plan, which diminishes the efficiency of the plan. This is mainly attributed to significant efforts and the lack of required expertise. In this paper, we present a process correlation analysis model that helps identify correlations of process elements from the results of process assessment. This model is defined based on CMMI and empirical data of improvement practices. We evaluate the model using industrial data.

  4. Sampling and farm stories prompt consumers to buy specialty cheeses

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Barbara A.; Bruhn, Christine M.

    2003-01-01

    California specialty cheese makers need information on what drives product sales so they can effectively market their products. Focus group and telephone research revealed that specialty cheese consumers have a strong preference for sampling cheese before making a purchase. Consumers also rely heavily on staff recommendations to select cheese. They appreciate unlimited sampling in an unhurried, low-pressure environment. Specialty cheese consumers consider themselves “food experimenters”; they...

  5. Characterization of microflora in Latin-style cheeses by next-generation sequencing technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusk Tina S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cheese contamination can occur at numerous stages in the manufacturing process including the use of improperly pasteurized or raw milk. Of concern is the potential contamination by Listeria monocytogenes and other pathogenic bacteria that find the high moisture levels and moderate pH of popular Latin-style cheeses like queso fresco a hospitable environment. In the investigation of a foodborne outbreak, samples typically undergo enrichment in broth for 24 hours followed by selective agar plating to isolate bacterial colonies for confirmatory testing. The broth enrichment step may also enable background microflora to proliferate, which can confound subsequent analysis if not inhibited by effective broth or agar additives. We used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to provide a preliminary survey of bacterial species associated with three brands of Latin-style cheeses after 24-hour broth enrichment. Results Brand A showed a greater diversity than the other two cheese brands (Brands B and C at nearly every taxonomic level except phylum. Brand B showed the least diversity and was dominated by a single bacterial taxon, Exiguobacterium, not previously reported in cheese. This genus was also found in Brand C, although Lactococcus was prominent, an expected finding since this bacteria belongs to the group of lactic acid bacteria (LAB commonly found in fermented foods. Conclusions The contrasting diversity observed in Latin-style cheese was surprising, demonstrating that despite similarity of cheese type, raw materials and cheese making conditions appear to play a critical role in the microflora composition of the final product. The high bacterial diversity associated with Brand A suggests it may have been prepared with raw materials of high bacterial diversity or influenced by the ecology of the processing environment. Additionally, the presence of Exiguobacterium in high proportions (96% in Brand B and, to a lesser extent, Brand C (46%, may

  6. Towards the Automated Annotation of Process Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leopold, H.; Meilicke, C.; Fellmann, M.; Pittke, F.; Stuckenschmidt, H.; Mendling, J.

    2016-01-01

    Many techniques for the advanced analysis of process models build on the annotation of process models with elements from predefined vocabularies such as taxonomies. However, the manual annotation of process models is cumbersome and sometimes even hardly manageable taking the size of taxonomies into

  7. Preliminary findings on the effect of light-oxidation on Asiago d’allevo vecchio protected designation of origin cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Balzan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Food is exposed to light during processing, packaging, distribution and retail storage, resulting in deterioration of the product quality. Milk and other dairy products are among the most sensitive due to the high content of riboflavin, vitamin B2, which is an efficient photosensitizer for oxidative processes. Photooxidation in cheese induces degradation of nutritional quality such as proteins, lipids, and vitamins. Moreover, it causes formation of off-flavours, off-odours and gradual bleaching. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of light exposition on sliced Asiago d’allevo cheese (lowland vs alpine aerobically packaged stored for 336 h under both fluorescent light and in the dark. Alpine cheese showed higher b* (P<0.001 and a* indexes (P<0.001 and also a higher lipid oxidation (P<0.01 than lowland one. Riboflavin content was significantly higher (P<0.001 in lowland cheese. Cheese samples exposed to the light were significantly lighter (P<0.001 than those exposed in the dark and they also showed a decrease in yellowness (P<0.001 and redness (P<0.001 as well as in riboflavin content (P<0.001. Lipid oxidation did not produce statistically significant change. Storage time significantly affected riboflavin content (P<0.001, TBARs (P<0.001 and cheese colour (P<0.001. Results suggest that light exposition had a pronounced effect on cheese characteristics.

  8. Influence of four single fresh forages on volatile organic compound (VOC content and profile and sensory properties of goat Caciotta cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Fedele

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the trial was to evaluate the effect of fresh single-species herbage on the VOC and sensory properties of cheese, in order to individuate specific descriptors linked to the use of fresh herbage in pureness. Two groups of Siriana housed goats were fed alternately with 2 grasses: Avena sativa (AS and Lolium perenne (LP and 2 legumes: Medicago sativa (MS and Trifolium incarnatum (TI in pureness. The milk was processed as Caciotta cheese and ripened for 20 days. The VOC analyses (by GC-MS showed the highest VOC total content in AS cheeses (226.55a.u., where alcohols was the dominant class; the lowest value (79.96a.u. was found in TI cheeses, and the dominant class was hydrocarbons. The panel test (for colour, odour, taste and final acceptability showed that cheeses from grasses’ groups were described with astringent and blue taste, those from legumes with acidic, bitter and light goaty taste. All cheeses showed goaty taste, except LP cheeses. Grasses’ cheeses showed higher final acceptability than those from legumes. The results showed that each meadow’s species, with its specific content of secondary metabolites, at specific phenological stage, was able to characterise the derived cheese products at sensorial level.

  9. Formation of biogenic amines in raw milk Hispánico cheese manufactured with proteinases and different levels of starter culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-García, E; Tomillo, J; Nuñez, M

    2000-11-01

    Two proteinases, a neutral proteinase from Bacillus subtilis and a cysteine proteinase from Micrococcus sp., were used to accelerate the ripening process of raw cow's milk Hispánico cheese, a semihard variety. Two levels (0.1% and 1%) of a commercial starter culture containing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris were added for cheese manufacture. The influence of both factors, proteinase addition and level of starter culture, on the growth of amino acid-decarboxylating microorganisms and on the formation of biogenic amines during cheese ripening was investigated in duplicate experiments. The population of tyrosine decarboxylase-positive bacteria, which represented less than 1% of the total bacterial population in most cheese samples, and tyrosine decarboxylase-positive lactobacilli was not influenced by proteinase addition or level of starter culture. Tyramine was detected in all batches of cheese from day 30. Its concentration was significantly (P < 0.05) influenced by proteinase addition but not by the level of starter culture and increased with cheese age. After 90 days of ripening, 103 to 191 mg/kg of tyramine was found in the different cheese batches. Histamine was not detected until day 60 in cheese with neutral proteinase and 1% starter culture and until day 90 in the rest of the cheeses. The concentration of this amine did not exceed 20 mg/kg in any of the batches investigated. Phenylethylamine and tryptamine were not found in any of the samples.

  10. The effects spicing on quality of mozzarella cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Akarca

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 3 different spice mixes were added just after blanching to mozzarella cheese produced by high moisture production method. The dough was kneaded and filled into to fibrous cases. After filling process, cheeses were stored for 28 days at 4 °C and 85 % of relative humidity. The following characteristics were measured: color parameters, milk acidity, total dry matter, maturation index, total aerobic mesophilic bacteria, coliform bacteria, coagulase positive staphylococci, lactic acid bacteria, species of Lactococcus bacteria, proteolytic bacteria, lipolytic bacteria and mold /yeast count were examined on 0, 5, 15,21 and 28 days after storage. Although L* (lightness and a* (redness values decreased during storage period, while moreover b* (yellowness values increased. In addition acidity, dry matter and maturation index values increased during storage. Total aerobic mesophilic bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, Lactococcus spp., lipolytic bacteria and mold/ yeast counts decreased, but proteolytic bacteria count increased.

  11. Biodiversity of Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophages isolated from cheese whey starters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Miriam; Bonvini, Barbara; Rossetti, Lia; Meucci, Aurora; Giraffa, Giorgio; Carminati, Domenico

    2015-05-01

    Twenty-one Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophages, 18 isolated from different cheese whey starters and three from CNRZ collection, were phenotypically and genetically characterised. A biodiversity between phages was evidenced both by host range and molecular (RAPD-PCR) typing. A more detailed characterisation of six phages showed similar structural protein profiles and a relevant genetic biodiversity, as shown by restriction enzyme analysis of total DNA. Latent period, burst time and burst size data evidenced that phages were active and virulent. Overall, data highlighted the biodiversity of Lb. helveticus phages isolated from cheese whey starters, which were confirmed to be one of the most common phage contamination source in dairy factories. More research is required to further unravel the ecological role of Lb. helveticus phages and to evaluate their impact on the dairy fermentation processes where whey starter cultures are used.

  12. Determination of staphylococcal enterotoxins in cheese by immunoenzyme assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Vesna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal food poisoning is one of the most common foodborne diseases resulting from the ingestion of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs preformed in foods by enterotoxigenic strains of coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS, mainly Staphylococcus aureus. The presence of enterotoxigenic strains of coagulase-positive staphylococci in raw milk during the production process leads to the contamination of products and outbreaks of alimentary intoxication. The problem of Staphylococcus aureus in cheese remains significant on a global level. Domestic cheese contaminated with enterotoxigenic staphylococci can result in the formation of enterotoxin, which can produce foodborne illness when the product is ingested. Due to microbiological contamination, microbiological criteria are tools that can be used in assessing the safety and quality of foods. In order to avoid foodborne illness, the Serbian Regulation on General and Special Conditions for Food Hygiene (Official Gazette of RS, No. 72/10 provides microbiological criteria for staphylococcal enterotoxins in dairy products.

  13. Evolution of the microbiological profile of vacuum-packed ricotta salata cheese during shelf-life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Casti

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ricotta salata cheese is a salted variety of ricotta traditionally made in Sardinia (Italy from the whey remaining after the production of Pecorino Romano protected designation of origin or other sheep milk cheeses. Ricotta salata cheese is very critical for the possible growth of pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms. Sporadic cases of listeriosis associated with ricotta salata cheese have been reported over recent years. The objective of the present study was to assess the evolution of spoilage and pathogen microorganism of vacuum-packed ricotta salata cheese during the entire product shelf-life. The durability study was conducted on 18 vacuum-packed ricotta salata cheese samples analysed at the beginning of the shelf-life and after 60 and 90 days of refrigerated storage. Pathogens as Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus were never detected. During shelf-life total bacterial counts ranged between 7.90±0.64 and 9.19±0.58 CFU g-1 on the rind and between 2.95±0.68 and 4.27±1.10 CFU g-1 in the inner paste, while Enterobacteriaceae ranged between 4.22±0.66 and 5.30±0.73 CFU g-1 on the rind and 3.13±1.80 and 2.80±0.88 CFU g-1 in the inner paste. By considering the technology used, the intrinsic properties and the almost total absence of competing microflora, ricotta salata cheese can support the growth of spoilage and pathogen microorganisms originating from the processing environment. The high level of total bacterial counts and Enterobacteriaceae observed both on the rind and in the inner paste suggests contamination of the product from the processing environment. Therefore, a strict implementation of hygiene during processing is essential in order to reduce the load of environmental contaminants that may grow during refrigerated storage.

  14. Evolution of the Microbiological Profile of Vacuum-Packed Ricotta Salata Cheese During Shelf-Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casti, Daniele; Scarano, Christian; Pala, Carlo; Cossu, Francesca; Lamon, Sonia; Spanu, Vincenzo; Ibba, Michela; Mocci, Anna Maria; Tedde, Francesco; Nieddu, Gavino; Spanu, Carlo; De Santis, Enrico Pietro Luigi

    2016-04-19

    Ricotta salata cheese is a salted variety of ricotta traditionally made in Sardinia (Italy) from the whey remaining after the production of Pecorino Romano protected designation of origin or other sheep milk cheeses. Ricotta salata cheese is very critical for the possible growth of pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms. Sporadic cases of listeriosis associated with ricotta salata cheese have been reported over recent years. The objective of the present study was to assess the evolution of spoilage and pathogen microorganism of vacuum-packed ricotta salata cheese during the entire product shelf-life. The durability study was conducted on 18 vacuum-packed ricotta salata cheese samples analysed at the beginning of the shelf-life and after 60 and 90 days of refrigerated storage. Pathogens as Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus were never detected. During shelf-life total bacterial counts ranged between 7.90±0.64 and 9.19±0.58 CFU g -1 on the rind and between 2.95±0.68 and 4.27±1.10 CFU g -1 in the inner paste, while Enterobacteriaceae ranged between 4.22±0.66 and 5.30±0.73 CFU g -1 on the rind and 3.13±1.80 and 2.80±0.88 CFU g -1 in the inner paste. By considering the technology used, the intrinsic properties and the almost total absence of competing microflora, ricotta salata cheese can support the growth of spoilage and pathogen microorganisms originating from the processing environment. The high level of total bacterial counts and Enterobacteriaceae observed both on the rind and in the inner paste suggests contamination of the product from the processing environment. Therefore, a strict implementation of hygiene during processing is essential in order to reduce the load of environmental contaminants that may grow during refrigerated storage.

  15. Liking of traditional cheese and consumer willingness to pay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Braghieri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We review herein the relevance of credence and sensory attributes for cheese liking as a basis for subsequent discussion on attributes related to traditional dairy products such as place of origin, process characteristics, etc. Several studies suggest that place of origin may have a positive impact on consumer evaluation. In addition, protected designation of origin labels generally affects consumers’ purchasing decisions, with a premium price paid for traditional products. Some of the main dimensions of traditional food products are: familiarity of the product, processing through traditional recipes, sensory properties and origins. However, different dimensions can be relevant for consumers of different countries. Southern European regions frequently tend to associate the concept of traditional with broad concepts such as heritage, culture or history; whereas central and northern European regions tend to focus mainly on practical issues such as convenience, health or appropriateness. Sensitivity to traditional cheese attributes may also vary according to different groups of consumers with older, more educated and wealthier subjects showing higher willingness to pay and acceptance levels. Given that sensory properties play a central role in product differentiation, we can conclude that information about credence attributes, if reliable, positively perceived and directed to sensitive groups of consumers, is able to affect consumer liking and willingness to pay for traditional cheese. Thus, it provides a further potential tool for product differentiation to small-scale traditional farms, where husbandry is often based on extensive rearing systems and production costs tend to be higher.

  16. Business Process Modelling based on Petri nets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Jianglong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Business process modelling is the way business processes are expressed. Business process modelling is the foundation of business process analysis, reengineering, reorganization and optimization. It can not only help enterprises to achieve internal information system integration and reuse, but also help enterprises to achieve with the external collaboration. Based on the prototype Petri net, this paper adds time and cost factors to form an extended generalized stochastic Petri net. It is a formal description of the business process. The semi-formalized business process modelling algorithm based on Petri nets is proposed. Finally, The case from a logistics company proved that the modelling algorithm is correct and effective.

  17. Modeling process flow using diagrams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, B.; de Mast, J.; Mandjes, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the practice of process improvement, tools such as the flowchart, the value-stream map (VSM), and a variety of ad hoc variants of such diagrams are commonly used. The purpose of this paper is to present a clear, precise, and consistent framework for the use of such flow diagrams in process

  18. A new process sensitivity index to identify important system processes under process model and parametric uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Heng [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Ye, Ming [Department of Scientific Computing, Florida State University, Tallahassee Florida USA; Walker, Anthony P. [Environmental Sciences Division and Climate Change Science Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Tennessee USA; Chen, Xingyuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA

    2017-04-01

    Hydrological models are always composed of multiple components that represent processes key to intended model applications. When a process can be simulated by multiple conceptual-mathematical models (process models), model uncertainty in representing the process arises. While global sensitivity analysis methods have been widely used for identifying important processes in hydrologic modeling, the existing methods consider only parametric uncertainty but ignore the model uncertainty for process representation. To address this problem, this study develops a new method to probe multimodel process sensitivity by integrating the model averaging methods into the framework of variance-based global sensitivity analysis, given that the model averaging methods quantify both parametric and model uncertainty. A new process sensitivity index is derived as a metric of relative process importance, and the index includes variance in model outputs caused by uncertainty in both process models and model parameters. For demonstration, the new index is used to evaluate the processes of recharge and geology in a synthetic study of groundwater reactive transport modeling. The recharge process is simulated by two models that converting precipitation to recharge, and the geology process is also simulated by two models of different parameterizations of hydraulic conductivity; each process model has its own random parameters. The new process sensitivity index is mathematically general, and can be applied to a wide range of problems in hydrology and beyond.

  19. modeling grinding modeling grinding processes as micro processes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    into two parts: static specific chip formation energy and dynamic specific chip formation ... the ratio of static normal chip formation force to static tangential chip formation force and the ratio ... grinding processing parameters to the friction coefficient between workpiece and grinding wheel. From equation. (20), the calculation ...

  20. Model-based software process improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettervall, Brenda T.

    1994-01-01

    The activities of a field test site for the Software Engineering Institute's software process definition project are discussed. Products tested included the improvement model itself, descriptive modeling techniques, the CMM level 2 framework document, and the use of process definition guidelines and templates. The software process improvement model represents a five stage cyclic approach for organizational process improvement. The cycles consist of the initiating, diagnosing, establishing, acting, and leveraging phases.

  1. Growth of Pseudomonas spp. in cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Dalgaard, Paw

    of spoilage microorganisms in cottage cheese can cause undesirable alterations in flavour, odour, appearance and texture. Contamination and growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads including Pseudomonas fragi and Pseudomonas putida has been reported for cottage cheese but the influence of these bacteria...... (pH 7.0) showed interesting results. Despite a lower pH value in the cottage cheese, compared to the dressing, more rapid growth was observed. This may be caused by insufficient amounts of oxygen in the cream dressing having a negative effect on growth of Pseudomonas spp. At 15˚C growth...

  2. Modelling of Batch Process Operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Samad, Noor Asma Fazli; Cameron, Ian; Gani, Rafiqul

    2011-01-01

    Here a batch cooling crystalliser is modelled and simulated as is a batch distillation system. In the batch crystalliser four operational modes of the crystalliser are considered, namely: initial cooling, nucleation, crystal growth and product removal. A model generation procedure is shown that s...

  3. Mathematical Modeling: A Structured Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anhalt, Cynthia Oropesa; Cortez, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical modeling, in which students use mathematics to explain or interpret physical, social, or scientific phenomena, is an essential component of the high school curriculum. The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) classify modeling as a K-12 standard for mathematical practice and as a conceptual category for high school…

  4. Dynamic correlations between microbiota succession and flavor development involved in the ripening of Kazak artisanal cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaoji; Liu, Fei; Shi, Xuewei; Wang, Bin; Li, Kaixiong; Li, Baokun; Zhuge, Bin

    2018-03-01

    Cheese is a typical handcrafted fermented food in Kazak minority from the Uighur Autonomy Region in China. The ripening process of the cheese is crucial for quality and flavor. The aim of this study was to gain a deeper knowledge on the bacterial and fungal community diversity at different time points during the post-ripening of the cheese and to understand the relationship between bacterial and fungal profiles and the chemical components including amino acids, fatty acids and volatile compounds related the cheese flavor. Cheese samples were collected from days 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 after the starting point of post-ripening. The bacterial and fungal compositions were analyzed with next generation sequencing targeting the 16S rDNA loci for bacteria and ITS loci for fungi. The amino acids contents were analyzed by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography combined with UV detection. The fatty acids and the volatile components were analyzed by Solid Phase Micro Extraction followed by Gas Chromatography/Mass spectrometry. We found that Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Kluyveromyces and Torulaspora were the dominant cheese's population. Bidirectional orthogonal partial least squares (O2PLS) based correlation analysis between microbiota succession and flavor dynamics showed that bacteria made more contributions to flavor formation than fungi. Eight bacteria genera and seven fungi genera were determined as functional core microbiota for the flavor production based on their dominance and functionality in microbial community. This study provided a comprehensive picture of the dynamic changes of microbiota profiles through the post-ripening process. The elucidation of the causal relationship between microbiota and the flavor components has advanced our understanding of the mechanism underlying the cheese development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dynamics of bacterial communities during manufacture and ripening of traditional Caciocavallo of Castelfranco cheese in relation to cows' feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giello, Marina; La Storia, Antonietta; Masucci, Felicia; Di Francia, Antonio; Ercolini, Danilo; Villani, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    Traditional Caciocavallo of Castelfranco is a semi-hard "pasta-filata" cheese produced from raw cows' milk in Campania region. The aim of the present research is mainly focused on the study, by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and viable counts, of the dynamics of bacterial communities during manufacture and ripening of traditional Caciocavallo cheese. Moreover, the possible correlation between cheese microbiota and cows' feeding based on silage or hay was also evaluated. In general, except for enterococci, the technological process significantly affected all the microbial groups. According to 16S rRNA, raw cows' milk was dominated by Streptococcus thermophilus, L. lactis and Pseudomonas sp. in hay cheese production, whereas Lactococcus lactis and Acinetobacter sp. dominated silage production. Differences in the taxonomic structure of the milk's microbiota within diet groups were not related to silage and hay cows' feeding. Moreover, S. thermophilus was the unique species that dominate from raw milks to fermented intermediates and cheese in both hay and silage cheese productions. Feeding and ripening time influenced significantly sensory characteristics of the cheeses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Model of the heat load under dynamic abrasive processing of food material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Аlеksееv

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern stage of the improvement food production is conditioned by tense fight for their cost-performance that is defined in significant measure by maximum efficiency of the use agricultural cheese. At the same time problems with disadvantage ecological condition, accompanying life our society, require from taken person of the food different influences on recovery of the organism. For decision of this problem to researchers most different countries unite their own efforts on decision of the touched questions. The improvement and development technology must rest in study existing. In base of the studies can lie the mathematical product models of the feeding and corresponding to processes created in different exploratory organization. The development qualitative, claimed, competitive products – a purpose of each modern producer, choosing for itself most idle time, effective and economic justified way of the decision given problems. Modern prospecting in theories and practical person of the checking quality and analysis allow to use in principal new methods at determination of the possible negative changes to product of the feeding happened in them, in particular, under heat processing. The given methods, except traditional touch component, take into account else and complex of the analytical models of the models, for positioning undesirable warm-up mode for processing the product in target group of the consumers (for instance for integer medical-preventive feeding.

  7. Determination of endogenous concentrations of nitrites and nitrates in different types of cheese in the United States: method development and validation using ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genualdi, Susan; Jeong, Nahyun; DeJager, Lowri

    2018-04-01

    Nitrites and nitrates can be present in dairy products from both endogenous and exogenous sources. In the European Union (EU), 150 mg kg - 1 of nitrates are allowed to be added to the cheese milk during the manufacturing process. The CODEX General Standard for Food Additives has a maximum permitted level of 50 mg kg - 1 residue in cheese, while in the United States (U.S.) nitrates are unapproved for use as food additives in cheese. In order to be able to investigate imported cheeses for nitrates intentionally added as preservatives and the endogenous concentrations of nitrates and nitrites present in cheeses in the U.S. marketplace, a method was developed and validated using ion chromatography with conductivity detection. A market sampling of cheese samples purchased in the Washington DC metro area was performed. In 64 samples of cheese, concentrations ranged from below the method detection limit (MDL) to 26 mg kg - 1 for nitrates and no concentrations of nitrites were found in any of the cheese samples above the MDL of 0.1 mg kg - 1 . A majority of the samples (93%) had concentrations below 10 mg kg - 1 , which indicate the presence of endogenous nitrates. The samples with concentrations above 10 mg kg - 1 were mainly processed cheese spread, which can contain additional ingredients often of plant-based origin. These ingredients are likely the cause of the elevated nitrate concentrations. The analysis of 12 additional cheese samples that are liable to the intentional addition of nitrates, 9 of which were imported, indicated that in this limited study, concentrations of nitrate in the U.S.-produced cheeses did not differ from those in imported samples.

  8. Modeling business processes: theoretical and practical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Dubininа

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The essence of process-oriented enterprise management has been examined in the article. The content and types of information technology have been analyzed in the article, due to the complexity and differentiation of existing methods, as well as the specificity of language, terminology of the enterprise business processes modeling. The theoretical aspects of business processes modeling have been reviewed and the modern traditional modeling techniques received practical application in the visualization model of retailers activity have been studied in the article. In the process of theoretical analysis of the modeling methods found that UFO-toolkit method that has been developed by Ukrainian scientists due to it systemology integrated opportunities, is the most suitable for structural and object analysis of retailers business processes. It was designed visualized simulation model of the business process "sales" as is" of retailers using a combination UFO-elements with the aim of the further practical formalization and optimization of a given business process.

  9. Modelling heat processing of dairy products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hotrum, N.; Fox, M.B.; Lieverloo, H.; Smit, E.; Jong, de P.; Schutyser, M.A.I.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter discusses the application of computer modelling to optimise the heat processing of milk. The chapter first reviews types of heat processing equipment used in the dairy industry. Then, the types of objectives that can be achieved using model-based process optimisation are discussed.

  10. How visual cognition influences process model comprehension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrusel, Razvan; Mendling, Jan; Reijers, Hajo A.

    2017-01-01

    Process analysts and other professionals extensively use process models to analyze business processes and identify performance improvement opportunities. Therefore, it is important that such models can be easily and properly understood. Previous research has mainly focused on two types of factors

  11. Modeling process flow using diagrams

    OpenAIRE

    Kemper, B.; de Mast, J.; Mandjes, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the practice of process improvement, tools such as the flowchart, the value-stream map (VSM), and a variety of ad hoc variants of such diagrams are commonly used. The purpose of this paper is to present a clear, precise, and consistent framework for the use of such flow diagrams in process improvement projects. The paper finds that traditional diagrams, such as the flowchart, the VSM, and OR-type of diagrams, have severe limitations, miss certain elements, or are based on implicit but cons...

  12. Steady-State Process Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, Ian; Gani, Rafiqul

    2011-01-01

    illustrate the “equation oriented” approach as well as the “sequential modular” approach to solving complex flowsheets for steady state applications. The applications include the Williams-Otto plant, the hydrodealkylation (HDA) of toluene, conversion of ethylene to ethanol and a bio-ethanol process....

  13. 21 CFR 133.102 - Asiago fresh and asiago soft cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Asiago fresh and asiago soft cheese. 133.102... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.102 Asiago fresh and asiago soft cheese. (a) Asiago fresh cheese...

  14. Salt Reduction in a Model High-Salt Akawi Cheese: Effects on Bacterial Activity, pH, Moisture, Potential Bioactive Peptides, Amino Acids, and Growth of Human Colon Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Akanksha; Shah, Nagendra P

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the effects of sodium chloride reduction and its substitution with potassium chloride on Akawi cheese during storage for 30 d at 4 °C. Survival of probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, and Bifidobacterium longum) and starter bacteria (Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus), angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitory and antioxidant activities, and concentrations of standard amino acids as affected by storage in different brine solutions (10% NaCl, 7.5% NaCl, 7.5% NaCl+KCl [1:1], 5% NaCl, and 5% NaCl+KCl [1:1]) were investigated. Furthermore, viability of human colon cells and human colon cancer cells as affected by the extract showing improved peptide profiles, highest release of amino acids and antioxidant activity (that is, from cheese brined in 7.5% NaCl+KCl) was evaluated. Significant increase was observed in survival of probiotic bacteria in cheeses with low salt after 30 d. Calcium content decreased slightly during storage in all cheeses brined in various solutions. Further, no significant changes were observed in ACE-inhibitory activity and antioxidant activity of cheeses during storage. Interestingly, concentrations of 4 essential amino acids (phenylalanine, tryptophan, valine, and leucine) increased significantly during storage in brine solutions containing 7.5% total salt. Low concentration of cheese extract (100 μg/mL) significantly improved the growth of normal human colon cells, and reduced the growth of human colon cancer cells. Overall, the study revealed that cheese extracts from reduced-NaCl brine improved the growth of human colon cells, and the release of essential amino acids, but did not affect the activities of potential bioactive peptides. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  15. Numerical modelling of reflood processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glynn, D.R.; Rhodes, N.; Tatchell, D.G.

    1983-01-01

    The use of a detailed computer model to investigate the effects of grid size and the choice of wall-to-fluid heat-transfer correlations on the predictions obtained for reflooding of a vertical heated channel is described. The model employs equations for the momentum and enthalpy of vapour and liquid and hence accounts for both thermal non-equilibrium and slip between the phases. Empirical correlations are used to calculate interphase and wall-to-fluid friction and heat-transfer as functions of flow regime and local conditions. The empirical formulae have remained fixed with the exception of the wall-to-fluid heat-transfer correlations. These have been varied according to the practices adopted in other computer codes used to model reflood, namely REFLUX, RELAP and TRAC. Calculations have been performed to predict the CSNI standard problem number 7, and the results are compared with experiment. It is shown that the results are substantially grid-independent, and that the choice of correlation has a significant influence on the general flow behaviour, the rate of quenching and on the maximum cladding temperature predicted by the model. It is concluded that good predictions of reflooding rates can be obtained with particular correlation sets. (author)

  16. Branching process models of cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Durrett, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This volume develops results on continuous time branching processes and applies them to study rate of tumor growth, extending classic work on the Luria-Delbruck distribution. As a consequence, the authors calculate the probability that mutations that confer resistance to treatment are present at detection and quantify the extent of tumor heterogeneity. As applications, the authors evaluate ovarian cancer screening strategies and give rigorous proofs for results of Heano and Michor concerning tumor metastasis. These notes should be accessible to students who are familiar with Poisson processes and continuous time. Richard Durrett is mathematics professor at Duke University, USA. He is the author of 8 books, over 200 journal articles, and has supervised more than 40 Ph.D. students. Most of his current research concerns the applications of probability to biology: ecology, genetics, and most recently cancer.

  17. The Lactose and Galactose Content of Cheese Suitable for Galactosaemia: New Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnoi, P A; MacDonald, A

    2016-01-01

    The UK Medical Advisory Panel of the Galactosaemia Support Group report the lactose and galactose content of 5 brands of mature Cheddar cheese, Comte and Emmi Emmental fondue mix from 32 cheese samples. The Medical Advisory Panel define suitable cheese in galactosaemia to have a lactose and galactose content consistently below 10 mg/100 g. A total of 32 samples (5 types of mature Cheddar cheese, Comte and "Emmi Swiss Fondue", an emmental fondue mix) were analysed by high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) technology used to perform lactose and galactose analysis. Cheddar cheese types: Valley Spire West Country, Parkham, Lye Cross Vintage, Lye Cross Mature, Tesco West Country Farmhouse Extra Mature and Sainsbury's TTD West Country Farmhouse Extra Mature had a lactose and galactose content consistently below 10 mg/100 g (range <0.05 to 12.65 mg). All Comte samples had a lactose content below the lower limit of detection (<0.05 mg) with galactose content from <0.05 to 1.86 mg/100 g; all samples of Emmi Swiss Fondue had lactose below the lower limit of detection (<0.05 mg) and galactose between 2.19 and 3.04 mg/100 g. All of these cheese types were suitable for inclusion in a low galactose diet for galactosaemia. It is possible that the galactose content of cheese may change over time depending on its processing, fermentation time and packaging techniques.

  18. Dynamics and rRNA transcriptional activity of lactococci and lactobacilli during Cheddar cheese ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desfossés-Foucault, Émilie; LaPointe, Gisèle; Roy, Denis

    2013-08-16

    Cheddar cheese is a complex ecosystem where both the bacterial population and the cheese making process contribute to flavor and texture development. The aim of this study was to use molecular methods to evaluate the impact of milk heat treatment and ripening temperature on starter lactococci and non-starter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) throughout ripening of Cheddar cheese. Eight Cheddar cheese batches were manufactured (four with thermized and four with pasteurized milk) and ripened at 4, 7 and 12°C to analyze the bacterial composition and rRNA transcriptional activity reflecting the ability of lactococci and lactobacilli to synthesize proteins. Abundance and rRNA transcription of lactococci and lactobacilli were quantified after DNA and RNA extraction by using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) targeting the 16S rRNA gene, respectively. Results showed that lactococci remained dominant throughout ripening, although 16S rRNA genome and cDNA copies/g of cheese decreased by four and two log copy numbers, respectively. Abundance and rRNA transcription of Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus buchneri/parabuchneri, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus brevis, and Lactobacillus coryniformis as well as total lactobacilli were also estimated using specific 16S rRNA primers. L. paracasei and L. buchneri/parabuchneri concomitantly grew in cheese made from thermized milk at 7 and 12°C, although L. paracasei displayed the most rRNA transcription among Lactobacillus species. This work showed that rRNA transcriptional activity of lactococci decreased throughout ripening and supports the usefulness of RNA analysis to assess which bacterial species have the ability to synthesize proteins during ripening, and could thereby contribute to cheese quality. © 2013.

  19. Use of human lysozyme transgenic goat milk in cheese making: effects on lactic acid bacteria performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfen, E C; Mills, D A; Maga, E A

    2007-09-01

    Genetically engineered goats expressing elevated levels of the antimicrobial enzyme lysozyme in their milk were developed to improve udder health, product shelf life, and consumer well-being. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of lysozyme on the development of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) throughout the cheese-making process. Raw and pasteurized milk from 7 lysozyme transgenic goats and 7 breed-, age-, and parity-matched nontransgenic controls was transformed into cheeses by using industry methods, and their microbiological load was evaluated. The numbers of colony-forming units of LAB were determined for raw and pasteurized goat milk, whey, and curd at d 2 and at d 6 or 7 of production. Selective plating media were used to enumerate lactococcal species separately from total LAB. Although differences in the mean number of colony-forming units between transgenic and control samples in raw milk, whey, and cheese curd were non-significant for both total LAB and lactococcal species from d 2 of production, a significant decrease was observed in both types of LAB among d 6 transgenic raw milk cheese samples. In pasteurized milk trials, a significant decrease in LAB was observed only in the raw milk of transgenic animals. These results indicate that lysozyme transgenic goat milk is not detrimental to LAB growth during the cheese-making process.

  20. Microbiological quality and safety assessment in the production of moderate and high humidity cheeses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise da Fontoura Prates

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Moderate and high humidity cheeses are described as important vehicles of pathogens in many foodborne diseases outbreaks. Microbial contamination can occur in raw material or in the different steps of the product processing due to inadequate hygiene practices. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the microbiological quality and safety in the production of moderate and high humidity cheese. Samples from raw milk, handlers’ hands surface, final product were collected in three cheese manufacturing plants located in southern Brazil, with different levels of sanitary control. Effectiveness of milk pasteurization was also evaluated. Thermotolerant coliforms, coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes were evaluated. Raw milk samples showed the highest contamination levels, with enumeration of 1.1x105 most probable number (MPN mL-1 for thermotolerant coliforms, 4x105 colony-forming units (CFU mL-1 for CPS and presence of Salmonella spp. CPS were also reported in one sample of handler’s hands surface. However, only one sample of the final product was out of Brazilian regulatory standards, exceeding the limit allowed for CPS. Milk pasteurization process used in cheese preparation was effective, regardless the level of sanitary control of the industries. Results highlighted the need for better hygiene practices, in obtaining the raw milk and in the handling during the cheese manufacturing steps.

  1. Control of superficial mould in Provolone Valpadana cheese with environmental treatments. Preliminary trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, C.; Innocente, N.

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of relying on technological systems as an alternative to the use of additives in controlling the development of surface mould was evaluated on Valpadana Provolone cheese made on an industrial scale. Experimental tests were performed to evaluate the effect of sanitising the environment with ultraviolet radiation of the dryer area instead of the classic method of fumigation, as well as the effectiveness of direct treatment of the cheese with UV radiation, in order to prevent contamination with mould. Monitoring at the dairy, as well as analyses of the cheese at different stages in the maturation process, revealed that treating the rooms with UV radiation was just as effective as fumigation in preventing the development of mould. Likewise, the direct treatment of the cheese with UV proved to be a valid alternative physical method to the use of surface chemical additives, although it was difficult to radiate uniformly over the whole cheese owing to the presence of shaded areas at the cords. Lastly, it was considered that the application of suitable plastic coatings, instead of paraffin, applied after the rind has formed, could also be used as alternative antifungus additives. In this case, it was observed that the use of the Plasticoat polymer led to a decrease in the humidity of the curd with respect to paraffin treatment, also affecting the maturation process [it

  2. Ripening-induced changes in microbial groups of artisanal Sicilian goats’ milk cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Di Marco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the microbial flora of “Caprino dei Nebrodi”, a raw goat’s milk cheese produced in Sicily, were studied during ripening. From 2 batches of cheese, 4 samples were taken at day 0, 2, 15, and 30 of ripening. Also, samples of curd and milk used in the manufacturing process were analyzed. By the end of the ripening process (day 30, high log10 cfu/g were found for Lactobacilli (7.20, Lattococci (7.10, and Enterococci (7.00, whereas counts of Enterobacteriaceae (3.91, Escherichia coli (3.30, and Staphylococcus (3.89 were found to be lower. The study provides useful information on the microbiological properties of “Caprino dei Nebrodi” cheese, and the results obtained suggest that in order to increase the quality of this artisanal product, it is necessary to improve the sanitary conditions of milking and cheese-making. The study was intended as a preliminary step towards the isolation and identification of bacterial species found in this type of goat’s cheese.

  3. Biogenic amines in Italian Pecorino cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eSchirone

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The quality of distinctive artisanal cheeses is closely associated with the territory of production and its traditions. Pedoclimatic characteristics, genetic autochthonous variations and anthropic components create an environment so specific that it would be extremely difficult to reproduce elsewhere. Pecorino cheese is included in this sector of the market and is widely diffused in Italy (approximately 53.727t of production. Pecorino is a common name given to indicate Italian cheeses made exclusively from pure ewes' milk characterized by a high content of fat matter and it is mainly produced in the middle and south of Italy by traditional procedures from raw or thermized milk. The microbiota plays a major role in the development of the organoleptic characteristics of the cheese but it can also be responsible for the accumulation of undesirable substances, such as biogenic amines (BA. Several factors can contribute to the qualitative and quantitative profiles of BA’s in Pecorino cheese such as environmental hygienic conditions, pH, salt concentration, aw, fat content, pasteurization of milk, decarboxylase microorganisms, starter cultures, temperature and time of ripening, storage, part of the cheese (core, edge and the presence of cofactor. Generally, the total content of BA’s can range from about 100-2400 mg/kg, with a prevalence of toxicologically important BA’s, tyramine and histamine. The presence of BA in Pecorino cheeses is becoming increasingly important to consumers and cheese-maker alike, due to the potential threats of toxicity to humans and consequent trade implications.

  4. Discovering Process Reference Models from Process Variants Using Clustering Techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, C.; Reichert, M.U.; Wombacher, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    In today's dynamic business world, success of an enterprise increasingly depends on its ability to react to changes in a quick and flexible way. In response to this need, process-aware information systems (PAIS) emerged, which support the modeling, orchestration and monitoring of business processes

  5. Systematic approach for the identification of process reference models

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Der Merwe, A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Process models are used in different application domains to capture knowledge on the process flow. Process reference models (PRM) are used to capture reusable process models, which should simplify the identification process of process models...

  6. Validation process of simulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Isidro, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    It is presented a methodology on empirical validation about any detailed simulation model. This king of validation it is always related with an experimental case. The empirical validation has a residual sense, because the conclusions are based on comparisons between simulated outputs and experimental measurements. This methodology will guide us to detect the fails of the simulation model. Furthermore, it can be used a guide in the design of posterior experiments. Three steps can be well differentiated: Sensitivity analysis. It can be made with a DSA, differential sensitivity analysis, and with a MCSA, Monte-Carlo sensitivity analysis. Looking the optimal domains of the input parameters. It has been developed a procedure based on the Monte-Carlo methods and Cluster techniques, to find the optimal domains of these parameters. Residual analysis. This analysis has been made on the time domain and on the frequency domain, it has been used the correlation analysis and spectral analysis. As application of this methodology, it is presented the validation carried out on a thermal simulation model on buildings, Esp., studying the behavior of building components on a Test Cell of LECE of CIEMAT. (Author) 17 refs

  7. Effect of Operational Parameters in the Continuous Anaerobic. Fermentation of Cheese Whey on Titers, Yields, Productivities, and Microbial Community Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Domingos, Joana M. B.; Martinez, Gonzalo A.; Scoma, Alberto; Fraraccio, Serena; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Boon, Nico; Reis, Maria A. M.; Fava, Fabio; Bertin, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were produced using cheese whey as feedstock. A mixed culture packed bed bioreactor was set up to digest anaerobically, under an acidogenic condition, a water solution of a cheese whey powder. Batch tests pointed out that the whole VFAs production process occurred via two sequential phases: (a) conversion of lactose into lactic acid and (b) conversion of lactic acid into a mixture of VFAs. Furthermore, the same tests showed that the ceramic material Vukopor S10 can...

  8. Classification of Pecorino cheeses produced in Italy according to their ripening time and manufacturing technique using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerma-García, M J; Gori, A; Cerretani, L; Simó-Alfonso, E F; Caboni, M F

    2010-10-01

    Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, followed by linear discriminant analysis of the spectral data, was used to classify Italian Pecorino cheeses according to their ripening time and manufacturing technique. The Fourier transform infrared spectra of the cheeses were divided into 18 regions and the normalized absorbance peak areas within these regions were used as predictors. Linear discriminant analysis models were constructed to classify Pecorino cheeses according to different ripening stages (hard and semi-hard) or according to their manufacturing technique (fossa and nonfossa cheeses). An excellent resolution was achieved according to both ripening time and manufacturing technique. Also, a final linear discriminant analysis model considering the 3 categories (hard nonfossa, hard fossa, and semi-hard nonfossa) was constructed. A good resolution among the 3 categories was obtained. Copyright © 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence for Lactobacillus helveticus CNRZ 32, an Industrial Cheese Starter and Cheese Flavor Adjunct

    OpenAIRE

    Broadbent, Jeff R.; Hughes, Joanne E.; Welker, Dennis L.; Tompkins, Thomas A.; Steele, James L.

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus helveticus is a lactic acid bacterium widely used in the manufacture of cheese and for production of bioactive peptides from milk proteins. We present the complete genome sequence for L.?helveticus CNRZ 32, a strain particularly recognized for its ability to reduce bitterness and accelerate flavor development in cheese.

  10. A large factory-scale application of selected autochthonous lactic acid bacteria for PDO Pecorino Siciliano cheese production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarcello, Rosa; Carpino, Stefania; Gaglio, Raimondo; Pino, Alessandra; Rapisarda, Teresa; Caggia, Cinzia; Marino, Giovanni; Randazzo, Cinzia L; Settanni, Luca; Todaro, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    The main hypothesis of this study was that the autochthonous lactic acid bacteria (LAB) selected for their dairy traits are able to stabilize the production of PDO (Protected Denomination of Origin) Pecorino Siciliano cheese, preserving its typicality. The experimental plan included the application of a multi-strain lactic acid bacteria (LAB) culture, composed of starter (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CAG4 and CAG37) and non starter (Enterococcus faecalis PSL71, Lactococcus garviae PSL67 and Streptococcus macedonicus PSL72) strains, during the traditional production of cheese at large scale level in six factories located in different areas of Sicily. The cheese making processes were followed from milk to ripened cheeses and the effects of the added LAB were evaluated on the microbiological, chemico-physical and sensorial characteristics of the final products. Results highlighted a high variability for all investigated parameters and the dominance of LAB cocci in bulk milk samples. The experimental curds showed a faster pH drop than control curds and the levels of LAB estimated in 5-month ripened experimental cheeses (7.59 and 7.27 Log CFU/g for rods and cocci, respectively) were higher than those of control cheeses (7.02 and 6.61 Log CFU/g for rods and cocci, respectively). The comparison of the bacterial isolates by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR evidenced the dominance of the added starter lactococci over native milk and vat LAB, while the added non starter LAB were found at almost the same levels of the indigenous strains. The sensory evaluation showed that the mixed LAB culture did not influence the majority of the sensory attributes of the cheeses and that each factory produced cheeses with unique characteristics. Finally, the multivariate statistical analysis based on all parameters evaluated on the ripened cheeses showed the dissimilarities and the relationships among cheeses. Thus, the main hypothesis of the work was accepted since the

  11. Brucella melitensis survival during manufacture of ripened goat cheese at two temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-González, Karla Y; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M; Monroy, Jorge F; López-Merino, Ahide; Suárez-Güemes, Francisco

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the current work was to assess the influence of two temperatures, 4°C and 24°C, on pH and water activity and their association with Brucella melitensis survival during the traditional manufacture of ripened goat cheese. Raw milk from a brucellosis-free goat herd was used for the manufacture of ripened cheese. The cheese was inoculated with 5×10(9) of the B. melitensis 16M strain during the tempering stage. The cheeses were matured for 5, 20, and 50 days at both temperatures. To assess Brucella survival, the pH and a(w) were recorded at each stage of the process (curd cutting, draining whey, immersion in brine, ripening I, ripening II, and ripening III). B. melitensis was detected at ripening stage III (1×10(3) colony-forming unit [CFU]/mL) from cheeses matured at 4°C with a pH of 5.0 and a(w) of 0.90, and at a ripening stage II (1×10(4) CFU/mL) from cheeses ripened at 24°C with a pH of 4.0 and a(w) of 0.89. The remaining stages were free from the inoculated pathogen. In addition, viable B. melitensis was recovered in significant amounts (1-2×10(6) CFU/mL) from the whey fractions of both types of cheese ripened at 24°C and 4°C. These results revealed the effects of high temperature (24°C vs. 4°C) on the low pH (4) and a(w) (0.89) that appeared to be associated with the suppression of B. melitensis at the early stages of cheese ripening. In the ripened goat cheeses, B. melitensis survived under a precise combination of temperature during maturation, ripening time, and a(w) in the manufacturing process.

  12. Integrated Process Modeling-A Process Validation Life Cycle Companion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahel, Thomas; Hauer, Stefan; Mueller, Eric M; Murphy, Patrick; Abad, Sandra; Vasilieva, Elena; Maurer, Daniel; Brocard, Cécile; Reinisch, Daniela; Sagmeister, Patrick; Herwig, Christoph

    2017-10-17

    During the regulatory requested process validation of pharmaceutical manufacturing processes, companies aim to identify, control, and continuously monitor process variation and its impact on critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the final product. It is difficult to directly connect the impact of single process parameters (PPs) to final product CQAs, especially in biopharmaceutical process development and production, where multiple unit operations are stacked together and interact with each other. Therefore, we want to present the application of Monte Carlo (MC) simulation using an integrated process model (IPM) that enables estimation of process capability even in early stages of process validation. Once the IPM is established, its capability in risk and criticality assessment is furthermore demonstrated. IPMs can be used to enable holistic production control strategies that take interactions of process parameters of multiple unit operations into account. Moreover, IPMs can be trained with development data, refined with qualification runs, and maintained with routine manufacturing data which underlines the lifecycle concept. These applications will be shown by means of a process characterization study recently conducted at a world-leading contract manufacturing organization (CMO). The new IPM methodology therefore allows anticipation of out of specification (OOS) events, identify critical process parameters, and take risk-based decisions on counteractions that increase process robustness and decrease the likelihood of OOS events.

  13. Process modelling on a canonical basis[Process modelling; Canonical modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siepmann, Volker

    2006-12-20

    Based on an equation oriented solving strategy, this thesis investigates a new approach to process modelling. Homogeneous thermodynamic state functions represent consistent mathematical models of thermodynamic properties. Such state functions of solely extensive canonical state variables are the basis of this work, as they are natural objective functions in optimisation nodes to calculate thermodynamic equilibrium regarding phase-interaction and chemical reactions. Analytical state function derivatives are utilised within the solution process as well as interpreted as physical properties. By this approach, only a limited range of imaginable process constraints are considered, namely linear balance equations of state variables. A second-order update of source contributions to these balance equations is obtained by an additional constitutive equation system. These equations are general dependent on state variables and first-order sensitivities, and cover therefore practically all potential process constraints. Symbolic computation technology efficiently provides sparsity and derivative information of active equations to avoid performance problems regarding robustness and computational effort. A benefit of detaching the constitutive equation system is that the structure of the main equation system remains unaffected by these constraints, and a priori information allows to implement an efficient solving strategy and a concise error diagnosis. A tailor-made linear algebra library handles the sparse recursive block structures efficiently. The optimisation principle for single modules of thermodynamic equilibrium is extended to host entire process models. State variables of different modules interact through balance equations, representing material flows from one module to the other. To account for reusability and encapsulation of process module details, modular process modelling is supported by a recursive module structure. The second-order solving algorithm makes it

  14. Identification of the Geographic Origin of Parmigiano Reggiano (P.D.O. Cheeses Deploying Non-Targeted Mass Spectrometry and Chemometrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert Popping

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Parmigiano Reggiano is an Italian product with a protected designation of origin (P.D.O.. It is an aged hard cheese made from raw milk. P.D.O. products are protected by European regulations. Approximately 3 million wheels are produced each year, and the product attracts a relevant premium price due to its quality and all around the world well known typicity. Due to the high demand that exceeds the production, several fraudulent products can be found on the market. The rate of fraud is estimated between 20% and 40%, the latter predominantly in the grated form. We have developed a non-target method based on Liquid Chomatography-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (LC-HRMS that allows the discrimination of Parmigiano Reggiano from non-authentic products with milk from different geographical origins or products, where other aspects of the production process do not comply with the rules laid down in the production specifications for Parmeggiano Reggiano. Based on a database created with authentic samples provided by the Consortium of Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese, a reliable classification model was built. The overall classification capabilities of this non-targeted method was verified on 32 grated cheese samples. The classification was 87.5% accurate.

  15. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA FLORA OF KONYA KUFLU CHEESE: A TRADITIONAL CHEESE FROM KONYA PROVINCE IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziba Guley

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the lactic acid bacteria flora of mature Konya Kuflu cheese. Konya Kuflu cheese is a traditional blue cheese which is produced from raw milk without starter culture addition and mould growth occurs in uncontrolled conditions during its ripening. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB isolated from 9 mature Konya Kuflu cheese samples were investigated using a combination of conventional biochemical tests, API test kits, and molecular approaches. For some isolates, different results were obtained according to the identification technique. The overall LAB profile of Konya Kuflu cheese samples revealed that Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus paracasei/Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus plantarum, Enterococcus faecium, and Enterococcus faecalis are the predominant species. In addition, 1 Pediococcus parvulus and 1 Enterococcus durans were also identified.

  16. Use of Sunkist Orange Fruit (Citrus sinensis Juice In Mozzarella Cheese Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djalal Rosyidi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Data collecting of this research was administered since February until March 2006 in the Animal Product Technology Laboratory of Animal Husbandry Faculty Brawijaya University Malang, Biological Laboratory of Muhammadiyah University Malang and Engineering Laboratory Centre Food and Laboratory  Gadjah Mada University Yogyakarta. The objective of this research was to know the best concentration of Sunkist orange fruit juice with direct acidification in Mozzarella cheese manufactured considered on yield, protein content, moisture content, stretchability and meltability. Hopefully the result would support in producing cheese earlier and better quality processed with direct acidification from Sunkist orange fruit juice. Method of this research was experiment used Completely Randomized Design and repeats four times. The treatment was Sunkist orange fruit juice concentration of 3% (P1, 3.5% (P2, 4% (P3 and 4.5% (P4 from milk volume. Variables measured would be yield, protein content, moisture content, stretchability and meltability. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance and  Duncans Multiple Range Test. The result showed that Sunkist orange fruit juice did not give significant different effect (P>0.05 on yield, stretchability and meltability, in the otherwise give highly significant different effect (P<0.01 on protein and moisture content of Mozzarella cheese. The conclusion of this research was the Sunkist orange fruit juice concentration of 3% was the best concentration and suggested to use on Mozzarella cheese manufacturing.   Keyword : Mozzarella cheese, orange fruit.

  17. Biotechnological Utilization with a Focus on Anaerobic Treatment of Cheese Whey: Current Status and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aspasia A. Chatzipaschali

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cheese whey utilization is of major concern nowadays. Its high organic matter content, in combination with the high volumes produced and limited treatment options make cheese whey a serious environmental problem. However, the potential production of biogas (methane, hydrogen or other marketable products with a simultaneous high COD reduction through appropriate treatment proves that cheese whey must be considered as an energy resource rather than a pollutant. The presence of biodegradable components in the cheese whey coupled with the advantages of anaerobic digestion processes over other treatment methods makes anaerobic digestion an attractive and suitable treatment option. This paper intends to review the most representative applications of anaerobic treatment of cheese whey currently being exploited and under research. Moreover, an effort has been made to categorize the common characteristics of the various research efforts and find a comparative basis, as far as their results are concerned. In addition, a number of dairy industries already using such anaerobic digestion systems are presented.

  18. Proteolysis in goat "coalho" cheese supplemented with probiotic lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Taliana Kênia Alves; de Araujo, Ana Rita Ribeiro; do Nascimento, Edilza Santos; de Matos Paz, José Eduardo; Gadelha, Carlos Alberto; Gadelha, Tatiane Santi; Pacheco, Maria Teresa Bertoldo; do Egypto Queiroga, Rita de Cássia Ramos; de Oliveira, Maria Elieidy Gomes; Madruga, Marta Suely

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to analyse the proteolytic effects of adding isolated and combined probiotic strains to goat "coalho" cheese. The cheeses were: QS - with culture Start, composed by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris (R704); QLA - with Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA-5); QLP - with Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (L. casei 01); QB - with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (BB 12); and QC, co-culture with the three probiotic microorganisms. The cheeses were analysed during 28 days of storage at 10°C. The probiotic cell count was higher than 6.5 and 7 log colony-forming units (CFU) g(-1) of cheese at the 1st and 28th days of storage, respectively. The addition of co-culture influenced (pcheese and resulted in a higher content of soluble protein and release of amino acids at the 1st day after processing. However, over all 28 days, the cheese supplemented with Bifidobacterium lactis in its isolated form showed the highest proteolytic activity, particularly in the hydrolysis of the alpha-s2 and kappa-casein fractions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Development and validation of an APCI-MS/GC–MS approach for the classification and prediction of Cheddar cheese maturity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Heng Hui; Yan, Bingnan; Linforth, Robert S.T.; Fisk, Ian D.

    2016-01-01

    Headspace techniques have been extensively employed in food analysis to measure volatile compounds, which play a central role in the perceived quality of food. In this study atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS), coupled with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS), was used to investigate the complex mix of volatile compounds present in Cheddar cheeses of different maturity, processing and recipes to enable characterisation of the cheeses based on their ripening stages. Partial least squares-linear discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) provided a 70% success rate in correct prediction of the age of the cheeses based on their key headspace volatile profiles. In addition to predicting maturity, the analytical results coupled with chemometrics offered a rapid and detailed profiling of the volatile component of Cheddar cheeses, which could offer a new tool for quality assessment and accelerate product development. PMID:26212994

  20. Suitability of the infrared spectroscopy and the rheological method for distinguishing traditional cheese from industrial Turoš cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristijan Valkaj

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to determine suitability of the infrared spectroscopy and the rheological method for distinguishing traditional cheese from industrial Turoš cheese. Turoš cheese belongs to the group of sour, dried, cone shaped cheeses with added salt and red dry pepper. Cheeses were sampled from 15 family farms and from market (industrial cheeses from five different batches. The rheological parameters of analysed cheeses were in accordance with the chemical composition of the same samples. Infrared spectroscopy of cheeses show good relation with the chemical composition and it has been proved to be a fast and effective method when compared to textural and standard chemical analysis for monitoring the standard procedure of production of sour, dried cheeses such as Turoš cheese. The extensive variability of all the parameters was a result of unbalanced production of Turoš cheese among family farms. Industrial production of Turoš cheese demonstrates more uniformity in relation to traditional on-farm cheese production.

  1. Chemical composition and microbial load of cheese produced using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aframomum sceptrum) on the chemical composition and microbial load of cheese was evaluated in a Completely Randomized Design. Cheese produced with 1% bear berry (Aframomum sceptrum) had the highest (P < 0.05) crude protein content ...

  2. Chemometrics approach to substrate development, case: semisyntetic cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Væggemose; Hansen, Birgitte Vedel

    1998-01-01

    from food production facilities.The Chemometrics approach to substrate development is illustrated by the development of a semisyntetic cheese substrate. Growth, colour formation and mycotoxin production of 6 cheese related fungi were studied on 9 types of natural cheeses and 24 synthetic cheese...... substrates and compared using principal component analysis (PCA). The synthetic cheese substrates contained various amounts of Ca, K, Mg, Na, P, Fe, Cu, Zn, lactate, lactose and casein. In this manner a robust, well-defined and easy prepared laboratory cheese substrate was developed for Penicillium commune......, the most frequently occurring contaminant on semi-hard cheese. Growth experiments on the substrate were repeatable and reproducible. The substrate was also suitable for the starter P. camemberti. Mineral elements in cheese were shown to have strong effect on growth, mycotoxin production and colour...

  3. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in European cheeses: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Rios, Veronica; Dalgaard, Paw

    Both in Europe and worldwide cheese has cause important outbreaks of listeriosis and can be a vehicle for transmission of Listeria monocytogenes to consumers. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted using scientific literature and European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) reports...... to summarize available data on the prevalence of L. monocytogenes in different types of cheeses produced in Europe. Multilevel random-effects meta-analysis models were used to estimate mean prevalence rates of the pathogen and to compare prevalence between types of cheeses (fresh, mould-ripened, ripened, smear.......7-1-2%). The prevalence differed between types of cheeses including fresh (1.4%; CI: 0.6-3.2%), mould-ripened (2.0%; CI: 0.6-6.3%), ripened (2.2%; CI: 0.9-5.6%), smear-ripened (4.8%; CI: 1.5-14.5%) and brined (8.6%; CI: 1.7-34.4%). Mean prevalence of L. monocytogenes in fresh and soft/semi-soft cheeses were...

  4. Measures of Quality in Business Process Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek Hronza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Business process modelling and analysing is undoubtedly one of the most important parts of Applied (Business Informatics. Quality of business process models (diagrams is crucial for any purpose in this area. The goal of a process analyst’s work is to create generally understandable, explicit and error free models. If a process is properly described, created models can be used as an input into deep analysis and optimization. It can be assumed that properly designed business process models (similarly as in the case of correctly written algorithms contain characteristics that can be mathematically described. Besides it will be possible to create a tool that will help process analysts to design proper models. As part of this review will be conducted systematic literature review in order to find and analyse business process model’s design and business process model’s quality measures. It was found that mentioned area had already been the subject of research investigation in the past. Thirty-three suitable scietific publications and twenty-two quality measures were found. Analysed scientific publications and existing quality measures do not reflect all important attributes of business process model’s clarity, simplicity and completeness. Therefore it would be appropriate to add new measures of quality.

  5. Assessment of workers' exposure to bioaerosols in a French cheese factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Xavier; Duquenne, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    concentrations of airborne culturable fungi, sometimes very high, throughout the manufacturing process. In addition to fungi, culturable bacteria and endotoxins are also present in the work atmosphere. All these microbial organisms thus contribute in a complex manner to total worker exposure. Despite the lack of both occupational exposure limit values and standardized measuring methods, our results suggest that an immunological risk may occur among workers, especially for cheese brushers, cheese washers, and packagers who are the most exposed workers in the factory. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  6. Chemical Characteristics of Goat Cheese with Different Percentages of Mixed Indigenous Probiotic Culture during Ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triana Setyawardani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed to study the chemical characteristic of goat cheese that used various concentrations of probiotic starter with combinations of Lactobacillus rhamnosus TW2 and Lactobacillus plantarum TW14 isolates. The experiment was conducted with a completely randomized design with a 4 x 4 factorial arrangement. The first factor was the concentration of probiotic starter consisted of 4 lavels i.e., 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10% v/v. All probiotic concentrations used the same ratio of L. rhamnosus TW2 and L. plantarum TW14, i.e. 1:1. The second factor was the duration of ripening process consisted of 4 levels i.e., 0 (no ripening, 10, 20, and 30 days at 5oC. The observed variables were cheese chemical properties including water content, protein, fat, ash, pH, total titratable acidity (TTA, free fatty acids (FFA, and proteolysis profile. The results showed that addition of probiotic starter at a concentration of 5% mixture of L. rhamnosus TW2 and L. plantarum TW14 increased (P<0.01 only on ash content. The duration of ripening process up to 30 d significantly increased (P<0.01 protein and fat. Combination of probiotic starter concentrations and duration of ripening process increased (P<0.01 fat and ash contents. Proteolysis profile showed that protein was degraded into 72 and 52kDa proteins, but no 17kDa protein was found in cheese ripened for 30 d. It is concluded that 30 d duration of ripening at 5oC was the main contributing factor to chemical characteristics of cheese including chemical properties, pH, TTA, FFA, and proteolysis profile of probiotic goat cheese, while the concentration of mixed probiotics affected ash content, TTA and FFA of cheese.

  7. The nutritional significance of cheese in the UK diet

    OpenAIRE

    Ash, Anthony; Wilbey, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Cheese currently suffers from an adverse nutritional image largely due to a perceived association between saturated fatty acid, cholesterol and the salt content of cheese with cardiovascular disease. However, cheese is also a rich source of essential nutrients such as, proteins, lipids, vitamins and minerals that play an integral part of a healthy diet. This review outlines the composition, structure and physiological characteristics of the nutritionally significant components of cheese, whil...

  8. Derived Demand for Fresh Cheese Products Imported into Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Christou, Andreas P.; Kilmer, Richard L.; Stearns, James A.; Feleke, Shiferaw T.; Ge, Jiaoju

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this article is to estimate the derived demand for imported fresh cheese products into Japan when fresh cheese import data are disaggregated by source country of production. We provide empirical measures of the sensitivity of demand to changes in total imports, own-price, and cross-prices among exporting countries for fresh cheese. Japan's derived demand for U.S. fresh cheese products is perfectly inelastic. Thus, the import demand competition among importing countries should...

  9. Molecular characterization of dominant bacterial population in “Vastedda della Valle del Belice” cheese: preliminary investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Todaro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The sensory characteristics of raw-milk cheeses are linked to the cheese-making process, to the environmental factors as animal feeding and to the biochemical and microbiological composition of the milk. In this report we temped to characterize the microflora in the typical Sicilian historical cheese as Vastedda della valle del Belice. Each cheese was previous subjected to microbial isolation on specific media (M17 and MRS. The colony obtained on the solid medium were subject to biochemical tests and DNA extraction. The microbial diversity occurring in the strains was evaluated by PCR, RFLP and sequencing targeted on 16S ribosomal DNA. A number of closest relatives species of lactic and contaminating bacteria were identified in a total of 18 cheeses. The more represented genus were: Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus and Pediococcus. Moreover it was found only one strain Lactococcus lactis for producing bacteriocines. The different bacteria species probably could play a key role in the maturation of the cheese. The preliminary obtained data show the optimized method is usefully to detect and characterize the bacteria having implications in the fermentation process as well as preservation of traditional products.

  10. Modelling income processes with lots of heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Browning, Martin; Ejrnæs, Mette; Alvarez, Javier

    2010-01-01

    We model earnings processes allowing for lots of heterogeneity across agents. We also introduce an extension to the linear ARMA model which allows the initial convergence in the long run to be different from that implied by the conventional ARMA model. This is particularly important for unit root...

  11. Counting Processes for Retail Default Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiefer, Nicholas Maximilian; Larson, C. Erik

    in a discrete state space. In a simple case, the states could be default/non-default; in other models relevant for credit modeling the states could be credit scores or payment status (30 dpd, 60 dpd, etc.). Here we focus on the use of stochastic counting processes for mortgage default modeling, using data...

  12. Quantificação de coliformes, Staphylococcus aureus e mesófilos presentes em diferentes etapas da produção de queijo frescal de leite de cabra em laticínios Enumeration of coliforms, Staphylococcus aureus and aerobic mesofilic bacteria throughout the manufacture process of a goat unripened cheese produced in a dairy plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Ulrich Picoli

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente estudo foi acompanhar a produção de queijo frescal de leite de cabra, avaliando a qualidade higiênica do processamento pela quantificação de coliformes, S. aureus e mesófilos totais. A produção de três diferentes lotes de queijo foi acompanhada, sendo coletadas amostras de várias etapas do processamento. Além disso, amostras de queijo pertencente ao lote acompanhado foram coletadas na prateleira de um estabelecimento comercial durante seu período de validade. Os suabes coletados foram semeados em ágar sangue ovino; as amostras de água foram submetidas à Colimetria; as demais amostras foram submetidas à contagem de S. aureus, coliformes e mesófilos totais por meio de protocolos de rotina. Verificou-se que, apesar da pasteurização ter diminuído consideravelmente as populações microbianas presentes no leite cru, a falta de sanificação adequada de um equipamento que entrava em contato com o leite cru e que dá acesso ao tanque de coagulação, resultou na recontaminação da matéria-prima. Ao final do processamento, o queijo encontrava-se dentro dos padrões exigidos pela legislação, contudo a elevada contagem de mesófilos totais sugere que sejam melhoradas as medidas de sanitização durante o processamento, a fim de garantir a qualidade higiênica e uma maior vida de prateleira ao queijo produzido.The aim of this study was to evaluate the hygienic conditions throughout the manufacture process of a goat unripened cheese, using the enumeration of coliforms, S. aureus and aerobic mesofilic bacteria as indicators. The production of three different lots of cheese was followed, being collected samples throughout the processing steps. Furthermore, samples of cheese belonging to the same sampled lot were collected in the shelf of a commercial establishment throughout the shelf life period. Swabs were streaked onto blood agar plates; water samples were submitted to colimetric assays; all other samples were

  13. Omics-Based Insights into Flavor Development and Microbial Succession within Surface-Ripened Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzi, A. S.; Walsh, A. M.; Sheehan, J. J.; Cotter, P. D.; Crispie, F.; McSweeney, P. L. H.; Rea, M. C.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study, a young Cheddar curd was used to produce two types of surface-ripened cheese, using two commercial smear-culture mixes of yeasts and bacteria. Whole-metagenome shotgun sequencing was used to screen the microbial population within the smear-culture mixes and on the cheese surface, with comparisons of microorganisms at both the species and the strain level. The use of two smear mixes resulted in the development of distinct microbiotas on the surfaces of the two test cheeses. In one case, most of the species inoculated on the cheese established themselves successfully on the surface during ripening, while in the other, some of the species inoculated were not detected during ripening and the most dominant bacterial species, Glutamicibacter arilaitensis, was not a constituent of the culture mix. Generally, yeast species, such as Debaryomyces hansenii and Geotrichum candidum, were dominant during the first stage of ripening but were overtaken by bacterial species, such as Brevibacterium linens and G. arilaitensis, in the later stages. Using correlation analysis, it was possible to associate individual microorganisms with volatile compounds detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in the cheese surface. Specifically, D. hansenii correlated with the production of alcohols and carboxylic acids, G. arilaitensis with alcohols, carboxylic acids and ketones, and B. linens and G. candidum with sulfur compounds. In addition, metagenomic sequencing was used to analyze the metabolic potential of the microbial populations on the surfaces of the test cheeses, revealing a high relative abundance of metagenomic clusters associated with the modification of color, variation of pH, and flavor development. IMPORTANCE Fermented foods, in particular, surface-ripened cheese, represent a model to explain the metabolic interactions which regulate microbial succession in complex environments. This study explains the role of individual species in a

  14. Distillation modeling for a uranium refining process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphal, B.R.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the spent fuel treatment program at Argonne National Laboratory, a vacuum distillation process is being employed for the recovery of uranium following an electrorefining process. Distillation of a salt electrolyte, containing a eutectic mixture of lithium and potassium chlorides, from uranium is achieved by a simple batch operation and is termed open-quotes cathode processingclose quotes. The incremental distillation of electrolyte salt will be modeled by an equilibrium expression and on a molecular basis since the operation is conducted under moderate vacuum conditions. As processing continues, the two models will be compared and analyzed for correlation with actual operating results. Possible factors that may contribute to aberrations from the models include impurities at the vapor-liquid boundary, distillate reflux, anomalous pressure gradients, and mass transport phenomena at the evaporating surface. Ultimately, the purpose of either process model is to enable the parametric optimization of the process

  15. Lactobacillus and Leuconostoc volatilomes in cheese conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogačić, Tomislav; Maillard, Marie-Bernadette; Leclerc, Aurélie; Hervé, Christophe; Chuat, Victoria; Valence, Florence; Thierry, Anne

    2016-03-01

    New strains are desirable to diversify flavour of fermented dairy products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of Leuconostoc spp. and Lactobacillus spp. in the production of aroma compounds by metabolic fingerprints of volatiles. Eighteen strains, including five Lactobacillus species (Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus sakei) and three Leuconostoc species (Leuconostoc citreum, Leuconostoc lactis, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides) were incubated for 5 weeks in a curd-based slurry medium under conditions mimicking cheese ripening. Populations were enumerated and volatile compounds were analysed by headspace trap gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A metabolomics approach followed by multivariate statistical analysis was applied for data processing and analysis. In total, 12 alcohols, 10 aldehydes, 7 esters, 11 ketones, 5 acids and 2 sulphur compounds were identified. Very large differences in concentration of volatile compounds between the highest producing strains and the control medium were observed in particular for diacetyl, 2-butanol, ethyl acetate, 3-methylbutanol, 3-methylbutanoic acid and 2-methylbutanoic acid. Some of the characterized strains demonstrated an interesting aromatizing potential to be used as adjunct culture.

  16. Piecewise deterministic processes in biological models

    CERN Document Server

    Rudnicki, Ryszard

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a concise introduction to piecewise deterministic Markov processes (PDMPs), with particular emphasis on their applications to biological models. Further, it presents examples of biological phenomena, such as gene activity and population growth, where different types of PDMPs appear: continuous time Markov chains, deterministic processes with jumps, processes with switching dynamics, and point processes. Subsequent chapters present the necessary tools from the theory of stochastic processes and semigroups of linear operators, as well as theoretical results concerning the long-time behaviour of stochastic semigroups induced by PDMPs and their applications to biological models. As such, the book offers a valuable resource for mathematicians and biologists alike. The first group will find new biological models that lead to interesting and often new mathematical questions, while the second can observe how to include seemingly disparate biological processes into a unified mathematical theory, and...

  17. Modeling closed nuclear fuel cycles processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmidt, O.V. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute for Inorganic Materials, Rogova, 5a street, Moscow, 123098 (Russian Federation); Makeeva, I.R. [Zababakhin All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Technical Physics, Vasiliev street 13, Snezhinsk, Chelyabinsk region, 456770 (Russian Federation); Liventsov, S.N. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Lenin Avenue, 30, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    Computer models of processes are necessary for determination of optimal operating conditions for closed nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) processes. Computer models can be quickly changed in accordance with new and fresh data from experimental research. 3 kinds of process simulation are necessary. First, the VIZART software package is a balance model development used for calculating the material flow in technological processes. VIZART involves taking into account of equipment capacity, transport lines and storage volumes. Secondly, it is necessary to simulate the physico-chemical processes that are involved in the closure of NFC. The third kind of simulation is the development of software that allows the optimization, diagnostics and control of the processes which implies real-time simulation of product flows on the whole plant or on separate lines of the plant. (A.C.)

  18. The effect of quality properties on Tulum cheese using different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cheese samples produced from pasteurized milk were found to have higher dry matter, fat and protein contents and acidity values than cheese samples produced from raw milk. No significant difference was found in the sensory properties of cheese produced from raw and pasteurized milk. In view of these findings, the use ...

  19. 21 CFR 133.147 - Grated American cheese food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Grated American cheese food. 133.147 Section 133.147 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized...

  20. Who Moved My Cheese? Adjusting to Age-Related Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Nieli

    2012-01-01

    The popular book, Who Moved My Cheese? (Johnson, 1998) is a metaphor for change. This parable-like story has particular resonance with older adults who face many potential life-altering changes. The four characters in the book are looking for their cheese in a maze. Cheese represents whatever makes people happy. How each character adjusts to the…