WorldWideScience

Sample records for model pressurized water

  1. Pressure Transient Model of Water-Hydraulic Pipelines with Cavitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Jiang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Transient pressure investigation of water-hydraulic pipelines is a challenge in the fluid transmission field, since the flow continuity equation and momentum equation are partial differential, and the vaporous cavitation has high dynamics; the frictional force caused by fluid viscosity is especially uncertain. In this study, due to the different transient pressure dynamics in upstream and downstream pipelines, the finite difference method (FDM is adopted to handle pressure transients with and without cavitation, as well as steady friction and frequency-dependent unsteady friction. Different from the traditional method of characteristics (MOC, the FDM is advantageous in terms of the simple and convenient computation. Furthermore, the mechanism of cavitation growth and collapse are captured both upstream and downstream of the water-hydraulic pipeline, i.e., the cavitation start time, the end time, the duration, the maximum volume, and the corresponding time points. By referring to the experimental results of two previous works, the comparative simulation results of two computation methods are verified in experimental water-hydraulic pipelines, which indicates that the finite difference method shows better data consistency than the MOC.

  2. Modeling and diagnostic techniques applicable to the analysis of pressure noise in pressurized water reactors and pressure-sensing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullens, J.A.; Thie, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Pressure noise data from a PWR are interpreted by means of a computer-implemented model. The model's parameters, namely hydraulic impedances and noise sources, are either calculated or deduced from fits to data. Its accuracy is encouraging and raises the possibility of diagnostic assistance for nuclear plant monitoring. A number of specific applications of pressure noise in the primary system of a PWR and in a pressure sensing system are suggested

  3. Pore water pressure variations in Subpermafrost groundwater : Numerical modeling compared with experimental modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivière, Agnès.; Goncalves, Julio; Jost, Anne; Font, Marianne

    2010-05-01

    Development and degradation of permafrost directly affect numerous hydrogeological processes such as thermal regime, exchange between river and groundwater, groundwater flows patterns and groundwater recharge (Michel, 1994). Groundwater in permafrost area is subdivided into two zones: suprapermafrost and subpermafrost which are separated by permafrost. As a result of the volumetric expansion of water upon freezing and assuming ice lenses and frost heave do not form freezing in a saturated aquifer, the progressive formation of permafrost leads to the pressurization of the subpermafrost groundwater (Wang, 2006). Therefore disappearance or aggradation of permafrost modifies the confined or unconfined state of subpermafrost groundwater. Our study focuses on modifications of pore water pressure of subpermafrost groundwater which could appear during thawing and freezing of soil. Numerical simulation allows elucidation of some of these processes. Our numerical model accounts for phase changes for coupled heat transport and variably saturated flow involving cycles of freezing and thawing. The flow model is a combination of a one-dimensional channel flow model which uses Manning-Strickler equation and a two-dimensional vertically groundwater flow model using Richards equation. Numerical simulation of heat transport consisted in a two dimensional model accounting for the effects of latent heat of phase change of water associated with melting/freezing cycles which incorporated the advection-diffusion equation describing heat-transfer in porous media. The change of hydraulic conductivity and thermal conductivity are considered by our numerical model. The model was evaluated by comparing predictions with data from laboratory freezing experiments. Experimental design was undertaken at the Laboratory M2C (Univesité de Caen-Basse Normandie, CNRS, France). The device consisted of a Plexiglas box insulated on all sides except on the top. Precipitation and ambient temperature are

  4. LINEAR KERNEL SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINES FOR MODELING PORE-WATER PRESSURE RESPONSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KHAMARUZAMAN W. YUSOF

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pore-water pressure responses are vital in many aspects of slope management, design and monitoring. Its measurement however, is difficult, expensive and time consuming. Studies on its predictions are lacking. Support vector machines with linear kernel was used here to predict the responses of pore-water pressure to rainfall. Pore-water pressure response data was collected from slope instrumentation program. Support vector machine meta-parameter calibration and model development was carried out using grid search and k-fold cross validation. The mean square error for the model on scaled test data is 0.0015 and the coefficient of determination is 0.9321. Although pore-water pressure response to rainfall is a complex nonlinear process, the use of linear kernel support vector machine can be employed where high accuracy can be sacrificed for computational ease and time.

  5. Graph based hydraulic modelling of pressure in water distribution networks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mpiana, LA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available of the flow at any given node is equal to zero. This is explained by: where 𝐶𝑖𝑗is a matrix of n row and b columns node-branch matrix and 𝐶𝑖𝑗 = { 1, 𝑖𝑓 𝑏𝑟𝑎𝑛𝑐ℎ 𝑗 𝑒𝑛𝑡𝑒𝑟𝑠 𝑛𝑜𝑑𝑒 ð... given period of time and can be formulated as Where 𝐵 is the amount of incoming water at the node 𝑖 and 𝑡 is the delivery time period of time required. The amount of incoming water required at the node for a period of time is compared...

  6. Physical model of lean suppression pressure oscillation phenomena: steam condensation in the light water reactor pressure suppression system (PSS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCauley, E.W.; Holman, G.S.; Aust, E.; Schwan, H.; Vollbrandt, J.

    1980-01-01

    Using the results of large scale multivent tests conducted by GKSS, a physical model of chugging is developed. The unique combination of accurate digital data and cinematic data has provided the derivation of a detailed, quantified correlation between the dynamic physical variables and the associated two-phase thermo-hydraulic phenomena occurring during lean suppression (chugging) phases of the loss-of-coolant accident in a boiling water reactor pressure suppression system

  7. Development of Extended Period Pressure-Dependent Demand Water Distribution Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judi, David R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mcpherson, Timothy N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-20

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has used modeling and simulation of water distribution systems for N-1 contingency analyses to assess criticality of water system assets. Critical components considered in these analyses include pumps, tanks, and supply sources, in addition to critical pipes or aqueducts. A contingency represents the complete removal of the asset from system operation. For each contingency, an extended period simulation (EPS) is run using EPANET. An EPS simulates water system behavior over a time period, typically at least 24 hours. It assesses the ability of a system to respond and recover from asset disruption through distributed storage in tanks throughout the system. Contingencies of concern are identified as those in which some portion of the water system has unmet delivery requirements. A delivery requirement is defined as an aggregation of water demands within a service area, similar to an electric power demand. The metric used to identify areas of unmet delivery requirement in these studies is a pressure threshold of 15 pounds per square inch (psi). This pressure threshold is used because it is below the required pressure for fire protection. Any location in the model with pressure that drops below this threshold at any time during an EPS is considered to have unmet service requirements and is used to determine cascading consequences. The outage area for a contingency is the aggregation of all service areas with a pressure below the threshold at any time during the EPS.

  8. Nonlinear Creep Model for Deep Rock under High Stress and High Pore Water Pressure Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Yuanguang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Conventional triaxial compression creep experiments for deep sandstone under high confining pressure and high pore water pressure were carried out, in order to predict the creep response of deep rock under these conditions. A nonlinear viscoelastic-plastic creep constitutive model was proposed based on the experimental results. The theory of component model was used as a basis for the formulation of this model. First, by using mathematical fitting and analogy, a new nonlinear viscous component was introduced based on the properties of the creep curves during the tertiary stage. Second, a timer component to judge whether the creep can get into the tertiary stage was presented. Finally, a nonlinear creep model was proposed. Results showed good agreement between theory curves from the nonlinear creep model and experimental data. This model can be applied to predict deep rock creep responses under high stress and high pore water pressure conditions. Hence, the obtained conclusions in this study are beneficial to deep rock engineering.

  9. Modelling of pressurized water reactor fuel, rod time dependent radial heat flow with boundary element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarler, B.

    1987-01-01

    The basic principles of the boundary element method numerical treatment of the radial flow heat diffusion equation are presented. The algorithm copes the time dependent Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions, temperature dependent material properties and regions from different materials in thermal contact. It is verified on the several analytically obtained test cases. The developed method is used for the modelling of unsteady radial heat flow in pressurized water reactor fuel rod. (author)

  10. Optical modeling of nickel-base alloys oxidized in pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clair, A. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon cedex (France); Foucault, M.; Calonne, O. [Areva ANP, Centre Technique Departement Corrosion-Chimie, 30 Bd de l' industrie, BP 181, 71205 Le Creusot (France); Finot, E., E-mail: Eric.Finot@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon cedex (France)

    2012-10-01

    The knowledge of the aging process involved in the primary water of pressurized water reactor entails investigating a mixed growth mechanism in the corrosion of nickel-base alloys. A mixed growth induces an anionic inner oxide and a cationic diffusion parallel to a dissolution-precipitation process forms the outer zone. The in situ monitoring of the oxidation kinetics requires the modeling of the oxide layer stratification with the full knowledge of the optical constants related to each component. Here, we report the dielectric constants of the alloys 600 and 690 measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry and fitted to a Drude-Lorentz model. A robust optical stratification model was determined using focused ion beam cross-section of thin foils examined by transmission electron microscopy. Dielectric constants of the inner oxide layer depleted in chromium were assimilated to those of the nickel thin film. The optical constants of both the spinels and extern layer were determined. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spectroscopic ellipsometry of Ni-base alloy oxidation in pressurized water reactor Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurements of the dielectric constants of the alloys Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical simulation of the mixed oxidation process using a three stack model Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scattered crystallites cationic outer layer; linear Ni-gradient bottom layer Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of the refractive index of the spinel and the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers.

  11. Optical modeling of nickel-base alloys oxidized in pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clair, A.; Foucault, M.; Calonne, O.; Finot, E.

    2012-01-01

    The knowledge of the aging process involved in the primary water of pressurized water reactor entails investigating a mixed growth mechanism in the corrosion of nickel-base alloys. A mixed growth induces an anionic inner oxide and a cationic diffusion parallel to a dissolution–precipitation process forms the outer zone. The in situ monitoring of the oxidation kinetics requires the modeling of the oxide layer stratification with the full knowledge of the optical constants related to each component. Here, we report the dielectric constants of the alloys 600 and 690 measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry and fitted to a Drude–Lorentz model. A robust optical stratification model was determined using focused ion beam cross-section of thin foils examined by transmission electron microscopy. Dielectric constants of the inner oxide layer depleted in chromium were assimilated to those of the nickel thin film. The optical constants of both the spinels and extern layer were determined. - Highlights: ► Spectroscopic ellipsometry of Ni-base alloy oxidation in pressurized water reactor ► Measurements of the dielectric constants of the alloys ► Optical simulation of the mixed oxidation process using a three stack model ► Scattered crystallites cationic outer layer; linear Ni-gradient bottom layer ► Determination of the refractive index of the spinel and the Cr 2 O 3 layers

  12. Two-phase coolant pump model of pressurized light water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.A. dos; Freitas, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    The two-phase coolant pump model of pressurized light water nuclear reactors is an important point for the loss of primary coolant accident analysis. The homologous curves set up the complete performance of the pump and are input for accidents analysis thermal-hydraulic codes. This work propose a mathematical model able to predict the two-phase homologous curves where it was incorporated geometric and operational pump condition. The results were compared with the experimental tests data from literature and it has showed a good agreement. (author)

  13. On the importance of valve modelling, reflected pressures, and wall friction, in CATHENA water hammer simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuthe, T.G.

    1998-01-01

    The results of code and modelling developments outlined in this paper show that CATHENA can be used to accurately model the behaviour of valve slam generated water hammer if sufficient care and detail are used to model the characteristics of the valve. It also shows that CATHENA can accurately predict the reflection and transmission of travelling water pressure waves at expansions, contractions, and dead ends. Finally, although CATHENA is capable of accurately predicting the critical phenomena observed in water hammer, the inter-peak timing of the pressure excursions is not well predicted when significant bulk flows occur. The use of an unsteady wall friction factor to correct for this discrepancy has been examined, but the implementation of relationships suggested in the literature provided too much damping. A good match between experimental and simulation data can be achieved, but it is suggested that the default implementation of such a relationship take place only after an investigation of further potential loss terms can be completed. (author)

  14. Thermal-Hydraulics analysis of pressurized water reactor core by using single heated channel model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Akbari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermal hydraulics of nuclear reactor as a basis of reactor safety has a very important role in reactor design and control. The thermal-hydraulic analysis provides input data to the reactor-physics analysis, whereas the latter gives information about the distribution of heat sources, which is needed to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis. In this study single heated channel model as a very fast model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of pressurized water reactor core has been developed. For verifying the results of this model, we used RELAP5 code as US nuclear regulatory approved thermal hydraulics code. The results of developed single heated channel model have been checked with RELAP5 results for WWER-1000. This comparison shows the capability of single heated channel model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of reactor core.

  15. Mesos-scale modeling of irradiation in pressurized water reactor concrete biological shields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pape, Yann [ORNL; Huang, Hai [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2016-01-01

    Neutron irradiation exposure causes aggregate expansion, namely radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE). The structural significance of RIVE on a portion of a prototypical pressurized water reactor (PWR) concrete biological shield (CBS) is investigated by using a meso- scale nonlinear concrete model with inputs from an irradiation transport code and a coupled moisture transport-heat transfer code. RIVE-induced severe cracking onset appears to be triggered by the ini- tial shrinkage-induced cracking and propagates to a depth of > 10 cm at extended operation of 80 years. Relaxation of the cement paste stresses results in delaying the crack propagation by about 10 years.

  16. Pressurized water reactor system model for control system design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, K.F.; Cain, J.T.

    1975-01-01

    Satisfactory operation of present generation Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Nuclear Power systems requires that several independent and interactive control systems be designed. Since it is not practical to use an actual PWR system as a design tool, a mathematical model of the system must be developed as a design and analysis tool. The model presented has been developed to be used as an aid in applying optimal control theory to design and implement new control systems for PWR plants. To be applicable, the model developed must represent the PWR system in its normal operating range. For safety analysis the operating conditions of the system are usually abnormal and, therefore, the system modeling requirements are different from those for control system design and analysis

  17. Study and modeling of fluctuating fluid forces exerted on fuel rods in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, Saptarshi

    2016-01-01

    Flow-induced vibrations in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core can cause fretting wear in the fuel rods. Due to friction, wear occurs at the contact locations between the spacer grid and the fuel rod. This could compromise the first safety barrier of the nuclear reactor by damaging the fuel rod cladding. In order to ensure the integrity of the cladding, it is necessary to know the random fluctuating forces acting on the rods. However, the spectra for these fluid forces are not well known. The goal of this PhD thesis was to use simple geometrical elements to check the reproducibility of realistic pressurized water reactor spacer grids. As a first step, large eddy simulations were performed on a concentric annular pipe for different mesh refinements using the CFD code Trio CFD (previously Trio U) developed by CEA. A mesh sensitivity study was performed to obtain an acceptable mesh for reproducing standard literature results. This information on mesh resolution was used when carrying out simulations using various geometric obstacles inside the pipe, namely, mixing vanes, circular spacer grid and a combination of square spacer grid with mixing vanes. The last of the three configurations is the closest to a realistic PWR fuel assembly. Structured mesh was generated for the annular pipe case and circular grid case. An innovative hybrid mesh was used for the two remaining cases of the mixing vanes and the square grid: keeping unstructured mesh around the obstacles and structured mesh in the rest of the domain. The inner wall of the domain was representative of the fuel rod cladding. Both hydraulic and wall pressure characteristics were analyzed for each case. The results for the square grid case were found to be an approximate combination of the mixing vane case and circular grid case. Simulation results were compared with experiments performed at CEA Cadarache. Some preliminary comparisons were also made with classical semi-empirical models. (author) [fr

  18. Modeling of primary water stress corrosion cracking at control rod drive mechanism nozzles of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Omar Fernandes

    2006-01-01

    One of the main failure mechanisms that cause risks to pressurized water reactors is the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) occurring in alloys. It can occurs, besides another places, at the control reactor displacement mechanism nozzles. It is caused by the joint effect of tensile stress, temperature, susceptible metallurgical microstructure and environmental conditions of the primary water. These cracks can cause accidents that reduce nuclear safety by blocking the rod's displacement and may cause leakage of primary water, reducing the reactor's life. In this work it is proposed a study of the existing models and a modeling proposal to primary water stress corrosion cracking in these nozzles in a nickel based Alloy 600. It is been superposed electrochemical and fracture mechanics models, and validated using experimental and literature data. The experimental data were obtained at CDTN-Brazilian Nuclear Technology Development Center, in a recent installed slow strain rate testing equipment. In the literature it is found a diagram that indicates a thermodynamic condition for the occurrence of some PWSCC sub modes in Alloy 600: it was used potential x pH diagrams (Pourbaix diagrams), for Alloy 600 in high temperature primary water (300 deg C till 350 deg C). Over it, were located the PWSCC sub modes, using experimental data. It was added a third parameter called 'stress corrosion strength fraction'. However, it is possible to superpose to this diagram, other parameters expressing PWSCC initiation or growth kinetics from other models. Here is the proposition of the original contribution of this work: from an original experimental condition of potential versus pH, it was superposed, an empiric-comparative, a semi-empiric-probabilistic, an initiation time, and a strain rate damage models, to quantify respectively the PWSCC susceptibility, the failure time, and in the two lasts, the initiation time of stress corrosion cracking. It was modeling from our

  19. The pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Pressurized water reactor technology has reached a maturity that has engendered a new surge of innovation, which in turn, has led to significant advances in the technology. These advances, characterized by bold thinking but conservative execution, are resulting in nuclear plant designs which offer significant performance and safety improvements. This paper describes the innovations which are being designed into mainstream PWR technology as well as the desings which are resulting from such innovations. (author)

  20. Tribocorrosion in pressurized high temperature water: a mass flow model based on the third body approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guadalupe Maldonado, S.

    2014-07-01

    Pressurized water reactors (PWR) used for power generation are operated at elevated temperatures (280-300 °C) and under higher pressure (120-150 bar). In addition to these harsh environmental conditions some components of the PWR assemblies are subject to mechanical loading (sliding, vibration and impacts) leading to undesirable and hardly controllable material degradation phenomena. In such situations wear is determined by the complex interplay (tribocorrosion) between mechanical, material and physical-chemical phenomena. Tribocorrosion in PWR conditions is at present little understood and models need to be developed in order to predict component lifetime over several decades. The goal of this project, carried out in collaboration with the French company AREVA NP, is to develop a predictive model based on the mechanistic understanding of tribocorrosion of specific PWR components (stainless steel control assemblies, stellite grippers). The approach taken here is to describe degradation in terms of electro-chemical and mechanical material flows (third body concept of tribology) from the metal into the friction film (i.e. the oxidized film forming during rubbing on the metal surface) and from the friction film into the environment instead of simple mass loss considerations. The project involves the establishment of mechanistic models for describing the single flows based on ad-hoc tribocorrosion measurements operating at low temperature. The overall behaviour at high temperature and pressure in investigated using a dedicated tribometer (Aurore) including electrochemical control of the contact during rubbing. Physical laws describing the individual flows according to defined mechanisms and as a function of defined physical parameters were identified based on the obtained experimental results and from literature data. The physical laws were converted into mass flow rates and solved as differential equation system by considering the mass balance in compartments

  1. Modeling of a Flooding Induced Station Blackout for a Pressurized Water Reactor Using the RISMC Toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandelli, Diego; Prescott, Steven R; Smith, Curtis L; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua J; Kinoshita, Robert A

    2011-07-01

    In the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) approach we want to understand not just the frequency of an event like core damage, but how close we are (or are not) to key safety-related events and how might we increase our safety margins. The RISMC Pathway uses the probabilistic margin approach to quantify impacts to reliability and safety by coupling both probabilistic (via stochastic simulation) and mechanistic (via physics models) approaches. This coupling takes place through the interchange of physical parameters and operational or accident scenarios. In this paper we apply the RISMC approach to evaluate the impact of a power uprate on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a tsunami-induced flooding test case. This analysis is performed using the RISMC toolkit: RELAP-7 and RAVEN codes. RELAP-7 is the new generation of system analysis codes that is responsible for simulating the thermal-hydraulic dynamics of PWR and boiling water reactor systems. RAVEN has two capabilities: to act as a controller of the RELAP-7 simulation (e.g., system activation) and to perform statistical analyses (e.g., run multiple RELAP-7 simulations where sequencing/timing of events have been changed according to a set of stochastic distributions). By using the RISMC toolkit, we can evaluate how power uprate affects the system recovery measures needed to avoid core damage after the PWR lost all available AC power by a tsunami induced flooding. The simulation of the actual flooding is performed by using a smooth particle hydrodynamics code: NEUTRINO.

  2. High Pressure Industrial Water Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    In conjunction with Space Shuttle Main Engine testing at Stennis, the Nordberg Water Pumps at the High Pressure Industrial Water Facility provide water for cooling the flame deflectors at the test stands during test firings.

  3. Strong influence of vapor pressure deficit on plants' water-use efficiency: a modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, K.; Zhang, Q.; Novick, K. A.

    2017-12-01

    The plant's trade-off between carbon uptake and water loss, which is often represented as intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE), is an important determinant of how plants will respond to expected changes in climate. Here, we present on work that assesses how the response of iWUE to the climatic drivers differs across the isohydricity spectrum, and to evaluate the relative influence of climatic drivers (vapor pressure deficit (D), soil moisture (θ), and atmospheric CO2 (ca)) on iWUE. The results suggested noticeable difference in the response of iWUE to climatic drivers among the species. The iWUE of the isohydric species, which tends to regulate stomata more actively, was more responsive to the variation of θ and D compared to the anisohydric species, of which stomata regulation is less active. Among the climatic drivers, D was the most influential driver on iWUE for all species. These results are consistent with those from a complementary effort to leverage long-term eddy covariance flux records from the FLUXNET 2015 database to compare the influence of D and θ on iWUE across a wide range of biomes; this analysis revealed that D is a more influential driver of iWUE than θ in the most cases. These findings highlight the importance of atmospheric dryness on trees' physiological response, which is important to understand given the large, global increases in D expected in coming decades. As a final step, we will report on early results to evaluate performance of widely-used ecosystem models in capturing the response of iWUE to climatic drivers across regions and to find out if the projection agrees well with flux tower observations. We also attempt to seek whether the relationship between iWUE and climatic drivers can be generalized for each vegetation type or climate regime.

  4. Modeling of hydrogen stratification in a pressurized water reactor containment with the contain computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kljenak, I.; Skerlavaj, A.; Parzer, I.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen distribution during a severe accident in a nuclear power plant with a two-loop Westinghouse-type pressurized water reactor was simulated with the CONTAIN computer code. The accidents is initiated by a large-break loss-of-coolant accident which is nit successfully mitigated by the action of the emergency core cooling system. Cases with and without successful actuation of spray systems and fan coolers were considered. The simulations predicted hydrogen stratification within the containment main compartment with intensive hydrogen mixing in the containment dome region. Pressure and temperature responses were analyzed as well.(author)

  5. Free energy models for ice VII and liquid water derived from pressure, entropy, and heat capacity relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Philip C; Benedict, Lorin X; Belof, Jonathan L

    2017-08-28

    We present equations of state relevant to conditions encountered in ramp and multiple-shock compression experiments of water. These experiments compress water from ambient conditions to pressures as high as about 14 GPa and temperatures of up to several hundreds of Kelvin. Water may freeze into ice VII during this process. Although there are several studies on the thermodynamic properties of ice VII, an accurate and analytic free energy model from which all other properties may be derived in a thermodynamically consistent manner has not been previously determined. We have developed such a free energy model for ice VII that is calibrated with pressure-volume-temperature measurements and melt curve data. Furthermore, we show that liquid water in the pressure and temperature range of interest is well-represented by a simple Mie-Grüneisen equation of state. Our liquid water and ice VII equations of state are validated by comparing to sound speed and Hugoniot data. Although they are targeted towards ramp and multiple-shock compression experiments, we demonstrate that our equations of state also behave reasonably well at pressures and temperatures that lie somewhat beyond those found in the experiments.

  6. Modeling of boron control during power transients in a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, P.; Distexhe, E.

    1986-01-01

    Accurate control instructions in a reactor control aid computer are included in order to realize the boron makeup throughput, which is required to obtain the boron concentration in the primary coolant loop, predicted by a neutronic code. A modeling of the transfer function between the makeup and the primary loop is proposed. The chemical and volumetric control system, the pressurizer, and the primary loop are modeled as instantaneous diffusion cells. The pipes are modeled as time lag lines. The model provides the unstationary boron distributions in the different elements of the setup. A numerical code is developed to calculate the time evolutions of the makeup throughput during power transients

  7. Prediction of diametral creep for pressure tubes of a pressurized heavy water reactor using data based modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Yong [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Na, Man Gyun [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a bundle position-wise linear model (BPLM) to predict Pressure Tube (PT) diametral creep employing the previously measured PT diameters and operating conditions. There are twelve bundles in a fuel channel, and for each bundle a linear model was developed by using the dependent variables, such as the fast neutron fluences and the bundle coolant temperatures. The training data set was selected using the subtractive clustering method. The data of 39 channels that consist of 80 percent of a total of 49 measured channels from Units 2, 3, and 4 of the Wolsung nuclear plant in Korea were used to develop the BPLM. The data from the remaining 10 channels were used to test the developed BPLM. The BPLM was optimized by the maximum likelihood estimation method. The developed BPLM to predict PT diametral creep was verified using the operating data gathered from Units 2, 3, and 4. Two error components for the BPLM, which are the epistemic error and the aleatory error, were generated. The diametral creep prediction and two error components will be used for the generation of the regional overpower trip setpoint at the corresponding effective full power days. The root mean square (RMS) errors were also generated and compared to those from the current prediction method. The RMS errors were found to be less than the previous errors.

  8. Determining the terrain characteristics related to the surface expression of subsurface water pressurization in permafrost landscapes using susceptibility modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Jean E.; Rudy, Ashley C. A.; Lamoureux, Scott F.; Treitz, Paul M.

    2017-06-01

    Warming of the Arctic in recent years has led to changes in the active layer and uppermost permafrost. In particular, thick active layer formation results in more frequent thaw of the ice-rich transient layer. This addition of moisture, as well as infiltration from late season precipitation, results in high pore-water pressures (PWPs) at the base of the active layer and can potentially result in landscape degradation. To predict areas that have the potential for subsurface pressurization, we use susceptibility maps generated using a generalized additive model (GAM). As model response variables, we used active layer detachments (ALDs) and mud ejections (MEs), both formed by high PWP conditions at the Cape Bounty Arctic Watershed Observatory, Melville Island, Canada. As explanatory variables, we used the terrain characteristics elevation, slope, distance to water, topographic position index (TPI), potential incoming solar radiation (PISR), distance to water, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI; ME model only), geology, and topographic wetness index (TWI). ALDs and MEs were accurately modelled in terms of susceptibility to disturbance across the study area. The susceptibility models demonstrate that ALDs are most probable on hill slopes with gradual to steep slopes and relatively low PISR, whereas MEs are associated with higher elevation areas, lower slope angles, and areas relatively far from water. Based on these results, this method identifies areas that may be sensitive to high PWPs and helps improve our understanding of geomorphic sensitivity to permafrost degradation.

  9. Determining the terrain characteristics related to the surface expression of subsurface water pressurization in permafrost landscapes using susceptibility modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Holloway

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Warming of the Arctic in recent years has led to changes in the active layer and uppermost permafrost. In particular, thick active layer formation results in more frequent thaw of the ice-rich transient layer. This addition of moisture, as well as infiltration from late season precipitation, results in high pore-water pressures (PWPs at the base of the active layer and can potentially result in landscape degradation. To predict areas that have the potential for subsurface pressurization, we use susceptibility maps generated using a generalized additive model (GAM. As model response variables, we used active layer detachments (ALDs and mud ejections (MEs, both formed by high PWP conditions at the Cape Bounty Arctic Watershed Observatory, Melville Island, Canada. As explanatory variables, we used the terrain characteristics elevation, slope, distance to water, topographic position index (TPI, potential incoming solar radiation (PISR, distance to water, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI; ME model only, geology, and topographic wetness index (TWI. ALDs and MEs were accurately modelled in terms of susceptibility to disturbance across the study area. The susceptibility models demonstrate that ALDs are most probable on hill slopes with gradual to steep slopes and relatively low PISR, whereas MEs are associated with higher elevation areas, lower slope angles, and areas relatively far from water. Based on these results, this method identifies areas that may be sensitive to high PWPs and helps improve our understanding of geomorphic sensitivity to permafrost degradation.

  10. Water Pressure. Water in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Carly Sporer

    The Water in Africa Project was realized over a 2-year period by a team of Peace Corps volunteers. As part of an expanded, detailed design, resources were collected from over 90 volunteers serving in African countries, photos and stories were prepared, and standards-based learning units were created for K-12 students. This unit, "Water…

  11. Observation and characterization of flow in critical sections of a horizontal pressurized gating system using water models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiganesh Venkataramani

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This work is concerned with the hydraulics and flow characterization in a pressurized, horizontal gating system with multiple ingates attached to a plate mold, using transparent water models. Runners with two different aspect ratios (w/h = 0.5 and 2 and four different types of ingates (rectangular, convergent, divergent and venturi were examined for their influence on flow behavior. Flow behavior was visualized using a high speed camera capable of capturing images up to 10,000 frames per second. Real time experimentation with a few runner – ingate combinations were carried out to validate the usefulness of water models in predicting the filling behavior. Comparison of the approaches provided useful insights into the filling behavior in critical sections of the flow passages as well as the utility of water models towards understanding of the filling behavior during real time casting.

  12. State-Space Model Predictive Control Method for Core Power Control in Pressurized Water Reactor Nuclear Power Stations

    OpenAIRE

    Guoxu Wang; Jie Wu; Bifan Zeng; Zhibin Xu; Wanqiang Wu; Xiaoqian Ma

    2017-01-01

    A well-performed core power control to track load changes is crucial in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power stations. It is challenging to keep the core power stable at the desired value within acceptable error bands for the safety demands of the PWR due to the sensitivity of nuclear reactors. In this paper, a state-space model predictive control (MPC) method was applied to the control of the core power. The model for core power control was based on mathematical models of the reacto...

  13. Pressurized water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    Design and mode of operation of the main PWR components are described: reactor core, pressure vessel and internals, cooling systems with pumps and steam generators, ancillary systems, and waste processing. (TK) [de

  14. Development and Applications of a General Coupled Thermal-hydraulic/Neutronic Model for the Ringhals-3 Pressurized Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staalek, Mathias

    2008-03-01

    Coupled calculations are important for the simulation of nuclear power plants when there is a strong feedback between the neutron kinetics and the thermal-hydraulics. A general coupled model of the Ringhals-3 Pressurized Water Reactor has been developed for this purpose. The development is outlined in the thesis with details given in the appended papers. A PARCS model was developed for the core calculations and a RELAP5 model for the thermal-hydraulic calculations. The RELAP5 model has 157 channels for modelling the flow in the fuel assemblies. This means that there is a one-one correspondence radially between the neutronic and thermal-hydraulic nodalization. This detailed mapping between the neutron kinetics and the thermal-hydraulics makes it possible to use the model for all kinds of transient. To provide realistic material data to the PARCS model, a cross-section interface was developed. With this interface one can import material data from a binary CASMO-4 library file into PARCS. Due to the one-to-one mapping, any any core loading can easily be considered. The PARCS model was benchmarked against measurements of the steady-state power distribution of Ringhals-3. The power shape was well reproduced by the model. Validational work for steady-state conditions of the thermal-hydraulic was also successfully performed. The most challenging part of the validation of a coupled model is for transients. This is much more difficult since the dynamics of the system becomes very important. Two transients that occurred at Ringhals-3 were chosen for the validational work. The first transient was a Load Rejection Transient. In general the model gave good results but some problems were experienced, e.g. the pressurizer pressure turned out to be more difficult to be correctly simulated. The second transient was a Loss of Feed Water transient. A malfunctioning feed water control valve closed, and therefore shut down the feed water supply to the steam generator in one of the

  15. An analytical and experimental investigation of natural circulation transients in a model pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massoud, M.

    1987-01-01

    Natural Circulation phenomena in a simulated PWR was investigated experimentally and analytically. The experimental investigation included determination of system characteristics as well as system response to the imposed transient under symmetric and asymmetric operations. System characteristics were used to obtain correlation for heat transfer coefficient in heat exchangers, system flow resistance, and system buoyancy heat. Asymmetric transients were imposed to study flow oscillation and possible instability. The analytical investigation encompassed development of mathematical model for single-phase, steady-state and transient natural circulation as well as modification of existing model for two-phase flow analysis of phenomena such as small break LOCA, high pressure coolant injection and pump coast down. The developed mathematical model for single-phase analysis was computer coded to simulate the imposed transients. The computer program, entitled ''Symmetric and Asymmetric Analysis of Single-Phase Flow (SAS),'' were employed to simulate the imposed transients. It closely emulated the system behavior throughout the transient and subsequent steady-state. Modifications for two-phase flow analysis included addition of models for once-through steam generator and electric heater rods. Both programs are faster than real time. Off-line, they can be used for prediction and training applications while on-line they serve for simulation and signal validation. The programs can also be used to determine the sensitivity of natural circulation behavior to variation of inputs such as secondary distribution and power transients

  16. An analytical and experimental investigation of natural circulation transients in a model pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massoud, M

    1987-01-01

    Natural Circulation phenomena in a simulated PWR was investigated experimentally and analytically. The experimental investigation included determination of system characteristics as well as system response to the imposed transient under symmetric and asymmetric operations. System characteristics were used to obtain correlation for heat transfer coefficient in heat exchangers, system flow resistance, and system buoyancy heat. Asymmetric transients were imposed to study flow oscillation and possible instability. The analytical investigation encompassed development of mathematical model for single-phase, steady-state and transient natural circulation as well as modification of existing model for two-phase flow analysis of phenomena such as small break LOCA, high pressure coolant injection and pump coast down. The developed mathematical model for single-phase analysis was computer coded to simulate the imposed transients. The computer program, entitled ''Symmetric and Asymmetric Analysis of Single-Phase Flow (SAS),'' were employed to simulate the imposed transients. It closely emulated the system behavior throughout the transient and subsequent steady-state. Modifications for two-phase flow analysis included addition of models for once-through steam generator and electric heater rods. Both programs are faster than real time. Off-line, they can be used for prediction and training applications while on-line they serve for simulation and signal validation. The programs can also be used to determine the sensitivity of natural circulation behavior to variation of inputs such as secondary distribution and power transients.

  17. Water-Based Pressure-Sensitive Paints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Watkins, A. Neal; Oglesby, Donald M.; Ingram, JoAnne L.

    2006-01-01

    Water-based pressure-sensitive paints (PSPs) have been invented as alternatives to conventional organic-solvent-based pressure-sensitive paints, which are used primarily for indicating distributions of air pressure on wind-tunnel models. Typically, PSPs are sprayed onto aerodynamic models after they have been mounted in wind tunnels. When conventional organic-solvent-based PSPs are used, this practice creates a problem of removing toxic fumes from inside the wind tunnels. The use of water-based PSPs eliminates this problem. The waterbased PSPs offer high performance as pressure indicators, plus all the advantages of common water-based paints (low toxicity, low concentrations of volatile organic compounds, and easy cleanup by use of water).

  18. Vapor–Liquid–Liquid Equilibrium Measurements and Modeling of Ethanethiol + Methane + Water, 1-Propanethiol + Methane + Water and 1-Butanethiol + Methane + Water Ternary Systems at 303, 335, and 365 K and Pressure Up to 9 MPa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awan, Javeed; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Tsivintzelis, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    New vapor–liquid–liquid equilibrium (VLLE) data for ethanethiol + methane + water, 1-propanethiol + methane + water, and 1-butanethiol + methane + water ternary systems have been measured at three temperatures (303, 335, and 365 K) and pressures up to 9 MPa. A “static-analytic” method was used....... However, the model underestimates the water content of the vapor phase, especially at low pressures and at the highest investigated temperature, i.e., at 365 K. Only the ethanthiol + methane + water system showed significant cross-association effects...

  19. High-pressure water facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    NASA Test Operations Group employees, from left, Todd Pearson, Tim Delcuze and Rodney Wilkinson maintain a water pump in Stennis Space Center's high-pressure water facility. The three were part of a group of employees who rode out Hurricane Katrina at the facility and helped protect NASA's rocket engine test complex.

  20. High pressure experimental water loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenon, M.

    1958-01-01

    A high pressure experimental water loop has been made for studying the detection and evolution of cladding failure in a pressurized reactor. The loop has been designed for a maximum temperature of 360 deg. C, a maximum of 160 kg/cm 2 and flow rates up to 5 m 3 /h. The entire loop consists of several parts: a main circuit with a canned rotor circulation pump, steam pressurizer, heating tubes, two hydro-cyclones (one de-gasser and one decanter) and one tubular heat exchanger; a continuous purification loop, connected in parallel, comprising pressure reducing valves and resin pots which also allow studies of the stability of resins under pressure, temperature and radiation; following the gas separator is a gas loop for studying the recombination of the radiolytic gases in the steam phase. The preceding circuits, as well as others, return to a low pressure storage circuit. The cold water of the low pressure storage flask is continuously reintroduced into the high pressure main circuit by means of a return pump at a maximum head of 160 kg /cm 2 , and adjusted to the pressurizer level. This loop is also a testing bench for the tight high pressure apparatus. The circulating pump and the connecting flanges (Oak Ridge type) are water-tight. The feed pump and the pressure reducing valves are not; the un-tight ones have a system of leak recovery. To permanently check the tightness the circuit has been fitted with a leak detection system (similar to the HRT one). (author) [fr

  1. Water cooled static pressure probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagen, Nicholas T. (Inventor); Eves, John W. (Inventor); Reece, Garland D. (Inventor); Geissinger, Steve L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved static pressure probe containing a water cooling mechanism is disclosed. This probe has a hollow interior containing a central coolant tube and multiple individual pressure measurement tubes connected to holes placed on the exterior. Coolant from the central tube symmetrically immerses the interior of the probe, allowing it to sustain high temperature (in the region of 2500 F) supersonic jet flow indefinitely, while still recording accurate pressure data. The coolant exits the probe body by way of a reservoir attached to the aft of the probe. The pressure measurement tubes are joined to a single, larger manifold in the reservoir. This manifold is attached to a pressure transducer that records the average static pressure.

  2. Summarized presentation of the numerical model used for the pressurizer of a light water nuclear reactor. Description and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siarry, P.

    1981-12-01

    The pressurizer model is first described together with its coupling to the nuclear unit. The different stages involved in the validation are then presented: validation of overall qualitative behavior; validation of the open loop pressurizer model; validation of the various units for controlling pressures and levels; simulation of two large transients (Bugey plant) [fr

  3. State-Space Model Predictive Control Method for Core Power Control in Pressurized Water Reactor Nuclear Power Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxu Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A well-performed core power control to track load changes is crucial in pressurized water reactor (PWR nuclear power stations. It is challenging to keep the core power stable at the desired value within acceptable error bands for the safety demands of the PWR due to the sensitivity of nuclear reactors. In this paper, a state-space model predictive control (MPC method was applied to the control of the core power. The model for core power control was based on mathematical models of the reactor core, the MPC model, and quadratic programming (QP. The mathematical models of the reactor core were based on neutron dynamic models, thermal hydraulic models, and reactivity models. The MPC model was presented in state-space model form, and QP was introduced for optimization solution under system constraints. Simulations of the proposed state-space MPC control system in PWR were designed for control performance analysis, and the simulation results manifest the effectiveness and the good performance of the proposed control method for core power control.

  4. State-space model predictive control method for core power control in pressurized water reactor nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guo Xu; Wu, Jie; Zeng, Bifan; Wu, Wangqiang; Ma, Xiao Qian [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou (China); Xu, Zhibin [Electric Power Research Institute of Guangdong Power Grid Corporation, Guangzhou (China)

    2017-02-15

    A well-performed core power control to track load changes is crucial in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power stations. It is challenging to keep the core power stable at the desired value within acceptable error bands for the safety demands of the PWR due to the sensitivity of nuclear reactors. In this paper, a state-space model predictive control (MPC) method was applied to the control of the core power. The model for core power control was based on mathematical models of the reactor core, the MPC model, and quadratic programming (QP). The mathematical models of the reactor core were based on neutron dynamic models, thermal hydraulic models, and reactivity models. The MPC model was presented in state-space model form, and QP was introduced for optimization solution under system constraints. Simulations of the proposed state-space MPC control system in PWR were designed for control performance analysis, and the simulation results manifest the effectiveness and the good performance of the proposed control method for core power control.

  5. Water-Based Pressure Sensitive Paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oglesby, Donald M.; Ingram, JoAnne L.; Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.

    2004-01-01

    Preparation and performance of a water-based pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is described. A water emulsion of an oxygen permeable polymer and a platinum porphyrin type luminescent compound were dispersed in a water matrix to produce a PSP that performs well without the use of volatile, toxic solvents. The primary advantages of this PSP are reduced contamination of wind tunnels in which it is used, lower health risk to its users, and easier cleanup and disposal. This also represents a cost reduction by eliminating the need for elaborate ventilation and user protection during application. The water-based PSP described has all the characteristics associated with water-based paints (low toxicity, very low volatile organic chemicals, and easy water cleanup) but also has high performance as a global pressure sensor for PSP measurements in wind tunnels. The use of a water-based PSP virtually eliminates the toxic fumes associated with the application of PSPs to a model in wind tunnels.

  6. Experiments and modeling of discharge characteristics in water-mist sprays generated by pressure-swirl atomizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, Paolo E.

    2012-12-01

    Pressure-swirl atomizers are often employed to generate a water-mist spray, typically employed in fire suppression. In the present study, an experimental characterization of dispersion (velocity and cone angle) and atomization (drop-size axial evolution) was carried out following a previously developed methodology, with specific reference to the initial region of the spray. Laser-based techniques were used to quantitatively evaluate the considered phenomena: velocity field was reconstructed through a Particle Image Velocimetry analysis; drop-size distribution was measured by a Malvern Spraytec device, highlighting secondary atomization and subsequent coalescence along the spray axis. Moreover, a comprehensive set of relations was validated as predictive of the involved parameters, following an inviscid-fluid approach. The proposed model pertains to early studies on pressure-swirl atomizers and primarily yields to determine both initial velocity and cone angle. The spray thickness is also predicted and a classic correlation for Sauter Mean Diameter is shown to provide good agreement with experimental results. The analysis was carried out at the operative pressure of 80 bar; two injectors were employed featuring different orifice diameters and flow numbers, as a sort of parametric approach to this spray typology.

  7. Fundamentals of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, L.

    1982-01-01

    In many countries, the pressurized water reactor (PWR) is the most widely used, even though it requires enrichment of the uranium to about 3% in U-235 and the moderator-coolant must be maintained at a high pressure, about 2200 pounds per square inch. Our objective in this series of seven lectures is to describe the design and operating characteristics of the PWR system, discuss the reactor physics methods used to evaluate performance, examine the way fuel is consumed and produced, study the instrumentation system, review the physics measurements made during initial startup of the reactor, and outline the administrative aspects of starting up a reactor and operating it safely and effectively

  8. High-pressure vapor-liquid equilibria of systems containing ethylene glycol, water and methane - Experimental measurements and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folas, Georgios; Berg, Ole J.; Solbraa, Even

    2007-01-01

    This work presents new experimental phase equilibrium measurements of the binary MEG-methane and the ternary MEG-water-methane system at low temperatures and high pressures which are of interest to applications related to natural gas processing. Emphasis is given to MEG and water solubility...

  9. The Drainage Consolidation Modeling of Sand Drain in Red Mud Tailing and Analysis on the Change Law of the Pore Water Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-sheng Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to prevent the occurring of dam failure and leakage, sand-well drainages systems were designed and constructed in red mud tailing. It is critical to focus on the change law of the pore water pressure. The calculation model of single well drainage pore water pressure was established. The pore water pressure differential equation was deduced and the analytical solution of differential equation using Bessel function and Laplace transform was given out. The impact of parameters such as diameter d, separation distance l, loading rate q, and coefficient of consolidation Cv in the function on the pore water pressure is analyzed by control variable method. This research is significant and has great reference for preventing red mud tailings leakage and the follow-up studies on the tailings stability.

  10. Water solubility in pyrope at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mookherjee, M.; Karato, S.-

    2006-12-01

    To address how much water is stored within the Earth's mantle, we need to understand the water solubility in the nominally anhydrous minerals. Much is known about olivine and pyroxene. Garnet is another important component, approaching 40% by volume in the transition zone. Only two studies on water solubility in pyrope at high-pressures exist which contradict each other. Lu and Keppler (1997) observed increase in water solubility in a natural pyrope up to 200 ppm wt of water, till 10 GPa. They concluded that the proton is located in the interstitial site. Withers et al. (1998) on the contrary, observed increasing water content in Mg-rich pyrope till 6 GPa, then sudden decrease of water, beyond detection, at 7 GPa. Based on infrared spectra, Withers et al. (1998), concluded hydrogarnet (Si^{4+} replaced by 4H+ to form O4H4) substitution in synthetic magnesium rich pyrope. They argued that at high pressure owing to larger volume, hydrogarnet substitution is unstable and water is expelled out of garnet. In transition zone conditions, however, majorite garnet seems to contain around 600-700 ppm wt of water (Bolfan-Casanova et al. 2000; Katayama et al. 2003). The cause for such discrepancy is not clear and whether garnet could store a significant amount of water at mantle condition is unconstrained. In order to understand the solubility mechanism of water in pyrope at high-pressure, we have conducted high- pressure experiments on naturally occurring single crystals of pyrope garnet (from Arizona, Aines and Rossman, 1984). To ascertain water-saturated conditions, we use olivine single-crystal as an internal standard. Preliminary results indicate that natural pyrope is capable of dissolving water at high-pressures, however, water preferentially enters olivine than in pyrope. We are undertaking systematic study to estimate the solubility of water in pyrope as a function of pressure. This will enable us to develop solubility models to understand the defect mechanisms

  11. Pressurized water-reactor feedwater piping response to water hammer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, D.

    1978-03-01

    The nuclear power industry is interested in steam-generator water hammer because it has damaged the piping and components at pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Water hammer arises when rapid steam condensation in the steam-generator feedwater inlet of a PWR causes depressurization, water-slug acceleration, and slug impact at the nearest pipe elbow. The resulting pressure pulse causes the pipe system to shake, sometimes violently. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential structural effects of steam-generator water hammer on feedwater piping. This was accomplished by finite-element computation of the response of two sections of a typical feedwater pipe system to four representative water-hammer pulses. All four pulses produced high shear and bending stresses in both sections of pipe. Maximum calculated pipe stresses varied because the sections had different characteristics and were sensitive to boundary-condition modeling

  12. Thermal - hydraulic analysis of pressurizer water reactors using the model of open lateral boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, R.C.

    1980-10-01

    A computational method is developed for thermal-hydraulic analysis, where the channel may be analysed by more than one independent steps of calculation. This is made possible by the incorporation of the model of open lateral boundary in the code COBRA-IIIP, which permits the determination of the subchannel of an open lattice PWR core in a multi-step calculation. The thermal-hydraulic code COBRA-IIIP, developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is used as the basic model for this study. (Author) [pt

  13. Pressurized water reactor inspection procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, D.; Mueller, G.; Otte, H.J.; Roth, W.

    1998-01-01

    Inspections of the reactor pressure vessels of pressurized water reactors (PWR) so far used to be carried out with different central mast manipulators. For technical reasons, parallel inspections of two manipulators alongside work on the refueling cavity, so as to reduce the time spent on the critical path in a revision outage, are not possible. Efforts made to minimize the inspection time required with one manipulator have been successful, but their effects are limited. Major reductions in inspection time can be achieved only if inspections are run with two manipulators in parallel. The decentralized manipulator built by GEC Alsthom Energie and so far emmployed in boiling water reactors in the USA, Spain, Switzerland and Japan allows two systems to be used in parallel, thus reducing the time required for standard inspection of a pressure vessel from some six days to three days. These savings of approximately three days are made possible without any compromises in terms of positioning by rail-bound systems. During inspection, the reactor refueling cavity is available for other revision work without any restrictions. The manipulator can be used equally well for inspecting standard PWR, PWR with a thermal shield, for inspecting the land between in-core instrumentation nozzles, BWR with and without jet pumps (complementary inspection), and for inspecting core support shrouds. (orig.) [de

  14. Chaboche-based cyclic material hardening models for 316 SS–316 SS weld under in-air and pressurized water reactor water conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William K.; Majumdar, Saurindranath; Natesan, Krishnamurti

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • 316 SS–316 SS weld cyclically harden/soften while undergoing fatigue loading. • Cyclic hardening/softening creates cycle dependent stress-strain curves. • This necessitate to estimate the cycle dependence of material properties. • Cyclic evolution of Chaboche parameters are estimated under different conditions. - Abstract: This paper discusses a material hardening models for welds made from 316 stainless steel (SS) to 316 SS. The model parameters were estimated from the strain-versus-stress curves obtained from tensile and fatigue tests conducted under different conditions (air at room temperature, air at 300 °C, and primary loop water conditions for a pressurized water reactor). These data were used to check the fatigue cycle dependency of the material hardening parameters (yield stress, parameters related to Chaboche-based linear and nonlinear kinematic hardening models, etc.). The details of the experimental results, material hardening models, and associated calculated results are published in an Argonne report (ANL/LWRS-15/2). This paper summarizes the reported material parameters for 316 SS–316 SS welds and their dependency on fatigue cycles and other test conditions.

  15. Core-state models for fuel management of equilibrium and transition cycles in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragones, J.M.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Corella, M.R.

    1977-08-01

    Fuel management requires that mass, energy, and reactivity balance be satisfied in each reload cycle. Procedures for selection of alternatives, core-state models, and fuel cost calculations have been developed for both equilibrium and transition cycles. Effective cycle lengths and fuel cycle variables--namely, reload batch size, schedule of incore residence for the fuel, feed enrichments, energy sharing cycle by cycle, and discharge burnup and isotopics--are the variables being considered for fuel management planning with a given energy generation plan, fuel design, recycling strategy, and financial assumptions.

  16. Multi-objective optimization of a compact pressurized water nuclear reactor computational model for biological shielding design using innovative materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunes, M.A., E-mail: matheus.tunes@usp.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 – CEP 05508 – 030 São Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira, C.R.E. de, E-mail: cassiano@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, The University of New Mexico, Farris Engineering Center, 221, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1070 (United States); Schön, C.G., E-mail: schoen@usp.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 – CEP 05508 – 030 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Use of two n-γ transport codes leads to optimized model of compact nuclear reactor. • It was possible to safely reduce both weight and volume of the biological shielding. • Best configuration obtained by using new composites for both γ and n attenuation. - Abstract: The aim of the present work is to develop a computational model of a compact pressurized water nuclear reactor (PWR) to investigate the use of innovative materials to enhance the biological shielding effectiveness. Two radiation transport codes were used: the first one – MCNP – for the PWR design and the GEM/EVENT to simulate (in a 1D slab) the behavior of several materials and shielding thickness on gamma and neutron radiation. Additionally MATLAB Optimization Toolbox was used to provide new geometric configurations of the slab aiming at reducing the volume and weight of the walls by means of a cost/objective function. It is demonstrated in the reactor model that the dose rate outside biological shielding has been reduced by one order of magnitude for the optimized model compared with the initial configuration. Volume and weight of the shielding walls were also reduced. The results indicated that one-dimensional deterministic code to reach an optimized geometry and test materials, combined with a three-dimensional model of a compact nuclear reactor in a stochastic code, is a fast and efficient procedure to test shielding performance and optimization before the experimental assessment. A major outcome of this research is that composite materials (ECOMASS 2150TU96) may replace (with advantages) traditional shielding materials without jeopardizing the nuclear power plant safety assurance.

  17. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure and high dynamic pressure on stability and rheological properties of model oil-in-water emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigikocin, Erman; Mert, Behic; Alpas, Hami

    2011-09-01

    Both static and dynamic high pressure applications provide interesting modifications in food structures which lead to new product formulations. In this study, the effects of two different treatments, high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) and high dynamic pressure (HDP), on oil-in-water emulsions were identified and compared. Microfluidization was selected from among the HDP homogenization techniques. The performance of each process was analyzed in terms of rheological modifications and emulsion stability improvements compared with the coarse emulsions. The stability of the emulsions was determined comparatively by using an analytical photo-centrifuge device employing novel analysis technology. Whey protein isolate (WPI) in combination with a food polysaccharide (xanthan gum, guar gum or locust bean gum) were used as emulsifying and stabilizing ingredients. The effective disruption of oil droplets and the degradation of polysaccharides by the shear forces under high pressure in HDP microfluidization yielded finer emulsions with lower viscosities, leading to distinctive improvements in emulsion stability. On the other hand, improvements in stability obtained with HHP treatment were due to the thickening of the emulsions mainly induced by protein unfolding. The corresponding increases in viscosity were intensified in emulsion formulations containing higher oil content. Apart from these, HHP treatment was found to be relatively more contributive to the enhancements in viscoelastic properties.

  18. Two-phase flow experiments on Counter-Current Flow Limitation in a model of the hot leg of a pressurized water reactor (2015 test series)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Matthias; Lucas, Dirk; Pietruske, Heiko; Szalinski, Lutz

    2016-12-15

    Counter-Current Flow Limitation (CCFL) is of importance for PWR safety analyses in several accident scenarios connected with loss of coolant. Basing on the experiences obtained during a first series of hot leg tests now new experiments on counter-current flow limitation were conducted in the TOPFLOW pressure vessel. The test series comprises air-water tests at 1 and 2 bar as well as steam-water tests at 10, 25 and 50 bar. During the experiments the flow structure was observed along the hot leg model using a high-speed camera and web-cams. In addition pressure was measured at several positions along the horizontal part and the water levels in the reactor-simulator and steam-generator-simulator tanks were determined. This report documents the experimental setup including the description of operational and special measuring techniques, the experimental procedure and the data obtained. From these data flooding curves were obtained basing on the Wallis parameter. The results show a slight shift of the curves in dependency of the pressure. In addition a slight decrease of the slope was found with increasing pressure. Additional investigations concern the effects of hysteresis and the frequencies of liquid slugs. The latter ones show a dependency on pressure and the mass flow rate of the injected water. The data are available for CFD-model development and validation.

  19. Two-phase flow experiments on Counter-Current Flow Limitation in a model of the hot leg of a pressurized water reactor (2015 test series)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, Matthias; Lucas, Dirk; Pietruske, Heiko; Szalinski, Lutz

    2016-12-01

    Counter-Current Flow Limitation (CCFL) is of importance for PWR safety analyses in several accident scenarios connected with loss of coolant. Basing on the experiences obtained during a first series of hot leg tests now new experiments on counter-current flow limitation were conducted in the TOPFLOW pressure vessel. The test series comprises air-water tests at 1 and 2 bar as well as steam-water tests at 10, 25 and 50 bar. During the experiments the flow structure was observed along the hot leg model using a high-speed camera and web-cams. In addition pressure was measured at several positions along the horizontal part and the water levels in the reactor-simulator and steam-generator-simulator tanks were determined. This report documents the experimental setup including the description of operational and special measuring techniques, the experimental procedure and the data obtained. From these data flooding curves were obtained basing on the Wallis parameter. The results show a slight shift of the curves in dependency of the pressure. In addition a slight decrease of the slope was found with increasing pressure. Additional investigations concern the effects of hysteresis and the frequencies of liquid slugs. The latter ones show a dependency on pressure and the mass flow rate of the injected water. The data are available for CFD-model development and validation.

  20. Space Shuttle Main Engine Low Pressure Oxidizer Turbo-Pump Inducer Dynamic Environment Characterization through Water Model and Hot-Fire Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, Patrick; Patton, Marc; Schwartz, Alan; Stanton, David

    2006-01-01

    The Low Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (LPOTP) inducer on the Block II configuration Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) experienced blade leading edge ripples during hot firing. This undesirable condition led to a minor redesign of the inducer blades. This resulted in the need to evaluate the performance and the dynamic environment of the redesign, relative to the current configuration, as part of the design acceptance process. Sub-scale water model tests of the two inducer configurations were performed, with emphasis on the dynamic environment due to cavitation induced vibrations. Water model tests were performed over a wide range of inlet flow coefficient and pressure conditions, representative of the scaled operating envelope of the Block II SSME, both in flight and in ground hot-fire tests, including all power levels. The water test hardware, facility set-up, type and placement of instrumentation, the scope of the test program, specific test objectives, data evaluation process and water test results that characterize and compare the two SSME LPOTP inducers are discussed. In addition, dynamic characteristics of the two water models were compared to hot fire data from specially instrumented ground tests. In general, good agreement between the water model and hot fire data was found, which confirms the value of water model testing for dynamic characterization of rocket engine turbomachinery.

  1. Water hammer characteristics of integral pressurized water reactor primary loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo, Qiaolin; Qiu, Suizheng; Lu, Wei; Tian, Wenxi; Su, Guanghui; Xiao, Zejun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Water hammer models developed for IPWR primary loop using MOC. • Good agreement between the developed code and the experiment. • The good agreement between WAHAP and Flowmaster can validate the equations in WAHAP. • The primary loop of IPWR suffers from slight water hammer impact. -- Abstract: The present work discussed the single-phase water hammer phenomenon, which was caused by the four-pump-alternate startup in an integral pressurized water reactor (IPWR). A new code named water hammer program (WAHAP) was developed independently based on the method of characteristic to simulate hydraulic transients in the primary system of IPWR and its components such as reactor core, once-through steam generators (OTSG), the main coolant pumps and so on. Experimental validation for the correctness of the equations and models in WAHAP was carried out and the models fit the experimental data well. Some important variables were monitored including transient volume flow rates, opening angle of valve disc and pressure drop in valves. The water hammer commercial software Flowmaster V7 was also employed to compare with WAHAP and the good agreement can validate the equations in WAHAP. The transient results indicated that the primary loop of IPWR suffers from slight water hammer impact under pump switching conditions

  2. Chloride Ingress into Concrete under Water Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou; Sander, Lotte Braad; Grelk, Bent

    2011-01-01

    The chloride ingress into concrete under water pressures of 100 kPa and 800 kPa have been investigated by experiments. The specimens were exposed to a 10% NaCl solution and water mixture. For the concrete having w/c = 0.35 the experimental results show the chloride diffusion coefficient at 800 k......Pa (~8 atm.) is 12 times greater than at 100 kPa (~1 atm.). For w/c = 0.45 and w/c = 0.55 the chloride diffusion coefficients are 7 and 3 times greater. This means that a change in pressure highly influences the chloride ingress into the concrete and thereby the life length models for concrete structures....

  3. Pressure scaled water impact test of a 12.5 inch diameter model of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    A total of 59 tail first drops were made. Model entry conditions simulated full scale vertical velocities of approximately 75 to 110 ft/sec with horizontal velocities up to 45 ft/sec and impact angles to + or - 10 deg. These tests were conducted at scaled atmospheric pressures (1.26 psia or 65 mm.Hg). The model, test program, test facility, test equipment, instrumentation system, data reduction procedures, and test results are described.

  4. Thermohydraulic analysis of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    The computer program PANTERA is applied in the thermo-hydraulic analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Cores (PWR). It is a version of COBRA-IIIC in which a new thermal conduction model for fuel rods was introduced. The results calculated by this program are compared with experimental data obtained from bundles of fuel rods, simulating reactor conditions. The validity of the new thermal model is checked too. The PANTERA code, through a simplified procedure of calculation, is used in the thermo-hydraulic analysis of Indian Point, Unit 2, reactor core, in stationary conditions. The results are discussed and compared with design data. (Autor) [pt

  5. Model of pulmonary fluid traffic homeostasis based on respiratory cycle pressure, bidirectional bronchiolo-pulmonar shunting and water evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbel, Sven; Kurbel, Beatrica; Gulam, Danijela; Spajić, Borislav

    2010-06-01

    The main puzzle of the pulmonary circulation is how the alveolar spaces remain dry over a wide range of pulmonary vascular pressures and blood flows. Although normal hydrostatic pressure in pulmonary capillaries is probably always below 10 mmHg, well bellow plasma colloid pressure of 25 mmHg, most textbooks state that some fluid filtration through capillary walls does occur, while the increased lymph drainage prevents alveolar fluid accumulation. The lack of a measurable pressure drop along pulmonary capillaries makes the classic description of Starling forces unsuitable to the low pressure, low resistance pulmonary circulation. Here presented model of pulmonary fluid traffic describes lungs as a matrix of small vascular units, each consisting of alveoli whose capillaries are anastomotically linked to the bronchiolar capillaries perfused by a single bronchiolar arteriole. It proposes that filtration and absorption in pulmonary and in bronchiolar capillaries happen as alternating periods of low and of increased perfusion pressures. The model is based on three levels of filtration control: short filtration phases due to respiratory cycle of the whole lung are modulated by bidirectional bronchiolo-pulmonar shunting independently in each small vascular unit, while fluid evaporation from alveolar groups further tunes local filtration. These mechanisms are used to describe a self-sustaining regulator that allows optimal fluid traffic in different settings. The proposed concept is used to describe development of pulmonary edema in several clinical entities (exercise in wet or dry climate, left heart failure, people who rapidly move to high altitudes, acute cyanide and carbon monoxide poisoning, large pulmonary embolisms). .

  6. Effect of hydrogel particle additives on water-accessible pore structure of sandy soils: a custom pressure plate apparatus and capillary bundle model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y; Durian, D J

    2013-05-01

    To probe the effects of hydrogel particle additives on the water-accessible pore structure of sandy soils, we introduce a custom pressure plate method in which the volume of water expelled from a wet granular packing is measured as a function of applied pressure. Using a capillary bundle model, we show that the differential change in retained water per pressure increment is directly related to the cumulative cross-sectional area distribution f(r) of the water-accessible pores with radii less than r. This is validated by measurements of water expelled from a model sandy soil composed of 2-mm-diameter glass beads. In particular, it is found that the expelled water is dramatically dependent on sample height and that analysis using the capillary bundle model gives the same pore size distribution for all samples. The distribution is found to be approximately log normal, and the total cross-sectional area fraction of the accessible pore space is found to be f(0)=0.34. We then report on how the pore distribution and total water-accessible area fraction are affected by superabsorbent hydrogel particle additives, uniformly mixed into a fixed-height sample at varying concentrations. Under both fixed volume and free swelling conditions, the total area fraction of water-accessible pore space in a packing decreases exponentially as the gel concentration increases. The size distribution of the pores is significantly modified by the swollen hydrogel particles, such that large pores are clogged while small pores are formed.

  7. Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Calculation Using Rossendorf Coolant Mixing Model Flow Measurements in Primary Loop of Coolant in a Pressurized Water Reactor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Farkas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to simulate the thermohydraulic consequences of a main steam line break and to compare the obtained results with Rossendorf Coolant Mixing Model (ROCOM 1.1 experimental results. The objective is to utilize data from steady-state mixing experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD calculations to determine the flow distribution and the effect of thermal mixing phenomena in the primary loops for the improvement of normal operation conditions and structural integrity assessment of pressurized water reactors. The numerical model of ROCOM was developed using the FLUENT code. The positions of the inlet and outlet boundary conditions and the distribution of detailed velocity/turbulence parameters were determined by preliminary calculations. The temperature fields of transient calculation were averaged in time and compared with time-averaged experimental data. The perforated barrel under the core inlet homogenizes the flow, and therefore, a uniform temperature distribution is formed in the pressure vessel bottom. The calculated and measured values of lowest temperature were equal. The inlet temperature is an essential parameter for safety assessment. The calculation predicts precisely the experimental results at the core inlet central region. CFD results showed a good agreement (both qualitatively and quantitatively with experimental results.

  8. A Model Assessment of mid-Century Pressures on Water resources in West Africa Arising from Population Growth and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisser, D.; Ibrahim, M.; Ibrahim, B.; Barry, B.; Proussevitch, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    West Africa is among the most vulnerable regions to climate change. The economy of most countries depends on rainfed agriculture in one rainy season and any change in precipitation will affect the agricultural output and the economies as a whole. At the same time, it is one of the regions where climate model shows the highest uncertainties in future trends of precipitation. We used WBMplus, a macroscale hydrological model to simultaneously calculate water demand and availability for a set of land use, and socio-economic scenarios around the 2050's (2051-2060) for river basins in the ten countries participating in the West African Science Service Center on Climate Change and Adapted Land Use (WASCAL) project. The model is driven with bias corrected climate model data from 5 GCM models (and 4 RCP's ) and simulates components of the hydrological cycle by taking into reservoir operations, and water demand for irrigated areas, livestock, as well as domestic water demand on a daily time step at a spatial resolution of 1 min (~2 km). Results suggest that water availability is under pressure from projected shifts towards less precipitation early in the rainy season (May-June) despite a small (~5%) increase in the ensemble mean annual precipitation. Water demand is projected to more than double for livestock and domestic, as a result of population growth (at a rate of ~3% per year). Demand for irrigation will rise sharply if irrigation is expanded from the current area (representing less than 3% of all croplands in the region), closer to its potential which is multiple times higher than the existing area. Despite adequate water supply for most regions on an annual basis, the shifts in water availability and increased variability in combination with increased demand could exert significant pressures on water resources locally during low flow periods. Ensemble results show small changes in annual water availability in the region but significant shifts in the temporal

  9. Hormonal regulation of salt and water excretion: a mathematical model of whole kidney function and pressure natriuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Robert; Thomas, S Randall

    2014-01-01

    We present a lumped-nephron model that explicitly represents the main features of the underlying physiology, incorporating the major hormonal regulatory effects on both tubular and vascular function, and that accurately simulates hormonal regulation of renal salt and water excretion. This is the first model to explicitly couple glomerulovascular and medullary dynamics, and it is much more detailed in structure than existing whole organ models and renal portions of multiorgan models. In contrast to previous medullary models, which have only considered the antidiuretic state, our model is able to regulate water and sodium excretion over a variety of experimental conditions in good agreement with data from experimental studies of the rat. Since the properties of the vasculature and epithelia are explicitly represented, they can be altered to simulate pathophysiological conditions and pharmacological interventions. The model serves as an appropriate starting point for simulations of physiological, pathophysiological, and pharmacological renal conditions and for exploring the relationship between the extrarenal environment and renal excretory function in physiological and pathophysiological contexts.

  10. Exponential Boundary Observers for Pressurized Water Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermine Som, Idellette Judith; Cocquempot, Vincent; Aitouche, Abdel

    2015-11-01

    This paper deals with state estimation on a pressurized water pipe modeled by nonlinear coupled distributed hyperbolic equations for non-conservative laws with three known boundary measures. Our objective is to estimate the fourth boundary variable, which will be useful for leakage detection. Two approaches are studied. Firstly, the distributed hyperbolic equations are discretized through a finite-difference scheme. By using the Lipschitz property of the nonlinear term and a Lyapunov function, the exponential stability of the estimation error is proven by solving Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMIs). Secondly, the distributed hyperbolic system is preserved for state estimation. After state transformations, a Luenberger-like PDE boundary observer based on backstepping mathematical tools is proposed. An exponential Lyapunov function is used to prove the stability of the resulted estimation error. The performance of the two observers are shown on a water pipe prototype simulated example.

  11. Solubility and physical properties of sugars in pressurized water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldaña, Marleny D.A.; Alvarez, Víctor H.; Haldar, Anupam

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sugar solubility in pressurized water and density at high pressures were measured. ► Glucose solubility was higher than that of lactose as predicted by their σ-profiles. ► Sugar aqueous solubility decreased with an increase in pressure from 15 to 120 bar. ► Aqueous glucose molecular packing shows high sensitivity to pressure. ► The COSMO-SAC model qualitatively predicted the sugar solubility data. - Abstract: In this study, the solubility, density, and refractive index of glucose and lactose in water as a function of temperature were measured. For solubility of sugars in pressurized water, experimental data were obtained at pressures of (15 to 120) bar and temperatures of (373 to 433) K using a dynamic flow high pressure system. Density data for aqueous sugar solutions were obtained at pressures of (1 to 300) bar and temperatures of (298 to 343) K. The refractive index of aqueous sugar solutions was obtained at 293 K and atmospheric pressure. Activity coefficient models, Van Laar and the Conductor-like Screening Model-Segment Activity Coefficient (COSMO-SAC), were used to fit and predict the experimental solubility data, respectively. The results obtained showed that the solubility of both sugars in pressurized water increase with an increase in temperature. However, with the increase of pressure from 15 bar to 120 bar, the solubility of both sugars in pressurized water decreased. The Van Laar model fit the experimental aqueous solubility data with deviations lower than 13 and 53% for glucose and lactose, respectively. The COSMO-SAC model predicted qualitatively the aqueous solubility of these sugars.

  12. Air scaling and modeling studies for the 1/5-scale mark I boiling water reactor pressure suppression experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, W.; McCauley, E.W.

    1978-01-01

    Results of table-top model experiments performed to investigate pool dynamics effects due to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) for the Peach Bottom Mark I boiling water reactor containment system guided subsequent conduct of the 1/5-scale torus experiment and provided new insight into the vertical load function (VLF). Pool dynamics results were qualitatively correct. Experiments with a 1/64-scale fully modeled drywell and torus showed that a 90 0 torus sector was adequate to reveal three-dimensional effects; the 1/5-scale torus experiment confirmed this

  13. Air scaling and modeling studies for the 1/5-scale mark I boiling water reactor pressure suppression experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, W.; McCauley, E.W.

    1978-01-04

    Results of table-top model experiments performed to investigate pool dynamics effects due to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) for the Peach Bottom Mark I boiling water reactor containment system guided subsequent conduct of the 1/5-scale torus experiment and provided new insight into the vertical load function (VLF). Pool dynamics results were qualitatively correct. Experiments with a 1/64-scale fully modeled drywell and torus showed that a 90/sup 0/ torus sector was adequate to reveal three-dimensional effects; the 1/5-scale torus experiment confirmed this.

  14. Transport and metabolic degradation of hydrogen peroxide in Chara corallina: model calculations and measurements with the pressure probe suggest transport of H(2)O(2) across water channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzler, T; Steudle, E

    2000-12-01

    A mathematical model is presented that describes permeation of hydrogen peroxide across a cell membrane and the implications of solute decomposition by catalase inside the cell. The model was checked and analysed by means of a numerical calculation that raised predictions for measured osmotic pressure relaxation curves. Predictions were tested with isolated internodal cells of CHARA: corallina, a model system for investigating interactions between water and solute transport in plant cells. Series of biphasic osmotic pressure relaxation curves with different concentrations of H(2)O(2) of up to 350 mol m(-3) are presented. A detailed description of determination of permeability (P(s)) and reflection coefficients (sigma(s)) for H(2)O(2) is given in the presence of the chemical reaction in the cell. Mean values were P(s)=(3.6+/-1.0) 10(-6) m s(-1) and sigma(s)=(0.33+/-0.12) (+/-SD, N=6 cells). Besides transport properties, coefficients for the catalase reaction following a Michaelis-Menten type of kinetics were determined. Mean values of the Michaelis constant (k(M)) and the maximum rate of decompositon (v(max)) were k(M)=(85+/-55) mol m(-3) and v(max)=(49+/-40) nmol (s cell)(-1), respectively. The absolute values of P:(s) and sigma(s) of H(2)O(2) indicated that hydrogen peroxide, a molecule with chemical properties close to that of water, uses water channels (aquaporins) to cross the cell membrane rapidly. When water channels were inhibited with the blocker mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)), the permeabilities of both water and H(2)O(2) were substantially reduced. In fact, for the latter, it was not measurable. It is suggested that some of the water channels in CHARA: (and, perhaps, in other species) serve as 'peroxoporins' rather than as 'aquaporins'.

  15. One-Dimensional Reactive Transport Modeling of CO2 Storage Systems - Change in Cap Rock Porosity Triggered by Pressure and Temperature Dependent CO2-Water-Rock Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemme, C.; van Berk, W.

    2015-12-01

    In carbon capture and storage (CCS) systems supercritical CO2 is injected into a reservoir and dissolves in the reservoir brine. Subsequently, CO2(aq) diffuses into the cap rock to regions of lower total pressure and temperature and triggers CO2-water-rock interactions that are coupled with mass transport and result in precipitation and/or dissolution of minerals along the CO2 migration path. Such hydrogeochemical interactions change porosities and are responsible for the improvement or deterioration of the long term integrity of the system. This study presents a semi-generic hydrogeochemical model based on chemical equilibrium thermodynamics, data from several CO2 storage systems, and plausible assumptions regarding non-available data. One-dimensional reactive transport modeling is performed by using the U.S.G.S. PHREEQC code (3.1.4-8929; phreeqc.dat database) to identify and quantify the loss or gain of total porosity affected by hydrogeochemical reactions driven by diffusive mass transport exposed to pressure and temperature gradients. A fine spatial and temporal discretization, the use of non-reactive tracers, and a broad variety of modeling scenarios enable the calculation of the relevant timescale for simulations of long-term storage of CO2 and the consideration of the pressure dependent mass action law constants along the CO2 migration path. Modeling results show that the relevant timescale for simulations of long-term storage of CO2 is in the range of 106 years, and that pressure/temperature conditions, heterogeneities (veins and fractures) and the mineralogical composition of the cap rock have the strongest influence on the increase in cap rock porosity (maximum increase from initial 5 % to 7.5 %). Critical parameter combinations - total pressure effects are crucial - could put long-term integrity at risks. Nevertheless, a wide range of conditions and parameter combinations for safe CO2 storage is identified by other modeling scenarios.

  16. Water vapour pressure within a maize crop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigter, C.J.

    1977-01-01

    After review of the purposes that have in the course of time been served by investigations on aerial water vapour pressure inside and just above plant stands, measured vapour pressure profiles within a maize crop are reported and discussed. Special attention is paid to measured horizontal

  17. Water Delivery--It's All about Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2005-01-01

    There is a great deal of wisdom in the old saying "water seeks its level." In fact, the concept has bearing on a very practical side of human life as well, since the public water delivery system is based on it. In this article, the author discusses the concept behind water pressure and describes how the water systems work based on this concept.…

  18. A Simple Model for the Viscosity of Rhyolites as a Function of Temperature, Pressure and Water Content: Implications for Obsidian Flow Emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, A. G.; Romine, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the dynamics of rhyolitic conduits and lava flows, requires precise knowledge of how viscosity (η) varies with temperature (T), pressure (P) and volatile content (X). In order to address the paucity of viscosity data for high-silica rhyolite at low water contents, which represent water saturation at near-surface conditions, we made 245 viscosity measurements on Mono Craters (California) rhyolites containing between 0.01 and 1.1 wt.% H2O, at temperatures between 796 and 1774 K using parallel plate and concentric cylinder methods at atmospheric pressure. We then developed and calibrated a new empirical model for the log of the viscosity of rhyolitic melts, where non-linear variations due to temperature and water content are nested within a linear dependence of log η on P. The model was fitted to a total of 563 data points: our 245 new data, 255 published data from rhyolites across a wide P-T-X space, and 63 data on haplogranitic and granitic melts under high P-T conditions. Statistically insignificant parameters were eliminated from the model in an effort to increase parsimony and the final model is simple enough for use in numerical models of conduit or lava flow dynamics: log η = -5.142+(13080-2982log⁡(w+0.229))/(T-(98.9-175.9 log⁡(w+0.229)))- P(0.0007-0.76/T ) where η is in Pa s, w is water content in wt.%, P is in MPa and T is in K. The root mean square deviation (rmsd) between the model predictions and the 563 data points used in calibration is 0.39 log units. Experimental constraints have led previously to spurious correlations between P, T, X and η in viscosity data sets, so that predictive models may struggle to correctly resolve the individual effects of P, T and X, and especially their cross-correlations. The increasing water solubility with depth inside a simple isothermal sheet of obsidian suggests that viscosity should decrease by ~1 order of magnitude at ~20m depth and by ~2 orders of magnitude at ~100m depth. If equilibrium water

  19. System-Level Heat Transfer Analysis, Thermal- Mechanical Cyclic Stress Analysis, and Environmental Fatigue Modeling of a Two-Loop Pressurized Water Reactor. A Preliminary Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Soppet, William [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Majumdar, Saurin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, Ken [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-03

    This report provides an update on an assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for light water reactor components under extended service conditions. This report is a deliverable in April 2015 under the work package for environmentally assisted fatigue under DOE's Light Water Reactor Sustainability program. In this report, updates are discussed related to a system level preliminary finite element model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR). Based on this model, system-level heat transfer analysis and subsequent thermal-mechanical stress analysis were performed for typical design-basis thermal-mechanical fatigue cycles. The in-air fatigue lives of components, such as the hot and cold legs, were estimated on the basis of stress analysis results, ASME in-air fatigue life estimation criteria, and fatigue design curves. Furthermore, environmental correction factors and associated PWR environment fatigue lives for the hot and cold legs were estimated by using estimated stress and strain histories and the approach described in NUREG-6909. The discussed models and results are very preliminary. Further advancement of the discussed model is required for more accurate life prediction of reactor components. This report only presents the work related to finite element modelling activities. However, in between multiple tensile and fatigue tests were conducted. The related experimental results will be presented in the year-end report.

  20. Analysis of some antecipated transients without scram for a pressurized water cooled reactor (PWR) using coupling of the containment code CORAN to the system model code ALMOD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, F. de A.T. de.

    1985-01-01

    Some antecipated transients without scram (ATWS) for a pressurized water cooled reactor, model KWU 1300 MWe, are studied using coupling of the containment code CORAN to the system model code ALMOD, under severe random conditions. This coupling has the objective of including containment model as part of a unified code system. These severe conditions include failure of reactor scram, following a station black-out and emergency power initiation for the burn-up status at the beginning and end of the cycle. Furthermore, for the burn-up status at the end of the cycle a failure in the closure of the pressurizer relief valve was also investigated. For the beginning of the cycle, the containment participates actively during the transient. It is noted that the effect of the burn-up in the fuel is to reduce the seriousness of these transients. On the other hand, the failure in the closure of the pressurized relief valve makes this transients more severe. Moreover, the containment safety or radiological public safety is not affected in any of the cases. (Author) [pt

  1. A RETRAN model of the Calvert Cliffs-1 pressurized water reactor for assessing the safety implications of control systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renier, J P.A.; Smith, O L

    1987-03-01

    The failure mode and effects analysis of Calvert Cliffs-1 identified sequences of events judged sufficiently complex to merit further analysis in detailed dynamic simulations. This report describes the RETRAN model developed for this purpose and the results obtained. The mathematical tool was RETRAN2/Mod3, the latest version of a widely used and extensively validated thermal-hydraulics production code obtained by license agreement with the developer, Electric Power Research Institute, and installed on the ORNL BM-3033 computers. RETRAN2 is based on a first-principles methodology that treats two-phase flow with slip. Thermal equilibrium of phases is assumed except in the pressurizer, where non-equilibrium processes are important and special methodology is used. Heat transfer in solids is obtained from the conventional conduction equation. Point or 1-D kinetics is available for the reactor core. The fundamental methodology is supplemented with a broad list of process submodels that calculate heat transfer coefficients, fluid and metal state properties, choked flow, form and wall friction losses, and other parameters. Also supplied are component submodels for various types of valves and pumps, the latter of which incorporate four-quadrant characteristics for components in which two-phase or reverse flow may be expected, and head versus flow curves for others. Extensive input allows the code to be highly particularized to a specific plant. The major investment in time and manpower occurs in setting up the base case; changes are comparatively easy to implement.

  2. Water-Pressure Distribution on Seaplane Float

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, F L

    1929-01-01

    The investigation presented in this report was conducted for the purpose of determining the distribution and magnitude of water pressures likely to be experienced on seaplane hulls in service. It consisted of the development and construction of apparatus for recording water pressures lasting one one-hundredth second or longer and of flight tests to determine the water pressures on a UO-1 seaplane float under various conditions of taxiing, taking off, and landing. The apparatus developed was found to operate with satisfactory accuracy and is suitable for flight tests on other seaplanes. The tests on the UO-1 showed that maximum pressures of about 6.5 pounds per square inch occur at the step for the full width of the float bottom. Proceeding forward from the step the maximum pressures decrease in magnitude uniformly toward the bow, and the region of highest pressures narrows toward the keel. Immediately abaft the step the maximum pressures are very small, but increase in magnitude toward the stern and there once reached a value of about 5 pounds per square inch. (author)

  3. Performance Evaluation of Pressure Transducers for Water Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.; Stegall, David E.; Treadway, Sean

    2012-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle is being designed for water landings. In order to benchmark the ability of engineering tools to predict water landing loads, test programs are underway for scale model and full-scale water impacts. These test programs are predicated on the reliable measurement of impact pressure histories. Tests have been performed with a variety of pressure transducers from various manufacturers. Both piezoelectric and piezoresistive devices have been tested. Effects such as thermal shock, pinching of the transducer head, and flushness of the transducer mounting have been studied. Data acquisition issues such as sampling rate and anti-aliasing filtering also have been studied. The response of pressure transducers have been compared side-by-side on an impulse test rig and on a 20-inch diameter hemisphere dropped into a pool of water. The results have identified a range of viable configurations for pressure measurement dependent on the objectives of the test program.

  4. Pressure control for minimizing leakage in water distribution systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourhan Samir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades water resources availability has been a major issue on the international agenda. In a situation of worsening scarcity of water resources and the rapidly increasing of water demands, the state of water losses management is part of man’s survival on earth. Leakage in water supply networks makes up a significant amount, sometimes more than 70% of the total water losses. The best practices suggest that pressure management is one of the most effective way to reduce the amount of leakage in a water distribution system. The approach presented in this study is aimed at modeling leakage as a function of pressure and pipe length, calibrating leakage coefficient, using fixed pressure reducing valves (PRVs to develop pressure fluctuation and developing WaterCAD scenarios to minimize leakage through the most effective settings of PRVs. This approach was applied on a district metered area (DMA in Alexandria, Egypt. The application of this approach produced some encouraging results, where the leakage through DMA was dropped by 37% for the best scenario. Thus, this approach is recommended as a decision support tool for determining a desirable solution for leakage reduction. Keywords: District measure area, Infrastructure leakage index, Leakage, Pressure management, Water supply networks

  5. Pressure dependence of dynamical heterogeneity in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teboul, Victor

    2008-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we investigate the effect of pressure on the dynamical heterogeneity in water. We show that the effect of a pressure variation in water is qualitatively different from the effect of a temperature variation on the dynamical heterogeneity in the liquid. We observe a strong decrease of the aggregation of molecules of low mobility together with a decrease of the characteristic time associated with this aggregation. However, the aggregation of the most mobile molecules and the characteristic time of this aggregation are only slightly affected. In accordance with this result, the non-Gaussian parameter shows an important decrease with pressure while the characteristic time t* of the non-Gaussian parameter is only slightly affected. These results highlight then the importance of pressure variation investigations in low temperature liquids on approach to the glass transition

  6. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, R D; Wolery, T J; Bourcier, W L; Wolfe, T; Haussmann, C

    2010-02-19

    Can we use the pressure associated with sequestration to make brine into fresh water? This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). Possible products are: Drinking water, Cooling water, and Extra aquifer space for CO{sub 2} storage. The conclusions are: (1) Many saline formation waters appear to be amenable to largely conventional RO treatment; (2) Thermodynamic modeling indicates that osmotic pressure is more limiting on water recovery than mineral scaling; (3) The use of thermodynamic modeling with Pitzer's equations (or Extended UNIQUAC) allows accurate estimation of osmotic pressure limits; (4) A general categorization of treatment feasibility is based on TDS has been proposed, in which brines with 10,000-85,000 mg/L are the most attractive targets; (5) Brines in this TDS range appear to be abundant (geographically and with depth) and could be targeted in planning future CCS operations (including site selection and choice of injection formation); and (6) The estimated cost of treating waters in the 10,000-85,000 mg/L TDS range is about half that for conventional seawater desalination, due to the anticipated pressure recovery.

  7. Diffraction studies of water under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    During the past decade, improvements in experimental techniques and computer simulation methods have led to a more comprehensive understanding of the properties of water. Foremost among these are X-ray and neutron diffraction which provide information directly of the microscopic structure. Water can exist over a wide range of pressure and temperature and many of its properties change in a characteristic way. It is, therefore, worthwhile to see what microscopic changes occur in the liquid as P and T are systematically varied. Recent developments in diffraction studies on water under pressure are reviewed, paying particular attention to pressure cell construction and structural changes and how these compare with results obtained from other methods

  8. Supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on the latest reactor concepts, single pass core and experimental findings in thermal hydraulics, materials, corrosion, and water chemistry. It highlights research on supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors (SCWRs), one of the Generation IV reactors that are studied around the world. This book includes cladding material development and experimental findings on heat transfer, corrosion and water chemistry. The work presented here will help readers to understand the fundamental elements of reactor design and analysis methods, thermal hydraulics, materials and water

  9. High pressure water jet cutting and stripping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, David T.; Babai, Majid K.

    1991-01-01

    High pressure water cutting techniques have a wide range of applications to the American space effort. Hydroblasting techniques are commonly used during the refurbishment of the reusable solid rocket motors. The process can be controlled to strip a thermal protective ablator without incurring any damage to the painted surface underneath by using a variation of possible parameters. Hydroblasting is a technique which is easily automated. Automation removes personnel from the hostile environment of the high pressure water. Computer controlled robots can perform the same task in a fraction of the time that would be required by manual operation.

  10. High pressure water jet mining machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Clark R.

    1981-05-05

    A high pressure water jet mining machine for the longwall mining of coal is described. The machine is generally in the shape of a plowshare and is advanced in the direction in which the coal is cut. The machine has mounted thereon a plurality of nozzle modules each containing a high pressure water jet nozzle disposed to oscillate in a particular plane. The nozzle modules are oriented to cut in vertical and horizontal planes on the leading edge of the machine and the coal so cut is cleaved off by the wedge-shaped body.

  11. Robust observer based control for axial offset in pressurized-water nuclear reactors based on the multipoint reactor model using Lyapunov approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaidabadinejad, Majid; Ansarifar, Gholam Reza [Isfahan Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2017-11-15

    In nuclear reactor imbalance of axial power distribution induces xenon oscillations. These fluctuations must be maintained bounded within allowable limits. Otherwise, the nuclear power plant could become unstable. Therefore, bounded these oscillations is considered to be a restriction for the load following operation. Also, in order to design the nuclear reactor control systems, poisons concentrations, especially xenon must be accessible. But, physical measurement of these parameters is impossible. In this paper, for the first time, in order to estimate the axial xenon oscillations and ensures these oscillations are kept bounded within allowable limits during load-following operation, a robust observer based nonlinear control based on multipoint kinetics reactor model for pressurized-water nuclear reactors is presented. The reactor core is simulated based on the multi-point nuclear reactor model (neutronic and thermal-hydraulic). Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed observer based controller for the load-following operation.

  12. Coolant mixing in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehne, T.; Grunwald, G.

    1998-10-01

    The behavior of PWRs during cold water or boron dilution transients is strongly influenced by the distribution of coolant temperature and boron concentration at the core inlet. This distribution is the needed input to 3-dimensional neutron kinetics to calculate the power distribution in the core. It mainly depends on how the plugs of cold or unborated water formed in a single loop are mixed in the downcomer and in the lower plenum. To simulate such mixture phenomena requires the application of 3-dimensional CFD (computational fluid dynamics) codes. The results of the simulation have to be validated against mixture experiments at scaled facilities. Therefore, in the framework of a research project funded by BMBF, the institute creates a 1:5 mixture facility representing first the geometry of a German pressurized water reactor and later the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) geometry. The calculations are based on the CFD Code CFX-4. (orig.)

  13. Managing water pressure for water savings in developing countries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-03

    Mar 3, 2014 ... adopted as the most accurate for assessment of real water losses. The MNF is the lowest flow supplied to a hydraulically isolated supply zone (Fig. 1). During the night, most commonly between. 02:00 and 04:00, water use is at its lowest and pressures in the network are at the highest levels, meaning that a ...

  14. Managing water pressure for water savings in developing countries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Whilst the problem of water losses in WDSs is global in scale, solutions need to be tailored to local circumstances due to the various causes of water loss and the mechanisms available to manage them. This paper investigates the potentials of the available pressure management methodologies and their implementation in ...

  15. Parameter Identification with the Random Perturbation Particle Swarm Optimization Method and Sensitivity Analysis of an Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor Nuclear Power Plant Model for Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to obtain appropriate parameters for an advanced pressurized water reactor (PWR unit model is of great significance for power system analysis. The attributes of that ability include the following: nonlinear relationships, long transition time, intercoupled parameters and difficult obtainment from practical test, posed complexity and difficult parameter identification. In this paper, a model and a parameter identification method for the PWR primary loop system were investigated. A parameter identification process was proposed, using a particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm that is based on random perturbation (RP-PSO. The identification process included model variable initialization based on the differential equations of each sub-module and program setting method, parameter obtainment through sub-module identification in the Matlab/Simulink Software (Math Works Inc., Natick, MA, USA as well as adaptation analysis for an integrated model. A lot of parameter identification work was carried out, the results of which verified the effectiveness of the method. It was found that the change of some parameters, like the fuel temperature and coolant temperature feedback coefficients, changed the model gain, of which the trajectory sensitivities were not zero. Thus, obtaining their appropriate values had significant effects on the simulation results. The trajectory sensitivities of some parameters in the core neutron dynamic module were interrelated, causing the parameters to be difficult to identify. The model parameter sensitivity could be different, which would be influenced by the model input conditions, reflecting the parameter identifiability difficulty degree for various input conditions.

  16. Impact of Pressure and Brine Salinity on Capillary Pressure-Water Saturation Relations in Geological CO2 Sequestration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongwon Jung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Capillary pressure-water saturation relations are required to explore the CO2/brine flows in deep saline aquifers including storage capacity, relative permeability of CO2/brine, and change to stiffness and volume. The study on capillary pressure-water saturation curves has been conducted through experimentation and theoretical models. The results show that as the pressure increases up to 12 MPa, (1 capillary pressure-water saturation curves shift to lower values at given water saturation, (2 after the drainage process, residual water saturation decreases, and (3 after the imbibition process, capillary CO2 trapping increases. Capillary pressure-water saturation curves above 12 MPa appear to be similar because of relatively constant contact angle and interfacial tension. Also, as brine salinity increases from 1 M to 3 M NaCl, (1 capillary pressure-water saturation curves shift to lower capillary pressure, (2 residual water saturation decreases, and (3 capillary CO2 trapping increases. The results show that pressure and brine salinity have an influence on the capillary pressure-water saturation curves. Also, the scaled capillary CO2 entry pressure considering contact angle and interfacial tension is inconsistent with atmospheric conditions due to the lack of wettability information. Better exploration of wettability alteration is required to predict capillary pressure-water saturation curves at various conditions that are relevant to geological CO2 sequestration.

  17. Functional systems of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzel, V.

    1982-01-01

    The main topics, discussed in the present paper, are: - Principle design of the reactor coolant system - reactor pressure vessel with internals - containment design - residual heat removal and emergency cooling systems - nuclear component cooling systems - emergency feed water systems - plant electric power supply system. (orig./RW)

  18. Evaluating the Laplace pressure of water nanodroplets from simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Shahrazad M. A.; Sciortino, Francesco; Poole, Peter H.; Saika-Voivod, Ivan

    2018-04-01

    We calculate the components of the microscopic pressure tensor as a function of radial distance r from the centre of a spherical water droplet, modelled using the TIP4P/2005 potential. To do so, we modify a coarse-graining method for calculating the microscopic pressure (Ikeshoji et al 2003 Mol. Simul. 29 101) in order to apply it to a rigid molecular model of water. As test cases, we study nanodroplets ranging in size from 776 to 2880 molecules at 220 K. Beneath a surface region comprising approximately two molecular layers, the pressure tensor becomes approximately isotropic and constant with r. We find that the dependence of the pressure on droplet radius is that expected from the Young-Laplace equation, despite the small size of the droplets.

  19. Cavitation nuclei in water exposed to transient pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Mørch, Knud Aage

    2015-01-01

    A model of skin-stabilized interfacial cavitation nuclei and their response to tensile and compressive stressing is presented. The model is evaluated in relation to experimental tensile strength results for water at rest at the bottom of an open water-filled container at atmospheric pressure...... and room temperature. These results are obtained by recording the initial growth of cavities generated by a short tensile pulse applied to the bottom of the container. It is found that the cavitation nuclei shift their tensile strength depending on their pressure history. Static pressurization...... for an extended period of time prior to testing is known to increase the tensile strength of water, but little information is available on how it is affected by compression pulses of short duration. This is addressed by imposing compression pulses of approximately 1 ms duration and a peak intensity of a few bar...

  20. Methodology for surge pressure evaluation in a water injection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meliande, Patricia; Nascimento, Elson A. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Civil; Mascarenhas, Flavio C.B. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Hidraulica Computacional; Dandoulakis, Joao P. [SHELL of Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Predicting transient effects, known as surge pressures, is of high importance for offshore industry. It involves detailed computer modeling that attempts to simulate the complex interaction between flow line and fluid in order to ensure efficient system integrity. Platform process operators normally raise concerns whether the water injection system is adequately designed or not to be protected against possible surge pressures during sudden valve closure. This report aims to evaluate the surge pressures in Bijupira and Salema water injection systems due to valve closure, through a computer model simulation. Comparisons among the results from empirical formulations are discussed and supplementary analysis for Salema system were performed in order to define the maximum volumetric flow rate for which the design pressure was able to withstand. Maximum surge pressure values of 287.76 bar and 318.58 bar, obtained in Salema and Bijupira respectively, using empirical formulations have surpassed the operating pressure design, while the computer model results have pointed the greatest surge pressure value of 282 bar in Salema system. (author)

  1. Pressurized water reactor flow skirt apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kielb, John F.; Schwirian, Richard E.; Lee, Naugab E.; Forsyth, David R.

    2016-04-05

    A pressurized water reactor vessel having a flow skirt formed from a perforated cylinder structure supported in the lower reactor vessel head at the outlet of the downcomer annulus, that channels the coolant flow through flow holes in the wall of the cylinder structure. The flow skirt is supported at a plurality of circumferentially spaced locations on the lower reactor vessel head that are not equally spaced or vertically aligned with the core barrel attachment points, and the flow skirt employs a unique arrangement of hole patterns that assure a substantially balanced pressure and flow of the coolant over the entire underside of the lower core support plate.

  2. Flashing of high-pressure saturated water into the pool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamasa, Tomoji; Kondo, Koichi; Aya, Izuo.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on a saturated high-pressure water discharging into a water pool. The purpose of the experiment is to clarify the phenomena that occur by a blow-down of the water from the pressure vessel into the water-filled containment in the case of a wall-crack accident or a LOCA in a passive safety reactor. The results show that a flashing oscillation (FO) occurs when the water discharges into the pool, under specified experimental conditions. The range of the flashing location oscillates between a point very close to and some distance away from the vent hole. The pressures in the vent tube and water pool constantly fluctuate due to the flashing oscillation. The pressure oscillation and alternating flashing location might be caused by the balancing action between the supply of saturated water, flashing at the control volume and steam condensation on the steam-water interface. The frequencies of FO, or frequencies of pressure oscillation and alternating flashing location, increased as water subcooling increased, and as discharging pressure and vent hole diameter decreased. A linear analysis was conducted using a spherical flashing bubble model in which the motion of bubble is controlled by steam condensation. The effects of these parameters on the period of FO in the experiments can be predicted well by the analysis. (author)

  3. A kinetic model for impact/sliding wear of pressurized water reactor internal components. Application to rod cluster control assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbinden, M.; Durbec, V.

    1996-12-01

    A new concept of industrial wear model adapted to components of nuclear plants is proposed. Its originality is to be supported, on one hand, by experimental results obtained via wear machines of relatively short operational times, and, on the other hand, by the information obtained from the operating feedback over real wear kinetics of the reactors components. The proposed model is illustrated by an example which corresponds to a specific real situation. The determination of the coefficients permitting to cover all assembly of configurations and the validation of the model in these configurations have been the object of the most recent work. (author)

  4. Integral Pressurized Water Reactor Simulator Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This publication provides detailed explanations of the theoretical concepts that the simulator users have to know to gain a comprehensive understanding of the physics and technology of integral pressurized water reactors. It provides explanations of each of the simulator screens and various controls that a user can monitor and modify. A complete description of all the simulator features is also provided. A detailed set of exercises is provided in the Exercise Handbook accompanying this publication.

  5. Water cycles in closed ecological systems: effects of atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygalov, Vadim Y.; Fowler, Philip A.; Metz, Joannah M.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Bucklin, Ray A.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    In bioregenerative life support systems that use plants to generate food and oxygen, the largest mass flux between the plants and their surrounding environment will be water. This water cycle is a consequence of the continuous change of state (evaporation-condensation) from liquid to gas through the process of transpiration and the need to transfer heat (cool) and dehumidify the plant growth chamber. Evapotranspiration rates for full plant canopies can range from 1 to 10 L m-2 d-1 (1 to 10 mm m-2 d-1), with the rates depending primarily on the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) between the leaves and the air inside the plant growth chamber. VPD in turn is dependent on the air temperature, leaf temperature, and current value of relative humidity (RH). Concepts for developing closed plant growth systems, such as greenhouses for Mars, have been discussed for many years and the feasibility of such systems will depend on the overall system costs and reliability. One approach for reducing system costs would be to reduce the operating pressure within the greenhouse to reduce structural mass and gas leakage. But managing plant growth environments at low pressures (e.g., controlling humidity and heat exchange) may be difficult, and the effects of low-pressure environments on plant growth and system water cycling need further study. We present experimental evidence to show that water saturation pressures in air under isothermal conditions are only slightly affected by total pressure, but the overall water flux from evaporating surfaces can increase as pressure decreases. Mathematical models describing these observations are presented, along with discussion of the importance for considering "water cycles" in closed bioregenerative life support systems.

  6. Relative power density distribution calculations of the Kori unit 1 pressurized water reactor with full-scope explicit modeling of monte carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. O.; Kim, J. K.

    1997-01-01

    Relative power density distributions of the Kori unit 1 pressurized water reactor calculated by Monte Carlo modeling with the MCNP code. The Kori unit 1 core is modeled on a three-dimensional representation of the one-eighth of the reactor in-vessel component with reflective boundaries at 0 and 45 degrees. The axial core model is based on half core symmetry and is divided into four axial segments. Fission reaction density in each rod is calculated by following 100 cycles with 5,000 test neutrons in each cycle after starting with a localized neutron source and ten noncontributing settle cycles. Relative assembly power distributions are calculated from fission reaction densities of rods in assembly. After 100 cycle calculations, the system coverages to a κ value of 1.00039 ≥ 0.00084. Relative assembly power distribution is nearly the same with that of the Kori unit 1 FSAR. Applicability of the full-scope Monte Carlo simulation in the power distribution calculation is examined by the relative root mean square error of 2.159%. (author)

  7. Cooling of pressurized water nuclear reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curet, H.D.

    1978-01-01

    The improvement of pressurized water nuclear reactor vessels comprising flow dividers providing separate and distinct passages for the flow of core coolant water from each coolant water inlet, the flow dividers being vertically disposed in the annular flow areas provided by the walls of the vessel, the thermal shield (if present), and the core barrel is described. In the event of rupture of one of the coolant water inlet lines, water, especially emergency core coolant water, in the intact lines is thus prevented from by-passing the core by circumferential flow around the outermost surface of the core barrel and is instead directed so as to flow vertically downward through the annulus area between the vessel wall and the core barrel in a more normal manner to increase the probability of cooling of the core by the available cooling water in the lower plenum, thus preventing or delaying thermal damage to the core, and providing time for other appropriate remedial or damage preventing action by the operator

  8. Studies of the kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of uranium by dry and moist air A model for determining the oxidation rate over a wide range of temperatures and water vapour pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivray, G. W.; Geeson, D. A.; Greenwood, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    The rate of oxidation of uranium metal by moist air has been measured at temperatures from 115 to 350°C and water vapour pressures from 0 to 47 kPa (350 Torr). From this and from previously reported data, a model has been developed which allows the rate of uranium oxidation to be calculated at any particular combination of temperature and water vapour pressure of interest, in the range 0-350°C and 0-101.3 kPa (760 Torr). The model is based on the assumption that the surface concentration of water determines the rate of reaction and that the adsorption of water onto the oxide follows a Langmuir type isotherm. Theoretical plots of rate as a function of water vapour pressure and Arrhenius plots derived from the model have been shown to be in good agreement with experimental data. The model assumes separate contributions to the overall observed rate from oxygen and water vapour. Surface studies have been carried out using SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry). Depth profiling of the oxide produced by isotopically labelled reagents ( 18O 2 and H 218O), has shown that oxygen from both reactants is incorporated into the oxide layer in the ratio predicted by the kinetic model. This supports a mechanism in which oxygen and water vapour produce separate diffusing species (possibly O 2- and OH -).

  9. Reducing energy consumption and leakage by active pressure control in a water supply system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Rajewicz, T.; Kien, H.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2013-01-01

    WTP Gruszczyn supplies drinking water to a part of the city of Pozna?, in the Midwest of Poland. For the optimal automatic pressure control of the clear water pumping station, nine pressure measuring points were installed in the distribution network, and an active pressure control model was

  10. Effects of Secondary Circuit Modeling on Results of Pressurized Water Reactor Main Steam Line Break Benchmark Calculations with New Coupled Code TRAB-3D/SMABRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daavittila, Antti; Haemaelaeinen, Anitta; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, Riitta

    2003-01-01

    All of the three exercises of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Regulatory Commission pressurized water reactor main steam line break (PWR MSLB) benchmark were calculated at VTT, the Technical Research Centre of Finland. For the first exercise, the plant simulation with point-kinetic neutronics, the thermal-hydraulics code SMABRE was used. The second exercise was calculated with the three-dimensional reactor dynamics code TRAB-3D, and the third exercise with the combination TRAB-3D/SMABRE. VTT has over ten years' experience of coupling neutronic and thermal-hydraulic codes, but this benchmark was the first time these two codes, both developed at VTT, were coupled together. The coupled code system is fast and efficient; the total computation time of the 100-s transient in the third exercise was 16 min on a modern UNIX workstation. The results of all the exercises are similar to those of the other participants. In order to demonstrate the effect of secondary circuit modeling on the results, three different cases were calculated. In case 1 there is no phase separation in the steam lines and no flow reversal in the aspirator. In case 2 the flow reversal in the aspirator is allowed, but there is no phase separation in the steam lines. Finally, in case 3 the drift-flux model is used for the phase separation in the steam lines, but the aspirator flow reversal is not allowed. With these two modeling variations, it is possible to cover a remarkably broad range of results. The maximum power level reached after the reactor trip varies from 534 to 904 MW, the range of the time of the power maximum being close to 30 s. Compared to the total calculated transient time of 100 s, the effect of the secondary side modeling is extremely important

  11. Structural analysis of fuel rod applied to pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Danilo P.; Pinheiro, Andre Ricardo M.; Lotto, André A., E-mail: danilo.pinheiro@marinha.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CTMSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The design of fuel assemblies applied to Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) has several requirements and acceptance criteria that must be attended for licensing. In the case of PWR fuel rods, an important mechanical structural requirement is to keep the radial stability when submitted to the coolant external pressure. In the framework of the Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) program new materials have been studied to replace zirconium based alloys as cladding, including iron-based alloys. In this sense, efforts have been made to evaluate the behavior of these materials under PWR conditions. The present work aims to evaluate the collapse cold pressure of a stainless steel thin-walled tube similar to that used as cladding material of fuel rods by means of the comparison of numeric data, and experimental results. As a result of the simulations, it was observed that the collapse pressure has a value intermediate value between those found by regulatory requirements and analytical calculations. The experiment was carried out for the validation of the computational model using test specimens of thin-walled tubes considering empty tube. The test specimens were sealed at both ends by means of welding. They were subjected to a high pressure device until the collapse of the tubes. Preliminary results obtained from experiments with the empty test specimens indicate that the computational model can be validated for stainless steel cladding, considering the difference between collapse pressure indicated in the regulatory document and the actual limit pressure concerning to radial instability of tubes with the studied characteristics. (author)

  12. Startup and commissioning of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, L.J.; Gilbert, C.F.

    1983-05-01

    A critical phase of plant development is the test, startup, and commissioning period. The effort expended prior to commissioning has a definite effect on the reliability and continuing availability of the plant during its life. This paper describes a test, startup, and commissioning program for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant. This program commences with the completion of construction and continues through the turnover of equipment/systems to the owner's startup/ commissioning group. The paper addresses the organization of the test/startup group, planning and scheduling, test procedures and initial testing, staffing and certification of the test group, training of operators, and turnover to the owner

  13. Test Report for MSFC Test No. 83-2: Pressure scaled water impact test of a 12.5 inch diameter model of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster filament wound case and external TVC PCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Water impact tests using a 12.5 inch diameter model representing a 8.56 percent scale of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster configuration were conducted. The two primary objectives of this SRB scale model water impact test program were: 1. Obtain cavity collapse applied pressure distributions for the 8.56 percent rigid body scale model FWC pressure magnitudes as a function of full-scale initial impact conditions at vertical velocities from 65 to 85 ft/sec, horizontal velocities from 0 to 45 ft/sec, and angles from -10 to +10 degrees. 2. Obtain rigid body applied pressures on the TVC pod and aft skirt internal stiffener rings at initial impact and cavity collapse loading events. In addition, nozzle loads were measured. Full scale vertical velocities of 65 to 85 ft/sec, horizontal velocities of 0 to 45 ft/sec, and impact angles from -10 to +10 degrees simulated.

  14. Fracturing Pressure of Shallow Sediment in Deep Water Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanliang Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The shallow sediment in deep water has weak strength and easily gets into plastic state under stress concentration induced by oil and gas drilling. During drilling, the formation around a wellbore can be divided into elastic zone and plastic zone. The unified strength theory was used after yielding. The radius of the plastic zone and the theoretical solution of the stress distribution in these two zones were derived in undrained condition. The calculation model of excess pore pressure induced by drilling was obtained with the introduction of Henkel’s excess pore pressure theory. Combined with hydraulic fracturing theory, the fracturing mechanism of shallow sediment was analyzed and the theoretical formula of fracturing pressure was given. Furthermore, the influence of the parameters of unified strength theory on fracturing pressure was analyzed. The theoretical calculation results agreed with measured results approximately, which preliminary verifies the reliability of this theory.

  15. Characterization of the Ignition Over-Pressure/Sound Suppression Water in the Space Launch System Mobile Launcher Using Volume of Fluid Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Vehicle consists of a Core Stage with four RS-25 engines and two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs). This vehicle is launched from the Launchpad using a Mobile Launcher (ML) which supports the SLS vehicle until its liftoff from the ML under its own power. The combination of the four RS-25 engines and two SRBs generate a significant Ignition Over-Pressure (IOP) and Acoustic Sound environment. One of the mitigations of these environments is the Ignition Over-Pressure/Sound Suppression (IOP/SS) subsystem installed on the ML. This system consists of six water nozzles located parallel to and 24 inches downstream of each SRB nozzle exit plane as well as 16 water nozzles located parallel to and 53 inches downstream of the RS-25 nozzle exit plane. During launch of the SLS vehicle, water is ejected through each water nozzle to reduce the intensity of the transient pressure environment imposed upon the SLS vehicle. While required for the mitigation of the transient pressure environment on the SLS vehicle, the IOP/SS subsystem interacts (possibly adversely) with other systems located on the Launch Pad. One of the other systems that the IOP/SS water is anticipated to interact with is the Hydrogen Burn-Off Igniter System (HBOI). The HBOI system's purpose is to ignite the unburned hydrogen/air mixture that develops in and around the nozzle of the RS-25 engines during engine start. Due to the close proximity of the water system to the HBOI system, the presence of the IOP/SS may degrade the effectiveness of the HBOI system. Another system that the IOP/SS water may interact with adversely is the RS-25 engine nozzles and the SRB nozzles. The adverse interaction anticipated is the wetting, to a significant degree, of the RS-25 nozzles resulting in substantial weight of ice forming and water present to a significant degree upstream of the SRB nozzle exit plane inside the nozzle itself, posing significant additional blockage of the effluent that exits the nozzle

  16. Model tests for prestressed concrete pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoever, R.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations with models of reactor pressure vessels are used to check results of three dimensional calculation methods and to predict the behaviour of the prototype. Model tests with 1:50 elastic pressure vessel models and with a 1:5 prestressed concrete pressure vessel are described and experimental results are presented. (orig.) [de

  17. Pressurized water reactor simulator. Workshop material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established an activity in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the development and distribution of simulation programs and educational material and sponsors courses and workshops. The workshops are in two parts: techniques and tools for reactor simulator development; and the use of reactor simulators in education. Workshop material for the first part is covered in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 12, 'Reactor Simulator Development' (2001). Course material for workshops using a WWER- 1000 reactor department simulator from the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, the Russian Federation is presented in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 21 'WWER-1000 Reactor Simulator' (2002). Course material for workshops using a boiling water reactor simulator developed for the IAEA by Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated of Canada (CTI) is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No.23 'Boiling Water Reactor Simulator' (2003). This report consists of course material for workshops using a pressurized water reactor simulator

  18. Operator Support System for Pressurized Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Renjie; Shen Shifei

    1996-01-01

    Operator Support System for Pressurized Water Reactor (OSSPWR) has been developed under the sponsorship of IAEA from August 1994. The project is being carried out by the Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. The Design concepts of the operator support functions have been established. The prototype systems of OSSPWR has been developed as well. The primary goal of the project is to create an advanced operator support system by applying new technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, advanced communication technologies, etc. Recently, the advanced man-machine interface for nuclear power plant operators has been developed. It is connected to the modern computer systems and utilizes new high performance graphic displays. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs

  19. Status of advanced small pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Peipei; Zhou Yun

    2012-01-01

    In order to expand the nuclear power in energy and desalination, increase competitiveness in global nuclear power market, many developed countries with strong nuclear energy technology have realized the importance of Small Modular Reactor (SMR) and initiated heavy R and D programs in SMR. The Advanced Small Pressurized Water Reactor (ASPWR) is characterized by great advantages in safety and economy and can be used in remote power grid and replace mid/small size fossil plant economically. This paper reviews the history and current status of SMR and ASPWR, and also discusses the design concept, safety features and other advantages of ASPWR. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overall review of ASPWR technology in western countries, and to promote the R and D in ASPWR in China. (authors)

  20. Pressurized-water-reactor station blackout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobbe, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA) Program was to investigate accident scenarios beyond the design basis. The primary objective of SASA was to analyze nuclear plant transients that could lead to partial or total core melt and evaluate potential mitigating actions. The following summarizes the pressurized water reactor (PWR) SASA effort at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL is presently evaluating Unresolved Safety Issue A-44 - Station Blackout from initiation of the transient to core uncovery. The balance of the analysis from core uncovery until fission product release is being performed at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The current analyses involve the Bellefonte Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS), a Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) 205 Fuel Assembly (205-FA) raised loop design to be operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority

  1. Piston slap induced pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage of an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Kazuhide; Wang, Xiaoyu; Saeki, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Liner cavitation is caused by water pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage (WCP). When the negative pressure falls below the saturated vapor pressure, the impulsive pressure following the implosion of cavitation bubbles causes cavitation erosion of the wet cylinder liner surface. The present work establishes a numerical model for structural-acoustic coupling between the crankcase and the acoustic field in the WCP considering their dynamic characteristics. The coupling effect is evaluated through mutual interaction terms that are calculated from the mode shapes of the acoustic field and of the crankcase vibration on the boundary. Water pressure fluctuations in the WCP under the action of piston slap forces are predicted and the contributions of the uncoupled mode shapes of the crankcase and the acoustic field to the pressure waveform are analyzed. The influence of sound speed variations on the water pressure response is discussed, as well as the pressure on the thrust sides of the four cylinders.

  2. Water Pressure Distribution on a Flying Boat Hull

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, F L

    1931-01-01

    This is the third in a series of investigations of the water pressures on seaplane floats and hulls, and completes the present program. It consisted of determining the water pressures and accelerations on a Curtiss H-16 flying boat during landing and taxiing maneuvers in smooth and rough water.

  3. Modern Modeling of Water Hammer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbanowicz Kamil

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic equipment on board ships is common. It assists in the work of: steering gear, pitch propellers, watertight doors, cargo hatch covers, cargo and mooring winches, deck cranes, stern ramps etc. The damage caused by transient flows (which include among others water hammer are often impossible to repair at sea. Hence, it is very important to estimate the correct pressure runs and associated side effects during their design. The presented study compares the results of research on the impact of a simplified way of modeling the hydraulic resistance and simplified effective weighting functions build of two and three-terms on the estimated results of the pressure changes. As it turns out, simple effective two-terms weighting functions are able to accurately model the analyzed transients. The implementation of the presented method will soon allow current automatic protection of hydraulic systems of the adverse effects associated with frequent elevated and reduced pressures.

  4. Coolant mixing in pressurized water reactors. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehne, T.; Grunwald, G.; Rohde, U.

    1998-10-01

    For the analysis of boron dilution transients and main steam like break scenarios the modelling of the coolant mixing inside the reactor vessel is important. The reactivity insertion due to overcooling or deboration depends strongly on the coolant temperature and boron concentration. The three-dimensional flow distribution in the downcomer and the lower plenum of PWR's was calculated with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code (CFX-4). Calculations were performed for the PWR's of SIEMENS KWU, Westinghouse and VVER-440 / V-230 type. The following important factors were identified: exact representation of the cold leg inlet region (bend radii etc.), extension of the downcomer below the inlet region at the PWR Konvoi, obstruction of the flow by the outlet nozzles penetrating the downcomer, etc. The k-ε turbulence model was used. Construction elements like perforated plates in the lower plenum have large influence on the velocity field. It is impossible to model all the orifices in the perforated plates. A porous region model was used to simulate perforated plates and the core. The porous medium is added with additional body forces to simulate the pressure drop through perforated plates in the VVER-440. For the PWR Konvoi the whole core was modelled with porous media parameters. The velocity fields of the PWR Konvoi calculated for the case of operation of all four main circulation pumps show a good agreement with experimental results. The CFD-calculation especially confirms the back flow areas below the inlet nozzles. The downcomer flow of the Russian VVER-440 has no recirculation areas under normal operation conditions. By CFD calculations for the downcomer and the lower plenum an analytical mixing model used in the reactor dynamic code DYN3D was verified. The measurements, the analytical model and the CFD-calculations provided very well agreeing results particularly for the inlet region. The difficulties of analytical solutions and the uncertainties of turbulence

  5. Investigation of the Relationship among Rainfall, Unsaturated Water Pressure and Ground Water Level Using Grey System Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C.; Cheng, C.; Ke, T.; Wen, J.

    2008-12-01

    Rainfall is infiltrated through the surface into the vadose zone and induces the variation of the ground water level. However, the hydrological system of the rainfall infiltration is complex. How to establish the relationship between the rainfall and variation of the ground water level becomes an important topic. In this study, the grey system theory is utilized to investigate the relationship among rainfall, unsaturated water pressure and ground water level. First, the grey relational analysis among ground water level, rainfall and unsaturated water pressure are performed. Six different depths of unsaturated water pressure are used for the grey relational analysis and the depth with the optimal grey relational grade is obtained. Then the GM(1,3) model is established based on sequences of ground water level, rainfall and unsaturated water pressure in the depth with the optimal grey relational grade. Second, the GM(1,2) model is established only using the sequences of ground water level and rainfall data. The comparison of the GM(1,2) and the GM(1,3) models are performed to assess the accuracy of ground water level forecast. Finally, the concept of the time lag is used to reestablish the grey models GM(1,2) and GM(1,3) and predict the variation of ground water level. The results show that the GM(1,3) model has the higher accuracy than the GM(1,2) model for ground water level forecast. The optimal time lag is equal to 23 hours in the study site. The accuracy of the ground water level forecast is higher in the GM(1,3) model with the time lag than the one without it. Keywords:Grey system theory, Ground water level, Rainfall, Unsaturated water pressure.

  6. Mathematical Modelling of Intraretinal Oxygen Partial Pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The aim of our present work is to develop a simple steady state model for intraretinal oxygen partial pressure distribution and to investigate the effect of various model parameters on the partial pressure distribution under adapted conditions of light and darkness.. Method: A simple eight-layered mathematical model ...

  7. Determining Atmospheric Pressure Using a Water Barometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrengel, C. Frederick, II; Larson, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    The atmosphere is an envelope of compressible gases that surrounds Earth. Because of its compressibility and nonuniform heating by the Sun, it is in constant motion. The atmosphere exerts pressure on Earth's surface, but that pressure is in constant flux. This experiment allows students to directly measure atmospheric pressure by measuring the…

  8. Pressurized water reactor nuclear power training center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshiro, Toshimasa; Maezawa, Yoshikazu; Tokuda, Kazuho; Takashima, Osao; Kido, Katsu.

    1976-01-01

    In spite of the necessity of training nuclear power plant operators so as to carry out proper operation, it is almost impossible to utilize real plants for training. Under such condition, Nuclear Power Training Center, Ltd. has been established in Tsuruga City, Fukui Prefecture. The introduced simulator simulates the No.1 unit of Zion Nuclear Power Plant, Illinois, U.S.A. The simulator is placed in a computer room and a control room, and consists of three digital computers, an analog electrohydraulic controller panel, an instructor console, a reactor panel, a safety protecting panel, an alarm panel and others. The features of this simulator are the functions of initial conditions, snap shot, back track, freeze, local operation, malfunction, operation record and others. The main object of training is the operators who are on duty in the central control rooms of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors. Training program includes the beginner course and retraining course. Anyone, who possesses the scholarly attainments equal to or higher than those of senior high school graduates and the experiences in a thermal power plant as the qualification, is allowed to receive the training. The training period is 22 weeks, but 10 days for the retraining course. In addition, the general training course for those concerned with nuclear power generation is prepared, and curricula for these courses are briefly described. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  9. Can the water content of highly compacted bentonite be increased by applying a high water pressure?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Kasbohm, J.

    2001-10-01

    A great many laboratory investigations have shown that the water uptake in highly compacted MX-80 clay takes place by diffusion at low external pressure. It means that wetting of the clay buffer in the deposition holes of a KBS-3 repository is very slow if the water pressure is low and that complete water saturation can take several tens of years if the initial degree of water saturation of the buffer clay and the ability of the rock to give off water are low. It has therefore been asked whether injection of water can raise the degree of water saturation and if a high water pressure in the nearfield can have the same effect. The present report describes attempts to moisten highly compacted blocks of MX-80 clay with a dry density of 1510 kg/m 3 by injecting water under a pressure of 650 kPa through a perforated injection pipe for 3 and 20 minutes, respectively. The interpretation was made by determining the water content of a number of samples located at different distances from the pipe. An attempt to interpret the pattern of distribution of injected uranium acetate solution showed that the channels into which the solution went became closed in a few minutes and that dispersion in the homogenized clay gave low U-concentrations. The result was that the water content increased from about 9 to about 11-12 % within a distance of about 1 centimeter from the injection pipe and to slightly more than 9 % at a distance of about 4-5 cm almost independently of the injection time. Complete water saturation corresponds to a water content of about 30 % and the wetting effect was hence small from a practical point of view. By use of microstructural models it can be shown that injected water enters only the widest channels that remain after the compaction and that these channels are quickly closed by expansion of the hydrating surrounding clay. Part of the particles that are thereby released become transported by the flowing water and cause clogging of the channels, which is

  10. Effects of Chamber Pressure and Partial Pressure of Water Vapor on Secondary Drying in Lyophilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searles, James A; Aravapalli, Sridhar; Hodge, Cody

    2017-10-01

    Secondary drying is the final step of lyophilization before stoppering, during which water is desorbed from the product to yield the final moisture content. We studied how chamber pressure and partial pressure of water vapor during this step affected the time course of water content of aqueous solutions of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in glass vials. The total chamber pressure had no effect when the partial pressure of water vapor was very low. However, when the vapor phase contained a substantial fraction of water vapor, the PVP moisture content was much higher. We carried out dynamic vapor sorption experiments (DVS) to demonstrate that the higher PVP moisture content was a straightforward result of the higher water vapor content in the lyophilizer. The results highlight that the partial pressure of water vapor is extremely important during secondary drying in lyophilization, and that lower chamber pressure set points for secondary drying may sometimes be justified as a strategy for ensuring low partial pressure of water vapor, especially for lyophilizers that do not inject dry gas to control pressure. These findings have direct application for process transfers/scale ups from freeze-dryers that do not inject dry gas for pressure control to those that do, and vice versa.

  11. Capillarity Induced Negative Pressure of Water Plugs in Nanochannels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tas, Niels Roelof; Mela, P.; Kramer, Tobias; Berenschot, Johan W.; van den Berg, Albert

    2003-01-01

    We have found evidence that water plugs in hydrophilic nanochannels can be at significant negative pressure due to tensile capillary forces. The negative pressure of water plugs in nanochannels induces bending of the thin channel capping layer, which results in a visible curvature of the liquid

  12. Contribution to a neutronic calculation scheme for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Del Campo, C.

    1987-01-01

    This research thesis aims at developing and validating the set of data and codes which build up the neutron computation scheme of pressurized water reactors. More precisely, it focuses on the improvement of the precision of calculation of command clusters (absorbing components which can be inserted into the core to control the reactivity), and on the modelling of reflector representation (material placed around the core and reflecting back the escaping neutrons). For the first case, a precise calculation is performed, based on the transport theory. For the second case, diffusion constants obtained in the previous case and simplified equations are used to reduce the calculation cost

  13. Neural Network Controller for the Pressurized Water Reactor Power Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggag, S.S.; Kotb, S.A.

    2017-01-01

    Although there have been some severe nuclear accidents such as Three Mile Island (USA), Chernobyl (Ukraine) and Fukushima (Japan), nuclear fission energy is still a source of clean energy that can substitute fossil fuels in a centralized way and in a great amount with commercial availability and economic competitiveness. Since the pressurized water reactor (PWR) is the most widely used nuclear fission reactor, it is safe, stable and efficient operation is meaningful to the current rebirth of the nuclear fission energy industry. Power-level regulation is an important technique which can deeply affect the operation stability and efficiency of PWRs (Pressurized Water Reactors ). This paper presents the effect of utilizing the Neural Network controller methodology in the power control model of the PWR. The Neural Network Controller was tested on a PWR model using the Matlab Simulink Interface. Two case studies were performed on the model using both the Neural Network method and the traditional rod speed program for controlling the nuclear power plant variables. The proposed controller presents a higher performance than that of the traditional rod speed program controller.

  14. Additional Stress And Fracture Mechanics Analyses Of Pressurized Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, Matthew; Yin, Shengjun; Stevens, Gary; Sommerville, Daniel; Palm, Nathan; Heinecke, Carol

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP

  15. Evolution of Framatome pressurized water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, C.; Bitsch, D.; Millot, J.P.

    1985-10-01

    FRAMATOME's PWR experience covers a total of 63 units, 36 of which are operating by end of 1984. More than 10 units were operated in load follow mode. Progress features, resulting from the feedback of construction and operating experience, and from the returns of a vast research and development program, were incorporated in their design through subsequent series of standard units. The last four loop standard, the N4 model, integrates in a rational way all those progress features, together with a significant design effort. The core design is based on the new Advanced Fuel Assemblies. The reactor control implements the ''Reactor Maximum Flexibility Package'' (R-MAX) which provides a high level of automatic reactor control. The steam generator incorporates an axial-mixed flow economizer design. The triangular-pitch tube bundle, together with modular steam/water separators and a rearrangement of the dryers resulted in a compact design. The reactor coolant pump benefits of higher performances over that of previous models due to an optimal hydraulic design, and of mechanical features which increase margins and facilitate the maintenance work. Following the N4 project, design work on advanced concepts is pursued by FRAMATOME. A main way of research is focused on the optimal use of fissile materials. These concepts are based on tight pitch fuel arrays, associated with a mechanical spectral shift device

  16. Pressure-specific and multiple pressure response of fish assemblages in European running waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinegger, Rafaela; Trautwein, Clemens; Schmutz, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    We classified homogenous river types across Europe and searched for fish metrics qualified to show responses to specific pressures (hydromorphological pressures or water quality pressures) vs. multiple pressures in these river types. We analysed fish taxa lists from 3105 sites in 16 ecoregions and 14 countries. Sites were pre-classified for 15 selected pressures to separate unimpacted from impacted sites. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to split unimpacted sites into four homogenous river types based on species composition and geographical location. Classification trees were employed to predict associated river types for impacted sites with four environmental variables. We defined a set of 129 candidate fish metrics to select the best reacting metrics for each river type. The candidate metrics represented tolerances/intolerances of species associated with six metric types: habitat, migration, water quality sensitivity, reproduction, trophic level and biodiversity. The results showed that 17 uncorrelated metrics reacted to pressures in the four river types. Metrics responded specifically to water quality pressures and hydromorphological pressures in three river types and to multiple pressures in all river types. Four metrics associated with water quality sensitivity showed a significant reaction in up to three river types, whereas 13 metrics were specific to individual river types. Our results contribute to the better understanding of fish assemblage response to human pressures at a pan-European scale. The results are especially important for European river management and restoration, as it is necessary to uncover underlying processes and effects of human pressures on aquatic communities.

  17. A random-walk model for pore pressure accumulation in marine soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Cheng, Niang-Sheng

    1999-01-01

    A numerical random-walk model has been developed for the pore-water pressure. The model is based on the analogy between the variation of the pore pressure and the diffusion process of any passive quantity such as concentration. The pore pressure in the former process is analogous to the concentra......A numerical random-walk model has been developed for the pore-water pressure. The model is based on the analogy between the variation of the pore pressure and the diffusion process of any passive quantity such as concentration. The pore pressure in the former process is analogous...

  18. Pressure dependence of viscosity in supercooled water and a unified approach for thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lokendra P; Issenmann, Bruno; Caupin, Frédéric

    2017-04-25

    The anomalous decrease of the viscosity of water with applied pressure has been known for over a century. It occurs concurrently with major structural changes: The second coordination shell around a molecule collapses onto the first shell. Viscosity is thus a macroscopic witness of the progressive breaking of the tetrahedral hydrogen bond network that makes water so peculiar. At low temperature, water at ambient pressure becomes more tetrahedral and the effect of pressure becomes stronger. However, surprisingly, no data are available for the viscosity of supercooled water under pressure, in which dramatic anomalies are expected based on interpolation between ambient pressure data for supercooled water and high pressure data for stable water. Here we report measurements with a time-of-flight viscometer down to [Formula: see text] and up to [Formula: see text], revealing a reduction of viscosity by pressure by as much as 42%. Inspired by a previous attempt [Tanaka H (2000) J Chem Phys 112:799-809], we show that a remarkably simple extension of a two-state model [Holten V, Sengers JV, Anisimov MA (2014) J Phys Chem Ref Data 43:043101], initially developed to reproduce thermodynamic properties, is able to accurately describe dynamic properties (viscosity, self-diffusion coefficient, and rotational correlation time) as well. Our results support the idea that water is a mixture of a high density, "fragile" liquid, and a low density, "strong" liquid, the varying proportion of which explains the anomalies and fragile-to-strong crossover in water.

  19. Pressure dependence of viscosity in supercooled water and a unified approach for thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lokendra P.; Issenmann, Bruno; Caupin, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    The anomalous decrease of the viscosity of water with applied pressure has been known for over a century. It occurs concurrently with major structural changes: The second coordination shell around a molecule collapses onto the first shell. Viscosity is thus a macroscopic witness of the progressive breaking of the tetrahedral hydrogen bond network that makes water so peculiar. At low temperature, water at ambient pressure becomes more tetrahedral and the effect of pressure becomes stronger. However, surprisingly, no data are available for the viscosity of supercooled water under pressure, in which dramatic anomalies are expected based on interpolation between ambient pressure data for supercooled water and high pressure data for stable water. Here we report measurements with a time-of-flight viscometer down to 244K and up to 300MPa, revealing a reduction of viscosity by pressure by as much as 42%. Inspired by a previous attempt [Tanaka H (2000) J Chem Phys 112:799–809], we show that a remarkably simple extension of a two-state model [Holten V, Sengers JV, Anisimov MA (2014) J Phys Chem Ref Data 43:043101], initially developed to reproduce thermodynamic properties, is able to accurately describe dynamic properties (viscosity, self-diffusion coefficient, and rotational correlation time) as well. Our results support the idea that water is a mixture of a high density, “fragile” liquid, and a low density, “strong” liquid, the varying proportion of which explains the anomalies and fragile-to-strong crossover in water. PMID:28404733

  20. Instrumentation and control strategies for an integral pressurized water reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belle R. Upadhyaya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Several vendors have recently been actively pursuing the development of integral pressurized water reactors (iPWRs that range in power levels from small to large reactors. Integral reactors have the features of minimum vessel penetrations, passive heat removal after reactor shutdown, and modular construction that allow fast plant integration and a secure fuel cycle. The features of an integral reactor limit the options for placing control and safety system instruments. The development of instrumentation and control (I&C strategies for a large 1,000 MWe iPWR is described. Reactor system modeling—which includes reactor core dynamics, primary heat exchanger, and the steam flashing drum—is an important part of I&C development and validation, and thereby consolidates the overall implementation for a large iPWR. The results of simulation models, control development, and instrumentation features illustrate the systematic approach that is applicable to integral light water reactors.

  1. Pressurizer model for Embalse nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkansky, D.G.; Bedrossian, G.C.

    1993-01-01

    Since the models normally used for he simulation of eventual accidents at the Embalse nuclear power plant with the FIREBIRD III code did not work satisfactorily when the pressurizer becomes empty of liquid, a new model was developed. This report presents the governing equations as well as the calculation technique, for which a computer program was made. An example of application is also presented. The results show that this new model can easily solve the problem of lack of liquid in the pressurizer, as it lets the fluid enter and exit freely, according to the pressure transient at the reactor outlet headers. (author)

  2. Mathematical Modelling of Intraretinal Oxygen Partial Pressure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    pressure distribution under adapted conditions of light and darkness.. Method: A simple eight-layered mathematical model for intraretinal oxygen partial pressure distribution was developed using Fick's law of diffusion, Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and oxygen delivery in the inner retina. The system of non-linear differential ...

  3. Mathematical Modelling of Intraretinal Oxygen Partial Pressure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    This minimum pressure may fall below the critical level of oxygen partial pressure and affect the retinal function. In order to restore normal retinal function, extreme hyperoxia may assist to make the choroid capable of supplying oxygen to the whole retina during total retinal artery occlusion. Keywords: Mathematical modeling ...

  4. Pressure And Thermal Modeling Of Rocket Launches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheldon D.; Myruski, Brian L.; Farmer, Richard C.; Freeman, Jon A.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents mathematical model for use in designing rocket-launching stand. Predicts pressure and thermal environment, as well as thermal responses of structures to impinging rocket-exhaust plumes. Enables relatively inexperienced analyst to determine time-varying distributions and absolute levels of pressure and heat loads on structures.

  5. Evaluation of pressure transducers under turbid natural waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Desa, E.; Desa, E.; Smith, D.; Peshwe, V.B.; VijayKumar, K.; Desa, J.A.E.

    Pressure measurements made in two turbid natural waters have led to the inference that the effective depthmean in situ density values, rho sub(eff), of these waters are less than (approx equal to 0.4%-4.5%) that of the density of the same water...

  6. Physiological water model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Susan

    1993-01-01

    The water of the human body can be categorized as existing in two main compartments: intracellular water and extracellular water. The intracellular water consists of all the water within the cells and constitutes over half of the total body water. Since red blood cells are surrounded by plasma, and all other cells are surrounded by interstitial fluid, the intracellular compartment has been subdivided to represent these two cell types. The extracellular water, which includes all of the fluid outside of the cells, can be further subdivided into compartments which represent the interstitial fluid, circulating blood plasma, lymph, and transcellular water. The interstitial fluid surrounds cells outside of the vascular system whereas plasma is contained within the blood vessels. Avascular tissues such as dense connective tissue and cartilage contain interstitial water which slowly equilibrates with tracers used to determine extracellular fluid volume. For this reason, additional compartments are sometimes used to represent these avascular tissues. The average size of each compartment, in terms of percent body weight, has been determined for adult males and females. These compartments and the forces which cause flow between them are presented. The kidneys, a main compartment, receive about 25 percent of the cardiac output and filters out a fluid similar to plasma. The composition of this filtered fluid changes as it flows through the kidney tubules since compounds are continually being secreted and reabsorbed. Through this mechanism, the kidneys eliminate wastes while conserving body water, electrolytes, and metabolites. Since sodium accounts for over 90 percent of the cations in the extracellular fluid, and the number of cations is balanced by the number of anions, considering the renal handling sodium and water only should sufficiently describe the relationship between the plasma compartment and kidneys. A kidney function model is presented which has been adapted from a

  7. Pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, H.; Schroder, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor steam generator having a vertical housing for the steam generating water and containing an upstanding heat exchanger to which the pressurized-water coolant passes and which is radially surrounded by a guide jacket supporting a water separator on its top. By thermosiphon action the steam generating water flows upward through and around the heat exchanger within the guide chamber to the latter's top from which it flows radially outwardly and downwardly through a down draft space formed between the outside of the jacket and the housing. The water separator discharges separated water downwardly. The housing has a feedwater inlet opening adjacent to the lower portion of the heat exchanger, providing preheating of the introduced feedwater. This preheated feedwater is conveyed by a duct upwardly to a location where it mixes with the water discharged from the water separator

  8. High-pressure-induced water penetration into 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagae, Takayuki; Kawamura, Takashi; Chavas, Leonard M. G.; Niwa, Ken; Hasegawa, Masashi; Kato, Chiaki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Structures of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase were determined at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 650 MPa. Comparison of these structures gives a detailed picture of the swelling of a cavity at the dimer interface and the generation of a new cleft on the molecular surface, which are accompanied by water penetration. Hydrostatic pressure induces structural changes in proteins, including denaturation, the mechanism of which has been attributed to water penetration into the protein interior. In this study, structures of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were determined at about 2 Å resolution under pressures ranging from 0.1 to 650 MPa using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Although most of the protein cavities are monotonically compressed as the pressure increases, the volume of one particular cavity at the dimer interface increases at pressures over 340 MPa. In parallel with this volume increase, water penetration into the cavity could be observed at pressures over 410 MPa. In addition, the generation of a new cleft on the molecular surface accompanied by water penetration could also be observed at pressures over 580 MPa. These water-penetration phenomena are considered to be initial steps in the pressure-denaturation process of IPMDH

  9. Assessment of water pipes durability under pressure surge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham Ha, Hai; Minh, Lanh Pham Thi; Tang Van, Lam; Bulgakov, Boris; Bazhenova, Soafia

    2017-10-01

    Surge phenomenon occurs on the pipeline by the closing valve or pump suddenly lost power. Due to the complexity of the water hammer simulation, previous researches have only considered water hammer on the single pipe or calculation of some positions on water pipe network, it have not been analysis for all of pipe on the water distribution systems. Simulation of water hammer due to closing valve on water distribution system and the influence level of pressure surge is evaluated at the defects on pipe. Water hammer on water supply pipe network are simulated by Water HAMMER software academic version and the capacity of defects are calculated by SINTAP. SINTAP developed from Brite-Euram projects in Brussels-Belgium with the aim to develop a process for assessing the integrity of the structure for the European industry. Based on the principle of mechanical fault, indicating the size of defects in materials affect the load capacity of the product in the course of work, the process has proposed setting up the diagram to fatigue assessment defect (FAD). The methods are applied for water pipe networks of Lien Chieu district, Da Nang city, Viet Nam, the results show the affected area of wave pressure by closing the valve and thereby assess the greatest pressure surge effect to corroded pipe. The SINTAP standard and finite element mesh analysis at the defect during the occurrence of pressure surge which will accurately assess the bearing capacity of the old pipes. This is one of the bases to predict the leakage locations on the water distribution systems. Amount of water hammer when identified on the water supply networks are decreasing due to local losses at the nodes as well as the friction with pipe wall, so this paper adequately simulate water hammer phenomena applying for actual water distribution systems. The research verified that pipe wall with defect is damaged under the pressure surge value.

  10. Neutron fluence determination for light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.

    1994-01-01

    A general description of limitations that exist in pressure vessel neutron fluence determinations for commercial light water reactors is presented. Complexity factors that arise in light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence calculations are identified and used to analyze calculational limitations. Two broad categories of calculational limitations are introduced, namely benchmark field limitations and deep penetration limitations. Explicit examples of limitations that can arise in each of these two broad categories are presented. These limitations are used to show that the recent draft regulatory guide for the determination of pressure vessel neutron fluence, developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is based upon procedures and assumptions that are not valid. To eliminate the complexity and limitations of calculational methods, it is recommended that the determination of light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence be based upon experiment. Recommendations for improved methods of pressure vessel surveillance neutron dosimetry are advanced

  11. Pressure Heads and Simulated Water Uptake Patterns for a Severely Stressed Bean Crop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durigon, A.; Santos, dos M.A.; Lier, van Q.D.; Metselaar, K.

    2012-01-01

    In modeling, actual crop transpiration as a function of soil hydraulic conditions is usually estimated from a water content or pressure head dependent reduction function. We compared the performance of the empirical pressure head based reduction function of Feddes (FRF) and a more physically based

  12. Bridge pressure flow scour for clear water conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    The equilibrium scour at a bridge caused by pressure flow with critical approach velocity in clear-water simulation conditions was studied both analytically and experimentally. The flume experiments revealed that (1) the measured equilibrium scour pr...

  13. Modeling of Pressure Effects in HVDC Cables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Peter; Hassager, Ole; Strøbech, Esben

    1999-01-01

    A model is developed for the prediction of pressure effects in HVDC mass impregnatedcables as a result of temperature changes.To test the model assumptions, experiments were performed in cable like geometries.It is concluded that the model may predict the formation of gas cavities....

  14. Heat insulation device for reactor pressure vessel in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Heiichiro; Tanaka, Yoshimi.

    1993-01-01

    Outer walls of a reactor pressure vessel are covered with water-tight walls made of metals. A heat insulation metal material is disposed between them. The water tight walls are joined by welding and flanges. A supply pipeline for filling gases and a discharge pipeline are in communication with the inside of the water tight walls. Further, a water detector is disposed in the midway of the gas discharge pipeline. With such a constitution, the following advantages can be attained. (1) Heat transfer from the reactor pressure vessel to water of a reactor container can be suppressed by filled gases and heat insulation metal material. (2) Since the pressure at the inside of the water tight walls can be equalized with the pressure of the inside of the reactor container, the thickness of the water-tight walls can be reduced. (3) Since intrusion of water to the inside of the walls due to rupture of the water tight walls is detected by the water detector, reactor scram can be conducted rapidly. (4) The sealing property of the flange joint portion is sufficient and detaching operation thereof is easy. (I.S.)

  15. Complex cooling water systems optimization with pressure drop consideration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gololo, KV

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pressure drop consideration has shown to be an essential requirement for the synthesis of a cooling water network where reuse/recycle philosophy is employed. This is due to an increased network pressure drop associated with additional reuse...

  16. Analysis of External Water Pressure for a Tunnel in Fractured Rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-jun Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available External water pressure around tunnels is a main influential factor in relation to the seepage safety of underground chambers and powerhouses which make managing external water pressure crucial to water conservation and hydropower projects. The equivalent continuous medium model and the discrete fracture network (DFN model were, respectively, applied to calculate the seepage field of the study domain. Calculations were based on the integrity and permeability of rocks, the extent of fracture development, and the combination of geological and hydrogeological conditions in the Huizhou pump-storage hydropower station. The station generates electricity from the upper reservoir and stores power by pumping water from the lower to the upper reservoir. In this paper, the external water pressure around the cavern and variations in pressure with only one operational and one venting powerhouse were analyzed to build a predictive model. The results showed that the external water pressure was small with the current anti-seepage and drainage system that normal operation of the reservoir can be guaranteed. The results of external water pressure around the tunnels provided sound scientific evidence for the future design of antiseepage systems.

  17. Ocean bottom pressure modeling for detection of seafloor vertical deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inazu, D.; Hino, R.; Fujimoto, H.

    2009-12-01

    Detection of seafloor crustal deformation is a difficult problem in marine geodesy. Horizontal displacement of the ocean bottom has been detected with accuracy of several centimeters per year by the GPS/Acoustic positioning of seafloor reference points (Spiess et al. 1998). Meanwhile, bottom pressure observations can record the vertical deformation of seafloor and there have been many challenges to detect vertical seafloor displacement. However, ocean bottom pressure variations are highly dominated by oceanic signals such as tidal and subinertial motions. The tidal and other oceanic variations in bottom pressure records are mostly equivalent to several tens and several centimeters water height anomalies, respectively. Generally, the ocean tide is efficiently corrected. Non-tidal components are required to be accurately removed from the bottom pressure records so that the vertical displacement of less than ten centimeters, the expected amount of displacement caused by slow slip events often observed in several subduction zones, is detected by continuous bottom pressure monitoring. We examine the bottom pressure estimations derived from the Kalman filter and smoother runs of the ECCO (Estimating the Circulation & Climate of the Ocean) product to compare in-situ bottom pressure records. The assimilated bottom pressure moderately represents the seasonal variation, and hardly represents the variation with periods less than a few months. This high frequency variation is mainly explained by the barotropic phenomena induced by meteorological disturbances. Hirose et al. (2001) and Carrère and Lyard (2003) modeled the barotropic ocean motion with the forcing of atmospheric pressure loading and wind over global oceans for the sake of the correction of satellite observations. This study addresses the accurate bottom pressure modeling, which enables us to detect vertical displacement of several centimeters from the in-situ bottom pressure observations. We develop accurate

  18. Where Did the Water Go?: Boyle's Law and Pressurized Diaphragm Water Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimhall, James; Naga, Sundar

    2007-01-01

    Many homes use pressurized diaphragm tanks for storage of water pumped from an underground well. These tanks are very carefully constructed to have separate internal chambers for the storage of water and for the air that provides the pressure. One might expect that the amount of water available for use from, for example, a 50-gallon tank would be…

  19. Reservoir pressure evolution model during exploration drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korotaev B. A.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis of laboratory studies and literature data the method for estimating reservoir pressure in exploratory drilling has been proposed, it allows identify zones of abnormal reservoir pressure in the presence of seismic data on reservoir location depths. This method of assessment is based on developed at the end of the XX century methods using d- and σ-exponentials taking into account the mechanical drilling speed, rotor speed, bit load and its diameter, lithological constant and degree of rocks' compaction, mud density and "regional density". It is known that in exploratory drilling pulsation of pressure at the wellhead is observed. Such pulsation is a consequence of transferring reservoir pressure through clay. In the paper the mechanism for transferring pressure to the bottomhole as well as the behaviour of the clay layer during transmission of excess pressure has been described. A laboratory installation has been built, it has been used for modelling pressure propagation to the bottomhole of the well through a layer of clay. The bulge of the clay layer is established for 215.9 mm bottomhole diameter. Functional correlation of pressure propagation through the layer of clay has been determined and a reaction of the top clay layer has been shown to have bulge with a height of 25 mm. A pressure distribution scheme (balance has been developed, which takes into account the distance from layers with abnormal pressure to the bottomhole. A balance equation for reservoir pressure evaluation has been derived including well depth, distance from bottomhole to the top of the formation with abnormal pressure and density of clay.

  20. Modeling pressure rise in gas targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, P.; Lapi, S. E.; Publicover, J.; Buckley, K.; Martinez, D. M.; Ruth, T. J.; Hoehr, C.

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to introduce a universal mathematical model to explain a gas target behaviour at steady-state time scale. To obtain our final goal, an analytical model is proposed to study the pressure rise in the targets used to produce medical isotopes on low-energy cyclotrons. The model is developed based on the assumption that during irradiation the system reaches steady-state. The model is verified by various experiments performed at different beam currents, gas type, and initial pressures at 13 MeV cyclotron at TRIUMF. Excellent agreement is achieved.

  1. Cold water, ultra-high pressure cleaning of abattoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempster, J F

    1977-02-01

    Cold water (10 degrees C) at ultra-high pressure (38-5--49 kg/cm2) was compared with (a) hot water 65-6--82.2 degrees C) at low pressure (4-2--5-6 kg/cm2) and (b) hot water containing a detergent (2% (w/v) sodium silicate). Seven sites were examined in a beef abattoir and six in a bacon factor. Three surfaces in the beef abattoir had lower residual colony counts (higher reductions) after hot water/low pressure than after cold water/high pressure. However, the differences were not significant (P greater than 0-05). The range of the mean log10 count/cm2 before cleaning was 4-02-5.15, and after cleaning 1-73-2.32 (hot water) and 1-9--2-85 (cold water). On three of the remaining sites, the three methods were compared. The total differences between treatments were not significant (P greater than 0-05), although there was an effect of surface and an interaction between surface and treatment. The cold water produced lower residual counts on three sites in the bacon factory than the hot water (45--54 degrees C). However, the differences were not significant on the remaining surfaces.

  2. A simple predictive model of quartz solubility in water-salt-CO 2 systems at temperatures up to 1000 °C and pressures up to 1000 MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinfiev, Nikolay N.; Diamond, Larryn W.

    2009-03-01

    Knowledge of the solubility of quartz over a broad spectrum of aqueous fluid compositions and T-P conditions is essential to our understanding of water-rock interaction in the Earth's crust. We propose an equation to compute the molality of aqueous silica, m, mol·(kg H 2O) -1, in equilibrium with quartz and water-salt-CO 2 fluids, as follows: logm=A(T)+B(T)·log{18.0152}/{VHO∗}+2logxO Here A(T) and B(T) are polynomials from Manning's ( GCA58 (1994), 4831) equation for quartz solubility in pure water, and xO and VHO∗ stand for the mole fraction and effective partial molar volume of H 2O in the fluid, respectively. The value of VHO∗ is computed from the relation V=xOVHO∗+∑xsV, where Vmix is the molar volume of the fluid mixture (in cm 3 mol -1), and x s and V s denote the mole fraction and the intrinsic volume of the solute, s, respectively. Values of Vmix may be obtained from experimental data on the fluid mixture or from a reliable equation of state for the mixture. Adoption of the V s values VNaCl = 30.8 cm 3 mol -1 and V = 29.9 cm 3 mol -1 permits satisfactory prediction of quartz solubility both in binary and ternary aqueous systems. In lieu of experimental data V s can be estimated from pure substance properties: the intrinsic volumes of molten salts yield Vs for the electrolyte components, whereas the excluded volumes of gas species in Redlich-Kwong-Soave-type equations of state yield Vs for the volatiles. The accuracy of our density model is only slightly inferior to the empirical regressions that experimentalists have used to interpolate their measurements of quartz solubility. The strength of our model lies in its ability to predict trends in quartz solubility in fluid mixtures over an extremely wide range of T-P-xs conditions relevant to the Earth's crust, including conditions hitherto unexplored experimentally. This success is attributable to our model having only one adjustable parameter per solute.

  3. A pressure drop model for PWR grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dong Seok; In, Wang Ki; Bang, Je Geon; Jung, Youn Ho; Chun, Tae Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A pressure drop model for the PWR grids with and without mixing device is proposed at single phase based on the fluid mechanistic approach. Total pressure loss is expressed in additive way for form and frictional losses. The general friction factor correlations and form drag coefficients available in the open literatures are used to the model. As the results, the model shows better predictions than the existing ones for the non-mixing grids, and reasonable agreements with the available experimental data for mixing grids. Therefore it is concluded that the proposed model for pressure drop can provide sufficiently good approximation for grid optimization and design calculation in advanced grid development. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  4. High Pressure Water Stripping Using Multi-Orifice Nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, David

    1999-01-01

    The use of multi-orifice rotary nozzles greatly increases the speed and stripping effectiveness of high pressure water blasting systems, but also greatly increases the complexity of selecting and optimizing the operating parameters. The rotational speed of the nozzle must be coupled with its transverse velocity as it passes across the surface of the substrate being stripped. The radial and angular positions of each orifice must be included in the analysis of the nozzle configuration. Orifices at the outer edge of the nozzle head move at a faster rate than the orifices located near the center. The energy transmitted to the surface from the impact force of the water stream from an outer orifice is therefore spread over a larger area than energy from an inner orifice. Utilizing a larger diameter orifice in the outer radial positions increases the total energy transmitted from the outer orifice to compensate for the wider distribution of energy. The total flow rate from the combination of all orifices must be monitored and should be kept below the pump capacity while choosing orifice to insert in each position. The energy distribution from the orifice pattern is further complicated since the rotary path of all the orifices in the nozzle head pass through the center section. All orifices contribute to the stripping in the center of the path while only the outer most orifice contributes to the stripping at the edge of the nozzle. Additional orifices contribute to the stripping from the outer edge toward the center section. With all these parameters to configure and each parameter change affecting the others, a computer model was developed to track and coordinate these parameters. The computer simulation graphically indicates the cumulative affect from each parameter selected. The result from the proper choices in parameters is a well designed, highly efficient stripping system. A poorly chosen set of parameters will cause the nozzle to strip aggressively in some areas

  5. Classification and modelling of functional outputs of computation codes. Application to accidental thermal-hydraulic calculations in pressurized water reactor (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auder, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    This research thesis has been made within the frame of a project on nuclear reactor vessel life. It deals with the use of numerical codes aimed at estimating probability densities for every input parameter in order to calculate probability margins at the output level. More precisely, it deals with codes with one-dimensional functional responses. The author studies the numerical simulation of a pressurized thermal shock on a nuclear reactor vessel, i.e. one of the possible accident types. The study of the vessel integrity relies on a thermal-hydraulic analysis and on a mechanical analysis. Algorithms are developed and proposed for each of them. Input-output data are classified using a clustering technique and a graph-based representation. A method for output dimension reduction is proposed, and a regression is applied between inputs and reduced representations. Applications are discussed in the case of modelling and sensitivity analysis for the CATHARE code (a code used at the CEA for the thermal-hydraulic analysis)

  6. Design and analysis of pressurized water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhn, P.E.; Kim, Y.H.

    1979-01-01

    To help develop nuclear engineering technologies in local industry sectors, technical and economical data on pressurized water reactor systems and components have been collected, systematically analyzed and computerized to a certain degree. Codes and standards necessary for engineering design of PWR systems have been surveyed and clarified in terms of NSSS, turbine-generator system and BOP, then again rearranged with respect to quality classes and seismic classes. Some design manuals, criteria and guidelines regarding design, construction, test and operation of PWR plants have also been surveyed and collected. Benchmark cost calculation for the construction of a 900 MWe PWR plant, according to the standard format, was carried out, and computer model on construction costs was improved and updated by considering the local supply of labor and materials. And for the indigeneous development of PWR equipment and materials, such data as delivery schedule and manufacturers of 52 systems and 36,000 components have also been reviewed herein. (author)

  7. Pressure: the politechnics of water supply in Mumbai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Nikhil

    2011-01-01

    In Mumbai, most all residents are delivered their daily supply of water for a few hours every day, on a water supply schedule. Subject to a more precarious supply than the city's upper-class residents, the city's settlers have to consistently demand that their water come on “time” and with “pressure.” Taking pressure seriously as both a social and natural force, in this article I focus on the ways in which settlers mobilize the pressures of politics, pumps, and pipes to get water. I show how these practices not only allow settlers to live in the city, but also produce what I call hydraulic citizenship—a form of belonging to the city made by effective political and technical connections to the city's infrastructure. Yet, not all settlers are able to get water from the city water department. The outcomes of settlers' efforts to access water depend on a complex matrix of socionatural relations that settlers make with city engineers and their hydraulic infrastructure. I show how these arrangements describe and produce the cultural politics of water in Mumbai. By focusing on the ways in which residents in a predominantly Muslim settlement draw water despite the state's neglect, I conclude by pointing to the indeterminacy of water, and the ways in which its seepage and leakage make different kinds of politics and publics possible in the city.

  8. Exploration of Impinging Water Spray Heat Transfer at System Pressures Near the Triple Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golliher, Eric L.; Yao, Shi-Chune

    2013-01-01

    The heat transfer of a water spray impinging upon a surface in a very low pressure environment is of interest to cooling of space vehicles during launch and re-entry, and to industrial processes where flash evaporation occurs. At very low pressure, the process occurs near the triple point of water, and there exists a transient multiphase transport problem of ice, water and water vapor. At the impingement location, there are three heat transfer mechanisms: evaporation, freezing and sublimation. A preliminary heat transfer model was developed to explore the interaction of these mechanisms at the surface and within the spray.

  9. Tensile Strength of Water Exposed to Pressure Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Mørch, Knud Aage

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that pressurization for an extended period of time increases the tensile strength of water, but little information is available on the effect of pressure pulses of short duration. This is addressed in the present paper where we first measure the tensile strength of water...... at an extended water-solid interface by imposing a tensile stress pulse which easily causes cavitation. Next, a compressive pulse of duration ~1 ms and a peak intensity of a few bar is imposed prior to the tensile stress pulse. A dramatic increase of the tensile strength is observed immediately after...

  10. Decay ratio estimation in pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Por, G.; Runkel, J.

    1990-11-01

    The well known decay ratio (DR) from stability analysis of boiling water reactors (BWR) is estimated from the impulse response function which was evaluated using a simplified univariate autoregression method. This simplified DR called modified DR (mDR) was applied on neutron noise measurements carried out during five fuel cycles of a 1300 MWe PWR. Results show that this fast evaluation method can be used for monitoring of the growing oscillation of the neutron flux during the fuel cycles which is a major concern of utilities in PWRs, thus it can be used for estimating safety margins. (author) 17 refs.; 10 figs

  11. Water Pressure Distribution on a Twin-Float Seaplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, F L

    1930-01-01

    This is the second of a series of investigations to determine water pressure distribution on various types of seaplane floats and hulls, and was conducted on a twin-float seaplane. It consisted of measuring water pressures and accelerations on a TS-1 seaplane during numerous landing and taxiing maneuvers at various speeds and angles. The results show that water pressures as great as 10 lbs. per sq. in.may occur at the step in various maneuvers and that pressures of approximately the same magnitude occur at the stern and near the bow in hard pancake landings with the stern way down. At the other parts of the float the pressures are less and are usually zero or slightly negative for some distance abaft the step. A maximum negative pressure of 0.87 lb. Per square inch was measured immediately abaft the step. The maximum positive pressures have a duration of approximately one-twentieth to one-hundredth second at any given location and are distributed over a very limited area at any particular instant.

  12. Modelling of pressure loads in a pressure suppression pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timperi, A.; Chauhan, M.; Paettikangas, T.; Niemi, J.

    2013-06-01

    Rapid collapse of a large steam bubble is analyzed by using CFD and FEM calculations. In addition, a 1D code is written which takes into account the finite condensation rate. The 1D simulations are compared with the PPOOLEX experiment COL-01. By adjusting the condensation rate, the calculated pressure peak near the vent outlet could be made same as in the experiment. Scaling of the measured pressure loads to full-scale is studied by dimensional analyses and by review of the analysis of Sonin (1981). The structural response of containment during chugging is studied by using an FEM of containment with simplified geometry and loading which was created based on experimental data. The results are compared to the case in which desynchronization is absent, and chugging occurs simultaneously in every vent pipe. The desynchronized loading is created by giving random initiation times for chugs out of distribution corresponding to the desynchronization time presented by Kukita and Namatame (1985). CFD simulations of the PPOOLEX experiment MIX-03 were performed. In the experiment, clear chugging behavior was observed. In the simulation, the interphasial surface was much more stable and oscillation occurred at a higher frequency than in the experiment. The differences are likely caused by the turbulence model and too coarse numerical mesh, which causes numerical diffusion. (Author)

  13. The Effective Convectivity Model for Simulation and Analysis of Melt Pool Heat Transfer in a Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Lower Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Chi Thanh

    2009-09-01

    Severe accidents in a Light Water Reactor (LWR) have been a subject of intense research for the last three decades. The research in this area aims to reach understanding of the inherent physical phenomena and reduce the uncertainties in their quantification, with the ultimate goal of developing models that can be applied to safety analysis of nuclear reactors, and to evaluation of the proposed accident management schemes for mitigating the consequences of severe accidents. In a hypothetical severe accident there is likelihood that the core materials will be relocated to the lower plenum and form a decay-heated debris bed (debris cake) or a melt pool. Interactions of core debris or melt with the reactor structures depend to a large extent on the debris bed or melt pool thermal hydraulics. In case of inadequate cooling, the excessive heat would drive the structures' overheating and ablation, and hence govern the vessel failure mode and timing. In turn, threats to containment integrity associated with potential ex-vessel steam explosions and ex-vessel debris uncoolability depend on the composition, superheat, and amount of molten corium available for discharge upon the vessel failure. That is why predictions of transient melt pool heat transfer in the reactor lower head, subsequent vessel failure modes and melt characteristics upon the discharge are of paramount importance for plant safety assessment. The main purpose of the present study is to develop a method for reliable prediction of melt pool thermal hydraulics, namely to establish a computational platform for cost-effective, sufficiently-accurate numerical simulations and analyses of core Melt-Structure-Water Interactions in the LWR lower head during a postulated severe core-melting accident. To achieve the goal, an approach to efficient use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been proposed to guide and support the development of models suitable for accident analysis. The CFD method, on the one hand, is

  14. Franco-German nuclear cooperation: from the 'common product' to the first European pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignon, D.

    1999-01-01

    It has now been 10 years since Framatome and Siemens decided to collaborate on the design and sales of an advanced nuclear power plant (NPP) model based on pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology. Originally called the 'common product', this model was renamed the European pressurized water reactor when Electricite de France (EDF) and the German electric utilities joined this cooperative development effort in 1992. Since the beginning, this cooperation has been formalized in the framework of an agreement that led to the founding of a joint and equally owned subsidiary, Nucler Power International (NPI), which is reponsible for leading the development of the new model and later handling its export sales

  15. EPR (European Pressurized water Reactor) The advanced nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear energy, which provides a steady supply of electricity at low cost, has its rightful place in the energy mix of the 21. century, which puts the emphasis on sustainable development. The EPR is the only 3. generation reactor under construction today. It is an evolutionary reactor that represents a new generation of pressurized water reactors with no break in the technology used for the most recent models. The EPR was developed by Framatome and Siemens, whose nuclear activities were combined in January 2001 to form Framatome ANP, a subsidiary of AREVA and Siemens. EDF and the major German electricity companies played an active part in the project. The safety authorities of the two countries joined forces to bring their respective safety standards into line and draw up joint design rules for the new reactor. The project had three objectives: meet the requirements of European utilities, comply with the safety standards laid down by the French safety authority for future pressurized water reactors, in concert with its German counterpart, and make nuclear energy even more competitive than energy generated using fossil fuels. The EPR can guarantee a safe, inexpensive electricity supply, without adding to the greenhouse effect. It meets the requirements of the safety authorities and lives up to the expectations of electricity utilities. This document presents the main characteristics of the EPR, and in particular the additional measures to prevent the occurrence of events likely to damage the core, the leak-tight containment, the measures to reduce the exposure of operating and maintenance personnel, the solutions for an even greater protection of the environment. The foreseen development of the EPR in France and abroad (Finland, China, the United States) is summarized

  16. Dual temperature dual pressure water-hydrogen chemical exchange for water detritiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Takahiko, E-mail: t-sugiyama@nucl.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Nagoya University, Fro-cho 1, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Takada, Akito; Morita, Youhei [Faculty of Engineering, Nagoya University, Fro-cho 1, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kotoh, Kenji [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, Moto-oka 744, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Munakata, Kenzo [Faculty of Engineering and Resource Science, Akita University, Tegata-gakuen-machi 1-1, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Taguchi, Akira [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Gofuku 3190, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Kawano, Takao; Tanaka, Masahiro; Akata, Naofumi [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi-cho 322-6, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Experimental and analytical studies on hydrogen-tritium isotope separation by a dual temperature dual pressure catalytic exchange (DTDP-CE) with liquid phase chemical exchange columns were carried out in order to apply it to a part of the water detritiation system for DEMO fuel cycle. A prototype DTDP-CE apparatus was successfully operated and it was confirmed that tritium was separated by the apparatus as significantly distinguishable. A calculation code was developed based on the channeling stage model. The values of separation factors and the effects of some operating parameters were well predicted by the separative analyses with the code.

  17. Design of virtual SCADA simulation system for pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijaksono, Umar, E-mail: umar.wijaksono@student.upi.edu; Abdullah, Ade Gafar; Hakim, Dadang Lukman [Electrical Power System Research Group, Department of Electrical Engineering Education, Jl. Dr. Setiabudi No. 207 Bandung, Indonesia 40154 (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    The Virtual SCADA system is a software-based Human-Machine Interface that can visualize the process of a plant. This paper described the results of the virtual SCADA system design that aims to recognize the principle of the Nuclear Power Plant type Pressurized Water Reactor. This simulation uses technical data of the Nuclear Power Plant Unit Olkiluoto 3 in Finland. This device was developed using Wonderware Intouch, which is equipped with manual books for each component, animation links, alarm systems, real time and historical trending, and security system. The results showed that in general this device can demonstrate clearly the principles of energy flow and energy conversion processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. This virtual SCADA simulation system can be used as instructional media to recognize the principle of Pressurized Water Reactor.

  18. Design of virtual SCADA simulation system for pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijaksono, Umar; Abdullah, Ade Gafar; Hakim, Dadang Lukman

    2016-01-01

    The Virtual SCADA system is a software-based Human-Machine Interface that can visualize the process of a plant. This paper described the results of the virtual SCADA system design that aims to recognize the principle of the Nuclear Power Plant type Pressurized Water Reactor. This simulation uses technical data of the Nuclear Power Plant Unit Olkiluoto 3 in Finland. This device was developed using Wonderware Intouch, which is equipped with manual books for each component, animation links, alarm systems, real time and historical trending, and security system. The results showed that in general this device can demonstrate clearly the principles of energy flow and energy conversion processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. This virtual SCADA simulation system can be used as instructional media to recognize the principle of Pressurized Water Reactor

  19. Design of virtual SCADA simulation system for pressurized water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaksono, Umar; Abdullah, Ade Gafar; Hakim, Dadang Lukman

    2016-02-01

    The Virtual SCADA system is a software-based Human-Machine Interface that can visualize the process of a plant. This paper described the results of the virtual SCADA system design that aims to recognize the principle of the Nuclear Power Plant type Pressurized Water Reactor. This simulation uses technical data of the Nuclear Power Plant Unit Olkiluoto 3 in Finland. This device was developed using Wonderware Intouch, which is equipped with manual books for each component, animation links, alarm systems, real time and historical trending, and security system. The results showed that in general this device can demonstrate clearly the principles of energy flow and energy conversion processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. This virtual SCADA simulation system can be used as instructional media to recognize the principle of Pressurized Water Reactor.

  20. The hydraulics of the pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchter, J.C.; Barbier, D.; Caruso, A.

    1999-01-01

    The SFEN organized, the 10 june 1999 at Paris, a meeting in the domain of the PWR hydraulics and in particular the hydraulic phenomena concerning the vessel and the vapor generators. The papers presented showed the importance of the industrial stakes with their associated phenomena: cores performance and safety with the more homogenous cooling system, the rods and the control rods wear, the temperature control, the fluid-structure interactions. A great part was also devoted to the progresses in the domain of the numerical simulation and the models and algorithms qualification. (A.L.B.)

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Water Nanodroplets on Silica Surfaces at High Air Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Jaffe, Richard Lawrence; Walther, Jens Honore

    2010-01-01

    e.g., nanobubbles. In the present work we study the role of air on the wetting of hydrophilic systems. We conduct molecular dynamics simulations of a water nanodroplet on an amorphous silica surface at different air pressures. The interaction potentials describing the silica, water, and air...... are obtained from the literature. The silica surface is modeled by a large 32 ⨯ 32 ⨯ 2 nm amorphous SiO2 structure consisting of 180000 atoms. The water consists of 18000 water molecules surrounded by N2 and O2 air molecules corresponding to air pressures of 0 bar (vacuum), 50 bar, 100 bar and 200 bar. We...... the effect of air and find a consistent increase in the water contact angle reaching 53º at 200 bar air pressure. These results are important for the creation and stability of nanobubbles at hydrophilic interfaces....

  2. Software to study the control strategy of pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Jose Ricardo de

    2002-01-01

    The computational program, result of this work, is a tool developed for the study of the control of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) constituted by only one coolant loop. The implementation of a user friendly interface for input/output data, makes the program also suitable for training and teaching applications. As design premise, it was considered enough just the modeling of the primary circuit, using as interface with the secondary circuit, a simplified differential equation of the temperature associated with the secondary power. All the incorporated dynamic equations to the model were developed using basic laws of conservation, boundary conditions and hypotheses appropriated to the control study. To arrive to the final model, core thermal and hydraulic characteristics and design data were obtained from of the available bibliography and adapted for a conceptual peculiar design of a small PWR. The whole program and all input/output interfaces were developed using the software Matlab, version 5.L Sub-routines of numeric integration based on the Runge-Kutta 4 method were applied, to solve the set of ordinary differential equations. (author)

  3. Supercritical water gasification with decoupled pressure and heat transfer modules

    KAUST Repository

    Dibble, Robert

    2017-09-14

    The present invention discloses a system and method for supercritical water gasification (SCWG) of biomass materials wherein the system includes a SCWG reactor and a plurality of heat exchangers located within a shared pressurized vessel, which decouples the function of containing high pressure from the high temperature function. The present invention allows the heat transfer function to be conducted independently from the pressure transfer function such that the system equipment can be designed and fabricated in manner that would support commercial scaled-up SCWG operations. By using heat exchangers coupled to the reactor in a series configuration, significant efficiencies are achieved by the present invention SCWG system over prior known SCWG systems.

  4. Experiments on aerosol removal by high-pressure water spray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corno, Ada del; Morandi, Sonia; Parozzi, Flavio; Araneo, Lucio; Casella, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Experimental research to measure the efficiency of high-pressure sprays in capturing aerosols if applied to a filtered containment venting system in case of severe accident. • Cloud of monodispersed SiO 2 particles with sizes 0.5 or 1.0 μm and initial concentration in the range 2–90 mg/m 3 . • Carried out in a chamber 0.5 × 1.0 m and 1.5 m high, with transparent walls equipped with a high pressure water spray with single nozzle. • Respect to low-pressure sprays, removal efficiency turned out significant: the half-life for 1 μm particles with a removal high-pressure spray system is orders of magnitude shorter than that with a low-pressure sprays system. - Abstract: An experimental research was managed in the framework of the PASSAM European Project to measure the efficiency of high-pressure sprays in capturing aerosols when applied to a filtered containment venting system in case of severe accident. The campaign was carried out in a purposely built facility composed by a scrubbing chamber 0.5 × 1.0 m and 1.5 m high, with transparent walls to permit the complete view of the aerosol removal process, where the aerosol was injected to form a cloud of specific particle concentration. The chamber was equipped with a high pressure water spray system with a single nozzle placed on its top. The test matrix consisted in the combination of water pressure injections, in the range 50–130 bar, on a cloud of monodispersed SiO 2 particles with sizes 0.5 or 1.0 μm and initial concentration ranging between 2 and 99 mg/m 3 . The spray was kept running for 2 min and the efficiency of the removal was evaluated, along the test time, using an optical particle sizer. With respect to low-pressure sprays, the removal efficiency turned out much more significant: the half-life for 1 μm particles with a removal high-pressure spray system is orders of magnitude shorter than that with a low-pressure spray system. The highest removal rate was detected with 1

  5. Lotic Water Hydrodynamic Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judi, David Ryan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tasseff, Byron Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-23

    Water-related natural disasters, for example, floods and droughts, are among the most frequent and costly natural hazards, both socially and economically. Many of these floods are a result of excess rainfall collecting in streams and rivers, and subsequently overtopping banks and flowing overland into urban environments. Floods can cause physical damage to critical infrastructure and present health risks through the spread of waterborne diseases. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has developed Lotic, a state-of-the-art surface water hydrodynamic model, to simulate propagation of flood waves originating from a variety of events. Lotic is a two-dimensional (2D) flood model that has been used primarily for simulations in which overland water flows are characterized by movement in two dimensions, such as flood waves expected from rainfall-runoff events, storm surge, and tsunamis. In 2013, LANL developers enhanced Lotic through several development efforts. These developments included enhancements to the 2D simulation engine, including numerical formulation, computational efficiency developments, and visualization. Stakeholders can use simulation results to estimate infrastructure damage and cascading consequences within other sets of infrastructure, as well as to inform the development of flood mitigation strategies.

  6. Behavior of stainless steels in pressurized water reactor primary circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Féron, D.; Herms, E.; Tanguy, B.

    2012-01-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in primary circuits of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience with the various grades of stainless steels over several decades of years has generally been excellent. Nevertheless, stress corrosion failures have been reported in few cases. Two main factors contributing to SCC susceptibility enhancement are investigated in this study: cold work and irradiation. Irradiation is involved in the stress corrosion cracking and corrosion of in-core reactor components in PWR environment. Irradiated assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a complex and multi-physics phenomenon for which a predictive modeling able to describe initiation and/or propagation is not yet achieved. Experimentally, development of initiation smart tests and of in situ instrumentation, also in nuclear reactors, is an important axis in order to gain a better understanding of IASCC kinetics. A strong susceptibility for SCC of heavily cold worked austenitic stainless steels is evidenced in hydrogenated primary water typical of PWRs. It is shown that for a given cold-working procedure, SCC susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels materials increases with increasing cold-work. Results have shown also strong influences of the cold work on the oxide layer composition and of the maximum stress on the time to fracture.

  7. Taipower's reload safety evaluation methodology for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ping-Hue; Yang, Y.S.

    1996-01-01

    For Westinghouse pressurized water reactors (PWRs) such as Taiwan Power Company's (TPC's) Maanshan Units 1 and 2, each of the safety analysis is performed with conservative reload related parameters such that reanalysis is not expected for all subsequent cycles. For each reload cycle design, it is required to perform a reload safety evaluation (RSE) to confirm the validity of the existing safety analysis for fuel cycle changes. The TPC's reload safety evaluation methodology for PWRs is based on 'Core Design and Safety Analysis Package' developed by the TPC and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), and is an important portion of the 'Taipower's Reload Design and Transient Analysis Methodologies for Light Water Reactors'. The Core Management System (CMS) developed by Studsvik of America, the one-dimensional code AXINER developed by TPC, National Tsinghua University and INER, and a modified version of the well-known subchannel core thermal-hydraulic code COBRAIIIC are the major computer codes utilized. Each of the computer models is extensively validated by comparing with measured data and/or vendor's calculational results. Moreover, parallel calculations have been performed for two Maanshan reload cycles to validate the RSE methods. The TPC's in-house RSE tools have been applied to resolve many important plant operational issues and plant improvements, as well as to verify the vendor's fuel and core design data. (author)

  8. Application-specific integrated circuit design for a typical pressurized water reactor pressure channel trip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battle, R.E.; Manges, W.W.; Emery, M.S.; Vendermolen, R.I.; Bhatt, S.

    1994-01-01

    This article discusses the use of application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) in nuclear plant safety systems. ASICs have certain advantages over software-based systems because they can be simple enough to be thoroughly tested, and they can be tailored to replace existing equipment. An architecture to replace a pressurized water reactor pressure channel trip is presented. Methods of implementing digital algorithms are also discussed

  9. Validated Analytical Model of a Pressure Compensation Drip Irrigation Emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamshery, Pulkit; Wang, Ruo-Qian; Taylor, Katherine; Tran, Davis; Winter, Amos

    2015-11-01

    This work is focused on analytically characterizing the behavior of pressure-compensating drip emitters in order to design low-cost, low-power irrigation solutions appropriate for off-grid communities in developing countries. There are 2.5 billion small acreage farmers worldwide who rely solely on their land for sustenance. Drip, compared to flood, irrigation leads to up to 70% reduction in water consumption while increasing yields by 90% - important in countries like India which are quickly running out of water. To design a low-power drip system, there is a need to decrease the pumping pressure requirement at the emitters, as pumping power is the product of pressure and flow rate. To efficiently design such an emitter, the relationship between the fluid-structure interactions that occur in an emitter need to be understood. In this study, a 2D analytical model that captures the behavior of a common drip emitter was developed and validated through experiments. The effects of independently changing the channel depth, channel width, channel length and land height on the performance were studied. The model and the key parametric insights presented have the potential to be optimized in order to guide the design of low-pressure, clog-resistant, pressure-compensating emitters.

  10. Fracture analysis of axially cracked pressure tube of pressurized heavy water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, S.; Bhasin, V.; Mahajan, S.C. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Three Dimensional (313) finite element elastic plastic fracture analysis was done for through wall axially cracked thin pressure tubes of 220 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. The analysis was done for Zr-2 and Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes operating at 300{degrees}C and subjected to 9.5 Mpa internal pressure. Critical crack length was determined based on tearing instability concept. The analysis included the effect of crack face pressure due to the leaking fluid from tube. This effect was found to be significant for pressure tubes. The available formulae for calculating J (for axially cracked tubes) do not take into account the effect of crack face pressure. 3D finite element analysis also gives insight into variation of J across the thickness of pressure tube. It was observed that J is highest at the mid-surface of tube. The results have been presented in the form of across the thickness average J value and a peak factor on J. Peak factor on J is ratio of J at mid surface to average J value. Crack opening area for different cracked lengths was calculated from finite element results. The fracture assessment of pressure tubes was also done using Central Electricity Generating Board R-6 method. Ductile tearing was considered.

  11. Standard Technical Specifications for Westinghouse pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgilio, M.J.

    1980-09-01

    The Standard Technical Specifications for Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors (W-STS) is a generic document prepared by the U.S. NRC for use in the licensing process of current Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors. The W-STS sets forth the Limits, Operating Conditions and other requirements applicable to nuclear reactor facility operation as set forth in by Section 50.36 of 10 CFR Part 50 for the protection of the health and safety of the public. This document is revised periodically to reflect current licensing requirements

  12. Standard Technical Specifications for Combustion Engineering Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vito, D.J.

    1980-12-01

    The Standard Technical Specifications for Combustion Engineering Pressurized Water Reactors (CE-STS) is a generic document prepared by the US NRC for use in the licensing process of current Combustion Engineering Pressurized Water Reactors. The CE-STS sets forth the limits, operating conditions, and other requirements applicable to nuclear reactor facility operation as set forth by Section 50.36 of 10 CFR 50 for the protection of the health and safety of the public. The document is revised periodically to reflect current licensing requirements

  13. Optimization of pressure gauge locations for water distribution systems using entropy theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Do Guen; Chang, Dong Eil; Jun, Hwandon; Kim, Joong Hoon

    2012-12-01

    It is essential to select the optimal pressure gauge location for effective management and maintenance of water distribution systems. This study proposes an objective and quantified standard for selecting the optimal pressure gauge location by defining the pressure change at other nodes as a result of demand change at a specific node using entropy theory. Two cases are considered in terms of demand change: that in which demand at all nodes shows peak load by using a peak factor and that comprising the demand change of the normal distribution whose average is the base demand. The actual pressure change pattern is determined by using the emitter function of EPANET to reflect the pressure that changes practically at each node. The optimal pressure gauge location is determined by prioritizing the node that processes the largest amount of information it gives to (giving entropy) and receives from (receiving entropy) the whole system according to the entropy standard. The suggested model is applied to one virtual and one real pipe network, and the optimal pressure gauge location combination is calculated by implementing the sensitivity analysis based on the study results. These analysis results support the following two conclusions. Firstly, the installation priority of the pressure gauge in water distribution networks can be determined with a more objective standard through the entropy theory. Secondly, the model can be used as an efficient decision-making guide for gauge installation in water distribution systems.

  14. Research on the water hammer protection of the long distance water supply project with the combined action of the air vessel and over-pressure relief valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D D; Jiang, J; Zhao, Z; Yi, W S; Lan, G

    2013-01-01

    We take a concrete pumping station as an example in this paper. Through the calculation of water hammer protection with a specific pumping station water supply project, and the analysis of the principle, mathematical models and boundary conditions of air vessel and over-pressure relief valve we show that the air vessel can protect the water conveyance system and reduce the transient pressure damage due to various causes. Over-pressure relief valve can effectively reduce the water hammer because the water column re-bridge suddenly stops the pump and prevents pipeline burst. The paper indicates that the combination set of air vessel and over-pressure relief valve can greatly reduce the quantity of the air valve and can eliminate the water hammer phenomenon in the pipeline system due to the vaporization and water column separation and re-bridge. The conclusion could provide a reference for the water hammer protection of long-distance water supply system

  15. A Theoretical Model of Water and Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Q.; Konar, M.; Reimer, J.; Di Baldassarre, G.; Lin, X.; Zeng, R.

    2015-12-01

    Water is an essential factor of agricultural production. Agriculture, in turn, is globalized through the trade of food commodities. In this paper, we develop a theoretical model of a small open economy that explicitly incorporates water resources. The model emphasizes three tradeoffs involving water decision-making that are important yet not always considered within the existing literature. One tradeoff focuses on competition for water among different sectors when there is a shock to one of the sectors only, such as trade liberalization and consequent higher demand for the product. A second tradeoff concerns the possibility that there may or may not be substitutes for water, such as increased use of sophisticated irrigation technology as a means to increase crop output in the absence of higher water availability. A third tradeoff explores the possibility that the rest of the world can be a source of supply or demand for a country's water-using products. A number of propositions are proven. For example, while trade liberalization tends to increase water use, increased pressure on water supplies can be moderated by way of a tax that is derivable with observable economic phenomena. Another example is that increased riskiness of water availability tends to cause water users to use less water than would be the case under profit maximization. These theoretical model results generate hypotheses that can be tested empirically in future work.

  16. Ultra-high pressure water jet: Baseline report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-31

    The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology was being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology acts as a cutting tool for the removal of surface substrates. The Husky{trademark} pump feeds water to a lance that directs the high pressure water at the surface to be removed. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure. These were dust and noise. The dust exposure was found to be minimal, which would be expected due to the wet environment inherent in the technology, but noise exposure was at a significant level. Further testing for noise is recommended because of the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, lockout/tagout, fall hazards, slipping hazards, hazards associated with the high pressure water, and hazards associated with air pressure systems.

  17. Ultra-high pressure water jet: Baseline report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology was being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU's evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology acts as a cutting tool for the removal of surface substrates. The Husky trademark pump feeds water to a lance that directs the high pressure water at the surface to be removed. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure. These were dust and noise. The dust exposure was found to be minimal, which would be expected due to the wet environment inherent in the technology, but noise exposure was at a significant level. Further testing for noise is recommended because of the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, lockout/tagout, fall hazards, slipping hazards, hazards associated with the high pressure water, and hazards associated with air pressure systems

  18. Radiation-induced embrittlement in light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; McElroy, W.N.

    1987-01-01

    In operating light water reactor (LWR) commercial power plants, neutron radiation induces embrittlement of the pressure vessel (PV) and its support structures. As a consequence, LWR-PV integrity is a primary safety consideration. LWR-PV integry is a significant economic consideration because the PV and its support structures are nonreplaceable power plant components and embrittlement of these components can therefore limit the effective operating lifetime of the plant. In addition to plant life considerations, LWR-PV embrittlement creates significant cycle-to-cycle impact through the restriction of normal heat-up and cool-down reactor operations. Recent LWR-PV benchmark experiments are analyzed. On this bases, it is established that an exponential representation accurately describes the spatial dependence of neutron exposure in LWR-PV. Implications produced by simple exponental behavior are explained and trend-curve models for the predictions of PV embrittelment are derived. These derivations provide for a clearer understanding and assessment of the assumptions underlying these trend-curve models. It is demonstrated that LWR-PV embrittlement possesses significant material dependence. (orig.)

  19. Probabilistic integrity assessment of pressure tubes in an operating pressurized heavy water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Young-Jin; Park, Heung-Bae [KEPCO E and C, 188 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-870 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung-Min; Kim, Young-Jin [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-dong, Jangan-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Han-Ok [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 34 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon-si 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Yoon-Suk, E-mail: yschang@khu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1 Seocheon-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Even though pressure tubes are major components of a pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR), only small proportions of pressure tubes are sampled for inspection due to limited inspection time and costs. Since the inspection scope and integrity evaluation have been treated by using a deterministic approach in general, a set of conservative data was used instead of all known information related to in-service degradation mechanisms because of inherent uncertainties in the examination. Recently, in order that pressure tube degradations identified in a sample of inspected pressure tubes are taken into account to address the balance of the uninspected ones in the reactor core, a probabilistic approach has been introduced. In the present paper, probabilistic integrity assessments of PHWR pressure tubes were carried out based on accumulated operating experiences and enhanced technology. Parametric analyses on key variables were conducted, which were periodically measured by in-service inspection program, such as deuterium uptake rate, dimensional change rate of pressure tube and flaw size distribution. Subsequently, a methodology to decide optimum statistical distribution by using a robust method adopting a genetic algorithm was proposed and applied to the most influential variable to verify the reliability of the proposed method. Finally, pros and cons of the alternative distributions comparing with corresponding ones derived from the traditional method as well as technical findings from the statistical assessment were discussed to show applicability to the probabilistic assessment of pressure tubes.

  20. Full bundle mechanical cleaning of pressurized water reactor steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, M.; Lewis, G.

    1998-01-01

    An improved system for cleaning the upper bundle region of pressurized water reactor steam generators is now available. This system employs high pressure water jets to remove sludge and scale from tube and support plate surfaces and from the broach holes throughout the upper bundle region of steam generators. Benefits of sludge removal can include mitigation of the corrosion process, improvement of plant performance and increased operational stability. The cleaning equipment is installed through existing handholes in the tubesheet region and accesses the upper bundle through flow slots in the tube support plates. The system includes a Bulk Cleaning Head which directs high pressure water jets into the tube bundle, a Vertical Deployment System which delivers and positions the head at the desired locations in the upper bundle region, and a high pressure water pumping and sludge processing system. This paper describes the system, several key components, overall system operation, safety issues, and field use chronology. Specific performance issues that are discussed include the cleaning coverage achieved, the time required to clean a steam generator, and cleaning effectiveness. The Upper Bundle Hydraulic Cleaning System described in this paper is available for use in several types of steam generators

  1. Ultra-high pressure water jet: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-31

    The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology was being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology acts as a cutting tool for the removal of surface substrates. The Husky{trademark} pump feeds water to a lance that directs the high pressure water at the surface to be removed. The technologies being tested for concrete decontamination are targeted for alpha contamination. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  2. UPStream: Automated hydraulic design of pressurized water distribution networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanouil, Stergios; Langousis, Andreas

    Hydraulic design of pressurized water distribution networks constitutes a time consuming process in engineering applications, requiring proper selection of pipe diameters so certain regulatory constrains are met. UPStream® is an open-source software, which combines EPANET's computational engine and a simple hydraulic gradient-based recursive approach for selection of pipe diameters, to automatically design pressurized water distribution networks, based on user-defined pressure and flow velocity constraints. To the best of our knowledge, there is no available open-source software for this purpose, which allows for case-specific modifications/interventions by advanced users, as well as extensions to weight between alternative design strategies. Therefore, UPStream® is expected to serve as a useful tool/platform for educational/academic purposes, research, and engineering practice.

  3. Ultra-high pressure water jet: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology was being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU's evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology acts as a cutting tool for the removal of surface substrates. The Husky trademark pump feeds water to a lance that directs the high pressure water at the surface to be removed. The technologies being tested for concrete decontamination are targeted for alpha contamination. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust

  4. Absorber rod bundle actuator in a pressurized water nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.; Peletan, R.

    1984-01-01

    The invention concerns an absorber rod bundle actuator in a pressurized water reactor with spectral shift control. The device comprises two coaxial control bars. The inner bar is integral with the absorber rod bundle; it has an enlarged zone which acts as a proton under pressure difference across an annular seal which can be radially expanded, the pressure difference allowing to the absorber rod bundles actuating on the piston. When a pressure difference is applied, the seal expands radially by a sufficient amount to make sealing contact with the zone of larger diameter in the outer bar. The invention applies more particularly to reactors with spectral shift control using bundles of fertile rods [fr

  5. Living PSA issues in France on pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewailly, J.; Deriot, S.; Dubreuil Chambardel, A.; Francois, P.; Magne, L.

    1993-09-01

    Two Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSAs) carried out in France on 900 and 1300 MWe Pressurized Water Reactor units ended in 1990. These PSAs determined the core damage frequency for all plant operating conditions ranging from cold shutdown for refuelling to full power operation. Since 1990, these PSAs have been used increasingly as tools for applications such as accident precursor analysis, risk-based Technical Specifications, and maintenance optimization. In turn, these applications are used to enhance the initial PSAs. The notion of a ''living'' PSA which can be used and updated is slowly taking form. The accident precursor analysis consists in applying PSA event trees to obtain quick information on the potential consequences of a precursor event and on the corresponding probabilities of occurrence. A feedback on PSAs is provided by comparing them with actual operating incidents. The computation of the allowed outage time during power operation, based on the computerized models of Probabilistic Safety Assessments, requires adjustments: calculation of hourly risk of core damage under different reactor conditions without equipment unavailabilities. The proposed method also turns out to be an aid in determining the safe shutdown condition and procedure. Furthermore, when introducing a sufficient level of detail, PSA reliability models make it possible to compute contributions and to perform sensitivity studies in order to highlight those components for which a maintenance effort should be made. From the experience acquired up to now, there was felt to be a strong need to create guidelines for using PSAs that would simplify their implementation by the experts in charge of determining Technical Specifications, of maintenance programs, etc. who are not generally specialists in PSAs. For this purpose, it is necessary to improve the intelligibility of the models made in order for them to be used and to offer user's guides adapted to each application. Documents

  6. WATER DIVERSION MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.B. Case

    1999-12-21

    The distribution of seepage in the proposed repository will be highly variable due in part to variations in the spatial distribution of percolations. The performance of the drip shield and the backfill system may divert the water flux around the waste packages to the invert. Diversion will occur along the drift surface, within the backfill, at the drip shield, and at the Waste Package (WP) surface, even after the drip shield and WP have been breached by corrosion. The purpose and objective of this Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) are to develop a conceptual model and constitutive properties for bounding the volume and rate of seepage water that flows around the drip shield (CRWMS M&O 1999c). This analysis model is to be compatible with the selected repository conceptual design (Wilkins and Heath, 1999) and will be used to evaluate the performance of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS), and to provide input to the EBS Water Distribution and Removal Model. This model supports the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) postclosure performance assessment for the Site Recommendation (SR). This document characterizes the hydrological constitutive properties of the backfill and invert materials (Section 6.2) and a third material that represents a mixture of the two. These include the Overton Sand which is selected as a backfill (Section 5.2), crushed tuff which is selected as the invert (Section 5.1), and a combined material (Sections 5.9 and 5.10) which has retention and hydraulic conductivity properties intermediate to the selected materials for the backfill and the invert. The properties include the grain size distribution, the dry bulk density and porosity, the moisture retention, the intrinsic permeability, the relative permeability, and the material thermal properties. The van Genuchten relationships with curve fit parameters are used to define the basic retention relationship of moisture potential to volumetric moisture content, and the basic relationship of unsaturated

  7. WATER DIVERSION MODEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.B. Case

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of seepage in the proposed repository will be highly variable due in part to variations in the spatial distribution of percolations. The performance of the drip shield and the backfill system may divert the water flux around the waste packages to the invert. Diversion will occur along the drift surface, within the backfill, at the drip shield, and at the Waste Package (WP) surface, even after the drip shield and WP have been breached by corrosion. The purpose and objective of this Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) are to develop a conceptual model and constitutive properties for bounding the volume and rate of seepage water that flows around the drip shield (CRWMS MandO 1999c). This analysis model is to be compatible with the selected repository conceptual design (Wilkins and Heath, 1999) and will be used to evaluate the performance of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS), and to provide input to the EBS Water Distribution and Removal Model. This model supports the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) postclosure performance assessment for the Site Recommendation (SR). This document characterizes the hydrological constitutive properties of the backfill and invert materials (Section 6.2) and a third material that represents a mixture of the two. These include the Overton Sand which is selected as a backfill (Section 5.2), crushed tuff which is selected as the invert (Section 5.1), and a combined material (Sections 5.9 and 5.10) which has retention and hydraulic conductivity properties intermediate to the selected materials for the backfill and the invert. The properties include the grain size distribution, the dry bulk density and porosity, the moisture retention, the intrinsic permeability, the relative permeability, and the material thermal properties. The van Genuchten relationships with curve fit parameters are used to define the basic retention relationship of moisture potential to volumetric moisture content, and the basic relationship of

  8. Pressure driven water flow through hydrophilic alumina nanomembranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskok, Ali; Koklu, Anil; Sengor, Sevinc

    2017-11-01

    We present an experimental study that focuses on pressure-driven flow of distilled water through alumina membranes with 5, 10 and 20 nm pore radii. The nanopore geometry, pore size and porosity are characterized using scanning electron microscopy images taken pre and post-flow experiments. Comparisons of these images have shown reduction in the pore size, which is attributed to precipitation of hydroxyl groups on alumina surfaces. Measured flowrates compared with the Hagen-Poiseuille flow relations consistently predict 2.2 nm reductions in the pore size for three different membranes. This behavior can be explained by the formation of a thick stick layer of water molecules over hydroxylated alumina surfaces, evidenced by water droplet contact angle measurements that exhibit increased hydrophilicity of alumina surfaces. Other possible effects of the mismatch between theory and experiments such as unaccounted pressure losses in the system or the streaming potential effects were also considered, but shown to be negligible for current experimental conditions.

  9. Temporal and spatial pore water pressure distribution surrounding a vertical landfill leachate recirculation well.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadambala, Ravi; Townsend, Timothy G; Jain, Pradeep; Singh, Karamjit

    2011-05-01

    Addition of liquids into landfilled waste can result in an increase in pore water pressure, and this in turn may increase concerns with respect to geotechnical stability of the landfilled waste mass. While the impact of vertical well leachate recirculation on landfill pore water pressures has been mathematically modeled, measurements of these systems in operating landfills have not been reported. Pressure readings from vibrating wire piezometers placed in the waste surrounding a liquids addition well at a full-scale operating landfill in Florida were recorded over a 2-year period. Prior to the addition of liquids, measured pore pressures were found to increase with landfill depth, an indication of gas pressure increase and decreasing waste permeability with depth. When liquid addition commenced, piezometers located closer to either the leachate injection well or the landfill surface responded more rapidly to leachate addition relative to those far from the well and those at deeper locations. After liquid addition stopped, measured pore pressures did not immediately drop, but slowly decreased with time. Despite the large pressures present at the bottom of the liquid addition well, much smaller pressures were measured in the surrounding waste. The spatial variation of the pressures recorded in this study suggests that waste permeability is anisotropic and decreases with depth.

  10. Transient modelling of a natural circulation loop under variable pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianna, Andre L.B.; Faccini, Jose L.H.; Su, Jian, E-mail: avianna@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: sujian@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: faccini@ien.gov.br [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Termo-Hidraulica Experimental

    2017-07-01

    The objective of the present work is to model the transient operation of a natural circulation loop, which is one-tenth scale in height to a typical Passive Residual Heat Removal system (PRHR) of an Advanced Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactor and was designed to meet the single and two-phase flow similarity criteria to it. The loop consists of a core barrel with electrically heated rods, upper and lower plena interconnected by hot and cold pipe legs to a seven-tube shell heat exchanger of countercurrent design, and an expansion tank with a descending tube. A long transient characterized the loop operation, during which a phenomenon of self-pressurization, without self-regulation of the pressure, was experimentally observed. This represented a unique situation, named natural circulation under variable pressure (NCVP). The self-pressurization was originated in the air trapped in the expansion tank and compressed by the loop water dilatation, as it heated up during each experiment. The mathematical model, initially oriented to the single-phase flow, included the heat capacity of the structure and employed a cubic polynomial approximation for the density, in the buoyancy term calculation. The heater was modelled taking into account the different heat capacities of the heating elements and the heater walls. The heat exchanger was modelled considering the coolant heating, during the heat exchanging process. The self-pressurization was modelled as an isentropic compression of a perfect gas. The whole model was computationally implemented via a set of finite difference equations. The corresponding computational algorithm of solution was of the explicit, marching type, as for the time discretization, in an upwind scheme, regarding the space discretization. The computational program was implemented in MATLAB. Several experiments were carried out in the natural circulation loop, having the coolant flow rate and the heating power as control parameters. The variables used in the

  11. Automated corrosion fatigue crack growth testing in pressurized water environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceschini, L.J.; Liaw, P.K.; Rudd, G.E.; Logsdon, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes in detail a novel approach to construct a test facility for developing corrosion fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) properties in aggressive environments. The environment studied is that of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) at 288 0 C (550 0 F) and 13.8 MPa (200 psig). To expedite data generation, each chamber was designed to accommodate two test specimens. A common water recirculation and pressurization system was employed to service two test chambers. Thus, four fatigue crack propagation rate tests could be conducted simultaneously in the pressurized water environment. The data analysis was automated to minimize the typically high labor costs associated with corrosion fatigue crack propagation testing. Verification FCGR tests conducted on an ASTM A469 rotor steel in a room temperature air environment as well as actual PWR environment FCGR tests performed on an ASTM A533 Grade B Class 2 pressure vessel steel demonstrated that the dual specimen test facility is an excellent system for developing the FCGR properties of materials in adverse environments

  12. Sloshing of water in annular pressure-suppression pool of boiling water reactors under earthquake ground motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.; Godden, W.G.; Scalise, D.T.

    1979-10-01

    This report presents an analytical investigation of the sloshing response of water in annular-circular as well as simple-circular tanks under horizontal earthquake ground motions, and the results are verified with tests. This study was motivated because of the use of annular tanks for pressure-suppression pools in Boiling Water Reactors. Such a pressure-suppression pool would typically have 80 ft and 120 ft inside and outside diameters and a water depth of 20 ft. The analysis was based upon potential flow theory and a computer program was written to obtain time-history plots of sloshing displacements of water and the dynamic pressures. Tests were carried out on 1/80th and 1/15th scale models under sinusoidal as well as simulated earthquake ground motions. Tests and analytical results regarding the natural frequencies, surface water displacements, and dynamic pressures were compared and a good agreement was found for relatively small displacements. The computer program gave satisfactory results as long as the maximum water surface displacements were less than 30 in., which is roughly the value obtained under full intensity of El Centro earthquake

  13. Orange oil/water nanoemulsions prepared by high pressure homogenizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourniatis, Loretta R.; Spinelli, Luciana S.; Mansur, Claudia R.E.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to use the high-pressure homogenizer (HPH) to prepare stable oil/water nanoemulsions presenting narrow particle size distribution. The dispersions were prepared using nonionic surfactants based on ethoxylated ether. The size and distribution of the droplets formed, along with their stability, were determined in a Zetasizer Nano ZS particle size analyzer. The stability and the droplet size distribution in these systems do not present the significant differences with the increase of the processing pressure in the HPH). The processing time can promote the biggest dispersion in the size of particles, thus reducing its stability. (author)

  14. An improved water cooled nuclear reactor and pressurizer assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, F.J.; Strong, R.

    1989-01-01

    One or more pipes interconnect a steam space of a pressuriser with an upper portion of the primary coolant circuit and one or more surge ports interconnect a water space of the pressuriser with a water-filled portion of the primary coolant circuit. The surge ports have low flow resistance for water from the water space to the primary coolant circuit and high flow resistance in the opposite direction. The reactor may be a pressurised water reactor or an indirect cycle boiling water reactor and may be integral or dispersed. The pressuriser may be integral with the reactor, where a shroud divides the pressuriser from the primary coolant circuit, or may be in a separate pressuriser pressure vessel. The arrangement controls the pressure in the primary circuit in the indirect cycle BWR, allows excess vapour to escape from the primary circuit under normal and fault conditions to prevent steam blanketing of the core and allows the pressuriser to act as a core flood tank for emergency cooling. (author)

  15. CFD modeling of the IRIS pressurizer dynamic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, Ronny R.; Montesinos, Maria E.; Garcia, Carlos; Bueno, Elizabeth D.; Mazaira, Leorlen R., E-mail: rsanz@instec.cu, E-mail: mmontesi@instec.cu, E-mail: cgh@instec.cu, E-mail: leored1984@gmail.com [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba); Bezerra, Jair L.; Lira, Carlos A.B. Oliveira, E-mail: jair.lima@ufpe.br, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br [Universida Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    Integral layout of nuclear reactor IRIS makes possible the elimination of the spray system, which is usually used to mitigate in-surge transient and also help to Boron homogenization. The study of transients with deficiencies in the Boron homogenization in this technology is very important, because they can cause disturbances in the reactor power and insert a strong reactivity in the core. The detailed knowledge of the behavior of multiphase multicomponent flows is challenging due to the complex phenomena and interactions at the interface. In this context, the CFD modeling is employed in the design of equipment in the nuclear industry as it allows predicting accidents or predicting their performance in dissimilar applications. The aim of the present research is to model the IRIS pressurizer's dynamic using the commercial CFD code CFX. A symmetric tri dimensional model equivalent to 1/8 of the total geometry was adopted to reduce mesh size and minimize processing time. The model considers the coexistence of four phases and also takes into account the heat losses. The relationships for interfacial mass, energy, and momentum transport are programmed and incorporated into CFX. Moreover, two subdomains and several additional variables are defined to monitoring the boron dilution sequences and condensation-evaporation rates in different control volumes. For transient states a non - equilibrium stratification in the pressurizer is considered. This paper discusses the model developed and the behavior of the system for representative transients sequences. The results of analyzed transients of IRIS can be applied to the design of pressurizer internal structures and components. (author)

  16. Swelling pressure and water absorption property of compacted granular bentonite during water absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamada, T.; Komine, H.; Murakami, S.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekine, I.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Bentonite is currently planned to be used as buffer materials in engineered barrier of radioactive waste disposal. Granular bentonites are expected as the materials used in constructions as buffer materials by in-situ compaction methods. After applying these buffer materials, it is expected that the condition of the buffer area changes in long-term by the seepage of groundwater into buffer area. Therefore, it is important to understand water movement and swelling behavior of the buffer materials for evaluating the performance of engineered barrier. In this study, we investigated water absorption property and swelling pressure of compacted granular bentonite. Specifically, the process of swelling pressure and amount of water absorption of granular bentonite-GX (Kunigel-GX, produced at the Tsukinuno mine in Japan) were observed by laboratory tests. To discuss the influence of maximum grain size of bentonite particle on swelling pressure and water absorption property, two types of samples were used. One is granular sample which is Bentonite-GX controlled under 2 mm the maximum grain size, the other is milled sample which is Bentonite-GX with the maximum grain size under 0.18 mm by milling with the agate mortar. In addition, the mechanism on the swelling pressure of compacted granular bentonite was considered and discussed. In the cases of granular sample, swelling pressure increases rapidly, then gradually continues to increase up to maximum value. In the cases of milled sample, swelling pressure also increases rapidly at first. However, then its value decreases before progressing of gradual increase continues. Especially, this trend was clearly observed at a relatively low dry density. At the peaks of these curves, the swelling pressure of granular samples is lower than that of milled samples. In addition, the increasing of swelling pressure by the time the peak observed during the process of swelling pressure from

  17. Stability analysis of supercritical-pressure light water-cooled reactor in constant pressure operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhwan, JI; Shirahama, H.; Koshizuka, S.; Oka, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic and the thermal-nuclear coupled stabilities of a supercritical pressure light water-cooled reactor. A stability analysis code at supercritical pressure is developed. Using this code, stabilities of full and partial-power reactor operating at supercritical pressure are investigated by the frequency-domain analysis. Two types of SCRs are analyzed; a supercritical light water reactor (SCLWR) and a supercritical water-cooled fast reactor (SCFR). The same stability criteria as Boiling Water Reactor are applied. The thermal-hydraulic stability of SCLWR and SCFR satisfies the criteria with a reasonable orifice loss coefficient. The decay ratio of the thermal-nuclear coupled stability in SCFR is almost zero because of a small coolant density coefficient of the fast reactor. The evaluated decay ratio of the thermal-nuclear coupled stability is 3,41 ∼ 10 -V at 100% power in SCFR and 0,028 at 100% power in SCLWR. The sensitivity is investigated. It is found that the thermal-hydraulic stability is sensitive to the mass flow rate strongly and the thermal-nuclear coupled stability to the coolant density coefficient. The bottom power peak distribution makes the thermal-nuclear stability worse and the thermal-nuclear stability better. (author)

  18. Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement: Insights from neural network modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, J.; Parfitt, D.; Wilford, K.; Riddle, N.; Alamaniotis, M.; Chroneos, A.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.

    2018-04-01

    Irradiation embrittlement of steel pressure vessels is an important consideration for the operation of current and future light water nuclear reactors. In this study we employ an ensemble of artificial neural networks in order to provide predictions of the embrittlement using two literature datasets, one based on US surveillance data and the second from the IVAR experiment. We use these networks to examine trends with input variables and to assess various literature models including compositional effects and the role of flux and temperature. Overall, the networks agree with the existing literature models and we comment on their more general use in predicting irradiation embrittlement.

  19. Vapour pressures and densities of the mixed-solvent desiccants (glycols + water + salts)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L.-F.; Soriano, Allan N. [R and D Center for Membrane Technology and Department of Chemical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung Li, Taiwan (China); Li, M.-H. [R and D Center for Membrane Technology and Department of Chemical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung Li, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: mhli@cycu.edu.tw

    2009-06-15

    The vapour pressures and densities of the mixed-solvent desiccants have been studied for temperatures ranging from (303.15 to 343.15) K. The mixed-solvent desiccants investigated were aqueous-organic systems with salt. The studied organic solvents were diethylene glycol, tetraethylene glycol, and dipropylene glycol. The chosen salts were lithium chloride and lithium bromide. Six ternaries (glycol/water/salt) were selected for this study. For each ternary system, four systems of which (4-25) mass% salt mixed with various glycols (50-80) mass% were investigated. Incorporated with the pseudo-solvent approach, a vapour pressure model based on the mean spherical approximation for aqueous electrolyte solutions was used to represent the measured vapour pressure of glycol/water/salt systems. A simplified density equation was applied to model the measured density of glycol/water/salt systems. Satisfactory results were obtained for vapour pressure and density calculations. The vapour pressures of the aqueous-organic systems with salt yield smaller values of vapour pressures compared to the conventionally used liquid desiccants. The properties obtained and presented in this study are, in general, of sufficient accuracy for most engineering-design calculations, such as the design of dehumidifier process using mixed-solvent desiccants as absorbents.

  20. Underground water stress release models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Dang, Shenjun; Lü, Shaochuan

    2011-08-01

    The accumulation of tectonic stress may cause earthquakes at some epochs. However, in most cases, it leads to crustal deformations. Underground water level is a sensitive indication of the crustal deformations. We incorporate the information of the underground water level into the stress release models (SRM), and obtain the underground water stress release model (USRM). We apply USRM to the earthquakes occurred at Tangshan region. The analysis shows that the underground water stress release model outperforms both Poisson model and stress release model. Monte Carlo simulation shows that the simulated seismicity by USRM is very close to the real seismicity.

  1. Preliminary ECLSS waste water model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Donald L.; Holder, Donald W., Jr.; Alexander, Kevin; Shaw, R. G.; Hayase, John K.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary waste water model for input to the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Water Processor (WP) has been generated for design purposes. Data have been compiled from various ECLSS tests and flight sample analyses. A discussion of the characterization of the waste streams comprising the model is presented, along with a discussion of the waste water model and the rationale for the inclusion of contaminants in their respective concentrations. The major objective is to establish a methodology for the development of a waste water model and to present the current state of that model.

  2. Development of alternative fuel for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, P.E.; Ferreira, R.A.N.; Ferraz, W.B.; Lameiras, F.S.; Santos, A.; Assis, G. de; Doerr, W.O.; Wehner, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    The utilization of alternative fuel cycles in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) such as Th/U and Th/Pu cycles can permit a better utilization of uranium reserves without the necessity of developing new power reactor concepts. The development of the technology of alternative fuels for PWR is one of the objectives of the 'Program on Thorium Utilization in Pressurized Water Reactors' carried out jointly by Empresas Nucleares Brasileiras S.A. (NUCLEBRAS), through its Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN) and by German institutions, the Julich Nuclear Research Center (KFA), the Kraftwerk Union A.G. (KWU) and NUKEM GmbH. This paper summarizes the results so far obtained in the fuel technology. The development of a fabrication process for PWR fuel pellets from gel-microspheres is reported as well as the design, the specification, and the fabrication of prototype fuel rods for irradiation tests. (Author) [pt

  3. EDF's nuclear safety approach for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.; Kus, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    The realization of the important French program fifty-four units equipped with pressurized water reactors in service, or under construction-had led to the progressive implementation of an original approach in the field of nuclear safety. From an initial core consisting of the deterministic approach to safety devised on the other side of the Atlantic, which has been entirely preserved and often specified, further extras have been added which overall increase the level of safety of the installations, without any particular complications. This paper aims at presenting succinctly the outcome of the deliberation, which constitutes now the approach adopted by Electricite de France for the safety of nuclear units equipped with pressurized water reactors. This approach is explained in more detail in EDF's 'with book' on nuclear safety. (author)

  4. Sources of radioiodine at pressurized water reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelletier, C.A.; Cline, J.E.; Barefoot, E.D.; Hemphill, R.T.; Voilleque, P.G.; Emel, W.A.

    1978-11-01

    The report determines specific components and operations at operating pressurized water reactors that have a potential for being significant emission sources of radioactive iodine. The relative magnitudes of these specific sources in terms of the chemical forms of the radioiodine and the resultant annual averages from major components are established. The data are generalized for broad industry use for predictive purposes. The conclusions of this study indicate that the majority of radioiodine emanating from the primary side of pressurized water reactors comes from a few major areas; in some cases these sources are locally treatable; the interaction of radioiodine with plant interior surfaces is an important phenomenon mediating the source and affecting its release to the atmosphere; the chemical form varies depending on the circumstances of the release

  5. Decomposition of tetrafluoromethane by water plasma generated under atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narengerile,; Saito, Hironori; Watanabe, Takayuki

    2009-01-01

    Tetrafluoromethane (CF 4 ) decomposition by water plasma generated under atmospheric pressure was investigated by means of thermodynamic analyses and experiments. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were performed between 300 and 6000 K at atmospheric pressure. Experimental results indicated that CF 4 was completely decomposed by water plasma, and recovery of fluorine can be achieved more than 99%. Influence of factors such as arc current and additive flow rate of O 2 on CF 4 decomposition was determined. Furthermore, the decomposition mechanism of CF 4 was investigated from chemical kinetics consideration. CF x(x:1-4) was thermally decomposed above 4000 K, oxidized in the temperature range of 4000-2400 K, and removed by H radical at temperatures below 2400 K.

  6. Decomposition of tetrafluoromethane by water plasma generated under atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narengerile,; Saito, Hironori [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Yokohama, 226-8502 (Japan); Watanabe, Takayuki, E-mail: watanabe@chemenv.titech.ac.j [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Yokohama, 226-8502 (Japan)

    2009-12-01

    Tetrafluoromethane (CF{sub 4}) decomposition by water plasma generated under atmospheric pressure was investigated by means of thermodynamic analyses and experiments. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were performed between 300 and 6000 K at atmospheric pressure. Experimental results indicated that CF{sub 4} was completely decomposed by water plasma, and recovery of fluorine can be achieved more than 99%. Influence of factors such as arc current and additive flow rate of O{sub 2} on CF{sub 4} decomposition was determined. Furthermore, the decomposition mechanism of CF{sub 4} was investigated from chemical kinetics consideration. CF{sub x(x:1-4)} was thermally decomposed above 4000 K, oxidized in the temperature range of 4000-2400 K, and removed by H radical at temperatures below 2400 K.

  7. Experimental Study on Peak Pressure of Shock Waves in Quasi-Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxiong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the similarity laws of the explosion, this research develops similarity requirements of the small-scale experiments of underwater explosions and establishes a regression model for peak pressure of underwater shock waves under experimental condition. Small-scale experiments are carried out with two types of media at the bottom of the water and for different water depths. The peak pressure of underwater shock waves at different measuring points is acquired. A formula consistent with the similarity law of explosions is obtained and an analysis of the regression precision of the formula confirms its accuracy. Significance experiment indicates that the influence of distance between measuring points and charge on peak pressure of underwater shock wave is the greatest and that of water depth is the least within the range of geometric parameters. An analysis of data from experiments with different media at the bottom of the water reveals an influence on the peak pressure, as the peak pressure of a shock wave in a body of water with a bottom soft mud and rocks is about 1.33 times that of the case where the bottom material is only soft mud.

  8. Contribution to multi-agents modeling of the operation of industrial processes: application to the operation of a pressurized water reactor under accidental situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, P.

    1996-01-01

    This work is related to the CEA 'Escrime' project which concerns the reliability and functioning safety of nuclear reactors, and in particular the operation and supervision of nuclear installations. Its aim is the analysis and the formalizing of PWRs operation in order to define the collaboration and optimum sharing of tasks between human operators and automatized systems for an improved functioning safety. Chapter 1 describes the operation of nuclear reactors and the instrumentation and control activities. It focusses on the weaknesses of actual automatized systems and examines the interest of the multi-agents approach to build an improved automatized system. Chapter 2 presents the actual state of the art about multi-agent systems and about their application to reactor operation. Chapter 3 is devoted to the definition of the conceptual model of automatized systems developed in this work (distribution of operation activities, competition between agents, hierarchy, arbitration). Chapter 4 describes the computer model of the essential operating system elaborated according to the conceptual model defined above. Modeling is performed using Spirit and an application is described in chapter 5. (J.S.)

  9. Aspects of Mathematical Modelling of Pressure Retarded Osmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anissimov, Yuri G.

    2016-01-01

    In power generating terms, a pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) energy generating plant, on a river entering a sea or ocean, is equivalent to a hydroelectric dam with a height of about 60 meters. Therefore, PRO can add significantly to existing renewable power generation capacity if economical constrains of the method are resolved. PRO energy generation relies on a semipermeable membrane that is permeable to water and impermeable to salt. Mathematical modelling plays an important part in understanding flows of water and salt near and across semipermeable membranes and helps to optimize PRO energy generation. Therefore, the modelling can help realizing PRO energy generation potential. In this work, a few aspects of mathematical modelling of the PRO process are reviewed and discussed. PMID:26848696

  10. Aspects of Mathematical Modelling of Pressure Retarded Osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anissimov, Yuri G

    2016-02-03

    In power generating terms, a pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) energy generating plant, on a river entering a sea or ocean, is equivalent to a hydroelectric dam with a height of about 60 meters. Therefore, PRO can add significantly to existing renewable power generation capacity if economical constrains of the method are resolved. PRO energy generation relies on a semipermeable membrane that is permeable to water and impermeable to salt. Mathematical modelling plays an important part in understanding flows of water and salt near and across semipermeable membranes and helps to optimize PRO energy generation. Therefore, the modelling can help realizing PRO energy generation potential. In this work, a few aspects of mathematical modelling of the PRO process are reviewed and discussed.

  11. Water-vapor pressure control in a volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialdone, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The variation with time of the partial pressure of water in a volume that has openings to the outside environment and includes vapor sources was evaluated as a function of the purging flow and its vapor content. Experimental tests to estimate the diffusion of ambient humidity through openings and to validate calculated results were included. The purging flows required to produce and maintain a certain humidity in shipping containers, storage rooms, and clean rooms can be estimated with the relationship developed here. These purging flows are necessary to prevent the contamination, degradation, and other effects of water vapor on the systems inside these volumes.

  12. Pressure transients resulting from sodium-water reaction following a large leak in LMFBR steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajput, A.K.

    1984-01-01

    The study of sodium water reaction, following a large leak, concerns primarily with the estimation of pressure/flow transients that are developed in the steam generator and the associated secondary circuit. This paper describes the mathematical formulations used in SWRT (Sodium Water Reaction Transients) code developed to estimate such pressure transients for FBTR plant. The results, obtained using SWRT have been presented for a leak in economiser (20m from bottom water header) and for a leak in super heater portions. A time lag of 50 m sec was considered for rupture disc takes to burst once the pressure experienced by it exceeds the set value. Also described in annexure to this paper is the mathematical formulation for two phase transient flow for the better estimation of leak rate from the ruptured end of the damaged heat transfer tube. This leak model considers slip but assumes thermal equilibrium between the liquid and vapour phases

  13. Detection of steam generator tube leaks in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, W.H.

    1984-11-01

    This report addresses the early detection of small steam generator tube leaks in pressurized water reactors. It identifies physical parameters, establishes instrumentation performance goals, and specifies sensor types and locations. It presents a simple algorithm that yields the leak rate as a function of known or measurable quantities. Leak rates of less than one-tenth gram per second should be detectable with existing instrumentation

  14. Assessment of a small pressurized water reactor for industrial energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepper, O.H.; Fuller, L.C.; Myers, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    An evaluation of several recent ERDA/ORNL sponsored studies on the application of a small, 365 MW(t) pressurized water reactor for industrial energy is presented. Preliminary studies have investigated technical and reliability requirements; costs for nuclear and fossil based steam were compared, including consideration of economic inflation and financing methods. For base-load industrial steam production, small reactors appear economically attractive relative to coal fired boilers that use coal priced at $30/ton

  15. Load-following induced xenon oscillations in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, P.; Tiihonen, O.

    1977-01-01

    A new computer code is introduced for studying xenon oscillations during load following operation of a pressurized water reactor. In the code all major feedback effects occurring in PWRs are incorporated through nonlinear correlations. These effects include fuel and coolant temperatures, control rods, and soluble poison density. The code is capable of simulating xenon transients due to flux distribution changes, e.g., during load following procedures. As an example a single xenon transient run is included. (author)

  16. Solubility of solid ferrocene in pressurized hot water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karásek, Pavel; Hohnová, Barbora; Planeta, Josef; Roth, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 8 (2010), s. 2866-2869 ISSN 0021-9568 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/07/0886; GA ČR GA203/08/1465; GA ČR GA203/08/1536 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : pressurized hot water * ferrocene * solubility Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.089, year: 2010

  17. Solubilities of oxygenated aromatic solids in pressurized hot water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karásek, Pavel; Planeta, Josef; Roth, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 5 (2009), s. 1457-1461 ISSN 0021-9568 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/07/0886; GA ČR GA203/08/1536 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : oxygenated aromatics * solubility * pressurized hot water Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.695, year: 2009

  18. Drinking water fluoride and blood pressure? An environmental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Hassan; Taghavi Shahri, Seyed Mahmood; Amini, Mohamad; Ramezani Mehrian, Majid; Mokhayeri, Yaser; Yunesian, Masud

    2011-12-01

    The relationship between intakes of fluoride (F) from drinking water and blood pressure has not yet been reported. We examined the relationship of F in ground water resources (GWRs) of Iran with the blood pressure of Iranian population in an ecologic study. The mean F data of the GWRs (as a surrogate for F levels in drinking water) were derived from a previously conducted study. The hypertension prevalence and the mean of systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP & DBP) of Iranian population by different provinces and genders were also derived from the provincial report of non-communicable disease risk factor surveillance of Iran. Statistically significant positive correlations were found between the mean concentrations of F in the GWRs and the hypertension prevalence of males (r = 0.48, p = 0.007), females (r = 0.36, p = 0.048), and overall (r = 0.495, p = 0.005). Also, statistically significant positive correlations between the mean concentrations of F in the GWRs and the mean SBP of males (r = 0.431, p = 0.018), and a borderline correlation with females (r = 0.352, p = 0.057) were found. In conclusion, we found the increase of hypertension prevalence and the SBP mean with the increase of F level in the GWRs of Iranian population.

  19. Reactor Safety Commission Code of Practice for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Commission of the Federal German Republic has summarized in the form of Official Guidelines the safety requirements which, in the Commission's view, have to be met in the design, construction and operation of a nuclear power station equipped with a pressurized water reactor. The Third Edition of the RSK Guidelines for pressurized water reactors dated 14.10.81. is a revised and expanded version of the Second Edition dated 24.1.79. The Reactor Safety Commission will with effect from October 1981 use these Guidelines in consultations on the siting of and safety concept for the installation approval of future pressurized water reactors and will assess these nuclear power stations during their erection in the light of these Guidelines. They have not however been immediately conceived for the adaptation of existing nuclear power stations, whether under construction or in operation. The scope of application of these Guidelines to such nuclear power stations will have to be examined for each individual case. The main aim of the Guidelines is to simplify the consultation process within the reactor Safety Commission and to provide early advice on the safety requirements considered necessary by the Commission. (author)

  20. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Annual Report FY09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolery, T; Aines, R; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W; Wolfe, T; Haussman, C

    2009-11-25

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine is reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction, such that the volume of fresh water extracted balances the volume of CO{sub 2} injected into the formation. This process provides additional CO{sub 2} storage capacity in the aquifer, reduces operational risks (cap-rock fracturing, contamination of neighboring fresh water aquifers, and seismicity) by relieving overpressure in the formation, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. This multi-faceted project combines elements of geochemistry, reservoir engineering, and water treatment engineering. The range of saline formation waters is being identified and analyzed. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the storage aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. Water treatment costs are being evaluated by comparing the necessary process facilities to those in common use for seawater RO. There are presently limited brine composition data available for actual CCS sites by the site operators including in the U.S. the seven regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (CSPs). To work around this, we are building a 'catalog' of compositions representative of 'produced' waters (waters produced in the course of seeking or producing oil and gas), to which we are adding data from actual CCS sites as they become available. Produced waters comprise the most common

  1. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of molecular hydrogen dissolved in water at pressures up to 200 MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borysow, Jacek; del Rosso, Leonardo; Celli, Milva; Moraldi, Massimo; Ulivi, Lorenzo

    2014-04-01

    We have measured the Raman Q-branch of hydrogen in a solution with water at a temperature of about 280 K and at pressures from 20 to 200 MPa. From a least-mean-square fitting analysis of the broad Raman Q-branch, we isolated the contributions from the four lowest individual roto-vibrational lines. The vibrational lines were narrower than the pure rotational Raman lines of hydrogen dissolved in water measured previously, but significantly larger than in the gas. The separations between these lines were found to be significantly smaller than in gaseous hydrogen and their widths were slightly increasing with pressure. The lines were narrowing with increasing rotational quantum number. The Raman frequencies of all roto-vibrational lines were approaching the values of gas phase hydrogen with increasing pressure. Additionally, from the comparison of the integrated intensity signal of Q-branch of hydrogen to the integrated Raman signal of the water bending mode, we have obtained the concentration of hydrogen in a solution with water along the 280 K isotherm. Hydrogen solubility increases slowly with pressure, and no deviation from a smooth behaviour was observed, even reaching thermodynamic conditions very close to the transition to the stable hydrogen hydrate. The analysis of the relative hydrogen concentration in solution on the basis of a simple thermodynamic model has allowed us to obtain the molar volume for the hydrogen gas/water solution. Interestingly, the volume relative to one hydrogen molecule in solution does not decrease with pressure and, at high pressure, is larger than the volume pertinent to one molecule of water. This is in favour of the theory of hydrophobic solvation, for which a larger and more stable structure of the water molecules is expected around a solute molecule.

  2. Integrated water resources modelling for assessing sustainable water governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoulikaris, Charalampos; Ganoulis, Jacques; Tsoukalas, Ioannis; Makropoulos, Christos; Gkatzogianni, Eleni; Michas, Spyros

    2015-04-01

    Climatic variations and resulting future uncertainties, increasing anthropogenic pressures, changes in political boundaries, ineffective or dysfunctional governance of natural resources and environmental degradation are some of the most fundamental challenges with which worldwide initiatives fostering the "think globally, act locally" concept are concerned. Different initiatives target the protection of the environment through sustainable development; Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) and Transboundary Water Resources Management (TWRM) in the case of internationally shared waters are frameworks that have gained wide political acceptance at international level and form part of water resources management planning and implementation on a global scale. Both concepts contribute in promoting economic efficiency, social equity and environmental sustainability. Inspired by these holistic management approaches, the present work describes an effort that uses integrated water resources modelling for the development of an integrated, coherent and flexible water governance tool. This work in which a sequence of computer based models and tools are linked together, aims at the evaluation of the sustainable operation of projects generating renewable energy from water as well as the sustainability of agricultural demands and environmental security in terms of environmental flow under various climatic and operational conditions. More specifically, catchment hydrological modelling is coupled with dams' simulation models and thereafter with models dedicated to water resources management and planning,while the bridging of models is conducted through geographic information systems and custom programming tools. For the case of Mesta/Nestos river basin different priority rules in the dams' operational schedule (e.g. priority given to power production as opposed to irrigation needs and vice versa), as well as different irrigation demands, e.g. current water demands as opposed to

  3. Capillary pressure at irregularly shaped pore throats: Implications for water retention characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Hyoung Suk; Kang, Dong Hun; Jang, Jaewon; Kim, Kwang Yeom; Yun, Tae Sup

    2017-12-01

    The random shapes of pore throats in geomaterials hinder accurate estimation of capillary pressure, and conventional pore network models that simply use the Young-Laplace equation assuming circular pore throats overestimate the capillary pressure. As a solution to this problem that does not complicate the pore network model or slow its implementation, we propose a new morphological analysis method to correlate the capillary pressure at an irregular pore channel with its cross-sectional geometry using lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulation and Mayer and Stowe-Princen theory. Geometry-based shape factors for pore throats are shown here to correlate strongly with the capillary pressure obtained by LB simulation. Water retention curves obtained by incorporating the morphological calibration into conventional pore network simulation and their correlative scheme agree well with experimental data. The suggested method is relevant to pore-scale processes such as geological CO2 sequestration, methane bubbling from wetlands, and enhanced carbon recovery.

  4. Molecular Dynamics of Equilibrium and Pressure-Driven Transport Properties of Water through LTA-Type Zeolites

    KAUST Repository

    Turgman-Cohen, Salomon

    2013-10-08

    We consider an atomistic model to investigate the flux of water through thin Linde type A (LTA) zeolite membranes with differing surface chemistries. Using molecular dynamics, we have studied the flow of water under hydrostatic pressure through a fully hydrated LTA zeolite film (∼2.5 nm thick) capped with hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties. Pressure drops in the 50-400 MPa range were applied across the membrane, and the flux of water was monitored for at least 15 ns of simulation time. For hydrophilic membranes, water molecules adsorb at the zeolite surface, creating a highly structured fluid layer. For hydrophobic membranes, a depletion of water molecules occurs near the water/zeolite interface. For both types of membranes, the water structure is independent of the pressure drop established in the system and the flux through the membranes is lower than that observed for the bulk zeolitic material; the latter allows an estimation of surface barrier effects to pressure-driven water transport. Mechanistically, it is observed that (i) bottlenecks form at the windows of the zeolite structure, preventing the free flow of water through the porous membrane, (ii) water molecules do not move through a cage in a single-file fashion but rather exhibit a broad range of residence times and pronounced mixing, and (iii) a periodic buildup of a pressure difference between inlet and outlet cages takes place which leads to the preferential flow of water molecules toward the low-pressure cages. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  5. Molecular dynamics of equilibrium and pressure-driven transport properties of water through LTA-type zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgman-Cohen, Salomon; Araque, Juan C; Hoek, Eric M V; Escobedo, Fernando A

    2013-10-08

    We consider an atomistic model to investigate the flux of water through thin Linde type A (LTA) zeolite membranes with differing surface chemistries. Using molecular dynamics, we have studied the flow of water under hydrostatic pressure through a fully hydrated LTA zeolite film (~2.5 nm thick) capped with hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties. Pressure drops in the 50-400 MPa range were applied across the membrane, and the flux of water was monitored for at least 15 ns of simulation time. For hydrophilic membranes, water molecules adsorb at the zeolite surface, creating a highly structured fluid layer. For hydrophobic membranes, a depletion of water molecules occurs near the water/zeolite interface. For both types of membranes, the water structure is independent of the pressure drop established in the system and the flux through the membranes is lower than that observed for the bulk zeolitic material; the latter allows an estimation of surface barrier effects to pressure-driven water transport. Mechanistically, it is observed that (i) bottlenecks form at the windows of the zeolite structure, preventing the free flow of water through the porous membrane, (ii) water molecules do not move through a cage in a single-file fashion but rather exhibit a broad range of residence times and pronounced mixing, and (iii) a periodic buildup of a pressure difference between inlet and outlet cages takes place which leads to the preferential flow of water molecules toward the low-pressure cages.

  6. Turbulent Spot Pressure Fluctuation Wave Packet Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Wave packet analysis provides a connection between linear small disturbance theory and subsequent nonlinear turbulent spot flow behavior. The traditional association between linear stability analysis and nonlinear wave form is developed via the method of stationary phase whereby asymptotic (simplified) mean flow solutions are used to estimate dispersion behavior and stationary phase approximation are used to invert the associated Fourier transform. The resulting process typically requires nonlinear algebraic equations inversions that can be best performed numerically, which partially mitigates the value of the approximation as compared to a more complete, e.g. DNS or linear/nonlinear adjoint methods. To obtain a simpler, closed-form analytical result, the complete packet solution is modeled via approximate amplitude (linear convected kinematic wave initial value problem) and local sinusoidal (wave equation) expressions. Significantly, the initial value for the kinematic wave transport expression follows from a separable variable coefficient approximation to the linearized pressure fluctuation Poisson expression. The resulting amplitude solution, while approximate in nature, nonetheless, appears to mimic many of the global features, e.g. transitional flow intermittency and pressure fluctuation magnitude behavior. A low wave number wave packet models also recover meaningful auto-correlation and low frequency spectral behaviors.

  7. Possibilities of tritium removal from waste waters of pressurized water reactors and fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribnikar, S.V.; Pupezin, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    Starting from parameters known for heavy water production processes, a parallel was made with separation of tritium from water. The quantity in common is the total cascade flow. The most efficient processes appear to be hydrogen sulfide, water exchange, hydrogen- and water distillation. Prospects of application of new processes are discussed briefly. Problems concerning detritiation of pressurized water reactors and large fuel reprocessing plants are analyzed. Detritiation of the former should not present problems. With the latter, economical detritiation can be achieved only after some plant flow patterns are changed. (U.S.)

  8. Modelling water temperature in TOXSWA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, C.M.J.; Deneer, J.W.; Adriaanse, P.I.

    2010-01-01

    A reasonably accurate estimate of the water temperature is necessary for a good description of the degradation of plant protection products in water which is used in the surface water model TOXSWA. Based on a consideration of basic physical processes that describe the influence of weather on the

  9. Physical and numerical modelling of natural convection in a fluid layer of small aspect ratio, in the frame of severe accidents of nuclear pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villermaux, Clotilde

    1999-01-01

    In the framework of PWR reactor accidents studies, the possibility of cooling the corium by the vessel flooding, is analysed. A particular attention is given to the liquid materials of the upper part of this pool. The confinement and the physical properties of this melt pool, may threat the vessel integrity by a heat flux concentration on the vessel lateral wall. A bibliographic study on the thermal transfers in natural convection, enhances the influence of the thermal extreme conditions and the layer geometry on the flow structure and the heat distribution. The lower part of the corium is constituted of an oxides layer. A stability study shows its perenniality: the metallic layer can be slipped of the oxides pool. The results analysis of the experimental program, BALI-metal, is completed by a direct numerical simulation with the TRIOU code. A model of the flow structure allows the find in bulk the experimental results. Finally a numerical simulation of the experimental tests is realized with the thermo-hydraulic code TOLBIAC. (A.L.B.)

  10. Modelling of blowdown of steam in the pressurized PPOOLEX facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paettikangas, T.; Niemi, J.; Timperi, A.

    2009-12-01

    PPOOLEX experiment WLL-04-02 on condensation of vapour is studied with CFD simulations. Wall condensation model has been adapted to an Euler-Euler multiphase model of the Fluent CFD code for this purpose. In addition, a simple direct-contact condensation model has also been included in the code. The main focus of the CFD modelling work was on modelling condensation in the drywell. The amount of condensation found in the CFD calculation was in fair agreement with the experiment. The present simulation was so short that the gas flowing into the wetwell contained significant amount of air. The mole fraction of vapour at the outlet of the vent pipe had the maximum value of about 0.3. Therefore, the noncondensable gas strongly affected the direct-contact condensation in the water pool. Much longer simulations are needed in order to study jugging and condensation oscillations. FSI calculations of the experiments were performed by using the Star-CD, ABAQUS and MpCCI codes. An approximate method that makes possible numerically stable FSI calculations for the experimental facilities was used. The method is based on linear perturbation method which necessitates small structural deformations. The calculations showed that FSI has to be taken into account for the POOLEX facility which has relatively light structures. A way for determining the pressure source for the acoustic model from pressure measured at the pool bottom was also examined. Separation of the pressure component due to wall motion from the blowdown load was attempted by conducting a Fourier analysis on the measured displacement signal. The study showed that in practise sufficiently accurate acceleration signal cannot be obtained this way because the transformed signal gets easily out of phase. A measurement system was proposed which could be used for determining the pressure fluctuations. (author)

  11. Modelling of blowdown of steam in the pressurized PPOOLEX facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paettikangas, T.; Niemi, J.; Timperi, A. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland))

    2009-12-15

    PPOOLEX experiment WLL-04-02 on condensation of vapour is studied with CFD simulations. Wall condensation model has been adapted to an Euler-Euler multiphase model of the Fluent CFD code for this purpose. In addition, a simple direct-contact condensation model has also been included in the code. The main focus of the CFD modelling work was on modelling condensation in the drywell. The amount of condensation found in the CFD calculation was in fair agreement with the experiment. The present simulation was so short that the gas flowing into the wetwell contained significant amount of air. The mole fraction of vapour at the outlet of the vent pipe had the maximum value of about 0.3. Therefore, the noncondensable gas strongly affected the direct-contact condensation in the water pool. Much longer simulations are needed in order to study jugging and condensation oscillations. FSI calculations of the experiments were performed by using the Star-CD, ABAQUS and MpCCI codes. An approximate method that makes possible numerically stable FSI calculations for the experimental facilities was used. The method is based on linear perturbation method which necessitates small structural deformations. The calculations showed that FSI has to be taken into account for the POOLEX facility which has relatively light structures. A way for determining the pressure source for the acoustic model from pressure measured at the pool bottom was also examined. Separation of the pressure component due to wall motion from the blowdown load was attempted by conducting a Fourier analysis on the measured displacement signal. The study showed that in practise sufficiently accurate acceleration signal cannot be obtained this way because the transformed signal gets easily out of phase. A measurement system was proposed which could be used for determining the pressure fluctuations. (author)

  12. Improvement in fuel utilization in pressurized heavy water reactors due to increased heavy water purity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that in a pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR), the reactivity of the reactor and, consequently, the discharge burnup of the fuel depend on the isotopic purity of the heavy water used in the reactor. The optimal purity of heavy water used in PHWRs, in turn, depends on the cost of fabricated uranium fuel and on the incremental cost incurred in improving the heavy water purity. The physics and economics aspects of the desirability of increasing the heavy water purity in PHWRs in India were first examined in 1978. With the cost data available at that time, it was found that improving the heavy water purity from 99.80% to 99.95% was economically attractive. The same problem is reinvestigated with current cost data. Even now, there is sufficient incentive to improve the isotopic purity of heavy water used in PHWRs. Admittedly, the economic advantage that can be derived depends on the cost of the fabricated fuel. Nevertheless, irrespective of the economics, there is also a fairly substantial saving in natural uranium. That the increase in the heavy water purity is to be maintained only in the low-pressure moderator system, and not in the high-pressure coolant system, makes the option of achieving higher fuel burnup with higher heavy water purity feasible

  13. Development Smart Water Aquaponics Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Adrian ZUGRAVU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper contributes to the modeling aquaculture. The paper main objectives are to identify an analysis smart water aquaponics. The purpose is to add more value to end aquaponics products. Aquaculture production depends on physical, chemical and biological qualities of pond water to a greater extent. The successful pond management requires an understanding of water quality. Intensification of pond makes the water quality undesirable with a number of water quality parameters. The objective of this model is to test and predicts plant and fish growth and net ammonium and nitrate concentrations in water in an aquaponic system. This is done by comparing the model outputs with measurements under controlled conditions in order to assess the accuracy of the tool to simulate nutrient concentrations in water and fish and plant biomass production of the system.

  14. Steam generator assembly for pressurized water reactors with a straight tube bundle and a partial flow preheater traversible by pressurized water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, R.

    1976-01-01

    To reduce the temperature difference between a straight tube bundle and the housing surrounding the same in a steam generator assembly for pressurized water reactors, a preheater for feed water is provided, and part of the pressurized water, after it has flowed through the heat exchanger or steam generator proper, is used for heating the feedwater in the preheater. 3 claims, 1 drawing figure

  15. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, W. P.; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S. and others

    2005-02-01

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform various integral effect tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. During the first phase of this project (1997.8∼2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished: a full-height, 1/300-volume-scaled full pressure facility for APR1400, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor that was developed by Korean industry. Main objectives of the present phase (2002.4∼2005.2), was to optimize the facility design and to construct the experimental facility. We have performed following researches: 1) Optimization of the basic design of the thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for PWRs - ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) - Reduced height design for APR1400 (+ specific design features of KSNP safety injection systems) - Thermal-hydraulic scaling based on three-level scaling methodology by Ishii et al. 2) Construction of the ATLAS facility - Detailed design of the test facility - Manufacturing and procurement of components - Installation of the facility 3) Development of supporting technology for integral effect tests - Development and application of advanced instrumentation technology - Preliminary analysis of test scenarios - Development of experimental procedures - Establishment and implementation of QA system/procedure

  16. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, W. P.; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S. and others

    2005-02-15

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform various integral effect tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. During the first phase of this project (1997.8{approx}2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished: a full-height, 1/300-volume-scaled full pressure facility for APR1400, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor that was developed by Korean industry. Main objectives of the present phase (2002.4{approx}2005.2), was to optimize the facility design and to construct the experimental facility. We have performed following researches: 1) Optimization of the basic design of the thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for PWRs - ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) - Reduced height design for APR1400 (+ specific design features of KSNP safety injection systems) - Thermal-hydraulic scaling based on three-level scaling methodology by Ishii et al. 2) Construction of the ATLAS facility - Detailed design of the test facility - Manufacturing and procurement of components - Installation of the facility 3) Development of supporting technology for integral effect tests - Development and application of advanced instrumentation technology - Preliminary analysis of test scenarios - Development of experimental procedures - Establishment and implementation of QA system/procedure.

  17. The Westinghouse Advanced Passive Pressurized Water Reactor, AP1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schene, R.

    2009-01-01

    Featuring proven technology and innovative passive safety systems, the Westinghouse AP1000 pressurized water reactor can achieve competitive generation costs in the current electricity market without emitting harmful greenhouse gases and further harming the environment. Westinghouse Electric Company, the pioneer in nuclear energy once again sets a new industry standard with the AP1000. The AP1000 is a two-loop pressurized water reactor that uses simplified, innovative and effective approach to safety. With a gross power rating of 3415 megawatt thermal and a nominal net electrical output of 1117 megawatt electric, the AP1000 is ideal for new base load generation. The AP1000 is the safest and most economical nuclear power plant available in the worldwide commercial marketplace, and is the only Generation III+ reactor to receive a design certification from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Based on nearly 20 years of research and development, the AP1000 builds and improves upon the established technology of major components used in current Westinghouse designed plants. These components, including steam generators, digital instrumentation and controls, fuel, pressurizers, and reactor vessels, are currently in use around the world and have years of proven, reliable operating experience. Historically, Westinghouse plant designs and technology have forged the cutting edge technology of nuclear plant around the world. Today, nearly 50 percent of the world's 440 nuclear plants are based on Westinghouse technology. Westinghouse continues to be the nuclear industry's global leader. (author)

  18. Aging study of boiling water reactor high pressure injection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, D.A.; Edson, J.L.; Fineman, C.F.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of high pressure injection systems is to maintain an adequate coolant level in reactor pressure vessels, so that the fuel cladding temperature does not exceed 1,200 degrees C (2,200 degrees F), and to permit plant shutdown during a variety of design basis loss-of-coolant accidents. This report presents the results of a study on aging performed for high pressure injection systems of boiling water reactor plants in the United States. The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate the effects of aging and the effectiveness of testing and maintenance in detecting and mitigating aging degradation. Guidelines from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program were used in performing the aging study. Review and analysis of the failures reported in databases such as Nuclear Power Experience, Licensee Event Reports, and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, along with plant-specific maintenance records databases, are included in this report to provide the information required to identify aging stressors, failure modes, and failure causes. Several probabilistic risk assessments were reviewed to identify risk-significant components in high pressure injection systems. Testing, maintenance, specific safety issues, and codes and standards are also discussed

  19. Modelling Ballast Water Transport

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayakumar, S.; Babu, M.T.; Vethamony, P.

    water in the marine environment. The bathymetry of the region has been taken from the CMAP data and augmented by data from hydrographic charts and bathymetry data available at NIO Data Center, Goa. Tides along the open boundary were generated...

  20. 78 FR 56752 - Interim Staff Guidance Specific Environmental Guidance for Integral Pressurized Water Reactors...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2013-0211] Interim Staff Guidance Specific Environmental Guidance for Integral Pressurized Water Reactors Reviews AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... environmental reviews for applications for licenses to construct and operate integral pressurized water reactors...

  1. Liquid radioactive waste processing system for pressurized water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    This Standard sets forth design, construction, and performance requirements, with due consideration for operation, of the Liquid Radioactive Waste Processing System for pressurized water reactor plants for design basis inputs. For the purpose of this Standard, the Liquid Radioactive Waste Processing System begins at the interfaces with the reactor coolant pressure boundary and the interface valve(s) in lines from other systems, or at those sumps and floor drains provided for liquid waste with the potential of containing radioactive material; and it terminates at the point of controlled discharge to the environment, at the point of interface with the waste solidification system, and at the point of recycle back to storage for reuse

  2. Integral bubble and jet models with pressure forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulfson, A. N.; Nikolaev, P. V.

    2017-07-01

    Modifications of integral bubble and jet models including the pressure force are proposed. Exact solutions are found for the modified model of a stationary convective jet from a point source of buoyancy and momentum. The exact solutions are compared against analytical solutions of the integral models for a stationary jet that are based on the approximation of the vertical boundary layer. It is found that the modified integral models of convective jets retain the power-law dependences on the altitude for the vertical velocity and buoyancy obtained in classical models. For a buoyant jet in a neutrally stratified atmosphere, the inclusion of the pressure force increases the amplitude of buoyancy and decreases the amplitude of vertical velocity. The total amplitude change is about 10%. It is shown that in this model there is a dynamic invariant expressing the law of a uniform distribution of the potential and kinetic energy along the jet axis. For a spontaneous jet rising in an unstably stratified atmosphere, the inclusion of the pressure force retains the amplitude of buoyancy and increases the amplitude of vertical velocity by about 15%. It is shown that in the model of a spontaneous jet there is a dynamic invariant expressing the law of a uniform distribution of the available potential and kinetic energy along the jet axis. The results are of interest for the problems of anthropogenic pollution diffusion in the air and water environments and the formulation of models for statistical and stochastic ensembles of thermals in a mass-flux parameterization of turbulent moments.

  3. Detection of steam generator tube leaks in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    This report addresses the early detection of small steam generator tube leaks in pressurized water reactors. It discusses the third, and final, year's work on an NRC-funded project examining diagnostic instrumentation in water reactors. The first two years were broad in coverage, concentrating on anticipatory measurements for detection of potential problems in both pressurized- and boiling-water reactors, with recommendations for areas of further study. One of these areas, the early detection of small steam tube leaks in PWRs, formed the basis of study for the last year of the project. Four tasks are addressed in this study of the detection of steam tube leaks. (1) Determination of which physical parameters indicate the onset of steam generator tube leaks. (2) Establishing performance goals for diagnostic instruments which could be used for early detection of steam generator tube leaks. (3) Defining the diagnostic instrumentation and their location which satisfy Items 1 and 2 above. (4) Assessing the need for diagnostic data processing and display. Parameters are identified, performance goals established, and sensor types and locations are specified in the report, with emphasis on the use of existing instrumentation with a minimum of retrofitting. A simple algorithm is developed which yields the leak rate as a function of known or measurable quantities. The conclusion is that leak rates of less than one-tenth gram per second should be detectable with existing instrumentation. (orig./HP)

  4. Culinary and pressure irrigation water system hydroelectric generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, Cory [Water Works Engineers, Pleasant Grove City, UT (United States)

    2016-01-29

    Pleasant Grove City owns and operates a drinking water system that included pressure reducing stations (PRVs) in various locations and flow conditions. Several of these station are suitable for power generation. The City evaluated their system to identify opportunities for power generation that can be implemented based on the analysis of costs and prediction of power generation and associated revenue. The evaluation led to the selection of the Battle Creek site for development of a hydro-electric power generating system. The Battle Creek site includes a pipeline that carries spring water to storage tanks. The system utilizes a PRV to reduce pressure before the water is introduced into the tanks. The evaluation recommended that the PRV at this location be replaced with a turbine for the generation of electricity. The system will be connected to the utility power grid for use in the community. A pelton turbine was selected for the site, and a turbine building and piping system were constructed to complete a fully functional power generation system. It is anticipated that the system will generate approximately 440,000 kW-hr per year resulting in $40,000 of annual revenue.

  5. A review on water fault diagnosis of PEMFC associated with the pressure drop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, Pucheng; Li, Yuehua; Xu, Huachi; Wu, Ziyao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Reviewed the effect factors and estimations of pressure drop associated with water fault diagnosis. • Reviewed pressure drop-based water fault diagnosis using different indicators. • Deviation of pressure drop is used frequently to diagnose water fault. • Reviewed recovery strategies based on pressure drop used in commercial PEMFC. • Merits, demerits and application prospects of pressure drop-based water fault diagnosis are discussed. - Abstract: The pressure difference between the inlet and outlet of the reactant in fuel cells is called the pressure drop, which is related to the water amount inside the fuel cells. In recent years there have been many studies that used the pressure drop to detect the water content and diagnose water fault of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). To our knowledge, there has not been a systematic review of these studies. In this paper, the effect variables of pressure drop are reviewed firstly. Then estimations of the theoretical pressure drop are reviewed mainly based on the following four aspects: Bernoulli’s equation, two-phase flow multiplier, Darcy’s law and artificial intelligence. Afterward, the water fault diagnosis based on the pressure drop using the following six indicators are reviewed: indicator of direct pressure drop, its deviation, frequency, multiplier, the ratio of pressure drop to flow rate and the flooding degree. In addition, the strategies of water fault recovery are also summarized. Finally the merits, demerits and application prospects of pressure drop-based water fault diagnosis are presented.

  6. A model for simulating autoclave-reactor pressure histories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorsness, C.B.

    1995-11-01

    Small heated-batch reactors, frequently referred to as autoclave reactors, are often used in developing information for a proposed new chemical/physical processing step. These systems often entail considerable pressure buildup during the course of operation. This report describes a model formulated to simulate well mixed autoclave reactors. The model solves a system of differential and algebraic equations which describe vapor/liquid equilibrium and chemical reactions in the reactor during a heating and cooling cycle. The model allows any number of chemical species to be defined. Phase equilibrium considerations are limited to systems with one liquid and one vapor phase, although some provisions for dealing with a second pure water liquid phase are considered. Equilibrium constraints are formulated using fugacity and activity coefficients. A new version of the general purpose differential-algebraic system solver DASSL, called DASPK, has been used to solve the system of equations. This solver has been found to work well in test problems. Selected results from a number of example problems are described. The example systems are water/nitrogen; crude oil/water; hexane/toluene; hexane/heptadecane; water/carbon dioxide; and a biomass system.

  7. Microstructural characterization and model of hardening for the irradiated austenitic stainless steels of the internals of pressurized water reactors; Caracterisation microstructurale et modelisation du durcissement des aciers austenitiques irradies des structures internes des reacteurs a eau pressurisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokor, C

    2003-07-01

    The core internals of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) are composed of SA 304 stainless steel plates and CW 316 stainless steel bolts. These internals undergo a neutron flux at a temperature between 280 deg C and 380 deg C which modifies their mechanical properties. These modifications are due to the changes in the microstructure of these materials under irradiation which depend on flux, dose and irradiation temperature. We have studied, by Transmission Electron Microscopy, the microstructure of stainless steels SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti irradiated in a mixed flux reactor (OSIRIS at 330 deg C between 0,8 dpa et 3,4 dpa) and in a fast breeder reactor at 330 deg C (BOR-60) up to doses of 40 dpa. Moreover, samples have been irradiated at 375 deg C in a fast breeder reactor (EBR-II) up to doses of 10 dpa. The microstructure of the irradiated stainless steels consists in faulted Frank dislocation loops in the [111] planes of austenitic, with a Burgers vector of [111]. It is possible to find some voids in the solution annealed samples irradiated at 375 deg C. The evolution of the dislocations loops and voids has been simulated with a 'cluster dynamic' model. The fit of the model parameters has allowed us to have a quantitative description of our experimental results. This description of the microstructure after irradiation was coupled together with a hardening model by Frank loops that has permitted us to make a quantitative description of the hardening of SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti stainless steels after irradiation at a certain dose, flux and temperature. The irradiation doses studied grow up to 90 dpa, dose of the end of life of PWR internals. (author)

  8. Pressure Sensitive Paint Applied to Flexible Models

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — One gap in current pressure-measurement technology is a high-spatial-resolution method for accurately measuring pressures on spatially and temporally varying...

  9. Assessment of slug impact due to dynamic pressure propagation in partially water filled cylindrical vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, J.; Jasmin Sudha, A.; Das, S.K.; Murthy, S.S.; Kumaresan, M.; Gopalakrishnan, V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In the safety analysis of LMFBRs, core disruptive accident (CDA) has been an issue of major concern. It is an extremely difficult task to model all the aspects of CDA in laboratory scale experiments. Therefore, an attempt has been made to simulate, only the liquid slug impact on the top cover of the reactor following pressure propagation from the core bubble. Since the focus of the experiments was only on the fluid dynamic phenomenon, water was used instead of sodium. Pressurised gas was released into the test vessel using a rupture disc. The adiabatic work potential generated by sudden release of pressure simulated the energy release. The main objective was to establish the relationship between slug velocity and source pressure. Experiments were carried out in water filled, rigid, cylindrical vessel at 0.3 MPa, 0.7 MPa and 1.5 MPa. The paper describes the details of the experimental set up and the results

  10. Advanced fuels for plutonium management in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasile, A.; Dufour, Ph.; Golfier, H.; Grouiller, J.P.; Guillet, J.L.; Poinot, Ch.; Youinou, G.; Zaetta, A.

    2003-01-01

    Several fuel concepts are under investigation at CEA with the aim of manage plutonium inventories in pressurized water reactors. This options range from the use of mature technologies like MOX adapted in the case of MOX-EUS (enriched uranium support) and COmbustible Recyclage A ILot (CORAIL) assemblies to more innovative technologies using IMF like DUPLEX and advanced plutonium assembly (APA). The plutonium burning performances reported to the electrical production go from 7 to 60 kg (TW h) -1 . More detailed analysis covering economic, sustainability, reliability and safety aspects and their integration in the whole fuel cycle would allow identifying the best candidate

  11. Neutron physics of a high converting advanced pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.D.

    1985-01-01

    The neutron physics of an APWR are analysed by single pin-cell calculations as well as two-dimensional whole-reactor computations. The calculational methods of the two codes employed for this study, viz. the cell code SPEKTRA and the diffusion-burnup code DIBU, are presented in detail. The APWR-investigations carried out concentrate on the void coefficient characteristics of tight UO 2 /PuO 2 -lattices, control rod worths, burnup behaviour and spatial power distributions in APWR cores. The principal physics design differences between advanced pressurized water reactors and present-day PWRs are identified and discussed. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Current development status of advanced pressurized water reactors (APWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.; Chawla, R.

    1985-08-01

    The current development status of advanced (high converting) pressurized water reactors (APWRs) is briefly reviewed. The areas covered are: reactor physics, thermohydraulics and other technical aspects, as well as electricity generating costs and longterm reactor strategical considerations related to the APWR's role in a plutonium economy. There does not seem to be any unsurmountable technical obstacle to the realization of an APWR. However, substantial further R and D efforts are required if an APWR is to go into commercial operation by the end of the century. (author)

  13. Effects of Water Management Strategies on Water Balance in a Water Scarce Region: A Case Study in Beijing by a Holistic Model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhigong Peng; Baozhong Zhang; Xueliang Cai; Lei Wang

    2016-01-01

    Irrigation is facing increasing pressure from other competitive water users to reduce water consumption in a water scarce region. Based on the Basin-wide Holistic Integrated Water Assessment (BHIWA) model, the effects of water management strategies on water balance in the dry regions of North China were analyzed. The results show that, with the decrease of irrigation water supply reliability (IWSR) and the increase of irrigation water use efficiency (WUE), irrigation water use decreased signi...

  14. Tackifier Mobility in Model Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Adriana; Li, Xiaoqing

    1997-03-01

    A systematic study of the molecular mobility of tackifier in a pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) has been done for the first time. The objective is to relate changes in adhesive performance with tackifier loading to tackifier mobility. Study focused first on a model PSA consisting of anionically polymerized polyisoprene (PI) (Mw=300,000 Mw/Mn 1.05) and a single simple tackifier, n-butyl ester of abietic acid. This model system is fully miscible at room temperature, and its tack performance has been studied. Tackifier mobility was measured using Pulsed-Gradient Spin-Echo NMR as a function of tackifier concentration and temperature. The concentration dependence observed for this adhesive with modestly enhanced performance was weak, indicating the tackifier neither acts to plasticize or antiplasticize appreciably. Diffusion in a two-phase system of hydrogenated PI with the same tackifier is similar, though the tack of that adhesive varies much more markedly with composition. In contrast, tackifier mobility varies strongly with composition in a PSA composed of PI with a commercial tackifier chemically similar to the model tackifier, but having a higher molecular weight and glass transition temperature. * Supported in part by US DOD: ARO(DAAH04-93-G-0410)

  15. Soil Water Thermodynamic to Unify Water Retention Curve by Pressure Plates and Tensiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik eBraudeau

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The pressure plate method is a standard method for measuring the pF curves, also called soil water retention curves, in a large soil moisture range from saturation to a dry state corresponding to a tension pressure of near 1500 kPa. However, the pressure plate can only provide discrete water retention curves represented by a dozen measured points. In contrast, the measurement of the soil water retention curves by tensiometer is direct and continuous, but limited to the range of the tensiometer reading: from saturation to near 70-80 kPa. The two methods stem from two very different concepts of measurement and the compatibility of both methods has never been demonstrated. The recently established thermodynamic formulation of the pedostructure water retention curve, will allow the compatibility of the two curves to be studied, both theoretically and experimentally. This constitutes the object of the present article. We found that the pressure plate method provides accurate measurement points of the pedostructure water retention curve h(W, conceptually the same as that accurately measured by the tensiometer. However, contrarily to what is usually thought, h is not equal to the applied air pressure on the sample, but rather, is proportional to its logarithm, in agreement with the thermodynamic theory developed in the article. The pF curve and soil water retention curve, as well as their methods of measurement are unified in a same physical theory. It is the theory of the soil medium organization (pedostructure and its interaction with water. We show also how the hydrostructural parameters of the theoretical curve equation can be estimated from any measured curve, whatever the method of measurement. An application example using published pF curves is given.

  16. Self-Propagating Frontal Polymerization in Water at Ambient Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olten, Nesrin; Kraigsley, Alison; Ronney, Paul D.

    2003-01-01

    Advances in polymer chemistry have led to the development of monomers and initiation agents that enable propagating free-radical polymerization fronts to exist. These fronts are driven by the exothermicity of the polymerization reaction and the transport of heat from the polymerized product to the reactant monomer/solvent/initiator solution. The thermal energy transported to the reactant solution causes the initiator to decompose, yielding free radicals, which start the free radical polymerization process as discussed in recent reviews. The use of polymerization processes based on propagating fronts has numerous applications. Perhaps the most important of these is that it enables rapid curing of polymers without external heating since the polymerization process itself provides the high temperatures necessary to initiate and sustain polymerization. This process also enables more uniform curing of arbitrarily thick samples since it does not rely on heat transfer from an external source, which will necessarily cause the temperature history of the sample to vary with distance from the surface according to a diffusion-like process. Frontal polymerization also enables filling and sealing of structures having cavities of arbitrary shape without having to externally heat the structure. Water at atmospheric pressure is most convenient solvent to employ and the most important for practical applications (because of the cost and environmental issues associated with DMSO and other solvents). Nevertheless, to our knowledge, steady, self-propagating polymerization fronts have not been reported in water at atmospheric pressure. Currently, polymerization fronts require a high boiling point solvent (either water at high pressures or an alternative solvent such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (boiling point 189 C at atmospheric pressure.) Early work on frontal polymerization, employed pressures up to 5000 atm in order to avoid boiling of the monomer/solvent/initiator solution. High

  17. Pressurized water reactor monitoring. Study of detection, diagnostic and estimation (least squares and filtering) methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillet, M.

    1986-07-01

    This thesis presents a study for the surveillance of the Primary circuit water inventory of a pressurized water reactor. A reference model is developed for the development of an automatic system ensuring detection and real-time diagnostic. The methods to our application are statistical tests and adapted a pattern recognition method. The estimation of the detected anomalies is treated by the least square fit method, and by filtering. A new projected optimization method with superlinear convergence is developed in this framework, and a segmented linearization of the model is introduced, in view of a multiple filtering. 46 refs [fr

  18. Effects of High Hydrostatic Pressure on Water Absorption of Adzuki Beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Shigeaki; Shigematsu, Toru; Karo, Mineko; Hayashi, Mayumi; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    The effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment on dried soybean, adzuki bean, and kintoki kidney bean, which are low-moisture-content cellular biological materials, was investigated from the viewpoint of water absorption. The samples were vacuum-packed with distilled water and pressurized at 200 MPa and 25 °C for 10 min. After the HHP treatment, time courses of the moisture contents of the samples were measured, and the dimensionless moisture contents were estimated. Water absorption in the case of soybean could be fitted well by a simple water diffusion model. High pressures were found to have negligible effects on water absorption into the cotyledon of soybean and kintoki kidney bean. A non-linear least square method based on the Weibull equation was applied for the adzuki beans, and the effective water diffusion coefficient was found to increase significantly from 8.6 × 10−13 to 6.7 × 10−10 m2/s after HHP treatment. Approximately 30% of the testa of the adzuki bean was damaged upon HHP treatment, which was comparable to the surface area of the testa in the partially peeled adzuki bean sample. Thus, HHP was confirmed to promote mass transfer to the cotyledon of legumes with a tight testa. PMID:28231195

  19. Effects of High Hydrostatic Pressure on Water Absorption of Adzuki Beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeaki Ueno

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP treatment on dried soybean, adzuki bean, and kintoki kidney bean, which are low-moisture-content cellular biological materials, was investigated from the viewpoint of water absorption. The samples were vacuum-packed with distilled water and pressurized at 200 MPa and 25 °C for 10 min. After the HHP treatment, time courses of the moisture contents of the samples were measured, and the dimensionless moisture contents were estimated. Water absorption in the case of soybean could be fitted well by a simple water diffusion model. High pressures were found to have negligible effects on water absorption into the cotyledon of soybean and kintoki kidney bean. A non-linear least square method based on the Weibull equation was applied for the adzuki beans, and the effective water diffusion coefficient was found to increase significantly from 8.6 × 10−13 to 6.7 × 10−10 m2/s after HHP treatment. Approximately 30% of the testa of the adzuki bean was damaged upon HHP treatment, which was comparable to the surface area of the testa in the partially peeled adzuki bean sample. Thus, HHP was confirmed to promote mass transfer to the cotyledon of legumes with a tight testa.

  20. Water cycle and its management for plant habitats at reduced pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygalov, Vadim Y.; Fowler, Philip A.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Bucklin, Ray A.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and mathematical models were developed for describing and testing temperature and humidity parameters for plant production in bioregenerative life support systems. A factor was included for analyzing systems operating at low (10-101.3 kPa) pressure to reduce gas leakage and structural mass (e.g., inflatable greenhouses for space application). The expected close relationship between temperature and relative humidity was observed, along with the importance of heat exchanger coil temperature and air circulation rate. The presence of plants in closed habitats results in increased water flux through the system. Changes in pressure affect gas diffusion rates and surface boundary layers, and change convective transfer capabilities and water evaporation rates. A consistent observation from studies with plants at reduced pressures is increased evapotranspiration rates, even at constant vapor pressure deficits. This suggests that plant water status is a critical factor for managing low-pressure production systems. The approach suggested should help space mission planners design artificial environments in closed habitats.

  1. PWR (pressurized water reactor) water treatment improvements: Cost-benefit analysis: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegwarth, D.P.; Bickerstaff, J.A.; Chakravorti, R.

    1988-05-01

    Pressurized water reactor steam generators and turbines have experienced a variety of corrosion problems as a result of ionic, corrosion product and oxidizing species transport into the steam generators. This project considered the design, cost and benefit of equipment modifications and additions which would decrese secondary cycle impurity transport. Improving condenser integrity, adding full-flow condensate polishers, providing low dissolved oxygen in makeup water and installation of all-ferrous heat exchangers are four changes that can significantly improve secondary water quality. Conceptual designs and costs of these four concepts at a 1160 MWe pressurized water reactor are summarized. The expected chemistry and operational benefits are discussed, and a cost-benefit analysis is given

  2. Effect of cationic surfactants on organic liquid-water capillary pressure-saturation relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demond, A. H.; Desai, F. N.; Hayes, K. F.

    1994-02-01

    Many solutes, either naturally occurring or introduced, are surface active and sorb preferentially at the interfaces of subsurface systems. In multiphase systems, the sorption of surfactants affects the capillary pressure-saturation relationships, fundamental constitutive relationships in the modeling of multiphase flow. In this study, the impact of surfactant sorption on capillary pressure relationships for organic liquid-waters systems was demonstrated by qualitatively correlating measurements of sorption and zeta potential, with interfacial tension and contact angle and, in turn, quantitatively relating these measurements to changes in capillary pressure-saturation relationships for o-xylene-water-quartz systems containing a cationic surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The results show that the sorption of CTAB causes the naturally hydrophilic system to become hydrophobic, as evidenced by a change in the contact angle from about 10°-15° to 155° or 180°, depending on the pH. This change in hydrophilicity is reflected in the zeta potential of the system which goes from negative to positive as the aqueous phase CTAB concentration increases. The spontaneous imbibition capillary pressure-saturation relationship is more sensitive to the sorption of CTAB than the drainage relationship. To predict the observed changes in both capillary pressure-saturation relationships, a modified form of Leverett's function was used where roughness and curvature corrections were incorporated into the intrinsic contact angle to give an operational contact angle. A comparison of the measured and predicted capillary pressure-saturation relationships showed reasonable agreement.

  3. Dynamic Oil-Water and Air-Water Capillary Pressure-Saturation Curves: Experiments and Lattice-Boltzmann Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, M. L.; Schaap, M. G.; Wildenschild, D.

    2006-12-01

    Capillary pressure plays a significant role in multiphase flow and transport in porous media. Although capillary forces occur at the pore-scale, many mathematical models require a macro-scale relationship between capillary pressure and other properties of the system. The capillary pressure-saturation curve is the most widely used relationship to characterize hydraulic properties of multiphase flow in porous media. These curves are most commonly obtained from quasi-static drainage and imbibition experiments. It is then often assumed that the quasi-static curves can be applied to modeling transient flow conditions. In these models, the time it takes to reach a quasi-static state is completely ignored, which can be on the order of hours to months. Experimental evidence suggests that capillary pressure-saturation curves are not unique and that they exhibit dynamic effects depending on the flow conditions in the the system prior to and during the time of measurement. The extent to which dynamic flow conditions effect the measured capillary pressure is currently debated and the exact cause of the observed dynamic effects is not fully understood. In this study various drainage and imbibition experiments were conducted to further investigate the role dynamic effects play in the capillary pressure-saturation curve. Oil-water and air-water experiments were conducted on the same porous medium to compare the dynamic effects resulting from density and viscosity differences. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations of the dynamic effects were carried out to provide a comparison to the experimental results. The simulation results were then analyzed in an effort to identify the pore-scale mechanisms responsible for the dynamic effects observed in the macro-scale experiments.

  4. Ground water modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leino-Forsman, H.; Olin, M.

    1991-01-01

    The first Seminar on Groundwater Modelling was arranged by VTT (Reactor Laboratory) in Espoo Finland in May 1991. The one day seminar dealt both with modelling of geochemistry and transport of groundwater, as well as mathematical methods for modelling. The seminar concentrated on giving a broad picture of the applications of groundwater modelling e.g. nuclear waste, groundwater resources including artificial groundwater and pollution. The participants came from research institutes and universities as well as engineering companies. Articles are published in Finnish with English abstracts

  5. Stochastic Still Water Response Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Hansen, Peter; Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2002-01-01

    water bending moment is compared to statistics from available regression formulas. It is found that the suggested model predicts a coefficient of variation of the maximum still water bending moment that is a factor of two to three times lower than that obtained by use of the regression formula. It turns......In this study a stochastic field model for the still water loading is formulated where the statistics (mean value, standard deviation, and correlation) of the sectional forces are obtained by integration of the load field over the relevant part of the ship structure. The objective of the model...

  6. Application of the failure assessment diagram to the evaluation of pressure-temperature limits for a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, K.K.; Bloom, J.M.; Pavinich, W.A.; Slayer, H.W.

    1985-01-01

    The failure assessment diagram approach, an elastic-plastic fracture mechanics procedure based on the J-integral concept, was used in the evaluation of pressuretemperature (P-T) limits for the beltline region of the vessel of a pressurized water reactor. The main objective of this paper is to illustrate the application of an alternate fracture mechanics method for the evaluation of pressure-temperature limits, as allowed by the Code of the Federal Regulation 10 CFR 50, Appendix G. The maximum allowable pressure levels were calculated at 33 time points along the given reactor bulk coolant temperature history representing the normal operation of a pressurized water reactor. The results of the calculations showed that adequate margins of safety on operating pressure for the critical weld in the beltline of the pressurized water reactor vessel are assured

  7. Safety analysis of a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled and moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Y.; Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    2002-01-01

    A safety analysis code for a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled reactor (SCLWR-H) with water rods cooled by descending flow, SPRAT-DOWN, is developed. The hottest channel, a water rod, down comer, upper and lower plenums, feed pumps, etc. are modeled as junction of nodes. Partial of the feed water flows downward from the upper dome of the reactor pressure vessel to the water rods. The accidents analyzed here are total loss of feed water flow, feed water pump seizure, and control rods ejection. All the accidents satisfy the criteria. The accident event at which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is total loss of feedwater flow. The transients analyzed here are loss of feed water heating, inadvertent start-up of an auxiliary water supply system, partial loss of feed water flow, loss of offsite power, loss of load, and abnormal withdrawal of control rods. All the transients satisfied the criteria. The transient event for which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is control rod withdrawal at normal operation. The behavior of loss of load transient is different from that of BWR. The power does not increase because loss of flow occurs and the density change is small. The sensitivities of the system behavior to various parameters during transients and accidents are analyzed. The parameters having strong influence are the capacity of the auxiliary water supply system, the coast down time of the main feed water pumps, and the time delay of the main feed water pumps trip. The control rod reactivity also has strong influence. (authors)

  8. Mechanical probabilistic study of pressurized water reactor (PWR) vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, V.; Persoz, M.; Debost-Eymard; Donore, A.M.; Meister, E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the probabilistic study carried out on the vessel case under assumptions of occurrence of an underclad flaw and of an accidental transient of the pressurized thermal shock type (PTS). The estimation model of the failure criterion requires finite element computations. Therefore the probabilistic analysis is based on a coupling between Code Aster, the EDF FE software for thermomechanical analysis and PROBAN, a probabilistic analysis software (Det Norske Veritas). The vessel model is first described by focusing on the thermomechanical model (pseudo-1D and 2D axisymmetrical computations are considered and compared) then on the model used in the probabilistic analysis. The second part deals with the probabilistic analyses (computations of failure probabilities during the transient) carried out on the model for different cases and the comparison of the results. Eventually, the perspectives of this work, from both the computational point of view and the application to the vessel study, are outlined. (orig./DGE)

  9. Apparatus for localizing disturbances in pressurized water reactors (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, D.

    1989-01-01

    The invention according to CS-PS 177386, entitled ''Apparatus for increasing the efficiency and passivity of the functioning of a bubbling-vacuum system for localizing disturbances in nuclear power plants with a pressurized water reactor'', concerns an important area of nuclear power engineering that is being developed in the RGW member countries. The invention solves the problems of increasing the reliability and intensification during the operation of the above very important system for guaranteeing the safety of the standard nuclear power plants of Soviet design. The essence of the invention consists in the installation of a simple passively operating supplementary apparatus. Consequently, the following can be observed in the system: first an improvement and simultaneous increase in the reliability of its function during the critical transition period, which follows the filling of the second space with air from the first space; secondly, elimination of the hitherto unavoidable initiating role of the active sprinkler-condensation device present; thirdly, a more effective performance and subjection of the elements to disintegration of the water flowing from the bubbling condenser into the first space; and fourthly, an enhanced utilization of the heat-conducting ability of the water reservoir of the bubbling condenser. Representatives of the supplementary apparatus are autonomous and local secondary systems of the sprinkler-sprayer without an insert, which spray the water under the effect of gravity. 1 fig

  10. Solution-diffusion with defects model for pressure-assisted forward osmosis

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, Jintang

    2014-11-01

    An osmosis transport model is presented that combines the standard internal and external concentration polarization equations in the forward osmosis (FO) field with the selective layer transport equations first proposed by Sherwood in 1967. The Sherwood model describes water flux as the sum of a solute-selective, diffusive component driven by the sum of osmotic pressure and hydraulic pressure differences, and a nonselective, convective component driven by hydraulic pressure difference only. This solution-diffusion with defects (SDWD) model and the solution-diffusion (SD) model were compared against data collected using polyamide thin-film-composite (PA-TFC) and integrally-skinned asymmetric cellulose triacetate (CTA) membranes, evaluated in various configurations. When tested with pure water on the porous support side and 1.5. M (π=72.7. bar) sodium chloride solution on the selective layer side, applying 1.25. bar of hydraulic pressure to the porous support side increased water flux by an order of magnitude for PA-TFC membranes, but had negligible effect on CTA membrane flux. These large flux variations can be explained by the SDWD model, but not the SD model. To confirm the existence of defects, a PA-TFC membrane was coated with a uniform, highly water-permeable, nonselective polymer. After coating to block convection through defects, the influence of hydraulic pressure on water flux through this membrane essentially disappeared. Water flux through these defects is low (<1% of total water flux for PA-TFC membranes) and of little consequence in practical FO or reverse osmosis (RO) applications. But in pressure-assisted forward osmosis (PAFO) or pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO), convective transport through defects affects the solute concentration difference across the membrane selective layer, increasing or decreasing water flux through defect-free regions. The presence of defects may explain why membrane power density in PRO is lower than that predicted based on

  11. Acceptance test procedure for High Pressure Water Jet System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal, J.B.

    1995-01-01

    The overall objective of the acceptance test is to demonstrate a combined system. This includes associated tools and equipment necessary to perform cleaning in the 105 K East Basin (KE) for achieving optimum reduction in the level of contamination/dose rate on canisters prior to removal from the KE Basin and subsequent packaging for disposal. Acceptance tests shall include necessary hardware to achieve acceptance of the cleaning phase of canisters. This acceptance test procedure will define the acceptance testing criteria of the high pressure water jet cleaning fixture. The focus of this procedure will be to provide guidelines and instructions to control, evaluate and document the acceptance testing for cleaning effectiveness and method(s) of removing the contaminated surface layer from the canister presently identified in KE Basin. Additionally, the desired result of the acceptance test will be to deliver to K Basins a thoroughly tested and proven system for underwater decontamination and dose reduction. This report discusses the acceptance test procedure for the High Pressure Water Jet

  12. Modeling Water Filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Model-eliciting activities (MEAs) are not new to those in engineering or mathematics, but they were new to Melissa Parks. Model-eliciting activities are simulated real-world problems that integrate engineering, mathematical, and scientific thinking as students find solutions for specific scenarios. During this process, students generate solutions…

  13. Research on axial total pressure distributions of sonic steam jet in subcooled water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xinzhuang; Li Wenjun; Yan Junjie

    2012-01-01

    The axial total pressure distributions of sonic steam jet in subcooled water were experimentally investigated for three different nozzle diameters (6.0 mm, 8.0 mm and 10.0 mm). The inlet steam pressure, and pool subcooling subcooled water temperature were in the range of 0.2-0.6 MPa and 420-860 ℃, respectively. The effect of steam pressure, subcooling water temperature and nozzle size on the axial pressure distributions were obtained, and also the characteristics of the maximum pressure and its position were studied. The results indicated that the characteristics of the maximum pressure were influenced by the nozzle size for low steam pressure, but the influence could be ignored for high steam pressure. Moreover, a correlation was given to correlate the position of the maximum pressure based on steam pressure and subcooling water temperature, and the discrepancies of predictions and experiments are within ±15%. (authors)

  14. Design of water rod cores of a direct cycle supercritical-pressure light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Yasushi; Koshizuka, Sei-Ichi; Oka, Yoshiaki

    1994-01-01

    A conceptual design of a direct-cycle supercritical-pressure light water reactor with water rods is presented. Three types of water rods are analyzed: single, semi-double and full-double tubes. A water rod replaces seven fuel rods in a triangular lattice. The coolant density change in the water rods and the fuel channel is calculated using a code developed in the present study. The full double tube is most superior in terms of the distribution of the moderator. The number of fuel rods to water rods is 198:19, which makes optimum moderation. The average enrichment becomes 4.13%. The axial power flattening is finally achieved by partial length fuel rods and enrichment split of 0.25%. The discharge burnup is 45 GWd/t. (author)

  15. WATER QUALITY MODELS: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Nair Sumita; Bhatia Sukhpreet Kaur

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining water quality and predicting the fate of water pollutants are one of the important tasks of present environmental problems. The best tool for predicting different pollution scenarios are the simulation of mathematical models which can provide a basis and technical support for environmental management.

  16. Effects of ambient temperature and water vapor on chamber pressure and oxygen level during low atmospheric pressure stunning of poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Paul H; Pritchard, David G

    2017-08-01

    The characteristics of the vacuum used in a low atmospheric pressure stunning system to stun (render unconscious) poultry prior to slaughter are described. A vacuum chamber is pumped by a wet screw compressor. The vacuum pressure is reduced from ambient atmospheric pressure to an absolute vacuum pressure of ∼250 Torr (∼33 kPa) in ∼67 sec with the vacuum gate valve fully open. At ∼250 Torr, the sliding gate valve is partially closed to reduce effective pumping speed, resulting in a slower rate of decreasing pressure. Ambient temperature affects air density and water vapor pressure and thereby oxygen levels and the time at the minimum total pressure of ∼160 Torr (∼21 kPa) is varied from ∼120 to ∼220 sec to ensure an effective stun within the 280 seconds of each cycle. The reduction in total pressure results in a gradual reduction of oxygen partial pressure that was measured by a solid-state electrochemical oxygen sensor. The reduced oxygen pressure leads to hypoxia, which is recognized as a humane method of stunning poultry. The system maintains an oxygen concentration of controller and the human machine interface enable precise and accurate control. The vacuum system operates in the turbulent viscous flow regime, and is best characterized by absolute vacuum pressure rather than gauge pressure. Neither the presence of broiler chickens nor different fore-line pipe designs of four parallel commercial systems affected the pressure-time data. Water in wet air always reduces the oxygen concentrations to a value lower than in dry air. The partial pressure of water and oxygen were found to depend on the pump down parameters due to the formation of fog in the chamber and desorption of water from the birds and the walls of the vacuum chamber. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association.

  17. TRAC-PF1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1984-02-01

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light water reactors. The TRAC-PF1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. The code features either a one-dimensional or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals; a two-phase, two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field; flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment; optional reflood tracking capability for both bottom flood and falling-film quench fronts; and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. This report describes the thermal-hydraulic models and the numerical solution methods used in the code. Detailed programming and user information also are provided

  18. TRAC-PF1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1984-02-01

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light water reactors. The TRAC-PF1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. The code features either a one-dimensional or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals; a two-phase, two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field; flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment; optional reflood tracking capability for both bottom flood and falling-film quench fronts; and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. This report describes the thermal-hydraulic models and the numerical solution methods used in the code. Detailed programming and user information also are provided.

  19. Continuum damage modeling through theoretical and experimental pressure limit formulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Majid

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we developed a mathematical modeling to represent the damage of thermoplastic pipes. On the one hand, we adapted the theories of the rupture pressure to fit the High Density Polyethylene (HDPE case. Indeed, the theories for calculating the rupture pressure are multiple, designed originally for steels and alloys. For polymer materials, we have found that these theories can be adapted using a coefficient related to the nature of the studied material. The HDPE is characterized by two important values of pressure, deduced from the ductile form of the internal pressures evolution until burst. For this reason, we have designed an alpha coefficient taking into account these two pressures and giving a good approximation of the evolution of the experimental burst pressures through the theoretically corrected ones, using Faupel㒒s pressure formula. Then, we can deduce the evolution of the theoretical damage using the calculated pressures. On the other hand, two other mathematical models were undertaken. The first one has given rise to an adaptive model referring to an expression of the pressure as a function of the life fraction, the characteristic pressures and the critical life fraction. The second model represents a continuum damage model incorporating the pressure equations as a function of the life fraction and based on the burst pressure�s static damage model. These models represent important tools for industrials to assess the failure of thermoplastic pipes and proceed quick checks

  20. Pressure impact of autoclave treatment on water sorption and pectin composition of flax cellulosic-fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alix, S; Colasse, L; Morvan, C; Lebrun, L; Marais, S

    2014-02-15

    The tensile properties of flax fibres might permit them to be used in composites as reinforcement in organic resin, as long as their mechanical properties are reproducible and their water sorption are reduced. In this study, to minimise the variability of mechanical properties, several samples of flax fibres were blended as a non-woven fabric. In order to reduce the water absorption of this non-woven technical fibres, an autoclave treatment was performed which was expected to remove the pectins and then to reduce the water sorption on their negative charges. The impact of autoclave pressure (0.5, 1 and 2 bars) on water sorption was investigated by using a gravimetric static equilibrium method. The Park model based on the three sorption modes: Langmuir, Henry's law and clustering, was successfully used to simulate the experimental sorption data. The lowest pressure treatments impacted only the Langmuir contribution while the 2 bar autoclave-treatment positively impacted the water resistance in the core of fibres by reducing Henry's absorption rate. This was shown to be related to the chemical modifications at the surface and in the core of fibres. A schematic model is presented relating the water sorption and the pectic composition of the fabric. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Detection of gaseous heavy water leakage points in CANDU 6 pressurized heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, T-K.; Jung, S-H.

    1996-01-01

    During reactor operation, the heavy water filled primary coolant system in a CANDU 6 Pressurized Heavy Water (PHWR) may leak through routine operations of the plant via components, mechanical joints, and during inadvertent operations etc. Early detection of leak points is therefore important to maintain plant safety and economy. There are many independent systems to monitor and recover heavy water leakage in a CANDU 6 PHWR. Methodology for early detection based on operating experience from these systems, is investigated in this paper. In addition, the four symptoms of D 2 O leakage, the associated process for clarifying and verifying the leakage, and the probable points of leakage are discussed. (author)

  2. Temperature/pressure and water vapor sounding with microwave spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhleman, D. O.; Janssen, M. A.; Clancy, R. T.; Gulkis, S.; Mccleese, D. J.; Zurek, R.; Haberle, R. M.; Frerking, M.

    1992-01-01

    Two intense microwave spectra lines exist in the martian atmosphere that allow unique sounding capabilities: water vapor at 183 GHz and the (2-1) rotational line of CO at 230 GHz. Microwave spectra line sounding is a well-developed technique for the Earth's atmosphere for sounding from above from spacecraft and airplanes, and from below from fixed surface sites. Two simple instruments for temperature sounding on Mars (the CO line) and water vapor measurements are described. The surface sounder proposed for the MESUR sites is designed to study the boundary layer water vapor distribution and the temperature/pressure profiles with vertical resolution of 0.25 km up to 1 km with reduced resolution above approaching a scale height. The water channel will be sensitive to a few tenths of a micrometer of water and the temperature profile will be retrieved to an accuracy between 1 and 2 K. The latter is routinely done on the Earth using oxygen lines near 60 GHz. The measurements are done with a single-channel heterodyne receiver looking into a 10-cm mirror that is canned through a range of elevation angles plus a target load. The frequency of the receiver is sweep across the water and CO lines generating the two spectra at about 1-hr intervals throughout the mission. The mass and power for the proposed instrument are 2 kg and 5-8 W continuously. The measurements are completely immune to the atmospheric dust and ice particle loads. It was felt that these measurements are the ultimate ones to properly study the martian boundary layer from the surface to a few kilometers. Sounding from above requires an orbiting spacecraft with multichannel microwave spectrometers such as the instrument proposed for MO by a subset of the authors, a putative MESUR orbiter, and a proposed Discovery mission called MOES. Such an instrument can be built with less than 10 kg and use less than 15 W. The obvious advantage of this approach is that the entire atmosphere can be sounded for temperature and

  3. Modelling of heat transfer to fluids at a supercritical pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuisheng, He

    2014-01-01

    A key feature of Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) is that, by raising the pressure of the reactor coolant fluid above the critical value, a phase change crisis is avoided. However, the changes in water density as it flows through the core of an SCWR are actually much higher than in the current water-cooled reactors. In a typical design, the ratio of the density of water at the core inlet to that at exit is as high as 7:1. Other fluid properties also vary significantly, especially around the pseudo-critical temperature (at which the specific heat capacity peaks). As a result, turbulent flow and heat transfer behaviour in the core is extremely complex and under certain conditions, significant heat transfer deterioration can potentially occur. Consequently, understanding and being able to predict flow and heat transfer phenomena under normal steady operation conditions and in start-up and hypothetical fault conditions are fundamental to the design of SCWR. There have been intensive studies on flow and heat transfer to fluids at supercritical pressure recently and several excellent review papers have been published. In the talk, we will focus on some turbulence modelling issues encountered in CFD simulations. The talk will first discuss some flow and heat transfer issues related to fluids at supercritical pressures and their potential implications in SCWR, and some recent developments in the understanding and modelling techniques of such problems, which will be followed by an outlook for some future developments.Factors which have a major influence on the flow and will be discussed are buoyancy and flow acceleration due to thermal expansion (both are due to density variations but involve different mechanisms) and the nonuniformity of other fluid properties. In addition, laminar-turbulent flow transition coupled with buoyancy and flow acceleration plays an important role in heat transfer effectiveness and wall temperature in the entrance region but such

  4. The flooding incident at the Aagesta pressurized heavy water nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlgren, C.

    1996-03-01

    This work is an independent investigation of the consequences of the flooding incident at the Aagesta HPWR, Stockholm in May 1969. The basis for the report is an incident in which, due to short circuits in the wiring because of flooding water, the ECCS is momentarily subjected to a pressure much higher than designed for. The hypothetical scenario analyzed here is the case in which the ECCS breaks due to the high pressure. As a consequence of the break, the pressure and the water level in the reactor vessel decrease. The report is divided into three parts; First the Aagesta HPWR is described as well as the chronology of the incident, an analysis of the effects of a hypothetical break in the ECCS is then developed. The second part is a scoping analysis of the incident, modeling the pressure decrease and mass flow rate out of the break. The heat-up of the core, and the core degradation was modeled as well. The third part is formed by a RELAP5/MOD3.1 modeling of the Aagesta HPWR. 18 refs

  5. Pressurized water reactor simulator. Workshop material. 2. ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established an activity in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the development and distribution of simulation programs and educational material and sponsors courses and workshops. The workshops are in two parts: techniques and tools for reactor simulator development. And the use of reactor simulators in education. Workshop material for the first part is covered in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 12, 'Reactor Simulator Development' (2001). Course material for workshops using a WWER- 1000 reactor department simulator from the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, the Russian Federation is presented in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 21, 2nd edition, 'WWER-1000 Reactor Simulator' (2005). Course material for workshops using a boiling water reactor simulator developed for the IAEA by Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated of Canada (CTI) is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No.23, 2nd edition, 'Boiling Water Reactor Simulator' (2005). This report consists of course material for workshops using a pressurized water reactor simulator

  6. Water Stress Projection Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    www.eia.gov/ forecasts /aeo/tables_ref.cfm U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). 2014. National land cover database (NLCD). Multi - Resolution Land...Engineers Washington, DC 20314-1000 ERDC/CERL TR-16-32 ii Abstract U.S. Army stationing is a constant multi -scale process. Large scale station- ing, which...20 4.6 Model output

  7. Sodium-rich carbonated natural mineral water ingestion and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Alejandro; Martins, Maria João; Guimarães, João Tiago; Severo, Milton; Azevedo, Isabel

    2010-02-01

    There is a strong positive correlation between sodium chloride intake and hypertension. In industrialized countries the ingestion of carbonated and non-carbonated mineral water is an important source of calorie-free fluids. The mineral content of these waters varies greatly, with many brands containing high levels of sodium. However, some mineral waters contain greater amounts of bicarbonate instead of chloride as the anion associated with the sodium cation. This is relevant because it is well established that the effect of sodium on blood pressure depends on the corresponding anion. Additionally the pressor effect of sodium bicarbonate is much lower than that of equivalent amounts of sodium chloride. The aim of our work was to evaluate the effect of ingesting a sodium-rich carbonated mineral water (Agua das Pedras) on blood pressure values in normotensive individuals. This crossover, non-blinded study evaluated 17 individuals (9 female and 8 male), aged 24-53 years, median body mass index (BMI) Agua das Pedras or Agua Vitalis. Each arm of the study lasted 7 weeks, with 6 weeks of washout between them. Twenty-four hour urinary samples were collected at the beginning and end of each arm to determine pH and sodium and potassium excretion. Blood pressure and body weight were measured weekly throughout the study. A mixed-effects model was used to compare groups (p Agua das Pedras had no effect on blood pressure. A study by Schorr and co-workers found that the ingestion of bicarbonate-rich water (1.5 l/day) had hypotensive effects in an elderly population. However, these results should be verified in hypertensive subjects, who are more likely to be salt sensitive, since in some of these individuals blood pressure rises even when sodium is ingested as sodium bicarbonate.

  8. Severe accident in pressurized water reactors: molten fuel-coolant interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battail-Claret, Sylvie

    1993-01-01

    In order to study the phenomenon of interaction between corium and water, the author of this research thesis proposes a scenario to describe the behaviour of a drop of molten iron oxide suddenly plunged into a bath of liquid at room temperature. First, she addresses the modelling of the evolution of the vapour film which surrounds the hot drop and comprises a phase of establishment of a steady film and the phase of destabilisation of this film when an external pressure wave passes by. Besides, she modelled the process of fragmentation of a hot body induced by the destabilisation of a process due to the impact of liquid water micro-jets with water trapping in the hot body. Finally, a model of 'bubble dynamics' is proposed to describe the evolution of the vapour bubble fed by fragments. Theoretical results are compared with experimental results [fr

  9. Modeling, Parameters Identification, and Control of High Pressure Fuel Cell Back-Pressure Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengxiang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The reactant pressure is crucial to the efficiency and lifespan of a high pressure PEMFC engine. This paper analyses a regulated back-pressure valve (BPV for the cathode outlet flow in a high pressure PEMFC engine, which can achieve precisely pressure control. The modeling, parameters identification, and nonlinear controller design of a BPV system are considered. The identified parameters are used in designing active disturbance rejection controller (ADRC. Simulations and extensive experiments are conducted with the xPC Target and show that the proposed controller can not only achieve good dynamic and static performance but also have strong robustness against parameters’ disturbance and external disturbance.

  10. Initial pressure spike and its propagation phenomena in sodium-water reaction tests for MONJU steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, M.; Hiroi, H.; Tanaka, N.; Hori, M.

    1977-01-01

    With the objective of demonstrating the safe design of steam generators for prototype LMFBR MONJU against the postulated large-leak accident, a number of large-leak sodium-water reaction tests have been conducted using the SWAT-1 and SWAT-3 rigs. Investigation of the potential effects of pressure load on the system is one of the major concerns in these tests. This paper reports the behavior of initial pressure spike in the reaction vessel, its propagation phenomena to the simulated secondary cooling system, and the comparisons with the computer code for one-dimensional pressure wave propagation problems. Both rigs used are the scaled-down models of the helically coiled steam generators of MONJU. The SWAT-1 rig is a simplified model and consists of a reaction vessel (1/8 scale of MONJU evaporator with 0.4 m dia. and 2.5 m height) and a pressure relief system i.e., a pressure relief line and a reaction products tank. On the other hand, the SWAT-3 rig is a 1/2.5 scale of MONJU SG system and consists of an evaporator (reaction vessel with 1.3 m dia. and 6.35 m height), a superheater, an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX), a piping system simulating the secondary cooling circuit and a pressure relief system. The both water injection systems consist of a water injection line with a rupture disk installed in front of injection hole and an electrically heated water tank. Choice of water injection rates in the scaled-down models is made based on the method of iso-velocity modeling. Test results indicated that the characteristics of the initial pressure spike are dominated by those of initial water injection which are controlled by the conditions of water heater and the size of water injection hole, etc

  11. Development of a model for Retran-3D for pressure losses at T-junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barten, W.; Coddington, P.; Sullivan, J.

    2001-01-01

    For Nuclear Power Plants, both for PWRs and BWRs, there are many instances in normal operation, accidents and transients when it is important to know the pressure drop and quality of the flow, at a flow junction. In this paper two-phase pressure drops in a horizontal T-junction with equal areas are assessed in the case of separating flow using the RETRAN-3D code. Therefore applying the RETRAN-3D code first recoverable pressure drops are calculated for different flow rate ratios, inlet qualities and system pressures for steam-water mixtures. These pressure drops are then compared to analytical expressions by Soliman and Ebadian (1994) developed from the analysis of a wide range of two-phase experimental pressure drop data for equal-sided junctions with horizontal inlet and side branches both for steam-water and air-water flow. With these comparisons the experimental pressure loss is separated into a recoverable part (i.e. that calculated by RETRAN-3D) and an irrecoverable. A model for the irrecoverable pressure losses is derived for the RETRAN-3D code by comparing the RETRAN-3D total momentum equation with the expressions generally used for pressure changes at T-junctions. The results of this model are compared to the experimental data through the expressions of Soliman and Ebadian and are shown to produce very good comparisons particularly for the range of conditions consistent with the experimental data. (author)

  12. A Numerical Investigation on the Effect of Gas Pressure on the Water Saturation of Compacted Bentonite-Sand Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Feng Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In deep geological disposal for high-level radioactive waste, the generated gas can potentially affect the sealing ability of bentonite buffers. There is a competition between water and gas: the former provides sealing by swelling bentonite, and the latter attempts to desaturate the bentonite buffer. Thus, this study focused on numerically modelling the coupling effects of water and gas on the water saturation and sealing efficiency of compacted bentonite-sand samples. Different gas pressures were applied to the top surface of an upper sample, whereas the water pressure on the bottom side of the lower sample was maintained at 4 MPa. The results indicated that gas pressure did not significantly affect the saturation of the bentonite-sand sample until 2 MPa. At 2 MPa, the degree of water saturation of the upper sample was close to 1.0. As the gas pressure increased, this influence was more apparent. When the gas pressure was 6 MPa or higher, it was difficult for the upper sample to become fully saturated. Additionally, the lower sample was desaturated due to the high gas pressure. This indicated that gas pressure played an important role in the water saturation process and can affect the sealing efficiency of bentonite-based buffer materials.

  13. Measurements and modeling of VLLE at elevated pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben

    and pure component calibration. Samples from the different liquid phases in the high-pressure cell is taken using a moveable needle. The systems investigated have been a combination of the components: CO2, N2, di-methyl ether (DME), water, methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol. 41 isotherms have been measured...... has traditionally been considered very time consuming. This work aims at developing and operating an equipment which allows routine measurements of both VLE and VLLE, in the temperature range of 25-45°C and pressure range of 1-100 bar. This has been done by taking advantage of on-line sampling...... and of these 18 were VLLE systems and 32 have not previously been published. Some of the experimental results have been modelled using an equation of state, SRK combined with the MHV1 mixing rule for the a-parameter and the NRTL model for the Gibbs excess energy. The Mathias-Copeman model was used...

  14. High converter pressurized water reactor with heavy water as a coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronen, Y.; Reyev, D.

    1983-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in water breeder and high converter reactors. The increase in the conversion ratio of these reactors is obtained by hardening the neutron spectrum achieved by tightening the reactor's lattice. Another way of hardening the neutron spectrum is to replace the light water with heavy water. Two pressurized water reactor fuel cycles that use heavy water as a coolant are considered. The first fuel cycle is based on plutonium and depleted uranium, and the second cycle is based on plutonium and enriched uranium. The uranium ore and separative work unit (SWU) requirements are calculated as well as the fuel cycle cost. The savings in uranium ore are about40 and 60% and about40% in SWU for both fuel cycles considered

  15. 1D models for condensation induced water hammer in pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloemeling, Frank; Neuhas, Thorsten; Schaffrath, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Condensation induced water hammer (CIWH) are caused by contact of steam and subcooled water. Thus, modeling the direct contact condensation is a crucial step towards the simulation of condensation induced water hammer with 1D pressure surge codes. Therefore, also the TUeV NORD SysTec GmbH and Co. KG inhouse pressure surge code DYVRO has been equipped with a new contact condensation model. The validation of DYVRO against an experiment dealing with CIWH is presented in this contribution. (orig.)

  16. Upper internals arrangement for a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, Norman R; Altman, David A; Yu, Ching; Rex, James A; Forsyth, David R

    2013-07-09

    In a pressurized water reactor with all of the in-core instrumentation gaining access to the core through the reactor head, each fuel assembly in which the instrumentation is introduced is aligned with an upper internals instrumentation guide-way. In the elevations above the upper internals upper support assembly, the instrumentation is protected and aligned by upper mounted instrumentation columns that are part of the instrumentation guide-way and extend from the upper support assembly towards the reactor head in hue with a corresponding head penetration. The upper mounted instrumentation columns are supported laterally at one end by an upper guide tube and at the other end by the upper support plate.

  17. Testing of a portable ultrahigh pressure water decontamination system (UHPWDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovell, A.; Dahlby, J.

    1996-02-01

    This report describes the tests done with a portable ultrahigh pressure water decontamination system (UHPWDS) on highly radioactively contaminated surfaces. A small unit was purchased, modified, and used for in-situ decontamination to change the waste level of the contaminated box from transuranic (TRU) waste to low- level waste (LLW). Low-level waste is less costly by as much as a factor of five or more if compared with TRU waste when handling, storage, and disposal are considered. The portable unit we tested is commercially available and requires minimal utilities for operation. We describe the UHPWDS unit itself, a procedure for its use, the results of the testing we did, and conclusions including positive and negative aspects of the UHPWDS

  18. Heavy-water-moderated pressure-tube reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pease, L.

    1977-08-01

    Several countries have heavy-water-moderated, pressure-tube reactors either in commercial operation or in late prototype stages. The supporting safety research and development includes such areas as the thermohydraulics of circuit depressurization, heat transfer from the fuel, heat rejection to the moderator from dry fuel, fuel and sheath behaviour, and fuel channel integrity. We review the work done in Canada, Great Britain, Italy and Japan, and describe some of the experimental tests underlaying the methods of accident analysis. The reactors have safety systems which, in the event of an accident, are able to shut down the reactor, keep the fuel cooled, and contain any released radioactivity. We summarize the characteristics of these safety systems (shutdown, emergency core cooling, and containment) in the various reactors, and discuss other reactor characteristics which either prevent accidents or reduce their potential demand on the safety systems. (author)

  19. Detecting pin diversion from pressurized water reactors spent fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Young S.; Sitaraman, Shivakumar

    2017-01-10

    Detecting diversion of spent fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) by determining possible diversion including the steps of providing a detector cluster containing gamma ray and neutron detectors, inserting the detector cluster containing the gamma ray and neutron detectors into the spent fuel assembly through the guide tube holes in the spent fuel assembly, measuring gamma ray and neutron radiation responses of the gamma ray and neutron detectors in the guide tube holes, processing the gamma ray and neutron radiation responses at the guide tube locations by normalizing them to the maximum value among each set of responses and taking the ratio of the gamma ray and neutron responses at the guide tube locations and normalizing the ratios to the maximum value among them and producing three signatures, gamma, neutron, and gamma-neutron ratio, based on these normalized values, and producing an output that consists of these signatures that can indicate possible diversion of the pins from the spent fuel assembly.

  20. Aging assessment of PWR [Pressurized Water Reactor] Auxiliary Feedwater Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casada, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    In support of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting a review of Pressurized Water Reactor Auxiliary Feedwater Systems. Two of the objectives of the NPAR Program are to identify failure modes and causes and identify methods to detect and track degradation. In Phase I of the Auxiliary Feedwater System study, a detailed review of system design and operating and surveillance practices at a reference plant is being conducted to determine failure modes and to provide an indication of the ability of current monitoring methods to detect system degradation. The extent to which current practices are contributing to aging and service wear related degradation is also being assessed. This paper provides a description of the study approach, examples of results, and some interim observations and conclusions. 1 fig., 1 tab

  1. Dominant accident sequences in Oconee-1 pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dearing, J F; Henninger, R J; Nassersharif, B

    1985-04-01

    A set of dominant accident sequences in the Oconee-1 pressurized water reactor was selected using probabilistic risk analysis methods. Because some accident scenarios were similar, a subset of four accident sequences was selected to be analyzed with the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) to further our insights into similar types of accidents. The sequences selected were loss-of-feedwater, small-small break loss-of-coolant, loss-of-feedwater-initiated transient without scram, and interfacing systems loss-of-coolant accidents. The normal plant response and the impact of equipment availability and potential operator actions were also examined. Strategies were developed for operator actions not covered in existing emergency operator guidelines and were tested using TRAC simulations to evaluate their effectiveness in preventing core uncovery and maintaining core cooling.

  2. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Won Pil; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S.

    2007-02-01

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform the tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. In the first phase of this project (1997.8∼2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished. In the second phase (2002.4∼2005.2), an optimized design of the ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) was established and the construction of the facility was almost completed. In the third phase (2005.3∼2007.2), the construction and commission tests of the ATLAS are to be completed and some first-phase tests are to be conducted

  3. Computer code for simulating pressurized water reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, A.M.B.

    1978-01-01

    A computer code was developed for the simulation of the steady-state and transient behaviour of the average channel of a Pressurizer Water Reactor core. Point kinetics equations were used with the reactivity calculated for average temperatures in the channel with the fuel and moderator temperature feedbacks. The radial heat conduction equation in the fuel was solved numerically. For calculating the thermodynamic properties of the coolant, the fundamental equations of conservation (mass, energy and momentum) were solved. The gap and clad were treated as a resistance added to the film coefficient. The fuel system equations were decoupled from the coolant equations. The program permitted the changes in the heat transfer correlations and the flow patterns along the coolant channel. Various test were performed to determine the steady-state and transient response employing the PWR core simulator developed, obtaining results with adequate precision. (author)

  4. Code for the core simulation in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, M.A.B.

    1978-08-01

    A computer code was developed for the simulation of the steady-state and transient behaviour of the average channel of a Pressurizer Water Reactor core. Point kinetics equations were used with the reactivity calculated for average temperatures in the channel with the fuel and moderator temperature feedbacks. The radial heat conduction equation in the fuel was solved numericaly. For calculating the thermodynamic properties of the coolant, the fundamental equations of conservation (mass, energy and momentum) were solved. The gap and clad were treated as a resistence added to the film coeficient. The fuel system equations were decoupled from the coolant equations. The program permitted the changes in the heat transfer correlations and the flow patterns along the coolant channel. Various test were performed to determine the steady-state and transient response employing the PWR core simulator developed, obtaining results with adequate precision. (Author) [pt

  5. Missiles caused by severe pressurized-water reactor accidients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, R.

    1995-01-01

    For future pressurized-water reactors, which should be designed against core-meltdown accidents, missiles generated inside the containment present a severe problem for its integrity. The masses and geometries of the missiles, as well as their velocities, may vary to a great extent. Therefore a reliable proof of the containment integrity is very difficult. In this article the potential sources of missiles are discussed, and the conclusion was reached that the generation of heavy missiles must be prevented. Steam explosions must not damage the reactor vessel head. Thus fragments of the head cannot become missiles that endanger the containment shell. Furthermore, during a melt-through failure of the reactor vessel under high pressure, the resulting forces must not catapult the whole vessel against the containment shell. Only missiles caused by hydrogen explosions may be tolerable, but shielding structures that protect the containment shell may be required. Further investigations are necessary. Finally, measures are described showing that the generation of heavy missiles can indeed be prevented. Investigations are currently being carried out that will confirm the strength of the reactor vessel head. In addition, a device for retaining the fragments of a failing reactor vessel is discussed

  6. Basal interstitial water pressure in laboratory debris flows over a rigid bed in an open channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hotta

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the interstitial water pressure of debris flows under various conditions gives essential information on the flow stress structure. This study measured the basal interstitial water pressure during debris flow routing experiments in a laboratory flume. Because a sensitive pressure gauge is required to measure the interstitial water pressure in shallow laboratory debris flows, a differential gas pressure gauge with an attached diaphragm was used. Although this system required calibration before and after each experiment, it showed a linear behavior and a sufficiently high temporal resolution for measuring the interstitial water pressure of debris flows. The values of the interstitial water pressure were low. However, an excess of pressure beyond the hydrostatic pressure was observed with increasing sediment particle size. The measured excess pressure corresponded to the theoretical excess interstitial water pressure, derived as a Reynolds stress in the interstitial water of boulder debris flows. Turbulence was thought to induce a strong shear in the interstitial space of sediment particles. The interstitial water pressure in boulder debris flows should be affected by the fine sediment concentration and the phase transition from laminar to turbulent debris flow; this should be the subject of future studies.

  7. Oscillations in the proximal intratubular pressure: a mathematical model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Leyssac, P P

    1987-01-01

    This study presents a dynamic continuous time model of the regulation of the renal proximal intratubular pressure in the rat. The model integrates a functional model of the glomerulus, a tubular model, a feedback model, and an afferent arteriolar model. The model has one equilibrium solution...

  8. River water quality modelling: II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanahan, P.; Henze, Mogens; Koncsos, L.

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. EPA QUAL2E model is currently the standard for river water quality modelling. While QUAL2E is adequate for the regulatory situation for which it was developed (the U.S. wasteload allocation process), there is a need for a more comprehensive framework for research and teaching. Moreover......, and to achieve robust model calibration. Mass balance problems arise from failure to account for mass in the sediment as well as in the water column and due to the fundamental imprecision of BOD as a state variable. (C) 1998 IAWQ Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  9. Non-destructive estimation of root pressure using sap flow, stem diameter measurements and mechanistic modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Swaef, Tom; Hanssens, Jochen; Cornelis, Annelies; Steppe, Kathy

    2013-02-01

    Upward water movement in plants via the xylem is generally attributed to the cohesion-tension theory, as a response to transpiration. Under certain environmental conditions, root pressure can also contribute to upward xylem water flow. Although the occurrence of root pressure is widely recognized, ambiguity exists about the exact mechanism behind root pressure, the main influencing factors and the consequences of root pressure. In horticultural crops, such as tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), root pressure is thought to cause cells to burst, and to have an important impact on the marketable yield. Despite the challenges of root pressure research, progress in this area is limited, probably because of difficulties with direct measurement of root pressure, prompting the need for indirect and non-destructive measurement techniques. A new approach to allow non-destructive and non-invasive estimation of root pressure is presented, using continuous measurements of sap flow and stem diameter variation in tomato combined with a mechanistic flow and storage model, based on cohesion-tension principles. Transpiration-driven sap flow rates are typically inversely related to stem diameter changes; however, this inverse relationship was no longer valid under conditions of low transpiration. This decoupling between sap flow rates and stem diameter variations was mathematically related to root pressure. Root pressure can be estimated in a non-destructive, repeatable manner, using only external plant sensors and a mechanistic model.

  10. A neutron diffraction study of the structure of heavy water at pressure using a new high-pressure cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, G.W.; Page, D.I.; Howell, W.S.

    1979-01-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements have been made at pressures up to 1 kbar on heavy water contained in a high-pressure cell manufactured from titanium zirconium alloy. The results have been used to test the degree to which the microscopic structure is susceptible to isothermal compression. The likely future progress in this field is commented on. (author)

  11. RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic analyses of two pressurized thermal shock sequences for the Oconee-1 pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolander, M.A.

    1985-10-01

    Thermal-hydraulic analyses of two pressurized thermal shock sequences for the Oconee-1 pressurized water reactor were performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory using the RELAP5/MOD2 computer code. This report presents the results of these calculations

  12. A new model for simulation of pressurizers in PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madeira, A.A.; Oliveira Barroso, A.C. de

    1981-01-01

    The pressurizer is treated as three-homogeneous region thermodynamic system, whith movable boundaries, all regions considered under the same pressure. In Normal operation, the two botton regions are occupied by water (liquid), and steam occupies the top region. Normal and spray induced condensation processes, evaporation and heat transfer cross the steam-water interface are analysed. The liquid region at the very botton of the pressurizer is treated in a simplyfied manner in order to retain the computacional advantages of the two-region models. (Author) [pt

  13. A random-walk model for pore pressure accumulation in marine soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Cheng, Niang-Sheng

    1999-01-01

    A numerical random-walk model has been developed for the pore-water pressure. The model is based on the analogy between the variation of the pore pressure and the diffusion process of any passive quantity such as concentration. The pore pressure in the former process is analogous...... to the concentration in the latter. In the simulation, particles are released in the soil, and followed as they travel through the statistical field variables. The model has been validated (1) against the Terzaghi consolidation process, and (2) against the process where the pore pressure builds up under progressive...... waves. The model will apparently enable the researcher to handle complex geometries (such as a pipeline buried in a soil) relatively easily. Early results with regard to the latter example, namely the buildup of pore pressure around a buried pipeline subject to a progressive wave, are encouraging....

  14. Contact angle of water droplets in a high temperature, high pressure environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, T.; Hazuku, T.; Takamasa, T.; Takamori, K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of surface wettability on a stainless plate in a high-temperature, high-pressure environment. Using a pressure vessel, we measured contact angles of water droplets at temperatures from 20 to 300 C. deg. and a constant pressure of 15 MPa, as an indicator of macroscopic surface wettability. Measured contact angles decreased with temperature below 250 C. deg., clustering around a straight line at temperatures below 120 C. deg. and around another line in the range from 120 to 250 C. deg.. At temperatures above 250 C. deg., on the other hand, the contact angles remained constant, independent of temperature, and contrary to the existing theoretical model, no highly hydrophilic condition or null contact angle condition was achieved. This result will enable more accurate assessment of heat transfer not only in steam pipes of a boiler but also in subchannel of a BWR-type reactor. (authors)

  15. Attenuation of wave-induced groundwater pressure in shallow water. Part 2. Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław R. Massel

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available In this Part 2 of the paper (Part 1 was published by Massel et al. 2004 an exact close-form solution for the pore-water pressure component and velocity circulation pattern induced by surface waves is developed. This comprehensive theoretical model, based on Biot's theory, takes into account soil deformations, volume change and pore-water flow. The calculations indicate that for the stiffness ratio G/E'w ≥ 100, the vertical distribution of the pore pressure becomes very close to the Moshagen & Tørum (1975 approach, when the soil is rigid and the fluid is incompressible.     The theoretical results of the paper have been compared with the experimental data collected during the laboratory experiment in the Large Wave Channel in Hannover (see Massel et al. 2004 and showed very good agreement. The apparent bulk modulus of pore water was not determined in the experiment but was estimated from the best fit of the experimental pore-water pressure with the theoretical one. In the paper only a horizontal bottom is considered and the case of an undulating bottom will be dealt with in another paper.

  16. Mathematical model for water quality (portable water): a case study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A water quality model for water-use-goal is proposed. The model is tested with a treatment schedule at a water works for portable water. It was observed that at least a 25 per cent savings can be achieved if the model is employed. Mathematics Connection Vol. 4 2004: 27-30 ...

  17. Imaging optical probe for pressurized steam-water environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, M.R.; Pulfrey, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    An air-cooled imaging optical probe, with an outside diameter of 25.4 mm, has been developed to provide high resolution viewing of flow regimes in a steam-water environment at 343 0 C and 15.2 MPa. The design study considered a 3-m length probe. A 0.3-m length probe prototype was fabricated and tested. The optical probe consists of a 3.5-mm diameter optics train surrounded by two coaxial coolant flow channels and two coaxial insulating dead air spaces. With air flowing through the probe at 5.7 g/s, thermal analysis shows that no part of the optics train will exceed 93 0 C when a 3-m length probe is immersed in a 343 0 C environment. Computer stress analysis plus actual tests show that the probe can operate successfully with conservative safety factors. The imaging optical probe was tested five times in the design environment at the semiscale facility at the INEL. Two-phase flow regimes in the high temperature, high pressure, steam-water blowdown and reflood experiments were recorded on video tape for the first time with the imaging optical probe

  18. Numerical simulation of large systems: application to a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallec, Michele.

    1981-10-01

    This note describes the design of a pressurized water reactor power plant simulator using a minicomputer. It contains the description of the models used to simulate the dynamic behavior of the various components of the nuclear power station (i.e. the reactor core, two steam generators, the pressurizer and the control systems associated with them); the algorithms used to integrate the resulting system of algebraic differential equations; the solution of problems associated with the use of a mini-computer; the control deck outlay designed and the variables shown on it to the user; and finally the description of tests made to validate the models used and the results obtained for various transients using plant signal is presented. These results are compared to corresponding plant signals and outputs of other, already existing models [fr

  19. Pressure Sensitive Paint Applied to Flexible Models Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, Edward T.; Kushner, Laura Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    One gap in current pressure-measurement technology is a high-spatial-resolution method for accurately measuring pressures on spatially and temporally varying wind-tunnel models such as Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (IADs), parachutes, and sails. Conventional pressure taps only provide sparse measurements at discrete points and are difficult to integrate with the model structure without altering structural properties. Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) provides pressure measurements with high spatial resolution, but its use has been limited to rigid or semi-rigid models. Extending the use of PSP from rigid surfaces to flexible surfaces would allow direct, high-spatial-resolution measurements of the unsteady surface pressure distribution. Once developed, this new capability will be combined with existing stereo photogrammetry methods to simultaneously measure the shape of a dynamically deforming model in a wind tunnel. Presented here are the results and methodology for using PSP on flexible surfaces.

  20. Press kit. EPR (European pressurized water reactor). The advanced nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    Nuclear energy, which provides a steady supply of electricity at low cost, has its rightful place in the energy mix of the 21 century, which puts the emphasis on sustainable development. In this framework, this document presents the advantages of the EPR (European Pressurized water Reactor). The EPR is the only third generation reactor under construction today. It is an evolutionary reactor that represents a new generation of pressurized water reactors with no break in the technology used for the most recent models. The EPR can guarantee a safe, inexpensive electricity supply, without adding to the greenhouse effect. It meets the requirements of the safety authorities and lives up to the expectations of electricity utilities. (A.L.B.)

  1. Simulation of a pressurized-water nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larminaux, Robert; Ourmann, Michel

    1978-01-01

    Faced with the large programme of fitting out PWR nuclear power stations, Electricite de France have undertaken a series of studies with a view to ensuring the best possible adaptation of the secondary part -particularly the feed water heating section- to the nuclear boiler. In order to undertake such studies it has been necessary to finalize simulation models of the entire power station. So as to verify the validity of the models, experiment-calculation comparisons were made during transient operating states recorded at the Ardennes power station as well as during starting up trials at the Tihange I power station [fr

  2. Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greneche, D.

    2014-01-01

    This article compares the 2 types of light water reactors that are used to produce electricity: the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Historically the BWR concept was developed after the PWR concept. Today 80% of light water reactors operating in the world are of PWR-type. This comparison is comprehensive and detailed. First the main technical features are reviewed and compared: reactor architecture, core and fuel design, reactivity control, reactor vessel, cooling systems and reactor containment. Secondly, various aspects concerning reactor operations like reactor control, fuel management, maintenance, inspections, radiation protection, waste generation and reactor reliability are presented and compared for both reactors. As for the issue of safety, it is highlighted that the accidental situations are too different for the 2 reactors to be compared. The main features of reactor safety are explained for both reactors

  3. Acceptance Test Report for the high pressure water jet system canister cleaning fixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdin, J.R.

    1995-10-25

    This Acceptance Test confirmed the test results and recommendations, documented in WHC-SD-SNF-DTR-001, Rev. 0 Development Test Report for the High Pressure Water Jet System Nozzles, for decontaminating empty fuel canisters in KE-Basin. Optimum water pressure, water flow rate, nozzle size and overall configuration were tested

  4. Acceptance Test Report for the high pressure water jet system canister cleaning fixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdin, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    This Acceptance Test confirmed the test results and recommendations, documented in WHC-SD-SNF-DTR-001, Rev. 0 Development Test Report for the High Pressure Water Jet System Nozzles, for decontaminating empty fuel canisters in KE-Basin. Optimum water pressure, water flow rate, nozzle size and overall configuration were tested

  5. Risks assessment of water pollution by pesticides at local scale (PESTEAUX project): study of polluting pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Stéphanie; Billo Bah, Boubacar

    2009-01-01

    Pollution of water resources (surface waters and ground waters) by pesticide uses is one of the key point of the European policy with the implementation of the Water Frame Work Directive (2000/60/EC) and the thematic Strategy on the Sustainable use of pesticides. According to this legislation, the Member States must initiate measures to limit environmental and toxicological effects caused by pesticide uses. The Agricultural Research Centre of Wallonia (CRA-W) emphasized the need of a tool for spatial risk analysis and develOPs it within the framework of PESTEAUX project. The originality of the approach proposed by the CRA-W is to generate maps to identify the risk of pollution at locale scale (agricultural parcel). The risk will be assessed according to the study of different factors, grouped under 3 data's layers: polluting pressure, vulnerability of the physical environment (soil) and meteorological data. This approach is directly based on the risk's definition which takes into account the polluting pressure, linked to the human activities, and the vulnerability of the soil, defined by factors of physical environment which characterize the water flow in the parcel. Moreover, meteorological data influence the intensity and likelihood flow of water, and indirectly pesticide by leaching or runoff. The PESTEAUX's approach to study the pollution is based on the model "source-vector-target". The source is the polluting pressure, in other words, the pesticides which could reach the targets. The main vector is the water which vehicles the pesticide on and trough the soil until the target which are the surface waters or ground waters. In this paper we introduce the factors contributing to the polluting pressure. These factors are linking to the human activities and more precisely, to the pesticide uses. The factors considered have an influence on pesticide's transport by water (in its solid state or in dissolved state by leaching, run-off, or erosion) but also on a set of

  6. Modelling the Pressure Profile for Optical Cables in Ducts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippe, A.; Bresser, O.R.; Hoekstra, Sipke; Griffioen, A.

    2013-01-01

    The longitudinal pressure profile is an important parameter when calculating the correct blowing force during the process of installing optical fiber cables using the viscous flow of air. This paper presents a model of the pressure inside the duct that contains a moving cable. This new model of the

  7. Prospective Chemistry Teachers' Mental Models of Vapor Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumay, Halil

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to identify prospective chemistry teachers' mental models of vapor pressure. The study involved 85 students in the Chemistry Teacher Training Department of a state university in Turkey. Participants' mental models of vapor pressure were explored using a concept test that involved qualitative comparison tasks.…

  8. Pressure in an exactly solvable model of active fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini Bettolo Marconi, Umberto; Maggi, Claudio; Paoluzzi, Matteo

    2017-07-01

    We consider the pressure in the steady-state regime of three stochastic models characterized by self-propulsion and persistent motion and widely employed to describe the behavior of active particles, namely, the Active Brownian particle (ABP) model, the Gaussian colored noise (GCN) model, and the unified colored noise approximation (UCNA) model. Whereas in the limit of short but finite persistence time, the pressure in the UCNA model can be obtained by different methods which have an analog in equilibrium systems, in the remaining two models only the virial route is, in general, possible. According to this method, notwithstanding each model obeys its own specific microscopic law of evolution, the pressure displays a certain universal behavior. For generic interparticle and confining potentials, we derive a formula which establishes a correspondence between the GCN and the UCNA pressures. In order to provide explicit formulas and examples, we specialize the discussion to the case of an assembly of elastic dumbbells confined to a parabolic well. By employing the UCNA we find that, for this model, the pressure determined by the thermodynamic method coincides with the pressures obtained by the virial and mechanical methods. The three methods when applied to the GCN give a pressure identical to that obtained via the UCNA. Finally, we find that the ABP virial pressure exactly agrees with the UCNA and GCN results.

  9. A Prediction Model of the Capillary Pressure J-Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W S Xu

    Full Text Available The capillary pressure J-function is a dimensionless measure of the capillary pressure of a fluid in a porous medium. The function was derived based on a capillary bundle model. However, the dependence of the J-function on the saturation Sw is not well understood. A prediction model for it is presented based on capillary pressure model, and the J-function prediction model is a power function instead of an exponential or polynomial function. Relative permeability is calculated with the J-function prediction model, resulting in an easier calculation and results that are more representative.

  10. Control of a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled and moderated reactor with water rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2003-01-01

    The plant system of a supercritical pressure light water reactor (SCR) is once-through direct cycle. The whole coolant from the feedwater pumps is driven to the turbines. The core flow rate is less than 1/7 of that of a boiling water reactor. In the present design of the high temperature thermal reactor (SCLWR-H), the fuel assemblies contain many water rods in which the coolant flows downward. The stepwise responses of the SCLWR-H are analyzed against perturbations without a control system. Based on these analyses, a control system of the SCLWR-H is designed. The pressure is controlled by the turbine control valves. The main steam temperature is controlled by the feedwater pumps. The reactor power is controlled by the control rods. The control parameters are optimized by the test calculations to satisfy the criteria of both fast convergence and stability. The reactor is controlled stably with the designed control systems against various perturbations, such as setpoint change of the pressure, the main steam temperature and the core power, decrease in the feedwater temperature, and decrease in the feedwater flow rate. (author)

  11. Limitations of demand- and pressure-driven modeling for large deficient networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Braun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The calculation of hydraulic state variables for a network is an important task in managing the distribution of potable water. Over the years the mathematical modeling process has been improved by numerous researchers for utilization in new computer applications and the more realistic modeling of water distribution networks. But, in spite of these continuous advances, there are still a number of physical phenomena that may not be tackled correctly by current models. This paper will take a closer look at the two modeling paradigms given by demand- and pressure-driven modeling. The basic equations are introduced and parallels are drawn with the optimization formulations from electrical engineering. These formulations guarantee the existence and uniqueness of the solution. One of the central questions of the French and German research project ResiWater is the investigation of the network resilience in the case of extreme events or disasters. Under such extraordinary conditions where models are pushed beyond their limits, we talk about deficient network models. Examples of deficient networks are given by highly regulated flow, leakage or pipe bursts and cases where pressure falls below the vapor pressure of water. These examples will be presented and analyzed on the solvability and physical correctness of the solution with respect to demand- and pressure-driven models.

  12. Limitations of demand- and pressure-driven modeling for large deficient networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Mathias; Piller, Olivier; Deuerlein, Jochen; Mortazavi, Iraj

    2017-10-01

    The calculation of hydraulic state variables for a network is an important task in managing the distribution of potable water. Over the years the mathematical modeling process has been improved by numerous researchers for utilization in new computer applications and the more realistic modeling of water distribution networks. But, in spite of these continuous advances, there are still a number of physical phenomena that may not be tackled correctly by current models. This paper will take a closer look at the two modeling paradigms given by demand- and pressure-driven modeling. The basic equations are introduced and parallels are drawn with the optimization formulations from electrical engineering. These formulations guarantee the existence and uniqueness of the solution. One of the central questions of the French and German research project ResiWater is the investigation of the network resilience in the case of extreme events or disasters. Under such extraordinary conditions where models are pushed beyond their limits, we talk about deficient network models. Examples of deficient networks are given by highly regulated flow, leakage or pipe bursts and cases where pressure falls below the vapor pressure of water. These examples will be presented and analyzed on the solvability and physical correctness of the solution with respect to demand- and pressure-driven models.

  13. Modeling of Natural Self-Pressurized Circulation Circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanocco, Pablo; Gimenez, Marcelo; Delmastro, Dario

    2003-01-01

    In this work, HUARPE code models for self-pressurized two-phase natural convection systems are improved.A drift-flux model is included, allowing the modeling of the relative velocity between phases.The model of steam dome structures is improved, with a thermal resistance scheme, in order to model the material thermal conductivity.This allows improving thermal losses modeling and structures dynamic.'Shape functions' are implemented based on analytic solutions for pressure derivative and density in each node, which allows less diffusive solving schemes, more appropriate for analyzing cases involving density waves phenomena.Finally, pressure evolutions during a pressurization transient are analyzed, comparing the new models and the previous version results.These results are also checked against RELAP code ones, obtained with different dome nodalizations. Moreover, modeling problems are analyzed for each case

  14. Water Distribution and Removal Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Deng; N. Chipman; E.L. Hardin

    2005-08-26

    The design of the Yucca Mountain high level radioactive waste repository depends on the performance of the engineered barrier system (EBS). To support the total system performance assessment (TSPA), the Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is developed to describe the thermal, mechanical, chemical, hydrological, biological, and radionuclide transport processes within the emplacement drifts, which includes the following major analysis/model reports (AMRs): (1) EBS Water Distribution and Removal (WD&R) Model; (2) EBS Physical and Chemical Environment (P&CE) Model; (3) EBS Radionuclide Transport (EBS RNT) Model; and (4) EBS Multiscale Thermohydrologic (TH) Model. Technical information, including data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documents will be provided to defend the applicability of these models for their intended purpose of evaluating the postclosure performance of the Yucca Mountain repository system. The WD&R model ARM is important to the site recommendation. Water distribution and removal represents one component of the overall EBS. Under some conditions, liquid water will seep into emplacement drifts through fractures in the host rock and move generally downward, potentially contacting waste packages. After waste packages are breached by corrosion, some of this seepage water will contact the waste, dissolve or suspend radionuclides, and ultimately carry radionuclides through the EBS to the near-field host rock. Lateral diversion of liquid water within the drift will occur at the inner drift surface, and more significantly from the operation of engineered structures such as drip shields and the outer surface of waste packages. If most of the seepage flux can be diverted laterally and removed from the drifts before contacting the wastes, the release of radionuclides from the EBS can be controlled, resulting in a proportional reduction in dose release at the accessible environment. The purposes

  15. Water Distribution and Removal Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Deng; N. Chipman; E.L. Hardin

    2005-01-01

    The design of the Yucca Mountain high level radioactive waste repository depends on the performance of the engineered barrier system (EBS). To support the total system performance assessment (TSPA), the Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is developed to describe the thermal, mechanical, chemical, hydrological, biological, and radionuclide transport processes within the emplacement drifts, which includes the following major analysis/model reports (AMRs): (1) EBS Water Distribution and Removal (WD and R) Model; (2) EBS Physical and Chemical Environment (P and CE) Model; (3) EBS Radionuclide Transport (EBS RNT) Model; and (4) EBS Multiscale Thermohydrologic (TH) Model. Technical information, including data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documents will be provided to defend the applicability of these models for their intended purpose of evaluating the postclosure performance of the Yucca Mountain repository system. The WD and R model ARM is important to the site recommendation. Water distribution and removal represents one component of the overall EBS. Under some conditions, liquid water will seep into emplacement drifts through fractures in the host rock and move generally downward, potentially contacting waste packages. After waste packages are breached by corrosion, some of this seepage water will contact the waste, dissolve or suspend radionuclides, and ultimately carry radionuclides through the EBS to the near-field host rock. Lateral diversion of liquid water within the drift will occur at the inner drift surface, and more significantly from the operation of engineered structures such as drip shields and the outer surface of waste packages. If most of the seepage flux can be diverted laterally and removed from the drifts before contacting the wastes, the release of radionuclides from the EBS can be controlled, resulting in a proportional reduction in dose release at the accessible environment

  16. Analysis of a small break loss-of-coolant accident of pressurized water reactor by APROS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Falahi, A. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland); Haennine, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Porkholm, K. [IVO International, Ltd., Vantaa (Finland)

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the capability of APROS (Advanced PROcess Simulator) code to simulate the real plant thermal-hydraulic transient of a Small Break Loss-Of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) of Loss-Of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility. The LOFT is a scaled model of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). This work is a part of a larger validation of the APROS thermal-hydraulic models. The results of SBLOCA transient calculated by APROS showed a reasonable agreement with the measured data.

  17. Blueshifting the onset of optical UV absorption for water under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Andreas; Schwerdtfeger, Peter

    2011-05-06

    First-principles calculations show that the optical UV absorption onset of solid water is blueshifted with increasing pressure. Across several crystal structures and a wide pressure range, the optical gap increases almost linearly with external pressure, making solid water more transparent. The origin of this unusual effect can be traced back to an increased Stark shift caused by water's electrostatic environment at smaller volumes.

  18. Automatic power control for a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hah, Yung Joon

    1994-02-01

    During a normal operation of a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the reactivity is controlled by control rods, boron, and the average temperature of the primary coolant. Especially in load follow operation, the reactivity change is induced by changes in power level and effects of xenon concentration. The control of the core power distribution is concerned, mainly, with the axial power distribution which depends on insertion and withdrawal of the control rods resulting in additional reactivity compensation. The utilization of part strength control element assemblies (PSCEAs) is quite appropriate for a control of the power distribution in the case of Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 3 (YGN Unit 3). However, control of the PSCEAs is not automatic, and changes in the boron concentration by dilution/boration are done manually. Thus, manual control of the PSCEAs and the boron concentration require the operator's experience and knowledge for a successful load follow operation. In this thesis, the new concepts have been proposed to adapt for an automatic power control in a PWR. One of the new concepts is the mode K control, another is a fuzzy power control. The system in mode K control implements a heavy-worth bank dedicated to axial shape control, independent of the existing regulating banks. The heavy bank provides a monotonic relationship between its motion and the axial power shape change, which allows automatic control of the axial power distribution. And the mode K enables precise regulation, by using double closed-loop control of the reactor coolant temperature and the axial power difference. Automatic reactor power control permits the nuclear power plant to accommodate the load follow operations, including frequency control, to respond to the grid requirements. The mode K reactor control concepts were tested using simulation responses of a Korean standardized 1000-MWe PWR which is a reference plant for the YGN Unit 3. The simulation results illustrate that the mode K would be

  19. Revisiting the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock Studies of an Aging Pressurized Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryson, J.W.; Dickson, T.L.; Malik, S.N.M.; Simonen, F.A.

    1999-08-01

    The Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) studies were a series of studies performed in the early-mid 1980s as part of an NRC-organized comprehensive research project to confirm the technical bases for the pressurized thermal shock (PTS) rule, and to aid in the development of guidance for licensee plant-specific analyses. The research project consisted of PTS pilot analyses for three PWRs: Oconee Unit 1, designed by Babcock and Wilcox; Calvert Cliffs Unit 1, designed by Combustion Engineering; and H.B. Robinson Unit 2, designed by Westinghouse. The primary objectives of the IPTS studies were (1) to provide for each of the three plants an estimate of the probability of a crack propagating through the wall of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) due to PTS; (2) to determine the dominant overcooling sequences, plant features, and operator actions and the uncertainty in the plant risk due to PTS; and (3) to evaluate the effectiveness of potential corrective actions. The NRC is currently evaluating the possibility of revising current PTS regulatory guidance. Technical bases must be developed to support any revisions. In the years since the results of IPTS studies were published, the fracture mechanics model, the embrittlement database, embrittlement correlation, inputs for flaw distributions, and the probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) computer code have been refined. An ongoing effort is underway to determine the impact of these fracture-technology refinements on the conditional probabilities of vessel failure calculated in the IPTS Studies. This paper discusses the results of these analyses performed for one of these plants.

  20. Bladder pressure sensors in an animal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koldewijn, E. L.; van Kerrebroeck, P. E.; Schaafsma, E.; Wijkstra, H.; Debruyne, F. M.; Brindley, G. S.

    1994-01-01

    Urinary incontinence due to detrusor hyperreflexia might be inhibited on demand if changes in bladder pressure could be detected by sensors and transferred into pudendal nerve electrostimulation. The aim of this study is to investigate how the bladder wall reacts on different sensor implants.

  1. An innovative technique for estimating water saturation from capillary pressure in clastic reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeoti, Lukumon; Ayolabi, Elijah Adebowale; James, Logan

    2017-11-01

    A major drawback of old resistivity tools is the poor vertical resolution and estimation of hydrocarbon when applying water saturation (Sw) from historical resistivity method. In this study, we have provided an alternative method called saturation height function to estimate hydrocarbon in some clastic reservoirs in the Niger Delta. The saturation height function was derived from pseudo capillary pressure curves generated using modern wells with complete log data. Our method was based on the determination of rock type from log derived porosity-permeability relationship, supported by volume of shale for its classification into different zones. Leverette-J functions were derived for each rock type. Our results show good correlation between Sw from resistivity based method and Sw from pseudo capillary pressure curves in wells with modern log data. The resistivity based model overestimates Sw in some wells while Sw from the pseudo capillary pressure curves validates and predicts more accurate Sw. In addition, the result of Sw from pseudo capillary pressure curves replaces that of resistivity based model in a well where the resistivity equipment failed. The plot of hydrocarbon pore volume (HCPV) from J-function against HCPV from Archie shows that wells with high HCPV have high sand qualities and vice versa. This was further used to predict the geometry of stratigraphic units. The model presented here freshly addresses the gap in the estimation of Sw and is applicable to reservoirs of similar rock type in other frontier basins worldwide.

  2. Chaotic behavior of water column oscillator simulating pressure balanced injection system in passive safety reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Y.; Madarame, H.; Okamoto, K.

    2001-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) proposed a passive safety reactor called the System-integrated Pressurized Water Reactor (SPWR). In a loss of coolant accident, the Pressurizing Line (PL) and the Injection Line (IL) are passively opened. Vapor generated by residual heat pushes down the water level in the Reactor Vessel (RV). When the level is lower than the inlet of the PL, the vapor is ejected into the Containment Vessel (CV) through the PL. Then boronized water in the CV is injected into the RV through the IL by the static head. In an experiment using a simple apparatus, gas ejection and water injection were found to occur alternately under certain conditions. The gas ejection interval was observed to fluctuate considerably. Though stochastic noise affected the interval, the experimental results suggested that the large fluctuation was produced by an inherent character in the system. A set of piecewise linear differential equations was derived to describe the experimental result. The large fluctuation was reproduced in the analytical solution. Thus it was shown to occur even in a deterministic system without any source of stochastic noise. Though the derived equations simulated the experiment well, they had ten independent parameters governing the behavior of the solution. There appeared chaotic features and bifurcation, but the analytical model was too complicated to examine the features and mechanism of bifurcation. In this study, a new simple model is proposed which consists of a set of piecewise linear ordinary differential equations with only four independent parameters. (authors)

  3. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of parameters affecting water hammer pressure wave behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaliatka, A.; Uspuras, E.; Vaisnoras, M.

    2006-01-01

    Pressure surges occurring in pipeline systems may be caused by fast control interference, start up and shut down processes and operation failure. They lead to water hammer upstream the closing valve and cavitational hammer downstream the valve, which may cause considerable damages to the pipeline and the support structures. Appearance of water hammer in thermal-hydraulic systems was widely studied employing different state-of-the-art thermal-hydraulic codes in many organizations. For the analysis water hammer test performed at Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental, Safety and Energy Technology (UMSICHT) at Oberhausen was considered. This paper presents the comparison of UMSICHT test facility experiment calculations employing the best estimate system code RELAP5/Mod3.3 to measured water hammer values after fast closure of a valve. The analysis revealed that the calculated first pressure peak, which has the highest value, matches the measured value very well. The performed analysis (as well as any other analyses) as a results of each individual calculation always contains uncertainty owing to initial conditions of installations, errors of measuring systems, errors caused by nodalization of objects at modelling, code correlations, etc. In this connection, results of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of the initial conditions and code-selected models are shown in the paper. (orig.)

  4. Mechanical Modeling of a WIPP Drum Under Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeffrey A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-11-25

    Mechanical modeling was undertaken to support the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) technical assessment team (TAT) investigating the February 14th 2014 event where there was a radiological release at the WIPP. The initial goal of the modeling was to examine if a mechanical model could inform the team about the event. The intention was to have a model that could test scenarios with respect to the rate of pressurization. It was expected that the deformation and failure (inability of the drum to contain any pressure) would vary according to the pressurization rate. As the work progressed there was also interest in using the mechanical analysis of the drum to investigate what would happen if a drum pressurized when it was located under a standard waste package. Specifically, would the deformation be detectable from camera views within the room. A finite element model of a WIPP 55-gallon drum was developed that used all hex elements. Analyses were conducted using the explicit transient dynamics module of Sierra/SM to explore potential pressurization scenarios of the drum. Theses analysis show similar deformation patterns to documented pressurization tests of drums in the literature. The calculated failure pressures from previous tests documented in the literature vary from as little as 16 psi to 320 psi. In addition, previous testing documented in the literature shows drums bulging but not failing at pressures ranging from 69 to 138 psi. The analyses performed for this study found the drums failing at pressures ranging from 35 psi to 75 psi. When the drums are pressurized quickly (in 0.01 seconds) there is significant deformation to the lid. At lower pressurization rates the deformation of the lid is considerably less, yet the lids will still open from the pressure. The analyses demonstrate the influence of pressurization rate on deformation and opening pressure of the drums. Analyses conducted with a substantial mass on top of the closed drum demonstrate that the

  5. Rock Breaking by Conical Pick Assisted with High Pressure Water Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Songyong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the process of hard rock breaking, the conical pick bears great cutting force and wear, and the cutting efficiency is lower. Thus different combination ways of water jet and conical pick were proposed to solve this issue; for instance, water jet placed in the front of pick (JFP and water jet through the center of pick (JCP was researched by numerical simulation and experiments in this paper. First, the models of rock breaking were built based on SPH combined with finite element method. Then, the stress distribution of rock and the cut force of pick were analyzed when the rock broken by the conical pick assisted with the high pressure water jet. It indicates that the effect of the JCP on rock breaking is better than the JFP. At last, experiments about rock breaking with a conical pick and the JCP were conducted to verify the reliability of the simulation. It indicates that the rock breaking with the assistance of high pressure water jet cannot only reduce the pick force, but also increase the rock crushing volume.

  6. A jazz-based approach for optimal setting of pressure reducing valves in water distribution networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paola, Francesco; Galdiero, Enzo; Giugni, Maurizio

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a model for valve setting in water distribution networks (WDNs), with the aim of reducing the level of leakage. The approach is based on the harmony search (HS) optimization algorithm. The HS mimics a jazz improvisation process able to find the best solutions, in this case corresponding to valve settings in a WDN. The model also interfaces with the improved version of a popular hydraulic simulator, EPANET 2.0, to check the hydraulic constraints and to evaluate the performances of the solutions. Penalties are introduced in the objective function in case of violation of the hydraulic constraints. The model is applied to two case studies, and the obtained results in terms of pressure reductions are comparable with those of competitive metaheuristic algorithms (e.g. genetic algorithms). The results demonstrate the suitability of the HS algorithm for water network management and optimization.

  7. Correction of Pressure Drop in Steam and Water System in Performance Test of Boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinglong; Zhao, Xianqiao; Hou, Fanjun; Wu, Xiaowu; Wang, Feng; Hu, Zhihong; Yang, Xinsen

    2018-01-01

    Steam and water pressure drop is one of the most important characteristics in the boiler performance test. As the measuring points are not in the guaranteed position and the test condition fluctuation exsits, the pressure drop test of steam and water system has the deviation of measuring point position and the deviation of test running parameter. In order to get accurate pressure drop of steam and water system, the corresponding correction should be carried out. This paper introduces the correction method of steam and water pressure drop in boiler performance test.

  8. Putting people into water quality modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickert, G. E.; Hassanzadeh, E.; Noble, B.; Baulch, H. M.; Morales-Marin, L. A.; Lindenschmidt, K. E.

    2017-12-01

    Water quality in the Qu'Appelle River Basin, Saskatchewan is under pressure due to nutrient pollution entering the river system from major cities, industrial zones and agricultural areas. Among these stressors, agricultural activities are basin-wide; therefore, they are the largest non-point source of water pollution in this region. The dynamics of agricultural impacts on water quality are complex and stem from decisions and activities of two distinct stakeholder groups, namely grain farmers and cattle producers, which have different business plans, values, and attitudes towards water quality. As a result, improving water quality in this basin requires engaging with stakeholders to: (1) understand their perspectives regarding a range of agricultural Beneficial Management Practices (BMPs) that can improve water quality in the region, (2) show them the potential consequences of their selected BMPs, and (3) work with stakeholders to better understand the barriers and incentives to implement the effective BMPs. In this line, we held a series of workshops in the Qu'Appelle River Basin with both groups of stakeholders to understand stakeholders' viewpoints about alternative agricultural BMPs and their impact on water quality. Workshop participants were involved in the statement sorting activity (Q-sorts), group discussions, as well as mapping activity. The workshop outcomes show that stakeholder had four distinct viewpoints about the BMPs that can improve water quality, i.e., flow and erosion control, fertilizer management, cattle site management, as well as mixed cattle and wetland management. Accordingly, to simulate the consequences of stakeholder selected BMPs, a conceptual water quality model was developed using System Dynamics (SD). The model estimates potential changes in water quality at the farm, tributary and regional scale in the Qu'Appelle River Basin under each and/or combination of stakeholder selected BMPs. The SD model was then used for real

  9. Activation calculations for components of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schloemer, L.; Phlippen, P.W.; Volmert, B.; Pantelias, M.

    2011-01-01

    In Switzerland the owners of nuclear power plants are responsible for the radioactive waste disposal and the respective financial reserves for decommissioning. Every 5-10 years the radioactive inventory of reactor internals, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and neutron irradiated structures in the RPV surrounding has to be determined. The authors describe the generic calculations for PWR reactors using the Monte Carlo Code MCNP5 for the neutron transport calculations and the GRSAKLTIV-II code based on ORIGEN for the activation analysis. The neutron cross sections are based on ENDF/B-VI- und JEFF 3.1 data. The activation calculations were performed for Co-60, - in the future calculations for other nuclides are planned. The model will be extended to the primary circuit in order to consider streaming effects.

  10. Simulation of pressurized water reactor in accidental state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakir, E.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop the 1300 MWe 4 loops 'PWR' simulator called 'SATRAPE', witch the adopted physics modelisation allows a simplified neutronic calculation, and focus essentially on the reactor thermal hydraulic behavior in the case of the following accidents: - Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). - Steam Generator Tube Failure (SGTF). - Steam Line Break (SLB). In case of the 'LOCA' or 'SLB' accident, this modelisation enables the calculation of the pressure and the temperature in the containment building, and also the debit of the released dose in this latter in case of the 'LOCA' accident. The adopted models are relatively simple so as to allow an explicit resolve. In SATRAPE, two graphical interfaces enables to launch orders, whereas the other permits to visualize, the principal state variables of installations. The results obtained show a very good consistency with the envisaged commonly scenario at the time of the considered accidents. 33 refs., 52 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  11. High pressure common rail injection system modeling and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H P; Zheng, D; Tian, Y

    2016-07-01

    In this paper modeling and common-rail pressure control of high pressure common rail injection system (HPCRIS) is presented. The proposed mathematical model of high pressure common rail injection system which contains three sub-systems: high pressure pump sub-model, common rail sub-model and injector sub-model is a relative complicated nonlinear system. The mathematical model is validated by the software Matlab and a virtual detailed simulation environment. For the considered HPCRIS, an effective model free controller which is called Extended State Observer - based intelligent Proportional Integral (ESO-based iPI) controller is designed. And this proposed method is composed mainly of the referred ESO observer, and a time delay estimation based iPI controller. Finally, to demonstrate the performances of the proposed controller, the proposed ESO-based iPI controller is compared with a conventional PID controller and ADRC. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Prediction of friction pressure drop for low pressure two-phase flows on the basis of approximate analytical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubov, N. O.; Kaban'kov, O. N.; Yagov, V. V.; Sukomel, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    Wide use of natural circulation loops operating at low redused pressures generates the real need to develop reliable methods for predicting flow regimes and friction pressure drop for two-phase flows in this region of parameters. Although water-air flows at close-to-atmospheric pressures are the most widely studied subject in the field of two-phase hydrodynamics, the problem of reliably calculating friction pressure drop can hardly be regarded to have been fully solved. The specific volumes of liquid differ very much from those of steam (gas) under such conditions, due to which even a small change in flow quality may cause the flow pattern to alter very significantly. Frequently made attempts to use some or another universal approach to calculating friction pressure drop in a wide range of steam quality values do not seem to be justified and yield predicted values that are poorly consistent with experimentally measured data. The article analyzes the existing methods used to calculate friction pressure drop for two-phase flows at low pressures by comparing their results with the experimentally obtained data. The advisability of elaborating calculation procedures for determining the friction pressure drop and void fraction for two-phase flows taking their pattern (flow regime) into account is demonstrated. It is shown that, for flows characterized by low reduced pressures, satisfactory results are obtained from using a homogeneous model for quasi-homogeneous flows, whereas satisfactory results are obtained from using an annular flow model for flows characterized by high values of void fraction. Recommendations for making a shift from one model to another in carrying out engineering calculations are formulated and tested. By using the modified annular flow model, it is possible to obtain reliable predictions for not only the pressure gradient but also for the liquid film thickness; the consideration of droplet entrainment and deposition phenomena allows reasonable

  13. COMPILATION OF GROUND WATER MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The full report presents an overview of currently available computer-based simulation models for ground-water flow, solute and heat transport, and hydrogeochemistry in both porous media and fractured rock. Separate sections address multiphase flow and related chemical species tra...

  14. Pressure transient analysis in single and two-phase water by finite difference methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, G.F.; Daley, J.G.

    1977-01-01

    An important consideration in the design of LMFBR steam generators is the possibility of leakage from a steam generator water tube. The ensuing sodium/water reaction will be largely controlled by the amount of water available at the leak site, thus analysis methods treating this event must have the capability of accurately modeling pressure transients through all states of water occurring in a steam generator, whether single or two-phase. The equation systems of the present model consist of the conservation equations together with an equation of state for one-dimensional homogeneous flow. These equations are then solved using finite difference techniques with phase considerations and non-equilibrium effects being treated through the equation of state. The basis for water property computation is Keenan's 'fundamental equation of state' which is applicable to single-phase water at pressures less than 1000 bars and temperatures less than 1300 0 C. This provides formulations allowing computation of any water property to any desired precision. Two-phase properties are constructed from values on the saturation line. The use of formulations permits the direct calculation of any thermodynamic property (or property derivative) to great precision while requiring very little computer storage, but does involve considerable computation time. For this reason an optional calculation scheme based on the method of 'transfinite interpolation' is included to give rapid computation in selected regions with decreased precision. The conservation equations were solved using the second order Lax-Wendroff scheme which includes wall friction, allows the formation of shocks and locally supersonic flow. Computational boundary conditions were found from a method-of-characteristics solution at the reservoir and receiver ends. The local characteristics were used to interpolate data from inside the pipe to the boundary

  15. BWR [boiling-water reactor] and PWR [pressurized-water reactor] off-normal event descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This document chronicles a total of 87 reactor event descriptions for use by operator licensing examiners in the construction of simulator scenarios. Events are organized into four categories: (1) boiling-water reactor abnormal events; (2) boiling-water reactor emergency events; (3) pressurized-water reactor abnormal events; and (4) pressurized-water reactor emergency events. Each event described includes a cover sheet and a progression of operator actions flow chart. The cover sheet contains the following general information: initial plant state, sequence initiator, important plant parameters, major plant systems affected, tolerance ranges, final plant state, and competencies tested. The progression of operator actions flow chart depicts, in a flow chart manner, the representative sequence(s) of expected immediate and subsequent candidate actions, including communications, that can be observed during the event. These descriptions are intended to provide examiners with a reliable, performance-based source of information from which to design simulator scenarios that will provide a valid test of the candidates' ability to safely and competently perform all licensed duties and responsibilities

  16. Optimization of hydride fueled pressurized water reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuffler, Carter A.; Trant, Jarrod M.; Todreas, Neil E.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: This paper reports the results of the thermal-hydraulic and economic analyses performed for hydride fueled PWR cores as part of a collaborative project on hydride fuels undertaken by MIT and UC Berkeley. The use of hydride fuels allows increased fuel to coolant ratios in a given core volume, and the achievement of higher burnups and thermal power from a core loading. A parametric study was developed to determine the optimum combination of lattice pitch, rod diameter, and channel shape - further referred to as geometry - for minimizing the cost of electricity associated with the use of UZrH 1.6 fuel in PWRs. Results of the steady-state and transient thermal hydraulic analyses are presented here. These are integrated with the results from fuel performance and neutronics studies into an economic model to reveal the desired optimal geometries. The thermal hydraulic analysis determines the maximum power that can be achieved for a given geometry, subject to steady-state and transient design constraints. Steady-state constraints include MDNBR, pressure drop, fuel temperature, and fuel rod vibrations. Transient constraints include the consideration of LOCA, LOFA, and over-power events. The fuel performance and neutronics analyses determine the maximum achievable burnup for a given geometry, subject to constraints on fuel internal pressure and fission gas release, clad oxidation, clad strain, and reactivity. All results are included in the economic model, which calculates the front and back end fuel cycle, operations and maintenance, and capital costs. Optimal designs include geometries where hydride fuel offers cost savings over oxide fuel, as well as geometries offering the lowest overall cost of electricity. All studies are performed for both UZrH 1.6 and UO 2 fuels, and the methodology is successfully validated by comparison of the predicted power, burnup, and cost of electricity for UO-2 fueled cores with corresponding data from

  17. Development of out-of-core concepts for a supercritical-water, pressure-tube reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, W.T.

    2010-01-01

    One of the Generation IV programs at Chalk River Laboratories has as its prime focus the development of out-of-core concepts for the SuperCritical Water (SCW) pressure tube reactor under development in Canada. A number of technical issues associated with the interface of out-of-core components and the pressure tubes of a SCW pressure tube reactor are being investigated. This article focuses on several aspects of out-of-core components and layouts, building upon concepts that have been developed during the past few years. The efforts are strongly focused on concepts for a fuel channel that can be fabricated with the tight lattice pitch (typically 230 to 250 mm) that may be required for some applications such as utilization of a thorium fuel cycle. It is not practical to adapt concepts with a tight lattice pitch while using the thicker materials required for the higher temperatures and pressures required for supercritical operation. A change in lattice pitch or configuration is required to accommodate the component size increases. This presentation will cover a number of new concepts developed to produce feeders and end fittings for the harsh conditions of a SCW pressure tube reactor. These components are then developed into conceptual models of a Gen IV pressure tube reactor mounted in both horizontal and vertical orientations. Full 3-D solid models of both concepts will be demonstrated as well as a 1/10th-scale model of one face of a horizontal concept that has been built from components made with a 3-D printer. (author)

  18. Adaptive Reference Control for Pressure Management in Water Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallesøe, Carsten; Jensen, Tom Nørgaard; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    consumers are considered. Under mild assumptions on the consumption pattern and hydraulic resistances of pipes we use properties of the network graph and Kirchhoffs node and mesh laws to show that simple relations exist between the actuator pressure and critical point pressures inside the network....... Subsequently, these relations are exploited in an adaptive reference control scheme for the actuator pressure that ensures constant pressure at the critical points. Numerical experiments underpin the results. © Copyright IEEE - All rights reserved....

  19. Performance of materials in the component cooling water systems of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.S.

    1993-01-01

    The component cooling water (CCW) system provides cooling water to several important loads throughout the plant under all operating conditions. An aging assessment CCW systems in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) was conducted as part of Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program (NPAR) instituted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper presents some of the results on the performances of materials in respect of their application in CCW Systems. All the CCW system failures reported to the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) from January 1988 to June 1990 were reviewed; it is concluded that three of the main contributors to CCW system failures are valves, pumps, and heat exchangers. This study identified the modes and causes of failure for these components; most of the causes for the aging-related failures could be related to the performance of materials. Also, in this paper the materials used for these components are reviewed, and there aging mechanisms under CCW system conditions are discussed

  20. Remerschen nuclear power station with BBR pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    On the basis of many decades of successful cooperation in the electricity supply sector with the German RWE utility, the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg and RWE jointly founded Societe Luxembourgeoise d'Energie Nucleaire S.A. (SENU) in 1974 in which each of the partners holds a fifty percent interest. SENU is responsible for planning, building and operating this nuclear power station. Following an international invitation for bids on the delivery and turnkey construction of a nuclear power station, the consortium of the German companies of Brown, Boveri and Cie. AG (BBC), Babcock - Brown Boveri Reaktor GmbH (BBR) and Hochtief AG (HT) received a letter of intent for the purchase of a 1,300 MW nuclear power station equipped with a pressurized water reactor. The 1,300 MW station of Remerschen will be largely identical with the Muelheim-Kaerlich plant under construction by the same consortium near Coblence on the River Rhine since early 1975. According to present scheduling, the Remerschen nuclear power station could start operation in 1981. (orig.) [de

  1. Introduction of advanced pressurized water reactors in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millot, J.P.; Nigon, M.; Vitton, M.

    1988-01-01

    Designed >30 yr ago, pressurized water reactors (PWRs) have evolved well to match the current safety, operating, and economic requirements. The first advanced PWR generation, the N4 reactor, is under construction with 1992 as a target date for commercial operation. The N4 may be considered to be a technological outcome of PWR evolution, providing advances in the fields of safety, man/machine interfaces, and load flexibility. As a step beyond N4, a second advanced PWR generation is presently under definition with, as a main objective, a greater ability to cope with the possible deterioration of the natural uranium market. In 1986, Electricite de France (EdF) launched investigations into the possible characteristics of this advanced PWR, called REP-2000 (PWR-2000: the reactor for the next century). Framatome joined EdF in 1987 but had been working on a new tight-lattice reactor. Main options are due by 1988; preliminary studies will begin and, by 1990, detailed design will proceed with the intent of firm commitments for the first unit by 1995. Commissioning is planned in the early years of the next century. This reactor type should be either an improved version of the N4 reactor or a spectral shift convertible reactor (RCVS). Through research and development efforts, Framatome, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), and EdF are investigating the physics of fuel rod tight lattices including neutronics, thermohydraulics, fuel behavior, and reactor mechanics

  2. Current state of research on pressurized water reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, Jean; Schwarz, Michel; Roubaud, Sebastien; Lavarenne, Caroline; Mattei, Jean-Marie; Rigollet, Laurence; Scotti, Oona; Clement, Christophe; Lancieri, Maria; Gelis, Celine; Jacquemain, Didier; Bentaib, Ahmed; Nahas, Georges; Tarallo, Francois; Guilhem, Gilbert; Cattiaux, Gerard; Durville, Benoit; Mun, Christian; Delaval, Christine; Sollier, Thierry; Stelmaszyk, Jean-Marc; Jeffroy, Francois; Dechy, Nicolas; Chanton, Olivier; Tasset, Daniel; Pichancourt, Isabelle; Barre, Francois; Bruna, Gianni; Evrard, Jean-Michel; Gonzalez, Richard; Loiseau, Olivier; Queniart, Daniel; Vola, Didier; Goue, Georges; Lefevre, Odile

    2018-03-01

    For more than 40 years, IPSN then IRSN has conducted research and development on nuclear safety, specifically concerning pressurized water reactors, which are the reactor type used in France. This publication reports on the progress of this research and development in each area of study - loss-of-coolant accidents, core melt accidents, fires and external hazards, component aging, etc. -, the remaining uncertainties and, in some cases, new measures that should be developed to consolidate the safety of today's reactors and also those of tomorrow. A chapter of this report is also devoted to research into human and organizational factors, and the human and social sciences more generally. All of the work is reviewed in the light of the safety issues raised by feedback from major accidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima Daiichi, as well as the issues raised by assessments conducted, for example, as part of the ten-year reviews of safety at French nuclear reactors. Finally, through the subjects it discusses, this report illustrates the many partnerships and exchanges forged by IRSN with public, industrial and academic bodies both within Europe and internationally

  3. Numerical study of optimal equilibrium cycles for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahlers, Y.P.

    2003-01-01

    An algorithm based on simulated annealing and successive linear programming is applied to solve equilibrium cycle optimization problems for pressurized water reactors. In these problems, the core reload scheme is represented by discrete variables, while the cycle length as well as uranium enrichment and loading of burnable poison in each feed fuel assembly are treated as continuous variables. The enrichments are considered to be distinct in all feed fuel assemblies. The number of batches and their sizes are not fixed and also determined by the algorithm. An important feature of the algorithm is that all the parameters are determined by the solution of one optimization problem including both discrete and continuous variables. To search for the best reload scheme, simulated annealing is used. The optimum cycle length as well as uranium enrichment and loading of burnable poison in each feed fuel assembly are determined for each reload pattern examined using successive linear programming. Numerical results of equilibrium cycle optimization for various values of the effective price of electricity and fuel reprocessing cost are studied

  4. Thermal shield support degradation in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, F.J.; Fry, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Damage to the thermal shield support structures of three pressurized water reactors (PWRs) due to flow-induced vibrations was recently discovered during refueling. In two of the reactors, severe damage occurred to the thermal shield, and in one reactor the core support barrel (CSB) was damaged, necessitating extended outages for repairs. In all three reactors, several of the thermal shield supports were either loose, damaged, or missing. The three plants had been in operation for approximately 10 years before the damage was apparent by visual inspection. Because each of the three US PWR manufacturers have experienced thermal shield support degradation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission requested that Oak Ridge National Laboratory analyze ex-core neutron detector noise data to determine the feasibility of detecting incipient thermal shield support degradation. Results of the noise data analysis indicate that thermal shield support degradation probably began early in the life of both severely damaged plants. The degradation was characterized by shifts in the resonant frequencies of core internal structures and the appearance of new resonances in the ex-core neutron detector noise. Both the data analyses and the finite element calculations indicate that these changes in resonant frequencies are less than 3 Hz. 11 refs., 16 figs

  5. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2006-01-31

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

  6. The optimum design of power distribution for pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Chunhui; Wei, Xinyu; Tai, Yun; Zhao, Fuyu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A two-level optimization method is developed. ► LP is optimized by backward diffusion calculation theory. ► Pontryagin’s maximum principle is used to investigate the optimum BP arrangement. ► NSGA-II is applied to coordinate the interrelationship between LP and BP. ► The optimized core saves fuel while providing a large power. -- Abstract: The aim of this work is to develop a two-level optimization method for designing the optimum initial fuel loading pattern and burnable poison placement in pressurized water reactors. At the lower level, based on the fuel loading pattern (LP) optimized by backward diffusion calculation theory, Pontryagin’s maximum principle is employed to investigate the optimum arrangement of burnable poison (BP) that can generate the lowest radial power peaking factor (PPF). At the upper level a multi-objective problem (MOP), with LP and BP as two objective functions, is proposed by coordinate the interrelationship of LP and BP, and optimized by non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II). The results of optimum designs called ‘Pareto optimum solutions’ are a set of multiple optimum solutions. After sensitivity analysis is performed, the final optimum solution which is chosen based on a typical VVER-1000 reactor reveals that the method could not only save the fuel consumption but also reduce the PPF in comparison to published data.

  7. Contributions to the energetical role of advanced pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    1984-06-01

    Three articles written by the author in the past two years and all concerned with energy production of the Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (APWR) are collated to form this report. The standpoint is made that the APWR using mixed oxide-fuel (about 8% Pusub(fiss) and Usub(depl)) would entail similar capital costs as a PWR, but with conversion rates of 0.85< C<0.95. Given this assumption the analysis shows that the high specific plutonium inventories (being proportional to the conversion ratio in the interested range) result in a strong damping effect on the growth rate, the effective uranium utilization, and on the total nuclear power level. Over one century an APWR strategy is 'far from equilibrium' and to describe this dynamic situation using static APWR data is not appropriate. If nuclear fission energy is to play a substantial and not just a marginal role in providing energy for the future (in the region of 5 - 8 TWsub(el) in 50 years time, corresponding to a share of 20 - 25% of the total world demand), clearly the fast breeder strategy offers the better chance of achieving the goal. (Auth.)

  8. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    KAUST Repository

    Martinez, N.

    2016-09-06

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure.

  9. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, N.; Michoud, G.; Cario, A.; Ollivier, J.; Franzetti, B.; Jebbar, M.; Oger, P.; Peters, J.

    2016-09-01

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure.

  10. Spreading pressures of water and n-propanol on polymer surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, H.J.; Kip, Gerhardus A.M.; van Silfhout, Arend; Arends, J.

    1986-01-01

    Spreading pressures of water and n-propanol on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polystyrene (PS), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), polycarbonate (PC), and glass are determined from ellipsometrically measured adsorption isotherms by graphical integration, yielding for water 9, 37, 26, 33, and 141

  11. Probabilistic Modeling of Intracranial Pressure Effects on Optic Nerve Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, Andrew J.; Raykin, Julia; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Altered intracranial pressure (ICP) is involved/implicated in several ocular conditions: papilledema, glaucoma and Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. The biomechanical effects of altered ICP on optic nerve head (ONH) tissues in these conditions are uncertain but likely important. We have quantified ICP-induced deformations of ONH tissues, using finite element (FE) and probabilistic modeling (Latin Hypercube Simulations (LHS)) to consider a range of tissue properties and relevant pressures.

  12. Low pressure water vapour plasma treatment of surfaces for biomolecules decontamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fumagalli, F; Kylian, O; Amato, Letizia

    2012-01-01

    Decontamination treatments of surfaces are performed on bacterial spores, albumin and brain homogenate used as models of biological contaminations in a low-pressure, inductively coupled plasma reactor operated with water-vapour-based gas mixtures. It is shown that removal of contamination can...... be achieved using pure H2O or Ar/H2O mixtures at low temperatures with removal rates comparable to oxygen-based mixtures. Particle fluxes (Ar+ ions, O and H atomic radicals and OH molecular radicals) from water vapour discharge are measured by optical emission spectroscopy and Langmuir probe under several...... operating conditions. Analysis of particle fluxes and removal rates measurements illustrates the role of ion bombardment associated with O radicals, governing the removal rates of organic matter. Auxiliary role of hydroxyl radicals is discussed on the basis of experimental data. The advantages of a water...

  13. High mean water vapour pressure promotes the transmission of bacillary dysentery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Zheng Li

    Full Text Available Bacillary dysentery is an infectious disease caused by Shigella dysenteriae, which has a seasonal distribution. External environmental factors, including climate, play a significant role in its transmission. This paper identifies climate-related risk factors and their role in bacillary dysentery transmission. Harbin, in northeast China, with a temperate climate, and Quzhou, in southern China, with a subtropical climate, are chosen as the study locations. The least absolute shrinkage and selectionator operator is applied to select relevant climate factors involved in the transmission of bacillary dysentery. Based on the selected relevant climate factors and incidence rates, an AutoRegressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA model is established successfully as a time series prediction model. The numerical results demonstrate that the mean water vapour pressure over the previous month results in a high relative risk for bacillary dysentery transmission in both cities, and the ARIMA model can successfully perform such a prediction. These results provide better explanations for the relationship between climate factors and bacillary dysentery transmission than those put forth in other studies that use only correlation coefficients or fitting models. The findings in this paper demonstrate that the mean water vapour pressure over the previous month is an important predictor for the transmission of bacillary dysentery.

  14. Modeling blood pressure: Comparative study of seemingly unrelated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most authors have focused on Systolic Blood Pressure(SBP) and Diastolic Blood Pressure(DBP) separately. The effect of some identified risk factors on SBP and DBP can be estimated separately since they are affected by different factors.This study is aimed at developing a model that can appropriately capture the ...

  15. Analysis of proposed gamma-ray detection system for the monitoring of core water inventory in a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markoff, D.M.

    1987-12-01

    An initial study has been performed of the feasibility of employing an axial array of gamma detectors located outside the pressure vessel to monitor the coolant in a PWR. A one-dimensional transport analysis model is developed for the LOFT research reactor and for a mock-PWR geometry. The gamma detector response to coolant voiding in the core and downcomer has been determined for both geometries. The effects of various conditions (for example, time after shutdown, materials in the transport path, and the relative void fraction in different water regions) on the detector response are studied. The calculational results have been validated by a favorable comparison with LOFT experimental data. Within the limitations and approximations considered in the analysis, the results indicate that the gamma-ray detection scheme is able to unambiguously respond to changes in the coolant inventory within any vessel water region.

  16. On the pressure field of nonlinear standing water waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, L. W.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure field produced by two dimensional nonlinear time and space periodic standing waves was calculated as a series expansion in the wave height. The high order series was summed by the use of Pade approximants. Calculations included the pressure variation at great depth, which was considered to be a likely cause of microseismic activity, and the pressure distribution on a vertical barrier or breakwater.

  17. Integrating the simulation of domestic water demand behaviour to an urban water model using agent based modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutiva, Ifigeneia; Makropoulos, Christos

    2015-04-01

    The urban water system's sustainable evolution requires tools that can analyse and simulate the complete cycle including both physical and cultural environments. One of the main challenges, in this regard, is the design and development of tools that are able to simulate the society's water demand behaviour and the way policy measures affect it. The effects of these policy measures are a function of personal opinions that subsequently lead to the formation of people's attitudes. These attitudes will eventually form behaviours. This work presents the design of an ABM tool for addressing the social dimension of the urban water system. The created tool, called Urban Water Agents' Behaviour (UWAB) model, was implemented, using the NetLogo agent programming language. The main aim of the UWAB model is to capture the effects of policies and environmental pressures to water conservation behaviour of urban households. The model consists of agents representing urban households that are linked to each other creating a social network that influences the water conservation behaviour of its members. Household agents are influenced as well by policies and environmental pressures, such as drought. The UWAB model simulates behaviour resulting in the evolution of water conservation within an urban population. The final outcome of the model is the evolution of the distribution of different conservation levels (no, low, high) to the selected urban population. In addition, UWAB is implemented in combination with an existing urban water management simulation tool, the Urban Water Optioneering Tool (UWOT) in order to create a modelling platform aiming to facilitate an adaptive approach of water resources management. For the purposes of this proposed modelling platform, UWOT is used in a twofold manner: (1) to simulate domestic water demand evolution and (2) to simulate the response of the water system to the domestic water demand evolution. The main advantage of the UWAB - UWOT model

  18. Effect of water pressure on absorbency of hydroentangled greige cotton nonwoven fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    A studied has been conducted to determine the effect of water pressure in a commercial-grade Fleissner MiniJet hydroentanglement system on the absorbency of greige (non-bleached) cotton lint-based nonwoven fabric. The study has shown that a water pressure of 125 Bar or higher on only two high-pressu...

  19. Modeling Water Pollution of Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Doležel

    2008-01-01

    depth of 220–300 m below the terrain. As an alternative, thinner stoppers were considered, but this option was discarded.The aim of this paper is to describe the design of the stoppers applied to separate the two types of water along the contact horizon using Desai’s DSC theory (Distinct State Concept, and generalized plane strain in the multiphase problem of water flow in a porous medium. In addition, a comparison of some results from scale experimental models with numerical solutions was carried out. The intrinsic material properties of stoppers for numerical computations were obtained from physical and chemical laboratory tests. The models were evaluated for the complete underground work, particularly in its final stage of construction. 

  20. Multivariate Modeling of Body Mass Index, Pulse Pressure, Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure in Chinese Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Yili; Zhang, Dongfeng; Pang, Zengchang

    2015-01-01

    Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure (PP), and body mass index (BMI) are heritable traits in human metabolic health but their common genetic and environmental backgrounds are not well investigated. The aim of this article was to explore the phenotypic and genetic associations among...... PP, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and BMI. The studied sample contained 615 twin pairs (17-84 years) collected in the Qingdao municipality. Univariate and multivariate structural equation models were fitted for assessing the genetic and environmental contributions....... The AE model combining additive genetic (A) and unique environmental (E) factors produced the best fit for each four phenotypes. Heritability estimated in univariate analysis ranged from 0.42 to 0.74 with the highest for BMI (95% CI 0.70-0.78), and the lowest for PP (95% CI 0.34-0.49). The multivariate...

  1. Analysis of an ultrasonic level device for in-core Pressurized Water Reactor coolant detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, K.R.

    1981-01-01

    A rigorous semi-empirical approach was undertaken to model the response of an ultrasonic level device (ULD) for application to in-core coolant detection in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). An equation is derived for the torsional wave velocity v/sub t phi/ in the ULD. Existing data reduction techniques were analyzed and compared to results from use of the derived equation. Both methods yield liquid level measurements with errors of approx. 5%. A sensitivity study on probe performance at reactor conditions predicts reduced level responsivity from data at lower temperatures

  2. Modeling Cyclic Variation of Intracranial Pressure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daley, M

    2001-01-01

    ...) recording during mechanical ventilation are due to cyclic extravascular compressional modulation primarily of the cerebral venous bed, an established isovolumetric model of cerebrospinal fluid...

  3. Oscillating water column structural model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, Guild [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bull, Diana L [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jepsen, Richard Alan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gordon, Margaret Ellen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    An oscillating water column (OWC) wave energy converter is a structure with an opening to the ocean below the free surface, i.e. a structure with a moonpool. Two structural models for a non-axisymmetric terminator design OWC, the Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB) are discussed in this report. The results of this structural model design study are intended to inform experiments and modeling underway in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated Reference Model Project (RMP). A detailed design developed by Re Vision Consulting used stiffeners and girders to stabilize the structure against the hydrostatic loads experienced by a BBDB device. Additional support plates were added to this structure to account for loads arising from the mooring line attachment points. A simplified structure was designed in a modular fashion. This simplified design allows easy alterations to the buoyancy chambers and uncomplicated analysis of resulting changes in buoyancy.

  4. Hydropower Potential inWater Distribution Networks: Pressure Control by PATs

    OpenAIRE

    Fecarotta, O.; Aricò, C.; Carravetta, A.; Martino, R.; Ramos, H.

    2014-01-01

    Pressure control is one of the main techniques to control leakages in Water Distribution Networks (WDNs) and to prevent pipe damage, improving the delivery standards of a water supply systems. Pressure reducing stations (PRSs) equipped by either pressure reducing valves or motor driven regulating valves are commonly used to dissipate excess hydraulic head in WDNs. An integrated new technical solution with economic and system flexibility benefits is presented which replaces...

  5. Fuzzy logic control of steam generator water level in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuan, C.C.; Lin, C.; Hsu, C.C.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a fuzzy logic controller is applied to control the steam generator water level in a pressurized water reactor. The method does not require a detailed mathematical mode of the object to be controlled. The design is based on a set of linguistic rules that were adopted from the human operator's experience. After off-line fuzzy computation, the controller is a lookup table, and thus, real-time control is achieved. Shrink-and-swell phenomena are considered in the linguistic rules, and the simulation results show that their effect is dramatically reduced. The performance of the control system can also be improved by changing the input and output scaling factors, which is convenient for on-line tuning

  6. Experimental (vapour + liquid) equilibrium data of (methanol + water), (water + glycerol) and (methanol + glycerol) systems at atmospheric and sub-atmospheric pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soujanya, J.; Satyavathi, B.; Vittal Prasad, T.E.

    2010-01-01

    Experimental (vapour + liquid) equilibrium results for the binary systems, (methanol + water) at the local atmospheric pressure of 95.3 kPa and at sub-atmospheric pressures of (15.19, 29.38, 42.66, 56.03, and 67.38) kPa, (water + glycerol) system at pressures (14.19, 29.38, 41.54, 54.72, 63.84, and 95.3) kPa and the (methanol + glycerol) system at pressures (32.02 and 45.3) kPa were obtained over the entire composition range using a Sweitoslwasky-type ebulliometer. The relationship of the liquid composition (x 1 ) as a function of temperature (T) was found to be well represented by the Wilson model. Computed vapour phase mole fractions, activity coefficients and the measured values along with optimum Wilson parameters are presented.

  7. Solid-state track recorder neutron dosimetry in light water reactor pressure vessel surveillance mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.; Gold, R.; Preston, C.C.

    1984-09-01

    Solid-State Track Recorder (SSTR) measurements of neutron-induced fission rates have been made in several pressure vessel mockup facilities as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Dosimetry Improvement Program (LWR-PV-SDIP). The results of extensive physics-dosimetry measurements made at the Pool Critical Assembly (PCA) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, TN are summarized. Included are 235 U, 238 U, 237 Np and 232 Th fission rates in the PCA 12/13, 8/7, and 4/12 SSC configurations. Additional low power measurements have been made in an engineering mockup at the VENUS critical assembly at CEN-SCK, Mol, Belgium. 237 Np and 238 U fission rates were made at selected locations in the VENUS mockup, which models the in-core and near-core regions of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Absolute core power measurements were made at VENUS by exposing solid-state track recorders (SSTRs) to polished fuel pellets within in-core fuel pins. 8 references, 4 figures, 10 tables

  8. Relating landfill gas emissions to atmospheric pressure using numerical modeling and state-space analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, T.G.; Christophersen, Mette; Moldrup, P.

    2003-01-01

    were applied: (I) State-space analysis was used to identify relations between gas flux and short-term (hourly) variations in atmospheric pressure. (II) A numerical gas transport model was fitted to the data and used to quantify short-term impacts of variations in atmospheric pressure, volumetric soil......-water content, soil gas permeability, soil gas diffusion coefficients, and biological CH4 degradation rate upon landfill gas concentration and fluxes in the soil. Fluxes and concentrations were found to be most sensitive to variations in volumetric soil water content, atmospheric pressure variations and gas...... permeability whereas variations in CH4 oxidation rate and molecular coefficients had less influence. Fluxes appeared to be most sensitive to atmospheric pressure at intermediate distances from the landfill edge. Also overall CH4 fluxes out of the soil over longer periods (years) were largest during periods...

  9. Status and Trends of Thermal-Hydraulic System Codes for Nuclear Power Plants With Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhitao; Wang Binghua; Qin Benke; Xie Heng

    2009-01-01

    Research and development of thermal-hydraulic system codes for nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors were analyzed on their history, status and application ranges. The important roles of best-estimate methodology, codes coupling and codes qualification were pointed out. The development models of thermal-hydraulic system codes around the world provide references to China's self-innovation. (authors)

  10. Accounting for Water Insecurity in Modeling Domestic Water Demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaitsis, S. E.; Huber-lee, A. T.; Vogel, R. M.; Naumova, E.

    2013-12-01

    Water demand management uses price elasticity estimates to predict consumer demand in relation to water pricing changes, but studies have shown that many additional factors effect water consumption. Development scholars document the need for water security, however, much of the water security literature focuses on broad policies which can influence water demand. Previous domestic water demand studies have not considered how water security can affect a population's consumption behavior. This study is the first to model the influence of water insecurity on water demand. A subjective indicator scale measuring water insecurity among consumers in the Palestinian West Bank is developed and included as a variable to explore how perceptions of control, or lack thereof, impact consumption behavior and resulting estimates of price elasticity. A multivariate regression model demonstrates the significance of a water insecurity variable for data sets encompassing disparate water access. When accounting for insecurity, the R-squaed value improves and the marginal price a household is willing to pay becomes a significant predictor for the household quantity consumption. The model denotes that, with all other variables held equal, a household will buy more water when the users are more water insecure. Though the reasons behind this trend require further study, the findings suggest broad policy implications by demonstrating that water distribution practices in scarcity conditions can promote consumer welfare and efficient water use.

  11. Computational model for transient studies of IRIS pressurizer behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rives Sanz, R.; Montesino Otero, M.E.; Gonzalez Mantecon, J.; Rojas Mazaira, L.

    2014-01-01

    International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) excels other Small Modular Reactor (SMR) designs due to its innovative characteristics regarding safety. IRIS integral pressurizer makes the design of larger pressurizer system than the conventional PWR, without any additional cost. The IRIS pressurizer volume of steam can provide enough margins to avoid spray requirement to mitigate in-surge transient. The aim of the present research is to model the IRIS pressurizer's dynamic using the commercial finite volume Computational Fluid Dynamic code CFX 14. A symmetric tridimensional model equivalent to 1/8 of the total geometry was adopted to reduce mesh size and minimize processing time. The model considers the coexistence of three phases: liquid, steam, and vapor bubbles in liquid volume. Additionally, it takes into account the heat losses between the pressurizer and primary circuit. The relationships for interfacial mass, energy, and momentum transport are programmed and incorporated into CFX by using expressions in CFX Command Language (CCL) format. Moreover, several additional variables are defined for improving the convergence and allow monitoring of boron dilution sequences and condensation-evaporation rate in different control volumes. For transient states a non - equilibrium stratification in the pressurizer is considered. This paper discusses the model developed and the behavior of the system for representative transients sequences such as the in/out-surge transients and boron dilution sequences. The results of analyzed transients of IRIS can be applied to the design of pressurizer internal structures and components. (author)

  12. Photosynthetic oxygen evolution is not reversed at high oxygen pressures: mechanistic consequences for the water-oxidizing complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolling, Derrick R J; Brown, Tyler S; Ananyev, Gennady; Dismukes, G Charles

    2009-02-17

    We investigated the effects of elevated O(2) pressure on the production of O(2) by photosynthetic organisms in several species of plants, algae, and a cyanobacterium. Using a noninvasive fluorometry technique to monitor sequential turnover of the photosystem II (PSII) reaction center as a function of O(2) pressures, we showed that none of the reactions of water oxidation are affected by elevated O(2) pressures up to 50-fold greater than atmospheric conditions. Thus, the terminal step of O(2) release from the water oxidation complex (S(4) --> S(0) + O(2) + nH(+)) is not reversible in whole cells, leaves, or isolated thylakoid membranes containing PSII, in contrast to reports using detergent-extracted PSII complexes. This implies that there is no thermodynamically accessible intermediate that can be populated by preventing or reversing the O(2) release step with O(2) at atmospheric pressure. To assess the sensitivity of PSII charge recombination to O(2) pressure, we quantitatively modeled the consequences of two putative perturbations to the catalytic cycle of water oxidation within the framework of the Kok model. On the basis of the breadth of oxygenic phototrophs examined in this study, we conclude that O(2) accumulation in cells or the atmosphere does not suppress photosynthetic productivity through the reversal of water oxidation in contemporary phototrophs and would have been unlikely to influence the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis.

  13. Decomposition of water-insoluble organic waste by water plasma at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, S; Watanabe, T

    2012-01-01

    The water plasma was generated in atmospheric pressure with the emulsion state of 1-decanol which is a source of soil and ground water pollution. In order to investigate effects of operating conditions on the decomposition of 1-decanol, generated gas and liquid from the water plasma treatment were analysed in different arc current and 1-decanol concentration. The 1-decanol was completely decomposed generating hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, treated liquid and solid carbon in all experimental conditions. The feeding rate of 1- decanol emulsion was increased with increasing the arc current in virtue of enhanced input power. The generation rate of gas and the ratio of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide were increased in the high arc current, while the generation rate of solid carbon was decreased due to enhanced oxygen radicals in the high input power. Generation rates of gas and solid carbon were increased at the same time with increasing the concentration of 1-decanol, because carbon radicals were increased without enhancement of oxygen radicals in a constant power level. In addition, the ratio of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide was increased along with the concentration of 1-decanol due to enhanced carbon radicals in the water plasma flame.

  14. The pressure drop characteristics of air-water bubbling flow for evaporative heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qinghua; Amano, R. S.; Cui, Wenzhi; Li, Longjian

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents a study on a novel water bubbling layer pressure drop and heat transfer experiment that was conducted to investigate the characteristics of pressure drop of air flow across the water bubbling layer. The attempt was to reduce the pressure drop while maintaining a higher value of the heat transfer coefficient. This type of heat transfer between water and merged tubes has potential application in evaporative cooling. To achieve the goal the pressure drop should be reduced by decreasing the bubble layer thickness through the water pump circulation. Pressure drops of air passing through the perforated plate and the water bubbling layer were measured for different heights of water bubbling layer, hole-plate area ratio of the perforated plate and the air velocity through the holes. Experimental data show that the increase of water bubbling layer height and air velocity both increase the pressure drop while the effect of the hole-plate area ratio of the perforated plate on the heat transfer coefficient is relatively complex. The measurements showed that even at a considerably lower height of water bubbling layer the heat transfer coefficient can exceed 5,000 W/m2-K. The heat transfer coefficients of 30 mm high water bubbling layer are higher than that of other higher water bubbling layers tested in the experiments

  15. Intermittent operation of ultra-low pressure ultrafiltration for decentralized drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter-Varbanets, Maryna; Gujer, Willi; Pronk, Wouter

    2012-06-15

    River water was treated by ultrafiltration at a relatively low transmembrane pressure (40 mbar). As observed before, flux stabilization occurred after several days of operation although no back-flushing or cross flow was applied. Interruptions in flux were applied by temporary offset of the transmembrane pressure. After restoration of the transmembrane pressure, the initial flux was higher than the stable flux level, and the flux recovery depended on the standstill time. Furthermore, if a short cross flow was applied after standstill, the flux was restored to an even higher level. In all cases, the flux decreased again during operation to reach finally the same stable level as before standstill. In order to evaluate the influence of intermittent operation as practiced for water treatment on a household level, daily interruptions of flux were applied. An optimum of total daily water production rate was obtained at 21 h of operation and 3 h of standstill per day. A model was developed which can describe the impact of intermittent operation on the flux depending on the duration of the standstill and operating periods. This enables the prediction of production capacity of the system operated intermittently. The flux increase during standstill could be explained by a relaxation and expansion of the biofouling layer, while the higher flux after forward-flushing was caused by this layer being partially sloughed off. Household water treatment with the process presented here will generally be operated on a discontinuous basis. The results show that such operation schemes do not compromise the permeability of the system, but actually lead to higher fluxes after standstill. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Experimental study on the influence of chemical sensitizer on pressure resistance in deep water of emulsion explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; zhang, Zhihua; Wang, Ya; Qin, hao

    2018-03-01

    The study on the pressure resistance performance of emulsion explosives in deep water can provide theoretical basis for underwater blasting, deep-hole blasting and emulsion explosives development. The sensitizer is an important component of emulsion explosives. By using reusable experimental devices to simulate the charge environment in deep water, the influence of the content of chemical sensitizer on the deep-water pressure resistance performance of emulsion explosives was studied. The experimental results show that with the increasing of the content of chemical sensitizer, the deep-water pressure resistance performance of emulsion explosives gradually improves, and when the pressure is fairly large, the effect is particularly pronounced; in a certain range, with the increase of the content of chemical sensitizer, that emulsion explosives’ explosion performance also gradually improve, but when the content reaches a certain value, the explosion properties declined instead; under the same emulsion matrix condition, when the content of NANO2 is 0.2%, that the emulsion explosives has good resistance to water pressure and good explosion properties. The correctness of the results above was testified in model blasting.

  17. Association between Arsenic Exposure from Drinking Water and Longitudinal Change in Blood Pressure among HEALS Cohort Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jieying; Liu, Mengling; Parvez, Faruque; Wang, Binhuan; Wu, Fen; Eunus, Mahbub; Bangalore, Sripal; Newman, Jonathan D; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Rakibuz-Zaman, Muhammad; Hasan, Rabiul; Sarwar, Golam; Levy, Diane; Slavkovich, Vesna; Argos, Maria; Scannell Bryan, Molly; Farzan, Shohreh F; Hayes, Richard B; Graziano, Joseph H; Ahsan, Habibul; Chen, Yu

    2015-08-01

    Cross-sectional studies have shown associations between arsenic exposure and prevalence of high blood pressure; however, studies examining the relationship of arsenic exposure with longitudinal changes in blood pressure are lacking. We evaluated associations of arsenic exposure in relation to longitudinal change in blood pressure in 10,853 participants in the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS). Arsenic was measured in well water and in urine samples at baseline and in urine samples every 2 years after baseline. Mixed-effect models were used to estimate the association of baseline well and urinary creatinine-adjusted arsenic with annual change in blood pressure during follow-up (median, 6.7 years). In the HEALS population, the median water arsenic concentration at baseline was 62 μg/L. Individuals in the highest quartile of baseline water arsenic or urinary creatinine-adjusted arsenic had a greater annual increase in systolic blood pressure compared with those in the reference group (β = 0.48 mmHg/year; 95% CI: 0.35, 0.61, and β = 0.43 mmHg/year; 95% CI: 0.29, 0.56 for water arsenic and urinary creatinine-adjusted arsenic, respectively) in fully adjusted models. Likewise, individuals in the highest quartile of baseline arsenic exposure had a greater annual increase in diastolic blood pressure for water arsenic and urinary creatinine-adjusted arsenic, (β = 0.39 mmHg/year; 95% CI: 0.30, 0.49, and β = 0.45 mmHg/year; 95% CI: 0.36, 0.55, respectively) compared with those in the lowest quartile. Our findings suggest that long-term arsenic exposure may accelerate age-related increases in blood pressure. These findings may help explain associations between arsenic exposure and cardiovascular disease.

  18. Analysis of EBR-II secondary sodium network for pressures pulses due to leaks of steam on water into sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivas, S.; Chopra, P.S.

    1977-01-01

    A systematic procedure is presented for the safety analysis of the secondary sodium system of an LMFBR in the event of a leak of water or steam into sodium in an evaporator or a superheater. Using fracture mechanics, it is shown that the usual assumption of failure initiation by guillotine rupture of one or more water or steam tubes is unrealistic. A model is proposed for the gradual growth of leaks due to the phenomenon of wastage. The pressure rise in the system due to a sodium-water reaction is calculated solving one-dimensional hydrodynamic equations. By comparing results obtained for the proposed gradual growth model with those due to guillotine failure it is shown that the assumption of guillotine failure leads to a significant overestimation of pressures and stresses. Based upon the proposed leak progression model the stresses in the EBR-II secondary sodium system are shown to be within safe limits. (Auth.)

  19. The DPSIR Framework and a Pressure-Oriented Water Quality Monitoring Approach to Ecological River Restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Frostell

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Without monitoring anthropogenic pressures on the water environment, it is difficult to set realistic river restoration targets in relation to water quality. Therefore a more holistic approach is needed to systematically explore the links between socio-economic drivers and observed water quality-related impacts on river ecosystems. Using the DPSIR (Drivers-Pressures-State of the Environment-Impacts-Responses framework, this study linked ecological river restoration with the socio-economic sector, with the focus on promoting a pressure-oriented water quality monitoring system. Based on the European Water Framework Directive (WFD and relevant literature, it was found that most water quality-related indicators employed today are state/impacts-oriented, while very few are pressure-oriented. As a response, we call for more attention to a DPR (Drivers-Pressures-Responses framework in developing an industrial ecology-based pressure-oriented water quality monitoring system for aiding ecological river restoration planning. This approach is characterized in general by accounting for material-related flows throughout the socio-economic sector in relation to river ecosystem degradation. Then the obtained information would help decision makers take appropriate measures to alleviate various significant human-induced wastes and emissions at their sources. We believe that such a pressure-oriented monitoring system will substantially complement traditional state/impacts-oriented environmental and ecological monitoring and help develop more proactive planning and decision-making processes for specific river restoration projects and general water quality management.

  20. Clean-up system for pool water in pressure suppression chamber and operation method therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirabayashi, Kentaro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1996-09-17

    Pool water in a pressure suppression chamber of a BWR type reactor is sucked by a pump of an after-heat removing system. The pool water pressurized here is sent to the pressure suppression chamber by way of a heat exchanger and a test line backwarding pipeline to stir the pool water in the pressure suppression chamber. Further, the pool water pressurized by the pump is sent to the pressure suppression chamber by way of a filtration desalting device and an exit pipe to purify the pool water. Upon cleaning of pipelines before the start of a periodical test, the pool water sucked by the pump is sent to the filtration desalting device and recovered to the pressure suppression chamber. This can reduce the amount of impurities carried to the suppression chamber. After the cleaning of the pipelines, pool water is passed through the test line backwarding pipeline, so that the pool water can be stirred at the same time. (I.N.)

  1. Thermodynamic modelling and optimization of a dual pressure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this work, attention was focused on a dual pressure reheat (DPRH) HRSG to maximize the heat recovery and hence performance of CC. Deaerator, an essential open feed water ... Author Affiliations. T Srinivas1. School of Mechanical and Building Sciences, Vellore Institute of Technology University, Vellore 632 014 ...

  2. Pressure and velocity profiles in a static mechanical hemilarynx model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Fariborz; Scherer, Ronald C.

    2002-12-01

    This study examined pressure and velocity profiles in a hemilarynx mechanical model of phonation. The glottal section had parallel walls and was fabricated from hard plastic. Twelve pressure taps were created in the vocal fold surface and connected to a differential pressure transducer through a pressure switch. The glottal gap was measured with feeler gauges and the uniform glottal duct was verified by use of a laser system. Eight pressure transducers were placed in the flat wall opposite the vocal fold. Hot-wire anemometry was used to obtain velocity profiles upstream and downstream of the glottis. The results indicate that the pressure distribution on the vocal fold surface was consistent with pressure change along a parallel duct, whereas the pressures on the opposite flat wall typically were lower (by 8%-40% of the transglottal pressure just past mid-glottis). The upstream velocity profiles were symmetric regardless of the constriction shape and size. The jet flow downstream of the glottis was turbulent even for laminar upstream conditions. The front of the jet was consistently approximately 1.5 mm from the flat wall for glottal gaps of 0.4, 0.8 and 1.2 mm. The turbulence intensity also remained approximately at the same location of about 4 mm from the flat wall for the two larger gaps.

  3. High conversion pressurized water reactor with boiling channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margulis, M., E-mail: maratm@post.bgu.ac.il [The Unit of Nuclear Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, POB 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Shwageraus, E., E-mail: es607@cam.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, CB2 1PZ Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Conceptual design of partially boiling PWR core was proposed and studied. • Self-sustainable Th–{sup 233}U fuel cycle was utilized in this study. • Seed-blanket fuel assembly lattice optimization was performed. • A coupled Monte Carlo, fuel depletion and thermal-hydraulics studies were carried out. • Thermal–hydraulic analysis assured that the design matches imposed safety constraints. - Abstract: Parametric studies have been performed on a seed-blanket Th–{sup 233}U fuel configuration in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) with boiling channels to achieve high conversion ratio. Previous studies on seed-blanket concepts suggested substantial reduction in the core power density is needed in order to operate under nominal PWR system conditions. Boiling flow regime in the seed region allows more heat to be removed for a given coolant mass flow rate, which in turn, may potentially allow increasing the power density of the core. In addition, reduced moderation improves the breeding performance. A two-dimensional design optimization study was carried out with BOXER and SERPENT codes in order to determine the most attractive fuel assembly configuration that would ensure breeding. Effects of various parameters, such as void fraction, blanket fuel form, number of seed pins and their dimensions, on the conversion ratio were examined. The obtained results, for which the power density was set to be 104 W/cm{sup 3}, created a map of potentially feasible designs. It was found that several options have the potential to achieve end of life fissile inventory ratio above unity, which implies potential feasibility of a self-sustainable Thorium fuel cycle in PWRs without significant reduction in the core power density. Finally, a preliminary three-dimensional coupled neutronic and thermal–hydraulic analysis for a single seed-blanket fuel assembly was performed. The results indicate that axial void distribution changes drastically with burnup. Therefore

  4. High Local Power Densities Permissible at Siemens Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehnel, Klaus; Richter, Klaus-Deiter; Drescher, Gerhard; Endrizzi, Ivo

    2002-01-01

    Operating nuclear fuel to higher discharge burnups reduces not only fuel cycle costs but also the volume of radioactive waste requiring disposal. In pressurized water reactors (PWRs), high local power densities are a prerequisite for achieving a high batch burnup.The range of maximum power densities that can be exploited for in-core fuel management and operational flexibility is restricted by the limiting conditions for operation obtained from analyses of anticipated operational occurrences and hypothetical accidents.Since utilities mainly use available margins for implementing advanced in-core fuel management strategies or for power uprating, a suitable parameter for making a rough comparison of the present thermal-hydraulic design status of different PWRs is the maximum local heat flux achieved during actual cycles under steady-state full-power conditions. A comparison between Siemens PWRs and the PWR designs of other vendors shows that the maximum local power densities during steady-state operation are usually higher in Siemens PWRs.The main reasons why higher power densities are permissible can usually be attributed to different core surveillance concepts (instrumentation and control) in conjunction with different control assembly management schemes. Moreover, two representative studies conducted with a new methodology using the three-dimensional neutronics/thermal-hydraulics coupled code PANBOX for core transient analysis present additional margins. Especially in plants using the Siemens core surveillance concept, the new methodology yields significant additional margins for PWRs to be operated with even higher permissible local power densities.The additional departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) margin gained in the representative studies was 0.38. However, utilization of this additional margin is accompanied by larger void fractions within the upper section of the hot channel during normal operation. Therefore, increasing steady-state maximum power

  5. A mathematical model for pressure-based organs behaving as biological pressure vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casha, Aaron R; Camilleri, Liberato; Gauci, Marilyn; Gatt, Ruben; Sladden, David; Chetcuti, Stanley; Grima, Joseph N

    2018-04-26

    We introduce a mathematical model that describes the allometry of physical characteristics of hollow organs behaving as pressure vessels based on the physics of ideal pressure vessels. The model was validated by studying parameters such as body and organ mass, systolic and diastolic pressures, internal and external dimensions, pressurization energy and organ energy output measurements of pressure-based organs in a wide range of mammals and birds. Seven rules were derived that govern amongst others, lack of size efficiency on scaling to larger organ sizes, matching organ size in the same species, equal relative efficiency in pressurization energy across species and direct size matching between organ mass and mass of contents. The lung, heart and bladder follow these predicted theoretical relationships with a similar relative efficiency across various mammalian and avian species; an exception is cardiac output in mammals with a mass exceeding 10kg. This may limit massive body size in mammals, breaking Cope's rule that populations evolve to increase in body size over time. Such a limit was not found in large flightless birds exceeding 100kg, leading to speculation about unlimited dinosaur size should dinosaurs carry avian-like cardiac characteristics. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Construction management of Indian pressurized heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohra, S.A.; Sharma, P.D.

    2006-01-01

    Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru and Dr. Homi J. Bhabha, the visionary architects of Science and Technology of modern India foresaw the imperative need to establish a firm base for indigenous research and development in the field of nuclear electricity generation. The initial phase has primarily focused on the technology development in a systematic and structured manner, which has resulted in establishment of strong engineering, manufacturing and construction base. The nuclear power program started with the setting up of two units of boiling light water type reactors in 1969 for speedy establishment of nuclear technology, safety culture, and development of operation and maintenance manpower. The main aim at that stage was to demonstrate (to ourselves, and indeed to the rest of the world) that India, inspite of being a developing country, with limited industrial infrastructure and low capacity power grids, could successfully assimilate the high technology involved in the safe and economical operation of nuclear power reactors. The selection of a BWR was in contrast to the pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWR), which was identified as the flagship for the first stage of India's nuclear power program. The long-term program in three stages utilizes large reserves of thorium in the monazite sands of Kerala beaches in the third stage with first stage comprising of series of PHWR type plants with a base of 10,000 MW. India has at present 14 reactors in operation 12 of these being of PHWR type. The performance of operating units of 2720 MW has improved significantly with an overall capacity factor of about 90% in recent times. The construction work on eight reactor units with installed capacity of 3960 MW (two PHWRs of 540 MW each, four PHWRs of 220 MW each and two VVERs of 1000 MW each) is proceeding on a rapid pace with project schedules of less than 5 years from first pour of concrete. This is being achieved through advanced construction technology and management. Present

  7. Organic solid waste treatment with high-temperature, high-pressure water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, K.; Akai, Y.; Matsubayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.

    1998-01-01

    For treating highly contaminated organic solid wastes derived from nuclear facilities, a treatment system has been developed which uses high-temperature, high-pressure water near the critical point, in order to destroy these organic solid wastes, dissolve them and keep all contaminants in the system. Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is one method of decomposing organic materials. In SCWO, organic materials are oxidized fast and completely in water whose temperature is higher than 374 deg C, and to which an oxidizing agent is added, and at a pressure of more than 22 MPa. However, some inorganic salts precipitate generally and may adhere to the wall of reactor. Therefore, regarding the application of SCWO to the treatment of radioactive waste, the key consideration is how to avoid salt precipitation which would result in the accumulation of radioactivity. To solve this problem, we have developed the 'two-stage method' in which the decomposition process and the oxidation process are separated. Further, to realize a simple system, the 'acidity control method' has also been developed. In order to confirm experimentally whether these methods not only decompose organic wastes completely but also preclude salt precipitation, a decomposition test was carried out on organic waste with cerium as the model element of plutonium. (author)

  8. Numerical investigation on stress corrosion cracking behavior of dissimilar weld joints in pressurized water reactor plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyan Zhao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There have been incidents recently where stress corrosion cracking (SCC observed in the dissimilar metal weld (DMW joints connecting the reactor pressure vessel (RPV nozzle with the hot leg pipe. Due to the complex microstructure and mechanical heterogeneity in the weld region, dissimilar metal weld joints are more susceptible to SCC than the bulk steels in the simulated high temperature water environment of pressurized water reactor (PWR. Tensile residual stress (RS, in addition to operating loads, has a great contribution to SCC crack growth. Limited experimental conditions, varied influence factors and diverging experimental data make it difficult to accurately predict the SCC behavior of DMW joints with complex geometry, material configuration, operating loads and crack shape. Based on the film slip/dissolution oxidation model and elastic-plastic finite element method (EPFEM, an approach is developed to quantitatively predict the SCC growth rate of a RPV outlet nozzle DMW joint. Moreover, this approach is expected to be a pre-analytical tool for SCC experiment of DMW joints in PWR primary water environment.

  9. Plasma pressure and anisotropy inferred from the Tsyganenkomagnetic field model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cao

    Full Text Available A numerical procedure has been developed to deduce the plasma pressure and anisotropy from the Tsyganenko magnetic field model. The Tsyganenko empirical field model, which is based on vast satellite field data, provides a realistic description of magnetic field configuration in the magnetosphere. When the force balance under the static condition is assumed, the electromagnetic J×B force from the Tsyganenko field model can be used to infer the plasma pressure and anisotropy distributions consistent with the field model. It is found that the J×B force obtained from the Tsyganenko field model is not curl-free. The curl-free part of the J×B force in an empirical field model can be balanced by the gradient of the isotropic pressure, while the nonzero curl of the J×B force can only be associated with the pressure anisotropy. The plasma pressure and anisotropy in the near-Earth plasma sheet are numerically calculated to obtain a static equilibrium consistent with the Tsyganenko field model both in the noon-midnight meridian and in the equatorial plane. The plasma pressure distribution deduced from the Tsyganenko 1989 field model is highly anisotropic and shows this feature early in the substorm growth phase. The pressure anisotropy parameter αP, defined as αP=1-PVertP, is typically ~0.3 at x ≈ -4.5RE and gradually decreases to a small negative value with an increasing tailward distance. The pressure anisotropy from the Tsyganenko 1989 model accounts for 50% of the cross-tail current at maximum and only in a highly localized region near xsim-10RE. In comparison, the plasma pressure anisotropy inferred from the Tsyganenko 1987 model is much smaller. We also find that the boundary

  10. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Nesbitt, Loyd B.

    1997-01-01

    A system for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs.

  11. Pressure-driven ballistic Kelvin's water dropper for energy harvesting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Yanbo; de Boer, Hans L.; van den Berg, Albert; Sprenkels, A.J.; Eijkel, Jan C.T.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a microfluidic-based self-excited energy conversion system inspired by Kelvin's water dropper but driven by inertia instead of gravity. Two micro water jets are produced by forcing water through two micropores by overpressure. The jets break up into microdroplets which

  12. Effect of Water Cut on Pressure Drop of Oil (D130) -Water Flow in 4″Horizontal Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Mehaboob; Shaahid, S. M.; Al-Hems, Luai M.

    2018-03-01

    The oil-water flow in pipes is a challenging subject that is rich in physics and practical applications. It is often encountered in many oil and chemical industries. The pressure gradient of two phase flow is still subject of immense research. The present study reports pressure measurements of oil (D130)-water flow in a horizontal 4″ diameter stainless steel pipe at different flow conditions. Experiments were carried out for different water cuts (WC); 0-100%. Inlet oil-water flow rates were varied from 4000 to 8000 barrels-per-day in steps of 2000. It has been found that the frictional pressure drop decreases for WC = 0 - 40 %. With further increase in WC, friction pressure drop increases, this could be due to phase inversion.

  13. On line surveillance of core parameters for a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwingelstein, G.; Kerlin, T.W.

    1976-01-01

    A surveillance algorithm for monitoring the Doppler coefficient and the overall fuel-to-coolant heat transfer coefficient for a pressurized water reactor has been developed for on line applications. The surveillance is achieved by comparison of the values of the parameters given by an adaptive identification process to the reference values corresponding to normal behaviour. The on-line adaptive identification method is based on a quasilinearization technique, sensitivity function calculation and a recursive least squares algorithm. The method was tested using a theoretical model for the Oconee I PWR and experimental results obtained during operation of Oconee I. The physical model of the plant consists of a stable variable model of 29th order where only some components of the state vector are measurable. The tests were achieved by adding a small time-varying perturbation signal to the flux controller set point while the reactor was operating at 95% of full power [fr

  14. Control method for pool water of pressure suppression chamber in reactor container vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Tetsuo; Konomaru, Toshimi; Saito, Koichi.

    1996-01-01

    In a reactor container having a pressure suppression chamber in adjacent with the outer circumference of a pedestal of a reactor pressure vessel, at least a portion of pool water is provisionally transported from the pressure suppression chamber to the inner side surrounded by the pedestal of the pressure vessel, and stored therein. In addition, an opening of the side wall of the pedestal is closed to raise the water level of the provisionally stored water thereby increasing the amount of provisionally stored pool water. Predetermined operations are performed in the pressure suppression chamber after transporting the pool water to the inner side surrounded by the pedestal of the pressure vessel. Namely, a portion of the pool water of the pressure suppression chamber is transported to the inner space surrounded by the pedestal to provisionally store it thereby forming a circumstance for enabling predetermined operations such as inspection and re-coating in the pressure suppression chamber. Then, radiation contamination prevailing to the outer side of the reactor container can be reduced thereby enabling to obtain various effects, namely, reduction in the amount of equipments for provisional installment, shortening for construction term and decrease in the amount of waste materials. (I.S.)

  15. Drinking Water Temperature Modelling in Domestic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Moerman, A.; Blokker, M.; Vreeburg, J.; van der Hoek, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Domestic water supply systems are the final stage of the transport process to deliver potable water to the customers’ tap. Under the influence of temperature, residence time and pipe materials the drinking water quality can change while the water passes the domestic drinking water system. According to the Dutch Drinking Water Act the drinking water temperature may not exceed the 25 °C threshold at point-of-use level. This paper provides a mathematical approach to model the heating of drinking...

  16. Drinking Water Sodium and Elevated Blood Pressure of Healthy Pregnant Women in Salinity-Affected Coastal Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheelbeek, Pauline F D; Khan, Aneire E; Mojumder, Sontosh; Elliott, Paul; Vineis, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Coastal areas in Southeast Asia are experiencing high sodium concentrations in drinking water sources that are commonly consumed by local populations. Salinity problems caused by episodic cyclones and subsequent seawater inundations are likely (partly) related to climate change and further exacerbated by changes in upstream river flow and local land-use activities. Dietary (food) sodium plays an important role in the global burden of hypertensive disease. It remains unknown, however, if sodium in drinking water-rather than food-has similar effects on blood pressure and disease risk. In this study, we examined the effect of drinking water sodium on blood pressure of pregnant women: increases in blood pressure in this group could severely affect maternal and fetal health. Data on blood pressure, drinking water source, and personal, lifestyle, and environmental confounders was obtained from 701 normotensive pregnant women residing in coastal Bangladesh. Generalized linear mixed regression models were used to investigate association of systolic and diastolic blood pressure of these-otherwise healthy-women with their water source. After adjustment for confounders, drinkers of tube well and pond water (high saline sources) were found to have significantly higher average systolic (+4.85 and +3.62 mm Hg) and diastolic (+2.30 and +1.72 mm Hg) blood pressures than rainwater drinkers. Drinking water salinity problems are expected to exacerbate in the future, putting millions of coastal people-including pregnant women-at increased risk of hypertension and associated diseases. There is an urgent need to further explore the health risks associated to this understudied environmental health problem and feasibility of possible adaptation strategies. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Review of Watershed Water Quality Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deliman, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    .... Several available watershed water quality models were reviewed and rated with regard to their potential in being utilized as the building block for the development of a Corps of Engineers watershed water quality model...

  18. Model-based setting of inspiratory pressure and respiratory rate in pressure-controlled ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schranz, C; Möller, K; Becher, T; Schädler, D; Weiler, N

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation carries the risk of ventilator-induced-lung-injury (VILI). To minimize the risk of VILI, ventilator settings should be adapted to the individual patient properties. Mathematical models of respiratory mechanics are able to capture the individual physiological condition and can be used to derive personalized ventilator settings. This paper presents model-based calculations of inspiration pressure (p I ), inspiration and expiration time (t I , t E ) in pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) and a retrospective evaluation of its results in a group of mechanically ventilated patients. Incorporating the identified first order model of respiratory mechanics in the basic equation of alveolar ventilation yielded a nonlinear relation between ventilation parameters during PCV. Given this patient-specific relation, optimized settings in terms of minimal p I and adequate t E can be obtained. We then retrospectively analyzed data from 16 ICU patients with mixed pathologies, whose ventilation had been previously optimized by ICU physicians with the goal of minimization of inspiration pressure, and compared the algorithm's ‘optimized’ settings to the settings that had been chosen by the physicians. The presented algorithm visualizes the patient-specific relations between inspiration pressure and inspiration time. The algorithm's calculated results highly correlate to the physician's ventilation settings with r = 0.975 for the inspiration pressure, and r = 0.902 for the inspiration time. The nonlinear patient-specific relations of ventilation parameters become transparent and support the determination of individualized ventilator settings according to therapeutic goals. Thus, the algorithm is feasible for a variety of ventilated ICU patients and has the potential of improving lung-protective ventilation by minimizing inspiratory pressures and by helping to avoid the build-up of clinically significant intrinsic positive end

  19. A human cadaver fascial compartment pressure measurement model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Frank C; Cooper, Dylan; Huffman, Gretchen; Bartkus, Edward; Wilbur, Lee

    2013-10-01

    Fresh human cadavers provide an effective model for procedural training. Currently, there are no realistic models to teach fascial compartment pressure measurement. We created a human cadaver fascial compartment pressure measurement model and studied its feasibility with a pre-post design. Three faculty members, following instructions from a common procedure textbook, used a standard handheld intra-compartment pressure monitor (Stryker(®), Kalamazoo, MI) to measure baseline pressures ("unembalmed") in the anterior, lateral, deep posterior, and superficial posterior compartments of the lower legs of a fresh human cadaver. The right femoral artery was then identified by superficial dissection, cannulated distally towards the lower leg, and connected to a standard embalming machine. After a 5-min infusion, the same three faculty members re-measured pressures ("embalmed") of the same compartments on the cannulated right leg. Unembalmed and embalmed readings for each compartment, and baseline readings for each leg, were compared using a two-sided paired t-test. The mean baseline compartment pressures did not differ between the right and left legs. Using the embalming machine, compartment pressure readings increased significantly over baseline for three of four fascial compartments; all in mm Hg (±SD): anterior from 40 (±9) to 143 (±44) (p = 0.08); lateral from 22 (±2.5) to 160 (±4.3) (p measurable fascial compartment pressure measurement model in a fresh human cadaver using a standard embalming machine. Set-up is minimal and the model can be incorporated into teaching curricula. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Theory of the Maxwell pressure tensor and the tension in a water bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widom, A; Swain, J; Silverberg, J; Sivasubramanian, S; Srivastava, Y N

    2009-07-01

    A water bridge refers to an experimental "flexible cable" made up of pure de-ionized water, which can hang across two supports maintained with a sufficiently large voltage difference. The resulting electric fields within the de-ionized water flexible cable maintain a tension that sustains the water against the downward force of gravity. A detailed calculation of the water bridge tension will be provided in terms of the Maxwell pressure tensor in a dielectric fluid medium. General properties of the dielectric liquid pressure tensor are discussed along with unusual features of dielectric fluid Bernoulli flows in an electric field. The "frictionless" Bernoulli flow is closely analogous to that of a superfluid.

  1. The nuclear physical method for high pressure steam manifold water level gauging and its error

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Nianzu; Li Beicheng; Jia Shengming

    1993-10-01

    A new method, which is non-contact on measured water level, for measuring high pressure steam manifold water level with nuclear detection technique is introduced. This method overcomes the inherent drawback of previous water level gauges based on other principles. This method can realize full range real time monitoring on the continuous water level of high pressure steam manifold from the start to full load of boiler, and the actual value of water level can be obtained. The measuring errors were analysed on site. Errors from practical operation in Tianjin Junliangcheng Power Plant and in laboratory are also presented

  2. Model of a stationary microwave argon discharge at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhelyazkov, I.; Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.

    2008-01-01

    The many applications of microwave gas discharges at atmospheric pressure in various fields of science, technology and medicine require an adequate model of these discharges. Such a model is based on the electromagnetic wave's propagation properties and on the elementary processes in the discharge bulk. In contrast to the microwave discharges at low-gas pressures, where many elementary processes might be ignored because of their negligible contribution to the electron and heavy particle's balance equations, for such discharges at atmospheric pressure the consideration of a large number of collisional processes is mandatory. For the build of a successful discharge-column model one needs three important quantities, notably the power θ necessary for sustaining an electron - ion pair, electron - neutral collision frequency for momentum transfer v en , and gas temperature T g . The first two key parameters are obtained by a collisional-radiative model of the argon at atmospheric pressure, while the microwave frequency ω/2π = 2.45 GHz, plasma column radius R, gas pressure p and gas temperature T g are fixed external parameters determined by the experimental conditions. Here, we present a model of a capillary argon microwave plasma column with a length L ≅ 14 cm, sustained by wave power of 110 W - the model yields the longitudinal distributions of the plasma density, expended wave power, wave electric field magnitude, and complex wave number

  3. Modelling of pressure increase protection system for the vacuum vessel of W7-X device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaliatka, Tadas, E-mail: tadas.kaliatka@lei.lt; Uspuras, Eugenijus; Kaliatka, Algirdas

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Two in-vessel LOCAs (partial and guillotine break of 40 mm diameter pipe of cooling system) for Wendelstein 7-X fusion device were analyzed. • The analysis of the processes in the cooling system, vacuum vessel and pressure increase protection system were performed using thermal-hydraulic RELAP5 Mod3.3 code. • The suitability of pressure increase protection system was assessed. - Abstract: In fusion devices, plasma is contained in a vacuum vessel. The vacuum vessel cannot withstand a pressure above atmospheric. Any damage of in-vessel components could lead to water ingress and may lead to pressure increase and possible damage of vacuum vessel. In order to avoid such undesirable consequences, the pressure increase protection system is designed. In this article, the processes occurring in the vacuum vessel and pressure increase protection system of W7-X device during LOCA (small and guillotine pipe break) event are analyzed. The model of W7-X cooling system, vacuum vessel and pressure increase protection system was developed using RELAP5 code. Numerical analysis of partial and guillotine break of 40 mm diameter pipe of cooling system was performed. Calculation results showed that burst disc of the pressure increase protection system does not open when the cross section area of partial break in the cooling system is smaller than 1 mm{sup 2}. During the guillotine break of cooling system, the burst disc opens, but pressure increase protection system is capable to prevent overpressure of the vacuum vessel.

  4. Sink or swim: population pressures threaten the nation's water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T

    1995-01-01

    Since 1974, water in the US has been regulated through federal statutes such as the Clean Water Act and the Safe Drinking Water Act, which set standards for water quality. Usage regulations vary by state. The states of Texas, Arizona, Kansas, and Iowa use the "right to capture" as the basis of usage. This means any one can draw as much water as desired without cost or consideration for others' needs. This unrestricted use of water has resulted in the siphoning off of water from the Colorado River in Arizona and Southern California to the point where the Colorado River is a trickle at the river's mouth at the Gulf of California. Texans' use of the Edwards aquifer contributed to the drying up of springs that feed the San Pedro and San Antonio Rivers. Florida's main freshwater aquifer is being contaminated by seepage of deep ancient seawater. Agriculture uses about 85% of US ground water supplies for crops and livestock. Americans use about 1450 gallons per day per capita. If population reaches 500 million as expected by 2050, supply would be reduced to about 700 gallons per day per capita, which is considered the minimal amount for human needs. Almost 50% of water supplied by municipal water systems is used to flush toilets and water lawns. 15% is lost through leaky pipes. Agricultural water usage is problematic due to overuse and contamination from pollutants such as animal manures. Water for human consumption is polluted by pesticides, which are not biodegradable, and parasites. The Environmental Protection Agency in 1991 and 1992 reported 218,000 violations of standards. The Ogallala aquifer is half depleted under Kansas and is falling at a rate of 1.5 feet annually. The replenishment rate is only 0.02-0.07 inches per year. This decline could result in the lack of access to the Ogallala aquifer, which irrigates millions of acres of crops in the central plains.

  5. Response of the water status of soybean to changes in soil water potentials controlled by the water pressure in microporous tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, S. L.; Henninger, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    Water transport through a microporous tube-soil-plant system was investigated by measuring the response of soil and plant water status to step change reductions in the water pressure within the tubes. Soybeans were germinated and grown in a porous ceramic 'soil' at a porous tube water pressure of -0.5 kpa for 28 d. During this time, the soil matric potential was nearly in equilibrium with tube water pressure. Water pressure in the porous tubes was then reduced to either -1.0, -1.5 or -2.0 kPa. Sap flow rates, leaf conductance and soil, root and leaf water potentials were measured before and after this change. A reduction in porous tube water pressure from -0.5 to -1.0 or -1.5 kPa did not result in any significant change in soil or plant water status. A reduction in porous tube water pressure to -2.0 kPa resulted in significant reductions in sap flow, leaf conductance, and soil, root and leaf water potentials. Hydraulic conductance, calculated as the transpiration rate/delta psi between two points in the water transport pathway, was used to analyse water transport through the tube-soil-plant continuum. At porous tube water pressures of -0.5 to-1.5 kPa soil moisture was readily available and hydraulic conductance of the plant limited water transport. At -2.0 kPa, hydraulic conductance of the bulk soil was the dominant factor in water movement.

  6. Gray water recycle: Effect of pretreatment technologies on low pressure reverse osmosis treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray water can be a valuable source of water when properly treated to reduce the risks associated with chemical and microbial contamination to acceptable levels for the intended reuse application. In this study, the treatment of gray water using low pressure reverse osmosis (RO) filtration after pre...

  7. China's coal-fired power plants impose pressure on water resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Xinxin; Liu, Junguo; Tang, Yu; Zhao, Xu; Yang, Hong; Gerbens-Leenes, P.W.; Vliet, van Michelle T.H.; Yan, Jinyue

    2017-01-01

    Coal is the dominant fuel for electricity generation around the world. This type of electricity generation uses large amounts of water, increasing pressure on water resources. This calls for an in-depth investigation in the water-energy nexus of coal-fired electricity generation. In China,

  8. Design, modeling, and simulation of MEMS pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geca, Mateusz; Kociubiński, Andrzej

    2013-10-01

    This paper focuses on the design and analysis of a MEMS piezoresistive pressure sensor. The absolute pressure sensor with a 150μm wide and 3μm thick silicon membrane is modeled and simulated using CoventorWare™ softwareprofiting from a finite element method (FEM) implemented to determine specific electro-mechanical parameter values characterizing MEMS structure being designed. Optimization of piezoresistor parameters has been also performed to determine optimum dimensions of piezoresistors and their location referred to the center on the pressure sensor diaphragm. The output voltage measured on a piezoresistive Wheatstone bridge has been obtained and compared for two different resistor materials along with and linearity error analysis.

  9. Numerical modelling of pressure suppression pools with CFD and FEM codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paettikangas, T.; Niemi, J.; Timperi, A. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland))

    2011-06-15

    Experiments on large-break loss-of-coolant accident for BWR is modeled with computational fluid (CFD) dynamics and finite element calculations. In the CFD calculations, the direct-contact condensation in the pressure suppression pool is studied. The heat transfer in the liquid phase is modeled with the Hughes-Duffey correlation based on the surface renewal model. The heat transfer is proportional to the square root of the turbulence kinetic energy. The condensation models are implemented with user-defined functions in the Euler-Euler two-phase model of the Fluent 12.1 CFD code. The rapid collapse of a large steam bubble and the resulting pressure source is studied analytically and numerically. Pressure source obtained from simplified calculations is used for studying the structural effects and FSI in a realistic BWR containment. The collapse results in volume acceleration, which induces pressure loads on the pool walls. In the case of a spherical bubble, the velocity term of the volume acceleration is responsible of the largest pressure load. As the amount of air in the bubble is decreased, the peak pressure increases. However, when the water compressibility is accounted for, the finite speed of sound becomes a limiting factor. (Author)

  10. Uniform relativistic universe models with pressure. Part 2. Observational tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krempec, J.; Krygier, B.

    1977-01-01

    The magnitude-redshift and angular diameter-redshift relations are discussed for the uniform (homogeneous and isotropic) relativistic Universe models with pressure. The inclusion of pressure into the energy-momentum tensor has given larger values of the deceleration parameter q. An increase of the deceleration parameter has led to the brightening of objects as well as to a little larger angular diameters. (author)

  11. Model of Structural Fragmentation Induced by High Pressure Torsion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratochvíl, J.; Kružík, Martin; Sedláček, R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2010), s. 88-98 ISSN 1606-5131 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : High-pressure torsion * intergranular glide * homogeneous deformation mode Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.649, year: 2010 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/MTR/kruzik-model of structural fragmentation induced by high pressure torsion.pdf

  12. Extended fuel cycle operation for pressurized water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestri, G.J. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear steam turbine power plant system having an arrangement therein for extended fuel cycle operation is described. The power plant includes a turbine connected at its inlet to a source of motive fluid having a predetermined pressure associated therewith. The turbine has also connected thereto an extraction conduit which extracts steam from a predetermined location therein for use in an associated apparatus. A bypass conduit is provided between a point upstream of the inlet and the extraction conduit. A flow control device is provided within the bypass conduit and opens when the pressure of the motive steam supply drops beneath the predetermined pressure as a result of reactivity loss within the nuclear reactor. Opening of the bypass conduit provides flow to the associated apparatus and at the same time provides an increased flow orifice to maintain fluid flow rate at a predetermined level

  13. Ultra-high pressure water jet: Baseline report; Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Husky trademark is an ultra high pressure waterjet cutting tool system. The pump is mounted on a steel tube frame which includes slots for transport by a forklift. The Husky trademark features an automatic shutdown for several conditions such as low oil pressure and high oil temperature. Placement of the Husky trademark must allow for a three foot clearance on all sides for operation and service access. At maximum continuous operation, the output volume is 7.2 gallons per minute with an output pressure of 40,000 psi. A diesel engine provides power for the system. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust

  14. Surface water pesticide modelling for decision support in drinking water production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, Nele; Dams, Jef; Bronders, Jan; Peleman, Gisèle; Verdickt, Liesbeth

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence of pesticides and other contaminants in river systems may compromise the use of surface water for drinking water production. To reduce the cost of removal of pesticides from the raw water, drinking water companies can: search for other raw water sources, invest in water storage capacity to overcome periods with high pesticide concentrations (often related to the application period), or impose measures to reduce the emission of pesticides to surface water (i.e. sustainable application strategies or use restrictions). To select the most appropriate water management options, the costs and effects of the aforementioned actions need to be evaluated. This evaluation requires knowledge on the concentrations and loads of pesticides at the point of drinking water abstraction, as well as insight in the contribution and the temporal variability of different sources or subbasins. In such a case, a modelling approach can assist in generating measurement-based datasets and to compare different scenarios for water management. We illustrate how a modelling approach can provide decision support for water management related to drinking water abstraction from surface water in a catchment that suffers from elevated pesticide concentrations. The study area is a water production center (WPC) located in northwestern Belgium. The WPC abstracts raw water from the river IJzer or from a natural pond and its connected streams. The available quantities as well as the quality of the water vary throughout the year. The WPC uses a reservoir of 3 million m³ to capture and store raw water to overcome periods with limited water availability and/or poor water quality. However, the pressure on water increases and in the future this buffering capacity might be no longer sufficient to fulfill the drinking water production demand. A surface water quality model for the area is set up using InfoWorks RS. The model is applied to obtain insight in the concentrations and loads at the different

  15. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) is a 5% scale model test of the Ares I vehicle, launch pad and support structures conducted at MSFC to verify acoustic and ignition environments and evaluate water suppression systems Test design considerations 5% measurements must be scaled to full scale requiring high frequency measurements Users had different frequencies of interest Acoustics: 200 - 2,000 Hz full scale equals 4,000 - 40,000 Hz model scale Ignition Transient: 0 - 100 Hz full scale equals 0 - 2,000 Hz model scale Environment exposure Weather exposure: heat, humidity, thunderstorms, rain, cold and snow Test environments: Plume impingement heat and pressure, and water deluge impingement Several types of sensors were used to measure the environments Different instrument mounts were used according to the location and exposure to the environment This presentation addresses the observed effects of the selected sensors and mount design on the acoustic and pressure measurements

  16. Vegetative Propagule Pressure and Water Depth Affect Biomass and Evenness of Submerged Macrophyte Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Li; Wang, Yong-Yang; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Pu; Zhang, Ming-Xiang; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Vegetative propagule pressure may affect the establishment and structure of aquatic plant communities that are commonly dominated by plants capable of clonal growth. We experimentally constructed aquatic communities consisting of four submerged macrophytes (Hydrilla verticillata, Ceratophyllum demersum, Elodea nuttallii and Myriophyllum spicatum) with three levels of vegetative propagule pressure (4, 8 and 16 shoot fragments for communities in each pot) and two levels of water depth (30 cm and 70 cm). Increasing vegetative propagule pressure and decreasing water level significantly increased the growth of the submerged macrophyte communities, suggesting that propagule pressure and water depth should be considered when utilizing vegetative propagules to re-establish submerged macrophyte communities in degraded aquatic ecosystems. However, increasing vegetative propagule pressure and decreasing water level significantly decreased evenness of the submerged macrophyte communities because they markedly increased the dominance of H. verticillata and E. nuttallii, but had little impact on that of C. demersum and M. spicatum. Thus, effects of vegetative propagule pressure and water depth are species-specific and increasing vegetative propagule pressure under lower water level can facilitate the establishment success of submerged macrophyte communities.

  17. Vegetative Propagule Pressure and Water Depth Affect Biomass and Evenness of Submerged Macrophyte Communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Li Li

    Full Text Available Vegetative propagule pressure may affect the establishment and structure of aquatic plant communities that are commonly dominated by plants capable of clonal growth. We experimentally constructed aquatic communities consisting of four submerged macrophytes (Hydrilla verticillata, Ceratophyllum demersum, Elodea nuttallii and Myriophyllum spicatum with three levels of vegetative propagule pressure (4, 8 and 16 shoot fragments for communities in each pot and two levels of water depth (30 cm and 70 cm. Increasing vegetative propagule pressure and decreasing water level significantly increased the growth of the submerged macrophyte communities, suggesting that propagule pressure and water depth should be considered when utilizing vegetative propagules to re-establish submerged macrophyte communities in degraded aquatic ecosystems. However, increasing vegetative propagule pressure and decreasing water level significantly decreased evenness of the submerged macrophyte communities because they markedly increased the dominance of H. verticillata and E. nuttallii, but had little impact on that of C. demersum and M. spicatum. Thus, effects of vegetative propagule pressure and water depth are species-specific and increasing vegetative propagule pressure under lower water level can facilitate the establishment success of submerged macrophyte communities.

  18. Hydration kinetics modeling of Portland cement considering the effects of curing temperature and applied pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Feng; Meyer, Christian

    2009-01-01

    A hydration kinetics model for Portland cement is formulated based on thermodynamics of multiphase porous media. The mechanism of cement hydration is discussed based on literature review. The model is then developed considering the effects of chemical composition and fineness of cement, water-cement ratio, curing temperature and applied pressure. The ultimate degree of hydration of Portland cement is also analyzed and a corresponding formula is established. The model is calibrated against the experimental data for eight different Portland cements. Simple relations between the model parameters and cement composition are obtained and used to predict hydration kinetics. The model is used to reproduce experimental results on hydration kinetics, adiabatic temperature rise, and chemical shrinkage of different cement pastes. The comparisons between the model reproductions and the different experimental results demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model, especially for cement hydration at elevated temperature and high pressure.

  19. High pressure waterjets for oil containment in calm and wavy waters; a parametric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaddar, N.K.; Nawwar, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The use of high pressure waterjets (HPWJ) as oil barriers has been proposed and tested. It has been shown that a series of waterjets directed horizontally above the free water surface provide an effective means of containing or deflecting oil slicks. The waterjets generate a high speed air flow capable of moving the surface layer of the liquid. A numerical model is implemented to study the characteristics of the entrained turbulent air flow using the Spectral Element Method (SEM) and an algebraic turbulent model for the Reynolds stresses. A test of the code is done for turbulent Couette Flow to check the accuracy of the calculated shear stresses against published data. A parametric study is performed to evaluate the HPWJ system performance at various operating and design parameters which include manifold pressure, nozzle flow rate, nozzle characteristics, jet height and surface wave conditions. The total driving shear force and power required for effective containment are used as performance measures. Shear stress and the total driving shear force at the air-liquid interface are calculated over a reference waterjet distance. Performance is measured under calm and wavy sea conditions. It is found that the containment pressure required to generate a given shear force in wavy surface conditions are 30-50% less than those required in calm water. The driving shear force decreases as the jet height above the liquid surface increased. Shear forces also appear to decrease with the reduction of the entrained air flow. The later is governed by nozzle type, spread angle and spacing. The results of the parametric study are consistent with the trends observed experimentally, and could be used in optimising the system design and performance as well as in setting appropriate operational conditions. 12 refs., 10 figs

  20. Dielectric Relaxation of Bound Water versus Soil Matric Pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst, M.A.; Dirksen, C.; Kampers, F.W.H.; Feddes, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    The electrical permittivity of soil is a function of the water content, which facilitates water content measurements. The permittivity of soil is also a function of the frequency of the applied electric field. This frequency dependence can be described by the relationship between the dielectric

  1. Low-pressure water-cooled inductively coupled plasma torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliskar, Carl J.; Warner, David K.

    1988-12-27

    An inductively coupled plasma torch is provided which comprises an inner tube, including a sample injection port to which the sample to be tested is supplied and comprising an enlarged central portion in which the plasma flame is confined; an outer tube surrounding the inner tube and containing water therein for cooling the inner tube, the outer tube including a water inlet port to which water is supplied and a water outlet port spaced from the water inlet port and from which water is removed after flowing through the outer tube; and an r.f. induction coil for inducing the plasma in the gas passing into the tube through the sample injection port. The sample injection port comprises a capillary tube including a reduced diameter orifice, projecting into the lower end of the inner tube. The water inlet is located at the lower end of the outer tube and the r.f. heating coil is disposed around the outer tube above and adjacent to the water inlet.

  2. Troubled waters: Growing climate and population pressures in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2014-04-09

    Apr 9, 2014 ... Rapid urbanization is squeezing India's limited water resources. While climate change may compound the problem, research in two southern watersheds points to industrial pollution, unregulated extraction, and changes in land use as the greatest threats to water quality and availability.

  3. How Ambient Pressure Influences Water Droplet Nucleation at Tropospheric Conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Brus, David; Wedekind, J.; Lihavainen, H.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 37, - (2010), L21802 ISSN 0094-8276 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nucleations theories * ambient pressure * condensation of droplets Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.505, year: 2010

  4. Modeling water demand when households have multiple sources of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulibaly, Lassina; Jakus, Paul M.; Keith, John E.

    2014-07-01

    A significant portion of the world's population lives in areas where public water delivery systems are unreliable and/or deliver poor quality water. In response, people have developed important alternatives to publicly supplied water. To date, most water demand research has been based on single-equation models for a single source of water, with very few studies that have examined water demand from two sources of water (where all nonpublic system water sources have been aggregated into a single demand). This modeling approach leads to two outcomes. First, the demand models do not capture the full range of alternatives, so the true economic relationship among the alternatives is obscured. Second, and more seriously, economic theory predicts that demand for a good becomes more price-elastic as the number of close substitutes increases. If researchers artificially limit the number of alternatives studied to something less than the true number, the price elasticity estimate may be biased downward. This paper examines water demand in a region with near universal access to piped water, but where system reliability and quality is such that many alternative sources of water exist. In extending the demand analysis to four sources of water, we are able to (i) demonstrate why households choose the water sources they do, (ii) provide a richer description of the demand relationships among sources, and (iii) calculate own-price elasticity estimates that are more elastic than those generally found in the literature.

  5. Analysis of severe accidents in pressurized heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-06-01

    Certain very low probability plant states that are beyond design basis accident conditions and which may arise owing to multiple failures of safety systems leading to significant core degradation may jeopardize the integrity of many or all the barriers to the release of radioactive material. Such event sequences are called severe accidents. It is required in the IAEA Safety Requirements publication on Safety of the Nuclear Power Plants: Design, that consideration be given to severe accident sequences, using a combination of engineering judgement and probabilistic methods, to determine those sequences for which reasonably practicable preventive or mitigatory measures can be identified. Acceptable measures need not involve the application of conservative engineering practices used in setting and evaluating design basis accidents, but rather should be based on realistic or best estimate assumptions, methods and analytical criteria. Recently, the IAEA developed a Safety Report on Approaches and Tools for Severe Accident Analysis. This publication provides a description of factors important to severe accident analysis, an overview of severe accident phenomena and the current status in their modelling, categorization of available computer codes, and differences in approaches for various applications of severe accident analysis. The report covers both the in- and ex-vessel phases of severe accidents. The publication is consistent with the IAEA Safety Report on Accident Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants and can be considered as a complementary report specifically devoted to the analysis of severe accidents. Although the report does not explicitly differentiate among various reactor types, it has been written essentially on the basis of available knowledge and databases developed for light water reactors. Therefore its application is mostly oriented towards PWRs and BWRs and, to a more limited extent, they can be only used as preliminary guidance for other types of reactors

  6. Aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    Research is being conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants. The objectives of this work are to (1) identify the significant factors related to occurrence of corrosion, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containments and liners of concrete containments, and to make recommendations on use of risk models in regulatory decisions; (2) provide NRC reviewers a means of establishing current structural capacity margins for steel containments, and concrete containments as limited by liner integrity; and (3) provide recommendations, as appropriate, on information to be requested of licensees for guidance that could be utilized by NRC reviewers in assessing the seriousness of reported incidences of containment degradation. In meeting these objectives research is being conducted in two primary task areas - pressure boundary condition assessment and root-cause resolution practices, and reliability-based condition assessments. Under the first task area a degradation assessment methodology was developed for use in characterizing the in-service condition of metal and concrete containment pressure boundary components and quantifying the amount of damage that is present. An assessment of available destructive and nondestructive techniques for examining steel containments and liners is ongoing. Under the second task area quantitative structural reliability analysis methods are being developed for application to degraded metallic pressure boundaries to provide assurances that they will be able to withstand future extreme loads during the desired service period with a level of reliability that is sufficient for public safety. To date, mathematical models that describe time-dependent changes in steel due to aggressive environmental factors have been identified, and statistical data supporting their use in time-dependent reliability analysis have been summarized

  7. Accident tolerant high-pressure helium injection system concept for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massey, Caleb; Miller, James; Vasudevamurthy, Gokul

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Potential helium injection strategy is proposed for LWR accident scenarios. • Multiple injection sites are proposed for current LWR designs. • Proof-of-concept experimentation illustrates potential helium injection benefits. • Computational studies show an increase in pressure vessel blowdown time. • Current LOCA codes have the capability to include helium for feasibility calculations. - Abstract: While the design of advanced accident-tolerant fuels and structural materials continues to remain the primary focus of much research and development pertaining to the integrity of nuclear systems, there is a need for a more immediate, simple, and practical improvement in the severe accident response of current emergency core cooling systems. Current blowdown and reflood methodologies under accident conditions still allow peak cladding temperatures to approach design limits and detrimentally affect the integrity of core components. A high-pressure helium injection concept is presented to enhance accident tolerance by increasing operator response time while maintaining lower peak cladding temperatures under design basis and beyond design basis scenarios. Multiple injection sites are proposed that can be adapted to current light water reactor designs to minimize the need for new infrastructure, and concept feasibility has been investigated through a combination of proof-of-concept experimentation and computational modeling. Proof-of-concept experiments show promising cooling potential using a high-pressure helium injection concept, while the developed choked-flow model shows core depressurization changes with added helium injection. Though the high-pressure helium injection concept shows promise, future research into the evaluation of system feasibility and economics are needed.Classification: L. Safety and risk analysis

  8. Pressurized water reactor monitoring. Study of detection, diagnostic and estimation methods (least error squares and filtering)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillet, M.

    1986-07-01

    This thesis presents a study for the surveillance of the ''primary coolant circuit inventory monitoring'' of a pressurized water reactor. A reference model is developed in view of an automatic system ensuring detection and diagnostic in real time. The methods used for the present application are statistical tests and a method related to pattern recognition. The estimation of failures detected, difficult owing to the non-linearity of the problem, is treated by the least error squares method of the predictor or corrector type, and by filtering. It is in this frame that a new optimized method with superlinear convergence is developed, and that a segmented linearization of the model is introduced, in view of a multiple filtering [fr

  9. Solvated electrons at the atmospheric pressure plasma-water anodic interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, R.; Kawamura, E.; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Lieberman, M. A.; Graves, D. B.

    2016-07-01

    We present results from a particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo model of a dc discharge in argon at atmospheric pressure coupled with a fluid model of an aqueous electrolyte acting as anode to the plasma. The coupled models reveal the structure of the plasma-electrolyte interface and near-surface region, with a special emphasis on solvated or hydrated electrons. Results from the coupled models are in generally good agreement with the experimental results of Rumbach et al (2016 Nat. Commun. 6 7248). Electrons injected from the plasma into the water are solvated, then lost by reaction with water within about 10-20 nm from the surface. The major reaction products are OH- and H2. The solvated electron density profile is controlled by the injected electron current density and subsequent reactions with water, and is relatively independent of the external plasma electric field and the salt concentration in the aqueous electrolyte. Simulations of the effects of added scavenger compounds (H2O2, \\text{NO}2- , \\text{NO}2- and H+) on near-surface solvated electron density generally match the experimental results. The generation of near-surface OH- following electron-water decomposition in the presence of bulk acid creates a highly basic region (pH ~ 11) very near the surface. In the presence of bulk solution acidity, pH can vary from a very acidic pH 2 away from the surface to a very basic pH 11 over a distance of ~200 nm. High near-surface gradients in aqueous solution properties could strongly affect plasma-liquid applications and challenge theoretical understanding of this complex region.

  10. High-pressure intrapleural chemotherapy: feasibility in the pig model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Facy Olivier

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The usual treatments for pleural malignancies are mostly palliative. In contrast, peritoneal malignancies are often treated with a curative intent by cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. As pressure has been shown to increase antitumor efficacy, we applied the concept of high-pressure intracavitary chemotherapy to the pleural space in a swine model. Methods Cisplatin and gemcitabine were selected because of their antineoplasic efficacy in vitro in a wide spectrum of cancer cell lines. The pleural cavity of 21 pigs was filled with saline solution; haemodynamic and respiratory parameters were monitored. The pressure was increased to 15-25 cm H2O. This treatment was associated with pneumonectomy in 6 pigs. Five pigs were treated with chemotherapy under pressure. Results The combination of gemcitabine (100 mg/l and cisplatin (30 mg/l was highly cytotoxic in vitro. The maximum tolerated pressure was 20 cm H20, due to haemodynamic failure. Pneumonectomy was not tolerated, either before or after pleural infusion. Five pigs survived intrapleural chemotherapy associating gemcitabine and cisplatin with 20 cm H2O pressure for 60 min. Conclusions High-pressure intrapleural chemotherapy is feasible in pigs. Further experiments will establish the pharmacokinetics and determine whether the benefit already shown in the peritoneum is also obtained in the pleura.

  11. Reynolds stress turbulence model applied to two-phase pressurized thermal shocks in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mérigoux, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.merigoux@edf.fr; Laviéville, Jérôme; Mimouni, Stéphane; Guingo, Mathieu; Baudry, Cyril

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • NEPTUNE-CFD is used to model two-phase PTS. • k-ε model did produce some satisfactory results but also highlights some weaknesses. • A more advanced turbulence model has been developed, validated and applied for PTS. • Coupled with LIM, the first results confirmed the increased accuracy of the approach. - Abstract: Nuclear power plants are subjected to a variety of ageing mechanisms and, at the same time, exposed to potential pressurized thermal shock (PTS) – characterized by a rapid cooling of the internal Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) surface. In this context, NEPTUNE-CFD is used to model two-phase PTS and give an assessment on the structural integrity of the RPV. The first available choice was to use standard first order turbulence model (k-ε) to model high-Reynolds number flows encountered in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) primary circuits. In a first attempt, the use of k-ε model did produce some satisfactory results in terms of condensation rate and temperature field distribution on integral experiments, but also highlights some weaknesses in the way to model highly anisotropic turbulence. One way to improve the turbulence prediction – and consequently the temperature field distribution – is to opt for more advanced Reynolds Stress turbulence Model. After various verification and validation steps on separated effects cases – co-current air/steam-water stratified flows in rectangular channels, water jet impingements on water pool free surfaces – this Reynolds Stress turbulence Model (R{sub ij}-ε SSG) has been applied for the first time to thermal free surface flows under industrial conditions on COSI and TOPFLOW-PTS experiments. Coupled with the Large Interface Model, the first results confirmed the adequacy and increased accuracy of the approach in an industrial context.

  12. Experimental and Numerical Study of the Evaporation of Water at Low Pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Mohammad Amin; Nobes, David S; Elliott, Janet A W

    2017-05-09

    Although evaporation is considered to be a surface phenomenon, the rate of molecular transport across a liquid-vapor boundary is strongly dependent on the coupled fluid dynamics and heat transfer in the bulk fluids. Recent experimental thermocouple measurements of the temperature field near the interface of evaporating water into its vapor have begun to show the role of heat transfer in evaporation. However, the role of fluid dynamics has not been explored sufficiently. Here, we have developed a mathematical model to describe the coupling of the heat, mass, and momentum transfer in the fluids with the transport phenomena at the interface. The model was used to understand the experimentally obtained velocity field in the liquid and temperature profiles in the liquid and vapor, in evaporation from a concave meniscus for various vacuum pressures. By using the model, we have shown that an opposing buoyancy flow suppressed the thermocapillary flow in the liquid during evaporation at low pressures in our experiments. As such, in the absence of thermocapillary convection, the evaporation is controlled by heat transfer to the interface, and the predicted behavior of the system is independent of choosing between the existing theoretical expressions for evaporation flux. Furthermore, we investigated the temperature discontinuity at the interface and confirmed that the discontinuity strongly depends on the heat flux from the vapor side, which depends on the geometrical shape of the interface.

  13. A Cascade-Based Emergency Model for Water Distribution Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Shuang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Water distribution network is important in the critical physical infrastructure systems. The paper studies the emergency resource strategies on water distribution network with the approach of complex network and cascading failures. The model of cascade-based emergency for water distribution network is built. The cascade-based model considers the network topology analysis and hydraulic analysis to provide a more realistic result. A load redistribution function with emergency recovery mechanisms is established. From the aspects of uniform distribution, node betweenness, and node pressure, six recovery strategies are given to reflect the network topology and the failure information, respectively. The recovery strategies are evaluated with the complex network indicators to describe the failure scale and failure velocity. The proposed method is applied by an illustrative example. The results showed that the recovery strategy considering the node pressure can enhance the network robustness effectively. Besides, this strategy can reduce the failure nodes and generate the least failure nodes per time.

  14. Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, D.J.; Schrader, K.J.; Schulz, T.L.

    1994-05-03

    The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

  15. Capital cost: pressurized water reactor plant. Commercial electric power cost studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    The investment cost study for the 1139 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume contains the drawings, equipment list and site description.

  16. The Oxidation Rate of SiC in High Pressure Water Vapor Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Robinson, R. Craig

    1999-01-01

    CVD SiC and sintered alpha-SiC samples were exposed at 1316 C in a high pressure burner rig at total pressures of 5.7, 15, and 25 atm for times up to 100h. Variations in sample emittance for the first nine hours of exposure were used to determine the thickness of the silica scale as a function of time. After accounting for volatility of silica in water vapor, the parabolic rate constants for Sic in water vapor pressures of 0.7, 1.8 and 3.1 atm were determined. The dependence of the parabolic rate constant on the water vapor pressure yielded a power law exponent of one. Silica growth on Sic is therefore limited by transport of molecular water vapor through the silica scale.

  17. Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Daniel J.; Schrader, Kenneth J.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

  18. Capital cost: pressurized water reactor plant. Commerical electric power cost studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    The investment cost study for the 1139-MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume includes in addition to the foreword and summary, the plant description and the detailed cost estimate

  19. Capital cost: pressurized water reactor plant. Commercial electric power cost studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    The investment cost study for the 1139 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume contains the drawings, equipment list and site description

  20. Tyre pressure monitoring using a dynamical model-based estimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, Giulio; Gentile, Angelo; Messina, Arcangelo

    2015-04-01

    In the last few years, various control systems have been investigated in the automotive field with the aim of increasing the level of safety and stability, avoid roll-over, and customise handling characteristics. One critical issue connected with their integration is the lack of state and parameter information. As an example, vehicle handling depends to a large extent on tyre inflation pressure. When inflation pressure drops, handling and comfort performance generally deteriorate. In addition, it results in an increase in fuel consumption and in a decrease in lifetime. Therefore, it is important to keep tyres within the normal inflation pressure range. This paper introduces a model-based approach to estimate online tyre inflation pressure. First, basic vertical dynamic modelling of the vehicle is discussed. Then, a parameter estimation framework for dynamic analysis is presented. Several important vehicle parameters including tyre inflation pressure can be estimated using the estimated states. This method aims to work during normal driving using information from standard sensors only. On the one hand, the driver is informed about the inflation pressure and he is warned for sudden changes. On the other hand, accurate estimation of the vehicle states is available as possible input to onboard control systems.

  1. Modeling beam-front dynamics at low gas pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, R.J.; Yu, S.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamics of space charge neutralization at the front of an intense self-focused electron beam pulse exhibits important differences in different gas pressure regimes. At very low pressures, the beam front is in the so-called ion-focused regime (IFR) where all secondary electrons are expelled from the beam region by the radial electric field without causing significant additional ionization. We estimate the upper pressure boundary of this regime by considering the distance scale length for cascade (avalanche) ionization. Data from the FX-25 diode experiments indicate a critical transition pressure (P/sub c/) that agrees with this estimate and with its scaling among various gas types. Normal mobility-limited treatments (local conductivity models) of the secondary electrons at the beam front are not justified until the gas pressure is 10 to 50 times higher than P/sub c/, due to runaway of these secondary electrons in the strong space-charge electric field at the lower pressures. The main conclusion of this study is that a non-local phase space (Boltzmann) treatment of the secondary electrons is required to accurately describe these different beam front regimes and the transitions between them; such a code model is currently under development

  2. Nonlinear model predictive control of managed pressure drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandan, Anirudh; Imtiaz, Syed

    2017-07-01

    A new design of nonlinear model predictive controller (NMPC) is proposed for managed pressure drilling (MPD) system. The NMPC is based on output feedback control architecture and employs offset-free formulation proposed in [1]. NMPC uses active set method for computing control inputs. The controller implements an automatic switching from constant bottom hole pressure (CBHP) regulation to flow control mode in the event of a reservoir kick. In the flow control mode the controller automatically raises the bottom hole pressure setpoint, and thereby keeps the reservoir fluid flow to the surface within a tunable threshold. This is achieved by exploiting constraint handling capability of NMPC. In addition to kick mitigation the controller demonstrated good performance in containing the bottom hole pressure (BHP) during the pipe connection sequence. The controller also delivered satisfactory performance in the presence of measurement noise and uncertainty in the system. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nationwide water availability data for energy-water modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zemlick, Katie M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Klise, Geoffrey Taylor [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this effort is to explore where the availability of water could be a limiting factor in the siting of new electric power generation. To support this analysis, water availability is mapped at the county level for the conterminous United States (3109 counties). Five water sources are individually considered, including unappropriated surface water, unappropriated groundwater, appropriated water (western U.S. only), municipal wastewater and brackish groundwater. Also mapped is projected growth in non-thermoelectric consumptive water demand to 2035. Finally, the water availability metrics are accompanied by estimated costs associated with utilizing that particular supply of water. Ultimately these data sets are being developed for use in the National Renewable Energy Laboratories' (NREL) Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, designed to investigate the likely deployment of new energy installations in the U.S., subject to a number of constraints, particularly water.

  4. Instrumenting a pressure suppression experiment for a MK I boiling water reactor: another measurements engineering challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shay, W.M.; Brough, W.G.; Miller, T.B.

    1977-01-01

    A scale test facility of a pressure suppression system from a boiling water reactor was instrumented with seven types of transducers to obtain high-accuracy experimental data during a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident. The instrumentation verified the analysis of the dynamic loading of the pressure suppression system

  5. Heat transfer in a seven-rod test bundle with supercritical pressure water (1). Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezato, Koichiro; Seki, Yohji; Dairaku, Masayuki; Suzuki, Satoshi; Enoeda, Mikio; Akiba, Masato; Mori, H.; Oka, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Heat transfer experiments in a seven-rod test bundle with supercritical pressure water has been carried out. The pressure drop and heat transfer coefficients (HTCs) in the test section are evaluated. In the present limited conditions, difference between HTCs at the surface facing the sub-channel center and those at the surface in the narrowest region between rods is not observed. (author)

  6. Development of a quasi-adiabatic calorimeter for the determination of the water vapor pressure curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokdad, S; Georgin, E; Hermier, Y; Sparasci, F; Himbert, M

    2012-07-01

    Progress in the knowledge of the water saturation curve is required to improve the accuracy of the calibrations in humidity. In order to achieve this objective, the LNE-CETIAT and the LNE-CNAM have jointly built a facility dedicated to the measurement of the saturation vapor pressure and temperature of pure water. The principle is based on a static measurement of the pressure and the temperature of pure water in a closed, temperature-controlled thermostat, conceived like a quasi-adiabatic calorimeter. A copper cell containing pure water is placed inside a temperature-controlled copper shield, which is mounted in a vacuum-tight stainless steel vessel immersed in a thermostated bath. The temperature of the cell is measured with capsule-type standard platinum resistance thermometers, calibrated with uncertainties below the millikelvin. The vapor pressure is measured by calibrated pressure sensors connected to the cell through a pressure tube whose temperature is monitored at several points. The pressure gauges are installed in a thermostatic apparatus ensuring high stability of the pressure measurement and avoiding any condensation in the tubes. Thanks to the employment of several technical solutions, the thermal contribution to the overall uncertainty budget is reduced, and the remaining major part is mainly due to pressure measurements. This paper presents a full description of this facility and the preliminary results obtained for its characterization.

  7. Synthesis of oxynitride materials for solar water splitting: investigations with ambient pressure and high pressure synthesis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmagunawardhane, Hingure Arachchilage Naveen

    Solar water splitting, a photocatalytic process where water is directly split into hydrogen and oxygen using sunlight absorbing semiconductor materials, is one of the most sought after methods to make hydrogen economy a reality. Oxynitrides containing d0 and d10 cations tend to have the appropriate band structure required for solar water splitting. So far, reported efficiencies are not high enough for practical use and synthesizing an oxynitride showing high enough efficiency remains necessary. In this dissertation, we discuss the synthesis of oxynitrides and studying their optical and photocatalytic properties with a particular emphasis on utilizing exploratory high pressure synthesis. High pressure synthesis is an interesting route to synthesize oxynitrides as this can stabilize reactants that tend to decompose at ambient pressure, helping to achieve the intended stoichiometry. For synthesis, we selected candidate compositions from published theoretical studies. Reactions were carried out at pressures around 1-3 GPa and at temperatures up to 1300°C in a multi-anvil large volume press. Phase changes were observed with in situ X-ray scattering. In these experiments, we found that most d0 and d10 cations tend to reduce in the high pressure reaction environment as temperature increases, but Zr4+, Hf4+ , and Ta5+ tend to retain their oxidation state. This information will be helpful in future theoretical studies to accurately predict stable oxynitrides synthesizable at high pressure. We synthesized (GaN)1-x(ZnO)x solid solution in the entire composition range at 1 GPa, 1150°C. The material showed photocatalytic H2 evolution activity even without surface modification with co catalysts, first such observed for this system. The minimum band gap of 2.65 eV and the highest H2 evolution activity of 2.31 mumol/h were observed at x = 0.51. On our initial investigation on the synthesis of gallium oxynitride spinel (Ga3O3N3) at high pressure, we found that the material could

  8. Theory structure on 'decontamination technology for primary coolant loop of in-service pressurized water reactors'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xianyu

    1996-07-01

    Theory structure on 'Decontamination Technology for Primary Coolant Loop of In-Service Pressurized Water Reactors' is proposed. The paper aims at systematizing the experiences accumulated abroad in the development of decontamination over a long period of time and raising them to the level of instructive theory, so as to help form 'Decontamination Technology for Primary Coolant Loop of In-Service Pressurized Water Reactors', turn 'skill' into 'science', and stop acting blindly in the development of decontamination. (26 refs., 5 figs.)

  9. Standard technical specifications for Westinghouse pressurized water reactors (revision issued Fall 1981). Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgilio, M.J.

    1981-11-01

    The Standard Technical Specifications for Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors (W-STS) is a generic document prepared by the U.S. NRC for use in the licensing process of current Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors. The W-STS sets forth the Limits, Operating Conditions and other requirements applicable to nuclear reactor facility operation as set forth in Section 50.36 of 10 CFR Part 50 for the protection of the health and safety of the public

  10. Managing multiple diffuse pressures on water quality and ecological habitat: Spatially targeting effective mitigation actions at the landscape scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Hannah; Reaney, Sim

    2015-04-01

    Catchment systems provide multiple benefits for society, including: land for agriculture, climate regulation and recreational space. Yet, these systems also have undesirable externalities, such as flooding, and the benefits they create can be compromised through societal use. For example, agriculture, forestry and urban land use practices can increase the export of fine sediment and faecal indicator organisms (FIO) delivered to river systems. These diffuse landscape pressures are coupled with pressures on the in stream temperature environment from projected climate change. Such pressures can have detrimental impacts on water quality and ecological habitat and consequently the benefits they provide for society. These diffuse and in-stream pressures can be reduced through actions at the landscape scale but are commonly tackled individually. Any intervention may have benefits for other pressures and hence the challenge is to consider all of the different pressures simultaneously to find solutions with high levels of cross-pressure benefits. This research presents (1) a simple but spatially distributed model to predict the pattern of multiple pressures at the landscape scale, and (2) a method for spatially targeting the optimum location for riparian woodland planting as mitigation action against these pressures. The model follows a minimal information requirement approach along the lines of SCIMAP (www.scimap.org.uk). This approach defines the critical source areas of fine sediment diffuse pollution, rapid overland flow and FIOs, based on the analysis of the pattern of the pressure in the landscape and the connectivity from source areas to rivers. River temperature was modeled using a simple energy balance equation; focusing on temperature of inflowing and outflowing water across a catchment. The model has been calibrated using a long term observed temperature record. The modelling outcomes enabled the identification of the severity of each pressure in relative rather

  11. EFFECTS OF PRESSURE AND TEMPERATURE ON ULTRAFILTRATION HOLLOW FIBER MEMBRANE IN MOBILE WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROSDIANAH RAMLI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In Sabah, Malaysia, there are still high probability of limited clean water access in rural area and disaster site. Few villages had been affected in Pitas due to improper road access, thus building a water treatment plant there might not be feasible. Recently, Kundasang area had been affected by earthquake that caused water disruption to its people due to the damage in the underground pipes and water tanks. It has been known that membrane technology brought ease in making mobile water treatment system that can be transported to rural or disaster area. In this study, hollow fiber membrane used in a mobile water treatment system due to compact and ease setup. Hollow fiber membrane was fabricated into small module at 15 and 30 fibers to suit the mobile water treatment system for potable water production of at least 80 L/day per operation. The effects of transmembrane pressure (TMP and feed water temperature were investigated. It was found that permeate flux increases by more than 96% for both 15 and 30 fiber bundles with increasing pressure in the range of 0.25 to 3.0 bar but dropped when the pressure reached maximum. Lower temperature of 17 to 18˚C increase the water viscosity by 15% from normal temperature of water at 24˚C, making the permeate flux decreases. The fabricated modules effectively removed 96% turbidity of the surface water sample tested.

  12. Water pressure and ground vibrations induced by water guns at a backwater pond on the Illinois River near Morris, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebel, Carolyn M.; Egly, Rachel M.

    2016-09-27

    Three different geophysical sensor types were used to characterize the underwater pressure waves and ground velocities generated by the underwater firing of seismic water guns. These studies evaluated the use of water guns as a tool to alter the movement of Asian carp. Asian carp are aquatic invasive species that threaten to move into the Great Lakes Basin from the Mississippi River Basin. Previous studies have identified a threshold of approximately 5 pounds per square inch (lb/in2) for behavioral modification and for structural limitation of a water gun barrier.Two studies were completed during August 2014 and May 2015 in a backwater pond connected to the Illinois River at a sand and gravel quarry near Morris, Illinois. The August 2014 study evaluated the performance of two 80-cubic-inch (in3) water guns. Data from the 80-in3 water guns showed that the pressure field had the highest pressures and greatest extent of the 5-lb/in2 target value at a depth of 5 feet (ft). The maximum recorded pressure was 13.7 lb/in2, approximately 25 ft from the guns. The produced pressure field took the shape of a north-south-oriented elongated sphere with the 5-lb/in2 target value extending across the entire study area at a depth of 5 ft. Ground velocities were consistent over time, at 0.0067 inches per second (in/s) in the transverse direction, 0.031 in/s in the longitudinal direction, and 0.013 in/s in the vertical direction.The May 2015 study evaluated the performance of one and two 100-in3 water guns. Data from the 100-in3 water guns, fired both individually and simultaneously, showed that the pressure field had the highest pressures and greatest extent of the 5-lb/in2 target value at a depth of 5 ft. The maximum pressure was 57.4 lb/in2, recorded at the underwater blast sensor closest to the water guns (at a horizontal distance of approximately 3 ft), as two guns fired simultaneously. Pressures and extent of the 5-lb/in2 target value decrease above and below this 5-ft depth

  13. Drinking Water Salinity and Raised Blood Pressure: Evidence from a Cohort Study in Coastal Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheelbeek, Pauline FD; Chowdhury, Muhammad A H; Haines, Andy; Alam, Dewan S; Hoque, Mohammad A; Butler, Adrian P; Khan, Aneire E; Mojumder, Sontosh K; Blangiardo, Marta A G; Elliott, Paul; Vineis, Paolo

    2017-05-30

    Millions of coastal inhabitants in Southeast Asia have been experiencing increasing sodium concentrations in their drinking-water sources, likely partially due to climate change. High (dietary) sodium intake has convincingly been proven to increase risk of hypertension; it remains unknown, however, whether consumption of sodium in drinking water could have similar effects on health. We present the results of a cohort study in which we assessed the effects of drinking-water sodium (DWS) on blood pressure (BP) in coastal populations in Bangladesh. DWS, BP, and information on personal, lifestyle, and environmental factors were collected from 581 participants. We used generalized linear latent and mixed methods to model the effects of DWS on BP and assessed the associations between changes in DWS and BP when participants experienced changing sodium levels in water, switched from "conventional" ponds or tube wells to alternatives [managed aquifer recharge (MAR) and rainwater harvesting] that aimed to reduce sodium levels, or experienced a combination of these changes. DWS concentrations were highly associated with BP after adjustments for confounding factors. Furthermore, for each 100 mg/L reduction in sodium in drinking water, systolic/diastolic BP was lower on average by 0.95/0.57 mmHg, and odds of hypertension were lower by 14%. However, MAR did not consistently lower sodium levels. DWS is an important source of daily sodium intake in salinity-affected areas and is a risk factor for hypertension. Considering the likely increasing trend in coastal salinity, prompt action is required. Because MAR showed variable effects, alternative technologies for providing reliable, safe, low-sodium fresh water should be developed alongside improvements in MAR and evaluated in "real-life" salinity-affected settings. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP659.

  14. Numerical investigation of heat transfer in parallel channels with water at supercritical pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Shitsi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermal phenomena such as heat transfer enhancement, heat transfer deterioration, and flow instability observed at supercritical pressures as a result of fluid property variations have the potential to affect the safety of design and operation of Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor SCWR, and also challenge the capabilities of both heat transfer correlations and Computational Fluid Dynamics CFD physical models. These phenomena observed at supercritical pressures need to be thoroughly investigated.An experimental study was carried out by Xi to investigate flow instability in parallel channels at supercritical pressures under different mass flow rates, pressures, and axial power shapes. Experimental data on flow instability at inlet of the heated channels were obtained but no heat transfer data along the axial length was obtained. This numerical study used 3D numerical tool STAR-CCM+ to investigate heat transfer at supercritical pressures along the axial lengths of the parallel channels with water ahead of experimental data. Homogeneous axial power shape HAPS was adopted and the heating powers adopted in this work were below the experimental threshold heating powers obtained for HAPS by Xi. The results show that the Fluid Centre-line Temperature FCLT increased linearly below and above the PCT region, but flattened at the PCT region for all the system parameters considered. The inlet temperature, heating power, pressure, gravity and mass flow rate have effects on WT (wall temperature values in the NHT (normal heat transfer, EHT (enhanced heat transfer, DHT (deteriorated heat transfer and recovery from DHT regions. While variation of all other system parameters in the EHT and PCT regions showed no significant difference in the WT and FCLT values respectively, the WT and FCLT values respectively increased with pressure in these regions. For most of the system parameters considered, the FCLT and WT values obtained in the two channels were nearly the

  15. Diagnostics and modeling of high pressure streamer induced discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marode, E.; Dessante, P.; Deschamps, N.; Deniset, C.

    2001-01-01

    A great variety of diagnostic has been applied to gain information on basic parameter governing high pressure nonthermal filamentary plasmas (and namely streamer induced filamentary discharges). Apart from electrical diagnostics, gas discharge, in contrast with solid state physics, can greatly benefit from all optical techniques owing to its ''transparent'' state. Emission and absorption spectroscopy, as well as LIF or CARS (talk are given during this meeting on these two techniques) are among such specific possibilities. The figures gained from these diagnostic measurements has generally no meaning by itself. They must be worked out, by means of calibrated former results, and/or by using them as input in high pressure plasma modeling. Mixing experimental and modeling approach is necessary for reaching relevant physical knowledge of the high pressure filamentary discharges processes. It is shown that diffusion, and thermal space and time distribution, must fully be taken into account

  16. Investigation of temperature fluctuation phenomena in a stratified steam-water two-phase flow in a simulating pressurizer spray pipe of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, Koji; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Ishida, Taisuke; Sugimoto, Katsumi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal hydraulics phenomena were discussed in a spray pipe of pressurizer. • Temperature fluctuation was investigated in a stratified steam-water two-phase. • Remarkable liquid temperature fluctuations were observed in the liquid layer. • The observed temperature fluctuations were caused by the internal gravity wave. • The temperature fluctuations decreased with increasing dissolved oxygen. - Abstract: Temperature fluctuation phenomena in a stratified steam-water two-phase flow in a horizontal rectangular duct, which simulate a pressurizer spray pipe of a pressurized water reactor, were studied experimentally. Vertical distributions of the temperature and the liquid velocity were measured with water of various dissolved oxygen concentrations. Large liquid temperature fluctuations were observed when the water was deaerated well and dissolved oxygen concentration was around 10 ppb. The large temperature fluctuations were not observed when the oxygen concentration was higher. It was shown that the observed temperature fluctuations were caused by the internal gravity wave since the Richardson numbers were larger than 0.25 and the temperature fluctuation frequencies were around the Brunt-Väisälä frequencies in the present experimental conditions. The temperature fluctuations decreased by the non-condensable gas since the non-condensable gas suppressed the condensation and the temperature difference in the liquid layer was small.

  17. Modeling soil water content for vegetation modeling improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianfrani, Carmen; Buri, Aline; Zingg, Barbara; Vittoz, Pascal; Verrecchia, Eric; Guisan, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    Soil water content (SWC) is known to be important for plants as it affects the physiological processes regulating plant growth. Therefore, SWC controls plant distribution over the Earth surface, ranging from deserts and grassland to rain forests. Unfortunately, only a few data on SWC are available as its measurement is very time consuming and costly and needs specific laboratory tools. The scarcity of SWC measurements in geographic space makes it difficult to model and spatially project SWC over larger areas. In particular, it prevents its inclusion in plant species distribution model (SDMs) as predictor. The aims of this study were, first, to test a new methodology allowing problems of the scarcity of SWC measurements to be overpassed and second, to model and spatially project SWC in order to improve plant SDMs with the inclusion of SWC parameter. The study was developed in four steps. First, SWC was modeled by measuring it at 10 different pressures (expressed in pF and ranging from pF=0 to pF=4.2). The different pF represent different degrees of soil water availability for plants. An ensemble of bivariate models was built to overpass the problem of having only a few SWC measurements (n = 24) but several predictors to include in the model. Soil texture (clay, silt, sand), organic matter (OM), topographic variables (elevation, aspect, convexity), climatic variables (precipitation) and hydrological variables (river distance, NDWI) were used as predictors. Weighted ensemble models were built using only bivariate models with adjusted-R2 > 0.5 for each SWC at different pF. The second step consisted in running plant SDMs including modeled SWC jointly with the conventional topo-climatic variable used for plant SDMs. Third, SDMs were only run using the conventional topo-climatic variables. Finally, comparing the models obtained in the second and third steps allowed assessing the additional predictive power of SWC in plant SDMs. SWC ensemble models remained very good, with

  18. A novel model of human skin pressure ulcers in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés A Maldonado

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Pressure ulcers are a prevalent health problem in today's society. The shortage of suitable animal models limits our understanding and our ability to develop new therapies. This study aims to report on the development of a novel and reproducible human skin pressure ulcer model in mice. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Male non-obese, diabetic, severe combined immunodeficiency mice (n = 22 were engrafted with human skin. A full-thickness skin graft was placed onto 4×3 cm wounds created on the dorsal skin of the mice. Two groups with permanent grafts were studied after 60 days. The control group (n = 6 was focused on the process of engraftment. Evaluations were conducted with photographic assessment, histological analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH techniques. The pressure ulcer group (n = 12 was created using a compression device. A pressure of 150 mmHg for 8 h, with a total of three cycles of compression-release was exerted. Evaluations were conducted with photographic assessment and histological analysis. RESULTS: Skin grafts in the control group took successfully, as shown by visual assessment, FISH techniques and histological analysis. Pressure ulcers in the second group showed full-thickness skin loss with damage and necrosis of all the epidermal and dermal layers (ulcer stage III in all cases. Complete repair occurred after 40 days. CONCLUSIONS: An inexpensive, reproducible human skin pressure ulcer model has been developed. This novel model will facilitate the development of new clinically relevant therapeutic strategies that can be tested directly on human skin.

  19. Study of spray cooling of a pressure vessel head of a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anglart, Henryk; Alavyoon, Farid; Novarini, Remi

    2010-01-01

    The present paper deals with a theoretical analysis of the spray cooling of a Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) head in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). To this end a detailed computational model has been developed. The model predicts the trajectories, diameters and temperatures of subcooled droplets moving in saturated vapor. The model has been validated through comparison with experimental data, in which droplet temperatures were measured as functions of the distance that they cover in saturated vapor from the moment they leave the sprinkler outlet to the moment they impact on the RPV head inner wall. The calculations are in very good agreement with measurements, confirming the model adequacy for the present study. The model has been used for a parametric study to investigate the influence of several parameters on the cooling efficiency of the spray system. Based on the study it has been shown that one of the main parameters that govern the temperature increase in a subcooled droplet is its initial diameter. Comparisons are also made between conclusions from the theoretical model and observations made through flow and temperature measurements in the plant (Forsmark 1 and 2). One of these observations is that the rate at which the RPV head temperature decreases on the way down from hot to cold standby is constant and independent of the sprinkling flow rate as long as the flow rate is above a certain minimum value. Accordingly, the theoretical model shows that if one assumes that the cooling of the RPV head is through a water film built on the inner wall due to sprinkling, the heat removal rate is only very weakly dependent on the sprinkling flow rate.

  20. Hig