WorldWideScience

Sample records for model photochemical oxidant

  1. Iron oxides photochemical dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blesa, M.A.; Litter, M.I.

    1987-01-01

    This work was intended to study the light irradiation influence of diverse wave-lengths on iron oxides dissolution in aqueous solutions. The objectives of this work were: the exploration of photochemical processes with the aim of its eventual application in: a) decontamination and chemical cleaning under special conditions; b) materials for solar energy conversion. (Author)

  2. European scale modeling of sulfur, oxidized nitrogen and photochemical oxidants. Model development and evaluation for the 1994 growing season

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langner, J.; Bergstroem, R. [Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Inst., Norrkoeping (Sweden); Pleijel, K. [Swedish Environmental Research Inst., Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1998-09-01

    A chemical mechanism, including the relevant reactions leading to the production of ozone and other photochemical oxidants, has been implemented in the MATCH regional tracer transport/chemistry/deposition model. The aim has been to develop a model platform that can be used as a basis for a range of regional scale studies involving atmospheric chemistry, including assessment of the importance of different sources of pollutants to the levels of photochemical oxidants and air pollutant forecasting. Meteorological input data to the model were taken from archived output from the operational version of HIRLAM at SMHI. Evaluation of model calculations over Europe for a six month period in 1994 for a range of chemical components show good results considering known sources of error and uncertainties in input data and model formulation. With limited further work the system is sufficiently good to be applied for scenario studies and for regional scale air pollutant forecasts 42 refs, 24 figs, 17 tabs

  3. Photochemical modelling of photo-oxidant levels over the Swiss plateau and emission reduction scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosselet, C.M.; Kerr, J.A.

    1993-05-01

    During summertime high pressure conditions, high photo-oxidant (O 3 , H 2 O 2 , PAN and others) levels are frequently observed in the planetary boundary layer in central Europe. It is well known that close to the earth's surface ozone is formed by complex reactions involving VOC, NO x , and sunlight. Substantial reductions of both precursors are needed to reduce photo-oxidant levels. In this context the reductions of the abundance of the precursors and the variation of their ratios is of great importance. Here we report model calculations from the Harwell Photochemical Trajectory Model of the levels of O 3 , H 2 O 2 and PAN along a trajectory over the Swiss Plateau from Lake Constance to Lake Geneva. These calculations are in satisfactory agreement with measurements made during the intensive observation period of the research program POLLUMET (Pollution and Meteorology in Switzerland). Sensitivity calculations of emission reduction scenarios indicate that on the Swiss Plateau the ozone production may be mainly NO x -limited; under conditions where the CO levels are closer to the upper limit within the range (120-600 ppbv). The calculated peak ozone level reduction caused by an exclusive NO x -emission reduction is about three times larger than that caused by an exclusive VOC reduction. The combined reduction of all precursor compounds is the most efficient strategy, although it is only marginally more efficient than the NO x -reduction scenario alone. (author) figs., tabs., 75 refs

  4. HANDBOOK ON ADVANCED PHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDATION ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This handbook summarizes commercial-scale system performance and cost data for advanced photochemical oxidation (APO) treatment of contaminated water, air, and solids. Similar information from pilot- and bench-scale evaluations of APO processes is also included to supplement the commercial-scale data. Performance and cost data is summarized for various APO processes, including vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photolysis, ultraviolet (UV)/oxidation, photo-Fenton, and dye- or semiconductor-sensitized APO processes. This handbook is intended to assist engineering practitioners in evaluating the applicability of APO processes and in selecting one or more such processes for site-specific evaluation.APO has been shown to be effective in treating contaminated water and air. Regarding contaminated water treatment, UV/oxidation has been evaluated for the most contaminants, while VUV photolysis has been evaluated for the fewest. Regarding contaminated air treatment, the sensitized APO processes have been evaluated for the most contaminants, while VUV photolysis has been evaluated for the fewest.APO processes for treating contaminated solids generally involve treatment of contaminated slurry or leachate generated using an extraction process such as soil washing. APO has been shown to be effective in treating contaminated solids, primarily at the bench-scale level. Information

  5. Trace organic removal by photochemical oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.K. Sen; Peori, R.G.; Wickware, S.L.

    1995-02-01

    Photochemical oxidation methods can be used for the destruction of dissolved organic contaminants in most process effluent streams, including those originating from the nuclear power sector. Evaporators can be used to separate organic contaminants from the aqueous phase if they are non volatile, but a large volume of secondary waste (concentrate) is produced, and the technology is capital-intensive. This paper describes two different types of photochemical oxidation technologies used to destroy trace organics in wastewater containing oil and grease. (author). 9 refs., 4 figs

  6. Photochemical oxidants: state of the science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kley, D; Kleinmann, M; Sanderman, H; Krupa, S

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric photochemical processes resulting in the production of tropospheric ozone (O(3)) and other oxidants are described. The spatial and temporal variabilities in the occurrence of surface level oxidants and their relationships to air pollution meteorology are discussed. Models of photooxidant formation are reviewed in the context of control strategies and comparisons are provided of the air concentrations of O(3) at select geographic locations around the world. This overall oxidant (O(3)) climatology is coupled to human health and ecological effects. The discussion of the effects includes both acute and chronic responses, mechanisms of action, human epidemiological and plant population studies and briefly, efforts to establish cause-effect relationships through numerical modeling. A short synopsis is provided of the interactive effects of O(3) with other abiotic and biotic factors. The overall emphasis of the paper is on identifying the current uncertainties and gaps in our understanding of the state of the science and some suggestions as to how they may be addressed.

  7. Aqueous-phase photochemical oxidation and direct photolysis of vanillin - a model compound of methoxy phenols from biomass burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. J.; Huang, D. D.; Cheung, H. Y.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Chan, C. K.

    2014-03-01

    We present here experimental results on aqueous-phase (A) photochemical oxidation (with UV and OH radicals generated from H2O2 photolysis) and (B) direct photolysis (with only UV irradiation) of a methoxy phenol, vanillin (VL), as a model compound from biomass burning. Both on-line aerosol mass spectrometric (AMS) characterization and off-line chemical analyses were performed. AMS analyses of dried atomized droplets of the bulk reacting mixtures showed that VL almost entirely evaporates during the drying process. Large amounts of organic mass remained in the particle phase after reactions under both conditions. Under condition (A), AMS measured organic mass first increased rapidly and then decreased, attributable to the formation of non-volatile products and subsequent formation of smaller and volatile products, respectively. The oxygen-to-carbon (O : C) ratio of the products reached 1.5 after about 80 min, but dropped substantially thereafter. In contrast, organic mass increased slowly under condition (B). The O : C ratio reached 1.0 after 180 min. In off-line analyses, small oxygenates were detected under condition (A), while hydroxylated products and dimers of VL were detected under condition (B). Particle hygroscopic growth factor (GF) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of the reacting mixtures were found to depend on both organic volume fraction and the degree of oxygenation of organics. Results show that (1) aqueous-phase processes can lead to the retention of a large portion of the organic mass in the particle phase; (2) once retained, this portion of organic mass significantly changes the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of the aerosol particles; (3) intensive photochemical oxidation gave rise to an O : C ratio as high as 1.5 but the ratio decreased as further oxidation led to smaller and more volatile products; and (4) polymerization occurred with direct photolysis, resulting in high-molecular-weight products of a yellowish color. This study

  8. Aqueous-phase photochemical oxidation and direct photolysis of vanillin - a model compound of methoxy-phenols from biomass burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. J.; Huang, D. D.; Cheung, H. Y.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Chan, C. K.

    2013-10-01

    We present here experimental results on aqueous-phase (A) photochemical oxidation (with UV and OH radicals generated from H2O2 photolysis) and (B) direct photolysis (with only UV irradiation) of a methoxy-phenol, vanillin (VL), as a model compound from biomass burning. Both on-line aerosol mass spectrometric (AMS) characterization and off-line chemical analyses were performed. AMS analyses of dried atomized droplets of the bulk reacting mixtures showed that VL almost entirely evaporates during the drying process. Large amounts of organic mass remained in the particle phase after reactions under both conditions. Under condition (A), AMS measured organic mass first increased rapidly and then decreased, attributable to the formation of non-volatile products and subsequent formation of smaller and volatile products, respectively. The oxygen-to-carbon (O:C) ratio of the products reached 1.5 after about 80 min, but dropped substantially thereafter. In contrast, organic mass increased slowly under condition (B). The O:C ratio reached 1.0 after 180 min. In off-line analyses, small oxygenates were detected under condition (A), while hydroxylated products and dimers of VL were detected under condition (B). Particle hygroscopic growth factor (GF) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of the reacting mixtures were found to be dependent on both organic volume fraction and the degree of oxygenation of organics. Results show that (1) aqueous-phase processes can lead to the retention of a large portion of the organic mass in the particle phase; (2) once retained, this portion of organic mass significantly changes the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of the aerosol particles; (3) intensive photochemical oxidation gave rise to an O:C ratio as high as 1.5 but the ratio decreased as further oxidation led to smaller and more volatile products; and (4) polymerization occurred with direct photolysis, resulting in high-molecular-weight products of a yellowish color. This study

  9. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY PROJECT BULLETIN: LASER INDUCED PHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDATIVE DESTRUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The process developed by Energy and Environmental Engineering, Incorporated, is designed to photochemically oxidize organic compounds in wastewater by applying ultraviolet radiation using an Excimer laser. The photochemical reactor can destroy low to moderate concentrations...

  10. Instantaneous global nitrous oxide photochemical rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, H.S.; Serang, O.; Podolske, J.

    1979-01-01

    In recent years, vertical profiles of nitrous oxide have been measured by balloon up to midstratosphere at several latitudes between 63 0 N and 73 0 S, including one profile in the tropical zone at 9 0 N. Two rocket flights measured nitrous oxide mixing ratios at 44 and 49 km. From these experimental data plus a large amount of interpolation and extrapolation, we have estimated a global distribution of nitrous oxide up to the altitude of 50 km. With standard global distributions of oxygen and ozone we carried out instantaneous, three-dimensional, global photochemical calculations, using recently measured temperature-dependent cross sections for nitrous oxide. The altitude of maximum photolysis rate of N 2 O is about 30 km at all latitudes, and the rate of photolysis is a maximum in tropical latitudes. The altitude of maximum rate of formation of nitric oxide is latitude dependent, about 26 km at the equator, about 23 km over temperate zones, and 20 km at the summer pole. The global rate of N 2 O destruction is 6.2 x 10 27 molecules s -1 , and the global rate of formation of NO from N 2 O is 1.4 x 10 27 molecules s -1 . The global N 2 O inventory divided by the stratospheric loss rate gives a residence time of about 175 years with respect to this loss process. From the global average N 2 O profile a vertical eddy diffusion profile was derived, and this profile agrees very closely with that of Stewart and Hoffert

  11. Photochemical oxidation: A solution for the mixed waste dilemma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prellberg, J.W.; Thornton, L.M.; Cheuvront, D.A. [Vulcan Peroxidation Systems, Inc., Tucson, AZ (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Numerous technologies are available to remove organic contamination from water or wastewater. A variety of techniques also exist that are used to neutralize radioactive waste. However, few technologies can satisfactorily address the treatment of mixed organic/radioactive waste without creating unacceptable secondary waste products or resulting in extremely high treatment costs. An innovative solution to the mixed waste problem is on-site photochemical oxidation. Liquid-phase photochemical oxidation has a long- standing history of successful application to the destruction of organic compounds. By using photochemical oxidation, the organic contaminants are destroyed on-site leaving the water, with radionuclides, that can be reused or disposed of as appropriate. This technology offers advantages that include zero air emissions, no solid or liquid waste formation, and relatively low treatment cost. Discussion of the photochemical process will be described, and several case histories from recent design testing, including cost analyses for the resulting full-scale installations, will be presented as examples.

  12. Plants as indicators of photochemical oxidants in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, J.S.

    1977-01-01

    Plant indicators have been important in identifying the photochemical oxidant problem in the USA since the 1940's. They continue to serve as an inexpensive means of detecting oxidants in the atmosphere and determining the geographical extent and frequency of occurrence of oxidants. Plant indicators are particularly useful for land-use planning and in the evaluation of air pollution effects on agriculture, forestry, and native vegetation. Plant indicators are not satisfactory substitutes for chemical monitoring of the atmosphere because their responses lack specificity and are affected by climatic, edaphic, and cultural factors, as well as the concentration and frequency of occurrence of oxidants. Because they integrate many environmental variables, plant indicators may be valuable models for the response of other species but only to the extent that they respond to oxidants in the same manner as these other species. The four most important factors for the successful use of plant indicators are: genetic uniformity of plant material; standardization of cultural conditions; standardization of procedures for scoring foliar symptoms; and uniformity of climatic and edaphic factors among study sites. The species used most frequently as indicators of oxidants in the US have been Bel W-3 tobacco and Pinto bean for 0/sub 3/ and petunia for peroxyacyl nitrate. 41 references, 1 table.

  13. Decoupling photochemical Fe(II) oxidation from shallow-water BIF deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konhauser, Kurt; Amskold, Larry; Lalonde, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    to the rise of atmospheric oxygen and the development of a protective ozone layer, the Earth's surface was subjected to high levels of ultraviolet radiation. Bulk ocean waters that were anoxic at this time could have supported high concentrations of dissolved Fe(II). Under such conditions, dissolved ferrous...... for biology [Fran??ois, L.M., 1986, Extensive deposition of banded iron formations was possible without photosynthesis. Nature 320, 352-354]. Here, we evaluate the potential importance of photochemical oxidation using a combination of experiments and thermodynamic models. The experiments simulate......-type systems, then we are driven to conclude that oxide-facies BIF are the product of a rapid, non-photochemical oxidative process, the most likely candidates being direct or indirect biological oxidation, and that a significant fraction of BIF could have initially been deposited as ferrous minerals. ?? 2007...

  14. Global emissions and models of photochemically active compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penner, J.E.; Atherton, C.S.; Graedel, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    Anthropogenic emissions from industrial activity, fossil fuel combustion, and biomass burning are now known to be large enough (relative to natural sources) to perturb the chemistry of vast regions of the troposphere. A goal of the IGAC Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA) is to provide authoritative and reliable emissions inventories on a 1 degree x 1 degree grid. When combined with atmospheric photochemical models, these high quality emissions inventories may be used to predict the concentrations of major photochemical products. Comparison of model results with measurements of pertinent species allows us to understand whether there are major shortcomings in our understanding of tropospheric photochemistry, the budgets and transport of trace species, and their effects in the atmosphere. Through this activity, we are building the capability to make confident predictions of the future consequences of anthropogenic emissions. This paper compares IGAC recommended emissions inventories for reactive nitrogen and sulfur dioxide to those that have been in use previously. We also present results from the three-dimensional LLNL atmospheric chemistry model that show how emissions of anthropogenic nitrogen oxides might potentially affect tropospheric ozone and OH concentrations and how emissions of anthropogenic sulfur increase sulfate aerosol loadings

  15. Kinetic analyses and mathematical modeling of primary photochemical and photoelectrochemical processes in plant photosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vredenberg, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the model and simulation of primary photochemical and photo-electrochemical reactions in dark-adapted intact plant leaves is presented. A descriptive algorithm has been derived from analyses of variable chlorophyll a fluorescence and P700 oxidation kinetics upon excitation with

  16. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) of Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants (Second External Review Draft, Sep 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has released the Integrated Science Assessment of Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants (Second External Review Draft) for independent peer review and public review. This draft document represents a concise synthesis and evaluation of the most policy-relevant scienc...

  17. Photochemical oxidant transport - Mesoscale lake breeze and synoptic-scale aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, W. A.; Cole, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    Data from routine ozone monitoring in southeastern Wisconsin and limited monitoring of the Milwaukee area by the Environmental Protection Agency are examined. Hourly averages as high as 30 pphm have been recorded in southeastern Wisconsin, and high readings have been reported in rural regions throughout the state. The observations indicate that photochemical oxidants and their nitrogen oxide and reactive hydrocarbon precursers advect from Chicago and northern Indiana into southeastern Wisconsin. There is evidence that synoptic-scale transport of photochemical oxidants occurs, allowing the pollution of entire anticyclones. These results cast doubt on the validity of the Air Quality Control Regions established by amendment to the Clean Air Act of 1970.

  18. Computer Modelling of Photochemical Smog Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebert, Barry J.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses a computer program that has been used in environmental chemistry courses as an example of modelling as a vehicle for teaching chemical dynamics, and as a demonstration of some of the factors which affect the production of smog. (Author/GS)

  19. Measurement of pollutant species in automotive exhaust: application of a 3D Eulerian model about the photochemical oxidant formation in the troposphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caplain, I.

    2005-05-01

    Automotive pollution has become a more and more worrying problem. Pollution regulations are more severe today but even if some pollutants have to fulfill strict emission standards, other compounds like volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbonyl compounds, are less controlled but remain toxic for human beings in a direct way (primary pollution) or in an indirect way (secondary pollution). This work deals with the experimental measurements of exhaust pollution, the inventory of pollutant emissions from transports, and the modeling of air quality. The experimental measurements are performed in the framework of the European project Artemis (assessment and reliability of transport emission models and inventory systems) under the coordination of INRETS, on a set of 30 gasoline and diesel vehicles of recent technology. These vehicles are submitted to various road tests in order to improve the emissions database for private vehicles. The main pollutants measured are the light VOCs (C2 to C6), the heavy VOCs (C7 to C15) and the carbonyl compounds. About a hundred of compounds are thus measured. The emissions factor of each pollutant has been determined for each vehicle and has been used for the elaboration of an emission map of the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region. These pollutant data have been used as input data for a physicochemical simulation model of troposphere (UAM: urban air-shed model). A previous study about the introduction of the detailed molecular speciation of VOCs and the use of the CBIV mechanism did not lead to concluding results about the speciation impact on ozone formation. The introduction of a new mechanism would allow to take into account the overall compounds and to see their eventual contribution to the ozone formation. This would require a modification of the model and in particular the addition of a flexible chemical mechanism (FCM) interface for the introduction of a new chemical mechanism (SAPRC 99 instead of CBIV) in the model. The overall input

  20. Oxidative Capacity Predicted Using Photochemical Age Approximation from SAMBBA Airborne Observations in the Amazon Rainforest

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, F. C.; Longo, K.; Guenther, A. B.; Freitas, S. R.; Moreira, D. S.; Flávio, L.; Braz, R.; Oram, D.; Lee, J. D.; Bauguitte, S.

    2016-12-01

    Emitted by vegetation, isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) is the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbons, with an annual global emission calculated ranging from 440 to 660Tg carbon, depending on the driving variables like temperature, solar radiation, leaf area index and plant functional type. It is estimated, for example, that the natural compounds like isoprene and terpenes present in the troposphere are about 90% and 50%, respectively, removed from the atmosphere by oxidation performed by hydroxyl radical (OH). Furthermore, the oxidation products of isoprene may contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, affecting the climate and altering the properties and lifetimes of clouds. Considering the importance of these emissions and the hydroxyl radical reaction in the atmosphere, the SAMBBA (South American Biomass Burning Analysis) experiment, which occurred during the dry season (September 2012) in the Amazon Rainforest, provided information about the chemical composition of the atmosphere through airborne observations. Although primarily focused on biomass burning flights, the SAMBBA project carried out other flights providing indirect oxidative capacity data in different environments: natural emission dominated flights and biomass-burning flights with fresh plumes and aged plumes. In this study, we evaluate the oxidative capacity of the Amazon rainforest in different environments, both for the unpolluted and biomass-burning disturbed atmosphere using the ratio [MVK + MACR]/[Isoprene]. Beyond that, we propose an improvement on the formulation of indirect OH density calculation, using the photochemical aging [O3]/[CO] as a parameter. During the day (11am-8pm - local time), the [OH] values for natural emission flights (8.1 x 106 molecules/cm3) and biomass-burning (9.4 x 106 molecules/cm3) are comparable with GABRIEL-2015 field campaign along Guyanas tropical rainforest and suggest that biomass-burning increase the oxidative capacity around 18% in average

  1. Investigation of Phenol Removal in Aqueous Solutions Using Advanced Photochemical Oxidation (APO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Jamshidi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Most organic compounds are resistant to conven­tional chemical and biological treatments. For this reason, other methods are being studied as alter­natives to the biological and classical physico-chemical pro­cesses. In this study, advanced photochemical oxidation (APO processes (UV, UV/H2O2, UV/H2O2/Fe(II, andUV/H2O2/Fe(III were investigated in lab-scale experiments for the degradation of phenol in an aqueous solution. A medium-pressure 300 watt (UV-C mercury ultraviolet lamp was used as the radiation source and H2O2 30% as the oxidant. Phenol (initial concentration= 0.5 mmol/L was selected as the model due to its high use and application. Some important parameters such as pH, H2O2 input concentration, iron catalyst concentration, the type of iron salt, and duration of UV radiation were studied based on the standard methods. The results showed that the Photo-Fenton process was the most effective treatment under acidic conditions producing a higher rate of phenol degradation over a very short radiation time. The process accelerated the oxidation rate by 4-5 times the rate of the UV/H2O2 process. The optimum conditions were obtained at a pH value of 3, with a molar ratio of 11.61 for H2O2/Phenol and molar ratios of 0.083 and 0.067for Iron/H2O2 in the UV/H2O2/Fe (II and the UV/H2O2/Fe (III systems, respectively.

  2. Intercontinental transport of aerosols and photochemical oxidants from Asia and its consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuebbles, Donald J.; Lei, Hang; Lin, Jintai

    2007-01-01

    The intercontinental transport of aerosols and photochemical oxidants from Asia is a crucial issue for air quality concerns in countries downwind of the significant emissions and concentrations of pollutants occurring in this important region of the world. Since the lifetimes of some important pollutants are long enough to be transported over long distance in the troposphere, regional control strategies for air pollution in downwind countries might be ineffective without considering the effects of long-range transport of pollutants from Asia. Field campaigns provide strong evidence for the intercontinental transport of Asian pollutants. They, together with ground-based observations and model simulations, show that the air quality over parts of North America is being affected by the pollutants transported from Asia. This paper examines the current understanding of the intercontinental transport of gases and aerosols from Asia and resulting effects on air quality, and on the regional and global climate system. - Air quality over parts of North America is being affected by pollutants transported from Asia

  3. Coupled Photochemical and Condensation Model for the Venus Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierson, Carver; Zhang, Xi; Mendonca, Joao; Liang, Mao-Chang

    2017-10-01

    Ground based and Venus Express observations have provided a wealth of information on the vertical and latitudinal distribution of many chemical species in the Venus atmosphere [1,2]. Previous 1D models have focused on the chemistry of either the lower [3] or middle atmosphere [4,5]. Photochemical models focusing on the sulfur gas chemistry have also been independent from models of the sulfuric acid haze and cloud formation [6,7]. In recent years sulfur-bearing particles have become important candidates for the observed SO2 inversion above 80 km [5]. To test this hypothesis it is import to create a self-consistent model that includes photochemistry, transport, and cloud condensation.In this work we extend the domain of the 1D chemistry model of Zhang et al. (2012) [5] to encompass the region between the surface to 110 km. This model includes a simple sulfuric acid condensation scheme with gravitational settling. It simultaneously solves for the chemistry and condensation allowing for self-consistent cloud formation. We compare the resulting chemical distributions to observations at all altitudes. We have also validated our model cloud mass against pioneer Venus observations [8]. This updated full atmosphere chemistry model is also being applied in our 2D solver (altitude and altitude). With this 2D model we can model how the latitudinal distribution of chemical species depends on the meridional circulation. This allows us to use the existing chemical observations to place constraints on Venus GCMs [9-11].References: [1] Arney et al., JGR:Planets, 2014 [2] Vandaele et al., Icarus 2017 (pt. 1 & 2) [3] Krasnopolsky, Icarus, 2007 [4] Krasnopolsky, Icarus, 2012 [5] Zhang et al., Icarus 2012 [6] Gao et al., Icarus, 2014 [7] Krasnopolsky, Icarus, 2015 [8] Knollenberg and Hunten, JGR:Space Physics, 1980 [9] Lee et al., JGR:Planets, 2007 [10] Lebonnois et al., Towards Understanding the Climate of Venus, 2013 [11] Mendoncca and Read, Planetary and Space Science, 2016

  4. Photo-chemical transport modelling of tropospheric ozone: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sumit; Sharma, Prateek; Khare, Mukesh

    2017-06-01

    Ground level ozone (GLO), a secondary pollutant having adverse impact on human health, ecology, and agricultural productivity, apart from being a major contributor to global warming, has been a subject matter of several studies. In order to identify appropriate strategies to control GLO levels, accurate assessment and prediction is essential, for which elaborate simulation and modelling is required. Several studies have been undertaken in the past to simulate GLO levels at different scales and for various applications. It is important to evaluate these studies, widely spread over in literature. This paper aims to critically review various studies that have been undertaken, especially in the past 15 years (2000-15) to model GLO. The review has been done of the studies that range over different spatial scales - urban to regional and continental to global. It also includes a review of performance evaluation and sensitivity analysis of photo-chemical transport models in order to assess the extent of application of these models and their predictive capability. The review indicates following major findings: (a) models tend to over-estimate the night-time GLO concentrations due to limited titration of GLO with NO within the model; (b) dominance of contribution from far-off regional sources to average ozone concentration in the urban region and higher contribution of local sources during days of high ozone episodes; requiring strategies for controlling precursor emissions at both regional and local scales; (c) greater influence of NOx over VOC in export of ozone from urban regions due to shifting of urban plumes from VOC-sensitive regime to NOx-sensitive as they move out from city centres to neighbouring rural regions; (d) models with finer resolution inputs perform better to a certain extent, however, further improvement in resolutions (beyond 10 km) did not show improvement always; (e) future projections show an increase in GLO concentrations mainly due to rise in

  5. A Model Study of the Photochemical Fate of As(III in Paddy-Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Carena

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The APEX (Aqueous Photochemistry of Environmentally-occurring Xenobiotics software previously developed by one of us was used to model the photochemistry of As(III in paddy-field water, allowing a comparison with biotic processes. The model included key paddy-water variables, such as the shielding effect of the rice canopy on incident sunlight and its monthly variations, water pH, and the photochemical parameters of the chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM occurring in paddy fields. The half-life times (t1/2 of As(III photooxidation to As(V would be ~20–30 days in May. In contrast, the photochemical oxidation of As(III would be much slower in June and July due to rice-canopy shading of radiation because of plant growth, despite higher sunlight irradiance. At pH < 8 the photooxidation of As(III would mainly be accounted for by reaction with transient species produced by irradiated CDOM (here represented by the excited triplet states 3CDOM*, neglecting the possibly more important reactions with poorly known species such as the phenoxy radicals and, to a lesser extent, with the hydroxyl radicals (HO•. However, the carbonate radicals (CO3•− could be key photooxidants at pH > 8.5 provided that the paddy-water 3CDOM* is sufficiently reactive toward the oxidation of CO32−. In particular, if paddy-water 3CDOM* oxidizes the carbonate anion with a second-order reaction rate constant near (or higher than 106 M−1·s−1, the photooxidation of As(III could be quite fast at pH > 8.5. Such pH conditions can be produced by elevated photosynthetic activity that consumes dissolved CO2.

  6. Total OH reactivity study from VOC photochemical oxidation in the SAPHIR chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Z.; Tillmann, R.; Hohaus, T.; Fuchs, H.; Novelli, A.; Wegener, R.; Kaminski, M.; Schmitt, S. H.; Wahner, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that hydroxyl radicals (OH) act as a dominant reactive species in the degradation of VOCs in the atmosphere. In recent field studies, directly measured total OH reactivity often showed poor agreement with OH reactivity calculated from VOC measurements (e.g. Nölscher et al., 2013; Lu et al., 2012a). This "missing OH reactivity" is attributed to unaccounted biogenic VOC emissions and/or oxidation products. The comparison of total OH reactivity being directly measured and calculated from single component measurements of VOCs and their oxidation products gives us a further understanding on the source of unmeasured reactive species in the atmosphere. This allows also the determination of the magnitude of the contribution of primary VOC emissions and their oxidation products to the missing OH reactivity. A series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, to explore in detail the photochemical degradation of VOCs (isoprene, ß-pinene, limonene, and D6-benzene) by OH. The total OH reactivity was determined from the measurement of VOCs and their oxidation products by a Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) with a GC/MS/FID system, and directly measured by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) at the same time. The comparison between these two total OH reactivity measurements showed an increase of missing OH reactivity in the presence of oxidation products of VOCs, indicating a strong contribution to missing OH reactivity from uncharacterized oxidation products.

  7. Diagnostic Evaluation of Ozone Production and Horizontal Transport in a Regional Photochemical Air Quality Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    A diagnostic model evaluation effort has been performed to focus on photochemical ozone formation and the horizontal transport process since they strongly impact the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of ozone (O3) within the lower troposphere. Results from th...

  8. APPLICATION OF BAYESIAN MONTE CARLO ANALYSIS TO A LAGRANGIAN PHOTOCHEMICAL AIR QUALITY MODEL. (R824792)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uncertainties in ozone concentrations predicted with a Lagrangian photochemical air quality model have been estimated using Bayesian Monte Carlo (BMC) analysis. Bayesian Monte Carlo analysis provides a means of combining subjective "prior" uncertainty estimates developed ...

  9. Photochemical preparation of aluminium oxide layers via vacuum ultraviolet irradiation of a polymeric hexanoato aluminium complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wennrich, L.; Khalil, H.; Bundesmann, C.; Decker, U.; Gerlach, J.W.; Helmstedt, U.; Manova, D.; Naumov, S.; Prager, L.

    2013-01-01

    By means of photochemical conversion of thin layers of a polymeric hexanoato aluminium complex as the precursor, thin aluminium oxide layers were prepared onto silicon wafers. The precursor compound was synthesized and characterized by several analytical techniques like NMR, FTIR, XPS, ICP, and found to be a polymeric aluminium-containing coordination compound which has been proposed to be a hydroxo-bridged aluminium chain with pendant hexanoyl side-chains ascertained as catena-poly[{di(κ-O,O-hexanoato)aluminium}(μ-hydroxo)] (PHAH). Thin layers deposited from a solution of PHAH in toluene onto silicon wafers were irradiated using VUV radiation from a xenon excimer lamp. The layers were characterized by XPS, XRD, XRR, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. VUV radiation with a radiant exposure of E = 36 J cm −2 led to almost carbon-free amorphous layers with a composition close to that of alumina having a density of about 2.1 g cm −3 . Thus, using the example of a polymeric aluminium complex, the potential of the photochemical conversion of metal complexes into oxides could be shown as an alternative method, in addition to sol–gel techniques, for the generation of thin plane metal-oxide layers at normal temperature and pressure. Highlights: ► A polymeric aluminium complex was synthesized and characterized by NMR, FTIR, XPS and ICP. ► Thin layers of the compound were irradiated using vacuum-UV radiation and converted to AlO x . ► Quantum-chemical calculations explain the conversion mechanism.

  10. Photochemical decoration of silver nanoparticles on graphene oxide nanosheets and their optical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Nguyen Thi; Chi, Do Thi; Dinh, Ngo Xuan; Hung, Nguyen Duy; Lan, Hoang [Department of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (AIST), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), No. 1 Dai Co Viet Street, Hai Ba Trung District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Tuan, Pham Anh [Vietnam Metrology Institute, 08 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Thang, Le Hong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), 01 Dai Co Viet Street, Hai Ba Trung District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Trung, Nguyen Ngoc [School of Engineering Physics, Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), 01 Dai Co Viet Street, Hai Ba Trung District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Hoa, Nguyen Quang [Department of Physics, Hanoi University of Science, 334 Nguyen Trai, Thanh Xuan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Huy, Tran Quang [Laboratory for Ultrastructure and Bionanotechnology (LUBN), National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology (NIHE), No. 1 Yecxanh Street, Hai Ba Trung District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Quy, Nguyen Van [International Training Institute for Materials Science (ITIMS), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), 01 Dai Co Viet Street, Hai Ba Trung District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Duong, Thanh-Tung [Department of Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daeduk Science Town, 305-764 Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Phan, Vu Ngoc [Department of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (AIST), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), No. 1 Dai Co Viet Street, Hai Ba Trung District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Le, Anh-Tuan, E-mail: tuan.leanh1@hust.edu.vn [Department of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (AIST), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), No. 1 Dai Co Viet Street, Hai Ba Trung District, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • A photochemical method for effective decoration of the Ag-NPs on GO nanosheets is presented. • The average size of the Ag-NPs on the GO nanosheets obtained ∼6–7 nm with uniform size distribution. • Surface interaction of Ag-NPs with GO nanosheets leads to surface plasmon-enhanced luminescence. - Abstract: Nanohybrid materials based on silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) and graphene oxide (GO) are attracting considerable research interest because of their potential many applications including surface-enhanced Raman scattering, catalysis, sensors, biomedicine and antimicrobials. In this study, we established a simple and effective method of preparing a finely dispersed Ag-GO aqueous solution using modified Hummer and photochemical technique. The Ag-NPs formation on GO nanosheets was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The average size of Ag-NPs on the GO nanosheets was approximately 6–7 nm with nearly uniform size distribution. The Ag-GO nanohybrid also exhibits an adsorption band at 435 nm because of the presence of Ag-NPs on the GO nanosheets. Photoluminescence emission of the Ag-GO nanohybrid was found at 400 and 530 nm, which can be attributed to the interaction between the luminescence of exploited GO nanosheets and localized surface plasmon resonance from metallic Ag-NPs. The observed excellent optical properties of the as-prepared Ag-GO nanohybrid showed a significant potential for optoelectronics applications.

  11. Photochemical decoration of silver nanoparticles on graphene oxide nanosheets and their optical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Nguyen Thi; Chi, Do Thi; Dinh, Ngo Xuan; Hung, Nguyen Duy; Lan, Hoang; Tuan, Pham Anh; Thang, Le Hong; Trung, Nguyen Ngoc; Hoa, Nguyen Quang; Huy, Tran Quang; Quy, Nguyen Van; Duong, Thanh-Tung; Phan, Vu Ngoc; Le, Anh-Tuan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A photochemical method for effective decoration of the Ag-NPs on GO nanosheets is presented. • The average size of the Ag-NPs on the GO nanosheets obtained ∼6–7 nm with uniform size distribution. • Surface interaction of Ag-NPs with GO nanosheets leads to surface plasmon-enhanced luminescence. - Abstract: Nanohybrid materials based on silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) and graphene oxide (GO) are attracting considerable research interest because of their potential many applications including surface-enhanced Raman scattering, catalysis, sensors, biomedicine and antimicrobials. In this study, we established a simple and effective method of preparing a finely dispersed Ag-GO aqueous solution using modified Hummer and photochemical technique. The Ag-NPs formation on GO nanosheets was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The average size of Ag-NPs on the GO nanosheets was approximately 6–7 nm with nearly uniform size distribution. The Ag-GO nanohybrid also exhibits an adsorption band at 435 nm because of the presence of Ag-NPs on the GO nanosheets. Photoluminescence emission of the Ag-GO nanohybrid was found at 400 and 530 nm, which can be attributed to the interaction between the luminescence of exploited GO nanosheets and localized surface plasmon resonance from metallic Ag-NPs. The observed excellent optical properties of the as-prepared Ag-GO nanohybrid showed a significant potential for optoelectronics applications

  12. Potential oxidative stress in the bodies of electric arc welding operators: effect of photochemical smog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, You-Gen; Zhou, Jun-Fu; Shan, Wei-Ying; Zhou, Pei-Su; Tong, Gui-Zhong

    2004-12-01

    To investigate whether photochemical smog emitted during the process of electric arc welding might cause oxidative stress and potential oxidative damage in the bodies of welding operators. Seventy electric arc welding operators (WOs) and 70 healthy volunteers (HVs) were enrolled in a randomized controlled study design, in which the levels of vitamin C (VC) and vitamin E (VE) in plasma as well as the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and the level of lipoperoxide (LPO) in erythrocytes were determined by spectrophotometry. Compared with the average values of the above experimental parameters in the HVs group, the average values of VC and VE in plasma as well as those of SOD, CAT and GPX in erythrocytes in the WOs group were significantly decreased (P smog the values of VC, VE, SOD, and GPX, except for CAT, in the WOs were decreased gradually (P smog in the bodies of WOs, thereby causing potential oxidative and lipoperoxidative damages in their bodies.

  13. Light-induced hysteresis and recovery behaviors in photochemically activated solution-processed metal-oxide thin-film transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Jeong-Wan; Park, Sung Kyu, E-mail: yhkim76@skku.edu, E-mail: skpark@cau.ac.kr [School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong-Hoon, E-mail: yhkim76@skku.edu, E-mail: skpark@cau.ac.kr [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-28

    In this report, photo-induced hysteresis, threshold voltage (V{sub T}) shift, and recovery behaviors in photochemically activated solution-processed indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) are investigated. It was observed that a white light illumination caused negative V{sub T} shift along with creation of clockwise hysteresis in electrical characteristics which can be attributed to photo-generated doubly ionized oxygen vacancies at the semiconductor/gate dielectric interface. More importantly, the photochemically activated IGZO TFTs showed much reduced overall V{sub T} shift compared to thermally annealed TFTs. Reduced number of donor-like interface states creation under light illumination and more facile neutralization of ionized oxygen vacancies by electron capture under positive gate potential are claimed to be the origin of the less V{sub T} shift in photochemically activated TFTs.

  14. Modelling the photochemical pollution over the metropolitan area of Porto Alegre, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, C.; Monteiro, A.; Ferreira, J.; Moraes, M. R.; Carvalho, A.; Ribeiro, I.; Miranda, A. I.; Moreira, D. M.

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the photochemical pollution over the Metropolitan Area of Porto Alegre (MAPA), Brazil, where high concentrations of ozone have been registered during the past years. Due to the restricted spatial coverage of the monitoring air quality network, a numerical modelling technique was selected and applied to this assessment exercise. Two different chemistry-transport models - CAMx and CALGRID - were applied for a summer period, driven by the MM5 meteorological model. The meteorological model performance was evaluated comparing its results to available monitoring data measured at the Porto Alegre airport. Validation results point out a good model performance. It was not possible to evaluate the chemistry models performance due to the lack of adequate monitoring data. Nevertheless, the model intercomparison between CAMx and CALGRID shows a similar behaviour in what concerns the simulation of nitrogen dioxide, but some discrepancies concerning ozone. Regarding the fulfilment of the Brazilian air quality targets, the simulated ozone concentrations surpass the legislated value in specific periods, mainly outside the urban area of Porto Alegre. The ozone formation is influenced by the emission of pollutants that act as precursors (like the nitrogen oxides emitted at Porto Alegre urban area and coming from a large refinery complex) and by the meteorological conditions.

  15. Photochemical oxidants injury in rice plants. III. Effect of ozone on physiological activities in rice plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, H; Saka, H

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were made to determine the effect of photochemical oxidants on physiological activities of rice plants. Rice plants were fumigated with ozone at concentrations of 0.12-0.20 ppm for 2-3 hr to investigate acute injury and at 0.05 and 0.09 ppm for daily exposure from 3.0 leaf stage to assess the effect of ozone on growth. It was observed that malondialdehyde produced by disruption of the components of the membrane increased in the leaves exposed to ozone. Ozone reduced the RuBP-carboxylase activity in both young and old leaves 12-24 hr after fumigation. In the young leaves the activity of this enzyme recovered to some extent after 48 hr, but it did not show any recovery in the old leaves. On the other hand, ozone remarkably increased the peroxidase activity and slightly increased acid phosphatase in all leaves. Abnormally high ethylene evolution and oxygen uptake were detected in leaves soon after ozone fumigation. In general, high molecular protein and chlorophyll contents in the detached leaves decreased with incubation in dark, particularly in the old ones. These phenomena were more accelerated by ozone fumigation. Kinetin and benzimidazole showed significant effects on chlorophyll retention in ozone-exposed leaves. Reduction of plant growth and photosynthetic rate was recognized even in low concentration of ozone in daily exposure at 0.05 and 0.09 ppm. From these results it was postulated that ozone may cause the senescence of leaves in rice plants.

  16. Photochemical modeling of glyoxal at a rural site: observations and analysis from BEARPEX 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Huisman

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present roughly one month of high time-resolution, direct, in situ measurements of gas-phase glyoxal acquired during the BEARPEX 2007 field campaign. The research site, located on a ponderosa pine plantation in the Sierra Nevada mountains, is strongly influenced by biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs; thus this data adds to the few existing measurements of glyoxal in BVOC-dominated areas. The short lifetime of glyoxal of ~1 h, the fact that glyoxal mixing ratios are much higher during high temperature periods, and the results of a photochemical model demonstrate that glyoxal is strongly influenced by BVOC precursors during high temperature periods.

    A zero-dimensional box model using near-explicit chemistry from the Leeds Master Chemical Mechanism v3.1 was used to investigate the processes controlling glyoxal chemistry during BEARPEX 2007. The model showed that MBO is the most important glyoxal precursor (~67 %, followed by isoprene (~26 % and methylchavicol (~6 %, a precursor previously not commonly considered for glyoxal production. The model calculated a noon lifetime for glyoxal of ~0.9 h, making glyoxal well suited as a local tracer of VOC oxidation in a forested rural environment; however, the modeled glyoxal mixing ratios over-predicted measured glyoxal by a factor 2 to 5. Loss of glyoxal to aerosol was not found to be significant, likely as a result of the very dry conditions, and could not explain the over-prediction. Although several parameters, such as an approximation for advection, were found to improve the model measurement discrepancy, reduction in OH was by far the most effective. Reducing model OH concentrations to half the measured values decreased the glyoxal over-prediction from a factor of 2.4 to 1.1, as well as the overprediction of HO2 from a factor of 1.64 to 1.14. Our analysis has shown that glyoxal is particularly sensitive to OH concentration compared to other BVOC oxidation products. This

  17. QSARs for phenols and phenolates: oxidation potential as a predictor of reaction rate constants with photochemically produced oxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, William A; Oueis, Yan; O'Connor, Meghan; Rinaman, Johanna E; Taggart, Miranda G; McCarthy, Rachel E; Foster, Kimberley A; Latch, Douglas E

    2017-03-22

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for prediction of the reaction rate constants of phenols and phenolates with three photochemically produced oxidants, singlet oxygen, carbonate radical, and triplet excited state sensitizers/organic matter, are developed. The predictive variable is the one-electron oxidation potential (E 1 ), which is calculated for each species using density functional theory. The reaction rate constants are obtained from the literature, and for singlet oxygen, are augmented with new experimental data. Calculated E 1 values have a mean unsigned error compared to literature values of 0.04-0.06 V. For singlet oxygen, a single linear QSAR that includes both phenols and phenolates is developed that predicts experimental rate constants, on average, to within a factor of three. Predictions for only 6 out of 87 compounds are off by more than a factor of 10. A more limited data set for carbonate radical reactions with phenols and phenolates also gives a single linear QSAR with prediction of rate constant being accurate to within a factor of three. The data for the reactions of phenols with triplet state sensitizers demonstrate that two sensitizers, 2-acetonaphthone and methylene blue, most closely predict the reactivity trend of triplet excited state organic matter with phenols. Using sensitizers with stronger reduction potentials could lead to overestimation of rate constants and thus underestimation of phenolic pollutant persistence.

  18. Chemical Kinetics and Photochemical Data for Use in Stratospheric Modeling. Evaluation No. 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMore, W. B.; Sander, S. P.; Golden, D. M.; Hampson, R. F.; Kurylo, M. J.; Howard, C. J.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Kolb, C. E.; Molina, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    This is the twelfth in a series of evaluated sets of rate constants and photochemical cross sections compiled by the NASA Panel for Data Evaluation. The primary application of the data is in the modeling of stratospheric processes, with special emphasis on the ozone layer and its possible perturbation by anthropogenic and natural phenomena.

  19. Photochirogenesis: Photochemical Models on the Origin of Biomolecular Homochirality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Meinert

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Current research focuses on a better understanding of the origin of biomolecular asymmetry by the identification and detection of the possibly first chiral molecules that were involved in the appearance and evolution of life on Earth. We have reasons to assume that these molecules were specific chiral amino acids. Chiral amino acids have been identified in both chondritic meteorites and simulated interstellar ices. Present research reasons that circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation was identified in interstellar environments and an asymmetric interstellar photon-molecule interaction might have triggered biomolecular symmetry breaking. We review on the possible prebiotic interaction of ‘chiral photons’ in the form of circularly polarized light, with early chiral organic molecules. We will highlight recent studies on enantioselective photolysis of racemic amino acids by circularly polarized light and experiments on the asymmetric photochemical synthesis of amino acids from only one C and one N containing molecules by simulating interstellar environments. Both approaches are based on circular dichroic transitions of amino acids that will be presented as well.

  20. Ozonolysis and Subsequent Photolysis of unsaturated organic molecules: Model Systems for Photochemical Aging of Organic Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Gomez, A. L.; Walser, M. L.; Lin, A.; Nizkorodov, S. A.

    2005-12-01

    Chemical and photochemical aging of organic species adsorbed on aerosol particle surfaces is believed to have a significant effect on cloud condensation properties of atmospheric aerosols. Ozone initiated oxidation reactions of thin films of undecylenic acid and alkene-terminated self assembled monolayers (SAMs) on SiO2 surface were investigated using a combination of spectroscopic and mass spectrometric techniques. Photolysis of the oxidized film in the tropospheric actinic region (λ>290 nm) readily produces formaldehyde and formic acid as gas-phase products. Photodissociation action spectra of the oxidized film suggest that organic peroxides are responsible for the enhanced photochemical activity. The presence of peroxides in the oxidized sample was confirmed by mass-spectrometric analysis and by an iodometric test. Significant polymerization resulting from secondary reactions of Criegee radicals during ozonolysis of the film is also observed. The reaction mechanism and its implications for photochemical aging of atmospheric aerosol particles will be discussed.

  1. Implications of imprecision in kinetic rate data for photochemical model calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, R W; Thompson, A M [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center

    1998-12-31

    Evaluation of uncertainties in photochemical model calculations is of great importance to scientists performing assessment modeling. A major source of uncertainty is the measurement imprecision inherent in photochemical reaction rate data that modelers rely on. A rigorous method of evaluating the impact of data imprecision on computational uncertainty is the study of error propagation using Monte Carlo techniques. There are two problems with the current implementation of the Monte Carlo method. First, there is no satisfactory way of accounting for the variation of imprecision with temperature in 1, 2, or 3D models; second, due to its computational expense, it is impractical in 3D model studies. These difficulties are discussed. (author) 4 refs.

  2. Implications of imprecision in kinetic rate data for photochemical model calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, R.W.; Thompson, A.M. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center

    1997-12-31

    Evaluation of uncertainties in photochemical model calculations is of great importance to scientists performing assessment modeling. A major source of uncertainty is the measurement imprecision inherent in photochemical reaction rate data that modelers rely on. A rigorous method of evaluating the impact of data imprecision on computational uncertainty is the study of error propagation using Monte Carlo techniques. There are two problems with the current implementation of the Monte Carlo method. First, there is no satisfactory way of accounting for the variation of imprecision with temperature in 1, 2, or 3D models; second, due to its computational expense, it is impractical in 3D model studies. These difficulties are discussed. (author) 4 refs.

  3. Laboratory investigation of photochemical oxidation of organic aerosol from wood fires 2: analysis of aerosol mass spectrometer data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Grieshop

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of photo-oxidation on organic aerosol (OA in dilute wood smoke by exposing emissions from soft- and hard-wood fires to UV light in a smog chamber. This paper focuses on changes in OA composition measured using a unit-mass-resolution quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS. The results highlight how photochemical processing can lead to considerable evolution of the mass, volatility and level of oxygenation of biomass-burning OA. Photochemical oxidation produced substantial new OA, more than doubling the OA mass after a few hours of aging under typical summertime conditions. Aging also decreased the volatility of the OA and made it progressively more oxygenated. The results also illustrate strengths of, and challenges with, using AMS data for source apportionment analysis. For example, the mass spectra of fresh and aged BBOA are distinct from fresh motor-vehicle emissions. The mass spectra of the secondary OA produced from aging wood smoke are very similar to those of the oxygenated OA (OOA that dominates ambient AMS datasets, further reinforcing the connection between OOA and OA formed from photo-chemistry. In addition, aged wood smoke spectra are similar to those from OA created by photo-oxidizing dilute diesel exhaust. This demonstrates that the OOA observed in the atmosphere can be produced by photochemical aging of dilute emissions from different types of combustion systems operating on fuels with modern or fossil carbon. Since OOA is frequently the dominant component of ambient OA, the similarity of spectra of aged emissions from different sources represents an important challenge for AMS-based source apportionment studies.

  4. A box model study on photochemical interactions between VOCs and reactive halogen species in the marine boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Toyota

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A new chemical scheme is developed for the multiphase photochemical box model SEAMAC (size-SEgregated Aerosol model for Marine Air Chemistry to investigate photochemical interactions between volatile organic compounds (VOCs and reactive halogen species in the marine boundary layer (MBL. Based primarily on critically evaluated kinetic and photochemical rate parameters as well as a protocol for chemical mechanism development, the new scheme has achieved a near-explicit description of oxidative degradation of up to C3-hydrocarbons (CH4, C2H6, C3H8, C2H4, C3H6, and C2H2 initiated by reactions with OH radicals, Cl- and Br-atoms, and O3. Rate constants and product yields for reactions involving halogen species are taken from the literature where available, but the majority of them need to be estimated. In particular, addition reactions of halogen atoms with alkenes will result in forming halogenated organic intermediates, whose photochemical loss rates are carefully evaluated in the present work. Model calculations with the new chemical scheme reveal that the oceanic emissions of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO and alkenes (especially C3H6 are important factors for regulating reactive halogen chemistry in the MBL by promoting the conversion of Br atoms into HBr or more stable brominated intermediates in the organic form. The latter include brominated hydroperoxides, bromoacetaldehyde, and bromoacetone, which sequester bromine from a reactive inorganic pool. The total mixing ratio of brominated organic species thus produced is likely to reach 10-20% or more of that of inorganic gaseous bromine species over wide regions over the ocean. The reaction between Br atoms and C2H2 is shown to be unimportant for determining the degree of bromine activation in the remote MBL. These results imply that reactive halogen chemistry can mediate a link between the oceanic emissions of VOCs and the behaviors of compounds that are sensitive to halogen chemistry such as dimethyl

  5. Quantitative assessment on the contribution of direct photolysis and radical oxidation in photochemical degradation of 4-chlorophenol and oxytetracycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiqing; He, Xuexiang; Fu, Yongsheng; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2016-07-01

    In UV-254 nm/H2O2 advanced oxidation process (AOP), the potential degradation pathways for organic pollutants include (1) hydrolysis, (2) direct H2O2 oxidation, (3) UV direct photolysis, and (4) hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) reaction. In this study, the contribution of these pathways was quantitatively assessed in the photochemical destruction of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP), demonstrating pathways (3) and (4) to be predominantly responsible for the removal of 4-CP by UV/H2O2 in 50 mM phosphate buffer solution. Increasing reaction pH could significantly enhance the contribution of direct photolysis in UV/H2O2 process. The contribution of HO(•) oxidation was improved with increasing initial H2O2 concentration probably due to the increased formation of HO(•). Presence of sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) as in UV/H2O2/Na2CO3 system promoted the degradation of 4-CP, with carbonate radical (CO3 (•-)) reaction and direct photolysis identified to be the main contributing pathways. The trends in the contribution of each factor were further evaluated and validated on the degradation of the antibiotic compound oxytetracycline (OTC). This study provides valuable information on the relative importance of different reaction pathways on the photochemical degradation of organic contaminants such as 4-CP and OTC in the presence and absence of a CO3 (•-) precursor.

  6. Mercury in Arctic snow: Quantifying the kinetics of photochemical oxidation and reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, E.A. [Department of Environmental Science, Acadia University, Wolfville, NS (Canada); Environmental Science Programme, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL (Canada); Mallory, M.L. [Department of Biology, Acadia University, Wolfville, NS (Canada); Ziegler, S.E. [Environmental Science Programme, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL (Canada); Tordon, R. [Environment Canada, Dartmouth, NS (Canada); O' Driscoll, N.J., E-mail: nelson.odriscoll@acadiau.ca [Department of Environmental Science, Acadia University, Wolfville, NS (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Controlled experiments were performed with frozen and melted Arctic snow to quantify relationships between mercury photoreaction kinetics, ultra violet (UV) radiation intensity, and snow ion concentrations. Frozen (− 10 °C) and melted (4 °C) snow samples from three Arctic sites were exposed to UV (280–400 nm) radiation (1.26–5.78 W · m{sup −2}), and a parabolic relationship was found between reduction rate constants in frozen and melted snow with increasing UV intensity. Total photoreduced mercury in frozen and melted snow increased linearly with greater UV intensity. Snow with the highest concentrations of chloride and iron had larger photoreduction and photooxidation rate constants, while also having the lowest Hg(0) production. Our results indicate that the amount of mercury photoreduction (loss from snow) is the highest at high UV radiation intensities, while the fastest rates of mercury photoreduction occurred at both low and high intensities. This suggests that, assuming all else is equal, earlier Arctic snow melt periods (when UV intensities are less intense) may result in less mercury loss to the atmosphere by photoreduction and flux, since less Hg(0) is photoproduced at lower UV intensities, thereby resulting in potentially greater mercury transport to aquatic systems with snowmelt. - Highlights: • Mercury photochemical kinetics were studied in frozen and melted Arctic snow. • UV-induced photoreduction and photooxidation rate constants were quantified. • Chloride ion, iron, and DOC influence mercury photoreactions in snow. • Frozen and melted snow have different mercury photoreduction characteristics. • Kinetic information provided can be used to model mercury fate in the Arctic.

  7. Mercury in Arctic snow: Quantifying the kinetics of photochemical oxidation and reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, E.A.; Mallory, M.L.; Ziegler, S.E.; Tordon, R.; O'Driscoll, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    Controlled experiments were performed with frozen and melted Arctic snow to quantify relationships between mercury photoreaction kinetics, ultra violet (UV) radiation intensity, and snow ion concentrations. Frozen (− 10 °C) and melted (4 °C) snow samples from three Arctic sites were exposed to UV (280–400 nm) radiation (1.26–5.78 W · m −2 ), and a parabolic relationship was found between reduction rate constants in frozen and melted snow with increasing UV intensity. Total photoreduced mercury in frozen and melted snow increased linearly with greater UV intensity. Snow with the highest concentrations of chloride and iron had larger photoreduction and photooxidation rate constants, while also having the lowest Hg(0) production. Our results indicate that the amount of mercury photoreduction (loss from snow) is the highest at high UV radiation intensities, while the fastest rates of mercury photoreduction occurred at both low and high intensities. This suggests that, assuming all else is equal, earlier Arctic snow melt periods (when UV intensities are less intense) may result in less mercury loss to the atmosphere by photoreduction and flux, since less Hg(0) is photoproduced at lower UV intensities, thereby resulting in potentially greater mercury transport to aquatic systems with snowmelt. - Highlights: • Mercury photochemical kinetics were studied in frozen and melted Arctic snow. • UV-induced photoreduction and photooxidation rate constants were quantified. • Chloride ion, iron, and DOC influence mercury photoreactions in snow. • Frozen and melted snow have different mercury photoreduction characteristics. • Kinetic information provided can be used to model mercury fate in the Arctic

  8. Photochemical air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Te Winkel, B.H.

    1992-01-01

    During periods of severe photochemical air pollution (smog) the industry in the Netherlands is recommended by the Dutch government to strongly reduce the emissions of air pollutants. For the electric power generating companies it is important to investigate the adequacy of this policy. The purpose of this investigation is to determine the contribution of electric power plants to photochemical air pollution and to assess the efficacy of emission reducing measures. A literature survey on the development of photochemical air pollution was carried out and modelled calculations concerning the share of the electric power plants to the photochemical air pollution were executed

  9. Testing the early Mars H2-CO2 greenhouse hypothesis with a 1-D photochemical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalha, Natasha; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Ramirez, Ramses; Kasting, James F.

    2015-09-01

    A recent study by Ramirez et al. (Ramirez, R.M. et al. [2014]. Nat. Geosci. 7(1), 59-63. http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/ngeo2000 (accessed 16.09.14)) demonstrated that an atmosphere with 1.3-4 bar of CO2 and H2O, in addition to 5-20% H2, could have raised the mean annual and global surface temperature of early Mars above the freezing point of water. Such warm temperatures appear necessary to generate the rainfall (or snowfall) amounts required to carve the ancient martian valleys. Here, we use our best estimates for early martian outgassing rates, along with a 1-D photochemical model, to assess the conversion efficiency of CO, CH4, and H2S to CO2, SO2, and H2. Our outgassing estimates assume that Mars was actively recycling volatiles between its crust and interior, as Earth does today. H2 production from serpentinization and deposition of banded iron-formations is also considered. Under these assumptions, maintaining an H2 concentration of ˜1-2% by volume is achievable, but reaching 5% H2 requires additional H2 sources or a slowing of the hydrogen escape rate below the diffusion limit. If the early martian atmosphere was indeed H2-rich, we might be able to see evidence of this in the rock record. The hypothesis proposed here is consistent with new data from the Curiosity Rover, which show evidence for a long-lived lake in Gale Crater near Mt. Sharp. It is also consistent with measured oxygen fugacities of martian meteorites, which show evidence for progressive mantle oxidation over time.

  10. Advanced oxidation treatment and photochemical fate of selected antidepressant pharmaceuticals in solutions of Suwannee River humic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoke, Hanoz, E-mail: hsantoke@uci.edu [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States); Song, Weihua, E-mail: wsong@uci.edu [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States); Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Cooper, William J., E-mail: wcooper@uci.edu [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States); Peake, Barrie M., E-mail: bpeake@chemistry.otago.ac.nz [Chemistry Department, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin 9054 (New Zealand)

    2012-05-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We elucidate the photochemical degradation of three antidepressant pharmaceuticals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydroxyl radical is the most significant contributor to the degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Excited state dissolved organic matter also plays a significant role for duloxetine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tentative reaction byproducts are identified. - Abstract: Antidepressant pharmaceuticals have recently been detected at low concentrations in wastewater and surface water. This work reports studies of the direct and indirect photochemical fate and treatment by advanced oxidation of three antidepressant compounds (duloxetine, venlafaxine and bupropion) in solutions of humic acid in order to elucidate their behavior in the natural environment prior to reaching a water treatment facility and potentially entering a potable water supply. Humic acid solution was prepared by adding to distilled water a known amount of organic matter as a photosensitizer. All three antidepressants react very rapidly with hydroxyl radicals ({center_dot}OH) and hydrated electrons (e{sup -}{sub aq}) with rate constants of {approx}10{sup 8} to 10{sup 10} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, but significantly slower with singlet oxygen ({sup 1}{Delta}O{sub 2}) ({approx}10{sup 3} to 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). The steady-state concentrations of {center_dot}OH and {sup 1}{Delta}O{sub 2}, in a sample of humic acid solution were measured and used with the second order rate constants to show that the hydroxyl radical was an order of magnitude more effective than the singlet oxygen in the solar-induced photochemical degradation of the antidepressants. Excited state dissolved organic matter also accounted for a substantial portion of degradation of duloxetine, decreasing its half-life by 27% under solar irradiation. Several reaction pathways and by-products arising from the photodegradation were identified using gamma-irradiation followed by LC

  11. Application of a Three-Layer Photochemical Box Model in an Athens Street Canyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proyou, Athena G; Ziomas, Loannis C; Stathopoulos, Antony

    1998-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to show that a photochemical box model could describe the air pollution diurnal profiles within a typical street canyon in the city of Athens. As sophisticated three-dimensional dispersion models are computationally expensive and they cannot serve to simulate pollution levels in the scale of an urban street canyon, a suitably modified three-layer photochemical box model was applied. A street canyon of Athens with heavy traffic was chosen to apply the aforementioned model. The model was used to calculate pollutant concentrations during two days with meteorological conditions favoring pollutant accumulation. Road traffic emissions were calculated based on existing traffic load measurements. Meteorological data, as well as various pollutant concentrations, in order to compare with the model results, were provided by available measurements. The calculated concentrations were found to be in good agreement with measured concentration levels and show that, when traffic load and traffic composition data are available, this model can be used to predict pollution episodes. It is noteworthy that high concentrations persisted, even after additional traffic restriction measures were taken on the second day because of the high pollution levels.

  12. Modeling of photochemical air pollution in the Barcelona area with highly disaggregated anthropogenic and biogenic emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toll, I.; Baldasano, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The city of Barcelona and its surrounding area, located in the western Mediterranean basin, can reach high levels of O 3 in spring and summertime. To study the origin of this photochemical pollution, a numerical modeling approach was adopted and the episode that took place between 3 and 5 August 1990 was chosen. The main meteorological mesoscale flows were reproduced with the meteorological non-hydrostatic mesoscale model MEMO for 5 August 1990, when weak pressure synoptic conditions took place. The emissions inventory was calculated with the EIM-LEM model, giving highly disaggregated anthropogenic and biogenic emissions in the zone studied, an 80 x 80 km 2 area around the city of Barcelona. Major sources of VOC were road traffic (51%) and vegetation (34%), while NO x were mostly emitted by road traffic (88%). However, emissions from some industrial stacks can be locally important and higher than those from road traffic. Photochemical simulation with the MARS model revealed that the combination of mesoscale wind flows and the above-mentioned local emissions is crucial in the production and transport of O 3 in the area. On the other hand, the geostrophic wind also played an important role in advecting the air masses away from the places O 3 had been generated. The model simulations were also evaluated by comparing meteorological measurements from nine surface stations and concentration measurements from five surface stations, and the results proved to be fairly satisfactory. (author)

  13. Action spectrum for photochemical retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) disruption in an in vivo monkey model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Sabarinathan, Ranjani; Bubel, Tracy; Williams, David R.; Hunter, Jennifer J.

    2016-03-01

    Observations of RPE disruption and autofluorescence (AF) photobleaching at light levels below the ANSI photochemical maximum permissible exposure (MPE) (Morgan et al., 2008) indicates a demand to modify future light safety standards to protect the retina from harm. To establish safe light exposures, we measured the visible light action spectrum for RPE disruption in an in vivo monkey model with fluorescence adaptive optics retinal imaging. Using this high resolution imaging modality can provide insight into the consequences of light on a cellular level and allow for longitudinal monitoring of retinal changes. The threshold retinal radiant exposures (RRE) for RPE disruption were determined for 4 wavelengths (460, 488, 544, and 594 nm). The anaesthetized macaque retina was exposed to a uniform 0.5° × 0.5° field of view (FOV). Imaging within a 2° × 2° FOV was performed before, immediately after and at 2 week intervals for 10 weeks. At each wavelength, multiple RREs were tested with 4 repetitions each to determine the threshold for RPE disruption. For qualitative analysis, RPE disruption is defined as any detectable change from the pre exposure condition in the cell mosaic in the exposed region relative to the corresponding mosaic in the immediately surrounding area. We have tested several metrics to evaluate the RPE images obtained before and after exposure. The measured action spectrum for photochemical RPE disruption has a shallower slope than the current ANSI photochemical MPE for the same conditions and suggests that longer wavelength light is more hazardous than other measurements would suggest.

  14. Multi-objective optimization of oxidative desulfurization in a sono-photochemical airlift reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behin, Jamshid; Farhadian, Negin

    2017-09-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to optimize ultrasound/ultraviolet-assisted oxidative desulfurization in an airlift reactor. Ultrasonic waves were incorporated in a novel-geometry reactor to investigate the synergistic effects of sono-chemistry and enhanced gas-liquid mass transfer. Non-hydrotreated kerosene containing sulfur and aromatic compounds was chosen as a case study. Experimental runs were conducted based on a face-centered central composite design and analyzed using RSM. The effects of two categorical factors, i.e., ultrasound and ultraviolet irradiation and two numerical factors, i.e., superficial gas velocity and oxidation time were investigated on two responses, i.e., desulfurization and de-aromatization yields. Two-factor interaction (2FI) polynomial model was developed for the responses and the desirability function associate with overlay graphs was applied to find optimum conditions. The results showed enhancement in desulfurization ability corresponds to more reduction in aromatic content of kerosene in each combination. Based on desirability approach and certain criteria considered for desulfurization/de-aromatization, the optimal desulfurization and de-aromatization yields of 91.7% and 48% were obtained in US/UV/O 3 /H 2 O 2 combination, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Atmospheric photochemical reactivity and ozone production at two sites in Hong Kong: Application of a Master Chemical Mechanism-photochemical box model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Z. H.; Guo, H.; Lam, S. H. M.; Saunders, S. M.; Wang, T.

    2014-09-01

    A photochemical box model incorporating the Master Chemical Mechanism (v3.2), constrained with a full suite of measurements, was developed to investigate the photochemical reactivity of volatile organic compounds at a semirural site (Mount Tai Mo Shan (TMS)) and an urban site (Tsuen Wan (TW)) in Hong Kong. The levels of ozone (O3) and its precursors, and the magnitudes of the reactivity of O3 precursors, revealed significant differences in the photochemistry at the two sites. Simulated peak hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) mixing ratios were similar at TW and TMS (p = 0.05), while the simulated hydroxyl radical (OH) mixing ratios were much higher at TW (p TMS, but at TW, both HCHO and O3 photolyses were found to be major contributors. By contrast, radical-radical reactions governed HOx radical losses at TMS, while at TW, the OH + NO2 reaction was found to dominate in the morning and the radical-radical reactions at noon. Overall, the conversion of NO to NO2 by HO2 dictated the O3 production at the two sites, while O3 destruction was dominated by the OH + NO2 reaction at TW, and at TMS, O3 photolysis and the O3 + HO2 reaction were the major mechanisms. The longer OH chain length at TMS indicated that more O3 was produced for each radical that was generated at this site.

  16. Photochemical oxidation processes for the elimination of phenyl-urea herbicides in waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, F. Javier; Real, Francisco J.; Acero, Juan L.; Garcia, Carolina

    2006-01-01

    Four phenyl-urea herbicides (linuron, chlorotoluron, diuron, and isoproturon) were individually photooxidized by monochromatic UV radiation in ultra-pure aqueous solutions. The influence of pH and temperature on the photodegradation process was established, and the first-order rate constants and quantum yields were evaluated. The sequence of photodecomposition rates was: linuron > chlorotoluron > diuron > isoproturon. The simultaneous photooxidation of mixtures of the selected herbicides in several types of waters was then performed by means of UV radiation alone, and by UV radiation combined with hydrogen peroxide. The types of waters used were: ultra-pure water, a commercial mineral water, a groundwater, and a lake water. The influence of the independent variables in these processes - the presence or absence of tert-butyl alcohol, types of herbicide and waters, and concentration of hydrogen peroxide - were established and discussed. A kinetic study was performed using a competitive kinetic model that allowed various rate constants to be evaluated for each herbicide. This kinetic model allows one to predict the elimination of these phenyl-urea herbicides in contaminated waters by the oxidation systems used (UV alone and combined UV/H 2 O 2 ). The herbicide concentrations predicted by this model agree well with the experimental results that were obtained

  17. Photochemical oxidation processes for the elimination of phenyl-urea herbicides in waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benitez, F. Javier [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Energetica, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071 Badajoz (Spain)]. E-mail: javben@unex.es; Real, Francisco J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Energetica, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071 Badajoz (Spain); Acero, Juan L. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Energetica, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071 Badajoz (Spain); Garcia, Carolina [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Energetica, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071 Badajoz (Spain)

    2006-11-16

    Four phenyl-urea herbicides (linuron, chlorotoluron, diuron, and isoproturon) were individually photooxidized by monochromatic UV radiation in ultra-pure aqueous solutions. The influence of pH and temperature on the photodegradation process was established, and the first-order rate constants and quantum yields were evaluated. The sequence of photodecomposition rates was: linuron > chlorotoluron > diuron > isoproturon. The simultaneous photooxidation of mixtures of the selected herbicides in several types of waters was then performed by means of UV radiation alone, and by UV radiation combined with hydrogen peroxide. The types of waters used were: ultra-pure water, a commercial mineral water, a groundwater, and a lake water. The influence of the independent variables in these processes - the presence or absence of tert-butyl alcohol, types of herbicide and waters, and concentration of hydrogen peroxide - were established and discussed. A kinetic study was performed using a competitive kinetic model that allowed various rate constants to be evaluated for each herbicide. This kinetic model allows one to predict the elimination of these phenyl-urea herbicides in contaminated waters by the oxidation systems used (UV alone and combined UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The herbicide concentrations predicted by this model agree well with the experimental results that were obtained.

  18. Overview: oxidant and particle photochemical processes above a south-east Asian tropical rainforest (the OP3 project: introduction, rationale, location characteristics and tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Hewitt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In April–July 2008, intensive measurements were made of atmospheric composition and chemistry in Sabah, Malaysia, as part of the "Oxidant and particle photochemical processes above a South-East Asian tropical rainforest" (OP3 project. Fluxes and concentrations of trace gases and particles were made from and above the rainforest canopy at the Bukit Atur Global Atmosphere Watch station and at the nearby Sabahmas oil palm plantation, using both ground-based and airborne measurements. Here, the measurement and modelling strategies used, the characteristics of the sites and an overview of data obtained are described. Composition measurements show that the rainforest site was not significantly impacted by anthropogenic pollution, and this is confirmed by satellite retrievals of NO2 and HCHO. The dominant modulators of atmospheric chemistry at the rainforest site were therefore emissions of BVOCs and soil emissions of reactive nitrogen oxides. At the observed BVOC:NOx volume mixing ratio (~100 pptv/pptv, current chemical models suggest that daytime maximum OH concentrations should be ca. 105 radicals cm−3, but observed OH concentrations were an order of magnitude greater than this. We confirm, therefore, previous measurements that suggest that an unexplained source of OH must exist above tropical rainforest and we continue to interrogate the data to find explanations for this.

  19. Photochemical generation and 1H NMR detection of alkyl allene oxides in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breen, L.E.; Schepp, N.P.; Tan, C.-H.E.

    2005-01-01

    Irradiation of substituted 5-alkyl-4,5-epoxyvalerophenones leads to the formation of alkyl allene oxides that, in some cases, are sufficiently long-lived to be detected at room temperature by 1 H NMR spectroscopy. Absolute lifetime measurements show that the size of the alkyl group has a significant influence on the reactivity of the allene oxide, with tert-butyl allene oxide having a lifetime of 24 h in CD 3 CN at room temperature that is considerably longer than the 1.5 h lifetime of the ethyl allene oxide. The allene oxides react rapidly with water to give α-hydroxyketones. The mechanism involves nucleophilic attack to the epoxide carbon to give an enol, which can also be detected as an intermediate by 1 H NMR spectroscopy. (author)

  20. UV-Assisted Photochemical Synthesis of Reduced Graphene Oxide/ZnO Nanowires Composite for Photoresponse Enhancement in UV Photodetectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changsong Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The weak photon absorption and high recombination rate of electron-hole pairs in disordered zinc oxide nanowires (ZNWs limit its application in UV photodetection. This limitation can be overcome by introducing graphene sheets to the ZNWs. Herein we report a high-performance photodetector based on one-dimensional (1D wide band-gap semiconductor disordered ZNWs composited with reduced graphene oxide (RGO for ultraviolet (UV photoresponse enhancement. The RGO/ZNWs composites have been successfully synthetized through UV-assisted photochemical reduction of GO in ZNWs suspension. The material characterizations in morphology, Raman scattering, and Ultraviolet-visible light absorption verified the formation of graphene sheets attached in ZNWs network and the enhancement of UV absorption due to the introduction of graphene. In comparison with photodetectors based on pure ZNWs, the photodetectors based on RGO/ZNWs composite exhibit enhanced photoresponse with photocurrent density of 5.87 mA·cm−2, on/off current ratio of 3.01 × 104, and responsivity of 1.83 A·W−1 when a UV irradiation of 3.26 mW·cm−2 and 1.0 V bias were used. Theory analysis is also presented to get insight into the inherent mechanisms of separation and transportation of photo-excited carriers in RGO/ZNWs composite.

  1. UV-Assisted Photochemical Synthesis of Reduced Graphene Oxide/ZnO Nanowires Composite for Photoresponse Enhancement in UV Photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changsong; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Na; Ma, Yang; San, Haisheng

    2018-01-05

    The weak photon absorption and high recombination rate of electron-hole pairs in disordered zinc oxide nanowires (ZNWs) limit its application in UV photodetection. This limitation can be overcome by introducing graphene sheets to the ZNWs. Herein we report a high-performance photodetector based on one-dimensional (1D) wide band-gap semiconductor disordered ZNWs composited with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) for ultraviolet (UV) photoresponse enhancement. The RGO/ZNWs composites have been successfully synthetized through UV-assisted photochemical reduction of GO in ZNWs suspension. The material characterizations in morphology, Raman scattering, and Ultraviolet-visible light absorption verified the formation of graphene sheets attached in ZNWs network and the enhancement of UV absorption due to the introduction of graphene. In comparison with photodetectors based on pure ZNWs, the photodetectors based on RGO/ZNWs composite exhibit enhanced photoresponse with photocurrent density of 5.87 mA·cm -2 , on/off current ratio of 3.01 × 10⁴, and responsivity of 1.83 A·W -1 when a UV irradiation of 3.26 mW·cm -2 and 1.0 V bias were used. Theory analysis is also presented to get insight into the inherent mechanisms of separation and transportation of photo-excited carriers in RGO/ZNWs composite.

  2. Lagrangian Photochemical Box-Model Calculations of Asian Pacific Rim Outflow During TRACE-P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, A.; Crawford, J.; Olson, J.; Avery, M.; Sachse, G.; Barrick, J.; Blake, D.; Tan, D.; Sandholm, S.; Kondo, Y.; Singh, H.; Eisele, F.; Zondlo, M.; Flocke, F.; Talbot, R.

    2006-12-01

    NASA's TRACE-P (TRAnsport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific) mission was conducted over the northwestern Pacific February-April, 2001. During two transit flights across the Pacific, extensive pollution was observed from an Asian outflow event that split into two branches over the central Pacific, one subsiding and moving southward over the central Pacific and the other continuing eastward in the upper troposphere. The subsiding branch was observed as a widespread stagnant pollution layer between 2 and 4 km over the central Pacific during transit flights from Kona, HI to Guam. In this region, high levels of O3 (70 ppbv), CO (217 ppbv), and NOx (114 pptv) were well in excess of typical values observed during TRACE-P along the Asian coast. Evidence suggests that the subsiding branch experienced extensive photochemical processing compared to the branch that remained at altitude. To examine the processes controlling the chemical evolution of ozone and its precursors in this outflow event, data collected during the TRACE-P mission have been combined with lagrangian photochemical box model calculations. One of the largest sources of uncertainty in these calculations was associated with predicted water vapor levels along the transport trajectories calculated using the HYSPLIT model. Water vapor levels predicted by HYSPLIT trajectory calculations in the subsiding layer ranged from 3390 to 4880 ppm, while the median level observed in the pollution layer was only 637 ppm. Simulations of ozone production and associated radical chemistry differed dramatically when using water vapor levels based on trajectory calculations versus observed water vapor levels. Levels of PAN and HO2NO2, NOx reservoir species, are also influenced by uncertainties in temperature along the trajectories. These results highlight the importance of accurately representing the humidification and warming of subsiding air masses in 3-D chemical- transport models.

  3. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of reactive intermediates in photochemical and transition metal-assisted oxidation, decarboxylation and alkyl transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraher, Jack McCaslin

    -olefins selectively. This process is made catalytic by the introduction of O2. Photochemical decarboxylation of propionic acid in the presence of Cu2+ generates ethylene and Cu +. Longer-chain acids also yield alpha olefins as exclusive products. In the absence of continued purging with O2 to aid removal of olefin, Cu+(olefin) complexes accumulate and catalytic activity slows dramatically due to depletion of Cu2+. The results underscore the profound effect that the choice of metal ions, the medium, and reaction conditions exert on the photochemistry of carboxylic acids. Free Oxygen Atom in Solution from 4-Benzoylpyridine N-Oxide Excited Singlet. Photolysis of 4-benzoylpyridine N-oxide (BPyO) in the presence of quenchers of the triplet excited state produces up to 41% O(3P) (as determined by generation of ethylene upon scavenging with cyclopentene). In the absence of 3BPyO* quenchers a maximum of 13% O(3P) relative to consumed BPyO is obtained. The remaining products are hydroxylated-4-benzoylpyridine and 4-benzoylpyridine. Additionally, the rate of BPyO consumption (as determined by UV-vis) decreases in the presence of 3BPyO* quenching agents. Second order rate constants for 3BPyO* quenching were determined. A mechanism for photochemical deoxygenation of BPyO is proposed on the basis of kinetic data and product distribution under various conditions. Additionally, comparisons are made between the observed intermediates and similar triplet excited states and radical anions.

  4. Development of a mouse model of neuropathic pain following photochemically induced ischemia in the sciatic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, J X; Blakeman, K H; Yu, W; Hultenby, K; Xu, X J; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Z

    2000-05-01

    A mouse model of neuropathic pain was developed by a photochemically induced ischemic nerve injury in normal male C57/BL6 mice. The ischemia was induced by unilateral irradiation of the sciatic nerve with an argon ion laser after intravenous administration of a photosensitizing dye, erythrosin B. The nerve injury resulted in a significant decrease in withdrawal threshold of the hindpaws to mechanical stimulation with von Frey hairs, as well as increased responsiveness to cold and heat stimulation. The mice, however, did not exhibit overt spontaneous pain-like behaviors. The evoked pain-related behaviors were observed bilaterally, although the ipsilateral changes were greater than on the contralateral side. The extent and time course of the behavioral changes were related to the duration of laser irradiation, with 1-min exposure producing the most consistent effect. Morphological examination at the light microscopic level revealed partial demyelination and axonal degeneration of the large myelinated fibers at the epicenter of the lesion 1 week postirradiation. The extent of the damage was correlated with the duration of irradiation. Injury and loss of unmyelinated fibers were also observed at the electronmicroscopic level. We conclude that an intravascular photochemical reaction leading to ischemia results in graded damage to the sciatic nerve in mice. Moreover, the nerve injury is associated with the development of abnormal pain-related behaviors. Both the behavioral and the morphological changes are correlated with the duration of irradiation. These results establish a mouse model of partial nerve injury with neuropathic pain-like behaviors which may be useful in studies using genetically modified mice. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  5. Photochemical smog modeling for assessment of potential impacts of different management strategies on air quality of the Bangkok Metropolitan Region, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oanh, Nguyen Thi Kim; Zhang, Baoning

    2004-10-01

    A photochemical smog model system, the Variable-Grid Urban Airshed Model/Systems Applications International Mesoscale Model (UAM-V/SAIMM), was used to investigate photochemical pollution in the Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR). The model system was first applied to simulate a historical photochemical smog episode of two days (January 13-14, 1997) using the 1997 anthropogenic emission database available at the Pollution Control Department and an estimated biogenic emission. The output 1-hr ozone (O3) for BMR, however, did not meet the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency suggested performance criteria. The simulated minimum and maximum O3 values in the domain were much higher than the observations. Multiple model runs with different precursor emission reduction scenarios showed that the best model performance with the simulated 1-hr O3 meeting all the criteria was obtained when the volatile organic compound (VOC) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission from mobile source reduced by 50% and carbon monoxide by 20% from the original database. Various combinations of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions in Bangkok and surrounding provinces were simulated to assess the contribution of different sources to O3 pollution in the city. O3 formation in Bangkok was found to be more VOC-sensitive than NOx-sensitive. To attain the Thailand ambient air quality standard for 1-hr O3 of 100 ppb, VOC emission in BMR should be reduced by 50-60%. Management strategies considered in the scenario study consist of Stage I, Stage II vapor control, replacement of two-stroke by four-stroke motorcycles, 100% compressed natural gas bus, 100% natural gas-fired power plants, and replacement of methyltertiarybutylether by ethanol as an additive for gasoline.

  6. Photochemical smog and plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, T.

    1974-07-01

    Surveys of plant damage due to photochemical smog are summarized. The components of smog which appear to be responsible for plant damage include ozone and peroxyacyl nitrates. Their phytotoxic effects are much greater than those due to sulfur oxides. Damage surveys since 1970 reveal the following symptoms appearing on herbaceous plants (morning glory, cocks comb, dahlia, knotweed, petunia, chickweed, Welsh onion, spinach, Chinese cabbage, chard, taro): yellowish-white leaf discoloration, white and brown spots on matured leaves, and silvering of the lower surfaces of young leaves. Symptoms which appear on arboraceous plants such as zelkova, poplar, ginkgo, planetree, rose mallow, magnolia, pine tree, and rhododendron include early yellowing and reddening, white or brown spots, and untimely leaf-fall. The above plants are now utilized as indicator plants of photochemical smog. Surveys covering a broad area of Tokyo and three other prefectures indicate that plant damage due to photochemical smog extends to relatively unpolluted areas.

  7. Oxidative degradation of lignin by photochemical and chemical radical generating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, M.H.; Kutsuki, H.; Morgan, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Oxidation of specifically radiolabeled 14 C-lignins by UV/H 2 O 2 , Fenton's reagent, photosensitizing riboflavin, UV- and γ-irradiation was examined. In the presence of UV/H 2 O 2 , a hydroxyl radical (radicalOH) generating system, 14 C-methoxy, 2-[ 14 C-sidechain] and 14 C-ring labeled lignin were rapidly and extensively degraded as measured by gel filtration of the reaction products on Sephadex LH-20. This suggested that exposure to radicalOH leads to rapid, nonspecific lignin degradation. Rapid degradation of 14 C-methoxy, 2-[ 14 C-sidechain] and 14 C-ring labeled lignin also occurred in the presence of the radicalOH generating system, Fenton's reagent, confirming the primary role of radicalOH in these reactions. Photosensitizing riboflavin, also capable of effecting transformation of organic compounds via Type I hydrogen radical abstractions, caused extensive oxidative degradation of 14 C-methoxy labeled lignin and significant degradation of 2-[ 14 C-sidechain] and 14 C-ring labeled lignin. In addition, UV- and γ-irradiation caused slower but extensive degradation of the polymers, probably via radical type mechanisms. All of these results indicate that radicalOH as well as organic radical generating systems are effective agents for the purpose of degrading this heterogeneous, optically inactive and random biopolymer. (author)

  8. EFFECT OF NATURAL IRON OXIDE, HYDROGEN PEROXIDE, AND OXALIC ACID ON PHOTOCHEMICAL DEGRADATION OF 2-CHLOROPHENOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W REMACHE

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The voluntary or accidental release of chemical compounds in the environment is a major cause of pollution of natural waters. Most of chlorophenols are toxic and hardly biodegradable and are difficult to remove from the environment. Therefore, it is important to find innovative and economical methods for the safe and complete destruction. The objective of this work is to test the activity photocatalytic of natural iron oxide (NIO in the photodegradation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP. The analysis chromatographic with HPLC of solutions exposed under UV irradiation revealed that the degradation of 2-CP was negligible under the condition of using only natural iron oxide. The effect of wavelength on photoreactivity of NIO was also investigated in this process: at high wavelength thus at low energy the efficiency of degradation is important. We have also investigated the activation of NIO by hydrogen peroxide and oxalic acid, The results showed that the photodegradation of 2-CP under UVA irradiation could be enhanced greatly in the presence of oxalate. 2-CP was completly removed after 240 minutes of irradiation when the concentration of oxalic acid is equal to 2.10-3 M. The use of 2.0 % of isopropanol as a scavenger confirmed the intervention of hydroxyl radicals in the photodegradation of 2-CP.

  9. Effects of Edaravone, a Free Radical Scavenger, on Photochemically Induced Cerebral Infarction in a Rat Hemiplegic Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, Satoshi; Harada, Katsuhiro; Ohwatashi, Akihiko; Kamikawa, Yurie

    2013-01-01

    Edaravone is a free radical scavenger that protects the adjacent cortex during cerebral infarction. We created a hemiparetic model of cerebral thrombosis from a photochemically induced infarction with the photosensitive dye, rose bengal, in rats. We examined the effects of edaravone on recovery in the model. A total of 36 adult Wistar rats were used. The right sensorimotor area was irradiated with green light with a wavelength of 533?nm (10?mm diameter), and the rose bengal was injected intra...

  10. Photochemical Pollution Modeling of Ozone at Metropolitan Area of Porto Alegre - RS/Brazil using WRF/Chem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuchiara, G. C.; Carvalho, J.

    2013-05-01

    One of the main problems related to air pollution in urban areas is caused by photochemical oxidants, particularly troposphere ozone (O3), which is considered a harmful substance. The O3 precursors (carbon monoxide CO, nitrogen oxides NOx and hydrocarbons HCs) are predominantly of anthropogenic origin in these areas, and vehicles are the main emission sources. Due to the increased urbanization and industrial development in recent decades, air pollutant emissions have increased likewise, mainly by mobile sources in the highly urbanized and developed areas, such as the Metropolitan Area of Porto Alegre-RS (MAPA). According to legal regulations implemented in Brazil in 2005, which aimed at increasing the fraction of biofuels in the national energy matrix, 2% biodiesel were supposed to be added to the fuel mixture within three years, and up to 5% after eight years of implementation of these regulations. Our work performs an analysis of surface concentrations for O3, NOx, CO, and HCs through numerical simulations with WRF/Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry). The model is validated against observational data obtained from the local urban air quality network for the period from January 5 to 9, 2009 (96 hours). One part of the study focused on the comparison of simulated meteorological variables, to observational data from two stations in MAPA. The results showed that the model simulates well the diurnal evolution of pressure and temperature at the surface, but is much less accurate for wind speed. Another part included the evaluation of model results of WRF/Chem for O3 versus observed data at air quality stations Esteio and Porto Alegre. Comparisons between simulated and observed O3 revealed that the model simulates well the evolution of the observed values, but on many occasions the model did not reproduce well the maximum and minimum concentrations. Finally, a preliminary quantitative sensitivity study on the impact of biofuel on the

  11. The Social Network of Tracer Variations and O(100) Uncertain Photochemical Parameters in the Community Atmosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, D. D.; Labute, M.; Chowdhary, K.; Debusschere, B.; Cameron-Smith, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Simulating the atmospheric cycles of ozone, methane, and other radiatively important trace gases in global climate models is computationally demanding and requires the use of 100's of photochemical parameters with uncertain values. Quantitative analysis of the effects of these uncertainties on tracer distributions, radiative forcing, and other model responses is hindered by the "curse of dimensionality." We describe efforts to overcome this curse using ensemble simulations and advanced statistical methods. Uncertainties from 95 photochemical parameters in the trop-MOZART scheme were sampled using a Monte Carlo method and propagated through 10,000 simulations of the single column version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). The variance of the ensemble was represented as a network with nodes and edges, and the topology and connections in the network were analyzed using lasso regression, Bayesian compressive sensing, and centrality measures from the field of social network theory. Despite the limited sample size for this high dimensional problem, our methods determined the key sources of variation and co-variation in the ensemble and identified important clusters in the network topology. Our results can be used to better understand the flow of photochemical uncertainty in simulations using CAM and other climate models. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and supported by the DOE Office of Science through the Scientific Discovery Through Advanced Computing (SciDAC).

  12. Applications of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to provide input to photochemical grid models for the Lake Michigan Ozone Study (LMOS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, W.A.; Tremback, C.J.; Pielke, R.A. [ASTeR, Inc., Ft. Collins, CO (United States); Eastman, J.L. [Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In spite of stringent emission controls, numerous exceedances of the US ozone air quality standard have continued in the Lake Michigan region, especially during the very hot summers of 1987 and 1988. Analyses revealed that exceedances of the 120 PPB hourly standard were 400% more likely at monitors located within 20 km of the lakeshore. While the role of Lake Michigan in exacerbating regional air quality problems has been investigated for almost 20 years, the relative impacts of various phenomena upon regional photochemical air quality have yet to be quantified. In order to design a defensible regional emission control policy, LMOS sponsored the development of a comprehensive regional photochemical modeling system. This is comprised of an emission model, an advanced regional photochemical model, and a prognostic meteorological model.

  13. Mixed N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Bis(oxazolinyl)borato Rhodium and Iridium Complexes in Photochemical and Thermal Oxidative Addition Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Songchen [Ames Laboratory; Manna, Kuntal [Ames Laboratory; Ellern, Arkady [Ames Laboratory; Sadow, Aaron D [Ames Laboratory

    2014-12-08

    In order to facilitate oxidative addition chemistry of fac-coordinated rhodium(I) and iridium(I) compounds, carbene–bis(oxazolinyl)phenylborate proligands have been synthesized and reacted with organometallic precursors. Two proligands, PhB(OxMe2)2(ImtBuH) (H[1]; OxMe2 = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; ImtBuH = 1-tert-butylimidazole) and PhB(OxMe2)2(ImMesH) (H[2]; ImMesH = 1-mesitylimidazole), are deprotonated with potassium benzyl to generate K[1] and K[2], and these potassium compounds serve as reagents for the synthesis of a series of rhodium and iridium complexes. Cyclooctadiene and dicarbonyl compounds {PhB(OxMe2)2ImtBu}Rh(η4-C8H12) (3), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(η4-C8H12) (4), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(CO)2 (5), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(η4-C8H12) (6), and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(CO)2 (7) are synthesized along with ToMM(η4-C8H12) (M = Rh (8); M = Ir (9); ToM = tris(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)phenylborate). The spectroscopic and structural properties and reactivity of this series of compounds show electronic and steric effects of substituents on the imidazole (tert-butyl vs mesityl), effects of replacing an oxazoline in ToM with a carbene donor, and the influence of the donor ligand (CO vs C8H12). The reactions of K[2] and [M(μ-Cl)(η2-C8H14)2]2 (M = Rh, Ir) provide {κ4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes'CH2}Rh(μ-H)(μ-Cl)Rh(η2-C8H14)2 (10) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(η3-C8H13) (11). In the former compound, a spontaneous oxidative addition of a mesityl ortho-methyl to give a mixed-valent dirhodium species is observed, while the iridium compound forms a monometallic allyl hydride. Photochemical reactions of dicarbonyl compounds 5 and 7 result in C–H bond oxidative addition providing the compounds {κ4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes'CH2}RhH(CO) (12) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(Ph)CO (13). In 12, oxidative addition results in cyclometalation of the mesityl ortho-methyl similar to 10, whereas the iridium compound reacts with the benzene solvent to give a rare crystallographically characterized cis

  14. Photochemical oxidation of short-chain polychlorinated n-alkane mixtures using H2O2/UV and the photo-Fenton reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Ken J. Friesen; Taha M. El-Morsi; Alaa S. Abd-El-Aziz

    2004-01-01

    The photochemical oxidation of a series of short-chain polychlorinated n-alkane (PCA) mixtures was investigated using H2O2/UV and modified photo-Fenton conditions (Fe3+/H2O2/UV) in both Milli-Q and lake water. All PCA mixtures, including chlorinated (Cl5 to Cl8) decanes, undecanes, dodecanes and tridecanes degraded in 0.02 M H2O2/UV at pH 2.8 in pure water, with 80±4% disappearance after 3 h of irradiation using a 300 nm light source. Degradation was somewhat enhanced under similar conditions...

  15. Photochemical modeling in California with two chemical mechanisms: model intercomparison and response to emission reductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chenxia; Kelly, James T; Avise, Jeremy C; Kaduwela, Ajith P; Stockwell, William R

    2011-05-01

    An updated version of the Statewide Air Pollution Research Center (SAPRC) chemical mechanism (SAPRC07C) was implemented into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) version 4.6. CMAQ simulations using SAPRC07C and the previously released version, SAPRC99, were performed and compared for an episode during July-August, 2000. Ozone (O3) predictions of the SAPRC07C simulation are generally lower than those of the SAPRC99 simulation in the key areas of central and southern California, especially in areas where modeled concentrations are greater than the federal 8-hr O3 standard of 75 parts per billion (ppb) and/or when the volatile organic compound (VOC)/nitrogen oxides (NOx) ratio is less than 13. The relative changes of ozone production efficiency (OPE) against the VOC/NOx ratio at 46 sites indicate that the OPE is reduced in SAPRC07C compared with SAPRC99 at most sites by as much as approximately 22%. The SAPRC99 and SAPRC07C mechanisms respond similarly to 20% reductions in anthropogenic VOC emissions. The response of the mechanisms to 20% NOx emissions reductions can be grouped into three cases. In case 1, in which both mechanisms show a decrease in daily maximum 8-hr O3 concentration with decreasing NOx emissions, the O3 decrease in SAPRC07C is smaller. In case 2, in which both mechanisms show an increase in O3 with decreasing NOx emissions, the O3 increase is larger in SAPRC07C. In case 3, SAPRC07C simulates an increase in O3 in response to reduced NOx emissions whereas SAPRC99 simulates a decrease in O3 for the same region. As a result, the areas where NOx controls would be disbeneficial are spatially expanded in SAPRC07C. Although the results presented here are valuable for understanding differences in predictions and model response for SAPRC99 and SAPRC07C, the study did not evaluate the impact of mechanism differences in the context of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's guidance for using numerical models in demonstrating air quality attainment

  16. Modeling electrodialysis and a photochemical process for their integration in saline wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Borges

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation processes can be used to treat industrial wastewater containing non-biodegradable organic compounds. However, the presence of dissolved salts may inhibit or retard the treatment process. In this study, wastewater desalination by electrodialysis (ED associated with an advanced oxidation process (photo-Fenton was applied to an aqueous NaCl solution containing phenol. The influence of process variables on the demineralization factor was investigated for ED in pilot scale and a correlation was obtained between the phenol, salt and water fluxes with the driving force. The oxidation process was investigated in a laboratory batch reactor and a model based on artificial neural networks was developed by fitting the experimental data describing the reaction rate as a function of the input variables. With the experimental parameters of both processes, a dynamic model was developed for ED and a continuous model, using a plug flow reactor approach, for the oxidation process. Finally, the hybrid model simulation could validate different scenarios of the integrated system and can be used for process optimization.

  17. Seasonal photochemical transformations of nitrogen species in a forest stream and lake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Porcal

    Full Text Available The photochemical release of inorganic nitrogen from dissolved organic matter is an important source of bio-available nitrogen (N in N-limited aquatic ecosystems. We conducted photochemical experiments and used mathematical models based on pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics to quantify the photochemical transformations of individual N species and their seasonal effects on N cycling in a mountain forest stream and lake (Plešné Lake, Czech Republic. Results from laboratory experiments on photochemical changes in N speciation were compared to measured lake N budgets. Concentrations of organic nitrogen (Norg; 40-58 µmol L-1 decreased from 3 to 26% during 48-hour laboratory irradiation (an equivalent of 4-5 days of natural solar insolation due to photochemical mineralization to ammonium (NH4+ and other N forms (Nx; possibly N oxides and N2. In addition to Norg mineralization, Nx also originated from photochemical nitrate (NO3- reduction. Laboratory exposure of a first-order forest stream water samples showed a high amount of seasonality, with the maximum rates of Norg mineralization and NH4+ production in winter and spring, and the maximum NO3- reduction occurring in summer. These photochemical changes could have an ecologically significant effect on NH4+ concentrations in streams (doubling their terrestrial fluxes from soils and on concentrations of dissolved Norg in the lake. In contrast, photochemical reactions reduced NO3- fluxes by a negligible (<1% amount and had a negligible effect on the aquatic cycle of this N form.

  18. Splitting and non splitting are pollution models photochemical reactions in the urban areas of greater Tehran area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidarinasab, A.; Dabir, B.; Sahimi, M.; Badii, Kh.

    2003-01-01

    During the past years, one of the most important problems has been air pollution in urban areas. In this regards, ozone, as one of the major products of photochemical reactions, has great importance. The term 'photochemical' is applied to a number of secondary pollutants that appear as a result of sun-related reactions, ozone being the most important one. So far various models have been suggested to predict these pollutants. In this paper, we developed the model that has been introduced by Dabir, et al. [4]. In this model more than 48 chemical species and 114 chemical reactions are involved. The result of this development, showed good to excellent agreement across the region for compounds such as O 3 , NO, NO 2 , CO, and SO 2 with regard to VOC and NMHC. The results of the simulation were compared with previous work [4] and the effects of increasing the number of components and reactions were evaluated. The results of the operator splitting method were compared with non splitting solving method. The result showed that splitting method with one-tenth time step collapsed with non splitting method (Crank-Nicolson, under-relaxation iteration method without splitting of the equation terms). Then we developed one dimensional model to 3-D and were compared with experimental data

  19. Photochemical reactions of actinide ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomiyasu, Hiroshi

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews the results of photochemical studies of actinide ions, which have been performed in our research group for past several years as follows: I) behavior of the excited uranyl(VI) ion; II) photo-reductions of the uranyl ion with organic and inorganic compounds; III) photo-oxidations of uranium(IV) and plutonium(III) in nitric acid solutions. (author)

  20. Ozone modeling for compliance planning: A synopsis of ''The Use of Photochemical Air Quality Models for Evaluating Emission Control Strategies: A Synthesis Report''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, C.L.

    1992-12-01

    The 1990 federal Clean Air Act Amendments require that many nonattainment areas use gridded, photochemical air quality models to develop compliance plans for meeting the ambient ozone standard. Both industry and regulatory agencies will need to consider explicitly the strengths and limitations of the models. Photochemical air quality models constitute the principal tool available for evaluating the relative effectiveness of alternative emission control strategies. Limitations in the utility of modeling results stem from the uncertainty and bias of predictions for modeled episodes, possible compensating errors, limitations in the number of modeled episodes, and incompatibility between deterministic model predictions and the statistical form of the air quality standard for ozone. If emissions estimates (including naturally produced ''biogenic'' emissions) are accurate, intensive aerometric data are available, and an evaluation of performance (including diagnostic evaluations) is successfully completed, gridded photochemical airquality models can determine (1) the types of emission controls - VOC, NO x , or both - that would be most effective for reducing ozone concentrations, and (2) the approximate magnitudes - to within about 20--40% - of the estimated ozone reductions

  1. Summary of photochemical and radiative data used in the LLNL one-dimensional transport-kinetics model of the troposphere and stratosphere: 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connell, P.S.; Wuebbles, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    This report summarizes the contents and sources of the photochemical and radiative segment of the LLNL one-dimensional transport-kinetics model of the troposphere and stratosphere. Data include the solar flux incident at the top of the atmosphere, absorption spectra for O 2 , O 3 and NO 2 , and effective absorption coefficients for about 40 photolytic processes as functions of wavelength and, in a few cases, temperature and pressure. The current data set represents understanding of atmospheric photochemical processes as of late 1982 and relies largely on NASA Evaluation Number 5 of Chemical Kinetics and Photochemical Data for Use in Stratospheric Modeling, JPL Publication 82-57 (DeMore et al., 1982). Implementation in the model, including the treatment of multiple scattering and cloud cover, is discussed in Wuebbles (1981)

  2. Results of photochemical modeling sensitivity analyses in the Lake Michigan region: Current status of Lake Michigan Ozone Control Program (LMOP) modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolwick, P.D. [Lake Michigan Air Directors Consortium, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Kaleel, R.J. [Illinois Environmental Protection Agency, Springfield, IL (United States); Majewski, M.A. [Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The four states that border Lake Michigan are cooperatively applying a state-of-the-art nested photochemical grid model to assess the effects of potential emission control strategies on reducing elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations in the region to levels below the national ambient air quality standard. In order to provide an extensive database to support the application of the photochemical model, a substantial data collection effort known as the Lake Michigan Ozone Study (LMOS) was completed during the summer of 1991. The Lake Michigan Ozone Control Program (LMOP) was established by the States of Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Indiana to carry out the application of the modeling system developed from the LMOS, in terms of developing the attainment demonstrations required from this area by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990.

  3. On the influence of meteorological input on photochemical modelling of a severe episode over a coastal area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirovano, G.; Coll, I.; Bedogni, M.; Alessandrini, S.; Costa, M. P.; Gabusi, V.; Lasry, F.; Menut, L.; Vautard, R.

    The modelling reconstruction of the processes determining the transport and mixing of ozone and its precursors in complex terrain areas is a challenging task, particularly when local-scale circulations, such as sea breeze, take place. Within this frame, the ESCOMPTE European campaign took place in the vicinity of Marseille (south-east of France) in summer 2001. The main objectives of the field campaign were to document several photochemical episodes, as well as to constitute a detailed database for chemistry transport models intercomparison. CAMx model has been applied on the largest intense observation periods (IOP) (June 21-26, 2001) in order to evaluate the impacts of two state-of-the-art meteorological models, RAMS and MM5, on chemical model outputs. The meteorological models have been used as best as possible in analysis mode, thus allowing to identify the spread arising in pollutant concentrations as an indication of the intrinsic uncertainty associated to the meteorological input. Simulations have been deeply investigated and compared with a considerable subset of observations both at ground level and along vertical profiles. The analysis has shown that both models were able to reproduce the main circulation features of the IOP. The strongest discrepancies are confined to the Planetary Boundary Layer, consisting of a clear tendency to underestimate or overestimate wind speed over the whole domain. The photochemical simulations showed that variability in circulation intensity was crucial mainly for the representation of the ozone peaks and of the shape of ozone plumes at the ground that have been affected in the same way over the whole domain and all along the simulated period. As a consequence, such differences can be thought of as a possible indicator for the uncertainty related to the definition of meteorological fields in a complex terrain area.

  4. Evaluation of Kinetic and Mechanistic Data for Modeling of Photochemical Smog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, R.; Lloyd, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    This review is a critical evaluation of the rate constants, mechanisms, and products of selected atmospheric reactions of hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and sulfur oxides in air. The evaluation considers eight hydrocarbons (n-butane, 2,3-dimethylbutane, ethene, propene, 1-butene, trans-2-butene, toluene, and m-xylene) for which smog chamber irradiations have been carried out under carefully controlled conditions and which have been the subject of computer modeling studies by more than one research group. The reactions involved are treated in the following categories: inorganic reactions in organic-NO/sub x/-air irradiations; organic reactions of the formaldehyde-NO/sub x/-air system; organic reactions of the acetaldehyde-NO/sub x/-air system; organic reactions of the alkene-NO/sub x/-air systems; organic reactions of the alkane-NO/sub x/-air systems; organic reactions of selected carbonyl-NO/sub x/-air systems; organic reactions of the aromatic-NO/sub x/-air systems; combination reactions of peroxy radicals, and homogeneous gas phase SO 2 reactions. This report considers literature through early 1983

  5. Sensitivity testing of the model set-up used for calculation of photochemical ozone creation potentials (POCP) under European conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altenstedt, J.; Pleijel, K.

    1998-02-01

    Photochemical Ozone Creation Potentials (POCP) is a method to rank VOC, relative to other VOC, according to their ability to produce ground level ozone. To obtain POCP values valid under European conditions, a critical analysis of the POCP concept has been performed using the IVL photochemical trajectory model. The critical analysis has concentrated on three VOC (ethene, n-butane and o-xylene) and has analysed the effect on their POCP values when different model parameters were varied. The three species were chosen because of their different degradation mechanisms in the atmosphere and thus their different abilities to produce ozone. The model parameters which have been tested include background emissions, initial concentrations, dry deposition velocities, the features of the added point source and meteorological parameters. The critical analysis shows that the background emissions of NO{sub x} and VOC have a critical impact on the POCP values. The hour of the day for the point source emission also shows a large influence on the POCP values. Other model parameters which have been studied have not shown such large influence on the POCP values. Based on the critical analysis a model set-up for calculation of POCP is defined. The variations in POCP values due to changes in the background emissions of NO{sub x} and VOC are so large that they can not be disregarded in the calculation of POCP. It is recommended to calculate POCP ranges based on the extremes in POCP values instead of calculating site specific POCP values. Four individual emission scenarios which produced the extremes in POCP values in the analysis have been selected for future calculation of POCP ranges. The scenarios are constructed based on the emissions in Europe and the resulting POCP ranges are thus intended to be applicable within Europe 67 refs, 61 figs, 16 tabs

  6. Preparation of photoelectrodes with spectral response in the visible without applied bias based on photochemically deposited copper oxide inside a porous titanium dioxide film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil, Elena [Institute of Materials-Physics Faculty, University of Havana, Colina Universitaria, C. Habana 10 400 (Cuba); Gonzalez, Bernardo [Institute of Materials-Physics Faculty, University of Havana, Colina Universitaria, C. Habana 10 400 (Cuba); Zumeta, Inti [Institute of Materials-Physics Faculty, University of Havana, Colina Universitaria, C. Habana 10 400 (Cuba); Domingo, Concepcion [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB), CSIC, 08290 Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain); Domenech, Xavier [Department of Chemistry, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08290 Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain); Ayllon, Jose A. [Department of Chemistry, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08290 Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain)]. E-mail: JoseAntonio.Ayllon@uab.es

    2005-10-01

    A soft and simple photochemical technique is proposed for the incorporation of copper oxide to nanoporous TiO{sub 2} with the purpose of sensitizing the TiO{sub 2} to wavelengths in the visible range. An aqueous solution of copper formate is employed as precursor. The light intensity value needed for the process, as well as its spectral range, is readily attainable with solar light. Because of the importance of heterojunctions of porous semiconductors in solar energy application, like extremely thin absorber solar cells, experimental conditions have been studied in order to obtain a thin absorption layer of copper oxide covering the TiO{sub 2}. Selection of copper formate solution concentration, irradiation time and previous immersion time in the precursor solution has been studied using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and optical spectral transmission. Direction and wavelength dependence of photocurrent show that photons are absorbed by the copper oxide and electrons injected to the TiO{sub 2}.

  7. Evaluation of emission control strategies to reduce ozone pollution in the Paso del Norte region using a photochemical air quality modeling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Victor Hugo

    Air pollution emissions control strategies to reduce ozone precursor pollutants are analyzed by applying a photochemical modeling system. Simulations of air quality conditions during an ozone episode which occurred in June, 2006 are undertaken by increasing or reducing area source emissions in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico. Two air pollutants are primary drivers in the formation of tropospheric ozone. Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) undergo multiple chemical reactions under favorable meteorological conditions to form ozone, which is a secondary pollutant that irritates respiratory systems in sensitive individuals especially the elderly and young children. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency established National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) to limit ambient air pollutants such as ozone by establishing an 8-hour average concentration of 0.075 ppm as the threshold at which a violation of the standard occurs. Ozone forms primarily due reactions in the troposphere of NOx and VOC emissions generated primarily by anthropogenic sources in urban regions. Data from emissions inventories indicate area sources account for ˜15 of NOx and ˜45% of regional VOC emissions. Area sources include gasoline stations, automotive paint bodyshops and nonroad mobile sources. Multiplicity of air pollution emissions sources provides an opportunity to investigate and potentially implement air quality improvement strategies to reduce emissions which contribute to elevated ozone concentrations. A baseline modeling scenario was established using the CAMx photochemical air quality model from which a series of sensitivity analyses for evaluating air quality control strategies were conducted. Modifications to area source emissions were made by varying NOx and / or VOC emissions in the areas of particular interest. Model performance was assessed for each sensitivity analysis. Normalized bias (NB) and normalized error (NE) were used to identify

  8. Dispersion and photochemical evolution of reactive pollutants in street canyons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Kyung-Hwan; Baik, Jong-Jin; Lee, Kwang-Yeon

    2013-05-01

    Dispersion and photochemical evolution of reactive pollutants in street canyons with canyon aspect ratios of 1 and 2 are investigated using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model coupled with the carbon bond mechanism IV (CBM-IV). Photochemical ages of NOx and VOC are expressed as a function of the NO2-to-NOx and toluene-to-xylene ratios, respectively. These are found to be useful for analyzing the O3 and OH oxidation processes in the street canyons. The OH oxidation process (O3 oxidation process) is more pronounced in the upper (lower) region of the street canyon with a canyon aspect ratio of 2, which is characterized by more (less) aged air. In the upper region of the street canyon, O3 is chemically produced as well as transported downward across the roof level, whereas O3 is chemically reduced in the lower region of the street canyon. The O3 chemical production is generally favorable when the normalized photochemical ages of NOx and VOC are larger than 0.55 and 0.28, respectively. The sensitivities of O3 chemical characteristics to NOx and VOC emission rates, photolysis rate, and ambient wind speed are examined for the lower and upper regions of the street canyon with a canyon aspect ratio of 2. The O3 concentration and the O3 chemical production rate divided by the O3 concentration increase as the NOx emission rate decreases and the VOC emission rate and photolysis rate increase. The O3 concentration is less sensitive to the ambient wind speed than to other factors considered. The relative importance of the OH oxidation process compared to the O3 oxidation process increases with increasing NOx emission rate and photolysis rate and decreasing VOC emission rate. In this study, both O3 and OH oxidation processes are found to be important in street-canyon scale chemistry. The methodology of estimating the photochemical ages can potentially be adopted to neighborhood scale chemistry.

  9. Development and first evaluation of micro-calgrid: a 3-D, urban-canopy-scale photochemical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, R.; Yamartino, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper details the development and first application of the MICRO-CALGRID (MCG), micro-scale photochemical model. The MCG model treats individual buildings as obstacles with impenetrable surfaces, rather than as roughness elements; is driven by the flow and turbulence fields generated by the MISKAM Navier-Stokes model, the emissions generated by the German MOBILEV model, and the concentration inflow boundary conditions generated by the urban-scale CALGRID model; includes a detailed treatment of vehicle-induced turbulence; and is equipped with three chemistry schemes (SAPRC-93, CB-4, and an analytic solution for Chapman cycle chemistry). The MCG model is exercised in both its 2-D and 3-D modes. Also described is a MCG application to a 5-day episode measured within a busy street canyon in Berlin, Germany. Concentrations of all measured pollutants (CO, NO, NO 2 , benzene, SO 2 and TSP) were well reproduced by the MCG model. NO 2 performance appeared adequate using the simpler analytic chemistry solution; however, inclusion of vehicle-induced turbulence was found to improve model performance statistics. (Author)

  10. Modeling study of vibrational photochemical isotope enrichment. [HBr + Cl/sub 2/; HCl + Br/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badcock, C.C.; Hwang, W.C.; Kalsch, J.F.

    1978-09-29

    Chemical kinetic modeling studies of vibrational-photochemical isotope enrichment have been performed on two systems: Model (I), H/sup 79/Br(H/sup 81/Br) + Cl/sub 2/ and, Model (II), H/sup 37/Cl(H/sup 35/Cl) + Br. Pulsed laser excitation was modeled to the first excited vibrational level of H/sup 79/Br in Model I and the first and second excited vibrational levels of both HCl isotopes in Model II. These are prototype systems of exoergic (Model I) and endoergic (Model II) reactions. The effects on enrichment of varying the external parameters (pressure, laser intensity) and the internal parameters (rate constants for V-V exchange and excited-state reactions) were examined. Studies of these prototype systems indicate that a favorable reaction for enrichment, with isotopically-specific excitation and a significantly accelerated vibrationally-excited-state reaction should have the following properties: the reaction from v = 0 should be only moderately exoergic, and the most favorable coreactant should be a polyatomic species, such as alkyl radical. Direct excitation of the reacting vibrational level is at least an order of magnitude more favorable for enrichment than is population by energy transfer. Enrichment of the minor isotope by these processes is more effective than is major isotope enrichment. Within limits, increased laser intensity is beneficial. However, for sequential excitation of a second vibrational level, major isotope enrichment can be diminished by high populations of the first vibrational level.

  11. Photochemical model estimated fire impacts on ozone and aerosol evaluated with field studies and routine data sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, K. R.

    2017-12-01

    Highly instrumented field studies provide a unique opportunity to evaluate multiple aspects of photochemical grid model representation of fire emissions, dispersion, and chemical evolution. Fuel information and burn area for a specific fire coupled with near-fire and downwind chemical measurements provides information needed to constrain model predicted fire plume transport and chemical evolution of important pollutants such as ozone and particulate matter (PM2.5) that have deleterious health effects. Most local to regional scale field campaigns to date have made relatively few transects through plumes from fires with well characterized fuel type and consumption. While more comprehensive field studies are being planned for 2018 and beyond (WE-CAN, FIREX, FIRE-CHEM, and FASMEE), existing measurement data from multiple field campaigns including 2013 SEAC4RS, satellite data, and routine surface networks are used to assess how a regulatory modeling system captures fire impacts on local to regional scale ozone and PM2.5. Key aspects of the regulatory modeling system include fire location and burn area from SMARTFIRE2, emissions from BlueSky framework, and predictions of ambient O3 and PM2.5 from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) photochemical transport model. A comparison of model estimated O3 from specific fires with routine surface measurements at rural locations in proximity to the 2013 Rim fire, 2011 Wallow fire, and 2011 Flint Hills fires suggest the modeling system over-estimates smoke impacts on hourly ozone. Sensitivity simulations where solar radiation and photolysis rates are more aggressively attenuated by smoke reduced O3 predictions but did not ameliorate the over prediction bias. PM2.5 organic carbon tends to be overpredicted at rural surface sites downwind from the 2011 Flint Hills prescribed fires while results were mixed at rural sites downwind of the 2013 Rim fire and 2011 Wallow fire suggesting differences in fuel characterization (e

  12. Mapping the Binding Interface of VEGF and a Monoclonal Antibody Fab-1 Fragment with Fast Photochemical Oxidation of Proteins (FPOP) and Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wecksler, Aaron T.; Molina, Patricia; Deperalta, Galahad; Gross, Michael L.

    2017-05-01

    We previously analyzed the Fab-1:VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) system described in this work, with both native top-down mass spectrometry and bottom-up mass spectrometry (carboxyl-group or GEE footprinting) techniques. This work continues bottom-up mass spectrometry analysis using a fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP) platform to map the solution binding interface of VEGF and a fragment antigen binding region of an antibody (Fab-1). In this study, we use FPOP to compare the changes in solvent accessibility by quantitating the extent of oxidative modification in the unbound versus bound states. Determining the changes in solvent accessibility enables the inference of the protein binding sites (epitope and paratopes) and a comparison to the previously published Fab-1:VEGF crystal structure, adding to the top-down and bottom-up data. Using this method, we investigated peptide-level and residue-level changes in solvent accessibility between the unbound proteins and bound complex. Mapping these data onto the Fab-1:VEGF crystal structure enabled successful characterization of both the binding region and regions of remote conformation changes. These data, coupled with our previous higher order structure (HOS) studies, demonstrate the value of a comprehensive toolbox of methods for identifying the putative epitopes and paratopes for biotherapeutic antibodies.

  13. Oxidative desulfurization: kinetic modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, S; Uppaluri, R; Purkait, M K

    2009-01-30

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H(2)O(2) over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel.

  14. Oxidative desulfurization: Kinetic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhir, S.; Uppaluri, R.; Purkait, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H 2 O 2 over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel

  15. Photochemical Internalization of Bleomycin Before External-Beam Radiotherapy Improves Locoregional Control in a Human Sarcoma Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norum, Ole-Jacob; Bruland, Oyvind Sverre; Gorunova, Ludmila; Berg, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the tumor growth response of the combination photochemical internalization and external-beam radiotherapy. Photochemical internalization is a technology to improve the utilization of therapeutic macromolecules in cancer therapy by photochemical release of endocytosed macromolecules into the cytosol. Methods and Materials: A human sarcoma xenograft TAX-1 was inoculated subcutaneously into nude mice. The photosensitizer AlPcS 2a and bleomycin were intraperitoneally administrated 48 h and 30 min, respectively, before diode laser light exposure at 670 nm (20 J/cm 2 ). Thirty minutes or 7 days after photochemical treatment, the animals were subjected to 4 Gy of ionizing radiation. Results: Using photochemical internalization of bleomycin as an adjunct to ionizing radiation increased the time to progression for the tumors from 17 to 33 days as compared with that observed with photodynamic therapy combined with ionizing radiation as well as for radiochemotherapy with bleomycin. The side effects observed when photochemical internalization of bleomycin was given shortly before ionizing radiation were eliminated by separating the treatment modalities in time. Conclusion: Photochemical internalization of bleomycin combined with ionizing radiation increased the time to progression and showed minimal toxicity and may therefore reduce the total radiation dose necessary to obtain local tumor control while avoiding long-term sequelae from radiotherapy.

  16. Photochemical methodologies for organic waste treatment: advanced oxidation process using uranyl ion with H2O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naik, D.B.; Sarkar, S.K.; Mukherjee, T.

    2009-01-01

    Excited uranyl ion is able to degrade dyes such as thionine and methylene blue on irradiation with 254 nm/300 nm light. By adding H 2 O 2 along with uranyl ion, photodegradation takes place with visible light and also with enhanced rate. The hydroxyl radicals generated in the reoxidation of U(IV)/UO 2 + to UO 2 2+ are responsible for this enhanced degradation. The above advanced oxidation process (AOP) was applied to study the oxidation of 2-propanol to acetone. (author)

  17. Effects of Edaravone, a Free Radical Scavenger, on Photochemically Induced Cerebral Infarction in a Rat Hemiplegic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ikeda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Edaravone is a free radical scavenger that protects the adjacent cortex during cerebral infarction. We created a hemiparetic model of cerebral thrombosis from a photochemically induced infarction with the photosensitive dye, rose bengal, in rats. We examined the effects of edaravone on recovery in the model. A total of 36 adult Wistar rats were used. The right sensorimotor area was irradiated with green light with a wavelength of 533 nm (10 mm diameter, and the rose bengal was injected intravenously to create an infarction. The edaravone group was injected intraperitoneally with edaravone (3 mg/kg, and the control group was injected with saline. The recovery process of the hemiplegia was evaluated with the 7-step scale of Fenny. The infarcted areas were measured after fixation. The recovery of the paralysis in the edaravone-treated group was significantly earlier than that in the untreated group. Seven days later, both groups were mostly recovered and had scores of 7, and the infarction region was significantly smaller in the edaravone-treated group. Edaravone reduced the infarction area and promoted the functional recovery of hemiparesis from cerebral thrombosis in a rat model. These findings suggest that edaravone treatment would be effective in clinical patients recovering from cerebral infarction.

  18. Effects of edaravone, a free radical scavenger, on photochemically induced cerebral infarction in a rat hemiplegic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Satoshi; Harada, Katsuhiro; Ohwatashi, Akihiko; Kamikawa, Yurie

    2013-01-01

    Edaravone is a free radical scavenger that protects the adjacent cortex during cerebral infarction. We created a hemiparetic model of cerebral thrombosis from a photochemically induced infarction with the photosensitive dye, rose bengal, in rats. We examined the effects of edaravone on recovery in the model. A total of 36 adult Wistar rats were used. The right sensorimotor area was irradiated with green light with a wavelength of 533 nm (10 mm diameter), and the rose bengal was injected intravenously to create an infarction. The edaravone group was injected intraperitoneally with edaravone (3 mg/kg), and the control group was injected with saline. The recovery process of the hemiplegia was evaluated with the 7-step scale of Fenny. The infarcted areas were measured after fixation. The recovery of the paralysis in the edaravone-treated group was significantly earlier than that in the untreated group. Seven days later, both groups were mostly recovered and had scores of 7, and the infarction region was significantly smaller in the edaravone-treated group. Edaravone reduced the infarction area and promoted the functional recovery of hemiparesis from cerebral thrombosis in a rat model. These findings suggest that edaravone treatment would be effective in clinical patients recovering from cerebral infarction.

  19. Evaluation of multisectional and two-section particulate matter photochemical grid models in the Western United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Ralph; Koo, Bonyoung; Yarwood, Greg

    2005-11-01

    Version 4.10s of the comprehensive air-quality model with extensions (CAMx) photochemical grid model has been developed, which includes two options for representing particulate matter (PM) size distribution: (1) a two-section representation that consists of fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM2.5-10) modes that has no interactions between the sections and assumes all of the secondary PM is fine; and (2) a multisectional representation that divides the PM size distribution into N sections (e.g., N = 10) and simulates the mass transfer between sections because of coagulation, accumulation, evaporation, and other processes. The model was applied to Southern California using the two-section and multisection representation of PM size distribution, and we found that allowing secondary PM to grow into the coarse mode had a substantial effect on PM concentration estimates. CAMx was then applied to the Western United States for the 1996 annual period with a 36-km grid resolution using both the two-section and multisection PM representation. The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) and Regional Modeling for Aerosol and Deposition (REMSAD) models were also applied to the 1996 annual period. Similar model performance was exhibited by the four models across the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) and Clean Air Status and Trends Network monitoring networks. All four of the models exhibited fairly low annual bias for secondary PM sulfate and nitrate but with a winter overestimation and summer underestimation bias. The CAMx multisectional model estimated that coarse mode secondary sulfate and nitrate typically contribute nitrate when averaged across the more rural IMPROVE monitoring network.

  20. Naval Research Laboratory Ecological -- Photochemical -- Bio-optical--Numerical Experiment (Neptune) Version 1: A Portable, Flexible Modeling Environment Designed to Resolve Time-dependent Feedbacks Between Upper Ocean Ecology, Photochemistry, and Optics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jolliff, Jason K; Kindle, John C

    2007-01-01

    A modeling system has been constructed that combines ecological element cycling, photochemical processes, and bio-optical processes into a single simulation that may be coupled to hydrodynamic models...

  1. Water-Mediated Photochemical Treatments for Low-Temperature Passivation of Metal-Oxide Thin-Film Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jae Sang; Jo, Jeong-Wan; Kang, Jingu; Jeong, Chan-Yong; Jeong, Hu Young; Kim, Sung Kyu; Kim, Kwanpyo; Kwon, Hyuck-In; Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Myung-Gil; Park, Sung Kyu

    2016-04-27

    The low-temperature electrical passivation of an amorphous oxide semiconductor (AOS) thin-film transistor (TFT) is achieved by a deep ultraviolet (DUV) light irradiation-water treatment-DUV irradiation (DWD) method. The water treatment of the first DUV-annealed amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin film is likely to induce the preferred adsorption of water molecules at the oxygen vacancies and leads to subsequent hydroxide formation in the bulk a-IGZO films. Although the water treatment initially degraded the electrical performance of the a-IGZO TFTs, the second DUV irradiation on the water-treated devices may enable a more complete metal-oxygen-metal lattice formation while maintaining low oxygen vacancies in the oxide films. Overall, the stable and dense metal-oxygen-metal (M-O-M) network formation could be easily achieved at low temperatures (below 150 °C). The successful passivation of structural imperfections in the a-IGZO TFTs, such as hydroxyl group (OH-) and oxygen vacancies, mainly results in the enhanced electrical performances of the DWD-processed a-IGZO TFTs (on/off current ratio of 8.65 × 10(9), subthreshold slope of 0.16 V/decade, an average mobility of >6.94 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), and a bias stability of ΔVTH IGZO TFTs.

  2. Determination of thiomersal by flow injection coupled with microwave-assisted photochemical online oxidative decomposition of organic mercury and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanella, Beatrice; Onor, Massimo; Mascherpa, Marco Carlo; D’Ulivo, Alessandro [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Ferrari, Carlo [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, INO–UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Bramanti, Emilia, E-mail: bramanti@pi.iccom.cnr.it [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-12-04

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Thiomersal was determined on line using FI-MW/UV-CVGAFS. •MW/UV allows a “green” on line oxidation of organic mercury to Hg{sup II}. •Each measure requires less than 5 min with a LOD of 3 ng mL{sup −1} (as mercury). •Hg concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranges between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL{sup −1}. -- Abstract: We developed a flow injection (FI) method for the determination of thiomersal (sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate, C{sub 9}H{sub 9}HgNaO{sub 2}S) based on the UV/microwave (MW) photochemical, online oxidation of organic mercury, followed by cold vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVG-AFS) detection. Thiomersal was quantitatively converted in the MW/UV process to Hg(II), with a yield of 97 ± 3%. This reaction was followed by the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) performed in a knotted reaction coil with NaBH{sub 4} solution, and AFS detection in an Ar/H{sub 2} miniaturized flame. The method was linear in the 0.01–2 μg mL{sup −1} range, with a LOD of 0.003 μg mL{sup −1}. This method has been applied to the determination of thiomersal in ophthalmic solutions, with recoveries ranging between 97% and 101%. We found a mercury concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranging between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL{sup −1}.

  3. Determination of thiomersal by flow injection coupled with microwave-assisted photochemical online oxidative decomposition of organic mercury and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campanella, Beatrice; Onor, Massimo; Mascherpa, Marco Carlo; D’Ulivo, Alessandro; Ferrari, Carlo; Bramanti, Emilia

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Thiomersal was determined on line using FI-MW/UV-CVGAFS. •MW/UV allows a “green” on line oxidation of organic mercury to Hg II . •Each measure requires less than 5 min with a LOD of 3 ng mL −1 (as mercury). •Hg concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranges between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL −1 . -- Abstract: We developed a flow injection (FI) method for the determination of thiomersal (sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate, C 9 H 9 HgNaO 2 S) based on the UV/microwave (MW) photochemical, online oxidation of organic mercury, followed by cold vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVG-AFS) detection. Thiomersal was quantitatively converted in the MW/UV process to Hg(II), with a yield of 97 ± 3%. This reaction was followed by the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) performed in a knotted reaction coil with NaBH 4 solution, and AFS detection in an Ar/H 2 miniaturized flame. The method was linear in the 0.01–2 μg mL −1 range, with a LOD of 0.003 μg mL −1 . This method has been applied to the determination of thiomersal in ophthalmic solutions, with recoveries ranging between 97% and 101%. We found a mercury concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranging between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL −1

  4. Engineering photochemical smog through convection towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, S.; Prueitt, M.L.; Bossert, J.E.; Mroz, E.J.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Jacobson, M.Z.; Turco, R.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Dept.

    1995-02-01

    Reverse convection towers have attracted attention as a medium for cleansing modern cities. Evaporation of an aqueous mist injected at the tower opening could generate electrical power by creating descent, and simultaneously scavenge unsightly and unhealthful particulates. The study offered here assesses the influence to tower water droplets on the photochemical component of Los Angeles type smog. The primary radical chain initiator OH is likely removed into aqueous phases well within the residence time of air in the tower, and then reacts away rapidly. Organics do not dissolve, but nighttime hydrolysis of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} depletes the nitrogen oxides. A lack of HOx would slow hydrocarbon oxidation and so also ozone production. Lowering of NOx would also alter ozone production rates, but the direction is uncertain. SO{sub 2} is available in sufficient quantities in some urban areas to react with stable oxidants, and if seawater were the source of the mist, the high pH would lead to fast sulfur oxidation kinetics. With an accommodation coefficient of 10{sup {minus}3}, however, ozone may not enter the aqueous phase efficiently. Even if ozone is destroyed or its production suppressed, photochemical recovery times are on the order of hours, so that tower processing must be centered on a narrow midday time window. The cost of building the number of structures necessary for this brief turnover could be prohibitive. The increase in humidity accompanying mist evaporation could be controlled with condensers, but might otherwise counteract visibility enhancements by recreating aqueous aerosols. Quantification of the divergent forcings convection towers must exert upon the cityscape would call for coupled three dimensional modeling of transport, microphysics, and photochemistry. 112 refs.

  5. An Integrative Study of Photochemical Air Pollution in Hong Kong: an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.

    2014-12-01

    Hong Kong is situated in the Pearl River delta of Southern China. This region has experienced phenomenal economic growth in the past 30 years. Emissions of large amount of pollutants from urban areas and various industries coupled with subtropical climate have led to frequent occurrences of severe photochemical air pollution. Despite the long-term control efforts of the Hong Kong government, the atmospheric levels of ozone have been increasing in the past decade. To obtain an updated and more complete understanding of photochemical smog, an integrative study has been conducted during 2010-2014. Several intensive measurement campaigns were carried out at urban, suburban and rural sites in addition to the routine observations at fourteen air quality monitoring stations in Hong Kong. Meteorological, photochemical, and chemical-transport modeling studies were conducted to investigate the causes/processes of elevated photochemical pollution . The main activities of this study were to (1) examine the situation and trends of photochemical air pollution in Hong Kong, (2) understand some underlying chemical processes in particular the poorly-understood heterogeneous processes of reactive nitrogen oxides, (3) quantify the local, regional, and super-regional contributions to the ozone pollution in Hong Kong, and (4) review the control policy and make further recommendations based on the science. This paper will give an overview of this study and present some key results on the trends and chemistry of the photochemical pollution in this polluted subtropical region.

  6. Photochemically Powered AgCl Janus Micromotors as a Model System to Understand Ionic Self-Diffusiophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao; Zhang, H P; Tang, Jinyao; Wang, Wei

    2018-03-13

    Micromotors are an emerging class of micromachines that could find potential applications in biomedicine, environmental remediation, and microscale self-assembly. Understanding their propulsion mechanisms holds the key to their future development. This is especially true for a popular category of micromotors that are driven by asymmetric surface photochemical reactions. Many of these micromotors release ionic species and are propelled via a mechanism termed "ionic self-diffusiophoresis". However, exactly how it operates remains vague. To address this fundamental yet important issue, we have developed a dielectric-AgCl Janus micromotor that clearly moves away from the AgCl side when exposed to UV or strong visible light. Taking advantage of numerical simulations and acoustic levitation techniques, we have provided tentative explanations for its speed decay over time as well as its directionality. In addition, photoactive AgCl micromotors demonstrate interesting gravitactic behaviors that hint at three-dimensional transport or sensing applications. The current work presents a well-controlled and easily fabricated model system to understand chemically powered micromotors, highlighting the usefulness of acoustic levitation for studying active matter free from the effect of boundaries.

  7. Photochemical model evaluation of 2013 California wild fire air quality impacts using surface, aircraft, and satellite data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, K R; Woody, M C; Valin, L; Szykman, J; Yates, E L; Iraci, L T; Choi, H D; Soja, A J; Koplitz, S N; Zhou, L; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Jimenez, Jose L; Hair, J W

    2018-10-01

    The Rim Fire was one of the largest wildfires in California history, burning over 250,000 acres during August and September 2013 affecting air quality locally and regionally in the western U.S. Routine surface monitors, remotely sensed data, and aircraft based measurements were used to assess how well the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) photochemical grid model applied at 4 and 12 km resolution represented regional plume transport and chemical evolution during this extreme wildland fire episode. Impacts were generally similar at both grid resolutions although notable differences were seen in some secondary pollutants (e.g., formaldehyde and peroxyacyl nitrate) near the Rim fire. The modeling system does well at capturing near-fire to regional scale smoke plume transport compared to remotely sensed aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aircraft transect measurements. Plume rise for the Rim fire was well characterized as the modeled plume top was consistent with remotely sensed data and the altitude of aircraft measurements, which were typically made at the top edge of the plume. Aircraft-based lidar suggests O 3 downwind in the Rim fire plume was vertically stratified and tended to be higher at the plume top, while CMAQ estimated a more uniformly mixed column of O 3 . Predicted wildfire ozone (O 3 ) was overestimated both at the plume top and at nearby rural and urban surface monitors. Photolysis rates were well characterized by the model compared with aircraft measurements meaning aerosol attenuation was reasonably estimated and unlikely contributing to O 3 overestimates at the top of the plume. Organic carbon was underestimated close to the Rim fire compared to aircraft data, but was consistent with nearby surface measurements. Periods of elevated surface PM 2.5 at rural monitors near the Rim fire were not usually coincident with elevated O 3 . Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Photochemical organic oxidations and dechlorinations with a mu-oxo bridged heme/non-heme diiron complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasser, Ian M; Fry, H Christopher; Hoertz, Paul G; Meyer, Gerald J; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2004-12-27

    Steady state and laser flash photolysis studies of the heme/non-heme mu-oxo diiron complex [((6)L)Fe(III)-O-Fe(III)-Cl](+) (1) have been undertaken. The anaerobic photolysis of benzene solutions of 1 did not result in the buildup of any photoproduct. However, the addition of excess triphenylphosphine resulted in the quantitative photoreduction of 1 to [((6)L)Fe(II)...Fe(II)-Cl](+) (2), with concomitant production by oxo-transfer of 1 equiv of triphenylphosphine oxide. Under aerobic conditions and excess triphenylphosphine, the reaction produces multiple turnovers (approximately 28) before the diiron complex is degraded. The anaerobic photolysis of tetrahydrofuran (THF) or toluene solutions of 1 likewise results in the buildup of 2. The oxidation products from these reactions included gamma-butyrolactone (approximately 15%) for the reaction in THF and benzaldehyde (approximately 23%) from the reaction in toluene. In either case, the O-atom which is incorporated into the carbonyl product is derived from dioxygen present under workup or under aerobic photolysis conditions. Transient absorption measurements of low-temperature THF solutions of 1 revealed the presence of an (P)Fe(II)-like [P = tetraaryl porphyrinate dianion] species suggesting that the reactive species is a formal (heme)Fe(II)/Fe(IV)=O(non-heme) pair. The non-heme Fe(IV)=O is thus most likely responsible for C-H bond cleavage and subsequent radical chemistry. The photolysis of 1 in chlorobenzene or 1,2-dichlorobenzene resulted in C-Cl cleavage reactions and the formation of [[((6)L)Fe(III)-Cl...Fe(III)-Cl](2)O](2+) (3), with chloride ligands that are derived from solvent dehalogenation chemistry. The resulting organic products are biphenyl trichlorides or biphenyl monochlorides, derived from dichlorobenzene and chlorobenzene, respectively. Similarly, product 3 is obtained by the photolysis of benzene-benzyl chloride solutions of 1; the organic product is benzaldehyde (approximately 70%). A brief

  9. Large-scale and green synthesis of octahedral flower-like cupric oxide nanocrystals with enhanced photochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Kuo; Pan, Yu-Yi; Wu, Mi; Huang, Fang-Zhi; Li, Chuan-Hao; Shen, Yu-Hua

    2014-10-01

    In this work, a large-scale and green method is reported for the facile synthesis of octahedral flower-like CuO nanocrystals via a coordination-deposition route by using Fehling regents. Not any harmful organic chemicals were used during the reaction period. The obtained hierarchical nanostructure can be rationally tailored by varying the concentration of tartrate ions and reaction time. The typical flower-like CuO nanocrystals in the range of 200-250 nm are consisted of numerous small crystalline whiskers, which present a porous surface with a specific surface area of 32.12 m2/g and a narrow band gap of 1.5 eV. Importantly, the flower-like CuO nanocrystals show an enhanced photocatalytic activity toward decomposing Rhodamine B (RhB) molecules. The degradation rate is about 87.9% in 40 min under visible light irradiation, which is about 2.5 times for the commercial CuO powers (35.2%). Moreover, the uniform flower-like monolayered CuO film exhibits an excellent photoelectrochemical (PEC) performance with a maximum photocurrent density of 58.8 μA/cm2, which is nearly five times higher than the commercial CuO film. This novel synthesis approach provides a large-scale and green protocol for synthesizing hierarchical metal oxide nanocrystals that are useful for photocatalysis, PEC water splitting and photovoltaic device.

  10. Photochemical transformation of phenylurea herbicides in surface waters: a model assessment of persistence, and implications for the possible generation of hazardous intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Debora; Minella, Marco; Maurino, Valter; Minero, Claudio; Vione, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This work models the phototransformation kinetics in surface waters of five phenylurea herbicides (diuron, fenuron, isoproturon, metoxuron and chlortoluron), for which important photochemical parameters are available in the literature (direct photolysis quantum yields and reaction rate constants with ·OH, CO3(-·) and the triplet states of chromophoric dissolved organic matter, (3)CDOM*). Model calculations suggest that isoproturon and metoxuron would be the least photochemically persistent and diuron the most persistent compound. Reactions with ·OH and (3)CDOM* would be the main phototransformation pathways for all compounds in the majority of environmental conditions. Reaction with CO3(-) could be important in waters with low dissolved organic carbon (DOC), while direct photolysis would be negligible for fenuron, quite important for chlortoluron, and somewhat significant for the other compounds. The direct photolysis of metoxuron and diuron is known to increase toxicity, and such a photoreaction pathway would be enhanced at intermediate DOC values (1-4 mg C L(1)). The reaction between phenylureas and ·OH is known to produce toxic intermediates, differently from (3)CDOM*. Therefore, the shift of reactivity from ·OH to (3)CDOM* with increasing DOC could reduce the environmental impact of photochemical transformation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Estimation of emission adjustments from the application of four-dimensional data assimilation to photochemical air quality modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza-Dominguez, A.; Russell, A.G.

    2001-01-01

    Four-dimensional data assimilation applied to photochemical air quality modeling is used to suggest adjustments to the emissions inventory of the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area. In this approach, a three-dimensional air quality model, coupled with direct sensitivity analysis, develops spatially and temporally varying concentration and sensitivity fields that account for chemical and physical processing, and receptor analysis is used to adjust source strengths. Proposed changes to domain-wide NO x , volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and CO emissions from anthropogenic sources and for VOC emissions from biogenic sources were estimated, as well as modifications to sources based on their spatial location (urban vs. rural areas). In general, domain-wide anthropogenic VOC emissions were increased approximately two times their base case level to best match observations, domain-wide anthropogenic NO x and biogenic VOC emissions (BEIS2 estimates) remained close to their base case value and domain-wide CO emissions were decreased. Adjustments for anthropogenic NO x emissions increased their level of uncertainty when adjustments were computed for mobile and area sources (or urban and rural sources) separately, due in part to the poor spatial resolution of the observation field of nitrogen-containing species. Estimated changes to CO emissions also suffer from poor spatial resolution of the measurements. Results suggest that rural anthropogenic VOC emissions appear to be severely underpredicted. The FDDA approach was also used to investigate the speciation profiles of VOC emissions, and results warrant revision of these profiles. In general, the results obtained here are consistent with what are viewed as the current deficiencies in emissions inventories as derived by other top-down techniques, such as tunnel studies and analysis of ambient measurements. (Author)

  12. Large-scale and green synthesis of octahedral flower-like cupric oxide nanocrystals with enhanced photochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shi-Kuo; Pan, Yu-Yi; Wu, Mi; Huang, Fang-Zhi; Li, Chuan-Hao; Shen, Yu-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A green method is reported for large-scale synthesis of CuO nanocrystals via a coordination-deposition technique. • Flower-like nanostructure can be rationally tailored by adjusting reaction parameters. • Flower-like nanostructure can be obtained in a wide reaction solution volume range. • Uniform flower-like nanocrystal film assembled by oil–water interfacial self-assembly method exhibits excellent PEC performance. - Abstract: In this work, a large-scale and green method is reported for the facile synthesis of octahedral flower-like CuO nanocrystals via a coordination-deposition route by using Fehling regents. Not any harmful organic chemicals were used during the reaction period. The obtained hierarchical nanostructure can be rationally tailored by varying the concentration of tartrate ions and reaction time. The typical flower-like CuO nanocrystals in the range of 200–250 nm are consisted of numerous small crystalline whiskers, which present a porous surface with a specific surface area of 32.12 m 2 /g and a narrow band gap of 1.5 eV. Importantly, the flower-like CuO nanocrystals show an enhanced photocatalytic activity toward decomposing Rhodamine B (RhB) molecules. The degradation rate is about 87.9% in 40 min under visible light irradiation, which is about 2.5 times for the commercial CuO powers (35.2%). Moreover, the uniform flower-like monolayered CuO film exhibits an excellent photoelectrochemical (PEC) performance with a maximum photocurrent density of 58.8 μA/cm 2 , which is nearly five times higher than the commercial CuO film. This novel synthesis approach provides a large-scale and green protocol for synthesizing hierarchical metal oxide nanocrystals that are useful for photocatalysis, PEC water splitting and photovoltaic device

  13. Large-scale and green synthesis of octahedral flower-like cupric oxide nanocrystals with enhanced photochemical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shi-Kuo; Pan, Yu-Yi; Wu, Mi; Huang, Fang-Zhi; Li, Chuan-Hao, E-mail: lichuanhao1983@163.com; Shen, Yu-Hua, E-mail: s_yuhua@163.com

    2014-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A green method is reported for large-scale synthesis of CuO nanocrystals via a coordination-deposition technique. • Flower-like nanostructure can be rationally tailored by adjusting reaction parameters. • Flower-like nanostructure can be obtained in a wide reaction solution volume range. • Uniform flower-like nanocrystal film assembled by oil–water interfacial self-assembly method exhibits excellent PEC performance. - Abstract: In this work, a large-scale and green method is reported for the facile synthesis of octahedral flower-like CuO nanocrystals via a coordination-deposition route by using Fehling regents. Not any harmful organic chemicals were used during the reaction period. The obtained hierarchical nanostructure can be rationally tailored by varying the concentration of tartrate ions and reaction time. The typical flower-like CuO nanocrystals in the range of 200–250 nm are consisted of numerous small crystalline whiskers, which present a porous surface with a specific surface area of 32.12 m{sup 2}/g and a narrow band gap of 1.5 eV. Importantly, the flower-like CuO nanocrystals show an enhanced photocatalytic activity toward decomposing Rhodamine B (RhB) molecules. The degradation rate is about 87.9% in 40 min under visible light irradiation, which is about 2.5 times for the commercial CuO powers (35.2%). Moreover, the uniform flower-like monolayered CuO film exhibits an excellent photoelectrochemical (PEC) performance with a maximum photocurrent density of 58.8 μA/cm{sup 2}, which is nearly five times higher than the commercial CuO film. This novel synthesis approach provides a large-scale and green protocol for synthesizing hierarchical metal oxide nanocrystals that are useful for photocatalysis, PEC water splitting and photovoltaic device.

  14. Seasonal versus Episodic Performance Evaluation for an Eulerian Photochemical Air Quality Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Ling; Brown, Nancy J.; Harley, Robert A.; Bao, Jian-Wen; Michelson, Sara A; Wilczak, James M

    2010-04-16

    This study presents detailed evaluation of the seasonal and episodic performance of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system applied to simulate air quality at a fine grid spacing (4 km horizontal resolution) in central California, where ozone air pollution problems are severe. A rich aerometric database collected during the summer 2000 Central California Ozone Study (CCOS) is used to prepare model inputs and to evaluate meteorological simulations and chemical outputs. We examine both temporal and spatial behaviors of ozone predictions. We highlight synoptically driven high-ozone events (exemplified by the four intensive operating periods (IOPs)) for evaluating both meteorological inputs and chemical outputs (ozone and its precursors) and compare them to the summer average. For most of the summer days, cross-domain normalized gross errors are less than 25% for modeled hourly ozone, and normalized biases are between {+-}15% for both hourly and peak (1 h and 8 h) ozone. The domain-wide aggregated metrics indicate similar performance between the IOPs and the whole summer with respect to predicted ozone and its precursors. Episode-to-episode differences in ozone predictions are more pronounced at a subregional level. The model performs consistently better in the San Joaquin Valley than other air basins, and episodic ozone predictions there are similar to the summer average. Poorer model performance (normalized peak ozone biases <-15% or >15%) is found in the Sacramento Valley and the Bay Area and is most noticeable in episodes that are subject to the largest uncertainties in meteorological fields (wind directions in the Sacramento Valley and timing and strength of onshore flow in the Bay Area) within the boundary layer.

  15. THE DUST PROPERTIES OF z {approx} 3 MIPS-LBGs FROM PHOTOCHEMICAL MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, X. L. [School of Physics and Electronics Information, Hubei University of Education, 430205 Wuhan (China); Pipino, A. [Institut fur Astronomie, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Matteucci, F., E-mail: fan@oats.inaf.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sezione di Astronomia, Universit a di Trieste, via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy)

    2013-05-10

    The stacked spectral energy distribution (SED) 24 {mu}m Lyman break galaxies (MIPS-LBGs) detected by the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) is fitted by means of the spectrophotometric model GRASIL with an ''educated'' fitting approach which benefits from the results of chemical evolution models. The star formation rate-age-metallicity degeneracies of SED modeling are broken by using star formation history (SFH) and chemical enrichment history suggested by chemical models. The dust mass, dust abundance, and chemical pattern of elements locked in the dust component are also directly provided by chemical models. Using our new ''fitting'' approach, we derive the total mass M{sub tot}, stellar mass M{sub *}, gas mass M{sub g} , dust mass M{sub d} , age, and star formation rate (SFR) of the stacked MIPS-LBG in a self-consistent way. Our estimate of M{sub *} = 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} of the stacked MIPS-LBG agrees with other works based on UV-optical SED fitting. We suggest that the MIPS-LBGs at z {approx} 3 are young (0.3-0.6 Gyr), massive (M{sub tot} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }), dusty (M{sub d} {approx} 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }), and metal-rich (Z {approx} Z{sub Sun }) progenitors of elliptical galaxies undergoing a strong burst of star formation (SFR {approx} 200 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}). Our estimate of M{sub d} = 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} of the stacked MIPS-LBG is about a factor of eight lower than the estimated value based on single temperature graybody fitting, suggesting that self-consistent SED models are needed to estimate dust mass. By comparing with Milky Way molecular cloud and dust properties, we suggest that denser and dustier environments and flatter dust size distribution are likely in high-redshift massive star-forming galaxies. These dust properties, as well as the different types of SFHs, can cause different SED shapes between high-redshift star-forming ellipticals and

  16. THE DUST PROPERTIES OF z ∼ 3 MIPS-LBGs FROM PHOTOCHEMICAL MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, X. L.; Pipino, A.; Matteucci, F.

    2013-01-01

    The stacked spectral energy distribution (SED) 24 μm Lyman break galaxies (MIPS-LBGs) detected by the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) is fitted by means of the spectrophotometric model GRASIL with an ''educated'' fitting approach which benefits from the results of chemical evolution models. The star formation rate-age-metallicity degeneracies of SED modeling are broken by using star formation history (SFH) and chemical enrichment history suggested by chemical models. The dust mass, dust abundance, and chemical pattern of elements locked in the dust component are also directly provided by chemical models. Using our new ''fitting'' approach, we derive the total mass M tot , stellar mass M * , gas mass M g , dust mass M d , age, and star formation rate (SFR) of the stacked MIPS-LBG in a self-consistent way. Our estimate of M * = 8 × 10 10 of the stacked MIPS-LBG agrees with other works based on UV-optical SED fitting. We suggest that the MIPS-LBGs at z ∼ 3 are young (0.3-0.6 Gyr), massive (M tot ∼ 10 11 M ☉ ), dusty (M d ∼ 10 8 M ☉ ), and metal-rich (Z ∼ Z ☉ ) progenitors of elliptical galaxies undergoing a strong burst of star formation (SFR ∼ 200 M ☉ yr –1 ). Our estimate of M d = 7 × 10 7 M ☉ of the stacked MIPS-LBG is about a factor of eight lower than the estimated value based on single temperature graybody fitting, suggesting that self-consistent SED models are needed to estimate dust mass. By comparing with Milky Way molecular cloud and dust properties, we suggest that denser and dustier environments and flatter dust size distribution are likely in high-redshift massive star-forming galaxies. These dust properties, as well as the different types of SFHs, can cause different SED shapes between high-redshift star-forming ellipticals and local starburst templates. This discrepancy of SED shapes could in turn explain the non-detection at submillimeter wavelengths of IR luminous (L IR ⪰10 12 L ☉ ) MIPS-LBGs.

  17. Contribution of regional-scale fire events to ozone and PM2.5 air quality estimated by photochemical modeling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, K. R.; Woody, M. C.; Tonnesen, G. S.; Hutzell, W.; Pye, H. O. T.; Beaver, M. R.; Pouliot, G.; Pierce, T.

    2016-09-01

    Two specific fires from 2011 are tracked for local to regional scale contribution to ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) using a freely available regulatory modeling system that includes the BlueSky wildland fire emissions tool, Spare Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) model, Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) meteorological model, and Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) photochemical grid model. The modeling system was applied to track the contribution from a wildfire (Wallow) and prescribed fire (Flint Hills) using both source sensitivity and source apportionment approaches. The model estimated fire contribution to primary and secondary pollutants are comparable using source sensitivity (brute-force zero out) and source apportionment (Integrated Source Apportionment Method) approaches. Model estimated O3 enhancement relative to CO is similar to values reported in literature indicating the modeling system captures the range of O3 inhibition possible near fires and O3 production both near the fire and downwind. O3 and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) are formed in the fire plume and transported downwind along with highly reactive VOC species such as formaldehyde and acetaldehyde that are both emitted by the fire and rapidly produced in the fire plume by VOC oxidation reactions. PAN and aldehydes contribute to continued downwind O3 production. The transport and thermal decomposition of PAN to nitrogen oxides (NOX) enables O3 production in areas limited by NOX availability and the photolysis of aldehydes to produce free radicals (HOX) causes increased O3 production in NOX rich areas. The modeling system tends to overestimate hourly surface O3 at routine rural monitors in close proximity to the fires when the model predicts elevated fire impacts on O3 and Hazard Mapping System (HMS) data indicates possible fire impact. A sensitivity simulation in which solar radiation and photolysis rates were more aggressively attenuated by aerosol in the plume

  18. Photochemical effects of sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, F

    1972-07-01

    The importance of sunlight in bringing about not only photosynthesis in plants, but also other photochemical effects, is reviewed. More effort should be devoted to photochemical storage of the sun's energy without the living plant. There is no theoretical reason to believe that such reactions are impossible. Ground rules for searching for suitable solar photochemical reactions are given, and a few attempts are described, but nothing successful has yet been found. Future possibilities are suggested. Photogalvanic cells which convert sunlight into electricity deserve further research. Eugene Rabinowitch has been an active pioneer in these fields.

  19. An artificial muscle model unit based on inorganic nanosheet sliding by photochemical reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabetani, Yu; Takamura, Hazuki; Hayasaka, Yuika; Sasamoto, Shin; Tanamura, Yoshihiko; Shimada, Tetsuya; Masui, Dai; Takagi, Shinsuke; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Tong, Zhiwei; Inoue, Haruo

    2013-04-21

    From the viewpoint of developing photoresponsive supramolecular systems in microenvironments to exhibit more sophisticated photo-functions even at the macroscopic level, inorganic/organic hybrid compounds based on clay or niobate nanosheets as the microenvironments were prepared, characterized, and examined for their photoreactions. We show here a novel type of artificial muscle model unit having much similarity with that in natural muscle fibrils. Upon photoirradiation, the organic/inorganic hybrid nanosheets reversibly slide horizontally on a giant scale, and the interlayer spaces in the layered hybrid structure shrink and expand vertically. In particular, our layered hybrid molecular system exhibits a macroscopic morphological change on a giant scale (~1500 nm) compared with the molecular size of ~1 nm, based on a reversible sliding mechanism.

  20. Photochirogenesis: Photochemical models on the absolute asymmetric formation of amino acids in interstellar space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinert, Cornelia; de Marcellus, Pierre; Le Sergeant d'Hendecourt, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Proteins of all living organisms including plants, animals, and humans are made up of amino acid monomers that show identical stereochemical L-configuration. Hypotheses for the origin of this symmetry breaking in biomolecules include the absolute asymmetric photochemistry model by which...... interstellar ultraviolet (UV) circularly polarized light (CPL) induces an enantiomeric excess in chiral organic molecules in the interstellar/circumstellar media. This scenario is supported by a) the detection of amino acids in the organic residues of UV-photo-processed interstellar ice analogues, b......) the occurrence of L-enantiomer-enriched amino acids in carbonaceous meteorites, and c) the observation of CPL of the same helicity over large distance scales in the massive star-forming region of Orion. These topics are of high importance in topical biophysical research and will be discussed in this review...

  1. The solar flare of 18 August 1979: Incoherent scatter radar data and photochemical model comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinn, J.; Sutherland, C.D.; Fenimore, E.E.; Ganguly, S.

    1988-04-01

    Measurements of electron density at seven D-region altidues were made with the Arecibo radar during a Class-X solar flare on 18 August 1979. Measurements of solar x-ray fluxes during the same period were available from the GOES-2 satellite (0.5 to 4 /angstrom/ and 1 to 8 /angstrom/) and from ISEE-3 (in four bands between 26 and 400 keV). From the x-ray flux data we computed ionization rates in the D-region and the associated chemical changes, using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and diffusion model (with 836 chemical reactions and 19 vertical levels). The computed electron densities matched the data fairly well after we had adjusted the rate coefficients of two reactions. We discuss the hierarchies among the many flare-induced chemical reactions in two altitude ranges within the D-region and the effects of adjusting several other rate coefficients. 51 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Photochemical hydrogen production system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Both technical and economic factors affect the cost of producing hydrogen by photochemical processes. Technical factors include the efficiency and the capital and operating costs of the renewable hydrogen conversion system; economic factors include discount rates, economic life, credit for co-product oxygen, and the value of the energy produced. This paper presents technical and economic data for a system that generates on-peak electric power form photochemically produced hydrogen

  3. Photochemical decomposition of catecholamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mol, N.J. de; Henegouwen, G.M.J.B. van; Gerritsma, K.W.

    1979-01-01

    During photochemical decomposition (lambda=254 nm) adrenaline, isoprenaline and noradrenaline in aqueous solution were converted to the corresponding aminochrome for 65, 56 and 35% respectively. In determining this conversion, photochemical instability of the aminochromes was taken into account. Irradiations were performed in such dilute solutions that the neglect of the inner filter effect is permissible. Furthermore, quantum yields for the decomposition of the aminochromes in aqueous solution are given. (Author)

  4. Photochemical reduction of uranyl ion with triphenylphosphine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brar, A.S.; Sidhu, M.S.; Sandhu, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    Photochemical reduction of uranyl ion with triphenylphosphine has been studied in acetone-water medium in the presence of sulphuric acid at 346nm, 400nm and 434nm wavelengths. The photochemical reduction is of second order and increases with increase in hydrogen ion concentration. Absorption spectra of uranyl ion in acidic medium and uranyl ion with triphenylphosphine do not show any ground state complex formation. The value of quantum yield increases with the wavelength of the radiation increase from 346 to 434nm. Plots of reciprocal of quantum yield for the formation of U(IV) versus reciprocal [triphenylphosphine] are linear. Products characterized by UV and visible, IR and TLC show the formation of U(IV) and triphenylphosphine oxide. On the basis of above observations mechanism of the photochemical reduction has been proposed. (author)

  5. Photochemical transformation of anionic 2-nitro-4-chlorophenol in surface waters: Laboratory and model assessment of the degradation kinetics, and comparison with field data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sur, Babita [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy); Department of Chemical Engineering, Calcutta University, 92 Acharya P. C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); De Laurentiis, Elisa; Minella, Marco; Maurino, Valter; Minero, Claudio [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy); Vione, Davide [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy); Centro Interdipartimentale NatRisk, Universita di Torino, Via Leonardo da Vinci 44, 10095 Grugliasco (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    Anionic 2-nitro-4-chlorophenol (NCP) may occur in surface waters as a nitroderivative of 4-chlorophenol, which is a transformation intermediate of the herbicide dichlorprop. Here we show that NCP would undergo efficient photochemical transformation in environmental waters, mainly by direct photolysis and reaction with {center_dot}OH. NCP has a polychromatic photolysis quantum yield {Phi}{sub NCP} = (1.27 {+-} 0.22) {center_dot} 10{sup -5}, a rate constant with {center_dot}OH k{sub NCP,}{center_dot}{sub OH} = (1.09 {+-} 0.09) {center_dot} 10{sup 10} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, a rate constant with {sup 1}O{sub 2}k{sub NCP,1O2} = (2.15 {+-} 0.38) {center_dot} 10{sup 7} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, a rate constant with the triplet state of anthraquinone-2-sulphonate k{sub NCP,3AQ2S*} = (5.90 {+-} 0.43) {center_dot} 10{sup 8} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, and is poorly reactive toward CO{sub 3}{sup -}{center_dot}. The k{sub NCP,3AQ2S*} value is representative of reaction with the triplet states of chromophoric dissolved organic matter. The inclusion of photochemical reactivity data into a model of surface-water photochemistry allowed the NCP transformation kinetics to be predicted as a function of water chemical composition and column depth. Very good agreement between model predictions and field data was obtained for the shallow lagoons of the Rhone delta (Southern France). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phototransformation kinetics of 2-nitro-4-chlorophenol, relevant to surface waters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of photochemical reactivity data in the laboratory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Model approach to combine photochemical reactivity with environmental variables. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Good agreement with field data in lagoon water (Rhone delta, Southern France). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct photolysis and reaction with {center_dot}OH as main photoprocesses in the environment.

  6. Efficacy of photochemical internalisation using disulfonated chlorin and porphyrin photosensitisers: An in vitro study in 2D and 3D prostate cancer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez de Pinillos Bayona, Alejandra; Woodhams, Josephine H; Pye, Hayley; Hamoudi, Rifat A; Moore, Caroline M; MacRobert, Alexander J

    2017-05-01

    This study shows the therapeutic outcome of Photochemical Internalisation (PCI) in prostate cancer in vitro surpasses that of Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) and could improve prostate PDT in the clinic, whilst avoiding chemotherapeutics side effects. In addition, the study assesses the potential of PCI with two different photosensitisers (TPCS 2a and TPPS 2a ) in prostate cancer cells (human PC3 and rat MatLyLu) using standard 2D monolayer culture and 3D biomimetic model. Photosensitisers were used alone for photodynamic therapy (PDT) or with the cytotoxin saporin (PCI). TPPS 2a and TPCS 2a were shown to be located in discrete cytoplasmic vesicles before light treatment and redistribute into the cytosol upon light excitation. PC3 cells exhibit a higher uptake than MatLyLu cells for both photosensitisers. In the 2D model, PCI resulted in greater cell death than PDT alone in both cell lines. In 3D model, morphological changes were also observed. Saporin-based toxicity was negligible in PC3 cells, but pronounced in MatLyLu cells (IC50 = 18 nM). In conclusion, the study showed that tumour features such as tumour cell growth rate or interaction with drugs determine therapeutic conditions for optimal photochemical treatment in metastatic prostate cancer. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Photochemical sensitization by azathioprine and its metabolites. Part 3. A direct EPR and spin-trapping study of light-induced free radicals from 6-mercaptopurine and its oxidation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D E; Sik, R H; Bilski, P; Chignell, C F; Reszka, K J

    1994-12-01

    Sunlight has been implicated in the high incidence of skin cancer found in patients receiving 6-mercaptopurine (PSH) in the form of its pro-drug azathioprine. In this study we have used EPR spectroscopy in conjunction with the spin-trapping technique to determine whether PSH and its metabolic or photochemical oxidation products generate highly reactive free radicals upon UV irradiation. When an aqueous anaerobic solution (pH 5 or 9) of PSH (pKa = 7.7) and either 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP) or nitromethane (NM) were irradiated (lambda > 300 nm) with a Xe arc lamp, the corresponding purine-6-thiyl (PS.) radical adduct and the reduced form of the spin trap (MNP/H. or CH3NO2.-) were observed. However, no radical adducts were detected when PSH and 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) were irradiated (lambda = 320 nm) in oxygen-free buffer. These findings suggest that PSH does not photoionize but that instead MNP and NM are reduced by direct electron transfer from excited state PSH, 1.3(PSH)*. In aerobic solution, oxygen can act as an electron acceptor and the O2.- and PS. radicals are formed and trapped by DMPO. 6-Mercaptopurine did photoionize when irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm as evidenced by the appearance of the DMPO/H.(eq- + H+) adduct, which decreased in intensity in the presence of N2O. 1.3(6-Mercaptopurine)* oxidized ascorbate, formate and reduced glutathione to the corresponding ascorbyl, CO2.- or glutathiyl radicals. The photochemical behavior of 6-thioxanthine and 6-thiouric acid was similar to PSH. However, the excited states of these metabolic oxidation products exhibited stronger reducing properties than 1.3(PSH)*.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. A model assessment of the ability of lake water in Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica, to induce the photochemical degradation of emerging contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minella, Marco; Maurino, Valter; Minero, Claudio; Vione, Davide

    2016-11-01

    The shallow lakes located in Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica, are free from ice for only up to a couple of months (mid December to early/mid February) during the austral summer. In the rest of the year, the ice cover shields the light and inhibits the photochemical processes in the water columns. Previous work has shown that chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in these lakes is very reactive photochemically. A model assessment is here provided of lake-water photoreactivity in field conditions, based on experimental data of lake water absorption spectra, chemistry and photochemistry obtained previously, taking into account the water depth and the irradiation conditions of the Antarctic summer. The chosen sample contaminants were the solar filter benzophenone-3 and the antimicrobial agent triclosan, which have very well known photoreactivity and have been found in a variety of environmental matrices in the Antarctic continent. The two compounds would have a half-life time of just a few days or less in the lake water during the Antarctic summertime, largely due to reaction with CDOM triplet states ((3)CDOM*). In general, pollutants that occur in the ice and could be released to lake water upon ice melting (around or soon after the December solstice) would be quickly photodegraded if they undergo fast reaction with (3)CDOM*. With some compounds, the important (3)CDOM* reactions might favour the production of harmful secondary pollutants, such as 2,8-dichlorodibenzodioxin from the basic (anionic) form of triclosan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Photochemically consumed hydrocarbons and their relationship with ozone formation in two megacities of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C.; Wang, J.; Liu, S.; Shao, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhu, T.; Shiu, C.; Lai, C.

    2010-12-01

    Two on-site continuous measurements of ozone and its precursors in two megacities of China were carried out in an urban site of Beijing and a suburban site near Guangzhou in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) to estimate precursor consumption and to assess its relationship with oxidant (O3+NO2) formation level. An observation-based method (OBM) with the precursor consumption concept was adopted to assess the relationship between oxidant production and amounts of photochemically consumed non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). In this approach, the ratio of ethylbenzene to m,p-xylenes was used to estimate the degree of photochemical processing, as well as the amounts of photochemically consumed NMHCs by reacting with OH. By trying to correlate the observed oxidant with the observed NMHC concentration, the two areas both revealed nearly no to low correlation between them. However, it existed fair to good correlations (R2=0.68 for Beijing, 0.53 for PRD) between the observed oxidant level and the degree of photochemical processing (ethylbenzene/m,p-xylenes). Furthermore, after taking the approach of consumption to estimate the consumed amounts of NMHCs, an interesting finding reveals that the definite correlation existed between the observed oxidant level and the total consumed NMHCs. The good correlations (R2=0.83 for Beijing, 0.81 for PRD) implies that the ambient oxidant level correlated to the amount of consumed NMHCs. The results of the two megacities in China by using the OBM with the precursor consumption concept can provide another pathway to explore the relationship between photochemically produced oxidant and consumed precursors, and will be helpful to validate model results and to reduce uncertainty of model predictions. However, the method has some room for uncertainty, as injection of fresh precursor emissions and additional boundary ozone involved, etc. could affect the estimation of consumed NMHCs and observed oxidant levels. Assistance of approaches in assessing the

  10. Inheritance of photochemical air pollution tolerance in petunias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, G.P.; Addis, D.H.; Thorne, L.

    1976-12-01

    Seven commercial inbred lines of pink flowered multiflora petunia (Petunia hybrida Vilm.) which differed widely in degrees of tolerance to photochemical oxidants were crossed in all possible combinations to yield a complete diallel cross. Sibling representatives of all 49 possible hybrids were then separately subjected to ozone (O/sub 3/), peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), and ambient oxidants at Arcadia, California. The seedlings were scored for tolerance to each pollutant and the inheritance of tolerance to each pollutant was studied. At the ambient levels of photochemical oxidants encountered, PAN more severely injured the petunias than did the O/sub 3/ component. Hybrids tolerant to one oxidant were not necessarily tolerant to the other. The genes which contributed photochemical oxidant tolerance in petunia acted primarily in an additive manner with some indication of partial dominance for tolerance. Gene interaction was evident in the expression of petunia sensitivity to PAN.

  11. Photochemical production of ozone and control strategy for Southern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, Chein-Jung; Liu, Shaw Chen; Chang, Chih-Chung; Chen, Jen-Ping; Chou, Charles C. K.; Lin, Chuan-Yao; Young, Chea-Yuan

    An observation-based method (OBM) is developed to evaluate the ozone (O 3) production efficiency (O 3 molecules produced per NO x molecule consumed) and O 3 production rate ( P(O 3)) during a field campaign in southern Taiwan. The method can also provide an estimate of the concentration of OH. A key step in the method is to use observed concentrations of two aromatic hydrocarbons, namely ethylbenzene and m, p-xylene, to estimate the degree of photochemical processing and amounts of photochemically consumed NO x and NMHCs by OH. In addition, total oxidant (O 3+NO 2) instead of O 3 itself turns out to be very useful for representing ozone production in the OBM approach. The average O 3 production efficiency during the field campaign in Fall (2003) is found to be about 10.2±3.9. The relationship of P(O 3) with NO x is examined and compared with a one-dimensional (1D) photochemical model. Values of P(O 3) derived from the OBM are slightly lower than those calculated in the 1D model. However, OH concentrations estimated by the OBM are about a factor of 2 lower than the 1D model. Fresh emissions, which affect the degree of photochemical processing appear to be a major cause of the underestimate. We have developed a three-dimensional (3D) OBM O 3 production diagram that resembles the EKMA ozone isopleth diagram to study the relationship of the total oxidant versus O 3 precursors. The 3D OBM O 3 production diagram suggests that reducing emissions of NMHCs are more effective in controlling O 3 than reducing NO x. However, significant uncertainties remain in the OBM, and considerable more work is required to minimize these uncertainties before a definitive control strategy can be reached. The observation-based approach provides a good alternative to measuring peroxy radicals for evaluating the production of O 3 and formulating O 3 control strategy in urban and suburban environments.

  12. Photochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerksen, W.K.

    1993-10-20

    The photochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate solutions to tetravalent uranium was investigated as a means of producing uranium dioxide feed for the saltless direct oxide reduction (SDOR) process. At high uranium concentrations, reoxidation of U{sup +4} occurs rapidly. The kinetics of the nitric oxidation of tetravalent uranium depend on the concentrations of hydrogen ion, nitrate ion, nitrous acid, and tetravalent uranium in the same manner as was reported elsewhere for the nitrate oxidation of PU{sup +3}. Reaction rate data were successfully correlated with a mechanism in which nitrogen dioxide is the reactive intermediate. Addition of a nitrous acid scavenger suppresses the reoxidation reaction. An immersion reactor employing a mercury vapor lamp gave reduction times fast enough for routine production usage. Precipitation techniques for conversion of aqueous U(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} to hydrous UO{sub 2} were evaluated. Prolonged dewatering times tended to make the process time consuming. Use of 3- to 4-M aqueous NaOH gave the best dewatering times observed. Reoxidation of the UO{sub 2} by water of hydration was encountered, which required the drying process to be carried out under a reducing atmosphere.

  13. Use of Combined Observational- and Model-Derived Photochemical Indicators to Assess the O3-NOx-VOC System Sensitivity in Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson R. Carrillo-Torres

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric levels of O3 have historically exceeded the official annual Mexican standards within the Monterrey Metropolitan Area (MMA in NE Mexico. High-frequency and high-precision measurements of tropospheric O3, NOy, NO2, NO, CO, SO2, PM10 and PM2.5 were made at the Obispado monitoring site near the downtown MMA from September 2012 to August 2013. The seasonal cycles of O3 and NOy are driven by changes in meteorology and to a lesser extent by variations in primary emissions. The NOy levels were positively correlated with O3 precursors and inversely correlated with O3 and wind speed. Recorded data were used to assess the O3-Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC-NOx system’s sensitivity through an observational-based approach. The photochemical indicator O3/NOy was derived from measured data during the enhanced O3 production period (12:00–18:00 Central Daylight Time (CDT, GMT-0500. The O3/NOy ratios calculated for this time period showed that the O3 production within the MMA is VOC sensitive. A box model simulation of production rates of HNO3 (PHNO3 and total peroxides (Pperox carried out for O3 episodes in fall and spring confirmed the VOC sensitivity within the MMA environment. No significant differences were observed in O3/NOy from weekdays to weekends or for PHNO3/Pperox ratios, confirming the limiting role of VOCs in O3 production within the MMA. The ratified photochemical regime observed may allow the environmental authorities to revise and verify the current policies for air quality control within the MMA.

  14. Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS). This file provides information on the numbers and distribution (latitude/longitude) of air monitoring sites...

  15. Global atmospheric model for mercury including oxidation by bromine atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Holmes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Global models of atmospheric mercury generally assume that gas-phase OH and ozone are the main oxidants converting Hg0 to HgII and thus driving mercury deposition to ecosystems. However, thermodynamic considerations argue against the importance of these reactions. We demonstrate here the viability of atomic bromine (Br as an alternative Hg0 oxidant. We conduct a global 3-D simulation with the GEOS-Chem model assuming gas-phase Br to be the sole Hg0 oxidant (Hg + Br model and compare to the previous version of the model with OH and ozone as the sole oxidants (Hg + OH/O3 model. We specify global 3-D Br concentration fields based on our best understanding of tropospheric and stratospheric Br chemistry. In both the Hg + Br and Hg + OH/O3 models, we add an aqueous photochemical reduction of HgII in cloud to impose a tropospheric lifetime for mercury of 6.5 months against deposition, as needed to reconcile observed total gaseous mercury (TGM concentrations with current estimates of anthropogenic emissions. This added reduction would not be necessary in the Hg + Br model if we adjusted the Br oxidation kinetics downward within their range of uncertainty. We find that the Hg + Br and Hg + OH/O3 models are equally capable of reproducing the spatial distribution of TGM and its seasonal cycle at northern mid-latitudes. The Hg + Br model shows a steeper decline of TGM concentrations from the tropics to southern mid-latitudes. Only the Hg + Br model can reproduce the springtime depletion and summer rebound of TGM observed at polar sites; the snowpack component of GEOS-Chem suggests that 40% of HgII deposited to snow in the Arctic is transferred to the ocean and land reservoirs, amounting to a net deposition flux to the Arctic of 60 Mg a−1. Summertime events of depleted Hg0 at Antarctic sites due to subsidence are much better simulated by

  16. Effects of the antioxidant moieties of dissolved organic matter on triplet-sensitized phototransformation processes: Implications for the photochemical modeling of sulfadiazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vione, Davide; Fabbri, Debora; Minella, Marco; Canonica, Silvio

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the photodegradation of some pollutants, induced by the excited triplet states of chromophoric dissolved organic matter ( 3 CDOM*), can be inhibited by back-reduction processes carried out by phenolic antioxidants occurring in dissolved organic matter (DOM). Here, for the first time to our knowledge, we included such an inhibition effect into a photochemical model and applied the model predictions to sulfadiazine (SDZ), a sulfonamide antibiotic that occurs in surface waters in two forms, neutral HSDZ and anionic SDZ - (pK a  = 6.5). The input parameters of the photochemical model were obtained by means of dedicated experiments, which showed that the inhibition effect was more marked for SDZ - than for HSDZ. Compared to the behavior of 2,4,6-trimethylphenol, which does not undergo antioxidant inhibition when irradiated in natural water samples, the back-reduction effect on the degradation of SDZ was proportional to the electron-donating capacity of the DOM. According to the model results, direct photolysis and OH reaction would account for the majority of both HSDZ and SDZ - photodegradation in waters having low dissolved organic carbon (DOC DOC values (>3-4 mgC L -1 ) and despite the back-reduction processes, the 3 CDOM* reactions are expected to account for the majority of HSDZ phototransformation. In the case of SDZ - at high DOC, most of the photodegradation would be accounted for by direct photolysis. The relative importance of the triplet-sensitized phototransformation of both SDZ - and (most importantly) HSDZ is expected to increase with increasing DOC, even in the presence of back reduction. An increase in water pH, favoring the occurrence of SDZ - with respect to HSDZ, would enhance direct photolysis at the expense of triplet sensitization. SDZ should be fairly photolabile under summertime sunlight, with predicted half-lives ranging from a few days to a couple of months depending on water conditions. Copyright © 2017

  17. Investigation of the photochemical changes of chlorogenic acids induced by ultraviolet light in model systems and in agricultural practice with Stevia rebaudiana cultivation as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaköse, Hande; Jaiswal, Rakesh; Deshpande, Sagar; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2015-04-08

    Mono- and diacyl chlorogenic acids undergo photochemical trans-cis isomerization under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The photochemical equilibrium composition was established for eight selected derivatives. In contrast to all other dicaffeoylquinic acid derivatives, cynarin (1,3-dicaffeoylquinic acid) undergoes a [2 + 2] photochemical cycloaddition reaction, constituting a first example of Schmidt's law in a natural product family. The relevance of photochemical isomerization in agricultural practice was investigated using 120 samples of Stevia rebaudiana leave samples grown under defined cultivation conditions. Ratios of cis to trans chlorogenic acids were determined in leaf samples and correlated with climatic and harvesting conditions. The data indicate a clear correlation between the formation of cis-caffeoyl derivatives and sunshine hours prior to harvesting and illustrate the relevance of UV exposure to plant material affecting its phytochemical composition.

  18. Photochemical degradation of PCBs in snow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matykiewiczová, Nina; Klánová, Jana; Klán, Petr

    2007-12-15

    This work represents the first laboratory study known to the authors describing photochemical behavior of persistent organic pollutants in snow at environmentally relevant concentrations. The snow samples were prepared by shock freezing of the corresponding aqueous solutions in liquid nitrogen and were UV-irradiated in a photochemical cold chamber reactor at -25 degrees C, in which simultaneous monitoring of snow-air exchange processeswas also possible. The main photodegradation pathway of two model snow contaminants, PCB-7 and PCB-153 (c approximately 100 ng kg(-1)), was found to be reductive dehalogenation. Possible involvement of the water molecules of snow in this reaction has been excluded by performing the photolyses in D2O snow. Instead, trace amounts of volatile organic compounds have been proposed to be the major source of hydrogen atom in the reduction, and this hypothesis was confirmed by the experiments with deuterated organic cocontaminants, such as d6-ethanol or d8-tetrahydrofuran. It is argued that bimolecular photoreduction of PCBs was more efficient or feasible than any other phototransformations under the experimental conditions used, including the coupling reactions. The photodegradation of PCBs, however, competed with a desorption process responsible for the pollutant loss from the snow samples, especially in case of lower molecular-mass congeners. Organic compounds, apparently largely located or photoproduced on the surface of snow crystals, had a predisposition to be released to the air but, at the same time, to react with other species in the gas phase. It is concluded that physicochemical properties of the contaminants and trace co-contaminants, their location and local concentrations in the matrix, and the wavelength and intensity of radiation are the most important factors in the evaluation of organic contaminants' lifetime in snow. Based on the results, it has been estimated that the average lifetime of PCBs in surface snow, connected

  19. Tropospheric Ozone and Photochemical Smog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillman, S.

    2003-12-01

    global background ozone can make the effects of local pollution events everywhere more acute, and can also cause ecological damage in remote locations that are otherwise unaffected by urban pollution. Ozone at the global scale is also related to greenhouse warming.This chapter provides an overview of photochemical smog at the urban and regional scale, focused primarily on ozone and including a summary of information about particulates. It includes the following topics: dynamics and extent of pollution events; health and ecological impacts; relation between ozone and precursor emissions, including hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides (NOx); sources, composition, and fundamental properties of particulates; chemistry of ozone and related species; methods of interpretation based on ambient measurements; and the connection between air pollution events and the chemistry of the global troposphere. Because there are many similarities between the photochemistry of ozone during pollution events and the chemistry of the troposphere in general, this chapter will include some information about global tropospheric chemistry and the links between urban-scale and global-scale events. Additional treatment of the global troposphere is found in Volume 4 of this work. The chemistry of ozone formation discussed here is also related to topics discussed in greater detail elsewhere in this volume (see Chapters 9.10 and 9.12) and in Volume 4.

  20. Facilitated beam-walking recovery during acute phase by kynurenic acid treatment in a rat model of photochemically induced thrombosis causing focal cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo, Masahiro; Yamauchi, Hideki; Suzuki, Masahiko; Sakuma, Mio; Urashima, Mitsuyoshi

    We previously demonstrated the presence of activated areas in the non-injured contralateral sensorimotor cortex in addition to the ipsilateral sensorimotor cortex of the area surrounding a brain infarction, using a rat model of focal photochemically induced thrombosis (PIT) and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Using this model, we next applied gene expression profiling to screen key molecules upregulated in the activated area. RNA was extracted from the ipsilateral and contralateral sensorimotor cortex to the focal brain infarction and from the sham controlled cortex, and hybridized to gene-expression profiling arrays containing 1,322 neurology-related genes. Results showed that glycine receptors were upregulated in both the ipsilateral and contralateral cortex to the focal ischemic lesion. To prove the preclinical significance of upregulated glycine receptors, kynurenic acid, an endogenous antagonist to glycine receptors on neuronal cells, was administered intrathecally. As a result, the kynurenic acid significantly improved behavioral recovery within 10 days from paralysis induced by the focal PIT (p beam walking. These results suggest that intrathecal administration of a glycine receptor antagonist may facilitate behavioral recovery during the acute phase after brain infarction. Copyright (c) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Simultaneous statistical bias correction of multiplePM2.5 species from a regional photochemical grid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years environmental epidemiologists have begun utilizing regionalscale air quality computer models to predict ambient air pollution concentrations in health studies instead of or in addition to monitoring data from central sites. The advantages of using such models i...

  2. Model of dopant action in oxide cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelsen, Daniel den; Gaertner, Georg

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes an electrochemical model, which largely explains the formation of Ba in the oxide cathode at activation and normal operation. In a non-doped oxide cathode electrolysis of BaO is, besides the exchange reaction from the activators in the cathode nickel, an important source of Ba. By doping with rare earth oxides the conductivity of the oxide layer increases, which implies that the potential difference during current drawing over the oxide layer becomes lower and electrolysis of BaO is suppressed. This implies that the part of the electronic conductivity of the (Ba,Sr)O layer induced by the dopants also controls the sensitivity for poisoning: the higher the dopant level, the larger the sensitivity for poisoning. Furthermore, the suppression of electrolysis during normal operation largely explains why doped oxide cathodes have a better life performance than non-doped cathodes. Finally a hypothesis on the enhancement of sintering upon doping is presented

  3. Photochemically Synthesized Polyimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Michael A.; Tyson, Daniel S.

    2008-01-01

    An alternative to the conventional approach to synthesis of polyimides involves the use of single monomers that are amenable to photopolymerization. Heretofore, the synthesis of polyimides has involved multiple-monomer formulations and heating to temperatures that often exceed 250 C. The present alternative approach enables synthesis under relatively mild conditions that can include room temperature. The main disadvantages of the conventional approach are the following: Elevated production temperatures can lead to high production costs and can impart thermal stresses to the final products. If the proportions of the multiple monomeric ingredients in a given batch are not exactly correct, the molecular weight and other physical properties of the final material could be reduced from their optimum or desired values. To be useful in the alternative approach, a monomer must have a molecular structure tailored to exploit Diels-Alder trapping of a photochemically generated ortho-quinodimethane. (In a Diels-Alder reaction, a diene combines with a dienophile to form molecules that contain six-membered rings.) In particular, a suitable monomer (see figure) contains ortho-methylbenzophenone connected to a dienophile (in this case, a maleimide) through a generic spacer group. Irradiation with ultraviolet light gives rise to a photochemical intermediate the aforementioned ortho-quinodimethane from the ortho-methylbenzophenone. This group may react with the dienophile on another such monomer molecule to produce an oligomer that, in turn may react in a stepgrowth manner to produce a polyimide. This approach offers several advantages in addition to those mentioned above: The monomer can be stored for a long time because it remains unreactive until exposed to light. Because the monomer is the only active starting ingredient, there is no need for mixing, no concern for ensuring correct proportions of monomers, and the purity of the final product material is inherently high. The use

  4. Rates and regimes of photochemical ozone production over Central East China in June 2006: a box model analysis using comprehensive measurements of ozone precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kanaya

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available An observation-based box model approach was undertaken to estimate concentrations of OH, HO2, and RO2 radicals and the net photochemical production rate of ozone at the top of Mount Tai, located in the middle of Central East China, in June 2006. The model calculation was constrained by the measurements of O3, H2O, CO, NO, NO2, hydrocarbon, HCHO, and CH3CHO concentrations, and temperature and J values. The net production rate of ozone was estimated to be 6.4 ppb h−1 as a 6-h average (09:00–15:00 CST, suggesting 58±37 ppb of ozone is produced in one day. Thus the daytime buildup of ozone recorded at the mountain top as ~23 ppb on average is likely affected by in situ photochemistry as well as by the upward transport of polluted air mass in the daytime. On days with high ozone concentrations (hourly values exceeding 100 ppb at least once, in situ photochemistry was more active than it was on low ozone days, suggesting that in situ photochemistry is an important factor controlling ozone concentrations. Sensitivity model runs for which different NOx and hydrocarbon concentrations were assumed suggested that the ozone production occurred normally under NOx-limited conditions, with some exceptional periods (under volatile-organic-compound-limited conditions in which there was fresh pollution. We also examined the possible influence of the heterogeneous loss of gaseous HO2 radicals in contact with aerosol particle surfaces on the rate and regimes of ozone production.

  5. Protection and sensitization of normal and malignant cells by a naturally occurring compound in a model of photochemical damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuan-Hao; Kumar, Neeru; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2012-03-01

    Certain phytonutrients are known to confer protection and immunosuppression against radiation insults. Radiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) can either lead to the destruction of normal tissue cells, or induce tumor radioresistance by activating ROS scavenging proteins. To identify whether the triterpene phytonutrient, ursolic acid, reduces radiation-induced damage in normal cells and promotes the apoptosis of malignant cells, we investigated the biologic mechanisms and effect of radiation-cell interaction with or without treatment with ursolic acid in human skin melanoma cells (ATCC CRL-11147TM) and transformed human retinal pigment epithelial (hTERT-RPE) cells. UV-VIS light was employed to investigate the efficacy of ursolic acid in altering cellular viability by modulations of p53 and NF-κB p65 signaling. Cell response was investigated by changes in proliferative activity and free radical generation assessed by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin liquid chromatography. Ursolic acid pretreatment strongly increased the level of p53 and decreased the level of phosphorylated p65 leading to enhanced cell death of skin melanoma cells in response to UV-VIS exposure. In contrast, ursolic acid appeared to downregulate p53 levels without disturbing NF-κB activation along with an increase of oxidative stress in hTERT-RPE cells. These findings indicate that ursolic acid may beneficially increase the radiosensitivity of tumor cells while potentiating a photoprotective effect on benign cells through differential effects on the NF-κB and p53 signaling pathways.

  6. Model study of meteorology and photochemical air pollution over un urban area in south-eastern France (ESCOMPTE campaign).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, M.; Cautenet, S.

    2003-04-01

    The ESCOMPTE Campaign has been conducted over Southern France (Provence region including the Marseille, Aix and Toulon cities and the Fos-Berre industrial center) in June and July of 2001. In order to study the redistribution of the pollutants emitted by anthropic and biogenic emissions and their impact on the atmospheric chemistry, we used meso-scale modeling (RAMS model, paralleled version 4.3, coupled on line with chemical modules : MOCA2.2 (Poulet et al, 2002) including 29 gaseous species). The hourly high resolution emissions were obtained from ESCOMPTE database (Ponche et al, 2002). The model was coupled with the dry deposition scheme (Walmsley and Weseley,1996). In this particular case of complex circulation (sea breeze associated with topography), the processes involving peaks of pollution were strongly non linear, and the meso scale modeling coupled on line with chemistry module was an essential step for a realistic redistribution of chemical species. Two nested grids satisfactorily describe the synoptic dynamics and the sea breeze circulations. The ECMWF meteorological fields provide the initial and boundary conditions. Different events characterized by various meteorological situations were simulated. Meteorological fields retrieved by modeling, also Modeled ozone, NOx, CO and SO2 concentrations, were compared with balloons, lidars, aircrafts and surface stations measurements. The chemistry regimes were explained according to the distribution of plumes. The stratified layers were examined.

  7. Evaluating the impact of new observational constraints on P-S/IVOC emissions, multi-generation oxidation, and chamber wall losses on SOA modeling for Los Angeles, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Prettiny K.; Zhao, Yunliang; Robinson, Allen L.; Worton, David R.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Ortega, Amber M.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Zotter, Peter; Prévôt, André S. H.; Szidat, Sönke; Hayes, Patrick L.

    2017-08-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is an important contributor to fine particulate matter (PM) mass in polluted regions, and its modeling remains poorly constrained. A box model is developed that uses recently published literature parameterizations and data sets to better constrain and evaluate the formation pathways and precursors of urban SOA during the CalNex 2010 campaign in Los Angeles. When using the measurements of intermediate-volatility organic compounds (IVOCs) reported in Zhao et al. (2014) and of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) reported in Worton et al. (2014) the model is biased high at longer photochemical ages, whereas at shorter photochemical ages it is biased low, if the yields for VOC oxidation are not updated. The parameterizations using an updated version of the yields, which takes into account the effect of gas-phase wall losses in environmental chambers, show model-measurement agreement at longer photochemical ages, even though some low bias at short photochemical ages still remains. Furthermore, the fossil and non-fossil carbon split of urban SOA simulated by the model is consistent with measurements at the Pasadena ground site. Multi-generation oxidation mechanisms are often employed in SOA models to increase the SOA yields derived from environmental chamber experiments in order to obtain better model-measurement agreement. However, there are many uncertainties associated with these aging mechanisms. Thus, SOA formation in the model is compared to data from an oxidation flow reactor (OFR) in order to constrain SOA formation at longer photochemical ages than observed in urban air. The model predicts similar SOA mass at short to moderate photochemical ages when the aging mechanisms or the updated version of the yields for VOC oxidation are implemented. The latter case has SOA formation rates that are more consistent with observations from the OFR though. Aging mechanisms may still play an important role in SOA chemistry, but the

  8. Photochemical reactions in dehydrated photosynthetic organisms, leaves, chloroplasts and photosystem II particles: reversible reduction of pheophytin and chlorophyll and oxidation of {beta}-carotene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuvalov, Vladimir A.; Heber, Ulrich

    2003-11-01

    Photoreactions of dehydrated leaves, isolated broken chloroplasts and PSII membrane fragments of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) were studied at different air humidities and compared with photoreactions of dry fronds of a fern, Polypodium vulgare, and a dry lichen, Parmelia sulcata, which in contrast to spinach are insensitive to photoinactivation in the dry state. Even in very dry air, P700 in the reaction center of photosystem I of dry leaves was oxidized, and the primary quinone acceptor Q{sub A} in the reaction center of photosystem II was photoreduced by low light. These reactions were only very slowly reversed in the dark and saturated under low light intensity. Light-minus-dark difference absorption spectra of the dry leaves, isolated chloroplasts and PSII membrane fragments measured at higher light intensities revealed absorbance changes of {beta}-carotene at 500 nm (light-dependent bleaching) and 980 nm (light-dependent band formation) and bleaching of chlorophyll at 436 and 680 nm with appearance of bands at 450 and 800 nm. Decrease of chlorophyll fluorescence upon strong illumination indicated photoaccumulation of a quencher. All these changes were kinetically related and readily reversible. They are interpreted to show light-induced oxidation of {beta}-carotene (Car) and reduction of chlorophyll-680 (Chl-680) in the reaction center of photosystem II of the dried leaves, chloroplasts and photosystem II particles. The fluorescence quencher was suggested to be Chl-680{sup -} or Car{sup +} in close proximity to P680, the primary electron donor. Appreciable photoaccumulation of reduced pheophytin was only observed in dry leaves after Q{sub A} reduction had been lost during heat treatment of hydrated leaves prior to dehydration. The observations are interpreted to show light-dependent cyclic electron flow within the reaction center of photosystem II in which Chl-680 (or Pheo) is reduced by P680* and Car is oxidized by P680{sup +} with consequent recombination of

  9. Photochemical reactions in dehydrated photosynthetic organisms, leaves, chloroplasts and photosystem II particles: reversible reduction of pheophytin and chlorophyll and oxidation of β-carotene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuvalov, Vladimir A.; Heber, Ulrich

    2003-01-01

    Photoreactions of dehydrated leaves, isolated broken chloroplasts and PSII membrane fragments of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) were studied at different air humidities and compared with photoreactions of dry fronds of a fern, Polypodium vulgare, and a dry lichen, Parmelia sulcata, which in contrast to spinach are insensitive to photoinactivation in the dry state. Even in very dry air, P700 in the reaction center of photosystem I of dry leaves was oxidized, and the primary quinone acceptor Q A in the reaction center of photosystem II was photoreduced by low light. These reactions were only very slowly reversed in the dark and saturated under low light intensity. Light-minus-dark difference absorption spectra of the dry leaves, isolated chloroplasts and PSII membrane fragments measured at higher light intensities revealed absorbance changes of β-carotene at 500 nm (light-dependent bleaching) and 980 nm (light-dependent band formation) and bleaching of chlorophyll at 436 and 680 nm with appearance of bands at 450 and 800 nm. Decrease of chlorophyll fluorescence upon strong illumination indicated photoaccumulation of a quencher. All these changes were kinetically related and readily reversible. They are interpreted to show light-induced oxidation of β-carotene (Car) and reduction of chlorophyll-680 (Chl-680) in the reaction center of photosystem II of the dried leaves, chloroplasts and photosystem II particles. The fluorescence quencher was suggested to be Chl-680 - or Car + in close proximity to P680, the primary electron donor. Appreciable photoaccumulation of reduced pheophytin was only observed in dry leaves after Q A reduction had been lost during heat treatment of hydrated leaves prior to dehydration. The observations are interpreted to show light-dependent cyclic electron flow within the reaction center of photosystem II in which Chl-680 (or Pheo) is reduced by P680* and Car is oxidized by P680 + with consequent recombination of Car + and Chl-680 - (or Pheo

  10. New electrochemical and photochemical systems for water and wastewater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarria, Victor M; Parra, Sandra; Rincon, Angela G; Torres, Ricardo A; Pulgarin, Cesar

    2005-01-01

    With the increasing pressure on a more effective use of water resources, the development of appropriate water treatment technologies become more and more important. Photochemical and electrochemical oxidation processes have been proposed in recent years as an attractive alternative for the treatment of contaminated water containing anthropogenic substances hardly biodegradable as well as to purify and disinfect drinking waters. The aim of this paper is to present some of our last results demonstrating that electrochemical, photochemical, and the coupling of these processes with biological systems are very promising alternatives for the improvement of the water quality

  11. A KINETIC MODEL FOR H2O2/UV PROCESS IN A COMPLETELY MIXED BATCH REACTOR. (R825370C076)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A dynamic kinetic model for the advanced oxidation process (AOP) using hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet irradiation (H2O2/UV) in a completely mixed batch reactor (CMBR) is developed. The model includes the known elementary chemical and photochemical reac...

  12. Oxide behaviour modelling progress in COMETHE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vliet, J. van; Hoppe, N.

    1983-01-01

    An attempt has been made to develop a global model which simultaneously describes many important aspects of uranium oxide under irradiation. The individual models describing fuel structural changes, swelling and gas release, which were earlier separate from one another, are now part of a more realistic integral fuel model. Fission gas release depends now on an explicitely calculated open porosity, which is generated by fuel swelling; the latter is in turn connected to fission gas release. The paper describes the individual oxide models and how they are linked together. (author)

  13. Modelling of UO2 oxidation in steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, A.C.; Iglesias, F.C.; Liu, Y.

    1996-01-01

    A computer model has been developed for calculating oxidation of UO 2 at high temperatures in steam oxidising conditions. Several methods to calculate the partial pressure of oxygen in the fuel and in the environment surrounding the fuel are available. The various methodologies have been compared and the best models have been compiled into a computer model which will be implemented into fuel thermal/mechanical behaviour codes such as FACTAR 2.0 (LOECI) and ELESIM/ELOCA. Calculations from the computer model have been compared to experimental results. The calculated oxidation reaction kinetics are in good agreement with the experimental data. (author)

  14. Graphene oxide quantum dot-derived nitrogen-enriched hybrid graphene nanosheets by simple photochemical doping for high-performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongjie; Li, Xinyu; Hu, Guanghui; Wu, Ting; Luo, Yi; Sun, Lang; Tang, Tao; Wen, Jianfeng; Wang, Heng; Li, Ming

    2017-11-01

    Nitrogen-enriched graphene was fabricated via a facile strategy. Graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets and graphene oxide quantum dots (GQDs) were used as a structure-directing agent and in situ activating agent, respectively, after photoreduction under NH3 atmosphere. The combination of photoreduction and NH3 not only reduced GO and GQD composites (GO/GQDs) within a shorter duration but also doped a high level of nitrogen on the composites (NrGO/GQDs). The nitrogen content of NrGO/GQDs reached as high as 18.86 at% within 5 min of irradiation. Benefiting from the nitrogen-enriched GO/GQDs hybrid structure, GQDs effectively prevent the agglomeration of GO sheets and increased the numbers of ion channels in the material. Meanwhile, the high levels of nitrogen improved electrical conductivity and strengthened the binding energy between GQD and GO sheets. Compared with reduced GO and low nitrogen-doped reduced GO, NrGO/GQD electrodes exhibited better electrochemical characteristics with a high specific capacitance of 344 F g-1 at a current density of 0.25 A g-1. Moreover, the NrGO/GQD electrodes exhibited 82% capacitance retention after 3000 cycles at a current density of 0.8 A g-1 in 6 M KOH electrolyte. More importantly, the NrGO/GQD electrodes deliver a high energy density of 43 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 417 W kg-1 in 1 M Li2SO4 electrolyte. The nitrogen-doped graphene and corresponding supercapacitor presented in this study are novel materials with potential applications in advanced energy storage systems.

  15. Research opportunities in photochemical sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The workshop entitled {open_quotes}Research Opportunities in Photochemical Sciences{close_quotes} was initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Research (ER), Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Division of Chemical Sciences. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado was requested by ER to host the workshop. It was held February 5-8, 1996 at the Estes Park Conference Center, Estes Park, CO, and attended by about 115 leading scientists and engineers from the U.S., Japan, and Europe; program managers for the DOE ER and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) programs also attended. The purpose of the workshop was to bridge the communication gap between the practioneers and supporters of basic research in photochemical science and the practioneers and supporters of applied research and development in technologies related to photochemical science. For the purposes of the workshop the definition of the term {open_quotes}photochemical science{close_quotes} was broadened to include homogeneous photochemistry, heterogeneous photochemistry, photoelectrochemistry, photocatalysis, photobiology (for example, the light-driven processes of biological photosynthesis and proton pumping), artificial photosynthesis, solid state photochemistry, and solar photochemistry. The technologies under development through DOE support that are most closely related to photochemical science, as defined above, are the renewable energy technologies of photovoltaics, biofuels, hydrogen energy, carbon dioxide reduction and utilization, and photocatalysis for environmental cleanup of water and air. Individual papers were processed separately for the United states Department of Energy databases.

  16. Facile photoreduction of graphene oxide by an NAD(P)H model: Hantzsch 1,4-dihydropyridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui-Hui; Liu, Qiang; Feng, Ke; Chen, Bin; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wu, Li-Zhu

    2012-05-29

    To make "clean" reduced GO sheets in high quality and in large scale, a natural reduced nicotinamine adenine dinucleotide NAD(P)H model, Hantzsch 1,4-dihydropyridine (HEH), is used as a mild organic photoreductant in this work. Benefiting from the intense absorption of HEH in the range of 300-420 nm, the graphene oxide (GO) can be readily reduced by HEH under UV light irradiation (λ > 320 nm) to afford single or few-layer reduced graphene oxide at room temperature. Studies on reduction extent reveal that both irradiation time and concentration ratio of HEH to GO are important for effective reduction of GO under UV light. The as-prepared photochemically reduced graphene oxide (PRGO) dispersion is stable without the need for any polymeric or surfactant stabilizers. Simply by extraction treatment, the "clean" PRGO sheets can be obtained in large quantities, and its conductivity approaches to 4680 S·m(-1) that is the highest value reported by photochemical approaches so far.

  17. Photochemical smog incident on June 30, 1973

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, S

    1973-01-01

    The first photochemical smog incident in Shizuoka prefecture (June 30, 1973) started in Hamamatsu and extended 100 km northeast as far as Fujinomiya city. This not only involved an extraordinarily large area, but the type of smog was different from that in Tokyo and Osaka. The victims were all pupils exercising at the time in the playgrounds. In Hamamatsu, 1050 children were involved and complained of eye irritation and pain, throat pain, coughs, and headaches between 2 and 3 pm, but there were no serious effects. The damages to agricultural produce were extensive and 70% of the total rice fields (1656 hectares), and 40 hectares of green scallions were affected. In Shizuoka, 716 children were affected about 5:30 pm, but in Fujinomiya, which is located further northeast, 16 children were affected about 4 pm. The movement of the damages, the locations, the extent of damages, and the direction of the wind, were puzzling in the light of the normal pattern of photochemical smogs, and the pollution sources could not be the coastal industrial area or automobile exhaust gases. Meteorological factors were similar to the usual photochemical smog conditions, but the locations of the cities involved and the wind direction from the sea suggested that the pollution source was the Pacific Ocean. Since the wind above 1000 m was northeast, circulation of industrial pollutants by the sea breeze is a possible explanation. The maximum concentration of oxidants was about 0.2 ppm in all areas except for Hamamatsu, where it was a little over 0.2 ppm.

  18. Selective Oxidation of Lignin Model Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ruili; Li, Yanding; Kim, Hoon; Mobley, Justin K; Ralph, John

    2018-05-02

    Lignin, the planet's most abundant renewable source of aromatic compounds, is difficult to degrade efficiently to welldefined aromatics. We developed a microwave-assisted catalytic Swern oxidation system using an easily prepared catalyst, MoO 2 Cl 2 (DMSO) 2 , and DMSO as the solvent and oxidant. It demonstrated high efficiency in transforming lignin model compounds containing the units and functional groups found in native lignins. The aromatic ring substituents strongly influenced the selectivity of β-ether phenolic dimer cleavage to generate sinapaldehyde and coniferaldehyde, monomers not usually produced by oxidative methods. Time-course studies on two key intermediates provided insight into the reaction pathway. Owing to the broad scope of this oxidation system and the insight gleaned with regard to its mechanism, this strategy could be adapted and applied in a general sense to the production of useful aromatic chemicals from phenolics and lignin. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Advanced oxidation processes: overall models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, M. [Univ. de los Andes, Escuela Basica de Ingenieria, La Hechicera, Merida (Venezuela); Curco, D.; Addardak, A.; Gimenez, J.; Esplugas, S. [Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica. Univ. de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    Modelling AOPs implies to consider all the steps included in the process, that means, mass transfer, kinetic (reaction) and luminic steps. In this way, recent works develop models which relate the global reaction rate to catalyst concentration and radiation absorption. However, the application of such models requires to know what is the controlling step for the overall process. In this paper, a simple method is explained which allows to determine the controlling step. Thus, it is assumed that reactor is divided in two hypothetical zones (dark and illuminated), and according to the experimental results, obtained by varying only the reaction volume, it can be decided if reaction occurs only in the illuminated zone or in the all reactor, including dark zone. The photocatalytic degradation of phenol, by using titania degussa P-25 as catalyst, is studied as reaction model. The preliminary results obtained are presented here, showing that it seems that, in this case, reaction only occurs in the illuminated zone of photoreactor. A model is developed to explain this behaviour. (orig.)

  20. Photochemical degradation of alachlor in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajana Đurkić

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the photochemical degradation of alachlor, a chloroacetanilide herbicide. All experiments were conducted in ultra-pure deionized water (ASTM Type I quality using direct ultraviolet (UV photolysis and the UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process. The direct UV photolysis and UV/H2O2 experiments were conducted in a commercial photochemical reactor with a quartz reaction vessel equipped with a 253.7 nm UV low pressure mercury lamp (Philips TUV 16 W. The experimental results demonstrate that UV photolysis was very effective for alachlor degradation (up to 97% removal using a high UV fluence of 4200 mJ/cm2. The UV/H2O2 process promoted alachlor degradation compared to UV photolysis alone, with a high degree of decomposition (97% achieved at a significantly lower UV fluence of 600 mJ/cm2 when combined with 1 mg H2O2/L. The application of UV photolysis alone with a UV fluence of 600 mJ/cm2 gave a negligible 4% alachlor degradation. The photo degradation of alachlor, in both direct UV photolysis and the UV/H2O2 process, followed pseudo first-order kinetics. The degradation rate constant was about 6 times higher for the UV/H2O2 process than for UV photolysis alone.

  1. The evolution of photochemical smog in a power plant plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Menachem; Valente, Ralph J.; Tanner, Roger L.; Gillani, Noor V.; Imhoff, Robert E.; Mueller, Stephen F.; Olszyna, Kenneth J.; Meagher, James F. Present address: Aeronomy Laboratory, NOAA, 325 Broadway, Boulder CO 80303, USA.)

    The evolution of photochemical smog in a plant plume was investigated with the aid of an instrumented helicopter. Air samples were taken in the plume of the Cumberland Power Plant, located in central Tennessee, during the afternoon of 16 July 1995 as part of the Southern Oxidants Study - Nashville Middle Tennessee Ozone Study. Twelve cross-wind air sampling traverses were made at six distance groups from 35 to 116 km from the source. During the sampling period the winds were from the west-northwest and the plume drifted towards the city of Nashville TN. Ten of the traverses were made upwind of the city, where the power plant plume was isolated, and two traverses downwind of the city when the plumes were possibly mixed. The results revealed that even six hours after the release, excess ozone production was limited to the edges of the plume. Only when the plume was sufficiently dispersed, but still upwind of Nashville, was excess ozone (up to 109 ppbv, 50-60 ppbv above background levels) produced in the center of the plume. The concentrations image of the plume and a Lagrangian particle model suggests that portions of the power plant plume mixed with the urban plume. The mixed urban power plant plume began to regenerate O 3 that peaked at 120 ppbv at a short distance (15-25 km) downwind of Nashville. Ozone productivity (the ratio of excess O 3 to NO y and NO z) in the isolated plume was significantly lower compared with that found in the city plume. The production of nitrate, a chain termination product, was significantly higher in the power plant plume compared to the mixed plume, indicating shorter chain length of the photochemical smog chain reaction mechanism.

  2. The evolution of photochemical smog in a power plant plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luria, M.; The Hebrew University, Jerusalem; Valente, R.J.; Tanner, R.L.; Imhoff, R.E.; Mueller, S.F.; Olszyna, K.J.; Meagher, J.F.; Gillani, N.V.; University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of photochemical smog in a plant plume was investigated with the aid of an instrumented helicopter. Air samples were taken in the plume of the Cumberland Power Plant, located in central Tennessee, during the afternoon of 16 July 1995 as part of the Southern Oxidants Study - Nashville Middle Tennessee Ozone Study. Twelve cross-wind air sampling traverses were made at six distance groups from 35 to 116 km from the source. During the sampling period the winds were from the west-northwest and the plume drifted towards the city of Nashville TN. Ten of the traverses were made upwind of the city, where the power plant plume was isolated, and two traverses downwind of the city when the plumes were possibly mixed. The results revealed that even six hours after the release, excess ozone production was limited to the edges of the plume. Only when the plume was sufficiently dispersed, but still upwind of Nashville, was excess ozone (up to 109 ppbv, 50-60 ppbv above background levels) produced in the center of the plume. The concentrations image of the plume and a Lagrangian particle model suggests that portions of the power plant plume mixed with the urban plume. The mixed urban power plant plume began to regenerate O 3 that peaked at 120 ppbv at a short distance (15-25 km) downwind of Nashville. Ozone productivity (the ratio of excess O 3 to NO y and NO z ) in the isolated plume was significantly lower compared with that found in the city plume. The production of nitrate, a chain termination product, was significantly higher in the power plant plume compared to the mixed plume, indicating shorter chain length of the photochemical smog chain reaction mechanism. (author)

  3. Testing a Conceptual Model of Soil Emissions of Nitrous and Nitric Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric A. Davidson; Michael Keller; Heather E. Erickson; Verchot NO-VALUE; Edzo Veldkamp

    2000-01-01

    Nitrous and nitric oxides are often studied separately by atmospheric chemists because they play such different roles in the atmosphere. N2O is a stable greenhouse gas in the lower atmosphere (the troposphere; Ramanathan et al. 1985), but it participates in photochemical reactions in the upper atmosphere (the stratosphere) that destroy ozone (Crutzen 1970). In contrast...

  4. Tropospheric Ozone Research: Monitoring and modelling of photo-oxidants over Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck JP; Roemer MGM; Vosbeek MEJP; Builtjes PJH; RIVM-LLO; TNO-MEP; KEMA

    1996-01-01

    The Dutch activities contributing to the EUROTRAC-TOR programme were set up to study and quantify the underlying chemical and transport processes important to the occurrence of photochemical oxidants in Europe. The project involved establishing an advanced monitoring site at Kollumerwaard,

  5. Photochemical Transformation Processes in Sunlit Surface Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vione, D.

    2012-12-01

    Photochemical reactions are major processes in the transformation of hardly biodegradable xenobiotics in surface waters. They are usually classified into direct photolysis and indirect or sensitised degradation. Direct photolysis requires xenobiotic compounds to absorb sunlight, and to get transformed as a consequence. Sensitised transformation involves reaction with transient species (e.g. °OH, CO3-°, 1O2 and triplet states of chromophoric dissolved organic matter, 3CDOM*), photogenerated by so-called photosensitisers (nitrate, nitrite and CDOM). CDOM is a major photosensitiser: is it on average the main source of °OH (and of CO3-° as a consequence, which is mainly produced upon oxidation by °OH of carbonate and bicarbonate) and the only important source of 1O2 and 3CDOM* [1, 2]. CDOM origin plays a key role in sensitised processes: allochthonous CDOM derived from soil runoff and rich in fulvic and humic substances is usually more photoactive than autochthonous CDOM (produced by in-water biological processes and mainly consisting of protein-like material) or of CDOM derived from atmospheric deposition. An interesting gradual evolution of CDOM origin and photochemistry can be found in mountain lakes across the treeline, which afford a gradual transition of allochthonous- autochtonous - atmopheric CDOM when passing from trees to alpine meadows to exposed rocks [3]. Another important issue is the sites of reactive species photoproduction in CDOM. While there is evidence that smaller molecular weight fractions are more photoactive, some studies have reported considerable 1O2 reactivity in CDOM hydrophobic sites and inside particles [4]. We have recently addressed the problem and found that dissolved species in standard humic acids (hydrodynamic diameter pollutants to be assessed and modelled. For instance, it is possible to predict pollutant half-life times by knowing absorption spectrum, direct photolysis quantum yield and reaction rate constants with °OH, CO3

  6. In-situ BrO measurements in the upper troposphere / lower stratosphere. Validation of the ENVISAT satellite measurements and photochemical model studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrechanyy, S.

    2007-04-15

    and SCOUT-O3 in the 15-20 km altitude regime are at the low side of comparable DOAS measurements a CLaMS study of the evolution of Bry from the source gases has been carried out. For this purpose an ensemble of trajectories rising from the lower troposphere to the TTL within 6 to more than 90 days were initialized with observed mixing ratios in the boundary layer of all important organic bromine source gases and the free-up of Bry by chemical and photochemical reactions was simulated. Bromoform, CHBr3, was found to be the main source of inorganic bromine at the tropopause. The derived tropospheric lifetime of bromoform is 33 days. The modelled BrO mixing ratio at the tropopause (less than 2.5 pptv) is consistent with HALOX measurements which do not detect significant amounts of BrO there (<1-2 pptv). Therefore measurements of more than 4 pptv (as retrieved from SCIAMACHY) can only be explained trough processes not included in the model. (orig.)

  7. Photochemical transformation of aircraft exhausts at their transition from the plume to the large scale dispersion in the Northern temperature belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karol, I L; Kiselev, A A [Main Geophysical Observatory, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    The 2-D diurnally varying photochemical model of the Northern temperate zonal tropospheric belt with fixed (off line) temperature and air transport is used for the description of the formation of aircraft exhaust concentration distribution in the North Atlantic commercial flight corridor, based on actual flights in summer and winter. A strong diurnal and seasonal variation of emitted NO{sub x} oxidation rate is revealed and evaluated. (author) 11 refs.

  8. Photochemical transformation of aircraft exhausts at their transition from the plume to the large scale dispersion in the Northern temperature belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karol, I.L.; Kiselev, A.A. [Main Geophysical Observatory, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The 2-D diurnally varying photochemical model of the Northern temperate zonal tropospheric belt with fixed (off line) temperature and air transport is used for the description of the formation of aircraft exhaust concentration distribution in the North Atlantic commercial flight corridor, based on actual flights in summer and winter. A strong diurnal and seasonal variation of emitted NO{sub x} oxidation rate is revealed and evaluated. (author) 11 refs.

  9. Factors controlling the redox potential of ZnCe6 in an engineered bacterioferritin photochemical 'reaction centre'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboob, Abdullah; Vassiliev, Serguei; Poddutoori, Prashanth K; van der Est, Art; Bruce, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) of photosynthesis has the unique ability to photochemically oxidize water. Recently an engineered bacterioferritin photochemical 'reaction centre' (BFR-RC) using a zinc chlorin pigment (ZnCe6) in place of its native heme has been shown to photo-oxidize bound manganese ions through a tyrosine residue, thus mimicking two of the key reactions on the electron donor side of PSII. To understand the mechanism of tyrosine oxidation in BFR-RCs, and explore the possibility of water oxidation in such a system we have built an atomic-level model of the BFR-RC using ONIOM methodology. We studied the influence of axial ligands and carboxyl groups on the oxidation potential of ZnCe6 using DFT theory, and finally calculated the shift of the redox potential of ZnCe6 in the BFR-RC protein using the multi-conformational molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann approach. According to our calculations, the redox potential for the first oxidation of ZnCe6 in the BRF-RC protein is only 0.57 V, too low to oxidize tyrosine. We suggest that the observed tyrosine oxidation in BRF-RC could be driven by the ZnCe6 di-cation. In order to increase the efficiency of tyrosine oxidation, and ultimately oxidize water, the first potential of ZnCe6 would have to attain a value in excess of 0.8 V. We discuss the possibilities for modifying the BFR-RC to achieve this goal.

  10. Photochemical pollution indicators; Les indicateurs de la pollution photochimique. La mesure des composes azotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perros, P E; Marion, T [Paris-7 Univ., 75 (France). Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques

    1998-11-01

    The number of photochemical pollution is generally based on the observation of ozone and nitrogen oxides concentration levels. So, the measurement of photochemical pollution indicators becomes essential to better understand the involved phenomena, and at the end to enable its reduction control and strategy. In this paper, we focus on the measurements of nitrogen compounds (NO{sub x} PAN, HNO{sub 3}). (authors) 24 refs.

  11. Photochemical heavy-atom effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koziar, J.C.; Cowan, D.O.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of halogenated solvents such as n-butyl chloride, n-propyl bromide, and ethyl iodide, on the photochemistry of several aromatic compounds are reviewed. Dimerization of acenaphthylene is discussed in terms of spin -orbit coupling induced by the solvents. Appropriate wave functions are given for both the solvents and the compound. Cycloaddition reactions, electrocyclic rearrangements, and photochemical cis-trans isomerization are also considered

  12. Approximate photochemical dynamics of azobenzene with reactive force fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Hartke, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    We have fitted reactive force fields of the ReaxFF type to the ground and first excited electronic states of azobenzene, using global parameter optimization by genetic algorithms. Upon coupling with a simple energy-gap transition probability model, this setup allows for completely force-field-based simulations of photochemical cis→trans- and trans→cis-isomerizations of azobenzene, with qualitatively acceptable quantum yields. This paves the way towards large-scale dynamics simulations of molecular machines, including bond breaking and formation (via the reactive force field) as well as photochemical engines (presented in this work).

  13. Photochemical reactions of neptunium in nitric acid solution containing photocatalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Kawamura, Fumio

    1991-01-01

    Photochemical oxidation and reduction behaviors of neptunium were preliminarily investigated in 3 mol/l nitric acid solution. Nitric acid of 3 mol/l simulated the high level waste solution from a spent fuel reprocessing process. Concentrations of Np(V), Np(VI) and nitrous acid were determined with a photospectrometer, and solution potential with an electrode. Without additives, Np(VI) was reduced to Np(V) by nitrous acid which was photolytically generated from nitric acid. With a scavenger for nitrous acid, Np(V) was oxidized to extractable Np(VI) by a photolytically generated oxidizing reagent which were predicted by the solution potential measurement. The reduction rate was higher than the oxidation rate because of the larger quantity and higher reactivity of nitrous acid than an oxidizing reagent. Photocatalyst was proved to be effective for the oxidation of Np(V) to Np(VI). (author)

  14. Investigation of Zircaloy-2 oxidation model for SFP accident analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: nemoto.yoshiyuki@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata, Ohaza, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan); Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Ogawa, Chihiro; Kondo, Keietsu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata, Ohaza, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan); Nakashima, Kazuo; Kanazawa, Toru; Tojo, Masayuki [Global Nuclear Fuel – Japan Co., Ltd., 2-3-1, Uchikawa, Yokosuka-shi, Kanagawa, 239-0836 (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    The authors previously conducted thermogravimetric analyses on Zircaloy-2 in air. By using the thermogravimetric data, an oxidation model was constructed in this study so that it can be applied for the modeling of cladding degradation in spent fuel pool (SFP) severe accident condition. For its validation, oxidation tests of long cladding tube were conducted, and computational fluid dynamics analyses using the constructed oxidation model were proceeded to simulate the experiments. In the oxidation tests, high temperature thermal gradient along the cladding axis was applied and air flow rates in testing chamber were controlled to simulate hypothetical SFP accidents. The analytical outputs successfully reproduced the growth of oxide film and porous oxide layer on the claddings in oxidation tests, and validity of the oxidation model was proved. Influence of air flow rate for the oxidation behavior was thought negligible in the conditions investigated in this study. - Highlights: •An oxidation model of Zircaloy-2 in air environment was developed. •The oxidation model was validated by the comparison with oxidation tests using long cladding tubes in hypothetical spent fuel pool accident condition. •The oxidation model successfully reproduced the typical oxidation behavior in air.

  15. A micellar model system for the role of zeaxanthin in the non-photochemical quenching process of photosynthesis--chlorophyll fluorescence quenching by the xanthophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avital, Shlomo; Brumfeld, Vlad; Malkin, Shmuel

    2006-07-01

    To get an insight to the mechanism of the zeaxanthin-dependent non-photochemical quenching in photosystem II of photosynthesis, we probed the interaction of some xanthophylls with excited chlorophyll-a by trapping both pigments in micelles of triton X-100. Optimal distribution of pigments among micelles was obtained by proper control of the micelle concentration, using formamide in the reaction mixture, which varies the micellar aggregation number over three orders of magnitude. The optimal reaction mixture was obtained around 40% (v/v) formamide in 0.2-0.4% (v/v) triton X-100 in water. Zeaxanthin in the micellar solution exhibited initially absorption and circular dichroism spectral features corresponding to a J-type aggregate. The spectrum was transformed over time (half-time values vary-an average characteristic figure is roughly 20 min) to give features representing an H-type aggregate. The isosbestic point in the series of spectral curves favors the supposition of a rather simple reaction between two pure J and H-types dimeric species. Violaxanthin exhibited immediately stable spectral features corresponding to a mixture of J-type and more predominately H-type dimers. Lutein, neoxanthin and beta-carotene did not show any aggregated spectral forms in micelles. The spectral features in micelles were compared to spectra in aqueous acetone, where the assignment to various aggregated types was established previously. The specific tendency of zeaxanthin to form the J-type dimer (or aggregate) could be important for its function in photosynthesis. The abilities of five carotenoids (zeaxanthin, violaxanthin, lutein, neoxanthin and beta-carotene) to quench chlorophyll-a fluorescence were compared. Zeaxanthin, in its two micellar dimeric forms, and beta-carotene were comparable good quenchers of chlorophyll-a fluorescence. Violaxanthin was a much weaker quencher, if at all. Lutein and neoxanthin rather enhanced the fluorescence. The implications to non-photochemical

  16. Modelling the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korla, Kalyani; Mitra, Chanchal K

    2014-01-01

    The Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation are the two most important sets of reactions in a eukaryotic cell that meet the major part of the total energy demands of a cell. In this paper, we present a computer simulation of the coupled reactions using open source tools for simulation. We also show that it is possible to model the Krebs cycle with a simple black box with a few inputs and outputs. However, the kinetics of the internal processes has been modelled using numerical tools. We also show that the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation together can be combined in a similar fashion - a black box with a few inputs and outputs. The Octave script is flexible and customisable for any chosen set-up for this model. In several cases, we had no explicit idea of the underlying reaction mechanism and the rate determining steps involved, and we have used the stoichiometric equations that can be easily changed as and when more detailed information is obtained. The script includes the feedback regulation of the various enzymes of the Krebs cycle. For the electron transport chain, the pH gradient across the membrane is an essential regulator of the kinetics and this has been modelled empirically but fully consistent with experimental results. The initial conditions can be very easily changed and the simulation is potentially very useful in a number of cases of clinical importance.

  17. A Highly Effective Photochemical System for Complex Treatment of Heavily Contaminated Wastewaters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krystyník, Pavel; Klusoň, Petr; Hejda, S.; Mašín, P.; Tito, D.N.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 11 (2014), s. 2212-2220 ISSN 1061-4303 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI1/065 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : advanced oxidation processes * photochemical oxidation * wastewater treatment Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 0.865, year: 2014

  18. Participation of oxidized sulfur center in intramolecular free radical processes in the model organic compounds of biological importance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogocki, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    The pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as prion diseases (Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease) and Alzheimer's disease is strongly associated with the presence of β-amyloid peptide (βA) and prion protein (hPrP) in the brain tissue. Both macromolecules contain methionine (Met) residues. Their presence seems to be responsible for unique redox properties of βA and hPrP. These residues may undergo relatively easy autooxidation and/or metal-catalysed oxidation. The presented studies were focused on the potential function of Met residues as antioxidants or pro-oxidants and on their role in radical-mediated oxidation of peptides and proteins. The role of S-, O-, N- and C-centered radicals generated in various oligopeptides containing Met and relevant model compounds has been examined in detail with respect to formation of 2c-3e bonds, redox processes, fragmentation and their mutual interconversion. In order to achieve these goals several experimental radiation, photochemical, and molecular modelling methods were applied. The experimental and molecular modelling results show significant influence of functional neighbouring groups and conformational flexibility of a peptide backbone on the oxidative reduction pathway in oligopeptides containing single and multiple Met residues. The results presented here allow for better understanding of the known propensities of βA and hPrP to reduce transition metals and to form reactive oxygen species and free radicals. (author)

  19. Paraquat: model for oxidant-initiated toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bus, J.S.; Gibson, J.E.

    1984-04-01

    Paraquat, a quaternary ammonium bipyridyl herbicide, produces degenerative lesions in the lung after systemic administration to man and animals. The pulmonary toxicity of paraquat resembles in several ways the toxicity of several other lung toxins, including oxygen, nitrofurantoin and bleomycin. Although a definitive mechanism of toxicity of parquat has not been delineated, a cyclic single electron reduction/oxidation of the parent molecule is a critical mechanistic event. The redox cycling of paraquat has two potentially important consequences relevant to the development of toxicity: generation of activated oxygen (e.g., superoxide anion, hydrogen perioxide, hydroxyl radical) which is highly reactive to cellular macromolecules; and/or oxidation of reducing equivalents (e.g., NADPH, reduced glutathione) necessary for normal cell function. Paraquat-induced pulmonary toxicity, therefore, is a potentially useful model for evaluation of oxidant mechanisms of toxicity. Furthermore, characterization of the consequences of intracellular redox cycling of xenobiotics will no doubt provide basic information regarding the role of this phenomena in the development of chemical toxicity. 105 references, 2 figures.

  20. Mathematical modeling of solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng-Yi; Maloney, Thomas M.

    1988-01-01

    Development of predictive techniques, with regard to cell behavior, under various operating conditions is needed to improve cell performance, increase energy density, reduce manufacturing cost, and to broaden utilization of various fuels. Such technology would be especially beneficial for the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) at it early demonstration stage. The development of computer models to calculate the temperature, CD, reactant distributions in the tubular and monolithic SOFCs. Results indicate that problems of nonuniform heat generation and fuel gas depletion in the tubular cell module, and of size limitions in the monolithic (MOD 0) design may be encountered during FC operation.

  1. MARMOT update for oxide fuel modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, Daniel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jiang, Chao [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Aagesen, Larry [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ahmed, Karim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jiang, Wen [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Biner, Bulent [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bai, Xianming [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Tonks, Michael [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Millett, Paul [Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the lower-length-scale research and development progresses in FY16 at Idaho National Laboratory in developing mechanistic materials models for oxide fuels, in parallel to the development of the MARMOT code which will be summarized in a separate report. This effort is a critical component of the microstructure based fuel performance modeling approach, supported by the Fuels Product Line in the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program. The progresses can be classified into three categories: 1) development of materials models to be used in engineering scale fuel performance modeling regarding the effect of lattice defects on thermal conductivity, 2) development of modeling capabilities for mesoscale fuel behaviors including stage-3 gas release, grain growth, high burn-up structure, fracture and creep, and 3) improved understanding in material science by calculating the anisotropic grain boundary energies in UO$_2$ and obtaining thermodynamic data for solid fission products. Many of these topics are still under active development. They are updated in the report with proper amount of details. For some topics, separate reports are generated in parallel and so stated in the text. The accomplishments have led to better understanding of fuel behaviors and enhance capability of the MOOSE-BISON-MARMOT toolkit.

  2. Photochemically induced oscillations of aromatic pentazadienes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, T; Hahn, C; Wokaun, A [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Aromatic pentazadienes are used to enhance the laser induced ablation of standard polymers with low absorption in the UV. Therefore the photochemistry of substituted 1,5-diaryl-3-alkyl-1,4-pentazadiene monomers was studied with a pulsed excimer laser as irradiation source. The net photochemical reaction proceeds in an overall one-step pathway A{yields}B. Quantum yields for the laser decomposition were determined to be up to 10%. An oscillating behaviour of the absorption was found during the dark period following the irradiation. The temperature dependence of this dark reaction has been studied. An attempt to model this behaviour in terms of a non-linear coupling between heat released, heat transfer, and reaction kinetics will be described. (author) 4 figs., 4 refs.

  3. Empirical soot formation and oxidation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boussouara Karima

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Modelling internal combustion engines can be made following different approaches, depending on the type of problem to be simulated. A diesel combustion model has been developed and implemented in a full cycle simulation of a combustion, model accounts for transient fuel spray evolution, fuel-air mixing, ignition, combustion, and soot pollutant formation. The models of turbulent combustion of diffusion flame, apply to diffusion flames, which one meets in industry, typically in the diesel engines particulate emission represents one of the most deleterious pollutants generated during diesel combustion. Stringent standards on particulate emission along with specific emphasis on size of emitted particulates have resulted in increased interest in fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of soot particulate formation and oxidation in internal combustion engines. A phenomenological numerical model which can predict the particle size distribution of the soot emitted will be very useful in explaining the above observed results and will also be of use to develop better particulate control techniques. A diesel engine chosen for simulation is a version of the Caterpillar 3406. We are interested in employing a standard finite-volume computational fluid dynamics code, KIVA3V-RELEASE2.

  4. Photochemical processes and ozone production in Finnish conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurila, T.; Hakola, H. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland). Air Quality Dept.

    1996-12-31

    Photochemical ozone production is observed in March-September. Highest ozone concentrations and production efficiencies are observed in spring in the northern parts and in summer in the southern parts of the country. VOC concentrations are relatively low compared to continental areas in general. During the growing season a substantial part of the total reactive mass of VOCs is of biogenic origin. Large forest areas absorb ozone substantially, decreasing the ambient ozone concentrations in central and northern parts of Finland where long-range transport of ozone is relatively important compared to local production. The aim of the work conducted at Finnish Meteorological Institute has been to characterise concentrations of photochemically active species in the boundary layer and their photochemical formation and deposition including the effects on vegetation. Also interactions between the boundary layer and free troposphere of ozone have been studied. In the future, fluxes of both biogenic species and air pollutants will be measured and the models will be further developed so that the photochemical and micrometeorological processes could be better understood

  5. Photochemical processes and ozone production in Finnish conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurila, T; Hakola, H [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland). Air Quality Dept.

    1997-12-31

    Photochemical ozone production is observed in March-September. Highest ozone concentrations and production efficiencies are observed in spring in the northern parts and in summer in the southern parts of the country. VOC concentrations are relatively low compared to continental areas in general. During the growing season a substantial part of the total reactive mass of VOCs is of biogenic origin. Large forest areas absorb ozone substantially, decreasing the ambient ozone concentrations in central and northern parts of Finland where long-range transport of ozone is relatively important compared to local production. The aim of the work conducted at Finnish Meteorological Institute has been to characterise concentrations of photochemically active species in the boundary layer and their photochemical formation and deposition including the effects on vegetation. Also interactions between the boundary layer and free troposphere of ozone have been studied. In the future, fluxes of both biogenic species and air pollutants will be measured and the models will be further developed so that the photochemical and micrometeorological processes could be better understood

  6. Photochemical Copper Coating on 3D Printed Thermoplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Winco K. C.; Sun, Bo; Huang, Junfeng; Jin, Yingdi; Meng, Zhengong; Choy, Hang Shan; Cai, Zhixiang; Li, Guijun; Ho, Cheuk Lam; Yang, Jinlong; Wong, Wai Yeung

    2016-08-01

    3D printing using thermoplastics has become very popular in recent years, however, it is challenging to provide a metal coating on 3D objects without using specialized and expensive tools. Herein, a novel acrylic paint containing malachite for coating on 3D printed objects is introduced, which can be transformed to copper via one-step laser treatment. The malachite containing pigment can be used as a commercial acrylic paint, which can be brushed onto 3D printed objects. The material properties and photochemical transformation processes have been comprehensively studied. The underlying physics of the photochemical synthesis of copper was characterized using density functional theory calculations. After laser treatment, the surface coating of the 3D printed objects was transformed to copper, which was experimentally characterized by XRD. 3D printed prototypes, including model of the Statue of Liberty covered with a copper surface coating and a robotic hand with copper interconnections, are demonstrated using this painting method. This composite material can provide a novel solution for coating metals on 3D printed objects. The photochemical reduction analysis indicates that the copper rust in malachite form can be remotely and photo-chemically reduced to pure copper with sufficient photon energy.

  7. Potential biosignatures in super-Earth atmospheres II. Photochemical responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenfell, J L; Gebauer, S; Godolt, M; Palczynski, K; Rauer, H; Stock, J; von Paris, P; Lehmann, R; Selsis, F

    2013-05-01

    Spectral characterization of super-Earth atmospheres for planets orbiting in the habitable zone of M dwarf stars is a key focus in exoplanet science. A central challenge is to understand and predict the expected spectral signals of atmospheric biosignatures (species associated with life). Our work applies a global-mean radiative-convective-photochemical column model assuming a planet with an Earth-like biomass and planetary development. We investigated planets with gravities of 1g and 3g and a surface pressure of 1 bar around central stars with spectral classes from M0 to M7. The spectral signals of the calculated planetary scenarios have been presented by in an earlier work by Rauer and colleagues. The main motivation of the present work is to perform a deeper analysis of the chemical processes in the planetary atmospheres. We apply a diagnostic tool, the Pathway Analysis Program, to shed light on the photochemical pathways that form and destroy biosignature species. Ozone is a potential biosignature for complex life. An important result of our analysis is a shift in the ozone photochemistry from mainly Chapman production (which dominates in Earth's stratosphere) to smog-dominated ozone production for planets in the habitable zone of cooler (M5-M7)-class dwarf stars. This result is associated with a lower energy flux in the UVB wavelength range from the central star, hence slower planetary atmospheric photolysis of molecular oxygen, which slows the Chapman ozone production. This is important for future atmospheric characterization missions because it provides an indication of different chemical environments that can lead to very different responses of ozone, for example, cosmic rays. Nitrous oxide, a biosignature for simple bacterial life, is favored for low stratospheric UV conditions, that is, on planets orbiting cooler stars. Transport of this species from its surface source to the stratosphere where it is destroyed can also be a key process. Comparing 1g with

  8. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar S. Sohal; Anil V. Virkar; Sergey N. Rashkeev; Michael V. Glazoff

    2010-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic no equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential, , within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, no equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  9. Efficient photochemical generation of peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides with ultraviolet light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, N. D.; Taha, Y. M.; Odame-Ankrah, C. A.; Huo, J. A.; Tokarek, T. W.; Cairns, E.; Moussa, S. G.; Liggio, J.; Osthoff, H. D.

    2015-01-01

    Photochemical sources of peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides (PANs) are utilized in many atmospheric measurement techniques for calibration or to deliver an internal standard. Conventionally, such sources rely on phosphor-coated low-pressure mercury (Hg) lamps to generate the UV light necessary to photo-dissociate a dialkyl ketone (usually acetone) in the presence of a calibrated amount of nitric oxide (NO) and oxygen (O2). In this manuscript, a photochemical PAN source in which the Hg lamp has been replaced by arrays of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) is described. The output of the UV-LED source was analyzed by gas chromatography (PAN-GC) and thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectroscopy (TD-CRDS). Using acetone, diethyl ketone (DIEK), diisopropyl ketone (DIPK), or di-n-propyl ketone (DNPK), respectively, the source produces peroxyacetic (PAN), peroxypropionic (PPN), peroxyisobutanoic (PiBN), or peroxy-n-butanoic nitric anhydride (PnBN) from NO in high yield (> 90%). Box model simulations with a subset of the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) were carried out to rationalize products yields and to identify side products. The use of UV-LED arrays offers many advantages over conventional Hg lamp setups, including greater light output over a narrower wavelength range, lower power consumption, and minimal generation of heat.

  10. Efficient photochemical generation of peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides with ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, N. D.; Taha, Y. M.; Odame-Ankrah, C. A.; Huo, J. A.; Tokarek, T. W.; Cairns, E.; Moussa, S. G.; Liggio, J.; Osthoff, H. D.

    2015-07-01

    Photochemical sources of peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides (PANs) are utilized in many atmospheric measurement techniques for calibration or to deliver an internal standard. Conventionally, such sources rely on phosphor-coated low-pressure mercury (Hg) lamps to generate the UV light necessary to photo-dissociate a dialkyl ketone (usually acetone) in the presence of a calibrated amount of nitric oxide (NO) and oxygen (O2). In this manuscript, a photochemical PAN source in which the Hg lamp has been replaced by arrays of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) is described. The output of the UV-LED source was analyzed by gas chromatography (PAN-GC) and thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectroscopy (TD-CRDS). Using acetone, diethyl ketone (DIEK), diisopropyl ketone (DIPK), or di-n-propyl ketone (DNPK), respectively, the source produces peroxyacetic (PAN), peroxypropionic (PPN), peroxyisobutanoic (PiBN), or peroxy-n-butanoic nitric anhydride (PnBN) from NO in high yield (> 90 %). Box model simulations with a subset of the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) were carried out to rationalize product yields and to identify side products. The present work demonstrates that UV-LED arrays are a viable alternative to current Hg lamp setups.

  11. Model alloy oxidation in oxyfuel characteristic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, D.; Rizzo, F.; Kranzmann, A.; Monteiro, M.; Caminha, I.

    2014-01-01

    In the oxyfuel process, pure oxygen is burned in boilers with recycled gas producing a gas rich in CO_2, making it easer to capture the CO_2 in the end of the process. The present work investigates the high temperature corrosion characteristics of a model Fe-Cr-Co alloy in typical oxyfuel process environment. Samples were oxidized at 600°C during 1000 hours in single atmosphere condition, where the samples is exposed to the same gas in all faces, and in a dual atmosphere condition, where the sample is exposed to water vapor in one side and to oxyfuel gas in the other. Samples where characterized by SEM and EDX. Results showed that corrosion is higher in a dual atmosphere condition than in single condition. (author)

  12. Photochemical organonitrate formation in wet aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yong Bin; Kim, Hwajin; Kim, Jin Young; Turpin, Barbara J.

    2016-10-01

    Water is the most abundant component of atmospheric fine aerosol. However, despite rapid progress, multiphase chemistry involving wet aerosols is still poorly understood. In this work, we report results from smog chamber photooxidation of glyoxal- and OH-containing ammonium sulfate or sulfuric acid particles in the presence of NOx and O3 at high and low relative humidity. Particles were analyzed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS). During the 3 h irradiation, OH oxidation products of glyoxal that are also produced in dilute aqueous solutions (e.g., oxalic acids and tartaric acids) were formed in both ammonium sulfate (AS) aerosols and sulfuric acid (SA) aerosols. However, the major products were organonitrogens (CHNO), organosulfates (CHOS), and organonitrogen sulfates (CHNOS). These were also the dominant products formed in the dark chamber, indicating non-radical formation. In the humid chamber (> 70 % relative humidity, RH), two main products for both AS and SA aerosols were organonitrates, which appeared at m / z- 147 and 226. They were formed in the aqueous phase via non-radical reactions of glyoxal and nitric acid, and their formation was enhanced by photochemistry because of the photochemical formation of nitric acid via reactions of peroxy radicals, NOx and OH during the irradiation.

  13. Test Concept for Advanced Oxidation Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Lars Rønn; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen; Mortensen, Lars

    advanced on-site oxidation tests. The remediation techniques included are electrochemical oxidation, photochemical/photocatalytic oxidation, ozone, hydrogen peroxide, permanganate, and persulfate among others. A versatile construction of the mobile test unit makes it possible to combine different...

  14. Multiscale model of metal alloy oxidation at grain boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sushko, Maria L.; Alexandrov, Vitaly; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    High temperature intergranular oxidation and corrosion of metal alloys is one of the primary causes of materials degradation in nuclear systems. In order to gain insights into grain boundary oxidation processes, a mesoscale metal alloy oxidation model is established by combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) and mesoscopic Poisson-Nernst-Planck/classical DFT with predictions focused on Ni alloyed with either Cr or Al. Analysis of species and fluxes at steady-state conditions indicates that the oxidation process involves vacancy-mediated transport of Ni and the minor alloying element to the oxidation front and the formation of stable metal oxides. The simulations further demonstrate that the mechanism of oxidation for Ni-5Cr and Ni-4Al is qualitatively different. Intergranular oxidation of Ni-5Cr involves the selective oxidation of the minor element and not matrix Ni, due to slower diffusion of Ni relative to Cr in the alloy and due to the significantly smaller energy gain upon the formation of nickel oxide compared to that of Cr 2 O 3 . This essentially one-component oxidation process results in continuous oxide formation and a monotonic Cr vacancy distribution ahead of the oxidation front, peaking at alloy/oxide interface. In contrast, Ni and Al are both oxidized in Ni-4Al forming a mixed spinel NiAl 2 O 4 . Different diffusivities of Ni and Al give rise to a complex elemental distribution in the vicinity of the oxidation front. Slower diffusing Ni accumulates in the oxide and metal within 3 nm of the interface, while Al penetrates deeper into the oxide phase. Ni and Al are both depleted from the region 3–10 nm ahead of the oxidation front creating voids. The oxide microstructure is also different. Cr 2 O 3 has a plate-like structure with 1.2–1.7 nm wide pores running along the grain boundary, while NiAl 2 O 4 has 1.5 nm wide pores in the direction parallel to the grain boundary and 0.6 nm pores in the perpendicular direction providing an additional

  15. Profiling the biological activity of oxide nanomaterials with mechanistic models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burello, E.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we present three mechanistic models for profiling the potential biological and toxicological effects of oxide nanomaterials. The models attempt to describe the reactivity, protein adsorption and membrane adhesion processes of a large range of oxide materials and are based on properties

  16. Southern Africa - a giant natural photochemical reactor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Diab, RD

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available photochemical reactor’ are abundant sources of ozone precursors (biomass burning, lightning, biogenic and urban-industrial sources), and meteorological conditions that promote anticyclonic recirculation on a subhemispheric scale....

  17. Carbon monoxide oxidation over three different states of copper: Development of a model metal oxide catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jernigan, Glenn Geoffrey [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-10-01

    Carbon monoxide oxidation was performed over the three different oxidation states of copper -- metallic (Cu), copper (I) oxide (Cu2O), and copper (II) oxide (CuO) as a test case for developing a model metal oxide catalyst amenable to study by the methods of modern surface science and catalysis. Copper was deposited and oxidized on oxidized supports of aluminum, silicon, molybdenum, tantalum, stainless steel, and iron as well as on graphite. The catalytic activity was found to decrease with increasing oxidation state (Cu > Cu2O > CuO) and the activation energy increased with increasing oxidation state (Cu, 9 kcal/mol < Cu2O, 14 kcal/mol < CuO, 17 kcal/mol). Reaction mechanisms were determined for the different oxidation states. Lastly, NO reduction by CO was studied. A Cu and CuO catalyst were exposed to an equal mixture of CO and NO at 300--350 C to observe the production of N2 and CO2. At the end of each reaction, the catalyst was found to be Cu2O. There is a need to study the kinetics of this reaction over the different oxidation states of copper.

  18. Photo oxidative degradation of azure-B by sono-photo-Fenton and photo-Fenton reagents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prahlad Vaishnave

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A model for the decomposition of azure-B by photo-Fenton reagent in the presence of ultrasound in homogeneous aqueous solution has been described. The photochemical decomposition rate of azure-B is markedly increased in the presence of ultrasound. It is a rather inexpensive reagent for wastewater treatment. The effect of different variables like the concentration of ferric ion, concentration of dye, hydrogen peroxide, pH, light intensity etc. on the reaction rate has been observed. The progress of the sono-photochemical degradation was monitored spectrophotometrically. The optimum sono-photochemical degradation conditions were experimentally determined. The results showed that the dye was completely oxidized and degraded into CO2 and H2O. A suitable tentative mechanism for sono-photochemical bleaching of azure-B by sono-photo-Fenton’s reaction has been proposed.

  19. Water Treatment Process Intensification by Combination of Electrochemical and Photochemical Methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krystyník, Pavel; Klusoň, Petr; Tito, D.N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 94, SI (2015), s. 85-92 ISSN 0255-2701 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI1/065; GA TA ČR TA03010548 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : electrocoagulation * photochemical oxidation * TOC removal Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.154, year: 2015

  20. A 3d Regional Scale Photochemical Air Quality Model. Application to a 3 Day Summertime Episode over Paris Un modèle photochimique 3D de qualité de l'air à l'échelle régionale. Application à un épisode de 3 jours à Paris en été

    OpenAIRE

    Carissimo B.; Dupont E.; Musson-Genon L.; Riboud P. M.; Jaecker-Voirol A.; Lipphardt M.; Martin B.; Quandalle Ph.; Salles J.; Aumont B.; Bergametti G.; Bey I.; Toupance G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents AZUR, a 3D Eulerian photochemical air quality model for the simulation of air pollution in urban and semi-urban areas. The model tracks gas pollutant species emitted into the atmosphere by transportation and industrial sources, it computes the chemical reactions of these species under varying meteorological conditions (photolysis, pressure, temperature, humidity), their transport by wind and their turbulent diffusion as a function of air stability. It has a modular softwar...

  1. Modelling horizontal and vertical concentration profiles of ozone and oxides of nitrogen within high-latitude urban areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, J.P.; Weston, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    Urban ozone concentrations are determined by the balance between ozone destruction, chemical production and supply through advection and turbulent down-mixing from higher levels. At high latitudes, low levels of solar insolation and high horizontal advection speeds reduce the photochemical production and the spatial ozone concentration patterns are largely determined by the reaction of ozone with nitric oxide and dry deposition to the surface. A Lagrangian column model has been developed to simulate the mean (monthly and annual) three-dimensional structure in ozone and nitrogen oxides (NO x ) concentrations in the boundary-layer within and immediately around an urban area. The short-time-scale photochemical processes of ozone and NO x , as well as emissions and deposition to the ground, are simulated. The model has a horizontal resolution of 1x1km and high resolution in the vertical. It has been applied over a 100x100km domain containing the city of Edinburgh (at latitude 56 o N) to simulate the city-scale processes of pollutants. Results are presented, using averaged wind-flow frequencies and appropriate stability conditions, to show the extent of the depletion of ozone by city emissions. The long-term average spatial patterns in the surface ozone and NO x concentrations over the model domain are reproduced quantitatively. The model shows the average surface ozone concentrations in the urban area to be lower than the surrounding rural areas by typically 50% and that the areas experiencing a 20% ozone depletion are generally restricted to within the urban area. The depletion of the ozone concentration to less than 50% of the rural surface values extends only 20m vertically above the urban area. A series of monitoring sites for ozone, nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide on a north-south transect through the city - from an urban, through a semi-rural, to a remote rural location - allows the comparison of modelled with observed data for the mean diurnal cycle of ozone

  2. Modeling Manganese Sorption and Surface Oxidation During Filtration

    OpenAIRE

    Bierlein, Kevin Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Soluble manganese (Mn) is a common contaminant in drinking water sources. High levels of Mn can lead to aesthetic water quality problems, necessitating removal of Mn during treatment to minimize consumer complaints. Mn may be removed during granular media filtration by the â natural greensand effect,â in which soluble Mn adsorbs to manganese oxide-coated (MnOx(s)) media and is then oxidized by chlorine, forming more manganese oxide. This research builds on a previous model developed by Mer...

  3. A Simplified Model for Volatile-N Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine; Glarborg, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In solid fuel flames, NO is largely formed from the oxidation of volatile nitrogen compounds such as HCN and NH3. To be able to model the nitrogen chemistry in these flames, it is necessary to have an adequate model for volatile-N oxidation. Simple global models for oxidation of HCN and NH3 from...... the literature should be used cautiously, since their predictive capabilities are limited, particularly under reducing conditions. Models for HCN/NH3/NO conversion based on the systematic reduction of a detailed chemical kinetic model offer high accuracy but rely on input estimates of combustion intermediates...... for the sub-bituminous and bituminous coals, especially at lower temperatures. The semiempirical correlations for estimating radical concentrations may also be useful in combination with models for other trace species, such as sulfur oxides, organic species, etc....

  4. Measurements and Modelling of Reactive Iodine Oxides in the Coastal MBL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najera, J. J.; Bloss, W. J.

    2012-04-01

    The release of iodine compounds into the marine atmosphere can affect a number of aspects of atmospheric composition: Iodine species can participate in catalytic ozone destruction cycles, which may be augmented by bromine species; reactions of iodine compounds can perturb the OH:HO2 and NO:NO2 ratios, heterogeneous loss of reservoir compounds such as HOI and INO3 can lead to removal of HOx and NOx, and higher iodine oxides can contribute to the formation and/or growth of aerosol particles. In this work, we focus upon understanding the effect of the spatial distribution of iodine emissions upon local HOx and NOx levels in the immediate vicinity of a coastal sites, using new observations to re-evaluate previous field campaign data. We present an analysis of results from a new instruments which measures point inorganic iodine species concentrations. The technique of resonance fluorescence (RF) is employed for the detection of iodine atoms, and the total photolabile iodine content. Measurements made at Mace Head, Ireland during July-August 2007 and May 2011 are presented. A detailed 1-dimensional photochemical box model is employed in a lagrangian sense to simulate the evolving chemical composition of an air column advected across the coastal margin. The model is compared with the observed iodine species, and then used to explore the transient response of the NOx and HOx families at the Mace Head site to heterogeneous iodine emissions: The transit time between the intertidal iodine emission zone and the shoreline site where previous measurements of HOx, NOx etc. have been made is insufficient for steady-state to become established, although this assumption has been used in earlier model studies of such data. Finally, we consider the limitations in our ability to quantify the impacts of iodine chemistry, which arise from uncertainties in the iodine kinetics and photochemistry - for example, what is the atmospheric lifetime of inorganic iodine ? - and explore their

  5. A 3 D regional scale photochemical air quality model application to a 3 day summertime episode over Paris; Un modele photochimique 3D de qualite de l`air a l`echelle regionale. Application a un episode de 3 jours a Paris en ete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaecker-Voirol, A.; Lipphardt, M.; Martin, B.; Quandalle, Ph.; Salles, J. [Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France); Carissimo, B.; Dupont, P.M.; Musson-Genon, L.; Riboud, P.M. [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Aumont, B.; Bergametti, G.; Bey, I.; Toupanse, G. [Paris-12 Univ., 94 - Creteil (France). Laboratoire interuniversitaire des systemes atmospheriques]|[Paris-7 Univ., 75 (France)

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents AZUR, a 3D Eulerian photochemical air quality model for the simulation of air pollution in urban and semi-urban areas. The model tracks gas pollutant species emitted into the atmosphere by transportation and industrial sources, it computes the chemical reactions of these species under varying meteorological conditions (photolysis, pressure, temperature, humidity), their transport by wind and their turbulent diffusion as a function of air stability. It has a modular software structure which includes several components dedicated to specific processes: MERCURE, a meso-scale meteorological model to compute the wind field, turbulent diffusion coefficients, and other meteorological parameters; MIEL, an emission inventory model describing the pollutant fluxes from automotive transportation, domestic and industrial activities; MoCA a photochemical gas phase model describing the chemistry of ozone, NO{sub x}, an hydrocarbon compounds; AIRQUAL, a 3D Eulerian model describing the transport by mean wind flux and air turbulent diffusion of species in the atmosphere, associated with a Gear type chemical equation solver. The model has been applied to a 3-day summertime episode over Paris area. Simulation results are compared to ground level concentration measurements performed by the local monitoring network (Airparif). (authors) 22 refs.

  6. A physiologically based kinetic model for bacterial sulfide oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klok, Johannes B M; de Graaff, Marco; van den Bosch, Pim L F; Boelee, Nadine C; Keesman, Karel J; Janssen, Albert J H

    2013-02-01

    In the biotechnological process for hydrogen sulfide removal from gas streams, a variety of oxidation products can be formed. Under natron-alkaline conditions, sulfide is oxidized by haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria via flavocytochrome c oxidoreductase. From previous studies, it was concluded that the oxidation-reduction state of cytochrome c is a direct measure for the bacterial end-product formation. Given this physiological feature, incorporation of the oxidation state of cytochrome c in a mathematical model for the bacterial oxidation kinetics will yield a physiologically based model structure. This paper presents a physiologically based model, describing the dynamic formation of the various end-products in the biodesulfurization process. It consists of three elements: 1) Michaelis-Menten kinetics combined with 2) a cytochrome c driven mechanism describing 3) the rate determining enzymes of the respiratory system of haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria. The proposed model is successfully validated against independent data obtained from biological respiration tests and bench scale gas-lift reactor experiments. The results demonstrate that the model is a powerful tool to describe product formation for haloalkaliphilic biomass under dynamic conditions. The model predicts a maximum S⁰ formation of about 98 mol%. A future challenge is the optimization of this bioprocess by improving the dissolved oxygen control strategy and reactor design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of photochemical pollution at different elevations in mountainous areas in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Guo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available To advance our understanding on the factors that affect photochemical pollution at different elevations in mountainous areas, concurrent systematic field measurements (September to November 2010 were conducted at a mountain site and at an urban site at the foot of the mountain in Hong Kong. The mixing ratios of air pollutants were greater at the foot of the mountain (i.e., Tsuen Wan urban site, TW than near the summit (i.e., Tai Mao Shan mountain site, TMS, expect for ozone. In total, only one O3 episode day was observed at TW, whereas twenty-one (21 O3 episode days were observed at TMS. The discrepancy of O3 at the two sites was attributed to the mixed effects of NO titration, vertical meteorological conditions, regional transport and mesoscale circulations. The lower NO levels at TMS and the smaller differences of "oxidant" Ox (O3 + NO2 between the two sites suggested that variations of O3 at the two sites were partly attributed to different degree of NO titration. In addition, analysis of vertical structure of meteorological variables revealed that the inversion layer at the range of altitudes of 500–1000 m might be another factor that caused the high O3 levels at TMS. Furthermore, analyses of the wind fields, the levels of air pollutants in different air flows, ratios of different trace gases and the correlation between variability and the lifetime of VOCs (volatile organic compounds indicated that high O3 concentrations at TMS were somewhat influenced by regional air masses from the highly polluted Pearl River delta (PRD region. In particular, the diurnal profiles and correlations of gaseous pollutants suggested influence of mesoscale circulations, which is confirmed using the Master Chemical Mechanism moving box model (Mbox and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model. By investigating the correlations of observed O3 and NOx* and the relationships of O3 and its precursors by an observation-based model (OBM, as well as the ratios

  8. Redox reaction in photochemical and ionizing irradiation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slama-Schwok, A.

    1985-09-01

    This work presents a basic study of electron transfer reactions which could be involved in appropriate systems for photochemical conversion and storage of solar energy. The aim was to extend the knowledge to new photosensitizers and quenchers and to compare them with the most popular photosensitizers-quenchers system, i.e. a rubidium complex. The photosensitizer studied here is an irridium complex. We studied in this work the air oxidation of bromide to Br 3 - and H 2 O 2 using the irridium complex as the sensitizer. The reducing properties of the reduced irridium complex photosensitizer were studied, using the pulse radiolysis techniques. In conclusion, the oxidation reduction properties of the irridium and its lowest excited state correspond to most of the photosensitizer for electron transfer reactions. The energy temporary present in the charge separation products can be stored using appropriate environment such as polyelectrolytes

  9. Photochemical Hydrogen Doping Induced Embedded Two-Dimensional Metallic Channel Formation in InGaZnO at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeong-Ho; Lee, Young-Ahn; Kim, Jinseo; Park, Jucheol; Ahn, Seungbae; Jeon, Ki-Joon; Kim, Jeong Won; Choi, Duck-Kyun; Seo, Hyungtak

    2015-10-27

    The photochemical tunability of the charge-transport mechanism in metal-oxide semiconductors is of great interest since it may offer a facile but effective semiconductor-to-metal transition, which results from photochemically modified electronic structures for various oxide-based device applications. This might provide a feasible hydrogen (H)-radical doping to realize the effectively H-doped metal oxides, which has not been achieved by thermal and ion-implantation technique in a reliable and controllable way. In this study, we report a photochemical conversion of InGaZnO (IGZO) semiconductor to a transparent conductor via hydrogen doping to the local nanocrystallites formed at the IGZO/glass interface at room temperature. In contrast to thermal or ionic hydrogen doping, ultraviolet exposure of the IGZO surface promotes a photochemical reaction with H radical incorporation to surface metal-OH layer formation and bulk H-doping which acts as a tunable and stable highly doped n-type doping channel and turns IGZO to a transparent conductor. This results in the total conversion of carrier conduction property to the level of metallic conduction with sheet resistance of ∼16 Ω/□, room temperature Hall mobility of 11.8 cm(2) V(-1) sec(-1), the carrier concentration at ∼10(20) cm(-3) without any loss of optical transparency. We demonstrated successful applications of photochemically highly n-doped metal oxide via optical dose control to transparent conductor with excellent chemical and optical doping stability.

  10. Model for low temperature oxidation during long term interim storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desgranges, Clara; Bertrand, Nathalie; Gauvain, Danielle; Terlain, Anne [Service de la Corrosion et du Comportement des Materiaux dans leur Environnement, CEA/Saclay - 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Poquillon, Dominique; Monceau, Daniel [CIRIMAT UMR 5085, ENSIACET-INPT, 31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2004-07-01

    For high-level nuclear waste containers in long-term interim storage, dry oxidation will be the first and the main degradation mode during about one century. The metal lost by dry oxidation over such a long period must be evaluated with a good reliability. To achieve this goal, modelling of the oxide scale growth is necessary and this is the aim of the dry oxidation studies performed in the frame of the COCON program. An advanced model based on the description of elementary mechanisms involved in scale growth at low temperatures, like partial interfacial control of the oxidation kinetics and/or grain boundary diffusion, is developed in order to increase the reliability of the long term extrapolations deduced from basic models developed from short time experiments. Since only few experimental data on dry oxidation are available in the temperature range of interest, experiments have also been performed to evaluate the relevant input parameters for models like grain size of oxide scale, considering iron as simplified material. (authors)

  11. Model for low temperature oxidation during long term interim storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desgranges, Clara; Bertrand, Nathalie; Gauvain, Danielle; Terlain, Anne; Poquillon, Dominique; Monceau, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    For high-level nuclear waste containers in long-term interim storage, dry oxidation will be the first and the main degradation mode during about one century. The metal lost by dry oxidation over such a long period must be evaluated with a good reliability. To achieve this goal, modelling of the oxide scale growth is necessary and this is the aim of the dry oxidation studies performed in the frame of the COCON program. An advanced model based on the description of elementary mechanisms involved in scale growth at low temperatures, like partial interfacial control of the oxidation kinetics and/or grain boundary diffusion, is developed in order to increase the reliability of the long term extrapolations deduced from basic models developed from short time experiments. Since only few experimental data on dry oxidation are available in the temperature range of interest, experiments have also been performed to evaluate the relevant input parameters for models like grain size of oxide scale, considering iron as simplified material. (authors)

  12. Simulation of photoreactive transients and of photochemical transformation of organic pollutants in sunlit boreal lakes across 14 degrees of latitude: A photochemical mapping of Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Birgit; Barsotti, Francesco; Minella, Marco; Landelius, Tomas; Minero, Claudio; Tranvik, Lars J; Vione, Davide

    2018-02-01

    Lake water constituents, such as chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and nitrate, absorb sunlight which induces an array of photochemical reactions. Although these reactions are a substantial driver of pollutant degradation in lakes they are insufficiently understood, in particular on large scales. Here, we provide for the first time comprehensive photochemical maps covering a large geographic region. Using photochemical kinetics modeling for 1048 lakes across Sweden we simulated the steady-state concentrations of four photoreactive transient species, which are continuously produced and consumed in sunlit lake waters. We then simulated the transient-induced photochemical transformation of organic pollutants, to gain insight into the relevance of the different photoreaction pathways. We found that boreal lakes were often unfavorable environments for photoreactions mediated by hydroxyl radicals (OH) and carbonate radical anions (CO 3 - ), while photoreactions mediated by CDOM triplet states ( 3 CDOM*) and, to a lesser extent, singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ) were the most prevalent. These conditions promote the photodegradation of phenols, which are used as plastic, medical drug and herbicide precursors. When CDOM concentrations increase, as is currently commonly the case in boreal areas such as Sweden, 3 CDOM* will also increase, promoting its importance in photochemical pathways even more. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Photochemical epoxidation of olefins by visible light in a redox system involving Sb(V) tetraphenylporphyrin and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Haruo; Hida, Mitsuhiko (Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan))

    1989-03-25

    The authors explore electron donors from the viewpoint of solar energy storage. Much attention has been focused on how a water molecule can be incorporated into electron donor system. In this paper, the authors describe a photochemical epoxidation of alkene sensitized by Sb(V)-, P(V)-, Sn(IV)-, Ge(IV)- tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) with higher oxidation potential than 1.0 Volts vs. NHE in redox systems with a water molecule as an electron donor. The water molecule acts as an electron donor, and alkene acts as an oxygen atom acceptor in this photoredox system. Epoxidation of alkenes usually requires strong oxidizing agents either by the thermal or photochemical method. This is the first example of the photochemical epoxide formation from alkene and water without any strong oxidizing agent. 1 fig.

  14. Modeling the photochemical attenuation of down-the-drain chemicals during river transport by stochastic methods and field measurements of pharmaceuticals and personal care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanamoto, Seiya; Nakada, Norihide; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    Existing stochastic models for predicting concentrations of down-the-drain chemicals in aquatic environments do not account for the diurnal variation of direct photolysis by sunlight, despite its being an important factor in natural attenuation. To overcome this limitation, we developed a stochastic model incorporating temporal variations in direct photolysis. To verify the model, we measured 57 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in a 7.6-km stretch of an urban river, and determined their physical and biological properties in laboratory experiments. During transport along the river, 8 PPCPs, including ketoprofen and azithromycin, were attenuated by >20%, mainly owing to direct photolysis and adsorption to sediments. The photolabile PPCPs attenuated significantly in the daytime but persisted in the nighttime. The observations were similar to the values predicted by the photolysis model for the photolabile PPCPs (i.e., ketoprofen, diclofenac and furosemide) but not by the existing model. The stochastic model developed in this study was suggested to be a novel and useful stochastic model for evaluating direct photolysis of down-the-drain chemicals, which occurs during the river transport.

  15. Photochemical dynamics of surface oriented molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, W.

    1992-01-01

    The period 8/01/91-7/31/92 is the first year of a new project titled ''Photochemical Dynamics of Surface Oriented Molecules'', initiated with DOE Support. The main objective of this project is to understand the dynamics of elementary chemical reactions by studying photochemical dynamics of surface-oriented molecules. In addition, the mechanisms of photon-surface interactions need to be elucidated. The strategy is to carry out experiments to measure the translational energy distribution, as a function of the angle from the surface normal, of the photoproducts by time-of-flight (TOF) technique by varying the photon wavelength, intensity, polarization, and pulse duration. By choosing adsorbates with different bonding configuration, the effects of adsorbate orientation on surface photochemical dynamics can be studied

  16. Advanced methods of solid oxide fuel cell modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Milewski, Jaroslaw; Santarelli, Massimo; Leone, Pierluigi

    2011-01-01

    Fuel cells are widely regarded as the future of the power and transportation industries. Intensive research in this area now requires new methods of fuel cell operation modeling and cell design. Typical mathematical models are based on the physical process description of fuel cells and require a detailed knowledge of the microscopic properties that govern both chemical and electrochemical reactions. ""Advanced Methods of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Modeling"" proposes the alternative methodology of generalized artificial neural networks (ANN) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) modeling. ""Advanced Methods

  17. Photochemical model evaluation of the ground-level ozone impacts on ambient air quality and vegetation health in the Alberta oil sands region: Using present and future emission scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, Krish; Cho, Sunny; Morris, Ralph; Spink, David; Jung, Jaegun; Pauls, Ron; Duffett, Katherine

    2016-09-01

    One of the potential environmental issues associated with oil sands development is increased ozone formation resulting from NOX and volatile organic compound emissions from bitumen extraction, processing and upgrading. To manage this issue in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) in northeast Alberta, a regional multi-stakeholder group, the Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA), developed an Ozone Management Framework that includes a modelling based assessment component. In this paper, we describe how the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model was applied to assess potential ground-level ozone formation and impacts on ambient air quality and vegetation health for three different ozone precursor cases in the AOSR. Statistical analysis methods were applied, and the CMAQ performance results met the U.S. EPA model performance goal at all sites. The modelled 4th highest daily maximum 8-h average ozone concentrations in the base and two future year scenarios did not exceed the Canada-wide standard of 65 ppb or the newer Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards of 63 ppb in 2015 and 62 ppb in 2020. Modelled maximum 1-h ozone concentrations in the study were well below the Alberta Ambient Air Quality Objective of 82 ppb in all three cases. Several ozone vegetation exposure metrics were also evaluated to investigate the potential impact of ground-level ozone on vegetation. The chronic 3-months SUM60 exposure metric is within the CEMA baseline range (0-2000 ppb-hr) everywhere in the AOSR. The AOT40 ozone exposure metric predicted by CMAQ did not exceed the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UN/ECE) threshold of concern of 3000 ppb-hr in any of the cases but is just below the threshold in high-end future emissions scenario. In all three emission scenarios, the CMAQ predicted W126 ozone exposure metric is within the CEMA baseline threshold of 4000 ppb-hr. This study outlines the use of photochemical modelling of the impact of an industry (oil

  18. Photochemical synthesis of UO2 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rath, M.C.; Keny, Sangeeta; Naik, D.B.

    2014-01-01

    UO 2 nanoparticles have been recently synthesized by us from aqueous solutions of uranyl nitrate through radiolytic method on high-energy electron beam irradiation. In this study, the synthesis of UO 2 nanoparticles through photochemical method is reported which is a complementary route to radiation chemical method

  19. Photochemical Transformation Processes in Sunlit Surface Waters (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vione, D.

    2013-12-01

    Photochemical reactions are major processes in the transformation of hardly biodegradable xenobiotics in surface waters. They are usually classified into direct photolysis and indirect or sensitised degradation. Direct photolysis requires xenobiotic compounds to absorb sunlight, and to get transformed as a consequence. Sensitised transformation involves reaction with transient species (e.g. °OH, CO3-°, 1O2 and triplet states of chromophoric dissolved organic matter, 3CDOM*), photogenerated by so-called photosensitisers (nitrate, nitrite and CDOM). CDOM is a major photosensitiser: is it on average the main source of °OH (and of CO3-° as a consequence, which is mainly produced upon oxidation by °OH of carbonate and bicarbonate) and the only important source of 1O2 and 3CDOM* [1, 2]. CDOM origin plays a key role in sensitised processes: allochthonous CDOM derived from soil runoff and rich in fulvic and humic substances is usually more photoactive than autochthonous CDOM (produced by in-water biological processes and mainly consisting of protein-like material) or of CDOM derived from atmospheric deposition. An interesting gradual evolution of CDOM origin and photochemistry can be found in mountain lakes across the treeline, which afford a gradual transition of allochthonous- autochtonous - atmopheric CDOM when passing from trees to alpine meadows to exposed rocks [3]. Another important issue is the sites of reactive species photoproduction in CDOM. While there is evidence that smaller molecular weight fractions are more photoactive, some studies have reported considerable 1O2 reactivity in CDOM hydrophobic sites and inside particles [4]. We have recently addressed the problem and found that dissolved species in standard humic acids (hydrodynamic diameter pollutants to be assessed and modelled. For instance, it is possible to predict pollutant half-life times by knowing absorption spectrum, direct photolysis quantum yield and reaction rate constants with °OH, CO3

  20. Photochemical internalization enhanced macrophage delivered chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Diane; Christie, Catherine; Ju, David; Nair, Rohit Kumar; Molina, Stephanie; Berg, Kristian; Krasieva, Tatiana B; Madsen, Steen J; Hirschberg, Henry

    2018-03-01

    Macrophage (Ma) vectorization of chemotherapeutic drugs has the advantage for cancer therapy in that it can actively target and maintain an elevated concentration of drugs at the tumor site, preventing their spread into healthy tissue. A potential drawback is the inability to deliver a sufficient number of drug-loaded Ma into the tumor, thus limiting the amount of active drug delivered. This study examined the ability of photochemical internalization (PCI) to enhance the efficacy of released drug by Ma transport. Tumor spheroids consisting of either F98 rat glioma cells or F98 cells combined with a subpopulation of empty or doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded mouse Ma (RAW264.7) were used as in vitro tumor models. PCI was performed with the photosensitizer AlPcS 2a and laser irradiation at 670 nm. RAW264.7 Ma pulsed with DOX released the majority of the incorporated DOX within two hours of incubation. PCI significantly increased the toxicity of DOX either as pure drug or derived from monolayers of DOX-loaded Ma. Significant growth inhibition of hybrid spheroids was also observed with PCI even at subpopulations of DOX-loaded Ma as low as 11% of the total initial hybrid spheroid cell number. Results show that RAW264.7 Ma, pulsed with DOX, could effectively incorporate and release DOX. PCI significantly increased the ability of both free and Ma-released DOX to inhibit the growth of tumor spheroids in vitro. The growth of F98 + DOX loaded Ma hybrid spheroids were synergistically reduced by PCI, compared to either photodynamic therapy or released DOX acting alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A mechanistic model on methane oxidation in the rice rhizosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodegom, van P.M.; Leffelaar, P.A.; Goudriaan, J.

    2001-01-01

    A mechanistic model is presented on the processes leading to methane oxidation in rice rhizosphere. The model is driven by oxygen release from a rice root into anaerobic rice soil. Oxygen is consumed by heterotrophic and methanotrophic respiration, described by double Monod kinetics, and by iron

  2. Ab initio and kinetic modeling studies of formic acid oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marshall, Paul; Glarborg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for oxidation of formic acid (HOCHO) in flames has been developed, based on theoretical work and data from literature. Ab initio calculations were used to obtain rate coefficients for reactions of HOCHO with H, O, and HO2. Modeling predictions with the mechanism...

  3. Simplified kinetic models of methanol oxidation on silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, A.; Lynggaard, H.; Stegelmann, C.

    2005-01-01

    Recently the authors developed a microkinetic model of methanol oxidation on silver [A. Andreasen, H. Lynggaard, C. Stegelmann, P. Stoltze, Surf. Sci. 544 (2003) 5-23]. The model successfully explains both surface science experiments and kinetic experiments at industrial conditions applying...

  4. Modeling of thermal expansion coefficient of perovskite oxide for solid oxide fuel cell cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, F.; Maghsoudipour, A.; Alizadeh, M.; Khakpour, Z.; Javaheri, M.

    2015-09-01

    Artificial intelligence models have the capacity to eliminate the need for expensive experimental investigation in various areas of manufacturing processes, including the material science. This study investigates the applicability of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) approach for modeling the performance parameters of thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of perovskite oxide for solid oxide fuel cell cathode. Oxides (Ln = La, Nd, Sm and M = Fe, Ni, Mn) have been prepared and characterized to study the influence of the different cations on TEC. Experimental results have shown TEC decreases favorably with substitution of Nd3+ and Mn3+ ions in the lattice. Structural parameters of compounds have been determined by X-ray diffraction, and field emission scanning electron microscopy has been used for the morphological study. Comparison results indicated that the ANFIS technique could be employed successfully in modeling thermal expansion coefficient of perovskite oxide for solid oxide fuel cell cathode, and considerable savings in terms of cost and time could be obtained by using ANFIS technique.

  5. Modeling of nitrous oxide production by autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria with multiple production pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Peng, Lai; Law, Yingyu; Guo, Jianhua; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2014-04-01

    Autotrophic ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) have been recognized as a major contributor to N2O production in wastewater treatment systems. However, so far N2O models have been proposed based on a single N2O production pathway by AOB, and there is still a lack of effective approach for the integration of these models. In this work, an integrated mathematical model that considers multiple production pathways is developed to describe N2O production by AOB. The pathways considered include the nitrifier denitrification pathway (N2O as the final product of AOB denitrification with NO2(-) as the terminal electron acceptor) and the hydroxylamine (NH2OH) pathway (N2O as a byproduct of incomplete oxidation of NH2OH to NO2(-)). In this model, the oxidation and reduction processes are modeled separately, with intracellular electron carriers introduced to link the two types of processes. The model is calibrated and validated using experimental data obtained with two independent nitrifying cultures. The model satisfactorily describes the N2O data from both systems. The model also predicts shifts of the dominating pathway at various dissolved oxygen (DO) and nitrite levels, consistent with previous hypotheses. This unified model is expected to enhance our ability to predict N2O production by AOB in wastewater treatment systems under varying operational conditions.

  6. Enhanced Indirect Photochemical Transformation of Histidine and Histamine through Association with Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chiheng; Lundeen, Rachel A; Remucal, Christina K; Sander, Michael; McNeill, Kristopher

    2015-05-05

    Photochemical transformations greatly affect the stability and fate of amino acids (AAs) in sunlit aquatic ecosystems. Whereas the direct phototransformation of dissolved AAs is well investigated, their indirect photolysis in the presence of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is poorly understood. In aquatic systems, CDOM may act both as sorbent for AAs and as photosensitizer, creating microenvironments with high concentrations of photochemically produced reactive intermediates, such as singlet oxygen (1O2). This study provides a systematic investigation of the indirect photochemical transformation of histidine (His) and histamine by 1O2 in solutions containing CDOM as a function of solution pH. Both His and histamine showed pH-dependent enhanced phototransformation in the CDOM systems as compared to systems in which model, low-molecular-weight 1O2 sensitizers were used. Enhanced reactivity resulted from sorption of His and histamine to CDOM and thus exposure to elevated 1O2 concentrations in the CDOM microenvironment. The extent of reactivity enhancement depended on solution pH via its effects on the protonation state of His, histamine, and CDOM. Sorption-enhanced reactivity was independently supported by depressed rate enhancements in the presence of a cosorbate that competitively displaced His and histamine from CDOM. Incorporating sorption and photochemical transformation processes into a reaction rate prediction model improved the description of the abiotic photochemical transformation rates of His in the presence of CDOM.

  7. Developments in kinetic modelling of chalcocite particle oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaervi, J; Ahokainen, T; Jokilaakso, A [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Materials Processing and Powder Metallurgy

    1998-12-31

    A mathematical model for simulating chalcocite particle oxidation is presented. Combustion of pure chalcocite with oxygen is coded as a kinetic module which can be connected as a separate part of commercial CFD-package, PHOENICS. Heat transfer, fluid flow and combustion phenomena can be simulated using CFD-calculation together with the kinetic model. Interaction between gas phase and particles are taken into account by source terms. The aim of the kinetic model is to calculate the particle temperature, contents of species inside the particle, oxygen consumption and formation of sulphur dioxide. Four oxidation reactions are considered and the shrinking core model is used to describe the rate of the oxidation reactions. The model is verified by simulating the particle oxidation reactions in a laboratory scale laminar-flow furnace under different conditions and the model predicts the effects of charges correctly. In the future, the model validation will be done after experimental studies in the laminar flow-furnace. (author) 18 refs.

  8. Developments in kinetic modelling of chalcocite particle oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaervi, J.; Ahokainen, T.; Jokilaakso, A. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Materials Processing and Powder Metallurgy

    1997-12-31

    A mathematical model for simulating chalcocite particle oxidation is presented. Combustion of pure chalcocite with oxygen is coded as a kinetic module which can be connected as a separate part of commercial CFD-package, PHOENICS. Heat transfer, fluid flow and combustion phenomena can be simulated using CFD-calculation together with the kinetic model. Interaction between gas phase and particles are taken into account by source terms. The aim of the kinetic model is to calculate the particle temperature, contents of species inside the particle, oxygen consumption and formation of sulphur dioxide. Four oxidation reactions are considered and the shrinking core model is used to describe the rate of the oxidation reactions. The model is verified by simulating the particle oxidation reactions in a laboratory scale laminar-flow furnace under different conditions and the model predicts the effects of charges correctly. In the future, the model validation will be done after experimental studies in the laminar flow-furnace. (author) 18 refs.

  9. Alternative model for the Great Oxidation Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, A.

    2014-12-01

    Transition from the Archean, largely anoxic atmosphere and ocean to the Proterozoic oxidizing surface conditions has been inferred in Zimbabwe from the geochemical and geological evidence as early as 1927. Subsequent studies provided additional support for this interpretation, bracketed the transition between 2.45 and 2.32 Ga, and suggested temporal and cause-and-effect relationship with a series of the early Paleoproterozoic ice ages (including 4 discrete events). Recently recognized transient oxidation events of the Archean add texture to this pattern, but do not change it. The rise of atmospheric oxygen requires a misbalance between oxygen sinks and sources and most attention was focused on sinks. In contrast, change in oxygen supply related to low organic productivity in Archean oceans with limited nutrient contents are considered here. Although carbon isotope values of carbonates and organic carbon indicate substantial relative burial rate of organic carbon during the Archean, most of the earlier buried organic matter at that time was recycled to sediments during continental weathering, implying very low productivity and burial of 'new' organic carbon. Low contents of redox-sensitive elements, such as Mo, Cu, Zn, and V, in Archean seawater could have kept organic productivity and oxygen production at low levels. The GOE was immediately preceded by deposition of giant iron formations, accounting for more than 70% of world iron resources, and worldwide emplacement of a number of LIPs between 2.5 and 2.45 Ga, indicating enhanced delivery of nutrients and redox-sensitive elements to the oceans via submarine hydrothermal processes and continental weathering under CO2- and SO2-rich atmosphere and associated terrestrial acidic runoff. This enhanced emplacement of LIPs has been linked with the growth of continental crust, emergence of the first supercontinent, and mantle overturn at the Archean-Proterozoic boundary. The GOE could have thus been triggered by enhanced

  10. Can polymer thermal oxidative ageing be modelled?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audouin, L.; Colin, X.; Fayolle, B.; Richaud, E.; Verdu, J.

    2010-01-01

    It has been supposed, for a long time, that kinetic modelling of polymer ageing for nonempirical lifetime prediction was out of reach for two main reasons: hyper-complexity of mechanisms and heterogeneity of reactions. The arguments relative to both aspects are examined here. It is concluded that, thanks to recent advances, especially the introduction of numerical methods, kinetic modelling is possible in various important practical cases. (authors)

  11. The influence of aerosols on photochemical smog in Mexico City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, T.; Mar, B. [UNAM, Mexico, Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera (Mexico); Madronich, S.; Rivale, S. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Muhlia, A. [UNAM, Mexico, Inst. de Geofysica (Mexico)

    2001-04-01

    Aerosols in the Mexico City atmosphere can have a non-negligible effect on the ultraviolet radiation field and hence on the formation of photochemical smog. We used estimates of aerosol optical depths from sun photometer observations in a detailed radiative transfer model, to calculate photolysis rate coefficients (J{sub NO2}) for the key reaction NO{sub 2}+h{nu}{yields}NO+O ({lambda}<430nm). The calculated values are in good agreement with previously published measurements of J{sub NO2} at two sites in Mexico City: Palacio de Mineria (19 degrees 25'59''N, 99 degrees 07'58''W, 2233masl), and IMP (19 degrees 28'48''N, 99 degrees 11'07''W, 2277masl) and in Tres Marias, a town near Mexico City (19 degrees 03'N, 99 degrees 14'W, 2810masl). In particular, the model reproduces very well the contrast between the two urban sites and the evidently much cleaner Tres Marias site. For the measurement days, reductions in surface J{sub NO2} by 10-30% could be attributed to the presence of aerosols, with considerable uncertainty due largely to lack of detailed data on aerosol optical properties at ultraviolet wavelengths (esp. the single scattering albedo). The potential impact of such large reductions in photolysis rates on surface ozone concentrations is illustrated with a simple zero-dimensional photochemical model. (Author)

  12. Photochemical Haze Formation in the Atmospheres of Super-Earths and Mini-Neptunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao; Hoerst, Sarah M.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Yu, Xinting; Moses, Julianne I.; Kempton, Eliza M.- R.; Marley, Mark S.; McGuiggan, Patricia; Morley, Caroline V.; Valenti, Jeff A.; hide

    2018-01-01

    UV (ultraviolet) radiation can induce photochemical processes in the atmospheres of exoplanet and produce haze particles. Recent transmission spectra of super-Earths and mini-Neptunes have demonstrated the possibility that exoplanets have haze/cloud layers at high altitudes in their atmospheres. Haze particles play an important role in planetary atmospheres because they affect the chemistry, dynamics, and radiation flux in planetary atmospheres, and may provide a source of organic material to the surface which may impact the origin or evolution of life. However, very little information is known about photochemical processes in cool, high-metallicity exoplanetary atmospheres. We present here photochemical haze formation in laboratory simulation experiments with UV radiation; we explored temperatures ranging from 300 to 600 degrees Kelvin and a range of atmospheric metallicities (100 times, 1000 times, and 10000 times solar metallicity). We find that photochemical hazes are generated in all simulated atmospheres, but the haze production rates appear to be temperature dependent: the particles produced in each metallicity group decrease as the temperature increases. The images taken with an atomic force microscope (AFM) show that the particle size (15 nanometers to 190 nanometers) varies with temperature and metallicity. Our results provide useful laboratory data on the photochemical haze formation and particle properties, which can serve as critical inputs for exoplanet atmosphere modeling, and guide future observations of exoplanets with the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST).

  13. Ice-nucleating particle emissions from photochemically aged diesel and biodiesel exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, G. P.; Jathar, S. H.; Kodros, J. K.; Levin, E. J. T.; Galang, A. M.; Friedman, B.; Link, M. F.; Farmer, D. K.; Pierce, J. R.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; DeMott, P. J.

    2016-05-01

    Immersion-mode ice-nucleating particle (INP) concentrations from an off-road diesel engine were measured using a continuous-flow diffusion chamber at -30°C. Both petrodiesel and biodiesel were utilized, and the exhaust was aged up to 1.5 photochemically equivalent days using an oxidative flow reactor. We found that aged and unaged diesel exhaust of both fuels is not likely to contribute to atmospheric INP concentrations at mixed-phase cloud conditions. To explore this further, a new limit-of-detection parameterization for ice nucleation on diesel exhaust was developed. Using a global-chemical transport model, potential black carbon INP (INPBC) concentrations were determined using a current literature INPBC parameterization and the limit-of-detection parameterization. Model outputs indicate that the current literature parameterization likely overemphasizes INPBC concentrations, especially in the Northern Hemisphere. These results highlight the need to integrate new INPBC parameterizations into global climate models as generalized INPBC parameterizations are not valid for diesel exhaust.

  14. Using of Photochemical H2O2/UVC Decontamination Cell for Heavily Polluted Waters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žebrák, R.; Mašín, P.; Klusoň, Petr; Krystyník, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2014, č. 2 (2014), s. 55-62 ISSN 1804-0195. [Symposium ODPADOVÉ FÓRUM 2014. Hustopeče u Brna, 23.042014-23.04.2013] R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI1/065 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : photochemical oxidation * remediation * pilot scale Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering http://www.wasteforum.cz/

  15. PHOTOCHEMICAL HEATING OF DENSE MOLECULAR GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glassgold, A. E. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Najita, J. R. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2015-09-10

    Photochemical heating is analyzed with an emphasis on the heating generated by chemical reactions initiated by the products of photodissociation and photoionization. The immediate products are slowed down by collisions with the ambient gas and then heat the gas. In addition to this direct process, heating is also produced by the subsequent chemical reactions initiated by these products. Some of this chemical heating comes from the kinetic energy of the reaction products and the rest from collisional de-excitation of the product atoms and molecules. In considering dense gas dominated by molecular hydrogen, we find that the chemical heating is sometimes as large, if not much larger than, the direct heating. In very dense gas, the total photochemical heating approaches 10 eV per photodissociation (or photoionization), competitive with other ways of heating molecular gas.

  16. Photochemical stability of electrochromic polymers and devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jacob; Madsen, Morten Vesterager; Krebs, Frederik C

    2013-01-01

    The stability of fully printed flexible organic electrochromics based on 11 different conjugated polymers is explored from the fundamental chemical degradation level to the operational device level. The photochemical stability of the electrochromic polymers (ECPs) is studied enabling an analysis ...... based on flexible barrier substrates exhibit increased stability and are indeed viable in devices such as shading elements, light management systems, displays with low switching speed requirements and signage. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry....

  17. Photochemical reaction products in air pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, E R; Darley, E F; Taylor, O C; Scott, W E

    1961-01-01

    Isolation and purification of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) from artificial photochemical reaction of olefins and NO/sub x/ in air are analyzed. Olefin splits at the double bond, one end forming carbonyl compound and the other yielding PAN, among others. At concentrations below 1 ppM, PAN causes plant damage. At a concentration of about 1 ppM, PAN is a strong eye irritant.

  18. Oxide-supported metal clusters: models for heterogeneous catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santra, A K; Goodman, D W

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the size-dependent electronic, structural and chemical properties of metal clusters on oxide supports is an important aspect of heterogeneous catalysis. Recently model oxide-supported metal catalysts have been prepared by vapour deposition of catalytically relevant metals onto ultra-thin oxide films grown on a refractory metal substrate. Reactivity and spectroscopic/microscopic studies have shown that these ultra-thin oxide films are excellent models for the corresponding bulk oxides, yet are sufficiently electrically conductive for use with various modern surface probes including scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). Measurements on metal clusters have revealed a metal to nonmetal transition as well as changes in the crystal and electronic structures (including lattice parameters, band width, band splitting and core-level binding energy shifts) as a function of cluster size. Size-dependent catalytic reactivity studies have been carried out for several important reactions, and time-dependent catalytic deactivation has been shown to arise from sintering of metal particles under elevated gas pressures and/or reactor temperatures. In situ STM methodologies have been developed to follow the growth and sintering kinetics on a cluster-by-cluster basis. Although several critical issues have been addressed by several groups worldwide, much more remains to be done. This article highlights some of these accomplishments and summarizes the challenges that lie ahead. (topical review)

  19. Modelling toluene oxidation : Incorporation of mass transfer phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, J.A.A.; van Soolingen, J.; Versteeg, G. F.

    The kinetics of the oxidation of toluene have been studied in close interaction with the gas-liquid mass transfer occurring in the reactor. Kinetic parameters for a simple model have been estimated on basis of experimental observations performed under industrial conditions. The conclusions for the

  20. Modelling the change in the oxidation coefficient during the aerobic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work the aerobic degradation of phenol by acclimated activated sludge was studied. Results demonstrate that while the phenol removal rate by acclimated activated sludge follows the Monod model, the oxygen uptake rate obeys a Haldane-type equation. The phenol oxidation coefficient obtained at different intial ...

  1. A conceptual model for the fuel oxidation of defective fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgs, J.D.; Lewis, B.J.; Thompson, W.T.; He, Z.

    2007-01-01

    A mechanistic conceptual model has been developed to predict the fuel oxidation behaviour in operating defective fuel elements for water-cooled nuclear reactors. This theoretical work accounts for gas-phase transport and sheath reactions in the fuel-to-sheath gap to determine the local oxygen potential. An improved thermodynamic analysis has also been incorporated into the model to describe the equilibrium state of the oxidized fuel. The fuel oxidation kinetics treatment accounts for multi-phase transport including normal diffusion and thermodiffusion for interstitial oxygen migration in the solid, as well as gas-phase transport in the fuel pellet cracks. The fuel oxidation treatment is further coupled to a heat conduction equation. A numerical solution of the coupled transport equations is obtained by a finite-element technique with the FEMLAB 3.1 software package. The model is able to provide radial-axial profiles of the oxygen-to-uranium ratio and the fuel temperatures as a function of time in the defective element for a wide range of element powers and defect sizes. The model results are assessed against coulometric titration measurements of the oxygen-to-metal profile for pellet samples taken from ten spent defective elements discharged from the National Research Universal Reactor at the Chalk River Laboratories and commercial reactors

  2. Sunlight-Induced Photochemical Degradation of Methylene Blue by Water-Soluble Carbon Nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshu Bhati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Water-soluble graphitic hollow carbon nanorods (wsCNRs are exploited for their light-driven photochemical activities under outdoor sunlight. wsCNRs were synthesized by a simple pyrolysis method from castor seed oil, without using any metal catalyst or template. wsCNRs exhibited the light-induced photochemical degradation of methylene blue used as a model pollutant by the generation of singlet oxygen species. Herein, we described a possible degradation mechanism of methylene blue under the irradiation of visible photons via the singlet oxygen-superoxide anion pathway.

  3. Oxidative stress of crystalline lens in rat menopausal model

    OpenAIRE

    Acer, Semra; Pekel, Gökhan; Küçükatay, Vural; Karabulut, Aysun; Yağcı, Ramazan; Çetin, Ebru Nevin; Akyer, Şahika Pınar; Şahin, Barbaros

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate lenticular oxidative stress in rat menopausal models. Methods: Forty Wistar female albino rats were included in this study. A total of thirty rats underwent oophorectomy to generate a menopausal model. Ten rats that did not undergo oophorectomy formed the control group (Group 1). From the rats that underwent oophorectomy, 10 formed the menopause control group (Group 2), 10 were administered a daily injection of methylprednisolone until the end of the study (Gro...

  4. Simulations of photochemical smog formation in complex urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muilwijk, C.; Schrijvers, P. J. C.; Wuerz, S.; Kenjereš, S.

    2016-12-01

    In the present study we numerically investigated the dispersion of photochemical reactive pollutants in complex urban areas by applying an integrated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational Reaction Dynamics (CRD) approach. To model chemical reactions involved in smog generation, the Generic Reaction Set (GRS) approach is used. The GRS model was selected since it does not require detailed modeling of a large set of reactive components. Smog formation is modeled first in the case of an intensive traffic emission, subjected to low to moderate wind conditions in an idealized two-dimensional street canyon with a building aspect ratio (height/width) of one. It is found that Reactive Organic Components (ROC) play an important role in the chemistry of smog formation. In contrast to the NOx/O3 photochemical steady state model that predicts a depletion of the (ground level) ozone, the GRS model predicts generation of ozone. Secondly, the effect of direct sunlight and shadow within the street canyon on the chemical reaction dynamics is investigated for three characteristic solar angles (morning, midday and afternoon). Large differences of up to one order of magnitude are found in the ozone production for different solar angles. As a proof of concept for real urban areas, the integrated CFD/CRD approach is applied for a real scale (1 × 1 km2) complex urban area (a district of the city of Rotterdam, The Netherlands) with high traffic emissions. The predicted pollutant concentration levels give realistic values that correspond to moderate to heavy smog. It is concluded that the integrated CFD/CRD method with the GRS model of chemical reactions is both accurate and numerically robust, and can be used for modeling of smog formation in complex urban areas.

  5. Modelling cloud effects on ozone on a regional scale : A case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthijsen, J.; Builtjes, P.J.H.; Meijer, E.W.; Boersen, G.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of clouds on ozone on a regional scale (Europe) with a regional scale photochemical dispersion model (LOTOS). The LOTOS-model calculates ozone and other photo-oxidant concentrations in the lowest three km of the troposphere, using actual meteorologic data and

  6. Modeling the radical chemistry in an oxidation flow reactor: radical formation and recycling, sensitivities, and the OH exposure estimation equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Palm, Brett B; Ortega, Amber M; Hlywiak, James; Hu, Weiwei; Peng, Zhe; Day, Douglas A; Knote, Christoph; Brune, William H; de Gouw, Joost A; Jimenez, Jose L

    2015-05-14

    Oxidation flow reactors (OFRs) containing low-pressure mercury (Hg) lamps that emit UV light at both 185 and 254 nm ("OFR185") to generate OH radicals and O3 are used in many areas of atmospheric science and in pollution control devices. The widely used potential aerosol mass (PAM) OFR was designed for studies on the formation and oxidation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), allowing for a wide range of oxidant exposures and short experiment duration with reduced wall loss effects. Although fundamental photochemical and kinetic data applicable to these reactors are available, the radical chemistry and its sensitivities have not been modeled in detail before; thus, experimental verification of our understanding of this chemistry has been very limited. To better understand the chemistry in the OFR185, a model has been developed to simulate the formation, recycling, and destruction of radicals and to allow the quantification of OH exposure (OHexp) in the reactor and its sensitivities. The model outputs of OHexp were evaluated against laboratory calibration experiments by estimating OHexp from trace gas removal and were shown to agree within a factor of 2. A sensitivity study was performed to characterize the dependence of the OHexp, HO2/OH ratio, and O3 and H2O2 output concentrations on reactor parameters. OHexp is strongly affected by the UV photon flux, absolute humidity, reactor residence time, and the OH reactivity (OHR) of the sampled air, and more weakly by pressure and temperature. OHexp can be strongly suppressed by high OHR, especially under low UV light conditions. A OHexp estimation equation as a function of easily measurable quantities was shown to reproduce model results within 10% (average absolute value of the relative errors) over the whole operating range of the reactor. OHexp from the estimation equation was compared with measurements in several field campaigns and shows agreement within a factor of 3. The improved understanding of the OFR185 and

  7. A model of pyritic oxidation in waste rock dumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, G.B.; Ritchie, A.I.M.

    1983-01-01

    The oxidation of pyrite can lead to high acid levels and high concentrations of trace metals in the water that runs off and percolates through pyritic material. This is the situation at the abandoned uranium mine at Rum Jungle in the Northern Territory of Australia, where pyritic oxidation in the waste rock dumps resulting from open cut mining of the uranium orebody has led to pollution of the nearby East Branch of the Finniss River, with trace metals such as copper, manganese and zinc. Mathematical equations are formulated which describe a model of pyritic oxidation within a waste rock dump, where it is assumed that oxygen transport is the rate limiting step in the oxidation process and that oxygen is transported by gaseous diffusion through the pore space of the dump, followed by diffusion into oxidation sites within the particles that comprise the dump. The equations have been solved numerically assuming values for such parameters as porosity, sulphur density and oxygen diffusion coefficients which are applicable to the waste rock dumps at Rum Jungle. An approximate solution to the equations is also presented. Calculations of the heat source distribution and the total SO 4 production rate are presented for both single size particles and for a range of particle sizes in the dump. The usefulness of the approximate solution, and of calculations based on single size particles in the dump in assessing the effectiveness of strategies to reduce pollution from such waste rock dumps are discussed

  8. Bioavialability of Dom Photochemically Released from Resuspended Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, G. B., Jr.; Rainey, D. H.; Mead, R. N.; Skrabal, S. A.; Kieber, R. J.; Felix, J. D.; Helms, J. R.

    2016-02-01

    Little is known regarding the bioavailability of dissolved organic matter (DOM) released photochemically from resuspended estuarine sediments. Sediments were collected from two sites along the Cape Fear River estuary, NC, USA, size fractionated in 0.2 µm filtered Gulf Stream seawater and exposed to simulated sunlight for six hours. Light exposed samples resulted in increases of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (34 ± 3 µM), chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) (a300nm, 2.7 m-1), and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) (78.6 quinine sulfate equivalents (QSE)) compared to dark controls. Ultra high resolution mass spectrometric characterization indicated the photoreleased DOM was more oxidized and condensed based upon van Kreevlan analysis. Samples were then filtered and inoculated to a final ratio of 4% with coastal water sample filtered through a100 µm net to remove larger grazing organisms and particles while keeping most of bacterial community intact. All three parameters were monitored during a 30 day-long incubation in the dark to assess biological consumption and alteration. Previously light exposed samples had double (20 vs. 9 µM) the amount of DOC consumed compared to samples not previously exposed to light and twice the loss of CDOM (a300nm, 0.6 vs. 0.3 m-1) compared to samples not previously exposed to light. Previously light exposed samples resulted in a threefold loss of FDOM (9.5 QSE) compared to samples not previously exposed to light (2.8 QSE). Results of this study are important because they demonstrate dissolved organic matter released photochemically from resuspended sediments is more bioavailable than ambient material likely fueling secondary productivity and impacting ecosystem functioning in coastal regions.

  9. Effect of photochemical ageing on the ice nucleation properties of diesel and wood burning particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A measurement campaign (IMBALANCE conducted in 2009 was aimed at characterizing the physical and chemical properties of freshly emitted and photochemically aged combustion particles emitted from a log wood burner and diesel vehicles: a EURO3 Opel Astra with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC but no particle filter and a EURO2 Volkswagen Transporter TDI Syncro without emission aftertreatment. Ice nucleation experiments in the deposition and condensation freezing modes were conducted with the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PINC at three nominal temperatures, −30 °C, −35 °C and −40 °C. Freshly emitted diesel particles showed ice formation only at −40 °C in the deposition mode at 137% relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi and 92% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw, and photochemical ageing did not play a role in modifying their ice nucleation behaviour. Only one diesel experiment where α-pinene was added for the ageing process, showed an ice nucleation enhancement at −35 °C. Wood burning particles also act as ice nuclei (IN at −40 °C in the deposition mode at the same conditions as for diesel particles and photochemical ageing also did not alter the ice formation properties of the wood burning particles. Unlike diesel particles, wood burning particles form ice via condensation freezing at −35 °C whereas no ice nucleation was observed at −30 °C. Photochemical ageing did not affect the ice nucleation ability of the diesel and wood burning particles at the three different temperatures investigated but a broader range of temperatures below −40 °C need to be investigated in order to draw an overall conclusion on the effect of photochemical ageing on deposition/condensation ice nucleation across the entire temperature range relevant to cold clouds.

  10. Laboratory Experiments and Modeling for Interpreting Field Studies of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation Using an Oxidation Flow Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Jose-Luis [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This grant was originally funded for deployment of a suite of aerosol instrumentation by our group in collaboration with other research groups and DOE/ARM to the Ganges Valley in India (GVAX) to study aerosols sources and processing. Much of the first year of this grant was focused on preparations for GVAX. That campaign was cancelled due to political reasons and with the consultation with our program manager, the research of this grant was refocused to study the applications of oxidation flow reactors (OFRs) for investigating secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and organic aerosol (OA) processing in the field and laboratory through a series of laboratory and modeling studies. We developed a gas-phase photochemical model of an OFR which was used to 1) explore the sensitivities of key output variables (e.g., OH exposure, O3, HO2/OH) to controlling factors (e.g., water vapor, external reactivity, UV irradiation), 2) develop simplified OH exposure estimation equations, 3) investigate under what conditions non-OH chemistry may be important, and 4) help guide design of future experiments to avoid conditions with undesired chemistry for a wide range of conditions applicable to the ambient, laboratory, and source studies. Uncertainties in the model were quantified and modeled OH exposure was compared to tracer decay measurements of OH exposure in the lab and field. Laboratory studies using OFRs were conducted to explore aerosol yields and composition from anthropogenic and biogenic VOC as well as crude oil evaporates. Various aspects of the modeling and laboratory results and tools were applied to interpretation of ambient and source measurements using OFR. Additionally, novel measurement methods were used to study gas/particle partitioning. The research conducted was highly successful and details of the key results are summarized in this report through narrative text, figures, and a complete list of publications acknowledging this grant.

  11. A microkinetic model of the methanol oxidation over silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, A.; Lynggaard, H.; Stegelmann, C.

    2003-01-01

    A simple microkinetic model for the oxidation of methanol on silver based on surface science studies at UHV and low temperatures has been formulated. The reaction mechanism is a simple Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism, with one type of active oxygen and one route to formaldehyde and carbon dioxide......, respectively. The model explains observed reaction orders, selectivity, apparent activation enthalpies and the choice of industrial reaction conditions. More interesting the model disproves the notion that the mechanism deduced from surface science in UHV cannot be responsible for formaldehyde synthesis...

  12. Impedance Modeling of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jakob Egeberg; Søgaard, Martin; Jacobsen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    A 1-dimensional impedance model for a solid oxide fuel cell cathode is formulated and applied to a cathode consisting of 50/50 wt% strontium doped lanthanum cobaltite and gadolinia doped ceria. A total of 42 impedance spectra were recorded in the temperature range: 555-852°C and in the oxygen...... partial pressure range 0.028-1.00 atm. The recorded impedance spectra were successfully analyzed using the developed impedance model in the investigated temperature and oxygen partial pressure range. It is also demonstrated that the model can be used to predict how impedance spectra evolve with different...

  13. Thermo-cleavable polymers: Materials with enhanced photochemical stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manceau, Matthieu; Petersen, Martin Helgesen; Krebs, Frederik C

    2010-01-01

    Photochemical stability of three thermo-cleavable polymers was investigated as thin films under atmospheric conditions. A significant increase in lifetime was observed once the side-chain was cleaved emphasizing the detrimental effect of solubilizing groups on the photochemical stability of conju......Photochemical stability of three thermo-cleavable polymers was investigated as thin films under atmospheric conditions. A significant increase in lifetime was observed once the side-chain was cleaved emphasizing the detrimental effect of solubilizing groups on the photochemical stability...... of conjugated polymers. In addition to their ease of processing, thermo-cleavable polymers thus also offer a greater intrinsic stability under illumination....

  14. Participation of the Halogens in Photochemical Reactions in Natural and Treated Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Halide ions are ubiquitous in natural waters and wastewaters. Halogens play an important and complex role in environmental photochemical processes and in reactions taking place during photochemical water treatment. While inert to solar wavelengths, halides can be converted into radical and non-radical reactive halogen species (RHS by sensitized photolysis and by reactions with secondary reactive oxygen species (ROS produced through sunlight-initiated reactions in water and atmospheric aerosols, such as hydroxyl radical, ozone, and nitrate radical. In photochemical advanced oxidation processes for water treatment, RHS can be generated by UV photolysis and by reactions of halides with hydroxyl radicals, sulfate radicals, ozone, and other ROS. RHS are reactive toward organic compounds, and some reactions lead to incorporation of halogen into byproducts. Recent studies indicate that halides, or the RHS derived from them, affect the concentrations of photogenerated reactive oxygen species (ROS and other reactive species; influence the photobleaching of dissolved natural organic matter (DOM; alter the rates and products of pollutant transformations; lead to covalent incorporation of halogen into small natural molecules, DOM, and pollutants; and give rise to certain halogen oxides of concern as water contaminants. The complex and colorful chemistry of halogen in waters will be summarized in detail and the implications of this chemistry for global biogeochemical cycling of halogen, contaminant fate in natural waters, and water purification technologies will be discussed.

  15. Photochemical reaction between triclosan and nitrous acid in the atmospheric aqueous environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianzhong; Zhu, Chengzhu; Lu, Jun; Lei, Yu; Wang, Jizhong; Chen, Tianhu

    2017-05-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important tropospheric pollutant and a major source of hydroxyl radical in the atmospheric gas phase. However, studies on the role of HONO in atmospheric aqueous phase chemistry processes are relatively few. The present work investigated the photochemical reaction of HONO with triclosan (TCS), which is an emerging contaminant, using a combination of laser flash photolysis spectrometry and gas chromatography mass spectrometry. With these techniques, the reaction pathway of HONO with TCS was proposed by directly monitoring the transient species and detecting the stable products. ·OH was generated from the photodissociation of the HONO aqueous solution and attacked TCS molecules on different sites to produce the TCS-OH adducts with a second-order rate constant of 1.11 × 109 L mol-1 s-1. The ·OH added a C atom adjacent to the ether bond in the aromatic ring of TCS and self-decayed when the ether bond broke. The intermediates generated from the addition of ·OH to the benzene ring of the TCS molecular structure were immediately nitrated by HONO, which played a key role in the formation process of nitrocompounds. An atmospheric model suggests that the aqueous oxidation of TCS by ·OH is a major reaction at high liquid water concentrations, and the photolysis of TCS dominates under low-humidity conditions.

  16. Methane on Mars: Thermodynamic Equilibrium and Photochemical Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, J. S.; Summers, M. E.; Ewell, M.

    2010-01-01

    The detection of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere of Mars by Mars Express and Earth-based spectroscopy is very surprising, very puzzling, and very intriguing. On Earth, about 90% of atmospheric ozone is produced by living systems. A major question concerning methane on Mars is its origin - biological or geological. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations indicated that methane cannot be produced by atmospheric chemical/photochemical reactions. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for three gases, methane, ammonia (NH3) and nitrous oxide (N2O) in the Earth s atmosphere are summarized in Table 1. The calculations indicate that these three gases should not exist in the Earth s atmosphere. Yet they do, with methane, ammonia and nitrous oxide enhanced 139, 50 and 12 orders of magnitude above their calculated thermodynamic equilibrium concentration due to the impact of life! Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations have been performed for the same three gases in the atmosphere of Mars based on the assumed composition of the Mars atmosphere shown in Table 2. The calculated thermodynamic equilibrium concentrations of the same three gases in the atmosphere of Mars is shown in Table 3. Clearly, based on thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, methane should not be present in the atmosphere of Mars, but it is in concentrations approaching 30 ppbv from three distinct regions on Mars.

  17. Photochemical reactions of aqueous plutonium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, H.A.; Toth, L.M.; Bell, J.T.

    1977-01-01

    The photochemical shift of the Pu 4+ disproportionation equilibrium in aqueous perchloric acid solutions has been measured and shown to be reversible. Ratios of equilibrium quotients between light and dark conditions have been measured for 0.01 M Pu ion concentrations in 0.53 to 1.24 N acid solutions exposed to 0.5 Watt of UV light. The photodecomposition of time- and temperature-aged Pu(IV) polymers in perchloric and nitric acid solutions have been examined as a function of aging conditions. Effects similar to those seen previously for fresh polymers have been observed in the aged perchloric acid solutions. (author)

  18. Photochemical synthesis of biomolecules under anoxic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folsome, C.; Brittain, A.; Zelko, M.

    1983-01-01

    The long-wavelength UV anoxic photosynthesis of uracil, various sugars (including deoxyribose and glycoaldehyde), amino acids, and other organic photoproducts is reported. The reactions were conducted in a mixture of water, calcium carbonate, hydrazine, and formaldehyde which were subjected to 24 hr or 72 hr radiation. Product yields were greatest when the hydrazine/formaldehyde ratio was one, and when the reactant concentrations were low. These data suggest that organic products can be formed in variety from those amounts of formaldehyde and hydazine precursors which are themselves formed under anoxic UV photochemical conditions.

  19. Methanol Oxidation on Model Elemental and Bimetallic Transition Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tritsaris, G. A.; Rossmeisl, J.

    2012-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells are a key enabling technology for clean energy conversion. Using density functional theory calculations, we study the methanol oxidation reaction on model electrodes. We discuss trends in reactivity for a set of monometallic and bimetallic transition metal surfaces, flat...... sites on the surface and to screen for novel bimetallic surfaces of enhanced activity. We suggest platinum copper surfaces as promising anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells....

  20. Quantification of oxide particle composition in model oxide dispersion strengthened steel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, A.J., E-mail: andrew.london@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Lozano-Perez, S.; Moody, M.P. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Amirthapandian, S.; Panigrahi, B.K.; Sundar, C.S. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, TN (India); Grovenor, C.R.M. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels (ODS) are being considered for structural components of future designs of fission and fusion reactors because of their impressive high-temperature mechanical properties and resistance to radiation damage, both of which arise from the nanoscale oxide particles they contain. Because of the critical importance of these nanoscale phases, significant research activity has been dedicated to analysing their precise size, shape and composition (Odette et al., Annu. Rev. Mater. Res. 38 (2008) 471–503 [1]; Miller et al., Mater. Sci. Technol. 29(10) (2013) 1174–1178 [2]). As part of a project to develop new fuel cladding alloys in India, model ODS alloys have been produced with the compositions, Fe–0.3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe–0.2Ti–0.3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe–14Cr–0.2Ti–0.3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The oxide particles in these three model alloys have been studied by APT in their as-received state and following ion irradiation (as a proxy for neutron irradiation) at various temperatures. In order to adequately quantify the composition of the oxide clusters, several difficulties must be managed, including issues relating to the chemical identification (ranging and variable peak-overlaps); trajectory aberrations and chemical structure; and particle sizing. This paper presents how these issues can be addressed by the application of bespoke data analysis tools and correlative microscopy. A discussion follows concerning the achievable precision in these measurements, with reference to the fundamental limiting factors.

  1. Quantification of oxide particle composition in model oxide dispersion strengthened steel alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, A J; Lozano-Perez, S; Moody, M P; Amirthapandian, S; Panigrahi, B K; Sundar, C S; Grovenor, C R M

    2015-12-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels (ODS) are being considered for structural components of future designs of fission and fusion reactors because of their impressive high-temperature mechanical properties and resistance to radiation damage, both of which arise from the nanoscale oxide particles they contain. Because of the critical importance of these nanoscale phases, significant research activity has been dedicated to analysing their precise size, shape and composition (Odette et al., Annu. Rev. Mater. Res. 38 (2008) 471-503 [1]; Miller et al., Mater. Sci. Technol. 29(10) (2013) 1174-1178 [2]). As part of a project to develop new fuel cladding alloys in India, model ODS alloys have been produced with the compositions, Fe-0.3Y2O3, Fe-0.2Ti-0.3Y2O3 and Fe-14Cr-0.2Ti-0.3Y2O3. The oxide particles in these three model alloys have been studied by APT in their as-received state and following ion irradiation (as a proxy for neutron irradiation) at various temperatures. In order to adequately quantify the composition of the oxide clusters, several difficulties must be managed, including issues relating to the chemical identification (ranging and variable peak-overlaps); trajectory aberrations and chemical structure; and particle sizing. This paper presents how these issues can be addressed by the application of bespoke data analysis tools and correlative microscopy. A discussion follows concerning the achievable precision in these measurements, with reference to the fundamental limiting factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Interaction of light and atmospheric photochemical products (smog) within plants. [Phaseolius vulgaris; Petunia hydrida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, O C; Dugger, W M; Cardiff, E A; Darley, E F

    1961-12-02

    Damage to plants from ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate, two photochemically formed components of smog, has been described. However, variations in symptom expression and the degree of damage caused by a given concentration of these components, whether of synthetic or natural origin, have complicated development of an adequate biological assay method for these materials. These observed variations in symptomatology have implicated stomatal action, inorganic nutrition temperature, genetics, ascorbic acid content, physiological age of tissue and photoperiod. Plants grown under artificial illumination differ in their response to the photochemically formed pollutants as compared with plants grown in the greenhouse. Interactions between light and oxidants from the polluted atmosphere within plants, as reported here, might well explain some of the variabilities in symptomatology observed in earlier controlled experiments as well as the unexplained natural variability observed in the Los Angeles area. The results presented also emphasize the importance of standardizing plant growth conditions for future work of this nature. 10 references.

  3. Evaluating four mathematical models for nitrous oxide production by autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Yuan, Zhiguo; Chandran, Kartik; Vanrolleghem, Peter A; Murthy, Sudhir

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence showing that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are major contributors to N(2)O emissions from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Although the fundamental metabolic pathways for N(2)O production by AOB are now coming to light, the mechanisms responsible for N(2)O production by AOB in WWTP are not fully understood. Mathematical modeling provides a means for testing hypotheses related to mechanisms and triggers for N(2)O emissions in WWTP, and can then also become a tool to support the development of mitigation strategies. This study examined the ability of four mathematical model structures to describe two distinct mechanisms of N(2)O production by AOB. The production mechanisms evaluated are (1) N(2)O as the final product of nitrifier denitrification with NO(2)- as the terminal electron acceptor and (2) N(2)O as a byproduct of incomplete oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH(2)OH) to NO(2)-. The four models were compared based on their ability to predict N(2)O dynamics observed in three mixed culture studies. Short-term batch experimental data were employed to examine model assumptions related to the effects of (1) NH4+ concentration variations, (2) dissolved oxygen (DO) variations, (3) NO(2)- accumulations and (4) NH(2OH as an externally provided substrate. The modeling results demonstrate that all these models can generally describe the NH4+, NO(2)-, and NO(3)- data. However, none of these models were able to reproduce all measured N(2)O data. The results suggest that both the denitrification and NH(2)OH pathways may be involved in N(2)O production and could be kinetically linked by a competition for intracellular reducing equivalents. A unified model capturing both mechanisms and their potential interactions needs to be developed with consideration of physiological complexity. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Transgenic Mouse Model for Reducing Oxidative Damage in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Torres, S.; Truong, T.; Moyer, E. L.; Kumar, A.; Tahimic, Candice C. G.; Alwood, J. S.; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss can occur due to many challenges such age, radiation, microgravity, and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) play a critical role in bone resorption by osteoclasts (Bartell et al. 2014). We hypothesize that suppression of excess ROS in skeletal cells, both osteoblasts and osteoclasts, regulates skeletal growth and remodeling. To test our hypothesis, we used transgenic mCAT mice which overexpress the human anti-oxidant catalase gene targeted to the mitochondria, the main site for endogenous ROS production. mCAT mice have a longer life-span than wildtype controls and have been used to study various age-related disorders. To stimulate remodeling, 16 week old mCAT mice or wildtype mice were exposed to treatment (hindlimb-unloading and total body-irradiation) or sham treatment conditions (control). Tissues were harvested 2 weeks later for skeletal analysis (microcomputed tomography), biochemical analysis (gene expression and oxidative damage measurements), and ex vivo bone marrow derived cell culture (osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis). mCAT mice expressed the transgene and displayed elevated catalase activity in skeletal tissue and marrow-derived osteoblasts and osteoclasts grown ex vivo. In addition, when challenged with treatment, bone tissues from wildtype mice showed elevated levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), indicating oxidative damage) whereas mCAT mice did not. Correlation analysis revealed that increased catalase activity significantly correlated with decreased MDA levels and that increased oxidative damage correlated with decreased percent bone volume (BVTV). In addition, ex-vivo cultured osteoblast colony growth correlated with catalase activity in the osteoblasts. Thus, we showed that these transgenic mice can be used as a model to study the relationship between markers of oxidative damage and skeletal properties. mCAT mice displayed reduced BVTV and trabecular number relative to wildtype mice, as well as increased structural model index in the

  5. Advanced impedance modeling of solid oxide electrochemical cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graves, Christopher R.; Hjelm, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Impedance spectroscopy is a powerful technique for detailed study of the electrochemical and transport processes that take place in fuel cells and electrolysis cells, including solid oxide cells (SOCs). Meaningful analysis of impedance measurements is nontrivial, however, because a large number...... techniques to provide good guesses for the modeling parameters, like transforming the impedance data to the distribution of relaxation times (DRT), together with experimental parameter sensitivity studies, is the state-of-the-art approach to achieve good EC model fits. Here we present new impedance modeling...... electrode and 2-D gas transport models which have fewer unknown parameters for the same number of processes, (ii) use of a new model fitting algorithm, “multi-fitting”, in which multiple impedance spectra are fit simultaneously with parameters linked based on the variation of measurement conditions, (iii...

  6. The Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM): Status and Recent Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William; Khan, Maudood; Peterson, Harold

    2011-01-01

    Improvements to the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) are discussed. Recent results from an August 2006 run of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system that employs LNOM lightning NOx (= NO + NO2) estimates are provided. The LNOM analyzes Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) data to estimate the raw (i.e., unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical profile of lightning NOx. The latest LNOM estimates of (a) lightning channel length distributions, (b) lightning 1-m segment altitude distributions, and (c) the vertical profile of NOx are presented. The impact of including LNOM-estimates of lightning NOx on CMAQ output is discussed.

  7. Asymptotically exact solution of a local copper-oxide model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guangming; Yu Lu.

    1994-03-01

    We present an asymptotically exact solution of a local copper-oxide model abstracted from the multi-band models. The phase diagram is obtained through the renormalization-group analysis of the partition function. In the strong coupling regime, we find an exactly solved line, which crosses the quantum critical point of the mixed valence regime separating two different Fermi-liquid (FL) phases. At this critical point, a many-particle resonance is formed near the chemical potential, and a marginal-FL spectrum can be derived for the spin and charge susceptibilities. (author). 15 refs, 1 fig

  8. Photochemical and Spectroscopic Effects Resulting from Excimer Laser Excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan Xiao

    I. Photochemical production of ozone from pure oxygen using excimer lasers. Production of ozone was observed from experiments when oxygen was under a broadband pulsed KrF laser radiation. The production process was found to be autocatalytic. Mechanisms for the ozone formation were proposed. Experimental results over a range of oxygen pressure and laser pulse energy (irradiance) provided evidences in favor of the proposed mechanisms. Experiments were also numerically modeled. Good agreement between the experimental and the numerical results were observed, which provided further evidence to support the proposed mechanisms. Cross sections for some photochemical processes in the mechanisms were estimated. Production of ozone from pure oxygen under a ArF excimer laser radiation (193 nm) was also studied and numerically modeled. Effects of ambient water vapor on ozone production were investigated. Experimental results showed a fast ozone destruction when water vapor was present in the cell. However, numerical results obtained from the well-known OH and HO _2 chain ozone destruction mechanism predicted a slower ozone destruction. Possible reasons for the discrepancy are discussed. II. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of N_2 at 193 and 248 nm detected by N_sp{2}{+} fluorescence. Using a broadband excimer laser operating at 193 and 248 nm multiphoton ionization at high pressures in air and pure nitrogen has been detected by fluorescence from N_sp{2}{+} in the B-X firstnegative system. Measurements of the fluorescence intensity as a function of beam irradiance indicate resonance in N_2 at the energy of two 193 nm photons (2 + 1 REMPI) and three 248 nm photons (3 + 1 REMPI). Possible intermediate states are discussed. III. Excimer laser-induced fluorescence from some organic solvents. Fluorescence was observed from vapor phase benzene, toluene, p-xylene, benzyl chloride, methyl benzoate, acetic anhydride, ether, methanol, ethyl acetone, acetone, and 2-butanone using

  9. The photochemical stability of the Venus atmosphere against UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, F.P.; Slanger, T.G.; Allen, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: One unresolved question regarding the Venus atmosphere is what chemical mechanism(s) stabilize its primary constituent (CO 2 ) against UV radiation. CO 2 photolyzes on the day side into CO and O after absorbing photons at 2 rather than recombining with CO to form CO 2 , and the intense night side O 2 airglow observed quantitatively supports this. CO and O 2 are photochemically stable in an otherwise pure CO 2 atmosphere so significant abundances of CO and O 2 could accumulate on Venus if no catalytic mechanism existed to speed the reformation of CO 2 . However, the observational upper limit on ground state O 2 is equivalent to 2 from CO and O 2 . Recent laboratory work verified the existence of the ClC(O)OO catalytic mechanism that has been used in photochemical models since the early 1980s. However, there are significant uncertainties in the rates for the component steps of this catalytic mechanism. An alternative mechanism for production of CO 2 that has not previously been modeled but which could be competitive with the ClCO(O)O mechanism is the reaction CO + O 2 (c 1 Σ - u ) → CO 2 + O( 1 D) or O( 1 S), Reaction (1). A range of values for Reaction (1) will be examined in model calculations to compare with observational (UV to IR) constraints and to assess under what conditions this mechanism is competitive with the ClC(O)OO catalytic mechanism. The sensitivity of the results to uncertainties in the CO 2 UV absorption cross section also will be examined

  10. Fundamental Studies of Butane Oxidation over Model-Supported Vanadium Oxide Catalysts: Molecular Structure-Reactivity Relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wachs, I.E.; Jehng, J.M.; Deo, G.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Guliants, V.V.; Benziger, J.B.; Sundaresan, S.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride was investigated over a series of model-supported vanadia catalysts where the vanadia phase was present as a two-dimensional metal oxide overlayer on the different oxide supports (TiO2, ZrO2, CeO2, Nb2O5, Al2O3, and SiO2). No correlation was found

  11. Oxidative stress of crystalline lens in rat menopausal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acer, Semra; Pekel, Gökhan; Küçükatay, Vural; Karabulut, Aysun; Yağcı, Ramazan; Çetin, Ebru Nevin; Akyer, Şahika Pınar; Şahin, Barbaros

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate lenticular oxidative stress in rat menopausal models. Forty Wistar female albino rats were included in this study. A total of thirty rats underwent oophorectomy to generate a menopausal model. Ten rats that did not undergo oophorectomy formed the control group (Group 1). From the rats that underwent oophorectomy, 10 formed the menopause control group (Group 2), 10 were administered a daily injection of methylprednisolone until the end of the study (Group 3), and the remaining 10 rats were administered intraperitoneal streptozocin to induce diabetes mellitus (Group 4). Total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and oxidative stress index (OSI) measurements of the crystalline lenses were analyzed. The mean OSI was the lowest in group 1 and highest in group 4. Nevertheless, the difference between the groups was not statistically significant in terms of OSI (p >0.05). The mean TOS values were similar between the groups (p >0.05), whereas the mean TAC of group 1 was significantly higher than that of the other groups (p <0.001). Our results indicate that menopause may not promote cataract formation.

  12. Oxidative stress of crystalline lens in rat menopausal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Acer

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate lenticular oxidative stress in rat menopausal models. Methods: Forty Wistar female albino rats were included in this study. A total of thirty rats underwent oophorectomy to generate a menopausal model. Ten rats that did not undergo oophorectomy formed the control group (Group 1. From the rats that underwent oophorectomy, 10 formed the menopause control group (Group 2, 10 were administered a daily injection of methylprednisolone until the end of the study (Group 3, and the remaining 10 rats were administered intraperitoneal streptozocin to induce diabetes mellitus (Group 4. Total oxidant status (TOS, total antioxidant capacity (TAC, and oxidative stress index (OSI measurements of the crystalline lenses were analyzed. Results: The mean OSI was the lowest in group 1 and highest in group 4. Nevertheless, the difference between the groups was not statistically significant in terms of OSI (p >0.05. The mean TOS values were similar between the groups (p >0.05, whereas the mean TAC of group 1 was significantly higher than that of the other groups (p <0.001. Conclusions: Our results indicate that menopause may not promote cataract formation.

  13. Discrete Event System Based Pyroprocessing Modeling and Simulation: Oxide Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. J.; Ko, W. I.; Choi, S. Y.; Kim, S. K.; Hur, J. M.; Choi, E. Y.; Im, H. S.; Park, K. I.; Kim, I. T.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic changes according to the batch operation cannot be predicted in an equilibrium material flow. This study began to build a dynamic material balance model based on the previously developed pyroprocessing flowsheet. As a mid- and long-term research, an integrated pyroprocessing simulator is being developed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) to cope with a review on the technical feasibility, safeguards assessment, conceptual design of facility, and economic feasibility evaluation. The most fundamental thing in such a simulator development is to establish the dynamic material flow framework. This study focused on the operation modeling of pyroprocessing to implement a dynamic material flow. As a case study, oxide reduction was investigated in terms of a dynamic material flow. DES based modeling was applied to build a pyroprocessing operation model. A dynamic material flow as the basic framework for an integrated pyroprocessing was successfully implemented through ExtendSim's internal database and item blocks. Complex operation logic behavior was verified, for example, an oxide reduction process in terms of dynamic material flow. Compared to the equilibrium material flow, a model-based dynamic material flow provides such detailed information that a careful analysis of every batch is necessary to confirm the dynamic material balance results. With the default scenario of oxide reduction, the batch mass balance was verified in comparison with a one-year equilibrium mass balance. This study is still under progress with a mid-and long-term goal, the development of a multi-purpose pyroprocessing simulator that is able to cope with safeguards assessment, economic feasibility, technical evaluation, conceptual design, and support of licensing for a future pyroprocessing facility

  14. A Structural Molar Volume Model for Oxide Melts Part III: Fe Oxide-Containing Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Eric; Gheribi, Aimen E.; Jung, In-Ho

    2016-04-01

    As part III of this series, the model is extended to iron oxide-containing melts. All available experimental data in the FeO-Fe2O3-Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-MnO-Al2O3-SiO2 system were critically evaluated based on the experimental condition. The variations of FeO and Fe2O3 in the melts were taken into account by using FactSage to calculate the Fe2+/Fe3+ distribution. The molar volume model with unary and binary model parameters can be used to predict the molar volume of the molten oxide of the Li2O-Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-MnO-PbO-FeO-Fe2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 system in the entire range of compositions, temperatures, and oxygen partial pressures from Fe saturation to 1 atm pressure.

  15. Trends in photochemical smog in the Cape Peninsula and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There has been growing public concern over reports of increasing air pollution in the Cape Peninsula. Attention has been focused on the 'brown haze' and on photochemical smog. Because of deficiencies in the monitoring equipment, information on trends in photochemical smog levels over the past decade is limited.

  16. WATER DEFICIT ENSURES THE PHOTOCHEMICAL EFFICIENCY OF Copaifera langsdorffii Desf1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Lino Rodrigues

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The intensity and frequency of drought periods has increased according to climate change predictions. The fast overcome and recovery are important adaptive features for plant species found in regions presenting water shortage periods. Copaifera langsdorffii is a neotropical species that has developed leaves presenting physiological mechanisms and morphological adaptations that allow its survival under seasonal water stress. We aimed in this work to observe substantial physiological responses for water saving and damage representative to the photochemical reaction after exposed plants to water stress and to subsequent recovery. We found in plants mechanisms to control water loss through the lower stomatal conductance, even after rehydration. It goes against the rapid recovery of leaves, indicated by the relative water content values restored to previously unstressed plants. Stomatal conductance was the only variable presenting high plasticity index. In photochemical activity, the species presented higher photochemical quenching, electron transport rate and effective quantum yield of photosystem II when they were subjected to rehydration after water stress period. Our results suggest that C. langsdorffii presented rapid rehydration and higher photochemical efficiency even after water restriction. These data demonstrate that this species can be used as a model for physiological studies due to the adjustment developed in response to different environmental schemes.

  17. Photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid mediated by iron in strongly acidic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Masaki, E-mail: mohno@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8513 (Japan); Ito, Masataka; Ohkura, Ryouichi [Faculty of Applied Life Sciences, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, 265-1, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Mino A, Esteban R. [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8513 (Japan); Kose, Tomohiro [Faculty of Applied Life Sciences, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, 265-1, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Okuda, Tetsuji [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8513 (Japan); Nakai, Satoshi [Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Kawata, Kuniaki [Faculty of Applied Life Sciences, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, 265-1, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Nishijima, Wataru [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8513 (Japan)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was decomposed based on ferric ion performance. • Complete decomposition of PFOA was confirmed in strongly acidic conditions. • Fe{sup 2+} changed to Fe{sup 3+} to restore chemical equilibrium in this condition. • Fe{sup 3+} was only produced from Fe{sup 2+} by hydroxyl radical in weakly acidic conditions. • The Fe{sup 3+} regeneration mechanisms resulted in the performance of Fe{sup 3+} for PFOA. - Abstract: The performance of a ferric ion mediated photochemical process for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) decomposition in strongly acidic conditions of pH 2.0 was evaluated in comparison with those in weakly acidic conditions, pH 3.7 or pH 5.0, based on iron species composition and ferric ion regeneration. Complete decomposition of PFOA under UV irradiation was confirmed at pH 2.0, whereas perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA) and other intermediates were accumulated in weakly acidic conditions. Iron states at each pH were evaluated using a chemical equilibrium model, Visual MINTEQ. The main iron species at pH 2.0 is Fe{sup 3+} ion. Although Fe{sup 3+} ion is consumed and is transformed to Fe{sup 2+} ion by photochemical decomposition of PFOA and its intermediates, the produced Fe{sup 2+} ion will change to Fe{sup 3+} ion to restore chemical equilibrium. Continuous decomposition will occur at pH 2.0. However, half of the iron cannot be dissolved at pH 3.7. The main species of dissolved iron is Fe(OH){sup 2+}. At pH 3.7 or higher pH, Fe{sup 3+} ion will only be produced from the oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} ion by hydroxyl radical produced by Fe(OH){sup 2+} under UV irradiation. These different mechanisms of Fe{sup 3+} regeneration that prevail in strongly and weakly acidic conditions will engender different performances of the ferric ion.

  18. LG Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberman, Ben [LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc., North Canton, OH (United States); Martinez-Baca, Carlos [LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc., North Canton, OH (United States); Rush, Greg [LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc., North Canton, OH (United States)

    2013-05-31

    This report presents a summary of the work performed by LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc. during the project LG Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Model Development (DOE Award Number: DE-FE0000773) which commenced on October 1, 2009 and was completed on March 31, 2013. The aim of this project is for LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc. (formerly known as Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc.) (LGFCS) to develop a multi-physics solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) computer code (MPC) for performance calculations of the LGFCS fuel cell structure to support fuel cell product design and development. A summary of the initial stages of the project is provided which describes the MPC requirements that were developed and the selection of a candidate code, STAR-CCM+ (CD-adapco). This is followed by a detailed description of the subsequent work program including code enhancement and model verification and validation activities. Details of the code enhancements that were implemented to facilitate MPC SOFC simulations are provided along with a description of the models that were built using the MPC and validated against experimental data. The modeling work described in this report represents a level of calculation detail that has not been previously available within LGFCS.

  19. 40 CFR 52.777 - Control strategy: photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... plastics, automotive plastics, and synthetic organic chemical manufacturing industries (SOCMI) batch... Quality Standard for ozone. The redesignation request and maintenance plan meet the redesignation... wastewater processes, offset lithography operations, business plastics, automotive plastics, and synthetic...

  20. Magnetism-tuning strategies for graphene oxide based on magnetic oligoacene oxide patches model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yanjie; Yen, Chia-Liang; Yan, Linyin; Kono, Hirohiko; Lin, Sheng-Hsien; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2018-01-31

    Graphene oxide (GO) has wide application potential owing to its 2D structure and diverse modification sites for various targeted uses. The introduction of magnetism into GO structures has further advanced the controllability of the application of GO materials. Herein, the concept of modular design and modeling was applied to tune the magnetism of GO. To obtain desirable magnetic properties, diradical-structured GO patches were formed by the introduction of two functional groups to break the Kekule structure of the benzene ring. In these diradical GO patches, the energy of the triplet state was lower than those of the open-shell broken-symmetry singlet state and closed-shell singlet state. To create such multi-radical patches, a practical approach is to determine a substantial spatial separation of the α and β spin densities in the molecule. Thus, systematic design strategies and tests were evaluated. The first strategy was extending the distance between the distribution center of the α and β spin densities; the second was controlling the delocalization directions of the α and β electrons; the third was controlling the delocalization extension of the α and β electrons by oxidative modification, and finally introducing multi-radical structures into the molecular system and controlling the position of each radical. Herein, successful molecular models with a large magnetic coupling constant (∼3600 cm -1 ) were obtained. This study paves the way to explore ferromagnetic MGO guided by theoretical study, which may become reality soon.

  1. The chemical energy unit partial oxidation reactor operation simulation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrakin, A. N.; Selivanov, A. A.; Batrakov, P. A.; Sotnikov, D. G.

    2018-01-01

    The chemical energy unit scheme for synthesis gas, electric and heat energy production which is possible to be used both for the chemical industry on-site facilities and under field conditions is represented in the paper. The partial oxidation reactor gasification process mathematical model is described and reaction products composition and temperature determining algorithm flow diagram is shown. The developed software product verification showed good convergence of the experimental values and calculations according to the other programmes: the temperature determining relative discrepancy amounted from 4 to 5 %, while the absolute composition discrepancy ranged from 1 to 3%. The synthesis gas composition was found out practically not to depend on the supplied into the partial oxidation reactor (POR) water vapour enthalpy and compressor air pressure increase ratio. Moreover, air consumption coefficient α increase from 0.7 to 0.9 was found out to decrease synthesis gas target components (carbon and hydrogen oxides) specific yield by nearly 2 times and synthesis gas target components required ratio was revealed to be seen in the water vapour specific consumption area (from 5 to 6 kg/kg of fuel).

  2. Modelling of the partial oxidation of {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated aldehydes on Mo-V-oxides based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehnke, H.; Petzoldt, J.C.; Stein, B.; Weimer, C.; Gaube, J.W. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Chemische Technologie

    1998-12-31

    A kinetic model based on the Mars-van Krevelen mechanism that allows to describe the microkinetics of the heterogeneously catalysed partial oxidation of {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated aldehydes is presented. This conversion is represented by a network, composed of the oxidation of the {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated aldehyde towards the {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated carboxylic acid and the consecutive oxidation of the acid as well as the parallel reaction of the aldehyde to products of deeper oxidation. The reaction steps of aldehyde respectively acid oxidation and catalyst reoxidation have been investigated separately in transient experiments. The combination of steady state and transient experiments has led to an improved understanding of the interaction of the catalyst with the aldehyde and the carboxylic acids as well as to a support of the kinetic model assumptions. (orig.)

  3. Application of the GRI 1.2 Methane Oxidation Model to Methane and Methanol Oxidation in Supercritical Water

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rice, Steven

    1997-01-01

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) has been leading an effort over the past few years to consolidate recent developments in the elementary reaction modeling of the oxidation of methane for combustion applications into a single...

  4. Photochemical alteration of organic carbon draining permafrost soils shifts microbial metabolic pathways and stimulates respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Collin P; Nalven, Sarah G; Crump, Byron C; Kling, George W; Cory, Rose M

    2017-10-03

    In sunlit waters, photochemical alteration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) impacts the microbial respiration of DOC to CO 2 . This coupled photochemical and biological degradation of DOC is especially critical for carbon budgets in the Arctic, where thawing permafrost soils increase opportunities for DOC oxidation to CO 2 in surface waters, thereby reinforcing global warming. Here we show how and why sunlight exposure impacts microbial respiration of DOC draining permafrost soils. Sunlight significantly increases or decreases microbial respiration of DOC depending on whether photo-alteration produces or removes molecules that native microbial communities used prior to light exposure. Using high-resolution chemical and microbial approaches, we show that rates of DOC processing by microbes are likely governed by a combination of the abundance and lability of DOC exported from land to water and produced by photochemical processes, and the capacity and timescale that microbial communities have to adapt to metabolize photo-altered DOC.The role of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) photo-alteration in the microbial respiration of DOC to CO 2 is unclear. Here, the authors show that the impact of this mechanism depends on whether photo-alteration of DOC produces or removes molecules used by native microbial communities prior to light exposure.

  5. Photochemical chlorine and bromine activation from artificial saline snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Wren

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The activation of reactive halogen species – particularly Cl2 – from sea ice and snow surfaces is not well understood. In this study, we used a photochemical snow reactor coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer to investigate the production of Br2, BrCl and Cl2 from NaCl/NaBr-doped artificial snow samples. At temperatures above the NaCl-water eutectic, illumination of samples (λ > 310 nm in the presence of gas phase O3 led to the accelerated release of Br2, BrCl and the release of Cl2 in a process that was significantly enhanced by acidity, high surface area and additional gas phase Br2. Cl2 production was only observed when both light and ozone were present. The total halogen release depended on [ozone] and pre-freezing [NaCl]. Our observations support a "halogen explosion" mechanism occurring within the snowpack, which is initiated by heterogeneous oxidation and propagated by Br2 or BrCl photolysis and by recycling of HOBr and HOCl into the snowpack. Our study implicates this important role of active chemistry occurring within the interstitial air of aged (i.e. acidic snow for halogen activation at polar sunrise.

  6. Path-integral method for the source apportionment of photochemical pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunker, A. M.

    2015-06-01

    A new, path-integral method is presented for apportioning the concentrations of pollutants predicted by a photochemical model to emissions from different sources. A novel feature of the method is that it can apportion the difference in a species concentration between two simulations. For example, the anthropogenic ozone increment, which is the difference between a simulation with all emissions present and another simulation with only the background (e.g., biogenic) emissions included, can be allocated to the anthropogenic emission sources. The method is based on an existing, exact mathematical equation. This equation is applied to relate the concentration difference between simulations to line or path integrals of first-order sensitivity coefficients. The sensitivities describe the effects of changing the emissions and are accurately calculated by the decoupled direct method. The path represents a continuous variation of emissions between the two simulations, and each path can be viewed as a separate emission-control strategy. The method does not require auxiliary assumptions, e.g., whether ozone formation is limited by the availability of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) or nitrogen oxides (NOx), and can be used for all the species predicted by the model. A simplified configuration of the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions (CAMx) is used to evaluate the accuracy of different numerical integration procedures and the dependence of the source contributions on the path. A Gauss-Legendre formula using three or four points along the path gives good accuracy for apportioning the anthropogenic increments of ozone, nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde, and nitric acid. Source contributions to these increments were obtained for paths representing proportional control of all anthropogenic emissions together, control of NOx emissions before VOC emissions, and control of VOC emissions before NOx emissions. There are similarities in the source contributions from the

  7. NMR relaxation induced by iron oxide particles: testing theoretical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossuin, Y; Orlando, T; Basini, M; Henrard, D; Lascialfari, A; Mattea, C; Stapf, S; Vuong, Q L

    2016-04-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles find their main application as contrast agents for cellular and molecular magnetic resonance imaging. The contrast they bring is due to the shortening of the transverse relaxation time T 2 of water protons. In order to understand their influence on proton relaxation, different theoretical relaxation models have been developed, each of them presenting a certain validity domain, which depends on the particle characteristics and proton dynamics. The validation of these models is crucial since they allow for predicting the ideal particle characteristics for obtaining the best contrast but also because the fitting of T 1 experimental data by the theory constitutes an interesting tool for the characterization of the nanoparticles. In this work, T 2 of suspensions of iron oxide particles in different solvents and at different temperatures, corresponding to different proton diffusion properties, were measured and were compared to the three main theoretical models (the motional averaging regime, the static dephasing regime, and the partial refocusing model) with good qualitative agreement. However, a real quantitative agreement was not observed, probably because of the complexity of these nanoparticulate systems. The Roch theory, developed in the motional averaging regime (MAR), was also successfully used to fit T 1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles, even outside the MAR validity range, and provided a good estimate of the particle size. On the other hand, the simultaneous fitting of T 1 and T 2 NMRD profiles by the theory was impossible, and this occurrence constitutes a clear limitation of the Roch model. Finally, the theory was shown to satisfactorily fit the deuterium T 1 NMRD profile of superparamagnetic particle suspensions in heavy water.

  8. Dynamic global model of oxide Czochralski process with weighing control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, V. M.; Vasiliev, M. G.; Yuferev, V. S.

    2011-03-01

    A dynamic model of oxide Czochralski growth with weighing control has been developed for the first time. A time-dependent approach is used for the calculation of temperature fields in different parts of a crystallization set-up and convection patterns in a melt, while internal radiation in crystal is considered in a quasi-steady approximation. A special algorithm is developed for the calculation of displacement of a triple point and simulation of a crystal surface formation. To calculate variations in the heat generation, a model of weighing control with a commonly used PID regulator is applied. As an example, simulation of the growth process of gallium-gadolinium garnet (GGG) crystals starting from the stage of seeding is performed.

  9. Thermal radiation modelling in a tubular solid oxide fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, M.E.; Pharoah, J.G.; Vandersteen, J.D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) are becoming the fuel cell of choice among companies and research groups interested in small power generation units. Questions still exist, however, about the operating characteristics of these devices; in particular the temperature distribution in the fuel cell. Using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) a model is proposed that incorporates conduction, convection and radiation. Both surface-to-surface and participating media are considered. It is hoped that a more accurate account of the temperature field in the various flow channels and cell components will be made to assist work on design of fuel cell components and reaction mechanisms. The model, when incorporating radiative heat transfer with participating media, predicts substantially lower operating temperatures and smaller temperature gradients than it does without these equations. It also shows the importance of the cathode air channel in cell cooling. (author)

  10. An experimental and modeling study of diethyl carbonate oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Nakamura, Hisashi; Curran, Henry J.; Polo-Có rdoba, Á ngel David; Pitz, William J.; Dagaut, P.; Togbé , Casimir; Sarathy, Mani; Mehl, Marco; Agudelo, John Ramiro; Bustamante, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Diethyl carbonate (DEC) is an attractive biofuel that can be used to displace petroleum-derived diesel fuel, thereby reducing CO2 and particulate emissions from diesel engines. A better understanding of DEC combustion characteristics is needed to facilitate its use in internal combustion engines. Toward this goal, ignition delay times for DEC were measured at conditions relevant to internal combustion engines using a rapid compression machine (RCM) and a shock tube. The experimental conditions investigated covered a wide range of temperatures (660-1300K), a pressure of 30bar, and equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 in air. To provide further understanding of the intermediates formed in DEC oxidation, species concentrations were measured in a jet-stirred reactor at 10atm over a temperature range of 500-1200K and at equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0. These experimental measurements were used to aid the development and validation of a chemical kinetic model for DEC.The experimental results for ignition in the RCM showed near negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior. Six-membered alkylperoxy radical (RO˙2) isomerizations are conventionally thought to initiate low-temperature branching reactions responsible for NTC behavior, but DEC has no such possible 6- and 7-membered ring isomerizations. However, its molecular structure allows for 5-, 8- and 9-membered ring RO˙2 isomerizations. To provide accurate rate constants for these ring structures, ab initio computations for RO˙2⇌Q˙OOH isomerization reactions were performed. These new RO˙2 isomerization rate constants have been implemented in a chemical kinetic model for DEC oxidation. The model simulations have been compared with ignition delay times measured in the RCM near the NTC region. Results of the simulation were also compared with experimental results for ignition in the high-temperature region and for species concentrations in the jet-stirred reactor. Chemical kinetic insights into the

  11. An experimental and modeling study of diethyl carbonate oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Nakamura, Hisashi

    2015-04-01

    Diethyl carbonate (DEC) is an attractive biofuel that can be used to displace petroleum-derived diesel fuel, thereby reducing CO2 and particulate emissions from diesel engines. A better understanding of DEC combustion characteristics is needed to facilitate its use in internal combustion engines. Toward this goal, ignition delay times for DEC were measured at conditions relevant to internal combustion engines using a rapid compression machine (RCM) and a shock tube. The experimental conditions investigated covered a wide range of temperatures (660-1300K), a pressure of 30bar, and equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 in air. To provide further understanding of the intermediates formed in DEC oxidation, species concentrations were measured in a jet-stirred reactor at 10atm over a temperature range of 500-1200K and at equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0. These experimental measurements were used to aid the development and validation of a chemical kinetic model for DEC.The experimental results for ignition in the RCM showed near negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior. Six-membered alkylperoxy radical (RO˙2) isomerizations are conventionally thought to initiate low-temperature branching reactions responsible for NTC behavior, but DEC has no such possible 6- and 7-membered ring isomerizations. However, its molecular structure allows for 5-, 8- and 9-membered ring RO˙2 isomerizations. To provide accurate rate constants for these ring structures, ab initio computations for RO˙2⇌Q˙OOH isomerization reactions were performed. These new RO˙2 isomerization rate constants have been implemented in a chemical kinetic model for DEC oxidation. The model simulations have been compared with ignition delay times measured in the RCM near the NTC region. Results of the simulation were also compared with experimental results for ignition in the high-temperature region and for species concentrations in the jet-stirred reactor. Chemical kinetic insights into the

  12. Photochemical key steps in the synthesis of surfactants from furfural-derived intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassama, Abdoulaye; Ernenwein, Cédric; Hoffmann, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    Furfural is oxidized to 2[5H]-furanone by using hydrogen peroxide or to 5-hydroxy-2[5H]-furanone by using photo-oxygenation. An amine function is introduced by photochemically induced radical addition of tertiairy amines, some of which carry an n-alkyl side chain as hydrophobic moiety. These amines are produced from fatty aldehydes and cyclic secondary amines. The resulting adducts are transformed into amphoteric surfactants possessing an ammonium and a carboxylate function. Amphoteric (pK(N) and isoelectric point) and surfactant properties such as the critical micelle concentration and the adsorption efficiency are determined.

  13. Sulfidic photochemical passivation of GaAs surfaces in alcoholic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonsmeier, T.; Ivankov, A.; Bauhofer, W.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a remarkable enhancement of the passivation effect of sulfidic solutions through illumination with above band gap light. Luminescence measurements on GaAs surfaces which have been illuminated during chemical passivation reveal in comparison to nonilluminated samples a further reduction of their surface density of states as well as a significantly increased stability of the passivation. Investigations with photoelectron spectroscopy show that illumination leads to a nearly complete removal of oxides on the surface. Measurements on Schottky diodes which have been manufactured with photochemically passivated GaAs indicate a noticeable decrease in band bending and a depinning of the Fermi level

  14. Modeling of oxide reduction in repeated-batch pyroprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyo Jik; Im, Hun Suk; Park, Geun Il

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pyroprocessing is a complicated batch-type operation. • Discrete event system modeling was used to create an integrated operation model. • Simulation showed that could be accomplished. • The dynamic material flow helps us understand the process operation. • We showed that complex material flow could be simulated in terms of mass balance. - Abstract: Pyroprocessing is a complicated batch-type operation, involving a highly complex material flow logic with a huge number of unit processes. Discrete event system modeling was used to create an integrated operation model for which simulation showed that dynamic material flow could be accomplished to provide considerable insight into the process operation. In the model simulation, the amount of material transported upstream and downstream in the process satisfies a mass balance equation while considering the hold-up incurred by every batch operation. This study also simulated, in detail, an oxide reduction group process embracing electrolytic reduction, cathode processing, and salt purification. Based on the default operation scenario, it showed that complex material flows could be precisely simulated in terms of the mass balance. Specifically, the amount of high-heat elements remaining in the molten salt bath is analyzed to evaluate the operation scenario.

  15. Experimental Study of Nonequilibrium Electrodeposition of Nanostructures on Copper and Nickel for Photochemical Fuel Cell Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh K. Shanmugam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To increase the performance of photochemical fuel cells, nonequilibrium electrodeposition has been performed on Cu and Ni to make photosensitive anodes. Processing parameters including electrolyte concentration, and electrode potential were studied using cyclic voltammetry. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS were performed to understand the formation of the nanostructures during the nonequilibrium deposition of copper fractals. An increase in the deposition rate was observed with the increase in electrolyte concentration (from 0.05 M to 1.0 M. Similar trend was found when the cathode potential was decreased from −0.5 V to −4.5 V. The effect of substrate material was also examined. Porous fractal structures on copper were achieved, while the deposited material showed high density of surface cracks on nickel. The fractal structures deposited on copper electrode with the increased surface area were converted into copper oxide by oxidation in air. Such oxide samples were made into anodes for photochemical fuel cell application. We demonstrated that an increase in the magnitude of open circuit output voltage is associated with the increase in the fractal surface area under the ultraviolet irradiation test conditions. However, the electrodeposited fractals on nickel showed very limited increase in the magnitude of open circuit voltage.

  16. Modeling of termokinetic oscillations at partial oxidation of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunov, A. V.; Belyaev, A. A.; Inovenkov, I. N.; Nefedov, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    Partial oxidation of natural gas at moderate temperatures below 1500 K has significant interest for a number of industrial applications. But such processes can proceed at different unstable regimes including oscillating modes. Nonlinear phenomena at partial oxidation of methane were observed at different conditions. The investigation of the complex nonlinear system of equations that describes this process is a real method to insure its stability at industrial conditions and, at the same time, is an effective tool for its further enhancement. Numerical analysis of methane oxidation kinetics in the continuous stirred-tank reactor, with the use of detailed kinetic model has shown the possibility of the appearance of oscillating modes in the appropriate range of reaction parameters that characterize the composition, pressure, reagents flow, thermophysical features of the system, and geometry of the reactor. The appearance of oscillating modes is connected both with the reaction kinetics, heat release and sink and reagents introduction and removing. At that, oscillations appear only at a limited range of parameters, but can be accompanied by significant change in the yield of products. We have determined the range of initial temperature and pressure at which oscillations can be observed, if all other parameters remained fixed. The boundaries of existence of oscillations on the phase plane were calculated. It was shown that depending on the position inside the oscillation region the oscillations have different frequency and amplitude. It was reviled the role of heat exchange with the environment: at the absence of heat exchange the oscillating modes are impossible. In the vicinity of the boundary of phase range, where oscillations exist, significant change of concentration of some products were observed, for example, that of CO2, which in this case one of the principal products is. At that, insignificant increase in pressure not only change the character of CO2 behaving

  17. Modeling of Cd(II) sorption on mixed oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waseem, M.; Mustafa, S.; Naeem, A.; Shah, K.H.; Hussain, S.Y.; Safdar, M.

    2011-01-01

    Mixed oxide of iron and silicon (0.75 M Fe(OH)3:0.25 M SiO/sub 2/) was synthesized and characterized by various techniques like surface area analysis, point of zero charge (PZC), energy dispersive X-rays (EDX) spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-rays diffraction (XRD) analysis. The uptake of Cd/sup 2+/ ions on mixed oxide increased with pH, temperature and metal ion concentration. Sorption data have been interpreted in terms of both Langmuir and Freundlich models. The Xm values at pH 7 are found to be almost twice as compared to pH 5. The values of both DH and DS were found to be positive indicating that the sorption process was endothermic and accompanied by the dehydration of Cd/sup 2+/. Further, the negative value of DG confirms the spontaneity of the reaction. The ion exchange mechanism was suggested to take place for each Cd/sup 2+/ ions at pH 5, whereas ion exchange was found coupled with non specific adsorption of metal cations at pH 7. (author)

  18. The role of lager beer yeast in oxidative stability of model beer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berner, Torben Sune; Arneborg, Nils

    2012-01-01

    that the oxidative stress resistance was strain dependent. Fermentation of model wort in European Brewing Convention tubes using three yeast strains with varying oxidative stress resistances resulted in three model beers with different rates of radical formation as measured by electron spin resonance in forced......AIMS: In this study, we investigated the relationship between the ability of lager brewing yeast strains to tolerate oxidative stress and their ability to produce oxidative stable model beer. METHODS AND RESULTS: Screening of 21 lager brewing yeast strains against diamide and paraquat showed...... in the model beers. CONCLUSIONS: A more oxidative stable beer is not obtained by a more-oxidative-stress-tolerant lager brewing yeast strain, exhibiting a higher secretion of thioredoxin, but rather by a less-oxidative-stress-tolerant strain, exhibiting a higher iron uptake. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT...

  19. Chemical Kinetics and Photochemical Data for Use in Atmospheric Studies: Evaluation Number 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, J. B.; Sander, S. P.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Barker, J. R.; Huie, R. E.; Kolb, C. E.; Kurylo, M. J.; Orkin, V. L.; Wilmouth, D. M.; Wine, P. H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the eighteenth in a series of evaluated sets of rate constants, photochemical cross sections, heterogeneous parameters, and thermochemical parameters compiled by the NASA Panel for Data Evaluation. The data are used primarily to model stratospheric and upper tropospheric processes, with particular emphasis on the ozone layer and its possible perturbation by anthropogenic and natural phenomena. The evaluation is available in electronic form from the following Internet URL: http://jpldataeval.jpl.nasa.gov/

  20. Plasmon mediated non-photochemical nucleation of nanoparticles by circularly polarized light

    OpenAIRE

    Karpov, Victor G.; Grigorchuk, Nicholas I.

    2014-01-01

    We predict nucleation of pancake shaped metallic nanoparticles having plasmonic frequencies in resonance with a non-absorbed circularly polarized electromagnetic field. We show that the same field can induce nucleation of randomly oriented needle shaped particles. The probabilities of these shapes are estimated vs. field frequency and strength, material parameters, and temperature. This constitutes a quantitative model of non-photochemical laser induced nucleation (NPLIN) consistent with the ...

  1. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  2. Method of making gold thiolate and photochemically functionalized microcantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiadjiev, Vassil I [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Gilbert M [Knoxville, TN; Pinnaduwage, Lal A [Knoxville, TN; Thundat, Thomas G [Knoxville, TN; Bonnesen, Peter V [Knoxville, TN; Goretzki, Gudrun [Nottingham, GB

    2009-08-25

    Highly sensitive sensor platforms for the detection of specific reagents, such as chromate, gasoline and biological species, using microcantilevers and other microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) whose surfaces have been modified with photochemically attached organic monolayers, such as self-assembled monolayers (SAM), or gold-thiol surface linkage are taught. The microcantilever sensors use photochemical hydrosilylation to modify silicon surfaces and gold-thiol chemistry to modify metallic surfaces thereby enabling individual microcantilevers in multicantilever array chips to be modified separately. Terminal vinyl substituted hydrocarbons with a variety of molecular recognition sites can be attached to the surface of silicon via the photochemical hydrosilylation process. By focusing the activating UV light sequentially on selected silicon or silicon nitride hydrogen terminated surfaces and soaking or spotting selected metallic surfaces with organic thiols, sulfides, or disulfides, the microcantilevers are functionalized. The device and photochemical method are intended to be integrated into systems for detecting specific agents including chromate groundwater contamination, gasoline, and biological species.

  3. Thermal oxidative degradation kinetics of agricultural residues using distributed activation energy model and global kinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiu'e; Chen, Jianbiao; Li, Gang; Wang, Yanhong; Lang, Xuemei; Fan, Shuanshi

    2018-08-01

    The study concerned the thermal oxidative degradation kinetics of agricultural residues, peanut shell (PS) and sunflower shell (SS). The thermal behaviors were evaluated via thermogravimetric analysis and the kinetic parameters were determined by using distributed activation energy model (DAEM) and global kinetic model (GKM). Results showed that thermal oxidative decomposition of two samples processed in three zones; the ignition, burnout, and comprehensive combustibility between two agricultural residues were of great difference; and the combustion performance could be improved by boosting heating rate. The activation energy ranges calculated by the DAEM for the thermal oxidative degradation of PS and SS were 88.94-145.30 kJ mol -1 and 94.86-169.18 kJ mol -1 , respectively. The activation energy obtained by the GKM for the oxidative decomposition of hemicellulose and cellulose was obviously lower than that for the lignin oxidation at identical heating rate. To some degree, the determined kinetic parameters could acceptably simulate experimental data. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Reactor modeling and process analysis for partial oxidation of natural gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis analyses a novel process of partial oxidation of natural gas and develops a numerical tool for the partial oxidation reactor modeling. The proposed process generates syngas in an integrated plant of a partial oxidation reactor, a syngas turbine and an air separation unit. This is called

  5. Radiolytic oxidation of propane: computer modeling of the reaction scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A.K.; Hanrahan, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The oxidation of gaseous propane under gamma radiolysis was studied at 100 torr pressure and 25 o C, at oxygen pressures from 1 to 15 torr. Major oxygen-containing products and their G-values with 10% added oxygen are as follows: acetone, 0.98; i-propyl alcohol, 0.86; propionaldehyde, 0.43; n-propyl alcohol, 0.11; acrolein, 0.14; and allyl alcohol, 0.038. The formation of major oxygen-containing products was explained on the basis that the alkyl radicals combine with molecular oxygen to give peroxyl radicals; the peroxyl radicals react with one another to give alkoxyl radicals, which in turn react with one another to form carbonyl compounds and alcohols. The reaction scheme for the formation of major products was examined using computer modeling based on a mechanism involving 28 reactions. Yields could be brought into agreement with the data within experimental error in nearly all cases. (author)

  6. Systemic oxidative stress markers in animal model for depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzinova, Elena; Kravtsova, Violetta; Aalkjær, Christian

    Involvement of oxidative stress (OxS) in development of major depressive disorder has recently become evident, though mechanisms behind this remain elusive. We analyzed therefore OxS pathways in rat Chronic Mild Stress (CMS) model of depression. Rats are exposed to chronic unpredictable mild...... mg/kg/day). Saline injections were done to control the vehicle effect. Escitalopram treated rats were sub-divided into 2 groups: responders and non-responders, according to their hedonic state and compared to non-stressed rats, treated with either saline or Escitalopram. Measurement of total...... glutathione and malondialdehyde (MDA) in lungs, heart, skeletal muscles, liver, saphenous, mesenteric, and tail arteries were used as estimates for OxS. In heart, glutathione was increased in CMS rats in comparison with non-stressed vehicle group. Accordingly, an estimate for free radical activity, MDA...

  7. Photochemical ozone budget during the BIBLE A and B campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Malcolm; Hu, Wenjie; Rodríguez, José M.; Kondo, Yutaka; Koike, Makoto; Kita, Kazuyuki; Kawakami, Shuji; Blake, Donald; Liu, Shaw; Ogawa, Toshihiro

    2003-02-01

    Using the measured concentrations of NO, O3, H2O, CO, CH4, and NMHCs along the flight tracks, a photochemical box model is used to calculate the concentrations of the Ox radicals, the HOx radicals, and the nitrogen species at the sampling points. The calculations make use of the measurements from radiometers to scale clear sky photolysis rates to account for cloud cover and ground albedo at the sampling time/point. The concentrations of the nitrogen species in each of the sampled air parcels are computed assuming they are in instantaneous equilibrium with the measured NO and O3. The diurnally varying species concentrations are next calculated using the box model and used to estimate the diurnally averaged production and removal rates of ozone for the sampled air parcels. Clear sky photolysis rates are used in the diurnal calculations. The campaign also provided measured concentration of NOy. The observed NO/NOy ratio is usually larger than the model calculated equilibrium value. There are several possible explanations. It could be a result of recent injection of NO into the air parcel, recent removal of HNO3 from the parcel, recent rapid transport of an air parcel from another location, or a combination of all processes. Our analyses suggest that the local production rate of O3 can be used as another indicator of recent NO injection. However, more direct studies using air trajectory analyses and other collaborative evidences are needed to ascertain the roles played by individual process.

  8. SPH based modelling of oxide and oxide film formation in gravity die castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingsen, K; M'Hamdi, M; Coudert, T

    2015-01-01

    Gravity die casting is an important casting process which has the capability of making complicated, high-integrity components for e.g. the automotive industry. Oxides and oxide films formed during filling affect the cast product quality. The Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method is particularly suited to follow complex flows. The SPH method has been used to study filling of a gravity die including the formation and transport of oxides and oxide films for two different filling velocities. A low inlet velocity leads to a higher amount of oxides and oxide films in the casting. The study demonstrates the usefulness of the SPH method for an increased understanding of the effect of different filling procedures on the cast quality. (paper)

  9. Study of the photochemical isomerization of ergosterol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mermet-Bouvier, Rene

    1972-01-01

    The photochemical reaction scheme of Ergosterol-Vitamin D 2 was studied. The schemes proposed in published literature are described together with earlier methods used for the analysis and determination. The method used is then discussed. In the first part, the factors concerning the changes occurring in molecular systems exposed to radiation, and the formalism used, are examined. Investigations of linear molecular systems and their applications to the reaction scheme of Ergosterol-Vitamin D 2 are discussed. The properties which enable the last three reaction schemes proposed in the literature to be distinguished are described. In the second part, the experimental analytical methods and the determinations made of the different isomers formed are presented. Chromatographic techniques (thin films, columns, gaseous phase) suitable for separating the various isomeric species are used. The existence of 8 isomers was established as well as a transformation occurring in one of them. The ultraviolet and infrared spectra were obtained. A reaction scheme is proposed (in which all the quantum yield values are given) from comparisons between the calculated and experimental values of the eigenvalue of the absolute minimum value λ m and the eigenvector corresponding to V m . (author) [fr

  10. Photochemically enhanced microbial degradation of environmental pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, A.; Matsumura, F.

    1991-01-01

    Biodegradation of persistent halogenated organic pollutants is of great interest from the viewpoint of its potential use to cleanup the contaminated sites and industrial waste streams on-site (i.e., in situ remediation). Recent studies have shown that lignin-degrading white rot fungi possess capabilities to degrade a variety of highly recalcitrant and toxic compounds. On the other hand, photodegradation by sunlight or ultraviolet light (UV) has not been considered as a potential technology to detoxify the contaminated sites, in spite of the availability of extensive research data, because of its limited reaching ability to subsurface locations. In view of the urgent needs for the development of technology to deal with mounting problems of toxic wastes, the authors have decided to experiment with the ideas of combining photochemical and microbial technologies. The main obstacle in developing such simultaneous combination systems has been the susceptibilities of microorganisms in general to UV irradiation. To overcome this problem, the authors have developed an ultraviolet- and fungicide-resistant strain of white rot fungus and now report their results

  11. Decomposition of oxalate precipitates by photochemical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, J.H.; Kim, E.H.

    1998-01-01

    A photo-radiation method was applied to decompose oxalate precipitates so that it can be dissolved into dilute nitric acid. This work has been studied as a part of partitioning of minor actinides. Minor actinides can be recovered from high-level wastes as oxalate precipitates, but they tend to be coprecipitated together with lanthanide oxalates. This requires another partitioning step for mutual separation of actinide and lanthanide groups. In this study, therefore, the photochemical decomposition mechanism of oxalates in the presence of nitric acid was elucidated by experimental work. The decomposition of oxalates was proved to be dominated by the reaction with hydroxyl radical generated from the nitric acid, rather than with nitrite ion also formed from nitrate ion. The decomposition rate of neodymium oxalate, which was chosen as a stand-in compound representing minor actinide and lanthanide oxalates, was found to be 0.003 M/hr at the conditions of 0.5 M HNO 3 and room temperature when a mercury lamp was used as a light source. (author)

  12. Decomposition of oxalate precipitates by photochemical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jae-Hyung Yoo; Eung-Ho Kim

    1999-01-01

    A photo-radiation method was applied to decompose oxalate precipitates so that it can be dissolved into dilute nitric acid. This work has been studied as a part of partitioning of minor actinides. Minor actinides can be recovered from high-level wastes as oxalate precipitates, but they tend to be coprecipitated together with lanthanide oxalates. This requires another partitioning step for mutual separation of actinide and lanthanide groups. In this study, therefore, some experimental work of photochemical decomposition of oxalate was carried out to prove its feasibility as a step of partitioning process. The decomposition of oxalic acid in the presence of nitric acid was performed in advance in order to understand the mechanistic behaviour of oxalate destruction, and then the decomposition of neodymium oxalate, which was chosen as a stand-in compound representing minor actinide and lanthanide oxalates, was examined. The decomposition rate of neodymium oxalate was found as 0.003 mole/hr at the conditions of 0.5 M HNO 3 and room temperature when a mercury lamp was used as a light source. (author)

  13. Photochemical reduction of uranyl ion with amides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brar, A.S.; Chander, R.; Sandhu, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    The photochemical reduction of uranyl ion by formamide, acetamide, propionamide, butyramide, iso butyramids, n-methylformamide, N, N-dimethylformamide and N, N-diethylformamide in aqueous medium using radiation >= 380 nm from a medium pressure mercury vapour lamp has been investigated. The reduction with the said amides has been found to obey pseudo first order kinetics. The magnitude of the rate of reduction for the simple amides has been found to follow the following order formamide > isobutyramide approx. butyramide > propionamide > acetamide while the rate order for N-alkylformamides compared with that of the formamide has been found to be formamide > N-methylformamide > N,N-diethylformamide approx. N,N-dimethylformamide. The pseudo first order rate constants and quenching constants have been found from the kinetic data. It has been found that physical and chemical quenching compete with each other. Plots of reciprocal of quantum yields versus reciprocal [amide] have been found to be linear with intercepts on the ordinate axis. Absorption spectra of uranyl ion in doubly distilled water, in the presence of acid and in the presence of acid and amide reveal that there is no ground state interaction between uranyl ion and the amide. A mechanism of photoreduction of uranyl ion with amides has been proposed. (author)

  14. Ultrasound assisted synthesis of nanocrystalline zinc oxide: Experiments and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosni, Mongia [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux, LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris 13, 99 av. J.B. Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Farhat, Samir, E-mail: farhat@lspm.cnrs.fr [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux, LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris 13, 99 av. J.B. Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Schoenstein, Frederic; Karmous, Farah; Jouini, Noureddine [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux, LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris 13, 99 av. J.B. Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Viana, Bruno [LCMCP Chimie-Paristech, UPMC, Collège de France, 11 Rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Mgaidi, Arbi [Laboratoire de chimie minérale industrielle université Tunis el Manar (Tunisia)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • ZnO nanospheres and nanowires were grown using ultrasound and thermal activation techniques. • The growth uses forced hydrolysis of zinc acetate in diethylene glycol (DEG). • A thermochemical model was developed based on thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. • We estimate species distribution in the bubble in temperature range from 5000 K to ambient. • We propose a new mechanism for ZnO growth assisted by ultrasound irradiation. - Abstract: A fast and green approach is proposed for the preparation of nanocrystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) via ultrasonic (US) irradiation in polyol medium. The process uses forced hydrolysis of zinc acetate in diethylene glycol (DEG). The protocol is compared to thermal activation under the same chemical environment. The activation method is found to be playing a critical role in the selective synthesis of morphologically distinct nanostructures. As compared to thermally activated conventional polyol process, (US) permits to considerably reduce reaction time as well as size of particles. In addition, the shape of these nanoparticles was changed from long nanowires to small nanospheres, indicating different reaction mechanisms. To explain this difference, a thermochemical model was developed based on thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. The model estimate species distribution in the bubble in temperature range from 5000 K to ambient simulating quenching process during bubble formation and collapse. Our results indicate the presence of high density of zinc atoms that could be responsible of a high density of nucleation as compared to thermal activation.

  15. Ultrasound assisted synthesis of nanocrystalline zinc oxide: Experiments and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosni, Mongia; Farhat, Samir; Schoenstein, Frederic; Karmous, Farah; Jouini, Noureddine; Viana, Bruno; Mgaidi, Arbi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • ZnO nanospheres and nanowires were grown using ultrasound and thermal activation techniques. • The growth uses forced hydrolysis of zinc acetate in diethylene glycol (DEG). • A thermochemical model was developed based on thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. • We estimate species distribution in the bubble in temperature range from 5000 K to ambient. • We propose a new mechanism for ZnO growth assisted by ultrasound irradiation. - Abstract: A fast and green approach is proposed for the preparation of nanocrystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) via ultrasonic (US) irradiation in polyol medium. The process uses forced hydrolysis of zinc acetate in diethylene glycol (DEG). The protocol is compared to thermal activation under the same chemical environment. The activation method is found to be playing a critical role in the selective synthesis of morphologically distinct nanostructures. As compared to thermally activated conventional polyol process, (US) permits to considerably reduce reaction time as well as size of particles. In addition, the shape of these nanoparticles was changed from long nanowires to small nanospheres, indicating different reaction mechanisms. To explain this difference, a thermochemical model was developed based on thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. The model estimate species distribution in the bubble in temperature range from 5000 K to ambient simulating quenching process during bubble formation and collapse. Our results indicate the presence of high density of zinc atoms that could be responsible of a high density of nucleation as compared to thermal activation

  16. A comprehensive experimental and modeling study of isobutene oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Chong-Wen

    2016-03-17

    Isobutene is an important intermediate in the pyrolysis and oxidation of higher-order branched alkanes, and it is also a component of commercial gasolines. To better understand its combustion characteristics, a series of ignition delay time (IDT) and laminar flame speed (LFS) measurements have been performed. In addition, flow reactor speciation data recorded for the pyrolysis and oxidation of isobutene is also reported. Predictions of an updated kinetic model described herein are compared with each of these data sets, as well as with existing jet-stirred reactor (JSR) species measurements. IDTs of isobutene oxidation were measured in four different shock tubes and in two rapid compression machines (RCMs) under conditions of relevance to practical combustors. The combination of shock tube and RCM data greatly expands the range of available validation data for isobutene oxidation models to pressures of 50 atm and temperatures in the range 666–1715 K. Isobutene flame speeds were measured experimentally at 1 atm and at unburned gas temperatures of 298–398 K over a wide range of equivalence ratios. For the flame speed results, there was good agreement between different facilities and the current model in the fuel-rich region. Ab initio chemical kinetics calculations were carried out to calculate rate constants for important reactions such as H-atom abstraction by hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and the decomposition of 2-methylallyl radicals. A comprehensive chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed to describe the combustion of isobutene and is validated by comparison to the presently considered experimental measurements. Important reactions, highlighted via flux and sensitivity analyses, include: (a) hydrogen atom abstraction from isobutene by hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals, and molecular oxygen; (b) radical–radical recombination reactions, including 2-methylallyl radical self-recombination, the recombination of 2-methylallyl radicals with

  17. Phase-field modeling of corrosion kinetics under dual-oxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, You-Hai; Chen, Long-Qing; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2012-04-01

    A phase-field model is proposed to simulate corrosion kinetics under a dual-oxidant atmosphere. It will be demonstrated that the model can be applied to simulate corrosion kinetics under oxidation, sulfidation and simultaneous oxidation/sulfidation processes. Phase-dependent diffusivities are incorporated in a natural manner and allow more realistic modeling as the diffusivities usually differ by many orders of magnitude in different phases. Simple free energy models are then used for testing the model while calibrated free energy models can be implemented for quantitative modeling.

  18. Mathematical modeling of oxygen transport in solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Ann Mari

    1997-12-31

    This thesis develops mathematical models to describe the electrochemical performance of a solid oxide fuel cell cathode based on electrochemical kinetics and mass transfer. The individual effects of various coupled processes are investigated. A one-dimensional model is developed based on porous electrode theory. Two different mechanisms are investigated for the charge transfer reaction. One of these assumes that intermediately adsorbed oxygen atoms are reduced at the electrode/electrolyte interface, similar to the models proposed for metal electrodes. Simulated polarization curves exhibit limited currents due to depletion of oxygen adsorbates at high cathodic overvoltages. An empirical correlation is confirmed to exist between the limiting current an the oxygen partial pressure, however, a similar correlation often assumed to exist between the measured polarization resistance and the oxygen partial pressure could not be justified. For the other model, oxygen vacancies are assumed to be exchanged directly at the electrode/electrolyte interface. The electrochemical behaviour is improved by reducing the oxygen partial pressure, due to increased vacancy concentration of the electrode material. Simulated polarization curves exhibit Tafel-like slopes in the cathodic direction, which are due to polarization concentration, and not activation polarization in the conventional sense. Anodic limiting currents are predicted due to lack of available free sites for vacancy exchange at the cathode side. The thesis also presents a theoretical treatment of current and potential distributions in simple two-dimensional cell geometries, and a two-dimensional model for a porous electrode-electrolyte system for investigation of the effect of interfacial diffusion of adsorbates along the electrode/electrolyte interface. 172 refs., 60 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. Modeling of the Nitric Oxide Transport in the Human Lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamaoun, Cyril; Van Muylem, Alain; Haut, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    In the human lungs, nitric oxide (NO) acts as a bronchodilatator, by relaxing the bronchial smooth muscles and is closely linked to the inflammatory status of the lungs, owing to its antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, the molar fraction of NO in the exhaled air has been shown to be higher for asthmatic patients than for healthy patients. Multiple models have been developed in order to characterize the NO dynamics in the lungs, owing to their complex structure. Indeed, direct measurements in the lungs are difficult and, therefore, these models are valuable tools to interpret experimental data. In this work, a new model of the NO transport in the human lungs is proposed. It belongs to the family of the morphological models and is based on the morphometric model of Weibel (1963). When compared to models published previously, its main new features are the layered representation of the wall of the airways and the possibility to simulate the influence of bronchoconstriction (BC) and of the presence of mucus on the NO transport in lungs. The model is based on a geometrical description of the lungs, at rest and during a respiratory cycle, coupled with transport equations, written in the layers composing an airway wall and in the lumen of the airways. First, it is checked that the model is able to reproduce experimental information available in the literature. Second, the model is used to discuss some features of the NO transport in healthy and unhealthy lungs. The simulation results are analyzed, especially when BC has occurred in the lungs. For instance, it is shown that BC can have a significant influence on the NO transport in the tissues composing an airway wall. It is also shown that the relation between BC and the molar fraction of NO in the exhaled air is complex. Indeed, BC might lead to an increase or to a decrease of this molar fraction, depending on the extent of the BC and on the possible presence of mucus. This should be confirmed experimentally and might

  20. Glutamine prevents oxidative stress in a model of portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabot, Gilmara Pandolfo; Carvalhal, Gustavo Franco; Marroni, Norma Possa; Licks, Francielli; Hartmann, Renata Minuzzo; da Silva, Vinícius Duval; Fillmann, Henrique Sarubbi

    2017-07-07

    To evaluate the protective effects of glutamine in a model of portal hypertension (PH) induced by partial portal vein ligation (PPVL). Male Wistar rats were housed in a controlled environment and were allowed access to food and water ad libitum . Twenty-four male Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups: (1) control group (SO) - rats underwent exploratory laparotomy; (2) control + glutamine group (SO + G) - rats were subjected to laparotomy and were treated intraperitoneally with glutamine; (3) portal hypertension group (PPVL) - rats were subjected to PPVL; and (4) PPVL + glutamine group (PPVL + G) - rats were treated intraperitoneally with glutamine for seven days. Local injuries were determined by evaluating intestinal segments for oxidative stress using lipid peroxidation and the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) after PPVL. Lipid peroxidation of the membrane was increased in the animals subjected to PH ( P 0.05). The activity of the antioxidant enzyme GTx was decreased in the gut of animals subjected to PH compared with that in the control group of animals not subjected to PH ( P 0.05). At least 10 random, non-overlapping images of each histological slide with 200 × magnification (44 pixel = 1 μm) were captured. The sum means of all areas, of each group were calculated. The mean areas of eNOS staining for both of the control groups were similar. The PPVL group showed the largest area of staining for eNOS. The PPVL + G group had the second highest amount of staining, but the mean value was much lower than that of the PPVL group ( P < 0.01). For iNOS, the control (SO) and control + G (SO + G) groups showed similar areas of staining. The PPVL group contained the largest area of iNOS staining, followed by the PPVL + G group; however, this area was significantly smaller than that of the group that underwent PH without glutamine ( P < 0.01). Treatment with

  1. Transgenic Mouse Model for Reducing Oxidative Damage in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, A.-S.; Torres, S.; Truong, T.; Kumar, A.; Alwood, J. S.; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to musculoskeletal disuse and radiation result in bone loss; we hypothesized that these catabolic treatments cause excess reactive oxygen species (ROS), and thereby alter the tight balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, culminating in bone loss. To test this, we used transgenic mice which over-express the human gene for catalase, targeted to mitochondria (MCAT). Catalase is an anti-oxidant that converts the ROS hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. MCAT mice were shown previously to display reduced mitochondrial oxidative stress and radiosensitivity of the CNS compared to wild type controls (WT). As expected, MCAT mice expressed the transgene in skeletal tissue, and in marrow-derived osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors cultured ex vivo, and also showed greater catalase activity compared to wildtype (WT) mice (3-6 fold). Colony expansion in marrow cells cultured under osteoblastogenic conditions was 2-fold greater in the MCAT mice compared to WT mice, while the extent of mineralization was unaffected. MCAT mice had slightly longer tibiae than WT mice (2%, P less than 0.01), although cortical bone area was slightly lower in MCAT mice than WT mice (10%, p=0.09). To challenge the skeletal system, mice were treated by exposure to combined disuse (2 wk Hindlimb Unloading) and total body irradiation Cs(137) (2 Gy, 0.8 Gy/min), then bone parameters were analyzed by 2-factor ANOVA to detect possible interaction effects. Treatment caused a 2-fold increase (p=0.015) in malondialdehyde levels of bone tissue (ELISA) in WT mice, but had no effect in MCAT mice. These findings indicate that the transgene conferred protection from oxidative damage caused by treatment. Unexpected differences between WT and MCAT mice emerged in skeletal responses to treatment.. In WT mice, treatment did not alter osteoblastogenesis, cortical bone area, moment of inertia, or bone perimeter, whereas in MCAT mice, treatment increased these

  2. Finite element modelling of the oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 with a controlled metal-oxide interface and the influence of growth stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zumpicchiat, Guillaume; Pascal, Serge; Tupin, Marc; Berdin-Méric, Clotilde

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: We developed two finite element models of zirconium-based alloy oxidation using the CEA Cast3M code to simulate the oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4: the diffuse interface model and the sharp interface model. We also studied the effect of stresses on the oxidation kinetics. The main results are: • Both models lead to parabolic oxidation kinetics in agreement with the Wagner’s theory. • The modellings enable to calculate the stress distribution in the oxide as well as in the metal. • A strong effect of the hydrostatic stress on the oxidation kinetics has been evidenced. • The stress gradient effect changes the parabolic kinetics into a sub-parabolic law closer to the experimental kinetics because of the stress gradient itself, but also because of the growth stress increase with the oxide thickness. - Abstract: Experimentally, zirconium-based alloys oxidation kinetics is sub-parabolic, by contrast with the Wagner theory which predicts a parabolic kinetics. Two finite element models have been developed to simulate this phenomenon: the diffuse interface model and the sharp interface model. Both simulate parabolic oxidation kinetics. The growth stress effects on oxygen diffusion are studied to try to explain the gap between theory and experience. Taking into account the influence of the hydrostatic stress and its gradient into the oxygen flux expression, sub-parabolic oxidation kinetics have been simulated. The sub-parabolic behaviour of the oxidation kinetics can be explained by a non-uniform compressive stress level into the oxide layer.

  3. Modelling nitrous oxide emissions from grazed grassland systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junye; Cardenas, Laura M.; Misselbrook, Tom H.; Cuttle, Steve; Thorman, Rachel E.; Li Changsheng

    2012-01-01

    Grazed grassland systems are an important component of the global carbon cycle and also influence global climate change through their emissions of nitrous oxide and methane. However, there are huge uncertainties and challenges in the development and parameterisation of process-based models for grazed grassland systems because of the wide diversity of vegetation and impacts of grazing animals. A process-based biogeochemistry model, DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC), has been modified to describe N 2 O emissions for the UK from regional conditions. This paper reports a new development of UK-DNDC in which the animal grazing practices were modified to track their contributions to the soil nitrogen (N) biogeochemistry. The new version of UK-DNDC was tested against datasets of N 2 O fluxes measured at three contrasting field sites. The results showed that the responses of the model to changes in grazing parameters were generally in agreement with observations, showing that N 2 O emissions increased as the grazing intensity increased. - Highlights: ► Parameterisation of grazing system using grazing intensity. ► Modification of UK D NDC for the UK soil and weather conditions. ► Validation of the UK D NDC against measured data of N 2 O emissions in three UK sites. ► Estimating influence of animal grazing practises on N 2 O emissions. - Grazing system was parameterised using grazing intensity and UK-DNDC model was modified and validated against measured data of N 2 O emissions in three UK sites.

  4. Sunlight technologies for photochemical deactivation of organic pollutants in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acher, A.; Fischer, E.; Tornheim, R. [The Volcani Center, Inst. of Soils and Water, Bet Dagan (Israel); Manor, Y. [Sheba Medical Center, Central Virology Lab., Ramat Gan (Israel)

    1997-12-31

    Sensitized-photochemical oxidation methods aimed at use in water treatment technologies for deactivation of biotic (microorganisms) and/or of xenobiotic (pesticides) pollutants in water were developed using global solar radiation or concentrated sunlight (up to 250 suns). The solar global radiation was used either for detoxification of industrial waste water from a pesticide factory to allow their discharge into the urban sewer, or for disinfection of domestric effluents to be used in crop irrigation. The disinfection process was eventually carried out in an experimental pilot-scale plant, capable of disinfection up to 50 m{sup 3}/h of effluent supplied by an activated sludge sewage treatment plant located in Tel-Aviv area. The treated effluents did not show any regrowth of the microorganisms during 7 days. The solar concentrated radiation experiments performed using facilities of the Sun Tower of The Weizman Institute of Science, Rehovot. The concentrated sunlight was provided by different combination of several computer controlled heliostates, up to 8, that track the sun and focus the received sunlight onto the target situated on the roof of the sun-tower. The sunlight intensities measured on the target reached up to 200 kW/m{sup 2}. The experiments were performed either batch- or continuous-wise. The water-samples exposed to disinfection were the above effluent, filtered and supplemented with vaccine strain poliovirus or with different concentrations of an industrial potential pollutant (bromacil), MB 2 mg/L and two concentrations of dissolved oxygen (8.0 or 40.0 mg O{sub 2}/L). An exposure time of 2-3 seconds at 150 kW/m{sup 2} was decreased the microorganisms alive (counts) by five orders of magnitude. A comparison between the two above water treatment technologies is presented. (orig./SR)

  5. Effect of temperature on photochemical smog reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bufalini, J J; Altshuller, A P

    1963-01-01

    In the present investigation the photo-oxidation reactions to trans-2-butene-nitric oxide and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (mesitylene)-nitric oxide in air have been followed. The rates of formation and disappearance of nitrogen dioxide and the rate of reaction of the hydrocarbons have been measured at 20 and 40/sup 0/. The results obtained indicate about a twofold decrease in conversion times over the 20/sup 0/ interval and a corresponding increase in rates of reactions. 5 references.

  6. Physical chemistry and modelling of the sintering of actinide oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechelle, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    This report gives a synthesis of the work I have carried out or to which I have numerically contributed to from 1996 up to 2012 in the Department of Plutonium Uranium and minor Actinides in Cadarache CEA Center. Their main goal is the study and the modeling of the sintering process of nuclear fuels which is the unifying thread of this document. Both in order to take into account the physical and chemical features of the actinide bearing oxide material and in order to combine the different transport phenomena leading to sintering, a sub-granular scale model is under development. Extension to a varying chemical composition as well as exchanges with the gaseous phase are foreseen. A simulation on a larger scale (pellet scale) is ongoing in the framework of a PhD thesis. Validation means have been tested with (U,Pu)O 2 material on the scale of the pellet (Small Angle Neutron Diffusion), on the scale of powder granules (X-Ray High Resolution Micro-Tomography) and with CeO 2 at the 'Institut de Chimie Separative' in Marcoule on a single crystal scale (Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope). The required microstructure homogeneity for nuclear fuels has led to a campaign of experimental studies about the role of Cr 2 O 3 as a sintering aid. Whole of these studies improve our understanding of fuel sintering and hence leads to an improved mastering of this process. (author) [fr

  7. Modeling of Alkane Oxidation Using Constituents and Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Jasette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    2010-01-01

    It is currently not possible to perform simulations of turbulent reactive flows due in particular to complex chemistry, which may contain thousands of reactions and hundreds of species. This complex chemistry results in additional differential equations, making the numerical solution of the equation set computationally prohibitive. Reducing the chemical kinetics mathematical description is one of several important goals in turbulent reactive flow modeling. A chemical kinetics reduction model is proposed for alkane oxidation in air that is based on a parallel methodology to that used in turbulence modeling in the context of the Large Eddy Simulation. The objective of kinetic modeling is to predict the heat release and temperature evolution. This kinetic mechanism is valid over a pressure range from atmospheric to 60 bar, temperatures from 600 K to 2,500 K, and equivalence ratios from 0.125 to 8. This range encompasses diesel, HCCI, and gas-turbine engines, including cold ignition. A computationally efficient kinetic reduction has been proposed for alkanes that has been illustrated for n-heptane using the LLNL heptane mechanism. This model is consistent with turbulence modeling in that scales were first categorized into either those modeled or those computed as progress variables. Species were identified as being either light or heavy. The heavy species were decomposed into defined 13 constituents, and their total molar density was shown to evolve in a quasi-steady manner. The light species behave either in a quasi-steady or unsteady manner. The modeled scales are the total constituent molar density, Nc, and the molar density of the quasi-steady light species. The progress variables are the total constituent molar density rate evolution and the molar densities of the unsteady light species. The unsteady equations for the light species contain contributions of the type gain/loss rates from the heavy species that are modeled consistent with the developed mathematical

  8. Photochemical and other pollution in South Holland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posthumus, A.C.

    1976-01-01

    At the same 15 places as in 1974, regularly distributed over the industrial area west of Rotterdam, indicator plants for air pollution were set out in the open and were cultivated by the same standard method. Tulip and gladiolus were used as indicators for HF, during spring and summer, respectively. Both indicated that the same two sites, at Vlaardingen and Spijkenisse, had maximum HF concentration. In general, the mean leaf-tip injury at all sites was somewhat heavier than in 1974. Lucerne, as an indicator for SO2, sometimes showed more injury north of the New Waterway than south of it in June. Spinach, an indicator for O3/SO2, showed maximum injury in three different periods in June, July and mostly in August. The frequency and the measure of the injury to tobacco Bel W3 by O3 was maximum during some periods in August and September, the mean injury being heavier than in 1974. Urtica urens and Poa annua too, indicator plants for photochemical air pollution by peroxyacetyl nitrate and O3, showed more frequent injury in 1975, specially in some weeks in June and most of it in August. Petunia too indicated more influence of ethylene than in 1974, mostly in the second half of June. This year again the effect of air pollution on growth and yield of tulip Blue Parrot, tobacco Bel W3 and tomato extase plants was studied at the same six sites as last year by the mouth of the Rhine, with filtered and unfiltered greenhouses. Tulips in the unfiltered greenhouses showed a heavier leaf injury than those in the filtered greenhouses, except at the site in The Hague. These injured plants had a significantly lower average fresh and dry weight of the stems and leaves and of the bulbs too. Tobacco and tomato plants had a higher average dry weight of stems and leaves in the filtered greenhouses than in the unfiltered ones.

  9. Nonlinear Model Predictive Control for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell System Based On Wiener Model

    OpenAIRE

    T. H. Lee; J. H. Park; S. M. Lee; S. C. Lee

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider Wiener nonlinear model for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The Wiener model of the SOFC consists of a linear dynamic block and a static output non-linearity followed by the block, in which linear part is approximated by state-space model and the nonlinear part is identified by a polynomial form. To control the SOFC system, we have to consider various view points such as operating conditions, another constraint conditions, change of load current and so on. A change of ...

  10. Novel Magnetic Zinc Oxide Nanotubes for Phenol Adsorption: Mechanism Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa F. Elkady

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Considering the great impact of a material’s surface area on adsorption processes, hollow nanotube magnetic zinc oxide with a favorable surface area of 78.39 m2/g was fabricated with the assistance of microwave technology in the presence of poly vinyl alcohol (PVA as a stabilizing agent followed by sonic precipitation of magnetite nano-particles. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM micrographs identified the nanotubes’ morphology in the synthesized material with an average aspect ratio of 3. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis verified the combination of magnetite material with the hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO in the prepared material. The immobilization of magnetite nanoparticles on to ZnO was confirmed using vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM. The sorption affinity of the synthesized magnetic ZnO nanotube for phenolic compounds from aqueous solutions was examined as a function of various processing factors. The degree of acidity of the phenolic solution has great influence on the phenol sorption process on to magnetic ZnO. The calculated value of ΔH0 designated the endothermic nature of the phenol uptake process on to the magnetic ZnO nanotubes. Mathematical modeling indicated a combination of physical and chemical adsorption mechanisms of phenolic compounds on to the fabricated magnetic ZnO nanotubes. The kinetic process correlated better with the second-order rate model compared to the first-order rate model. This result indicates the predominance of the chemical adsorption process of phenol on to magnetic ZnO nanotubes.

  11. The composition dependence of the photochemical reactivity of strontium barium titanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Abhilasha

    The efficiency of particulate water photolysis catalysts is impractically low due to the recombination of intermediate species and charge carriers. The back reaction can occur easily if the oxidation and reduction sites on the surface of the catalyst are not far enough apart. It is hypothesized that it will be possible to increase the separation of the sites of the two half reactions and reduce the recombination of photogenerated charge carriers by using a ferroelectric material with permanent internal dipolar fields. This separation of the reaction sites may significantly increase the efficiency of the process. The present work compares the photochemical reactivities of ferroelectric and nonferroelectric materials (SrxBa1-xTiO 3, 0.0≤ x ≤1.0) with similar composition and structure. The reactivities are compared by measuring the color change of methylene blue dye after the aqueous dye solution reacts on the surface of ceramic sample pellets as a result of exposure to UV light. The reactivities are also compared by measuring the amount of silver that is formed when an aqueous AgNO3 solution photochemically reacts on the surface. The change in the color of the dye is measured by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and absorbance measurements. The amount of silver is measured by atomic force microscopy. The photochemical reactivity of SrxBa1-xTiO3 shows a local maximum at the composition of the ferroelectric to non-ferroelectric transition. Also, the reactivities decrease as BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 become less pure. The dominant factors causing this trend in reactivities of SrxBa1-xTiO3 are the dielectric constant and alloy scattering. It is found that higher values of the dielectric constant increase the photochemical reactivity by enlarging the space charge region. The increase in alloy scattering in SrxBa1-xTiO 3 solid solutions as x increases from zero or decreases from 1, has adverse effect on reactivity. There are other factors such as ferroelectric polarization

  12. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Supplement VIII, halogen species evaluation for atmospheric chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, R.; Baulch, D.L.; Cox, R.A.; Hampson, R.F. Jr.; Kerr, J.A.; Rossi, M.J.; Troe, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper updates and extends part of the previous data base of critical evaluations of the kinetics and photochemistry of gas-phase chemical reactions of neutral species involved in atmospheric chemistry [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 9, 295 (1980); 11, 327 (1982); 13, 1259 (1984); 18, 881 (1989); 21, 1125 (1992); 26, 521 (1997); 26, 1329 (1997); 28, 191 (1999)]. The present evaluation is limited to the inorganic halogen family of atmospherically important reactions. The work has been carried out by the authors under the auspices of the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Phase Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. Data sheets have been prepared for 102 thermal and photochemical reactions, containing summaries of the available experimental data with notes giving details of the experimental procedures. For each thermal reaction, a preferred value of the rate coefficient at 298 K is given together with a temperature dependence where possible. The selection of the preferred value is discussed and estimates of the accuracies of the rate coefficients and temperature coefficients have been made for each reaction. For each photochemical reaction the data sheets list the preferred values of the photoabsorption cross sections and the quantum yields of the photochemical reactions together with comments on how they were selected. The data sheets are intended to provide the basic physical chemical data needed as input for calculations that model atmospheric chemistry. A table summarizing the preferred rate data is provided, together with an appendix listing the available values of enthalpies of formation of the reactant and product species

  13. Photochemical Synthesis and Properties of Colloidal Copper, Silver and Gold Adsorbed on Quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loginov, Anatoliy V.; Gorbunova, Valentina V.; Boitsova, Tatiana B.

    2002-01-01

    Original methods for the photochemical production of stable copper, silver and gold colloids in the form of films on quartz, and dispersion in liquids were devised. It is shown that photochemical synthesis of colloidal metals is a difficult multiphase process, and includes the formation of low-valence forms of Cu(I), Au(I) and nonmetal clusters, colloidal particles and their agglomerates. Cluster stabilization and further growth to colloidal particles are achieved by adsorption onto the solid surface (quartz) or by increasing the viscosity of photolyte. In the absence of these methods of stabilization, the processes of intermediate reoxidation to Cu(II) and Au(III) and agglomeration of Ag and Au colloids proceed in a photolyte. Adsorption and the rate of cluster growth on a quartz surface are speeded up by the action of monochromatic UV light. Experimental models of the mechanism of colloidal formation are suggested. The dependence of the growth rate and the properties of the colloids on conditions of the photochemical procedure (energy and light intensity, concentration of initial complex) has been established

  14. A conceptual and calculational model for gas formation from impure calcined plutonium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, John L.; Eller, P. Gary

    2000-01-01

    Safe transport and storage of pure and impure plutonium oxides requires an understanding of processes that may generate or consume gases in a confined storage vessel. We have formulated conceptual and calculational models for gas formation from calcined materials. The conceptual model for impure calcined plutonium oxides is based on the data collected to date

  15. Could clinical photochemical internalisation be optimised to avoid neuronal toxicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Caitriona; Hopper, Colin; MacRobert, Alexander J; Phillips, James B; Woodhams, Josephine H

    2017-08-07

    Photochemical Internalisation (PCI) is a novel drug delivery technology in which low dose photodynamic therapy (PDT) can selectively rupture endo/lysosomes by light activation of membrane-incorporated photosensitisers, facilitating intracellular drug release in the treatment of cancer. For PCI to be developed further, it is important to understand whether nerve damage is an impending side effect when treating cancers within or adjacent to nervous system tissue. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and their associated satellite glia were subjected to PCI treatment in a 3D co-culture system following incubation with photosensitisers: meso-tetraphenylporphine (TPPS 2a ) or tetraphenylchlorin disulfonate (TPCS 2 a) and Bleomycin. Results from the use of 3D co-culture models demonstrate that a cancer cell line PCI30 and satellite glia were more sensitive to PCI than neurons and mixed glial cells, athough neurite length was affected. Neurons in culture survived PCI treatment under conditions sufficient to kill tumour cells, suggesting cancers within or adjacent to nervous system tissue could be treated with this novel technology. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Photoelectrolysis at the oxide-electrolyte interface as interpreted through the 'transition' layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, R. K.; Weber, Michael F.; Schumacher, L.; Dignam, M. J.

    1980-12-01

    A transition layer model of the oxide-electrolyte interface, proposed earlier by one of us, is outlined and then examined in the light of experimental data relating primarily to photoelectrolysis of water at semiconducting oxide electrodes. The model provides useful insight into the behaviour of the system and allows a calculation of thc minimum bias potential needed for photoelectrolysis, thus illuminating the origin of the requirement for such an external bias. In order to electrolyse water without a bias, the model requires an n-type oxide to be sufficiently reduced so that it is thermodynamically capable of chemically reducing water to produce hydrogen at 1 atm pressure. Similarly, for bias-free operation, a p-type metal oxide must be thermodynamically unstable with respect to the release of oxygen at 1 atm pressure. In the face of these requirements it is apparent that oxide stability is bound to be in general a serious problem for nonstoichiometric single metal oxides.

  17. Modelling of low energy ion sputtering from oxide surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubart, T; Nyberg, T; Berg, S

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of this work is to present a way to estimate the values of surface binding energy for oxides. This is done by fitting results from the binary collisions approximation code Tridyn with data from the reactive sputtering processing curves, as well as the elemental composition obtained from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Oxide targets of Al, Ti, V, Nb and Ta are studied. The obtained surface binding energies are then used to predict the partial sputtering yields. Anomalously high sputtering yield is observed for the TiO 2 target. This is attributed to the high sputtering yield of Ti lower oxides. Such an effect is not observed for the other studied metals. XPS measurement of the oxide targets confirms the formation of suboxides during ion bombardment as well as an oxygen deficient surface in the steady state. These effects are confirmed from the processing curves from the oxide targets showing an elevated sputtering rate in pure argon.

  18. Cellular Automata Modelling of Photo-Induced Oxidation Processes in Molecularly Doped Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Goldie

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of employing cellular automata (CA to model photo-induced oxidation processes in molecularly doped polymers is explored. It is demonstrated that the oxidation dynamics generated using CA models exhibit stretched-exponential behavior. This dynamical characteristic is in general agreement with an alternative analysis conducted using standard rate equations provided the molecular doping levels are sufficiently low to prohibit the presence of safe-sites which are impenetrable to dissolved oxygen. The CA models therefore offer the advantage of exploring the effect of dopant agglomeration which is difficult to assess from standard rate equation solutions. The influence of UV-induced bleaching or darkening upon the resulting oxidation dynamics may also be easily incorporated into the CA models and these optical effects are investigated for various photo-oxidation product scenarios. Output from the CA models is evaluated for experimental photo-oxidation data obtained from a series of hydrazone-doped polymers.

  19. Radiolytic oxidation of propane: Computer modeling of the reaction scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Avinash K.; Hanrahan, Robert J.

    The oxidation of gaseous propane under gamma radiolysis was studied at 100 torr pressure and 25°C, at oxygen pressures from 1 to 15 torr. Major oxygen-containing products and their G-values with 10% added oxygen are as follows: acetone, 0.98; i-propyl alcohol, 0.86; propionaldehyde, 0.43; n-propyl alcohol, 0.11; acrolein, 0.14; and allyl alcohol, 0.038. Minor products include i-butyl alcohol, t-amyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol, n-amyl alcohol, and i-amyl alcohol. Small yields of i-hexyl alcohol and n-hexyl alcohol were also observed. There was no apparent difference in the G-values at pressures of 50, 100 and 150 torr. When the oxygen concentration was decreased below 5%, the yields of acetone, i-propyl alcohol, and n-propyl alcohol increased, the propionaldehyde yield decreased, and the yields of other products remained constant. The formation of major oxygen-containing products was explained on the basis that the alkyl radicals combine with molecular oxygen to give peroxyl radicals; the peroxyl radicals react with one another to give alkoxyl radicals, which in turn react with one another to form carbonyl compounds and alcohols. The reaction scheme for the formation of major products was examined using computer modeling based on a mechanism involving 28 reactions. Yields could be brought into agreement with the data within experimental error in nearly all cases.

  20. Towards a Predictive Thermodynamic Model of Oxidation States of Uranium Incorporated in Fe (hydr) oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagus, Paul S. [Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States)

    2013-01-01

    -Level Excited States: Consequences For X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy”, J. Elec. Spectros. and Related Phenom., 200, 174 (2015) describes our first application of these methods. As well as applications to problems and materials of direct interest for our PNNL colleagues, we have pursued applications of fundamental theoretical significance for the analysis and interpretation of XPS and XAS spectra. These studies are important for the development of the fields of core-level spectroscopies as well as to advance our capabilities for applications of interest to our PNNL colleagues. An excellent example is our study of the surface core-level shifts, SCLS, for the surface and bulk atoms of an oxide that provides a new approach to understanding how the surface electronic of oxides differs from that in the bulk of the material. This work has the potential to lead to a new key to understanding the reactivity of oxide surfaces. Our theoretical studies use cluster models with finite numbers of atoms to describe the properties of condensed phases and crystals. This approach has allowed us to focus on the local atomistic, chemical interactions. For these clusters, we obtain orbitals and spinors through the solution of the Hartree-Fock, HF, and the fully relativistic Dirac HF equations. These orbitals are used to form configuration mixing wavefunctions which treat the many-body effects responsible for the open shell angular momentum coupling and for the satellites of the core-level spectra. Our efforts have been in two complementary directions. As well as the applications described above, we have placed major emphasis on the enhancement and extension of our theoretical and computational capabilities so that we can treat complex systems with a greater range of many-body effects. Noteworthy accomplishments in terms of method development and enhancement have included: (1) An improvement in our treatment of the large matrices that must be handled when many-body effects are treated. (2

  1. Mass transfer model for two-layer TBP oxidation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    To prove that two-layer, TBP-nitric acid mixtures can be safely stored in the canyon evaporators, it must be demonstrated that a runaway reaction between TBP and nitric acid will not occur. Previous bench-scale experiments showed that, at typical evaporator temperatures, this reaction is endothermic and therefore cannot run away, due to the loss of heat from evaporation of water in the organic layer. However, the reaction would be exothermic and could run away if the small amount of water in the organic layer evaporates before the nitric acid in this layer is consumed by the reaction. Provided that there is enough water in the aqueous layer, this would occur if the organic layer is sufficiently thick so that the rate of loss of water by evaporation exceeds the rate of replenishment due to mixing with the aqueous layer. This report presents measurements of mass transfer rates for the mixing of water and butanol in two-layer, TBP-aqueous mixtures, where the top layer is primarily TBP and the bottom layer is comprised of water or aqueous salt solution. Mass transfer coefficients are derived for use in the modeling of two-layer TBP-nitric acid oxidation experiments. Three cases were investigated: (1) transfer of water into the TBP layer with sparging of both the aqueous and TBP layers, (2) transfer of water into the TBP layer with sparging of just the TBP layer, and (3) transfer of butanol into the aqueous layer with sparging of both layers. The TBP layer was comprised of 99% pure TBP (spiked with butanol for the butanol transfer experiments), and the aqueous layer was comprised of either water or an aluminum nitrate solution. The liquid layers were air sparged to simulate the mixing due to the evolution of gases generated by oxidation reactions. A plastic tube and a glass frit sparger were used to provide different size bubbles. Rates of mass transfer were measured using infrared spectrophotometers provided by SRTC/Analytical Development

  2. Modelling of oxidation and hydriding behaviour of Zircaloy-2 pressure tubes in PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, D.N.; Sunil Kumar; Khan, K.B.

    2002-01-01

    A computer model named DOCTOR (Deuteriding of Coolant Tubes during Operation of Reactor) has been developed for predicting the axial profile of oxide thickness and hydrogen (Deuterium) concentration in PHWR pressure tubes. This model is applicable to single channel or full core analysis. The main source of hydrogen is considered to be oxidation of pressure tube on the i.d. surface by high temperature coolant water. Three stages of oxidation is considered namely, pre- transition, post transition and accelerated. Oxidation rate is considered to be dependent on channel power, axial power/flux distribution, coolant temperature and pre-existing oxide thickness at the location. The kinetics parameters for oxidation model are derived from the actual measurement of oxide thickness on a number of pressure tubes examined in PIE Division. The input data required for the model are: channel power, channel power factor, axial flux distribution, coolant inlet temperature, critical oxide thickness, hydrogen pick up fraction, initial hydrogen in the material and time of operation (efpy). The model calculates the oxide layer thickness on the inside surface of the pressure tube along the length. The amount of hydrogen picked up by the pressure tube is calculated from the oxide thickness using hydrogen pick up fraction determined from the PIE data. The pressure tube length is divided into a number of axial segments for calculation. The temperature and fast neutron flux assumed to be constant in a given segment. The axial temperature profile calculated from the axial power profile in the channel is used for calculating the oxidation rate at various locations in the pressure tube. The model has been validated with PIE data of hydrogen equivalent measurement on a number of irradiated Zircaloy-2 pressure tubes of various PHWRs. The performance of the model in predicting the axial profile of hydrogen in the pressure tubes has been found to be good. (author)

  3. Photochemical Approaches to Complex Chemotypes: Applications in Natural Product Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The use of photochemical transformations is a powerful strategy that allows for the formation of a high degree of molecular complexity from relatively simple building blocks in a single step. A central feature of all light-promoted transformations is the involvement of electronically excited states, generated upon absorption of photons. This produces transient reactive intermediates and significantly alters the reactivity of a chemical compound. The input of energy provided by light thus offers a means to produce strained and unique target compounds that cannot be assembled using thermal protocols. This review aims at highlighting photochemical transformations as a tool for rapidly accessing structurally and stereochemically diverse scaffolds. Synthetic designs based on photochemical transformations have the potential to afford complex polycyclic carbon skeletons with impressive efficiency, which are of high value in total synthesis. PMID:27120289

  4. Impact of oxide thickness on gate capacitance – Modelling and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, National ... conventional HEMT, Schottky barrier diode is formed at the gate electrode. .... term corresponds to the energy required for the electric field in the oxide layer and the.

  5. Modelling the change in the oxidation coefficient during the aerobic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-20

    Jan 20, 2013 ... activated sludge in batch reactors under different initial phenol concentrations. ... wet air oxidation, ozonation, non-catalytic, catalytic and ... design of aeration devices. ... using an open (flowing gas/static liquid) respirometer.

  6. Modelling nitrous oxide emissions from cropland at the regional scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Benoît

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Arable soils are a large source of nitrous oxide (N2O emissions, making up half of the biogenic emissions worldwide. Estimating their source strength requires methods capable of capturing the spatial and temporal variability of N2O emissions, along with the effects of crop management. Here, we applied a process-based model, CERES, with geo-referenced input data on soils, weather, and land use to map N2O emissions from wheat-cropped soils in three agriculturally intensive regions in France. Emissions were mostly controlled by soil type and local climate conditions, and only to a minor extent by the doses of fertilizer nitrogen applied. As a result, the direct emission factors calculated at the regional level were much smaller (ranging from 0.0007 to 0.0033 kg N2O-N kg–1 N than the value of 0.0125 kg N2O-N kg–1 N currently recommended in the IPCC Tier 1 methodology. Regional emissions were far more sensitive to the soil microbiological parameter s governing denitrification and its fraction evolved as N2O, soil bulk density, and soil initial inorganic N content. Mitigation measures should therefore target a reduction in the amount of soil inorganic N upon sowing of winter crops, and a decrease of the soil N2O production potential itself. From a general perspective, taking into account the spatial variability of soils and climate thereby appears necessary to improve the accuracy of national inventories, and to tailor mitigation strategies to regional characteristics. The methodology and results presented here may easily be transferred to winter oilseed rape, whose has growing cycle and fertilser requirements are similar.

  7. A kinetic model of municipal sludge degradation during non-catalytic wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince-Pike, Arrian; Wilson, David I; Baroutian, Saeid; Andrews, John; Gapes, Daniel J

    2015-12-15

    Wet oxidation is a successful process for the treatment of municipal sludge. In addition, the resulting effluent from wet oxidation is a useful carbon source for subsequent biological nutrient removal processes in wastewater treatment. Owing to limitations with current kinetic models, this study produced a kinetic model which predicts the concentrations of key intermediate components during wet oxidation. The model was regressed from lab-scale experiments and then subsequently validated using data from a wet oxidation pilot plant. The model was shown to be accurate in predicting the concentrations of each component, and produced good results when applied to a plant 500 times larger in size. A statistical study was undertaken to investigate the validity of the regressed model parameters. Finally the usefulness of the model was demonstrated by suggesting optimum operating conditions such that volatile fatty acids were maximised. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Behaviour of defective CANDU fuel: fuel oxidation kinetic and thermodynamic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgs, J.

    2005-01-01

    The thermal performance of operating CANDU fuel under defect conditions is affected by the ingress of heavy water into the fuel element. A mechanistic model has been developed to predict the extent of fuel oxidation in defective fuel and its affect on fuel thermal performance. A thermodynamic treatment of such oxidized fuel has been performed as a basis for the boundary conditions in the kinetic model. Both the kinetic and thermodynamic models have been benchmarked against recent experimental work. (author)

  9. Photochemical Formation and Transformation of Birnessite: Effects of Cations on Micromorphology and Crystal Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tengfei; Liu, Lihu; Tan, WenFeng; Suib, Steven L; Qiu, Guohong; Liu, Fan

    2018-05-24

    As important components with excellent oxidation and adsorption activity in soils and sediments, manganese oxides affect the transportation and fate of nutrients and pollutants in natural environments. In this work, birnessite was formed by photocatalytic oxidation of Mn2+aq in the presence of nitrate under solar irradiation. The effects of concentrations and species of interlayer cations (Na+, Mg2+, and K+) on birnessite crystal structure and micromorphology were investigated. The roles of adsorbed Mn2+ and pH in the transformation of the photosynthetic birnessite were further studied. The results indicated that Mn2+aq was oxidized to birnessite by superoxide radicals (O2•-) generated from the photolysis of NO3- under UV irradiation. The particle size and thickness of birnessite decreased with increasing cation concentration. The birnessite showed a plate-like morphology in the presence of K+, while exhibited a rumpled sheet-like morphology when Na+ or Mg2+ was used. The different micromorphologies of birnessites could be ascribed to the position of cations in the interlayer. The adsorbed Mn2+ and high pH facilitated the reduction of birnessite to low-valence manganese oxides including hausmannite, feitknechtite, and manganite. This study suggests that interlayer cations and Mn2+ play essential roles in the photochemical formation and transformation of birnessite in aqueous environments.

  10. Modeling Nitrous Oxide Production during Biological Nitrogen Removal via Nitrification and Denitrification: Extensions to the General ASM Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Ruscalleda, Maël; Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles

    2011-01-01

    on N2O production from four different mixed culture nitrification and denitrification reactor study reports. Modeling results confirm that hydroxylamine oxidation by ammonium oxidizers (AOB) occurs 10 times slower when NO2– participates as final electron acceptor compared to the oxic pathway. Among......Nitrous oxide (N2O) can be formed during biological nitrogen (N) removal processes. In this work, a mathematical model is developed that describes N2O production and consumption during activated sludge nitrification and denitrification. The well-known ASM process models are extended to capture N2O...

  11. Unified computational model of transport in metal-insulating oxide-metal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, B. D.; Hjalmarson, H. P.; Jacobs-Gedrim, R. B.; Agarwal, Sapan; James, C. D.; Marinella, M. J.

    2018-04-01

    A unified physics-based model of electron transport in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) systems is presented. In this model, transport through metal-oxide interfaces occurs by electron tunneling between the metal electrodes and oxide defect states. Transport in the oxide bulk is dominated by hopping, modeled as a series of tunneling events that alter the electron occupancy of defect states. Electron transport in the oxide conduction band is treated by the drift-diffusion formalism and defect chemistry reactions link all the various transport mechanisms. It is shown that the current-limiting effect of the interface band offsets is a function of the defect vacancy concentration. These results provide insight into the underlying physical mechanisms of leakage currents in oxide-based capacitors and steady-state electron transport in resistive random access memory (ReRAM) MIM devices. Finally, an explanation of ReRAM bipolar switching behavior based on these results is proposed.

  12. Transient dynamic and modeling parameter sensitivity analysis of 1D solid oxide fuel cell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huangfu, Yigeng; Gao, Fei; Abbas-Turki, Abdeljalil; Bouquain, David; Miraoui, Abdellatif

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A multiphysics, 1D, dynamic SOFC model is developed. • The presented model is validated experimentally in eight different operating conditions. • Electrochemical and thermal dynamic transient time expressions are given in explicit forms. • Parameter sensitivity is discussed for different semi-empirical parameters in the model. - Abstract: In this paper, a multiphysics solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) dynamic model is developed by using a one dimensional (1D) modeling approach. The dynamic effects of double layer capacitance on the electrochemical domain and the dynamic effect of thermal capacity on thermal domain are thoroughly considered. The 1D approach allows the model to predict the non-uniform distributions of current density, gas pressure and temperature in SOFC during its operation. The developed model has been experimentally validated, under different conditions of temperature and gas pressure. Based on the proposed model, the explicit time constant expressions for different dynamic phenomena in SOFC have been given and discussed in detail. A parameters sensitivity study has also been performed and discussed by using statistical Multi Parameter Sensitivity Analysis (MPSA) method, in order to investigate the impact of parameters on the modeling accuracy

  13. Photochemical degradation of atenolol, carbamazepine, meprobamate, phenytoin and primidone in wastewater effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Mei Mei [Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, 428 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA), P.O. Box 99954, Las Vegas, NV 89193-9954 (United States); Trenholm, Rebecca [Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA), P.O. Box 99954, Las Vegas, NV 89193-9954 (United States); Rosario-Ortiz, Fernando L., E-mail: Fernando.rosario@colorado.edu [Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, 428 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2015-01-23

    Highlights: • The photochemical degradation of 5 compounds was evaluated in wastewater effluents. • Attenuation by sensitized photolysis was the most important degradation pathway. • Hydroxyl radical accounted for most of the degradation for aliphatic compounds. • Other transient oxidants could also significantly impact the degradation of the compounds. - Abstract: The photochemical degradation of five pharmaceuticals was examined in two secondary wastewater effluents. The compounds, which included atenolol, carbamazepine, meprobamate, phenytoin and primidone, were evaluated for both direct and sensitized photolysis. In the two wastewaters, direct photolysis did not lead to significant compound degradation; however, sensitized photolysis was an important removal pathway for the five pharmaceuticals. Upon solar irradiation, hydroxyl radical (HO·) was quantified using the hydroxylation of benzene and singlet oxygen ({sup 1}O{sub 2}) formation was monitored following the degradation of furfuryl alcohol. Degradation via sensitized photolysis was observed following five-day exposures for atenolol (69–91%), carbamazepine (67–98%), meprobamate (16–52%), phenytoin (44–85%), and primidone (34–88%). Varying removal is likely a result of the differences in reactivity with transient oxidants. Averaged steady state HO· concentrations ranged from 1.2 to 4.0 × 10{sup −16} M, whereas the concentrations of {sup 1}O{sub 2} were 6.0–7.6 × 10{sup −14} M. Partial removal due to presence of HO· indicates it was not the major sink for most compounds examined. Other transient oxidants, such as {sup 1}O{sub 2} and triplet state effluent organic matter, are likely to play important roles in fates of these compounds.

  14. Photosynthesis by isolated chloroplasts. IV. General concept and comparison of three photochemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnon, D I; Allen, M B; Whatley, F R

    1956-01-01

    Procedures are described for the preparation of chloroplasts capable of carrying out three photochemical reactions, each representing an increasingly complex phase of photosynthesis: photolysis of water (Hill reaction), esterification of inorganic phosphate into adenosine triphosphate (photosynthetic phosphorylation) and the reduction of carbon dioxide to the level of carbohydrates with a simultaneous evolution of oxygen. The three photochemical reactions were separable by variations in the technique for preparation of chloroplasts and by differential inhibition by several reagents. Inhibition of a more complex phase of photosynthesis does not affect the simpler one which precedes it and, conversely, the inhibition of a simpler phase of photosynthesis is paralleled by an inhibition of the more complex phase which follows. Reversible inhibition of CO/sub 2/ fixation and photosynthetic phosphorylation, but not of photolysis, by sulfhydryl group inhibitors suggests that sulfhydryl compounds (enzymes, cofactors, or both) are involved in phosphorylation and CO/sub 2/ fixation, but not in the primary conversion of light into chemical energy as measured by the Hill reaction. Evidence is presented in support of the conclusion that the synthesis of ATP by green cells occurs at two distinct sites: anaerobically in chloroplasts by photosynthetic phosphorylation, and acrobically in smaller cytoplasmic particles, presumably mitochondria, by oxidative phosphorylation independent of light. A general scheme of photosynthesis by chloroplasts, consistent with these findings, is presented. 44 references, 8 figures, 4 tables.

  15. Role of nitrite in the photochemical formation of radicals in the snow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Hans-Werner; Kleffmann, Jörg; Villena, Guillermo; Wiesen, Peter; King, Martin; France, James; Anastasio, Cort; Staebler, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Photochemical reactions in snow can have an important impact on the composition of the atmosphere over snow-covered areas as well as on the composition of the snow itself. One of the major photochemical processes is the photolysis of nitrate leading to the formation of volatile nitrogen compounds. We report nitrite concentrations determined together with nitrate and hydrogen peroxide in surface snow collected at the coastal site of Barrow, Alaska. The results demonstrate that nitrite likely plays a significant role as a precursor for reactive hydroxyl radicals as well as volatile nitrogen oxides in the snow. Pollution events leading to high concentrations of nitrous acid in the atmosphere contributed to an observed increase in nitrite in the surface snow layer during nighttime. Observed daytime nitrite concentrations are much higher than values predicted from steady-state concentrations based on photolysis of nitrate and nitrite indicating that we do not fully understand the production of nitrite and nitrous acid in snow. The discrepancy between observed and expected nitrite concentrations is probably due to a combination of factors, including an incomplete understanding of the reactive environment and chemical processes in snow, and a lack of consideration of the vertical structure of snow.

  16. Generalized kinetic model of reduction of molecular oxidant by metal containing redox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchenko, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Present work is devoted to kinetics of reduction of molecular oxidant by metal containing redox. Constructed generalized kinetic model of redox process in the system solid redox - reagent solution allows to perform the general theoretical approach to research and to obtain new results on kinetics and mechanism of interaction of redox with oxidants.

  17. Experimental kinetic study and modeling of calcium oxide carbonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouchon, L.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions, major contributors to the greenhouse effect, are considered as the main cause of global warming. So, decrease of CO 2 emitted by large industrial combustion sources or power plants, is an important scientific goal. One of the approaches is based on CO 2 separation and capture from flue gas, followed by sequestration in a wide range of geological formations. In this aim, CO 2 is captured by sorbents like calcium oxide (CaO) in multi-cycle process of carbonation/de-carbonation. However, it was shown that the most important limitations of such process are related to the reversibility of reaction. CaO rapidly loses activity towards CO 2 , so the maximum extent of carbonation decreases as long as the number of cycles increases. In order to well understand the processes and parameters influencing the capture capacity of CaO-based sorbents, it appears important to get details on the kinetic law governing the reaction, which have not been really studied up to now. To investigate this reaction, CaO carbonation kinetics was followed by means of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) on divided materials. Special care was given to the validation of the usual kinetic assumptions such as steady state and rate-determining step assumptions. The aim was to obtain a model describing the reaction in order to explain the influence of intensive variables such as carbonation temperature and CO 2 partial pressure. TGA curves obtained under isothermal and isobaric conditions showed an induction period linked to the nucleation process and a strong slowing down of the reaction rate once a given fractional conversion was reached. Both phenomena were observed to depend on carbonation temperature and CO 2 partial pressure. To explain these results, the evolution of texture and microstructure of the solid during the reaction was regarded as essential. Reaction at the grain scale induces a volume increase from CaO to CaCO 3 which causes a change in the

  18. Models for the Configuration and Integrity of Partially Oxidized Fuel Rod Cladding at High Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefken, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    Models were designed to resolve deficiencies in the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.2 calculations of the configuration and integrity of hot, partially oxidized cladding. These models are expected to improve the calculations of several important aspects of fuel rod behavior. First, an improved mapping was established from a compilation of PIE results from severe fuel damage tests of the configuration of melted metallic cladding that is retained by an oxide layer. The improved mapping accounts for the relocation of melted cladding in the circumferential direction. Then, rules based on PIE results were established for calculating the effect of cladding that has relocated from above on the oxidation and integrity of the lower intact cladding upon which it solidifies. Next, three different methods were identified for calculating the extent of dissolution of the oxidic part of the cladding due to its contact with the metallic part. The extent of dissolution effects the stress and thus the integrity of the oxidic part of the cladding. Then, an empirical equation was presented for calculating the stress in the oxidic part of the cladding and evaluating its integrity based on this calculated stress. This empirical equation replaces the current criterion for loss of integrity which is based on temperature and extent of oxidation. Finally, a new rule based on theoretical and experimental results was established for identifying the regions of a fuel rod with oxidation of both the inside and outside surfaces of the cladding. The implementation of these models is expected to eliminate the tendency of the SCDAP/RELAP5 code to overpredict the extent of oxidation of the upper part of fuel rods and to underpredict the extent of oxidation of the lower part of fuel rods and the part with a high concentration of relocated material. This report is a revision and reissue of the report entitled, Improvements in Modeling of Cladding Oxidation and Meltdown

  19. Oxidation of Fe(II) in rainwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, J D; Whitehead, R F; Kieber, R J; Hardison, D R

    2005-04-15

    Photochemically produced Fe(II) is oxidized within hours under environmentally realistic conditions in rainwater. The diurnal variation between photochemical production and reoxidation of Fe(II) observed in our laboratory accurately mimics the behavior of ferrous iron observed in field studies where the highest concentrations of dissolved Fe(ll) occur in afternoon rain during the period of maximum sunlight intensity followed by gradually decreasing concentrations eventually returning to early morning pre-light values. The experimental work presented here, along with the results of kinetics studies done by others, suggests thatthe primary process responsible for the decline in photochemically produced Fe(II) concentrations is oxidation by hydrogen peroxide. This reaction is first order with respect to both the concentrations of Fe(II) and H2O2. The second-order rate constant determined for six different authentic rain samples varied over an order of magnitude and was always less than or equal to the rate constant determined for this reaction in simple acidic solutions. Oxidation of photochemically produced ferrous iron by other oxidants including molecular oxygen, ozone, hydroxyl radical, hydroperoxyl/superoxide radical, and hexavalent chromium were found to be insignificant under the conditions present in rainwater. This study shows that Fe(II) occurs as at least two different chemical species in rain; photochemically produced Fe(II) that is oxidized over time periods of hours, and a background Fe(II) that is protected against oxidation, perhaps by organic complexation, and is stable against oxidation for days. Because the rate of oxidation of photochemically produced Fe(II) does not increase with increasing rainwater pH, the speciation of this more labile form of Fe(II) is also not controlled by simple hydrolysis reactions.

  20. Metal Oxide Nanomaterial QNAR Models: Available Structural Descriptors and Understanding of Toxicity Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Ying

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide nanomaterials are widely used in various areas; however, the divergent published toxicology data makes it difficult to determine whether there is a risk associated with exposure to metal oxide nanomaterials. The application of quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR modeling in metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity studies can reduce the need for time-consuming and resource-intensive nanotoxicity tests. The nanostructure and inorganic composition of metal oxide nanomaterials makes this approach different from classical QSAR study; this review lists and classifies some structural descriptors, such as size, cation charge, and band gap energy, in recent metal oxide nanomaterials quantitative nanostructure activity relationship (QNAR studies and discusses the mechanism of metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity based on these descriptors and traditional nanotoxicity tests.

  1. Photochemically induced emission tuning of conductive polumers used in OLEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilopoulou, M [NCSR ' Demokritos' , Institute of Microelectronics, POB 60228, 153 10 Agia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Pistolis, G [Institute of Physical Chemistry, NCSR ' Demokritos' Athens 153 10 (Greece); Argitis, P [NCSR ' Demokritos' , Institute of Microelectronics, POB 60228, 153 10 Agia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece)

    2005-01-01

    The present work focuses on the use of novel patterning technology schemes for the fabrication of OLED-based displays and in particular on the definition of two colour emitting pixels in one polymeric conducting layer. The approach adopted to this end is based on photochemically induced emition tuning. On the basis of this approach a novel photolithographic patterning technique was developed, aiming at the considerable simplification of the display fabrication process and on the performance improvement. We prepared electroluminescent devices that are emitting blue colour ({lambda}{sub max} 413 nm) with a turnon voltage about 12-15 V. In other devices we introduce a dispersed dye (1-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]-6-phenylhexatriene) and a series of photoacid generators (onium salts) in the polymeric layer and, by using an appropriate photochemical transformation through a photomask in a single layer, we were able to change the colour to desirable direction, since the parent compound and its photochemical product have distinguishable luminescence spectra (green and blue colour respectively). We were able to produce two of the three primary colours in a single layer of a conductive polymer by using a photochemical transformation based on photoacid induced emission change. A series of photoacid generators were evaluated.

  2. Photochemical Aryl Radical Cyclizations to Give (E-3-Ylideneoxindoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gurry

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available (E-3-Ylideneoxindoles are prepared in methanol in reasonable to good yields, as adducts of photochemical 5-exo-trig of aryl radicals, in contrast to previously reported analogous radical cyclizations initiated by tris(trimethylsilylsilane and azo-initiators that gave reduced oxindole adducts.

  3. Surface retention and photochemical reactivity of the diphenylether herbicide oxyfluorfen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrano, Laura; Bufo, Sabino A; Cataldi, Tommaso R I; Albanis, Triantafyllos A

    2004-01-01

    The photochemical behavior of oxyfluorfen [2-chloro-1-(3-etoxy-4-nitrophenoxy)-4-(trifluoromethyl) benzene] on two Greek soils was investigated. Soils were sampled from Nea Malgara and Preveza regions, characterized by a different organic matter content. Soils were spiked with the diphenyl-ether herbicide and irradiation experiments were performed either in the laboratory with a solar simulator (xenon lamp) or outside, under natural sunlight irradiation; other soil samples were kept in the dark to control the retention reaction. Kinetic parameters of both retention and photochemical reactions were calculated using zero-, first- and second- (Langmuir-Hinshelwood) order equations, and best fit was checked through statistical analysis. The soil behaviors were qualitatively similar but quantitatively different, with the soil sampled from the Nea Malgara region much more sorbent as compared with Preveza soil. All studied reactions followed second-order kinetics and photochemical reactions were influenced by retaining capability of the soils. The contributions of the photochemical processes to the global dissipation rates were also calculated. Two main metabolites were identified as 2-chloro-1-(3-ethoxy-4-hydroxyphenoxy)-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzene and 2-chloro-1- (3-hydroxy-4-nitrophenoxy)-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzene.

  4. Repair processes for photochemical damage in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaver, J.E.

    1974-01-01

    Repair processes for photochemical damage in cells following uv irradiation are reviewed. Cultured fibroblast cells from human patients with xeroderma pigmentosum were used as an example to illustrate aspects of repair of injuries to DNA and proteins. (250 references) (U.S.)

  5. Simulation of photochemical pollutants in summer 2013 in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Guo, H.; Hu, J.

    2016-12-01

    Rapid economic growth and associated emissions increase in China have led to severe air pollution in recent decades. Photochemical pollutants are secondary formed pollutants in the atmosphere with the existence of sunlight. Ozone (O3) is adverse to human health and ecosystems and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is a major component of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) that affects human health, visibility, and climate. In this work, the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model was used to investigate the formation of O3 and SOA in three episodes from June to August 2013. Compared with observation data, O3 performance meets the EPA criteria of mean normalized bias (MNB) within ± 0.15 in major parts of China including five megacities. The diurnal variation of O3 had similar trend with the temperature. The August episode has the highest O3 concentrations of 100 ppb in North China Plain while the July episode has the lowest concentrations of 50 ppb. SOA concentrations were up to 35-40 μgm-3 at different cities in different episodes. Biogenic SOA was the majority with the contributions from glyoxal (GLY), methylglyoxal (MGLY), isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) and oligomers (OLGM) of 70%. Isopleth found that NOx controls O3 concentration in most areas of China. Reducing VOC would have minor effects on O3 concentrations while reducing NOx could largely reduce O3 concentration except for urban areas such as Shanghai and Guangzhou. On the contrary, SOA was controlled by VOCs in cities such as Beijing, Shanghai, and Xi'an. This study provides valuable information for designing effective control strategies for O3 and particulate matter in China.

  6. The Oxides of Nitrogen in Air Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Air Resources Board, Sacramento.

    Research on the health effects of oxides of nitrogen and on the role of oxides of nitrogen in producing photochemical smog effects is presented in this report. Prepared by the California State Department of Public Health at the request of the State Legislature, it gives a comprehensive review of available information, as well as the need for air…

  7. Models for solid oxide fuel cell systems exploitation of models hierarchy for industrial design of control and diagnosis strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Marra, Dario; Polverino, Pierpaolo; Sorrentino, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This book presents methodologies for optimal design of control and diagnosis strategies for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell systems. A key feature of the methodologies presented is the exploitation of modelling tools that balance accuracy and computational burden.

  8. Three model systems measure oxidation/nitration damage caused ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    caused by peroxynitrite ... (OONO–) or its carbon dioxide derivatives cause oxidation/nitration and hence mutation to various body poly- mers e.g. .... The work described in this paper is quite brief due to ex- ... exact way to balance the dose of antioxidants in mixtures ... tralizing conditions the half-life of OONO– is less than.

  9. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria: A model for molecular microbial ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowalchuk, G.A.; Stephen, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    The eutrophication of many ecosystems in recent decades has led to an increased interest in the ecology of nitrogen transformation. Chemolitho-autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria are responsible for the rate-limiting step of nitrification in a wide variety of environments, making them important

  10. Ab Initio Thermodynamic Modeling of Electrified Metal-Oxide Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Zhenhua; Hansen, Martin Hangaard; Greeley, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells are attractive devices in a sustainable energy context because of their fuel flexibility and potentially highly efficient conversion of chemical to electrical energy. The performance of the device is to a large extent determined by the atomic structure of the electrode-elec...

  11. Oxidation Phenomena in Advanced High Strength Steels : Modelling and Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mao, W.

    2018-01-01

    Galvanized advanced high strength steels (AHSS) will be the most competitive structural material for automotive applications in the next decade. Oxidation of AHSS during the recrystalization annealing process in a continuous galvanizing line to a large extent influences the quality of zinc coating

  12. Employing RADIANCE to refine indoor photocatalytic oxidation modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelzers, R.S.; Yu, Q.; Mangkuto, R.A.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) gained great attention in the last years as one of the foremost environmental concerns and it is therefore imperative that effective methods are developed to conserve IAQ. Currently, the novel technology photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) is a potential alternative. A

  13. Generic Top-Functionalization of Patterned Antifouling Zwitterionic Polymers on Indium Tin Oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Giesbers, M.; Zuilhof, H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel surface engineering approach that combines photochemical grafting and surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) to attach zwitterionic polymer brushes onto indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates. The photochemically grafted hydroxyl-terminated organic

  14. Radioactive intermediate products in the photolysis of the system [1-14C] tributyltin oxide cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloetzer, D.

    1982-01-01

    Interactions between matrix and applied biocide in the photochemical degradation of the system [1- 14 C] tributyltin oxide/cellulose have been investigated. The intermediate formation of [1- 14 C] tributylstannyl cellulose ethers was found to be the most important step. The photochemical preparation of bis [8- 14 C] tributylstannyl glucose ether is described. (author)

  15. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and dysregulated iron homeostatis in rat models of cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) is considered a risk factor for the exacerbation of air pollution health effects. Therefore, rodent models of CVD are increasingly used to examine mechanisms ofvariation in susceptibility. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and altere...

  16. Modelling ionising radiation induced defect generation in bipolar oxides with gated diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnaby, H.J.; Cirba, C.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Kosier, St.; Fouillat, P.; Montagner, X.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation-induced oxide defects that degrade electrical characteristics of bipolar junction transistor (BJTs) can be measured with the use of gated diodes. The buildup of defects and their effect on device radiation response are modeled with computer simulation. (authors)

  17. Photochemical fate of beta-blockers in NOM enriched waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ling; Xu, Haomin; Cooper, William J.; Song, Weihua

    2012-01-01

    Beta-blockers, prescribed for the treatment of high blood pressure and for long-term use after a heart attack, have been detected in surface and ground waters. This study examines the photochemical fate of three beta-blockers, atenolol, metoprolol, and nadolol. Hydrolysis accounted for minor losses of these beta-blockers in the pH range 4–10. The rate of direct photolysis at pH 7 in a solar simulator varied from 6.1 to 8.9 h −1 at pH 7. However, the addition of a natural organic matter (NOM) isolate enhanced the photochemical loss of all three compounds. Indirect photochemical fate, generally described by reactions with hydroxyl radical (·OH) and singlet oxygen ( 1 ΔO 2 ), and, the direct reaction with the triplet excited state, 3 NOM ⁎ , also varied but collectively appeared to be the major loss factor. Bimolecular reaction rate constants of the three beta-blockers with 1 ΔO 2 and ·OH were measured and accounted for 0.02–0.04% and 7.2–38.9% of their loss, respectively. These data suggest that the 3 NOM ⁎ contributed 50.6–85.4%. Experiments with various 3 NOM ⁎ quenchers supported the hypothesis that it was singly the most important reaction. Atenolol was chosen for more detailed investigation, with the photoproducts identified by LC–MS analysis. The results suggested that electron-transfer could be an important mechanism in photochemical fate of beta-blockers in the presence of NOM. - Highlights: ► Photochemical degradation of beta-blockers in the simulated natural waters. ► Reactive Oxygen Species play a minor role in the indirect photodegradation. ► The loss of beta-blockers results from direct reaction with 3 DOM ⁎ .

  18. A mathematical model of bacteria capable of complete oxidation of ammonium predicts improved nitrogen removal and reduced production of nitrous oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Pokhilko, Alexandra; Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    The removal of excess nutrients\\ud from water ecosystems requires oxidation of toxic\\ud ammonium by two types of bacteria; one oxidizes\\ud ammonium to nitrite and the other oxidizes nitrite\\ud to nitrate. The oxidation of ammonium is often\\ud incomplete and nitrite accumulates. Nitrite is also\\ud toxic, and is converted by the ammoniumoxidizing\\ud bacteria to nitrous oxide, a powerful\\ud greenhouse gas. Here we use mathematical\\ud modeling to analyze a potential solution to the\\ud problems re...

  19. Modelling of stable isotope fractionation by methane oxidation and diffusion in landfill cover soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahieu, Koenraad; De Visscher, Alex; Vanrolleghem, Peter A.; Van Cleemput, Oswald

    2008-01-01

    A technique to measure biological methane oxidation in landfill cover soils that is gaining increased interest is the measurement of stable isotope fractionation in the methane. Usually to quantify methane oxidation, only fractionation by oxidation is taken into account. Recently it was shown that neglecting the isotope fractionation by diffusion results in underestimation of the methane oxidation. In this study a simulation model was developed that describes gas transport and methane oxidation in landfill cover soils. The model distinguishes between 12 CH 4 , 13 CH 4 , and 12 CH 3 D explicitly, and includes isotope fractionation by diffusion and oxidation. To evaluate the model, the simulations were compared with column experiments from previous studies. The predicted concentration profiles and isotopic profiles match the measured ones very well, with a root mean square deviation (RMSD) of 1.7 vol% in the concentration and a RMSD of 0.8 per mille in the δ 13 C value, with δ 13 C the relative 13 C abundance as compared to an international standard. Overall, the comparison shows that a model-based isotope approach for the determination of methane oxidation efficiencies is feasible and superior to existing isotope methods

  20. Mathematical Modelling to Predict Oxidative Behaviour of Conjugated Linoleic Acid in the Food Processing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aitziber Ojanguren

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Industrial processes that apply high temperatures in the presence of oxygen may compromise the stability of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA bioactive isomers. Statistical techniques are used in this study to model and predict, on a laboratory scale, the oxidative behaviour of oil with high CLA content, controlling the limiting factors of food processing. This modelling aims to estimate the impact of an industrial frying process (140 °C, 7 L/h air on the oxidation of CLA oil for use as frying oil instead of sunflower oil. A factorial design was constructed within a temperature (80–200 °C and air flow (7–20 L/h range. Oil stability index (Rancimat method was used as a measure of oxidation. Three-level full factorial design was used to obtain a quadratic model for CLA oil, enabling the oxidative behaviour to be predicted under predetermined process conditions (temperature and air flow. It is deduced that temperatures applied in food processes affect the oxidation of CLA to a greater extent than air flow. As a result, it is estimated that the oxidative stability of CLA oil is less resistant to industrial frying than sunflower oil. In conclusion, thanks to the mathematical model, a good choice of the appropriate industrial food process can be selected to avoid the oxidation of the bioactive isomers of CLA, ensuring its functionality in novel applications.

  1. Photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid in aqueous periodate with VUV and UV light irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, M.H.; Wang, B.B.; Yu, H.S.; Wang, L.L.; Yuan, S.H.; Chen, J.

    2010-01-01

    The photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in aqueous periodate (IO 4 - ) was investigated under two types of low-pressure mercury lamps: one emits at 254 nm light (UV light) and the other emits both 254 nm and 185 nm light (VUV light). PFOA decomposed efficiently under VUV light irradiation while it decomposed poorly under UV light irradiation. The addition of IO 4 - significantly increased the rate of decomposition and defluorination of PFOA irradiated with UV light whereas it decreased both processes under VUV irradiation. Reactive radical (IO 3 ·) generated by photolysis of IO 4 - initiated the oxidation of PFOA in UV process. Aquated electrons (e aq - ), generated from water homolysis, scavenged IO 4 - resulting in decrease of reactive radical species production and PFOA decomposition. The shorter-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) formed in a stepwise manner from long-chain PFCAs.

  2. Probability density functions of photochemicals over a coastal area of Northern Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiadis, T.; Fortezza, F.; Alberti, L.; Strocchi, V.; Marani, A.; Dal Bo', G.

    1998-01-01

    The present paper surveys the findings of experimental studies and analyses of statistical probability density functions (PDFs) applied to air pollutant concentrations to provide an interpretation of the ground-level distributions of photochemical oxidants in the coastal area of Ravenna (Italy). The atmospheric-pollution data set was collected from the local environmental monitoring network for the period 1978-1989. Results suggest that the statistical distribution of surface ozone, once normalised over the solar radiation PDF for the whole measurement period, follows a log-normal law as found for other pollutants. Although the Weibull distribution also offers a good fit of the experimental data, the area's meteorological features seem to favour the former distribution once the statistical index estimates have been analysed. Local transport phenomena are discussed to explain the data tail trends

  3. Photophysical and photochemical effects in ultrafast laser patterning of CVD graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobrinetskiy, Ivan; Otero, Nerea; Romero, Pablo M; Emelianov, Aleksei; Komarov, Ivan; Nasibulin, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The micro-scale patterns in graphene on Si/SiO 2 substrate were fabricated using ultrashort 515 nm laser pulses. For both picosecond and femtosecond laser pulses two competitive processes, based on photo-thermal (ablation) and photochemical (oxidation/etching) effects, were observed. The laser-induced etching of graphene starts just below the threshold energy of graphene ablation: 1.7 nJ per 280 fs pulse and 2.7 µ J per 30 ps pulse. Whilst etching is not sensitive to thermal properties of graphene and provides uniform patterns, the ablation, in contrast, is highly affected by defects in the graphene structure like wrinkles and bilayer islands. The mechanisms of ultrafast laser interaction with graphene are discussed. (letter)

  4. Chemical degradation of proteins in the solid state with a focus on photochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozziconacci, Olivier; Schöneich, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Protein pharmaceuticals comprise an increasing fraction of marketed products but the limited solution stability of proteins requires considerable research effort to prepare stable formulations. An alternative is solid formulation, as proteins in the solid state are thermodynamically less susceptible to degradation. Nevertheless, within the time of storage a large panel of kinetically controlled degradation reactions can occur such as, e.g., hydrolysis reactions, the formation of diketopiperazine, condensation and aggregation reactions. These mechanisms of degradation in protein solids are relatively well covered by the literature. Considerably less is known about oxidative and photochemical reactions of solid proteins. This review will provide an overview over photolytic and non-photolytic degradation reactions, and specially emphasize mechanistic details on how solid structure may affect the interaction of protein solids with light. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. From small aromatic molecules to functional nanostructured carbon by pulsed laser-induced photochemical stitching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Gokhale

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel route employing UV laser pulses (KrF Excimer, 248 nm to cleave small aromatic molecules and stitch the generated free radicals into functional nanostructured forms of carbon is introduced. The process differs distinctly from any strategies wherein the aromatic rings are broken in the primary process. It is demonstrated that this pulsed laser-induced photochemical stitching (PLPS process when applied to routine laboratory solvents (or toxic chemical wastes when discarded Chlorobenzene and o-Dichlorobenzene yields Carbon Nanospheres (CNSs comprising of graphene-like sheets assembled in onion-like configurations. This room temperature process implemented under normal laboratory conditions is versatile and clearly applicable to the whole family of haloaromatic compounds without and with additions of precursors or other nanomaterials. We further bring out its applicability for synthesis of metal-oxide based carbon nanocomposites.

  6. Generalized molybdenum oxide surface chemical state XPS determination via informed amorphous sample model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas, E-mail: job314@lehigh.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lehigh University, B336 Iacocca Hall, 111 Research Drive, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); PhotoCatalytic Synthesis group, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, Meander 229, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Mendoza-Sanchez, Beatriz [CRANN, Chemistry School, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Fernandez, Vincent [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Veenstra, Rick [PhotoCatalytic Synthesis group, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, Meander 229, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Dukstiene, Nijole [Department of Physical and Inorganic Chemistry, Kaunas University of Technology, Radvilenu pl. 19, LT-50254 Kaunas (Lithuania); Roberts, Adam [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Trafford Wharf Road, Wharfside, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom); Fairley, Neal [Casa Software Ltd, Bay House, 5 Grosvenor Terrace, Teignmouth, Devon TQ14 8NE (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • We analyzed and modeled spectral envelopes of complex molybdenum oxides. • Molybdenum oxide films of varying valence and crystallinity were synthesized. • MoO{sub 3} and MoO{sub 2} line shapes from experimental data were created. • Informed amorphous sample model (IASM) developed. • Amorphous molybdenum oxide XPS envelopes were interpreted. - Abstract: Accurate elemental oxidation state determination for the outer surface of a complex material is of crucial importance in many science and engineering disciplines, including chemistry, fundamental and applied surface science, catalysis, semiconductors and many others. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is the primary tool used for this purpose. The spectral data obtained, however, is often very complex and can be subject to incorrect interpretation. Unlike traditional XPS spectra fitting procedures using purely synthetic spectral components, here we develop and present an XPS data processing method based on vector analysis that allows creating XPS spectral components by incorporating key information, obtained experimentally. XPS spectral data, obtained from series of molybdenum oxide samples with varying oxidation states and degree of crystallinity, were processed using this method and the corresponding oxidation states present, as well as their relative distribution was elucidated. It was shown that monitoring the evolution of the chemistry and crystal structure of a molybdenum oxide sample due to an invasive X-ray probe could be used to infer solutions to complex spectral envelopes.

  7. Molecular modeling studies of oleate adsorption on iron oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rath, Swagat S. [CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar (India); Sinha, Nishant [Accelrys K.K, Bengaluru (India); Sahoo, Hrushikesh [CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar (India); Das, Bisweswar, E-mail: bdas@immt.res.in [CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar (India); Mishra, Barada Kanta [CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar (India)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Plane wave periodic DFT study of oleate-iron oxide interaction. • Magnetite-oleate complex is more stable than hematite and goethite. • Flotation recovery of magnetite is more compared to the other two oxides. - Abstract: Comparative studies of oleate interaction with hematite, magnetite and goethite using density functional calculations are presented. The approach is illustrated by carrying out geometric optimization of oleate on the stable and most exposed planes of hematite, magnetite, and goethite. Interaction energies for oleate-mineral surface have been determined, based on which, magnetite is found to be forming the most stable complex with oleate. Trend as obtained from the quantum chemical calculations has been validated by contact angle measurements and flotation studies on hematite, magnetite and goethite with sodium oleate at different pH and collector concentrations.

  8. Molecular modeling studies of oleate adsorption on iron oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rath, Swagat S.; Sinha, Nishant; Sahoo, Hrushikesh; Das, Bisweswar; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Plane wave periodic DFT study of oleate-iron oxide interaction. • Magnetite-oleate complex is more stable than hematite and goethite. • Flotation recovery of magnetite is more compared to the other two oxides. - Abstract: Comparative studies of oleate interaction with hematite, magnetite and goethite using density functional calculations are presented. The approach is illustrated by carrying out geometric optimization of oleate on the stable and most exposed planes of hematite, magnetite, and goethite. Interaction energies for oleate-mineral surface have been determined, based on which, magnetite is found to be forming the most stable complex with oleate. Trend as obtained from the quantum chemical calculations has been validated by contact angle measurements and flotation studies on hematite, magnetite and goethite with sodium oleate at different pH and collector concentrations

  9. Photochemical Production of Hydrogen from Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1978-01-01

    The energy flux in sunlight is 40 000 kW per head of the world population. Theoretically much of this energy can be used to photolyze water, in presence of a sensitizer, to H2 (and 02) for a hydrogen economy. The main difficulty in a homogeneous medium is the back-reaction of the primary products. According to the 'membrane principle', the reducing and the oxidizing primary products are released on opposite sides of asymmetric membranes, and so prevented from back-reacting. In essence, this is the mechanism of the photosynthetic machinery in plants and bacteria. This therefore serves as an example in the artificial construction of suitable asymmetric, 'vectorial', membranes. Relatively small areas of photolytic collectors, e.g. in tropical deserts, could cover the energy needs of large populations through hydrogen. (author)

  10. Mathematical Modeling of Wastewater Oxidation under Microgravity Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Boyun Guo; Donald W. Holder; David S. Schechter

    2005-01-01

    Volatile removal assembly (VRA) is a module installed in the International Space Station for removing contaminants (volatile organics) in the wastewater produced by the crew. The VRA contains a slim pack bed reactor to perform catalyst oxidation of the wastewater at elevated pressure and temperature under microgravity conditions. Optimal design of the reactor requires a thorough understanding about how the reactor performs under microgravity conditions. The objective of this study was to theo...

  11. Pineapple Waste Extract for Preventing Oxidation in Model Food Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia Gómez, Francisco; Almajano Pablos, María Pilar

    2016-07-01

    Pineapple (Ananas comosus) is consumed in the form of chunks (canned), cubes, fruit salad, and also in juices, concentrates, and jams. In the processes to produce these products, the waste generated represents a high percentage of the total fruit. Some studies have shown that residues of certain fruits, such as pineapple, have the same antioxidant activity as the fruit pulp. So although these residues are discarded, they could be used as an alternative source of polyphenols, as natural antioxidants. This study is focused on the antioxidant activity of wastes obtained in the production of pineapple products and their application. The polyphenols' scavenging activity was determined by the oxygen radical antioxidant capacity assay. The antioxidant potential was determined in emulsions (o/w) and in muffins, where the primary oxidation products (by peroxide value, PV) and the secondary oxidation products (by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) were analyzed. In addition the muffins were analyzed by means of a triangular sensory test. The PV method showed that pineapple waste extracts caused a reduction in oxidation products of 59% in emulsions and 91% in the muffins. The reduction in TBARs values for emulsions were 27% and for muffins were 51%. The triangular sensory test showed that the samples containing the extract were not distinguished from the control (α = 0.05). © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. Chemical composition and photochemical reactivity of exhaust from aircraft turbine engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. F. Lyon

    Full Text Available Assessment of the environmental impact of aircraft emissions is required by planners and policy makers. Seveal areas of concern are: 1. exposure of airport workers and urban residents to toxic chemicals emitted when the engines operate at low power (idle and taxi on the ground; 2. contributions to urban photochemical air pollution of aircraft volatile organic and nitrogen oxides emissions from operations around airports; and 3. emissions of nitrogen oxides and particles during high-altitude operation. The environmental impact of chemicals emitted from jet aircraft turbine engines has not been firmly established due to lack of data regarding emission rates and identities of the compounds emitted. This paper describes an experimental study of two different aircraft turbine engines designed to determine detailed organic emissions, as well as emissions of inorganic gases. Emissions were measured at several engine power settings. Measurements were made of detailed organic composition from C1 through C17, CO, CO2, NO, NOx, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Measurements were made using a multi-port sampling pro be positioned directly behind the engine in the exhaust exit plane. The emission measurements have been used to determine the organic distribution by carbon number and the distribution by compound class at each engine power level. The sum of the organic species was compared with an independent measurement of total organic carbon to assess the carbon mass balance. A portion of the exhaust was captured and irradiated in outdoor smog chambers to assess the photochemical reactivity of the emissions with respect to ozone formation. The reactivity of emissions from the two engines was apportioned by chemical compound class.

  13. Chemical composition and photochemical reactivity of exhaust from aircraft turbine engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. W. Spicer

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of the environmental impact of aircraft emissions is required by planners and policy makers. Seveal areas of concern are: 1. exposure of airport workers and urban residents to toxic chemicals emitted when the engines operate at low power (idle and taxi on the ground; 2. contributions to urban photochemical air pollution of aircraft volatile organic and nitrogen oxides emissions from operations around airports; and 3. emissions of nitrogen oxides and particles during high-altitude operation. The environmental impact of chemicals emitted from jet aircraft turbine engines has not been firmly established due to lack of data regarding emission rates and identities of the compounds emitted. This paper describes an experimental study of two different aircraft turbine engines designed to determine detailed organic emissions, as well as emissions of inorganic gases. Emissions were measured at several engine power settings. Measurements were made of detailed organic composition from C1 through C17, CO, CO2, NO, NOx, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Measurements were made using a multi-port sampling pro be positioned directly behind the engine in the exhaust exit plane. The emission measurements have been used to determine the organic distribution by carbon number and the distribution by compound class at each engine power level. The sum of the organic species was compared with an independent measurement of total organic carbon to assess the carbon mass balance. A portion of the exhaust was captured and irradiated in outdoor smog chambers to assess the photochemical reactivity of the emissions with respect to ozone formation. The reactivity of emissions from the two engines was apportioned by chemical compound class.

  14. Modeling SOA formation from the oxidation of intermediate volatility n-alkanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lee-Taylor

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The chemical mechanism leading to SOA formation and ageing is expected to be a multigenerational process, i.e. a successive formation of organic compounds with higher oxidation degree and lower vapor pressure. This process is here investigated with the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere. Gas phase oxidation schemes are generated for the C8–C24 series of n-alkanes. Simulations are conducted to explore the time evolution of organic compounds and the behavior of secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation for various preexisting organic aerosol concentration (COA. As expected, simulation results show that (i SOA yield increases with the carbon chain length of the parent hydrocarbon, (ii SOA yield decreases with decreasing COA, (iii SOA production rates increase with increasing COA and (iv the number of oxidation steps (i.e. generations needed to describe SOA formation and evolution grows when COA decreases. The simulated oxidative trajectories are examined in a two dimensional space defined by the mean carbon oxidation state and the volatility. Most SOA contributors are not oxidized enough to be categorized as highly oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA but reduced enough to be categorized as hydrocarbon like organic aerosols (HOA, suggesting that OOA may underestimate SOA. Results show that the model is unable to produce highly oxygenated aerosols (OOA with large yields. The limitations of the model are discussed.

  15. Numerical modelling of emissions of nitrogen oxides in solid fuel combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bešenić, Tibor; Mikulčić, Hrvoje; Vujanović, Milan; Duić, Neven

    2018-06-01

    Among the combustion products, nitrogen oxides are one of the main contributors to a negative impact on the environment, participating in harmful processes such as tropospheric ozone and acid rains production. The main source of emissions of nitrogen oxides is the human combustion of fossil fuels. Their formation models are investigated and implemented with the goal of obtaining a tool for studying the nitrogen-containing pollutant production. In this work, numerical simulation of solid fuel combustion was carried out on a three-dimensional model of a drop tube furnace by using the commercial software FIRE. It was used for simulating turbulent fluid flow and temperature field, concentrations of the reactants and products, as well as the fluid-particles interaction by numerically solving the integro-differential equations describing these processes. Chemical reactions mechanisms for the formation of nitrogen oxides were implemented by the user functions. To achieve reasonable calculation times for running the simulations, as well as efficient coupling with the turbulent mixing process, the nitrogen scheme is limited to sufficiently few homogeneous reactions and species. Turbulent fluctuations that affect the reaction rates of nitrogen oxides' concentration are modelled by probability density function approach. Results of the implemented model for nitrogen oxides' formation from coal and biomass are compared to the experimental data. Temperature, burnout and nitrogen oxides' concentration profiles are compared, showing satisfactory agreement. The new model allows the simulation of pollutant formation in the real-world applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cladding oxidation during air ingress. Part II: Synthesis of modelling results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuzet, E.; Haurais, F.; Bals, C.; Coindreau, O.; Fernandez-Moguel, L.; Vasiliev, A.; Park, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A state-of-the-art for air oxidation modelling in the frame of severe accident is done. • Air oxidation models from main severe accident codes are detailed. • Simulations from main severe accident codes are compared against experimental results. • Perspectives in terms of need for further model development and experiments are given. - Abstract: Air ingress is a potential risk in some low probable situations of severe accidents in a nuclear power plant. Air is a highly oxidizing atmosphere that can lead to an enhanced Zr-based cladding oxidation and core degradation affecting the release of fission products. This is particularly true speaking about ruthenium release, due to its high radiotoxicity and its ability to form highly volatile oxides in a significant manner in presence of air. The oxygen affinity is decreasing from the Zircaloy cladding, fuel and ruthenium inclusions. It is consequently of great need to understand the phenomena governing cladding oxidation by air as a prerequisite for the source term issues in such scenarios. In the past years, many works have been done on cladding oxidation by air under severe accident conditions. This paper with in addition the paper “Cladding oxidation during air ingress – Part I: Synthesis of experimental results” of this journal issue aim at assessing the state of the art on this phenomenon. In this paper, the modelling of air ingress phenomena in the main severe accident codes (ASTEC, ATHLET-CD, MAAP, MELCOR, RELAP/SCDAPSIM, SOCRAT) is described in details, as well as the validation against the integral experiments QUENCH-10, QUENCH-16 and PARAMETER-SF4. A full review of cladding oxidation by air is thus established.

  17. Fatty acid oxidation changes and the correlation with oxidative stress in different preeclampsia-like mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Ding

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD expression is decreased in placenta of some cases of preeclampsia (PE which may result in free fatty acid (FFA increased. High FFA level will induce oxidative stress, so abnormal long-chain fatty acid-oxidation may participate in the pathogenesis of PE through oxidative stress pathway. METHODS: PE-like groups were ApoC3 transgenic mice with abnormal fatty acid metabolism, classical PE-like models with injection of Nw-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NA or lipopolysaccharide (LPS and the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS mouse model with β2GPI injection (ApoC3+NS, ApoC3+L-NA, L-NA, LPS and β2GPI groups. The control group was wild-type mice with normal saline injection. Except for β2GPI mice, the other mice were subdivided into pre-implantation (Pre and mid-pregnancy (Mid subgroups by injection time. RESULTS: All PE-like groups showed hypertension and proteinuria except ApoC3+NS mice only showed hypertension. Serum FFA levels increased significantly except in LPS group compared to controls (P<0.05. LCHAD mRNA and protein expression in the liver and placenta was significantly higher for ApoC3+NS, ApoC3+L-NA and β2GPI mice and lower for L-NA mice than controls (P<0.05 but did not differ between LPS mice and controls. P47phox mRNA and protein expression in the liver significantly increased in all PE-like groups except LPS group, while P47phox expression in the placenta only significantly increased in L-NA and β2GPI groups. CONCLUSIONS: Abnormal long-chain fatty acid-oxidation may play a different role in different PE-like models and in some cases participate in the pathogenesis of PE through oxidative stress pathway.

  18. Modeling explicit tropospheric oxidation through identifying volatile organic compound (VOC) sources, their impact on air quality and their signatures in South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hairong

    Photochemical smog, characterized by high concentrations of ozone (O 3) and fine particles, is of great concern in the urban areas like the Pearl River Delta (PRD). Ambient O3 and its precursors were simultaneously measured for the first time at a site within the inland PRD region (WQS) and a site in Hong Kong (TC) from 22 October to 01 December 2007, in order to improve our understanding of the interplay of O3 pollution between Hong Kong and the inland PRD region, to explore the relationships between O3 and its precursors, and to identify the key volatile organic compound (VOC) species and emission source categories contributing to the O3 formation. Ratio analyses for trace gases and VOCs and back trajectory calculation revealed that the air masses arriving at WQS were more aged due to regional influence, whereas the air masses at TC were mainly affected by local emissions and/or regional transport. An observation-Based Model (OBM) was employed to determine the O 3-precursor relationship. At both sites, O3 production was found to be VOC-limited. Anthropogenic hydrocarbons played a key role in O 3 production, while reducing NO emissions aided the build up of O 3 concentrations. The contribution of carbonyls to O3 formation was firstly input in the OBM by using measured data, the results showed that the net O3 production derived from the OBM agreed better with the observed O3 increment after hourly carbonyl concentrations were included. A photochemical trajectory model was developed and used for the first time to simulate the formation of photochemical pollutants at WQS, Guangzhou during photochemical pollution episodes between 12 and 17 November, 2007. Calculated photochemical ozone creation potential (POCP) indices indicated that alkanes and oxygenated organic compounds had relatively low reactivity, while alkenes and aromatics presented high reactivity. Analysis of the emission inventory found that the sum of 60 of the 139 VOC species accounted for 91% of the

  19. Development of 3D Oxide Fuel Mechanics Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, B. W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Casagranda, A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pitts, S. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jiang, W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-07-27

    This report documents recent work to improve the accuracy and robustness of the mechanical constitutive models used in the BISON fuel performance code. These developments include migration of the fuel mechanics models to be based on the MOOSE Tensor Mechanics module, improving the robustness of the smeared cracking model, implementing a capability to limit the time step size based on material model response, and improving the robustness of the return mapping iterations used in creep and plasticity models.

  20. SO2 oxidation catalyst model systems characterized by thermal methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatem, G; Eriksen, Kim Michael; Gaune-Escard, M

    2002-01-01

    The molten salts M2S2O7 and MHSO4, the binary molten salt Systems M2S2O7-MHSO4 and the molten salt-gas systems M2S2O7 V2O5 and M2S2O7-M2SO4 V2O5 (M = Na, K, Rb, Cs) in O-2, SO2 and At atmospheres have been investigated by thermal methods like calorimetry, Differential Enthalpic Analysis (DEA) and...... to the mechanism Of SO2 oxidation by V2O5 based industrial catalysts....

  1. A model for oxidizing species concentrations in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, B.; Chexal, B.; Pathania, R.; Chun, J.; Ballinger, R.; Abdollahian, D.

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate and control the intergranular stress corrosion cracking of boiling water reactor (BWR) vessel internal components requires knowledge of the concentration of oxidizing species that affects the electrochemical potentials in various regions of a BWR. In a BWR flow circuit, as water flows through the radiation field, the radiolysis process and chemical reactions lead to the production of species such as oxygen, hydrogen, and hydrogen peroxide. Since chemistry measurements are difficult inside BWRs, analytical tools have been developed by Ruiz and Lin, Ibe and Uchida and Chun and Ballinger for estimating the concentration of species that provide the necessary input for water chemistry control and material protection

  2. Dynamic Modeling, Model-Based Control, and Optimization of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Benjamin James

    2011-07-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells are a promising option for distributed stationary power generation that offers efficiencies ranging from 50% in stand-alone applications to greater than 80% in cogeneration. To advance SOFC technology for widespread market penetration, the SOFC should demonstrate improved cell lifetime and load-following capability. This work seeks to improve lifetime through dynamic analysis of critical lifetime variables and advanced control algorithms that permit load-following while remaining in a safe operating zone based on stress analysis. Control algorithms typically have addressed SOFC lifetime operability objectives using unconstrained, single-input-single-output control algorithms that minimize thermal transients. Existing SOFC controls research has not considered maximum radial thermal gradients or limits on absolute temperatures in the SOFC. In particular, as stress analysis demonstrates, the minimum cell temperature is the primary thermal stress driver in tubular SOFCs. This dissertation presents a dynamic, quasi-two-dimensional model for a high-temperature tubular SOFC combined with ejector and prereformer models. The model captures dynamics of critical thermal stress drivers and is used as the physical plant for closed-loop control simulations. A constrained, MIMO model predictive control algorithm is developed and applied to control the SOFC. Closed-loop control simulation results demonstrate effective load-following, constraint satisfaction for critical lifetime variables, and disturbance rejection. Nonlinear programming is applied to find the optimal SOFC size and steady-state operating conditions to minimize total system costs.

  3. Optical modeling of nickel-base alloys oxidized in pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clair, A. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon cedex (France); Foucault, M.; Calonne, O. [Areva ANP, Centre Technique Departement Corrosion-Chimie, 30 Bd de l' industrie, BP 181, 71205 Le Creusot (France); Finot, E., E-mail: Eric.Finot@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon cedex (France)

    2012-10-01

    The knowledge of the aging process involved in the primary water of pressurized water reactor entails investigating a mixed growth mechanism in the corrosion of nickel-base alloys. A mixed growth induces an anionic inner oxide and a cationic diffusion parallel to a dissolution-precipitation process forms the outer zone. The in situ monitoring of the oxidation kinetics requires the modeling of the oxide layer stratification with the full knowledge of the optical constants related to each component. Here, we report the dielectric constants of the alloys 600 and 690 measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry and fitted to a Drude-Lorentz model. A robust optical stratification model was determined using focused ion beam cross-section of thin foils examined by transmission electron microscopy. Dielectric constants of the inner oxide layer depleted in chromium were assimilated to those of the nickel thin film. The optical constants of both the spinels and extern layer were determined. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spectroscopic ellipsometry of Ni-base alloy oxidation in pressurized water reactor Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurements of the dielectric constants of the alloys Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical simulation of the mixed oxidation process using a three stack model Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scattered crystallites cationic outer layer; linear Ni-gradient bottom layer Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of the refractive index of the spinel and the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers.

  4. Model simulating oxidation of Zircalot-4 at 400 (C in water vapor. Influence of thermal cycling and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Eduardo A.; Beranguer, G.

    1998-01-01

    This work gives a model simulating the oxidation of Zircaloy-4 in water vapor at 400 (C with different precipitates and granular sizes. The model combines diffusion with inter linked porosity, defining also an interface in the oxide separating phases of inter linked porosity from non inter linked porosity in the (PI/PnL) oxide, which spreads in a discrete way in time and is capable of reproducing kinetics of experimental oxidation

  5. The Adsorption of Cd(II) on Manganese Oxide Investigated by Batch and Modeling Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoming; Chen, Tianhu; Zou, Xuehua; Zhu, Mulan; Chen, Dong; Pan, Min

    2017-09-28

    Manganese (Mn) oxide is a ubiquitous metal oxide in sub-environments. The adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide as function of adsorption time, pH, ionic strength, temperature, and initial Cd(II) concentration was investigated by batch techniques. The adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide can be satisfactorily simulated by pseudo-second-order kinetic model with high correlation coefficients (R² > 0.999). The adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide significantly decreased with increasing ionic strength at pH adsorption was independent of ionic strength at pH > 6.0, which indicated that outer-sphere and inner-sphere surface complexation dominated the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide at pH 6.0, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity of Mn oxide for Cd(II) calculated from Langmuir model was 104.17 mg/g at pH 6.0 and 298 K. The thermodynamic parameters showed that the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide was an endothermic and spontaneous process. According to the results of surface complexation modeling, the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide can be satisfactorily simulated by ion exchange sites (X₂Cd) at low pH and inner-sphere surface complexation sites (SOCd⁺ and (SO)₂CdOH - species) at high pH conditions. The finding presented herein plays an important role in understanding the fate and transport of heavy metals at the water-mineral interface.

  6. The Adsorption of Cd(II on Manganese Oxide Investigated by Batch and Modeling Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Huang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Manganese (Mn oxide is a ubiquitous metal oxide in sub-environments. The adsorption of Cd(II on Mn oxide as function of adsorption time, pH, ionic strength, temperature, and initial Cd(II concentration was investigated by batch techniques. The adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption of Cd(II on Mn oxide can be satisfactorily simulated by pseudo-second-order kinetic model with high correlation coefficients (R2 > 0.999. The adsorption of Cd(II on Mn oxide significantly decreased with increasing ionic strength at pH < 5.0, whereas Cd(II adsorption was independent of ionic strength at pH > 6.0, which indicated that outer-sphere and inner-sphere surface complexation dominated the adsorption of Cd(II on Mn oxide at pH < 5.0 and pH > 6.0, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity of Mn oxide for Cd(II calculated from Langmuir model was 104.17 mg/g at pH 6.0 and 298 K. The thermodynamic parameters showed that the adsorption of Cd(II on Mn oxide was an endothermic and spontaneous process. According to the results of surface complexation modeling, the adsorption of Cd(II on Mn oxide can be satisfactorily simulated by ion exchange sites (X2Cd at low pH and inner-sphere surface complexation sites (SOCd+ and (SO2CdOH− species at high pH conditions. The finding presented herein plays an important role in understanding the fate and transport of heavy metals at the water–mineral interface.

  7. The Adsorption of Cd(II) on Manganese Oxide Investigated by Batch and Modeling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoming; Chen, Tianhu; Zou, Xuehua; Zhu, Mulan; Chen, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxide is a ubiquitous metal oxide in sub-environments. The adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide as function of adsorption time, pH, ionic strength, temperature, and initial Cd(II) concentration was investigated by batch techniques. The adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide can be satisfactorily simulated by pseudo-second-order kinetic model with high correlation coefficients (R2 > 0.999). The adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide significantly decreased with increasing ionic strength at pH adsorption was independent of ionic strength at pH > 6.0, which indicated that outer-sphere and inner-sphere surface complexation dominated the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide at pH 6.0, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity of Mn oxide for Cd(II) calculated from Langmuir model was 104.17 mg/g at pH 6.0 and 298 K. The thermodynamic parameters showed that the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide was an endothermic and spontaneous process. According to the results of surface complexation modeling, the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide can be satisfactorily simulated by ion exchange sites (X2Cd) at low pH and inner-sphere surface complexation sites (SOCd+ and (SO)2CdOH− species) at high pH conditions. The finding presented herein plays an important role in understanding the fate and transport of heavy metals at the water–mineral interface. PMID:28956849

  8. Bisphenol A Induces Hepatotoxicity through Oxidative Stress in Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab K. Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are cytotoxic agents that lead to significant oxidative damage. Bisphenol A (BPA is a contaminant with increasing exposure to it and exerts both toxic and estrogenic effects on mammalian cells. Due to limited information concerning the effect of BPA on liver, this study investigates whether BPA causes hepatotoxicity by induction of oxidative stress in liver. Rats were divided into five groups: The first four groups, BPA (0.1, 1, 10, 50 mg/kg/day were administrated orally to rats for four weeks. The fifth group was taken water with vehicle. The final body weights in the 0.1 mg group showed a significant decrease compared to control group. Significant decreased levels of reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione reductase and catalase activity were found in the 50 mg BPA group compared to control groups. High dose of BPA (50 mg/kg significantly increased the biochemical levels of ALT, ALP and total bilirubin. BPA effect on the activity of antioxidant genes was confirmed by real time PCR in which the expression levels of these genes in liver tissue were significantly decrease compared to control. Data from this study demonstrate that BPA generate ROS and reduce the antioxidant gene expression that causes hepatotoxicity.

  9. Oxidation kinetics of model compounds of metabolic waste in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webley, Paul A.; Holgate, Henry R.; Stevenson, David M.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    1990-01-01

    In this NASA-funded study, the oxidation kinetics of methanol and ammonia in supercritical water have been experimentally determined in an isothermal plug flow reactor. Theoretical studies have also been carried out to characterize key reaction pathways. Methanol oxidation rates were found to be proportional to the first power of methanol concentration and independent of oxygen concentration and were highly activated with an activation energy of approximately 98 kcal/mole over the temperature range 480 to 540 C at 246 bar. The oxidation of ammonia was found to be catalytic with an activation energy of 38 kcal/mole over temperatures ranging from 640 to 700 C. An elementary reaction model for methanol oxidation was applied after correction for the effect of high pressure on the rate constants. The conversion of methanol predicted by the model was in good agreement with experimental data.

  10. Coordinated HArd Sphere Model (CHASM): A Simplified Model for Silicate and Oxide Liquids at Mantle Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, A. S.; Asimow, P. D.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Recent first-principles theoretical calculations (Stixrude 2009) and experimental shock-wave investigations (Mosenfelder 2009) indicate that melting perovskite requires significantly less energy than previously thought, supporting the idea of a deep-mantle magma ocean early in Earth's history. The modern-day solid Earth is thus likely the result of crystallization from an early predominantly molten state, a process that is primarily controlled by the poorly understood behavior of silicate melts at extreme pressures and temperatures. Probing liquid thermodynamics at mantle conditions is difficult for both theory and experiment, and further challenges are posed by the large relevant compositional space including at least MgO, SiO2, and FeO. First-principles molecular dynamics has been used with great success to determine the high P-T properties of a small set of fixed composition silicate-oxide liquids including MgO (Karki 2006), SiO2 (Karki 2007), Mg2SiO4 (de Koker 2008), MgSiO3 (Stixrude 2005), and Fe2SiO4 (Ramo 2012). While extremely powerful, this approach has limitations including high computational cost, lower bounds on temperature due to relaxation constraints, as well as restrictions to length scales and time scales that are many orders of magnitude smaller than those relevant to the Earth or experimental methods. As a compliment to accurate first-principles calculations, we have developed the Coordinated HArd Sphere Model (CHASM). We extend the standard hard sphere mixture model, recently applied to silicate liquids by Jing (2011), by accounting for the range of oxygen coordination states available to liquid cations. Utilizing approximate analytic expressions for the hard sphere model, the method can predict complex liquid structure and thermodynamics while remaining computationally efficient. Requiring only minutes on standard desktop computers rather than months on supercomputers, the CHASM approach is well-suited to providing an approximate thermodynamic

  11. Hypoxia and oxidation levels of DNA and lipids in humans and animal experimental models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Risom, Lotte; Lundby, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this review was to evaluate the association between hypoxia and oxidative damage to DNA and lipids. Evaluation criteria encompassed specificity and validation status of the biomarkers, study design, strength of the association, dose-response relationship, biological plausibility......, analogous exposures, and effect modification by intervention. The collective interpretation indicates persuasive evidence from the studies in humans for an association between hypoxia and elevated levels of oxidative damage to DNA and lipids. The levels of oxidatively generated DNA lesions and lipid...... in subjects at high altitude. Most of the animal experimental models should be interpreted with caution because the assays for assessment of lipid peroxidation products have suboptimal validity....

  12. Oxidative Stress Associated with Neuronal Apoptosis in Experimental Models of Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisela Méndez-Armenta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is considered one of the most common neurological disorders worldwide. Oxidative stress produced by free radicals may play a role in the initiation and progression of epilepsy; the changes in the mitochondrial and the oxidative stress state can lead mechanism associated with neuronal death pathway. Bioenergetics state failure and impaired mitochondrial function include excessive free radical production with impaired synthesis of antioxidants. This review summarizes evidence that suggest what is the role of oxidative stress on induction of apoptosis in experimental models of epilepsy.

  13. Modeling and experimental evaluation of the diffusion bonding of the oxide dispersion strengthened steel PM2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sittel, Wiebke; Basuki, Widodo W.; Aktaa, Jarir

    2015-01-01

    A modeling based optimization process of the solid state diffusion bonding is presented for joining ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened steels PM2000. An optimization study employing varying bonding temperatures and pressures results in almost the same strength and toughness of the bonded compared to the as received material. TEM investigations of diffusion bonded samples show a homogeneous distribution of oxide particles at the bonding seam similar to that in the bulk. Hence, no loss in strength or creep resistance due to oxide particle agglomeration is found, as verified by the mechanical properties observed for the joint.

  14. Windows(Registered Trademark)-Based Software Models Cyclic Oxidation Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smialek, J. L.; Auping, J. V.

    2004-01-01

    Oxidation of high-temperature aerospace materials is a universal issue for combustion-path components in turbine or rocket engines. In addition to the question of the consumption of material due to growth of protective scale at use temperatures, there is also the question of cyclic effects and spallation of scale on cooldown. The spallation results in the removal of part of the protective oxide in a discontinuous step and thereby opens the way for more rapid oxidation upon reheating. In experiments, cyclic oxidation behavior is most commonly characterized by measuring changes in weight during extended time intervals that include hundreds or thousands of heating and cooling cycles. Weight gains occurring during isothermal scale-growth processes have been well characterized as being parabolic or nearly parabolic functions of time because diffusion controls reaction rates. In contrast, the net weight change in cyclic oxidation is the sum of the effects of the growth and spallation of scale. Typically, the net weight gain in cyclic oxidation is determined only empirically (that is, by measurement), with no unique or straightforward mathematical connection to either the rate of growth or the amount of metal consumed. Thus, there is a need for mathematical modeling to infer spallation mechanisms. COSP is a computer program that models the growth and spallation processes of cyclic oxidation on the basis of a few elementary assumptions that were discussed in COSP: A Computer Model of Cyclic Oxidation, Oxidation of Metals, vol. 36, numbers 1 and 2, 1991, pages 81-112. Inputs to the model include the selection of an oxidation-growth law and a spalling geometry, plus oxide-phase, growth-rate, cycle-duration, and spall-constant parameters. (The spalling fraction is often shown to be a constant factor times the existing amount of scale.) The output of COSP includes the net change in weight, the amounts of retained and spalled oxide, the total amounts of oxygen and metal

  15. Modelling of elementary kinetics of H2 and CO oxidation on ceria pattern cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, HC; Tabish, AN; Aravind, PV

    2015-01-01

    Elementary kinetic mechanisms of fuel oxidation on ceria have not been dealt with in detail in literature. An elementary kinetic model is developed considering charge transfer and adsorption steps for electrochemical H 2 and CO oxidation on ceria. The reaction chemistry is solved by fitting previously obtained impedance spectra for H 2 and CO oxidation on ceria. The rate determining step is found to be the charge transfer rather than the adsorption for both H 2 and CO. A method is presented to extend the kinetics obtained from pattern anodes to macroscopic simulations in which the activation overvoltage can be calculated on the basis of elementary kinetics.

  16. Configurational Model for Conductivity of Stabilized Fluorite Structure Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Finn Willy

    1981-01-01

    The formalism developed here furnishes means by which ionic configurations, solid solution limits, and conductivity mechanisms in doped fluorite structures can be described. The present model differs markedly from previous models but reproduces qualitatively reality. The analysis reported...

  17. Molecular-beam studies of primary photochemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.T.

    1982-12-01

    Application of the method of molecular-beam photofragmentation translational spectroscopy to the investigation of primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules is described. Examples will be given to illustrate how information concerning the energetics, dynamics, and mechanism of dissociation processes can be obtained from the precise measurements of angular and velocity distributions of products in an experiment in which a well-defined beam of molecules is crossed with a laser

  18. Molecular-beam studies of primary photochemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.T.

    1982-12-01

    Application of the method of molecular-beam photofragmentation translational spectroscopy to the investigation of primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules is described. Examples will be given to illustrate how information concerning the energetics, dynamics, and mechanism of dissociation processes can be obtained from the precise measurements of angular and velocity distributions of products in an experiment in which a well-defined beam of molecules is crossed with a laser.

  19. Separation of the mercury isotopes by the indirect photochemical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botter nee Bergheaud, F.; Scaringella nee Desnoyer, M.; Wacongne, M.

    1976-01-01

    A method of photochemical separation of the mercury isotopes by the so-called indirect route in which a gas stream of oxygen and butadiene containing a mixture of mercury isotopes is passed through one or a number of vessels placed in series. The gas stream is irradiated by a lamp containing mercury which is depleted in one or a number of the isotopes and said isotopes are recovered in a trap placed downstream of the vessel or vessels

  20. PHOTOCHEMICAL AIR POLLUTION IN THE NORTH OF PORTUGAL: A HIGH TROPOSHERIC OZONE EPISODE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, A.; Carvalho, A.; Tchepel, O.; Ferreira, J.; Martins, H.; Miranda, A.; Borrego, C.; Saavedra, S.; Rodríguez, A.; Souto, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Very high concentrations of ozone are continuously measured at the monitoring station at Lamas d’Olo, located at the North of Portugal,. A particular high photochemical episode occurred between 11 and 13 of July 2005, registering ozone hourly maximum values above 350 µg.m-3. This ozone-rich episode is investigated in this paper, in order to identify its origin and formation. Besides the analysis of both meteorological and air quality monitoring datasets, a numerical modelling approach, based on MM5-CAMx system, was used to simulate the dispersion and transport (horizontal and vertical) of the photochemical pollutants and its precursors. A cross spectrum analysis of the meteorological and air quality time series was performed, in the frequency domain, to establish the relationships between ozone data measured at Lamas d’Olo with air quality data from neighbourhood stations and meteorological parameters. Results point out different behaviour/contribution between the analysed sites. Moreover, different contributions of the u and v wind component on the ozone concentration fluctuations were found suggesting the presence a mountain breeze circulation and a north synoptic transport. The preliminary modelling results pointed out that the vertical transport of pollutants are responsible for the measured high concentrations, combined with particular meteorological conditions, related to the planetary boundary layer (PBL) development. The pollutants transported and existent at high vertical levels are captured/trapped when the PBL height reaches its daily maximum, and extremely high ozone ground level concentrations are consequently measured.

  1. Photochemical degradation of 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaki, M.D.; Philippopoulos, C.J.

    2007-01-01

    The photochemical oxidation of 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol (1,3-DCP) was studied by following the target compound degradation, the total carbon removal rate by a total organic carbon (TOC) analyzer and by identifying the oxidation products by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The reaction was performed in a batch recycle reactor, at room temperature, using UV radiation provided by a low pressure 12 W Hg lamp and H 2 O 2 as oxidant. Chloride ions, formic, acetic and chloroacetic acid were measured by ion chromatography. Apart from the chloride ions and the organic acids, the presence of 1,3-dichloro-2-propanone and chloroacetyl chloride was also detected and a possible pathway is proposed for the degradation of the parent compound. Complete degradation of 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol was achieved and the TOC removal reached as much as 80% at the end of the reaction time. The effect of the initial concentration of hydrogen peroxide was investigated and it was established that higher concentrations of H 2 O 2 slow down the reaction rate. Finally, the effect of the initial concentration of 1,3-DCP was investigated

  2. A plasmaless, photochemical etch process for porous organosilicate glass films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, E. Todd; Molis, Steven E.

    2017-12-01

    A plasmaless, photochemical etch process using ultraviolet (UV) light in the presence of NH3 or O2 etched porous organosilicate glass films, also called pSiCOH films, in a two-step process. First, a UV/NH3 or UV/O2 treatment removed carbon (mostly methyl groups bonded to silicon) from a pSiCOH film by demethylation to a depth determined by the treatment exposure time. Second, aqueous HF was used to selectively remove the demethylated layer of the pSiCOH film leaving the methylated layer below. UV in the presence of inert gas or H2 did not demethylate the pSiCOH film. The depth of UV/NH3 demethylation followed diffusion limited kinetics and possible mechanisms of demethylation are presented. Unlike reactive plasma processes, which contain ions that can damage surrounding structures during nanofabrication, the photochemical etch contains no damaging ions. Feasibility of the photochemical etching was shown by comparing it to a plasma-based process to remove the pSiCOH dielectric from between Cu interconnect lines, which is a critical step during air gap fabrication. The findings also expand our understanding of UV photon interactions in pSiCOH films that may contribute to plasma-induced damage to pSiCOH films.

  3. The chitosan - Porphyrazine hybrid materials and their photochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chełminiak-Dudkiewicz, Dorota; Ziegler-Borowska, Marta; Stolarska, Magdalena; Sobotta, Lukasz; Falkowski, Michal; Mielcarek, Jadwiga; Goslinski, Tomasz; Kowalonek, Jolanta; Węgrzynowska-Drzymalska, Katarzyna; Kaczmarek, Halina

    2018-04-01

    Three magnesium sulfanyl porphyrazines differing in the size of peripheral substituents (3,5-dimethoxybenzylsulfanyl, (3,5-dimethoxybenzyloxy)benzylsulfanyl, 3,5-bis[(3,5-bis[(3,5-dimethoxybenzyloxy)benzyloxy]benzylsulfanyl) were exposed to visible and ultraviolet radiation (UV A + B + C) in order to determine their photochemical properties. The course of photochemical reactions in dimethylformamide solutions and the ability of the systems to generate singlet oxygen were studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy, which additionally gave information on aggregation processes. The porphyrazines were found to be stable upon visible light irradiation conditions, but when exposed to high energy UV radiation, the efficient photodegradation of these macrocycles was observed. Therefore, these three magnesium sulfanyl porphyrazines were incorporated into chitosan matrix. The obtained thin films of chitosan doped with porphyrazines were subjected to polychromatic UV-radiation and studied by spectroscopic methods (UV-Vis, FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Application of chitosan as a polymer matrix for porphyrazines was found to be successful method that effectively stopped the unwelcome degradation of macrocycles, thus worth considering for their photoprotection. In addition, the surface properties of the hybrid material were determined by contact angle measurements and calculation of surface free energy. Intermolecular interactions between these novel porphyrazines and chitosan were detected. The mechanism of photochemical reactions occurring in studied systems has been discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Radiolytic modelling of spent fuel oxidative dissolution mechanism. Calibration against UO2 dynamic leaching experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merino, J.; Cera, E.; Bruno, J.; Quinones, J.; Casas, I.; Clarens, F.; Gimenez, J.; Pablo, J. de; Rovira, M.; Martinez-Esparza, A.

    2005-01-01

    Calibration and testing are inherent aspects of any modelling exercise and consequently they are key issues in developing a model for the oxidative dissolution of spent fuel. In the present work we present the outcome of the calibration process for the kinetic constants of a UO 2 oxidative dissolution mechanism developed for using in a radiolytic model. Experimental data obtained in dynamic leaching experiments of unirradiated UO 2 has been used for this purpose. The iterative calibration process has provided some insight into the detailed mechanism taking place in the alteration of UO 2 , particularly the role of · OH radicals and their interaction with the carbonate system. The results show that, although more simulations are needed for testing in different experimental systems, the calibrated oxidative dissolution mechanism could be included in radiolytic models to gain confidence in the prediction of the long-term alteration rate of the spent fuel under repository conditions

  5. A simple model to estimate the optimal doping of p - Type oxide superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adir Moysés Luiz

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen doping of superconductors is discussed. Doping high-Tc superconductors with oxygen seems to be more efficient than other doping procedures. Using the assumption of double valence fluctuations, we present a simple model to estimate the optimal doping of p-type oxide superconductors. The experimental values of oxygen content for optimal doping of the most important p-type oxide superconductors can be accounted for adequately using this simple model. We expect that our simple model will encourage further experimental and theoretical researches in superconducting materials.

  6. Kinetic modeling of antimony(III) oxidation and sorption in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yongbing; Mi, Yuting; Zhang, Hua

    2016-10-05

    Kinetic batch and saturated column experiments were performed to study the oxidation, adsorption and transport of Sb(III) in two soils with contrasting properties. Kinetic and column experiment results clearly demonstrated the extensive oxidation of Sb(III) in soils, and this can in return influence the adsorption and transport of Sb. Both sorption capacity and kinetic oxidation rate were much higher in calcareous Huanjiang soil than in acid red Yingtan soil. The results indicate that soil serve as a catalyst in promoting oxidation of Sb(III) even under anaerobic conditions. A PHREEQC model with kinetic formulations was developed to simulate the oxidation, sorption and transport of Sb(III) in soils. The model successfully described Sb(III) oxidation and sorption data in kinetic batch experiment. It was less successful in simulating the reactive transport of Sb(III) in soil columns. Additional processes such as colloid facilitated transport need to be quantified and considered in the model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mathematical modelling of the kinetics of aerosol oxidation of sulfur dioxide upon electron-beam purification of power-plant flue gases from nitrogen and sulfur oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimov, G.Ya.; Gerasimova, T.S.; Fadeev, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    A kinetic model of SO 2 oxidation in flue gases, irradiated with accelerated electron flux is proposed. The model comprises an optimized mechanism of gas phase radiation chemical oxidation of NO and SO 2 , kinetics circuit of SO 2 and NH 3 thermal interaction, kinetic models of volumetric condensation of water and sulfuric acid vapors and liquid-phase oxidation of SO 2 in aerosol drops, produced in the course of volumetric condensation. Calculation results are in a satisfactory agreement with experimental data. (author)

  8. Large-scale Modeling of Nitrous Oxide Production: Issues of Representing Spatial Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, C. K.; Knighton, J.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrous oxide is produced from the biological processes of nitrification and denitrification in terrestrial environments and contributes to the greenhouse effect that warms Earth's climate. Large scale modeling can be used to determine how global rate of nitrous oxide production and consumption will shift under future climates. However, accurate modeling of nitrification and denitrification is made difficult by highly parameterized, nonlinear equations. Here we show that the representation of spatial heterogeneity in inputs, specifically soil moisture, causes inaccuracies in estimating the average nitrous oxide production in soils. We demonstrate that when soil moisture is averaged from a spatially heterogeneous surface, net nitrous oxide production is under predicted. We apply this general result in a test of a widely-used global land surface model, the Community Land Model v4.5. The challenges presented by nonlinear controls on nitrous oxide are highlighted here to provide a wider context to the problem of extraordinary denitrification losses in CLM. We hope that these findings will inform future researchers on the possibilities for model improvement of the global nitrogen cycle.

  9. Dynamic modelling of nitrous oxide emissions from three Swedish sludge liquor treatment systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindblom, E.; Arnell, M.; Flores-Alsina, X.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to model the dynamics and validate the results of nitrous oxide (N2O)emissions from three Swedish nitrifying/denitrifying, nitritation and anammox systems treating real anaerobic digester sludge liquor. The Activated Sludge Model No. 1 is extended to describe N2O...

  10. Development of the kinetic model of platinum catalyzed ammonia oxidation in a microreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebrov, E.V.; Croon, de M.H.J.M.; Schouten, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    The ammonia oxidation reaction on supported polycrystalline platinum catalyst was investigated in an aluminum-based microreactor. An extensive set of reactions was included in the chemical reactor modeling to facilitate the construction of a kinetic model capable of satisfactory predictions for a

  11. Three-phase boundary length in solid-oxide fuel cells: A mathematical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhanan, Vinod M.; Heuveline, Vincent; Deutschmann, Olaf

    A mathematical model to calculate the volume specific three-phase boundary length in the porous composite electrodes of solid-oxide fuel cell is presented. The model is exclusively based on geometrical considerations accounting for porosity, particle diameter, particle size distribution, and solids phase distribution. Results are presented for uniform particle size distribution as well as for non-uniform particle size distribution.

  12. Photochemical fate of beta-blockers in NOM enriched waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ling; Xu, Haomin; Cooper, William J. [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States); Song, Weihua, E-mail: wsong@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2012-06-01

    Beta-blockers, prescribed for the treatment of high blood pressure and for long-term use after a heart attack, have been detected in surface and ground waters. This study examines the photochemical fate of three beta-blockers, atenolol, metoprolol, and nadolol. Hydrolysis accounted for minor losses of these beta-blockers in the pH range 4-10. The rate of direct photolysis at pH 7 in a solar simulator varied from 6.1 to 8.9 h{sup -1} at pH 7. However, the addition of a natural organic matter (NOM) isolate enhanced the photochemical loss of all three compounds. Indirect photochemical fate, generally described by reactions with hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) and singlet oxygen ({sup 1}{Delta}O{sub 2}), and, the direct reaction with the triplet excited state, {sup 3}NOM{sup Low-Asterisk }, also varied but collectively appeared to be the major loss factor. Bimolecular reaction rate constants of the three beta-blockers with {sup 1}{Delta}O{sub 2} and {center_dot}OH were measured and accounted for 0.02-0.04% and 7.2-38.9% of their loss, respectively. These data suggest that the {sup 3}NOM{sup Low-Asterisk} contributed 50.6-85.4%. Experiments with various {sup 3}NOM{sup Low-Asterisk} quenchers supported the hypothesis that it was singly the most important reaction. Atenolol was chosen for more detailed investigation, with the photoproducts identified by LC-MS analysis. The results suggested that electron-transfer could be an important mechanism in photochemical fate of beta-blockers in the presence of NOM. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photochemical degradation of beta-blockers in the simulated natural waters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reactive Oxygen Species play a minor role in the indirect photodegradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The loss of beta-blockers results from direct reaction with {sup 3}DOM{sup Low-Asterisk }.

  13. Energy-Efficient and Environmentally Friendly Solid Oxide Membrane Electrolysis Process for Magnesium Oxide Reduction: Experiment and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiaofei; Pal, Uday B.; Powell, Adam C.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports a solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis experiment using an LSM(La0.8Sr0.2MnO3-δ)-Inconel inert anode current collector for production of magnesium and oxygen directly from magnesium oxide at 1423 K (1150 °C). The electrochemical performance of the SOM cell was evaluated by means of various electrochemical techniques including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic scan, and electrolysis. Electronic transference numbers of the flux were measured to assess the magnesium dissolution in the flux during SOM electrolysis. The effects of magnesium solubility in the flux on the current efficiency and the SOM stability during electrolysis are discussed. An inverse correlation between the electronic transference number of the flux and the current efficiency of the SOM electrolysis was observed. Based on the experimental results, a new equivalent circuit of the SOM electrolysis process is presented. A general electrochemical polarization model of SOM process for magnesium and oxygen gas production is developed, and the maximum allowable applied potential to avoid zirconia dissociation is calculated as well. The modeling results suggest that a high electronic resistance of the flux and a relatively low electronic resistance of SOM are required to achieve membrane stability, high current efficiency, and high production rates of magnesium and oxygen.

  14. SITE - EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES: LASER INDUCED PHOTO- CHEMICAL OXIDATIVE DESTRUCTION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN LEACHATES AND GROUNDWATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The technology described in this report has been developed under the Emerging Technology Program of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program to photochemically oxidize organic compounds in wastewater by applying ultraviolet radiation using an excimer laser. T...

  15. Modeling and parametric simulations of solid oxide fuel cells with methane carbon dioxide reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni, Meng

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A 2D model is developed for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). ► CH 4 reforming by CO 2 (MCDR) is included. ► SOFC with MCDR shows comparable performance with methane steam reforming SOFC. ► Increasing CO electrochemical oxidation greatly enhances the SOFC performance. ► Effects of potential and temperature on SOFC performance are also discussed. - Abstract: A two-dimensional model is developed to simulate the performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) fed with CO 2 and CH 4 mixture. The electrochemical oxidations of both CO and H 2 are included. Important chemical reactions are considered in the model, including methane carbon dioxide reforming (MCDR), reversible water gas shift reaction (WGSR), and methane steam reforming (MSR). It’s found that at a CH 4 /CO 2 molar ratio of 50/50, MCDR and reversible WGSR significantly influence the cell performance while MSR is negligibly small. The performance of SOFC fed with CO 2 /CH 4 mixture is comparable to SOFC running on CH 4 /H 2 O mixtures. The electric output of SOFC can be enhanced by operating the cell at a low operating potential or at a high temperature. In addition, the development of anode catalyst with high activity towards CO electrochemical oxidation is important for SOFC performance enhancement. The model can serve as a useful tool for optimization of the SOFC system running on CH 4 /CO 2 mixtures

  16. Chemical kinetic models for combustion of hydrocarbons and formation of nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachimowski, C. J.; Wilson, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    The formation of nitrogen oxides NOx during combustion of methane, propane, and a jet fuel, JP-4, was investigated in a jet stirred combustor. The results of the experiments were interpreted using reaction models in which the nitric oxide (NO) forming reactions were coupled to the appropriate hydrocarbon combustion reaction mechanisms. Comparison between the experimental data and the model predictions reveals that the CH + N2 reaction process has a significant effect on NO formation especially in stoichiometric and fuel rich mixtures. Reaction models were assembled that predicted nitric oxide levels that were in reasonable agreement with the jet stirred combustor data and with data obtained from a high pressure (5.9 atm (0.6 MPa)), prevaporized, premixed, flame tube type combustor. The results also suggested that the behavior of hydrocarbon mixtures, like JP-4, may not be significantly different from that of pure hydrocarbons. Application of the propane combustion and nitric oxide formation model to the analysis of NOx emission data reported for various aircraft gas turbines showed the contribution of the various nitric oxide forming processes to the total NOx formed.

  17. Computational Modeling of Cobalt-based Water Oxidation: Current Status and Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Mauro; Luber, Sandra

    2018-04-01

    A lot of effort is nowadays put into the development of novel water oxidation catalysts. In this context mechanistic studies are crucial in order to elucidate the reaction mechanisms governing this complex process, new design paradigms and strategies how to improve the stability and efficiency of those catalysis. This review is focused on recent theoretical mechanistic studies in the field of homogeneous cobalt-based water oxidation catalysts. In the first part, computational methodologies and protocols are summarized and evaluated on the basis of their applicability towards real catalytic or smaller model systems, whereby special emphasis is laid on the choice of an appropriate model system. In the second part, an overview of mechanistic studies is presented, from which conceptual guidelines are drawn on how to approach novel studies of catalysts and how to further develop the field of computational modeling of water oxidation reactions.

  18. Computational Modeling of Cobalt-Based Water Oxidation: Current Status and Future Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Schilling

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A lot of effort is nowadays put into the development of novel water oxidation catalysts. In this context, mechanistic studies are crucial in order to elucidate the reaction mechanisms governing this complex process, new design paradigms and strategies how to improve the stability and efficiency of those catalysts. This review is focused on recent theoretical mechanistic studies in the field of homogeneous cobalt-based water oxidation catalysts. In the first part, computational methodologies and protocols are summarized and evaluated on the basis of their applicability toward real catalytic or smaller model systems, whereby special emphasis is laid on the choice of an appropriate model system. In the second part, an overview of mechanistic studies is presented, from which conceptual guidelines are drawn on how to approach novel studies of catalysts and how to further develop the field of computational modeling of water oxidation reactions.

  19. Kinetic Modeling of a Heterogeneous Fenton Oxidative Treatment of Petroleum Refining Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basheer Hasan, Diya'uddeen; Abdul Raman, Abdul Aziz; Wan Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri

    2014-01-01

    The mineralisation kinetics of petroleum refinery effluent (PRE) by Fenton oxidation were evaluated. Within the ambit of the experimental data generated, first-order kinetic model (FKM), generalised lumped kinetic model (GLKM), and generalized kinetic model (GKM) were tested. The obtained apparent kinetic rate constants for the initial oxidation step (k 2′), their final oxidation step (k 1′), and the direct conversion to endproducts step (k 3′) were 10.12, 3.78, and 0.24 min−1 for GKM; 0.98, 0.98, and nil min−1 for GLKM; and nil, nil, and >0.005 min−1 for FKM. The findings showed that GKM is superior in estimating the mineralization kinetics. PMID:24592152

  20. Pressure Dependent Product Formation in the Photochemically Initiated Allyl + Allyl Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Zeuch

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Photochemically driven reactions involving unsaturated radicals produce a thick global layer of organic haze on Titan, Saturn’s largest moon. The allyl radical self-reaction is an example for this type of chemistry and was examined at room temperature from an experimental and kinetic modelling perspective. The experiments were performed in a static reactor with a volume of 5 L under wall free conditions. The allyl radicals were produced from laser flash photolysis of three different precursors allyl bromide (C3H5Br, allyl chloride (C3H5Cl, and 1,5-hexadiene (CH2CH(CH22CHCH2 at 193 nm. Stable products were identified by their characteristic vibrational modes and quantified using FTIR spectroscopy. In addition to the (re- combination pathway C3H5+C3H5 → C6H10 we found at low pressures around 1 mbar the highest final product yields for allene and propene for the precursor C3H5Br. A kinetic analysis indicates that the end product formation is influenced by specific reaction kinetics of photochemically activated allyl radicals. Above 10 mbar the (re- combination pathway becomes dominant. These findings exemplify the specificities of reaction kinetics involving chemically activated species, which for certain conditions cannot be simply deduced from combustion kinetics or atmospheric chemistry on Earth.

  1. Non-animal photosafety screening for complex cosmetic ingredients with photochemical and photobiochemical assessment tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Hayato; Hirota, Morihiko; Seto, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Gen; Kato, Masashi; Kitagaki, Masato; Sugiyama, Mariko; Kouzuki, Hirokazu; Onoue, Satomi

    2015-08-01

    Previously, a non-animal screening approach was proposed for evaluating photosafety of cosmetic ingredients by means of in vitro photochemical and photobiochemical assays; however, complex cosmetic ingredients, such as plant extracts and polymers, could not be evaluated because their molecular weight is often poorly defined and so their molar concentration cannot be calculated. The aim of the present investigation was to establish a photosafety screen for complex cosmetic ingredients by using appropriately modified in vitro photosafety assays. Twenty plant extracts were selected as model materials on the basis of photosafety information, and their phototoxic potentials were assessed by means of ultraviolet (UV)/visible light (VIS) spectral analysis, reactive oxygen species (ROS)/micellar ROS (mROS) assays, and 3T3 neutral red uptake phototoxicity testing (3T3 NRU PT). The maximum UV/VIS absorption value was employed as a judgment factor for evaluating photoexcitability of samples, and the value of 1.0 was adopted as a tentative criterion for photosafety identification. The ROS/mROS assays were conducted at 50 μg/mL, and no false negative prediction was obtained. Furthermore, the ROS/mROS assays at 50 μg/mL had a similar predictive capacity to the ROS/mROS assays in the previous study. A systematic tiered approach for simple and rapid non-animal photosafety evaluation of complex cosmetic ingredients can be constructed using these modified in vitro photochemical assays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Modelling of Zircaloy-steam-oxidation under severe fuel damage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malang, S.; Neitzel, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Small break loss-of-coolant accidents and special transients in an LWR, in combination with loss of required safety systems, may lead to an uncovered core for an extended period of time. As a consequence, the cladding temperature could rise up to the melting point due to the decay heat, resulting in severely damaged fuel rods. During heat-up the claddings oxidize due to oxygen uptake from the steam atmosphere in the core. The modeling and assessment of the Zircaloy-steam oxidation under such conditions is important, mainly for two reasons: The oxidation of the cladding influences the temperature transients due to the exothermic heat of reaction; the amount of liquified fuel depends on the oxide layer thickness and the oxygen content of the remaining Zircaloy metal when the melting point is reached. (author)

  3. Genome-Scale, Constraint-Based Modeling of Nitrogen Oxide Fluxes during Coculture of Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguere, Andrew T.; Murthy, Ganti S.; Bottomley, Peter J.; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, emits nitrogen (N) oxide gases (NO, NO2, and N2O), which are potentially hazardous compounds that contribute to global warming. To better understand the dynamics of nitrification-derived N oxide production, we conducted culturing experiments and used an integrative genome-scale, constraint-based approach to model N oxide gas sources and sinks during complete nitrification in an aerobic coculture of two model nitrifying bacteria, the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea and the nitrite-oxidizing bacterium Nitrobacter winogradskyi. The model includes biotic genome-scale metabolic models (iFC578 and iFC579) for each nitrifier and abiotic N oxide reactions. Modeling suggested both biotic and abiotic reactions are important sources and sinks of N oxides, particularly under microaerobic conditions predicted to occur in coculture. In particular, integrative modeling suggested that previous models might have underestimated gross NO production during nitrification due to not taking into account its rapid oxidation in both aqueous and gas phases. The integrative model may be found at https://github.com/chaplenf/microBiome-v2.1. IMPORTANCE Modern agriculture is sustained by application of inorganic nitrogen (N) fertilizer in the form of ammonium (NH4+). Up to 60% of NH4+-based fertilizer can be lost through leaching of nitrifier-derived nitrate (NO3−), and through the emission of N oxide gases (i.e., nitric oxide [NO], N dioxide [NO2], and nitrous oxide [N2O] gases), the latter being a potent greenhouse gas. Our approach to modeling of nitrification suggests that both biotic and abiotic mechanisms function as important sources and sinks of N oxides during microaerobic conditions and that previous models might have underestimated gross NO production during nitrification. PMID:29577088

  4. Genome-Scale, Constraint-Based Modeling of Nitrogen Oxide Fluxes during Coculture of Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellbye, Brett L; Giguere, Andrew T; Murthy, Ganti S; Bottomley, Peter J; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A; Chaplen, Frank W R

    2018-01-01

    Nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, emits nitrogen (N) oxide gases (NO, NO 2 , and N 2 O), which are potentially hazardous compounds that contribute to global warming. To better understand the dynamics of nitrification-derived N oxide production, we conducted culturing experiments and used an integrative genome-scale, constraint-based approach to model N oxide gas sources and sinks during complete nitrification in an aerobic coculture of two model nitrifying bacteria, the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea and the nitrite-oxidizing bacterium Nitrobacter winogradskyi . The model includes biotic genome-scale metabolic models (iFC578 and iFC579) for each nitrifier and abiotic N oxide reactions. Modeling suggested both biotic and abiotic reactions are important sources and sinks of N oxides, particularly under microaerobic conditions predicted to occur in coculture. In particular, integrative modeling suggested that previous models might have underestimated gross NO production during nitrification due to not taking into account its rapid oxidation in both aqueous and gas phases. The integrative model may be found at https://github.com/chaplenf/microBiome-v2.1. IMPORTANCE Modern agriculture is sustained by application of inorganic nitrogen (N) fertilizer in the form of ammonium (NH 4 + ). Up to 60% of NH 4 + -based fertilizer can be lost through leaching of nitrifier-derived nitrate (NO 3 - ), and through the emission of N oxide gases (i.e., nitric oxide [NO], N dioxide [NO 2 ], and nitrous oxide [N 2 O] gases), the latter being a potent greenhouse gas. Our approach to modeling of nitrification suggests that both biotic and abiotic mechanisms function as important sources and sinks of N oxides during microaerobic conditions and that previous models might have underestimated gross NO production during nitrification.

  5. Reassessing the atmospheric oxidation mechanism of toluene

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Yuemeng; Zhao, Jun; Terazono, Hajime; Misawa, Kentaro; Levitt, Nicholas P.; Li, Yixin; Lin, Yun; Peng, Jianfei; Wang, Yuan; Duan, Lian; Pan, Bowen; Zhang, Fang; Feng, Xidan; An, Taicheng; Marrero-Ortiz, Wilmarie

    2017-01-01

    Photochemical oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons leads to tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, with profound implications for air quality, human health, and climate. Toluene is the most abundant aromatic compound under urban environments, but its detailed chemical oxidation mechanism remains uncertain. From combined laboratory experiments and quantum chemical calculations, we show a toluene oxidation mechanism that is different from the one adopted in current atmo...

  6. Impacts of Combustion Conditions and Photochemical Processing on the Light Absorption of Biomass Combustion Aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinsson, J; Eriksson, A C; Nielsen, I Elbæk; Malmborg, V Berg; Ahlberg, E; Andersen, C; Lindgren, R; Nyström, R; Nordin, E Z; Brune, W H; Svenningsson, B; Swietlicki, E; Boman, C; Pagels, J H

    2015-12-15

    The aim was to identify relationships between combustion conditions, particle characteristics, and optical properties of fresh and photochemically processed emissions from biomass combustion. The combustion conditions included nominal and high burn rate operation and individual combustion phases from a conventional wood stove. Low temperature pyrolysis upon fuel addition resulted in "tar-ball" type particles dominated by organic aerosol with an absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) of 2.5-2.7 and estimated Brown Carbon contributions of 50-70% to absorption at the climate relevant aethalometer-wavelength (520 nm). High temperature combustion during the intermediate (flaming) phase was dominated by soot agglomerates with AAE 1.0-1.2 and 85-100% of absorption at 520 nm attributed to Black Carbon. Intense photochemical processing of high burn rate flaming combustion emissions in an oxidation flow reactor led to strong formation of Secondary Organic Aerosol, with no or weak absorption. PM1 mass emission factors (mg/kg) of fresh emissions were about an order of magnitude higher for low temperature pyrolysis compared to high temperature combustion. However, emission factors describing the absorption cross section emitted per kg of fuel consumed (m(2)/kg) were of similar magnitude at 520 nm for the diverse combustion conditions investigated in this study. These results provide a link between biomass combustion conditions, emitted particle types, and their optical properties in fresh and processed plumes which can be of value for source apportionment and balanced mitigation of biomass combustion emissions from a climate and health perspective.

  7. Modeling of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of mixed oxide fuel for sodium fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karahan, Aydin; Buongiorno, Jacopo

    2010-01-01

    An engineering code to model the irradiation behavior of UO 2 -PuO 2 mixed oxide fuel pins in sodium-cooled fast reactors was developed. The code was named fuel engineering and structural analysis tool (FEAST-OXIDE). FEAST-OXIDE has several modules working in coupled form with an explicit numerical algorithm. These modules describe: (1) fission gas release and swelling, (2) fuel chemistry and restructuring, (3) temperature distribution, (4) fuel-clad chemical interaction and (5) fuel-clad mechanical analysis. Given the fuel pin geometry, composition and irradiation history, FEAST-OXIDE can analyze fuel and cladding thermo-mechanical behavior at both steady-state and design-basis transient scenarios. The code was written in FORTRAN-90 program language. The mechanical analysis module implements the LIFE algorithm. Fission gas release and swelling behavior is described by the OGRES and NEFIG models. However, the original OGRES model has been extended to include the effects of joint oxide gain (JOG) formation on fission gas release and swelling. A detailed fuel chemistry model has been included to describe the cesium radial migration and JOG formation, oxygen and plutonium radial distribution and the axial migration of cesium. The fuel restructuring model includes the effects of as-fabricated porosity migration, irradiation-induced fuel densification, grain growth, hot pressing and fuel cracking and relocation. Finally, a kinetics model is included to predict the clad wastage formation. FEAST-OXIDE predictions have been compared to the available FFTF, EBR-II and JOYO databases, as well as the LIFE-4 code predictions. The agreement was found to be satisfactory for steady-state and slow-ramp over-power accidents.

  8. Modeling of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of mixed oxide fuel for sodium fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karahan, Aydin, E-mail: karahan@mit.ed [Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA (United States); Buongiorno, Jacopo [Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA (United States)

    2010-01-31

    An engineering code to model the irradiation behavior of UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} mixed oxide fuel pins in sodium-cooled fast reactors was developed. The code was named fuel engineering and structural analysis tool (FEAST-OXIDE). FEAST-OXIDE has several modules working in coupled form with an explicit numerical algorithm. These modules describe: (1) fission gas release and swelling, (2) fuel chemistry and restructuring, (3) temperature distribution, (4) fuel-clad chemical interaction and (5) fuel-clad mechanical analysis. Given the fuel pin geometry, composition and irradiation history, FEAST-OXIDE can analyze fuel and cladding thermo-mechanical behavior at both steady-state and design-basis transient scenarios. The code was written in FORTRAN-90 program language. The mechanical analysis module implements the LIFE algorithm. Fission gas release and swelling behavior is described by the OGRES and NEFIG models. However, the original OGRES model has been extended to include the effects of joint oxide gain (JOG) formation on fission gas release and swelling. A detailed fuel chemistry model has been included to describe the cesium radial migration and JOG formation, oxygen and plutonium radial distribution and the axial migration of cesium. The fuel restructuring model includes the effects of as-fabricated porosity migration, irradiation-induced fuel densification, grain growth, hot pressing and fuel cracking and relocation. Finally, a kinetics model is included to predict the clad wastage formation. FEAST-OXIDE predictions have been compared to the available FFTF, EBR-II and JOYO databases, as well as the LIFE-4 code predictions. The agreement was found to be satisfactory for steady-state and slow-ramp over-power accidents.

  9. PREFACE: Semiconducting oxides Semiconducting oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlow, Richard; Walsh, Aron

    2011-08-01

    Semiconducting oxides are amongst the most widely studied and topical materials in contemporary condensed matter science, with interest being driven both by the fundamental challenges posed by their electronic and magnetic structures and properties, and by the wide range of applications, including those in catalysis and electronic devices. This special section aims to highlight recent developments in the physics of these materials, and to show the link between developing fundamental understanding and key application areas of oxide semiconductors. Several aspects of the physics of this wide and expanding range of materials are explored in this special section. Transparent semiconducting oxides have a growing role in several technologies, but challenges remain in understanding their electronic structure and the physics of charge carriers. A related problem concerns the nature of redox processes and the reactions which interconvert defects and charge carriers—a key issue which may limit the extent to which doping strategies may be used to alter electronic properties. The magnetic structures of the materials pose several challenges, while surface structures and properties are vital in controlling catalytic properties, including photochemical processes. The field profits from and exploits a wide range of contemporary physical techniques—both experimental and theoretical. Indeed, the interplay between experiment and computation is a key aspect of contemporary work. A number of articles describe applications of computational methods whose use, especially in modelling properties of defects in these materials, has a long and successful history. Several papers in this special section relate to work presented at a symposium within the European Materials Research Society (EMRS) meeting held in Warsaw in September 2010, and we are grateful to the EMRS for supporting this symposium. We would also like to thank the editorial staff of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for

  10. Oxidative Damage and Cellular Defense Mechanisms in Sea Urchin Models of Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Colin; Anderson, Arielle; Lortie, Mae; Parsons, Rachel; Bodnar, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The free radical or oxidative stress theory of aging proposes that the accumulation of oxidative cellular damage is a major contributor to the aging process and a key determinant of species longevity. This study investigates the oxidative stress theory in a novel model for aging research, the sea urchin. Sea urchins present a unique model for the study of aging due to the existence of species with tremendously different natural life spans including some species with extraordinary longevity and negligible senescence. Cellular oxidative damage, antioxidant capacity and proteasome enzyme activities were measured in the tissues of three sea urchin species: short-lived Lytechinus variegatus, long-lived Strongylocentrotus franciscanus and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus which has an intermediate lifespan. Levels of protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) measured in tissues (muscle, nerve, esophagus, gonad, coelomocytes, ampullae) and 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) measured in cell-free coelomic fluid showed no general increase with age. The fluorescent age-pigment lipofuscin measured in muscle, nerve and esophagus, increased with age however it appeared to be predominantly extracellular. Antioxidant mechanisms (total antioxidant capacity, superoxide dismutase) and proteasome enzyme activities were maintained with age. In some instances, levels of oxidative damage were lower and antioxidant activity higher in cells or tissues of the long-lived species compared to the short-lived species, however further studies are required to determine the relationship between oxidative damage and longevity in these animals. Consistent with the predictions of the oxidative stress theory of aging, the results suggest that negligible senescence is accompanied by a lack of accumulation of cellular oxidative damage with age and maintenance of antioxidant capacity and proteasome enzyme activities may be important mechanisms to mitigate damage. PMID:23707327

  11. Plutonium chemistry: a synthesis of experimental data and a quantitative model for plutonium oxide solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haschke, J.M.; Oversby, V.M.

    2002-01-01

    The chemistry of plutonium is important for assessing potential behavior of radioactive waste under conditions of geologic disposal. This paper reviews experimental data on dissolution of plutonium oxide solids, describes a hybrid kinetic-equilibrium model for predicting steady-state Pu concentrations, and compares laboratory results with predicted Pu concentrations and oxidation-state distributions. The model is based on oxidation of PuO 2 by water to produce PuO 2+x , an oxide that can release Pu(V) to solution. Kinetic relationships between formation of PuO 2+x , dissolution of Pu(V), disproportionation of Pu(V) to Pu(IV) and Pu(VI), and reduction of Pu(VI) are given and used in model calculations. Data from tests of pyrochemical salt wastes in brines are discussed and interpreted using the conceptual model. Essential data for quantitative modeling at conditions relevant to nuclear waste repositories are identified and laboratory experiments to determine rate constants for use in the model are discussed

  12. Photochemical Dynamics of Intramolecular Singlet Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhou; Iwasaki, Hikari; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2017-06-01

    Singlet fission (SF) converts a singlet exciton (S_1) into a pair of triplet ones (T_1) via a ``multi-exciton'' (ME) intermediate: S_1 \\longleftrightarrow ^1ME \\longleftrightarrow ^1(T_1T_1) \\longrightarrow 2T_1. In exothermic cases, e.g., crystalline pentacene or its derivatives, the quantum yield of SF can reach 200%. With SF doubling the electric current generated by an incident high-energy photon, the solar conversion efficiency in pentacene-based organic photovoltaics (OPVs) can exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit of 33.7%. The ME state is popularly considered to be a dimeric state with significant charge transfer (CT) character that is strongly coupled to both S_1 and ^1(T_1T_1), while this local model lacks strong support from full quantum dynamics studies. Intramolecular SF (ISF) occurring to covalently-bound dimers in the solution phase is an excellent model for a straightforward dynamics simulation of local excitons. In the present study, we investigate the ISF mechanisms for three covalently-bound dimers of pentacene derivatives, including ortho-, meta-, and para-bis(6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene)benzene, in non-protic solvents. Specifically, we propagate the real-time, non-adiabatic quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) dynamics on the potential energy surfaces associated with the states of S_1, ^1(T_1T_1) and CT. We explore how the energies of these ISF-relevant states and the non-adiabatic couplings between each other fluctuate with time and the instantaneous molecular configuration (e.g., intermonomer distance and orientation). We also quantitatively compare Condon and non-Condon ISF dynamics with solution-phase spectroscopic data. Our results allow us to understand the roles of CT energy levels in the ISF mechanism and propose a design strategy to maximize ISF efficiency. M. B. Smith and J. Michl, Chem. Rev. 110, 6891 (2010). W. Shockley and H. J. Queisser, J. Appl. Phys. 32, 510 (1961). T. C. Berkelbach, M. S. Hybertsen

  13. Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Methanol Ignition and Oxidation at High Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aranda, V.; Christensen, J. M.; Alzueta, Maria

    2013-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for oxidation of CH3OH at high pressure and intermediate temperatures has been developed and validated experimentally. Ab initio calculations and Rice–Ramsperger–Kassel–Marcus/transition state theory (RRKM/TST) analysis were used to obtain rate coefficients for CH...... the conditions studied, the onset temperature for methanol oxidation was not dependent on the stoichiometry, whereas increasing pressure shifted the ignition temperature toward lower values. Model predictions of the present experimental results, as well as rapid compression machine data from the literature, were...

  14. A 3d Regional Scale Photochemical Air Quality Model. Application to a 3 Day Summertime Episode over Paris Un modèle photochimique 3D de qualité de l'air à l'échelle régionale. Application à un épisode de 3 jours à Paris en été

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carissimo B.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents AZUR, a 3D Eulerian photochemical air quality model for the simulation of air pollution in urban and semi-urban areas. The model tracks gas pollutant species emitted into the atmosphere by transportation and industrial sources, it computes the chemical reactions of these species under varying meteorological conditions (photolysis, pressure, temperature, humidity, their transport by wind and their turbulent diffusion as a function of air stability. It has a modular software structure which includes several components dedicated to specific processes :-MERCURE, a meso-scale meteorological model to compute the wind field, turbulent diffusion coefficients, and other meteorological parameters. It is a 3D regional scale model accounting for different ground types and urban densities. It includes a complete set of physical parameterizations in clear sky. -MIEL, an emission inventory model describing the pollutant fluxes from automotive transportation, domestic and industrial activities. This model includes a mobile source inventory based on road vehicle countings together with global information on transportation fluxes extracted from statistical population data. It uses specific emission factors representative of the vehicle fleet and real driving patterns. -MoCA a photochemical gas phase model describing the chemistry of ozone, NOx, and hydrocarbon compounds. This model, with 83 species and 191 reactions, is a reduced mechanism well adapted to various air quality conditions (ranging from urban to rural conditions. For interpretative reasons, the identity of primary hydrocarbons is preserved. -AIRQUAL, a 3D Eulerian model describing the transport by mean wind flux and air turbulent diffusion of species in the atmosphere, associated with a Gear type chemical equation solver. The model has been applied to a 3-day summertime episode over Paris area. Simulation results are compared to ground level concentration measurements performed by

  15. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in photochemically aged air from the eastern and western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derstroff, Bettina; Hüser, Imke; Bourtsoukidis, Efstratios; Crowley, John N.; Fischer, Horst; Gromov, Sergey; Harder, Hartwig; Janssen, Ruud H. H.; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Lelieveld, Jos; Mallik, Chinmay; Martinez, Monica; Novelli, Anna; Parchatka, Uwe; Phillips, Gavin J.; Sander, Rolf; Sauvage, Carina; Schuladen, Jan; Stönner, Christof; Tomsche, Laura; Williams, Jonathan

    2017-08-01

    During the summertime CYPHEX campaign (CYprus PHotochemical EXperiment 2014) in the eastern Mediterranean, multiple volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured from a 650 m hilltop site in western Cyprus (34° 57' N/32° 23' E). Periodic shifts in the northerly Etesian winds resulted in the site being alternately impacted by photochemically processed emissions from western (Spain, France, Italy) and eastern (Turkey, Greece) Europe. Furthermore, the site was situated within the residual layer/free troposphere during some nights which were characterized by high ozone and low relative humidity levels. In this study we examine the temporal variation of VOCs at the site. The sparse Mediterranean scrub vegetation generated diel cycles in the reactive biogenic hydrocarbon isoprene, from very low values at night to a diurnal median level of 80-100 pptv. In contrast, the oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) methanol and acetone exhibited weak diel cycles and were approximately an order of magnitude higher in mixing ratio (ca. 2.5-3 ppbv median level by day, range: ca. 1-8 ppbv) than the locally emitted isoprene and aromatic compounds such as benzene and toluene. Acetic acid was present at mixing ratios between 0.05 and 4 ppbv with a median level of ca. 1.2 ppbv during the daytime. When data points directly affected by the residual layer/free troposphere were excluded, the acid followed a pronounced diel cycle, which was influenced by various local effects including photochemical production and loss, direct emission, dry deposition and scavenging from advecting air in fog banks. The Lagrangian model FLEXPART was used to determine transport patterns and photochemical processing times (between 12 h and several days) of air masses originating from eastern and western Europe. Ozone and many OVOC levels were ˜ 20 and ˜ 30-60 % higher, respectively, in air arriving from the east. Using the FLEXPART calculated transport time, the contribution of photochemical

  16. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs in photochemically aged air from the eastern and western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Derstroff

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available During the summertime CYPHEX campaign (CYprus PHotochemical EXperiment 2014 in the eastern Mediterranean, multiple volatile organic compounds (VOCs were measured from a 650 m hilltop site in western Cyprus (34° 57′ N/32° 23′ E. Periodic shifts in the northerly Etesian winds resulted in the site being alternately impacted by photochemically processed emissions from western (Spain, France, Italy and eastern (Turkey, Greece Europe. Furthermore, the site was situated within the residual layer/free troposphere during some nights which were characterized by high ozone and low relative humidity levels. In this study we examine the temporal variation of VOCs at the site. The sparse Mediterranean scrub vegetation generated diel cycles in the reactive biogenic hydrocarbon isoprene, from very low values at night to a diurnal median level of 80–100 pptv. In contrast, the oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs methanol and acetone exhibited weak diel cycles and were approximately an order of magnitude higher in mixing ratio (ca. 2.5–3 ppbv median level by day, range: ca. 1–8 ppbv than the locally emitted isoprene and aromatic compounds such as benzene and toluene. Acetic acid was present at mixing ratios between 0.05 and 4 ppbv with a median level of ca. 1.2 ppbv during the daytime. When data points directly affected by the residual layer/free troposphere were excluded, the acid followed a pronounced diel cycle, which was influenced by various local effects including photochemical production and loss, direct emission, dry deposition and scavenging from advecting air in fog banks. The Lagrangian model FLEXPART was used to determine transport patterns and photochemical processing times (between 12 h and several days of air masses originating from eastern and western Europe. Ozone and many OVOC levels were  ∼  20 and  ∼  30–60 % higher, respectively, in air arriving from the east. Using the FLEXPART

  17. Experimental and modeling study of the oxidation of n- and iso-butanal

    KAUST Repository

    Veloo, Peter S.; Dagaut, P.; Togbé , Casimir; Dayma, Guillaume; Sarathy, Mani; Westbrook, Charles K.; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the kinetics of large molecular weight aldehydes is essential in the context of both conventional and alternative fuels. For example, they are key intermediates formed during the low-temperature oxidation of hydrocarbons as well as during the high-temperature oxidation of oxygenated fuels such as alcohols. In this study, an experimental and kinetic modeling investigation of n-butanal (. n-butyraldehyde) and iso-butanal (. iso-butyraldehyde or 2-methylpropanal) oxidation kinetics was performed. Experiments were performed in a jet stirred reactor and in counterflow flames over a wide range of equivalence ratios, temperatures, and pressures. The jet stirred reactor was utilized to observe the evolution of stable intermediates and products for the oxidation of n- and iso-butanal at elevated pressures and low to intermediate temperatures. The counterflow configuration was utilized for the determination of laminar flame speeds. A detailed chemical kinetic interpretative model was developed and validated consisting of 244 species and 1198 reactions derived from a previous study of the oxidation of propanal (propionaldehyde). Extensive reaction pathway and sensitivity analysis was performed to provide detailed insight into the mechanisms governing low-, intermediate-, and high-temperature reactivity. The simulation results using the present model are in good agreement with the experimental laminar flame speeds and well within a factor of two of the speciation data obtained in the jet stirred reactor. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  18. Generalized first-order kinetic model for biosolids decomposition and oxidation during hydrothermal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanableh, A

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop generalized first-order kinetic models to represent hydrothermal decomposition and oxidation of biosolids within a wide range of temperatures (200-450 degrees C). A lumping approach was used in which oxidation of the various organic ingredients was characterized by the chemical oxygen demand (COD), and decomposition was characterized by the particulate (i.e., nonfilterable) chemical oxygen demand (PCOD). Using the Arrhenius equation (k = k(o)e(-Ea/RT)), activation energy (Ea) levels were derived from 42 continuous-flow hydrothermal treatment experiments conducted at temperatures in the range of 200-450 degrees C. Using predetermined values for k(o) in the Arrhenius equation, the activation energies of the various organic ingredients were separated into 42 values for oxidation and a similar number for decomposition. The activation energy values were then classified into levels representing the relative ease at which the organic ingredients of the biosolids were oxidized or decomposed. The resulting simple first-order kinetic models adequately represented, within the experimental data range, hydrothermal decomposition of the organic particles as measured by PCOD and oxidation of the organic content as measured by COD. The modeling approach presented in the paper provide a simple and general framework suitable for assessing the relative reaction rates of the various organic ingredients of biosolids.

  19. Experimental and modeling study of the oxidation of n- and iso-butanal

    KAUST Repository

    Veloo, Peter S.

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the kinetics of large molecular weight aldehydes is essential in the context of both conventional and alternative fuels. For example, they are key intermediates formed during the low-temperature oxidation of hydrocarbons as well as during the high-temperature oxidation of oxygenated fuels such as alcohols. In this study, an experimental and kinetic modeling investigation of n-butanal (. n-butyraldehyde) and iso-butanal (. iso-butyraldehyde or 2-methylpropanal) oxidation kinetics was performed. Experiments were performed in a jet stirred reactor and in counterflow flames over a wide range of equivalence ratios, temperatures, and pressures. The jet stirred reactor was utilized to observe the evolution of stable intermediates and products for the oxidation of n- and iso-butanal at elevated pressures and low to intermediate temperatures. The counterflow configuration was utilized for the determination of laminar flame speeds. A detailed chemical kinetic interpretative model was developed and validated consisting of 244 species and 1198 reactions derived from a previous study of the oxidation of propanal (propionaldehyde). Extensive reaction pathway and sensitivity analysis was performed to provide detailed insight into the mechanisms governing low-, intermediate-, and high-temperature reactivity. The simulation results using the present model are in good agreement with the experimental laminar flame speeds and well within a factor of two of the speciation data obtained in the jet stirred reactor. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  20. Simulating secondary organic aerosol in a regional air quality model using the statistical oxidation model – Part 2: Assessing the influence of vapor wall losses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Cappa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of losses of organic vapors to chamber walls during secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation experiments has recently been established. Here, the influence of such losses on simulated ambient SOA concentrations and properties is assessed in the University of California at Davis / California Institute of Technology (UCD/CIT regional air quality model using the statistical oxidation model (SOM for SOA. The SOM was fit to laboratory chamber data both with and without accounting for vapor wall losses following the approach of Zhang et al. (2014. Two vapor wall-loss scenarios are considered when fitting of SOM to chamber data to determine best-fit SOM parameters, one with “low” and one with “high” vapor wall-loss rates to approximately account for the current range of uncertainty in this process. Simulations were run using these different parameterizations (scenarios for both the southern California/South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB and the eastern United States (US. Accounting for vapor wall losses leads to substantial increases in the simulated SOA concentrations from volatile organic compounds (VOCs in both domains, by factors of  ∼  2–5 for the low and  ∼  5–10 for the high scenarios. The magnitude of the increase scales approximately inversely with the absolute SOA concentration of the no loss scenario. In SoCAB, the predicted SOA fraction of total organic aerosol (OA increases from  ∼  0.2 (no to  ∼  0.5 (low and to  ∼  0.7 (high, with the high vapor wall-loss simulations providing best general agreement with observations. In the eastern US, the SOA fraction is large in all cases but increases further when vapor wall losses are accounted for. The total OA ∕ ΔCO ratio captures the influence of dilution on SOA concentrations. The simulated OA ∕ ΔCO in SoCAB (specifically, at Riverside, CA is found to increase substantially during the day only for the high vapor wall

  1. A Holistic Model That Physicochemically Links Iron Oxide - Apatite and Iron Oxide - Copper - Gold Deposits to Magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, A. C.; Reich, M.; Knipping, J.; Bilenker, L.; Barra, F.; Deditius, A.; Lundstrom, C.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2015-12-01

    Iron oxide-apatite (IOA) and iron oxide-copper-gold deposits (IOCG) are important sources of their namesake metals and increasingly for rare earth metals in apatite. Studies of natural systems document that IOA and IOCG deposits are often spatially and temporally related with one another and coeval magmatism. However, a genetic model that accounts for observations of natural systems remains elusive, with few observational data able to distinguish among working hypotheses that invoke meteoric fluid, magmatic-hydrothermal fluid, and immiscible melts. Here, we use Fe and O isotope data and high-resolution trace element (e.g., Ti, V, Mn, Al) data of individual magnetite grains from the world-class Los Colorados (LC) IOA deposit in the Chilean Iron Belt to elucidate the origin of IOA and IOCG deposits. Values of d56Fe range from 0.08‰ to 0.26‰, which are within the global range of ~0.06‰ to 0.5‰ for magnetite formed at magmatic conditions. Values of δ18O for magnetite and actinolite are 2.04‰ and 6.08‰, respectively, consistent with magmatic values. Ti, V, Al, and Mn are enriched in magnetite cores and decrease systematically from core to rim. Plotting [Al + Mn] vs. [Ti + V] indicates that magnetite cores are consistent with magmatic and/or magmatic-hydrothermal (i.e., porphyry) magnetites. Decreasing Al, Mn, Ti, V is consistent with a cooling trend from porphyry to Kiruna to IOCG systems. The data from LC are consistent with the following new genetic model for IOA and IOCG systems: 1) magnetite cores crystallize from silicate melt; 2) these magnetite crystals are nucleation sites for aqueous fluid that exsolves and scavenges inter alia Fe, P, S, Cu, Au from silicate melt; 3) the magnetite-fluid suspension is less dense that the surrounding magma, allowing ascent; 4) as the suspension ascends, magnetite grows in equilibrium with the fluid and takes on a magmatic-hydrothermal character (i.e., lower Al, Mn, Ti, V); 5) during ascent, magnetite, apatite and

  2. Photochemical aging of aerosol particles in different air masses arriving at Baengnyeong Island, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eunha; Lee, Meehye; Brune, William H.; Lee, Taehyoung; Park, Taehyun; Ahn, Joonyoung; Shang, Xiaona

    2018-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles are a serious health risk, especially in regions like East Asia. We investigated the photochemical aging of ambient aerosols using a potential aerosol mass (PAM) reactor at Baengnyeong Island in the Yellow Sea during 4-12 August 2011. The size distributions and chemical compositions of aerosol particles were measured alternately every 6 min from the ambient air or through the highly oxidizing environment of a potential aerosol mass (PAM) reactor. Particle size and chemical composition were measured by using the combination of a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). Inside the PAM reactor, O3 and OH levels were equivalent to 4.6 days of integrated OH exposure at typical atmospheric conditions. Two types of air masses were distinguished on the basis of the chemical composition and the degree of aging: air transported from China, which was more aged with a higher sulfate concentration and O : C ratio, and the air transported across the Korean Peninsula, which was less aged with more organics than sulfate and a lower O : C ratio. For both episodes, the particulate sulfate mass concentration increased in the 200-400 nm size range when sampled through the PAM reactor. A decrease in organics was responsible for the loss of mass concentration in 100-200 nm particles when sampled through the PAM reactor for the organics-dominated episode. This loss was especially evident for the m/z 43 component, which represents less oxidized organics. The m/z 44 component, which represents further oxidized organics, increased with a shift toward larger sizes for both episodes. It is not possible to quantify the maximum possible organic mass concentration for either episode because only one OH exposure of 4.6 days was used, but it is clear that SO2 was a primary precursor of secondary aerosol in northeast Asia, especially during long-range transport from China. In addition

  3. Detailed kinetic modeling study of n-pentanol oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Heufer, Karl Alexander; Sarathy, Mani; Curran, Henry J.; Davis, Alexander C.; Westbrook, Charles K.; Pitz, William J.

    2012-01-01

    To help overcome the world's dependence upon fossil fuels, suitable biofuels are promising alternatives that can be used in the transportation sector. Recent research on internal combustion engines shows that short alcoholic fuels (e.g., ethanol or n-butanol) have reduced pollutant emissions and increased knock resistance compared to fossil fuels. Although higher molecular weight alcohols (e.g., n-pentanol and n-hexanol) exhibit higher reactivity that lowers their knock resistance, they are suitable for diesel engines or advanced engine concepts, such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), where higher reactivity at lower temperatures is necessary for engine operation. The present study presents a detailed kinetic model for n-pentanol based on modeling rules previously presented for n-butanol. This approach was initially validated using quantum chemistry calculations to verify the most stable n-pentanol conformation and to obtain C-H and C-C bond dissociation energies. The proposed model has been validated against ignition delay time data, speciation data from a jet-stirred reactor, and laminar flame velocity measurements. Overall, the model shows good agreement with the experiments and permits a detailed discussion of the differences between alcohols and alkanes. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  4. Electrochemical Impedance Modeling of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadi, R.; Søgaard, Martin; Ramos, Tania

    2014-01-01

    (TLM), which is suitably modified to account for the electrode microstructural details, is used for modeling the impedance arising from the electrochemical reactions. In order to solve the system of nonlinear equations, an in-house code based on the finite difference method was developed. Some...

  5. Detailed kinetic modeling study of n-pentanol oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Heufer, Karl Alexander

    2012-10-18

    To help overcome the world\\'s dependence upon fossil fuels, suitable biofuels are promising alternatives that can be used in the transportation sector. Recent research on internal combustion engines shows that short alcoholic fuels (e.g., ethanol or n-butanol) have reduced pollutant emissions and increased knock resistance compared to fossil fuels. Although higher molecular weight alcohols (e.g., n-pentanol and n-hexanol) exhibit higher reactivity that lowers their knock resistance, they are suitable for diesel engines or advanced engine concepts, such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), where higher reactivity at lower temperatures is necessary for engine operation. The present study presents a detailed kinetic model for n-pentanol based on modeling rules previously presented for n-butanol. This approach was initially validated using quantum chemistry calculations to verify the most stable n-pentanol conformation and to obtain C-H and C-C bond dissociation energies. The proposed model has been validated against ignition delay time data, speciation data from a jet-stirred reactor, and laminar flame velocity measurements. Overall, the model shows good agreement with the experiments and permits a detailed discussion of the differences between alcohols and alkanes. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  6. Modeling selenate adsorption behavior on oxides, clay minerals, and soils using the triple layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenate adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous aluminum oxide, amorphous iron oxide, goethite, clay minerals: kaolinites, montmorillonites, illite, and 18 soil samples from Hawaii, and the Southwestern and the Midwestern regions of the US as a function of solution pH. Selenate adsorpti...

  7. Kinetic analysis of photochemical sterilization of thermoduric bacterial spores in slurry of semiconductor catalyst particles with aeration. Handotai shokubai ryushi no tsuki kendakukei ni okeru tainetsusei saikin hoshi no hikari sakkin to sono sokudoronteki kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tone, S; Taya, M; Kato, S; Horie, Y; Ashikaga, Y [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering and Science; Joo, Hyunkyu [Konkuk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-11-10

    To study the utilization of the photochemical sterilization of thermoduric bacterial spores B. stearothermophilus with photocatalysis of TiO2 particles, light irradiation experiments are conducted under various operational conditions. TiO2 particles and dissolved oxygen resulting from aeration must coexist to accelerate the rate of spore sterilization under light irradiation of a high pressure mercury lamp. The sterilization rate increases with larger average light intensity in the reactor, and it is estimated that the dissolved oxygen contributes to the formation of oxidative radicals which become the attacking species. The maximal rate of spore sterilization is obtained under the condition of TiO2 concentration of 5[times]10[sup -2]kg[center dot]m[sup -3]. By combining a second-order rate equation, wherein the spores' death caused by the oxidative radicals formed by TiO2 photocatalysis is taken into consideration, and single-hit multitarget model, wherein the target damaged by the oxidizer in the spores is assumed, the sterilization velocity can be described well, and the effect of light intensity and the obtained rate parameters are correlated well. 13 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Mathematical modeling of nitrous oxide production in an anaerobic/oxic/anoxic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaoqian; Zhao, Jianqiang; Hu, Bo; Chen, Ying; Ge, Guanghuan; Li, Xiaoling; Wang, Sha; Gao, Kun; Tian, Xiaolei

    2016-12-01

    This study incorporates three currently known nitrous oxide (N 2 O) production pathways: ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) denitrification, incomplete hydroxylamine (NH 2 OH) oxidation, and heterotrophic denitrification on intracellular polymers, into a mathematical model to describe N 2 O production in an anaerobic/oxic/anoxic (AOA) process for the first time. The developed model was calibrated and validated by four experimental cases, then evaluated by two independent anaerobic/aerobic (AO) studies from literature. The modeling results displayed good agreement with the measured data. N 2 O was primarily generated in the aerobic stage by AOB denitrification (67.84-81.64%) in the AOA system. Smaller amounts of N 2 O were produced via incomplete NH 2 OH oxidation (15.61-32.17%) and heterotrophic denitrification on intracellular polymers (0-12.47%). The high nitrite inhibition on N 2 O reductase led to the increased N 2 O accumulation in heterotrophic denitrification on intracellular polymers. The new model was capable of modeling nitrification-denitrification dynamics and heterotrophic denitrification on intracellular polymers in the AOA system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Optimization of operating conditions in oxidation of dibenzothiophene in the light hydrocarbon model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbari Azam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effects of process variables on the efficiency and mechanism of dibenzothiophene oxidation in formicacid/H2O2 system for deep desulfurization of a light hydrocarbon model were systematically studied by statistical modelling and optimization using response surface methodology and implementing the central composite design. A quadratic regression model was developed to predict the yield of sulfur oxidation as the model response. The model indicated that temperature was the most significant effective factor and suggested an important interaction between temperature and H2O2/sulfur ratio; at temperatures above 56°C, more excess oxidant was necessary because of instability of active peroxo intermediates and loss of H2O2 due to thermal decomposition. In contrast, the water hindrance effect of H2O2 aqueous solution in desulfurization progress was more significant at temperatures bellow 56°C. In the optimization process, minimizing H2O2/sulfur ratio and catalyst consumption for maximum yield of desulfurization was economically considerable. The optimal condition was obtained at temperature of 57 °C, H2O2/sulfur ratio of 2.5 mol/mol and catalyst dosage of 0.82 mL in 50 mL solution of DBT in n-hexane leading to a maximum oxidation yield of 95% after 1 hour reaction. Good agreement between predicted and experimental results (less than 4% error was found.

  10. Photochemical Cyclopolymerization of Polyimides in Ultraviolet Ridgidizing Composites for Use in Inflatable Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This innovation uses photochemical cyclopolymerization of polyimides to manufacture ultraviolet rigidizable composites for use in RIS (ridgidizing inflatable)...

  11. Understanding the Atmosphere of 51 Eri b: Do Photochemical Hazes Cloud the Planets Spectrum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Mark Scott; Zahnle, Kevin; Moses, J.; Morley, C.

    2015-01-01

    The first young giant planet to be discovered by the Gemini Planet Imager was the (is) approximately 2MJ planet 51 Eri b. This approximately 20 Myr old young Jupiter is the first directly imaged planet to show unmistakable methane in H band. To constrain the planet's mass, atmospheric temperature, and composition, the GPI J and H band spectra as well as some limited photometric points were compared to the predictions of substellar atmosphere models. The best fitting models reported in the discovery paper (Macintosh et al. 2015) relied upon a combination of clear and cloudy atmospheric columns to reproduce the data. However for an object as cool as 700 K, the origin of the cloud coverage is somewhat puzzling, as the global silicate and iron clouds would be expected to have sunk well below the photosphere by this effective temperature. While strong vertical mixing in these low gravity atmospheres remains a plausible explanation, we have explored whether atmospheric photochemistry, driven by the UV flux from the primary star, may yield hazes that also influence the observed spectrum of the planet. To explore this possibility we have modeled the atmospheric photochemistry of 51 Eri b using two state-of-the-art photochemical models, both capable of predicting yields of complex hydrocarbons under various atmospheric conditions. In our presentation we will summarize the modeling approach employed to characterize 51 Eri b, explaining constraints on the planet's effective temperature, gravity, and atmospheric composition and also present results of our studies of atmospheric photochemistry. We will discuss whether photochemical hazes could indeed be responsible for the particulate opacity that apparently sculpts the spectrum of the planet.

  12. Comparison of two lung clearance models based on the dissolution rates of oxidized depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crist, K.C.

    1984-10-01

    An in-vitro dissolution study was conducted on two respirable oxidized depleted uranium samples. The dissolution rates generated from this study were then utilized in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Task Group lung clearance model and a lung clearance model proposed by Cuddihy. Predictions from both models based on the dissolution rates of the amount of oxidized depleted uranium that would be cleared to blood from the pulmonary region following an inhalation exposure were compared. It was found that the predictions made by both models differed considerably. The difference between the predictions was attributed to the differences in the way each model perceives the clearance from the pulmonary region. 33 references, 11 figures, 9 tables

  13. Comparison of two lung clearance models based on the dissolution rates of oxidized depleted uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crist, K.C.

    1984-10-01

    An in-vitro dissolution study was conducted on two respirable oxidized depleted uranium samples. The dissolution rates generated from this study were then utilized in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Task Group lung clearance model and a lung clearance model proposed by Cuddihy. Predictions from both models based on the dissolution rates of the amount of oxidized depleted uranium that would be cleared to blood from the pulmonary region following an inhalation exposure were compared. It was found that the predictions made by both models differed considerably. The difference between the predictions was attributed to the differences in the way each model perceives the clearance from the pulmonary region. 33 references, 11 figures, 9 tables.

  14. Modelling study of boundary-layer ozone over northern China - Part II: Responses to emission reductions during the Beijing Olympics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guiqian; Zhu, Xiaowan; Xin, Jinyuan; Hu, Bo; Song, Tao; Sun, Yang; Wang, Lili; Wu, Fangkun; Sun, Jie; Cheng, Mengtian; Chao, Na; Li, Xin; Wang, Yuesi

    2017-09-01

    The implementation of emission reduction measures during the Olympics provided a valuable opportunity to study regional photochemical pollution over northern China. In this study, the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University/National Centre for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model and Community Multiscale Air Quality model system was applied to conduct two sets of modelling analyses of the period from July 20 to September 20, 2008, to illustrate the influences of emission reduction measures on regional photochemical pollution over northern China during the Beijing Olympics. The results indicated that the implementation of emission control measures decreased the concentrations of ozone (O3) precursors, namely nitrogen oxide (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), throughout the boundary layer. The concentrations of these compounds were reduced by 45% in the central urban area of Beijing at the ground level. Although the average O3 concentration in the central urban area increased by more than 8 ppbv, the total oxidant concentration decreased significantly by more than 5 ppbv. Greater O3 concentrations mainly occurred during periods with weak photochemical reactions. During periods of strong photochemical production, the O3 concentration decreased significantly due to a weakening vertical circulation between the lower and upper boundary layer. Consequently, the number of days when the O3 concentration exceeded 100 ppbv decreased by 25% in Beijing. The emission control measures altered the sensitivity of the regional O3 production. The coordinated control region of NOx and VOCs expanded, and the control region of VOCs decreased in size. The reduction of non-point-source emissions, such as fugitive VOCs and vehicles, was more useful for controlling regional photochemical pollution over northern China.

  15. Thermodynamic and kinetic aspects on the selective surface oxidation of binary, ternary and quarternary model alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaminathan, Srinivasan; Spiegel, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Segregation and selective oxidation phenomena of minor alloying elements during annealing of steel sheets lead to the formation of bare spots after hot dip galvanizing. In order to understand the influence of common alloying elements on the surface chemistry after annealing, model alloys of binary (Fe-2Si, Fe-2Mn and Fe-0.8Cr), ternary (Fe-2Mn-2Si, Fe-2Mn-0.8Cr and Fe-2Si-0.8Cr) and quarternary (Fe-2Mn-2Si-0.8Cr) systems were investigated. The specimens were annealed for 60 s at 820 deg. C in N 2 -5% H 2 gas atmospheres with different dew points -80 and -40 deg. C, respectively. Surface chemistry of the annealed specimens was obtained by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to view surface morphology. At low dew point -80 deg. C, apart from the thermodynamical calculations such as solubility product of oxides and their critical solute concentrations, kinetics play a decisive role on the selective oxidation, i.e. oxygen competition. As expected, the amount of external selective oxidation of alloying elements are well pronounced at higher dew point -40 deg. C. An attempt has been made to explain the dominant process of Si and Mn on Cr-oxidation and segregation. It is observed that annealing of quarternary system at higher dew point shifts the Cr-oxidation from external to internal

  16. Chemometrics models for assessment of oxidative stress risk in chrome-electroplating workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendehdel, Rezvan; Shetab-Boushehri, Seyed Vahid; Azari, Mansoor R; Hosseini, Vajihe; Mohammadi, Hamidreza

    2015-04-01

    Oxidative stress is the main cause of hexavalant chromium-induced damage in chrome electroplating workers. The main goal of this study is toxicity analysis and the possibility of toxicity risk categorizing in the chrome electroplating workers based on oxidative stress parameters as prognostic variables. We assessed blood chromium levels and biomarkers of oxidative stress such as lipid peroxidation, thiol (SH) groups and antioxidant capacity of plasma. Data were subjected to principle component analysis (PCA) and artificial neuronal network (ANN) to obtain oxidative stress pattern for chrome electroplating workers. Blood chromium levels increased from 4.42 ppb to 10.6 ppb. Induction of oxidative stress was observed by increased in lipid peroxidation (22.38 ± 10.47 μM versus 14.74 ± 4.82 μM, p chrome electroplaters. The result showed multivariate modeling can be interpreted as the induced biochemical toxicity in the workers exposed to hexavalent chromium. Different occupation groups were assessed on the basis of risk level of oxidative stress which could further justify proceeding engineering control measures.

  17. Thermodynamic and kinetic aspects on the selective surface oxidation of binary, ternary and quarternary model alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminathan, Srinivasan [High Temperature Reactions Group, Department of Interface Chemistry and Surface Engineering, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-40237 Duesseldorf (Germany)]. E-mail: s.swaminathan@mpie.de; Spiegel, Michael [High Temperature Reactions Group, Department of Interface Chemistry and Surface Engineering, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-40237 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    Segregation and selective oxidation phenomena of minor alloying elements during annealing of steel sheets lead to the formation of bare spots after hot dip galvanizing. In order to understand the influence of common alloying elements on the surface chemistry after annealing, model alloys of binary (Fe-2Si, Fe-2Mn and Fe-0.8Cr), ternary (Fe-2Mn-2Si, Fe-2Mn-0.8Cr and Fe-2Si-0.8Cr) and quarternary (Fe-2Mn-2Si-0.8Cr) systems were investigated. The specimens were annealed for 60 s at 820 deg. C in N{sub 2}-5% H{sub 2} gas atmospheres with different dew points -80 and -40 deg. C, respectively. Surface chemistry of the annealed specimens was obtained by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to view surface morphology. At low dew point -80 deg. C, apart from the thermodynamical calculations such as solubility product of oxides and their critical solute concentrations, kinetics play a decisive role on the selective oxidation, i.e. oxygen competition. As expected, the amount of external selective oxidation of alloying elements are well pronounced at higher dew point -40 deg. C. An attempt has been made to explain the dominant process of Si and Mn on Cr-oxidation and segregation. It is observed that annealing of quarternary system at higher dew point shifts the Cr-oxidation from external to internal.

  18. Cholesterol photo-oxidation: A chemical reaction network for kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaba, Carlo; Rodríguez-Estrada, Maria Teresa; Lercker, Giovanni; García, Hugo Sergio; Medina-Meza, Ilce Gabriela

    2016-12-01

    In this work we studied the effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) methyl esters on cholesterol photo-induced oxidation. The oxidative routes were modeled with a chemical reaction network (CRN), which represents the first application of CRN to the oxidative degradation of a food-related lipid matrix. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, T-I), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, T-II) and a mixture of both (T-III) were added to cholesterol using hematoporphyrin as sensitizer, and were exposed to a fluorescent lamp for 48h. High amounts of Type I cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) were recovered (epimers 7α- and 7β-OH, 7-keto and 25-OH), as well as 5β,6β-epoxy. Fitting the experimental data with the CRN allowed characterizing the associated kinetics. DHA and EPA exerted different effects on the oxidative process. DHA showed a protective effect to 7-hydroxy derivatives, whereas EPA enhanced side-chain oxidation and 7β-OH kinetic rates. The mixture of PUFAs increased the kinetic rates several fold, particularly for 25-OH. With respect to the control, the formation of β-epoxy was reduced, suggesting potential inhibition in the presence of PUFAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Model for solid oxide fuel cell cathodes prepared by infiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Alfred Junio; Søgaard, Martin; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2017-01-01

    A 1-dimensional model