WorldWideScience

Sample records for model photochemical oxidant

  1. European scale modeling of sulfur, oxidized nitrogen and photochemical oxidants. Model development and evaluation for the 1994 growing season

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langner, J.; Bergstroem, R. [Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Inst., Norrkoeping (Sweden); Pleijel, K. [Swedish Environmental Research Inst., Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1998-09-01

    A chemical mechanism, including the relevant reactions leading to the production of ozone and other photochemical oxidants, has been implemented in the MATCH regional tracer transport/chemistry/deposition model. The aim has been to develop a model platform that can be used as a basis for a range of regional scale studies involving atmospheric chemistry, including assessment of the importance of different sources of pollutants to the levels of photochemical oxidants and air pollutant forecasting. Meteorological input data to the model were taken from archived output from the operational version of HIRLAM at SMHI. Evaluation of model calculations over Europe for a six month period in 1994 for a range of chemical components show good results considering known sources of error and uncertainties in input data and model formulation. With limited further work the system is sufficiently good to be applied for scenario studies and for regional scale air pollutant forecasts 42 refs, 24 figs, 17 tabs

  2. 40 CFR 52.1877 - Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... oxidants (hydrocarbons). 52.1877 Section 52.1877 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....1877 Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons). (a) The requirements of Subpart G of this... national standard for photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) in the Metropolitan Cincinnati...

  3. Photochemical Transformation of Graphene Oxide in Sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a graphene derivative that is more easily manufactured in large scale and used to synthesize reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with properties analogous to graphene. In this study, we investigate the photochemical fate of GO under sunlight conditions. The resu...

  4. Photochemical oxidants: state of the science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kley, D; Kleinmann, M; Sanderman, H; Krupa, S

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric photochemical processes resulting in the production of tropospheric ozone (O(3)) and other oxidants are described. The spatial and temporal variabilities in the occurrence of surface level oxidants and their relationships to air pollution meteorology are discussed. Models of photooxidant formation are reviewed in the context of control strategies and comparisons are provided of the air concentrations of O(3) at select geographic locations around the world. This overall oxidant (O(3)) climatology is coupled to human health and ecological effects. The discussion of the effects includes both acute and chronic responses, mechanisms of action, human epidemiological and plant population studies and briefly, efforts to establish cause-effect relationships through numerical modeling. A short synopsis is provided of the interactive effects of O(3) with other abiotic and biotic factors. The overall emphasis of the paper is on identifying the current uncertainties and gaps in our understanding of the state of the science and some suggestions as to how they may be addressed.

  5. Aqueous-phase photochemical oxidation and direct photolysis of vanillin - a model compound of methoxy-phenols from biomass burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. J.; Huang, D. D.; Cheung, H. Y.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Chan, C. K.

    2013-10-01

    We present here experimental results on aqueous-phase (A) photochemical oxidation (with UV and OH radicals generated from H2O2 photolysis) and (B) direct photolysis (with only UV irradiation) of a methoxy-phenol, vanillin (VL), as a model compound from biomass burning. Both on-line aerosol mass spectrometric (AMS) characterization and off-line chemical analyses were performed. AMS analyses of dried atomized droplets of the bulk reacting mixtures showed that VL almost entirely evaporates during the drying process. Large amounts of organic mass remained in the particle phase after reactions under both conditions. Under condition (A), AMS measured organic mass first increased rapidly and then decreased, attributable to the formation of non-volatile products and subsequent formation of smaller and volatile products, respectively. The oxygen-to-carbon (O:C) ratio of the products reached 1.5 after about 80 min, but dropped substantially thereafter. In contrast, organic mass increased slowly under condition (B). The O:C ratio reached 1.0 after 180 min. In off-line analyses, small oxygenates were detected under condition (A), while hydroxylated products and dimers of VL were detected under condition (B). Particle hygroscopic growth factor (GF) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of the reacting mixtures were found to be dependent on both organic volume fraction and the degree of oxygenation of organics. Results show that (1) aqueous-phase processes can lead to the retention of a large portion of the organic mass in the particle phase; (2) once retained, this portion of organic mass significantly changes the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of the aerosol particles; (3) intensive photochemical oxidation gave rise to an O:C ratio as high as 1.5 but the ratio decreased as further oxidation led to smaller and more volatile products; and (4) polymerization occurred with direct photolysis, resulting in high-molecular-weight products of a yellowish color. This study

  6. Aqueous-phase photochemical oxidation and direct photolysis of vanillin - a model compound of methoxy phenols from biomass burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. J.; Huang, D. D.; Cheung, H. Y.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Chan, C. K.

    2014-03-01

    We present here experimental results on aqueous-phase (A) photochemical oxidation (with UV and OH radicals generated from H2O2 photolysis) and (B) direct photolysis (with only UV irradiation) of a methoxy phenol, vanillin (VL), as a model compound from biomass burning. Both on-line aerosol mass spectrometric (AMS) characterization and off-line chemical analyses were performed. AMS analyses of dried atomized droplets of the bulk reacting mixtures showed that VL almost entirely evaporates during the drying process. Large amounts of organic mass remained in the particle phase after reactions under both conditions. Under condition (A), AMS measured organic mass first increased rapidly and then decreased, attributable to the formation of non-volatile products and subsequent formation of smaller and volatile products, respectively. The oxygen-to-carbon (O : C) ratio of the products reached 1.5 after about 80 min, but dropped substantially thereafter. In contrast, organic mass increased slowly under condition (B). The O : C ratio reached 1.0 after 180 min. In off-line analyses, small oxygenates were detected under condition (A), while hydroxylated products and dimers of VL were detected under condition (B). Particle hygroscopic growth factor (GF) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of the reacting mixtures were found to depend on both organic volume fraction and the degree of oxygenation of organics. Results show that (1) aqueous-phase processes can lead to the retention of a large portion of the organic mass in the particle phase; (2) once retained, this portion of organic mass significantly changes the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of the aerosol particles; (3) intensive photochemical oxidation gave rise to an O : C ratio as high as 1.5 but the ratio decreased as further oxidation led to smaller and more volatile products; and (4) polymerization occurred with direct photolysis, resulting in high-molecular-weight products of a yellowish color. This study

  7. Photochemical oxidation of dimethylsulfide in seawater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Dimethylsulfide (DMS) is generally thought to be lost from the surface oceans by evasion into the atmosphere as well as consumption by microbe. However, photochemical process might be important in the removal of DMS in the oceanic photic zone. A kinetic investigation into the photochemical oxidation of DMS in seawater was performed. The photo-oxidation rates of DMS were influenced by various factors including the medium, dissolved oxygen, photosensitizers, and heavy metal ions. The photo-oxidation rates of DMS were higher in seawater than in distilled water, presumably due to the effect of salinity existing in seawater. Three usual photosensitizers (humic acid, fulvic acid and anthroquinone), especially in the presence of oxygen, were able to enhance the photo-oxidation rate of DMS, with the fastest rate observed with anthroquinone. Photo-oxidation of DMS followed first order reaction kinetics with the rate constant ranging from 2.5×10-5 to 34.3×10-5 s-1. Quantitative analysis showed that approximately 32% of the photochemically removed DMS was converted to dimethylsulfoxide. One of the important findings was that the presence of Hg2+ could markedly accelerate the photo-oxidation rate of DMS in seawater. The mechanism of mercuric catalysis for DMS photolysis was suggested according to the way of CTTM (charge transfer to metal) of DMS-Hg2+ complex.

  8. Real-Time Studies of Iron Oxalate-Mediated Oxidation of Glycolaldehyde as a Model for Photochemical Aging of Aqueous Tropospheric Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Daniel A; Coggon, Matthew M; Lignell, Hanna; Schilling, Katherine A; Zhang, Xuan; Schwantes, Rebecca H; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H; Beauchamp, J L

    2016-11-15

    The complexation of iron(III) with oxalic acid in aqueous solution yields a strongly absorbing chromophore that undergoes efficient photodissociation to give iron(II) and the carbon dioxide anion radical. Importantly, iron(III) oxalate complexes absorb near-UV radiation (λ > 350 nm), providing a potentially powerful source of oxidants in aqueous tropospheric chemistry. Although this photochemical system has been studied extensively, the mechanistic details associated with its role in the oxidation of dissolved organic matter within aqueous aerosol remain largely unknown. This study utilizes glycolaldehyde as a model organic species to examine the oxidation pathways and evolution of organic aerosol initiated by the photodissociation of aqueous iron(III) oxalate complexes. Hanging droplets (radius 1 mm) containing iron(III), oxalic acid, glycolaldehyde, and ammonium sulfate (pH ∼3) are exposed to irradiation at 365 nm and sampled at discrete time points utilizing field-induced droplet ionization mass spectrometry (FIDI-MS). Glycolaldehyde is found to undergo rapid oxidation to form glyoxal, glycolic acid, and glyoxylic acid, but the formation of high molecular weight oligomers is not observed. For comparison, particle-phase experiments conducted in a laboratory chamber explore the reactive uptake of gas-phase glycolaldehyde onto aqueous seed aerosol containing iron and oxalic acid. The presence of iron oxalate in seed aerosol is found to inhibit aerosol growth. These results suggest that photodissociation of iron(III) oxalate can lead to the formation of volatile oxidation products in tropospheric aqueous aerosols.

  9. Photochemical oxidation: A solution for the mixed waste dilemma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prellberg, J.W.; Thornton, L.M.; Cheuvront, D.A. [Vulcan Peroxidation Systems, Inc., Tucson, AZ (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Numerous technologies are available to remove organic contamination from water or wastewater. A variety of techniques also exist that are used to neutralize radioactive waste. However, few technologies can satisfactorily address the treatment of mixed organic/radioactive waste without creating unacceptable secondary waste products or resulting in extremely high treatment costs. An innovative solution to the mixed waste problem is on-site photochemical oxidation. Liquid-phase photochemical oxidation has a long- standing history of successful application to the destruction of organic compounds. By using photochemical oxidation, the organic contaminants are destroyed on-site leaving the water, with radionuclides, that can be reused or disposed of as appropriate. This technology offers advantages that include zero air emissions, no solid or liquid waste formation, and relatively low treatment cost. Discussion of the photochemical process will be described, and several case histories from recent design testing, including cost analyses for the resulting full-scale installations, will be presented as examples.

  10. Photochemical transformation of graphene oxide in sunlight (journal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a graphene derivative that is more easily manufactured in large scale and used to synthesize reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with properties analogous to graphene. In this study, we investigate the photochemical fate of GO under sunlight conditions. The resu...

  11. Real-Time Studies of Iron Oxalate-Mediated Oxidation of Glycolaldehyde as a Model for Photochemical Aging of Aqueous Tropospheric Aerosols

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Daniel A.; Coggon, Matthew M.; Lignell, Hanna; Schilling, Katherine Ann; Zhang, Xuan; Schwantes, Rebecca H.; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.; Beauchamp, Jesse Lee

    2016-01-01

    The complexation of iron (III) with oxalic acid in aqueous solution yields a strongly absorbing chromophore that undergoes efficient photodissociation to give iron (II) and the carbon dioxide anion radical. Importantly, iron (III) oxalate complexes absorb near-UV radiation (λ > 350 nm), providing a potentially powerful source of oxidants in aqueous tropospheric chemistry. Although this photochemical system has been studied extensively, the mechanistic details associated with its role in the o...

  12. 40 CFR 52.269 - Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and carbon monoxide. 52.269 Section 52.269 Protection of Environment... PLANS California § 52.269 Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and... provide for attainment and maintenance of the national standards for photochemical oxidants...

  13. Photochemical Phenomenology Model for the New Millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, James; Evans, J. Scott

    2001-01-01

    The "Photochemical Phenomenology Model for the New Millennium" project tackles the issue of reengineering and extension of validated physics-based modeling capabilities ("legacy" computer codes) to application-oriented software for use in science and science-support activities. While the design and architecture layouts are in terms of general particle distributions involved in scattering, impact, and reactive interactions, initial Photochemical Phenomenology Modeling Tool (PPMT) implementations are aimed at construction and evaluation of photochemical transport models with rapid execution for use in remote sensing data analysis activities in distributed systems. Current focus is on the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) data acquired during the CASSINI flyby of Jupiter. Overall, the project has stayed on the development track outlined in the Year 1 annual report and most Year 2 goals have been met. The issues that have required the most attention are: implementation of the core photochemistry algorithms; implementation of a functional Java Graphical User Interface; completion of a functional CORBA Component Model framework; and assessment of performance issues. Specific accomplishments and the difficulties encountered are summarized in this report. Work to be carried out in the next year center on: completion of testing of the initial operational implementation; its application to analysis of the CASSINI/CIRS Jovian flyby data; extension of the PPMT to incorporate additional phenomenology algorithms; and delivery of a mature operational implementation.

  14. Photochemical oxidation of halocarbons in the troposphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, R.A. (Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell, Eng.); Derwent, R.G.; Eggleton, A.E.J.; Lovelock, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the reactivity of hydroxyl radicals with some simple halocarbons are reported, together with some new measurements of the air concentration of halocarbons in the N and S hemispheres. The OH reactivities are used to derive life-times of the halocarbons with respect to photo-oxidation in the troposphere. It is found that the chlorohydrocarbons containing H atoms are moderately reactive with lifetimes of 1 y or less but the fully halogenated compounds carbon tetrachloride and Freons 11 and 12 are essentially inert towards photo-oxidation. The air concentration and reactivity data are combined to provide an estimate of the magnitude of the tropospheric sink for the halocarbons due to oxidation by OH radicals. For some of the more reactive halocarbons this sink exceeds the estimated anthropogenic emissions and an additional, possibly natural, source is indicated.

  15. Mathematical Modeling of Photochemical Air Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Gregory John

    Air pollution is an environmental problem that is both pervasive and difficult to control. An important element of any rational control approach is a reliable means for evaluating the air quality impact of alternative abatement measures. This work presents such a capability, in the form of a mathematical description of the production and transport of photochemical oxidants within an urban airshed. The combined influences of advection, turbulent diffusion, chemical reaction, emissions and surface removal processes are all incorporated into a series of models that are based on the species continuity equations. A delineation of the essential assumptions underlying the formulation of a three-dimensional, a Lagrangian trajectory, a vertically integrated and single cell air quality model is presented. Since each model employs common components and input data the simpler forms can be used for rapid screening calculations and the more complex ones for detailed evaluations. The flow fields, needed for species transport, are constructed using inverse distance weighted polynomial interpolation techniques that map routine monitoring data onto a regular computational mesh. Variational analysis procedures are then employed to adjust the field so that mass is conserved. Initial concentration and mixing height distributions can be established with the same interpolation algorithms. Subgrid scale turbulent transport is characterized by a gradient diffusion hypothesis. Similarity solutions are used to model the surface layer fluxes. Above this layer different treatments of turbulent diffusivity are required to account for variations in atmospheric stability. Convective velocity scaling is utilized to develop eddy diffusivities for unstable conditions. The predicted mixing times are in accord with results obtained during sulfur hexafluoride (SF(,6)) tracer experiments. Conventional models are employed for neutral and stable conditions. A new formulation for gaseous deposition fluxes

  16. Kinetics study on photochemical oxidation of polyacrylamide by ozone combined with hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Guang-meng; SUN De-zhi; CHUNG Jong Shik

    2006-01-01

    An investigation on the process of ozone combined with hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet radiation has been carried out in order to establish the kinetics for photochemical oxidation of polyacrylamide (PAM) in aqueous solution. Effects of operating parameters, including initial PAM concentration, dosages of ozone and hydrogen peroxide, UV radiation and pH value on the photochemical oxidation of PAM, have been studied. There was an increase in photochemical oxidation rate of PAM with increasing of dosages of O3, H2O2 and ultraviolet radiation. Upon increasing of the initial PAM concentration, the photochemical oxidation rate of PAM decreased. Slight effect of pH value on the photochemical oxidation rate of PAM was observed in the experiments. The kinetics equation for the photochemical oxidation of PAM by the system has been established.

  17. Photochemical oxidation of persistent cyanide-related compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budaev, S. L.; Batoeva, A. A.; Khandarkhaeva, M. S.; Aseev, D. G.

    2017-03-01

    Kinetic regularities of the photolysis of thiocyanate solutions using of mono- and polychromatic UV radiation sources with different spectral ranges are studied. Comparative experiments aimed at investigating the role of photochemical action during the oxidation of thiocyanates with persulfates and additional catalytic activation with iron(III) ions are performed. The rate of conversion and the initial rate of thiocyanate oxidation are found to change in the order UV < UV/S2O 8 2- < S2O 8 2- /Fe3+ < UV/S2O 8 2- /Fe3+. A synergistic effect is detected when using the combined catalytic method for the destruction of thiocyanates by the UV/S2O 8 2- /Fe3+ oxidation system. This effect is due to the formation of reactive oxygen species, as a result of both the decomposition of persulfate and the reduction of inactive Fe3+ intermediates into Fe3+.

  18. Photochemical Phenomenology Model for the New Millenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, James; Evans, J. Scott

    2000-01-01

    This project tackles the problem of conversion of validated a priori physics-based modeling capabilities, specifically those relevant to the analysis and interpretation of planetary atmosphere observations, to application-oriented software for use in science and science-support activities. The software package under development, named the Photochemical Phenomenology Modeling Tool (PPMT), has particular focus on the atmospheric remote sensing data to be acquired by the CIRS instrument during the CASSINI Jupiter flyby and orbital tour of the Saturnian system. Overall, the project has followed the development outline given in the original proposal, and the Year 1 design and architecture goals have been met. Specific accomplishments and the difficulties encountered are summarized in this report. Most of the effort has gone into complete definition of the PPMT interfaces within the context of today's IT arena: adoption and adherence to the CORBA Component Model (CCM) has yielded a solid architecture basis, and CORBA-related issues (services, specification options, development plans, etc.) have been largely resolved. Implementation goals have been redirected somewhat so as to be more relevant to the upcoming CASSINI flyby of Jupiter, with focus now being more on data analysis and remote sensing retrieval applications.

  19. Improving a Mars photochemical model with thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Bonal, A.; Martin-Torres, F. J.; Simoncini, E.

    2012-12-01

    Different conditions of temperature and pressure drive the chemistry of a planetary atmosphere to different steady states. However, the different thermodynamic conditions are not considered in many studies about the abundance of liquid water, methane or other important compounds called sometimes biomarkers, leading to wrong calculations. We have adapted a photochemical model for Mars atmosphere [1] to the proper thermodynamical conditions and coupled it with realistic profiles of Temperature and Pressure previously calculated with PRAMS GCM. As we have shown previously [2], the influence of T,P and molar fraction in the Gibbs Free Energy calculations and therefore in the kinetics of the gases in a planetary atmosphere has a huge influence in the final steady state and concentrations. The study is applied to different compounds and determine their abundance with real Mars conditions. The existence and reactivity of liquid water on Mars is highly linked with the presence of other compounds in the atmosphere such as Ozone, OH or CH4, and the determination of those also require the thermodynamical studies. [1 ] Franck Lefèvre and François Forget. Observed variations of methane on Mars unexplained by known atmospheric chemistry and physics. Nature 460, 720-723 (6 August 2009) [2] Simoncini E., Delgado-Bonal A., Martin-Torres F.J., Accounting thermodynamic conditions in chemical models of planetary atmospheres. Submitted to Astrophysical Journal.

  20. Sunlight-induced photochemical decay of oxidants in natural waters: implications in ballast water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, William J; Jones, Adam C; Whitehead, Robert F; Zika, Rod G

    2007-05-15

    The transport and discharge of ship ballast water has been recognized as a major vector for the introduction of invasive species. Chemical oxidants, long used in drinking water and wastewater treatment, are alternative treatment methods for the control of invasive species currently being tested for use on ships. One concern when a ballasted vessel arrives in port is the adverse effects of residual oxidant in the treated water. The most common oxidants include chlorine (HOCl/OCl-), bromine (HOBr/OBr-), ozone (03), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), chlorine dioxide (ClO2), and monochloramine (NH2Cl). The present study was undertaken to evaluate the sunlight-mediated photochemical decomposition of these oxidants. Sunlight photodecomposition was measured at various pH using either distilled water or oligotrophic Gulf Stream water for specific oxidants. For selected oxidants, quantum yields at specific wavelengths were obtained. An environmental photochemical model, GCSOLAR, also provided predictions of the fate (sunlight photolysis half-lives) of HOCI/OCl-, HOBr/OBr-, ClO2, and NH2Cl for two different seasons at latitude 40 degrees and in water with two different concentrations of chromophoric dissolved organic matter. These data are useful in assessing the environmental fate of ballast water treatment oxidants if they were to be discharged in port.

  1. Anoxic photochemical oxidation of siderite generates molecular hydrogen and iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J Dongun; Yee, Nathan; Nanda, Vikas; Falkowski, Paul G

    2013-06-18

    Photochemical reactions of minerals are underappreciated processes that can make or break chemical bonds. We report the photooxidation of siderite (FeCO3) by UV radiation to produce hydrogen gas and iron oxides via a two-photon reaction. The calculated quantum yield for the reaction suggests photooxidation of siderite would have been a significant source of molecular hydrogen for the first half of Earth's history. Further, experimental results indicate this abiotic, photochemical process may have led to the formation of iron oxides under anoxic conditions. The reaction would have continued through the Archean to at least the early phases of the Great Oxidation Event, and provided a mechanism for oxidizing the atmosphere through the loss of hydrogen to space, while simultaneously providing a key reductant for microbial metabolism. We propose that the photochemistry of Earth-abundant minerals with wide band gaps would have potentially played a critical role in shaping the biogeochemical evolution of early Earth.

  2. The application of forest classification from Landsat data as a basis for natural hydrocarbon emission estimation and photochemical oxidant model simulations in southeastern Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salop, J.; Wakelyn, N. T.; Levy, G. F.; Middleton, W. M.; Gervin, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    The possible contribution by natural hydrocarbon emissions to the total ozone budget recorded in the Tidewater region of southeastern Virginia during the height of the summer period was examined. Natural sources investigated were limited to the primary HC emitters and most prevalent natural vegetation, the forests. Three types and their areal coverage were determined for Region VI of the Virginia State Air Pollution Control Board using remotely sensed data from Landsat, a NASA experimental earth resources satellite. Emission factors appropriate to the specific types (coniferous 0.24 x 10 to the 13th, mixed 0.63 x 10 to the 13th, deciduous 1.92 x 10 to the 13th, microgram/h), derived from contemporary procedures, were applied to produce an overall regional emission rate of 2.79 x 10 to the 13th microgram/h for natural non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC). This rate was used with estimates of the anthropogenic NO(x) and NMHC loading, as input into a photochemical box model. Additional HC loading on the order of that estimated to be produced by the natural forest communities was required in order to reach certain measured summer peak ozone levels as the computer simulation was unable to account for the measured episodic levels on the basis of the anthropogenic inventory alone.

  3. Kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry reactions of the nitrogen oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, R. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Data sheets for thermal and photochemical reactions of importance in the atmospheric chemistry of the nitrogen oxides are presented. For each reaction the available experimental data are summarized and critically evaluated, and a preferred value of the rate coefficient is given. The selection of the preferred value is discussed and an estimate of its accuracy is given. For the photochemical process, the data are summarized, and preferred for the photoabsorption cross section and primary quantum yields are given.

  4. Photochemical Process Modeling and Analysis of Ozone Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冰; 邱彤; 陈丙珍

    2014-01-01

    Air pollution in modern city and industrial zones has become a serious public concern in recent years in China. Significance of air quality assessment and emission control strategy design is increasing. Most studies in China focus on particulate matter (PM), especially PM2.5, while few account for photochemical secondary air pol-lutions represented by ozone (O3). In this paper, a procedure for air quality simulation with comprehensive air quality model with extensions (CAMx) is demonstrated for studying the photochemical process and ozone generation in the troposphere. As a case study, the CAMx photochemical grid model is used to model ozone over southern part of Beijing city in winter, 2011. The input parameters to CAMx include emission sources, meteorology field data, terrain definition, photolysis status, initial and boundary conditions. The simulation results are verified by theoretical analysis of the ozone generation tendency. The simulated variation tendency of domain-wide average value of hourly ozone concentration coincides reasonably well with the theoretical analysis on the atmospheric photochemical process, demonstrating the effectiveness of the procedure. An integrated model system that cooperates with CAMx will be established in our future work.

  5. 40 CFR 52.229 - Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons), Metropolitan Los Angeles...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons), Metropolitan Los Angeles Intrastate Region. 52.229 Section 52.229... oxidants (hydrocarbons), Metropolitan Los Angeles Intrastate Region. (a) (b) The following rules are... and approved for the SIP, remain federally enforceable: (1) Los Angeles County APCD, Regulation IV...

  6. Improvement of procedures for evaluating photochemical models. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesche, T.W.; Lurmann, F.R.; Roth, P.M.; Georgopoulos, P.; Seinfeld, J.H.

    1990-08-01

    The study establishes a set of procedures that should be used by all groups evaluating the performance of a photochemical model application. A set of ten numerical measures are recommended for evaluating a photochemical model's accuracy in predicting ozone concentrations. Nine graphical methods and six investigative simulations are also recommended to give additional insight into model performance. Standards are presented that each modeling study should try to meet. To complement the operational model evaluation procedures, several diagnostic procedures are suggested. The sensitivity of the model to uncertainties in hydrocarbon emission rates and speciation, and other parameters should be assessed. Uncertainty bounds of key input variables and parameters can be propagated through the model to provide estimated uncertainties in the ozone predictions. Comparisons between measurements and predictions of species other than ozone will help ensure that the model is predicting the right ozone for the right reasons. Plotting concentrations residuals (differences) against a variety of variables may give insight into the reasons for poor model performance. Mass flux and balance calculations can identify the relative importance of emissions and transport. The study also identifies testing a model's response to emission changes as the most important research need. Another important area is testing the emissions inventory.

  7. On the in vivo photochemical rate parameters for PDT reactive oxygen species modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Michele M.; Ghogare, Ashwini A.; Greer, Alexander; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2017-03-01

    Photosensitizer photochemical parameters are crucial data in accurate dosimetry for photodynamic therapy (PDT) based on photochemical modeling. Progress has been made in the last few decades in determining the photochemical properties of commonly used photosensitizers (PS), but mostly in solution or in vitro. Recent developments allow for the estimation of some of these photochemical parameters in vivo. This review will cover the currently available in vivo photochemical properties of photosensitizers as well as the techniques for measuring those parameters. Furthermore, photochemical parameters that are independent of environmental factors or are universal for different photosensitizers will be examined. Most photosensitizers discussed in this review are of the type II (singlet oxygen) photooxidation category, although type I photosensitizers that involve other reactive oxygen species (ROS) will be discussed as well. The compilation of these parameters will be essential for ROS modeling of PDT.

  8. Experimental Measurements of the Effects of Photo-chemical Oxidation on Aerosol Emissions in Aircraft Exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miracolo, M. A.; Presto, A. A.; Hennigan, C. J.; Nguyen, N.; Ranjan, M.; Reeder, A.; Lipsky, E.; Donahue, N. M.; Robinson, A. L.

    2009-12-01

    Many military and commercial airfields are located in non-attainment areas for particulate matter (PM2.5), but the contribution of emissions from in-use aircraft to local and regional PM2.5 concentrations is uncertain. In collaboration with the Pennsylvania Air National Guard 171st Air Refueling Wing, the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) Mobile Laboratory was deployed to measure fresh and aged emissions from a CFM56-2B1 gas-turbine engine mounted on a KC-135 Stratotanker airframe. The CFM-56 family of engine powers many different types of military and civilian aircraft, including the Boeing 737 and several Airbus models. It is one of the most widely deployed models of engines in the world. The goal of this work was to measure the gas-particle partitioning of the fresh emissions at atmospherically relevant conditions and to investigate the effect of atmospheric oxidation on aerosol loadings as the emissions age. Emissions were sampled from an inlet installed one meter downstream of the engine exit plane and transferred into a portable smog chamber via a heated inlet line. Separate experiments were conducted at different engine loads ranging from ground idle to take-off rated thrust. During each experiment, some diluted exhaust was added to the chamber and the volatility of the fresh emissions was then characterized using a thermodenuder. After this characterization, the chamber was exposed to either ambient sunlight or UV lights to initiate photochemical oxidation, which produced secondary aerosol and ozone. A suite of gas and particle-phase instrumentation was used to characterize the evolution of the gas and particle-phase emissions, including an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to measure particle size and composition distributions. Fresh emissions of fine particles varied with engine load with peak emission factors at low and high loads. At high engine loads, the fresh emissions were dominated by black carbon; at low loads volatile organic carbon emissions were

  9. Thermal and Photochemical Reactions of NO2 on a Chromium (III) Oxide Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, N.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    Chromium oxide (Cr2O3) is a major component of the oxide layer on stainless steel surfaces. It is also widely used as pigment in paints and roofs and as a protective coating on various surfaces. While many studies have focused on the catalytic activity of Cr2O3 surfaces for selective catalytic reduction (SCR), less attention has been paid to its surface chemistry involving atmospherically important species such as NO2 under atmospheric conditions. In this study, we have investigated thermal and photochemical reactions of NO2 in the presence and the absence of water vapor, using a thin layer of Cr2O3 as a model for the surface of stainless steel as well as other similarly coated surfaces in the boundary layer. A 30 nm thick Cr2O3 film was deposited on a germanium attenuated total reflectance (ATR) crystal, and the changes in the surface species were monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Upon NO2 adsorption, nitrate (NO3-) ions appeared likely coordinated to Cr3+ ion(s). The NO3- peaks reversibly shifted when water vapor was added, suggesting that NO3- become solvated. Irradiation at 311 nm led to a decrease in NO3- ions under both dry and humid conditions. The major gas-phase species formed by the irradiation was NO under dry conditions, while NO2 was mainly formed in the presence of H2O. Possible mechanisms and the implications for heterogeneous NO2 chemistry in the boundary layer will be discussed. The results will also be compared to similar chemistry on other surfaces.

  10. Kinetic analyses and mathematical modeling of primary photochemical and photoelectrochemical processes in plant photosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vredenberg, Wim

    2011-02-01

    In this paper the model and simulation of primary photochemical and photo-electrochemical reactions in dark-adapted intact plant leaves is presented. A descriptive algorithm has been derived from analyses of variable chlorophyll a fluorescence and P700 oxidation kinetics upon excitation with multi-turnover pulses (MTFs) of variable intensity and duration. These analyses have led to definition and formulation of rate equations that describe the sequence of primary linear electron transfer (LET) steps in photosystem II (PSII) and of cyclic electron transport (CET) in PSI. The model considers heterogeneity in PSII reaction centers (RCs) associated with the S-states of the OEC and incorporates in a dark-adapted state the presence of a 15-35% fraction of Q(B)-nonreducing RCs that probably is identical with the S₀ fraction. The fluorescence induction algorithm (FIA) in the 10 μs-1s excitation time range considers a photochemical O-J-D, a photo-electrochemical J-I and an I-P phase reflecting the response of the variable fluorescence to the electric trans-thylakoid potential generated by the proton pump fuelled by CET in PSI. The photochemical phase incorporates the kinetics associated with the double reduction of the acceptor pair of pheophytin (Phe) and plastoquinone Q(A) [PheQ(A)] in Q(B) nonreducing RCs and the associated doubling of the variable fluorescence, in agreement with the three-state trapping model (TSTM) of PS II. The decline in fluorescence emission during the so called SMT in the 1-100s excitation time range, known as the Kautsky curve, is shown to be associated with a substantial decrease of CET-powered proton efflux from the stroma into the chloroplast lumen through the ATPsynthase of the photosynthetic machinery.

  11. A Photochemical Kinetic Model for Solid Dosage Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Thiago C; La Cruz, Thomas E; Tabora, Jose E

    2017-08-20

    Photochemical kinetics models for pharmaceutical compounds in solution have been extensively investigated, but not in solid phase upon exposure to different light sources. The objective of this study was to develop a mathematical model to describe the solid state photodegradation of pharmaceutical powder materials under different area/volumetric scales and light exposure conditions. The model considered the previous formalism presented for photodegradation kinetics in solution phase with important elements applied to static powder material being irradiated with a polychromatic light source. The model also included the influence of optical phenomena (i.e. reflectance, scattering factors, etc.) by applying Beer-Lambert law to light attenuation, including effects of powder density. Drug substance and drug product intermediates (blends and tablet cores) were exposed to different light sources and intensities. The model reasonably predicted the photodegradation levels of powder beds of drug substance and drug product intermediates under white and yellow lights with intensities around 5 to 11 kLux. Importantly, the model estimates demonstrated that the reciprocity law for photoreactions was held. Further model evaluation showed that, due to light attenuation, the powder bed is in virtual darkness at cake depths greater than 500 μm. At 100 μm, the photodegradation of the investigated compound is expected to be close to 100% in 10 days under white fluorescent halophosphate light at 9.5 kLux. For tablets, defining the volume over exposed surface area ratio is more challenging. Nevertheless, the model can consider a bracket between worst and best cases to provide a reasonable photodegradation estimate. This tool can be significantly leveraged to simulate different light exposure scenarios while assessing photostability risk in order to define appropriate Control Strategy in manufacturing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Laboratory investigation of photochemical oxidation of organic aerosol from wood fires 1: measurement and simulation of organic aerosol evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Grieshop

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of photo-oxidation on organic aerosol (OA emissions from flaming and smoldering hard- and soft-wood fires under plume-like conditions. This was done by exposing the dilute emissions from a small wood stove to UV light in a smog chamber and measuring the gas- and particle-phase pollutant concentrations with a suite of instruments including a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS, an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS and a thermodenuder. The measurements highlight how atmospheric processing can lead to considerable evolution of the mass and volatility of biomass-burning OA. Photochemical oxidation produced substantial new OA, increasing concentrations by a factor of 1.5 to 2.8 after several hours of exposure to typical summertime hydroxyl radical (OH concentrations. Less than 20% of this new OA could be explained using a state-of-the-art secondary organic aerosol model and the measured decay of traditional SOA precursors. The thermodenuder data indicate that the primary OA is semivolatile; at 50°C between 50 and 80% of the fresh primary OA evaporated. Aging reduced the volatility of the OA; at 50°C only 20 to 40% of aged OA evaporated. The predictions of a volatility basis-set model that explicitly tracks the partitioning and aging of low-volatility organics was compared to the chamber data. The OA production can be explained by the oxidation of low-volatility organic vapors; the model can also reproduce observed changes in OA volatility and composition. The model was used to investigate the competition between photochemical processing and dilution on OA concentrations in plumes.

  13. Enzymatic AND Logic Gate with Sigmoid Response Induced by Photochemically Controlled Oxidation of the Output

    OpenAIRE

    Privman, Vladimir; Fratto, Brian E.; Zavalov, Oleksandr; Halamek, Jan; Katz, Evgeny

    2013-01-01

    We report a study of a system which involves an enzymatic cascade realizing an AND logic gate, with an added photochemical processing of the output allowing to make the gate's response sigmoid in both inputs. New functional forms are developed for quantifying the kinetics of such systems, specifically designed to model their response in terms of signal and information processing. These theoretical expressions are tested for the studied system, which also allows us to consider aspects of bioch...

  14. Photo-chemical transport modelling of tropospheric ozone: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sumit; Sharma, Prateek; Khare, Mukesh

    2017-06-01

    Ground level ozone (GLO), a secondary pollutant having adverse impact on human health, ecology, and agricultural productivity, apart from being a major contributor to global warming, has been a subject matter of several studies. In order to identify appropriate strategies to control GLO levels, accurate assessment and prediction is essential, for which elaborate simulation and modelling is required. Several studies have been undertaken in the past to simulate GLO levels at different scales and for various applications. It is important to evaluate these studies, widely spread over in literature. This paper aims to critically review various studies that have been undertaken, especially in the past 15 years (2000-15) to model GLO. The review has been done of the studies that range over different spatial scales - urban to regional and continental to global. It also includes a review of performance evaluation and sensitivity analysis of photo-chemical transport models in order to assess the extent of application of these models and their predictive capability. The review indicates following major findings: (a) models tend to over-estimate the night-time GLO concentrations due to limited titration of GLO with NO within the model; (b) dominance of contribution from far-off regional sources to average ozone concentration in the urban region and higher contribution of local sources during days of high ozone episodes; requiring strategies for controlling precursor emissions at both regional and local scales; (c) greater influence of NOx over VOC in export of ozone from urban regions due to shifting of urban plumes from VOC-sensitive regime to NOx-sensitive as they move out from city centres to neighbouring rural regions; (d) models with finer resolution inputs perform better to a certain extent, however, further improvement in resolutions (beyond 10 km) did not show improvement always; (e) future projections show an increase in GLO concentrations mainly due to rise in

  15. Investigations on the necrotic injury to Taro Leaf by photochemical oxidants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, Y.; Takasaki, T.; Morikawa, M.; Matsumaru, T.; Shiratori, K.; Omichi, S.; Yoda, H.

    1975-03-01

    In August of 1969, taro, Colocasia antiquorum SCHOTT., planted in Ichihara city and neighboring towns in chiba prefecture, was observed to be suddenly damaged. The injury appeared as reddish-brown necrotic spots on interveinal mesophyll along the veins. Some injured leaves died back within few days. In order to resolve the reason for singular leaf injury, field surveys were made everywhere leaf injury occurred. The cause of taro leaf injury was determined to be as follows and attributed to air pollution. 1) Two plant growth chambers were prepared for this examinations. One was equipped with activated carbon and manganese dioxide filters for the purpose of removing air pollutants such as photochemical oxidants and sulfur dioxide. The other was without any filter. 2) When was planted taro in the filtered chamber, the injury was completely suppressed. In the filterless chamber the injury occurred many times throughout summer. 3) It was found that the air was sometimes polluted by photochemical oxidants and pollutants achieved more than 10 or 20 pphm in maximum concentration in the filterless chamber. Taro leaf injury developed immediately after occurrance of photochemical air pollutants. 4) At that time tobacco, Bel W3 which had been planted together with taro in filterless chamber, was severly injured. 5) Histological observation was carried out on cross sections of injured leaves. Their palisade cells and tissues were damaged and brown pigment sometimes accumulated in affected tissue, but epidermis and spongy tissues remained normal. 6) Ozone fumigation was examined on taro leaves with 30 pphm in concentration for 3 hours. Immediately after the fumigation water soaked spots developed on their leaves and turned to the chlorotic spots after 1 or 2 days. Most of chlorotic spots developed on interveinal mesophyll along the vein.

  16. A Model Study of the Photochemical Fate of As(III in Paddy-Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Carena

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The APEX (Aqueous Photochemistry of Environmentally-occurring Xenobiotics software previously developed by one of us was used to model the photochemistry of As(III in paddy-field water, allowing a comparison with biotic processes. The model included key paddy-water variables, such as the shielding effect of the rice canopy on incident sunlight and its monthly variations, water pH, and the photochemical parameters of the chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM occurring in paddy fields. The half-life times (t1/2 of As(III photooxidation to As(V would be ~20–30 days in May. In contrast, the photochemical oxidation of As(III would be much slower in June and July due to rice-canopy shading of radiation because of plant growth, despite higher sunlight irradiance. At pH < 8 the photooxidation of As(III would mainly be accounted for by reaction with transient species produced by irradiated CDOM (here represented by the excited triplet states 3CDOM*, neglecting the possibly more important reactions with poorly known species such as the phenoxy radicals and, to a lesser extent, with the hydroxyl radicals (HO•. However, the carbonate radicals (CO3•− could be key photooxidants at pH > 8.5 provided that the paddy-water 3CDOM* is sufficiently reactive toward the oxidation of CO32−. In particular, if paddy-water 3CDOM* oxidizes the carbonate anion with a second-order reaction rate constant near (or higher than 106 M−1·s−1, the photooxidation of As(III could be quite fast at pH > 8.5. Such pH conditions can be produced by elevated photosynthetic activity that consumes dissolved CO2.

  17. Review of photochemical reaction constants of organic micropollutants required for UV advanced oxidation processes in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wols, B A; Hofman-Caris, C H M

    2012-06-01

    Emerging organic contaminants (pharmaceutical compounds, personal care products, pesticides, hormones, surfactants, fire retardants, fuel additives etc.) are increasingly found in water sources and therefore need to be controlled by water treatment technology. UV advanced oxidation technologies are often used as an effective barrier against organic contaminants. The combined operation of direct photolysis and reaction with hydroxyl radicals ensures good results for a wide range of contaminants. In this review, an overview is provided of the photochemical reaction parameters (quantum yield, molar absorption, OH radical reaction rate constant) of more than 100 organic micropollutants. These parameters allow for a prediction of organic contaminant removal by UV advanced oxidation systems. An example of contaminant degradation is elaborated for a simplified UV/H(2)O(2) system.

  18. Diagnostic Evaluation of Ozone Production and Horizontal Transport in a Regional Photochemical Air Quality Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    A diagnostic model evaluation effort has been performed to focus on photochemical ozone formation and the horizontal transport process since they strongly impact the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of ozone (O3) within the lower troposphere. Results from th...

  19. Total OH reactivity study from VOC photochemical oxidation in the SAPHIR chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Z.; Tillmann, R.; Hohaus, T.; Fuchs, H.; Novelli, A.; Wegener, R.; Kaminski, M.; Schmitt, S. H.; Wahner, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that hydroxyl radicals (OH) act as a dominant reactive species in the degradation of VOCs in the atmosphere. In recent field studies, directly measured total OH reactivity often showed poor agreement with OH reactivity calculated from VOC measurements (e.g. Nölscher et al., 2013; Lu et al., 2012a). This "missing OH reactivity" is attributed to unaccounted biogenic VOC emissions and/or oxidation products. The comparison of total OH reactivity being directly measured and calculated from single component measurements of VOCs and their oxidation products gives us a further understanding on the source of unmeasured reactive species in the atmosphere. This allows also the determination of the magnitude of the contribution of primary VOC emissions and their oxidation products to the missing OH reactivity. A series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, to explore in detail the photochemical degradation of VOCs (isoprene, ß-pinene, limonene, and D6-benzene) by OH. The total OH reactivity was determined from the measurement of VOCs and their oxidation products by a Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) with a GC/MS/FID system, and directly measured by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) at the same time. The comparison between these two total OH reactivity measurements showed an increase of missing OH reactivity in the presence of oxidation products of VOCs, indicating a strong contribution to missing OH reactivity from uncharacterized oxidation products.

  20. The Photochemical Oxidation of Siderite That Drove Hydrogen Based Microbial Redox Reactions in The Archean Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. D.; Yee, N.; Falkowski, P. G.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe and molecular hydrogen (H2) is a rich source of electron in a mildly reducing environment for microbial redox reactions, such as anoxygenic photosynthesis and methanogenesis. Subaerial volcanoes, ocean crust serpentinization and mid-ocean ridge volcanoes have been believed to be the major source of the hydrogen flux to the atmosphere. Although ferrous ion (Fe2+) photooxidation has been proposed as an alternative mechanism by which hydrogen gas was produced, ferruginous water in contact with a CO2-bearing atmosphere is supersaturated with respect to FeCO3 (siderite), thus the precipitation of siderite would have been thermodynamically favored in the Archean environment. Siderite is the critical mineral component of the oldest fossilized microbial mat. It has also been inferred as a component of chemical sedimentary protolith in the >3750 Ma Nuvvuagittuq supracrustal belt, Canada and the presence of siderite in the protolith suggests the occurrence of siderite extends to Hadean time. Analyses of photooxidation of siderite suggest a significant flux of hydrogen in the early atmosphere. Our estimate of the hydrogen production rate under Archean solar flux is approximately 50 times greater than the estimated hydrogen production rate by the volcanic activity based on a previous report (Tian et al. Science 2005). Our analyses on siderite photooxidation also suggest a mechanism by which banded iron formation (BIF) was formed. The photooxidation transforms siderite to magnetite/maghemite (spinnel iron oxide), while oxygenic oxidation of siderite leads to goethite, and subsequently to hematite (Fe3+2O3) upon dehydration. We will discuss the photochemical reaction, which was once one of the most ubiquitous photochemical reactions before the rise of oxygen in the atmosphere. Photooxidation of siderite over time by UV light From left to right: UV oxidized siderite, pristine siderite, oxidized siderite by oxygen

  1. Efficient decomposition of environmentally persistent perfluorocarboxylic acids by use of persulfate as a photochemical oxidant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Hisao; Yamamoto, Ari; Hayakawa, Etsuko; Taniyasu, Sachi; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Kutsuna, Shuzo; Kiatagawa, Hiroshi; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2005-04-01

    Photochemical decomposition of persistent perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) in water by use of persulfate ion (S2O8(2-)) was examined to develop a technique to neutralize stationary sources of PFCAs. Photolysis of S2O8(2-) produced highly oxidative sulfate radical anions (SO4-), which efficiently decomposed perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and other PFCAs bearing C4-C8 perfluoroalkyl groups. The major products were F- and CO2; also, small amounts of PFCAs with shorter than initial chain lengths were detected in the reaction solution. PFOA at a concentration of 1.35 mM (typical of that in untreated wastewater after an emulsifying process in fluoropolymer manufacture) was completely decomposed by a photochemical system with 50 mM S2O8(2-) and 4 h of irradiation from a 200-W xenon-mercury lamp. The initial PFOA decomposition rate was 11 times higherthan with photolysis alone. All sulfur-containing species in the reaction solution were eventually transformed to sulfate ions by this method. This method was successfully applied to the decomposition of perfluorononanoic acid contained in a floor wax solution.

  2. Photochemical decoration of silver nanoparticles on graphene oxide nanosheets and their optical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Nguyen Thi; Chi, Do Thi; Dinh, Ngo Xuan; Hung, Nguyen Duy; Lan, Hoang [Department of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (AIST), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), No. 1 Dai Co Viet Street, Hai Ba Trung District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Tuan, Pham Anh [Vietnam Metrology Institute, 08 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Thang, Le Hong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), 01 Dai Co Viet Street, Hai Ba Trung District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Trung, Nguyen Ngoc [School of Engineering Physics, Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), 01 Dai Co Viet Street, Hai Ba Trung District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Hoa, Nguyen Quang [Department of Physics, Hanoi University of Science, 334 Nguyen Trai, Thanh Xuan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Huy, Tran Quang [Laboratory for Ultrastructure and Bionanotechnology (LUBN), National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology (NIHE), No. 1 Yecxanh Street, Hai Ba Trung District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Quy, Nguyen Van [International Training Institute for Materials Science (ITIMS), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), 01 Dai Co Viet Street, Hai Ba Trung District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Duong, Thanh-Tung [Department of Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daeduk Science Town, 305-764 Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Phan, Vu Ngoc [Department of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (AIST), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), No. 1 Dai Co Viet Street, Hai Ba Trung District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Le, Anh-Tuan, E-mail: tuan.leanh1@hust.edu.vn [Department of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (AIST), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), No. 1 Dai Co Viet Street, Hai Ba Trung District, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • A photochemical method for effective decoration of the Ag-NPs on GO nanosheets is presented. • The average size of the Ag-NPs on the GO nanosheets obtained ∼6–7 nm with uniform size distribution. • Surface interaction of Ag-NPs with GO nanosheets leads to surface plasmon-enhanced luminescence. - Abstract: Nanohybrid materials based on silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) and graphene oxide (GO) are attracting considerable research interest because of their potential many applications including surface-enhanced Raman scattering, catalysis, sensors, biomedicine and antimicrobials. In this study, we established a simple and effective method of preparing a finely dispersed Ag-GO aqueous solution using modified Hummer and photochemical technique. The Ag-NPs formation on GO nanosheets was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The average size of Ag-NPs on the GO nanosheets was approximately 6–7 nm with nearly uniform size distribution. The Ag-GO nanohybrid also exhibits an adsorption band at 435 nm because of the presence of Ag-NPs on the GO nanosheets. Photoluminescence emission of the Ag-GO nanohybrid was found at 400 and 530 nm, which can be attributed to the interaction between the luminescence of exploited GO nanosheets and localized surface plasmon resonance from metallic Ag-NPs. The observed excellent optical properties of the as-prepared Ag-GO nanohybrid showed a significant potential for optoelectronics applications.

  3. Tracing Gas and Particle Phase Oxidation From Engine Sources as a Function of Fuel Type, Load, and Photochemical Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, B.; Farmer, D.; Jathar, S.; Galang, A.; Fulgham, R.; Link, M.; Brophy, P.

    2015-12-01

    Motor vehicle emissions are an important source of anthropogenic gases and particles in the atmosphere. To study the gas and particle phase emissions, an HR-TOF-AMS and HR-TOF-CIMS were deployed at the CSU Engines Lab, along with an oxidative flow reactor, to measure emissions from a 4.5 L John Deere engine, which ran either diesel or biodiesel fuel. Concurrent gas-phase and particle-phase measurements allowed determination of the gas-phase and particle-phase oxidation properties as a function of fuel type, fuel load, and photochemical age. The impacts of particulate filers on composition and oxidation state were also assessed. While aerosol composition and associated oxidation properties for the biodiesel and diesel fuel types were similar, differences in photochemical production existed for the amount of load, or efficiency of the engine. The mean particulate oxygen to carbon ratios (O:C) and mean hydrogen to carbon ratios (H:C) moved from an initial 0.1 and 2 to a final 0.55 and 1.6, respectively, upon idle biodiesel and diesel engine exhaust exposure to approximately 7 days of OH exposure. The more efficient higher load biodiesel and diesel engine exhaust experienced less changes in the mean O:C and H:C values (an initial 0.1 and 2 to a final 0.3 and 1.7, respectively) with approximately the same amount of OH exposure. Despite largely scrubbing the majority of particles from the engine exhaust, experiments with engine particulate filters still showed photochemical production of oxidized particle-phase species at high photochemical ages, similar to that of idle engine exhaust without any particulate filters. Bulk gas-phase data was compared to bulk aerosol data in Van Krevelen space in order to understand how particle-phase oxidation traces gas-phase oxidation as a function of fuel type, engine load, and photochemical age.

  4. Enzymatic AND logic gate with sigmoid response induced by photochemically controlled oxidation of the output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privman, Vladimir; Fratto, Brian E; Zavalov, Oleksandr; Halámek, Jan; Katz, Evgeny

    2013-06-27

    We report a study of a system which involves an enzymatic cascade realizing an AND logic gate, with an added photochemical processing of the output, allowing the gate's response to be made sigmoid in both inputs. New functional forms are developed for quantifying the kinetics of such systems, specifically designed to model their response in terms of signal and information processing. These theoretical expressions are tested for the studied system, which also allows us to consider aspects of biochemical information processing such as noise transmission properties and control of timing of the chemical and physical steps.

  5. Dosimetry Determines the Initial OH Radical Concentration in Fast Photochemical Oxidation of Proteins (FPOP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Ben; Zhang, Hao; Giblin, Daryl; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2015-05-01

    Fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP) employs laser photolysis of hydrogen peroxide to give OH radicals that label amino acid side-chains of proteins on the microsecond time scale. A method for quantitation of hydroxyl radicals after laser photolysis is of importance to FPOP because it establishes a means to adjust the yield of •OH, offers the opportunity of tunable modifications, and provides a basis for kinetic measurements. The initial concentration of OH radicals has yet to be measured experimentally. We report here an approach using isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to determine quantitatively the initial •OH concentration (we found ~0.95 mM from 15 mM H2O2) from laser photolysis and to investigate the quenching efficiencies for various •OH scavengers.

  6. First-Principles Study of Photochemical Activation of CO2 by Ti-based Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Haiying; Zapol, Peter; Curtiss, Larry

    2013-03-01

    The photochemical conversion of CO2 and H2O into energy-bearing hydrocarbon fuels provides an attractive way of mitigating the green-house gas CO2 and utilizing solar energy as a sustainable energy source. However, due to the high reduction potential and chemical inertness of CO2 molecules, the conversion rate of CO2 is impractically low. The activation of CO2 is critical in facilitating further reactions. By carrying out first-principles calculations of reaction pathways from CO2 to CO2-anions on Ti-based oxides including zeolites in the presence of photoexcited electrons, we have studied the initial step of CO2 activation via 1e transfer. It is shown that the CO2 reactivity of these surfaces strongly depends on the crystal structure, surface orientation, and presence of defects. This opens a new dimension in surface structure modification to enhance the CO2 adsorption and reduction on semiconductor surfaces.

  7. Mechanisms in Ruthenium(II) photochemistry and Iron(III) catalyzed oxidations : Photochemical, Electrochemical and Spectroscopic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unjaroen, Duenpen

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, photochemical, electrochemical and spectroscopic studies of Ru(II), Fe(II), and Fe(III) complexes are described. The overall goal in this studies was to understanding process that occur during oxidation catalysis and photo irradiation and especially the changes in the structure that

  8. Photochemical grid model implementation of VOC, NOx, and O3 source apportionment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. F. Kwok

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available For the purposes of developing optimal emissions control strategies, efficient approaches are needed to identify the major sources or groups of sources that contribute to elevated ozone (O3 concentrations. Source based apportionment techniques implemented in photochemical grid models track sources through the physical and chemical processes important to the formation and transport of air pollutants. Photochemical model source apportionment has been used to estimate impacts of specific sources, groups of sources (sectors, sources in specific geographic areas, and stratospheric and lateral boundary inflow on O3. The implementation and application of a source apportionment technique for O3 and its precursors, nitrogen oxides (NOx and volatile organic compounds (VOC, for the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model are described here. The Integrated Source Apportionment Method (ISAM O3 approach is a hybrid of source apportionment and source sensitivity in that O3 production is attributed to precursor sources based on O3 formation regime (e.g., for a NOx-sensitive regime, O3 is apportioned to participating NOx emissions. This implementation is illustrated by tracking multiple emissions source sectors and lateral boundary inflow. NOx, VOC, and O3 attribution to tracked sectors in the application are consistent with spatial and temporal patterns of precursor emissions. The O3 ISAM implementation is further evaluated through comparisons of apportioned ambient concentrations and deposition amounts with those derived from brute force zero-out scenarios, with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.58 and 0.99 depending on specific combination of target species and tracked precursor emissions. Low correlation coefficients occur for chemical regimes that have strong non-linearity in O3 sensitivity, which demonstrates different functionalities between source apportionment and zero-out approaches, depending on whether sources of interest are either to

  9. Modelling the photochemical pollution over the metropolitan area of Porto Alegre, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, C.; Monteiro, A.; Ferreira, J.; Moraes, M. R.; Carvalho, A.; Ribeiro, I.; Miranda, A. I.; Moreira, D. M.

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the photochemical pollution over the Metropolitan Area of Porto Alegre (MAPA), Brazil, where high concentrations of ozone have been registered during the past years. Due to the restricted spatial coverage of the monitoring air quality network, a numerical modelling technique was selected and applied to this assessment exercise. Two different chemistry-transport models - CAMx and CALGRID - were applied for a summer period, driven by the MM5 meteorological model. The meteorological model performance was evaluated comparing its results to available monitoring data measured at the Porto Alegre airport. Validation results point out a good model performance. It was not possible to evaluate the chemistry models performance due to the lack of adequate monitoring data. Nevertheless, the model intercomparison between CAMx and CALGRID shows a similar behaviour in what concerns the simulation of nitrogen dioxide, but some discrepancies concerning ozone. Regarding the fulfilment of the Brazilian air quality targets, the simulated ozone concentrations surpass the legislated value in specific periods, mainly outside the urban area of Porto Alegre. The ozone formation is influenced by the emission of pollutants that act as precursors (like the nitrogen oxides emitted at Porto Alegre urban area and coming from a large refinery complex) and by the meteorological conditions.

  10. The study and applications of photochemical-dynamical gravity wave model Ⅰ--Model description

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Jiyao(徐寄遥); MA; Ruiping(马瑞平); A.K.Smith

    2002-01-01

    A two-dimensional, nonlinear, compressible, diabatic, nonhydrostatic photochemical- dynamical gravity wave model has been advanced. The model includes diabetic process produced by photochemistry and the effect of gravity wave on atmospheric chemical species. In the horizontal direction, the pseudospectral method is used. The finite difference approximations are used in vertical direction z and time t. The FICE method is used to solve the model. The model results on small amplitude fluctuation are very close to those of linear theory, which demonstrates the correctness of the model.

  11. Advanced air quality modeling system for the simulation of photochemical ozone formation over North Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, C.; Wheeler, N.; Dolwick, P.; Olerud, D.; Houyoux, M. [MCNC-North Carolina Supercomputing Center, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Timin, B.; Lawrimore, J.; Holman, S. [North Carolina Dept. of Environment and Natural Resources, Raleigh, NC (United States). Div. of Air Quality; Jeffries, H. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

    1998-12-31

    An advanced air quality modeling system is used to simulate the formation of photochemical oxidants, mainly ozone, over North Carolina. The objective of this modeling study is to successfully model the formation processes of ozone in North Carolina to lead to effective ozone control strategy developments for both 1-hour and 8-hour standards and eventually to address the particulate matter issue. The modeling system selected for this ongoing project is the North Carolina Supercomputing Center`s Environmental Decision Support System (EDSS), which evolved from a working prototype of EPA`s Third Generation Modeling System, or Models-3. The EDSS consists of three major modeling components : the Multiscale Air Quality SImulation Platform (MAQSIP) for chemistry/transport modeling, Mesoscale Model Version 5 (MM5) for meteorological modeling, and Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) system for emission modeling. Two inner subdomains at 12-km and 4-km grid resolutions centered over Charlotte are nested inside a coarse domain at a 36-km resolution. Sixteen vertical layers with a denser grid at lower altitude are used to better resolve the mixing layer. The CB-IV chemistry mechanism with updated isoprene chemistry and radical-radical reactions is used to simulate the chemical transformations of reacting species. Preliminary results show that the MAQSIP has reasonably simulated the temporal and spatial distribution of ozone as compared to observations in the first 6-day episode during July 10--15, 1995. Improved ozone predictions are shown in the model using finer grid resolution. Various ozone sensitivity studies on the model inputs such as initial and boundary conditions and the existence of clouds are under testing. An innovative analysis tool for model evaluation and error detection, the Process Analysis method, is also applied to help understand the regulating processes that lead to formation of ozone.

  12. A Framework for Evaluating Regional-Scale Numerical Photochemical Modeling Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper discusses the need for critically evaluating regional-scale (~ 200-2000 km) three dimensional numerical photochemical air quality modeling systems to establish a model's credibility in simulating the spatio-temporal features embedded in the observations. Because of li...

  13. Oxidative capacity and radical chemistry in the polluted atmosphere of Hong Kong and Pearl River Delta region: analysis of a severe photochemical smog episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Likun; Gu, Rongrong; Wang, Tao; Wang, Xinfeng; Saunders, Sandra; Blake, Donald; Louie, Peter K. K.; Luk, Connie W. Y.; Simpson, Isobel; Xu, Zheng; Wang, Zhe; Gao, Yuan; Lee, Shuncheng; Mellouki, Abdelwahid; Wang, Wenxing

    2016-08-01

    We analyze a photochemical smog episode to understand the oxidative capacity and radical chemistry of the polluted atmosphere in Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region. A photochemical box model based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2) is constrained by an intensive set of field observations to elucidate the budgets of ROx (ROx = OH+HO2+RO2) and NO3 radicals. Highly abundant radical precursors (i.e. O3, HONO and carbonyls), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) facilitate strong production and efficient recycling of ROx radicals. The OH reactivity is dominated by oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs), followed by aromatics, alkenes and alkanes. Photolysis of OVOCs (except for formaldehyde) is the dominant primary source of ROx with average daytime contributions of 34-47 %. HONO photolysis is the largest contributor to OH and the second-most significant source (19-22 %) of ROx. Other considerable ROx sources include O3 photolysis (11-20 %), formaldehyde photolysis (10-16 %), and ozonolysis reactions of unsaturated VOCs (3.9-6.2 %). In one case when solar irradiation was attenuated, possibly by the high aerosol loadings, NO3 became an important oxidant and the NO3-initiated VOC oxidation presented another significant ROx source (6.2 %) even during daytime. This study suggests the possible impacts of daytime NO3 chemistry in the polluted atmospheres under conditions with the co-existence of abundant O3, NO2, VOCs and aerosols, and also provides new insights into the radical chemistry that essentially drives the formation of photochemical smog in the high-NOx environment of Hong Kong and the PRD region.

  14. Photochemical modeling of glyoxal at a rural site: observations and analysis from BEARPEX 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Huisman

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present roughly one month of high time-resolution, direct, in situ measurements of gas-phase glyoxal acquired during the BEARPEX 2007 field campaign. The research site, located on a ponderosa pine plantation in the Sierra Nevada mountains, is strongly influenced by biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs; thus this data adds to the few existing measurements of glyoxal in BVOC-dominated areas. The short lifetime of glyoxal of ~1 h, the fact that glyoxal mixing ratios are much higher during high temperature periods, and the results of a photochemical model demonstrate that glyoxal is strongly influenced by BVOC precursors during high temperature periods.

    A zero-dimensional box model using near-explicit chemistry from the Leeds Master Chemical Mechanism v3.1 was used to investigate the processes controlling glyoxal chemistry during BEARPEX 2007. The model showed that MBO is the most important glyoxal precursor (~67 %, followed by isoprene (~26 % and methylchavicol (~6 %, a precursor previously not commonly considered for glyoxal production. The model calculated a noon lifetime for glyoxal of ~0.9 h, making glyoxal well suited as a local tracer of VOC oxidation in a forested rural environment; however, the modeled glyoxal mixing ratios over-predicted measured glyoxal by a factor 2 to 5. Loss of glyoxal to aerosol was not found to be significant, likely as a result of the very dry conditions, and could not explain the over-prediction. Although several parameters, such as an approximation for advection, were found to improve the model measurement discrepancy, reduction in OH was by far the most effective. Reducing model OH concentrations to half the measured values decreased the glyoxal over-prediction from a factor of 2.4 to 1.1, as well as the overprediction of HO2 from a factor of 1.64 to 1.14. Our analysis has shown that glyoxal is particularly sensitive to OH concentration compared to other BVOC oxidation products. This

  15. Photochirogenesis: Photochemical Models on the Origin of Biomolecular Homochirality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Meinert

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Current research focuses on a better understanding of the origin of biomolecular asymmetry by the identification and detection of the possibly first chiral molecules that were involved in the appearance and evolution of life on Earth. We have reasons to assume that these molecules were specific chiral amino acids. Chiral amino acids have been identified in both chondritic meteorites and simulated interstellar ices. Present research reasons that circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation was identified in interstellar environments and an asymmetric interstellar photon-molecule interaction might have triggered biomolecular symmetry breaking. We review on the possible prebiotic interaction of ‘chiral photons’ in the form of circularly polarized light, with early chiral organic molecules. We will highlight recent studies on enantioselective photolysis of racemic amino acids by circularly polarized light and experiments on the asymmetric photochemical synthesis of amino acids from only one C and one N containing molecules by simulating interstellar environments. Both approaches are based on circular dichroic transitions of amino acids that will be presented as well.

  16. Laboratory investigation of photochemical oxidation of organic aerosol from wood fires – Part 2: Analysis of aerosol mass spectrometer data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Grieshop

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of photo-oxidation on organic aerosol (OA in dilute wood smoke by exposing emissions from soft- and hard-wood fires to UV light in a smog chamber. This paper focuses on changes in OA composition measured using a unit mass resolution quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS. The results highlight how photochemical processing can lead to considerable evolution of the mass, the volatility and the level of oxygenation of biomass-burning OA. Photochemical oxidation produced substantial new OA, more than doubling the primary contribution after a few hours of aging under typical summertime conditions. Aging decreased the OA volatility of the total OA as measured with a thermodenuder; it also made the OA progressively more oxygenated in every experiment. With explicit knowledge of the condensed-phase mass spectrum (MS of the primary emissions from each fire, each MS can be decomposed into primary and residual spectra throughout the experiment. The residual spectra provide an estimate of the composition of the photochemically produced OA. These spectra are also very similar to those of the oxygenated OA that dominates ambient AMS datasets. In addition, aged wood smoke spectra are shown to be similar to those from OA created by photo-oxidized dilute diesel exhaust and aged biomass-burning OA measured in urban and remote locations. This demonstrates that the oxygenated OA observed in the atmosphere can be produced by photochemical aging of dilute emissions from combustion of fuels containing both modern and fossil carbon.

  17. Implications of imprecision in kinetic rate data for photochemical model calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, R.W.; Thompson, A.M. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center

    1997-12-31

    Evaluation of uncertainties in photochemical model calculations is of great importance to scientists performing assessment modeling. A major source of uncertainty is the measurement imprecision inherent in photochemical reaction rate data that modelers rely on. A rigorous method of evaluating the impact of data imprecision on computational uncertainty is the study of error propagation using Monte Carlo techniques. There are two problems with the current implementation of the Monte Carlo method. First, there is no satisfactory way of accounting for the variation of imprecision with temperature in 1, 2, or 3D models; second, due to its computational expense, it is impractical in 3D model studies. These difficulties are discussed. (author) 4 refs.

  18. Evaluation of simulated photochemical partitioning of oxidized nitrogen in the upper troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Henderson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional and global chemical transport models underpredict NOx (NO + NO2 in the upper troposphere where it is a precursor to the greenhouse gas ozone. The NOx bias has been shown in model evaluations using aircraft data (Singh et al., 2007 and total column NO2 (molecules cm−2 from satellite observations (Napelenok et al., 2008. The causes of NOx underpredictions have yet to be fully understood due to the interconnected nature of simulated emission, transport, and chemistry processes. Recent observation-based studies, in the upper troposphere, identify chemical rate coefficients as a potential source of error (Olson et al., 2006; Ren et al., 2008. Since typical chemistry evaluation techniques are not available for upper tropospheric conditions, this study develops an evaluation platform from in situ observations, stochastic convection, and deterministic chemistry. We derive a stochastic convection model and optimize it using two simulated datasets of time since convection, one based on meteorology, and the other on chemistry. The chemistry surrogate for time since convection is calculated using seven different chemical mechanisms, all of which predict shorter time since convection than our meteorological analysis. We evaluate chemical simulations by inter-comparison and by pairing results with observations based on NOx:HNO3, a photochemical aging indicator. Inter-comparison reveals individual chemical mechanism biases and recommended updates. Evaluation against observations shows that all chemical mechanisms overpredict NOx removal relative to long-lived methanol and carbon monoxide. All chemical mechanisms underpredict observed NOx by at least 30%, and further evaluation is necessary to refine simulation sensitivities to initial conditions and chemical rate uncertainties.

  19. A box model study on photochemical interactions between VOCs and reactive halogen species in the marine boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Toyota

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A new chemical scheme is developed for the multiphase photochemical box model SEAMAC (size-SEgregated Aerosol model for Marine Air Chemistry to investigate photochemical interactions between volatile organic compounds (VOCs and reactive halogen species in the marine boundary layer (MBL. Based primarily on critically evaluated kinetic and photochemical rate parameters as well as a protocol for chemical mechanism development, the new scheme has achieved a near-explicit description of oxidative degradation of up to C3-hydrocarbons (CH4, C2H6, C3H8, C2H4, C3H6, and C2H2 initiated by reactions with OH radicals, Cl- and Br-atoms, and O3. Rate constants and product yields for reactions involving halogen species are taken from the literature where available, but the majority of them need to be estimated. In particular, addition reactions of halogen atoms with alkenes will result in forming halogenated organic intermediates, whose photochemical loss rates are carefully evaluated in the present work. Model calculations with the new chemical scheme reveal that the oceanic emissions of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO and alkenes (especially C3H6 are important factors for regulating reactive halogen chemistry in the MBL by promoting the conversion of Br atoms into HBr or more stable brominated intermediates in the organic form. The latter include brominated hydroperoxides, bromoacetaldehyde, and bromoacetone, which sequester bromine from a reactive inorganic pool. The total mixing ratio of brominated organic species thus produced is likely to reach 10-20% or more of that of inorganic gaseous bromine species over wide regions over the ocean. The reaction between Br atoms and C2H2 is shown to be unimportant for determining the degree of bromine activation in the remote MBL. These results imply that reactive halogen chemistry can mediate a link between the oceanic emissions of VOCs and the behaviors of compounds that are sensitive to halogen chemistry such as dimethyl

  20. Laboratory investigation of photochemical oxidation of organic aerosol from wood fires 2: analysis of aerosol mass spectrometer data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Grieshop

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of photo-oxidation on organic aerosol (OA in dilute wood smoke by exposing emissions from soft- and hard-wood fires to UV light in a smog chamber. This paper focuses on changes in OA composition measured using a unit-mass-resolution quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS. The results highlight how photochemical processing can lead to considerable evolution of the mass, volatility and level of oxygenation of biomass-burning OA. Photochemical oxidation produced substantial new OA, more than doubling the OA mass after a few hours of aging under typical summertime conditions. Aging also decreased the volatility of the OA and made it progressively more oxygenated. The results also illustrate strengths of, and challenges with, using AMS data for source apportionment analysis. For example, the mass spectra of fresh and aged BBOA are distinct from fresh motor-vehicle emissions. The mass spectra of the secondary OA produced from aging wood smoke are very similar to those of the oxygenated OA (OOA that dominates ambient AMS datasets, further reinforcing the connection between OOA and OA formed from photo-chemistry. In addition, aged wood smoke spectra are similar to those from OA created by photo-oxidizing dilute diesel exhaust. This demonstrates that the OOA observed in the atmosphere can be produced by photochemical aging of dilute emissions from different types of combustion systems operating on fuels with modern or fossil carbon. Since OOA is frequently the dominant component of ambient OA, the similarity of spectra of aged emissions from different sources represents an important challenge for AMS-based source apportionment studies.

  1. [Membrane-based photochemical systems as models for photosynthetic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, J.K.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this research are to improve our conceptual view of the ways in which membranes and interfaces can be used to control chemical reactivity. We have focused on understanding three elementary processes that are central to developing membrane-based integrated chemical systems for water photolysis or related photoconversion/photostorage processes. Specifically, we have sought to identify: the influence of interfaces upon charge separation/recombination reactions, pathways for transmembrane charge separation across hydrocarbon bilayer membranes, and mechanisms of water oxidation catalyzed by transition metal coordination complexes. Historically, the chemical dynamics of each of these processes has been poorly understood, with numerous unresolved issues and conflicting viewpoints appearing in the literature. As described in this report our recent research has led to considerable clarification of the underlying reaction mechanisms.

  2. Photochemical oxidation of water and reduction of polyoxometalate anions at interfaces of water with ionic liquids or diethylether

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardini, Gianluca; Wedd, Anthony G.; Zhao, Chuan; Bond, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    Photoreduction of [P2W18O62]6-, [S2Mo18O62]4-, and [S2W18O62]4- polyoxometalate anions (POMs) and oxidation of water occurs when water–ionic liquid and water–diethylether interfaces are irradiated with white light (275–750 nm) or sunlight. The ionic liquids (ILs) employed were aprotic ([Bmim]X; Bmim = (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium,X = BF4,PF6) and protic (DEAS = diethanolamine hydrogen sulphate; DEAP = diethanolamine hydrogen phosphate). Photochemical formation of reduced POMs at both thermody...

  3. Mercury in Arctic snow: Quantifying the kinetics of photochemical oxidation and reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, E.A. [Department of Environmental Science, Acadia University, Wolfville, NS (Canada); Environmental Science Programme, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL (Canada); Mallory, M.L. [Department of Biology, Acadia University, Wolfville, NS (Canada); Ziegler, S.E. [Environmental Science Programme, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL (Canada); Tordon, R. [Environment Canada, Dartmouth, NS (Canada); O' Driscoll, N.J., E-mail: nelson.odriscoll@acadiau.ca [Department of Environmental Science, Acadia University, Wolfville, NS (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Controlled experiments were performed with frozen and melted Arctic snow to quantify relationships between mercury photoreaction kinetics, ultra violet (UV) radiation intensity, and snow ion concentrations. Frozen (− 10 °C) and melted (4 °C) snow samples from three Arctic sites were exposed to UV (280–400 nm) radiation (1.26–5.78 W · m{sup −2}), and a parabolic relationship was found between reduction rate constants in frozen and melted snow with increasing UV intensity. Total photoreduced mercury in frozen and melted snow increased linearly with greater UV intensity. Snow with the highest concentrations of chloride and iron had larger photoreduction and photooxidation rate constants, while also having the lowest Hg(0) production. Our results indicate that the amount of mercury photoreduction (loss from snow) is the highest at high UV radiation intensities, while the fastest rates of mercury photoreduction occurred at both low and high intensities. This suggests that, assuming all else is equal, earlier Arctic snow melt periods (when UV intensities are less intense) may result in less mercury loss to the atmosphere by photoreduction and flux, since less Hg(0) is photoproduced at lower UV intensities, thereby resulting in potentially greater mercury transport to aquatic systems with snowmelt. - Highlights: • Mercury photochemical kinetics were studied in frozen and melted Arctic snow. • UV-induced photoreduction and photooxidation rate constants were quantified. • Chloride ion, iron, and DOC influence mercury photoreactions in snow. • Frozen and melted snow have different mercury photoreduction characteristics. • Kinetic information provided can be used to model mercury fate in the Arctic.

  4. Photochemical-dynamical models of externally FUV irradiated protoplanetary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Haworth, Thomas J; Facchini, Stefano; Bisbas, Thomas G; Clarke, Cathie J

    2016-01-01

    There is growing theoretical and observational evidence that protoplanetary disc evolution may be significantly affected by the canonical levels of far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation found in a star forming environment, leading to substantial stripping of material from the disc outer edge even in the absence of nearby massive stars. In this paper we perform the first full radiation hydrodynamic simulations of the flow from the outer rim of protoplanetary discs externally irradiated by such intermediate strength FUV fields, including direct modelling of the photon dominated region (PDR) which is required to accurately compute the thermal properties. We find excellent agreement between our models and the semi-analytic models of Facchini et al. (2016) for the profile of the flow itself, as well as the mass loss rate and location of their "critical radius". This both validates their results (which differed significantly from prior semi-analytic estimates) and our new numerical method, the latter of which can now be ...

  5. Source identification and budget analysis on elevated levels of formaldehyde within ship plumes: a photochemical/dynamic model analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, C. H.; Kim, H. S.; von Glasow, R.; Brimblecombe, P.; Kim, J.; Park, R. J.; Woo, J. H.

    2010-06-01

    Elevated levels of formaldehyde (HCHO) along the ship corridors have been observed by satellite sensors, such as ESA/ERS-2 GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment), and were also predicted by global 3-D chemistry-transport models. In this study, three likely sources of the elevated HCHO levels were investigated to identify the detailed sources and examine the contributions of the sources (budget) of the elevated levels of HCHO in the ship corridors using a newly-developed ship-plume photochemical/dynamic model: (1) primary HCHO emission from ships; (2) secondary HCHO production via the atmospheric oxidation of Non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) emitted from ships; and (3) atmospheric oxidation of CH4 within the ship plumes. From multiple ship-plume model simulations, CH4 oxidation by elevated levels of in-plume OH radicals was found to be the main factor responsible for the elevated levels of HCHO in the ship corridors. More than ~91% of the HCHO for the base ship plume case (ITCT 2K2 ship-plume case) is produced by this atmospheric chemical process, except in the areas close to the ship stacks where the main source of the elevated HCHO levels would be primary HCHO from the ships (due to the deactivation of CH4 oxidation from the depletion of in-plume OH radicals). Because of active CH4 oxidation (chemical destruction of CH4) by OH radicals, the instantaneous chemical lifetime of CH4 (τ CH4) decreased to ~0.45 yr inside the ship plume, which is in contrast to τ CH4 of ~1.1 yr in the background (up to ~41% decrease). A variety of likely ship-plume situations at three locations at different latitudes within the global ship corridors was also studied to determine the extent of the enhancements in the HCHOlevels in the marine boundary layer (MBL) influenced by ship emissions. It was found that the ship-plume HCHO levels could be 20.5-434.9 pptv higher than the background HCHO levels depending on the latitudinal locations of the ship plumes (i

  6. Evaluation of simulated photochemical partitioning of oxidized nitrogen in the upper troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Henderson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Regional and global chemical transport models underpredict NOx (NO+NO2 in the upper troposphere where it is a precursor to the greenhouse gas ozone. The NOx bias been shown in model evaluations using aircraft data (Singh et al., 2007 and total column NO2 (molecules cm−2 from satellite observations (Napelenok et al., 2008. The causes of NOx underpredictions have yet to be fully understood due to the interconnected nature of simulated emission, transport, and chemistry processes. Recent observation-based studies suggest that, in the upper troposphere, simulated chemistry overpredicts hydrogen radicals (OH and HO2 and would convert NOx to HNO3 too quickly (Olson et al., 2006; Bertram et al., 2007; Ren et al., 2008. Since typical chemistry evaluation techniques are not available for upper tropospheric conditions, this study develops an evaluation platform from in situ observations, stochastic convection, and deterministic chemistry. We derive a stochastic convection model and optimize it using two simulated datasets of time since convection, one based on meteorology and the other on chemistry. The chemistry surrogate for time since convection is calculated using seven different chemical mechanisms, all of which predict shorter time since convection than our meteorological analysis. We evaluate chemical simulations by inter-comparison and by pairing results with observations based on NOx:HNO3, a photochemical aging indicator. Inter-comparison reveals individual chemical mechanism biases and recommended updates. Evaluation against observations shows that all chemical mechanisms overpredict NOx removal relative to long-lived methanol and carbon monoxide. All chemical mechanisms underpredict observed NOx by at least 30%, and further evaluation is necessary to refine simulation

  7. Photochemical oxidation of chloride ion by ozone in acid aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levanov, Alexander V; Isaykina, Oksana Ya; Amirova, Nazrin K; Antipenko, Ewald E; Lunin, Valerii V

    2015-11-01

    The experimental investigation of chloride ion oxidation under the action of ozone and ultraviolet radiation with wavelength 254 nm in the bulk of acid aqueous solution at pH 0-2 has been performed. Processes of chloride oxidation in these conditions are the same as the chemical reactions in the system O3 - OH - Cl(-)(aq). Despite its importance in the environment and for ozone-based water treatment, this reaction system has not been previously investigated in the bulk solution. The end products are chlorate ion ClO3(-) and molecular chlorine Cl2. The ions of trivalent iron have been shown to be catalysts of Cl(-) oxidation. The dependencies of the products formation rates on the concentrations of O3 and H(+) have been studied. The chemical mechanism of Cl(-) oxidation and Cl2 emission and ClO3(-) formation has been proposed. According to the mechanism, the dominant primary process of chloride oxidation represents the complex interaction with hydroxyl radical OH with the formation of Cl2(-) anion-radical intermediate. OH radical is generated on ozone photolysis in aqueous solution. The key subsequent processes are the reactions Cl2(-) + O3 → ClO + O2 + Cl(-) and ClO + H2O2 → HOCl + HO2. Until the present time, they have not been taken into consideration on mechanistic description and modelling of Cl(-) oxidation. The final products are formed via the reactions 2ClO → Cl2O2, Cl2O2 + H2O → 2H(+) + Cl(-) + ClO3(-) and HOCl + H(+) + Cl(-) ⇄ H2O + Cl2. Some portion of chloride is oxidized directly by O3 molecule with the formation of molecular chlorine in the end.

  8. Advanced oxidation treatment and photochemical fate of selected antidepressant pharmaceuticals in solutions of Suwannee River humic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoke, Hanoz, E-mail: hsantoke@uci.edu [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States); Song, Weihua, E-mail: wsong@uci.edu [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States); Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Cooper, William J., E-mail: wcooper@uci.edu [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States); Peake, Barrie M., E-mail: bpeake@chemistry.otago.ac.nz [Chemistry Department, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin 9054 (New Zealand)

    2012-05-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We elucidate the photochemical degradation of three antidepressant pharmaceuticals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydroxyl radical is the most significant contributor to the degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Excited state dissolved organic matter also plays a significant role for duloxetine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tentative reaction byproducts are identified. - Abstract: Antidepressant pharmaceuticals have recently been detected at low concentrations in wastewater and surface water. This work reports studies of the direct and indirect photochemical fate and treatment by advanced oxidation of three antidepressant compounds (duloxetine, venlafaxine and bupropion) in solutions of humic acid in order to elucidate their behavior in the natural environment prior to reaching a water treatment facility and potentially entering a potable water supply. Humic acid solution was prepared by adding to distilled water a known amount of organic matter as a photosensitizer. All three antidepressants react very rapidly with hydroxyl radicals ({center_dot}OH) and hydrated electrons (e{sup -}{sub aq}) with rate constants of {approx}10{sup 8} to 10{sup 10} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, but significantly slower with singlet oxygen ({sup 1}{Delta}O{sub 2}) ({approx}10{sup 3} to 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). The steady-state concentrations of {center_dot}OH and {sup 1}{Delta}O{sub 2}, in a sample of humic acid solution were measured and used with the second order rate constants to show that the hydroxyl radical was an order of magnitude more effective than the singlet oxygen in the solar-induced photochemical degradation of the antidepressants. Excited state dissolved organic matter also accounted for a substantial portion of degradation of duloxetine, decreasing its half-life by 27% under solar irradiation. Several reaction pathways and by-products arising from the photodegradation were identified using gamma-irradiation followed by LC

  9. Photochemical Oxidative Cyclisation of Stilbenes and Stilbenoids—The Mallory-Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kåre B. Jørgensen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available After Mallory described in 1964 the use of iodine as catalyst for the photochemical cyclisation of stilbenes, this reaction has proven its effectiveness in the synthesis of phenanthrenes, other PAHs and phenacenes with a surprisingly large selection of substituents. The “early age” of the reaction was reviewed by Mallory in 1984in a huge chapter in the Organic Reactions series, but the development has continued. Alternative conditions accommodate more sensitive substituents, and isomers can be favoured by sacrificial substituents. Herein the further developments and applications of this reaction after 1984 are discussed and summarized.

  10. Oxidation of chlorfenvinphos in ultrapure and natural waters by ozonation and photochemical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, Juan L; Real, Francisco J; Javier Benitez, F; González, Antonio

    2008-06-01

    The chemical oxidation of the organophosphorus insecticide chlorfenvinphos, a priority pollutant in aquatic environments, has been conducted in ultrapure water, by means of single degradation agents (ozone and UV radiation), and by the Advanced Oxidation Processes constituted by combinations of these oxidants (O(3)/H(2)O(2) and UV/H(2)O(2)). The influence of the operating variables was discussed, and the degradation rates were evaluated by determining the rate constants for the reactions with ozone (k(O)(3)=3.7+/-0.2 L mol(-1)s(-1)) and OH radicals (k(OH)=(3.2+/-0.2)x10(9) L mol(-1)s(-1)), as well as the quantum yield for the photodegradation (around 0.1 mol E(-1), depending on the pH). Additionally, the ozonation of chlorfenvinphos in a natural water system (a surface water from a reservoir) was studied. The influence of the operating conditions on the insecticide removal efficiency was established, and the R(ct) parameter was evaluated. A kinetic model was proposed for the prediction of the elimination rate of chlorfenvinphos in the ozonation process and the results obtained reveal a good agreement between experimental results and predicted values.

  11. Oxidative decomposition of atrazine in water in the presence of hydrogen peroxide using an innovative microwave photochemical reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Huilun [Department of Environmental Engineering, Civil and Environment Engineering School, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Italian National Research Council-Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organometallici (ICCOM), Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Bramanti, Emilia, E-mail: ebramanti@iccom.cnr.it [Italian National Research Council-Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organometallici (ICCOM), Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Longo, Iginio [Italian National Research Council-National Institute of Optics (INO), Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Onor, Massimo [Italian National Research Council-Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organometallici (ICCOM), Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Ferrari, Carlo [Italian National Research Council-National Institute of Optics (INO), Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2011-02-28

    The simultaneous application of microwave (MW) power and UV light leads to improved results in photochemical processes. This study investigates the oxidative decomposition of atrazine in water using an innovative MW and UV photochemical reactor, which activates a chemical reaction with MW and UV radiation using an immersed source without the need for a MW oven. We investigated the influence of reaction parameters such as initial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations, reaction temperatures and applied MW power and identified the optimal conditions for the oxidative decomposition of atrazine. Atrazine was completely degraded by MW/UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in a very short time (i.e. t{sub 1/2} = 1.1 min for 20.8 mg/L in optimal conditions). From the kinetic study, the disappearance rate of atrazine can be expressed as dX/dt = k{sub PH}[M]{sub 0}(b - X)(1 - X), where b {identical_to} [H{sub 2}O{sub 2}]{sub 0}/[M]{sub 0} + k{sub OH}[{center_dot}OH]/k{sub PH}[M]{sub 0}, and X is the atrazine conversion, which correlates well with the experimental data. The kinetic analysis also showed that an indirect reaction of atrazine with an OH radical is dominant at low concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and a direct reaction of atrazine with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is dominant when the concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is more than 200 mg/L.

  12. Action spectrum for photochemical retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) disruption in an in vivo monkey model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Sabarinathan, Ranjani; Bubel, Tracy; Williams, David R.; Hunter, Jennifer J.

    2016-03-01

    Observations of RPE disruption and autofluorescence (AF) photobleaching at light levels below the ANSI photochemical maximum permissible exposure (MPE) (Morgan et al., 2008) indicates a demand to modify future light safety standards to protect the retina from harm. To establish safe light exposures, we measured the visible light action spectrum for RPE disruption in an in vivo monkey model with fluorescence adaptive optics retinal imaging. Using this high resolution imaging modality can provide insight into the consequences of light on a cellular level and allow for longitudinal monitoring of retinal changes. The threshold retinal radiant exposures (RRE) for RPE disruption were determined for 4 wavelengths (460, 488, 544, and 594 nm). The anaesthetized macaque retina was exposed to a uniform 0.5° × 0.5° field of view (FOV). Imaging within a 2° × 2° FOV was performed before, immediately after and at 2 week intervals for 10 weeks. At each wavelength, multiple RREs were tested with 4 repetitions each to determine the threshold for RPE disruption. For qualitative analysis, RPE disruption is defined as any detectable change from the pre exposure condition in the cell mosaic in the exposed region relative to the corresponding mosaic in the immediately surrounding area. We have tested several metrics to evaluate the RPE images obtained before and after exposure. The measured action spectrum for photochemical RPE disruption has a shallower slope than the current ANSI photochemical MPE for the same conditions and suggests that longer wavelength light is more hazardous than other measurements would suggest.

  13. Fe{sup 3+}-doped zeolites. Optimised conditions for the oxidative degradation of 2,4-xylidine in laboratory and solar photochemical reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahin, N.; Thanh, H. le; Bonfill, A.; Woerner, M.; Lang, J.; Bossmann, S.H.; Oliveros, E.; Braun, A.M. [Lehrstuhl fuer Umweltmesstechnik am Engler-Bunte Inst. der Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Among advanced oxidation processes (AOP), the photochemically enhanced Fenton reaction (photo-Fenton) may be considered as one of the most efficient for the degradation of contaminants in industrial wastewater. This process involves a series of complex reactions, which cannot be described completely by conventional models. Therefore, the experimental design methodology has been employed for modelling the experimental data obtained in a laboratory batch reactor as well as in a novel type of solar reactor. As heterogeneous Fenton catalyst, a Fe{sup 3+}-exchanged zeolite Y photocatalyst was employed. As a model pollutant, 2,4-dimethyl aniline (2,4-xylidine) was chosen, because its oxidative degradation chemistry is well known. The experimental design model has been used for describing the behaviour of the reaction system in sensitivity studies aimed at optimising the amounts of Fenton reagents (heterogeneous Fenton catalyst and hydrogen peroxide) employed in the process. The results show that this heterogeneous photo-Fenton process is very sensitive to the concentration of catalyst as well as of added hydrogen peroxide. (orig.)

  14. Photochemical oxidation processes for the elimination of phenyl-urea herbicides in waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, F Javier; Real, Francisco J; Acero, Juan L; Garcia, Carolina

    2006-11-16

    Four phenyl-urea herbicides (linuron, chlorotoluron, diuron, and isoproturon) were individually photooxidized by monochromatic UV radiation in ultra-pure aqueous solutions. The influence of pH and temperature on the photodegradation process was established, and the first-order rate constants and quantum yields were evaluated. The sequence of photodecomposition rates was: linuron>chlorotoluron>diuron>isoproturon. The simultaneous photooxidation of mixtures of the selected herbicides in several types of waters was then performed by means of UV radiation alone, and by UV radiation combined with hydrogen peroxide. The types of waters used were: ultra-pure water, a commercial mineral water, a groundwater, and a lake water. The influence of the independent variables in these processes - the presence or absence of tert-butyl alcohol, types of herbicide and waters, and concentration of hydrogen peroxide - were established and discussed. A kinetic study was performed using a competitive kinetic model that allowed various rate constants to be evaluated for each herbicide. This kinetic model allows one to predict the elimination of these phenyl-urea herbicides in contaminated waters by the oxidation systems used (UV alone and combined UV/H2O2). The herbicide concentrations predicted by this model agree well with the experimental results that were obtained.

  15. 2D photochemical modeling of Saturn's stratosphere. Part II: Feedback between composition and temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Hue, V; Cavalié, T; Dobrijevic, M; Hersant, F

    2015-01-01

    Saturn's axial tilt produces seasons in a similar way as on Earth. Both the stratospheric temperature and composition are affected by this latitudinally varying insolation along the seasons. The thermal structure is controlled and regulated by the amount of hydrocarbons in the stratosphere, which act as absorbers and coolants from the UV to the far-IR spectral range, and this structure influences the amount of hydrocarbons. We study here the feedback between the chemical composition and the thermal structure by coupling a latitudinal and seasonal photochemical model with a radiative seasonal model. Our results show that the seasonal temperature peak in the higher stratosphere, associated with the seasonal increase of insolation, is shifted earlier than the maximum insolation peak. This shift is increased with increasing latitudes and is caused by the low amount of stratospheric coolants in the spring season. At 80$^{\\circ}$ in both hemispheres, the temperature peak at 1d-2mbar is seen to occur half a season e...

  16. Oxidant and particle photochemical processes above a south-east Asian tropical rain forest (the OP3 project: introduction, rationale, location characteristics and tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Hewitt

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In April–July 2008, intensive measurements were made of atmospheric composition and chemistry in Sabah, Malaysia, as part of the "Oxidant and particle photochemical processes above a South-East Asian tropical rain forest" (OP3 project. Fluxes and concentrations of trace gases and particles were made from and above the rain forest canopy at the Bukit Atur Global Atmosphere Watch station and at the nearby Sabahmas oil palm plantation, using both ground-based and airborne measurements. Here, the measurement and modelling strategies used, the characteristics of the sites and an overview of data obtained are described. Composition measurements show that the rainforest site was not impacted by significant sources of anthropogenic pollution, and this is confirmed by satellite retrievals of NO2 and HCHO. The dominant modulators of atmospheric chemistry at the rain forest site were therefore emissions of BVOCs and soil emissions of reactive nitrogen oxides. At the observed BVOC:NOx volume mixing ratio (~104 pptv/pptv, current chemical models suggest that daytime maximum OH concentrations should be ca. 105 radicals cm−3, but observed OH concentrations were an order of magnitude greater than this. We confirm, therefore, previous measurements which suggest that an unexplained source of OH must exist above tropical forests and continue to interrogate the data to find explanations for this.

  17. Overview: oxidant and particle photochemical processes above a south-east Asian tropical rainforest (the OP3 project: introduction, rationale, location characteristics and tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Hewitt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In April–July 2008, intensive measurements were made of atmospheric composition and chemistry in Sabah, Malaysia, as part of the "Oxidant and particle photochemical processes above a South-East Asian tropical rainforest" (OP3 project. Fluxes and concentrations of trace gases and particles were made from and above the rainforest canopy at the Bukit Atur Global Atmosphere Watch station and at the nearby Sabahmas oil palm plantation, using both ground-based and airborne measurements. Here, the measurement and modelling strategies used, the characteristics of the sites and an overview of data obtained are described. Composition measurements show that the rainforest site was not significantly impacted by anthropogenic pollution, and this is confirmed by satellite retrievals of NO2 and HCHO. The dominant modulators of atmospheric chemistry at the rainforest site were therefore emissions of BVOCs and soil emissions of reactive nitrogen oxides. At the observed BVOC:NOx volume mixing ratio (~100 pptv/pptv, current chemical models suggest that daytime maximum OH concentrations should be ca. 105 radicals cm−3, but observed OH concentrations were an order of magnitude greater than this. We confirm, therefore, previous measurements that suggest that an unexplained source of OH must exist above tropical rainforest and we continue to interrogate the data to find explanations for this.

  18. A new non-human primate model of photochemically induced cerebral infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ikeda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Rat models of photochemically induced cerebral infarction have been readily studied, but to date there are no reports of transcranial photochemically induced infarctions in the marmoset. In this report, we used this non-human primate as a model of cerebral thrombosis and observed the recovery process. METHODS: Five common marmosets were used. Cerebral ischemia was produced via intravascular thrombosis induced by an intravenous injection of Rose Bengal and irradiation with green light. After inducing cerebral infarction, we observed the behavior of marmosets via a continuous video recording. We evaluated maximum speed, mean speed, and distance traveled in 1 min. In addition, we evaluated scores for feeding behavior, upper limb grip, and lower limb grip. We confirmed the infarct area after cerebral infarction using 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining in a separate marmoset. RESULTS: We found functional decreases 2 days after creating the cerebral infarction in all measurements. Total distance traveled, average speed, upper limb score, and feeding behavior score did not recover to pre-infarction levels within 28 days. Maximum speed in 1 min and lower limb score recovered 28 days after infarction as compared to pre-infarction levels. We confirmed the infarct area of 11.4 mm × 6.8 mm as stained with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride. CONCLUSION: We were able to create a primate photothrombosis-induced cerebral infarction model using marmosets and observe functional recovery. We suggest that this is a useful model for basic research of cerebral infarction.

  19. 2D photochemical modeling of Saturn's stratosphere. Part II: Feedback between composition and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hue, V.; Greathouse, T. K.; Cavalié, T.; Dobrijevic, M.; Hersant, F.

    2016-03-01

    Saturn's axial tilt of 26.7° produces seasons in a similar way as on Earth. Both the stratospheric temperature and composition are affected by this latitudinally varying insolation along Saturn's orbital path. The atmospheric thermal structure is controlled and regulated by the amount of hydrocarbons in the stratosphere, which act as absorbers and coolants from the UV to the far-IR spectral range, and this structure has an influence on the amount of hydrocarbons. We study here the feedback between the chemical composition and the thermal structure by coupling a latitudinal and seasonal photochemical model with a radiative seasonal model. Our results show that the seasonal temperature peak in the higher stratosphere, associated with the seasonal increase of insolation, is shifted earlier than the maximum insolation peak. This shift is increased with increasing latitudes and is caused by the low amount of stratospheric coolants in the spring season. At 80° in both hemispheres, the temperature peak at 10-2 mbar is seen to occur half a season (3-4 Earth years) earlier than was previously predicted by radiative seasonal models that assumed spatially and temporally uniform distribution of coolants. This shift progressively decreases with increasing pressure, up to around the 0.5 mbar pressure level where it vanishes. On the opposite, the thermal field has a small feedback on the abundance distributions. Accounting for that feedback modifies the predicted equator-to-pole temperature gradient. The meridional gradients of temperature at the mbar pressure levels are better reproduced when this feedback is accounted for. At lower pressure levels, Saturn's stratospheric thermal structure seems to depart from pure radiative seasonal equilibrium as previously suggested by Guerlet et al. (2014). Although the agreement with the absolute value of the stratospheric temperature observed by Cassini is moderate, it is a mandatory step toward a fully coupled GCM-photochemical model.

  20. Laboratory investigation of photochemical oxidation of organic aerosol from wood fires – Part 1: Measurement and simulation of organic aerosol evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Grieshop

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of photo-oxidation on organic aerosol (OA in wood smoke by exposing diluted emissions from soft- and hard-wood fires to UV light in a smog chamber. Particle- and gas-phase concentrations were monitored with a suite of instruments including a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS, an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS and a thermodenuder to measure aerosol volatility. The measurements highlight how in-plume processing can lead to considerable evolution of the mass and volatility of biomass burning OA. Photochemical oxidation produced substantial new OA, increasing concentrations by a factor of 1.5 to 2.8 after several hours of exposure to typical summertime hydroxyl radical (OH concentrations. Less than 20% of this new OA could be explained using the measured decay of traditional secondary organic aerosol (SOA precursors and a state-of-the-art SOA model. Aging also created less volatile OA; at 50°C between 50 and 80% of the fresh primary OA evaporated but only 20 to 40% of aged OA. Therefore, the data provide additional evidence that primary OA is semivolatile. They also raise questions about the current approach used to simulate OA in chemical transport models, which assume that primary OA are non-volatile but that SOA is semivolatile. Predictions of a volatility basis-set model that explicitly tracks the partitioning and aging of low-volatile organics are compared to the chamber data. This model demonstrates that the OA production observed in these experiments can be explained by oxidation of low volatility organic vapors. The basis-set model can also simulate observed changes in OA volatility and composition, predicting the OA production and the increased oxygenation and decreased volatility of the OA.

  1. Photochemical oxidation of thiophene by O2 in an oil/acetonitrile two-phase extraction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fa-Tang; Zhao, Di-Shun; Li, Hong-Xia; Liu, Rui-Hong

    2008-10-01

    Photochemical oxidation of thiophene in an n-octane/acetonitrile extraction system using O(2) as oxidant was studied. Results obtained here can be used as a reference for desulfurization of gasoline, because thiophene is one of the main components containing sulfur in fluid catalytic cracking gasoline. A 500-W high-pressure mercury lamp was used as a light source for irradiation, and air was introduced by a gas pump to supply O(2). Thiophene dissolved in nopolar n-octane solvent was photodecomposed and removed into the polar acetonitrile phase. The desulfurization rate of thiophene in n-octane was 65.2% under photoirradiation for 5 h under the conditions of air flow at 150 mL min(-1), and V(n-octane):V(acetonitrile) = 1:1. This can be improved to 96.5% by adding 0.15 g Na-ZSM-5 zeolite into the 100-mL reaction system, which is the absorbent for O(2) and thiophene. Under such conditions, the photooxidation kinetics of thiophene with O(2) and Na-ZSM-5 zeolite is first-order with an apparent rate constant of 0.6297 h(-1) and half-time of 1.10 h. The sulfur content can be reduced from 800 microL L(-1) to 28 microL L(-1).

  2. Low-Temperature Photochemically Activated Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide for Highly Stable Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaisutti, Rawat; Kim, Jaeyoung; Park, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2016-08-10

    We report on highly stable amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) gas sensors for ultraviolet (UV)-activated room-temperature detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The IGZO sensors fabricated by a low-temperature photochemical activation process and exhibiting two orders higher photocurrent compared to conventional zinc oxide sensors, allowed high gas sensitivity against various VOCs even at room temperature. From a systematic analysis, it was found that by increasing the UV intensity, the gas sensitivity, response time, and recovery behavior of an IGZO sensor were strongly enhanced. In particular, under an UV intensity of 30 mW cm(-2), the IGZO sensor exhibited gas sensitivity, response time and recovery time of 37%, 37 and 53 s, respectively, against 750 ppm concentration of acetone gas. Moreover, the IGZO gas sensor had an excellent long-term stability showing around 6% variation in gas sensitivity over 70 days. These results strongly support a conclusion that a low-temperature solution-processed amorphous IGZO film can serve as a good candidate for room-temperature VOCs sensors for emerging wearable electronics.

  3. Photophysical and photochemical effects of UV and VUV photo-oxidation and photolysis on PET and PEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Andrew

    Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) is a widely used polymer in the bottling, packaging, and clothing industry. In recent years an increasing global demand for PET has taken place due to the Solar Disinfection (SODIS) process. SODIS is a method of sterilizing fresh water into drinkable water. The PET bottles are used in the process to contain the water during solar irradiation due to its highly transparent optical property. Alongside PET, polyethylene 2,6-napthalate (PEN) is used in bottling and flexible electronic applications. The surface of PEN would need to be modified to control the hydrophilicity and the interaction it exudes as a substrate. The UV light absorption properties of PET and PEN are of great importance for many applications, and thus needs to be studied along with its photochemical resistance. The optical and chemical nature of PET was studied as it was treated by UV photo-oxidation, photo-ozonation, and photolysis under atmospheric pressure. Another investigation was also used to study PEN and PET as they are treated by vacuum UV (VUV) photo-oxidation, VUV photolysis, and remote oxygen reactions. The extent of the photoreactions' effect into the depth of the polymers is examined as treatment conditions are changed. The different experimental methods established the rate of several competing photoreactions on PET and PEN during irradiance, and their effect on the optical quality of the polymers.

  4. Benzophenone-based photochemical micropatterning of biomolecules to create model substrates and instructive biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeon, Aurora J; Harley, Brendan A; Bailey, Ryan C

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic and heterogeneous environment that controls many aspects of cell behavior. Not surprisingly, many different approaches have focused on creating model substrates that recapitulate the biomolecular, topographical, and mechanical properties of the ECM for in vitro studies of cell behavior. This chapter details a general, versatile method for the spatially controlled deposition of multiple biomolecules onto both planar and topographically complex support structures with micrometer resolution. This approach is based upon the well-understood photochemical UV crosslinking of benzophenone (BP) to solution-phase biomolecules. This is a molecularly general strategy that can be utilized to immobilize biomolecules onto any surface prefunctionalized with BP. Examples described herein include modification of planar and corrugated glass substrates as well as collagen-glycosaminoglycan biomaterials configured either as highly porous scaffolds or nonporous membranes with a variety of biomolecular targets, including proteins, glycoproteins, and carbohydrates.

  5. Photochemical properties of carotenoids: what can we get from the VB model?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO; Yi; (高嶷); LIU; Chungen; (刘春根); JIANG; Yuansheng; (江元生)

    2003-01-01

    The empirical valence bond model, solved by the DMRG technique, is applied to the systematical study of the photochemical processes of carotenoids. The polyenes with five up to one hundred of C=C bonds are investigated. The probability of the state arrangement for the conjugated bond, Pij, is evaluated. It is a parameter to correlate the bond lengths, and could also be applied to rationalizing the quantum yields of the photo-isomerization and the reaction constantof the quenching of singlet-oxygen happened to the external C=C bond of the carotenoids. The maximum reaction constant in long chain limit is determined as about 2.92×1010 L·mol-1·s-1.

  6. Lombardia region photochemical characterization by means of modelling simulation; Caratterizzazione fotochimica dell'area lombarda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabusi, V.; Finzi, G. [Brescia Univ., Brescia (Italy). Dipt. di Elettronica per l' Automazione

    2001-08-01

    The following study is part of a project aimed to develop a comprehensive modelling system designed to analyse and select possible air quality strategies in metropolitan areas by means of emission abatement measure impact simulation. In this work, a system prototype is proposed, adopting selected software codices, which have been implemented and tested in a Northern Italy domain including the whole of Regione Lombardia, often affected by severe photochemical pollution episodes. The assessment of the relation between ozone, NO{sub x} and VOC is especially important as a starting point for environmental policy. So the modelling system has been applied for the evaluation and comparison of some different emission control strategies, in order to point out the photochemical regime of the domain. [Italian] Uno studio nel quadro di un progetto di ricerca finalizzato allo sviluppo di modelli per l'analisi e la scelta di strategie di risanamento della qualita' dell'aria in ambito metropolitano, attraverso la simulazione dell'impatto del contenimento delle emissioni. Il sistema modellistico e' stato implementato e testato su und dominio dell'Italia settentrionale, comprendente l'intera regione Lombardia, dove si verificano spesso episodi critici di inquinamento fotochimico. La valutazione della relazione fra l'ozono, gli NO{sub x} e i VOC, e' il punto di partenza nelle strategie di risanamento. Pertanto il sistema modellistico e' stato impiegato per la valutazione e il confronto di diverse strategie di controllo delle emissioni al fine di caratterizzare dal punto di vista fotochimico il dominio di indagine.

  7. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of reactive intermediates in photochemical and transition metal-assisted oxidation, decarboxylation and alkyl transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraher, Jack McCaslin

    -olefins selectively. This process is made catalytic by the introduction of O2. Photochemical decarboxylation of propionic acid in the presence of Cu2+ generates ethylene and Cu +. Longer-chain acids also yield alpha olefins as exclusive products. In the absence of continued purging with O2 to aid removal of olefin, Cu+(olefin) complexes accumulate and catalytic activity slows dramatically due to depletion of Cu2+. The results underscore the profound effect that the choice of metal ions, the medium, and reaction conditions exert on the photochemistry of carboxylic acids. Free Oxygen Atom in Solution from 4-Benzoylpyridine N-Oxide Excited Singlet. Photolysis of 4-benzoylpyridine N-oxide (BPyO) in the presence of quenchers of the triplet excited state produces up to 41% O(3P) (as determined by generation of ethylene upon scavenging with cyclopentene). In the absence of 3BPyO* quenchers a maximum of 13% O(3P) relative to consumed BPyO is obtained. The remaining products are hydroxylated-4-benzoylpyridine and 4-benzoylpyridine. Additionally, the rate of BPyO consumption (as determined by UV-vis) decreases in the presence of 3BPyO* quenching agents. Second order rate constants for 3BPyO* quenching were determined. A mechanism for photochemical deoxygenation of BPyO is proposed on the basis of kinetic data and product distribution under various conditions. Additionally, comparisons are made between the observed intermediates and similar triplet excited states and radical anions.

  8. Molecular composition and volatility of isoprene photochemical oxidation secondary organic aerosol under low and high NOx conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Ambro, Emma; Lee, Ben H.; Liu, Jiumeng; Shilling, John E.; Gaston, Cassandra J.; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Mohr, Claudia; Lutz, Anna; Zhang, Zhenfa; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.; Rivera-Rios, Jean; Keutsch, Frank N.; Thornton, Joel A.

    2017-01-04

    We present measurements of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from isoprene photochemical oxidation formed in an environmental simulation chamber using dry neutral seed particles, thereby suppressing the role of acid catalyzed multiphase chemistry, at a variety of oxidant conditions. A high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS) utilizing iodide-adduct ionization coupled to the Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) allowed for the simultaneous online sampling of the gas and particle composition. Under high HO2 and low NO conditions, highly oxygenated (O:C ≥ 1) C5 compounds were major components (~50%) of the SOA. The overall composition of the SOA evolved both as a function of time and as a function of input NO concentrations. As the level of input NO increased, organic nitrates increased in both the gas- and particle-phases, but the dominant non-nitrate particle-phase components monotonically decreased. We use comparisons of measured and predicted gas-particle partitioning of individual components to assess the validity of literature-based group-contribution methods for estimating saturation vapor concentrations. While there is evidence for equilibrium partitioning being achieved on the chamber residence time scale (5.2 hours) for some individual components, significant errors in group-contribution methods are revealed. In addition, >30% of the SOA mass, detected as low-molecular weight compounds, cannot be reconciled with equilibrium partitioning. These compounds desorb from the FIGAERO at unexpectedly high temperatures given their molecular composition, indicative of thermal decomposition of effectively lower volatility components, likely larger molecular weight oligomers. We use these insights from the laboratory and observations of the same SOA components made during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) to assess the importance of isoprene photooxidation as a local SOA source.

  9. Photochemical Age Determinations in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Daum, Peter H.; Lee, Y.- N.; Nunnermacker, L. J.; Springston, S. R.; Weinstein-Lloyd, J.; Hyde, P.; Doskey, Paul; Rudolph, Jochen; Fast, Jerome D.; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2003-02-05

    An extensive VOC data set was gathered as part of a photochemical oxidant field campaign conducted in the Phoenix air basin in the late spring of 1998. Sampling was done at the surface and by aircraft at mid-boundary layer height; in regions with emission sources and downwind in the urban plume. VOC concentration ratios were used to calculate photochemical age, defined as the time integrated exposure of an air mass to OH radical. Based on the VOC ratios of 15 compounds (with OH reactivity varying between acetylene and p,m-xylene), we present estimates for photochemical age and dilution factors for several regions within the air basin. Geographic trends are in agreement with the expectation that pollutants are transported in a generally eastward direction so that older and more dilute mixtures occur to the east of the city. Photochemical ages determined from aircraft samples agree with those determined at a downwind surface site. The bias in photochemical age that occurs because fresh pollutants are added to an aged mixture has been quantified by using a particle trajectory model. A combination of trajectory results (actual age of the pollutants in an air mass) and photochemical age yields an estimate of the average OH concentration experienced by the air parcel. OH obtained in this way is somewhat lower, but has the same trends as OH concentrations calculated using a photochemical box model that is constrained with observed concentrations coincident with the VOC samples.

  10. Molecular composition and volatility of isoprene photochemical oxidation secondary organic aerosol under low- and high-NOx conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambro, Emma L.; Lee, Ben H.; Liu, Jiumeng; Shilling, John E.; Gaston, Cassandra J.; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Mohr, Claudia; Lutz, Anna; Zhang, Zhenfa; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.; Rivera-Rios, Jean C.; Keutsch, Frank N.; Thornton, Joel A.

    2017-01-01

    We present measurements of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from isoprene photochemical oxidation in an environmental simulation chamber at a variety of oxidant conditions and using dry neutral seed particles to suppress acid-catalyzed multiphase chemistry. A high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) utilizing iodide-adduct ionization coupled to the Filter Inlet for Gases and Aerosols (FIGAERO) allowed for simultaneous online sampling of the gas and particle composition. Under high-HO2 and low-NO conditions, highly oxygenated (O : C ≥ 1) C5 compounds were major components (˜ 50 %) of SOA. The SOA composition and effective volatility evolved both as a function of time and as a function of input NO concentrations. Organic nitrates increased in both the gas and particle phases as input NO increased, but the dominant non-nitrate particle-phase components monotonically decreased. We use comparisons of measured and predicted gas-particle partitioning of individual components to assess the validity of literature-based group-contribution methods for estimating saturation vapor concentrations. While there is evidence for equilibrium partitioning being achieved on the chamber residence timescale (5.2 h) for some individual components, significant errors in group-contribution methods are revealed. In addition, > 30 % of the SOA mass, detected as low-molecular-weight semivolatile compounds, cannot be reconciled with equilibrium partitioning. These compounds desorb from the FIGAERO at unexpectedly high temperatures given their molecular composition, which is indicative of thermal decomposition of effectively lower-volatility components such as larger molecular weight oligomers.

  11. Photochemical tyrosine oxidation in the structurally well-defined α3Y protein: proton-coupled electron transfer and a long-lived tyrosine radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Starla D; Jorge, Christine; Liang, Li; Valentine, Kathleen G; Hammarström, Leif; Tommos, Cecilia

    2014-10-08

    Tyrosine oxidation-reduction involves proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and a reactive radical state. These properties are effectively controlled in enzymes that use tyrosine as a high-potential, one-electron redox cofactor. The α3Y model protein contains Y32, which can be reversibly oxidized and reduced in voltammetry measurements. Structural and kinetic properties of α3Y are presented. A solution NMR structural analysis reveals that Y32 is the most deeply buried residue in α3Y. Time-resolved spectroscopy using a soluble flash-quench generated [Ru(2,2'-bipyridine)3](3+) oxidant provides high-quality Y32-O• absorption spectra. The rate constant of Y32 oxidation (kPCET) is pH dependent: 1.4 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) (pH 5.5), 1.8 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) (pH 8.5), 5.4 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) (pD 5.5), and 4.0 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) (pD 8.5). k(H)/k(D) of Y32 oxidation is 2.5 ± 0.5 and 4.5 ± 0.9 at pH(D) 5.5 and 8.5, respectively. These pH and isotope characteristics suggest a concerted or stepwise, proton-first Y32 oxidation mechanism. The photochemical yield of Y32-O• is 28-58% versus the concentration of [Ru(2,2'-bipyridine)3](3+). Y32-O• decays slowly, t1/2 in the range of 2-10 s, at both pH 5.5 and 8.5, via radical-radical dimerization as shown by second-order kinetics and fluorescence data. The high stability of Y32-O• is discussed relative to the structural properties of the Y32 site. Finally, the static α3Y NMR structure cannot explain (i) how the phenolic proton released upon oxidation is removed or (ii) how two Y32-O• come together to form dityrosine. These observations suggest that the dynamic properties of the protein ensemble may play an essential role in controlling the PCET and radical decay characteristics of α3Y.

  12. EFFECT OF NATURAL IRON OXIDE, HYDROGEN PEROXIDE, AND OXALIC ACID ON PHOTOCHEMICAL DEGRADATION OF 2-CHLOROPHENOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W REMACHE

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The voluntary or accidental release of chemical compounds in the environment is a major cause of pollution of natural waters. Most of chlorophenols are toxic and hardly biodegradable and are difficult to remove from the environment. Therefore, it is important to find innovative and economical methods for the safe and complete destruction. The objective of this work is to test the activity photocatalytic of natural iron oxide (NIO in the photodegradation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP. The analysis chromatographic with HPLC of solutions exposed under UV irradiation revealed that the degradation of 2-CP was negligible under the condition of using only natural iron oxide. The effect of wavelength on photoreactivity of NIO was also investigated in this process: at high wavelength thus at low energy the efficiency of degradation is important. We have also investigated the activation of NIO by hydrogen peroxide and oxalic acid, The results showed that the photodegradation of 2-CP under UVA irradiation could be enhanced greatly in the presence of oxalate. 2-CP was completly removed after 240 minutes of irradiation when the concentration of oxalic acid is equal to 2.10-3 M. The use of 2.0 % of isopropanol as a scavenger confirmed the intervention of hydroxyl radicals in the photodegradation of 2-CP.

  13. Nanostructured Indium Oxide Coated Silicon Nanowire Arrays: A Hybrid Photothermal/Photochemical Approach to Solar Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Laura B; O'Brien, Paul G; Jelle, Abdinoor; Sandhel, Amit; Perovic, Douglas D; Mims, Charles A; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2016-09-27

    The field of solar fuels seeks to harness abundant solar energy by driving useful molecular transformations. Of particular interest is the photodriven conversion of greenhouse gas CO2 into carbon-based fuels and chemical feedstocks, with the ultimate goal of providing a sustainable alternative to traditional fossil fuels. Nonstoichiometric, hydroxylated indium oxide nanoparticles, denoted In2O3-x(OH)y, have been shown to function as active photocatalysts for CO2 reduction to CO via the reverse water gas shift reaction under simulated solar irradiation. However, the relatively wide band gap (2.9 eV) of indium oxide restricts the portion of the solar irradiance that can be utilized to ∼9%, and the elevated reaction temperatures required (150-190 °C) reduce the overall energy efficiency of the process. Herein we report a hybrid catalyst consisting of a vertically aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) support evenly coated by In2O3-x(OH)y nanoparticles that utilizes the vast majority of the solar irradiance to simultaneously produce both the photogenerated charge carriers and heat required to reduce CO2 to CO at a rate of 22.0 μmol·gcat(-1)·h(-1). Further, improved light harvesting efficiency of the In2O3-x(OH)y/SiNW films due to minimized reflection losses and enhanced light trapping within the SiNW support results in a ∼6-fold increase in photocatalytic conversion rates over identical In2O3-x(OH)y films prepared on roughened glass substrates. The ability of this In2O3-x(OH)y/SiNW hybrid catalyst to perform the dual function of utilizing both light and heat energy provided by the broad-band solar irradiance to drive CO2 reduction reactions represents a general advance that is applicable to a wide range of catalysts in the field of solar fuels.

  14. Photochemical Pollution Modeling of Ozone at Metropolitan Area of Porto Alegre - RS/Brazil using WRF/Chem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuchiara, G. C.; Carvalho, J.

    2013-05-01

    One of the main problems related to air pollution in urban areas is caused by photochemical oxidants, particularly troposphere ozone (O3), which is considered a harmful substance. The O3 precursors (carbon monoxide CO, nitrogen oxides NOx and hydrocarbons HCs) are predominantly of anthropogenic origin in these areas, and vehicles are the main emission sources. Due to the increased urbanization and industrial development in recent decades, air pollutant emissions have increased likewise, mainly by mobile sources in the highly urbanized and developed areas, such as the Metropolitan Area of Porto Alegre-RS (MAPA). According to legal regulations implemented in Brazil in 2005, which aimed at increasing the fraction of biofuels in the national energy matrix, 2% biodiesel were supposed to be added to the fuel mixture within three years, and up to 5% after eight years of implementation of these regulations. Our work performs an analysis of surface concentrations for O3, NOx, CO, and HCs through numerical simulations with WRF/Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry). The model is validated against observational data obtained from the local urban air quality network for the period from January 5 to 9, 2009 (96 hours). One part of the study focused on the comparison of simulated meteorological variables, to observational data from two stations in MAPA. The results showed that the model simulates well the diurnal evolution of pressure and temperature at the surface, but is much less accurate for wind speed. Another part included the evaluation of model results of WRF/Chem for O3 versus observed data at air quality stations Esteio and Porto Alegre. Comparisons between simulated and observed O3 revealed that the model simulates well the evolution of the observed values, but on many occasions the model did not reproduce well the maximum and minimum concentrations. Finally, a preliminary quantitative sensitivity study on the impact of biofuel on the

  15. A New Insight of Graphene oxide-Fe(III) Complex Photochemical Behaviors under Visible Light Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Renlan; Zhu, Xiaoying; Chen, Baoliang

    2017-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) contains not only aromatic carbon lattice but also carboxyl groups which enhanced the aqueous solubility of GO. To study the transformation of GO nanosheets in natural environments, GO aqueous dispersion was mixed with Fe3+ ions to form photoactive complex. Under visible light irradiation, Fe(III) of the complex would be reduced to Fe(II) which could subsequently reduce highly toxic Cr(VI) to Cr3+. The electron of the reduction was contributed by the decarboxylation of carboxyl groups on GO and iron was acting as a catalyst during the photoreduction. On the other hand, the consumption of carboxyl groups may convert GO to rGO which are tend to aggregate since the decreased electrostatic repulsion and the increased π-π attraction. The formed Cr3+ may be electrostatically adsorbed by the rGO sheets and simultaneously precipitated with the aggregated rGO sheets, resulting the effective removal of chromium and GO nanosheets from the aqueous environment. This study may shed a light on understanding the environmental transformation of GO and guide the treatment of Cr(VI). PMID:28084446

  16. Biogenic VOC measurements during the Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes (OP3) above a South-East Asian tropical rainforest Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Charlotte; Hopkins, James; Lee, James; Lewis, Alastair; Hamilton, Jacqueline

    2010-05-01

    We present the first ambient air speciated monoterpene measurements from the UK FGAM (Facility for Ground based Atmospheric Measrements) - York dual channel gas chromatograph system with flame ionisation detectors, alongside measurements of other biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) such as isoprene, which were made during the Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes above a South-East Asian tropical rainforest (OP3) campaign in Danum Valley, Borneo, in 2008. The monoterpenes measured were alpha-pinene, camphene, 3-carene, gamma-terpinene and limonene. We compare the relative concentrations and diurnal profiles of the different monoterpene species and other BVOCs such as isoprene, and analyse variability in their concentrations in light of various environmental conditions, in order to gain insight into factors which influence their emission rates, and therefore regulate their potential impact upon photochemical processes within the boundary layer. We also present regional BVOC measurements made onboard the FAAM BAE 146 aircraft over both the natural rainforest and oil palm plantations.

  17. The Statistical Evolution of Multiple Generations of Oxidation Products in the Photochemical Aging of Chemically Reduced Organic Aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Kevin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kessler, Sean; Kroll, Jesse H.

    2011-10-03

    The heterogeneous reaction of hydroxyl radicals (OH) with squalane and bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate (BES) particles are used as model systems to examine how distributions of reactionproducts evolve during the oxidation of chemically reduced organic aerosol. A kinetic model of multigenerational chemistry, which is compared to previously measured (squalane) and new(BES) experimental data, reveals that it is the statistical mixtures of different generations of oxidation products that control the average particle mass and elemental composition during thereaction. The model suggests that more highly oxidized reaction products, although initially formed with low probability, play a large role in the production of gas phase reaction products.In general, these results highlight the importance of considering atmospheric oxidation as a statistical process, further suggesting that the underlying distribution of molecules could playimportant roles in aerosol formation as well as in the evolution of key physicochemical properties such as volatility and hygroscopicity.

  18. Testing the Early Mars H2-CO2 Greenhouse Hypothesis with a 1-D Photochemical Model

    CERN Document Server

    Batalha, Natasha; Ramirez, Ramses; Kasting, James

    2015-01-01

    A recent study by Ramirez et al. (2014) demonstrated that an atmosphere with 1.3-4 bar of CO2 and H2O, in addition to 5-20% H2, could have raised the mean annual and global surface temperature of early Mars above the freezing point of water. Such warm temperatures appear necessary to generate the rainfall (or snowfall) amounts required to carve the ancient martian valleys. Here, we use our best estimates for early martian outgassing rates, along with a 1-D photochemical model, to assess the conversion efficiency of CO, CH4, and H2S to CO2, SO2, and H2. Our outgassing estimates assume that Mars was actively recycling volatiles between its crust and interior, as Earth does today. H2 production from serpentinization and deposition of banded iron-formations is also considered. Under these assumptions, maintaining an H2 concentration of ~1-2% by volume is achievable, but reaching 5% H2 requires additional H2 sources or a slowing of the hydrogen escape rate below the diffusion limit. If the early martian atmosphere...

  19. A modelling study of photochemical regimes over Europe: robustness and variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Beekmann

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The variability of the relative sensitivity of photochemical ozone formation to volatile organic compounds (VOC and NOx emissions, the chemical regime, over Europe during summers 2001 to 2003 is simulated with a regional scale transport-chemistry model. The robustness and variability of chemical regimes is shown. A VOC sensitive regime over North-Western Europe and a mainly NOx sensitive regime over the Mediterranean basin and Eastern Europe are found, confirming earlier published results. The chemical regime time variability, its robustness with respect to several environmental factors (seasonality, interannual variability and with respect to model uncertainty are thoroughly analysed. For the regions with well pronounced chemical regimes over North-Western Europe and the Mediterranean, the chemical regime occurrence only slightly depends on the ozone target considered – daily ozone or Ox (= O3 + NO2 maximum or mean, AOT's, SOMO35, .... For these regions, differences between particular years and summer months are weak, day to day variability is significant but does not change the occurrence of one or another chemical regime. On the contrary, over North-Eastern Germany, the chemical regime changes form one day to another and is also dependent on the ozone target chosen. Expected decreases in anthropogenic NOx emissions over Europe since the last and for the next few decades have shifted and will shift chemical regimes to more NOx sensitive. The predictive skill of chemical regime indicator species is made evident at continental scale, extending their spatial range of applicability with respect to earlier studies. Several sensitivity tests were performed in order to account for major sources of model uncertainty. With the exception of regions near ship tracks over the Mediterranean basin, the spatial pattern of chemical regimes appears to be robust with respect to model

  20. The Social Network of Tracer Variations and O(100) Uncertain Photochemical Parameters in the Community Atmosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, D. D.; Labute, M.; Chowdhary, K.; Debusschere, B.; Cameron-Smith, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Simulating the atmospheric cycles of ozone, methane, and other radiatively important trace gases in global climate models is computationally demanding and requires the use of 100's of photochemical parameters with uncertain values. Quantitative analysis of the effects of these uncertainties on tracer distributions, radiative forcing, and other model responses is hindered by the "curse of dimensionality." We describe efforts to overcome this curse using ensemble simulations and advanced statistical methods. Uncertainties from 95 photochemical parameters in the trop-MOZART scheme were sampled using a Monte Carlo method and propagated through 10,000 simulations of the single column version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). The variance of the ensemble was represented as a network with nodes and edges, and the topology and connections in the network were analyzed using lasso regression, Bayesian compressive sensing, and centrality measures from the field of social network theory. Despite the limited sample size for this high dimensional problem, our methods determined the key sources of variation and co-variation in the ensemble and identified important clusters in the network topology. Our results can be used to better understand the flow of photochemical uncertainty in simulations using CAM and other climate models. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and supported by the DOE Office of Science through the Scientific Discovery Through Advanced Computing (SciDAC).

  1. Photochemical oxidation of water and reduction of polyoxometalate anions at interfaces of water with ionic liquids or diethylether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Gianluca; Wedd, Anthony G.; Zhao, Chuan; Bond, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    Photoreduction of [P2W18O62]6-, [S2Mo18O62]4-, and [S2W18O62]4- polyoxometalate anions (POMs) and oxidation of water occurs when water–ionic liquid and water–diethylether interfaces are irradiated with white light (275–750 nm) or sunlight. The ionic liquids (ILs) employed were aprotic ([Bmim]X; Bmim = (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium,X = BF4,PF6) and protic (DEAS = diethanolamine hydrogen sulphate; DEAP = diethanolamine hydrogen phosphate). Photochemical formation of reduced POMs at both thermodynamically stable and unstable water–IL interfaces led to their initial diffusion into the aqueous phase and subsequent extraction into the IL phase. The mass transport was monitored visually by color change and by steady-state voltammetry at microelectrodes placed near the interface and in the bulk solution phases. However, no diffusion into the organic phase was observed when [P2W18O62]6- was photo-reduced at the water–diethylether interface. In all cases, water acted as the electron donor to give the overall process: 4POM + 2H2O + hν → 4POM- + 4H+ + O2. However, more highly reduced POM species are likely to be generated as intermediates. The rate of diffusion of photo-generated POM- was dependent on the initial concentration of oxidized POM and the viscosity of the IL (or mixed phase system produced in cases in which the interface is thermodynamically unstable). In the water-DEAS system, the evolution of dioxygen was monitored in situ in the aqueous phase by using a Clark-type oxygen sensor. Differences in the structures of bulk and interfacial water are implicated in the activation of water. An analogous series of reactions occurred upon irradiation of solid POM salts in the presence of water vapor. PMID:22753501

  2. 1D-coupled photochemical model of neutrals, cations and anions in the atmosphere of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrijevic, M.; Loison, J. C.; Hickson, K. M.; Gronoff, G.

    2016-04-01

    Many models with different characteristics have been published so far to study the chemical processes at work in Titan's atmosphere. Some models focus on neutral species in the stratosphere or ionic species in the ionosphere, but few of them couple all the species throughout the whole atmosphere. Very few of these emphasize the importance of uncertainties in the chemical scheme and study their propagation in the model. We have developed a new 1D-photochemical model of Titan's atmosphere coupling neutral species with positive and negative ions from the lower atmosphere up to the ionosphere and have compared our results with observations to have a comprehensive view of the chemical processes driving the composition of the stratosphere and ionosphere of Titan. We have updated the neutral, positive ion and negative ion chemistry and have improved the description of N2 photodissociation by introducing high resolution N2 absorption cross sections. We performed for the first time an uncertainty propagation study in a fully coupled ion-neutral model. We determine how uncertainties on rate constants on both neutral and ionic reactions influence the model results and pinpoint the key reactions responsible for this behavior. We find very good agreement between our model results and observations in both the stratosphere and in the ionosphere for most neutral compounds. Our results are also in good agreement with an average INMS mass spectrum and specific flybys in the dayside suggesting that our chemical model (for both neutral and ions) provides a good approximation of Titan's atmospheric chemistry as a whole. Our uncertainty propagation study highlights the difficulty to interpret the INMS mass spectra for masses 14, 31, 41 and we identified the key reactions responsible for these ambiguities. Despite an overall improvement in the chemical model, disagreement for some specific compounds (HC3N, C2H5CN, C2H4) highlights the role that certain physical processes could play

  3. Preparation of conducting polymer patterns using photochemical reaction of oxidation polymerization agents; Sanka jugozai no hikarikagaku henka wo riyoshita dodensei kobunshi patan no seisaku hoho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Yasushi; Naruse, Tsutomu; Yoshimoto, Shoji; Kimura, Kazuyuki [Aichi Prefectura Goverment, Aichi (Japan). Institute of Industrial Research; Natsume, Yukihiro [Aica Kogyo Corp., Aichi (Japan)

    1999-09-10

    Preparation of conducting polymer patterns using the photochemical oxidizing ability changes of an oxidation polymerization agent has been investigated. Photoreactive metal salts such as iron (3) chloride were used for oxidation polymerization of conducting polymers such as polymers such as polypyrrole. Metal salts were reduced by exposing to ultra-violet (UV) light and missed the ability of oxidation polymerization. Therefore, conducting polypyrrole patterns have been prepared on the unirradiated part by exposing films containing iron (3) chloride to UV light through the pattern mask and then contacting with pyrrole vapor or dipping in pyrrole solution. By this method, large and fine conducting polymer patterns can easily be prepared on plastics, ceramics, papers, clothes, woods, etc. In addition, it may be able to prepare patterns with partially different conductivity by controlling the irradiation time of UV light and/or shades of the pattern masks. (author)

  4. Mixed N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Bis(oxazolinyl)borato Rhodium and Iridium Complexes in Photochemical and Thermal Oxidative Addition Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Songchen [Ames Laboratory; Manna, Kuntal [Ames Laboratory; Ellern, Arkady [Ames Laboratory; Sadow, Aaron D [Ames Laboratory

    2014-12-08

    In order to facilitate oxidative addition chemistry of fac-coordinated rhodium(I) and iridium(I) compounds, carbene–bis(oxazolinyl)phenylborate proligands have been synthesized and reacted with organometallic precursors. Two proligands, PhB(OxMe2)2(ImtBuH) (H[1]; OxMe2 = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; ImtBuH = 1-tert-butylimidazole) and PhB(OxMe2)2(ImMesH) (H[2]; ImMesH = 1-mesitylimidazole), are deprotonated with potassium benzyl to generate K[1] and K[2], and these potassium compounds serve as reagents for the synthesis of a series of rhodium and iridium complexes. Cyclooctadiene and dicarbonyl compounds {PhB(OxMe2)2ImtBu}Rh(η4-C8H12) (3), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(η4-C8H12) (4), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(CO)2 (5), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(η4-C8H12) (6), and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(CO)2 (7) are synthesized along with ToMM(η4-C8H12) (M = Rh (8); M = Ir (9); ToM = tris(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)phenylborate). The spectroscopic and structural properties and reactivity of this series of compounds show electronic and steric effects of substituents on the imidazole (tert-butyl vs mesityl), effects of replacing an oxazoline in ToM with a carbene donor, and the influence of the donor ligand (CO vs C8H12). The reactions of K[2] and [M(μ-Cl)(η2-C8H14)2]2 (M = Rh, Ir) provide {κ4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes'CH2}Rh(μ-H)(μ-Cl)Rh(η2-C8H14)2 (10) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(η3-C8H13) (11). In the former compound, a spontaneous oxidative addition of a mesityl ortho-methyl to give a mixed-valent dirhodium species is observed, while the iridium compound forms a monometallic allyl hydride. Photochemical reactions of dicarbonyl compounds 5 and 7 result in C–H bond oxidative addition providing the compounds {κ4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes'CH2}RhH(CO) (12) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(Ph)CO (13). In 12, oxidative addition results in cyclometalation of the mesityl ortho-methyl similar to 10, whereas the iridium compound reacts with the benzene solvent to give a rare crystallographically characterized cis

  5. Photochemical modeling in California with two chemical mechanisms: model intercomparison and response to emission reductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chenxia; Kelly, James T; Avise, Jeremy C; Kaduwela, Ajith P; Stockwell, William R

    2011-05-01

    An updated version of the Statewide Air Pollution Research Center (SAPRC) chemical mechanism (SAPRC07C) was implemented into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) version 4.6. CMAQ simulations using SAPRC07C and the previously released version, SAPRC99, were performed and compared for an episode during July-August, 2000. Ozone (O3) predictions of the SAPRC07C simulation are generally lower than those of the SAPRC99 simulation in the key areas of central and southern California, especially in areas where modeled concentrations are greater than the federal 8-hr O3 standard of 75 parts per billion (ppb) and/or when the volatile organic compound (VOC)/nitrogen oxides (NOx) ratio is less than 13. The relative changes of ozone production efficiency (OPE) against the VOC/NOx ratio at 46 sites indicate that the OPE is reduced in SAPRC07C compared with SAPRC99 at most sites by as much as approximately 22%. The SAPRC99 and SAPRC07C mechanisms respond similarly to 20% reductions in anthropogenic VOC emissions. The response of the mechanisms to 20% NOx emissions reductions can be grouped into three cases. In case 1, in which both mechanisms show a decrease in daily maximum 8-hr O3 concentration with decreasing NOx emissions, the O3 decrease in SAPRC07C is smaller. In case 2, in which both mechanisms show an increase in O3 with decreasing NOx emissions, the O3 increase is larger in SAPRC07C. In case 3, SAPRC07C simulates an increase in O3 in response to reduced NOx emissions whereas SAPRC99 simulates a decrease in O3 for the same region. As a result, the areas where NOx controls would be disbeneficial are spatially expanded in SAPRC07C. Although the results presented here are valuable for understanding differences in predictions and model response for SAPRC99 and SAPRC07C, the study did not evaluate the impact of mechanism differences in the context of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's guidance for using numerical models in demonstrating air quality attainment

  6. Photochemical nitric oxide precursors: synthesis, photochemistry, and ligand substitution kinetics of ruthenium salen nitrosyl and ruthenium salophen nitrosyl complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Works, Carmen F; Jocher, Christoph J; Bart, Gwen D; Bu, Xianhui; Ford, Peter C

    2002-07-15

    Described are syntheses, characterizations, and photochemical reactions of the nitrosyl complexes Ru(salen)(ONO)(NO) (I, salen = N,N'-ethylenebis(salicylideneiminato) dianion), Ru(salen)(Cl)(NO) (II), Ru((t)Bu(4)salen)(Cl)(NO) (III,(t)Bu(4)salen = N,N'-ethylenebis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylideneiminato) dianion), Ru((t)Bu(4)salen)(ONO)(NO) (IV), Ru((t)Bu(2)salophen)(Cl)(NO) (V, (t)Bu(2)salophen = N,N'-1,2-phenylenediaminebis(3-tert-butylsalicylideneiminato) dianion), and Ru((t)Bu(4)salophen)(Cl)(NO) (VI, (t)Bu(4)salophen = N,N'-1,2-phenylenebis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylideneiminato) dianion). Upon photolysis, these Ru(L)(X)(NO) compounds undergo NO dissociation to give the ruthenium(III) solvento products Ru(L)(X)(Sol). Quantum yields for 365 nm irradiation in acetonitrile solution fall in a fairly narrow range (0.055-0.13) but decreased at longer lambda(irr). The quantum yield (lambda(irr) = 365 nm) for NO release from the water soluble complex [Ru(salen)(H(2)O)(NO)]Cl (VII) was 0.005 in water. Kinetics of thermal back-reactions to re-form the nitrosyl complexes demonstrated strong solvent dependence with second-order rate constants k(NO) varying from 5 x 10(-4) M(-1) s(-1) for the re-formation of II in acetonitrile to 5 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) for re-formation of III in cyclohexane. Pressure and temperature effects on the back-reaction rates were also examined. These results are relevant to possible applications of photochemistry for nitric oxide delivery to biological targets, to the mechanisms by which NO reacts with metal centers to form metal-nitrosyl bonds, and to the role of photochemistry in activating similar compounds as catalysts for several organic transformations. Also described are the X-ray crystal structures of I and V.

  7. Modeling electrodialysis and a photochemical process for their integration in saline wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Borges

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation processes can be used to treat industrial wastewater containing non-biodegradable organic compounds. However, the presence of dissolved salts may inhibit or retard the treatment process. In this study, wastewater desalination by electrodialysis (ED associated with an advanced oxidation process (photo-Fenton was applied to an aqueous NaCl solution containing phenol. The influence of process variables on the demineralization factor was investigated for ED in pilot scale and a correlation was obtained between the phenol, salt and water fluxes with the driving force. The oxidation process was investigated in a laboratory batch reactor and a model based on artificial neural networks was developed by fitting the experimental data describing the reaction rate as a function of the input variables. With the experimental parameters of both processes, a dynamic model was developed for ED and a continuous model, using a plug flow reactor approach, for the oxidation process. Finally, the hybrid model simulation could validate different scenarios of the integrated system and can be used for process optimization.

  8. A PHOTOCHEMICAL MODEL FOR THE CARBON-RICH PLANET WASP-12b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopparapu, Ravi kumar; Kasting, James F. [Department of Geosciences, Penn State University, 443 Deike Building, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zahnle, Kevin J. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2012-01-20

    The hot-Jupiter WASP-12b is a heavily irradiated exoplanet in a short-period orbit around a G0-star with twice the metallicity of the Sun. A recent thermochemical equilibrium analysis based on Spitzer and ground-based infrared observations suggests that the presence of CH{sub 4} in its atmosphere and the lack of H{sub 2}O features can only be explained if the carbon-to-oxygen ratio in the planet's atmosphere is much greater than the solar ratio ([C]/[O] = 0.54). Here, we use a one-dimensional photochemical model to study the effect of disequilibrium chemistry on the observed abundances of H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4} in the WASP-12b atmosphere. We consider two cases: one with solar [C]/[O] and another with [C]/[O] = 1.08. The solar case predicts that H{sub 2}O and CO are more abundant than CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}, as expected, whereas the high [C]/[O] model shows that CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and HCN are more abundant. This indicates that the extra carbon from the high [C]/[O] model is in hydrocarbon species. H{sub 2}O photolysis is the dominant disequilibrium mechanism that alters the chemistry at higher altitudes in the solar [C]/[O] case, whereas photodissociation of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and HCN is significant in the super-solar case. Furthermore, our analysis indicates that C{sub 2}H{sub 2} is the major absorber in the atmosphere of WASP-12b and the absorption features detected near 1.6 and 8 {mu}m may be arising from C{sub 2}H{sub 2} rather than CH{sub 4}. The Hubble Space Telescope's WFC3 can resolve this discrepancy, as C{sub 2}H{sub 2} has absorption between 1.51 and 1.54 {mu}m, while CH{sub 4} does not.

  9. Propagation of uncertainty in photochemical mechanisms through urban/regional scale grid-based air pollution models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isukapalli, S.S.; Georgopoulos, P.G. [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Inst., Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Uncertainty in biogenic emission estimates and photochemical reaction rates can contribute significantly to modeling error in Photochemical Air Quality Simulation Models (PAQSMs). Uncertainties in isoprene emissions from biogenic sources, and isoprene atmospheric degradation rates have recently received considerable attention with respect to control strategy selection for the reduction of tropospheric ozone levels. This study addresses the effects of uncertainties in isoprene emissions and reaction rates on ambient ozone concentrations predicted by PAQSMs. Since PAQSMs are computationally intensive, propagation of uncertainty in reaction rate constants using traditional methods, such as Monte Carlo methods, is not computationally feasible. Here, a novel computationally efficient method of uncertainty analysis, called the Stochastic Response Surface Method (SRSM), is applied to propagate uncertainty in isoprene emissions and reaction rate parameters. Case studies include estimation of uncertainty in ozone concentrations predicted by (a) a box-model, (b) a plume trajectory model, the Reactive Plume Model (RPM), and (c) an urban-to-regional scale grid model, the Urban Airshed Model (UAM). The results of this analysis are used to characterize the relative importance of uncertainties in isoprene emissions and reaction rates on ozone levels for a wide range of conditions. Furthermore, this work demonstrates the applicability of the SRSM uncertainty propagation methodology to computationally intensive models such as the UAM.

  10. Photochemical ozone and nitric oxide formation in air-nitrogen dioxide mixtures containing sulfur dioxide or chlorine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, J.S.; Springer, G.S.; Stedman, D.H.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of sulfur dioxide and chlorine on ozone and nitric oxide concentrations in nitrogen dioxide-air mixtures were studied. The presence of 0-10 ppM SO/sub 2/ produced no change in the air mixture. Addition of 1-15 ppm chlorine increased the ozone concentration in the air mixture. A reaction model describing the interactions of chlorine and NO/sub 2/ is presented. (1 diagram, 6 graphs, 30 references, 3 tables)

  11. Seasonal photochemical transformations of nitrogen species in a forest stream and lake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Porcal

    Full Text Available The photochemical release of inorganic nitrogen from dissolved organic matter is an important source of bio-available nitrogen (N in N-limited aquatic ecosystems. We conducted photochemical experiments and used mathematical models based on pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics to quantify the photochemical transformations of individual N species and their seasonal effects on N cycling in a mountain forest stream and lake (Plešné Lake, Czech Republic. Results from laboratory experiments on photochemical changes in N speciation were compared to measured lake N budgets. Concentrations of organic nitrogen (Norg; 40-58 µmol L-1 decreased from 3 to 26% during 48-hour laboratory irradiation (an equivalent of 4-5 days of natural solar insolation due to photochemical mineralization to ammonium (NH4+ and other N forms (Nx; possibly N oxides and N2. In addition to Norg mineralization, Nx also originated from photochemical nitrate (NO3- reduction. Laboratory exposure of a first-order forest stream water samples showed a high amount of seasonality, with the maximum rates of Norg mineralization and NH4+ production in winter and spring, and the maximum NO3- reduction occurring in summer. These photochemical changes could have an ecologically significant effect on NH4+ concentrations in streams (doubling their terrestrial fluxes from soils and on concentrations of dissolved Norg in the lake. In contrast, photochemical reactions reduced NO3- fluxes by a negligible (<1% amount and had a negligible effect on the aquatic cycle of this N form.

  12. The Sensitivity of Model Ozone to Advective and Photochemical Processes in the High Latitude Winter Lower Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, A.; Kawa, S. R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Three dimensional chemistry and transport models (CTMs) contain a set of coupled continuity equations which describe the evolution of constituents such as ozone and other minor species which affect ozone. Both advection and photochemical processes contribute to constituent evolution, and a CTM provides a means to evaluate these contributions separately. Such evaluation is particularly useful when both terms are important to the modeled tendency. An example is the ozone tendency in the high latitude winter lower stratosphere, where advection tends to increase ozone, and catalytic processes involving chlorine radicals tend to decrease ozone. The Goddard three dimensional chemistry and transport model uses meteorological fields from the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System, thus the modeled ozone evolution may reproduce the observed evolution and provide a test of the model representation of photochemical processes if the transport is shown to be modeled appropriately. We have investigated the model advection further using diabatic trajectory calculations. For long lived constituents such as N2O, the model field for a particular time on a potential temperature surface is compared with a field produced by calculating 15 day back trajectories for a fixed latitude longitude grid, and mapping model N2O at the terminus of the back trajectories onto the initial grid. This provides a quantitative means to evaluate two aspects of the CTM transport: one, the model horizontal gradient between middle latitudes and the polar vortex is compared with the gradient produced using the non-diffusive trajectory calculation; two, the model vertical advection, which is produced by the divergence of the horizontal winds, is compared with the vertical transport expected from diabatic cooling.

  13. Photochirogenesis: Photochemical models on the absolute asymmetric formation of amino acids in interstellar space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinert, Cornelia; de Marcellus, Pierre; Le Sergeant d'Hendecourt, Louis

    2011-01-01

    interstellar ultraviolet (UV) circularly polarized light (CPL) induces an enantiomeric excess in chiral organic molecules in the interstellar/circumstellar media. This scenario is supported by a) the detection of amino acids in the organic residues of UV-photo-processed interstellar ice analogues, b....... Further evidence that amino acids and other molecules of prebiotic interest are asymmetrically formed in space comes from studies on the enantioselective photolysis of amino acids by UV-CPL. Also, experiments have been performed on the absolute asymmetric photochemical synthesis of enantiomer...... of how life’s precursor molecules were possibly built and how life selected the left-handed form of proteinogenic amino acids....

  14. Applying model simulation and photochemical indicators to evaluate ozone sensitivity in southern Taiwan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yen-Ping Peng1; Kang-Shin Chen2; Hsin-Kai Wang2; Chia-Hsiang Lai3; Ming-Hsun Lin4; Cheng-Haw Lee4

    2011-01-01

    Ozone sensitivity was investigated using CAMx simulations and photochemical indicator ratios at three sites (Pingtung City, ChaoChou Town, and Kenting Town) in Pingtung County in southern Taiwan during 2003 and 2004.The CAMx simulations compared fairly well with the hourly concentrations of ozone.Simulation results also showed that Pingtung City was mainly a volatile organic compounds (VOC)-sensitive regime, while Chao-Chou Town was either a VOC-sensitive or a NOx-sensitive regime, depending on the seasons.Measurements of three photochemical indicators (H202, HNO3, and NOy) were conducted, and simulated three transition ranges of H202/HNO3 (0.5-0.8), O3/HNO3 (10.3-16.2) and O3/NOy (5.7-10.8) were adopted to assess the ozone sensitive regime at the three sites.The results indicated that the three transition ranges yield consistent results with CAMx simulations at most times at Pingtung City.However, both VOC-sensitive and NOx-sensitive regimes were important at the rural site Chao-Chou Town.Kenting Town, a touring site at the southern end of Taiwan, was predominated by a NOx-sensitive regime in four seasons.

  15. Forcing of a photochemical air quality model with atmospheric fields simulated by a regional climate model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available . Sophisticated numerical models are required to describe such complexity, and need to take into account all meteorological and emission changes, as well as apply relevant dispersion and chemistry to solving variation in pollutant concentration. The capacity...

  16. Modelling photochemical pollutants in a deep urban street canyon: Application of a coupled two-box model approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian; Cai, Xiao-Ming; Bloss, William James

    2016-10-01

    Air pollution associated with road transport is a major environmental issue in urban areas. Buildings in urban areas are the artificial obstacles to atmospheric flow and cause reduced ventilation for street canyons. For a deep street canyon, there is evidence of the formation of multiple segregated vortices, which generate flow regimes such that pollutants exhibit a significant contrast between these vortices. This results in poor air ventilation conditions at pedestrian level, thereby leading to elevated pollutant levels and potential breaches of air quality limits. The hypothesis of a well-mixed deep street canyon in the practical one-box model approach is shown to be inappropriate. This study implements a simplified simulation of the canyon volume: a coupled two-box model with a reduced chemical scheme to represent the key photochemical processes with timescales similar to and smaller than the turbulent mixing timescale. The two-box model captures the significant pollutant contrast between the lower and upper parts of a deep street canyon, particularly for NO2. Core important parameters (i.e. heterogeneity coefficient, exchange velocity and box height ratio) in the two-box model approach were investigated through sensitivity tests. The two-box model results identify the emission regimes and the meteorological conditions under which NO2 in the lower canyon (i.e. the region of interest for the assessment of human health effects) is in breach of air quality standards. Higher NO2 levels were observed for the cases with higher heterogeneity coefficients (the two boxes are more segregated), with lower exchange velocities (worse ventilation conditions), or with smaller box height ratios (reduced dilution possibly due to secondary smaller eddies in the lower canyon). The performance of a one-box model using the same chemical scheme is also evaluated against the two-box model. The one-box model was found to systematically underestimate NO2 levels compared with those in

  17. Sensitivity testing of the model set-up used for calculation of photochemical ozone creation potentials (POCP) under European conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altenstedt, J.; Pleijel, K.

    1998-02-01

    Photochemical Ozone Creation Potentials (POCP) is a method to rank VOC, relative to other VOC, according to their ability to produce ground level ozone. To obtain POCP values valid under European conditions, a critical analysis of the POCP concept has been performed using the IVL photochemical trajectory model. The critical analysis has concentrated on three VOC (ethene, n-butane and o-xylene) and has analysed the effect on their POCP values when different model parameters were varied. The three species were chosen because of their different degradation mechanisms in the atmosphere and thus their different abilities to produce ozone. The model parameters which have been tested include background emissions, initial concentrations, dry deposition velocities, the features of the added point source and meteorological parameters. The critical analysis shows that the background emissions of NO{sub x} and VOC have a critical impact on the POCP values. The hour of the day for the point source emission also shows a large influence on the POCP values. Other model parameters which have been studied have not shown such large influence on the POCP values. Based on the critical analysis a model set-up for calculation of POCP is defined. The variations in POCP values due to changes in the background emissions of NO{sub x} and VOC are so large that they can not be disregarded in the calculation of POCP. It is recommended to calculate POCP ranges based on the extremes in POCP values instead of calculating site specific POCP values. Four individual emission scenarios which produced the extremes in POCP values in the analysis have been selected for future calculation of POCP ranges. The scenarios are constructed based on the emissions in Europe and the resulting POCP ranges are thus intended to be applicable within Europe 67 refs, 61 figs, 16 tabs

  18. Photochemical modeling of the Antarctic stratosphere: Observational constraints from the airborne Antarctic ozone experiment and implications for ozone behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jose M.; Sze, Nien-Dak; Ko, Malcolm K. W.

    1988-01-01

    The rapid decrease in O3 column densities observed during Antarctic spring has been attributed to several chemical mechanisms involving nitrogen, bromine, or chlorine species, to dynamical mechanisms, or to a combination of the above. Chlorine-related theories, in particular, predict greatly elevated concentrations of ClO and OClO and suppressed abundances of NO2 below 22 km. The heterogeneous reactions and phase transitions proposed by these theories could also impact the concentrations of HCl, ClNO3 and HNO3 in this region. Observations of the above species have been carried out from the ground by the National Ozone Expedition (NOZE-I, 1986, and NOZE-II, 1987), and from aircrafts by the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) during the austral spring of 1987. Observations of aerosol concentrations, size distribution and backscattering ratio from AAOE, and of aerosol extinction coefficients from the SAM-II satellite can also be used to deduce the altitude and temporal behavior of surfaces which catalyze heterogeneous mechanisms. All these observations provide important constraints on the photochemical processes suggested for the spring Antarctic stratosphere. Results are presented for the concentrations and time development of key trace gases in the Antarctic stratosphere, utilizing the AER photochemical model. This model includes complete gas-phase photochemistry, as well as heterogeneous reactions. Heterogeneous chemistry is parameterized in terms of surface concentrations of aerosols, collision frequencies between gas molecules and aerosol surfaces, concentrations of HCl/H2O in the frozen particles, and probability of reaction per collision (gamma). Values of gamma are taken from the latest laboratory measurements. The heterogeneous chemistry and phase transitions are assumed to occur between 12 and 22 km. The behavior of trace species at higher altitudes is calculated by the AER 2-D model without heterogeneous chemistry. Calculations are performed for

  19. Catalysis of Photochemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albini, A.

    1986-01-01

    Offers a classification system of catalytic effects in photochemical reactions, contrasting characteristic properties of photochemical and thermal reactions. Discusses catalysis and sensitization, examples of catalyzed reactions of excepted states, complexing ground state substrates, and catalysis of primary photoproducts. (JM)

  20. Evaluation of emission control strategies to reduce ozone pollution in the Paso del Norte region using a photochemical air quality modeling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Victor Hugo

    Air pollution emissions control strategies to reduce ozone precursor pollutants are analyzed by applying a photochemical modeling system. Simulations of air quality conditions during an ozone episode which occurred in June, 2006 are undertaken by increasing or reducing area source emissions in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico. Two air pollutants are primary drivers in the formation of tropospheric ozone. Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) undergo multiple chemical reactions under favorable meteorological conditions to form ozone, which is a secondary pollutant that irritates respiratory systems in sensitive individuals especially the elderly and young children. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency established National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) to limit ambient air pollutants such as ozone by establishing an 8-hour average concentration of 0.075 ppm as the threshold at which a violation of the standard occurs. Ozone forms primarily due reactions in the troposphere of NOx and VOC emissions generated primarily by anthropogenic sources in urban regions. Data from emissions inventories indicate area sources account for ˜15 of NOx and ˜45% of regional VOC emissions. Area sources include gasoline stations, automotive paint bodyshops and nonroad mobile sources. Multiplicity of air pollution emissions sources provides an opportunity to investigate and potentially implement air quality improvement strategies to reduce emissions which contribute to elevated ozone concentrations. A baseline modeling scenario was established using the CAMx photochemical air quality model from which a series of sensitivity analyses for evaluating air quality control strategies were conducted. Modifications to area source emissions were made by varying NOx and / or VOC emissions in the areas of particular interest. Model performance was assessed for each sensitivity analysis. Normalized bias (NB) and normalized error (NE) were used to identify

  1. Modeling study of vibrational photochemical isotope enrichment. [HBr + Cl/sub 2/; HCl + Br/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badcock, C.C.; Hwang, W.C.; Kalsch, J.F.

    1978-09-29

    Chemical kinetic modeling studies of vibrational-photochemical isotope enrichment have been performed on two systems: Model (I), H/sup 79/Br(H/sup 81/Br) + Cl/sub 2/ and, Model (II), H/sup 37/Cl(H/sup 35/Cl) + Br. Pulsed laser excitation was modeled to the first excited vibrational level of H/sup 79/Br in Model I and the first and second excited vibrational levels of both HCl isotopes in Model II. These are prototype systems of exoergic (Model I) and endoergic (Model II) reactions. The effects on enrichment of varying the external parameters (pressure, laser intensity) and the internal parameters (rate constants for V-V exchange and excited-state reactions) were examined. Studies of these prototype systems indicate that a favorable reaction for enrichment, with isotopically-specific excitation and a significantly accelerated vibrationally-excited-state reaction should have the following properties: the reaction from v = 0 should be only moderately exoergic, and the most favorable coreactant should be a polyatomic species, such as alkyl radical. Direct excitation of the reacting vibrational level is at least an order of magnitude more favorable for enrichment than is population by energy transfer. Enrichment of the minor isotope by these processes is more effective than is major isotope enrichment. Within limits, increased laser intensity is beneficial. However, for sequential excitation of a second vibrational level, major isotope enrichment can be diminished by high populations of the first vibrational level.

  2. Oxidative desulfurization: kinetic modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, S; Uppaluri, R; Purkait, M K

    2009-01-30

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H(2)O(2) over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel.

  3. Photochemical Oxidation of a Manganese(III) Complex with Oxygen and Toluene Derivatives to Form a Manganese(V)-Oxo Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jieun; Ohkubo, Kei; Prokop-Prigge, Katharine A.; Neu, Heather M.; Goldberg, David P.; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-01-01

    Visible light photoirradiation of an oxygen-saturated benzonitrile solution of a manganese(III) corrolazine complex [(TBP8Cz)MnIII (1): [TBP8Cz = octakis(p-tert-butylphenyl)corrolazinato3−] in the presence of toluene derivatives resulted in formation of the manganese(V)-oxo complex [(TBP8Cz)MnV(O)]. The photochemical oxidation of (TBP8Cz)MnIII with O2 and hexamethylbenzene (HMB) led to the isosbestic conversion of 1 to (TBP8Cz)MnV(O), accompanied by the selective oxidation of HMB to pentamethylbenzyl alcohol (87%). The formation rate of (TBP8Cz)MnV(O) increased with methyl group substitution, from toluene, p-xylene, mesitylene, durene, pentamethylbenzene, up to hexamethylbenzene. Deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) were observed for toluene (KIE = 5.4) and mesitylene (KIE = 5.3). Femtosecond laser flash photolysis of (TBP8Cz)MnIII revealed the formation of a tripquintet excited state, which was rapidly converted to a tripseptet excited state. The tripseptet excited state was shown to be the key, activated state that reacts with O2 via a diffusion-limited rate constant. The data allow for a mechanism to be proposed in which the tripseptet excited state reacts with O2 to give the putative (TBP8Cz)MnIV(O2•−), which then abstracts a hydrogen atom from the toluene derivatives in the rate-determining step. The mechanism of hydrogen abstraction is discussed by comparison of the reactivity with the hydrogen abstraction from the same toluene derivatives by cumylperoxyl radical. Taken together, the data suggest a new catalytic method is accessible for the selective oxidation of C-H bonds with O2 and light, and the first evidence for catalytic oxidation of C–H bonds was obtained with 10-methyl-9,10-dihydroacridine as a substrate. PMID:24219426

  4. Photochemically deposited nano-Ag/sol-gel TiO2-In2O3 mixed oxide mesoporous-assembled nanocrystals for photocatalytic dye degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreethawong, Thammanoon; Ngamsinlapasathian, Supachai; Yoshikawa, Susumu

    2014-05-01

    This work focused on the improvement of the photocatalytic activity for Congo Red (CR) azo dye degradation of mesoporous-assembled 0.95 TiO2-0.05 In2O3 mixed oxide photocatalyst (with a TiO2-to-In2O3 molar ratio of 0.95:0.05) by loading with Ag nanoparticles. The mesoporous-assembled 0.95TiO2-0.05In2O3 mixed oxide photocatalyst was synthesized by a hydrolytic sol-gel method with the aid of a structure-directing surfactant, prior to loading with various Ag contents (0.5-2 wt.%) by a photochemical deposition method. The optimum Ag loading content was found to be 1.5 wt.%, exhibiting a great increase in photocatalytic CR dye degradation activity. The 1.5 wt.% Ag-loaded 0.95TiO2-0.05In2O3 mixed oxide photocatalyst was further applied for the CR dye degradation in the presence of water hardness. Different types (Ca2+ and Ca2+ -Mg2+ mixture) and concentrations (200 and 500 mg/l) of water hardness were investigated. The results showed that the water hardness reduced the photocatalytic CR dye degradation activity, particularly for the extremely hard water with 500 mg/l of Ca2+ -Mg2+ mixture. The adjustment of initial solution pH of the CR dye-containing hard water to an appropriate value was found to improve the photocatalytic CR dye degradation activity under the identical reaction conditions.

  5. Effects of Edaravone, a Free Radical Scavenger, on Photochemically Induced Cerebral Infarction in a Rat Hemiplegic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ikeda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Edaravone is a free radical scavenger that protects the adjacent cortex during cerebral infarction. We created a hemiparetic model of cerebral thrombosis from a photochemically induced infarction with the photosensitive dye, rose bengal, in rats. We examined the effects of edaravone on recovery in the model. A total of 36 adult Wistar rats were used. The right sensorimotor area was irradiated with green light with a wavelength of 533 nm (10 mm diameter, and the rose bengal was injected intravenously to create an infarction. The edaravone group was injected intraperitoneally with edaravone (3 mg/kg, and the control group was injected with saline. The recovery process of the hemiplegia was evaluated with the 7-step scale of Fenny. The infarcted areas were measured after fixation. The recovery of the paralysis in the edaravone-treated group was significantly earlier than that in the untreated group. Seven days later, both groups were mostly recovered and had scores of 7, and the infarction region was significantly smaller in the edaravone-treated group. Edaravone reduced the infarction area and promoted the functional recovery of hemiparesis from cerebral thrombosis in a rat model. These findings suggest that edaravone treatment would be effective in clinical patients recovering from cerebral infarction.

  6. 2D photochemical modeling of Saturn's stratosphere. Part I: Seasonal variation of atmospheric composition without meridional transport

    CERN Document Server

    Hue, Vincent; Dobrijevic, Michel; Hersant, Franck; Greathouse, Thomas K

    2015-01-01

    Saturn's axial tilt of 26.7{\\deg} produces seasons in a similar way as on Earth. Both the stratospheric temperature and composition are affected by this latitudinally varying insolation along Saturn's orbital path. A new time dependent 2D photochemical model is presented to study the seasonal evolution of Saturn's stratospheric composition. This study focuses on the impact of the seasonally variable thermal field on the main stratospheric C2 hydrocarbon chemistry (C2H2 and C2H6) using a realistic radiative climate model. Meridional mixing and advective processes are implemented in the model but turned off in the present study for the sake of simplicity. The results are compared to a simple study case where a latitudinally and temporally steady thermal field is assumed. Our simulations suggest that, when the seasonally variable thermal field is accounted for, the downward diffusion of the seasonally produced hydrocarbons is faster due to the seasonal compression of the atmospheric column during winter. This ef...

  7. Photochemical activation of ruthenium(II)-pyridylamine complexes having a pyridine-N-oxide pendant toward oxygenation of organic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Takahiko; Nakayama, Kazuya; Sakaguchi, Miyuki; Ogura, Takashi; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2011-11-09

    Ruthenium(II)-acetonitrile complexes having η(3)-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (TPA) with an uncoordinated pyridine ring and diimine such as 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) and 2,2'-bipyrimidine (bpm), [Ru(II)(η(3)-TPA)(diimine)(CH(3)CN)](2+), reacted with m-chloroperbenzoic acid to afford corresponding Ru(II)-acetonitrile complexes having an uncoordinated pyridine-N-oxide arm, [Ru(II)(η(3)-TPA-O)(diimine)(CH(3)CN)](2+), with retention of the coordination environment. Photoirradiation of the acetonitrile complexes having diimine and the η(3)-TPA with the uncoordinated pyridine-N-oxide arm afforded a mixture of [Ru(II)(TPA)(diimine)](2+), intermediate-spin (S = 1) Ru(IV)-oxo complex with uncoordinated pyridine arm, and intermediate-spin Ru(IV)-oxo complex with uncoordinated pyridine-N-oxide arm. A Ru(II) complex bearing an oxygen-bound pyridine-N-oxide as a ligand and bpm as a diimine ligand was also obtained, and its crystal structure was determined by X-ray crystallography. Femtosecond laser flash photolysis of the isolated O-coordinated Ru(II)-pyridine-N-oxide complex has been investigated to reveal the photodynamics. The Ru(IV)-oxo complex with an uncoordinated pyridine moiety was alternatively prepared by reaction of the corresponding acetonitrile complex with 2,6-dichloropyridine-N-oxide (Cl(2)py-O) to identify the Ru(IV)-oxo species. The formation of Ru(IV)-oxo complexes was concluded to proceed via intermolecular oxygen atom transfer from the uncoordinated pyridine-N-oxide to a Ru(II) center on the basis of the results of the reaction with Cl(2)py-O and the concentration dependence of the consumption of the starting Ru(II) complexes having the uncoordinated pyridine-N-oxide moiety. Oxygenation reactions of organic substrates by [Ru(II)(η(3)-TPA-O)(diimine)(CH(3)CN)](2+) were examined under irradiation (at 420 ± 5 nm) and showed selective allylic oxygenation of cyclohexene to give cyclohexen-1-ol and cyclohexen-1-one and cumene oxygenation to afford cumyl alcohol

  8. Fabrication of copper decorated tungsten oxide–titanium oxide nanotubes by photochemical deposition technique and their photocatalytic application under visible light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momeni, Mohamad Mohsen, E-mail: mm.momeni@cc.iut.ac.ir

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: Schematic presentation of the pretreatment method of titanium sheets and producing process of WTNs and Cu/WTNs films on titanium foils. - Highlights: • WO{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (WTNs) were synthesized by one-step electrochemical anodizing. • Copper decorated WO{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (Cu/WTNs) were successfully prepared by photochemical deposition. • Photocatalytic activity of Cu/WTNs is higher than that of bare WTNs. • These photocatalysts showed good stability and it could be recycled several times without significant loss of its activity. - Abstract: Copper decorated WO{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (Cu/WTNs) with a high photocatalytic activity were prepared by anodizing and photochemical deposition. Highly ordered WO{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (WTNs) on pure titanium foils were successfully fabricated by electrochemical anodizing and copper deposited on these nanotubes (Cu/WTNs) by photoreduction method. The resulting samples were characterized by various methods. Only the anatase phase was detected by X-ray diffraction analysis. The presence of copper in the structure of thin films was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. The extension of optical absorption into the visible region of as-prepared films was indicated by UV/Vis spectroscopy. The degradation of methylene blue was used as a model reaction to evaluate the photocatalytic activity of the obtained samples. Results showed that the photocatalytic activity of Cu/WTNs samples is higher than bare WTNs sample. Kinetic research showed that the reaction rate constant of Cu/WTNs is approximately 2.5 times higher than the apparent reaction rate constant of bare WTNs. These results not only offer an economical method for constructing Cu/WTNs photocatalysts, but also shed new insight on the rational design of a low cost and high-efficiency photocatalyst for environmental remediation.

  9. A mathematical model of non-photochemical quenching to study short-term light memory in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszyńska, Anna; Heidari, Somayyeh; Jahns, Peter; Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    Plants are permanently exposed to rapidly changing environments, therefore it is evident that they had to evolve mechanisms enabling them to dynamically adapt to such fluctuations. Here we study how plants can be trained to enhance their photoprotection and elaborate on the concept of the short-term illumination memory in Arabidopsis thaliana. By monitoring fluorescence emission dynamics we systematically observe the extent of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) after previous light exposure to recognise and quantify the memory effect. We propose a simplified mathematical model of photosynthesis that includes the key components required for NPQ activation, which allows us to quantify the contribution to photoprotection by those components. Due to its reduced complexity, our model can be easily applied to study similar behavioural changes in other species, which we demonstrate by adapting it to the shadow-tolerant plant Epipremnum aureum. Our results indicate that a basic mechanism of short-term light memory is preserved. The slow component, accumulation of zeaxanthin, accounts for the amount of memory remaining after relaxation in darkness, while the fast one, antenna protonation, increases quenching efficiency. With our combined theoretical and experimental approach we provide a unifying framework describing common principles of key photoprotective mechanisms across species in general, mathematical terms.

  10. Water-Mediated Photochemical Treatments for Low-Temperature Passivation of Metal-Oxide Thin-Film Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jae Sang; Jo, Jeong-Wan; Kang, Jingu; Jeong, Chan-Yong; Jeong, Hu Young; Kim, Sung Kyu; Kim, Kwanpyo; Kwon, Hyuck-In; Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Myung-Gil; Park, Sung Kyu

    2016-04-27

    The low-temperature electrical passivation of an amorphous oxide semiconductor (AOS) thin-film transistor (TFT) is achieved by a deep ultraviolet (DUV) light irradiation-water treatment-DUV irradiation (DWD) method. The water treatment of the first DUV-annealed amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin film is likely to induce the preferred adsorption of water molecules at the oxygen vacancies and leads to subsequent hydroxide formation in the bulk a-IGZO films. Although the water treatment initially degraded the electrical performance of the a-IGZO TFTs, the second DUV irradiation on the water-treated devices may enable a more complete metal-oxygen-metal lattice formation while maintaining low oxygen vacancies in the oxide films. Overall, the stable and dense metal-oxygen-metal (M-O-M) network formation could be easily achieved at low temperatures (below 150 °C). The successful passivation of structural imperfections in the a-IGZO TFTs, such as hydroxyl group (OH-) and oxygen vacancies, mainly results in the enhanced electrical performances of the DWD-processed a-IGZO TFTs (on/off current ratio of 8.65 × 10(9), subthreshold slope of 0.16 V/decade, an average mobility of >6.94 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), and a bias stability of ΔVTH < 2.5 V), which show more than a 30% improvement over the simple DUV-treated a-IGZO TFTs.

  11. Determination of thiomersal by flow injection coupled with microwave-assisted photochemical online oxidative decomposition of organic mercury and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanella, Beatrice; Onor, Massimo; Mascherpa, Marco Carlo; D’Ulivo, Alessandro [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Ferrari, Carlo [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, INO–UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Bramanti, Emilia, E-mail: bramanti@pi.iccom.cnr.it [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-12-04

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Thiomersal was determined on line using FI-MW/UV-CVGAFS. •MW/UV allows a “green” on line oxidation of organic mercury to Hg{sup II}. •Each measure requires less than 5 min with a LOD of 3 ng mL{sup −1} (as mercury). •Hg concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranges between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL{sup −1}. -- Abstract: We developed a flow injection (FI) method for the determination of thiomersal (sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate, C{sub 9}H{sub 9}HgNaO{sub 2}S) based on the UV/microwave (MW) photochemical, online oxidation of organic mercury, followed by cold vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVG-AFS) detection. Thiomersal was quantitatively converted in the MW/UV process to Hg(II), with a yield of 97 ± 3%. This reaction was followed by the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) performed in a knotted reaction coil with NaBH{sub 4} solution, and AFS detection in an Ar/H{sub 2} miniaturized flame. The method was linear in the 0.01–2 μg mL{sup −1} range, with a LOD of 0.003 μg mL{sup −1}. This method has been applied to the determination of thiomersal in ophthalmic solutions, with recoveries ranging between 97% and 101%. We found a mercury concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranging between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL{sup −1}.

  12. Engineering photochemical smog through convection towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, S.; Prueitt, M.L.; Bossert, J.E.; Mroz, E.J.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Jacobson, M.Z.; Turco, R.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Dept.

    1995-02-01

    Reverse convection towers have attracted attention as a medium for cleansing modern cities. Evaporation of an aqueous mist injected at the tower opening could generate electrical power by creating descent, and simultaneously scavenge unsightly and unhealthful particulates. The study offered here assesses the influence to tower water droplets on the photochemical component of Los Angeles type smog. The primary radical chain initiator OH is likely removed into aqueous phases well within the residence time of air in the tower, and then reacts away rapidly. Organics do not dissolve, but nighttime hydrolysis of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} depletes the nitrogen oxides. A lack of HOx would slow hydrocarbon oxidation and so also ozone production. Lowering of NOx would also alter ozone production rates, but the direction is uncertain. SO{sub 2} is available in sufficient quantities in some urban areas to react with stable oxidants, and if seawater were the source of the mist, the high pH would lead to fast sulfur oxidation kinetics. With an accommodation coefficient of 10{sup {minus}3}, however, ozone may not enter the aqueous phase efficiently. Even if ozone is destroyed or its production suppressed, photochemical recovery times are on the order of hours, so that tower processing must be centered on a narrow midday time window. The cost of building the number of structures necessary for this brief turnover could be prohibitive. The increase in humidity accompanying mist evaporation could be controlled with condensers, but might otherwise counteract visibility enhancements by recreating aqueous aerosols. Quantification of the divergent forcings convection towers must exert upon the cityscape would call for coupled three dimensional modeling of transport, microphysics, and photochemistry. 112 refs.

  13. A method to represent ozone response to large changes in precursor emissions using high-order sensitivity analysis in photochemical models

    OpenAIRE

    G. Yarwood; Emery, C; Jung, J.; U. Nopmongcol; T. Sakulyanotvittaya

    2013-01-01

    Photochemical grid models (PGMs) are used to simulate tropospheric ozone and quantify its response to emission changes. PGMs are often applied for annual simulations to provide both maximum concentrations for assessing compliance with air quality standards and frequency distributions for assessing human exposure. Efficient methods for computing ozone at different emission levels can improve the quality of ozone air quality management efforts. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using t...

  14. A method to represent ozone response to large changes in precursor emissions using high-order sensitivity analysis in photochemical models

    OpenAIRE

    G. Yarwood; Emery, C; Jung, J.; U. Nopmongcol; Sakulyanontvittaya, T.

    2013-01-01

    Photochemical grid models (PGMs) are used to simulate tropospheric ozone and quantify its response to emission changes. PGMs are often applied for annual simulations to provide both maximum concentrations for assessing compliance with air quality standards and frequency distributions for assessing human exposure. Efficient methods for computing ozone at different emission levels can improve the quality of ozone air quality management efforts. This study demonstrates the feas...

  15. Photochemical processing of aqueous atmospheric brown carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric Brown Carbon (BrC is a collective term for light absorbing organic compounds in the atmosphere. While the identification of BrC and its formation mechanisms is currently a central effort in the community, little is known about the atmospheric removal processes of aerosol BrC. As a result, we report a series of laboratory studies of photochemical processing of BrC in the aqueous phase, by direct photolysis and OH oxidation. Solutions of ammonium sulfate mixed with glyoxal (GLYAS or methylglyoxal (MGAS are used as surrogates for a class of secondary BrC mediated by imine intermediates. Three nitrophenol species, namely 4-nitrophenol, 5-nitroguaiacol and 4-nitrocatechol, were investigated as a class of water soluble BrC originating from biomass burning. Photochemical processing induced significant changes in the absorptive properties of BrC. The imine-mediated BrC solutions exhibited rapid photo-bleaching with both direct photolysis and OH oxidation, with atmospheric half-lives of minutes to a few hours. The nitrophenol species exhibited photo-enhancement in the visible range during direct photolysis and the onset of OH oxidation, but rapid photo-bleaching was induced by further OH exposure on an atmospheric timescale of an hour or less. To illustrate atmospheric relevance of this work, we also performed direct photolysis experiments on water soluble organic carbon extracted from biofuel combustion samples and observed rapid changes in optical properties of these samples as well. Overall, these experiments indicate that atmospheric models need to incorporate representations of atmospheric processing of BrC species to accurately model their radiative impacts.

  16. Photochemical processing of aqueous atmospheric brown carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zhao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric brown carbon (BrC is a collective term for light absorbing organic compounds in the atmosphere. While the identification of BrC and its formation mechanisms is currently a central effort in the community, little is known about the atmospheric removal processes of aerosol BrC. As a result, we report on a series of laboratory studies of photochemical processing of BrC in the aqueous phase, by direct photolysis and OH oxidation. Solutions of ammonium sulfate mixed with glyoxal (GLYAS or methylglyoxal (MGAS are used as surrogates for a class of secondary BrC mediated by imine intermediates. Three nitrophenol species, namely 4-nitrophenol, 5-nitroguaiacol and 4-nitrocatechol, were investigated as a class of water-soluble BrC originating from biomass burning. Photochemical processing induced significant changes in the absorptive properties of BrC. The imine-mediated BrC solutions exhibited rapid photo-bleaching with both direct photolysis and OH oxidation, with atmospheric half-lives of minutes to a few hours. The nitrophenol species exhibited photo-enhancement in the visible range during direct photolysis and the onset of OH oxidation, but rapid photo-bleaching was induced by further OH exposure on an atmospheric timescale of an hour or less. To illustrate the atmospheric relevance of this work, we also performed direct photolysis experiments on water-soluble organic carbon extracted from biofuel combustion samples and observed rapid changes in the optical properties of these samples as well. Overall, these experiments indicate that atmospheric models need to incorporate representations of atmospheric processing of BrC species to accurately model their radiative impacts.

  17. Photochemical processing of aqueous atmospheric brown carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Huang, L.; Li, X.; Yang, F.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric brown carbon (BrC) is a collective term for light absorbing organic compounds in the atmosphere. While the identification of BrC and its formation mechanisms is currently a central effort in the community, little is known about the atmospheric removal processes of aerosol BrC. As a result, we report on a series of laboratory studies of photochemical processing of BrC in the aqueous phase, by direct photolysis and OH oxidation. Solutions of ammonium sulfate mixed with glyoxal (GLYAS) or methylglyoxal (MGAS) are used as surrogates for a class of secondary BrC mediated by imine intermediates. Three nitrophenol species, namely 4-nitrophenol, 5-nitroguaiacol and 4-nitrocatechol, were investigated as a class of water-soluble BrC originating from biomass burning. Photochemical processing induced significant changes in the absorptive properties of BrC. The imine-mediated BrC solutions exhibited rapid photo-bleaching with both direct photolysis and OH oxidation, with atmospheric half-lives of minutes to a few hours. The nitrophenol species exhibited photo-enhancement in the visible range during direct photolysis and the onset of OH oxidation, but rapid photo-bleaching was induced by further OH exposure on an atmospheric timescale of an hour or less. To illustrate the atmospheric relevance of this work, we also performed direct photolysis experiments on water-soluble organic carbon extracted from biofuel combustion samples and observed rapid changes in the optical properties of these samples as well. Overall, these experiments indicate that atmospheric models need to incorporate representations of atmospheric processing of BrC species to accurately model their radiative impacts.

  18. Analysis of observations and modeling of criteria pollutants and photochemical age indicators during MILAGRO at Tenango del Aire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Suarez, L. G.

    2009-04-01

    We report measurements and modeling results from the mobile air quality monitoring unit and other instruments in Tenango del Aire (TA). Tenango del Aire is a small town in the mountain pass between the Siera de Chichinautzin and the Popocatepel and Iztachiuatl Volcanos. The pass joins the Valley of Mexico and the Valley of Cuernavaca. TA was the most shouter and equipped site on that flank of MILAGRO. We compare model results and measurements of O3, NOx, NOy, CO, SO2, CH2O, mixing high and some VOC speciated analysis. Indicators of photochemical age as O3/CO, NOy/CO, are also reported. Mean hourly averages for all the campaign are reported. Specific episodes are also analyzed in depth. Evidence of a polluted regional background atmosphere is shown. The basic average surface transport patern was as follows, from 09:00 to 12:00 winds from the north arrive to TA bringing fresh polluted parcels from the highly populated sowtheast parts of the MCMA. Between 12:00 and 13:00 hours a shift of wind direction brings back those or parts of those parcels and parcels farer away. Most of the times, this conditions continues until next morning when for few hours air again drains south from the valley of Mexico. Ozone reaches a maximum value between 12:00 and 13:00, and these values stay still until after 18:00. Average value of this plateau is 80 ppb. During this plateau indicators as O3/CO and NOy/CO show that air parcels passing over TA are photochemicaly aged.

  19. Large-scale and green synthesis of octahedral flower-like cupric oxide nanocrystals with enhanced photochemical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shi-Kuo; Pan, Yu-Yi; Wu, Mi; Huang, Fang-Zhi; Li, Chuan-Hao, E-mail: lichuanhao1983@163.com; Shen, Yu-Hua, E-mail: s_yuhua@163.com

    2014-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A green method is reported for large-scale synthesis of CuO nanocrystals via a coordination-deposition technique. • Flower-like nanostructure can be rationally tailored by adjusting reaction parameters. • Flower-like nanostructure can be obtained in a wide reaction solution volume range. • Uniform flower-like nanocrystal film assembled by oil–water interfacial self-assembly method exhibits excellent PEC performance. - Abstract: In this work, a large-scale and green method is reported for the facile synthesis of octahedral flower-like CuO nanocrystals via a coordination-deposition route by using Fehling regents. Not any harmful organic chemicals were used during the reaction period. The obtained hierarchical nanostructure can be rationally tailored by varying the concentration of tartrate ions and reaction time. The typical flower-like CuO nanocrystals in the range of 200–250 nm are consisted of numerous small crystalline whiskers, which present a porous surface with a specific surface area of 32.12 m{sup 2}/g and a narrow band gap of 1.5 eV. Importantly, the flower-like CuO nanocrystals show an enhanced photocatalytic activity toward decomposing Rhodamine B (RhB) molecules. The degradation rate is about 87.9% in 40 min under visible light irradiation, which is about 2.5 times for the commercial CuO powers (35.2%). Moreover, the uniform flower-like monolayered CuO film exhibits an excellent photoelectrochemical (PEC) performance with a maximum photocurrent density of 58.8 μA/cm{sup 2}, which is nearly five times higher than the commercial CuO film. This novel synthesis approach provides a large-scale and green protocol for synthesizing hierarchical metal oxide nanocrystals that are useful for photocatalysis, PEC water splitting and photovoltaic device.

  20. Photochemical Air Quality Modeling for California By U.S. EPA and Carb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J.; Cai, C.; Baker, K. R.; Avise, J.; Kaduwela, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    Multiple areas of California have been designated as nonattainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone and PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter CARB) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Both simulations were conducted at 4-km horizontal resolution and cover the May-June 2010 period when special study measurements were made. Despite differences in emissions, meteorology, boundary conditions, and chemical mechanisms, the CMAQ predictions by EPA and CARB were generally similar with good model performance for ozone at key monitors. Differences in predictions for PM2.5 components were identified in some locations and attributed to differences in emissions and other platform elements. Our results suggest areas where model development would be beneficial.

  1. Contribution of regional-scale fire events to ozone and PM2.5 air quality estimated by photochemical modeling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, K. R.; Woody, M. C.; Tonnesen, G. S.; Hutzell, W.; Pye, H. O. T.; Beaver, M. R.; Pouliot, G.; Pierce, T.

    2016-09-01

    Two specific fires from 2011 are tracked for local to regional scale contribution to ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) using a freely available regulatory modeling system that includes the BlueSky wildland fire emissions tool, Spare Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) model, Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) meteorological model, and Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) photochemical grid model. The modeling system was applied to track the contribution from a wildfire (Wallow) and prescribed fire (Flint Hills) using both source sensitivity and source apportionment approaches. The model estimated fire contribution to primary and secondary pollutants are comparable using source sensitivity (brute-force zero out) and source apportionment (Integrated Source Apportionment Method) approaches. Model estimated O3 enhancement relative to CO is similar to values reported in literature indicating the modeling system captures the range of O3 inhibition possible near fires and O3 production both near the fire and downwind. O3 and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) are formed in the fire plume and transported downwind along with highly reactive VOC species such as formaldehyde and acetaldehyde that are both emitted by the fire and rapidly produced in the fire plume by VOC oxidation reactions. PAN and aldehydes contribute to continued downwind O3 production. The transport and thermal decomposition of PAN to nitrogen oxides (NOX) enables O3 production in areas limited by NOX availability and the photolysis of aldehydes to produce free radicals (HOX) causes increased O3 production in NOX rich areas. The modeling system tends to overestimate hourly surface O3 at routine rural monitors in close proximity to the fires when the model predicts elevated fire impacts on O3 and Hazard Mapping System (HMS) data indicates possible fire impact. A sensitivity simulation in which solar radiation and photolysis rates were more aggressively attenuated by aerosol in the plume

  2. A modelling study of photochemical regimes over Europe: robustness and variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Beekmann

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The variability of the relative sensitivity to volatile organic compounds (VOC or NOx emissions, the chemical regime, over Europe during summers 2001 to 2003 is simulated with a regional scale transport-chemistry model. The robustness of chemical regimes is shown. A VOC sensitive regime over North-Western Europe and a mainly NOx sensitive regime over the Mediterranean basin and Eastern Europe are found, confirming earlier published results. The chemical regime time variability, its robustness to several environmental factors (seasonality, interannual variability and to model uncertainty are thoroughly analysed. The chemical regime spatial structure only slightly depends on the ozone target considered (daily ozone maximum or AOT40, SOMO35, .... Differences between particular years and summer months are weak. Day to day variability is significant but does not change the occurrence of one or another chemical regime over North-Western Europe and the Mediterranean basin. Expected decreases in anthropogenic NOx emissions over Europe since the last and for the next few decades have shifted and will shift chemical regimes to more NOx sensitive. The predictive and explanatory use of chemical regime indicator species is also investigated. For all cases but near ship tracks over the Mediterranean basin, the spatial pattern of chemical regimes appears to be robust with respect to model uncertainty.

  3. The solar flare of 18 August 1979: Incoherent scatter radar data and photochemical model comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinn, J.; Sutherland, C.D.; Fenimore, E.E.; Ganguly, S.

    1988-04-01

    Measurements of electron density at seven D-region altidues were made with the Arecibo radar during a Class-X solar flare on 18 August 1979. Measurements of solar x-ray fluxes during the same period were available from the GOES-2 satellite (0.5 to 4 /angstrom/ and 1 to 8 /angstrom/) and from ISEE-3 (in four bands between 26 and 400 keV). From the x-ray flux data we computed ionization rates in the D-region and the associated chemical changes, using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and diffusion model (with 836 chemical reactions and 19 vertical levels). The computed electron densities matched the data fairly well after we had adjusted the rate coefficients of two reactions. We discuss the hierarchies among the many flare-induced chemical reactions in two altitude ranges within the D-region and the effects of adjusting several other rate coefficients. 51 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Photochemically induced spinal ischaemia: a model of spinal cord trauma in the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olby, Natasha J.; Blakemore, W. F.

    1995-05-01

    Focal thrombosis was induced in the dorsal funiculus of the rat spinal cord by exposing the cord to light following intravenous injection of the photoactive dye, rose bengal. The light source was a 599 standing wave dye laser, pumped by an Innova 70 - 4 argon ion laser (Coherent Ltd, Cambridge, UK) and the light was delivered to the operative site via an optical fiber. The histological characteristics of the development and resolution of the lesion have been studied. Forty rats were examined with light and electron microscopy at various time points between 30 minutes and one month after irradiation and the lesion length was measured. Platelet aggregation, increased extracellular space in the white matter and vacuolation of the neurones and glia of the grey matter were present 30 minutes after injury. Progressive necrosis of the white and grey matter developed over the subsequent 24 hours to produce a fusiform lesion that occupied the dorsal funiculus and dorsal horns of the spinal cord at its center and tapered cranially and caudally along the dorsal columns for a total distance of seven millimeters. By one month after injury the area of necrosis had become a cyst lined by astrocytes ventrolaterally and meningeal cells dorsally. Measurements of lesion length showed a variability of 26%. This model of spinal cord trauma produces a lesion that is sufficiently reproducible to be suitable for performing studies aimed at tissue preservation and repair.

  5. Photochemical model evaluation of the surface ozone impact of a power plant in a heavily industrialized area of southwestern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castell, N; Mantilla, E; Salvador, R; Stein, A F; Millán, M

    2010-01-01

    The characterization and evaluation of the impact that an industry is likely to have on the surrounding ozone levels is one of many problems confronting air quality managers and should be taken into consideration when authorizing its installation. The correct management of an environment, in terms of monitoring existing industries and planning new activities, requires adequate knowledge of the processes sustained by the industrial emissions therein. This paper explores the improvements in air quality management arising from taking into account the uncertainties involved in the photochemical modeling of the impact of an industry on surface ozone levels. For this, we evaluate the impact on ozone levels of a power plant located in an industrial area of southwestern Spain (Huelva). The evaluation takes into account the effects of both emissions' uncertainty and the non-linear chemistry between ozone and its precursors, thus providing a probable range of increase over the normative values (hourly and 8-hourly maximums) defined in the European Directive. The proposed methodology is easily applicable by air quality managers. Advanced modeling techniques were used for the power plant assessment, MM5 atmospheric modeling system, and air quality model CAMx. The results from meteorology and ozone forecasts have shown acceptable agreement with the observations. The spatial distribution of the impact is found to be strongly determined by mesoscale meteorological processes, which are reinforced by the local orography; there is also a marked temporal evolution. The industrial plume is observed to induce a decrease (or maintenance) of the ozone levels near the emission source (0-10km), and an increase in the ozone concentrations farther away (with maximums between 10 and 50km). In fact, in the meteorological episodes with a predominance of local breeze circulations, impacts have been detected at distances of more than 100km from the emission source. Sensitivity of the power plant

  6. Realizing the recognition features of model antipsychotic compounds by important protein: Photochemical and computational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Fei; Peng, Wei; Chao, Ming-Wei; Peng, Yu-Kui

    2015-07-01

    Phenothiazine and its derivatives are the most effective antipsychotic drugs. They have been used in the treatment of serious mental and emotional symptoms including bipolar disorder, organic psychoses, psychotic depression and schizophrenia. However, these drugs cause serious side effects such as akathisia, hyperprolactinaemia and neuroleptic malignant syndrome. In this work we investigated the molecular recognition of two typical phenothiazine compounds, phenosafranin and safranin O by the most pivotal heme protein hemoglobin using steady state and time-resolved fluorescence, extrinsic 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescent probe, circular dichroism (CD) along with computational modeling. Results show phenothiazines complex with protein via formation of adducts at 298 K with moderate strengths of 3.555×10(4) M(-1) and 2.567×10(4) M(-1) for the hemoglobin-phenosafranin and hemoglobin-safranin O, respectively. We also found phenothiazines were effectors at the protein allosteric site, which affects the allosteric equilibrium. Further, time-resolved fluorescence and hydrophobic ANS experiments showed the static mechanism is dominated for the shrinkage in the fluorescence intensity of β-37 Trp residue at the α1β2 interface. The stoichiometric proportion of the protein-drug adduct is 1:1, as derived from Job's plot. Several crucial noncovalent bonds, including hydrogen bonds, π-π stacking and hydrophobic interactions played a major role in stabilizing the noncovalent conjugates. Based on three-dimensional fluorescence, we concluded that the conformation of hemoglobin is partially destabilized after recognition with phenothiazines. These alterations were confirmed by far-UV CD spectra that showed the α-helix of protein decreased from 78.3% in free hemoglobin to 62.8% and 64.8% in hemoglobin-phenosafranin and hemoglobin-safranin O, respectively. Computer-aided molecular docking was consistent, indicating that both phenothiazines are situated

  7. Wet oxidation of a spacecraft model waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. C.; Wydeven, T.

    1985-01-01

    Wet oxidation was used to oxidize a spacecraft model waste under different oxidation conditions. The variables studied were pressure, temperature, duration of oxidation, and the use of one homogeneous and three heterogeneous catalysts. Emphasis is placed on the final oxidation state of carbon and nitrogen since these are the two major components of the spacecraft model waste and two important plant nutrients.

  8. Cost of photochemical machining

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Rajkumar; Allen, David; Zamora, Oscar

    2004-01-01

    Photochemical machining (PCM), also known as photoetching, photofabrication or photochemical milling, is a non-traditional manufacturing method based on the combination of photoresist imaging and chemical etching. PCM uses techniques similar to those employed for the production of printed circuit boards and silicon integrated circuits. The PCM industry plays a valuable worldwide role in the production of metal precision parts and decorative items. Parts produced by PCM are t...

  9. Modelling horizontal and vertical concentration profiles of ozone and oxides of nitrogen within high-latitude urban area

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholson, J P; Fowler, D

    2000-01-01

    A Lagrangian column model has been developed to simulate the mean (monthly and annual) three-dimensional structure in ozone and nitrogen oxides concentrations in the boundary layer within and immediately around an urban area. Short time-scale photochemical processes of ozone, as well as emissions and deposition to the ground are simulated. The results show that the average surface ozone concentration in the urban area is lower than the surrounding rural areas by typically 50%. Model results are compared with observations.

  10. Photochemical behaviour of phenylurea herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine-Khodja, Amina; Boulkamh, Abdelaziz; Boule, Pierre

    2004-02-01

    The photochemical behaviour of phenylurea herbicides in aqueous solution is highly dependent on the nature and position of substituents on the ring. Most of these herbicides are methylated on the urea moiety, the other substituents are usually halogens or methoxy groups. The main reaction involving the aromatic ring of unhalogenated phenylureas excited at wavelengths shorter than 300 nm is an intramolecular rearrangement, similar to photo-Fries rearrangement, whereas with halogenated derivatives, photohydrolysis is the main transformation pathway. In the particular case of para-halogenated phenylureas, the intermediate formation of a carbene is observed. When the urea moiety is substituted with a methoxyl group, demethoxylation is a competitive reaction. N-Demethylation or oxidation of methyl groups is also observed, but with a lower yield. Photooxidation of phenylureas can also be induced by photocatalysis, iron salts or humic substances. In the absence of water, the main route for phototransformation of diuron is the oxidation or elimination of methyl groups. It is entirely possible that a photochemical intermediate could turn out to be more toxic than the initial herbicide.

  11. How are radicals (re)generated in photochemical ATRP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribelli, Thomas G; Konkolewicz, Dominik; Bernhard, Stefan; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2014-09-24

    The polymerization mechanism of photochemically mediated Cu-based atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was investigated using both experimental and kinetic modeling techniques. There are several distinct pathways that can lead to photochemical (re)generation of Cu(I) activator species or formation of radicals. These (re)generation pathways include direct photochemical reduction of the Cu(II) complexes by excess free amine moieties and unimolecular reduction of the Cu(II) complex, similar to activators regenerated by electron-transfer (ARGET) ATRP processes. Another pathway is photochemical radical generation either directly from the alkyl halide, ligand, or via interaction of ligand with either monomer or with alkyl halides. These photochemical radical generation processes are similar to initiators for continuous activator regeneration (ICAR) ATRP processes. A series of model experiments, ATRP reactions, and kinetic simulations were performed to evaluate the contribution of these reactions to the photochemical ATRP process. The results of these studies indicate that the dominant radical (re)generation reaction is the photochemical reduction of Cu(II) complexes by free amines moieties (from amine containing ligands). The unimolecular reduction of the Cu(II) deactivator complex is not significant, however, there is some contribution from ICAR ATRP reactions involving the interaction of alkyl halides and ligand, ligand with monomer, and the photochemical cleavage of the alkyl halide. Therefore, the mechanism of photochemically mediated ATRP is consistent with a photochemical ARGET ATRP reaction dominating the radical (re)generation.

  12. Photochemical transformation of anionic 2-nitro-4-chlorophenol in surface waters: Laboratory and model assessment of the degradation kinetics, and comparison with field data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sur, Babita [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy); Department of Chemical Engineering, Calcutta University, 92 Acharya P. C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); De Laurentiis, Elisa; Minella, Marco; Maurino, Valter; Minero, Claudio [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy); Vione, Davide [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy); Centro Interdipartimentale NatRisk, Universita di Torino, Via Leonardo da Vinci 44, 10095 Grugliasco (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    Anionic 2-nitro-4-chlorophenol (NCP) may occur in surface waters as a nitroderivative of 4-chlorophenol, which is a transformation intermediate of the herbicide dichlorprop. Here we show that NCP would undergo efficient photochemical transformation in environmental waters, mainly by direct photolysis and reaction with {center_dot}OH. NCP has a polychromatic photolysis quantum yield {Phi}{sub NCP} = (1.27 {+-} 0.22) {center_dot} 10{sup -5}, a rate constant with {center_dot}OH k{sub NCP,}{center_dot}{sub OH} = (1.09 {+-} 0.09) {center_dot} 10{sup 10} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, a rate constant with {sup 1}O{sub 2}k{sub NCP,1O2} = (2.15 {+-} 0.38) {center_dot} 10{sup 7} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, a rate constant with the triplet state of anthraquinone-2-sulphonate k{sub NCP,3AQ2S*} = (5.90 {+-} 0.43) {center_dot} 10{sup 8} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, and is poorly reactive toward CO{sub 3}{sup -}{center_dot}. The k{sub NCP,3AQ2S*} value is representative of reaction with the triplet states of chromophoric dissolved organic matter. The inclusion of photochemical reactivity data into a model of surface-water photochemistry allowed the NCP transformation kinetics to be predicted as a function of water chemical composition and column depth. Very good agreement between model predictions and field data was obtained for the shallow lagoons of the Rhone delta (Southern France). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phototransformation kinetics of 2-nitro-4-chlorophenol, relevant to surface waters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of photochemical reactivity data in the laboratory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Model approach to combine photochemical reactivity with environmental variables. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Good agreement with field data in lagoon water (Rhone delta, Southern France). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct photolysis and reaction with {center_dot}OH as main photoprocesses in the environment.

  13. The escape of heavy atoms from the ionosphere of HD209458b. I. A photochemical-dynamical model of the thermosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Koskinen, T T; Yelle, R V; Lavvas, P

    2012-01-01

    The detections of atomic hydrogen, heavy atoms and ions surrounding the extrasolar giant planet (EGP) HD209458b constrain the composition, temperature and density profiles in its upper atmosphere. Thus the observations provide guidance for models that have so far predicted a range of possible conditions. We present the first hydrodynamic escape model for the upper atmosphere that includes all of the detected species in order to explain their presence at high altitudes, and to further constrain the temperature and velocity profiles. This model calculates the stellar heating rates based on recent estimates of photoelectron heating efficiencies, and includes the photochemistry of heavy atoms and ions in addition to hydrogen and helium. The composition at the lower boundary of the escape model is constrained by a full photochemical model of the lower atmosphere. We confirm that molecules dissociate near the 1 microbar level, and find that complex molecular chemistry does not need to be included above this level. ...

  14. Uncertainty in photochemical modeling results from using seasonal estimates vs day-specific emissions inputs for utility sources in an urban airshed in the northeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arunachalam, S.; Georgopoulos, P.G. [Rutgers, the State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Design and development of robust ozone control strategies through photochemical modeling studies are dependent to a large extent on the quality of the emissions inputs that are used. A key issue here in the quality of the emissions inventory is the choice between using day-specific information versus seasonal estimates for emissions from major utilities in the modeling domain of interest. Emissions of NO{sub x} from electric utilities constitute more than a third of the total NO{sub x} emissions from all sources ill a typical urban modeling domain, and hence it is important that the emissions from these sources are characterized as accurately as possible in the photochemical model. Since a considerable amount of resources are required to develop regional or urban-level emissions inventories for modeling purposes, one has to accept the level of detail that can be incorporated in a given modeling inventory and try to develop optimal control strategies based on the inputs. The sensitivity of the model to the differences in emissions inputs as mentioned above are examined in the New Jersey-Philadelphia-Delaware Valley Urban Airshed Model State Implementation Plan (SIP) application for two ozone episodes that occurred in the Northeastern US - the July 6-8, 1988 and the July 18-20, 1991. Day-specific emissions information are collected for a major portion of the elevated point sources within tile domain for these two episodes and various metrics besides the daily maximum one-hour averaged ozone predictions, are compared from model predictions for the two cases. Such comparative studies will bring into focus the presence of a weekend effect, if any, and differences between weekday and weekend emissions can also be tested with the model, using the same meteorology. Understanding the impact of this difference will lead to a better design sensitivity-uncertainty simulations and call lead to the development of robust emission control strategies as well.

  15. Photochemical transformation of anionic 2-nitro-4-chlorophenol in surface waters: laboratory and model assessment of the degradation kinetics, and comparison with field data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sur, Babita; De Laurentiis, Elisa; Minella, Marco; Maurino, Valter; Minero, Claudio; Vione, Davide

    2012-06-01

    Anionic 2-nitro-4-chlorophenol (NCP) may occur in surface waters as a nitroderivative of 4-chlorophenol, which is a transformation intermediate of the herbicide dichlorprop. Here we show that NCP would undergo efficient photochemical transformation in environmental waters, mainly by direct photolysis and reaction with OH. NCP has a polychromatic photolysis quantum yield Φ(NCP)=(1.27±0.22)·10(-5), a rate constant with OH k(NCP,)(OH)=(1.09±0.09)·10(10) M(-1) s(-1), a rate constant with (1)O(2)k(NCP,1O2)=(2.15±0.38)·10(7) M(-1) s(-1), a rate constant with the triplet state of anthraquinone-2-sulphonate k(NCP,3AQ2S*)=(5.90±0.43)·10(8) M(-1) s(-1), and is poorly reactive toward CO(3)(-). The k(NCP,3AQ2S*) value is representative of reaction with the triplet states of chromophoric dissolved organic matter. The inclusion of photochemical reactivity data into a model of surface-water photochemistry allowed the NCP transformation kinetics to be predicted as a function of water chemical composition and column depth. Very good agreement between model predictions and field data was obtained for the shallow lagoons of the Rhône delta (Southern France).

  16. Model catalytic oxidation studies using supported monometallic and heterobimetallic oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1992-02-03

    This research program is directed toward a more fundamental understanding of the effects of catalyst composition and structure on the catalytic properties of metal oxides. Metal oxide catalysts play an important role in many reactions bearing on the chemical aspects of energy processes. Metal oxides are the catalysts for water-gas shift reactions, methanol and higher alcohol synthesis, isosynthesis, selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides, and oxidation of hydrocarbons. A key limitation to developing insight into how oxides function in catalytic reactions is in not having precise information of the surface composition under reaction conditions. To address this problem we have prepared oxide systems that can be used to study cation-cation effects and the role of bridging (-O-) and/or terminal (=O) surface oxygen anion ligands in a systematic fashion. Since many oxide catalyst systems involve mixtures of oxides, we selected a model system that would permit us to examine the role of each cation separately and in pairwise combinations. Organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes were proposed for use, to prepare model systems consisting of isolated monomeric cations, isolated monometallic dimers and isolated bimetallic dimers supported on silica and alumina. The monometallic and bimetallic dimers were to be used as models of more complex mixed- oxide catalysts. Our current program was to develop the systems and use them in model oxidation reactions.

  17. Characterizing the unique photochemical environment in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Gu, D.; Zhao, C.; Huey, L. G.; Stickel, R.; Liao, J.

    2010-12-01

    Recent observational evidence suggests that the atmospheric chemical system over China could be more complex than expected, possibly as a result of the rapid increasing anthropogenic emissions. During the CAREBeijing-2007 Experiment in August of 2007, up to 14 ppbv of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN, CH3C(O)OONO2) and 4.5 ppbv of glyoxal (CHOCHO) were observed, among the highest levels observed in the world in recent years. Elevated nitrous acid (HNO2) (~1.0 ppbv on average) was also observed in the early afternoon despite of the moderate amount of its precursors, i.e. nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO + NO2). We employ a 1-D photochemical model (REAM) to analyze the observations. The results indicate that reactive aromatics are the dominating source of PAN (55%-75%) and glyoxal (90%), and methylglyoxal is the major precursor of peroxy acetyl radical (50%). Downward transport from boundary layer is found to contribute ~50% of the PAN observed at surface. Photolysis of HNO2 is by far the largest primary OH source (more than 50%) throughout the daytime, and yet the fast formation rate of HNO2 inferred from the observations could not be explained by current known mechanisms. Detailed photochemical analysis is conducted to understand the controlling factors for O3 formation. O3 formation chemistry is strongly affected by aromatics and HNO2. By providing a large primary OH source, HNO2 leads to ~25% enhancement of the average O3 production rate, and aromatics contribute ~40% by serving as a major source of RO2 and HO2 radicals. Due to the large abundance of reactive hydrocarbons, O3 formation is generally NOx limited, although the sensitivity is low that a 50% reduction of NOx could only result in less than 25% reduction of the O3 production rate. Future research targeting HNO2 formation mechanism and emission sources of aromatics is necessary for better understanding the unique photochemical environment in China under significant anthropogenic impacts and the regional pollution

  18. A model assessment of the ability of lake water in Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica, to induce the photochemical degradation of emerging contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minella, Marco; Maurino, Valter; Minero, Claudio; Vione, Davide

    2016-11-01

    The shallow lakes located in Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica, are free from ice for only up to a couple of months (mid December to early/mid February) during the austral summer. In the rest of the year, the ice cover shields the light and inhibits the photochemical processes in the water columns. Previous work has shown that chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in these lakes is very reactive photochemically. A model assessment is here provided of lake-water photoreactivity in field conditions, based on experimental data of lake water absorption spectra, chemistry and photochemistry obtained previously, taking into account the water depth and the irradiation conditions of the Antarctic summer. The chosen sample contaminants were the solar filter benzophenone-3 and the antimicrobial agent triclosan, which have very well known photoreactivity and have been found in a variety of environmental matrices in the Antarctic continent. The two compounds would have a half-life time of just a few days or less in the lake water during the Antarctic summertime, largely due to reaction with CDOM triplet states ((3)CDOM*). In general, pollutants that occur in the ice and could be released to lake water upon ice melting (around or soon after the December solstice) would be quickly photodegraded if they undergo fast reaction with (3)CDOM*. With some compounds, the important (3)CDOM* reactions might favour the production of harmful secondary pollutants, such as 2,8-dichlorodibenzodioxin from the basic (anionic) form of triclosan.

  19. Photochemical tissue bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Robert W.; Kochevar, Irene E.

    2012-01-10

    Photochemical tissue bonding methods include the application of a photosensitizer to a tissue and/or tissue graft, followed by irradiation with electromagnetic energy to produce a tissue seal. The methods are useful for tissue adhesion, such as in wound closure, tissue grafting, skin grafting, musculoskeletal tissue repair, ligament or tendon repair and corneal repair.

  20. Aircraft measurements, modelled stratospheric [NO2]/[NO] ratio and photochemical steady-state approach within the frame of ENVISAT satellite data validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinov, Ivan; Bortoli, Daniele; Giovanelli, Giorgio; Heland, J.; Petritoli, Andrea; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Schlager, H.; Ulanovsky, Aleksey; Yuzhkov, Vladimir

    2003-08-01

    The scientific payload aboard the stratospheric aircraft M55 Geophysica consists of both in-situ and remote sensing instruments deployed to validate the ENVISAT chemical payload - SCIAMACHY, MIPAS-E and GOMOS during dedicated field campaigns: July and October 2002, Forli (Italy) and February - March 2003, Kiruna (Sweden). Along with the precise measurements required for correct validation procedures, it is necessary to provide additional information related to certain relationships between the available geophysical parameters in order to allow us to better interpret retrieved results, both from the space and from the aircraft measurements. In this regard NO2/NO ratio is inferred/tested along the flight tracks and used to verify the existence of a steady state photochemical equilibrium, using the data obtained by GASCOD-A/4π, FOZAN and SIOUX instruments. The obtained experimental ratio is compared to that derived from model calculations. A short description of the instruments and flight conditions are described also.

  1. Photochemical Ablation of Organic Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Barbara

    2004-03-01

    As discovered by Srinivasan in 1982, irradiation of materials by far UV laser light can lead to photochemical ablation, a process distinct from normal thermal ablation in which the laser primarily heats the material. A versatile mesoscopic model for molecular dynamics simulations of the laser ablation phenomena is presented. The model incorporates both the thermal and photochemical events, that is, both heating of the system and UV induced bond-cleavage followed by abstraction and radical-radical recombination reactions. The results from the simulations are compared to experimental data and the basic physics and chemistry for each irradiation regime are discussed. Initial results from polymer ablation simulations will be presented. L. V. Zhigilei, P. B. S. Kodali and B. J. Garrison, J. Phys. Chem. B, 102, 2845-2853 (1998); L. V. Zhigilei and B. J. Garrison, Journal of Applied Physics, 88, 1281-1298 (2000). Y. G. Yingling, L. V. Zhigilei and B. J. Garrison, J. Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry, 145, 173-181 (2001); Y. G. Yingling and B. J. Garrison, Chem. Phys. Lett., 364, 237-243 (2002).

  2. Additive and Photochemical Manufacturing of Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Winco K. C.; Sun, Bo; Meng, Zhengong; Huang, Junfeng; Jin, Yingdi; Choy, Hang Shan; Cai, Zhixiang; Li, Guijun; Ho, Cheuk Lam; Yang, Jinlong; Wong, Wai Yeung

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, 3D printing technologies have been extensively developed, enabling rapid prototyping from a conceptual design to an actual product. However, additive manufacturing of metals in the existing technologies is still cost-intensive and time-consuming. Herein a novel platform for low-cost additive manufacturing is introduced by simultaneously combining the laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) method with photochemical reaction. Using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) polymer as the sacrificial layer, sufficient ejection momentum can be generated in the LIFT method. A low-cost continuous wave (CW) laser diode at 405 nm was utilized and proved to be able to transfer the photochemically synthesized copper onto the target substrate. The wavelength-dependent photochemical behaviour in the LIFT method was verified and characterized by both theoretical and experimental studies compared to 1064 nm fiber laser. The conductivity of the synthesized copper patterns could be enhanced using post electroless plating while retaining the designed pattern shapes. Prototypes of electronic circuits were accordingly built and demonstrated for powering up LEDs. Apart from pristine PDMS materials with low surface energies, the proposed method can simultaneously perform laser-induced forward transfer and photochemical synthesis of metals, starting from their metal oxide forms, onto various target substrates such as polyimide, glass and thermoplastics.

  3. Additive and Photochemical Manufacturing of Copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Winco K C; Sun, Bo; Meng, Zhengong; Huang, Junfeng; Jin, Yingdi; Choy, Hang Shan; Cai, Zhixiang; Li, Guijun; Ho, Cheuk Lam; Yang, Jinlong; Wong, Wai Yeung

    2016-12-21

    In recent years, 3D printing technologies have been extensively developed, enabling rapid prototyping from a conceptual design to an actual product. However, additive manufacturing of metals in the existing technologies is still cost-intensive and time-consuming. Herein a novel platform for low-cost additive manufacturing is introduced by simultaneously combining the laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) method with photochemical reaction. Using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) polymer as the sacrificial layer, sufficient ejection momentum can be generated in the LIFT method. A low-cost continuous wave (CW) laser diode at 405 nm was utilized and proved to be able to transfer the photochemically synthesized copper onto the target substrate. The wavelength-dependent photochemical behaviour in the LIFT method was verified and characterized by both theoretical and experimental studies compared to 1064 nm fiber laser. The conductivity of the synthesized copper patterns could be enhanced using post electroless plating while retaining the designed pattern shapes. Prototypes of electronic circuits were accordingly built and demonstrated for powering up LEDs. Apart from pristine PDMS materials with low surface energies, the proposed method can simultaneously perform laser-induced forward transfer and photochemical synthesis of metals, starting from their metal oxide forms, onto various target substrates such as polyimide, glass and thermoplastics.

  4. Stratospheric Ozone: Transport, Photochemical Production and Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, A. R.; Kawa, S. R.; Jackman, C. H.

    2003-01-01

    Observations from various satellite instruments (e.g., Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE), Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS)) specify the latitude and seasonal variations of total ozone and ozone as a function of altitude. These seasonal variations change with latitude and altitude partly due to seasonal variation in transport and temperature, partly due to differences in the balance between photochemical production and loss processes, and partly due to differences in the relative importance of the various ozone loss processes. Comparisons of modeled seasonal ozone behavior with observations test the following: the seasonal dependence of dynamical processes where these dominate the ozone tendency; the seasonal dependence of photochemical processes in the upper stratosphere; and the seasonal change in the balance between photochemical and dynamical processes.

  5. Assessing the sensitivity of the hydroxyl radical to model biases in composition and temperature using a single-column photochemical model for Lauder, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Comí, Laura; Morgenstern, Olaf; Zeng, Guang; Masters, Sarah L.; Querel, Richard R.; Nedoluha, Gerald E.

    2016-11-01

    We assess the major factors contributing to local biases in the hydroxyl radical (OH) as simulated by a global chemistry-climate model, using a single-column photochemical model (SCM) analysis. The SCM has been constructed to represent atmospheric chemistry at Lauder, New Zealand, which is representative of the background atmosphere of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) mid-latitudes. We use long-term observations of variables essential to tropospheric OH chemistry, i.e. ozone (O3), water vapour (H2O), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), and temperature, and assess how using these measurements affect OH calculated in the SCM, relative to a reference simulation only using modelled fields. The analysis spans 1994 to 2010. Results show that OH responds approximately linearly to correcting biases in O3, H2O, CO, CH4, and temperature. The biggest impact on OH is due to correcting an overestimation by approximately 20 to 60 % of H2O, using radiosonde observations. Correcting this moist bias leads to a reduction of OH by around 5 to 35 %. This is followed by correcting predominantly overestimated O3. In the troposphere, the model biases are mostly in the range of -10 to 30 %. The impact of changing O3 on OH is due to two pathways; the OH responses to both are of similar magnitude but different seasonality: correcting in situ tropospheric ozone leads to changes in OH in the range -14 to 4 %, whereas correcting the photolysis rate of O3 in accordance with overhead column ozone changes leads to increases of OH of 8 to 16 %. The OH sensitivities to correcting CH4, CO, and temperature biases are all minor effects. The work demonstrates the feasibility of quantitatively assessing OH sensitivity to biases in longer-lived species, which can help explain differences in simulated OH between global chemistry models and relative to observations. In addition to clear-sky simulations, we have performed idealized sensitivity simulations to assess the impact of clouds (ice and liquid

  6. Use of Combined Observational- and Model-Derived Photochemical Indicators to Assess the O3-NOx-VOC System Sensitivity in Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson R. Carrillo-Torres

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric levels of O3 have historically exceeded the official annual Mexican standards within the Monterrey Metropolitan Area (MMA in NE Mexico. High-frequency and high-precision measurements of tropospheric O3, NOy, NO2, NO, CO, SO2, PM10 and PM2.5 were made at the Obispado monitoring site near the downtown MMA from September 2012 to August 2013. The seasonal cycles of O3 and NOy are driven by changes in meteorology and to a lesser extent by variations in primary emissions. The NOy levels were positively correlated with O3 precursors and inversely correlated with O3 and wind speed. Recorded data were used to assess the O3-Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC-NOx system’s sensitivity through an observational-based approach. The photochemical indicator O3/NOy was derived from measured data during the enhanced O3 production period (12:00–18:00 Central Daylight Time (CDT, GMT-0500. The O3/NOy ratios calculated for this time period showed that the O3 production within the MMA is VOC sensitive. A box model simulation of production rates of HNO3 (PHNO3 and total peroxides (Pperox carried out for O3 episodes in fall and spring confirmed the VOC sensitivity within the MMA environment. No significant differences were observed in O3/NOy from weekdays to weekends or for PHNO3/Pperox ratios, confirming the limiting role of VOCs in O3 production within the MMA. The ratified photochemical regime observed may allow the environmental authorities to revise and verify the current policies for air quality control within the MMA.

  7. Global atmospheric model for mercury including oxidation by bromine atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Holmes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Global models of atmospheric mercury generally assume that gas-phase OH and ozone are the main oxidants converting Hg0 to HgII and thus driving mercury deposition to ecosystems. However, thermodynamic considerations argue against the importance of these reactions. We demonstrate here the viability of atomic bromine (Br as an alternative Hg0 oxidant. We conduct a global 3-D simulation with the GEOS-Chem model assuming gas-phase Br to be the sole Hg0 oxidant (Hg + Br model and compare to the previous version of the model with OH and ozone as the sole oxidants (Hg + OH/O3 model. We specify global 3-D Br concentration fields based on our best understanding of tropospheric and stratospheric Br chemistry. In both the Hg + Br and Hg + OH/O3 models, we add an aqueous photochemical reduction of HgII in cloud to impose a tropospheric lifetime for mercury of 6.5 months against deposition, as needed to reconcile observed total gaseous mercury (TGM concentrations with current estimates of anthropogenic emissions. This added reduction would not be necessary in the Hg + Br model if we adjusted the Br oxidation kinetics downward within their range of uncertainty. We find that the Hg + Br and Hg + OH/O3 models are equally capable of reproducing the spatial distribution of TGM and its seasonal cycle at northern mid-latitudes. The Hg + Br model shows a steeper decline of TGM concentrations from the tropics to southern mid-latitudes. Only the Hg + Br model can reproduce the springtime depletion and summer rebound of TGM observed at polar sites; the snowpack component of GEOS-Chem suggests that 40% of HgII deposited to snow in the Arctic is transferred to the ocean and land reservoirs, amounting to a net deposition flux to the Arctic of 60 Mg a−1. Summertime events of depleted Hg0 at Antarctic sites due to subsidence are much better simulated by

  8. Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS). This file provides information on the numbers and distribution (latitude/longitude) of air monitoring sites...

  9. Global atmospheric model for mercury including oxidation by bromine atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Holmes

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Global models of atmospheric mercury generally assume that OH and ozone are the main oxidants converting Hg0 to HgII and thus driving mercury deposition to ecosystems. However, thermodynamic considerations argue against the importance of these reactions. We demonstrate here the viability of atomic bromine (Br as an alternative Hg0 oxidant. We conduct a global 3-D simulation with the GEOS-Chem model assuming Br to be the sole Hg0 oxidant (Hg + Br model and compare to the previous version of the model with OH and ozone as the sole oxidants (Hg + OH/O3 model. We specify global 3-D Br concentration fields based on our best understanding of tropospheric and stratospheric Br chemistry. In both the Hg + Br and Hg + OH/O3 models, we add an aqueous photochemical reduction of HgII in cloud to impose a tropospheric lifetime for mercury of 6.5 months against deposition, as needed to reconcile observed total gaseous mercury (TGM concentrations with current estimates of anthropogenic emissions. This added reduction would not be necessary in the Hg + Br model if we adjusted the Br oxidation kinetics downward within their range of uncertainty. We find that the Hg + Br and Hg + OH/O3 models are equally capable of reproducing the spatial distribution of TGM and its seasonal cycle at northern mid-latitudes. The Hg + Br model shows a steeper decline of TGM concentrations from the tropics to southern mid-latitudes. Only the Hg + Br model can reproduce the springtime depletion and summer rebound of TGM observed at polar sites; the snowpack component of GEOS-Chem suggests that 40% of HgII deposited to snow in the Arctic is transferred to the ocean and land reservoirs, amounting to a net deposition flux of 60 Mg a−1. Summertime events of depleted Hg0 at Antarctic sites due to subsidence are much better simulated by the Hg + Br model. Model

  10. Investigation of the photochemical changes of chlorogenic acids induced by ultraviolet light in model systems and in agricultural practice with Stevia rebaudiana cultivation as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaköse, Hande; Jaiswal, Rakesh; Deshpande, Sagar; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2015-04-08

    Mono- and diacyl chlorogenic acids undergo photochemical trans-cis isomerization under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The photochemical equilibrium composition was established for eight selected derivatives. In contrast to all other dicaffeoylquinic acid derivatives, cynarin (1,3-dicaffeoylquinic acid) undergoes a [2 + 2] photochemical cycloaddition reaction, constituting a first example of Schmidt's law in a natural product family. The relevance of photochemical isomerization in agricultural practice was investigated using 120 samples of Stevia rebaudiana leave samples grown under defined cultivation conditions. Ratios of cis to trans chlorogenic acids were determined in leaf samples and correlated with climatic and harvesting conditions. The data indicate a clear correlation between the formation of cis-caffeoyl derivatives and sunshine hours prior to harvesting and illustrate the relevance of UV exposure to plant material affecting its phytochemical composition.

  11. Tropospheric Ozone and Photochemical Smog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillman, S.

    2003-12-01

    global background ozone can make the effects of local pollution events everywhere more acute, and can also cause ecological damage in remote locations that are otherwise unaffected by urban pollution. Ozone at the global scale is also related to greenhouse warming.This chapter provides an overview of photochemical smog at the urban and regional scale, focused primarily on ozone and including a summary of information about particulates. It includes the following topics: dynamics and extent of pollution events; health and ecological impacts; relation between ozone and precursor emissions, including hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides (NOx); sources, composition, and fundamental properties of particulates; chemistry of ozone and related species; methods of interpretation based on ambient measurements; and the connection between air pollution events and the chemistry of the global troposphere. Because there are many similarities between the photochemistry of ozone during pollution events and the chemistry of the troposphere in general, this chapter will include some information about global tropospheric chemistry and the links between urban-scale and global-scale events. Additional treatment of the global troposphere is found in Volume 4 of this work. The chemistry of ozone formation discussed here is also related to topics discussed in greater detail elsewhere in this volume (see Chapters 9.10 and 9.12) and in Volume 4.

  12. Graphite oxidation modeling for application in MELCOR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelbard, Fred

    2009-01-01

    The Arrhenius parameters for graphite oxidation in air are reviewed and compared. One-dimensional models of graphite oxidation coupled with mass transfer of oxidant are presented in dimensionless form for rectangular and spherical geometries. A single dimensionless group is shown to encapsulate the coupled phenomena, and is used to determine the effective reaction rate when mass transfer can impede the oxidation process. For integer reaction order kinetics, analytical expressions are presented for the effective reaction rate. For noninteger reaction orders, a numerical solution is developed and compared to data for oxidation of a graphite sphere in air. Very good agreement is obtained with the data without any adjustable parameters. An analytical model for surface burn-off is also presented, and results from the model are within an order of magnitude of the measurements of burn-off in air and in steam.

  13. A method to represent ozone response to large changes in precursor emissions using high-order sensitivity analysis in photochemical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Yarwood

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Photochemical grid models (PGMs are used to simulate tropospheric ozone and quantify its response to emission changes. PGMs are often applied for annual simulations to provide both maximum concentrations for assessing compliance with air quality standards and frequency distributions for assessing human exposure. Efficient methods for computing ozone at different emission levels can improve the quality of ozone air quality management efforts. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using the decoupled direct method (DDM to calculate first- and second-order sensitivity of ozone to anthropogenic NOx and VOC emissions in annual PGM simulations at continental scale. Algebraic models are developed that use Taylor series to produce complete annual frequency distributions of hourly ozone at any location and any anthropogenic emission level between zero and 100%, adjusted independently for NOx and VOC. We recommend computing the sensitivity coefficients at the midpoint of the emissions range over which they are intended to be applied, in this case with 50% anthropogenic emissions. The algebraic model predictions can be improved by combining sensitivity coefficients computed at 10 and 50% anthropogenic emissions. Compared to brute force simulations, algebraic model predictions tend to be more accurate in summer than winter, at rural than urban locations, and with 100% than zero anthropogenic emissions. Equations developed to combine sensitivity coefficients computed with 10 and 50% anthropogenic emissions are able to reproduce brute force simulation results with zero and 100% anthropogenic emissions with a mean bias of less than 2 ppb and mean error of less than 3 ppb averaged over 22 US cities.

  14. A method to represent ozone response to large changes in precursor emissions using high-order sensitivity analysis in photochemical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Yarwood

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Photochemical grid models (PGMs are used to simulate tropospheric ozone and quantify its response to emission changes. PGMs are often applied for annual simulations to provide both maximum concentrations for assessing compliance with air quality standards and frequency distributions for assessing human exposure. Efficient methods for computing ozone at different emission levels can improve the quality of ozone air quality management efforts. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using the decoupled direct method (DDM to calculate first- and second-order sensitivity of ozone to anthropogenic NOx and VOC emissions in annual PGM simulations at continental scale. Algebraic models are developed that use Taylor series to produce complete annual frequency distributions of hourly ozone at any location and any anthropogenic emission level between zero and 100%, adjusted independently for NOx and VOC. We recommend computing the sensitivity coefficients at the mid-point of the emissions range over which they are intended to be applied, in this case with 50% anthropogenic emissions. The algebraic model predictions can be improved by combining sensitivity coefficients computed at 10% and 50% anthropogenic emissions. Compared to brute force simulations, algebraic model predictions tend to be more accurate in summer than winter, at rural than urban locations, and with 100% than zero anthropogenic emissions. Equations developed to combine sensitivity coefficients computed with 10% and 50% anthropogenic emissions are able to reproduce brute force simulation results with zero and 100% anthropogenic emissions with mean bias less than 2 ppb and mean error less than 3 ppb averaged over 22 US cities.

  15. [Membrane-based photochemical systems as models for photosynthetic cells]. Progress report, February 15, 1990--August 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, J.K.

    1992-12-31

    The objectives of this research are to improve our conceptual view of the ways in which membranes and interfaces can be used to control chemical reactivity. We have focused on understanding three elementary processes that are central to developing membrane-based integrated chemical systems for water photolysis or related photoconversion/photostorage processes. Specifically, we have sought to identify: the influence of interfaces upon charge separation/recombination reactions, pathways for transmembrane charge separation across hydrocarbon bilayer membranes, and mechanisms of water oxidation catalyzed by transition metal coordination complexes. Historically, the chemical dynamics of each of these processes has been poorly understood, with numerous unresolved issues and conflicting viewpoints appearing in the literature. As described in this report our recent research has led to considerable clarification of the underlying reaction mechanisms.

  16. The effect of fuel composition on the formation of photochemical smog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutkiewicz, R.K. [Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Energy Research Inst.

    1995-12-31

    The high level of solar radiation, moderate to high ambient temperatures and increasing vehicle density have resulted in an increasing number of incidents of photochemical smog in Cape Town. Whilst the situation has not reached levels reported from many cities around the world there is concern that photochemical smog may become a serious pollution problem. Work has started on a characterization of the photochemical smog and to determine what measures will be required to limit photochemical smog. The work has consisted of the monitoring of ambient levels of photochemical precursors such as hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen, and measurement of ozone. In addition to continuous monitoring by the Cape Town City Council some measurements have been made of PAN and other components of photochemical smog. In addition a study is being carried out of the composition of a brown haze which envelopes CaPe Town during spring and autumn under strong inversion episodes. In addition to ambient monitoring, work is being carried out on the effect of vehicle emissions and fuel evaporation on the formation of photochemical smog. This work involves the formation of photochemical smog in an indoor smog chamber in which exhaust emissions and volatile organic compounds are tested in terms of their photochemical smog tendency. This work is aimed at estimating the effect of increasing precursor levels on the potential photochemical smog situation in Cape Town

  17. Rates and regimes of photochemical ozone production over Central East China in June 2006: a box model analysis using comprehensive measurements of ozone precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kanaya

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available An observation-based box model approach was undertaken to estimate concentrations of OH, HO2, and RO2 radicals and the net photochemical production rate of ozone at the top of Mount Tai, located in the middle of Central East China, in June 2006. The model calculation was constrained by the measurements of O3, H2O, CO, NO, NO2, hydrocarbon, HCHO, and CH3CHO concentrations, and temperature and J values. The net production rate of ozone was estimated to be 6.4 ppb h−1 as a 6-h average (09:00–15:00 CST, suggesting 58±37 ppb of ozone is produced in one day. Thus the daytime buildup of ozone recorded at the mountain top as ~23 ppb on average is likely affected by in situ photochemistry as well as by the upward transport of polluted air mass in the daytime. On days with high ozone concentrations (hourly values exceeding 100 ppb at least once, in situ photochemistry was more active than it was on low ozone days, suggesting that in situ photochemistry is an important factor controlling ozone concentrations. Sensitivity model runs for which different NOx and hydrocarbon concentrations were assumed suggested that the ozone production occurred normally under NOx-limited conditions, with some exceptional periods (under volatile-organic-compound-limited conditions in which there was fresh pollution. We also examined the possible influence of the heterogeneous loss of gaseous HO2 radicals in contact with aerosol particle surfaces on the rate and regimes of ozone production.

  18. Photochemical transformation of vanadium(5) acetylacetonate complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchmij, S.Ya.; Turchaninov, A.M.; Kryukov, A.I. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Fizicheskoj Khimii)

    1980-08-01

    Photochemical transformations of mixed vanadium (5) complex formed as a result of interaction between ethylorthovanadate and acetylacetone which includes in the first coordination sphere vanadyl oxygen, two enolate-ions and enthoxygroup are studied spectrophotometrically and using ESR method. During irradiation of ethanol solutions of the complex a successive reduction of central atom with formation of acetyl-acetonate complexes of vanadium (4) and (3) takes place. At that the solvent is oxidated. In CCl/sub 4/ solution under the effect of UV irradiation ethoxygroup is replaced by chlorine ion with the formation of new mixed vanadium (5) complex, sensible to visible and UV radiation.

  19. Reactive nitrogen in Mexico City and its relation to ozone-precursor sensitivity: results from photochemical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sillman

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We use results of a 3-D photochemistry/transport model for ozone formation in Mexico City during events in 1997 to investigate ambient concentrations of reactive nitrogen in relation to ozone-precursor sensitivity. Previous results from other locations suggest that ratios such as O3/NOy and H2O2/HNO3 might provide measurement-based indicators for NOx-sensitive or VOC-sensitive conditions. Mexico City presents a different environment due to its high concentrations of VOC and high level of pollutants in general. The model predicts a correlation between PAN and O3 with relatively high PAN/O3 (0.07, which is still lower than measured values. The model PAN is comparable with results from a model for Paris but much higher than were found in Nashville in both models and measurements. The difference can be explained by the lower temperature in Mexico City relative to Nashville. Model HNO3 in Mexico City is unusually low for an urban area and PAN/HNO3 is very high, probably due to the high ratio of reactivity-weighted VOC to NOx. The model predicts that VOC-sensitive chemistry in Mexico is associated with high NOx, NOy and NOx/NOy and with low O3/NOy and H2O2/HNO3, suggesting that these indicators work well for Mexico City. The relation between ozone-precursor sensitivity and either O3/NOz or O3/HNO3 is more ambiguous. VOC-sensitive conditions are associated with higher O3/HNO3 than would be found in NOx-sensitive conditions, but model O3/HNO3 associated with both NOx-sensitive and VOC-sensitive chemistry is higher in Mexico than in other cities. The model predicts mixed sensitivity to NOx and VOC in Mexico City, with a

  20. Reactive nitrogen in Mexico City and its relation to ozone-precursor sensitivity: results from photochemical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sillman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We use results of a 3-D photochemistry/transport model for ozone formation in Mexico City during events in 1997 to investigate ambient concentrations of reactive nitrogen in relation to ozone-precursor sensitivity. Previous results from other locations suggest that ratios such as O3/NOy and H2O2/HNO3 might provide measurement-based indicators for NOx-sensitive or VOC-sensitive conditions. Mexico City presents a different environment due to its high concentrations of VOC and high level of pollutants in general. The model predicts a correlation between PAN and O3 with relatively high PAN/O3 (0.07, which is still lower than measured values. The model PAN is comparable with results from a model for Paris but much higher than were found in Nashville in both models and measurements. The difference is due in part to the lower temperature in Mexico City relative to Nashville. Model HNO3 in Mexico City is unusually low for an urban area and PAN/HNO3 is very high, probably due to the high ratio of reactivity-weighted VOC to NOx. The model predicts that VOC-sensitive chemistry in Mexico is associated with high NOx, NOy and NOx/NOy and with low O3/NOy and H2O2/HNO3, suggesting that these indicators work well for Mexico City. The relation between ozone-precursor sensitivity and either O3/NOz or O3/HNO3 is more ambiguous. VOC-sensitive conditions are associated with higher O3/HNO3 than would be found in NOx-sensitive conditions, but model O3/HNO3 associated with both NOx-sensitive and VOC-sensitive chemistry is higher in Mexico than in other cities. The model predicts a mixed pattern of ozone-precursor sensitivity in Mexico City, with

  1. Mechanistic insights into chemical and photochemical transformations of bismuth vanadate photoanodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Francesca M.; Cooper, Jason K.; Kunzelmann, Viktoria; McDowell, Matthew T.; Yu, Jie; Larson, David M.; Borys, Nicholas J.; Abelyan, Christine; Beeman, Jeffrey W.; Yu, Kin Man; Yang, Jinhui; Chen, Le; Shaner, Matthew R.; Spurgeon, Joshua; Houle, Frances A.; Persson, Kristin A.; Sharp, Ian D.

    2016-07-01

    Artificial photosynthesis relies on the availability of semiconductors that are chemically stable and can efficiently capture solar energy. Although metal oxide semiconductors have been investigated for their promise to resist oxidative attack, materials in this class can suffer from chemical and photochemical instability. Here we present a methodology for evaluating corrosion mechanisms and apply it to bismuth vanadate, a state-of-the-art photoanode. Analysis of changing morphology and composition under solar water splitting conditions reveals chemical instabilities that are not predicted from thermodynamic considerations of stable solid oxide phases, as represented by the Pourbaix diagram for the system. Computational modelling indicates that photoexcited charge carriers accumulated at the surface destabilize the lattice, and that self-passivation by formation of a chemically stable surface phase is kinetically hindered. Although chemical stability of metal oxides cannot be assumed, insight into corrosion mechanisms aids development of protection strategies and discovery of semiconductors with improved stability.

  2. Mechanistic insights into chemical and photochemical transformations of bismuth vanadate photoanodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Francesca M; Cooper, Jason K; Kunzelmann, Viktoria; McDowell, Matthew T; Yu, Jie; Larson, David M; Borys, Nicholas J; Abelyan, Christine; Beeman, Jeffrey W; Yu, Kin Man; Yang, Jinhui; Chen, Le; Shaner, Matthew R; Spurgeon, Joshua; Houle, Frances A; Persson, Kristin A; Sharp, Ian D

    2016-07-05

    Artificial photosynthesis relies on the availability of semiconductors that are chemically stable and can efficiently capture solar energy. Although metal oxide semiconductors have been investigated for their promise to resist oxidative attack, materials in this class can suffer from chemical and photochemical instability. Here we present a methodology for evaluating corrosion mechanisms and apply it to bismuth vanadate, a state-of-the-art photoanode. Analysis of changing morphology and composition under solar water splitting conditions reveals chemical instabilities that are not predicted from thermodynamic considerations of stable solid oxide phases, as represented by the Pourbaix diagram for the system. Computational modelling indicates that photoexcited charge carriers accumulated at the surface destabilize the lattice, and that self-passivation by formation of a chemically stable surface phase is kinetically hindered. Although chemical stability of metal oxides cannot be assumed, insight into corrosion mechanisms aids development of protection strategies and discovery of semiconductors with improved stability.

  3. Evaluating the impact of new observational constraints on P-S/IVOC emissions, multi-generation oxidation, and chamber wall losses on SOA modeling for Los Angeles, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Prettiny K.; Zhao, Yunliang; Robinson, Allen L.; Worton, David R.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Ortega, Amber M.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Zotter, Peter; Prévôt, André S. H.; Szidat, Sönke; Hayes, Patrick L.

    2017-08-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is an important contributor to fine particulate matter (PM) mass in polluted regions, and its modeling remains poorly constrained. A box model is developed that uses recently published literature parameterizations and data sets to better constrain and evaluate the formation pathways and precursors of urban SOA during the CalNex 2010 campaign in Los Angeles. When using the measurements of intermediate-volatility organic compounds (IVOCs) reported in Zhao et al. (2014) and of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) reported in Worton et al. (2014) the model is biased high at longer photochemical ages, whereas at shorter photochemical ages it is biased low, if the yields for VOC oxidation are not updated. The parameterizations using an updated version of the yields, which takes into account the effect of gas-phase wall losses in environmental chambers, show model-measurement agreement at longer photochemical ages, even though some low bias at short photochemical ages still remains. Furthermore, the fossil and non-fossil carbon split of urban SOA simulated by the model is consistent with measurements at the Pasadena ground site. Multi-generation oxidation mechanisms are often employed in SOA models to increase the SOA yields derived from environmental chamber experiments in order to obtain better model-measurement agreement. However, there are many uncertainties associated with these aging mechanisms. Thus, SOA formation in the model is compared to data from an oxidation flow reactor (OFR) in order to constrain SOA formation at longer photochemical ages than observed in urban air. The model predicts similar SOA mass at short to moderate photochemical ages when the aging mechanisms or the updated version of the yields for VOC oxidation are implemented. The latter case has SOA formation rates that are more consistent with observations from the OFR though. Aging mechanisms may still play an important role in SOA chemistry, but the

  4. Photochemical Escape of Oxygen from Early Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jinjin

    2015-01-01

    Photochemical escape is an important process for oxygen escape from present Mars. In this work, a 1-D Monte-Carlo Model is developed to calculate escape rates of energetic oxygen atoms produced from O2+ dissociative recombination reactions (DR) under 1, 3, 10, and 20 times present solar XUV fluxes. We found that although the overall DR rates increase with solar XUV flux almost linearly, oxygen escape rate increases from 1 to 10 times present solar XUV conditions but decreases when increasing solar XUV flux further. Analysis shows that atomic species in the upper thermosphere of early Mars increases more rapidly than O2+ when increasing XUV fluxes. While the latter is the source of energetic O atoms, the former increases the collision probability and thus decreases the escape probability of energetic O. Our results suggest that photochemical escape be a less important escape mechanism than previously thought for the loss of water and/or CO2 from early Mars.

  5. Nonequilibrium Thermodynamic Model of Manganese Carbonate Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝瑞霞; 彭省临

    1999-01-01

    Manganese carbonate can be converted to many kinds of manganese oxides when it is aerated in air and oxygen.Pure manganese carbonate can be changed into Mn3O4 and γ-MnOOH,and manganese carbonate ore can be converted to MnO2 under the air-aerating and oxygen-aerating circumstances.The oxidation process of manganese carbonate is a changing process of mineral association,and is also a converting process of valence of manganese itself.Not only equilibrium stat,but also nonequilibrium state are involved in this whole process,This process is an irreversible heterogeneous complex reaction,and oberys the nonequilibrium thermodynamic model,The oxidation rate of manganese cabonate is controlled by many factors,especially nonmanganese metallic ions which play an important role in the oxidation process of manganese carbonate.

  6. Fabrication and anti-fouling properties of photochemically and thermally immobilized poly(ethylene oxide) and low molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Ren, Jin; Hlaing, Aye; Yan, Mingdi

    2011-02-01

    Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and low molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) were covalently immobilized on silicon wafers and gold films by way of the CH insertion reaction of perfluorophenyl azides (PFPAs) by either photolysis or thermolysis. The immobilization does not require chemical derivatization of PEO or PEG, and polymers of different molecular weights were successfully attached to the substrate to give uniform films. Microarrays were also generated by printing polymer solutions on PFPA-functionalized wafer or Au slides followed by light activation. For low molecular weight PEG, the immobilization was highly dependent on the quality of the film deposited on the substrate. While the spin-coated and printed PEG showed poor immobilization efficiency, thermal treatment of the PEG melt on PFPA-functionalized surfaces resulted in excellent film quality, giving, for example, a grafting density of 9.2×10(-4)Å(-2) and an average distance between grafted chains of 33Å for PEG 20,000. The anti-fouling property of the films was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi). Low protein adsorption was observed on thermally-immobilized PEG whereas the photoimmobilized PEG showed increased protein adsorption. In addition, protein arrays were created using polystyrene (PS) and PEG based on the differential protein adsorption of the two polymers.

  7. Photochemical oxidant injury and bark beetle coleoptera scolytidae infestation of ponderosa pine. I. Incidence of bark beetle infestation in injured trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stark, R.W.; Miller, P.R.; Cobb, F.W. Jr.; Wood, D.L.; Parmeter, J.R. Jr.

    1968-05-01

    A total of 107 beetle-killed and 963 nearest-neighbor ponderosa pines were examined to determine the association between severity of atmospheric pollution injury and infestation by bark beetles. Trees exhibiting advanced symptoms of pollution injury were most frequently infested by the western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis, and the mountain pine beetle, D. ponderosae. The degree of injury and incidence of bark beetle infestation were not related to total height, diameter, length of live and dead crown or crown class. As severity of oxidant injury increased, live crown ratio decreased and incidence of bark beetle infestation increased. One hundred noninfested trees in each of three disease categories, advanced, intermediate, and healthy, were examined for evidence of prior beetle attacks. Thirty-six percent of the advanced-diseased trees versus only 5% of the healthy trees were attacked. Thus, the beetles may discriminate between healthy and diseased trees at a distance, upon contact with the host, or both. These studies indicate strongly that atmospheric pollution injury predisposes ponderosa pine to bark beetle infestations. 3 references, 7 tables.

  8. Photochemical Synthesis of Au@Pd Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Methanol Oxidation Reaction: the Promotional Effect of the Au Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Yingnan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for synthesizing Au@Pd core-shell nanoparticles was proposed based on photochemistry. By irradiating the mixture of Au (III and Pd (II ions using ultraviolet light, the Au@Pd core-shell nanoparticles were prepared. The size of the nanoparticles and the thickness of the Pd shell could be efficiently adjusted by changing the molar ratio of Au (III to Pd (II ion. In this way, nanoparticles with diameter in the range of 5.6~4.6 nm were obtained. The core-shell structure of the synthesized nanoparticles was showed by the characterization using UV-Vis, TEM/HR-TEM and XPS. The paper investigated the electrocatalysis performance of Au@Pd nanoparticles in the methanol catalytic oxidation reaction, as well as the electron donating effect of Au core to Pd shell and the promotion of this effect on the catalytic activity of Pd shell. The experimental results provided reference for the development of non-platinum catalysts of low-temperature fuel cell anode.

  9. Research opportunities in photochemical sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The workshop entitled {open_quotes}Research Opportunities in Photochemical Sciences{close_quotes} was initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Research (ER), Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Division of Chemical Sciences. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado was requested by ER to host the workshop. It was held February 5-8, 1996 at the Estes Park Conference Center, Estes Park, CO, and attended by about 115 leading scientists and engineers from the U.S., Japan, and Europe; program managers for the DOE ER and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) programs also attended. The purpose of the workshop was to bridge the communication gap between the practioneers and supporters of basic research in photochemical science and the practioneers and supporters of applied research and development in technologies related to photochemical science. For the purposes of the workshop the definition of the term {open_quotes}photochemical science{close_quotes} was broadened to include homogeneous photochemistry, heterogeneous photochemistry, photoelectrochemistry, photocatalysis, photobiology (for example, the light-driven processes of biological photosynthesis and proton pumping), artificial photosynthesis, solid state photochemistry, and solar photochemistry. The technologies under development through DOE support that are most closely related to photochemical science, as defined above, are the renewable energy technologies of photovoltaics, biofuels, hydrogen energy, carbon dioxide reduction and utilization, and photocatalysis for environmental cleanup of water and air. Individual papers were processed separately for the United states Department of Energy databases.

  10. Atmospheric Oxidation in a Southeastern US Forest: Sensitivity of Differences Between Modeled and Measured Hydroxyl (OH) to Model Mechanism and Inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, W. H.; Feiner, P. A.; Zhang, L.; Miller, D. O.

    2014-12-01

    Forests play a critical role in the atmosphere's oxidation chemistry because of their broad global extent and their prodigious emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). The high hydroxyl (OH) reactivity of these BVOCs causes much of the initial chemistry to occur near the forest. Some OH measurements in forests are much greater than calculated with models, leading to close examination of the BVOC oxidation mechanisms and the possibility of significant OH recycling. The 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) provides a rigorous test of the BVOC oxidation mechanisms and OH recycling with its extensive measurement suite that was positioned in an Alabama forest for six weeks. OH measurements made with the Ground-based Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (GTHOS) are compared to photochemical box models constrained with other simultaneous measurements in order to test the understanding of this forest photochemistry. In this work, we use a global sensitivity analysis (Random Sampling - High Dimensional Model Representation) to examine the sensitivity of the differences between the modeled and measured OH to the model mechanism and inputs. In this presentation, we will discuss the model reactions and inputs that have the most influence on the modeled OH and its difference with measured OH and will provide recommendations for reducing model and measurement uncertainty.

  11. Advanced oxidation processes: overall models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, M. [Univ. de los Andes, Escuela Basica de Ingenieria, La Hechicera, Merida (Venezuela); Curco, D.; Addardak, A.; Gimenez, J.; Esplugas, S. [Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica. Univ. de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    Modelling AOPs implies to consider all the steps included in the process, that means, mass transfer, kinetic (reaction) and luminic steps. In this way, recent works develop models which relate the global reaction rate to catalyst concentration and radiation absorption. However, the application of such models requires to know what is the controlling step for the overall process. In this paper, a simple method is explained which allows to determine the controlling step. Thus, it is assumed that reactor is divided in two hypothetical zones (dark and illuminated), and according to the experimental results, obtained by varying only the reaction volume, it can be decided if reaction occurs only in the illuminated zone or in the all reactor, including dark zone. The photocatalytic degradation of phenol, by using titania degussa P-25 as catalyst, is studied as reaction model. The preliminary results obtained are presented here, showing that it seems that, in this case, reaction only occurs in the illuminated zone of photoreactor. A model is developed to explain this behaviour. (orig.)

  12. Degradation of dibutyl phthalate (DBP) by UV-254 nm/H2O2 photochemical oxidation: kinetics and influence of various process parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Duan, Xiaodi; He, Xuexiang; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2016-12-01

    Degradation of dibuytl phthalate (DBP), a plasticizer and also a widely distributed endocrine disruptor, by UV-254 nm/H2O2 advanced oxidation process (AOP) was investigated in this study. A significant DBP removal of 77.1 % at an initial concentration of 1.0 μM was achieved at UV fluence of 160 mJ/cm(2), initial H2O2 dosage of 1.0 mM, and pH of 7.6 ± 0.1. The DBP degradation exhibited a pseudo-first-order reaction kinetic pattern, with the rate constants linearly increasing with increasing H2O2 dosage while decreasing with increasing initial DBP concentration and pH value in a specific range. DBP destruction was significantly inhibited in the presence of alkalinity and natural organic matter (NOM), two known factors that should be taken a serious consideration of in the research and design of UV/H2O2-based AOPs. Presence of common inorganic anions (i.e., Cl(-), SO4(2-), and NO3(-)) and metal cations (i.e., Fe(3+) and Zn(2+)) had a slight impact on the degradation of DBP, although Cu(2+) could improve the degradation efficiency even at a concentration as low as 0.01 mg/L, suggesting a strong potential of applying UV/H2O2 for the removal of DBP with an environmental relevant level of copper.

  13. Optimization of the heterogeneous Fenton-oxidation of the model pollutant 2,4-xylidine using the optimal experimental design methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios-Enriquez, M. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico). Facultad de Quimica; Karlsruhe Univ. (Germany). Engler-Bunte-Inst.; Shahin, N.; Lang, J.; Oliveros, E.; Bossmann, S.H.; Braun, A. [Karlsruhe Univ. (Germany). Engler-Bunte-Inst.; Duran-de-Bazua, C. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico). Facultad de Quimica

    2004-11-01

    Among advanced oxidation processes (AOP), the photochemically enhanced Fenton reaction (photo-Fenton) may be particularly effective for the treatment of industrial waste water, and the possibility to use solar light is an additional advantage of this process. In the present work, a Fe{sup 3+}exchanged zeolite Y was tested as a heterogeneous photo-Fenton catalyst for the degradation of the model organic pollutant, 2,4-xylidine. The performance of the catalyst was investigated using a bench photochemical reactor as well as solar reactors. The incident solar radiant powers (determined by ferrioxalate actinometry) showed linear correlations with the outputs of a Si-photodiode and a bolometer mounted on the solar unit, and could therefore be easily estimated from the on-line observation of the sensor outputs. The experimental design methodology was used for planning the experiments under normalized conditions and for modeling the rates of 2,4-xylidine oxidation as a function of the concentrations of the additives (Fe{sup 3+}exchanged zeolite catalyst and hydrogen peroxide). Although a direct quantitative comparison between both reactors is difficult (different geometries and volumes, different spectral distribution of the radiation sources), the performance of the solar reactor appears to compare favorably with that of the bench photochemical reactor. (Author)

  14. Investigating ambient ozone formation regimes in neighboring cities of shale plays in the Northeast United States using photochemical modeling and satellite retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Yuan; Faust, Eric; Hou, Xiangting; Lee, Pius; Kim, Hyun Cheol; Hedquist, Brent C.; Liao, Kuo-Jen

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates long-term (i.e., 2007-2014) fluctuations in ambient ozone formation regimes for cities adjacent to shale plays in the Northeast United States (U.S.). Ozone air quality in many cities of the Northeast U.S. does not meet the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), and understanding ambient ozone formation regimes is essential to develop effective air pollution mitigation strategies for cities violating the air quality standards. Since 2013, the U.S. has become the world's largest producer of tight oil and natural gas from shale rock, and previous studies show that emissions of air pollutant precursors from shale oil and gas-related activities would have the potential to affect ambient ozone air quality in adjacent cities of shale plays. This work leveraged (1) satellite-retrieved column densities of formaldehyde (HCHO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) from multiple instruments (i.e., Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2)); (2) photochemical air quality modeling and sensitivity analysis; and (3) ratios of satellite-retrieved air pollutant column densities to investigate ambient ozone formation regimes in neighboring cities of shale plays (i.e., Marcellus Shale) in the Northeast U.S. from 2007 to 2014. Our results show that ambient ozone formation in Boston, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. (which are close to Marcellus Shale) was in the NOx -limited or transition regime during the period of study. Ambient ozone formation in New York City was in the transition regime during 2010-2013 and VOC -limited regime during 2007-2009 and in 2014. Based on the result of this study, we conclude that controls NOx emissions would mitigate ozone air pollution from 2007 to 2014 in most of the cities examined in this study. Controls of local VOC emissions would ease ozone air pollution in New York City during the study period. With projected increases in oil and gas production from shale plays in

  15. Regional ozone pollution and key controlling factors of photochemical ozone production in Pearl River Delta during summer time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG; ChihChung; CHOU; C.K.Charles; Andreas; Wahner

    2010-01-01

    An intensive field campaign including measurements from the environmental monitoring network and from two super sites took place in the Pearl River Delta region in summer 2006.Using routinely measured O3 and NOx concentrations,the spatial and temporal variation of O3 and of the total oxidant concentrations was characterized.According to the spatial variability of NO2/NO,the two super sites were found to be representative of polluted urban and downwind suburban conditions.In addition,both sites were located in high O3 regions.In-depth diagnostic of photochemical ozone production processes and their key controlling factors are achieved with an observation-based model(OBM) to gain regional perspectives.Budget analysis and sensitivity model runs show that aldehyde and HONO chemistry had significant impacts on local photochemical ozone production rates.The analysis of calculated Relative Incremental Reactivities shows that photochemical ozone production rates are mainly sensitive to anthropogenic hydrocarbons(HCs) in the polluted urban areas.In the suburban areas,sensitivity to nitrogen oxide(NO) concentrations dominated.Key anthropogenic HCs in both areas are alkenes and aromatics.Significant differences of ozone production efficiencies are identified between the urban and suburban regions,consistent with the OBM diagnosed results.

  16. Tropospheric Ozone Research: Monitoring and modelling of photo-oxidants over Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck JP; Roemer MGM; Vosbeek MEJP; Builtjes PJH; RIVM-LLO; TNO-MEP; KEMA

    1996-01-01

    The Dutch activities contributing to the EUROTRAC-TOR programme were set up to study and quantify the underlying chemical and transport processes important to the occurrence of photochemical oxidants in Europe. The project involved establishing an advanced monitoring site at Kollumerwaard, monitorin

  17. In-situ BrO measurements in the upper troposphere / lower stratosphere. Validation of the ENVISAT satellite measurements and photochemical model studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrechanyy, S.

    2007-04-15

    and SCOUT-O3 in the 15-20 km altitude regime are at the low side of comparable DOAS measurements a CLaMS study of the evolution of Bry from the source gases has been carried out. For this purpose an ensemble of trajectories rising from the lower troposphere to the TTL within 6 to more than 90 days were initialized with observed mixing ratios in the boundary layer of all important organic bromine source gases and the free-up of Bry by chemical and photochemical reactions was simulated. Bromoform, CHBr3, was found to be the main source of inorganic bromine at the tropopause. The derived tropospheric lifetime of bromoform is 33 days. The modelled BrO mixing ratio at the tropopause (less than 2.5 pptv) is consistent with HALOX measurements which do not detect significant amounts of BrO there (<1-2 pptv). Therefore measurements of more than 4 pptv (as retrieved from SCIAMACHY) can only be explained trough processes not included in the model. (orig.)

  18. Is the VUV laser ablation of polymers a pure photochemical process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castex, M. C.; Bityurin, N.

    2002-09-01

    Within the pure photochemical model of laser ablation of polymers, developed in our previous publications, we estimate the value of the surface temperature at the ablation front for several important examples. Derived formulas allow probing physical self-consistency of the pure photochemical ablation model.

  19. Photochemical transformation of aircraft exhausts at their transition from the plume to the large scale dispersion in the Northern temperature belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karol, I.L.; Kiselev, A.A. [Main Geophysical Observatory, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The 2-D diurnally varying photochemical model of the Northern temperate zonal tropospheric belt with fixed (off line) temperature and air transport is used for the description of the formation of aircraft exhaust concentration distribution in the North Atlantic commercial flight corridor, based on actual flights in summer and winter. A strong diurnal and seasonal variation of emitted NO{sub x} oxidation rate is revealed and evaluated. (author) 11 refs.

  20. Seasonal changes in photochemical properties of dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcal, P.; Dillon, P. J.; Molot, L. A.

    2013-03-01

    The fate of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in lakes and streams is significantly affected by photochemical transformation of DOM. A series of laboratory photochemical experiments was conducted to describe long-term changes in photochemical properties of DOM. The stream samples used in this study originated from three different catchments on the southern-most part of the Boreal ecozone near Dorset, Ontario, Canada. A first-order kinetics equation was used to model photochemical degradation of DOM and the kinetic rate constant, K, was used as an indicator of photochemical properties of DOM. Highest Kwas observed in samples from the catchment dominated by coniferous forest while the lowest K was measured in the deciduous catchment. Kinetic rate constants from all three catchments showed a sinusoidal pattern during the hydrological year. K increased steadily during autumn and winter and decreased during spring and summer. The highest values were observed during spring melt events when DOM was flushed from terrestrial sources by high flows. The minimum rate constants were found in summer when discharge was lowest. DOM molecular weight and specific absorbance at 254 nm also exhibited annual cycles corresponding to the seasonal cycles of terrestrial organic matter but the relationships between these properties and K was probably affected by previous exposure to solar radiation during transit from the catchment as well as pH and iron.

  1. A Self-Consistent Model for Thermal Oxidation of Silicon at Low Oxide Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Gerlach

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal oxidation of silicon belongs to the most decisive steps in microelectronic fabrication because it allows creating electrically insulating areas which enclose electrically conductive devices and device areas, respectively. Deal and Grove developed the first model (DG-model for the thermal oxidation of silicon describing the oxide thickness versus oxidation time relationship with very good agreement for oxide thicknesses of more than 23 nm. Their approach named as general relationship is the basis of many similar investigations. However, measurement results show that the DG-model does not apply to very thin oxides in the range of a few nm. Additionally, it is inherently not self-consistent. The aim of this paper is to develop a self-consistent model that is based on the continuity equation instead of Fick’s law as the DG-model is. As literature data show, the relationship between silicon oxide thickness and oxidation time is governed—down to oxide thicknesses of just a few nm—by a power-of-time law. Given by the time-independent surface concentration of oxidants at the oxide surface, Fickian diffusion seems to be neglectable for oxidant migration. The oxidant flux has been revealed to be carried by non-Fickian flux processes depending on sites being able to lodge dopants (oxidants, the so-called DOCC-sites, as well as on the dopant jump rate.

  2. Simulation on volume emission rate at OIRA band based on photochemical model%利用光化学模型的氧红外大气波段体发射率模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪自军; 陈圣波

    2011-01-01

    基于光化学模型模拟氧红外大气(OIRA)波段1.27μm气辉体发射率(VER),是利用临边OIRA波段卫星数据反演中间层臭氧浓度一个重要的过程.从奇氧族光化学反应出发,基于大气动力学和光化学理论,建立了O2(a1△g)的光化学模型.通过太阳辐射模拟值,解算了光化学反应系数,进而进行了Odin卫星轨道面内气辉VER的模拟.结果表明,白天气辉VER一般数量级达到106,峰值出现在50~55km高度范围,而黑夜VER几乎为0.且随天顶角增大,VER达到峰值的高度增大.与利用Odin OSIRIS IR Levell数据反演的同时间VER剖面相比,VER剖面在数值量级、二维结构特征和衰减变化时间点方面,有很高的一致性.而且高纬地区比低纬地区一致性高,特别是80~100km之间稳合度最高,证明使用建立的光化学模型能够反演高纬度地区中间层臭氧.%Simulation on 1.27 μm airglow volume emission rate (VER) is an indispensable aspect for inversion of mesospheric ozone concentration from satellite measurement in the near oxygen infrared atmospheric (OIRA) band. In this study, the photochemical reactions of odd oxygen family were reviewed.A photochemical model of O2 (a1△g) was established based on the atmospheric kinetics and photochemistry.The photochemical index were solved from the modeled solar fluxes, and then the airglow VER in an orbit plane of Odin was simulated. The results show that the large 106 of VER emerges in the daytime, with a peak near 50-55 km. The VER in the nighttime is nearly zero. The VER peak rises with the increase of solar zenith angle. The comparison between the modeled and retrieved VER from Odin OSIRIS IR Levell data indicates that, there is a good agreement among the scale, photochemical features and decay time at all points along the section. Furthermore, the difference between the modeled and retrieved VER is smaller in high latitudes and the minimum is achieved between 80 and 100 km. It is shown

  3. Supramolecular Photochemistry Controlling Photochemical Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Ramamurthy, V

    2011-01-01

    This is the most updated, comprehensive collection of monographs on all aspects of photochemistry and photophysics related to natural and synthetic, inorganic, organic, and biological supramolecular systems. Supramolecular Photochemistry: Controlling Photochemical Processes addresses reactions in crystals, organized assemblies, monolayers, zeolites, clays, silica, micelles, polymers, dendrimers, organic hosts, supramolecular structures, organic glass, proteins and DNA, and applications of photosystems in confined media. This landmark publication describes the past, present, and future of this

  4. Empirical Modeling of Metal Oxides Dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seon-Byeong; Won, Hui-Jun; Park, Sang-Yoon; Moon, Jei-Kwon; Choi, Wang-Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    There have been tons of studies to examine the dissolution of metal oxides in terms of dissolution kinetics, type of reactants, geometry, etc. However, most of previous studies is the observation of macroscopic dissolution characteristics and might not provide the atomic scale characteristics of dissolution reactions. Even the analysis of microscopic structure of metal oxide with SEM, XRD, etc. during the dissolution does not observe the microscopic characteristics of dissolution mechanism. Computational analysis with well-established dissolution model is the one of the best approaches to understand indirectly the microscopic dissolution behaviour. Various designs of experimental conditions are applied to the in-vitro methods interpreting the dissolution characteristics controlled by each influencing parameter.

  5. Photochemical pollution indicators; Les indicateurs de la pollution photochimique. La mesure des composes azotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perros, P.E.; Marion, T. [Paris-7 Univ., 75 (France). Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques

    1998-11-01

    The number of photochemical pollution is generally based on the observation of ozone and nitrogen oxides concentration levels. So, the measurement of photochemical pollution indicators becomes essential to better understand the involved phenomena, and at the end to enable its reduction control and strategy. In this paper, we focus on the measurements of nitrogen compounds (NO{sub x} PAN, HNO{sub 3}). (authors) 24 refs.

  6. Approximate photochemical dynamics of azobenzene with reactive force fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Hartke, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    We have fitted reactive force fields of the ReaxFF type to the ground and first excited electronic states of azobenzene, using global parameter optimization by genetic algorithms. Upon coupling with a simple energy-gap transition probability model, this setup allows for completely force-field-based simulations of photochemical cis→trans- and trans→cis-isomerizations of azobenzene, with qualitatively acceptable quantum yields. This paves the way towards large-scale dynamics simulations of molecular machines, including bond breaking and formation (via the reactive force field) as well as photochemical engines (presented in this work).

  7. Approximate photochemical dynamics of azobenzene with reactive force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Hartke, Bernd

    2013-12-14

    We have fitted reactive force fields of the ReaxFF type to the ground and first excited electronic states of azobenzene, using global parameter optimization by genetic algorithms. Upon coupling with a simple energy-gap transition probability model, this setup allows for completely force-field-based simulations of photochemical cis→trans- and trans→cis-isomerizations of azobenzene, with qualitatively acceptable quantum yields. This paves the way towards large-scale dynamics simulations of molecular machines, including bond breaking and formation (via the reactive force field) as well as photochemical engines (presented in this work).

  8. Modelling the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korla, Kalyani; Mitra, Chanchal K

    2014-01-01

    The Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation are the two most important sets of reactions in a eukaryotic cell that meet the major part of the total energy demands of a cell. In this paper, we present a computer simulation of the coupled reactions using open source tools for simulation. We also show that it is possible to model the Krebs cycle with a simple black box with a few inputs and outputs. However, the kinetics of the internal processes has been modelled using numerical tools. We also show that the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation together can be combined in a similar fashion - a black box with a few inputs and outputs. The Octave script is flexible and customisable for any chosen set-up for this model. In several cases, we had no explicit idea of the underlying reaction mechanism and the rate determining steps involved, and we have used the stoichiometric equations that can be easily changed as and when more detailed information is obtained. The script includes the feedback regulation of the various enzymes of the Krebs cycle. For the electron transport chain, the pH gradient across the membrane is an essential regulator of the kinetics and this has been modelled empirically but fully consistent with experimental results. The initial conditions can be very easily changed and the simulation is potentially very useful in a number of cases of clinical importance.

  9. Photochemical reactions of neptunium in nitric acid solution containing photocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Kawamura, Fumio (Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Energy Research Lab.)

    1991-01-01

    Photochemical oxidation and reduction behaviors of neptunium were preliminarily investigated in 3 mol/l nitric acid solution. Nitric acid of 3 mol/l simulated the high level waste solution from a spent fuel reprocessing process. Concentrations of Np(V), Np(VI) and nitrous acid were determined with a photospectrometer, and solution potential with an electrode. Without additives, Np(VI) was reduced to Np(V) by nitrous acid which was photolytically generated from nitric acid. With a scavenger for nitrous acid, Np(V) was oxidized to extractable Np(VI) by a photolytically generated oxidizing reagent which were predicted by the solution potential measurement. The reduction rate was higher than the oxidation rate because of the larger quantity and higher reactivity of nitrous acid than an oxidizing reagent. Photocatalyst was proved to be effective for the oxidation of Np(V) to Np(VI). (author).

  10. Modeling Nitrogen Oxides in the Lower Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, S. Randy; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This talk will focus on the status of current understanding (not a historical review) as regards modeling nitrogen oxides (NOy) in the lower stratosphere (LS). The presentation will be organized around three major areas of process understanding: 1) NOy sources, sinks, and transport to the LS, 2) NOy species partitioning, and 3) polar multiphase processes. In each area, process topics will be identified with an estimate of the degree of confidence associated with their representation in numerical models. Several exotic and/or speculative processes will also be discussed. Those topics associated with low confidence or knowledge gaps, weighted by their prospective importance in stratospheric chemical modeling, will be collected into recommendations for further study. Suggested approaches to further study will be presented for discussion.

  11. Simulation of wet oxidation of silicon based on the interfacial silicon emission model and comparison with dry oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Uematsu, Masashi; Kageshima, Hiroyuki; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2001-01-01

    Silicon oxidation in wet ambients is simulated based on the interfacial silicon emission model and is compared with dry oxidation in terms of the silicon-atom emission. The silicon emission model enables the simulation of wet oxidation to be done using the oxidant self-diffusivity in the oxide with a single activation energy. The amount of silicon emission from the interface during wet oxidation is smaller than that during dry oxidation. The small emission rate for wet oxidation is responsibl...

  12. MARMOT update for oxide fuel modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, Daniel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jiang, Chao [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Aagesen, Larry [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ahmed, Karim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jiang, Wen [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Biner, Bulent [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bai, Xianming [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Tonks, Michael [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Millett, Paul [Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the lower-length-scale research and development progresses in FY16 at Idaho National Laboratory in developing mechanistic materials models for oxide fuels, in parallel to the development of the MARMOT code which will be summarized in a separate report. This effort is a critical component of the microstructure based fuel performance modeling approach, supported by the Fuels Product Line in the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program. The progresses can be classified into three categories: 1) development of materials models to be used in engineering scale fuel performance modeling regarding the effect of lattice defects on thermal conductivity, 2) development of modeling capabilities for mesoscale fuel behaviors including stage-3 gas release, grain growth, high burn-up structure, fracture and creep, and 3) improved understanding in material science by calculating the anisotropic grain boundary energies in UO$_2$ and obtaining thermodynamic data for solid fission products. Many of these topics are still under active development. They are updated in the report with proper amount of details. For some topics, separate reports are generated in parallel and so stated in the text. The accomplishments have led to better understanding of fuel behaviors and enhance capability of the MOOSE-BISON-MARMOT toolkit.

  13. Kinetic Modelling of Macroscopic Properties Changes during Crosslinked Polybutadiene Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audouin, Ludmila; Coquillat, Marie; Colin, Xavier; Verdu, Jacques; Nevière, Robert

    2008-08-01

    The thermal oxidation of additive free hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) isocyanate crosslinked rubber bulk samples has been studied at 80, 100 and 120 °C in air. The oxidation kinetics has been monitored by gravimetry and thickness distribution of oxidation products was determined by FTIR mapping. Changes of elastic shear modulus G' during oxidation were followed during oxidation at the same temperatures. The kinetic model established previously for HTPB has been adapted for bulk sample oxidation using previously determined set of kinetic parameters. Oxygen diffusion control of oxidation has been introduced into the model. The mass changes kinetic curves and oxidation products profiles were simulated and adequate fit was obtained. Using the rubber elasticity theory the elastic modulus changes were simulated taking into account the elastically active chains concentration changes due to chain scission and crosslinking reactions. The reasonable fit of G' as a function of oxidation time experimental curves was obtained.

  14. Photochemical Studies on Aqueous Carboplatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟平; 杨懿昆; 阙振寰; 熊惠周

    1994-01-01

    The photochemical products,quantum yields and mechanisms of aqueous Carboplatin havebeen studied at 313 and 254 nm irradiation.Excitation in the ligand field bands 1A1→1A2 and 1A1→1E leads tosubstitution reactions,giving diaquodiammineplatinum and tetraaquoplatinum.And then these complexesundergo thermally hydrolysis and polymerization producing polymeric hydroxo-bridged complexes.Oxygen isnot involved in the reactions.Excitation in the charge-transfer band 1A1→1A2u results in redox reaction.Metallic platinum and diaquodiammineplatinum are formed,respectively,in the absence and the presence ofoxygen.

  15. Nonstationary heating during VUV photochemical ablation of polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bityurin, N.; Castex, M. C.

    According to a previously developed pure photochemical model of VUV laser ablation of polymers, the velocity of ablation front is proportional to surface intensity, and a stationary value of the surface temperature does not depend on laser intensity. Previous estimations show, however, that this stationary surface temperature could be too high to be relevant to the photochemical mechanism. This raises a question of whether the stationary value of the surface temperature can be achieved for a given time shape of light intensity coming to the surface irradiated by a laser pulse of high enough fluence. The intensity time shape is connected not only with the time shape of a laser pulse but also with screening of laser radiation by the plume. This problem is discussed in the present communication. Specifically, it is shown that with a hyperbolic surface intensity time shape, heat diffusion can successfully compete with laser heating decreasing maximum surface temperature compared to its stationary value. The hyperbolic surface laser intensity corresponds to a rectangular laser pulse screened by plume during the photochemical ablation. This allows one to estimate that the photochemical model for a multiple-pulse VUV laser ablation with a high plume extinction coefficient is self-consistent even for a high value of stationary temperature and for high enough laser fluences.

  16. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar S. Sohal; Anil V. Virkar; Sergey N. Rashkeev; Michael V. Glazoff

    2010-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic no equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential, , within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, no equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  17. Photochemically induced oscillations of aromatic pentazadienes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, T.; Hahn, C.; Wokaun, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Aromatic pentazadienes are used to enhance the laser induced ablation of standard polymers with low absorption in the UV. Therefore the photochemistry of substituted 1,5-diaryl-3-alkyl-1,4-pentazadiene monomers was studied with a pulsed excimer laser as irradiation source. The net photochemical reaction proceeds in an overall one-step pathway A{yields}B. Quantum yields for the laser decomposition were determined to be up to 10%. An oscillating behaviour of the absorption was found during the dark period following the irradiation. The temperature dependence of this dark reaction has been studied. An attempt to model this behaviour in terms of a non-linear coupling between heat released, heat transfer, and reaction kinetics will be described. (author) 4 figs., 4 refs.

  18. Simplified Modeling of Oxidation of Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    A method of simplified computational modeling of oxidation of hydrocarbons is undergoing development. This is one of several developments needed to enable accurate computational simulation of turbulent, chemically reacting flows. At present, accurate computational simulation of such flows is difficult or impossible in most cases because (1) the numbers of grid points needed for adequate spatial resolution of turbulent flows in realistically complex geometries are beyond the capabilities of typical supercomputers now in use and (2) the combustion of typical hydrocarbons proceeds through decomposition into hundreds of molecular species interacting through thousands of reactions. Hence, the combination of detailed reaction- rate models with the fundamental flow equations yields flow models that are computationally prohibitive. Hence, further, a reduction of at least an order of magnitude in the dimension of reaction kinetics is one of the prerequisites for feasibility of computational simulation of turbulent, chemically reacting flows. In the present method of simplified modeling, all molecular species involved in the oxidation of hydrocarbons are classified as either light or heavy; heavy molecules are those having 3 or more carbon atoms. The light molecules are not subject to meaningful decomposition, and the heavy molecules are considered to decompose into only 13 specified constituent radicals, a few of which are listed in the table. One constructs a reduced-order model, suitable for use in estimating the release of heat and the evolution of temperature in combustion, from a base comprising the 13 constituent radicals plus a total of 26 other species that include the light molecules and related light free radicals. Then rather than following all possible species through their reaction coordinates, one follows only the reduced set of reaction coordinates of the base. The behavior of the base was examined in test computational simulations of the combustion of

  19. Metal hybrid nanoparticles for catalytic organic and photochemical transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyunjoon

    2015-03-17

    In order to understand heterogeneous catalytic reactions, model catalysts such as a single crystalline surface have been widely studied for many decades. However, catalytic systems that actually advance the reactions are three-dimensional and commonly have multiple components including active metal nanoparticles and metal oxide supports. On the other hand, as nanochemistry has rapidly been developed and been applied to various fields, many researchers have begun to discuss the impact of nanochemistry on heterogeneous catalysis. Metal hybrid nanoparticles bearing multiple components are structurally very close to the actual catalysts, and their uniform and controllable morphology is suitable for investigating the relationship between the structure and the catalytic properties in detail. In this Account, we introduce four typical structures of metal hybrid nanoparticles that can be used to conduct catalytic organic and photochemical reactions. Metal@silica (or metal oxide) yolk-shell nanoparticles, in which metal cores exist in internal voids surrounded by thin silica (or metal oxide) shells, exhibited extremely high thermal and chemical stability due to the geometrical protection of the silica layers against the metal cores. The morphology of the metal cores and the pore density of the hollow shells were precisely adjusted to optimize the reaction activity and diffusion rates of the reactants. Metal@metal oxide core-shell nanoparticles and inverted structures, where the cores supported the shells serving an active surface, exhibited high activity with no diffusion barriers for the reactants and products. These nanostructures were used as effective catalysts for various organic and gas-phase reactions, including hydrogen transfer, Suzuki coupling, and steam methane reforming. In contrast to the yolk- and core-shell structures, an asymmetric arrangement of distinct domains generated acentric dumbbells and tipped rods. A large domain of each component added multiple

  20. Photochemical processes and ozone production in Finnish conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurila, T.; Hakola, H. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland). Air Quality Dept.

    1996-12-31

    Photochemical ozone production is observed in March-September. Highest ozone concentrations and production efficiencies are observed in spring in the northern parts and in summer in the southern parts of the country. VOC concentrations are relatively low compared to continental areas in general. During the growing season a substantial part of the total reactive mass of VOCs is of biogenic origin. Large forest areas absorb ozone substantially, decreasing the ambient ozone concentrations in central and northern parts of Finland where long-range transport of ozone is relatively important compared to local production. The aim of the work conducted at Finnish Meteorological Institute has been to characterise concentrations of photochemically active species in the boundary layer and their photochemical formation and deposition including the effects on vegetation. Also interactions between the boundary layer and free troposphere of ozone have been studied. In the future, fluxes of both biogenic species and air pollutants will be measured and the models will be further developed so that the photochemical and micrometeorological processes could be better understood

  1. Photochemical Copper Coating on 3D Printed Thermoplastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Winco K C; Sun, Bo; Huang, Junfeng; Jin, Yingdi; Meng, Zhengong; Choy, Hang Shan; Cai, Zhixiang; Li, Guijun; Ho, Cheuk Lam; Yang, Jinlong; Wong, Wai Yeung

    2016-08-09

    3D printing using thermoplastics has become very popular in recent years, however, it is challenging to provide a metal coating on 3D objects without using specialized and expensive tools. Herein, a novel acrylic paint containing malachite for coating on 3D printed objects is introduced, which can be transformed to copper via one-step laser treatment. The malachite containing pigment can be used as a commercial acrylic paint, which can be brushed onto 3D printed objects. The material properties and photochemical transformation processes have been comprehensively studied. The underlying physics of the photochemical synthesis of copper was characterized using density functional theory calculations. After laser treatment, the surface coating of the 3D printed objects was transformed to copper, which was experimentally characterized by XRD. 3D printed prototypes, including model of the Statue of Liberty covered with a copper surface coating and a robotic hand with copper interconnections, are demonstrated using this painting method. This composite material can provide a novel solution for coating metals on 3D printed objects. The photochemical reduction analysis indicates that the copper rust in malachite form can be remotely and photo-chemically reduced to pure copper with sufficient photon energy.

  2. Photochemical Copper Coating on 3D Printed Thermoplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Winco K. C.; Sun, Bo; Huang, Junfeng; Jin, Yingdi; Meng, Zhengong; Choy, Hang Shan; Cai, Zhixiang; Li, Guijun; Ho, Cheuk Lam; Yang, Jinlong; Wong, Wai Yeung

    2016-01-01

    3D printing using thermoplastics has become very popular in recent years, however, it is challenging to provide a metal coating on 3D objects without using specialized and expensive tools. Herein, a novel acrylic paint containing malachite for coating on 3D printed objects is introduced, which can be transformed to copper via one-step laser treatment. The malachite containing pigment can be used as a commercial acrylic paint, which can be brushed onto 3D printed objects. The material properties and photochemical transformation processes have been comprehensively studied. The underlying physics of the photochemical synthesis of copper was characterized using density functional theory calculations. After laser treatment, the surface coating of the 3D printed objects was transformed to copper, which was experimentally characterized by XRD. 3D printed prototypes, including model of the Statue of Liberty covered with a copper surface coating and a robotic hand with copper interconnections, are demonstrated using this painting method. This composite material can provide a novel solution for coating metals on 3D printed objects. The photochemical reduction analysis indicates that the copper rust in malachite form can be remotely and photo-chemically reduced to pure copper with sufficient photon energy. PMID:27501761

  3. Photochemical Copper Coating on 3D Printed Thermoplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Winco K. C.; Sun, Bo; Huang, Junfeng; Jin, Yingdi; Meng, Zhengong; Choy, Hang Shan; Cai, Zhixiang; Li, Guijun; Ho, Cheuk Lam; Yang, Jinlong; Wong, Wai Yeung

    2016-08-01

    3D printing using thermoplastics has become very popular in recent years, however, it is challenging to provide a metal coating on 3D objects without using specialized and expensive tools. Herein, a novel acrylic paint containing malachite for coating on 3D printed objects is introduced, which can be transformed to copper via one-step laser treatment. The malachite containing pigment can be used as a commercial acrylic paint, which can be brushed onto 3D printed objects. The material properties and photochemical transformation processes have been comprehensively studied. The underlying physics of the photochemical synthesis of copper was characterized using density functional theory calculations. After laser treatment, the surface coating of the 3D printed objects was transformed to copper, which was experimentally characterized by XRD. 3D printed prototypes, including model of the Statue of Liberty covered with a copper surface coating and a robotic hand with copper interconnections, are demonstrated using this painting method. This composite material can provide a novel solution for coating metals on 3D printed objects. The photochemical reduction analysis indicates that the copper rust in malachite form can be remotely and photo-chemically reduced to pure copper with sufficient photon energy.

  4. Heterogeneous reactions of NO2 and HNO3 on oxides and mineral dust: A combined laboratory and modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, G. M.; Song, C. H.; Phadnis, M.; Carmichael, G. R.; Grassian, V. H.

    2001-08-01

    This study combines laboratory measurements and modeling analysis to quantify the role of heterogeneous reactions of gaseous nitrogen dioxide and nitric acid on mineral oxide and mineral dust particles in tropospheric ozone formation. At least two types of heterogeneous reactions occur on the surface of these particles. Upon initial exposure of the oxide to NO2 there is a loss of NO2 from the gas phase by adsorption on the particle surface, i.e., NO2(g) → NO2(a). As the reaction proceeds, a reduction of gaseous NO2 to NO, NO2 (g) → NO (g) is found to occur. Initial uptake coefficients γ0 for NO2 on the surface of these particles have been measured at 298 K using a Knudsen cell reactor coupled to a mass spectrometer. For the oxides studied, α,γ-Al2O3, α,γ-Fe2O3, TiO2, SiO2, CaO, and MgO, γ0 ranges from dry surfaces are just below the lower limit to have an impact on the photochemical oxidant cycle, while the heterogeneous reactivity of HNO3 is sufficiently large to have an effect. Under conditions of high mineral dust mass loadings and/or smaller size distributions the importance of these reactions (both NO2 and HNO3) is expected to increase.

  5. Efficient photochemical generation of peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides with ultraviolet light emitting diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Rider

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photochemical sources of peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides (PANs are utilized in many atmospheric measurement techniques for calibration or to deliver an internal standard. Conventionally, such sources rely on phosphor-coated low-pressure mercury (Hg lamps to generate the UV light necessary to photo-dissociate a dialkyl ketone (usually acetone in the presence of a calibrated amount of nitric oxide (NO and oxygen (O2. In this manuscript, a photochemical PAN source in which the Hg lamp has been replaced by arrays of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs is described. The output of the UV-LED source was analyzed by gas chromatography (PAN-GC and thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectroscopy (TD-CRDS. Using acetone, diethyl ketone (DIEK, diisopropyl ketone (DIPK, or di-n-propyl ketone (DNPK, respectively, the source produces peroxyacetic (PAN, peroxypropionic (PPN, peroxyisobutanoic (PiBN, or peroxy-n-butanoic nitric anhydride (PnBN from NO in high yield (> 90%. Box model simulations with a subset of the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM were carried out to rationalize products yields and to identify side products. The use of UV-LED arrays offers many advantages over conventional Hg lamp setups, including greater light output over a narrower wavelength range, lower power consumption, and minimal generation of heat.

  6. Photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid mediated by iron in strongly acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Masaki; Ito, Masataka; Ohkura, Ryouichi; Mino A, Esteban R; Kose, Tomohiro; Okuda, Tetsuji; Nakai, Satoshi; Kawata, Kuniaki; Nishijima, Wataru

    2014-03-15

    The performance of a ferric ion mediated photochemical process for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) decomposition in strongly acidic conditions of pH 2.0 was evaluated in comparison with those in weakly acidic conditions, pH 3.7 or pH 5.0, based on iron species composition and ferric ion regeneration. Complete decomposition of PFOA under UV irradiation was confirmed at pH 2.0, whereas perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA) and other intermediates were accumulated in weakly acidic conditions. Iron states at each pH were evaluated using a chemical equilibrium model, Visual MINTEQ. The main iron species at pH 2.0 is Fe(3+) ion. Although Fe(3+) ion is consumed and is transformed to Fe(2+) ion by photochemical decomposition of PFOA and its intermediates, the produced Fe(2+) ion will change to Fe(3+) ion to restore chemical equilibrium. Continuous decomposition will occur at pH 2.0. However, half of the iron cannot be dissolved at pH 3.7. The main species of dissolved iron is Fe(OH)(2+). At pH 3.7 or higher pH, Fe(3+) ion will only be produced from the oxidation of Fe(2+) ion by hydroxyl radical produced by Fe(OH)(2+) under UV irradiation. These different mechanisms of Fe(3+) regeneration that prevail in strongly and weakly acidic conditions will engender different performances of the ferric ion.

  7. From Laboratory Studies to the Field Applications of Advanced Oxidation Processes: A Case Study of Technology Transfer from Switzerland to Burkina Faso on the Field of Photochemical Detoxification of Biorecalcitrant Chemical Pollutants in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kenfack

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fenton and photo-Fenton detoxification of non-biodegradable chemical pollution in water was investigated under simulated UV light in the laboratory and under direct sunlight in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. The laboratory experiments enable one to make a systematic diagnosis among three types of wastewaters, identifying a biorecalcitrant wastewater containing the Chloro-hydroxy-Pryridine (CHYPR. The application of the photo-Fenton process on effluent containing the CHYPR showed not to stimulate the generation of biodegradable by-products. Optimal conditions for detoxification of effluent containing the CHYPR were found at pH=2.8, [Fe2+]=5.2 mM, initial [H2O2]=768 mM, for an effluent concentrated at 2.2 mM of CHYPR. The application of the photochemical process on a field pilot solar photoreactor for the detoxification of water polluted with a pesticide made with Endosulfan showed very promising results, with potential biodegradable effluents obtained at the end of the photochemical treatment. Optimal conditions of the applied study were found at pH=3. [H2O2]=8 mM and [Fe2+]=0.18 mM for an initial concentration of 0.36 mM of Endosulfan.

  8. Regional Air Quality Model Application of the Aqueous-Phase Photo Reduction of Atmospheric Oxidized Mercury by Dicarboxylic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse O. Bash

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In most ecosystems, atmospheric deposition is the primary input of mercury. The total wet deposition of mercury in atmospheric chemistry models is sensitive to parameterization of the aqueous-phase reduction of divalent oxidized mercury (Hg2+. However, most atmospheric chemistry models use a parameterization of the aqueous-phase reduction of Hg2+ that has been shown to be unlikely under normal ambient conditions or use a non mechanistic value derived to optimize wet deposition results. Recent laboratory experiments have shown that Hg2+ can be photochemically reduced to elemental mercury (Hg in the aqueous-phase by dissolved organic matter and a mechanism and the rate for Hg2+ photochemical reduction by dicarboxylic acids (DCA has been proposed. For the first time in a regional scale model, the DCA mechanism has been applied. The HO2-Hg2+ reduction mechanism, the proposed DCA reduction mechanism, and no aqueous-phase reduction (NAR of Hg2+ are evaluated against weekly wet deposition totals, concentrations and precipitation observations from the Mercury Deposition Network (MDN using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model version 4.7.1. Regional scale simulations of mercury wet deposition using a DCA reduction mechanism evaluated well against observations, and reduced the bias in model evaluation by at least 13% over the other schemes evaluated, although summertime deposition estimates were still biased by −31.4% against observations. The use of the DCA reduction mechanism physically links Hg2+ reduction to plausible atmospheric processes relevant under typical ambient conditions.

  9. Development of a photochemical reactor for the treatment of effluents in petroleum industry; Desenvolvimento de um reator fotoquimico para o tratamento de efluentes da industria do petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mota, Andre Luis Novais; Chiavone-Filho, Osvaldo [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil); Muranaka, Cinthia Tiemi; Moraes, Jose Ermirio Ferreira de; Guardani, Roberto; Nascimento, Claudio Augusto Oller do [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica; Quina, Frank H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2004-07-01

    Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOP) have been largely studied for the treatment of wastewaters containing highly toxic organic compounds, being mainly indicated when the biologic process is inefficient. In some cases, AOP need the use of special UV lamps, which represent significant cost and electrical energy demand, consisting in the main problem related to the application these processes in industrial scale. Because this fact, the development of a photochemical reactor presenting a chip UV source is very important. In this present work, a new photochemical reactor was designed. The UV radiation source was a row of 12 fluorescent lamps (Sylvania, black light, 40 W). In these experiments, the photo-Fenton process, a combination of ferrous ions, hydrogen peroxide and UV light, was studied. This system was employed for the degradation of a simulated wastewater containing phenol as model pollutant, which presents an aromatic ring in its molecular structure, such as the BTEX group, one of the main pollutants of the petroleum industry. (author)

  10. Photochemical organonitrate formation in wet aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yong Bin; Kim, Hwajin; Kim, Jin Young; Turpin, Barbara J.

    2016-10-01

    Water is the most abundant component of atmospheric fine aerosol. However, despite rapid progress, multiphase chemistry involving wet aerosols is still poorly understood. In this work, we report results from smog chamber photooxidation of glyoxal- and OH-containing ammonium sulfate or sulfuric acid particles in the presence of NOx and O3 at high and low relative humidity. Particles were analyzed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS). During the 3 h irradiation, OH oxidation products of glyoxal that are also produced in dilute aqueous solutions (e.g., oxalic acids and tartaric acids) were formed in both ammonium sulfate (AS) aerosols and sulfuric acid (SA) aerosols. However, the major products were organonitrogens (CHNO), organosulfates (CHOS), and organonitrogen sulfates (CHNOS). These were also the dominant products formed in the dark chamber, indicating non-radical formation. In the humid chamber (> 70 % relative humidity, RH), two main products for both AS and SA aerosols were organonitrates, which appeared at m / z- 147 and 226. They were formed in the aqueous phase via non-radical reactions of glyoxal and nitric acid, and their formation was enhanced by photochemistry because of the photochemical formation of nitric acid via reactions of peroxy radicals, NOx and OH during the irradiation.

  11. Photochemical Charge Separation in Nanocrystal Photocatalyst Films: Insights from Surface Photovoltage Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Osterloh, Frank E

    2014-03-01

    Photochemical charge generation, separation, and transport at nanocrystal interfaces are central to photoelectrochemical water splitting, a pathway to hydrogen from solar energy. Here, we use surface photovoltage spectroscopy to probe these processes in nanocrystal films of HCa2Nb3O10, a proven photocatalyst. Charge injection from the nanoparticles into the gold support can be observed, as well as oxidation and reduction of methanol and oxygen adsorbates on the nanosheet films. The measured photovoltage depends on the illumination intensity and substrate material, and it varies with illumination time and with film thickness. The proposed model predicts that the photovoltage is limited by the built-in potential of the nanosheet-metal junction, that is, the difference of Fermi energies in the two materials. The ability to measure and understand these light-induced charge separation processes in easy-to-fabricate films will promote the development of nanocrystal applications in photoelectrochemical cells, photovoltaics, and photocatalysts.

  12. Mathematical Model of Silicon Oxidation in Microelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Bondarev

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper involves analytical solutions and formulae for determination of the oxide film thickness in the silicon oxidation while using nitride mask. Calculations are based on solutions of a three-dimensional diffusion equation and new mathematical functions that are firstly defined by the author. Suitable analytical and numerical solutions based on the diffusion equation have not yet been obtained

  13. Modeling for CVD of Solid Oxide Electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, T.L.

    2002-09-18

    Because of its low thermal conductivity, high thermal expansion and high oxygen ion conductivity yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the material of choice for high temperature electrolyte applications. Current coating fabrication methods have their drawbacks, however. Air plasma spray (APS) is a relatively low-cost process and is suitable for large and relatively complex shapes. it is difficult to produce uniform, relatively thin coatings with this process, however, and the coatings do not exhibit the columnar microstructure that is needed for reliable, long-term performance. The electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) process does produce the desirable microstructure, however, the capital cost of these systems is very high and the line-of-sight nature of the process limits coating uniformity and the ability to coat large and complex shapes. The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process also produces the desirable columnar microstructure and--under proper conditions--can produce uniform coatings over complex shapes. CVD has been used for many materials but is relatively undeveloped for oxides, in general, and for zirconia, in particular. The overall goal of this project--a joint effort of the University of Louisville and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)--is to develop the YSZ CVD process for high temperature electrolyte applications. This report describes the modeling effort at the University of Louisville, which supports the experimental work at ORNL. Early work on CVD of zirconia and yttria used metal chlorides, which react with water vapor to form solid oxide. Because of this rapid gas-phase reaction the water generally is formed in-situ using the reverse water-gas-shift reaction or a microwave plasma. Even with these arrangements gas-phase nucleation and powder formation are problems when using these precursors. Recent efforts on CVD of zirconia and YSZ have focused on use of metal-organic precursors (MOCVD). These are more stable in the gas

  14. The structural basis of non-photochemical quenching is revealed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogdell, Richard J

    2006-02-01

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII, the major plant light-harvesting pigment-protein complex, efficiently harvests light-energy. However, if the incident light intensity is too high and photosynthesis becomes saturated, LHCII can switch into a quenching state that prevents photodamage. This important process is called non-photochemical quenching, or NPQ, and represents feedback control. Andrew Pascal et al. have recently proposed a detailed model of NPQ based upon the crystal structure of LHCII from spinach.

  15. A Detailed Modeling Study of Propane Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C K; Jayaweera, T M; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J

    2004-03-19

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been used to simulate ignition delay times recorded by a number of experimental shock tube studies over the temperature range 900 {le} T {le} 1800 K, in the pressure range 0.75-40 atm and in the equivalence ratio range 0.5 {le} {phi} {le} 2.0. Flame speed measurements at 1 atm in the equivalence ratio range 0.4 {le} {phi} {le} 1.8 have also been simulated. Both of these data sets, particularly those recorded at high pressure, are of particular importance in validating a kinetic mechanism, as internal combustion engines operate at elevated pressures and temperatures and rates of fuel oxidation are critical to efficient system operation. Experiments in which reactant, intermediate and product species were quantitatively recorded, versus temperature in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) and versus time in a flow reactor are also simulated. This data provide a stringent test of the kinetic mechanism as it must reproduce accurate quantitative profiles for all reactant, intermediate and product species. The JSR experiments were performed in the temperature range 1000-1110 K, in the equivalence ratio range 0.5 {le} {phi} {le} 4.0, at a pressure of 5 atm. These experiments are complemented by those carried out in a flow reactor in the temperature range 660-820 K, at 10 atm and at an equivalence ratio of 0.4. In addition, burner stabilized flames were simulated, where chemical species profiles were measured at atmospheric pressure for two propane-air flat flames. Overall, reasonably good agreement is observed between the model simulations and the experimental results.

  16. Photochemical conversion of solar energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzani, Vincenzo; Credi, Alberto; Venturi, Margherita

    2008-01-01

    Energy is the most important issue of the 21st century. About 85% of our energy comes from fossil fuels, a finite resource unevenly distributed beneath the Earth's surface. Reserves of fossil fuels are progressively decreasing, and their continued use produces harmful effects such as pollution that threatens human health and greenhouse gases associated with global warming. Prompt global action to solve the energy crisis is therefore needed. To pursue such an action, we are urged to save energy and to use energy in more efficient ways, but we are also forced to find alternative energy sources, the most convenient of which is solar energy for several reasons. The sun continuously provides the Earth with a huge amount of energy, fairly distributed all over the world. Its enormous potential as a clean, abundant, and economical energy source, however, cannot be exploited unless it is converted into useful forms of energy. This Review starts with a brief description of the mechanism at the basis of the natural photosynthesis and, then, reports the results obtained so far in the field of photochemical conversion of solar energy. The "grand challenge" for chemists is to find a convenient means for artificial conversion of solar energy into fuels. If chemists succeed to create an artificial photosynthetic process, "... life and civilization will continue as long as the sun shines!", as the Italian scientist Giacomo Ciamician forecast almost one hundred years ago.

  17. Review of heterogeneous photochemical reactions of NOy on aerosol-A possible daytime source of nitrous acid (HONO) in the atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinzhu Ma; Yongchun Liu; Chong Han; Qingxin Ma; Chang Liu; Hong He

    2013-01-01

    As an important precursor of hydroxyl radical,nitrous acid (HONO) plays a key role in the chemistry of the lower atmosphere.Recent atmospheric measurements and model calculations show strong enhancement for HONO formation during daytime,while they are inconsistent with the known sources in the atmosphere,suggesting that current models are lacking important sources for HONO.In this article,heterogeneous photochemical reactions of nitric acid/nitrate anion and nitrogen oxide on various aerosols were reviewed and their potential contribution to HONO formation was also discussed.It is demonstrated that HONO can be formed by photochemical reaction on surfaces with deposited HNO3,by photocatalytic reaction of NO2 on TiO2 or TiO2-containing materials,and by photochemical reaction of NO2 on soot,humic acids or other photosensitized organic surfaces.Although significant uncertainties still exist in the exact mechanisms and the yield of HONO,these additional sources might explain daytime observations in the atmosphere.

  18. Remotely Sensing the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, Vern

    2015-01-01

    In remote sensing, the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) provides insight into physiological processes occurring inside the leaves in a stand of plants. Developed by Gamon et al., (1990 and 1992), PRI evolved from laboratory measurements of the reflectance of individual leaves (Bilger et al.,1989). Yet in a remotely sensed image, a pixel measurement may include light from both reflecting and transmitting leaves. We conducted laboratory experiments comparing values of PRI based upon polarized reflectance and transmittance measurements of water and nutrient stressed leaves. We illuminated single detached leaves using a current controlled light source (Oriel model 66881) and measured the leaf weight using an analytical balance (Mettler model AE 260) and the light reflected and transmitted by the leaf during dry down using two Analytical Spectral Devices spectroradiometers. Polarizers on the incident and reflected light beams allowed us to divide the leaf reflectance into two parts: a polarized surface reflectance and a non-polarized 'leaf interior' reflectance. Our results underscore the importance when calculating PRI of removing the leaf surface reflection, which contains no information about physiological processes ongoing in the leaf interior. The results show that the leaf physiology information is in the leaf interior reflectance, not the leaf transmittance. Applied to a plant stand, these results suggest use of polarization measurements in sun-view directions that minimize the number of sunlit transmitting leaves in the sensor field of view.

  19. SOA FROM ISOPRENE OXIDATION PRODUCTS: MODEL SIMULATION OF CLOUD CHEMISTRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent laboratory evidence supports the hypothesis that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is formed in the atmosphere through aqueous-phase reactions in clouds. The results of batch photochemical reactions of glyoxal, methylglyoxal and hydrogen peroxide are presented. These labor...

  20. Photochemical dynamics of indolylmaleimide derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tatsuhiro; Nakazono, Manabu; Kondorskiy, Alexey; Ishida, Toshimasa; Nanbu, Shinkoh

    2012-08-28

    On-the-fly nonadiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out for three anionic species of indolylmaleimides (3-(1H-3-indolyl)-2,5-dihydro-1H-2,5-pyrroledione, IM) to clarify the mechanisms of photochemical reactions. The results are obtained for (i) a monovalent anion with a deprotonated indole NH group (IM(-)'), (ii) a monovalent anion with a deprotonated maleimide NH group (IM(-)'') and (iii) a divalent anion with doubly deprotonated indole and the maleimide NH groups (IM(2-)). Quantum chemical calculations are treated at the three state averaged complete-active space self-consistent field level for 6 electrons in 5 orbitals with the cc-pVDZ basis set (CAS (6, 5) SCF/cc-pVDZ). Molecular dynamics simulations are performed with electronically nonadiabatic transitions included using the Zhu-Nakamura version of the trajectory surface hopping (ZN-TSH) method. It is found that the nonadiabatic transitions occur accompanied by the stretching and shrinking motions of the N(7)-C(8) bond in the case of IM(-)' and the C(11)-N(12) bond in IM(2-) rather than the twisting motion of the dihedral angle. We also found that the ultrafast S(2)→ S(1) nonadiabatic transitions occur through the conical intersection (CoIn) right after photoexcitation to S(2) in IM(-)' and IM(2-). Furthermore, the S(1)→ S(0) nonadiabatic transitions are found to take place in IM(-)'. It is concluded that IM(2-) would mainly contribute to the photoemission, because the S(1)← S(0) and S(2)← S(0) transitions of IM(-)'' are dipole-forbidden transitions and, moreover, IM(2-) is found to be the only species to stay in the S(1) state without non-radiative decay.

  1. Topography of Photochemical Initiation in Molecular Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward D. Aluker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose a fluctuation model of the photochemical initiation of an explosive chain reaction in energetic materials. In accordance with the developed model, density fluctuations of photo-excited molecules serve as reaction nucleation sites due to the stochastic character of interactions between photons and energetic molecules. A further development of the reaction is determined by a competition of two processes. The first process is growth in size of the isolated reaction cell, leading to a micro-explosion and release of the material from the cell towards the sample surface. The second process is the overlap of reaction cells due to an increase in their size, leading to the formation of a continuous reaction zone and culminating in a macro-explosion, i.e., explosion of the entire area, covering a large part of the volume of the sample. Within the proposed analytical model, we derived expressions of the explosion probability and the duration of the induction period as a function of the initiation energy (exposure. An experimental verification of the model was performed by exploring the initiation of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN with the first harmonic of YAG: Nd laser excitation (1,064 nm, 10 ns, which has confirmed the adequacy of the model. This validation allowed us to make a few quantitative assessments and predictions. For example, there must be a few dozen optically excited molecules produced by the initial fluctuations for the explosive decomposition reaction to occur and the life-time of an isolated cell before the micro-explosion must be of the order of microseconds.

  2. Characterization of photochemical pollution at different elevations in mountainous areas in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Guo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available To advance our understanding on the factors that affect photochemical pollution at different elevations in mountainous areas, concurrent systematic field measurements (September to November 2010 were conducted at a mountain site and at an urban site at the foot of the mountain in Hong Kong. The mixing ratios of air pollutants were greater at the foot of the mountain (i.e., Tsuen Wan urban site, TW than near the summit (i.e., Tai Mao Shan mountain site, TMS, expect for ozone. In total, only one O3 episode day was observed at TW, whereas twenty-one (21 O3 episode days were observed at TMS. The discrepancy of O3 at the two sites was attributed to the mixed effects of NO titration, vertical meteorological conditions, regional transport and mesoscale circulations. The lower NO levels at TMS and the smaller differences of "oxidant" Ox (O3 + NO2 between the two sites suggested that variations of O3 at the two sites were partly attributed to different degree of NO titration. In addition, analysis of vertical structure of meteorological variables revealed that the inversion layer at the range of altitudes of 500–1000 m might be another factor that caused the high O3 levels at TMS. Furthermore, analyses of the wind fields, the levels of air pollutants in different air flows, ratios of different trace gases and the correlation between variability and the lifetime of VOCs (volatile organic compounds indicated that high O3 concentrations at TMS were somewhat influenced by regional air masses from the highly polluted Pearl River delta (PRD region. In particular, the diurnal profiles and correlations of gaseous pollutants suggested influence of mesoscale circulations, which is confirmed using the Master Chemical Mechanism moving box model (Mbox and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model. By investigating the correlations of observed O3 and NOx* and the relationships of O3 and its precursors by an observation-based model (OBM, as well as the ratios

  3. Mechanistic insights into chemical and photochemical transformations of bismuth vanadate photoanodes

    OpenAIRE

    Toma, Francesca M.; Cooper, Jason K.; Kunzelmann, Viktoria; McDowell, Matthew T.; Yu, Jie; Larson, David M.; Borys, Nicholas J.; Abelyan, Christine; Beeman, Jeffrey W.; Yu, Kin Man; Yang, Jinhui; Chen, Le; Shaner, Matthew R.; Spurgeon, Joshua; Houle, Frances A.

    2016-01-01

    Artificial photosynthesis relies on the availability of semiconductors that are chemically stable and can efficiently capture solar energy. Although metal oxide semiconductors have been investigated for their promise to resist oxidative attack, materials in this class can suffer from chemical and photochemical instability. Here we present a methodology for evaluating corrosion mechanisms and apply it to bismuth vanadate, a state-of-the-art photoanode. Analysis of changing morphology and compo...

  4. Modeling the photochemical attenuation of down-the-drain chemicals during river transport by stochastic methods and field measurements of pharmaceuticals and personal care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanamoto, Seiya; Nakada, Norihide; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    Existing stochastic models for predicting concentrations of down-the-drain chemicals in aquatic environments do not account for the diurnal variation of direct photolysis by sunlight, despite its being an important factor in natural attenuation. To overcome this limitation, we developed a stochastic model incorporating temporal variations in direct photolysis. To verify the model, we measured 57 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in a 7.6-km stretch of an urban river, and determined their physical and biological properties in laboratory experiments. During transport along the river, 8 PPCPs, including ketoprofen and azithromycin, were attenuated by >20%, mainly owing to direct photolysis and adsorption to sediments. The photolabile PPCPs attenuated significantly in the daytime but persisted in the nighttime. The observations were similar to the values predicted by the photolysis model for the photolabile PPCPs (i.e., ketoprofen, diclofenac and furosemide) but not by the existing model. The stochastic model developed in this study was suggested to be a novel and useful stochastic model for evaluating direct photolysis of down-the-drain chemicals, which occurs during the river transport.

  5. Modeling Electronic Properties of Complex Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Karthik

    Complex oxides are a class of materials that have recently emerged as potential candidates for electronic applications owing to their interesting electronic properties. The goal of this dissertation is to develop a fundamental understanding of these electronic properties using a combination of first-principles approaches based on density functional theory (DFT), and Schr odinger-Poisson (SP) simulation (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.

  6. Advanced methods of solid oxide fuel cell modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Milewski, Jaroslaw; Santarelli, Massimo; Leone, Pierluigi

    2011-01-01

    Fuel cells are widely regarded as the future of the power and transportation industries. Intensive research in this area now requires new methods of fuel cell operation modeling and cell design. Typical mathematical models are based on the physical process description of fuel cells and require a detailed knowledge of the microscopic properties that govern both chemical and electrochemical reactions. ""Advanced Methods of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Modeling"" proposes the alternative methodology of generalized artificial neural networks (ANN) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) modeling. ""Advanced Methods

  7. Air oxidation of Zircaloy, Part 2: New model for Zry-4 oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stempniewicz, M.M., E-mail: stempniewicz@nrg.eu

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Recommended set of correlations proposed for air oxidation of Zircaloy-4. • New breakaway correlation for air oxidation of Zircaloy-4. • Improved accuracy of predicting air oxidation of Zircaloy-4. • Models applicable to analyses of accidents in Spent Fuel Pool. - Abstract: The accident in Fukushima brought up new issues in the area of safety of nuclear reactors. Among others, Spent Fuel Pool accidents gained new focus. The computer codes applicable for safety analyses of Nuclear Power Plants have limited verification and validation in this area and their applicability remains still to be proven. An important phenomenon occurring during loss of water in SFP is air oxidation of Zircaloy cladding material. Mathematical modeling of this phenomenon in computer codes has been under development during the last years. This document presents a review of models for air oxidation of Zircaloy, including: up to date models available in open literature, as well as models available in computer codes: ASTEC, MELCOR, and SPECTRA. The models were tested by performing simulations of a number air oxidation experiments from ANL, KIT, and IRSN. As a result of this work, a recommended set of correlations, applicable for wide range of temperatures, including pre- and post-breakaway reaction, has been selected. For the pre-breakaway (parabolic) regime the correlation of Benjamin et al. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 1979) was selected for the low temperatures and a new correlation has been proposed for the high temperatures. For the post-breakaway (linear) regime, Boase and Vandergraaf (Nucl. Technol., 1977;32:60–71) were selected for the low temperatures and a new correlation has been proposed for the high temperatures. Furthermore, a new model for the breakaway transition has been proposed. The correlation set is applicable for Zircaloy-4, for practically the entire temperature range. The recommended set provides an improved accuracy of results

  8. Photochemical Hydrogen Doping Induced Embedded Two-Dimensional Metallic Channel Formation in InGaZnO at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeong-Ho; Lee, Young-Ahn; Kim, Jinseo; Park, Jucheol; Ahn, Seungbae; Jeon, Ki-Joon; Kim, Jeong Won; Choi, Duck-Kyun; Seo, Hyungtak

    2015-10-27

    The photochemical tunability of the charge-transport mechanism in metal-oxide semiconductors is of great interest since it may offer a facile but effective semiconductor-to-metal transition, which results from photochemically modified electronic structures for various oxide-based device applications. This might provide a feasible hydrogen (H)-radical doping to realize the effectively H-doped metal oxides, which has not been achieved by thermal and ion-implantation technique in a reliable and controllable way. In this study, we report a photochemical conversion of InGaZnO (IGZO) semiconductor to a transparent conductor via hydrogen doping to the local nanocrystallites formed at the IGZO/glass interface at room temperature. In contrast to thermal or ionic hydrogen doping, ultraviolet exposure of the IGZO surface promotes a photochemical reaction with H radical incorporation to surface metal-OH layer formation and bulk H-doping which acts as a tunable and stable highly doped n-type doping channel and turns IGZO to a transparent conductor. This results in the total conversion of carrier conduction property to the level of metallic conduction with sheet resistance of ∼16 Ω/□, room temperature Hall mobility of 11.8 cm(2) V(-1) sec(-1), the carrier concentration at ∼10(20) cm(-3) without any loss of optical transparency. We demonstrated successful applications of photochemically highly n-doped metal oxide via optical dose control to transparent conductor with excellent chemical and optical doping stability.

  9. Contribution of regional-scale fire events to ozone and PM2.5 air quality estimated by photochemical modeling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two specific fires from 2011 are tracked for local to regional scale contribution to ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) using a freely available regulatory modeling system that includes the BlueSky wildland fire emissions tool, Spare Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (...

  10. Modeling oxidation damage of continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Peng Yang; Gui-Qiong Jiao; Bo Wang

    2011-01-01

    For fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), oxidation of the constituents is a very important damage type for high temperature applications. During the oxidizing process, the pyrolytic carbon interphase gradually recesses from the crack site in the axial direction of the fiber into the interior of the material. Carbon fiber usually presents notch-like or local neck-shrink oxidation phenomenon, causing strength degradation. But, the reason for SiC fiber degradation is the flaw growth mechanism on its surface. A micromechanical model based on the above mechanisms was established to simulate the mechanical properties of CMCs after high temperature oxidation. The statistic and shearlag theory were applied and the calculation expressions for retained tensile modulus and strength were deduced, respectively. Meanwhile, the interphase recession and fiber strength degradation were considered. And then, the model was validated by application to a C/SiC composite.

  11. Photochemical control of the distribution of Venusian water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Christopher D.; Gao, Peter; Esposito, Larry; Yung, Yuk; Bougher, Stephen; Hirtzig, Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    We use the JPL/Caltech 1-D photochemical model to solve continuity diffusion equation for atmospheric constituent abundances and total number density as a function of radial distance from the planet Venus. Photochemistry of the Venus atmosphere from 58 to 112 km is modeled using an updated and expanded chemical scheme (Zhang et al., 2010, 2012), guided by the results of recent observations and we mainly follow these references in our choice of boundary conditions for 40 species. We model water between 10 and 35 ppm at our 58 km lower boundary using an SO2 mixing ratio of 25 ppm as our nominal reference value. We then vary the SO2 mixing ratio at the lower boundary between 5 and 75 ppm holding water mixing ratio of 18 ppm at the lower boundary and finding that it can control the water distribution at higher altitudes. SO2 and H2O can regulate each other via formation of H2SO4. In regions of high mixing ratios of SO2 there exists a "runaway effect" such that SO2 gets oxidized to SO3, which quickly soaks up H2O causing a major depletion of water between 70 and 100 km. Eddy diffusion sensitivity studies performed characterizing variability due to mixing that show less of an effect than varying the lower boundary mixing ratio value. However, calculations using our nominal eddy diffusion profile multiplied and divided by a factor of four can give an order of magnitude maximum difference in the SO2 mixing ratio and a factor of a few difference in the H2O mixing ratio when compared with the respective nominal mixing ratio for these two species. In addition to explaining some of the observed variability in SO2 and H2O on Venus, our work also sheds light on the observations of dark and bright contrasts at the Venus cloud tops observed in an ultraviolet spectrum. Our calculations produce results in agreement with the SOIR Venus Express results of 1 ppm at 70-90 km (Bertaux et al., 2007) by using an SO2 mixing ratio of 25 ppm SO2 and 18 ppm water as our nominal reference

  12. Photochemical model evaluation of the ground-level ozone impacts on ambient air quality and vegetation health in the Alberta oil sands region: Using present and future emission scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, Krish; Cho, Sunny; Morris, Ralph; Spink, David; Jung, Jaegun; Pauls, Ron; Duffett, Katherine

    2016-09-01

    One of the potential environmental issues associated with oil sands development is increased ozone formation resulting from NOX and volatile organic compound emissions from bitumen extraction, processing and upgrading. To manage this issue in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) in northeast Alberta, a regional multi-stakeholder group, the Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA), developed an Ozone Management Framework that includes a modelling based assessment component. In this paper, we describe how the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model was applied to assess potential ground-level ozone formation and impacts on ambient air quality and vegetation health for three different ozone precursor cases in the AOSR. Statistical analysis methods were applied, and the CMAQ performance results met the U.S. EPA model performance goal at all sites. The modelled 4th highest daily maximum 8-h average ozone concentrations in the base and two future year scenarios did not exceed the Canada-wide standard of 65 ppb or the newer Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards of 63 ppb in 2015 and 62 ppb in 2020. Modelled maximum 1-h ozone concentrations in the study were well below the Alberta Ambient Air Quality Objective of 82 ppb in all three cases. Several ozone vegetation exposure metrics were also evaluated to investigate the potential impact of ground-level ozone on vegetation. The chronic 3-months SUM60 exposure metric is within the CEMA baseline range (0-2000 ppb-hr) everywhere in the AOSR. The AOT40 ozone exposure metric predicted by CMAQ did not exceed the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UN/ECE) threshold of concern of 3000 ppb-hr in any of the cases but is just below the threshold in high-end future emissions scenario. In all three emission scenarios, the CMAQ predicted W126 ozone exposure metric is within the CEMA baseline threshold of 4000 ppb-hr. This study outlines the use of photochemical modelling of the impact of an industry (oil

  13. Photochemical Formation of Sulfur-Containing Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Jay A.; Vaida, Veronica

    2017-06-01

    In order to understand planetary climate systems, modeling the properties of atmospheric aerosols is vital. Aerosol formation plays an important role in planetary climates and is tied to feedback loops that can either warm or cool a planet. Sulfur compounds are known to play an important role in new particle aerosol formation and have been observed in a number of planetary atmospheres throughout our solar system. Our current understanding of sulfur chemistry explains much of what we observe in Earth's atmosphere; however, several discrepancies arise when comparing observations of the Venusian atmosphere with model predictions. This suggests that there are still problems in our fundamental understanding of sulfur chemistry. This is concerning given recent renewed interest in sulfate injections in the stratosphere for solar radiation management geo-engineering schemes. We investigate the role of sunlight as a potential driver of the formation of sulfur-containing aerosols. I will present recent work investigating the generation of large quantities of aerosol from the irradiation of mixtures of SO_2 with water and organic species, using a solar simulator that mimics the light that is available in the Earth's troposphere and the Venusian middle atmosphere. I will present on recent work done in our lab suggesting the formation of sulfurous acid, H_2SO_3, and describe experimental work that supports this proposed mechanism. Additionally I will present on new work showing the highly reactive nature of electronically excited SO_2 with saturated alkane species. The implications of this photochemically induced sulfur aerosol formation in the atmosphere of Earth and other planetary atmospheres will be discussed.

  14. The study and applications of photochemical-dynamical gravity wave model Ⅱ-- The effects of stable gravity wave on chemical species distribution in mesosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Jiyao(徐寄遥); MA; Ruiping(马瑞平); A.K.Smith

    2002-01-01

    A nonlinear, compressible, non-isothermal gravity wave model that involves photochemistry is used to study the effects of gravity wave on atmospheric chemical species distributions in this paper. The changes in the distributions of oxygen compound and hydrogen compound density induced by gravity wave propagation are simulated. The results indicate that when a gravity wave propagates through a mesopause region, even if it does not break, it can influence the background distributions of chemical species. The effect of gravity wave on chemical species at night is larger than in daytime.

  15. 光化学烟雾形成的化学动力学模拟研究%Research on chemical kinetics simulation of photochemical smog formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶双成; 邓顺熙; 李彦鹏

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to develop the chemical kinetics model of photochemical smog formation based on photochemical smog reaction mechanism proposed by Seinfeld. The formation process of photochemical smog is numerically simulated by using explicit Runge-Kutta method and MATLAB tool. Then, the relationships between different initial concentration of nitrogen oxides and non-methane hydrocarbons as well as photochemical smog concentrations on ozone and peroxy-acetyl nitrates were analyzed. The validity of the simplified model was examined by comparing the simulation results with the experimental results. The results of statistics show that the regression coefficient of ozone formation simulation result versus smog chamber experiment has reached 0.814 6. Therefore, the present model can be considered as an applicable method to simulate the accumulation and consumption of ozone in a loop system. Several conclusions have been drawn in accordance with the results of simulation. The results show that the initial hydrocarbon was steadily consumed, and aldehydes have initially increased due to the conversion of hydrocarbon. The change from nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxide is evident. Once the concentrations of ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrates are accumulated initially, they will be consumed. The results also show that the formation of urban photochemical smog is effectively affected by changing of different initial concentration. When the initial concentration of nitrogen oxides was fixed, increasing non-methane hydrocarbons led to the increase of ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrates. While the initial concentration of non-methane hydrocarbons was fixed, nitrogen oxides results in both ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrates will be increased. However, the multiplication of initial concentration of non-methane hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides will yield rapid increase of ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrates , which finally delay the time of achieving maximum ozone concentration. The results also

  16. Diagnosis of Photochemical Ozone Production Rates and Limiting Factors based on Observation-based Modeling Approach over East Asia: Impact of Radical Chemistry Mechanism and Ozone-Control Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Growth of tropospheric ozone, causing health and climate impacts, is concerned over East Asia, because emissions of precursors have dramatically increased. Photochemical production rates of ozone and limiting factors, primarily studied for urban locations, have been poorly assessed within a perspective of regional-scale air pollution over East Asia. We performed comprehensive observations of ozone precursors at several locations with regional representativeness and made such assessment based on the observation-based modeling approach. Here, diagnosis at Fukue Island (32.75°N, 128.68°E) remotely located in western Japan (May 2009) is highlighted, where the highest 10% of hourly ozone concentrations reached 72‒118 ppb during May influenced by Asian continental outflow. The average in-situ ozone production rate was estimated to be 6.8 ppb per day, suggesting that in-travel production was still active, while larger buildup must have occurred beforehand. Information on the chemical status of the air mass arriving in Japan is important, because it affects how further ozone production occurs after precursor addition from Japanese domestic emissions. The main limiting factor of ozone production was usually NOx, suggesting that domestic NOx emission control is important in reducing further ozone production and the incidence of warning issuance (>120 ppb). VOCs also increased the ozone production rate, and occasionally (14% of time) became dominant. This analysis implies that the VOC reduction legislation recently enacted should be effective. The uncertainty in the radical chemistry mechanism governing ozone production had a non-negligible impact, but the main conclusion relevant to policy was not altered. When chain termination was augmented by HO2-H2O + NO/NO2 reactions and by heterogeneous loss of HO2 on aerosol particle surfaces, the daily ozone production rate decreased by <24%, and the fraction of hours when the VOC-limited condition occurred varied from 14% to 13

  17. Simplified kinetic models of methanol oxidation on silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Anders; Lynggaard, Hasse Harloff; Stegelmann, Carsten;

    2005-01-01

    Recently the authors developed a microkinetic model of methanol oxidation on silver [A. Andreasen, H. Lynggaard, C. Stegelmann, P. Stoltze, Surf. Sci. 544 (2003) 5–23]. The model successfully explains both surface science experiments and kinetic experiments at industrial conditions applying...

  18. Simplified kinetic models of methanol oxidation on silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, A.; Lynggaard, H.; Stegelmann, C.;

    2005-01-01

    Recently the authors developed a microkinetic model of methanol oxidation on silver [A. Andreasen, H. Lynggaard, C. Stegelmann, P. Stoltze, Surf. Sci. 544 (2003) 5-23]. The model successfully explains both surface science experiments and kinetic experiments at industrial conditions applying...

  19. On the origin of the ionosphere at Moon : a study using results from Chandrayaan-I S-band radio occultation experiment and a photochemical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kailasam Madathil, Ambili; Bhardwaj, Anil; Choudhary, Raj Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Using Chandrayaan-1 communication link between orbiter and ground (S-band frequency), the presence of ionosphere at Moon has been explored using Radio Occultation technique. Results obtained from the observations conducted between July 30 and August 14, 2009 show evidence for a possible existence of the Ionosphere at Moon. A few seconds before the occultation of Chandrayaan-1 radio signals, extra fluctuation in the rate of change of difference between the theoretically estimated Doppler and observed Doppler was observed. The fluctuation was more pronounced when the probing radio waves were crossing through the day-night terminator. Using standard onion-peeling technique to invert the phase changes in radio signals to the refractivity of the medium, we estimated the bending angle and hence the electron density profiles for the Lunar medium. The estimated electron density near the Lunar surface was of the order of 400 - 1000 cm ^{-3} which decreased monotonically with increasing altitude till about 40 km above the surface where it became negligible. The observed electron density was compared with the results from a model which was developed based on CHACE measurements abroad Moon Impact Probe of Chandrayaan-I. The model included the photo chemical reactions and solar wind interactions of the lunar plasma. We propose that the ionosphere over Moon could have molecular origin with H _{2}O ^{+},CO_{2} ^{+} and H_{3}O ^{+} as dominant ions.

  20. A Simple Parallel Photochemical Reactor for Photodecomposition Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaobo Chen; Halasz, Sarah M.; Giles, Eric C.; Mankus, Jessica V.; Johnson, Joseph C.; Burda, Clemens

    2006-01-01

    A simple and useful parallel photochemical reactor intended to study the photodecomposition of dyes using semiconductor photocatalysis is presented. The photochemical reactions are followed through time-dependent changes in the ground-state absorption spectra of the dyes.

  1. Photochemical and Nonphotochemical Transformations of Cysteine with Dissolved Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chiheng; Erickson, Paul R; Lundeen, Rachel A; Stamatelatos, Dimitrios; Alaimo, Peter J; Latch, Douglas E; McNeill, Kristopher

    2016-06-21

    Cysteine (Cys) plays numerous key roles in the biogeochemistry of natural waters. Despite its importance, a full assessment of Cys abiotic transformation kinetics, products and pathways under environmental conditions has not been conducted. This study is a mechanistic evaluation of the photochemical and nonphotochemical (dark) transformations of Cys in solutions containing chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The results show that Cys underwent abiotic transformations under both dark and irradiated conditions. Under dark conditions, the transformation rates of Cys were moderate and were highly pH- and temperature-dependent. Under UVA or natural sunlight irradiations, Cys transformation rates were enhanced by up to two orders of magnitude compared to rates under dark conditions. Product analysis indicated cystine and cysteine sulfinic acid were the major photooxidation products. In addition, this study provides an assessment of the contributions of singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide, and triplet dissolved organic matter to the CDOM-sensitized photochemical oxidation of Cys. The results suggest that another unknown pathway was dominant in the CDOM-sensitized photodegradation of Cys, which will require further study to identify.

  2. Modelling nitrous oxide emissions from organic soils in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppelt, Thomas; Dechow, Rene; Gebbert, Sören; Freibauer, Annette

    2013-04-01

    The greenhouse gas emission potential of peatland ecosystems are mandatory for a complete annual emission budget in Europe. The GHG-Europe project aims to improve the modelling capabilities for greenhouse gases, e.g., nitrous oxide. The heterogeneous and event driven fluxes of nitrous oxide are challenging to model on European scale, especially regarding the upscaling purpose and certain parameter estimations. Due to these challenges adequate techniques are needed to create a robust empirical model. Therefore a literature study of nitrous oxide fluxes from organic soils has been carried out. This database contains flux data from boreal and temperate climate zones and covers the different land use categories: cropland, grassland, forest, natural and peat extraction sites. Especially managed crop- and grassland sites feature high emission potential. Generally nitrous oxide emissions increases significantly with deep drainage and intensive application of nitrogen fertilisation. Whereas natural peatland sites with a near surface groundwater table can act as nitrous oxide sink. An empirical fuzzy logic model has been applied to predict annual nitrous oxide emissions from organic soils. The calibration results in two separate models with best model performances for bogs and fens, respectively. The derived parameter combinations of these models contain mean groundwater table, nitrogen fertilisation, annual precipitation, air temperature, carbon content and pH value. Influences of the calibrated parameters on nitrous oxide fluxes are verified by several studies in literature. The extrapolation potential has been tested by an implemented cross validation. Furthermore the parameter ranges of the calibrated models are compared to occurring values on European scale. This avoid unknown systematic errors for the regionalisation purpose. Additionally a sensitivity analysis specify the model behaviour for each alternating parameter. The upscaling process for European peatland

  3. Developments in kinetic modelling of chalcocite particle oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaervi, J.; Ahokainen, T.; Jokilaakso, A. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Materials Processing and Powder Metallurgy

    1997-12-31

    A mathematical model for simulating chalcocite particle oxidation is presented. Combustion of pure chalcocite with oxygen is coded as a kinetic module which can be connected as a separate part of commercial CFD-package, PHOENICS. Heat transfer, fluid flow and combustion phenomena can be simulated using CFD-calculation together with the kinetic model. Interaction between gas phase and particles are taken into account by source terms. The aim of the kinetic model is to calculate the particle temperature, contents of species inside the particle, oxygen consumption and formation of sulphur dioxide. Four oxidation reactions are considered and the shrinking core model is used to describe the rate of the oxidation reactions. The model is verified by simulating the particle oxidation reactions in a laboratory scale laminar-flow furnace under different conditions and the model predicts the effects of charges correctly. In the future, the model validation will be done after experimental studies in the laminar flow-furnace. (author) 18 refs.

  4. Oxidation of atrazine by photoactivated potassium persulfate in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandarkhaeva, M. S.; Aseev, D. G.; Sizykh, M. R.; Batoeva, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    General laws of the photochemical oxidation of atrazine by inorganic peroxo compounds under the impact of solar radiation are studied. It is found that almost complete conversion of atrazine can be achieved via photochemical oxidation with persulfate after 120 min, but no deep mineralization is observed. The effect an aqueous matrix has on the processes of atrazine degradation in combined oxidation systems is considered.

  5. Photochemical fate of pharmaceuticals in the environment: cimetidine and ranitidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latch, Douglas E; Stender, Brian L; Packer, Jennifer L; Arnold, William A; McNeill, Kristopher

    2003-08-01

    The photochemical fates of the histamine H2-receptor antagonists cimetidine and ranitidine were studied. Each of the two environmentally relevant pharmaceuticals displayed high rates of reaction with both singlet oxygen (1O2, O2(1delta(g))) and hydroxyl radical (*OH), two transient oxidants formed in sunlit natural waters. For cimetidine, the bimolecular rate constant for reaction with *OH in water is 6.5 +/- 0.5 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). Over the pH range 4-10, cimetidine reacts with 1O2 with bimolecular rate constants ranging from 3.3 +/- 0.3 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) at low pH to 2.5 +/- 0.2 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) in alkaline solutions. The bimolecular rate constants for ranitidine reacting with 1O2 in water ranges from 1.6 +/- 0.2 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 6-6.4 +/- 0.2 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 10. Reaction of ranitidine hydrochloride with *OH proceeds with a rate constant of 1.5 +/- 0.2 x 10(10) M(-1) s(-1). Ranitidine was also degraded in direct photolysis experiments with a half-life of 35 min under noon summertime sunlight at 45 degrees latitude, while cimetidine was shown to be resistant to direct photolysis. The results of these experiments, combined with the expected steady-state near surface concentrations of 1O2 and *OH, indicate that photooxidation mediated by 1O2 is the likely degradation pathway for cimetidine in most natural waters, and photodegradation by direct photolysis is expected to be the major pathway for ranitidine, with some degradation caused by 1O2. These predictions were verified in studies using Mississippi River water. Model compounds were analyzed by laser flash photolysis experiments to assess which functionalities within ranitidine and cimetidine are most susceptible to singlet-oxygenation and direct photolysis. The heterocyclic moieties of the pharmaceuticals were clearly implicated as the sites of reaction with 1O2, as evidenced by the high relative rate constants of the furan and imidazole models. The nitroacetamidine portion of ranitidine

  6. Alternative model for the Great Oxidation Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, A.

    2014-12-01

    Transition from the Archean, largely anoxic atmosphere and ocean to the Proterozoic oxidizing surface conditions has been inferred in Zimbabwe from the geochemical and geological evidence as early as 1927. Subsequent studies provided additional support for this interpretation, bracketed the transition between 2.45 and 2.32 Ga, and suggested temporal and cause-and-effect relationship with a series of the early Paleoproterozoic ice ages (including 4 discrete events). Recently recognized transient oxidation events of the Archean add texture to this pattern, but do not change it. The rise of atmospheric oxygen requires a misbalance between oxygen sinks and sources and most attention was focused on sinks. In contrast, change in oxygen supply related to low organic productivity in Archean oceans with limited nutrient contents are considered here. Although carbon isotope values of carbonates and organic carbon indicate substantial relative burial rate of organic carbon during the Archean, most of the earlier buried organic matter at that time was recycled to sediments during continental weathering, implying very low productivity and burial of 'new' organic carbon. Low contents of redox-sensitive elements, such as Mo, Cu, Zn, and V, in Archean seawater could have kept organic productivity and oxygen production at low levels. The GOE was immediately preceded by deposition of giant iron formations, accounting for more than 70% of world iron resources, and worldwide emplacement of a number of LIPs between 2.5 and 2.45 Ga, indicating enhanced delivery of nutrients and redox-sensitive elements to the oceans via submarine hydrothermal processes and continental weathering under CO2- and SO2-rich atmosphere and associated terrestrial acidic runoff. This enhanced emplacement of LIPs has been linked with the growth of continental crust, emergence of the first supercontinent, and mantle overturn at the Archean-Proterozoic boundary. The GOE could have thus been triggered by enhanced

  7. Southern Africa - a giant natural photochemical reactor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Diab, RD

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The analogy of a ‘giant natural photochemical reactor’ is extended in this paper to the central and southern African tropics, where tropospheric ozone enhancement occurs over a vast geographical area from the Congo to South Africa, and over a long...

  8. VUV laser ablation of polymers. Photochemical aspect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castex, M. C.; Bityurin, N.; Olivero, C.; Muraviov, S.; Bronnikova, N.; Riedel, D.

    2000-12-01

    A photochemical theory of laser ablation owing to the direct chain scission process is considered in quite general form taking into account the modification of material. The formulas obtained can be used for estimating mechanisms of VUV laser ablation of polymers.

  9. Subcritical and supercritical water oxidation of CELSS model wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Wydeven, T.; Koo, C.

    1989-01-01

    A mixture of ammonium hydroxide with acetic acid and a slurry of human feces, urine, and wipes were used as CELSS model wastes to be wet-oxidized at temperatures from 250 to 500 C, i.e. below and above the critical point of water (374 C and 218 kg/sq cm or 21.4 MPa). The effects of oxidation temperature ( 250-500 C) and residence time (0-120 mn) on carbon and nitrogen and on metal corrosion from the reactor material were studied. Almost all of the organic matter in the model wastes was oxidized in the temperature range from 400 to 500 C, above the critical conditions for water. In contrast, only a small portion of the organic matter was oxidized at subcritical conditions. A substantial amount of nitrogen remained in solution in the form of ammonia at temperatures ranging from 350 to 450 C suggesting that, around 400 C, organic carbon is completely oxidized and most of the nitrogen is retained in solution. The Hastelloy C-276 alloy reactor corroded during subcritical and supercritical water oxidation.

  10. Modeling the ignition of a copper oxide aluminum thermite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kibaek; Stewart, D. Scott; Clemenson, Michael; Glumac, Nick; Murzyn, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    An experimental "striker confinement" shock compression experiment was developed in the Glumac-group at the University of Illinois to study ignition and reaction in composite reactive materials. These include thermitic and intermetallic reactive powders. Sample of materials such as a thermite mixture of copper oxide and aluminum powders are initially compressed to about 80 percent full density. Two RP-80 detonators simultaneously push steel bars into the reactive material and the resulting compression causes shock compaction of the material and rapid heating. At that point one observes significant reaction and propagation of fronts. But the fronts are peculiar in that they are comprised of reactive events that can be traced to the reaction of the initially separated reactants of copper oxide and aluminum that react at their mutual interfaces, that nominally make copper liquid and aluminum oxide products. We discuss our model of the ignition of the copper oxide aluminum thermite in the context of the striker experiment and how a Gibbs formulation model [1], that includes multi-components for liquid and solid phases of aluminum, copper oxide, copper and aluminum oxide, can predict the events observed at the particle scale in the experiments.

  11. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Cyclohexane Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silke, E J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Ribaucour, M

    2006-11-10

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of cyclohexane at both low and high temperatures. Reaction rate constant rules are developed for the low temperature combustion of cyclohexane. These rules can be used for in chemical kinetic mechanisms for other cycloalkanes. Since cyclohexane produces only one type of cyclohexyl radical, much of the low temperature chemistry of cyclohexane is described in terms of one potential energy diagram showing the reaction of cyclohexyl radical + O{sub 2} through five, six and seven membered ring transition states. The direct elimination of cyclohexene and HO{sub 2} from RO{sub 2} is included in the treatment using a modified rate constant of Cavallotti et al. Published and unpublished data from the Lille rapid compression machine, as well as jet-stirred reactor data are used to validate the mechanism. The effect of heat loss is included in the simulations, an improvement on previous studies on cyclohexane. Calculations indicated that the production of 1,2-epoxycyclohexane observed in the experiments can not be simulated based on the current understanding of low temperature chemistry. Possible 'alternative' H-atom isomerizations leading to different products from the parent O{sub 2}QOOH radical were included in the low temperature chemical kinetic mechanism and were found to play a significant role.

  12. Electrothermal model for complete metal-oxide surge arresters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, E. Guedes da; Naidu, S.R. [UFPB, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil); Lima, A. Guedes de [CEFET-PB, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2001-01-01

    A computational, electrothermal model for a complete metal-oxide surge arrester based on the implicit form of the finite-differences method is presented. The model is used to calculate the cooling curve after the application of overvoltages and the temperature variations during standard test. The model has been checked against experiments carried out on a test section and a complete surge arrester and the behaviour of a hypothetical surge arrester during standard tests simulated. (Author)

  13. Comparison on light-response models of actual photochemical efficiency in photosystem II%光系统II实际光化学量子效率对光的响应模型的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶子飘; 胡文海; 闫小红

    2016-01-01

    为了比较光系统II实际光化学量子效率(ΦPSI )对光的响应机理模型(简称机理模型)、负指数模型和指数模型的优缺点,用LI-6400-40B光合作用测定仪控制CO2浓度和温度,测量了剑叶金鸡菊(Coreopsis lanceolata)、黄荆(Vitex negundo)和大狼杷草(Bidens frondosa)的电子传递速率(ETR)对光的响应曲线(ETR-I)和ΦPSI对光的响应曲线(ΦPSI-I),然后用这3个模型分别拟合了这些数据。拟合结果表明:3个模型都可以较好地拟合这3种植物的ETR-I的响应数据和ΦPSI-I的响应数据,但由指数模型拟合ETR-I和ΦPSI-I的响应数据得到相应的饱和光强(PARsat)和光系统II最大光能利用效率(Fv/Fm)之间存在显著差异,且估算的饱和光强远低于实测值。由机理模型可知,ΦPSI不仅与光强的函数有关,还与植物的内禀特性有关,即与天线色素分子的本征光能吸收截面、激子的传递效率、能级的简并度、光化学反应常数、热耗散常数和处于最低激发态的平均寿命等参数有关。此外,由机理模型还可知,ΦPSI随光强的增加而下降的原因是捕光色素分子的有效光能吸收截面随光强增加而降低。% Aims The objective of this study was to compare the merits and demerits of three models (i.e., a mechanistic model, a negative exponential model and an exponential model) to simulate the light-response curves of actual photochemical efficiency (ΦPSII-I). Moreover, it was to reveal the mechanism that ΦPSII decreased with light intensity increasing. Methods The electron transport rate (ETR) and theΦPSII of Coreopsis lanceolata, Vitex negundo and Bidens frondosa were measured by LI-6400-40B under controlled CO2 concentrations and temperatures, then light-response curves of ETR-I andΦPSII-I were simulated by a mechanistic model, a negative exponential model and an exponential model, respectively. Important findings The fitted results showed that ETR

  14. A photochemically driven molecular-level abacus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton; Ballardini; Balzani; Credi; Dress; Ishow; Kleverlaan; Kocian; Preece; Spencer; Stoddart; Venturi; Wenger

    2000-10-01

    sequence of photoinduced electron transfer processes? In order to find an answer to this question, the electrochemical, photophysical, and photochemical (under continuous and pulsed excitation) properties of the [2]rotaxane, its dumbbell-shaped component, and some model compounds containing electro- and photoactive units have been investigated. In an attempt to obtain the photoinduced abacus-like movement of the BPP34C10 macrocycle between the two stations, two strategies have been employed-one was based fully on processes that involved only the rotaxane components (intramolecular mechanism), while the other one required the help of external reactants (sacrificial mechanism). Both mechanisms imply a sequence of four steps (destabilization of the stable translational isomer, macrocyclic ring displacement, electronic reset, and nuclear reset) that have to compete with energy-wasteful steps. The results have demonstrated that photochemically driven switching can be performed successfully by the sacrificial mechanism, whereas, in the case of the intramolecular mechanism, it would appear that the electronic reset of the system is faster than the ring displacement.

  15. Universal Responses of Cyclic-Oxidation Models Studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smialek, James L.

    2003-01-01

    Oxidation is an important degradation process for materials operating in the high-temperature air or oxygen environments typical of jet turbine or rocket engines. Reaction of the combustion gases with the component material forms surface layer scales during these oxidative exposures. Typically, the instantaneous rate of reaction is inversely proportional to the existing scale thickness, giving rise to parabolic kinetics. However, more realistic applications entail periodic startup and shutdown. Some scale spallation may occur upon cooling, resulting in loss of the protective diffusion barrier provided by a fully intact scale. Upon reheating, the component will experience accelerated oxidation due to this spallation. Cyclic-oxidation testing has, therefore, been a mainstay of characterization and performance ranking for high-temperature materials. Models simulate this process by calculating how a scale spalls upon cooling and regrows upon heating (refs. 1 to 3). Recently released NASA software (COSP for Windows) allows researchers to specify a uniform layer or discrete segments of spallation (ref. 4). Families of model curves exhibit consistent regularity and trends with input parameters, and characteristic features have been empirically described in terms of these parameters. Although much insight has been gained from experimental and model curves, no equation has been derived that can describe this behavior explicitly as functions of the key oxidation parameters.

  16. Modeling the viscosity of silicate melts containing manganese oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Wan-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our recently developed model for the viscosity of silicate melts is applied to describe and predict the viscosities of oxide melts containing manganese oxide. The model requires three pairs of adjustable parameters that describe the viscosities in three systems: pure MnO, MnO-SiO2 and MnO-Al2O3-SiO2. The viscosity of other ternary and multicomponent silicate melts containing MnO is then predicted by the model without any additional adjustable model parameters. Experimental viscosity data are reviewed for melts formed by MnO with SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, MgO, PbO, Na2O and K2O. The deviation of the available experimental data from the viscosities predicted by the model is shown to be within experimental error limits.

  17. Animation Model to Conceptualize ATP Generation: A Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Ananta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the molecular unit of intracellular energy and it is the product of oxidative phosphorylation of cellular respiration uses in cellular processes. The study explores the growth of the misconception levels amongst the learners and evaluates the effectiveness of animation model over traditional methods. The data…

  18. Modelling toluene oxidation : Incorporation of mass transfer phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, J.A.A.; van Soolingen, J.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    The kinetics of the oxidation of toluene have been studied in close interaction with the gas-liquid mass transfer occurring in the reactor. Kinetic parameters for a simple model have been estimated on basis of experimental observations performed under industrial conditions. The conclusions for the m

  19. Modelling toluene oxidation : Incorporation of mass transfer phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, J.A.A.; van Soolingen, J.; Versteeg, G. F.

    The kinetics of the oxidation of toluene have been studied in close interaction with the gas-liquid mass transfer occurring in the reactor. Kinetic parameters for a simple model have been estimated on basis of experimental observations performed under industrial conditions. The conclusions for the

  20. SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION MODEL DEVELOPMENT FOR SELECTED EPA PRIORITY POLLUTANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) evaluated for five compounds: acetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenol, pentachlorophenol, pyridine, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (methyl ester). inetic models were developed for acetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and pyridine. he test compounds were e...

  1. Modelling toluene oxidation : Incorporation of mass transfer phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, J.A.A.; van Soolingen, J.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    The kinetics of the oxidation of toluene have been studied in close interaction with the gas-liquid mass transfer occurring in the reactor. Kinetic parameters for a simple model have been estimated on basis of experimental observations performed under industrial conditions. The conclusions for the m

  2. Structure and properties of molybdenum oxide nitrides as model systems for selective oxidation catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerch Martin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molybdenum oxide nitride (denoted as Mo(O,N3 was obtained by ammonolysis of α-MoO3 with gaseous ammonia. Electronic and geometric structure, reducibility, and conductivity of Mo(O,N3 were investigated by XRD, XAS, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and impedance measurements. Catalytic performance in selective propene oxidation was determined by online mass spectrometry und gas chromatography. Upon incorporation of nitrogen, Mo(O,N3 maintained the characteristic layer structure of α-MoO3. XRD analysis showed an increased structural disorder in the layers while nitrogen is removed from the lattice of Mo(O,N3 at temperatures above ~600 K. Compared to regular α-MoO3, Mo(O,N3 exhibited a higher electronic and ionic conductivity and an onset of reduction in propene at lower temperatures. Surprisingly, α-MoO3 and Mo(O,N3 exhibited no detectable differences in onset temperatures of propene oxidation and catalytic selectivity or activity. Apparently, the increased reducibility, oxygen mobility, and conductivity of Mo(O,N3 compared to α-MoO3 had no effect on the catalytic behavior of the two catalysts. The results presented confirm the suitability of molybdenum oxide nitrides as model systems for studying bulk contributions to selective oxidation.

  3. The influence of aerosols on photochemical smog in Mexico City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, T.; Mar, B. [UNAM, Mexico, Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera (Mexico); Madronich, S.; Rivale, S. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Muhlia, A. [UNAM, Mexico, Inst. de Geofysica (Mexico)

    2001-04-01

    Aerosols in the Mexico City atmosphere can have a non-negligible effect on the ultraviolet radiation field and hence on the formation of photochemical smog. We used estimates of aerosol optical depths from sun photometer observations in a detailed radiative transfer model, to calculate photolysis rate coefficients (J{sub NO2}) for the key reaction NO{sub 2}+h{nu}{yields}NO+O ({lambda}<430nm). The calculated values are in good agreement with previously published measurements of J{sub NO2} at two sites in Mexico City: Palacio de Mineria (19 degrees 25'59''N, 99 degrees 07'58''W, 2233masl), and IMP (19 degrees 28'48''N, 99 degrees 11'07''W, 2277masl) and in Tres Marias, a town near Mexico City (19 degrees 03'N, 99 degrees 14'W, 2810masl). In particular, the model reproduces very well the contrast between the two urban sites and the evidently much cleaner Tres Marias site. For the measurement days, reductions in surface J{sub NO2} by 10-30% could be attributed to the presence of aerosols, with considerable uncertainty due largely to lack of detailed data on aerosol optical properties at ultraviolet wavelengths (esp. the single scattering albedo). The potential impact of such large reductions in photolysis rates on surface ozone concentrations is illustrated with a simple zero-dimensional photochemical model. (Author)

  4. Ice-nucleating particle emissions from photochemically aged diesel and biodiesel exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, G. P.; Jathar, S. H.; Kodros, J. K.; Levin, E. J. T.; Galang, A. M.; Friedman, B.; Link, M. F.; Farmer, D. K.; Pierce, J. R.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; DeMott, P. J.

    2016-05-01

    Immersion-mode ice-nucleating particle (INP) concentrations from an off-road diesel engine were measured using a continuous-flow diffusion chamber at -30°C. Both petrodiesel and biodiesel were utilized, and the exhaust was aged up to 1.5 photochemically equivalent days using an oxidative flow reactor. We found that aged and unaged diesel exhaust of both fuels is not likely to contribute to atmospheric INP concentrations at mixed-phase cloud conditions. To explore this further, a new limit-of-detection parameterization for ice nucleation on diesel exhaust was developed. Using a global-chemical transport model, potential black carbon INP (INPBC) concentrations were determined using a current literature INPBC parameterization and the limit-of-detection parameterization. Model outputs indicate that the current literature parameterization likely overemphasizes INPBC concentrations, especially in the Northern Hemisphere. These results highlight the need to integrate new INPBC parameterizations into global climate models as generalized INPBC parameterizations are not valid for diesel exhaust.

  5. Ab initio and kinetic modeling studies of formic acid oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marshall, Paul; Glarborg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for oxidation of formic acid (HOCHO) in flames has been developed, based on theoretical work and data from literature. Ab initio calculations were used to obtain rate coefficients for reactions of HOCHO with H, O, and HO2. Modeling predictions with the mechanism...... as the fate of HOCO, determines the oxidation rate of formic acid. At lower temperatures HO2, formed from HOCO + O2, is an important chain carrier and modeling predictions become sensitive to the HOCHO + HO2 reaction. © 2014 The Combustion Institute....... on calculations with the kinetic model. Formic acid is consumed mainly by reaction with OH, yielding OCHO, which dissociates rapidly to CO2 + H, and HOCO, which may dissociate to CO + OH or CO2 + H, or react with H, OH, or O2 to form more stable products. The branching fraction of the HOCHO + OH reaction, as well...

  6. Surface chemistry for stable and smart molecular and biomolecular interfaces via photochemical grafting of alkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Landis, Elizabeth C; Franking, Ryan; Hamers, Robert J

    2010-09-21

    Many emerging fields such as biotechnology and renewable energy require functionalized surfaces that are "smart" and highly stable. Surface modification schemes developed previously have often been limited to simple molecules or have been based on weakly bound layers that have limited stability. In this Account, we report on recent developments enabling the preparation of molecular and biomolecular interfaces that exhibit high selectivity and unprecedented stability on a range of covalent materials including diamond, vertically aligned carbon nanofibers, silicon, and metal oxides. One particularly successful pathway to ultrastable interfaces involves the photochemical grafting of organic alkenes to the surfaces. Bifunctional alkenes with a suitable functional group at the distal end can directly impart functionality and can serve as attachment points for linking complex structures such as DNA and proteins. The successful application of photochemical grafting to a surprisingly wide range of materials has motivated researchers to better understand the underlying photochemical reaction mechanisms. The resulting studies using experimental and computational methods have provided fundamental insights into the electronic structure of the molecules and the surface control photochemical reactivity. Such investigations have revealed the important role of a previously unrecognized process, photoelectron emission, in initiating photochemical grafting of alkenes to surfaces. Molecular and biomolecular interfaces formed on diamond and other covalent materials are leading to novel types of molecular electronic interfaces. For example, electrical, optical, or electromechanical structures that convert biological information directly into analytical signals allow for direct label-free detection of DNA and proteins. Because of the preferential adherence of molecules to graphitic edge-plane sites, the grafting of redox-active species to vertically aligned carbon nanofibers leads to

  7. Model catalytic oxidation studies using supported monometallic and heterobimetallic oxides. Progress report, August 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1992-02-03

    This research program is directed toward a more fundamental understanding of the effects of catalyst composition and structure on the catalytic properties of metal oxides. Metal oxide catalysts play an important role in many reactions bearing on the chemical aspects of energy processes. Metal oxides are the catalysts for water-gas shift reactions, methanol and higher alcohol synthesis, isosynthesis, selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides, and oxidation of hydrocarbons. A key limitation to developing insight into how oxides function in catalytic reactions is in not having precise information of the surface composition under reaction conditions. To address this problem we have prepared oxide systems that can be used to study cation-cation effects and the role of bridging (-O-) and/or terminal (=O) surface oxygen anion ligands in a systematic fashion. Since many oxide catalyst systems involve mixtures of oxides, we selected a model system that would permit us to examine the role of each cation separately and in pairwise combinations. Organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes were proposed for use, to prepare model systems consisting of isolated monomeric cations, isolated monometallic dimers and isolated bimetallic dimers supported on silica and alumina. The monometallic and bimetallic dimers were to be used as models of more complex mixed- oxide catalysts. Our current program was to develop the systems and use them in model oxidation reactions.

  8. Using of Photochemical H2O2/UVC Decontamination Cell for Heavily Polluted Waters

    OpenAIRE

    Žebrák, R.; Mašín, P.; Klusoň, P. (Petr); Krystyník, P. (Pavel)

    2014-01-01

    The presented contribution focuses on the complex study of the pilot-scale photochemical H2O2/UVC system arranged as the ex-situ decontamination cell for heavily polluted waters (contamination with organic substances. The method principle comprises the rational decomposition of hydrogen peroxide induced by UV-C (254 nm). The produced OH radicals are very efficient oxidation species enabling the direct destruction of wide spectrum of organic compounds (polyaromatic hydrocarbons, chlorinat...

  9. Photochemical preparation of sub-wavelength heterogeneous laser-induced periodic surface structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Cheol; Reinhardt, Hendrik; Hillebrecht, Pierre; Hampp, Norbert A

    2012-04-17

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are a phenomenon caused by interaction of light with solid surfaces. We present a photochemical concept which uses LIPSS-related light intensity patterns for the generation of heterogeneous nanostructures. The process facilitates arbitrary combinations of substrate and LIPSS-pattern materials. An efficient method for the generation of organometallic hybrid-nanowire arrays on porous anodic aluminum oxide is demonstrated.

  10. Suppressing photochemical reactions with quantized light fields

    CERN Document Server

    Galego, Javier; Feist, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Photoisomerization, i.e., a change of molecular structure after absorption of a photon, is one of the most fundamental photochemical processes. It can perform desirable functionality, e.g., as the primary photochemical event in human vision, where it stores electronic energy in the molecular structure, or for possible applications in solar energy storage and as memories, switches, and actuators; but it can also have detrimental effects, for example as an important damage pathway under solar irradiation of DNA, or as a limiting factor for the efficiency of organic solar cells. While photoisomerization can be avoided by shielding the system from light, this is of course not a viable pathway for approaches that rely on the interaction with external light (such as solar cells or solar energy storage). Here, we show that strong coupling of organic molecules to a confined light mode can be used to strongly suppress photoisomerization, and thus convert molecules that normally show fast photodegradation into photosta...

  11. Photochemical degradation of crude oil in seawater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Guipeng; ZHANG Li; SUN Xiaojing; JING Weiwen

    2006-01-01

    Photochemical degradation of crude oil in seawater is an important issue in marine environmental protection and is studied in this work. Results showed that petroleum hydrocarbons could be effectively degraded by the irradiation of high-pressure mercury light or natural sunlight. Photochemical reaction was controlled by various factors including light source, aquatic medium, heavy metal ion and photo-sensitizer. The rate of photo-degradation was fast at the initial stage of exposure, exhibiting a first-order reaction kinetic behavior. However, after irradiation for a few hours, the concentration of water-soluble fraction (WSF) of petroleum hydrocarbons stabilized. For all experimental conditions, the range of the photo-degradation rate is from 0.001 3 to 0.005 7/min.

  12. [Photochemical degradation of chlorpyrifos in water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiangwei; Hua, Rimao; Tang, Feng; Li, Xuede; Cao, Haiqun; Yue, Yongde

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, the effects of different light sources, temperature, pH, and water quality on the photochemical degradation of clilorpyrifos in water were examined under natural and simulated solar irradiation. The results showed that the photochemical degradation of chlorpyrifos in water followed the first order reaction, and its half-life was 0.62, 6.92, 19.74 and 22.50 h under high pressure mercury lamp (HPML), xenon lamp (XL), ultraviolet lamp (UV), and sunlight (SL) irradiation, respectively. Temperature had a significant effect on the degradation rate of chlorpyrifos, which was increased with increasing temperature and reached the maximum at 35 degrees C. The degradation rate of chlorpyrifos was stable both in acid and in neutral buffer solution, but enhanced in alkaline buffer solution. Water quality also had a significant effect, with a decreasing degradation rate of chlorpyrifos in the sequence of distilled water > tap water > river water > lake wate > paddy water.

  13. Upper limits of possible photochemical hazes on Pluto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stansberry, J.A.; Lunine, J.I.; Tomasko, M.G. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA))

    1989-11-01

    Elliot et al. (1989) invoked a haze layer near the surface of Pluto to explain certain features of a stellar occultation by that planet in June, 1988. The primary requirements for this haze layer were that it achieve unity tangential optical depth at a radius of 1174 km and be essentially transparent above 1189 km. The authors explore here the possibility that aerosols generated through methane photolysis could be responsible for such a haze layer. A comprehensive model of aerosol production, particle growth, sedimentation and condensation is applied to the atmosphere of Pluto using pressures, temperatures and composition derived from the stellar occultation and other data. They test two atmosphere models proposed in the literature, one from Elliot et al. (1989), and one from Hubbard et al. (1989), as well as a range of optical properties for the particles. In order to produce a haze with unity tangential optical depth at 1174 km, they had to use an aerosol mass production rate equal to twice the total methane dissociation rate due to solar UV expected for Pluto and assume that the particles produced were 10 times more absorbing than those in other hazes in the outer solar system. The possibility of condensation in the atmosphere was considered but did not result in distinctly different haze optical depths. If a photochemical haze on Pluto was responsible for the occultation lightcurve measured by Elliot et al., operation of a photochemical system different from those on Titan, Uranus or Neptune is indicated.

  14. Iron-catalyzed photochemical transformation of benzoic acid in atmospheric liquids: Product identification and reaction mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yiwei; Zhang, Kai; Chen, Hao; Wu, Taixing; Krzyaniak, Metthew; Wellons, Amina; Bolla, Dawn; Douglas, Kenneth; Zuo, Yuegang

    This study investigated iron-catalyzed photochemical oxidation of benzoic acid (BA), one of the major photodegradation products of petroleum hydrocarbons, under sunlight or monochromatic light irradiation in a wavelength range of 254-419 nm. The photochemical degradation of BA in the absence of iron (III) occurred at irradiation wavelengths below 300 nm. The photochemical transformation of BA in the presence Fe(III) was observed at both 254, 350, 419 nm and under solar irradiation. The half-life for the photodegradation of BA (100 μM) was 160±20 min in the presence of 20 μM Fe(III) at pH 3.20 on sunny August days at noon time. The degradation rate increased with increasing concentration of Fe(III). The reaction products were separated and identified using capillary electrophoresis (CE), gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and UV-Visible spectrophotometry. The major reaction products were 2-hydroxybenzoic, 3-hydroxybenzoic and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids. Hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) and Fe(II) species were also formed during the photochemical reactions. The proposed reaction mechanisms include the photoexcitation of Fe(III) hydroxide complexes to form Fe(II) ions and hydroxyl radicals (OH rad ) that attack ortho, meta and para positions of BA to form corresponding monohydroxybenzoic acids and H 2O 2. The monohydroxybenzoic acids formed further react with hydroxyl and surperoxide radicals (HO 2- rad /O 2- rad ) to yield dihydroxybenzoic acids in atmospheric water droplets.

  15. Sunlight-Induced Photochemical Degradation of Methylene Blue by Water-Soluble Carbon Nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshu Bhati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Water-soluble graphitic hollow carbon nanorods (wsCNRs are exploited for their light-driven photochemical activities under outdoor sunlight. wsCNRs were synthesized by a simple pyrolysis method from castor seed oil, without using any metal catalyst or template. wsCNRs exhibited the light-induced photochemical degradation of methylene blue used as a model pollutant by the generation of singlet oxygen species. Herein, we described a possible degradation mechanism of methylene blue under the irradiation of visible photons via the singlet oxygen-superoxide anion pathway.

  16. Modeling and Simulations in Photoelectrochemical Water Oxidation: From Single Level to Multiscale Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Bieberle, A.

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes recent developments, challenges, and strategies in the field of modeling and simulations of photoelectrochemical (PEC) water oxidation. We focus on water splitting by metal-oxide semiconductors and discuss topics such as theoretical calculations of light absorption, band gap/b

  17. Simulations of photochemical smog formation in complex urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muilwijk, C.; Schrijvers, P. J. C.; Wuerz, S.; Kenjereš, S.

    2016-12-01

    In the present study we numerically investigated the dispersion of photochemical reactive pollutants in complex urban areas by applying an integrated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational Reaction Dynamics (CRD) approach. To model chemical reactions involved in smog generation, the Generic Reaction Set (GRS) approach is used. The GRS model was selected since it does not require detailed modeling of a large set of reactive components. Smog formation is modeled first in the case of an intensive traffic emission, subjected to low to moderate wind conditions in an idealized two-dimensional street canyon with a building aspect ratio (height/width) of one. It is found that Reactive Organic Components (ROC) play an important role in the chemistry of smog formation. In contrast to the NOx/O3 photochemical steady state model that predicts a depletion of the (ground level) ozone, the GRS model predicts generation of ozone. Secondly, the effect of direct sunlight and shadow within the street canyon on the chemical reaction dynamics is investigated for three characteristic solar angles (morning, midday and afternoon). Large differences of up to one order of magnitude are found in the ozone production for different solar angles. As a proof of concept for real urban areas, the integrated CFD/CRD approach is applied for a real scale (1 × 1 km2) complex urban area (a district of the city of Rotterdam, The Netherlands) with high traffic emissions. The predicted pollutant concentration levels give realistic values that correspond to moderate to heavy smog. It is concluded that the integrated CFD/CRD method with the GRS model of chemical reactions is both accurate and numerically robust, and can be used for modeling of smog formation in complex urban areas.

  18. Modelling cloud effects on ozone on a regional scale : A case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthijsen, J.; Builtjes, P.J.H.; Meijer, E.W.; Boersen, G.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of clouds on ozone on a regional scale (Europe) with a regional scale photochemical dispersion model (LOTOS). The LOTOS-model calculates ozone and other photo-oxidant concentrations in the lowest three km of the troposphere, using actual meteorologic data and emiss

  19. A microkinetic model of the methanol oxidation over silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, A.; Lynggaard, H.; Stegelmann, C.

    2003-01-01

    , respectively. The model explains observed reaction orders, selectivity, apparent activation enthalpies and the choice of industrial reaction conditions. More interesting the model disproves the notion that the mechanism deduced from surface science in UHV cannot be responsible for formaldehyde synthesis......A simple microkinetic model for the oxidation of methanol on silver based on surface science studies at UHV and low temperatures has been formulated. The reaction mechanism is a simple Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism, with one type of active oxygen and one route to formaldehyde and carbon dioxide...

  20. Growth Model for Pulsed-Laser Deposited Perovskite Oxide Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xu; FEI Yi-Yan; ZHU Xiang-Dong; Lu Hui-Bin; YANG Guo-Zhen

    2008-01-01

    We present a multi-level growth model that yields some of the key features of perovskite oxide film growth as observed in the reflection high energy electron diffraction(RHEED)and ellipsometry studies.The model describes the effect of deposition,temperature,intra-layer transport,interlayer transport and Ostwald ripening on the morphology of a growth surface in terms of the distribution of terraces and step edges during and after deposition.The numerical results of the model coincide well with the experimental observation.

  1. A modelling approach for the heterogeneous oxidation of elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzig, A.; Sekerakova, L.; Johlitz, M.; Lion, A.

    2017-04-01

    The influence of oxygen on elastomers, known as oxidation, is one of the most important ageing processes and becomes more and more important for nowadays applications. The interaction with thermal effects as well as antioxidants makes oxidation of polymers a complex process. Based on the polymer chosen and environmental conditions, the ageing processes may behave completely different. In a lot of cases the influence of oxygen is limited to the surface layer of the samples, commonly referred to as diffusion-limited oxidation. For the lifetime prediction of elastomer components, it is essential to have detailed knowledge about the absorption and diffusion behaviour of oxygen molecules during thermo-oxidative ageing and how they react with the elastomer. Experimental investigations on industrially used elastomeric materials are executed in order to develop and fit models, which shall be capable of predicting the permeation and consumption of oxygen as well as changes in the mechanical properties. The latter are of prime importance for technical applications of rubber components. Oxidation does not occur homogeneously over the entire elastomeric component. Hence, material models which include ageing effects have to be amplified in order to consider heterogeneous ageing, which highly depends on the ageing temperature. The influence of elevated temperatures upon accelerated ageing has to be critically analysed, and influences on the permeation and diffusion coefficient have to be taken into account. This work presents phenomenological models which describe the oxygen uptake and the diffusion into elastomers based on an improved understanding of ongoing chemical processes and diffusion limiting modifications. On the one side, oxygen uptake is modelled by means of Henry's law in which solubility is a function of the temperature as well as the ageing progress. The latter is an irreversible process and described by an inner differential evolution equation. On the other side

  2. A modelling approach for the heterogeneous oxidation of elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzig, A.; Sekerakova, L.; Johlitz, M.; Lion, A.

    2017-09-01

    The influence of oxygen on elastomers, known as oxidation, is one of the most important ageing processes and becomes more and more important for nowadays applications. The interaction with thermal effects as well as antioxidants makes oxidation of polymers a complex process. Based on the polymer chosen and environmental conditions, the ageing processes may behave completely different. In a lot of cases the influence of oxygen is limited to the surface layer of the samples, commonly referred to as diffusion-limited oxidation. For the lifetime prediction of elastomer components, it is essential to have detailed knowledge about the absorption and diffusion behaviour of oxygen molecules during thermo-oxidative ageing and how they react with the elastomer. Experimental investigations on industrially used elastomeric materials are executed in order to develop and fit models, which shall be capable of predicting the permeation and consumption of oxygen as well as changes in the mechanical properties. The latter are of prime importance for technical applications of rubber components. Oxidation does not occur homogeneously over the entire elastomeric component. Hence, material models which include ageing effects have to be amplified in order to consider heterogeneous ageing, which highly depends on the ageing temperature. The influence of elevated temperatures upon accelerated ageing has to be critically analysed, and influences on the permeation and diffusion coefficient have to be taken into account. This work presents phenomenological models which describe the oxygen uptake and the diffusion into elastomers based on an improved understanding of ongoing chemical processes and diffusion limiting modifications. On the one side, oxygen uptake is modelled by means of Henry's law in which solubility is a function of the temperature as well as the ageing progress. The latter is an irreversible process and described by an inner differential evolution equation. On the other side

  3. Potential Biosignatures in Super-Earth Atmospheres II. Photochemical Responses

    CERN Document Server

    Grenfell, J L; Godolt, M; Palczynski, K; Rauer, H; Stock, J; Paris, P v; Lehmann, R; Selsis, F

    2013-01-01

    Spectral characterization of Super-Earth atmospheres for planets orbiting in the Habitable Zone of M-dwarf stars is a key focus in exoplanet science. A central challenge is to understand and predict the expected spectral signals of atmospheric biosignatures (species associated with life). Our work applies a global-mean radiative-convective-photochemical column model assuming a planet with an Earth-like biomass and planetary development. We investigated planets with gravities of 1g and 3g and a surface pressure of one bar around central stars with spectral classes from M0 to M7. The spectral signals of the calculated planetary scenarios have been presented by Rauer et al. (2011). The main motivation of the present work is to perform a deeper analysis of the chemical processes in the planetary atmospheres. We apply a diagnostic tool, the Pathway Analysis Program, to shed light on the photochemical pathways that form and destroy biosignature species. Ozone is a potential biosignature for complex- life. An import...

  4. Laboratory Experiments and Modeling for Interpreting Field Studies of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation Using an Oxidation Flow Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Jose-Luis [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This grant was originally funded for deployment of a suite of aerosol instrumentation by our group in collaboration with other research groups and DOE/ARM to the Ganges Valley in India (GVAX) to study aerosols sources and processing. Much of the first year of this grant was focused on preparations for GVAX. That campaign was cancelled due to political reasons and with the consultation with our program manager, the research of this grant was refocused to study the applications of oxidation flow reactors (OFRs) for investigating secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and organic aerosol (OA) processing in the field and laboratory through a series of laboratory and modeling studies. We developed a gas-phase photochemical model of an OFR which was used to 1) explore the sensitivities of key output variables (e.g., OH exposure, O3, HO2/OH) to controlling factors (e.g., water vapor, external reactivity, UV irradiation), 2) develop simplified OH exposure estimation equations, 3) investigate under what conditions non-OH chemistry may be important, and 4) help guide design of future experiments to avoid conditions with undesired chemistry for a wide range of conditions applicable to the ambient, laboratory, and source studies. Uncertainties in the model were quantified and modeled OH exposure was compared to tracer decay measurements of OH exposure in the lab and field. Laboratory studies using OFRs were conducted to explore aerosol yields and composition from anthropogenic and biogenic VOC as well as crude oil evaporates. Various aspects of the modeling and laboratory results and tools were applied to interpretation of ambient and source measurements using OFR. Additionally, novel measurement methods were used to study gas/particle partitioning. The research conducted was highly successful and details of the key results are summarized in this report through narrative text, figures, and a complete list of publications acknowledging this grant.

  5. Bioavialability of Dom Photochemically Released from Resuspended Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, G. B., Jr.; Rainey, D. H.; Mead, R. N.; Skrabal, S. A.; Kieber, R. J.; Felix, J. D.; Helms, J. R.

    2016-02-01

    Little is known regarding the bioavailability of dissolved organic matter (DOM) released photochemically from resuspended estuarine sediments. Sediments were collected from two sites along the Cape Fear River estuary, NC, USA, size fractionated in 0.2 µm filtered Gulf Stream seawater and exposed to simulated sunlight for six hours. Light exposed samples resulted in increases of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (34 ± 3 µM), chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) (a300nm, 2.7 m-1), and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) (78.6 quinine sulfate equivalents (QSE)) compared to dark controls. Ultra high resolution mass spectrometric characterization indicated the photoreleased DOM was more oxidized and condensed based upon van Kreevlan analysis. Samples were then filtered and inoculated to a final ratio of 4% with coastal water sample filtered through a100 µm net to remove larger grazing organisms and particles while keeping most of bacterial community intact. All three parameters were monitored during a 30 day-long incubation in the dark to assess biological consumption and alteration. Previously light exposed samples had double (20 vs. 9 µM) the amount of DOC consumed compared to samples not previously exposed to light and twice the loss of CDOM (a300nm, 0.6 vs. 0.3 m-1) compared to samples not previously exposed to light. Previously light exposed samples resulted in a threefold loss of FDOM (9.5 QSE) compared to samples not previously exposed to light (2.8 QSE). Results of this study are important because they demonstrate dissolved organic matter released photochemically from resuspended sediments is more bioavailable than ambient material likely fueling secondary productivity and impacting ecosystem functioning in coastal regions.

  6. Methanol Oxidation on Model Elemental and Bimetallic Transition Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tritsaris, G. A.; Rossmeisl, J.

    2012-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells are a key enabling technology for clean energy conversion. Using density functional theory calculations, we study the methanol oxidation reaction on model electrodes. We discuss trends in reactivity for a set of monometallic and bimetallic transition metal surfaces, flat...... sites on the surface and to screen for novel bimetallic surfaces of enhanced activity. We suggest platinum copper surfaces as promising anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells....

  7. Advanced impedance modeling of solid oxide electrochemical cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graves, Christopher R.; Hjelm, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Impedance spectroscopy is a powerful technique for detailed study of the electrochemical and transport processes that take place in fuel cells and electrolysis cells, including solid oxide cells (SOCs). Meaningful analysis of impedance measurements is nontrivial, however, because a large number o...... analysis methods and integrates the analysis process in a modular workflow – data validation (Kramers-Kronig), clean-up, visualization (DRT and others), modeling (nonlinear least-squares fitting), and final plotting for publication....

  8. Impedance Modeling of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jakob Egeberg; Søgaard, Martin; Jacobsen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    A 1-dimensional impedance model for a solid oxide fuel cell cathode is formulated and applied to a cathode consisting of 50/50 wt% strontium doped lanthanum cobaltite and gadolinia doped ceria. A total of 42 impedance spectra were recorded in the temperature range: 555-852°C and in the oxygen...... physical parameters such as the cathode thickness. ©2010 COPYRIGHT ECS - The Electrochemical Society...

  9. Natural gas and blends oxidation and ignition: Experiments and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Y.; Dagaut, P.; Cathonnet, M.; Boettner, J.C. [CNRS, Orleans (France); Bachman, J.S.; Carlier, P. [Gaz de France, La Plaine-Saint-Denis (France)

    1994-12-31

    The kinetics of the oxidation of natural gas and blends (CH{sub 4}/C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CH{sub 4}/C{sub 3}H{sub 8}, CH{sub 4}/C{sub 2}H{sub 6}/C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) has been studied in a jet-stirred reactor (800 {<=} T/K {<=} 1240, 1 {<=} P/atm {<=} 10, 0.1 {<=} equivalence ratio {<=} 1.5). The concentration profiles of reactants, intermediates, and products measured in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) have been used to validate a detailed kinetic reaction mechanism. Literature ignition delay times measured in shock tube have also been modeled. A generally good agreement between the data and the model is found. The same mechanism has also been used to successfully represent the oxidation of methane, ethyne, ethene, ethane, propene, propane, n-butane, and 1-butene in various conditions including JSR, shock tube, and flame. The present study clearly shows the importance of trace hydrocarbons in the oxidation of methane. The computations indicate that the oxidation of methane is initiated by its reaction with O{sub 2} when no other hydrocarbon is present. In natural gas and blends, higher hydrocarbons react before methane, leading to the formation of OH, H, and O radicals, which in turn initiate methane oxidation. This work demonstrates that methane cannot be used safely to represent the kinetics of natural gas combustion. However, simple blends like methane-propane or methane-ethane-propane could be used.

  10. Photochemical synthesis of mono and bimetallic nanoparticles and their use in catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardoe, Andrea

    2011-07-01

    Nanomaterials have become a popular topic of research over the years because of their many important applications. It can be a challenge to stabilize the particles at a nanometer size, while having control over their surface features. Copper nanoparticles were synthesized photochemically using a photogenerated radical allowing spatial and temporal control over their formation. The synthesis was affected by the stabilizers used, which changed the size, dispersity, rate of formation, and oxidation rate. Copper nanoparticles suffer from their fast oxidation in air, so copper-silver bimetallic nanoparticles were synthesized in attempts to overcome the oxidation of copper nanoparticles. Bimetallic nanoparticles were synthesized, but preventing the oxidation of the copper nanoparticles proved difficult. One important application of nanoparticles that was explored here is in catalyzing organic reactions. Because of the fast oxidation of copper nanoparticles, silver nanoparticles were synthesized photochemically on different supports including TiO2 and hydrotalcite (HTC). Their catalytic efficiency was tested using alcohol oxidations. Different silver nanoparticle shapes (decahedra and plates) were compared with the spheres to see the different catalytic efficiencies.

  11. Assessment of the basis for modeling releases from plutonium oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, L.A.; Mishima, J.

    1990-08-01

    Ideally, a model of the release of plutonium aerosols from plutonium during oxidation or combustion should begin from a description of the plutonium material and its surroundings and proceed unequivocally to a situation-dependent estimate of the amount of oxide released and its size distribution. Such a model would need to provide a description of the heat- and mass-transfer processes involved and link them directly to the rate of aerosol production. The first step, the description of heat and mass transfer, is more easily achieved from current information than the second, the aerosol release. The sections of this report titled Physical Fundamentals'' and Available Theoretical Information'' describe the approach that would be required for theoretical modeling. The Experimental Results'' section describes the information on aerosol releases, size distributions, peak temperatures, oxidation rates, and experimental conditions that we have gleaned from the existing experimental literature. The data is summarized and the bibliography lists the relevant literature that has and has not been reviewed. 42 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Modeling toxic compounds from nitric oxide emission measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallero, Daniel A.; Peirce, Jeffrey; Cho, Ki Don

    Determining the amount and rate of degradation of toxic pollutants in soil and groundwater is difficult and often requires invasive techniques, such as deploying extensive monitoring well networks. Even with these networks, degradation rates across entire systems cannot readily be extrapolated from the samples. When organic compounds are degraded by microbes, especially nitrifying bacteria, oxides or nitrogen (NO x) are released to the atmosphere. Thus, the flux of nitric oxide (NO) from the soil to the lower troposphere can be used to predict the rate at which organic compounds are degraded. By characterizing and applying biogenic and anthropogenic processes in soils the rates of degradation of organic compounds. Toluene was selected as a representative of toxic aromatic compounds, since it is inherently toxic, it is a substituted benzene compound and is listed as a hazardous air pollutant under Section 12 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Measured toluene concentrations in soil, microbial population growth and NO fluxes in chamber studies were used to develop and parameterize a numerical model based on carbon and nitrogen cycling. These measurements, in turn, were used as indicators of bioremediation of air toxic (i.e. toluene) concentrations. The model found that chemical concentration, soil microbial abundance, and NO production can be directly related to the experimental results (significant at P hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen. As such, the model may be a tool for decision makers in ozone non-attainment areas.

  13. Effect of photochemical ageing on the ice nucleation properties of diesel and wood burning particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, C.; Kanji, Z. A.; Stetzer, O.; Tritscher, T.; Chirico, R.; Heringa, M. F.; Weingartner, E.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Lohmann, U.

    2013-01-01

    A measurement campaign (IMBALANCE) conducted in 2009 was aimed at characterizing the physical and chemical properties of freshly emitted and photochemically aged combustion particles emitted from a log wood burner and diesel vehicles: a EURO3 Opel Astra with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) but no particle filter and a EURO2 Volkswagen Transporter TDI Syncro without emission aftertreatment. Ice nucleation experiments in the deposition and condensation freezing modes were conducted with the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PINC) at three nominal temperatures, -30 °C, -35 °C and -40 °C. Freshly emitted diesel particles showed ice formation only at -40 °C in the deposition mode at 137% relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) and 92% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw), and photochemical ageing did not play a role in modifying their ice nucleation behaviour. Only one diesel experiment where α-pinene was added for the ageing process, showed an ice nucleation enhancement at -35 °C. Wood burning particles also act as ice nuclei (IN) at -40 °C in the deposition mode at the same conditions as for diesel particles and photochemical ageing also did not alter the ice formation properties of the wood burning particles. Unlike diesel particles, wood burning particles form ice via condensation freezing at -35 °C whereas no ice nucleation was observed at -30 °C. Photochemical ageing did not affect the ice nucleation ability of the diesel and wood burning particles at the three different temperatures investigated but a broader range of temperatures below -40 °C need to be investigated in order to draw an overall conclusion on the effect of photochemical ageing on deposition/condensation ice nucleation across the entire temperature range relevant to cold clouds.

  14. Effect of photochemical aging on the ice nucleation properties of diesel and wood burning particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, C.; Stetzer, O.; Tritscher, T.; Chirico, R.; Heringa, M. F.; Kanji, Z. A.; Weingartner, E.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Lohmann, U.

    2012-06-01

    A measurement campaign (IMBALANCE) was conducted in 2009 and aimed at characterizing the physical and chemical properties of freshly emitted and photochemically aged combustion particles emitted from a log wood burner and diesel vehicles: a EURO3 Opel Astra with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) but no particle filter and a EURO2 Volkswagen Transporter TDI Syncro with no emission after-treatment. Ice nucleation experiments in the deposition and condensation freezing modes were conducted with the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PINC) at three nominal temperatures, -30 °C, -35 °C and -40 °C. Freshly emitted diesel particles showed ice formation only at -40 °C in the deposition mode at 137% relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) and 92% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw), and photochemical aging did not play a role in modifying their ice nucleation behavior. Only one diesel experiment where α-pinene was added, showed an ice nucleation enhancement after the aging at -35 °C. Wood burning particles also act as ice nuclei (IN) at -40 °C in the deposition mode at the same conditions as for diesel particles and photochemical aging did also not alter the ice formation properties of the wood burning particles. Unlike diesel particles, wood burning particles form ice via condensation freezing at -35 °C with no ice nucleation observed at -30 °C for wood burning particles. Photochemical aging did not affect the ice nucleation ability of the diesel and wood burning particles at the three different temperatures investigated but a broader range of temperatures below -30 °C need to be investigated in order to draw an overall conclusion on the effect of photochemical aging on deposition/condensation ice nucleation across the entire temperature range relevant to cold clouds.

  15. Effect of photochemical aging on the ice nucleation properties of diesel and wood burning particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chou

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A measurement campaign (IMBALANCE was conducted in 2009 and aimed at characterizing the physical and chemical properties of freshly emitted and photochemically aged combustion particles emitted from a log wood burner and diesel vehicles: a EURO3 Opel Astra with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC but no particle filter and a EURO2 Volkswagen Transporter TDI Syncro with no emission after-treatment. Ice nucleation experiments in the deposition and condensation freezing modes were conducted with the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PINC at three nominal temperatures, −30 °C, −35 °C and −40 °C. Freshly emitted diesel particles showed ice formation only at −40 °C in the deposition mode at 137% relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi and 92% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw, and photochemical aging did not play a role in modifying their ice nucleation behavior. Only one diesel experiment where α-pinene was added, showed an ice nucleation enhancement after the aging at −35 °C. Wood burning particles also act as ice nuclei (IN at −40 °C in the deposition mode at the same conditions as for diesel particles and photochemical aging did also not alter the ice formation properties of the wood burning particles. Unlike diesel particles, wood burning particles form ice via condensation freezing at −35 °C with no ice nucleation observed at −30 °C for wood burning particles. Photochemical aging did not affect the ice nucleation ability of the diesel and wood burning particles at the three different temperatures investigated but a broader range of temperatures below −30 °C need to be investigated in order to draw an overall conclusion on the effect of photochemical aging on deposition/condensation ice nucleation across the entire temperature range relevant to cold clouds.

  16. Effect of photochemical ageing on the ice nucleation properties of diesel and wood burning particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A measurement campaign (IMBALANCE conducted in 2009 was aimed at characterizing the physical and chemical properties of freshly emitted and photochemically aged combustion particles emitted from a log wood burner and diesel vehicles: a EURO3 Opel Astra with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC but no particle filter and a EURO2 Volkswagen Transporter TDI Syncro without emission aftertreatment. Ice nucleation experiments in the deposition and condensation freezing modes were conducted with the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PINC at three nominal temperatures, −30 °C, −35 °C and −40 °C. Freshly emitted diesel particles showed ice formation only at −40 °C in the deposition mode at 137% relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi and 92% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw, and photochemical ageing did not play a role in modifying their ice nucleation behaviour. Only one diesel experiment where α-pinene was added for the ageing process, showed an ice nucleation enhancement at −35 °C. Wood burning particles also act as ice nuclei (IN at −40 °C in the deposition mode at the same conditions as for diesel particles and photochemical ageing also did not alter the ice formation properties of the wood burning particles. Unlike diesel particles, wood burning particles form ice via condensation freezing at −35 °C whereas no ice nucleation was observed at −30 °C. Photochemical ageing did not affect the ice nucleation ability of the diesel and wood burning particles at the three different temperatures investigated but a broader range of temperatures below −40 °C need to be investigated in order to draw an overall conclusion on the effect of photochemical ageing on deposition/condensation ice nucleation across the entire temperature range relevant to cold clouds.

  17. Quantification of oxide particle composition in model oxide dispersion strengthened steel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, A.J., E-mail: andrew.london@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Lozano-Perez, S.; Moody, M.P. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Amirthapandian, S.; Panigrahi, B.K.; Sundar, C.S. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, TN (India); Grovenor, C.R.M. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels (ODS) are being considered for structural components of future designs of fission and fusion reactors because of their impressive high-temperature mechanical properties and resistance to radiation damage, both of which arise from the nanoscale oxide particles they contain. Because of the critical importance of these nanoscale phases, significant research activity has been dedicated to analysing their precise size, shape and composition (Odette et al., Annu. Rev. Mater. Res. 38 (2008) 471–503 [1]; Miller et al., Mater. Sci. Technol. 29(10) (2013) 1174–1178 [2]). As part of a project to develop new fuel cladding alloys in India, model ODS alloys have been produced with the compositions, Fe–0.3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe–0.2Ti–0.3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe–14Cr–0.2Ti–0.3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The oxide particles in these three model alloys have been studied by APT in their as-received state and following ion irradiation (as a proxy for neutron irradiation) at various temperatures. In order to adequately quantify the composition of the oxide clusters, several difficulties must be managed, including issues relating to the chemical identification (ranging and variable peak-overlaps); trajectory aberrations and chemical structure; and particle sizing. This paper presents how these issues can be addressed by the application of bespoke data analysis tools and correlative microscopy. A discussion follows concerning the achievable precision in these measurements, with reference to the fundamental limiting factors.

  18. Modeling of oxidation of structural materials in LBE systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, H.; Schroer, C.; Voß, Z.; Wedemeyer, O.; Konys, J.

    2008-02-01

    In recent years, liquid metal alloys have been examined in the light of various applications in technical systems the most famous example is the sodium cooled Fast Breeder Reactor. One major problem in non-isothermal heavy liquid metal systems lies in the corrosion of their structural components. The formation of oxide scales on the structural components is considered as a viable measure in limiting the dissolution rates in the hot parts in lead and lead-bismuth loops. Models for oxide scale growth under the action of flowing liquid metals have been implemented in the newly developed code MATLIM, which allow calculating the evolution of the oxide scales on structural materials in multi-modular loops. There are thermo-hydraulic limitations on oxygen supply from the liquid metal to the structural materials, the oxygen mass transfer coefficient in the liquid metal, which depends on the flow conditions, being rate-determining. This seems to explain, for example, why in the first stage of oxidation of stainless steels slowly growing, dense single layer Fe/Cr spinel scales are formed.

  19. Growth model of lantern-like amorphous silicon oxide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ping; Zou, Xingquan; Chi, Lingfei; Li, Qiang; Xiao, Tan

    2007-03-01

    Silicon oxide nanowire assemblies with lantern-like morphology were synthesized by thermal evaporation of the mixed powder of SnO2 and active carbon at 1000 °C and using the silicon wafer as substrate and source. The nano-lanterns were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), energy-dispersive spectroscope (EDS) and selective area electron diffraction (SAED). The results show that the nano-lantern has symmetrical morphology, with one end connecting with the silicon wafer and the other end being the tin ball. The diameter of the nano-lantern is about 1.5-3.0 µm. Arc silicon oxide nanowire assemblies between the two ends have diameters ranging from 70 to 150 nm. One single catalyst tin ball catalyzes more than one amorphous nanowires' growth. In addition, the growth mechanism of the nano-lantern is discussed and a growth model is proposed. The multi-nucleation sites round the Sn droplet's perimeter are responsible for the formation of many SiOx nanowires. The growing direction of the nanowires is not in the same direction of the movement of the catalyst tin ball, resulting in the bending of the nanowires and forming the lantern-like silicon oxide morphology. The controllable synthesis of the lantern-like silicon oxide nanostructure may have potential applications in the photoelectronic devices field.

  20. Growth model of lantern-like amorphous silicon oxide nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Ping; Zou Xingquan; Chi Lingfei; Li Qiang; Xiao Tan [Department of Physics, Shantou University, Shantou 515063 (China)

    2007-03-28

    Silicon oxide nanowire assemblies with lantern-like morphology were synthesized by thermal evaporation of the mixed powder of SnO{sub 2} and active carbon at 1000 deg. C and using the silicon wafer as substrate and source. The nano-lanterns were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), energy-dispersive spectroscope (EDS) and selective area electron diffraction (SAED). The results show that the nano-lantern has symmetrical morphology, with one end connecting with the silicon wafer and the other end being the tin ball. The diameter of the nano-lantern is about 1.5-3.0 {mu}m. Arc silicon oxide nanowire assemblies between the two ends have diameters ranging from 70 to 150 nm. One single catalyst tin ball catalyzes more than one amorphous nanowires' growth. In addition, the growth mechanism of the nano-lantern is discussed and a growth model is proposed. The multi-nucleation sites round the Sn droplet's perimeter are responsible for the formation of many SiO{sub x} nanowires. The growing direction of the nanowires is not in the same direction of the movement of the catalyst tin ball, resulting in the bending of the nanowires and forming the lantern-like silicon oxide morphology. The controllable synthesis of the lantern-like silicon oxide nanostructure may have potential applications in the photoelectronic devices field.

  1. Thermo-cleavable polymers: Materials with enhanced photochemical stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manceau, Matthieu; Petersen, Martin Helgesen; Krebs, Frederik C

    2010-01-01

    Photochemical stability of three thermo-cleavable polymers was investigated as thin films under atmospheric conditions. A significant increase in lifetime was observed once the side-chain was cleaved emphasizing the detrimental effect of solubilizing groups on the photochemical stability of conju......Photochemical stability of three thermo-cleavable polymers was investigated as thin films under atmospheric conditions. A significant increase in lifetime was observed once the side-chain was cleaved emphasizing the detrimental effect of solubilizing groups on the photochemical stability...... of conjugated polymers. In addition to their ease of processing, thermo-cleavable polymers thus also offer a greater intrinsic stability under illumination....

  2. Photochemical reaction between triclosan and nitrous acid in the atmospheric aqueous environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianzhong; Zhu, Chengzhu; Lu, Jun; Lei, Yu; Wang, Jizhong; Chen, Tianhu

    2017-05-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important tropospheric pollutant and a major source of hydroxyl radical in the atmospheric gas phase. However, studies on the role of HONO in atmospheric aqueous phase chemistry processes are relatively few. The present work investigated the photochemical reaction of HONO with triclosan (TCS), which is an emerging contaminant, using a combination of laser flash photolysis spectrometry and gas chromatography mass spectrometry. With these techniques, the reaction pathway of HONO with TCS was proposed by directly monitoring the transient species and detecting the stable products. ·OH was generated from the photodissociation of the HONO aqueous solution and attacked TCS molecules on different sites to produce the TCS-OH adducts with a second-order rate constant of 1.11 × 109 L mol-1 s-1. The ·OH added a C atom adjacent to the ether bond in the aromatic ring of TCS and self-decayed when the ether bond broke. The intermediates generated from the addition of ·OH to the benzene ring of the TCS molecular structure were immediately nitrated by HONO, which played a key role in the formation process of nitrocompounds. An atmospheric model suggests that the aqueous oxidation of TCS by ·OH is a major reaction at high liquid water concentrations, and the photolysis of TCS dominates under low-humidity conditions.

  3. Evaluation of discrepancy between measured and modelled oxidized mercury species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kos

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available L. Zhang et al. (2012, in a recent report, compared model estimates with new observations of oxidized and particulate mercury species (Hg2+ and Hgp in the Great Lakes region and found that the sum of Hg2+ and Hgp varied between a factor of 2 to 10 between measurements and model. They suggested too high emission inputs as Hg2+ and too fast oxidative conversion of Hg0 to Hg2+ and Hgp as possible causes. This study quantitatively explores measurement uncertainties in detail. These include sampling efficiency, composition of sample, interfering species and calibration errors. Model (Global/Regional Atmospheric Heavy Metals Model – GRAHM sensitivity experiments are used to examine the consistency between various Hg measurements and speciation of Hg near emission sources to better understand the discrepancies between modelled and measured concentrations of Hg2+ and Hgp. We find that the ratio of Hg0, Hg2+ and Hgp in the emission inventories, measurements of surface air concentrations of oxidized Hg and measurements of wet deposition are currently inconsistent with each other in the vicinity of emission sources. Current speciation of Hg emissions suggests higher concentrations of Hg2+ in air and in precipitation near emission sources; however, measured air concentrations of Hg2+ and measured concentrations of Hg in precipitation are not found to be significantly elevated near emission sources compared to the remote regions. The averaged unbiased root mean square error (RMSE between simulated and observed concentrations of Hg2+ is found to be reduced by 42% and for Hgp reduced by 40% for 21 North American sites investigated, when a ratio for Hg0 : Hg2+ : Hgp in the emissions is changed from 50 : 40 : 10 (as specified in the original inventories to 90 : 8 : 2. Unbiased RMSE reductions near emissions sources in the eastern United States and Canada are found to be reduced by up to 58% for Hg2+. Significant improvement in the model simulated spatial

  4. Methane on Mars: Thermodynamic Equilibrium and Photochemical Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, J. S.; Summers, M. E.; Ewell, M.

    2010-01-01

    The detection of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere of Mars by Mars Express and Earth-based spectroscopy is very surprising, very puzzling, and very intriguing. On Earth, about 90% of atmospheric ozone is produced by living systems. A major question concerning methane on Mars is its origin - biological or geological. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations indicated that methane cannot be produced by atmospheric chemical/photochemical reactions. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for three gases, methane, ammonia (NH3) and nitrous oxide (N2O) in the Earth s atmosphere are summarized in Table 1. The calculations indicate that these three gases should not exist in the Earth s atmosphere. Yet they do, with methane, ammonia and nitrous oxide enhanced 139, 50 and 12 orders of magnitude above their calculated thermodynamic equilibrium concentration due to the impact of life! Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations have been performed for the same three gases in the atmosphere of Mars based on the assumed composition of the Mars atmosphere shown in Table 2. The calculated thermodynamic equilibrium concentrations of the same three gases in the atmosphere of Mars is shown in Table 3. Clearly, based on thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, methane should not be present in the atmosphere of Mars, but it is in concentrations approaching 30 ppbv from three distinct regions on Mars.

  5. Oxidative stress in toxicology: established mammalian and emerging piscine model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, K A; Havrilla, C M; Brady, T C; Abramo, K H; Levin, E D

    1998-07-01

    Interest in the toxicological aspects of oxidative stress has grown in recent years, and research has become increasingly focused on the mechanistic aspects of oxidative damage and cellular responses in biological systems. Toxic consequences of oxidative stress at the subcellular level include lipid peroxidation and oxidative damage to DNA and proteins. These effects are often used as end points in the study of oxidative stress. Typically, mammalian species have been used as models to study oxidative stress and to elucidate the mechanisms underlying cellular damage and response, largely because of the interest in human health issues surrounding oxidative stress. However, it is becoming apparent that oxidative stress also affects aquatic organisms exposed to environmental pollutants. Research in fish has demonstrated that mammalian and piscine systems exhibit similar toxicological and adaptive responses to oxidative stress. This suggests that piscine models, in addition to traditional mammalian models, may be useful for further understanding the mechanisms underlying the oxidative stress response.

  6. Remotely sensing the photochemical reflectance index, PRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, Vern; Daughtry, Craig; Dahlgren, Robert

    2015-09-01

    In remote sensing, the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) provides insight into physiological processes occurring inside leaves in a plant stand. Developed by1,2, PRI evolved from laboratory reflectance measurements of individual leaves. Yet in a remotely sensed image, a pixel measurement may include light from both reflecting and transmitting leaves. We compared values of PRI based upon polarized reflectance and transmittance measurements of water and nutrient stressed leaves. Our results show the polarized leaf surface reflection should be removed when calculating PRI and that the leaf physiology information is in leaf interior reflectance, not leaf transmittance.

  7. Photochemical synthesis of biomolecules under anoxic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folsome, C.; Brittain, A.; Zelko, M.

    1983-01-01

    The long-wavelength UV anoxic photosynthesis of uracil, various sugars (including deoxyribose and glycoaldehyde), amino acids, and other organic photoproducts is reported. The reactions were conducted in a mixture of water, calcium carbonate, hydrazine, and formaldehyde which were subjected to 24 hr or 72 hr radiation. Product yields were greatest when the hydrazine/formaldehyde ratio was one, and when the reactant concentrations were low. These data suggest that organic products can be formed in variety from those amounts of formaldehyde and hydazine precursors which are themselves formed under anoxic UV photochemical conditions.

  8. Enantioselectivity of Photochemical Reactions within Polymer Microcapsules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA,Lei; WU,Li-Zhu; ZHANG,Li-Ping; TUNG,Chen-Ho

    2003-01-01

    Polymer microcapsule was employed as a reaction medium to achieve enantioselectivity in photochemical reduction of phenyl cyclohexyl ketone and photoelectrocyclization of tropolone methyl ether unader the influence of various chiral inductors. In all cases,low but evident enantioselectivity was observed. The poor enantioselectivity is probably due to the facts that not all the capsules include simultaneously both the chiral inductor and the reactant molecules, and the wall of the microcapsule is not rigid enough tohold the reactant and the chiral inductor moleculesin close contact.

  9. Using 18O as a Tracer of Oxygen in the Photochemical Alteration of Dissolved Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. A.; Stubbins, A.; Helms, J.; Dias, R. F.; Mopper, K.

    2006-12-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in natural waters is affected by numerous processes, including photochemical alteration. Photochemical processes result in the net oxidation and mineralization of DOM concomitant with dissolved oxygen consumption and production of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC; principally CO2). The photochemical oxygen budget is not well constrained while DIC production accounts for nearly all the dissolved oxygen consumed, conflicting data suggests that more than half of the oxygen consumed is required to account for observed DOM oxidation and hydrogen peroxide production. An alternate source of oxygen is required to balance this budget; water itself may provide the answer. In order to determine the source of oxygen, a number of time series irradiations were performed using Great Dismal Swamp water (southeast Virginia) with 18O enrichments as either dissolved oxygen or water. Early results, upon irradiation in a UV solar simulator, show significant incorporation of 18O-enriched oxygen into high molecular weight (HMW) DOM from both sources. While the majority of the incorporated oxygen originated from the dissolved oxygen, at least 5 percent originated from water. Data will be presented showing the rate and degree of incorporation of 18O-enriched oxygen from both sources as well as the production of 18O-enriched carbon dioxide. The movement of 18O label will be discussed in relation to shifts in spectral qualities, including photobleaching and spectral slope, of the irradiated samples and selective incorporation as detailed by FT-ICRMS.

  10. Disentangling the interactions between photochemical and bacterial degradation of dissolved organic matter: amino acids play a central role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado, André M; Cotner, James B; Cory, Rose M; Edhlund, Betsy L; McNeill, Kristopher

    2015-04-01

    acid-rich environments, such as eutrophic and less terrestrially influenced waters, experience a higher cost due to the increased necessity of salvage pathways for these essential amino acids. Finally, we propose a conceptual model whereby the effects of DOM photochemical degradation on microbial metabolism result from the balance between two mechanisms: One is dependent on the DOM sources, and the other is dependent on the DOM concentration in natural systems.

  11. Oxidative airway inflammation leads to systemic and vascular oxidative stress in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Naif O; Nadeem, A; Al-Harbi, Mohamed M; Imam, F; Al-Shabanah, Othman A; Ahmad, Sheikh F; Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M; Bahashwan, Saleh A

    2015-05-01

    Oxidant-antioxidant imbalance plays an important role in repeated cycles of airway inflammation observed in asthma. It is when reactive oxygen species (ROS) overwhelm antioxidant defenses that a severe inflammatory state becomes apparent and may impact vasculature. Several studies have shown an association between airway inflammation and cardiovascular complications; however so far none has investigated the link between airway oxidative stress and systemic/vascular oxidative stress in a murine model of asthma. Therefore, this study investigated the contribution of oxidative stress encountered in asthmatic airways in modulation of vascular/systemic oxidant-antioxidant balance. Rats were sensitized intraperitoneally with ovalbumin (OVA) in the presence of aluminum hydroxide followed by several intranasal (i.n.) challenges with OVA. Rats were then assessed for airway and vascular inflammation, oxidative stress (ROS, lipid peroxides) and antioxidants measured as total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and thiol content. Challenge with OVA led to increased airway inflammation and oxidative stress with a concomitant increase in vascular inflammation and oxidative stress. Oxidative stress in the vasculature was significantly inhibited by antioxidant treatment, N-acetyl cysteine; whereas hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhalation worsened it. Therefore, our study shows that oxidative airway inflammation is associated with vascular/systemic oxidative stress which might predispose these patients to increased cardiovascular risk.

  12. Establishment of a rat model of trigeminal neuralgia induced by photochemical nerve injury%一种光化学损伤诱导的三叉神经痛大鼠模型的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔悦; 王丹巧; 高天乐; 徐晓军; 赵佳; 王晔; 孙丹丹; 张莹; 刘洋; 赵小亮; 牛晓红; 张美玉

    2014-01-01

    Aim To investigate the behavioral changes of the pain related neuromodulation and neurotransmission in peripheral and central nervous systems in rats with trigeminal neuralgia (TN)and provide a disease relevant animal model for mecha-nism study of TN.Methods The male SD rats were randomly divided into sham operation group and TN surgical group.The latter group was further divided into model group and gabapentin group (100 mg · kg-1 ). TN was induced by intravenous erythrosine B injection and laser irradiation.The pain behavior of rats was evaluated using mechanical pain threshold measured with Von Frey hairs.Fluorescence quantitative PCR technique was deployed to study the change of Tac1 mRNA expressions in trigeminal ganglia.Utilizing microdialysis technique followed by high performance liquid chromatography fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD),the extracellular striatum fluid was collected and glutamate(Glu)concentration was determined.Results In the model group,the average mechanical pain threshold in facial ar-ea innervated by the trigeminal nerve remained below 4g after 7 days post surgery.The mechanical threshold of the model group (1.63 ±1.27)g was significantly lower (P<0.01)than the control group (24.17 ±4.49)g on day10 post surgery.In gen-eral,the mechanical withdraw threshold was decreased from the preoperative value of 26g to the postoperative value of (1.60 ± 1.74)g (P<0.01),and maintained stable at (0.71 ±1.24) g during the whole dynamic monitoring period from day7 to day60.The successful rate of this model was 63%.After sur-gery,Tac1 mRNA expression in trigeminal ganglia and extracel-lular Glu levels in striatum were significantly up-regulated (P<0.05 ) in the model group. Animals receiving Gabapentin showed significant improvement in pain symptoms,as well as re-ductions of Tac1 mRNA expression in trigeminal ganglia and ex-tracellular Glu concentration in striatum (P<0.05 ).Conclu-sions The above described photochemically induced TN rat model can

  13. Characterization of photochemical pollution at different elevations in mountainous areas in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Guo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available To advance our understanding on the factors that affect photochemical pollution at different elevations in mountainous areas, concurrent systematic field measurements (September to November 2010 were conducted at a mountain site and at an urban site at the foot of the mountain in Hong Kong. The mixing ratios of air pollutants were greater at the foot of the mountain (i.e. Tsuen Wan urban site, TW than near the summit (i.e. Tai Mao Shan mountain site, TMS, except for ozone. In total, only 1 O3 episode day was observed at TW, whereas 21 O3 episode days were observed at TMS. The discrepancy of O3 at the two sites was attributed to the mixed effects of NO titration, vertical meteorological conditions, regional transport and mesoscale circulations. The lower NO levels at TMS and the smaller differences of "oxidant" Ox (O3 + NO2 than O3 between the two sites suggested that variations of O3 at the two sites were partly attributed to different degree of NO titration. In addition, analysis of vertical structure of meteorological variables revealed that the inversion layer at the range of altitudes of 500–1000 m might be another factor that caused the high O3 levels at TMS. Furthermore, analyses of the wind fields and the levels of air pollutants in different air flows indicated that high O3 concentrations at TMS were somewhat influenced by regional air masses from the highly polluted Pearl River Delta (PRD region. In particular, the analysis of diurnal profiles and correlations of gaseous pollutants suggested influence of mesoscale circulations which was further confirmed using the Master Chemical Mechanism moving box model (Mbox and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model. By investigating the correlations of observed O3 and NOx*, as well as the ratios of VOC/NOx, it was concluded that photochemical O

  14. Evidence of Oxidative Stress in Autism Derived from Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Ming

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder that leads to deficits in social interaction, communication and restricted, repetitive motor movements. Autism is a highly heritable disorder, however, there is mounting evidence to suggest that toxicant-induced oxidative stress may play a role. The focus of this article will be to review our animal model of autism and discuss our evidence that oxidative stress may be a common underlying mechanism of neurodevelopmental damage. We have shown that mice exposed to either methylmercury (MeHg or valproic acid (VPA in early postnatal life display aberrant social, cognitive and motor behavior. Interestingly, early exposure to both compounds has been clinically implicated in the development of autism. We recently found that Trolox, a water-soluble vitamin E derivative, is capable of attenuating a number of neurobehavioral alterations observed in mice postnatally exposed to MeHg. In addition, a number of other investigators have shown that oxidative stress plays a role in neural injury following MeHg exposure both in vitro and in vivo. New data presented here will show that VPA-induced neurobehavioral deficits are attenuated by vitamin E as well and that the level of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, a marker of astrocytic neural injury, is altered following VPA exposure. Collectively, these data indicate that vitamin E and its derivative are capable of protecting against neurobehavioral deficits induced by both MeHg and VPA. This antioxidant protection suggests that oxidative stress may be a common mechanism of injury leading to aberrant behavior in both our animal model as well as in the human disease state.

  15. Mass psychogenic systemic illness in school children in relation to the Tokyo photochemical smog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, S.; Honma, T.

    1986-05-01

    To clarify the pathogenic mechanism of epidemics with acute systemic neurobehavioral illness associated with photochemical air pollution in Japan, we re-examined our past records in sixteen junior high school children, and compared them with major epidemics that occurred in 1970-1972 during which time Japanese society faced a new and unusual type of air pollution (Tokyo smog). Dysfunction of alveolar-arterial gas exchange, together with respiratory alkalosis, was newly found in these children, who suffered from chest discomfort, ocular irritation, emotional distress, tetany, and unconsciousness. It was concluded that anxiety reaction, precipitated by the physical effects of photochemical oxidants and athletic performance, possibly led to many outbreaks of mass psychogenic systemic illness (hyperventilation syndrome) among school children.

  16. FTIR and DSC studies of the thermal and photochemical stability of Balanites aegyptiaca oil (Toogga oil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardette, Jean-Luc; Baba, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    The oil extracted from the bean of Balanites aegyptiaca was characterized, and its photochemical and thermal stabilization were evaluated. The chemical composition was determined using gas chromatography (GC), revealing that the oil is very rich in unsaturated fatty acids (72% omega-6 and omega-9). The photochemical stability was assessed by subjecting it to artificially accelerated photo-aging and then examining the changes using infrared spectroscopy. The thermal stability was studied at six different temperatures ranging from 130 to 200°C and monitored in situ by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The kinetic parameters (EA and k) describing the thermal degradation of this oil were calculated. It has been shown that the antioxidants present in the oil delay the oxidation process (induction period). The degradation of the Toogga oil was compared with that of oleic and linoleic fatty acids. In addition, the degradation of the Toogga oil extracted with hexane was compared to that of the neat oil.

  17. LG Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberman, Ben [LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc., North Canton, OH (United States); Martinez-Baca, Carlos [LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc., North Canton, OH (United States); Rush, Greg [LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc., North Canton, OH (United States)

    2013-05-31

    This report presents a summary of the work performed by LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc. during the project LG Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Model Development (DOE Award Number: DE-FE0000773) which commenced on October 1, 2009 and was completed on March 31, 2013. The aim of this project is for LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc. (formerly known as Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc.) (LGFCS) to develop a multi-physics solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) computer code (MPC) for performance calculations of the LGFCS fuel cell structure to support fuel cell product design and development. A summary of the initial stages of the project is provided which describes the MPC requirements that were developed and the selection of a candidate code, STAR-CCM+ (CD-adapco). This is followed by a detailed description of the subsequent work program including code enhancement and model verification and validation activities. Details of the code enhancements that were implemented to facilitate MPC SOFC simulations are provided along with a description of the models that were built using the MPC and validated against experimental data. The modeling work described in this report represents a level of calculation detail that has not been previously available within LGFCS.

  18. Preservation engineering assets developed from an oxidation predictive model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coutelieris Frank A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A previously developed model which effectively predicts the probability of olive oil reaching the end of its shelf-life within a certain time frame was tested for its response when the convective diffusion of oxygen through packaging material is taken in account. Darcy’s Law was used to correlate the packaging permeability with the oxygen flow through the packaging materials. Mass transport within the food-packaging system was considered transient and the relative one-dimensional differential equations along with appropriate initial and boundary conditions were numerically solved. When the Peclet (Pe number was used to validate the significance of the oxygen transport mechanism through packaging, the model results confirmed the Arrhenius type dependency of diffusion, where the slope of the line per material actually indicated their –Ea/R. Furthermore, Pe could not be correlated to the hexanal produced in samples stored under light. Photo-oxidation has a significant role in the oxidative degradation of olive oil confirmed by the shelf-assessing test. The validity of our model for the oxygen diffusion driven systems, was also confirmed, for that reason the predictive boundaries were set. Results safely indicated the significance of applying a self-assessing process to confirm the packaging selection process for oxygen sensitive food via this model.

  19. Photochemical processes for atrazine degradation: methodological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héquet, V; Gonzalez, C; Le Cloirec, P

    2001-12-01

    Numerous studies have been carried out on s-triazines, and more specifically on atrazine, with the long-term objective of resolving the problems caused by these herbicides: removing them from drinking water. However, applications have remained too limited. So far, processes based on photochemical degradation have been little implemented. We, therefore, investigated the development of photochemical processes, emphasizing their capacity to degrade triazine by photolytic and photocatalytic mode. The study sought to assess the performance of these ssstems. Experiments ts showed that according to a medium pressure mercury source (UV-Vis irradiation), the photolytic degradation of atrazine was very efficient, with a best atrazine degradation half-life shorter that 5 min. The main degradation pathway was deshalogenation. The photocatalytic degradation of atrazine under irradiation over 290 nm in the presence of titanium dioxide was shown to be efficient too, with a half-life of about 20 min. In this case an experimental design was conducted so as to assess the influence of various parameters: pH, water medium, and amount of catalyst. There has been observational evidence for the efficiency of the processes investigated here and for potential technological developments as regards drinking water treatment.

  20. Photochemical tissue bonding with chitosan adhesive films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piller Sabine C

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photochemical tissue bonding (PTB is a promising sutureless technique for tissue repair. PTB is often achieved by applying a solution of rose bengal (RB between two tissue edges, which are irradiated by a green laser to crosslink collagen fibers with minimal heat production. In this study, RB has been incorporated in chitosan films to create a novel tissue adhesive that is laser-activated. Methods Adhesive films, based on chitosan and containing ~0.1 wt% RB were manufactured and bonded to calf intestine by a solid state laser (λ = 532 nm, Fluence~110 J/cm2, spot size~0.5 cm. A single-column tensiometer, interfaced with a personal computer, tested the bonding strength. K-type thermocouples recorded the temperature (T at the adhesive-tissue interface during laser irradiation. Human fibroblasts were also seeded on the adhesive and cultured for 48 hours to assess cell growth. Results The RB-chitosan adhesive bonded firmly to the intestine with adhesion strength of 15 ± 2 kPa, (n = 31. The adhesion strength dropped to 0.5 ± 0.1 (n = 8 kPa when the laser was not applied to the adhesive. The average temperature of the adhesive increased from 26°C to 32°C during laser exposure. Fibroblasts grew confluent on the adhesive without morphological changes. Conclusion A new biocompatible chitosan adhesive has been developed that bonds photochemically to tissue with minimal temperature increase.

  1. Chitosan Adhesive Films for Photochemical Tissue Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauto, Antonio; Mawad, Damia; Barton, Matthew; Piller, Sabine C.; Longo, Leonardo

    2011-08-01

    Photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) is a promising sutureless technique for tissue repair. PTB is often achieved by applying a solution of rose bengal (RB) between two tissue edges, which are irradiated by a green laser to crosslink collagen fibers with minimal heat production. In this study, RB has been incorporated in chitosan films to create a novel tissue adhesive that is laser-activated. Materials and Methods. Adhesive films, based on chitosan and containing ˜0.1wt% RB were manufactured and bonded to calf intestine by a solid state laser (wavelength = 532 nm, Fluence ˜110 J/cm2, spot size ˜5 mm). A single-column tensiometer, interfaced with a personal computer, tested the bonding strength. K-type thermocouples recorded the temperature (T) at the adhesive-tissue interface during laser irradiation. Human fibroblasts were also seeded on the adhesive and cultured for 48 hours to assess cell growth. Results and Conclusion. The RB-chitosan adhesive bonded firmly to the intestine (15±2 kPa, n = 31). The adhesion strength dropped to 0.5±0.1 kPa (n = 8) when the laser was not applied to the adhesive. The average temperature of the adhesive increased from 26 °C to 32 °C during laser exposure. Fibroblasts grew confluent on the adhesive without morphological changes. A new biocompatible chitosan adhesive has been developed that bonds photochemically to tissue with minimal temperature increase.

  2. Photochemical production of carbon disulphide in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huixiang; Moore, Robert M.; Miller, William L.

    1998-03-01

    It is generally accepted that the ocean is an important source for atmospheric CS2, which makes a major contribution to the formation of COS in the atmosphere. The processes producing CS2 in seawater, however, are essentially unknown. We report for the first time to our knowledge that marine photochemical reactions are identified as a significant source for oceanic CS2. Apparent quantum yield spectra of CS2 production were obtained using water samples collected in the northeast Atlantic. Results indicate that it is mainly UV solar radiation (290-340 nm) which is responsible for CS2 photoproduction. The photoproduction rate of CS2 is positively correlated with absorbance at 350 nm, suggesting that the reactions are mediated by chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). Laboratory irradiations have confirmed that cysteine and cystine are efficient precursors of CS2 and that OH radicals are likely to be important intermediates. Both the field survey and laboratory work point to similar mechanisms for photochemical production of CS2 and COS in marine waters. A CS2 production rate of 0.49 Tg yr-1 for the world oceans has been estimated using the quantum yield spectra from this work and the sea surface light field provided by Leifer [1988]. This estimate is of the same order of magnitude as the present estimate of the CS2 flux from the ocean to the atmosphere based on surface saturation and wind speed.

  3. Photochemical tissue bonding with chitosan adhesive films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauto, Antonio; Mawad, Damia; Barton, Matthew; Gupta, Abhishek; Piller, Sabine C; Hook, James

    2010-09-08

    Photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) is a promising sutureless technique for tissue repair. PTB is often achieved by applying a solution of rose bengal (RB) between two tissue edges, which are irradiated by a green laser to crosslink collagen fibers with minimal heat production. In this study, RB has been incorporated in chitosan films to create a novel tissue adhesive that is laser-activated. Adhesive films, based on chitosan and containing ~0.1 wt% RB were manufactured and bonded to calf intestine by a solid state laser (λ = 532 nm, Fluence~110 J/cm2, spot size~0.5 cm). A single-column tensiometer, interfaced with a personal computer, tested the bonding strength. K-type thermocouples recorded the temperature (T) at the adhesive-tissue interface during laser irradiation. Human fibroblasts were also seeded on the adhesive and cultured for 48 hours to assess cell growth. The RB-chitosan adhesive bonded firmly to the intestine with adhesion strength of 15 ± 2 kPa, (n = 31). The adhesion strength dropped to 0.5 ± 0.1 (n = 8) kPa when the laser was not applied to the adhesive. The average temperature of the adhesive increased from 26°C to 32°C during laser exposure. Fibroblasts grew confluent on the adhesive without morphological changes. A new biocompatible chitosan adhesive has been developed that bonds photochemically to tissue with minimal temperature increase.

  4. Photochemical aerosols in warm exoplanetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanaka, Hiroshi; Smith, Mark A.; McKay, Christopher P.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Marley, Mark S.

    2016-10-01

    Recent transit observations of exoplanets have demonstrated the possibility of a wide prevalence of haze/cloud layers at high altitudes. Hydrocarbon photochemical haze could be the candidate for such haze particles on warm sub-Neptunes, but the lack of evidence for methane poses a puzzle for such hydrocarbon photochemical haze. The CH4/CO ratios in planetary atmospheres vary substantially from their temperature and dynamics. We have conducted a series of laboratory simulations to investigate how atmospheric compositions, specifically CH4/CO ratios, affect the haze production rates and their optical properties. The mass production rates in the H2-CH4-CO gas mixtures are rather insensitive to the CH4/CO ratios larger than at 0.3. Significant formation of solid material is observed in a H2-CO gas mixture even without CH4. The complex refractive indices of the aerosol analogue from the H2-CO gas mixture show strong absorption at the visible/near-IR wavelengths. These experimental facts imply that substantial carbonaceous aerosols may be generated in warm H2-CO-CH4 exoplanetary atmospheres, and that it might be responsible for the observed dark albedos at the visible wavelengths.

  5. Macro Level Modeling of a Tubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid Zabihian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a macro-level model of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC stack implemented in Aspen Plus® for the simulation of SOFC system. The model is 0-dimensional and accepts hydrocarbon fuels such as reformed natural gas, with user inputs of current density, fuel and air composition, flow rates, temperature, pressure, and fuel utilization factor. The model outputs the composition of the exhaust, work produced, heat available for the fuel reformer, and electrochemical properties of SOFC for model validation. It was developed considering the activation, concentration, and ohmic losses to be the main over-potentials within the SOFC, and mathematical expressions for these were chosen based on available studies in the literature. The model also considered the water shift reaction of CO and the methane reforming reaction. The model results were validated using experimental data from Siemens Westinghouse. The results showed that the model could capture the operating pressure and temperature dependency of the SOFC performance successfully in an operating range of 1–15 atm for pressure and 900 °C–1,000 °C for temperature. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis was performed to identify the model constants and input parameters that impacted the over-potentials.

  6. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baulch, D. L.; Cox, R. A.; Hampson, R. F., Jr.; Kerr, J. A.; Troe, J.; Watson, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper contains a critical evaluation of the kinetics and photochemistry of gas phase chemical reactions of neutral species involved in middle atmosphere chemistry (10-55 km altitude). Data sheets have been prepared for 148 thermal and photochemical reactions, containing summaries of the available experimental data with notes giving details of the experimental procedures. For each reaction a preferred value of the rate coefficient at 298 K is given together with a temperature dependency where possible. The selection of the preferred value is discussed, and estimates of the accuracies of the rate coefficients and temperature coefficients have been made for each reaction. The data sheets are intended to provide the basic physical chemical data needed as input for calculations which model atmospheric chemistry. A table summarizing the preferred rate data is provided, together with an appendix listing the available data on enthalpies of formation of the reactant and product species.

  7. Charge transport in photochemically modified molecularly doped polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiak, James W.; Storch, Teresa J.; Mao, Erji

    1995-08-01

    Hole mobilities in p-diethylaminobenzaldehyde diphenylhydrazone (DEH) doped polycarbonate films are determined using the time-of-flight transient photocurrent technique. Measurements of hole transport parameters are determined over a range of electric fields before and after the samples are deliberately irradiated with UV light. UV irradiation of the hole transport molecule DEH results in the creation of a photoproduct, 1-phenyl-3-(4- diethylamino-1-phenyl)-1, 3-indazole with moderately high efficiency. Once formed, this photoproduct has been shown to act as a barrier to hole conduction. We exploit this photochemical reaction to examine the hole transport properties in a molecularly doped polymer system containing DEH doped polycarbonate. We propose that the increase in concentration of the photoproduct modifies the intrinsic order of the system and provides a unique probe to distinguish between the disorder formalism of Baessler and coworkers and models which propose polaron formation.

  8. Photochemical aerosols on Titan and the giant planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R.

    2015-10-01

    Our ideas about the nature of photochemical aerosols on Titan and the giant planets is evolving thanks to new data coming in from the Cassini spacecraft, ground-based and space-based telescopes, and theory and modeling. Aerosol formation begins at altitudes around 1000 km on Titan and around 800 km above the 1-bar pressure level in the polar thermospheres of Jupiter and Saturn where auroral energy is available to form ions and radicals. We have evidence that hydrocarbon chemistry is important in aerosol formation for all of these bodies and we believe that hydrazine on Jupiter and phosphine on Saturn may lead to aerosol production. Aeroso ls have a fractal aggregate structure on Titan and in the polar regions of Jupiter and Saturn. Their vertical and horizontal distributions reflect a balance between local production and horizontal and vertical transport governed by eddies and jets. They are important for radiative energy balance in ways that have only recently come to light.

  9. Oxidative stress in toxicology: established mammalian and emerging piscine model systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, K.A.; Havrilla, C M; Brady, T C; Abramo, K H; Levin, E.D.

    1998-01-01

    Interest in the toxicological aspects of oxidative stress has grown in recent years, and research has become increasingly focused on the mechanistic aspects of oxidative damage and cellular responses in biological systems. Toxic consequences of oxidative stress at the subcellular level include lipid peroxidation and oxidative damage to DNA and proteins. These effects are often used as end points in the study of oxidative stress. Typically, mammalian species have been used as models to study o...

  10. Mechanical modeling of porous oxide fuel pellet A Test Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nukala, Phani K [ORNL; Barai, Pallab [ORNL; Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL; Ott, Larry J [ORNL

    2009-10-01

    A poro-elasto-plastic material model has been developed to capture the response of oxide fuels inside the nuclear reactors under operating conditions. Behavior of the oxide fuel and variation in void volume fraction under mechanical loading as predicted by the developed model has been reported in this article. The significant effect of void volume fraction on the overall stress distribution of the fuel pellet has also been described. An important oxide fuel issue that can have significant impact on the fuel performance is the mechanical response of oxide fuel pellet and clad system. Specifically, modeling the thermo-mechanical response of the fuel pellet in terms of its thermal expansion, mechanical deformation, swelling due to void formation and evolution, and the eventual contact of the fuel with the clad is of significant interest in understanding the fuel-clad mechanical interaction (FCMI). These phenomena are nonlinear and coupled since reduction in the fuel-clad gap affects thermal conductivity of the gap, which in turn affects temperature distribution within the fuel and the material properties of the fuel. Consequently, in order to accurately capture fuel-clad gap closure, we need to account for fuel swelling due to generation, retention, and evolution of fission gas in addition to the usual thermal expansion and mechanical deformation. Both fuel chemistry and microstructure also have a significant effect on the nucleation and growth of fission gas bubbles. Fuel-clad gap closure leading to eventual contact of the fuel with the clad introduces significant stresses in the clad, which makes thermo-mechanical response of the clad even more relevant. The overall aim of this test problem is to incorporate the above features in order to accurately capture fuel-clad mechanical interaction. Because of the complex nature of the problem, a series of test problems with increasing multi-physics coupling features, modeling accuracy, and complexity are defined with the

  11. Lithium ion transport in a model of amorphous polyethylene oxide.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boinske, P. T.; Curtiss, L.; Halley, J. W.; Lin, B.; Sutjianto, A.; Chemical Engineering; Univ. of Minnesota

    1996-01-01

    We have made a molecular dynamics study of transport of a single lithium ion in a previously reported model of amorphous polyethylene oxide. New ab initio calculations of the interaction of the lithium ion with 1,2-dimethoxyethane and with dimethyl ether are reported which are used to determine force fields for the simulation. We report preliminary calculations of solvation energies and hopping barriers and a calculation of the ionic conductivity which is independent of any assumptions about the mechanism of ion transport. We also report some details of a study of transport of the trapped lithium ion on intermediate time and length scales.

  12. Evaluation of the photochemical production of hydrogen from solar energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heppert, J. A.

    1977-08-09

    The potential for utilizing solar energy through photochemical storage were investigated. Both water and nitrosyl chloride systems are examined. A comprehensive review of the literature led to the conclusion that many major questions must be answered before photochemical energy storage becomes a viable alternate means of exploiting solar energy.

  13. Photochemical hazes in planetary atmospheres: solar system bodies and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanaka, Hiroshi; Cruikshank, Dale P.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2015-11-01

    Recent transit observations of exoplanets have demonstrated the possibility of a wide prevalence of haze/cloud layers at high altitudes. Hydrocarbon photochemical haze could be the candidate for such haze particles on warm sub-Neptunes, but the lack of evidence for methane poses a puzzle for such hydrocarbon photochemical haze. The CH4/CO ratios in planetary atmospheres vary substantially from their temperature and dynamics. An understanding of haze formation rates and plausible optical properties in a wide diversity of planetary atmospheres is required to interpret the current and future observations.Here, we focus on how atmospheric compositions, specifically CH4/CO ratios, affect the haze production rates and their optical properties. We have conducted a series of cold plasma experiments to constrain the haze mass production rates from gas mixtures of various CH4/CO ratios diluted either in H2 or N2 atmosphere. The mass production rates in the N2-CH4-CO system are much greater than those in the H2-CH4-CO system. They are rather insensitive to the CH4/CO ratios larger than at 0.3. Significant formation of solid material is observed both in H2-CO and N2-CO systems without CH4 in the initial gas mixtures. The complex refractive indices were derived for haze samples from N2-CH4, H2-CH4, and H2-CO gas mixtures. These are the model atmospheres for Titan, Saturn, and exoplanets, respectively. The imaginary part of the complex refractive indices in the UV-Vis region are distinct among these samples, which can be utilized for modeling these planetary atmospheres.

  14. Modelling of the partial oxidation of {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated aldehydes on Mo-V-oxides based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehnke, H.; Petzoldt, J.C.; Stein, B.; Weimer, C.; Gaube, J.W. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Chemische Technologie

    1998-12-31

    A kinetic model based on the Mars-van Krevelen mechanism that allows to describe the microkinetics of the heterogeneously catalysed partial oxidation of {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated aldehydes is presented. This conversion is represented by a network, composed of the oxidation of the {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated aldehyde towards the {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated carboxylic acid and the consecutive oxidation of the acid as well as the parallel reaction of the aldehyde to products of deeper oxidation. The reaction steps of aldehyde respectively acid oxidation and catalyst reoxidation have been investigated separately in transient experiments. The combination of steady state and transient experiments has led to an improved understanding of the interaction of the catalyst with the aldehyde and the carboxylic acids as well as to a support of the kinetic model assumptions. (orig.)

  15. Photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid mediated by iron in strongly acidic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Masaki, E-mail: mohno@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8513 (Japan); Ito, Masataka; Ohkura, Ryouichi [Faculty of Applied Life Sciences, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, 265-1, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Mino A, Esteban R. [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8513 (Japan); Kose, Tomohiro [Faculty of Applied Life Sciences, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, 265-1, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Okuda, Tetsuji [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8513 (Japan); Nakai, Satoshi [Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Kawata, Kuniaki [Faculty of Applied Life Sciences, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, 265-1, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Nishijima, Wataru [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8513 (Japan)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was decomposed based on ferric ion performance. • Complete decomposition of PFOA was confirmed in strongly acidic conditions. • Fe{sup 2+} changed to Fe{sup 3+} to restore chemical equilibrium in this condition. • Fe{sup 3+} was only produced from Fe{sup 2+} by hydroxyl radical in weakly acidic conditions. • The Fe{sup 3+} regeneration mechanisms resulted in the performance of Fe{sup 3+} for PFOA. - Abstract: The performance of a ferric ion mediated photochemical process for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) decomposition in strongly acidic conditions of pH 2.0 was evaluated in comparison with those in weakly acidic conditions, pH 3.7 or pH 5.0, based on iron species composition and ferric ion regeneration. Complete decomposition of PFOA under UV irradiation was confirmed at pH 2.0, whereas perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA) and other intermediates were accumulated in weakly acidic conditions. Iron states at each pH were evaluated using a chemical equilibrium model, Visual MINTEQ. The main iron species at pH 2.0 is Fe{sup 3+} ion. Although Fe{sup 3+} ion is consumed and is transformed to Fe{sup 2+} ion by photochemical decomposition of PFOA and its intermediates, the produced Fe{sup 2+} ion will change to Fe{sup 3+} ion to restore chemical equilibrium. Continuous decomposition will occur at pH 2.0. However, half of the iron cannot be dissolved at pH 3.7. The main species of dissolved iron is Fe(OH){sup 2+}. At pH 3.7 or higher pH, Fe{sup 3+} ion will only be produced from the oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} ion by hydroxyl radical produced by Fe(OH){sup 2+} under UV irradiation. These different mechanisms of Fe{sup 3+} regeneration that prevail in strongly and weakly acidic conditions will engender different performances of the ferric ion.

  16. 40 CFR 52.777 - Control strategy: photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... from mobile sources and demonstrating that no increase in emissions would take place. Indiana satisfied... control technology (RACT), new source review (NSR), vehicle inspection/maintenance (I/M), and general... (NOX) reasonably available control technology (RACT) requirements under section 182(f) of the Clean...

  17. Plasmonic antenna effects on photochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuyan; Ueno, Kosei; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2011-04-19

    Efficient solar energy conversion has been vigorously pursued since the 1970s, but its large-scale implementation hinges on the availability of high-efficiency modules. For maximum efficiency, it is important to absorb most of the incoming radiation, which necessitates both efficient photoexcitation and minimal electron-hole recombination. To date, researchers have primarily focused on the latter difficulty: finding a strategy to effectively separate photoinduced electrons and holes. Very few reports have been devoted to broadband sunlight absorption and photoexcitation. However, the currently available photovoltaic cells, such as amorphous silicon, and even single-crystal silicon and sensitized solar cells, cannot respond to the wide range of the solar spectrum. The photoelectric conversion characteristics of solar cells generally decrease in the infrared wavelength range. Thus, the fraction of the solar spectrum absorbed is relatively poor. In addition, the large mismatch between the diffraction limit of light and the absorption cross-section makes the probability of interactions between photons and cell materials quite low, which greatly limits photoexcitation efficiency. Therefore, there is a pressing need for research aimed at finding conditions that lead to highly efficient photoexcitation over a wide spectrum of sunlight, particularly in the visible to near-infrared wavelengths. As characterized in the emerging field of plasmonics, metallic nanostructures are endowed with optical antenna effects. These plasmonic antenna effects provide a promising platform for artificially sidestepping the diffraction limit of light and strongly enhancing absorption cross-sections. Moreover, they can efficiently excite photochemical reactions between photons and molecules close to an optical antenna through the local field enhancement. This technology has the potential to induce highly efficient photoexcitation between photons and molecules over a wide spectrum of sunlight

  18. Model studies with gold: a versatile oxidation and hydrogenation catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ming; Gong, Jinlong; Dong, Guangbin; Mullins, C Buddie

    2014-03-18

    Historically, scientists have considered gold an inert catalyst constituent. However, in recent decades, chemists have discovered that nanoscale gold shows exceptional activity for many chemical reactions. They have investigated model gold surfaces in order to obtain fundamental understanding of catalytic properties. In this Account, we present our current understanding of oxidation and hydrogenation reactions on the Au(111) single crystal as a planar representative of gold catalysts, revealing the interesting surface chemistry of gold. We begin by comparing two inverse reactions, alcohol oxidation and aldehyde hydrogenation, on a Au(111) surface. Beyond the expected different chemistry, we observe intriguing similarities since the same surface is employed. First, both molecular oxygen and hydrogen have high barriers to dissociation on Au(111), and frequently chemists study reactions here by using atomic O and H to populate the surfaces. Recombinative desorption features of oxygen and hydrogen are apparent at ∼500 and ∼110 K, lower than other transition metals. These results indicate that oxygen and hydrogen have low desorption activation energies and weakly chemisorb on the surface, likely leading to selective reactions. On the oxygen-precovered Au(111) surface, alcohols are selectively oxidized to aldehydes. Similarly, weakly bound hydrogen atoms on Au(111) also show chemoselective reactivity for hydrogenation of propionaldehyde and acetone. The second similarity is that the gold surface activates self-coupling of alcohol or aldehyde with oxygen or hydrogen, resulting in the formation of esters and ethers, respectively, in alcohol oxidation and aldehyde hydrogenation. During these two reactions, both alkoxy groups and alcohol-like species show up as intermediates, which likely play a key role in the formation of coupling products. In addition, the cross coupling reaction between alcohol and aldehyde occurs on both O- and H-modified surfaces, yielding the

  19. Photochemical stability of electrochromic polymers and devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jacob; Madsen, Morten Vesterager; Krebs, Frederik C

    2013-01-01

    The stability of fully printed flexible organic electrochromics based on 11 different conjugated polymers is explored from the fundamental chemical degradation level to the operational device level. The photochemical stability of the electrochromic polymers (ECPs) is studied enabling an analysis...... operations for many years under indoor conditions and for a few years under outside conditions. Finally, functioning electrochromic devices (ECDs) were made and the effect of illumination on the response time and optical contrast was established. This report shows that encapsulated electrochromic devices...... based on flexible barrier substrates exhibit increased stability and are indeed viable in devices such as shading elements, light management systems, displays with low switching speed requirements and signage. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry....

  20. A Simple Hydraulic Analog Model of Oxidative Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Wayne T; Jackman, Matthew R; Messer, Jeffrey I; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Glancy, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is the primary source of cellular energy transduction in mammals. This energy conversion involves dozens of enzymatic reactions, energetic intermediates, and the dynamic interactions among them. With the goal of providing greater insight into the complex thermodynamics and kinetics ("thermokinetics") of mitochondrial energy transduction, a simple hydraulic analog model of oxidative phosphorylation is presented. In the hydraulic model, water tanks represent the forward and back "pressures" exerted by thermodynamic driving forces: the matrix redox potential (ΔGredox), the electrochemical potential for protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane (ΔGH), and the free energy of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) (ΔGATP). Net water flow proceeds from tanks with higher water pressure to tanks with lower pressure through "enzyme pipes" whose diameters represent the conductances (effective activities) of the proteins that catalyze the energy transfer. These enzyme pipes include the reactions of dehydrogenase enzymes, the electron transport chain (ETC), and the combined action of ATP synthase plus the ATP-adenosine 5'-diphosphate exchanger that spans the inner membrane. In addition, reactive oxygen species production is included in the model as a leak that is driven out of the ETC pipe by high pressure (high ΔGredox) and a proton leak dependent on the ΔGH for both its driving force and the conductance of the leak pathway. Model water pressures and flows are shown to simulate thermodynamic forces and metabolic fluxes that have been experimentally observed in mammalian skeletal muscle in response to acute exercise, chronic endurance training, and reduced substrate availability, as well as account for the thermokinetic behavior of mitochondria from fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle and the metabolic capacitance of the creatine kinase reaction.

  1. Fibre-optic photochemical stroke: generating and measuring photochemical changes inside the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiminis, G.; Klarić, T. S.; Schartner, E. P.; Warren-Smith, S. C.; Lewis, M. D.; Koblar, S. A.; Monro, T. M.

    2014-05-01

    We report here on the development of a method to induce a stroke in a specific location within a mouse brain through the use of an optical fibre. By capturing the emitted fluorescence signal generated using the same fibre it is then possible to monitor photochemical changes within the brain in real-time, potentially reducing the requirement for post-operative histology to determine if a stroke has successfully been induced within the animal.

  2. Photochemical Wastewater Treatment for Potential Agricultural Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra García

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The urban wastewaters after advanced primary treatment (APT are again discharged into the river without any use. In the present research in a soilless culture system where maize seedlings were tested three different treatments were planted: 1. Obtained from the effluent water of an APT, 2. Photochemically treated wastewater (PCT and 3. Urban water network (UW. A block randomly distributed design was tested, with five repetitions where the experimental unit was formed by a 36 cavities filled with Peat Moss and the useful plot was considered by 16 central plants for each experimental unit. Irrigations were scheduled since the first time of the planting, employed 27 mL/cavity. The removal of the organic contaminants present into the water was conducted by the employment of a Batch photoreactor, adapted with a recirculation system (UV/H2O2/O3, evaluated to determine UV-Vis spectra, pH, color and turbidity parameters initial and final samples. Measurements of height and percentage of germination in plants, where is determined that the seedlings irrigated with water PCT were reached the highest average compared to APT and UW irrigated; After the 50 cm growing plant, a determination of the presence of heavy metal, via atomic absorption method, were carried on analyzing the leaves, roots and stalks of the samples. Concluding that the presences of heavy metals into the APT were higher than PCT treatments, it can be an impediment for the normal growing of the plants. Therefore, the application of the photochemical treatment using (UV/H2O2/O3 system, represent a viable alternative for the wastewater treatment after the APT process to possible use of irrigation.

  3. Photochemical reactions among formaldehyde, chlorine, and nitrogen dioxide in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanst, P.L.; Gay, B.W. Jr.

    1977-11-01

    Photochemical reactions among chlorine, nitrogen dioxide, and formaldehyde were studied, using parts-per-million concentrations in 1 atm of air. The reactant mixtures were irradiated by ultraviolet fluorescent lamps and simultaneously analyzed by the Fourier transform infrared technique by use of folded light paths up to 504 m. With an excess of NO/sub 2/ over Cl/sub 2/, the reaction products included O/sub 3/, CO, HNO/sub 3/,N/sub 2/O/sub 5/, HCl, and nitryl chloride (ClNO/sub 2/). When chlorine exceeded NO/sub 2/, the principal product was peroxy nitric acid (HOONO/sub 2/). Peroxy formyl nitrate, nitrous acid, and chlorine nitrate were not seen. The nitryl chloride was stable even with the ultraviolet lights on. The peroxy nitric acid disappeared from the cell with a half-life of about 10 min. Formyl radicals (HCO), unlike acetyl radicals, did not combine with O/sub 2/ and NO/sub 2/ by addition. HCO reacted with O/sub 2/ to yield CO and HO/sub 2/. The HO/sub 2/ will then add to NO/sub 2/ to yield HOONO/sub 2/. If NO is present, the HO/sub 2/ will prefer to react with it, oxidizing it to NO/sub 2/.

  4. Photochemical degradation of marbofloxacin and enrofloxacin in natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturini, Michela; Speltini, Andrea; Maraschi, Federica; Profumo, Antonella; Pretali, Luca; Fasani, Elisa; Albini, Angelo

    2010-06-15

    The photochemical fate of Marbofloxacin (MAR) and Enrofloxacin (ENR), two Fluoroquinolones (FQs) largely used as veterinary bactericides known to be present in surface waters, was investigated in aqueous solution. The degradation of these pollutants (5-50 microg L(-1) starting concentration) was complete in about 1 h by exposure to solar light (summer) and obeyed a first-order kinetics. The structure of the primary photoproducts was determined. Those from ENR arose through three paths, namely, oxidative degradation of the piperazine side-chain, reductive defluorination, and fluorine solvolysis. More heavily degraded products that had been previously reported were rationalized as secondary photoproducts from the present ones. As for MAR, this underwent homolytic cleavage of the tetrahydrooxadiazine moiety to give two quinolinols. All of the primary products were themselves degraded in about 1 h. The photoreactions rates were scarcely affected by Ca(2+) (200 mg L(-1)), Mg(2+) (30 mg L(-1)), Cl(-) (30 mg L(-1)), and humic acid (1 mg L(-1)), but increased in the presence of phosphate (20 mg L(-1)). The fastest degradation of ENR occurred at pH about 8 where the zwitterionic form was present, while in the case of MAR the cationic form was the most reactive.

  5. Atmospheric photochemical degradation of 1,4-unsaturated dicarbonyls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X.; Jeffries, H.E.; Sexton, K.G.

    1999-12-01

    To better understand fates of aromatics hydrocarbon species in the atmosphere, the authors have investigated the transformation chemistry of butenedial (CHOCH{double{underscore}bond}CHCHO), 4-oxo-2-pentenal (CH{sub 3}COCH{double{underscore}bond}CHCHO), and 3-hexene-2, 5-dione (CH{sub 3}COCH{double{underscore}bond}CHCOCH{sub 3}). These 1,4-unsaturated dicarbonyls are known to be products of aromatic photochemical oxidation. Both hydroxyl radical (OH) and ozone (O{sub 3}) initiated smog chamber experiments under atmospheric conditions were conducted in the University of North Carolina outdoor smog chamber. Carbonyl intermediates and products were measured using the O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine derivatization method followed by gas chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry analysis. Carbonyl products detected and identified by comparison with standards in the OH-initiated photooxidation of butenedial include formaldehyde, acrolein, glycolaldehyde, glyoxal, and malonaldehyde (CHOCH{sub 2}CHO). For 4-oxo-2-pentenal, the carbonyl products were formaldehyde, methyl vinyl ketone, glycolaldehyde, hydroxyacetone, glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and malonaldehyde. for 3-hexene-2,5-dione the products were formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, hydroxyacetone, and methylglyoxal. Carbonyl products detected in the P{sub 3}-initiated experiments with cyclohexane as the OH scavenger were formaldehyde and glyoxal in butenedial; formaldehyde, glyoxal, methyl-glyoxal, and malonaldehyde in 4-oxo-2-pentenal; and formaldehyde and methylglyoxal in 3-hexene-2,5-dione.

  6. An experimental and modeling study of diethyl carbonate oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Nakamura, Hisashi

    2015-04-01

    Diethyl carbonate (DEC) is an attractive biofuel that can be used to displace petroleum-derived diesel fuel, thereby reducing CO2 and particulate emissions from diesel engines. A better understanding of DEC combustion characteristics is needed to facilitate its use in internal combustion engines. Toward this goal, ignition delay times for DEC were measured at conditions relevant to internal combustion engines using a rapid compression machine (RCM) and a shock tube. The experimental conditions investigated covered a wide range of temperatures (660-1300K), a pressure of 30bar, and equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 in air. To provide further understanding of the intermediates formed in DEC oxidation, species concentrations were measured in a jet-stirred reactor at 10atm over a temperature range of 500-1200K and at equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0. These experimental measurements were used to aid the development and validation of a chemical kinetic model for DEC.The experimental results for ignition in the RCM showed near negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior. Six-membered alkylperoxy radical (RO˙2) isomerizations are conventionally thought to initiate low-temperature branching reactions responsible for NTC behavior, but DEC has no such possible 6- and 7-membered ring isomerizations. However, its molecular structure allows for 5-, 8- and 9-membered ring RO˙2 isomerizations. To provide accurate rate constants for these ring structures, ab initio computations for RO˙2⇌Q˙OOH isomerization reactions were performed. These new RO˙2 isomerization rate constants have been implemented in a chemical kinetic model for DEC oxidation. The model simulations have been compared with ignition delay times measured in the RCM near the NTC region. Results of the simulation were also compared with experimental results for ignition in the high-temperature region and for species concentrations in the jet-stirred reactor. Chemical kinetic insights into the

  7. Modeling of sulfur oxide removal in circulating fluidized bed absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, D.; Edwards, J.R.; Kuznetsov, A.V. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Srivastava, R. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division

    2002-07-01

    This paper presents a model to simulate a circulating fluidized bed absorber (CFBA) that combines flow, mixing, and reaction through residence time distribution (RTD). These parameters are often overlooked in existing simulation models. In addition, the paper presents a newly developed gas-solid reaction model for sulphur dioxide removal by limestone. For the reaction model that considers RTD inside the core and annulus regions of CFBA, the macrochemical reaction is simulated according to microchemical reaction dynamics. The proposed model can predict sulphur dioxide and limestone distributions inside the CFBA and calculate how much limestone is needed to remove an appropriate amount of sulphur dioxide. Sulphur dioxide concentration at the outlet of the CFBA decreases as the distance of the CFBA increases from the bottom of the core region. Limestone concentration varies only very slightly in the core region, suggesting that limestone in the CFBA is efficiently utilized to remove sulphur oxide. Sulphur dioxide partial pressure at the exit of the CFBA decreases as fresh limestone increases at the inlet to the CFBA. 16 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Photosynthetic water oxidation: insights from manganese model chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Karin J; Brennan, Bradley J; Tagore, Ranitendranath; Brudvig, Gary W

    2015-03-17

    Catalysts for light-driven water oxidation are a critical component for development of solar fuels technology. The multielectron redox chemistry required for this process has been successfully deployed on a global scale in natural photosynthesis by green plants and cyanobacteria using photosystem II (PSII). PSII employs a conserved, cuboidal Mn4CaOX cluster called the O2-evolving complex (OEC) that offers inspiration for artificial O2-evolution catalysts. In this Account, we describe our work on manganese model chemistry relevant to PSII, particularly the functional model [Mn(III/IV)2(terpy)2(μ-O)2(OH2)2](NO3)3 complex (terpy = 2,2';6',2″-terpyridine), a mixed-valent di-μ-oxo Mn dimer with two terminal aqua ligands. In the presence of oxo-donor oxidants such as HSO5(-), this complex evolves O2 by two pathways, one of which incorporates solvent water in an O-O bond-forming reaction. Deactivation pathways of this catalyst include comproportionation to form an inactive Mn(IV)Mn(IV) dimer and also degradation to MnO2, a consequence of ligand loss when the oxidation state of the complex is reduced to labile Mn(II) upon release of O2. The catalyst's versatility has been shown by its continued catalytic activity after direct binding to the semiconductor titanium dioxide. In addition, after binding to the surface of TiO2 via a chromophoric linker, the catalyst can be oxidized by a photoinduced electron-transfer mechanism, mimicking the natural PSII process. Model oxomanganese complexes have also aided in interpreting biophysical and computational studies on PSII. In particular, the μ-oxo exchange rates of the Mn-terpy dimer have been instrumental in establishing that the time scale for μ-oxo exchange of high-valent oxomanganese complexes with terminal water ligands is slower than O2 evolution in the natural photosynthetic system. Furthermore, computational studies on the Mn-terpy dimer and the OEC point to similar Mn(IV)-oxyl intermediates in the O-O bond

  9. Shape-dependence of the thermal and photochemical reactions of methanol on nanocrystalline anatase TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, David A.; Cargnello, Matteo; Diroll, Benjamin T.; Murray, Christopher B.; Vohs, John M.

    2016-12-01

    Structure-activity relationships and the influence of particle size and shape on the partial- and photo-oxidation of methanol on nanocrystalline anatase TiO2 were investigated using temperature-programmed desorption. The study employed two distinct nanoparticle morphologies: truncated bipyramids exposing primarily {101} facets, and flatter platelets exposing primarily {001} surfaces, whose nominal sizes ranged from 10 to 25 nm. The platelets were found to be more active for thermally-driven reactions, such as coupling of methoxide groups to produce dimethyl ether, and deoxygenation to produce methane. A dependence of the reactivity of {001} facets for the coupling of methoxide groups to produce dimethyl ether on facet size was also observed. In contrast to the thermally-driven reactions, the bipyramidal nanoparticles were observed to be more active for a range of photochemical reactions, including oxidation and coupling to produce methyl formate, and photo-decomposition of surface methoxide species. This study also shows how well-defined nanocrystals can be used to help bridge the materials gap between studies of single crystal model catalysts and their high surface area industrial analogs.

  10. A fresh look at the evolution and diversification of photochemical reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Tanai

    2015-10-01

    In this review, I reexamine the origin and diversification of photochemical reaction centers based on the known phylogenetic relations of the core subunits, and with the aid of sequence and structural alignments. I show, for example, that the protein folds at the C-terminus of the D1 and D2 subunits of Photosystem II, which are essential for the coordination of the water-oxidizing complex, were already in place in the most ancestral Type II reaction center subunit. I then evaluate the evolution of reaction centers in the context of the rise and expansion of the different groups of bacteria based on recent large-scale phylogenetic analyses. I find that the Heliobacteriaceae family of Firmicutes appears to be the earliest branching of the known groups of phototrophic bacteria; however, the origin of photochemical reaction centers and chlorophyll synthesis cannot be placed in this group. Moreover, it becomes evident that the Acidobacteria and the Proteobacteria shared a more recent common phototrophic ancestor, and this is also likely for the Chloroflexi and the Cyanobacteria. Finally, I argue that the discrepancies among the phylogenies of the reaction center proteins, chlorophyll synthesis enzymes, and the species tree of bacteria are best explained if both types of photochemical reaction centers evolved before the diversification of the known phyla of phototrophic bacteria. The primordial phototrophic ancestor must have had both Type I and Type II reaction centers.

  11. Unmetallated and metallated phthalocyanines bearing oxadiazole groups: Synthesis, photophysical and photochemical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nas, Asiye [Department of Chemistry, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Kantekin, Halit, E-mail: halit@ktu.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Durmuş, Mahmut [Gebze Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, PO Box 141, Gebze, 41400 Kocaeli (Turkey); Gümrükçüoğlu, Nurhan [Department of Chemistry, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2014-10-15

    Unmetallated (4) and metallated (zinc(II), cobalt(II), lead(II)) phthalocyanines (5–7) carrying four 4-(4-(5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)phenoxy) groups on the peripheral positions were synthesized by cyclotetramerization of 4-(4-(5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)phenoxy)phthalonitrile (3) in the presence of corresponding metal salts (zinc(II) acetate, cobalt(II) chloride, lead(II) oxide) for metallated and without any metal for unmetallated phthalocyanines. The obtained organo-soluble phthalocyanines were characterized by infrared, electronic absorption, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectral techniques and elemental analysis as well. The photophysical and photochemical properties of newly synthesized tetra-substituted unmetallated (4), zinc(II) (5) and lead(II) (7) phthalocyanines were reported in N,N-dimetilformamid (DMF). The synthesized phthalocyanine compound 6 was not evaluated for photophysical and photochemical studies due to open shell and paramagnetic behavior of cobalt(II) metal ions in the phthalocyanine cavity. - Highlights: • Synthesis of unmetallated and metallated phthalocyanines. • Photophysical and photochemical properties of tetra-substituted phthalocyanines. • Characterization of organosoluble phthalocyanines by several spectral techniques.

  12. Non-photochemical fluorescence quenching and the diadinoxanthin cycle in a marine diatom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaizola, M; La Roche, J; Kolber, Z; Falkowski, P G

    1994-08-01

    The diadinoxanthin cycle (DD-cycle) in chromophyte algae involves the interconversion of two carotenoids, diadinoxanthin (DD) and diatoxanthin (DT). We investigated the kinetics of light-induced DD-cycling in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum and its role in dissipating excess excitation energy in PS II. Within 15 min following an increase in irradiance, DT increased and was accompanied by a stoichiometric decrease in DD. This reaction was completely blocked by dithiothreitol (DTT). A second, time-dependent, increase in DT was detected ∼ 20 min after the light shift without a concomitant decrease in DD. DT accumulation from both processes was correlated with increases in non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence. Stern-Volmer analyses suggests that changes in non-photochemical quenching resulted from changes in thermal dissipation in the PS II antenna and in the reaction center. The increase in non-photochemical quenching was correlated with a small decrease in the effective absorption cross section of PS II. Model calculations suggest however that the changes in cross section are not sufficiently large to significantly reduce multiple excitation of the reaction center within the turnover time of steady-state photosynthetic electron transport at light saturation. In DTT poisoned cells, the change in non-photochemical quenching appears to result from energy dissipation in the reaction center and was associated with decreased photochemical efficiency. D1 protein degradation was slightly higher in samples poisoned with DTT than in control samples. These results suggest that while DD-cycling may dynamically alter the photosynthesis-irradiance response curve, it offers limited protection against photodamage of PS II reaction centers at irradiance levels sufficient to saturate steady-state photosynthesis.

  13. Photothermal and photochemical effects of laser light absorption by indocyanine green (ICG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Diagaradjane, Parmeswaran; Pikkula, Brian M.; Yu, Jie; Wong, Michael S.; Anvari, Bahman

    2005-04-01

    Indocyanine Green (ICG) is clinically used as a fluorescent dye for imaging purposes. Its rapid circulation kinetics and minimal toxicity has prompted investigation into ICG's utility as a photosentitizer for therapeutic applications. Traditionally, optically mediated tumor therapy has focused on photodynamic therapy, which employs a photochemical mechanism resulting from the absorption of low intensity CW laser light by localized photosensitizers such as Photofrin II, Benzoporphyrin Derivative (BPD), ICG. Treatment of cutaneous vascular malformations such as port-wine stains, on the other hand, is based on a photothermal mechanism resulting from the absorption of high intensity pulsed laser light by hemoglobin. In this study, we compared the effectiveness of combining photochemical and photothermal mechanisms during application of ICG in conjunction with laser irradiation with the intention that the combined approach may lead to a reduction in the threshold dose of pulsed laser light required to treat hypervascular malformations. The blood vessels in rabbit ears were used as an in vivo model for targeted vasculature. Irradiation of the ears with IR light (λ=785 nm, Δτ = 3 min, Io = 120 mW) was used to elicit photochemical damage, while photothermal damage was brought about using pulses from a ruby laser (λ=694 nm, τ = 3 ms) with different fluences. For the combined modality, photochemical damage was induced first and followed by photothermal irradiation. This modality was compared with photothermal irradiation alone. The effectiveness of each irradiation scheme was assessed using histopathological analysis. We present preliminary data that suggests that pretreatment with photodynamic therapy before photothermal coagulation results in more severe vascular damage with lower photothermal fluence levels. The results of this study provide the foundation work for further exploration of the therapeutic potentials of photochemical and photothermal effects during

  14. Anaerobiosis induced state transition: a non photochemical reduction of PQ pool mediated by NDH in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreedhar Nellaepalli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non photochemical reduction of PQ pool and mobilization of LHCII between PSII and PSI are found to be linked under abiotic stress conditions. The interaction of non photochemical reduction of PQ pool and state transitions associated physiological changes are critically important under anaerobic condition in higher plants. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: The present study focused on the effect of anaerobiosis on non-photochemical reduction of PQ pool which trigger state II transition in Arabidopsis thaliana. Upon exposure to dark-anaerobic condition the shape of the OJIP transient rise is completely altered where as in aerobic treated leaves the rise is unaltered. Rise in F(o and F(J was due to the loss of oxidized PQ pool as the PQ pool becomes more reduced. The increase in F(o' was due to the non photochemical reduction of PQ pool which activated STN7 kinase and induced LHCII phosphorylation under anaerobic condition. Further, it was observed that the phosphorylated LHCII is migrated and associated with PSI supercomplex increasing its absorption cross-section. Furthermore, evidences from crr2-2 (NDH mutant and pgr5 mutants (deficient in non NDH pathway of cyclic electron transport have indicated that NDH is responsible for non photochemical reduction of the PQ pool. We propose that dark anaerobic condition accelerates production of reducing equivalents (such as NADPH by various metabolic pathways which reduce PQ pool and is mediated by NDH leading to state II transition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Anaerobic condition triggers non photochemical reduction of PQ pool mediated by NDH complex. The reduced PQ pool activates STN7 kinase leading to state II transition in A. thaliana.

  15. Constraints on the Microphysics of Pluto's Photochemical Haze from New Horizons Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Peter; Wong, Michael L; Liang, Mao-Chang; Shia, Run-Lie; Kammer, Joshua A; Yung, Yuk L; Summers, Michael E; Gladstone, G Randall; Young, Leslie A; Olkin, Catherine B; Ennico, Kimberly; Weaver, Harold A; Stern, S Alan

    2016-01-01

    The New Horizons flyby of Pluto confirmed the existence of hazes in its atmosphere. Observations of a large high- to low- phase brightness ratio, combined with the blue color of the haze, suggest that the haze particles are fractal aggregates, analogous to the photochemical hazes on Titan. Therefore, studying the Pluto hazes can shed light on the similarities and differences between the Pluto and Titan atmospheres. We model the haze distribution using the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres assuming that the distribution is shaped by sedimentation and coagulation of particles originating from photochemistry. Hazes composed of both purely spherical and purely fractal aggregate particles are considered. Agreement between model results and occultation observations is obtained with aggregate particles when the downward flux of photochemical products is equal to the column-integrated methane destruction rate ~1.2 $\\times$ 10$^{-14}$ g cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, while for spherical particles the mass flu...

  16. Validation of the chloramine-T induced oxidation of human serum albumin as a model for oxidative damage in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anraku, Makoto; Kragh-Hansen, Ulrich; Kawai, Keiichi; Maruyama, Toru; Yamasaki, Yasuomi; Takakura, Yoshinobu; Otagiri, Masaki

    2003-04-01

    The validity of using chloramine-T as a model compound for mimicing oxidative stress was examined using human serum albumin (HSA) as a model. Important sites of oxidation were studied by mild treatment with chloramine-T and by mutating 34Cys for a serine (C34S). High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) combined with fluorescence detection to confirm the validity of chloramine-T as an oxidizing agent was used. Oxidized amino acid residues were detected by reaction with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitro benzoic acid), digestion with cyanogen bromide, followed by capillary electrophoresis. Protein conformation was examined by spectroscopic techniques. From the HPLC analysis of human serum, the validity of using chloramine-T as an oxidizing agent was confirmed. At low chloramine-T concentrations (CT0.1-HSA, CT1-HSA), 34Cys and Met residues were oxidized, at medium concentrations (CT10-HSA), the tryptophan residue also appeared to be oxidized, and at the highest concentration (CT50-HSA), the net charge of Site II of HSA was found to be more negative. The two highest levels of oxidation of HSA (CT10-HSA, CT50-HSA) resulted in conformational changes with an increased exposure of hydrophobic regions, decreased high-affinity bindings of warfarin and ketoprofen and a reduced esterase-like activity. The latter protein also has a shorter plasma half-life and an increased liver clearance. We succeeded in imitating oxidative damage to HSA using chloramine-T and the findings show that Site II is more affected than Site I and 34Cys, when HSA is exposed to oxidative stress.

  17. Modelling of diffusion and conductivity relaxation of oxide ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preis, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    A two-dimensional square grain model has been applied to simulate simultaneously the diffusion process and relaxation of the dc conduction of polycrystalline oxide materials due to a sudden change of the oxygen partial pressure of the surrounding gas phase. The numerical calculations are performed by employing the finite element approach. The grains are squares of equal side length (average grain size) and the grain boundaries may consist of thin slabs of uniform thickness. An additional (space charge) layer adjacent to the grain boundary cores (thin slabs) either blocking (depletion layer) or highly conductive for electronic charge carriers may surround the grains. The electronic transport number of the mixed ionic-electronic conducting oxide ceramics may be close to unity (predominant electronic conduction). If the chemical diffusion coefficient of the neutral mobile component (oxygen) of the grain boundary core regions is assumed to be higher by many orders of magnitude than that in the bulk, the simulated relaxation curves for mass transport (diffusion) and dc conduction can deviate remarkably from each other. Deviations between the relaxation of mass transport and dc conduction are found in the case of considerably different electronic conductivities of grain boundary core regions, space charge layers, and bulk. On the contrary, the relaxation curves of mass transport and electronic conductivity are in perfect coincidence, when either effective medium diffusion occurs or the effective conductivity is unaffected by the individual conductivities of core regions and possible space charge layers, i.e. the grain boundary resistivity is negligible.

  18. The role of lager beer yeast in oxidative stability of model beer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berner, Torben Sune; Arneborg, Nils

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: In this study, we investigated the relationship between the ability of lager brewing yeast strains to tolerate oxidative stress and their ability to produce oxidative stable model beer. METHODS AND RESULTS: Screening of 21 lager brewing yeast strains against diamide and paraquat showed...... that the oxidative stress resistance was strain dependent. Fermentation of model wort in European Brewing Convention tubes using three yeast strains with varying oxidative stress resistances resulted in three model beers with different rates of radical formation as measured by electron spin resonance in forced...... in the model beers. CONCLUSIONS: A more oxidative stable beer is not obtained by a more-oxidative-stress-tolerant lager brewing yeast strain, exhibiting a higher secretion of thioredoxin, but rather by a less-oxidative-stress-tolerant strain, exhibiting a higher iron uptake. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT...

  19. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  20. Reactor modeling and process analysis for partial oxidation of natural gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, Bogdan Alexandru

    2004-01-01

    This thesis analyses a novel process of partial oxidation of natural gas and develops a numerical tool for the partial oxidation reactor modeling. The proposed process generates syngas in an integrated plant of a partial oxidation reactor, a syngas turbine and an air separation unit. This is called

  1. Modeling and Simulations in Photoelectrochemical Water Oxidation: From Single Level to Multiscale Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueqing; Bieberle-Hütter, Anja

    2016-06-08

    This review summarizes recent developments, challenges, and strategies in the field of modeling and simulations of photoelectrochemical (PEC) water oxidation. We focus on water splitting by metal-oxide semiconductors and discuss topics such as theoretical calculations of light absorption, band gap/band edge, charge transport, and electrochemical reactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface. In particular, we review the mechanisms of the oxygen evolution reaction, strategies to lower overpotential, and computational methods applied to PEC systems with particular focus on multiscale modeling. The current challenges in modeling PEC interfaces and their processes are summarized. At the end, we propose a new multiscale modeling approach to simulate the PEC interface under conditions most similar to those of experiments. This approach will contribute to identifying the limitations at PEC interfaces. Its generic nature allows its application to a number of electrochemical systems.

  2. Experimental and modeling study of the oxidation of xylenes

    CERN Document Server

    Battin-Leclerc, F; Glaude, P A; Belmekki, N; Battin-Leclerc, Fr\\'{e}d\\'{e}rique; Bounaceur, Roda; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Belmekki, Najib

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental and modeling study of the oxidation of the three isomers of xylene (ortho-, meta- and para-xylenes). For each compound, ignition delay times of hydrocarbon-oxygen-argon mixtures with fuel equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 2 were measured behind reflected shock waves for temperatures from 1330 to 1800 K and pressures from 6.7 to 9 bar. The results show a similar reactivity for the three isomers. A detailed kinetic mechanism has been proposed, which reproduces our experimental results, as well as some literature data obtained in a plug flow reactor at 1155 K showing a clear difference of reactivity between the three isomers of xylene. The main reaction paths have been determined by sensitivity and flux analyses and have allowed the differences of reactivity to be explained.

  3. A physiologically based kinetic model for bacterial sulfide oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, J.B.; Graaff, M. de; Bosch, P.L. van den; Boelee, N.C.; Keesman, K.J.; Janssen, A.J.W.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the biotechnological process for hydrogen sulfide removal from gas streams, a variety of oxidation products can be formed. Under natron-alkaline conditions, sulfide is oxidized by haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria via flavocytochrome c oxidoreductase. From previous studies, it was concl

  4. An approach to modeling of silicon oxidation in a wet ultra-diluted ambient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalgin, A.Y.; Hof, A.J.; Schmitz, J.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we make steps towards developing a new wet-oxidation model of silicon based on electron-stimulated dissociation of H2O molecules. The need for a new model arises from the fact that existing physical models are inadequate to describe the thin-oxide regime. Two regimes of silicon oxidati

  5. Model experiments to estimate the influence of the stratospheric ozone depletion on the solar photochemical degradation of organic micropollutants; Modellversuche zum Einfluss der Abnahme der stratosphaerischen Ozonschichtdicke auf den solaren photochemischen Abbau organischer Mikroverunreinigungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindelin, A.J.; Frimmel, F.H. [Univ. Karlsruhe, Lehrstuhl fuer Wasserchemie (Germany)

    1998-03-01

    By means of simulated sunlight, the influence of the current ozone layer depletion on solar photochemical processes in water was investigated. The straospheric ozone decrease increases the solar UV-B flux. A Xe short-arc lamp with optical filters was used as light source and nitrate was used as a precursor of sunlight-induced reactive species. The experiments showed, that a change of the spectrum of solar UV-B radiation due to the ozone layer depletion can accelerate the nitrate-induced and direct photolytical degradation of the organic herbicides terbuthylazine, dichlorprop, and chloridazon significantly. (orig.) [Deutsch] Mit Hilfe von simuliertem Sonnenlicht wurde untersucht, inwieweit die aktuelle Verringerung der Dicke der stratosphaerischen Ozonschicht photochemische Umsetzungen in Gewaessern beeinflusst. Als Strahlungsquelle diente eine Xe-Kurzbogenlampe mit optischen Filtern. Als Modellsubstanz fuer in Gewaessern vorkommende reaktive Stoffe wurde Nitrat verwendet. Die Versuche zeigten, dass die Veraenderung des Spektrums solarer UV-B-Strahlung aufgrund einer stratosphaerischen Ozonschichtabnahme den photolytischen und nitratinduzierten Abbau organischer Herbizide erheblich beschleunigen kann. (orig.)

  6. Experimental Study of Nonequilibrium Electrodeposition of Nanostructures on Copper and Nickel for Photochemical Fuel Cell Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh K. Shanmugam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To increase the performance of photochemical fuel cells, nonequilibrium electrodeposition has been performed on Cu and Ni to make photosensitive anodes. Processing parameters including electrolyte concentration, and electrode potential were studied using cyclic voltammetry. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS were performed to understand the formation of the nanostructures during the nonequilibrium deposition of copper fractals. An increase in the deposition rate was observed with the increase in electrolyte concentration (from 0.05 M to 1.0 M. Similar trend was found when the cathode potential was decreased from −0.5 V to −4.5 V. The effect of substrate material was also examined. Porous fractal structures on copper were achieved, while the deposited material showed high density of surface cracks on nickel. The fractal structures deposited on copper electrode with the increased surface area were converted into copper oxide by oxidation in air. Such oxide samples were made into anodes for photochemical fuel cell application. We demonstrated that an increase in the magnitude of open circuit output voltage is associated with the increase in the fractal surface area under the ultraviolet irradiation test conditions. However, the electrodeposited fractals on nickel showed very limited increase in the magnitude of open circuit voltage.

  7. Photocatalytic Oxidation of Lignin Model Systems by Merging Visible-Light Photoredox and Palladium Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärkäs, Markus D; Bosque, Irene; Matsuura, Bryan S; Stephenson, Corey R J

    2016-10-07

    Lignin valorization has long been recognized as a sustainable solution for the renewable production of aromatic compounds. Two-step oxidation/reduction strategies, whereby the first oxidation step is required to "activate" lignin systems for controlled fragmentation reactions, have recently emerged as viable routes toward this goal. Herein we describe a catalytic protocol for oxidation of lignin model systems by combining photoredox and Pd catalysis. The developed dual catalytic protocol allowed the efficient oxidation of lignin model substrates at room temperature to afford the oxidized products in good to excellent yields.

  8. Ultrasound assisted synthesis of nanocrystalline zinc oxide: Experiments and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosni, Mongia [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux, LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris 13, 99 av. J.B. Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Farhat, Samir, E-mail: farhat@lspm.cnrs.fr [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux, LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris 13, 99 av. J.B. Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Schoenstein, Frederic; Karmous, Farah; Jouini, Noureddine [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux, LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris 13, 99 av. J.B. Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Viana, Bruno [LCMCP Chimie-Paristech, UPMC, Collège de France, 11 Rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Mgaidi, Arbi [Laboratoire de chimie minérale industrielle université Tunis el Manar (Tunisia)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • ZnO nanospheres and nanowires were grown using ultrasound and thermal activation techniques. • The growth uses forced hydrolysis of zinc acetate in diethylene glycol (DEG). • A thermochemical model was developed based on thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. • We estimate species distribution in the bubble in temperature range from 5000 K to ambient. • We propose a new mechanism for ZnO growth assisted by ultrasound irradiation. - Abstract: A fast and green approach is proposed for the preparation of nanocrystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) via ultrasonic (US) irradiation in polyol medium. The process uses forced hydrolysis of zinc acetate in diethylene glycol (DEG). The protocol is compared to thermal activation under the same chemical environment. The activation method is found to be playing a critical role in the selective synthesis of morphologically distinct nanostructures. As compared to thermally activated conventional polyol process, (US) permits to considerably reduce reaction time as well as size of particles. In addition, the shape of these nanoparticles was changed from long nanowires to small nanospheres, indicating different reaction mechanisms. To explain this difference, a thermochemical model was developed based on thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. The model estimate species distribution in the bubble in temperature range from 5000 K to ambient simulating quenching process during bubble formation and collapse. Our results indicate the presence of high density of zinc atoms that could be responsible of a high density of nucleation as compared to thermal activation.

  9. A comprehensive experimental and modeling study of isobutene oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Chong-Wen

    2016-03-17

    Isobutene is an important intermediate in the pyrolysis and oxidation of higher-order branched alkanes, and it is also a component of commercial gasolines. To better understand its combustion characteristics, a series of ignition delay time (IDT) and laminar flame speed (LFS) measurements have been performed. In addition, flow reactor speciation data recorded for the pyrolysis and oxidation of isobutene is also reported. Predictions of an updated kinetic model described herein are compared with each of these data sets, as well as with existing jet-stirred reactor (JSR) species measurements. IDTs of isobutene oxidation were measured in four different shock tubes and in two rapid compression machines (RCMs) under conditions of relevance to practical combustors. The combination of shock tube and RCM data greatly expands the range of available validation data for isobutene oxidation models to pressures of 50 atm and temperatures in the range 666–1715 K. Isobutene flame speeds were measured experimentally at 1 atm and at unburned gas temperatures of 298–398 K over a wide range of equivalence ratios. For the flame speed results, there was good agreement between different facilities and the current model in the fuel-rich region. Ab initio chemical kinetics calculations were carried out to calculate rate constants for important reactions such as H-atom abstraction by hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and the decomposition of 2-methylallyl radicals. A comprehensive chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed to describe the combustion of isobutene and is validated by comparison to the presently considered experimental measurements. Important reactions, highlighted via flux and sensitivity analyses, include: (a) hydrogen atom abstraction from isobutene by hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals, and molecular oxygen; (b) radical–radical recombination reactions, including 2-methylallyl radical self-recombination, the recombination of 2-methylallyl radicals with

  10. Photochemical treatment as an alternative to improve the quality of wastewater after advanced primary treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández Fernando

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present research contains the photochemical treatment (PCT of residual wastewater effluent derived from an advanced primary treatment process (APT. The application employed an ultraviolet light system, hydrogen peroxide and ozone as a free hydroxyl’s radicals generator; strong oxidants for the organic contaminants mineralization which affects the water quality. The aliquots of the APT and PCT were analyzed by determination of the parameters as the color, turbidity, electric conductivity, COD, UV-Vis spectrometry, anion and cation techniques, enabling the determination of the photo-oxidative wastewater treatment efficiency. The microbiological assays denote the one hundred percent photo-oxidative effectiveness for the removal of undesirable microorganisms. After the treatment, the water is suitable for its reuse, commercialization or spill into a body receptor without any risk for the environment or the health.

  11. Modeling the chemical evolution of nitrogen oxides near roadways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan Jason; DenBleyker, Allison; McDonald-Buller, Elena; Allen, David; Zhang, K. Max

    2011-01-01

    The chemical evolution of nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) and nitrogen monoxide (NO) in the vicinity of roadways is numerically investigated using a computational fluid dynamics model, CFD-VIT-RIT and a Gaussian-based model, CALINE4. CFD-VIT-RIT couples a standard k- ɛ turbulence model for turbulent mixing and the Finite-Rate model for chemical reactions. CALINE4 employs a discrete parcel method, assuming that chemical reactions are independent of the dilution process. The modeling results are compared to the field measurement data collected near two roadways in Austin, Texas, State Highway 71 (SH-71) and Farm to Market Road 973 (FM-973), under parallel and perpendicular wind conditions during the summer of 2007. In addition to ozone (O 3), other oxidants and reactive species including hydroperoxyl radical (HO 2), organic peroxyl radical (RO 2), formaldehyde (HCHO) and acetaldehyde (CH 3CHO) are considered in the transformation from NO to NO 2. CFD-VIT-RIT is shown to be capable of predicting both NO x and NO 2 profiles downwind. CALINE4 is able to capture the NO x profiles, but underpredicts NO 2 concentrations under high wind velocity. Our study suggests that the initial NO 2/NO x ratios have to be carefully selected based on traffic conditions in order to assess NO 2 concentrations near roadways. The commonly assumed NO 2/NO x ratio by volume of 5% may not be suitable for most roadways, especially those with a high fraction of heavy-duty truck traffic. In addition, high O 3 concentrations and high traffic volumes would lead to the peak NO 2 concentration occurring near roadways with elevated concentrations persistent over a long distance downwind.

  12. Chemical Kinetics and Photochemical Data for Use in Atmospheric Studies: Evaluation Number 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, J. B.; Sander, S. P.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Barker, J. R.; Huie, R. E.; Kolb, C. E.; Kurylo, M. J.; Orkin, V. L.; Wilmouth, D. M.; Wine, P. H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the eighteenth in a series of evaluated sets of rate constants, photochemical cross sections, heterogeneous parameters, and thermochemical parameters compiled by the NASA Panel for Data Evaluation. The data are used primarily to model stratospheric and upper tropospheric processes, with particular emphasis on the ozone layer and its possible perturbation by anthropogenic and natural phenomena. The evaluation is available in electronic form from the following Internet URL: http://jpldataeval.jpl.nasa.gov/

  13. A green chemistry of graphene: photochemical reduction towards monolayer graphene sheets and the role of water adlayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Hao; Chen, Jie-Sheng; Wang, Xinchen; Schuster, Manfred E; Schlögl, Robert; Antonietti, Markus

    2012-04-01

    Clean sheets: Stable aqueous dispersions of graphene sheets (GSs) are obtained by exposing graphene oxide to irradiation with light at room temperature, without using any chemical additives. The photochemical reduction method is sustainable and scalable, repairs a majority of defects in the graphene layers, and can be used to fine-tune surface functional groups. Interestingly, the aqueous GS dispersions are stable without any added surfactant. The existence of a water layer that is strongly bound to GS is evidenced.

  14. Identification of the Active Species in Photochemical Hole Scavenging Reactions of Methanol on TiO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Mingmin; Henderson, Michael A.

    2011-11-03

    Molecular and dissociative methanol adsorption species were prepared on rutile TiO2(110) surfaces to study photocatalytic oxidation of methanol in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Adsorbed methoxy groups (CH3O-) were found to be the photoactive form of adsorbed methanol converted to adsorbed formaldehyde and a surface OH group by hole-mediated C-H bond cleavage. These results suggest that adsorbed methoxy is the effective hole scavenger in photochemical reactions involving methanol.

  15. Laser-Time Interaction XII: Photochemical, Photothermal, and Photomechanical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Donald D.; Jacques, Steven L.; Johnson, Peter C.

    2001-01-01

    This proceedings contains papers on the following topics: photodynamic therapy, immunotherapy, pulsed laser effects, polarized light interactions, photochemical interactions, occular laser effects,thermal interactions, laser shaping of cartilage.

  16. The role of lager beer yeast in oxidative stability of model beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, T S; Arneborg, N

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between the ability of lager brewing yeast strains to tolerate oxidative stress and their ability to produce oxidative stable model beer. Screening of 21 lager brewing yeast strains against diamide and paraquat showed that the oxidative stress resistance was strain dependent. Fermentation of model wort in European Brewing Convention tubes using three yeast strains with varying oxidative stress resistances resulted in three model beers with different rates of radical formation as measured by electron spin resonance in forced ageing experiments. Interestingly, the strain with the lowest oxidative stress resistance and lowest secretion of thioredoxin, as measured by Western blotting, resulted in the highest uptake of iron, as measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and the slowest formation of radicals in the model beers. A more oxidative stable beer is not obtained by a more-oxidative-stress-tolerant lager brewing yeast strain, exhibiting a higher secretion of thioredoxin, but rather by a less-oxidative-stress-tolerant strain, exhibiting a higher iron uptake. To obtain lager beers with enhanced oxidative stability, yeast strains should be screened for their low oxidative stress tolerance and/or high ability to take up iron rather than for their high oxidative stress tolerance and/or high ability to secrete thioredoxin. © 2011 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Modeling of structural effects in biomedical elements after titanium oxidation in fluidized bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendzik K.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation is one of the most employed methods to improve titanium and its alloys properties especially due to medical application. This process like most of the thermochemical treatment processes substantially influences on the characteristic of surface layers and the same on its mechanical and useful properties. Oxide coatings produced during titanium oxidation were examined due to their composition identification. Titanium was oxidized in fluidized bed in temperature range between 500÷700°C. Microstructures of titanium with a visible oxide coating on its surface after thermochemical treatment and changes of grain size in core of titanium samples are described. Moreover Xray phase analysis of obtained oxides coatings was made as well as microhardness measurements of titanium surface layers after oxidation process. Finally, the surfaces of titanium after oxidation in fluidized bed were measured by Auger electron spectroscopy. All research results are used to built numerical model of oxidation process in fluidized. Titanium oxidation process in fluidized bed is very complicated, because changes of parameters are non linear characteristics. This fact and lack of mathematical algorithms describing this process makes modeling properties of titanium elements by traditional numerical methods difficult or even impossible. In this case it is possible to try using artificial neural network. Using neural networks for modeling oxidizing in fluidized bed is caused by several nets' features: non linear character, ability to generalize the results of calculations for data out of training set, no need for mathematical algorithms describing influence changes input parameters on modeling materials properties.

  18. Photochemical ozone budget during the BIBLE A and B campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Malcolm; Hu, Wenjie; Rodríguez, José M.; Kondo, Yutaka; Koike, Makoto; Kita, Kazuyuki; Kawakami, Shuji; Blake, Donald; Liu, Shaw; Ogawa, Toshihiro

    2003-02-01

    Using the measured concentrations of NO, O3, H2O, CO, CH4, and NMHCs along the flight tracks, a photochemical box model is used to calculate the concentrations of the Ox radicals, the HOx radicals, and the nitrogen species at the sampling points. The calculations make use of the measurements from radiometers to scale clear sky photolysis rates to account for cloud cover and ground albedo at the sampling time/point. The concentrations of the nitrogen species in each of the sampled air parcels are computed assuming they are in instantaneous equilibrium with the measured NO and O3. The diurnally varying species concentrations are next calculated using the box model and used to estimate the diurnally averaged production and removal rates of ozone for the sampled air parcels. Clear sky photolysis rates are used in the diurnal calculations. The campaign also provided measured concentration of NOy. The observed NO/NOy ratio is usually larger than the model calculated equilibrium value. There are several possible explanations. It could be a result of recent injection of NO into the air parcel, recent removal of HNO3 from the parcel, recent rapid transport of an air parcel from another location, or a combination of all processes. Our analyses suggest that the local production rate of O3 can be used as another indicator of recent NO injection. However, more direct studies using air trajectory analyses and other collaborative evidences are needed to ascertain the roles played by individual process.

  19. Transgenic Mouse Model for Reducing Oxidative Damage in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, A.-S.; Torres, S.; Truong, T.; Kumar, A.; Alwood, J. S.; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to musculoskeletal disuse and radiation result in bone loss; we hypothesized that these catabolic treatments cause excess reactive oxygen species (ROS), and thereby alter the tight balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, culminating in bone loss. To test this, we used transgenic mice which over-express the human gene for catalase, targeted to mitochondria (MCAT). Catalase is an anti-oxidant that converts the ROS hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. MCAT mice were shown previously to display reduced mitochondrial oxidative stress and radiosensitivity of the CNS compared to wild type controls (WT). As expected, MCAT mice expressed the transgene in skeletal tissue, and in marrow-derived osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors cultured ex vivo, and also showed greater catalase activity compared to wildtype (WT) mice (3-6 fold). Colony expansion in marrow cells cultured under osteoblastogenic conditions was 2-fold greater in the MCAT mice compared to WT mice, while the extent of mineralization was unaffected. MCAT mice had slightly longer tibiae than WT mice (2%, P less than 0.01), although cortical bone area was slightly lower in MCAT mice than WT mice (10%, p=0.09). To challenge the skeletal system, mice were treated by exposure to combined disuse (2 wk Hindlimb Unloading) and total body irradiation Cs(137) (2 Gy, 0.8 Gy/min), then bone parameters were analyzed by 2-factor ANOVA to detect possible interaction effects. Treatment caused a 2-fold increase (p=0.015) in malondialdehyde levels of bone tissue (ELISA) in WT mice, but had no effect in MCAT mice. These findings indicate that the transgene conferred protection from oxidative damage caused by treatment. Unexpected differences between WT and MCAT mice emerged in skeletal responses to treatment.. In WT mice, treatment did not alter osteoblastogenesis, cortical bone area, moment of inertia, or bone perimeter, whereas in MCAT mice, treatment increased these

  20. Laser photochemical reaction dynamics in formaldehyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zughul, M.B.A.

    1978-08-01

    Appearance rate constants of molecular photochemical products were measured following laser photolysis of formaldehyde in the near ultraviolet. The pressure dependence of appearance rates was studied for three formaldehyde isotopic species: H/sub 2/CO, HDCO, and D/sub 2/CO. The effect of added foreign gases on those rates in H/sub 2/CO has been determined for He, Ar, Xe, and NO. The energy dependence of photodissociation rates has been examined following laser photolysis at 354.7 and 299.1 nm and the results compared with earlier data obtained at 337.1 nm. The corresponding appearance rates measured for other carbonyls such as acrolein, propynal, ketene, and cyclobutanone were found to be much faster and greater than gas kinetic, indicating a photodissociation mechanism which is different from that of formaldehyde. The decay rates of CO(v = 1) have been measured for several collision partners including H/sub 2/CO, HDCO, acrolein, ketene, cis-2-butene, and cyclobutanone. Appearance rates for the radical dissociation channel in formaldehyde by monitoring H-atom production were measured using three different techniques: resonance fluorescence, resonance absorption, and two-photon excited fluorescence of Hydrogen Lyman-..cap alpha.. photons. 152 references, 45 figures, 16 tables.

  1. Locating conical intersections relevant to photochemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick, Bernhard [Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Regensburg, D 93040 Regensburg (Germany)], E-mail: Bernhard.Dick@chemie.uni-regensburg.de; Haas, Yehuda; Zilberg, Shmuel [Department of Physical Chemistry and the Farkas Center for Light-induced Processes, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2008-05-23

    A new computerized method for locating conical intersections of interest in photochemistry is presented. The search is based on the Longuet-Higgins phase change theorem (Berry phase) which provides the subspace required for the initial search. The subspace is approximated as a plane containing three stable structures lying on a Longuet-Higgins loop. The search is conducted for a minimum of {delta}E, the energy difference between two electronic states. It is started using up to three points within the circle defined by the three structures; symmetry, if relevant, is helpful but not essential. Since a two-dimensional subspace of the large 3N - 6 space is used, the search that uses either Cartesian or internal coordinates is efficient and yields a degeneracy after a few iterations. Given that not all degrees of freedom are included in the search, usually a high lying part of the conical intersection is initially located. The system is subsequently optimized along all coordinates keeping {delta}E as close to zero as desired. The method is demonstrated for the symmetric H{sub 3} system and also for the butadiene-cyclobutene-bicyclobutane system in which the three stable structures are not equivalent. The method is general and can be extended to any photochemical system.

  2. Photochemical Patterning of Ionically Cross-Linked Hydrogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Bruchet

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Iron(III cross-linked alginate hydrogel incorporating sodium lactate undergoes photoinduced degradation, thus serving as a biocompatible positive photoresist suitable for photochemical patterning. Alternatively, surface etching of iron(III cross-linked hydrogel contacting lactic acid solution can be used for controlling the thickness of the photochemical pattering. Due to biocompatibility, both of these approaches appear potentially useful for advanced manipulation with cell cultures including growing cells on the surface or entrapping them within the hydrogel.

  3. Investigation of the Photochemical Method for Uranium Isotope Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urey, H. C.

    1943-07-10

    To find a process for successful photochemical separation of isotopes several conditions have to be fulfilled. First, the different isotopes have to show some differences in the spectrum. Secondly, and equally important, this difference must be capable of being exploited in a photochemical process. Parts A and B outline the physical and chemical conditions, and the extent to which one might expect to find them fulfilled. Part C deals with the applicability of the process.

  4. Modeling of Alkane Oxidation Using Constituents and Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Jasette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    2010-01-01

    It is currently not possible to perform simulations of turbulent reactive flows due in particular to complex chemistry, which may contain thousands of reactions and hundreds of species. This complex chemistry results in additional differential equations, making the numerical solution of the equation set computationally prohibitive. Reducing the chemical kinetics mathematical description is one of several important goals in turbulent reactive flow modeling. A chemical kinetics reduction model is proposed for alkane oxidation in air that is based on a parallel methodology to that used in turbulence modeling in the context of the Large Eddy Simulation. The objective of kinetic modeling is to predict the heat release and temperature evolution. This kinetic mechanism is valid over a pressure range from atmospheric to 60 bar, temperatures from 600 K to 2,500 K, and equivalence ratios from 0.125 to 8. This range encompasses diesel, HCCI, and gas-turbine engines, including cold ignition. A computationally efficient kinetic reduction has been proposed for alkanes that has been illustrated for n-heptane using the LLNL heptane mechanism. This model is consistent with turbulence modeling in that scales were first categorized into either those modeled or those computed as progress variables. Species were identified as being either light or heavy. The heavy species were decomposed into defined 13 constituents, and their total molar density was shown to evolve in a quasi-steady manner. The light species behave either in a quasi-steady or unsteady manner. The modeled scales are the total constituent molar density, Nc, and the molar density of the quasi-steady light species. The progress variables are the total constituent molar density rate evolution and the molar densities of the unsteady light species. The unsteady equations for the light species contain contributions of the type gain/loss rates from the heavy species that are modeled consistent with the developed mathematical

  5. Photochemical escape of oxygen from the Martian atmosphere: new insights from MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, R. J.; Deighan, J.; Bougher, S. W.; Cravens, T.; Fox, J. L.; Lee, Y.; Rahmati, A.; McFadden, J. P.; Benna, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Elrod, M. K.; Andersson, L.; Fowler, C. M.; Curry, S.; Gröller, H.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    One of the primary goals of the MAVEN mission is to characterize rates of atmospheric escape from Mars at the present epoch and relate those escape rates to solar drivers. One of the known escape processes is photochemical escape, where a) an exothermic chemical reaction in the atmosphere results in an upward-traveling neutral particle whose velocity exceeds planetary escape velocity and b) the particle is not prevented from escaping through any subsequent collisions. Because escaping hot atoms are not directly measured, models of production and transport (through the atmosphere) of such atoms must be used to constrain photochemical escape rates. These models require altitude profiles of neutral densities and electron and ion densities and temperatures, as well as compositional information, all of which are measured by MAVEN instruments at the relevant altitudes (150-300 km). For every altitude profile: Profiles of O2+ dissociative recombination (DR) rates will be calculated from electron temperature, electron density and O2+ density. Profiles of energy distributions of hot O atoms will be calculated from profiles of electron and ion temperatures. Profiles of all neutral densities will be input into models of hot O transport in order to calculate photochemical escape fluxes from DR of O2+. We will present photochemical escape fluxes as a function of several factors, in particular solar zenith angle and EUV flux. This, combined with further simulations with progressively higher EUV fluxes, will eventually enable a total integrated loss estimate over the course of Martian history and hence a determination of the impact of this loss process on the evolution of the Martian climate.

  6. 利用动物模型评价核黄素光化学法灭活红细胞病毒的效果%Evaluation of Riboflavin Photochemical Inactivation Efficacy of Virus in Red Blood Cells by Using Animal Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨鹏; 张循善; 程越; 赵俊; 王明丽

    2011-01-01

    本研究旨在评估核黄素光化学法(核黄素终浓度为150 wmoI/L,光照时间为20分钟,光照强度为,40000Lux)灭活红细胞中病毒的有效性.将HCMV作为指示病毒加入红细胞中.30只BALA/c小鼠设为实验组(n=10)、病毒对照组(n=10)、可见光对照组(n=5)和红细胞对照组(n=5);实验组小鼠注射经核黄素光化学法灭活处理的红细胞;病毒对照组小鼠注射未经灭活处理的红细胞;可见光对照组小鼠注射经可见光照射的红细胞;红细胞对照组小鼠注射正常红细胞.取各组小鼠进行体外病毒分离,PCR检测HCMV UL83基因,间接免疫荧光鉴定PP65抗原.结果表明:病毒对照组和可见光对照组病毒分离、PCR及间接免疫荧光检测均为阳性,而实验组和红细胞对照组所有结果均为阴性.结论:核黄素光化学法灭活红细胞病毒是有效的.%This study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy of riboflavin photochemical inactivation of virus in red blood cells by using animal models. human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) plus red blood cells were used as indicator, 30 BALA/c mice were divided into the experimental group (n = 10), virus control group (n = 10), visible light control group(n = 5 ) and red blood cell control group ( n = 5 ). Mice in experimental group were inoculated with red blood cells inactived by the riboflavin photochemical, mice in virus control group was injected with red blood cells without riboflavin photochemical inactivation treatment, and mice in light control group was infused with red blood cells irradiated by visible light, and mice in red blood cells control group was injected with normal red blood cells. The virus was isolated in vitro from mice of various groups, the HCMV UL83 gene was detected by PCR, the PP65 antigen was identified by indirect immunofluorescence. The results indicated that the virus isolation, PCR detection and indirect immunofluorescence identification all showed positive in virus control group and

  7. Degradation of artificial sweeteners via direct and indirect photochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkola, Noora; Vaalgamaa, Sanna; Jernberg, Joonas; Vähätalo, Anssi V

    2016-07-01

    We studied the direct and indirect photochemical reactivity of artificial sweeteners acesulfame, saccharin, cyclamic acid and sucralose in environm entally relevant dilute aqueous solutions. Aqueous solutions of sweeteners were irradiated with simulated solar radiation (>290 nm; 96 and 168 h) or ultraviolet radiation (UVR; up to 24 h) for assessing photochemical reactions in surface waters or in water treatment, respectively. The sweeteners were dissolved in deionised water for examination of direct photochemical reactions. Direct photochemical reactions degraded all sweeteners under UVR but only acesulfame under simulated solar radiation. Acesulfame was degraded over three orders of magnitude faster than the other sweeteners. For examining indirect photochemical reactions, the sweeteners were dissolved in surface waters with indigenous dissolved organic matter or irradiated with aqueous solutions of nitrate (1 mg N/L) and ferric iron (2.8 mg Fe/L) introduced as sensitizers. Iron enhanced the photodegradation rates but nitrate and dissolved organic matter did not. UVR transformed acesulfame into at least three products: iso-acesulfame, hydroxylated acesulfame and hydroxypropanyl sulfate. Photolytic half-life was one year for acesulfame and more than several years for the other sweeteners in surface waters under solar radiation. Our study shows that the photochemical reactivity of commonly used artificial sweeteners is variable: acesulfame may be sensitive to photodegradation in surface waters, while saccharin, cyclamic acid and sucralose degrade very slowly even under the energetic UVR commonly used in water treatment.

  8. Effects of aerosols on tropospheric oxidants: A global model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Xuexi; Brasseur, Guy; Emmons, Louisa; Horowitz, Larry; Kinnison, Douglas

    2001-10-01

    The global distributions of sulfate and soot particles in the atmosphere are calculated, and the effect of aerosol particles on tropospheric oxidants is studied using a global chemical/transport/aerosol model. The model is developed in the framework of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) global three-dimensional chemical/transport model (Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers (MOZART)). In addition to the gas-phase photochemistry implemented in the MOZART model, the present study also accounts for the formation of sulfate and black carbon aerosols as well as for heterogeneous reactions on particles. The simulated global sulfate aerosol distributions and seasonal variation are compared with observations. The seasonal variation of sulfate aerosols is in agreement with measurements, except in the Arctic region. The calculated vertical profiles of sulfate aerosol agree well with the observations over North America. In the case of black carbon the calculated surface distribution is in fair agreement with observations. The effects of aerosol formation and heterogeneous reactions on the surface of sulfate aerosols are studied. The model calculations show the following: (1) The concentration of H2O2 is reduced when sulfate aerosols are formed due to the reaction of SO2 + H2O2 in cloud droplets. The gas-phase reaction SO2 + OH converts OH to HO2, but the reduction of OH and enhancement of HO2 are insignificant (<3%). (2) The heterogeneous reaction of HO2 on the surface of sulfate aerosols produces up to 10% reduction of hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) with an uptake coefficient of 0.2. However, this uptake coefficient could be overestimated, and the results should be regard as an upper limit estimation. (3) The N2O5 reaction on the surface of sulfate aerosols leads to an 80% reduction of NOx at middle to high latitudes during winter. Because ozone production efficiency is low in winter, ozone decreases by only 10% as a result of this reaction. However

  9. Differences in ozone photochemical characteristics between the megacity Tianjin and its rural surroundings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Su-qin; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Chun-sheng; Lu, Xue-qiang; Ran, Liang; Han, Meng; Li, Pei-yan; Li, Xiang-jin

    2013-11-01

    Ground level ozone and its precursors were measured from July 10 to September 30, 2009 within Tianjin. The data were used to analyze differences in ozone photochemical oxidant production in urban and rural areas. Results showed more pronounced risk of O3 exposure at the rural site, Wuqing. During the observation period, ozone varied monthly, peaking in Jul. and reaching a minimum in Sep. The daily maximum ozone concentration was found to exceed 80 ppb for 28 days 100 ppb for 12 days, 120 ppb for 7 days at Wuqing, while it exceeded 80 ppb for 10 days, 100 ppb for 2 days, and 120 ppb for 1 day at the urban site, Tieta. The daily maximum ozone concentrations at Wuqing and Tieta were 193.7 ppb and 130.4 ppb. The daily maximum ozone concentration occurred at noon in Tieta and at 14:00 in Wuqing. NO and NOx peaked in September and reached minimum values in Jul., CO showed little variation at both sites. NOx and CO showed similar double-peak diurnal cycles resulted from a combination of diurnal variation of emission and the Planetary Boundary Layer During the VOCs (volatile organic compounds) sampling period, the average total VOCs concentration showed considerable day to day variation, which was 87.91 ppb with a range of 27.2 ppb-437.3 ppb at Tieta, and the average total VOCs was 197.95 ppb with a range of 63.48 ppb-473.97 ppb at Wuqing. A sensitivity study performed with the NCAR-MM model showed alkenes to be the most numerous contributors to O3 production, accounting for 53.3% of the total. Aromatics and alkanes accounted for 35.1% and 9.2%, respectively.

  10. Stoichiometric modeling of oxidation of reduced inorganic sulfur compounds (Riscs) in Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobadilla Fazzini, Roberto A; Cortés, Maria Paz; Padilla, Leandro; Maturana, Daniel; Budinich, Marko; Maass, Alejandro; Parada, Pilar

    2013-08-01

    The prokaryotic oxidation of reduced inorganic sulfur compounds (RISCs) is a topic of utmost importance from a biogeochemical and industrial perspective. Despite sulfur oxidizing bacterial activity is largely known, no quantitative approaches to biological RISCs oxidation have been made, gathering all the complex abiotic and enzymatic stoichiometry involved. Even though in the case of neutrophilic bacteria such as Paracoccus and Beggiatoa species the RISCs oxidation systems are well described, there is a lack of knowledge for acidophilic microorganisms. Here, we present the first experimentally validated stoichiometric model able to assess RISCs oxidation quantitatively in Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans (strain DSM 17318), the archetype of the sulfur oxidizing acidophilic chemolithoautotrophs. This model was built based on literature and genomic analysis, considering a widespread mix of formerly proposed RISCs oxidation models combined and evaluated experimentally. Thiosulfate partial oxidation by the Sox system (SoxABXYZ) was placed as central step of sulfur oxidation model, along with abiotic reactions. This model was coupled with a detailed stoichiometry of biomass production, providing accurate bacterial growth predictions. In silico deletion/inactivation highlights the role of sulfur dioxygenase as the main catalyzer and a moderate function of tetrathionate hydrolase in elemental sulfur catabolism, demonstrating that this model constitutes an advanced instrument for the optimization of At. thiooxidans biomass production with potential use in biohydrometallurgical and environmental applications.

  11. Degradation of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) by homogeneous and heterogeneous photocatalysis applied to the photochemically enhanced Fenton reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossmann, S H; Oliveros, E; Göb, S; Kantor, M; Göppert, A; Lei, L; Yue, P L; Braun, A M

    2001-01-01

    The reaction mechanism of the oxidative degradation of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) by the photochemically enhanced Fenton reaction was studied using a homogeneous (Fe2+(aq) + H2O2) and a heterogeneous reaction system (iron(III)-exchanged zeolite Y+ H2O2). In the homogeneous Fenton system, efficient degradation was observed in a batch reactor, equipped with a medium pressure mercury arc in a Pyrex envelope and employing 80% of the stoichiometric amount of H2O2 required for the total oxidation of PVA and a concentration ratio as low as I mole of iron(II) sulfate per 20 moles of PVA sub-units (C2H40). Model PVA polymers of three different molecular weights (15,000, 49,000 and 100,000 g mol(-1)) were found to follow identical degradation patterns. Strong experimental evidence supports the formation of supermacromolecules (MW: 1-5 x 10(6) g/mol) consisting of oxidized PVA and trapped iron(III) at an early reaction stage. Low molecular weight intermediates, such as oxalic acid, formic acid or formaldehyde were not found during PVA degradation in the homogeneous Fenton system, and we may deduce that the manifold of degradation reactions is mainly taking place within the super-macromolecules from which CO2 is directly released. However, in the heterogeneous Fenton system, the reaction behavior was found to be distinctly different: a decrease of the molecular weights of all three tested monodisperse PVA samples was observed by the broadening of the GPC-traces during irradiation, and oxalic acid was formed. The results lead to the mechanistic hypothesis that during the heterogeneous Fenton process, the cleavage of the PVA-chains may occur at random positions, the reactive centres being located inside the iron(III)-doped zeolite Y photocatalysts.

  12. Sunlight technologies for photochemical deactivation of organic pollutants in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acher, A.; Fischer, E.; Tornheim, R. [The Volcani Center, Inst. of Soils and Water, Bet Dagan (Israel); Manor, Y. [Sheba Medical Center, Central Virology Lab., Ramat Gan (Israel)

    1997-12-31

    Sensitized-photochemical oxidation methods aimed at use in water treatment technologies for deactivation of biotic (microorganisms) and/or of xenobiotic (pesticides) pollutants in water were developed using global solar radiation or concentrated sunlight (up to 250 suns). The solar global radiation was used either for detoxification of industrial waste water from a pesticide factory to allow their discharge into the urban sewer, or for disinfection of domestric effluents to be used in crop irrigation. The disinfection process was eventually carried out in an experimental pilot-scale plant, capable of disinfection up to 50 m{sup 3}/h of effluent supplied by an activated sludge sewage treatment plant located in Tel-Aviv area. The treated effluents did not show any regrowth of the microorganisms during 7 days. The solar concentrated radiation experiments performed using facilities of the Sun Tower of The Weizman Institute of Science, Rehovot. The concentrated sunlight was provided by different combination of several computer controlled heliostates, up to 8, that track the sun and focus the received sunlight onto the target situated on the roof of the sun-tower. The sunlight intensities measured on the target reached up to 200 kW/m{sup 2}. The experiments were performed either batch- or continuous-wise. The water-samples exposed to disinfection were the above effluent, filtered and supplemented with vaccine strain poliovirus or with different concentrations of an industrial potential pollutant (bromacil), MB 2 mg/L and two concentrations of dissolved oxygen (8.0 or 40.0 mg O{sub 2}/L). An exposure time of 2-3 seconds at 150 kW/m{sup 2} was decreased the microorganisms alive (counts) by five orders of magnitude. A comparison between the two above water treatment technologies is presented. (orig./SR)

  13. Cellular Automata Modelling of Photo-Induced Oxidation Processes in Molecularly Doped Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Goldie

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of employing cellular automata (CA to model photo-induced oxidation processes in molecularly doped polymers is explored. It is demonstrated that the oxidation dynamics generated using CA models exhibit stretched-exponential behavior. This dynamical characteristic is in general agreement with an alternative analysis conducted using standard rate equations provided the molecular doping levels are sufficiently low to prohibit the presence of safe-sites which are impenetrable to dissolved oxygen. The CA models therefore offer the advantage of exploring the effect of dopant agglomeration which is difficult to assess from standard rate equation solutions. The influence of UV-induced bleaching or darkening upon the resulting oxidation dynamics may also be easily incorporated into the CA models and these optical effects are investigated for various photo-oxidation product scenarios. Output from the CA models is evaluated for experimental photo-oxidation data obtained from a series of hydrazone-doped polymers.

  14. Asparagine decarboxylation by lipid oxidation products in model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Francisco J; Delgado, Rosa M; Navarro, José L; Zamora, Rosario

    2010-10-13

    The decarboxylation of asparagine in the presence of alkanals, alkenals, and alkadienals, among other lipid derivatives, was studied in an attempt to understand the reaction pathways by which some lipid oxidation products are able to convert asparagine into acrylamide. Asparagine was converted into 3-aminopropionamide in the presence of lipid derivatives as a function of reaction conditions (pH, water content, time, and temperature), as well as the type and amount of lipid compound involved. Alkadienals (and analogous ketodienes) were the most reactive lipids followed by hydroperoxides and alkenals. Saturated carbonyls and polyunsaturated fatty acids, or other polyunsaturated derivatives, also exhibited some reactivity. On the other hand, saturated lipids or monounsaturated alcohols did not degrade asparagine. A mechanism for the decarboxylation of asparagine in the presence of alkadienals based on the deuteration results obtained when asparagine/2,4-decadienal model systems were heated in the presence of deuterated water was proposed. The activation energy (E(a)) of asparagine decarboxylation by 2,4-decadienal was 81.0 kJ/mol, which is higher than that found for the conversion of 3-aminopropionamide into acrylamide in the presence of 2,4-decadienal. This result points to the decarboxylation step as the key step in the conversion of asparagine into acrylamide in the presence of alkadienals. Therefore, any inhibiting strategy for suppressing the formation of acrylamide by alkadienals should be mainly directed to the inhibition of this step.

  15. Copper Oxide Nanoparticles for Advanced Refrigerant Thermophysical Properties: Mathematical Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Fadhilah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In modern days, refrigeration systems are important for industrial and domestic applications. The systems consume more electricity as compared to other appliances. The refrigeration systems have been investigated thoroughly in many ways to reduce the energy consumption. Hence, nanorefrigerant which is one kind of nanofluids has been introduced as a superior properties refrigerant that increased the heat transfer rate in the refrigeration system. Many types of materials could be used as the nanoparticles to be suspended into the conventional refrigerants. In this study, the effect of the suspended copper oxide (CuO nanoparticles into the 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane, R-134a is investigated by using mathematical modeling. The investigation includes the thermal conductivity, dynamic viscosity, and heat transfer rate of the nanorefrigerant in a tube of evaporator. The results show enhanced thermophysical properties of nanorefrigerant compared to the conventional refrigerant. These advanced thermophysical properties increased the heat transfer rate in the tube. The nanorefrigerant could be a potential working fluid to be used in the refrigeration system to increase the heat transfer characteristics and save the energy usage.

  16. One-step surface selective modification of UV-curable hard coatings with photochemical metal organics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon Kwang; Park, Chang-Sun; Park, Hyung-Ho

    2016-12-01

    An organic-inorganic hybrid bi-layer film with a selective distribution of inorganic components was synthesized from a one-pot process of UV irradiation. A photochemical metal oxide precursor (Sr 2-ethylhexanoate) varying from 0 to 4 wt% was dispersed in UV-curable coating materials. Under UV exposure, the bi-layer started reacting simultaneously but at different rates due to differences in the two UV-condensable components' reactivity. The effects of the dispersed inorganic component on the surface morphology and mechanical properties were investigated by atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation, respectively. The reaction process and rates were studied from linkage change using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy at various UV exposure times (0-30 min). The elemental distribution and the interface on the coating layer were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy from Ar etching, revealing continuous and gradual composition changes in depth. The results showed that a flattened and surface-selectively hardened SrO containing the coating film could be obtained by this simple process. Consequently, a small ratio of photochemical metal oxide reinforced the organic hard coating film's mechanical properties through the formation of an effective SrO top layer.

  17. Photochemical Hydrogen Abstraction and Electron Transfer Reactions of Tetrachlorobenzoquinone with Pyrimidine Nucleobases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun-hui Liu; Li-dan Wu; Xiao-ran Zou; Wen Yang; Qian Du; Hong-mei Su

    2011-01-01

    Pentachlorophenol,a widespread environmental pollutant that is possibly carcinogenic to humans,is metabolically oxidized to tetrachloroquinone (TCBQ) which can result in DNA damage.We have investigated the photochemical reaction dynamics of TCBQ with two pyrimidine type nucleobases (thymine and uracil) upon UVA (355 nm) excitation using the technique of nanosecond time-resolved laser flash photolysis.It has been found that 355 nm excitation populates TCBQ molecules to their triplet state 3TCBQ*,which are highly reactive towards thymine or uracil and undergo two parallel reactions,the hydrogen abstraction and electron transfer,leading to the observed photoproducts of TCBQH.and TCBQ.- in transient absorption spectra.The concomitantly produced nucleobase radicals and radical cations are expected to induce a series of oxidative or strand cleavage damage to DNA afterwards.By characterizing the photochemical hydrogen abstraction and electron transfer reactions,our results provide potentially important molecular reaction mechanisms for understanding the carcinogenic effects of pentachlorophenol and its metabolites TCBQ.

  18. Energy dependent model of a metal oxide surge arrester. Sanka aengata hiraiki no energy izon model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, S.; Kan, M.; Masuzawa, K. (Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-03-20

    This paper reports on modeling a zinc-oxide lightning arrester. The paper indicates that it is difficult to model the zinc-oxide elements by using non-linear resistance and inductance only, based on results of measuring hysteresis curves of restriction voltage on dual peak discharge of the elements. The paper then proposes a model (of numerical expression) that incorporates a concept that the restriction voltage decreases in response to energy absorbed by the elements from the discharge current. The paper explains a method for deciding on constants contained in the proposed expression, and a method to calculate the restriction voltage according to the proposed expression by using TACS of the program EMTP for circuit analysis. Further, it is indicated that the measured values of the restriction voltage on the dual-peak discharge current agree well with the calculated values from the proposed expression. A comparison was made on effects of this model and the conventional non-linear resistance model on the results of analyzing lightning surge responses in a 500-kV model system. 6 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Observations and Model Analysis of Enhanced Oxidized Mercury in the Free Troposphere during NOMADSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, L.; Shah, V.; Ambrose, J. L., II; Jaffe, D. A.; Jaegle, L.; Selin, N. E.; Song, S.; Festa, J.; Stutz, J.

    2014-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a hazardous neurotoxic pollutant with complex atmospheric speciation and chemistry. It exists in the atmosphere primarily as gaseous elemental Hg (GEM), with a lifetime on the order of months, while oxidized Hg is more water soluble and deposits readily. Thus, Hg is considered both a local and a global pollutant. There are significant limitations in our understanding of global Hg cycling, including the sources and chemical mechanisms producing enhanced oxidized Hg in the free troposphere. Ground-based and airborne studies have associated free tropospheric oxidized Hg with GEM oxidation and atmospheric subsidence. Chemical transport models suggest that free tropospheric GEM oxidation is largely attributable to bromine (Br) atoms. During the 2013 Nitrogen Oxidants Mercury and Aerosol Distributions Sources and Sinks (NOMADSS) campaign, we sought to quantify the distribution and chemical transformation of Hg species in the free troposphere over the southeastern US. Enhanced oxidized Hg over North Texas was associated with long-range transport and subsidence from the sub-tropical Pacific free troposphere, where GEOS-Chem predicts air enriched in oxidized Hg. Bromine oxide (BrO) concentrations were also elevated over North Texas, perhaps supporting halogen oxidation as a source of free tropospheric oxidized Hg. Over the Atlantic Ocean, oxidized Hg up to 680 pg m-3 was associated with GEM oxidation and subsidence within the Atlantic high pressure system. The standard GEOS-Chem model underestimates free tropospheric oxidized Hg in these locations by a factor of three to ten, possibly due to underestimation of Br concentrations and/or uncertainty in the Hg+Br rate constant. We investigate GEOS-Chem's improved ability to reproduce the observed concentrations by tripling free tropospheric Br in the tropics and implementing a faster Hg+Br oxidation mechanism. Results have important implications for our understanding of global-scale atmospheric Hg chemistry and

  20. Towards a Predictive Thermodynamic Model of Oxidation States of Uranium Incorporated in Fe (hydr) oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagus, Paul S. [Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States)

    2013-01-01

    -Level Excited States: Consequences For X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy”, J. Elec. Spectros. and Related Phenom., 200, 174 (2015) describes our first application of these methods. As well as applications to problems and materials of direct interest for our PNNL colleagues, we have pursued applications of fundamental theoretical significance for the analysis and interpretation of XPS and XAS spectra. These studies are important for the development of the fields of core-level spectroscopies as well as to advance our capabilities for applications of interest to our PNNL colleagues. An excellent example is our study of the surface core-level shifts, SCLS, for the surface and bulk atoms of an oxide that provides a new approach to understanding how the surface electronic of oxides differs from that in the bulk of the material. This work has the potential to lead to a new key to understanding the reactivity of oxide surfaces. Our theoretical studies use cluster models with finite numbers of atoms to describe the properties of condensed phases and crystals. This approach has allowed us to focus on the local atomistic, chemical interactions. For these clusters, we obtain orbitals and spinors through the solution of the Hartree-Fock, HF, and the fully relativistic Dirac HF equations. These orbitals are used to form configuration mixing wavefunctions which treat the many-body effects responsible for the open shell angular momentum coupling and for the satellites of the core-level spectra. Our efforts have been in two complementary directions. As well as the applications described above, we have placed major emphasis on the enhancement and extension of our theoretical and computational capabilities so that we can treat complex systems with a greater range of many-body effects. Noteworthy accomplishments in terms of method development and enhancement have included: (1) An improvement in our treatment of the large matrices that must be handled when many-body effects are treated. (2

  1. Isotopic ratio of nitrogen on Titan: Photochemical interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen isotope fractionation in predissociation of N2 (Liang et al., 2007) is combined with production of N(4S), N(2D), and N+ in dissociation and dissociative ionization by the solar EUV photons, photoelectrons, magnetospheric electrons and protons, and cosmic rays from the photochemical model. The calculated 14N/15N ratio in nitriles is 57, in excellent agreement with the observed ratio in HCN. Loss of nitrogen in condensation and polymerization of nitriles is 392 g cm-2 Byr-1 with nitrogen isotope fractionation factor of 2.8. Loss of nitrogen by sputtering is 57 g cm-2 Byr-1 (De La Haye et al., 2007) with fractionation factor of 0.73 (Mandt et al., 2014). If the current loss was constant throughout the age of the Solar System, then the initial 14N/15N ratio on Titan is 129, similar to 127±32 for ammonia in comets (Rousselot et al., 2014). However, the solar EUV and wind were stronger from the young Sun, and this tends to further reduce the initial 14N/15N ratio. Nevertheless uncertainties of the problem and of the ratio in comets support the idea that nitrogen on Titan appeared as ammonia ice with 14N/15N similar to that in comets.

  2. Bifurcation transitions in a photochemical system under low magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipriyanov, A. A.; Purtov, P. A.

    2012-05-01

    In the last decades, the effect of low magnetic fields on biochemical and chemical systems has been an urgent problem. By now numerous experimental and theoretical studies have been conducted to demonstrate that commonly this effect is of no essence as it does not exceed 10%. However, there are experimental works which testify that in some systems, magnetic field effects are more significant. Thus, of great interest is an active search for rather simple but realistic models that are based on physically explicit assumptions and able to account for a strong effect of low magnetic fields. The present work not only offers a theoretical study on the simplest photochemical system, describing a reversible reaction of photodissociation, but also shows how a low magnetic field can strongly modify its properties under highly nonequilibrium conditions. It is assumed that external magnetic field can have effect on the rates of radical reactions occurring in a system. This, in turn, leads to bifurcation of the nonequilibrium stationary state and, thus, to a drastic change in the properties of chemical systems (temperature and reagent concentration).

  3. Modeling of hydrogen sulfide oxidation in concrete corrosion products from sewer pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2009-04-01

    Abiotic and biotic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide related to concrete corrosion was studied in corrosion products originating from a sewer manhole. The concrete corrosion products were suspended in an acidic solution, mimicking the conditions in the pore water of corroded concrete. The removal of hydrogen sulfide and dissolved oxygen was measured in parallel in the suspension, upon which the suspension was sterilized and the measurement repeated. The results revealed the biotic oxidation to be fast compared with the abiotic oxidation. The stoichiometry of the hydrogen sulfide oxidation was evaluated using the ratio between oxygen and hydrogen sulfide uptake. The ratio for the biotic oxidation pointed in the direction of elemental sulfur being formed as an intermediate in the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfuric acid. The experimental results were applied to suggest a hypothesis and a mathematical model describing the hydrogen sulfide oxidation pathway in a matrix of corroded concrete.

  4. An atmospheric photochemical source of the persistent greenhouse gas CF4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubb, Aaron M.; McGillen, Max R.; Portmann, Robert W.; Daniel, John S.; Burkholder, James B.

    2015-11-01

    A previously uncharacterized atmospheric source of the persistent greenhouse gas tetrafluoromethane, CF4, has been identified in the UV photolysis of trifluoroacetyl fluoride, CF3C(O)F, which is a degradation product of several halocarbons currently present in the atmosphere. CF4 quantum yields in the photolysis of CF3C(O)F were measured at 193, 214, 228, and 248 nm, wavelengths relevant to stratospheric photolysis, to be (75.3 ± 1) × 10-4, (23.7 ± 0.4) × 10-4, (6.6 ± 0.2) × 10-4, and ≤0.4 × 10-4, respectively. A 2-D atmospheric model was used to estimate the contribution of the photochemical source to the global CF4 budget. The atmospheric photochemical production of CF4 from CF3CH2F (HFC-134a), CF3CHFCl (HCFC-124), and CF3CCl2F (CFC-114a) per molecule emitted was calculated to be (1-2.5) × 10-5, 1.0 × 10-4, and 2.8 × 10-3, respectively. Although CF4 photochemical production was found to be relatively minor at the present time, the identified mechanism demonstrates that long-lived products with potential climate impacts can be formed from the atmospheric breakdown of shorter-lived source gases.

  5. Photochemical aging of volatile organic compounds in the Los Angeles basin: Weekday-weekend effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warneke, Carsten; Gouw, Joost A.; Edwards, Peter M.; Holloway, John S.; Gilman, Jessica B.; Kuster, William C.; Graus, Martin; Atlas, Elliot; Blake, Don; Gentner, Drew R.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Harley, Robert A.; Alvarez, Sergio; Rappenglueck, Bernhard; Trainer, Michael; Parrish, David D.

    2013-05-01

    During the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) field study in May-June 2010, measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were performed in the Los Angeles (LA) basin onboard a NOAA research aircraft and at a ground site located in Pasadena. A weekday-weekend effect in ozone, caused by lower NOx emissions due to reduced diesel truck traffic in the weekends, has been previously observed in Los Angeles and other cities. Measurements in the Caldecott tunnel show that emission ratios of VOCs do not vary with the day of the week, but measurements during CalNex2010 show a VOC weekday-weekend effect through faster photochemical processing at lower ambient NOx mixing ratios. Ambient VOC enhancement ratios of long-lived species such as benzene are the same between weekdays and weekends, whereas enhancement ratios of short-lived species, such as trimethyl benzene, are up to a factor of three lower on weekends. Based upon the observed differences in VOC enhancement ratios to CO, we determine that photochemical processing was on average 65%-75% faster on weekends during CalNex2010, which indicates that ambient OH radical concentrations were larger by this factor causing the observed change in VOC composition. A box model calculation based on the Master Chemical Mechanism was used to verify the increase in photochemical processing in the weekends.

  6. One-step photochemical synthesis of permanent, nonleaching, ultrathin antimicrobial coatings for textiles and plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhende, Vikram P; Samanta, Satyabrata; Jones, David M; Hardin, Ian R; Locklin, Jason

    2011-08-01

    Antimicrobial copolymers of hydrophobic N-alkyl and benzophenone containing polyethylenimines were synthesized from commercially available linear poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline), and covalently attached to surfaces of synthetic polymers, cotton, and modified silicon oxide using mild photo-cross-linking. Specifically, these polymers were applied to polypropylene, poly(vinyl chloride), polyethylene, cotton, and alkyl-coated oxide surfaces using solution casting or spray coating and then covalently cross-linked rendering permanent, nonleaching antimicrobial surfaces. The photochemical grafting of pendant benzophenones allows immobilization to any surface that contains a C-H bond. Incubating the modified materials with either Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli demonstrated that the modified surfaces had substantial antimicrobial capacity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (>98% microbial death).

  7. Model-based evaluation of the role of Anammox on nitric oxide and nitrous oxide productions in membrane aerated biofilm reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Smets, Barth F.; Yuan, Zhiguo;

    2013-01-01

    A multispecies one-dimensional biofilm model considering nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) productions for membrane aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) that remove nitrogen autotrophically through aerobic ammonia oxidation followed by Anammox is used to study the role of Anammox activity on th...

  8. Quantitative Mapping of Reversible Mitochondrial Complex I Cysteine Oxidation in a Parkinson Disease Mouse Model*

    OpenAIRE

    Danielson, Steven R.; Held, Jason M.; Oo, May; Riley, Rebeccah; Gibson, Bradford W.; Andersen, Julie K.

    2011-01-01

    Differential cysteine oxidation within mitochondrial Complex I has been quantified in an in vivo oxidative stress model of Parkinson disease. We developed a strategy that incorporates rapid and efficient immunoaffinity purification of Complex I followed by differential alkylation and quantitative detection using sensitive mass spectrometry techniques. This method allowed us to quantify the reversible cysteine oxidation status of 34 distinct cysteine residues out of a total 130 present in muri...

  9. A kinetic model of municipal sludge degradation during non-catalytic wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince-Pike, Arrian; Wilson, David I; Baroutian, Saeid; Andrews, John; Gapes, Daniel J

    2015-12-15

    Wet oxidation is a successful process for the treatment of municipal sludge. In addition, the resulting effluent from wet oxidation is a useful carbon source for subsequent biological nutrient removal processes in wastewater treatment. Owing to limitations with current kinetic models, this study produced a kinetic model which predicts the concentrations of key intermediate components during wet oxidation. The model was regressed from lab-scale experiments and then subsequently validated using data from a wet oxidation pilot plant. The model was shown to be accurate in predicting the concentrations of each component, and produced good results when applied to a plant 500 times larger in size. A statistical study was undertaken to investigate the validity of the regressed model parameters. Finally the usefulness of the model was demonstrated by suggesting optimum operating conditions such that volatile fatty acids were maximised.

  10. Automated sequence analysis of atmospheric oxidation pathways: SEQUENCE version 1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Butler

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm for the sequential analysis of the atmospheric oxidation of chemical species using output from a photochemical model is presented. Starting at a "root species", the algorithm traverses all possible reaction sequences which consume this species, and lead, via intermediate products, to final products. The algorithm keeps track of the effects of all of these reactions on their respective reactants and products. Upon completion, the algorithm has built a detailed picture of the effects of the oxidation of the root species on its chemical surroundings. The output of the algorithm can be used to determine product yields, radical recycling fractions, and ozone production potentials of arbitrary chemical species.

  11. Modelling nitrous oxide emissions from cropland at the regional scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Benoît

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Arable soils are a large source of nitrous oxide (N2O emissions, making up half of the biogenic emissions worldwide. Estimating their source strength requires methods capable of capturing the spatial and temporal variability of N2O emissions, along with the effects of crop management. Here, we applied a process-based model, CERES, with geo-referenced input data on soils, weather, and land use to map N2O emissions from wheat-cropped soils in three agriculturally intensive regions in France. Emissions were mostly controlled by soil type and local climate conditions, and only to a minor extent by the doses of fertilizer nitrogen applied. As a result, the direct emission factors calculated at the regional level were much smaller (ranging from 0.0007 to 0.0033 kg N2O-N kg–1 N than the value of 0.0125 kg N2O-N kg–1 N currently recommended in the IPCC Tier 1 methodology. Regional emissions were far more sensitive to the soil microbiological parameter s governing denitrification and its fraction evolved as N2O, soil bulk density, and soil initial inorganic N content. Mitigation measures should therefore target a reduction in the amount of soil inorganic N upon sowing of winter crops, and a decrease of the soil N2O production potential itself. From a general perspective, taking into account the spatial variability of soils and climate thereby appears necessary to improve the accuracy of national inventories, and to tailor mitigation strategies to regional characteristics. The methodology and results presented here may easily be transferred to winter oilseed rape, whose has growing cycle and fertilser requirements are similar.

  12. Studies on energy consumption patterns for improving air quality in the seoul metropolitan area. pt. 3 Status of photochemical air pollution and control technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Soo; Son, Jae Ik; Park, Young Ok; Kim, Hong Yong; Cho, Sung Ho [Korea Inst. of Energy Research, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    1. Status of photochemical air pollution in the capital area and control strategy. The results of this study show that the air quality in the capital area has an indication of regional photochemical air pollution. Primary pollutants can be controlled at the emission sources, but it is not easy to find the target of photochemical pollution control. For effective photochemical pollution control, basic studies on the fraction of VOCs in total hydrocarbon emissions, the composition of VOCs, and non-traditional emissions such as those from solvent use should be conducted. Comprehensive studies on photochemical pollution control strategies in this report would be useful for identifying essential factors on devising strategies. 2. Air quality modelling using STEM-II. Modelling domain in the last year was confined to the capital area that was too small for a regional-scale model. Modeling domain in this year covered the east of China to the East Sea. The results of modeling in this year were much better than those of the last year. However, the limitations associated with incomplete input data and modeling domain that was too large for the capital area would not be overcome without sufficient basic studies. (author). 29 refs., 34 figs., 21 tabs.

  13. Evidence for dissolved organic matter as the primary source and sink of photochemically produced hydroxyl radical in arctic surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Sarah E; Logan, J Robert; Cory, Rose M; McNeill, Kristopher

    2014-04-01

    Hydroxyl radical (˙OH) is an indiscriminate oxidant that reacts at near-diffusion-controlled rates with organic carbon. Thus, while ˙OH is expected to be an important oxidant of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and other recalcitrant compounds, the role of ˙OH in the oxidation of these compounds in aquatic ecosystems is not well known due to the poorly constrained sources and sinks of ˙OH, especially in pristine (unpolluted) natural waters. We measured the rates of ˙OH formation and quenching across a range of surface waters in the Arctic varying in concentrations of expected sources and sinks of ˙OH. Photochemical formation of ˙OH was observed in all waters tested, with rates of formation ranging from 2.6 ± 0.6 to 900 ± 100 × 10(-12) M s(-1). Steady-state concentrations ranged from 2 ± 1 to 290 ± 60 × 10(-17) M, and overlapped with previously reported values in surface waters. While iron-mediated photo-Fenton reactions likely contributed to the observed ˙OH production, several lines of evidence suggest that DOM was the primary source and sink of photochemically produced ˙OH in pristine arctic surface waters. DOM from first-order or headwater streams was more efficient in producing ˙OH than what has previously been reported for DOM, and ˙OH formation decreased with increasing residence time of DOM in sunlit surface waters. Despite the ubiquitous formation of ˙OH in arctic surface waters observed in this study, photochemical ˙OH formation was estimated to contribute ≤4% to the observed photo-oxidation of DOM; however, key uncertainties in this estimate must be addressed before ruling out the role of ˙OH in the oxidation of DOM in these waters.

  14. Global modelling of the ClNO2 production impact on tropospheric nitrogen oxides and main oxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas Rodríguez, Carlos Alberto; Brown, Steven S.; Lamarque, Jean-Francoise; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe; Thornton, Joel A.; Jaegle, Lyatt; Fibiger, Dorothy; McDuffie, Erin E.; Sullivan, Amy P.; Weber, Rodney J.; Dibb, Jack

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous uptake of dinitrogen pentoxide, N2O5, to aerosol is one of the most important reactions controlling the global budget of nitrogen oxides, with subsequent impacts on oxidants such as ozone and hydroxyl radical. Most chemistry global models assume that this uptake proceeds through hydrolysis to produce nitric acid, effectively a terminal sink for nitrogen oxides. However, recent field studies have shown that the yield of nitryl chloride, ClNO2, from N2O5 uptake is significant in many locations. Because ClNO2 photolyzes subsequent to its nighttime production to recycle NO2 and produce atomic chlorine, a potent oxidant, the impact of heterogeneous N2O5 uptake and the role of ClNO2 on the scale distribution of oxidants need to be re-assessed. Here we present global simulations using the chemistry-climate model CAM-Chem, including a state of the art halogen chemistry scheme and different assumptions for the magnitude and spatial distribution of ClNO2 yields from N2O5. The model shows a significant effect of ClNO2 production on tropospheric ozone, hydroxyl radical and peroxyacyl nitrates (PAN) during northern hemisphere late winter and early spring. Simulations are compared to observations from recent field campaigns, including ClNO2 and N2O5 from the Wintertime INvestigation of Transport, Emissions and Reactivity (WINTER) study on the NSF / NCAR C-130 aircraft on the U.S. East Coast in February and March of 2015.

  15. Evaluation and Model of Performance of A Tubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Jun-xi; SHEN Sheng-qiang

    2005-01-01

    A simulation model was developed to analyze the steady state and transient operation of a tubular solid oxide fuel cell. The model covers both the electrochemical and the heat transfer models. The electrochemical model deals with the Nernst potential, ohmic polarization, activation polarization, and concentration polarization, while the heat transfer model concerns the heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation. The numerical results show that the ohmic loss is the dominant one among the three polarizations in a cathode-supported solid oxide fuel cell and in the middle part of a solid oxide fuel cell the temperature is higher than those at both the ends. When the inlet temperature and the flow rates of the fuel and the oxidant are kept constantly, the temperature of the solid structure of the cell will increase due to the increase of power output of the cell from the initial state to the new one.

  16. Phenolic mediators enhance the manganese peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of recalcitrant lignin model compounds and synthetic lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nousiainen, Paula; Kontro, Jussi; Manner, Helmiina; Hatakka, Annele; Sipilä, Jussi

    2014-11-01

    Fungal oxidative enzymes, such as peroxidases and laccases, are the key catalysts in lignin biodegradation in vivo, and consequently provide an important source for industrial ligninolytic biocatalysts. Recently, it has been shown that some syringyl-type phenolics have potential as industrial co-oxidants or mediators, in laccase-catalyzed modification of lignocellulosic material. We have now studied the effect of such mediators with ligninolytic peroxidases on oxidation of the most recalcitrant lignin model compounds. We found that they are able to enhance the manganese peroxidase (MnP) catalyzed oxidation reactions of small non-phenolic compounds, veratryl alcohol and veratrylglycerol β-guaiacyl ether (adlerol), which are not usually oxidized by manganese peroxidases alone. In these experiments we compared two peroxidases from white-rot fungi, MnP from Phlebia sp. Nf b19 and versatile peroxidase (VP) from Bjerkandera adusta under two oxidation conditions: (i) the Mn(III) initiated mediated oxidation by syringyl compounds and (ii) the system involving MnP-dependent lipid peroxidation, both with production of (hydrogen) peroxides in situ to maintain the peroxidase catalytic cycle. It was found that both peroxidases produced α-carbonyl oxidation product of veratryl alcohol in clearly higher yields in reactions mediated by phenoxy radicals than in lipid-peroxyl radical system. The oxidation of adlerol, on the other hand, was more efficient in lipid-peroxidation-system. VP was more efficient than MnP in the oxidation of veratryl alcohol and showed its lignin peroxidase type activity in the reaction conditions indicated by some cleavage of Cα-Cβ-bond of adlerol. Finally, the mediator assisted oxidation conditions were applied in the oxidation of synthetic lignin (DHP) and the structural analysis of the oxidized polymers showed clear modifications in the polymer outcome, e.g. the oxidation resulted in reduced amount of aliphatic hydroxyls indicated by (31)P NMR

  17. Oxidative Damage in the Aging Heart: an Experimental Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Gustavo Lenci; Neto, Francisco Filipak; Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto de Oliveira; Liebel, Samuel; de Fraga, Rogério; Bueno, Ronaldo da Rocha Loures

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Several theories have been proposed to explain the cause of ‘aging’; however, the factors that affect this complex process are still poorly understood. Of these theories, the accumulation of oxidative damage over time is among the most accepted. Particularly, the heart is one of the most affected organs by oxidative stress. The current study, therefore, aimed to investigate oxidative stress markers in myocardial tissue of rats at different ages. Methods: Seventy-two rats were distributed into 6 groups of 12 animals each and maintained for 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and the levels of non-protein thiols, lipid peroxidation, and protein carbonylation, as well as superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were determined. Results: Superoxide dismutase, catalase activity and lipid peroxidation were reduced in the older groups of animals, when compared with the younger group. However, protein carbonylation showed an increase in the 12-month group followed by a decrease in the older groups. In addition, the levels of non-protein thiols were increased in the 12-month group and not detected in the older groups. Conclusion: Our data showed that oxidative stress is not associated with aging in the heart. However, an increase in non-protein thiols may be an important factor that compensates for the decrease of superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in the oldest rats, to maintain appropriate antioxidant defenses against oxidative insults. PMID:27006709

  18. In vitro model suggests oxidative stress involved in keratoconus disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamichos, D.; Hutcheon, A. E. K.; Rich, C. B.; Trinkaus-Randall, V.; Asara, J. M.; Zieske, J. D.

    2014-04-01

    Keratoconus (KC) affects 1:2000 people and is a disorder where cornea thins and assumes a conical shape. Advanced KC requires surgery to maintain vision. The role of oxidative stress in KC remains unclear. We aimed to identify oxidative stress levels between human corneal keratocytes (HCKs), fibroblasts (HCFs) and keratoconus cells (HKCs). Cells were cultured in 2D and 3D systems. Vitamin C (VitC) and TGF-β3 (T3) were used for 4 weeks to stimulate self-assembled extracellular matrix (ECM). No T3 used as controls. Samples were analyzed using qRT-PCR and metabolomics. qRT-PCR data showed low levels of collagen I and V, as well as keratocan for HKCs, indicating differentiation to a myofibroblast phenotype. Collagen type III, a marker for fibrosis, was up regulated in HKCs. We robustly detected more than 150 metabolites of the targeted 250 by LC-MS/MS per condition and among those metabolites several were related to oxidative stress. Lactate levels, lactate/malate and lactate/pyruvate ratios were elevated in HKCs, while arginine and glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio were reduced. Similar patterns found in both 2D and 3D. Our data shows that fibroblasts exhibit enhanced oxidative stress compared to keratocytes. Furthermore the HKC cells exhibit the greatest level suggesting they may have a myofibroblast phenotype.

  19. Photochemical preparation and application research of Au nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG; Shou-an; SUN; Jia-lin

    2005-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles protected by organic small molecular compounds or macromolecule have attracted considerable attention and their preparation is one of hotspots in the nano-chemical material field due to their ongoing and potential applications in optics, electronics, catalysts and biosensors. In recent years there are many liquid phase chemistry methods to prepare monodispersed gold particles. Among them, the photochemical method is quite attractive because of its some important advantages for size-controlled synthesis of gold nanoparticles. Therefore, in this paper the recert progress of the photochemical preparing Au nanoparticle materials was briefly introduced and mainly emphasized authors' own works of this area.

  20. The exploration of supramolecular systems and nanostructures by photochemical techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Ceroni, Paola

    2011-01-01

    ""The Exploration of Supramolecular Systems and Nanostructures by Photochemical Techniques"" provides a comprehensive view of the most commonly used photochemical and photophysical techniques and their applications to the study of supramolecular systems. Optical inputs are extremely powerful in the study of nanostructures since they can be used both to ""read"" the state of the system and to provide it energy to work. After a brief introduction to the realm of photochemistry, electronically excited state formation and the different pathways of excited state deactivation, the book focuses on th

  1. Metal Oxide Nanomaterial QNAR Models: Available Structural Descriptors and Understanding of Toxicity Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Ying

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide nanomaterials are widely used in various areas; however, the divergent published toxicology data makes it difficult to determine whether there is a risk associated with exposure to metal oxide nanomaterials. The application of quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR modeling in metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity studies can reduce the need for time-consuming and resource-intensive nanotoxicity tests. The nanostructure and inorganic composition of metal oxide nanomaterials makes this approach different from classical QSAR study; this review lists and classifies some structural descriptors, such as size, cation charge, and band gap energy, in recent metal oxide nanomaterials quantitative nanostructure activity relationship (QNAR studies and discusses the mechanism of metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity based on these descriptors and traditional nanotoxicity tests.

  2. Models for solid oxide fuel cell systems exploitation of models hierarchy for industrial design of control and diagnosis strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Marra, Dario; Polverino, Pierpaolo; Sorrentino, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This book presents methodologies for optimal design of control and diagnosis strategies for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell systems. A key feature of the methodologies presented is the exploitation of modelling tools that balance accuracy and computational burden.

  3. PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS OF FORMYLMETHYLFLAVIN AND RIBOFLAVIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Mirza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Formylmethylflavin (FMF is a major intermediate product in the aerobic and anaerobic photolysis of riboflavin (RF and is highly sensitive to light and hydrolysis. It is more sensitive to light as compared to RF. FMF is further degraded into lumichrome (LC, carboxymethylflavin (CMF in acidic medium, and LC, CMF and lumiflavin (LF in alkaline medium. When FMF is exposed to light it is degraded in to LC and LF via a photoreduction and CMF through photooxidation pathways. In aerobic and anaerobic conditions, RF when exposed to light is excited to singlet state (1RF and from singlet to triplet state (3RF. This is followed by the conversion of 3RF into a semiquinone radical (RFH and this radical further disproportionate to form an oxidized RF and a cyclic intermediate, which is further oxidized to FMF and degradation products (LC, LF, CMF.

  4. Arsenate and phosphate adsorption in relation to oxides composition in soils: LCD modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanshan; Weng, Liping

    2013-07-02

    The pH dependent solid-solution distribution of arsenate and phosphate in five Dutch agricultural soil samples was measured in the pH range 4-8, and the results were interpreted using the LCD (ligand and charge distribution) adsorption modeling. The pH dependency is similar for both oxyanions, with a minimum soluble concentration observed around pH 6-8. This pH dependency can be successfully described with the LCD model and it is attributed mainly to the synergistic effects from Ca adsorption. The solubility of phosphate is much lower than that of arsenate. This big difference cannot be sufficiently explained by the reduction of small amount of As(V) into As(III), neither by slow desorption/adsorption. The difference between phosphate and arsenate in their solid-solution distribution becomes larger with the increase of aluminum (hydr)oxides (Al-oxides) contribution to the total amount of metal (Al and Fe) (hydr)oxides. The influence of Al-oxides is much larger than its relative amount extracted from the soils. When Al-oxides account for >40% of the soil oxides, the whole adsorbents behave apparently similarly to that of pure Al-oxides. These results indicated that surface coating and substitution may have modified significantly oxyanion adsorption to Fe-oxides in soils, and how to account for this complexity is a challenge for geochemical modeling.

  5. Unification of catalytic water oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions: amorphous beat crystalline cobalt iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indra, Arindam; Menezes, Prashanth W; Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Bergmann, Arno; Das, Chittaranjan; Tallarida, Massimo; Schmeißer, Dieter; Strasser, Peter; Driess, Matthias

    2014-12-17

    Catalytic water splitting to hydrogen and oxygen is considered as one of the convenient routes for the sustainable energy conversion. Bifunctional catalysts for the electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are pivotal for the energy conversion and storage, and alternatively, the photochemical water oxidation in biomimetic fashion is also considered as the most useful way to convert solar energy into chemical energy. Here we present a facile solvothermal route to control the synthesis of amorphous and crystalline cobalt iron oxides by controlling the crystallinity of the materials with changing solvent and reaction time and further utilize these materials as multifunctional catalysts for the unification of photochemical and electrochemical water oxidation as well as for the oxygen reduction reaction. Notably, the amorphous cobalt iron oxide produces superior catalytic activity over the crystalline one under photochemical and electrochemical water oxidation and oxygen reduction conditions.

  6. The role of organic ligands in ferrous-induced photochemical degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, C Y; Chu, W

    2007-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that hydrogen peroxide is generated in a ferrioxalate-induced photoreductive reaction, but information about the effect of organic ligands on the photochemical behaviour of ferrous species is limited. The degradation of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) by a ferrous-catalyzed oxidation in the presence of various ligands such as formate, citrate, malelate, oxalate, and ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EDTA) was studied. The experiments were conducted under either dark or irradiated (350n m) conditions. Forty-two percent and 34% of 2,4-D were removed by the Fe(2+)/oxalate/UV and Fe(2+)/citrate/UV processes, respectively, after 30 min of reaction and oxidative intermediates were obtained in both cases. The presence of hydroxylated intermediates suggests that 2,4-D may be attacked by hydroxyl radicals, which are the products of the photo-Fenton-like reaction. As such, hydrogen peroxide was produced by the photolysis of ferrous oxalate or ferrous citrate, referred to hereafter as photogenerated H(2)O(2). As expected, the total removal percentage of 2,4-D jumped to 97% when 1mM of hydrogen peroxide (so-called spiked H(2)O(2)) was externally added to the reaction vessel to initiate the Fe(2+)/oxalate/UV process. Therefore, the treatment of 2,4-D by the Fe(2+)/oxalate/H(2)O(2)/UV system can be operated in two steps: the photolysis of ferrous oxalate first, followed by adding the spiked H(2)O(2) sometime after the commencement of the reaction. A two-phase model has been developed to describe this tandem ferrous-catalyzed photooxidation, which would help to achieve the mineralization of 2,4-D.

  7. Activity Calculation by Application of Sub-Regular Solution Model in Binary Oxide Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Yan-qing; XIE Gang; TAO Dong-ping; LI Rong-xing; YU Xiao-hua

    2012-01-01

    To confirm sub-regular solution model valid for predicting the activity of component in binary oxide systems, seven systems in the whole concentration and twelve systems presenting saturation concentration have been studied. The total average relative errors of component 1 and 2 are 3.2 % and 4.1% respectively by application of the sub-regular solution model into the systems within the whole concentration. However, the total average relative errors are 16 % and 1088 % in the systems presenting saturation concentration. The results show that sub-regular solu- tion model is not good for predicting the systems presenting saturation concentration, especially for the systems con- taining acidic or neutral oxide. The reason may be that the influence of the two types of oxide on the configuration is greater in binary oxide systems. These oxides can be present in the form of complex anion partly, Si-O, Al-O, Ti-O and so on, for example (SiO4)4-. That is contrary to sub-regular solution model which is supposed that the oxide systems consist of cation and O2-. But compared with regular solution model and quasi-regular solution model, sub- regular solution model is closer to the characteristics of actual solution and the calculated results are superior.

  8. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and dysregulated iron homeostatis in rat models of cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) is considered a risk factor for the exacerbation of air pollution health effects. Therefore, rodent models of CVD are increasingly used to examine mechanisms ofvariation in susceptibility. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and altere...

  9. Modeling of autoignition and NO sensitization for the oxidation of IC engine surrogate fuels

    CERN Document Server

    Anderlohr, Jörg; Da Cruz, A Pires; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; 10.1016/j.combustflame.2008.09.009

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an approch for modeling with one single kinetic mechanism the chemistry of the autoignition and combustion processes inside an internal combustion engine, as well as the chemical kinetics governing the post-oxidation of unburned hydrocarbons in engine exhaust gases. Therefore a new kinetic model was developed, valid over a wide range of temperatures including the negative temperature coefficient regime. The model simulates the autoignition and the oxidation of engine surrogate fuels composed of n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene, which are sensitized by the presence of nitric oxides. The new model was obtained from previously published mechanisms for the oxidation of alkanes and toluene where the coupling reactions describing interactions between hydrocarbons and NOx were added. The mechanism was validated against a wide range of experimental data obtained in jet-stirred reactors, rapid compression machines, shock tubes and homogenous charge compression ignition engines. Flow rate and sensi...

  10. Temperature Dependent Residual Stress Models for Ultra-High-Temperature Ceramics on High Temperature Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruzhuan; Li, Weiguo

    2016-11-01

    The strength of SiC-depleted layer of ultra-high-temperature ceramics on high temperature oxidation degrades seriously. The research for residual stresses developed within the SiC-depleted layer is important and necessary. In this work, the residual stress evolutions in the SiC-depleted layer and the unoxidized substrate in various stages of oxidation are studied by using the characterization models. The temperature and oxidation time dependent mechanical/thermal properties of each phase in SiC-depleted layer are considered in the models. The study shows that the SiC-depleted layer would suffer from large tensile stresses due to the great temperature changes and the formation of pores on high temperature oxidation. The stresses may lead to the cracking and even the delamination of the oxidation layer.

  11. A model for thermal oxidation of Si and SiC including material expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christen, T., E-mail: thomas.christen@ch.abb.com; Ioannidis, A. [ABB Corporate Research, Segelhofstrasse 1K, CH-5405 Baden (Switzerland); Winkelmann, C. [ETH Zürich, Seminar for Applied Mathematics, Rämistrasse 101, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-02-28

    A model based on drift-diffusion-reaction kinetics for Si and SiC oxidation is discussed, which takes the material expansion into account with an additional convection term. The associated velocity field is determined self-consistently from the local reaction rate. The approach allows a calculation of the densities of volatile species in an nm-resolution at the oxidation front. The model is illustrated with simulation results for the growth and impurity redistribution during Si oxidation and for carbon and silicon emission during SiC oxidation. The approach can be useful for the prediction of Si and/or C interstitial distribution, which is particularly relevant for the quality of metal-oxide-semiconductor electronic devices.

  12. Temperature Dependent Residual Stress Models for Ultra-High-Temperature Ceramics on High Temperature Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruzhuan; Li, Weiguo

    2017-08-01

    The strength of SiC-depleted layer of ultra-high-temperature ceramics on high temperature oxidation degrades seriously. The research for residual stresses developed within the SiC-depleted layer is important and necessary. In this work, the residual stress evolutions in the SiC-depleted layer and the unoxidized substrate in various stages of oxidation are studied by using the characterization models. The temperature and oxidation time dependent mechanical/thermal properties of each phase in SiC-depleted layer are considered in the models. The study shows that the SiC-depleted layer would suffer from large tensile stresses due to the great temperature changes and the formation of pores on high temperature oxidation. The stresses may lead to the cracking and even the delamination of the oxidation layer.

  13. Efficacy of chitosan in inhibiting the oxidation of (+)-catechin in white wine model solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnici, Fabio; Natali, Nadia; Riponi, Claudio

    2014-10-08

    The efficacy of chitosan and sulfites in inhibiting the oxidation of (+)-catechin in aerated model white wines has been compared by monitoring the browning development and the generation of oxidized phenolic compounds. In addition, the protecting effects of these two additives toward the oxidative decay of varietal thiols were investigated. Chitosan effectively contrasted the browning onset in model solutions all along the entire duration of the experimentation. Color development was limited and comparable in both the sulfite and chitosan added samples. Thanks to its polyelectrolyte behavior, chitosan adsorbed up to 80% of the more hydrophilic oxidized phenolic species and chelated 70 and 30% of Fe and Cu added to the solutions, respectively. Thiol oxidation was significantly lowered by chitosan, suggesting that this additive could contribute to maintain the varietal character of wines coming from aromatic grapes and vinified with reduced sulfite amounts.

  14. Modelling the change in the oxidation coefficient during the aerobic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-20

    Jan 20, 2013 ... aerobic degradation of phenol by acclimated activated sludge. Cintia C Lobo1, Nora C ... hazardous environmental pollutants. Several industries ... wastes, and in decomposing organic material, and are produced from the metabolism ... enzymatic peroxide wet oxidation, electrochemical and photo- catalytic ...

  15. Ab Initio Thermodynamic Modeling of Electrified Metal-Oxide Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Zhenhua; Hansen, Martin Hangaard; Greeley, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells are attractive devices in a sustainable energy context because of their fuel flexibility and potentially highly efficient conversion of chemical to electrical energy. The performance of the device is to a large extent determined by the atomic structure of the electrode-elec...

  16. Electro- and photochemical switching of dithienylethene self-assembled monolayers on gold electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Browne, W.R.; Kudernac, T.; Katsonis, N.

    2008-01-01

    The photochemical and electrochemical properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of three structurally distinct hexahydro- and hexafluoro-dithienylcyclopentene-based photochromic switches on gold electrodes are reported. The photochemical and electrochemical switching between the open and closed...

  17. Metal oxide surge arrester model with active V-I characteristics; Sanka aenkei hiraiki dotokusei model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagiwara, T.; Funabashi, T.; Watanabe, H.; Takeuchi, N. [Meidensha Corporation, Tokyo (Japan); Ueda, T. [Chubu Electric Power Co. Inc., Nagoya (Japan)

    1996-11-20

    Generally a model of Metal Oxide Surge Arrester (MOSA) for numerical analysis uses a non-linear resistance. But actual Voltage-Current (V-I) characteristics of MOSA have hysteresis loop in time domain like i-{Phi} characteristic of a transformer and frequency dependency. The authors have investigated relation between the actual V-I hysteresis characteristics obtained by some current waveforms and static V-I characteristics. From the voltage difference between above two characteristics, an equation was derived and a new model of MOSA was developed. This model consists of a non-linear resistance representing fundamental V-I characteristic, a linear inductance and voltage source which depends on the absorbed energy. The calculated results by the proposed model are compared with measurement results by using the waveform of standard impulse current, steep front current and oscillated current. And the accuracy of the model has been confirmed to be satisfactory. The model is expected to be useful to investigate insulation coordination of power systems. 11 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Mathematical Modelling to Predict Oxidative Behaviour of Conjugated Linoleic Acid in the Food Processing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aitziber Ojanguren

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Industrial processes that apply high temperatures in the presence of oxygen may compromise the stability of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA bioactive isomers. Statistical techniques are used in this study to model and predict, on a laboratory scale, the oxidative behaviour of oil with high CLA content, controlling the limiting factors of food processing. This modelling aims to estimate the impact of an industrial frying process (140 °C, 7 L/h air on the oxidation of CLA oil for use as frying oil instead of sunflower oil. A factorial design was constructed within a temperature (80–200 °C and air flow (7–20 L/h range. Oil stability index (Rancimat method was used as a measure of oxidation. Three-level full factorial design was used to obtain a quadratic model for CLA oil, enabling the oxidative behaviour to be predicted under predetermined process conditions (temperature and air flow. It is deduced that temperatures applied in food processes affect the oxidation of CLA to a greater extent than air flow. As a result, it is estimated that the oxidative stability of CLA oil is less resistant to industrial frying than sunflower oil. In conclusion, thanks to the mathematical model, a good choice of the appropriate industrial food process can be selected to avoid the oxidation of the bioactive isomers of CLA, ensuring its functionality in novel applications.

  19. The NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM): Application to Air Quality Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold; Khan, Maudood; Biazar, Arastoo; Wang, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    Recent improvements to the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) and its application to the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system are discussed. The LNOM analyzes Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and National Lightning Detection Network(TradeMark)(NLDN) data to estimate the raw (i.e., unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical profile of lightning NO(x) (= NO + NO2). The latest LNOM estimates of lightning channel length distributions, lightning 1-m segment altitude distributions, and the vertical profile of lightning NO(x) are presented. The primary improvement to the LNOM is the inclusion of non-return stroke lightning NOx production due to: (1) hot core stepped and dart leaders, (2) stepped leader corona sheath, K-changes, continuing currents, and M-components. The impact of including LNOM-estimates of lightning NO(x) for an August 2006 run of CMAQ is discussed.

  20. Packed bed reactor for photochemical .sup.196 Hg isotope separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Mark W.; Speer, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Straight tubes and randomly oriented pieces of tubing having been employed in a photochemical mercury enrichment reactor and have been found to improve the enrichment factor (E) and utilization (U) compared to a non-packed reactor. One preferred embodiment of this system uses a moving bed (via gravity) for random packing.

  1. Electrochemical and Photochemical Treatment of Aqueous Waste Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    PAGES 6 Aerogel, Electrochemical treatment, Photochemical waste treatment, SERDP 16. PRICE CODE N/A 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18. SECURITY 19...Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 7000 East Avenue Livermore, California 94550 (510)423-6574 ABSTRACT from sea water and 0.1 M KNO3 . This electrolytic

  2. Influence of Heterogeneous OH Oxidation on the Evaporation Behavior and Composition of a Model Organic Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesar, K. R.; Cappa, C. D.; Wilson, K. R.

    2011-12-01

    Heterogeneously oxidized squalane particles are used here as a model system to investigate the interplay between chemical composition and particle volatility. Reaction of squalane particles by OH radicals leads to the production of oxygenated products. Here we use the vacuum ultra-violet Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (VUV-AMS) at beamline 9.0.2 at the Advanced Light Source to monitor the evolution of specific oxidation products that result from increasing OH exposures, and how the composition changes as the oxidized particles evaporate. The soft ionization in the VUV-AMS allows us to uniquely track the parent squalane molecule and the various oxidation products over multiple generations of oxidation. Compositional changes of the oxidized particles resulting from evaporation have been measured in three sets of laboratory experiments. In the first set, a thermodenuder at varying temperatures was used to induce evaporation of particles at a fixed OH exposure. Second, the OH exposure was varied along with temperature to create a cross-sectional observation of particle composition at 50% mass fraction remaining for ten different oxidation levels. The combination of these two experiments provides information as to the compositional changes that occur during evaporation due to heating. In the third set of experiments, VUV-AMS spectra of oxidized squalane particles following dilution-induced evaporation were measured for comparison with the thermodenuder experiments. These experiments provide insights into the relationships between particle oxidation, composition and evaporation kinetics.

  3. Optimization of a new flow design for solid oxide cells using computational fluid dynamics modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duhn, Jakob Dragsbæk; Jensen, Anker Degn; Wedel, Stig;

    2016-01-01

    Design of a gas distributor to distribute gas flow into parallel channels for Solid Oxide Cells (SOC) is optimized, with respect to flow distribution, using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling. The CFD model is based on a 3d geometric model and the optimized structural parameters include...

  4. Generalized molybdenum oxide surface chemical state XPS determination via informed amorphous sample model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas, E-mail: job314@lehigh.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lehigh University, B336 Iacocca Hall, 111 Research Drive, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); PhotoCatalytic Synthesis group, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, Meander 229, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Mendoza-Sanchez, Beatriz [CRANN, Chemistry School, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Fernandez, Vincent [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Veenstra, Rick [PhotoCatalytic Synthesis group, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, Meander 229, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Dukstiene, Nijole [Department of Physical and Inorganic Chemistry, Kaunas University of Technology, Radvilenu pl. 19, LT-50254 Kaunas (Lithuania); Roberts, Adam [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Trafford Wharf Road, Wharfside, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom); Fairley, Neal [Casa Software Ltd, Bay House, 5 Grosvenor Terrace, Teignmouth, Devon TQ14 8NE (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • We analyzed and modeled spectral envelopes of complex molybdenum oxides. • Molybdenum oxide films of varying valence and crystallinity were synthesized. • MoO{sub 3} and MoO{sub 2} line shapes from experimental data were created. • Informed amorphous sample model (IASM) developed. • Amorphous molybdenum oxide XPS envelopes were interpreted. - Abstract: Accurate elemental oxidation state determination for the outer surface of a complex material is of crucial importance in many science and engineering disciplines, including chemistry, fundamental and applied surface science, catalysis, semiconductors and many others. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is the primary tool used for this purpose. The spectral data obtained, however, is often very complex and can be subject to incorrect interpretation. Unlike traditional XPS spectra fitting procedures using purely synthetic spectral components, here we develop and present an XPS data processing method based on vector analysis that allows creating XPS spectral components by incorporating key information, obtained experimentally. XPS spectral data, obtained from series of molybdenum oxide samples with varying oxidation states and degree of crystallinity, were processed using this method and the corresponding oxidation states present, as well as their relative distribution was elucidated. It was shown that monitoring the evolution of the chemistry and crystal structure of a molybdenum oxide sample due to an invasive X-ray probe could be used to infer solutions to complex spectral envelopes.

  5. Increased pulmonary arteriolar tone associated with lung oxidative stress and nitric oxide in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Andrew M; Jagadapillai, Rekha; Vaishnav, Radhika A; Friedland, Robert P; Drinovac, Robert; Lin, Xingyu; Gozal, Evelyne

    2016-09-01

    Vascular dysfunction and decreased cerebral blood flow are linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Loss of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) and oxidative stress in human cerebrovascular endothelium increase expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and enhance production of the Aβ peptide, suggesting that loss of endothelial NO contributes to AD pathology. We hypothesize that decreased systemic NO bioavailability in AD may also impact lung microcirculation and induce pulmonary endothelial dysfunction. The acute effect of NO synthase (NOS) inhibition on pulmonary arteriolar tone was assessed in a transgenic mouse model (TgAD) of AD (C57BL/6-Tg(Thy1-APPSwDutIowa)BWevn/Mmjax) and age-matched wild-type controls (C57BL/6J). Arteriolar diameters were measured before and after the administration of the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME Lung superoxide formation (DHE) and formation of nitrotyrosine (3-NT) were assessed as indicators of oxidative stress, inducible NOS (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) expression as indicators of inflammation. Administration of L-NAME caused either significant pulmonary arteriolar constriction or no change from baseline tone in wild-type (WT) mice, and significant arteriolar dilation in TgAD mice. DHE, 3-NT, TNF-α, and iNOS expression were higher in TgAD lung tissue, compared to WT mice. These data suggest L-NAME could induce increased pulmonary arteriolar tone in WT mice from loss of bioavailable NO In contrast, NOS inhibition with L-NAME had a vasodilator effect in TgAD mice, potentially caused by decreased reactive nitrogen species formation, while significant oxidative stress and inflammation were present. We conclude that AD may increase pulmonary microvascular tone as a result of loss of bioavailable NO and increased oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that AD may have systemic microvascular implications beyond central neural control mechanisms.

  6. Molecular modeling studies of oleate adsorption on iron oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rath, Swagat S. [CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar (India); Sinha, Nishant [Accelrys K.K, Bengaluru (India); Sahoo, Hrushikesh [CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar (India); Das, Bisweswar, E-mail: bdas@immt.res.in [CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar (India); Mishra, Barada Kanta [CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar (India)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Plane wave periodic DFT study of oleate-iron oxide interaction. • Magnetite-oleate complex is more stable than hematite and goethite. • Flotation recovery of magnetite is more compared to the other two oxides. - Abstract: Comparative studies of oleate interaction with hematite, magnetite and goethite using density functional calculations are presented. The approach is illustrated by carrying out geometric optimization of oleate on the stable and most exposed planes of hematite, magnetite, and goethite. Interaction energies for oleate-mineral surface have been determined, based on which, magnetite is found to be forming the most stable complex with oleate. Trend as obtained from the quantum chemical calculations has been validated by contact angle measurements and flotation studies on hematite, magnetite and goethite with sodium oleate at different pH and collector concentrations.

  7. Heterogeneous OH oxidation of organic aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.; Kroll, J.; Cappa, C.; Che, D.; Ahmed, M.; Leone, S.; Worsnop, D.; Wilson, K.

    2008-12-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is the most important reactive species in both clean and polluted atmospheres, and therefore gas-phase OH chemistry has been extensively studied for decades. Due to this enormous effort the rates and mechanism of OH reactions with gas phase organics are relatively well understood. However, it unclear whether these well established gas-phase chemical mechanisms apply to the more complex heterogeneous reactions of OH radicals with organic aerosols (OA). Although recent studies have begun to examine OH oxidation of OA, numerous outstanding questions still remain regarding both the rate and chemical mechanism of these reactions. Here we present an in depth investigation of the heterogeneous oxidation of organic squalane particles by OH radicals. By combining a photochemical aerosol flow reactor with a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), with both electron impact and vacuum ultraviolet photoionization, we investigate OH heterogeneous chemistry in unprecedented detail. Employing elemental composition measurements with detailed kinetics we have arrived at a simple oxidation model which accurately accounts for the evolution of squalane and its" oxidation products. In addition, by exploring a large range of OH concentrations we are able to directly measure the role of secondary particle-phase chain chemistry which can significantly accelerate the oxidation of OA in the atmosphere. Based on these measurements we have arrived at an explicit chemical mechanism for heterogeneous OH oxidation of OA which accurately accounts for our observations over a wide range of reaction conditions.

  8. Nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide alterations in chronically stressed rats: a model for nitric oxide in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shang-Feng; Lu, Yun-Rong; Shi, Li-Gen; Wu, Xue-Yan; Sun, Bo; Fu, Xin-Yan; Luo, Jian-Hong; Bao, Ai-Min

    2014-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and NO synthase-1 (NOS1) are involved in the stress response and in depression. We compared NOS-NO alterations in rats exposed to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) with alterations in major depressive disorder (MDD) in humans. In the hypothalamus of male CUS rats we determined NOS activity, and in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) we determined NOS1-immunoreactive (ir) cell densities and co-localization of NOS1 with stress-related neuropeptides corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), vasopressin (AVP) or oxytocin (OXT). We measured plasma NO levels and cortisol in male medicine-naïve MDD patients and plasma NO and corticosterone (CORT) in CUS rats. In the CUS rat total NOS activity in the hypothalamus (P=0.018) and NOS1-ir cell density in the PVN were both significantly decreased (P=0.018), while NOS1 staining was mainly expressed in OXT-ir neurons in this nucleus. Interestingly, plasma NO levels were significantly increased both in male CUS rats (P=0.001) and in male MDD patients (Pdepression.

  9. The Oxides of Nitrogen in Air Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Air Resources Board, Sacramento.

    Research on the health effects of oxides of nitrogen and on the role of oxides of nitrogen in producing photochemical smog effects is presented in this report. Prepared by the California State Department of Public Health at the request of the State Legislature, it gives a comprehensive review of available information, as well as the need for air…

  10. Kinetic Modeling of C3H6 Inhibition on NO Oxidation over Pt Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Mufti Azis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Exhaust after treatment for lean burn and diesel engine is a complex catalytic system that consists of a number of catalytic units. Pt/Al2O3 is often used as a model Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC that plays an important role to facilitate oxidation of NO to NO2. In the present study, we proposed a detailed kinetic model of NO oxidation as well as low temperature C3H6 inhibition to simulate temperature-programmed reaction (TPR data for NO oxidation over Pt/Al2O3. A steady-state microkinetic model based on Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism for NO oxidation was proposed. In addition, low temperature C3H6 inhibition was proposed as a result of site blocking as well as surface nitrite consumption. The model can explain the experimental data well over the studied temperature range. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 10th November 2015; Revised: 1st February 2016; Accepted: 1st February 2016 How to Cite: Azis, M.M., Creaser, D. (2016. Kinetic Modeling of C3H6 Inhibition on NO Oxidation over Pt Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (1: 27-33. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.1.403.27-33 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.1.403.27-33

  11. Detailed Multi-dimensional Modeling of Direct Internal Reforming Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseronis, K; Fragkopoulos, I S; Bonis, I; Theodoropoulos, C

    2016-06-01

    Fuel flexibility is a significant advantage of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and can be attributed to their high operating temperature. Here we consider a direct internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell setup in which a separate fuel reformer is not required. We construct a multidimensional, detailed model of a planar solid oxide fuel cell, where mass transport in the fuel channel is modeled using the Stefan-Maxwell model, whereas the mass transport within the porous electrodes is simulated using the Dusty-Gas model. The resulting highly nonlinear model is built into COMSOL Multiphysics, a commercial computational fluid dynamics software, and is validated against experimental data from the literature. A number of parametric studies is performed to obtain insights on the direct internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell system behavior and efficiency, to aid the design procedure. It is shown that internal reforming results in temperature drop close to the inlet and that the direct internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell performance can be enhanced by increasing the ope