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Sample records for model phenolic compounds

  1. Aquatic pathways model to predict the fate of phenolic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaberg, R.L.; Peloquin, R.A.; Strenge, D.L.; Mellinger, P.J.

    1983-04-01

    Organic materials released from energy-related activities could affect human health and the environment. To better assess possible impacts, we developed a model to predict the fate of spills or discharges of pollutants into flowing or static bodies of fresh water. A computer code, Aquatic Pathways Model (APM), was written to implement the model. The computer programs use compartmental analysis to simulate aquatic ecosystems. The APM estimates the concentrations of chemicals in fish tissue, water and sediment, and is therefore useful for assessing exposure to humans through aquatic pathways. The APM will consider any aquatic pathway for which the user has transport data. Additionally, APM will estimate transport rates from physical and chemical properties of chemicals between several key compartments. The major pathways considered are biodegradation, fish and sediment uptake, photolysis, and evaporation. The model has been implemented with parameters for distribution of phenols, an important class of compounds found in the water-soluble fractions of coal liquids. Current modeling efforts show that, in comparison with many pesticides and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), the lighter phenolics (the cresols) are not persistent in the environment. The properties of heavier molecular weight phenolics (indanols, naphthols) are not well enough understood at this time to make similar judgements. For the twelve phenolics studied, biodegradation appears to be the major pathway for elimination from aquatic environments. A pond system simulation (using APM) of a spill of solvent refined coal (SRC-II) materials indicates that phenol, cresols, and other single cyclic phenolics are degraded to 16 to 25 percent of their original concentrations within 30 hours. Adsorption of these compounds into sediments and accumulation by fish was minor.

  2. Phenolic compounds in flaxseed

    OpenAIRE

    Johnsson, Pernilla

    2004-01-01

    The dietary lignan secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), present in high concentrations in flaxseed, and its metabolites enterolactone and enterodiol are thought to decrease the risk of hormone dependent cancers, cardiovascular disease and other “welfare” diseases. Flaxseed also contains other biologically active phenolic compounds, such as phenolic acids. The understanding of the nature of these compounds is crucial for their possible exploitation in drugs and functional foods. Until the m...

  3. Screening of Catalysts for Hydrodeoxygenation of Phenol as Model Compound for Bio-oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2013-01-01

    Four groups of catalysts have been tested for hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of phenol as a model compound of bio-oil, including: oxide catalysts, methanol synthesis catalysts, reduced noble metal catalysts, and reduced non-noble metal catalysts. In total 23 different catalysts were tested at 100 bar H2...... and 275 °C in a batch reactor. The experiments showed that none of the tested oxides and methanol synthesis catalysts had any significant activity for phenol HDO at the given conditions, which were linked to their inability to hydrogenate the phenol. HDO of phenol over reduced metal catalysts could...

  4. Zeolite supported palladium catalysts for hydroalkylation of phenolic model compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Akhmetzyanova, U.; Opanasenko, Maksym; Horáček, J.; Montanari, E.; Čejka, Jiří; Kikhtyanin, O.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 252, NOV 2017 (2017), s. 116-124 ISSN 1387-1811 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP106/12/G015 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Phenol hydroalkylation * Cyclohexylcyclohexane * MWW Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 3.615, year: 2016

  5. Phenolic compounds in Ecuadorian fruits

    OpenAIRE

    Vasco, Catalina

    2009-01-01

    A group of eighteen fruits cultivated in Ecuador were evaluated for their total soluble phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity and attempts were made to identify the group and content of phenolic compounds responsible for the antioxidant activity. In terms of total phenolic content, three groups (with 1000 mg gallic acid equivalents/100 g FW) were clearly distinguishable. RP-HPLC-DAD and/or LC-MS/MS were used to study the phenolic compounds in four Rosaceae fruits (Andean blackberry, str...

  6. Phenolic Compounds in Brassica Vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Cartea González, María Elena; Francisco Candeira, Marta; Soengas Fernández, María del Pilar; Velasco Pazos, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are a large group of phytochemicals widespread in the plant kingdom. Depending on their structure they can be classified into simple phenols, phenolic acids, hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids. Phenolic compounds have received considerable attention for being potentially protective factors against cancer and heart diseases, in part because of their potent antioxidative properties and their ubiquity in a wide range of commonly consumed foods of plant origin. The...

  7. Kinetic analysis of polyoxometalate (POM) oxidation of non-phenolic lignin model compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomoya Yokoyama; Hou-min Chang; Ira A. Weinstock; Richard S. Reiner; John F. Kadla

    2003-01-01

    Kinetic and reaction mechanism of non-phenolic lignin model compounds under anaerobic polyoxometalate (POM), Na5(+1.9)[SiV1(-0.1)MoW10(+0.1) 40], bleaching conditions were examined. Analyses using a syringyl type model, 1-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)ethanol (1), a guaiacyl type, 1-(3,4- imethoxyphenyl)ethanol (2), and 1- (4-ethoxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)ethanol (3) suggest...

  8. Phenolic Compounds in Brassica Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Velasco

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds are a large group of phytochemicals widespread in the plant kingdom. Depending on their structure they can be classified into simple phenols, phenolic acids, hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids. Phenolic compounds have received considerable attention for being potentially protective factors against cancer and heart diseases, in part because of their potent antioxidative properties and their ubiquity in a wide range of commonly consumed foods of plant origin. The Brassicaceae family includes a wide range of horticultural crops, some of them with economic significance and extensively used in the diet throughout the world. The phenolic composition of Brassica vegetables has been recently investigated and, nowadays, the profile of different Brassica species is well established. Here, we review the significance of phenolic compounds as a source of beneficial compounds for human health and the influence of environmental conditions and processing mechanisms on the phenolic composition of Brassica vegetables.

  9. In situ catalytic hydrogenation of model compounds and biomass-derived phenolic compounds for bio-oil upgrading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junfeng Feng; Zhongzhi Yang; Chung-yun Hse; Qiuli Su; Kui Wang; Jianchun Jiang; Junming Xu

    2017-01-01

    The renewable phenolic compounds produced by directional liquefaction of biomass are a mixture of complete fragments decomposed from native lignin. These compounds are unstable and difficult to use directly as biofuel. Here, we report an efficient in situ catalytic hydrogenation method that can convert phenolic compounds into saturated cyclohexanes. The process has...

  10. Thermal Decomposition Mechanisms of Lignin Model Compounds: From Phenol to Vanillin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Adam Michael

    Lignin is a complex, aromatic polymer abundant in cellulosic biomass (trees, switchgrass etc.). Thermochemical breakdown of lignin for liquid fuel production results in undesirable polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that lead to tar and soot byproducts. The fundamental chemistry governing these processes is not well understood. We have studied the unimolecular thermal decomposition mechanisms of aromatic lignin model compounds using a miniature SiC tubular reactor. Products are detected and characterized using time-of-flight mass spectrometry with both single photon (118.2 nm; 10.487 eV) and 1 + 1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) as well as matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. Gas exiting the heated reactor (300 K--1600 K) is subject to a free expansion after a residence time of approximately 100 micros. The expansion into vacuum rapidly cools the gas mixture and allows the detection of radicals and other highly reactive intermediates. By understanding the unimolecular fragmentation patterns of phenol (C6H5OH), anisole (C6H 5OCH3) and benzaldehyde (C6H5CHO), the more complicated thermocracking processes of the catechols (HO-C 6H4-OH), methoxyphenols (HO-C6H4-OCH 3) and hydroxybenzaldehydes (HO-C6H4-CHO) can be interpreted. These studies have resulted in a predictive model that allows the interpretation of vanillin, a complex phenolic ether containing methoxy, hydroxy and aldehyde functional groups. This model will serve as a guide for the pyrolyses of larger systems including lignin monomers such as coniferyl alcohol. The pyrolysis mechanisms of the dimethoxybenzenes (H3C-C 6H4-OCH3) and syringol, a hydroxydimethoxybenzene have also been studied. These results will aid in the understanding of the thermal fragmentation of sinapyl alcohol, the most complex lignin monomer. In addition to the model compound work, pyrolyisis of biomass has been studied via the pulsed laser ablation of poplar wood. With the REMPI scheme, aromatic lignin decomposition

  11. Transformations of Phenolic Compounds in an in vitro Model Simulating the Human Alimentary Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Duda-Chodak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to establish the antioxidant properties of polyphenolic compounds of selected fruits before and after their transformations during digestion. The experiment was conducted in in vitro conditions on a set of dialysis membranes which simulated the human digestive tract. Apples of the Šampion, Malinowka and Golden Delicious cultivars, black chokeberry, banana, Wegierka zwykla blue plum, melon and Lukasowka pear were chosen for examination. It was found that compounds obtained after simulated digestion of chokeberries, pears and bananas showed lower antioxidant potential than fresh fruits, while the opposite results were obtained for apples and plums. All dialysates obtained after digestion were characterized by lower content of total polyphenols in comparison with raw material (fresh fruits. It was found that the polyphenols were hydrolyzed, especially glycosides of quercetin and cyanidin. Phenolic acids and cyanidin were characterized by low availability for absorption, whereas catechin and quercetin had a very high level of accessibility in the model small intestine.

  12. Lipid encapsulated phenolic compounds by fluidization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenolic compounds exhibit antioxidant and antimicrobial activities with applications as functional food and feed additives. Ferulic acid, a phenolic compound present in grain crops and lignocellulose biomass, was encapsulated with saturated triglycerides using a laboratory fluidizer. Stability of t...

  13. Bioavailability of dietary phenolic compounds: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Gutiérrez-Grijalva Paul Gutiérrez-Grijalva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds are ubiquitous in plant-based foods. High dietary intake of fruits, vegetables and cereals is related to a decreased rate in chronic diseases. Phenolic compounds are thought to be responsible, at least in part, for those health effects. Nonetheless, phenolic compounds bioaccessibility and biotransformation is often not considered in these studies; thus, a precise mechanism of action of phenolic compounds is not known. In this review we aim to present a comprehensive knowledge of the metabolic processes through which phenolic compounds go after intake.

  14. Phenolic compounds removal from mimosa tannin model water and olive mill wastewater by energy-efficient electrocoagulation process

    OpenAIRE

    Marijana Kraljić Roković; Mario Čubrić; Ozren Wittine

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the influence of NaCl concentration, time, and current density on the removal efficiency of phenolic compounds by electrocoagulation process, as well as to compare the specific energy consumption (SEC) of these processes under different experimental conditions. Electrocoagulation was carried out on two different samples of water: model water of mimosa tannin and olive mill wastewater (OMW). Low carbon steel electrodes were used in the experiments. The p...

  15. Wild Roman chamomile extracts and phenolic compounds: enzymatic assays and molecular modelling studies with VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Rafaela; Calhelha, Ricardo C; Froufe, Hugo J C; Abreu, Rui M V; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Queiroz, Maria João R P; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a process by which new blood vessels are formed from the pre-existing vasculature, and it is a key process that leads to tumour development. Some studies have recognized phenolic compounds as chemopreventive agents; flavonoids, in particular, seem to suppress the growth of tumor cells modifying the cell cycle. Herein, the antiangiogenic activity of Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile L.) extracts (methanolic extract and infusion) and the main phenolic compounds present (apigenin, apigenin-7-O-glucoside, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, luteolin, and luteolin-7-O-glucoside) was evaluated through enzymatic assays using the tyrosine kinase intracellular domain of the Vascular Endothelium Growth Factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR-2), which is a transmembrane receptor expressed fundamentally in endothelial cells involved in angiogenesis, and molecular modelling studies. The methanolic extract showed a lower IC50 value (concentration that provided 50% of VEGFR-2 inhibition) than the infusion, 269 and 301 μg mL(-1), respectively. Regarding phenolic compounds, luteolin and apigenin showed the highest capacity to inhibit the phosphorylation of VEGFR-2, leading us to believe that these compounds are involved in the activity revealed by the methanolic extract.

  16. Kinetic and Isotherm Modelling of the Adsorption of Phenolic Compounds from Olive Mill Wastewater onto Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro A. Casazza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of phenolic compounds from olive oil wastewater by commercial activated carbon was studied as a function of adsorbent quantity and temperature. The sorption kinetics and the equilibrium isotherms were evaluated. Under optimum conditions (8 g of activated carbon per 100 mL, the maximum sorption capacity of activated carbon expressed as mg of caff eic acid equivalent per g of activated carbon was 35.8 at 10 °C, 35.4 at 25 °C and 36.1 at 40 °C. The pseudo-second-order model was considered as the most suitable for kinetic results, and Langmuir isotherm was chosen to bett er describe the sorption system. The results confi rmed the effi ciency of activated carbon to remove almost all phenolic compound fractions from olive mill effl uent. The preliminary results obtained will be used in future studies. The carbohydrate fraction of this upgraded residue could be employed to produce bioethanol, and adsorbed phenolic compounds can be recovered and used in different industries.

  17. Phenolic compounds removal from mimosa tannin model water and olive mill wastewater by energy-efficient electrocoagulation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijana Kraljić Roković

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the influence of NaCl concentration, time, and current density on the removal efficiency of phenolic compounds by electrocoagulation process, as well as to compare the specific energy consumption (SEC of these processes under different experimental conditions. Electrocoagulation was carried out on two different samples of water: model water of mimosa tannin and olive mill wastewater (OMW. Low carbon steel electrodes were used in the experiments. The properties of the treated effluent were determined using UV/Vis spectroscopy and by measuring total organic carbon (TOC. Percentage of removal increased with time, current density, and NaCl concentration. SEC value increased with increased time and current density but it was decreased significantly by NaCl additions (0-29 g L-1. It was found that electro­coagulation treatment of effluents containing phenolic compounds involves complex formation between ferrous/ferric and phenolic compounds present in treated effluent, which has significant impact on the efficiency of the process.

  18. Compositional differences in the phenolics compounds of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluates phenolic composition of commercial and experimental wines derived from bunch (Vitis vinifera) and muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia) grapes to determine compositional differences in phenolics. HPLC analysis of wines showed that majority of phenolic compounds eluted during the first 30 min. Of the red ...

  19. Wild Roman chamomile extracts and phenolic compounds: enzymatic assays and molecular modelling studies with VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Guimarães, Rafaela; Calhelha, Ricardo C.; Froufe, Hugo J.C.; Abreu, Rui M.V.; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Queiroz, Maria João R.P.; Ferreira, Isabel C.F.R.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a process by which new blood vessels are formed from the pre-existing vasculature, and it is a key process that leads to tumour development. Some studies have recognized phenolic compounds as chemopreventive agents; flavonoids, in particular, seem to suppress the growth of tumor cells modifying the cell cycle. Herein, the antiangiogenic activity of Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile L.) extracts (methanolic extract and infusion) and the main phenolic compounds present (apigen...

  20. Determination of Phenolic Compounds in Wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos Proestos

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Wine contains natural antioxidants such as phenolic compounds also known as bioactive compounds. Samples of commercially available Greek wines were analyzed in order to determine this phenolic content. For the analysis, Reversed Phase-High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC coupled with a multiwavelength Ultraviolet/visible (UV/vis detector was used. The most abundant phenolic substances detected were (+-catechin (13.5-72.4 mg L-1 , gallic acid (0.40-99.47 mg L-1 and caffeic acid (0.87-33.48 mg L-1. The principal component analysis (PCA technique was used to study differentiation among wines according to their production area. Red wines contained more phenolic substances than white ones. Differences of the phenolic composition in wines of the same cultivar were investigated too.

  1. Analysis of phenolic compounds for poultry feeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenolic compounds have generated significant interest recently as feed additives that can impart bioactive characteristics such as anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, and anti-fungal properties to a feed formulation [1-2]. Such natural compounds may offer some preventive benefit to the routine administra...

  2. Uptake of phenolic compounds from plant foods in human intestinal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gavirangappa Hithamani

    compounds, as well as the uptake of phenolic compounds from finger millet, green gram, and onion, was investigated in. Caco-2 monolayer model. ... potential as well as their influence on related gene expression. (Zhang 2015; Calabriso et al. 2016) ... standard' of intestinal cell models (Hubatsch et al. 2007), is an excellent ...

  3. Adsorption capacity of phenolic compounds onto cellulose and xylan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma dos Santos Costa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between three phenolic compounds (catechin, caffeic acid and ferulic acid onto two dietary fibres (cellulose and xylan has been evaluated to inquire possible interferences on the biodisponibility of phenolic compounds. The adsorption kinetics were performed using solutions containing 100 mg/L of phenolic compounds during a contact time ranging between 10 and 120 minutes at pH 2.0, 4.5, and 7.0. After the kinetics, isotherms were obtained using phenolic compounds concentration ranging between 10 and 80 mg/L during 60 minutes, at pH 2.0 and 7.0 and temperature of 36 °C. Results indicate that adsorbed quantities mainly changed in function of pH, however the maximum adsorption was only of 0.978 mg of caffeic acid/g of xylan at pH 2 and after 60 min. Redlich-Peterson model were able to predict the adsorption isotherms of all phenolic compounds onto cellulose, except for caffeic acid at pH 7.0. The low adsorption capacities observed suggest that both dietary fibres are unable to compromise the biodisponibility of phenolic compounds, especially in the small intestine, where they are partially absorbed.

  4. Development of a phenol-enriched olive oil with phenolic compounds from olive cake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Manuel; Romero, Maria-Paz; Motilva, Maria-José

    2010-10-13

    The recent information regarding the healthy properties of virgin olive oil phenols and the interest in increasing the value of byproducts from the oil extraction processs support the standardized development of phenol-enriched olive oil. Accordingly, the aim of this research work was to evaluate strategies for the development of a virgin olive oil enriched with phenolic compounds obtained from olive cake to increase phenolic ingestion without the drawback of a higher calorie intake. For this proposal, different combinations of phenolic extracts were evaluated at a range of concentrations to obtain the best prototype of enriched olive oil. To study the functionality of the phenol enrichments, the total phenolic content and the oxidative stability were determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu and Rancimat tests, respectively. In addition, the phenolic composition and antioxidant capacity (ORAC assay) of the oils were studied. Finally, the stability and potential bioaccesibility of the phenolic fraction of the enriched oils were tested by an in vitro gastrointestinal digestion model. Results of the study showed different strategies to select the best prototype of enriched olive oil, taking into consideration not only their phenolic content but also other important factors such as the feasibility of implementing the preparation process in the food industry.

  5. Aqueous-phase photochemical oxidation and direct photolysis of vanillin - a model compound of methoxy phenols from biomass burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. J.; Huang, D. D.; Cheung, H. Y.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Chan, C. K.

    2014-03-01

    We present here experimental results on aqueous-phase (A) photochemical oxidation (with UV and OH radicals generated from H2O2 photolysis) and (B) direct photolysis (with only UV irradiation) of a methoxy phenol, vanillin (VL), as a model compound from biomass burning. Both on-line aerosol mass spectrometric (AMS) characterization and off-line chemical analyses were performed. AMS analyses of dried atomized droplets of the bulk reacting mixtures showed that VL almost entirely evaporates during the drying process. Large amounts of organic mass remained in the particle phase after reactions under both conditions. Under condition (A), AMS measured organic mass first increased rapidly and then decreased, attributable to the formation of non-volatile products and subsequent formation of smaller and volatile products, respectively. The oxygen-to-carbon (O : C) ratio of the products reached 1.5 after about 80 min, but dropped substantially thereafter. In contrast, organic mass increased slowly under condition (B). The O : C ratio reached 1.0 after 180 min. In off-line analyses, small oxygenates were detected under condition (A), while hydroxylated products and dimers of VL were detected under condition (B). Particle hygroscopic growth factor (GF) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of the reacting mixtures were found to depend on both organic volume fraction and the degree of oxygenation of organics. Results show that (1) aqueous-phase processes can lead to the retention of a large portion of the organic mass in the particle phase; (2) once retained, this portion of organic mass significantly changes the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of the aerosol particles; (3) intensive photochemical oxidation gave rise to an O : C ratio as high as 1.5 but the ratio decreased as further oxidation led to smaller and more volatile products; and (4) polymerization occurred with direct photolysis, resulting in high-molecular-weight products of a yellowish color. This study

  6. Aqueous-phase photochemical oxidation and direct photolysis of vanillin - a model compound of methoxy-phenols from biomass burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. J.; Huang, D. D.; Cheung, H. Y.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Chan, C. K.

    2013-10-01

    We present here experimental results on aqueous-phase (A) photochemical oxidation (with UV and OH radicals generated from H2O2 photolysis) and (B) direct photolysis (with only UV irradiation) of a methoxy-phenol, vanillin (VL), as a model compound from biomass burning. Both on-line aerosol mass spectrometric (AMS) characterization and off-line chemical analyses were performed. AMS analyses of dried atomized droplets of the bulk reacting mixtures showed that VL almost entirely evaporates during the drying process. Large amounts of organic mass remained in the particle phase after reactions under both conditions. Under condition (A), AMS measured organic mass first increased rapidly and then decreased, attributable to the formation of non-volatile products and subsequent formation of smaller and volatile products, respectively. The oxygen-to-carbon (O:C) ratio of the products reached 1.5 after about 80 min, but dropped substantially thereafter. In contrast, organic mass increased slowly under condition (B). The O:C ratio reached 1.0 after 180 min. In off-line analyses, small oxygenates were detected under condition (A), while hydroxylated products and dimers of VL were detected under condition (B). Particle hygroscopic growth factor (GF) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of the reacting mixtures were found to be dependent on both organic volume fraction and the degree of oxygenation of organics. Results show that (1) aqueous-phase processes can lead to the retention of a large portion of the organic mass in the particle phase; (2) once retained, this portion of organic mass significantly changes the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of the aerosol particles; (3) intensive photochemical oxidation gave rise to an O:C ratio as high as 1.5 but the ratio decreased as further oxidation led to smaller and more volatile products; and (4) polymerization occurred with direct photolysis, resulting in high-molecular-weight products of a yellowish color. This study

  7. Characterization of Phenolic Compounds in Wine Lees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhijing, Ye; Shavandi, Amin; Harrison, Roland; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A

    2018-03-25

    The effect of vinification techniques on phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of wine lees are poorly understood. The present study investigated the antioxidant activity of white and red wine lees generated at early fermentation and during aging. In this study, the total phenol content (TPC), total tannin content (TTC), mean degree of polymerization (mDP), and antioxidant activities of five white and eight red wine lees samples from different vinification backgrounds were determined. The results showed that vinification techniques had a significant ( p 35 mg Trolox/g FDM) (PN: Pinot noir lees; FDM: Freeze-dried Material). This study indicates that tannin is one of the major phenolic compounds available in wine lees that can be useful in human and animal health applications.

  8. Antiplasmodial activity of some phenolic compounds from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Plasmodium falciparum, one of the causative agents of malaria, has high adaptability through mutation and is resistant to many types of anti-malarial drugs. This study presents an in vitro assessment of the antiplasmodial activity of some phenolic compounds isolated from plants of the genus Allanblackia.

  9. Separation and characterization of phenolic compounds from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Terminalia ivoriensis A. Chev. (Combretaceae) is an Ivorian medicinal plant. There is little ethnobotanical and almost no chemical information available for this species. The aim of this study was to isolate phenolic compounds from T. ivoriensis. In this way, its ethyl acetate extract (Ea) was fractionated by silica gel column ...

  10. Separation and characterization of phenolic compounds from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Attioua

    2013-07-03

    Jul 3, 2013 ... (Theobroma cacao). J. Mass Spectrom. 38:35-42. Sanchez R, Jauregui LR, Viladomat B, Codina (2004). Qualitative analysis of phenolic compounds in apple Pomace using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in tandem mode. Rapid Communun Mass Spectrom. 18:553-563. Saulo LDS ...

  11. Characterization of Phenolic Compounds in Wine Lees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Zhijing

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of vinification techniques on phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of wine lees are poorly understood. The present study investigated the antioxidant activity of white and red wine lees generated at early fermentation and during aging. In this study, the total phenol content (TPC, total tannin content (TTC, mean degree of polymerization (mDP, and antioxidant activities of five white and eight red wine lees samples from different vinification backgrounds were determined. The results showed that vinification techniques had a significant (p < 0.05 impact on total phenol and tannin content of the samples. White wine lees had high mDP content compared with red ones. Catechin (50–62% and epicatechin contents were the predominant terminal units of polymeric proanthocyanidin extracted from examined samples. Epigallocatechin was the predominant extension unit of white wine lees, whereas epicatechin was the predominant compound in red wine marc. The ORAC (oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay was strongly correlated with the DPPH (α, α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl assay, and the results showed the strong antioxidant activities associated with red wine lees (PN > 35 mg Trolox/g FDM (PN: Pinot noir lees; FDM: Freeze-dried Material. This study indicates that tannin is one of the major phenolic compounds available in wine lees that can be useful in human and animal health applications.

  12. Phenolic compounds reduce formation of Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine and pyrazines formed by Maillard reactions in a model bread system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildner-Szkudlarz, Sylwia; Siger, Aleksander; Szwengiel, Artur; Przygoński, Krzysztof; Wojtowicz, Elżbieta; Zawirska-Wojtasiak, Renata

    2017-09-15

    This study had the objective of determining the antiglycation activity of phenolic compounds (PCs) ((+)-catechin, quercetin, gallic, ferulic, and caffeic acids) added to a model bread with regards to the inhibition of N ε -(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) formation. PCs were found to significantly reduce CML (31.77%-87.56%), even at the lowest concentration, with the exception of ferulic acid (FA). The strongest inhibitory effect of FA (∼62%) appeared when concentration was increased to 1.0g/100g of flour. The available lysine losses (0.00%-90.51%) showed a significant correlation (0.853-0.990) with effectiveness of CML inhibition, except in the case of samples with FA. (+)-Catechin reduced CML levels the most, probably due to its structure-antioxidant activity relationship, its thermal stability (∼51% loss), and its reactivity with ε-lysine side chains (∼40.77% loss). Although the bread supplemented with PCs contained low levels of CML, this process may adversely affect bread flavor, reducing the formation of pyrazines (1.10%-80.77%). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Temperature-Dependent Kinetics of Grape Seed Phenolic Compounds Extraction: Experiment and Model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bucic´-Kojic´, A.; Sovová, Helena; Planinic´, M.; Tomas, S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 136, 3-4 (2013), s. 1136-1140 ISSN 0308-8146 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : kinetics modelling * temperature * grape seed Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.259, year: 2013

  14. Uptake of phenolic compounds from plant foods in human intestinal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gavirangappa Hithamani

    Keywords. Caco-2 cells; finger millet; green gram; onion; phenolic compounds; uptake. 1. Introduction. Polyphenols are documented to exhibit many beneficial biological properties ... use of Caco-2 cell model for drug absorption measurements has been approved by the ...... bamboo leaves (AOB) in rats. Br. J. Nutr. 97 484– ...

  15. Uptake of phenolic compounds from plant foods in human intestinal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    19

    Hence, it was proposed to study the differences in the uptake of these compounds using Caco-2. 57 cell line as a model of the intestinal barrier. Although there are various reports on the natural. 58 sources of antioxidants, cereal grains being one among them, information on the bioavailability. 59 of these phenolic ...

  16. Antibacterial Activity of Phenolic Compounds Against the Phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa

    OpenAIRE

    Maddox, Christina E.; Laur, Lisa M.; Tian, Li

    2010-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a pathogenic bacterium that causes diseases in many crop species, which leads to considerable economic loss. Phenolic compounds (a group of secondary metabolites) are widely distributed in plants and have shown to possess antimicrobial properties. The anti-Xylella activity of 12 phenolic compounds, representing phenolic acid, coumarin, stilbene and flavonoid, was evaluated using an in vitro agar dilution assay. Overall, these phenolic compounds were effective in inhibiti...

  17. Phenolic compounds in Rosaceae fruits from Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasco, Catalina; Riihinen, Kaisu; Ruales, Jenny; Kamal-Eldin, Afaf

    2009-02-25

    RP-HPLC-DAD was used to study the content of phenolic compounds in four Ecuadorian fruits (strawberry, Andean blackberry, plum, and capuli cherry). Compounds were identified using spectral characteristics of representative standards and reference samples. Further, LC-MS with MS/MS was used to confirm molecular assignments in previously unstudied capuli cherry. Gallic acid was detected in Andean blackberry, and galloyl esters were detected in strawberries. Both these berries contained ellagic acid derivatives as major compounds, followed by anthocyanins, cyanidin, and pelargonidin glycosides. Plums and capuli cherry showed similar profiles of phenolic compounds, with chlorogenic and neochlorogenic acids being the most important hydroxycinnamates. (-)-Epicatechin was found in high amounts in Andean blackberry, plums, and capuli cherry, while (+)-catechin was only found in capuli cherry. Proanthocyanidins were major compounds in all fruits, and all contained considerable amounts of quercetin derivatives and smaller amounts of kaempferol derivatives. LC-MS analysis of capuli cherry revealed dimeric and trimeric procyanidins, quercetin and kaempferol hexosides and pentosides, and a kaempferol-O,C-dipentoside.

  18. [Phenolic compounds in branches of Tamarix rasissima].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Li, Wei-Qi; Zheng, Ping; Wang, Rui; Yu, Jian-Qiang; Yang, Jian-Hong; Yao, Yao

    2014-06-01

    To study the chemical constituents of the branches of Tamarix rasissima, repeated silica gel column chromatography, Sephadex LH-20 chromatography and recrystallization were applied for chemical constituents isolation and purification. Ten phenolic compounds were isolated from the n-BuOH fraction and their structures were elucidated by physical properties and spectra analysis such as UV, ESI-MS and NMR as monodecarboxyellagic acid (1), ellagic acid (2), 3, 3'-di-O-methylellagic acid (3), 3, 3'-di-O-methylellagic acid-4-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (4), 3, 3'-di-O-methylellagic acid-4'-O-alpha-D-arabinfuranoside (5), ferulic acid (6), isoferulic acid (7), caffeic acid (8), 4-O-acetyl-caffeic acid (9), and 4-methyl-1, 2-benzenediol (10). All compounds except for isoferulic acid were isolated firstly from this plant except for isoferulic acid, and compounds 5, 9 and 10 were obtained from Tamarix genus for the first time.

  19. [Evolution of phenolic compounds during wine aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glories, Y

    1978-01-01

    The phenolic compounds of red wine are separated and isolated by a method involving two precipitations (by EtOH and by MeOH-CHCl2), adsorption of the precipitates and supernatants on to p.v.p., and selective desorption of different fractions by mydroalcoholic and acidic solvents. The method permits the definition of wine composition by groups of phenolic compounds which are identified and quantified, and whose molecular mass is determined. Tanins exist in wine in different forms: combinations with salts (T-S) and with polysaccharides (T-P), highly condensed tanins (TtC), condensed tanins (TC), tanin-anthocyanin complexes (T-A), less condensed tanins (T), procyanidin dimer (P). The combinations of tanins with polysaccharides comprise a new class of compounds whose importance is relatively limited in young wine but increases with time during wine maturation (20 to 30 p. cent of the tanins can exist in this form after 20 years of conservation). The percentage of each class varies in the case of young wine, with the cepage, the level of grape maturaity and the conditions of vinification. During the maturation process, the percentage corresponding to the procyanidin dimer group (P), rapidly attains zero after several years. The tanins of old wines are primarily composed of condensed tanins (TC + TtC) and combinations with polysaccharides and with salts. The anthocyanins exist in wine in 3 forms: free anthocyanins, combined anthocyanins and polymerised anthocyanins which belong to the condensed tanins. The free anthocyanins rapidly dissapear during the first few years of wine maturation. The combined and polymerised anthocyanins generally remain present in regard-less of wine age. These groups play an important role in the determination of wine colour.

  20. Phenolic Compounds from Wine as Natural Preservatives of Fish Meat

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Aredes Aredes-Fernández; María Cristina Manca de Nadra; María José Rodríguez-Vaquero

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the antibacterial effect of phenolic compound combinations and total polyphenols of Argentinean red wine varieties against Escherichia coli ATCC 35218 and Listeria monocytogenes using commercial fish meat as model food. Rutin-quercetin combination and three wine varieties (Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec and Merlot) caused cellular death of both bacteria on fish meat at 4 °C. Rutin-quercetin combination was effective on fish meat even at 20 °C. Clarified wine...

  1. FRUCTOSANS AND PHENOLIC COMPOUNDS OF YACON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Gins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the high-efficiency liquid chromatography, the phenolic compounds of yacon (Polymnia sonchifolia introduced in Ukraine have been studied. The derivants of hydroxycinnamic acid is prevalent in the ethanol extracts from leaves and roots of yacon. Differences in the contents of  ethanol extracts from fresh and dry roots were shown. The total amount of hydroxycinnamic acids was 2,8 % – 4,3 % depending on the layer of leaves. It was found that roots content 36-45% of fructosans expressed as fructose and dry matter.

  2. Phenolic Compounds Analysis of Root, Stalk, and Leaves of Nettle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semih Otles

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Types of nettles (Urtica dioica were collected from different regions to analyze phenolic compounds in this research. Nettles are specially grown in the coastal part. According to this kind of properties, nettle samples were collected from coastal part of (Mediterranean, Aegean, Black sea, and Marmara Turkey. Phenolic profile, total phenol compounds, and antioxidant activities of nettle samples were analyzed. Nettles were separated to the part of root, stalk, and leaves. Then, these parts of nettle were analyzed to understand the difference of phenolic compounds and amount of them. Nettle (root, stalk and leaves samples were analyzed by using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Diode-Array Detection (HPLC-DAD to qualitative and quantitative determination of the phenolic compounds. Total phenolic components were measured by using Folin-Ciocalteu method. The antioxidant activity was measured by using DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl which is generally used for herbal samples and based on single electron transfer (SET.

  3. The Health Benefiting Mechanisms of Virgin Olive Oil Phenolic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Parkinson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Virgin olive oil (VOO is credited as being one of the many healthful components associated with the Mediterranean diet. Mediterranean populations experience reduced incidence of chronic inflammatory disease states and VOO is readily consumed as part of an everyday Mediterranean dietary pattern. VOO is rich in phenolic compounds and the health promoting benefits of these phenolics are now established. Recent studies have highlighted the biological properties of VOO phenolic compounds elucidating their anti-inflammatory activities. This paper will review current knowledge on the anti-inflammatory and nutrigenomic, chemoprotective and anti-atherosclerotic activities of VOO phenolics. In addition the concentration, metabolism and bioavailability of specific phenolic compounds will be discussed. The evidence presented in the review concludes that oleurepein, hydroxytyrosol and oleocanthal have potent pharmacological activities in vitro and in vivo; however, intervention studies with biologically relevant concentrations of these phenolic compounds are required.

  4. The Health Benefiting Mechanisms of Virgin Olive Oil Phenolic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Lisa; Cicerale, Sara

    2016-12-16

    Virgin olive oil (VOO) is credited as being one of the many healthful components associated with the Mediterranean diet. Mediterranean populations experience reduced incidence of chronic inflammatory disease states and VOO is readily consumed as part of an everyday Mediterranean dietary pattern. VOO is rich in phenolic compounds and the health promoting benefits of these phenolics are now established. Recent studies have highlighted the biological properties of VOO phenolic compounds elucidating their anti-inflammatory activities. This paper will review current knowledge on the anti-inflammatory and nutrigenomic, chemoprotective and anti-atherosclerotic activities of VOO phenolics. In addition the concentration, metabolism and bioavailability of specific phenolic compounds will be discussed. The evidence presented in the review concludes that oleurepein, hydroxytyrosol and oleocanthal have potent pharmacological activities in vitro and in vivo; however, intervention studies with biologically relevant concentrations of these phenolic compounds are required.

  5. Phenolic Compounds Analysis of Root, Stalk, and Leaves of Nettle

    OpenAIRE

    Otles, Semih; Yalcin, Buket

    2012-01-01

    Types of nettles (Urtica dioica) were collected from different regions to analyze phenolic compounds in this research. Nettles are specially grown in the coastal part. According to this kind of properties, nettle samples were collected from coastal part of (Mediterranean, Aegean, Black sea, and Marmara) Turkey. Phenolic profile, total phenol compounds, and antioxidant activities of nettle samples were analyzed. Nettles were separated to the part of root, stalk, and leaves. Then, these parts ...

  6. Development of a phenol-enriched olive oil with both its own phenolic compounds and complementary phenols from thyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubió, Laura; Motilva, Maria-José; Macià, Alba; Ramo, Tomás; Romero, Maria-Paz

    2012-03-28

    Besides affecting the oil's sensorial characteristics, the presence of herbs and spices has an impact on the nutritional value of the flavored oils. The aim of the study was to develop a new product based on the phenol-enrichment of a virgin olive oil with both its own phenolic compounds (secoiridoid derivatives) plus additional complementary phenols from thyme (flavonoids). We studied the effect of the addition of phenolic extracts (olive cake and thyme) on phenolic composition, oxidative stability, antioxidant activity, and bitter sensory attribute of olive oils. Results showed that flavonoids from thyme appeared to have higher transference ratios (average 89.7%) from the phenolic extract to oil, whereas secoiridoids from olive presented lower transference ratios (average 35.3%). The bitter sensory attribute of the phenol-enriched oils diminished with an increase of the concentration of phenols from thyme, which might denote an improvement in the consumer acceptance.

  7. Spectroscopic analysis of phenolic compounds for food and feed formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenolic compounds exhibit several bioactive properties including anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, and anti-fungal characteristics with potential applications as additives in functional food and feed formulations. Phenolic compounds occur in plants as secondary metabolites and may be recovered as a co-...

  8. Uptake of phenolic compounds from plant foods in human intestinal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transport of individual phenolic compounds from apical compartment to the basolateral compartmentacross Caco-2 monolayer was also investigated. Sprouting enhanced the uptake of syringic acid from both thesegrains. Open-pan boiling reduced the uptake of quercetin from the onion. Among pure phenolic compounds, ...

  9. Quality characteristics and phenolic compounds of European pear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pear fruits are an important source of plant secondary metabolites and one of the major sources of dietary phenolic compounds. Materials and Methods: The aim of this study was to determine the individual phenolic compounds and some quality characteristics of the flesh and peel of the fruit in four pear ...

  10. Phenolic Compounds in the Potato and Its Byproducts: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Akyol, Hazal; Riciputi, Ylenia; Capanoglu, Esra; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza; Verardo, Vito

    2016-01-01

    The potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is a tuber that is largely used for food and is a source of different bioactive compounds such as starch, dietary fiber, amino acids, minerals, vitamins, and phenolic compounds. Phenolic compounds are synthetized by the potato plant as a protection response from bacteria, fungi, viruses, and insects. Several works showed that these potato compounds exhibited health-promoting effects in humans. However, the use of the potato in the food industry submits this v...

  11. Estimate of consumption of phenolic compounds by Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa Gesser Corrêa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Estimate the intake of phenolic compounds by the Brazilian population. METHODS: To estimate the average per capita food consumption, micro data from the National Dietary Survey and from the Household Budget Survey from 2008 to 2009 was analyzed. The phenolic content in food was estimated from the base of Phenol-Explorer. It was chosen according to compatibility and variety of food items and usual method of preparation. RESULTS: The Brazilian population consumed, on average, 460.15 mg/day of total phenolic compounds, derived mainly from beverages (48.9%, especially coffee and legumes (19.5%. Since this analysis of classes of phenolics it was possible to observe an intake of 314 mg/day of phenolic acids, 138.92 mg/day of flavonoids and 7.16 mg/ day of other kinds of phenolics. Regarding the variables studied this present study shows that those men who live in the countryside and in the northeastern region of the country had a higher consumption of phenolic compounds. Besides, consumption was higher by adults and the elderly, the medium income classes, the population with incomplete and complete primary education and those with adequate nutrition and also overweight status. CONCLUSION: The intake of phenolic compounds can be considered low, especially where consumption of fruit and vegetables is insufficient. We can conclude that coffee and black beans were the best contributors to phenolic intake.

  12. Antioxidant Phenolic Compounds from Pu-erh Tea

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    Shu Shan Du

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Eight compounds were isolated from the water extract of Pu-erh tea and their structures were elucidated by NMR and MS as gallic acid (1, (+-catechin (2, (−-epicatechin (3, (−-epicatechin-3-O-gallate (4, (−-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (5, (−-epiafzelechin- 3-O-gallate (6, kaempferol (7, and quercetin (8. Their in vitro antioxidant activities were assessed by the DPPH and ABTS scavenging methods with microplate assays. The relative order of DPPH scavenging capacity for these compounds was compound 8 > compound 7 > compound 1 > compound 6 > compound 4 ≈ compound 5 > compound 2 > VC (reference > compound 3, and that of ABTS scavenging capacity was compound 1 > compound 2 > compound 7 ≈ compound 8 > compound 6 > compound 5 > compound 4 > VC (reference > compound 3. The results showed that these phenolic compounds contributed to the antioxidant activity of Pu-erh tea.

  13. Development of Phenol-Enriched Olive Oil with Phenolic Compounds Extracted from Wastewater Produced by Physical Refining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturi, Francesca; Sanmartin, Chiara; Taglieri, Isabella; Nari, Anita; Andrich, Gianpaolo; Terzuoli, Erika; Donnini, Sandra; Nicolella, Cristiano; Zinnai, Angela

    2017-08-22

    While in the last few years the use of olive cake and mill wastewater as natural sources of phenolic compounds has been widely considered and several studies have focused on the development of new extraction methods and on the production of functional foods enriched with natural antioxidants, no data has been available on the production of a phenol-enriched refined olive oil with its own phenolic compounds extracted from wastewater produced during physical refining. In this study; we aimed to: (i) verify the effectiveness of a multi-step extraction process to recover the high-added-value phenolic compounds contained in wastewater derived from the preliminary washing degumming step of the physical refining of vegetal oils; (ii) evaluate their potential application for the stabilization of olive oil obtained with refined olive oils; and (iii) evaluate their antioxidant activity in an in vitro model of endothelial cells. The results obtained demonstrate the potential of using the refining wastewater as a source of bioactive compounds to improve the nutraceutical value as well as the antioxidant capacity of commercial olive oils. In the conditions adopted, the phenolic content significantly increased in the prototypes of phenol-enriched olive oils when compared with the control oil.

  14. Uptake of phenolic compounds from plant foods in human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hithamani, Gavirangappa; Kizhakayil, Dhanya; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2017-12-01

    In continuation of our studies on the bioaccessibility of phenolic compounds from food grains as influenced by domestic processing, we examined the uptake of phenolics from native/sprouted finger millet (Eleucine coracana) and green gram (Vigna radiata) and native/heat-processed onion (Allium cepa) in human Caco-2 cells. Absorption of pure phenolic compounds, as well as the uptake of phenolic compounds from finger millet, green gram, and onion, was investigated in Caco-2 monolayer model. Transport of individual phenolic compounds from apical compartment to the basolateral compartment across Caco-2 monolayer was also investigated. Sprouting enhanced the uptake of syringic acid from both these grains. Open-pan boiling reduced the uptake of quercetin from the onion. Among pure phenolic compounds, syringic acid was maximally absorbed, while the flavonoid isovitexin was least absorbed. Apparent permeability coefficient P (app) of phenolic compounds from their standard solutions was 2.02 x 10 -6 cm/s to 8.94 x 10 -6 cm/s. Sprouting of grains enhanced the uptake of syringic acid by the Caco-2 cells. Open-pan boiling drastically reduced the uptake of quercetin from the onion. The permeability of phenolic acids across Caco-2 monolayer was higher than those of flavonoids.

  15. Effect of phenolic compounds on the rapid direct enzymatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phenolic compounds are also present in pulp processing, petroleum refining, leather tannery, textiles and plastics (Lee et al., 1996; Angelino and Gennaro, 1997; Pẽnalver et al., 2002; Asan and Isildak, 2003; Lupetti et al., 2004). Furthermore, phenols may also be found in fertilizers and explosives (Aktas et al., 2006).

  16. Phenolic Compounds in the Potato and Its Byproducts: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazal Akyol

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The potato (Solanum tuberosum L. is a tuber that is largely used for food and is a source of different bioactive compounds such as starch, dietary fiber, amino acids, minerals, vitamins, and phenolic compounds. Phenolic compounds are synthetized by the potato plant as a protection response from bacteria, fungi, viruses, and insects. Several works showed that these potato compounds exhibited health-promoting effects in humans. However, the use of the potato in the food industry submits this vegetable to different processes that can alter the phenolic content. Moreover, many of these compounds with high bioactivity are located in the potato’s skin, and so are eliminated as waste. In this review the most recent articles dealing with phenolic compounds in the potato and potato byproducts, along with the effects of harvesting, post-harvest, and technological processes, have been reviewed. Briefly, the phenolic composition, main extraction, and determination methods have been described. In addition, the “alternative” food uses and healthy properties of potato phenolic compounds have been addressed.

  17. Phenolic Compounds in the Potato and Its Byproducts: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyol, Hazal; Riciputi, Ylenia; Capanoglu, Esra; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza; Verardo, Vito

    2016-05-27

    The potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is a tuber that is largely used for food and is a source of different bioactive compounds such as starch, dietary fiber, amino acids, minerals, vitamins, and phenolic compounds. Phenolic compounds are synthetized by the potato plant as a protection response from bacteria, fungi, viruses, and insects. Several works showed that these potato compounds exhibited health-promoting effects in humans. However, the use of the potato in the food industry submits this vegetable to different processes that can alter the phenolic content. Moreover, many of these compounds with high bioactivity are located in the potato's skin, and so are eliminated as waste. In this review the most recent articles dealing with phenolic compounds in the potato and potato byproducts, along with the effects of harvesting, post-harvest, and technological processes, have been reviewed. Briefly, the phenolic composition, main extraction, and determination methods have been described. In addition, the "alternative" food uses and healthy properties of potato phenolic compounds have been addressed.

  18. Distribution of olive oil phenolic compounds in rat tissues after administration of a phenolic extract from olive cake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Aida; Rubió, Laura; Borràs, Xenia; Macià, Alba; Romero, Maria-Paz; Motilva, Maria-José

    2012-03-01

    The distribution and accumulation of olive oil phenolic compounds in the body are topics lacked of information. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioavailability, metabolism and distribution of phenolic compounds from olive cake. The metabolism and distribution of phenolic compounds were examined by UPLC-MS/MS after an acute intake of a phenolic extract from olive cake, analyzing plasma and tissues (heart, brain, liver, kidney, spleen, testicle and thymus) 1, 2 and 4 h after ingestion using Wistar rats as the in vivo model. The results showed a wide distribution of phenolic compounds and their metabolites in the tissues, with a main detoxification route through the kidneys. Highlighting the quantification of the free forms of some phenolic compounds, such as oleuropein derivative in plasma (Cmax 4 h: 24 nmol/L) and brain (Cmax 2 h: 2.8 nmol/g), luteolin in kidney (Cmax 1 h: 0.04 nmol/g), testicle (Cmax 2 h: 0.07 nmol/g) and heart (Cmax 1 h: 0.47 nmol/g); and hydroxytyrosol in plasma (Cmax 2 h: 5.2 nmol/L), kidney (Cmax 4 h: 3.8 nmol/g) and testicle (Cmax 2 h: 2.7 nmol/g). After a single ingestion of olive oil phenolic compounds, these were absorbed, metabolized and distributed through the blood stream to practically all parts of the body, even across the blood-brain barrier. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Antifungal activity of extracts and phenolic compounds from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antifungal activity of extracts and phenolic compounds from Barringtonia racemosa L. (Lecythidaceae). NM Hussin, R Muse, S Ahmad, J Ramli, M Mahmood, MR Sulaiman, MYA Shukor, MFA Rahman, KNK Aziz ...

  20. The effect of growing conditions on phenolic compounds and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    arid and is widely used for anti-inflammatory and healing properties. This study evaluates the level of phenolic compounds and the antimicrobial activity in extracts of M. urundeuva obtained from greenhouse seedlings grown from seeds that ...

  1. Phenolic compounds in Rosaceae fruit and nut crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogah, Onwuchekwa; Watkins, Carolyn S; Ubi, Benjamin Ewa; Oraguzie, Nnadozie C

    2014-10-01

    The demand for new fruit cultivars with high levels of phytochemicals, in particular phenolic compounds, has received increasing attention from biochemists, pharmaceutical companies, plant breeders, and the general public due to their health benefits. This review focuses on the economically important Rosaceae, which contains varying proportions and concentrations of these compounds. The paper discusses the common phenolics in the Rosaceae including phenolic acids, flavonols, flavanols, anthocyanins, and dihydrochalcones. The nonextractable phenolics are also presented but not discussed in detail. The metabolism and bioavailability of phenolics, as well as human and environmental factors that affect their concentration and composition, are highlighted. Furthermore, the paper presents different approaches for biofortification and posits that breeding may be the most viable and sustainable option as it improves other fruit quality traits simultaneously and increases confidence in adoption of new cultivars with enhanced consumer appeal.

  2. Ethanolic Walnut Kernel Phenolic Compounds and its Antimicrobial Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Ashrafi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Food-borne pathogens are causes of poisoning and gastrointestinal infections. In recent years, it is recommended to use natural materials like plant extracts and essences instead of chemical preservatives in food industry. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify the phenolic compounds of ethanolic walnut kernel and its antimicrobial effect on some food-borne pathogens. Methods: In this experimental study, after collection of walnut kernel, its ethanolic extract was prepared. Then its antimicrobial activity on salmonella typhimurium, shigella disentriae, listeria monocytogenes was examined as Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC using microdilution method. Chloramphenicol (30µg was used as the reference antimicrobial agent. Total phenols, flavonoids and flavonols were also determined by colorimetric method. Results: The results showed that MIC was between 0.625 and 1.25 mg/ml and MBC was between 1.25 and 2.5mg/ml for ethanolic extract. Total phenols were 365±14.71mg/g gallic acid equivalent, and total flavonoids and flavonols were 285±12.25 and 132± 1.63mg/g rutin equivalent, respectively. Conclusion: These findings showed that walnut kernel has antibacterial effects on three aforementioned bacteria and can substitute for chemical preservatives. More studies, such as examinations in food models are needed to unravel the antimicrobial effects of this plant.

  3. Daily intake estimation of phenolic compounds in the Spanish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inma Navarro González

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Phenolic compounds are a large group of molecules present in plants with a diversity of chemical structures and biological activity. The objective of this study was to quantify the intake of phenolic compounds of the Spanish population. Material and Methods: The most consumed foods from vegetal origin in Spain were selected. These were picked up in the National Survey of Spanish Dietary Intake (ENIDE of 2011, edited by AESAN (Spanish Agency for Food Safety and Nutrition as a basis for quantifying the intake of phenolic compounds of Spaniards using the Phenol-Explorer database. Results: This database has allowed to estimate the average intake of polyphenols per day of Spaniards, which is 1365.1mg. Conclusions: The average intake of total polyphenols of Spaniards could have a protective effect against the mortality rate and exercise a preventive function on some chronic diseases along with other healthy lifestyle habits.

  4. TLC analysis of some phenolic compounds in kombucha beverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malbaša Radomir V.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Black and green tea contains a wide range of natural phenolic compounds Flavanoids and their glycosides, catechins and the products of their condensation, and phenolic acids are the most important. Kombucha beverage is obtained by fermentation of tea fungus on black or green tea sweetened with sucrose. The aim of this paper was to investigate the composition of some phenolic compounds, catechin, epicatechin, quercetin, myricetin, gallic and tanic acid, and monitoring of their status during tea fungus fermentation. The method used for this study was thin layer chromatography with two different systems. The main phenolic compounds in the samples with green tea were catechin and epicatechin, and in the samples with black tea it was quercetin.

  5. Effect of dietary fiber on the bioaccessibility of phenolic compounds of mango, papaya and pineapple fruits by an in vitro digestion model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo VELDERRAIN-RODRÍGUEZ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of dietary fiber (DF in the food matrix of some tropical fruits plays an important role in the release and absorption of its bioactive compounds, such as phenolic compounds (PCs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the DF fractions in mango cv. ‘Ataulfo’, papaya cv. ‘Maradol’ and pineapple cv. ‘Esmeralda’, on the bioaccessibility of their PCs and antioxidant capacity (AOXC under an in vitro digestion model. The highest PCs content and AOXC was found in mango (274.30 mg GAE/100 g FW, followed by papaya (212 mg GAE//100 g FW, and pineapple (107.63 mg GAE/100 g FW, respectively. About 50% of the total PCs in all fruits was released at gastric phase, increasing closer to 60% at intestinal phase in mango and pineapple. However, the highest content of PCs associated to DF was found in mango (2.48 mg GAE/100 g FW compared with papaya DF fractions (0.96 GAE/100 g FW and pineapple (0.52 GAE/100 g FW. The presence of DF in mango, papaya and pineapple did not represent a major limitation on the bioaccessibility of its PCs according to the in vitro digestion model used in this study.

  6. Production of phenolic compounds from Spirulina maxima ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to illustrate the enhancing process of phenolics synthesis in Spirulina maxima grown in Zarrouk's medium supplemented with different concentration of NaNO3 and/or combined with phenylalanine (L-PA). Also, the protective efficacy of Spirulina polyphenolic (SPP) extracts against ...

  7. Phenolic Compounds from Wine as Natural Preservatives of Fish Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Aredes Aredes-Fernández

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to investigate the antibacterial effect of phenolic compound combinations and total polyphenols of Argentinean red wine varieties against Escherichia coli ATCC 35218 and Listeria monocytogenes using commercial fish meat as model food. Rutin-quercetin combination and three wine varieties (Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec and Merlot caused cellular death of both bacteria on fish meat at 4 °C. Rutin-quercetin combination was effective on fish meat even at 20 °C. Clarified wines did not affect the bacteria, indicating that wine polyphenols are responsible for the observed effect. The use of wine phenolic compounds as antibacterial agent could be used to prevent contamination and extend the shelf life of fish meat. A big finding of this work is the use of rutin–quercetin combination as preservative for the conservation of fish meat and its transport to the fish market, which is an effective antibacterial agent even when the transport temperature is not constant.

  8. Benefits of olive oil phenolic compounds in disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Martinez, Olga; Ruiz, Concepcion; Gutierrez-Ibanez, Alvaro; Illescas-Montes, Rebeca; Melguizo-Rodriguez, Lucia

    2018-02-12

    The preventive effects of olive oil against different diseases have been attributed to its high phenolic compound content. The objective of this study was to examine available scientific evidence on the beneficial effects against chronic diseases of olive oil phenolic compounds. This article examines recently published data on olive oil phenolic compounds and their potential benefits in the prevention of cardiovascular disease, cancer, neurodegenerative disease, and osteoporosis. The antioxidant, anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory activities of olive oil phenolic compounds have preventive effects against heart disease and cancer. These compounds also exert neuroprotective and neuromodulator effects against neurodegenerative disease, inhibiting the development of amyloid plaques. Finally, they are known to protect against osteoporosis, favoring bone regeneration. Dietary intake of olive oil can be recommended by healthcare professionals as an important source of phenolic compounds that play a role in the prevention of chronic disease and the consequent improvement in quality of life. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Role of phenolic compounds in peptic ulcer: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabiha Sumbul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptic ulcer is the most common gastrointestinal tract (GIT disorder in clinical practice, which affects approximately 5-10% of the people during their life. The use of herbal drugs for the prevention and treatment of various diseases is constantly developing throughout the world. This is particularly true with regard to phenolic compounds that probably constitute the largest group of plants secondary metabolites. Phenolic compounds have attracted special attention due to their health-promoting characteristics. In the past ten years a large number of the studies have been carried out on the effects of phenolic compounds on human health. Many studies have been carried out that strongly support the contribution of polyphenols to the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, osteoporosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and diabetes mellitus, and suggest a role in the prevention of peptic ulcer. Polyphenols display a number of pharmacological properties in the GIT area, acting as antisecretory, cytoprotective, and antioxidant agents. The antioxidant properties of phenolic compounds have been widely studied, but it has become clear that their mechanisms of action go beyond the modulation of oxidative stress. Various polyphenolic compounds have been reported for their anti-ulcerogenic activity with a good level of gastric protection. Besides their action as gastroprotective, these phenolic compounds can be an alternative for the treatment of gastric ulcers. Therefore, considering the important role of polyphenolic compounds in the prevention or reduction of gastric lesions induced by different ulcerogenic agents, in this review, we have summarized the literature on some potent antiulcer plants, such as, Oroxylum indicum, Zingiber officinale, Olea europaea L., Foeniculum vulgare, Alchornea glandulosa, Tephrosia purpurea, and so on, containing phenolic compounds, namely, baicalein, cinnamic acid, oleuropein, rutin, quercetin, and tephrosin

  10. Inhibition of lignin-derived phenolic compounds to cellulase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lei; Li, Wen-Chao; Liu, Li; Zhu, Jia-Qing; Li, Xia; Li, Bing-Zhi; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Lignin-derived phenolic compounds are universal in the hydrolysate of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass. The phenolics reduce the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis and increase the cost of ethanol production. We investigated inhibition of phenolics on cellulase during enzymatic hydrolysis using vanillin as one of the typical lignin-derived phenolics and Avicel as cellulose substrate. As vanillin concentration increased from 0 to 10 mg/mL, cellulose conversion after 72-h enzymatic hydrolysis decreased from 53 to 26 %. Enzyme deactivation and precipitation were detected with the vanillin addition. The enzyme concentration and activity consecutively decreased during hydrolysis, but the inhibition degree, expressed as the ratio of the cellulose conversion without vanillin to the conversion with vanillin (A 0 /A), was almost independent on hydrolysis time. Inhibition can be mitigated by increasing cellulose loading or cellulase concentration. The inhibition degree showed linear relationship with the vanillin concentration and exponential relationship with the cellulose loading and the cellulase concentration. The addition of calcium chloride, BSA, and Tween 80 did not release the inhibition of vanillin significantly. pH and temperature for hydrolysis also showed no significant impact on inhibition degree. The presence of hydroxyl group, carbonyl group, and methoxy group in phenolics affected the inhibition degree. Besides phenolics concentration, other factors such as cellulose loading, enzyme concentration, and phenolic structure also affect the inhibition of cellulose conversion. Lignin-blocking agents have little effect on the inhibition effect of soluble phenolics, indicating that the inhibition mechanism of phenolics to enzyme is likely different from insoluble lignin. The inhibition of soluble phenolics can hardly be entirely removed by increasing enzyme concentration or adding blocking proteins due to the dispersity and multiple binding sites of phenolics

  11. Directional liquefaction of biomass for phenolic compounds and in situ hydrodeoxygenation upgrading of phenolics using bifunctional catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junfeng Feng; Chung-yun Hse; Kui Wang; Zhongzhi Yang; Jianchun Jiang; Junming Xu

    2017-01-01

    Phenolic compounds derived from biomass are important feedstocks for the sustainable production of hydrocarbon biofuels. Hydrodeoxygenation is an effective process to remove oxygen-containing functionalities in phenolic compounds. This paper reported a simple method for producing hydrocarbons by liquefying biomass and upgrading liquefied products. Three phenolic...

  12. Olive phenolic compounds: metabolic and transcriptional profiling during fruit development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alagna Fiammetta

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olive (Olea europaea L. fruits contain numerous secondary metabolites, primarily phenolics, terpenes and sterols, some of which are particularly interesting for their nutraceutical properties. This study will attempt to provide further insight into the profile of olive phenolic compounds during fruit development and to identify the major genetic determinants of phenolic metabolism. Results The concentration of the major phenolic compounds, such as oleuropein, demethyloleuropein, 3–4 DHPEA-EDA, ligstroside, tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, verbascoside and lignans, were measured in the developing fruits of 12 olive cultivars. The content of these compounds varied significantly among the cultivars and decreased during fruit development and maturation, with some compounds showing specificity for certain cultivars. Thirty-five olive transcripts homologous to genes involved in the pathways of the main secondary metabolites were identified from the massive sequencing data of the olive fruit transcriptome or from cDNA-AFLP analysis. Their mRNA levels were determined using RT-qPCR analysis on fruits of high- and low-phenolic varieties (Coratina and Dolce d’Andria, respectively during three different fruit developmental stages. A strong correlation was observed between phenolic compound concentrations and transcripts putatively involved in their biosynthesis, suggesting a transcriptional regulation of the corresponding pathways. OeDXS, OeGES, OeGE10H and OeADH, encoding putative 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-P synthase, geraniol synthase, geraniol 10-hydroxylase and arogenate dehydrogenase, respectively, were almost exclusively present at 45 days after flowering (DAF, suggesting that these compounds might play a key role in regulating secoiridoid accumulation during fruit development. Conclusions Metabolic and transcriptional profiling led to the identification of some major players putatively involved in biosynthesis of secondary compounds in the

  13. Olive phenolic compounds: metabolic and transcriptional profiling during fruit development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Olive (Olea europaea L.) fruits contain numerous secondary metabolites, primarily phenolics, terpenes and sterols, some of which are particularly interesting for their nutraceutical properties. This study will attempt to provide further insight into the profile of olive phenolic compounds during fruit development and to identify the major genetic determinants of phenolic metabolism. Results The concentration of the major phenolic compounds, such as oleuropein, demethyloleuropein, 3–4 DHPEA-EDA, ligstroside, tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, verbascoside and lignans, were measured in the developing fruits of 12 olive cultivars. The content of these compounds varied significantly among the cultivars and decreased during fruit development and maturation, with some compounds showing specificity for certain cultivars. Thirty-five olive transcripts homologous to genes involved in the pathways of the main secondary metabolites were identified from the massive sequencing data of the olive fruit transcriptome or from cDNA-AFLP analysis. Their mRNA levels were determined using RT-qPCR analysis on fruits of high- and low-phenolic varieties (Coratina and Dolce d’Andria, respectively) during three different fruit developmental stages. A strong correlation was observed between phenolic compound concentrations and transcripts putatively involved in their biosynthesis, suggesting a transcriptional regulation of the corresponding pathways. OeDXS, OeGES, OeGE10H and OeADH, encoding putative 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-P synthase, geraniol synthase, geraniol 10-hydroxylase and arogenate dehydrogenase, respectively, were almost exclusively present at 45 days after flowering (DAF), suggesting that these compounds might play a key role in regulating secoiridoid accumulation during fruit development. Conclusions Metabolic and transcriptional profiling led to the identification of some major players putatively involved in biosynthesis of secondary compounds in the olive tree. Our data

  14. IDENTIFICATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF PHENOLIC COMPOUNDS FROM RED GRAPE POMACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADINA FRUM

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The wine industry generates a great amount of waste every year, thus its valorization is of most importance. This study uses red, fermented pomace from Cabernet Sauvignon and Feteasca Neagra cultivars. The phenolic compounds were extracted using four different extractions and the content of total polyphenols was determined using a spectrophotometrical method. Several phenolic compounds were analyzed using an HPLC method. The Cabernet Sauvignon pomace had the highest content of total polyphenols and total phenolic compounds analyzed and of quercetin, rutin, ferulic acid and resveratrol, while the Feteasca Neagra pomace had the highest content of gallic acid, syringic acid, cinamic acid and (+ - catechin. The caffeic acid and the chlorogenic acid were not found in any of the analyzed pomaces. These pomaces could be used in the food industry as functional ingredients.

  15. Biological activities of phenolic compounds present in virgin olive oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicerale, Sara; Lucas, Lisa; Keast, Russell

    2010-02-02

    The Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower incidence of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases and certain types of cancer. The apparent health benefits have been partially ascribed to the dietary consumption of virgin olive oil by Mediterranean populations. Much research has focused on the biologically active phenolic compounds naturally present in virgin olive oils to aid in explaining reduced mortality and morbidity experienced by people consuming a traditional Mediterranean diet. Studies (human, animal, in vivo and in vitro) have demonstrated that olive oil phenolic compounds have positive effects on certain physiological parameters, such as plasma lipoproteins, oxidative damage, inflammatory markers, platelet and cellular function, antimicrobial activity and bone health. This paper summarizes current knowledge on the bioavailability and biological activities of olive oil phenolic compounds.

  16. Biological Activities of Phenolic Compounds Present in Virgin Olive Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Keast

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower incidence of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases and certain types of cancer. The apparent health benefits have been partially ascribed to the dietary consumption of virgin olive oil by Mediterranean populations. Much research has focused on the biologically active phenolic compounds naturally present in virgin olive oils to aid in explaining reduced mortality and morbidity experienced by people consuming a traditional Mediterranean diet. Studies (human, animal, in vivo and in vitro have demonstrated that olive oil phenolic compounds have positive effects on certain physiological parameters, such as plasma lipoproteins, oxidative damage, inflammatory markers, platelet and cellular function, antimicrobial activity and bone health. This paper summarizes current knowledge on the bioavailability and biological activities of olive oil phenolic compounds.

  17. A review of phenolic compounds in oil-bearing plants: Distribution, identification and occurrence of phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alu'datt, Muhammad H; Rababah, Taha; Alhamad, Mohammad N; Al-Mahasneh, Majdi A; Almajwal, Ali; Gammoh, Sana; Ereifej, Khalil; Johargy, Ayman; Alli, Inteaz

    2017-03-01

    Over the last two decades, separation, identification and measurement of the total and individual content of phenolic compounds has been widely investigated. Recently, the presence of a wide range of phenolic compounds in oil-bearing plants has been shown to contribute to their therapeutic properties, including anti-cancer, anti-viral, anti-oxidant, hypoglycemic, hypo-lipidemic, and anti-inflammatory activities. Phenolics in oil-bearing plants are now recognized as important minor food components due to several organoleptic and health properties, and they are used as food or sources of food ingredients. Variations in the content of phenolics in oil-bearing plants have largely been attributed to several factors, including the cultivation, time of harvest and soil types. A number of authors have suggested that the presence phenolics in extracted proteins, carbohydrates and oils may contribute to objectionable off flavors The objective of this study was to review the distribution, identification and occurrence of free and bound phenolic compounds in oil-bearing plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Phenolic Compounds from Belamcanda chinensis Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Ying Song

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Two new sucrose derivatives, namely, belamcanosides A (1 and B (2, together with five other known compounds (3−7, were isolated from the seeds of Belamcanda chinensis (L. DC. Their structures were identified based on spectroscopic data. Especially, the absolute configurations of fructose and glucose residues in 1 and 2 were assigned by acid hydrolysis, followed by derivatization and gas chromatography (GC analysis. Among the known compounds, (−-hopeaphenol (3, (+-syringaresinol (4, and quercetin (5, were isolated from B. chinensis for the first time. In addition, biological evaluation of 1 and 2 against cholesterol synthesis and metabolism at the gene level was carried out. The results showed that compounds 1 and 2 could regulate the expression of cholesterol synthesis and metabolism-associated genes, including 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR, squalene epoxidase (SQLE, low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR, and sortilin (SORT1 genes in HepG2 cells.

  19. Optimization of phenolic compounds analysis by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Diana L D; Duarte, Armando C; Esteves, Valdemar I

    2007-06-15

    Operational parameters like migration time, temperature, voltage, composition of background electrolyte and content of organic modifier were optimized in CZE for the determination of lignin-like phenolic compounds. The applied background electrolyte buffer consisted of a Na(2)B(4)O(7), KH(2)PO(4) aqueous solution, pH 9.15 using acetonitrile as organic modifier with UV-detection. Compounds, such as acetosyringone, acetovanillone, syringealdehyde, p-hydroxyacetophenone, vanillin, syringic acid, ferulic acid, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, p-coumaric acid, vanillic acid and p-hydroxybenzoic acid were applied as reference compounds. The quality and quantity of different phenolic compounds obtained upon alkaline CuO oxidation of a commercial humic acid were determined with CZE using ethylvanillin as internal standard. The optimized CZE revealed has being an appropriate method since it is quick, sensitive and quantitative and does not require a time-consuming sample preparation.

  20. Extraction and antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To use response surface methodology to optimize the extraction of the phenolic compounds in wheat bran treated by steam explosion, and to determine the antioxidant activity of the extract obtained. Methods: By using response surface methodology, the effects of extraction time, methanol concentration ...

  1. Extraction and antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To use response surface methodology to optimize the extraction of the phenolic compounds in wheat bran treated by steam explosion, and to determine the antioxidant activity of the extract obtained. Methods: By using response surface methodology, the effects of extraction time, methanol concentration, ...

  2. Effect of phenolic compounds released during degradation of Coir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    mice by 63%, curcumin induced a similar inhibition but quercertin and rutin failed to alter tumor formation at dietary level of 2% carcin. Lin and Chin (2007) reported phenolic compounds are widely present in the plant kingdom. Many epidemiological studies have indicated that consumption of some plant derived food stuffs ...

  3. Chemical evaluation of protein quality and phenolic compound ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work studies the chemical evaluation of protein quality and phenolic compound contents of some Cucurbitaceae (egusi) oilseeds from different areas in Cameroon. These seeds are Cucumeropsis mannii, Cucurbita maxima, Cucurbita moschata, Lagenaria siceraria and Cucumis sativus. The seeds were cleaned, dried, ...

  4. Nitration of phenolic compounds and oxidation of hydroquinones ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this work, we have reported a mild, efficient and selective method for the mononitration of phenolic compounds using sodium nitrite in the presence of tetrabutylammonium dichromate (TBAD) and oxidation of hydroquinones to quinones with TBAD in CH2Cl2. Using this method, high yields of nitrophenols and ...

  5. Effect of phenolic compounds released during degradation of Coir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to investigate the effect of degraded coir pith based cyanobacterial culture filtrate on Rattus norvegicus. The culture filtrate containing phenolic compound was administered at a rate of 42 mg/Kg for 15 days and its effect on serum glucose, protein, creatinine, urea, uric acid, alkaline phosphate ...

  6. Glycoalkaloids and phenolic compounds in gamma irradiated potatoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergers, W.W.A.

    1980-01-01

    Potatoes were used to study the metabolic stress effects in irradiated vegetable products. The changes of the contents of specific target compounds (glycoalkaloids, phenolic acids and coumarins) in alcoholic extracts of gamma irradiated potatoes were studied for metabolic irradiation stress. Doses of up to 3 kGy were applied to potatoes of several varieties. (Auth.)

  7. Nitration of phenolic compounds and oxidation of hydroquinones ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nitration of phenolic compounds and oxidation of hydroquinones using tetrabutylammonium chromate and dichromate under aprotic conditions. ALI REZA POURALI* and AREZOU GOLI. School of Chemistry, Damghan University, Damghan 36715/364, Iran e-mail: pourali@du.ac.ir. MS received 24 February 2010; revised 2 ...

  8. Nitration of phenolic compounds and oxidation of hydroquinones ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this work, we have reported a mild, efficient and selective method for the mononitration of phenolic compounds using sodium nitrite in the presence of tetrabutylammonium dichromate (TBAD) and oxidation of hydroquinones to quinones with TBAD in CH2Cl2. Using this method, high yields of nitrophenols and quinones ...

  9. Extraction and Antioxidant Activity of Phenolic Compounds from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1School of Food Science, Henan Institute of Science and Technology, Xinxiang 453003, 2Department of Food Science, Xinyang. College of Agriculture ... Purpose: To investigate the extraction and antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds from Okra flowers. ..... antioxidant activities of essential oil and methanol extract of ...

  10. Olive oil phenolic compounds and high-density lipoprotein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernáez, Alvaro; Farràs, Marta; Fitó, Montserrat

    2016-02-01

    The functional capacities of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) reflect the physiological role of the particle better than the quantity of HDL cholesterol. Owing to its phenolic compounds, the consumption of virgin olive oil has emerged as a promising therapy to promote these capacities. This review highlights the human studies that explain these benefits and explores some possible mechanisms. The consumption of olive oil phenolic compounds increased the ability of HDLs to pick up cholesterol excess in peripheral cells (the cholesterol efflux capacity). Olive oil phenolic compounds have also been shown to improve HDL antioxidant capacities and some anti-inflammatory traits. These changes respond to an improvement of HDL oxidative status and composition. Novel strategies to increase HDL functional capacities are in demand from clinicians. The attainment of a fully-functional HDL through dietary or lifestyle changes is a priority in cardiovascular research. Within this context, the consumption of virgin olive oil, because of its phenolic compounds, may be a relevant protective approach. Further studies in large-scale, randomized controlled trials are, however, required to confirm these effects in HDL functionality.

  11. Mechanisms of action of phenolic compounds in olive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafehi, Haloom; Ververis, Katherine; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2012-06-01

    Olive oil, an oil rich in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFCs) and minor constituents including phenolic compounds, is a major component of the Mediterranean diet. The potential health benefits of the Mediterranean diet were highlighted by the seminal Seven Countries Study, and more contemporary research has identified olive oil as a major element responsible for these effects. It is emerging that the phenolic compounds are the most likely candidates accounting for the cardioprotective and cancer preventative effects of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO). In particular, the phenolic compound, hydroxytyrosol has been identified as one of the most potent antioxidants found in olive oil. This review will briefly consider historical aspects of olive oil research and the biological properties of phenolic compounds in olive oil will be discussed. The focus of the discussion will be related to the mechanisms of action of hydroxytyrosol. Studies have demonstrated that hydroxytyrosol induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. Further, research has shown that hydroxytyrosol can prevent cardiovascular disease by reducing the expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells and preventing the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The molecular mechanisms accounting for these effects are reviewed.

  12. Characterization and quantification of phenolic compounds of extra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemlali olive oil was blended with oils obtained from Oueslati and Chetoui varieties to improve the quality of the former one. Parameters such as triacylglycerols and phenolic compounds were characterized for various blends of Chemlali x Oueslati and Chemlali x Chetoui. Results show that blended oils had an improved ...

  13. Removal of hard COD, nitrogenous compounds and phenols from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to identify the factors affecting the suspended and fixed biomass in the removal of hard COD, nitrogenous compounds and phenols from a coal gasification wastewater (CGWW) stream using a hybrid fixed-film bioreactor (H-FFBR) process under real-time plant operational conditions and ...

  14. Chemical evaluation of protein quality and phenolic compound ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr ACHU Mercy BIH epouse LOH

    2011-07-07

    Jul 7, 2011 ... These results show a great variability on the protein contents which depend on the specie and which also seem to depend on the regions, as seen from the low values obtained for Sudanese seeds. Phenolic compounds have been shown to have a lot of beneficial effects as antioxidants, antithrombotic and ...

  15. Extraction of phenolic compounds from Temnocalyx obovatus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-19

    Sep 19, 2011 ... antioxidant compounds from Temnocalyx obovatus. A sample treatment and preparation protocol that employs strict statistical treatment to ensure sample homogeneity was applied. As preliminary indicator of homogeneity, total nitrogen and phosphorus were determined and an iterative process using ...

  16. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities in some fruits and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The highest values of TEAC were found in garlic (9.6 μmol), okra (3 μmol), spinach (2.2 μmol), tamarind (2.2 μmol) and onion (2.1 μmol). These data revealed that, some local fruits and vegetables from Burkina Faso are potential sources of bioactive compounds. Key words: Antioxidant activity, phenolic compounds, fruits, ...

  17. Biological Activities of Phenolic Compounds of Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Servili

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, multiple biological properties, providing antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, chemopreventive and anti-cancer benefits, as well as the characteristic pungent and bitter taste, have been attributed to Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO phenols. In particular, growing efforts have been devoted to the study of the antioxidants of EVOO, due to their importance from health, biological and sensory points of view. Hydrophilic and lipophilic phenols represent the main antioxidants of EVOO, and they include a large variety of compounds. Among them, the most concentrated phenols are lignans and secoiridoids, with the latter found exclusively in the Oleaceae family, of which the drupe is the only edible fruit. In recent years, therefore, we have tackled the study of the main properties of phenols, including the relationships between their biological activity and the related chemical structure. This review, in fact, focuses on the phenolic compounds of EVOO, and, in particular, on their biological properties, sensory aspects and antioxidant capacity, with a particular emphasis on the extension of the product shelf-life.

  18. Phenolic Compounds of Cereals and Their Antioxidant Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hung, Pham

    2016-01-01

    Phenolic compounds play an important role in health benefits because of their highly antioxidant capacity. In this review, total phenolic contents (TPCs), phenolic acid profile and antioxidant capacity of the extracted from wheat, corn, rice, barley, sorghum, rye, oat, and millet, which have been recently reported, are summarized. The review shows clearly that cereals contain a number of phytochemicals including phenolics, flavonoids, anthocyanins, etc. The phytochemicals of cereals significantly exhibit antioxidant activity as measured by trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging, reducing power, oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), inhibition of oxidation of human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and DNA, Rancimat, inhibition of photochemilumenescence (PCL), and iron(II) chelation activity. Thus, the consumption of whole grains is considered to have significantly health benefits in prevention from chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer because of the contribution of phenolic compounds existed. In addition, the extracts from cereal brans are considered to be used as a source of natural antioxidants.

  19. Biological Activities of Phenolic Compounds of Extra Virgin Olive Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servili, Maurizio; Sordini, Beatrice; Esposto, Sonia; Urbani, Stefania; Veneziani, Gianluca; Di Maio, Ilona; Selvaggini, Roberto; Taticchi, Agnese

    2013-12-20

    Over the last few decades, multiple biological properties, providing antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, chemopreventive and anti-cancer benefits, as well as the characteristic pungent and bitter taste, have been attributed to Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO) phenols. In particular, growing efforts have been devoted to the study of the antioxidants of EVOO, due to their importance from health, biological and sensory points of view. Hydrophilic and lipophilic phenols represent the main antioxidants of EVOO, and they include a large variety of compounds. Among them, the most concentrated phenols are lignans and secoiridoids, with the latter found exclusively in the Oleaceae family, of which the drupe is the only edible fruit. In recent years, therefore, we have tackled the study of the main properties of phenols, including the relationships between their biological activity and the related chemical structure. This review, in fact, focuses on the phenolic compounds of EVOO, and, in particular, on their biological properties, sensory aspects and antioxidant capacity, with a particular emphasis on the extension of the product shelf-life.

  20. Factors influencing phenolic compounds in table olives (Olea europaea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoenprasert, Suthawan; Mitchell, Alyson

    2012-07-25

    The Mediterranean diet appears to be associated with a reduced risk of several chronic diseases including cancer and cardiovascular and Alzheimer's diseases. Olive products (mainly olive oil and table olives) are important components of the Mediterranean diet. Olives contain a range of phenolic compounds; these natural antioxidants may contribute to the prevention of these chronic conditions. Consequently, the consumption of table olives and olive oil continues to increase worldwide by health-conscious consumers. There are numerous factors that can affect the phenolics in table olives including the cultivar, degree of ripening, and, importantly, the methods used for curing and processing table olives. The predominant phenolic compound found in fresh olive is the bitter secoiridoid oleuropein. Table olive processing decreases levels of oleuropein with concomitant increases in the hydrolysis products hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol. Many of the health benefits reported for olives are thought to be associated with the levels of hydroxytyrosol. Herein the pre- and post-harvest factors influencing the phenolics in olives, debittering methods, and health benefits of phenolics in table olives are reviewed.

  1. Anti-Bacterial Activity of Phenolic Compounds against Streptococcus pyogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macé, Sabrina; Hansen, Lisbeth Truelstrup; P. Vasantha Rupasinghe, H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Worldwide, Streptococcus pyogenes is the leading cause of bacterial pharyngitis. To reduce the use of antibiotics, antimicrobial phytochemical-containing remedies, which have long been in use in traditional medicine, may provide new approaches for management of streptococcal pharyngitis....... The objective of this study was to assess the inhibitory activities of 25 natural phenolic compounds against three strains of S. pyogenes. Methods: After an initial screening, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the nine most effective phenolic compounds...... were determined. The effect of four compounds with the lowest MIC and MBC on streptococcal growth and biofilm formation was also studied. Results: 1,2-Naphthoquinone and 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone elicited the greatest anti-S. pyogenes activities with MICs ranging from 0.39 to 6.25 µg mL−1 and MBCs...

  2. Optimization of the Aqueous Extraction of Phenolic Compounds from Olive Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloe D. Goldsmith

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Olive leaves are an agricultural waste of the olive-oil industry representing up to 10% of the dry weight arriving at olive mills. Disposal of this waste adds additional expense to farmers. Olive leaves have been shown to have a high concentration of phenolic compounds. In an attempt to utilize this waste product for phenolic compounds, we optimized their extraction using water—a “green” extraction solvent that has not yet been investigated for this purpose. Experiments were carried out according to a Box Behnken design, and the best possible combination of temperature, extraction time and sample-to-solvent ratio for the extraction of phenolic compounds with a high antioxidant activity was obtained using RSM; the optimal conditions for the highest yield of phenolic compounds was 90 °C for 70 min at a sample-to-solvent ratio of 1:100 g/mL; however, at 1:60 g/mL, we retained 80% of the total phenolic compounds and maximized antioxidant capacity. Therefore the sample-to-solvent ratio of 1:60 was chosen as optimal and used for further validation. The validation test fell inside the confidence range indicated by the RSM output; hence, the statistical model was trusted. The proposed method is inexpensive, easily up-scaled to industry and shows potential as an additional source of income for olive growers.

  3. Antioxidative activity and emulsifying properties of cuttlefish skin gelatin modified by oxidised phenolic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aewsiri, T.; Benjakul, S.; Visessanguan, W.; Eun, J.B.; Wierenga, P.A.; Gruppen, H.

    2009-01-01

    Antioxidative activity and emulsifying properties of cuttlefish skin gelatin modified by different oxidised phenolic compounds including caffeic acid, ferulic acid and tannic acid at different concentrations were investigated. Oxidised phenolic compounds were covalently attached to gelatin as

  4. Irreversible adsorption of phenolic compounds by activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, T.M.; King, C.J.

    1988-12-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine the reasons why phenolic sorbates can be difficult to remove and recover from activated carbons. The chemical properties of the sorbate and the adsorbent surface, and the influences of changes in the adsorption and desorption conditions were investigated. Comparison of isotherms established after different contact times or at different temperatures indicated that phenolic compounds react on carbon surfaces. The reaction rate is a strong function of temperature. Regeneration of carbons by leaching with acetone recovered at least as much phenol as did regeneration with other solvents or with displacers. The physiochemical properties of adsorbents influences irreversible uptakes. Sorbates differed markedly in their tendencies to undergo irreversible adsorption. 64 refs., 47 figs., 32 tabs.

  5. Irreversible adsorption of phenolic compounds by activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, T.M.; King, C.J.

    1988-12-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine the reasons why phenolic sorbates can be difficult to remove and recover from activated carbons. The chemical properties of the sorbate and the adsorbent surface, and the influences of changes in the adsorption and desorption conditions were investigated. Comparison of isotherms established after different contact times or at different temperatures indicated that phenolic compounds react on carbon surfaces. The reaction rate is a strong function of temperature. Regeneration of carbons by leaching with acetone recovered at least as much phenol as did regeneration with other solvents or with displacers. The physiochemical properties of adsorbents influences irreversible uptakes. Sorbates differed markedly in their tendencies to undergo irreversible adsorption. 64 refs., 47 figs., 32 tabs

  6. Edible flowers as sources of phenolic compounds with bioactive potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Tânia C S P; Dias, Maria Inês; Barros, Lillian; Calhelha, Ricardo C; Alves, Maria José; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2018-03-01

    The edible flowers are widely used, but there is still a lot to be done in relation to its bioactive potential and its correlation with the presence of phenolic compounds. The aim of this study was determined the individual phenolic profile in the hydromethanolic extracts and infusion preparations of four different flower samples (Dahlia mignon, Rosa damascena 'Alexandria' and R. gallica 'Francesa' draft in R. canina, Calendula officinalis L., and Centaurea cyanus L.) and their bioactive potential (antioxidant, antiproliferative, and antibacterial capacity). All the studied flowers presented different profiles regarding their phenolic composition and revealed biological potential. The bioactive potential of the studied flowers was moderate, the hydromethanolic extracts of rose petals showed the best results for antioxidant and antibacterial assays, while the antiproliferative properties were only present in some of the tested cell lines, for the hydromethanolic extracts, in which dahlia and rose showed the best results. These results demonstrate that edible flowers can be used as a source of phenolic compounds with bioactive potential, which can be applied in the food sector, as foods and as sources natural ingredients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Diurnal Influence on Phenol Compound Dynamic into Leaves of Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Zhivetiev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Content of phenol compound in leaves of Alchemilla subcrenata, Achillea asiatica, Taraxacum officinale, Veronica chamaedrys was researched. The dynamics of alteration of phenol compound content during round the clock in October was determined. The dependence of phenol compound substance in leaves of study plants on temperature was shown.

  8. New phenolic compounds from Kokuto, non-centrifuged cane sugar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takara, Kensaku; Matsui, Daigo; Wada, Koji; Ichiba, Toshio; Chinen, Isao; Nakasone, Yoko

    2003-02-01

    Five new phenolic compounds, 4-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl-propanone (8), 3-[5-[(threo) 2,3-dihydro-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-hydroxymethyl-7-methoxybenzofuranyl]-propanoic acid (12), 2-[4-(3-hydroxy-1-propenyl)-2,6-dimethoxyphenoxy]-3-hydroxy-3-(4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)propyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside (13), 4-[(erythro) 2,3-dihydro-3(hydroxymethyl)-5-(3-hydropropyl)-7-methoxy-2-benzofuranyl]-2,6-dimethoxyphenyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside (14), 9-O-beta-D-xylopyranoside of icariol A2 (15), and known phenolic compounds were isolated from Kokuto, non-centrifuged cane sugar (Saccharum officinarum L.). Their structures were determined by a spectral investigation.

  9. Radiation induced chemical changes of phenolic compounds in strawberries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitfellner, F.; Solar, S. E-mail: sonja.solar@univie.ac.at; Sontag, G

    2003-06-01

    In unirradiated strawberries four phenolic acids (gallic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid), the flavonoids (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin and glycosides from kaempferol and quercetin were determined by reversed phase chromatography with diode array detection. Characteristic linear dose/concentration relationships were found for 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and two unidentified compounds. One of them may be usable as marker to prove an irradiation treatment.

  10. Radiation induced chemical changes of phenolic compounds in strawberries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitfellner, F.; Solar, S.; Sontag, G.

    2003-01-01

    In unirradiated strawberries four phenolic acids (gallic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid), the flavonoids (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin and glycosides from kaempferol and quercetin were determined by reversed phase chromatography with diode array detection. Characteristic linear dose/concentration relationships were found for 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and two unidentified compounds. One of them may be usable as marker to prove an irradiation treatment

  11. Laccase catalyzed synthesis of iodinated phenolic compounds with antifungal activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Ihssen

    Full Text Available Iodine is a well known antimicrobial compound. Laccase, an oxidoreductase which couples the one electron oxidation of diverse phenolic and non-phenolic substrates to the reduction of oxygen to water, is capable of oxidizing unreactive iodide to reactive iodine. We have shown previously that laccase-iodide treatment of spruce wood results in a wash-out resistant antimicrobial surface. In this study, we investigated whether phenolic compounds such as vanillin, which resembles sub-structures of softwood lignin, can be directly iodinated by reacting with laccase and iodide, resulting in compounds with antifungal activity. HPLC-MS analysis showed that vanillin was converted to iodovanillin by laccase catalysis at an excess of potassium iodide. No conversion of vanillin occurred in the absence of enzyme. The addition of redox mediators in catalytic concentrations increased the rate of iodide oxidation ten-fold and the yield of iodovanillin by 50%. Iodinated phenolic products were also detected when o-vanillin, ethyl vanillin, acetovanillone and methyl vanillate were incubated with laccase and iodide. At an increased educt concentration of 0.1 M an almost one to one molar ratio of iodide to vanillin could be used without compromising conversion rate, and the insoluble iodovanillin product could be recovered by simple centrifugation. The novel enzymatic synthesis procedure fulfills key criteria of green chemistry. Biocatalytically produced iodovanillin and iodo-ethyl vanillin had significant growth inhibitory effects on several wood degrading fungal species. For Trametes versicolor, a species causing white rot of wood, almost complete growth inhibition and a partial biocidal effect was observed on agar plates. Enzymatic tests indicated that the iodinated compounds acted as enzyme responsive, antimicrobial materials.

  12. Biological Activities of Phenolic Compounds Present in Virgin Olive Oil

    OpenAIRE

    Cicerale, Sara; Lucas, Lisa; Keast, Russell

    2010-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower incidence of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases and certain types of cancer. The apparent health benefits have been partially ascribed to the dietary consumption of virgin olive oil by Mediterranean populations. Much research has focused on the biologically active phenolic compounds naturally present in virgin olive oils to aid in explaining reduced mortality and morbidity experienced by people consuming a trad...

  13. Effect of phenolic compounds on the rapid direct enzymatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-05-15

    May 15, 2009 ... compounds in the environment, e.g. pesticides, bactericides, wood preservatives and dyes. Phenolic ... ers and explosives (Aktas et al., 2006). The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) lists 11 ... assay buffer consisted of 0.1 M Tris-HCl, pH 8.0 containing. 0.6 mM CaCl2. Commercial β-GUD was ...

  14. Anticancer activity of selected phenolic compounds: QSAR studies using ridge regression and neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Sisir; Vracko, Marjan; Bagchi, Manish C

    2007-11-01

    Phenol and its congeners are known to induce caspase-mediated apoptosis activity and cytotoxicity on various cancer cell lines. Apoptosis, scavenging of radicals, antioxidant, and pro-oxidant characteristics are primarily responsible for the antitumor activities of phenolic compounds. Quantitative structure-activity relationship studies on the cellular apoptosis and cytotoxicity of phenolic compounds have been investigated recently by Selassie and colleagues (J Med Chem; 48:7234, 2005) wherein models were developed for various carcinogenic cell lines. These quantitative structure-activity relationship models are based on few experimentally obtained physicochemical parameters such as Verloop's sterimol descriptor, hydrophobicity, Hammett electronic parameter, and octanol/water partition coefficient. The paper deals with structure-activity relationships of phenols and its derivatives for the development of predictive models from the standpoint of theoretical structural parameters and ridge regression methodology. The quantitative structure-activity relationship studies developed here for the caspase-mediated apoptosis activity and cytotoxicity on murine leukemia cell line (L1210), human promylolytic cell line (HL-60), human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7), parenteral human acute lymphoblastic cells (CCRF-CEM), and multidrug-resistant subline of CCRF-resistant to vinblastine (CEM/VLB) cells utilize physicochemical molecular descriptors calculated solely from the structure of phenolic compounds under investigation along with the descriptors used by Selassie and group. It is seen that such quantitative structure-activity relationships can provide a better quality predictive model for the phenolic compounds. The biological activities of the nine sets of phenolic compounds have been calculated based on ridge regression analysis that clearly gives a better significant correlation compared to the activities predicted by Selassie and co-workers. Counter

  15. Inhibitory Effect of Natural Phenolic Compounds on Aspergillus parasiticus Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina P. Pizzolitto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the impact of Aspergillus species on crops, it appears to be highly desirable to apply strategies to prevent their growth, as well as to eliminate or reduce their presence in food products. For this reason, the aims of this investigation were to evaluate the effects of ten natural phenolic compounds on the Aspergillus parasiticus growth and to determine which physicochemical properties are involved in the antifungal activity. According to the results of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values of the individual compounds, isoeugenol, carvacrol, and thymol were the most active phenolic components (1.26 mM, 1.47 mM, and 1.50 mM, resp., followed by eugenol (2.23 mM. On the other hand, creosol, p-cresol, o-cresol, m-cresol, vanillin, and phenol had no effects on fungal development. Logarithm of the octanol/water partition coefficient (log P, refractivity index (RI, and molar volume (MV were demonstrated to be the descriptors that best explained the antifungal activity correlated to lipophilicity, reactivity of the components, and steric aspect. These findings make an important contribution to the search for new compounds with antifungal activity.

  16. Characterization of phenols biodegradation by compound specific stable isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xi; Gilevska, Tetyana; Wenzig, Felix; Hans, Richnow; Vogt, Carsten

    2015-04-01

    Biodegradation of phenol and alkylphenols has been described under both oxic and anoxic conditions. In the absence of molecular oxygen, the degradation of phenolic compounds is initiated by microorganisms through carboxylation, fumarate addition to the methyl moiety or anoxic hydroxylation of the methyl moiety. Comparatively, under aerobic condition, the initiation mechanisms are revealed to be monoxygenation or dihydroxylation for phenol and ring hydroxylation or methyl group oxidation for cresols. While several studies biochemically characterized the enzymes and reaction mechanisms in the relevant degradation pathways, isotope fractionation patterns were rarely reported possibly due to constraints in current analytical methods. In this study, the carbon isotope fractionation patterns upon the degradation of phenol and cresols by several strains were analyzed by using isotope ratio mass spectrometry connected with liquid chromatography (LC-IRMS). The corresponding enrichment factors for carbon (ƐC) have been obtained. Cresols degradation by various strains showed generally moderate carbon isotope fractionation patterns with notable differences. For p-cresol degradation, five strains were examined. The aerobic strain Acinetobacter calcoaceticus NCIMB8250 exploits ring hydroxylation by molecular oxygen as initial reaction, and a ƐC value of -1.4±0.2‰ was obtained. Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes NCIMB 9867, an aerobic strain initiating cresols degradation via oxygen-dependent side chain hydroxylation, yielded a ƐC value of -2.3±0.2‰. Under nitrate-reducing conditions, Geobacter metallireducens DSM 7210 and Azoarcus buckelii DSM 14744 attacks p-cresol at the side chain by monohydroxylation using water as oxygen source; the two strains produced ƐC values of -3.6±0.4‰ and -2±0.1‰, accordingly. The sulfate-reducing Desulfosarcina cetonica DSM 7267 activating cresols by fumarate addition to the methyl moiety yielded ƐC values of -1.9±0.2‰ for p

  17. Antioxidant and Antiradical Properties of Selected Flavonoids and Phenolic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zübeyir Huyut

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds and flavonoids are known by their antioxidant properties and one of the most important sources for humans is the diet. Due to the harmful effects of synthetic antioxidants such as BHA and BHT, natural novel antioxidants have become the focus of attention for protecting foods and beverages and reducing oxidative stress in vivo. In the current study, we investigated the total antioxidant, metal chelating, Fe3+ and Cu2+ reduction, and free radical scavenging activities of some phenolic and flavonoid compounds including malvin, oenin, ID-8, silychristin, callistephin, pelargonin, 3,4-dihydroxy-5-methoxybenzoic acid, 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzaldehyde, and arachidonoyl dopamine. The antioxidant properties of these compounds at different concentrations (10–30 μg/mL were compared with those of reference antioxidants such as BHA, BHT, α-tocopherol, and trolox. Each substance showed dose-dependent antioxidant activity. Furthermore, oenin, malvin, arachidonoyl dopamine, callistephin, silychristin, and 3,4-dihydroxy-5-methoxybenzoic acid exhibited more effective antioxidant activity than that observed for the reference antioxidants. These results suggest that these novel compounds may function to protect foods and medicines and to reduce oxidative stress in vivo.

  18. Phenolic compounds and biological activity of Capsicum annuum L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate antifungal and antioxidant activities of vegetable extracts (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Dora, cv. Strizanka, cv. Morava), grown in Serbia. Different experimental models have included the determination content of total phenolics, total flavonoids, antioxidant capacity and minimum ...

  19. Radiation induced chemical changes of phenolic compounds in strawberries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitfellner, F.; Solar, S.; Sontag, G.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The investigations were directed to the determination of the effect of γ-irradiation on various phenolic compounds in strawberries in dependence of dose. A significant decrease of these compounds during irradiation could reduce their beneficial effect on health, which are based on their antioxidative and anticarcinogenic properties. On the other hand hydroxilation of phenolic acids has been proposed as a promising method to distinguish between irradiated and not irradiated fruits and vegetables. Irradiated and not irradiated strawberry samples were homogenized, centrifuged and chromatographically purified from matrix components on polyamide columns. For determination of hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acids, which are present as esters or as glycosides, the samples had to be acid/base hydrolized prior to purification. The individual compounds were separated by reversed phase chromatography and detected by means of a diode-array-detector. Peak identification was based on both UV-Vis-spectra and retention times compared with those of standards. In hydrolized samples four phenolic acids [gallic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, p-coumaric acid and caffeic acid] were identified. Only 4-hydroxybenzoic acid was affected by irradiation (build up with dose). Five flavonoids were detected in non hydrolized samples [(+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, kaempferol-3-glucoside, quercetin-3-glucoside and, in trace quantities, quercetin-3-galactoside], the concentration of the catechines and of kaempferol-3-glucoside decreased as irradiation dose increased, whereas those of quercetin-3-glucoside remained unchanged. In addition two as yet unclassified compounds showed a significant change of concentration upon irradiation. One of them (m/e = 450) is decreasing, one (m/e = 318) is increasing to the fivefold at a dose of 6 kGy

  20. Antioxidant Activity of Phenolic Compounds from Fava Bean Sprouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Koharu; Hosoya, Takahiro; Kawarazaki, Kai; Izawa, Norihiko; Kumazawa, Shigenori

    2016-06-01

    Fava beans are eaten all over the world and recently, marketing for their sprouts began in Japan. Fava bean sprouts contain more polyphenols and l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) than the bean itself. Our antioxidant screening program has shown that fava bean sprouts also possess a higher antioxidant activity than other commercially available sprouts and mature beans. However, the individual constituents of fava bean sprouts are not entirely known. In the present study, we investigated the phenolic compounds of fava bean sprouts and their antioxidant activity. Air-dried fava bean sprouts were treated with 80% methanol and the extract was partitioned in water with chloroform and ethyl acetate. HPLC analysis had shown that the ethyl acetate-soluble parts contained phenolic compounds, separated by preparative HPLC to yield 5 compounds (1-5). Structural analysis using NMR and MS revealed that the compounds isolated were kaempferol glycosides. All isolated compounds had an α-rhamnose at the C-7 position with different sugars attached at the C-3 position. Compounds 1-5 had β-galactose, β-glucose, α-rhamnose, 6-acetyl-β-galactose and 6-acetyl-β-glucose, respectively, at the C-3 position. The amount of l-DOPA in fava bean sprouts was determined by the quantitative (1) H NMR technique. The l-DOPA content was 550.45 mg ± 11.34 /100 g of the raw sprouts. The antioxidant activities of compounds 2-5 and l-DOPA were evaluated using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl scavenging assay. l-DOPA showed high antioxidant activity, but the isolated kaempferol glycosides showed weak activity. Therefore, it can be suggested that l-DOPA contributed to the antioxidant activity of fava bean sprouts. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  1. Competitive adsorption of phenolic compounds from aqueous solution using sludge-based activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, E F; Andriantsiferana, C; Wilhelm, A M; Delmas, H

    2011-01-01

    Preparation of activated carbon from sewage sludge is a promising approach to produce cheap and efficient adsorbent for pollutants removal as well as to dispose of sewage sludge. The first objective of this study was to investigate the physical and chemical properties (BET surface area, ash and elemental content, surface functional groups by Boehm titration and weight loss by thermogravimetric analysis) of the sludge-based activated carbon (SBAC) so as to give a basic understanding of its structure and to compare to those of two commercial activated carbons, PICA S23 and F22. The second and main objective was to evaluate the performance of SBAC for single and competitive adsorption of four substituted phenols (p-nitrophenol, p-chlorophenol, p-hydroxy benzoic acid and phenol) from their aqueous solutions. The results indicated that, despite moderate micropore and mesopore surface areas, SBAC had remarkable adsorption capacity for phenols, though less than PICA carbons. Uptake of the phenolic compound was found to be dependent on both the porosity and surface chemistry of the carbons. Furthermore, the electronegativity and the hydrophobicity of the adsorbate have significant influence on the adsorption capacity. The Langmuir and Freundlich models were used for the mathematical description of the adsorption equilibrium for single-solute isotherms. Moreover, the Langmuir-Freundlich model gave satisfactory results for describing multicomponent system isotherms. The capacity of the studied activated carbons to adsorb phenols from a multi-solute system was in the following order: p-nitrophenol > p-chlorophenol > PHBA > phenol.

  2. Phenolic Compounds Characterization and Biological Activities of Citrus aurantium Bloom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Oskoueian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus plants are known to possess beneficial biological activities for human health. In addition, ethnopharmacological application of plants is a good tool to explore their bioactivities and active compounds. This research was carried out to evaluate the phenolic and flavonoid analysis, antioxidant properties, anti inflammatory and anti cancer activity of Citrus aurantium bloom. The total phenolics and flavonoids results revealed that methanolic extract contained high total phenolics and flavonoids compared to ethanolic and boiling water extracts. The obtained total phenolics value for methanolic Citrus aurantium bloom extract was 4.55 ± 0.05 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE/g dry weight (DW, and for total flavonoids it was 3.83 ± 0.05 mg rutin equivalent/g DW. In addition, the RP-HPLC analyses of phenolics and flavonoids indicated the presence of gallic acid, pyrogallol, syringic acid, caffeic acid, rutin, quercetin and naringin as bioactive compounds. The antioxidant activity of Citrus aurantium bloom were examined by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH assay and the ferric reducing/antioxidant potential (FRAP. The free radical scavenging and ferric reducing power activities were higher for the methanolic extract of Citrus aurantium bloom at a concentration of 300 μg/mL, with values of 55.3% and 51.7%, respectively, as compared to the corresponding boiling water and ethanolic extracts, but the activities were lower than those of antioxidant standards such as BHT and α-tocopherol. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory result of methanolic extract showed appreciable reduction in nitric oxide production of stimulated RAW 264.7 cells at the presence of plant extract. Apart from that, the anticancer activity of the methanolic extract was investigated in vitro against human cancer cell lines (MCF-7; MDA-MB-231, human colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29 and Chang cell as a normal human hepatocyte. The obtained result demonstrated the moderate to

  3. Phenolic compounds characterization and biological activities of Citrus aurantium bloom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Ehsan; Oskoueian, Ehsan; Hendra, Rudi; Oskoueian, Armin; Jaafar, Hawa Z E

    2012-01-30

    Citrus plants are known to possess beneficial biological activities for human health. In addition, ethnopharmacological application of plants is a good tool to explore their bioactivities and active compounds. This research was carried out to evaluate the phenolic and flavonoid analysis, antioxidant properties, anti inflammatory and anti cancer activity of Citrus aurantium bloom. The total phenolics and flavonoids results revealed that methanolic extract contained high total phenolics and flavonoids compared to ethanolic and boiling water extracts. The obtained total phenolics value for methanolic Citrus aurantium bloom extract was 4.55 ± 0.05 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g dry weight (DW), and for total flavonoids it was 3.83 ± 0.05 mg rutin equivalent/g DW. In addition, the RP-HPLC analyses of phenolics and flavonoids indicated the presence of gallic acid, pyrogallol, syringic acid, caffeic acid, rutin, quercetin and naringin as bioactive compounds. The antioxidant activity of Citrus aurantium bloom were examined by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) assay and the ferric reducing/antioxidant potential (FRAP). The free radical scavenging and ferric reducing power activities were higher for the methanolic extract of Citrus aurantium bloom at a concentration of 300 μg/mL, with values of 55.3% and 51.7%, respectively, as compared to the corresponding boiling water and ethanolic extracts, but the activities were lower than those of antioxidant standards such as BHT and α-tocopherol. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory result of methanolic extract showed appreciable reduction in nitric oxide production of stimulated RAW 264.7 cells at the presence of plant extract. Apart from that, the anticancer activity of the methanolic extract was investigated in vitro against human cancer cell lines (MCF-7; MDA-MB-231), human colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29) and Chang cell as a normal human hepatocyte. The obtained result demonstrated the moderate to appreciable

  4. Phenolic compounds from the roots of Valeriana officinalis var. latifolia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng-Cheng; Ran, Xin-Hui; Luo, Huai-Rong; Liu, Yu-Qing; Zhou Jun [State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China. Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Ma, Qing-Yun; Zhao, You-Xing, E-mail: zhoujun3264@yahoo.com.cn, E-mail: zhaoyouxing@itbb.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Biology and Genetic Resources of Tropical Crops. Ministry of Agriculture, Institute of Tropical Bioscience and Biotechnology. Chinese Academy of Tropical Agriculture Sciences (China)

    2013-09-15

    A new benzofuran neolignan, dihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol 9-isovalerate, along with ten known phenolic compounds, olivil, pinoresinol, 8-hydroxypinoresinol, pinorespiol, 8-hydroxy- 7-epipinoresinol, trans-p-hydroxyphenyl- propenoic acid, cis-p-hydroxyphenyl-propenoic acid, ferulic acid, isoferulic acid and isovanillin were isolated from the roots of Valeriana officinalis var. latifolia. Their structures and configurations were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods. The inhibitory activity for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and enhancing activity on nerve growth factor (NGF)-mediated neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells of dihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol 9-isovaterate and olivil were evaluated. (author)

  5. Phenolic compounds from the roots of Valeriana officinalis var. latifolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Peng-Cheng; Ran, Xin-Hui; Luo, Huai-Rong; Liu, Yu-Qing; Zhou Jun; Ma, Qing-Yun; Zhao, You-Xing

    2013-01-01

    A new benzofuran neolignan, dihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol 9-isovalerate, along with ten known phenolic compounds, olivil, pinoresinol, 8-hydroxypinoresinol, pinorespiol, 8-hydroxy- 7-epipinoresinol, trans-p-hydroxyphenyl- propenoic acid, cis-p-hydroxyphenyl-propenoic acid, ferulic acid, isoferulic acid and isovanillin were isolated from the roots of Valeriana officinalis var. latifolia. Their structures and configurations were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods. The inhibitory activity for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and enhancing activity on nerve growth factor (NGF)-mediated neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells of dihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol 9-isovaterate and olivil were evaluated. (author)

  6. Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activity of Phalaenopsis Orchid Hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truong Ngoc Minh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Phalaenopsis spp. is the most commercially and economically important orchid, but their plant parts are often left unused, which has caused environmental problems. To date, reports on phytochemical analyses were most available on endangered and medicinal orchids. The present study was conducted to determine the total phenolics, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity of ethanol extracts prepared from leaves and roots of six commercial hybrid Phalaenopsis spp. Leaf extracts of “Chian Xen Queen” contained the highest total phenolics with a value of 11.52 ± 0.43 mg gallic acid equivalent per g dry weight and the highest total flavonoids (4.98 ± 0.27 mg rutin equivalent per g dry weight. The antioxidant activity of root extracts evaluated by DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging assay and β-carotene bleaching method was higher than those of the leaf extracts. Eleven phenolic compounds were identified, namely, protocatechuic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, caffeic acid, syringic acid, vanillin, ferulic acid, sinapic acid, p-coumaric acid, benzoic acid, and ellagic acid. Ferulic, p-coumaric and sinapic acids were concentrated largely in the roots. The results suggested that the root extracts from hybrid Phalaenopsis spp. could be a potential source of natural antioxidants. This study also helps to reduce the amount of this orchid waste in industrial production, as its roots can be exploited for pharmaceutical purposes.

  7. Mineral analysis, anthocyanins and phenolic compounds in wine residues flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennemann Gabriela Datsch

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the mineral content (N, P, K, S, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, Fe and Zn, anthocyanins and phenolic compounds in flours produced from residues of different grape cultivars from the wineries in the Southern region of Brazil. Mineral analysis showed a significant difference for all grape cultivar, with the exception for phosphorus content. Residues from cv. Seibel showed higher levels of N, Cu and Mg. The cultivars Ancelotta, Tanat and Bordô present higher contents of K, Zn, Mn, Fe and Ca. For the concentration of anthocyanins, cultivars Cabernet Sauvignon (114.7 mg / 100g, Tannat (88.5 mg / 100 g and Ancelotta (33.8 mg/100 g had the highest concentrations. The cultivars Pinot Noir (7.0 g AGE / 100 g, Tannat (4.3 g AGE / 100 g, and Ancelotta (3.9 g AGE / 100 g had the highest content of phenolic compounds. Considering these results, it became evident the potential of using the residue of winemaking to produce flour for human consumption, highlighting the grapes ‘Tannat' and ‘Ancellotta'.

  8. Effectiveness of Phenolic Compounds against Citrus Green Mould

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona M. Sanzani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stored citrus fruit suffer huge losses because of the development of green mould caused by Penicillium digitatum. Usually synthetic fungicides are employed to control this disease, but their use is facing some obstacles, such public concern about possible adverse effects on human and environmental health and the development of resistant pathogen populations. In the present study quercetin, scopoletin and scoparone—phenolic compounds present in several agricultural commodities and associated with response to stresses—were firstly tested in vitro against P. digitatum and then applied in vivo on oranges cv. Navelina. Fruits were wound-treated (100 µg, pathogen-inoculated, stored and surveyed for disease incidence and severity. Although only a minor (≤13% control effect on P. digitatum growth was recorded in vitro, the in vivo trial results were encouraging. In fact, on phenolic-treated oranges, symptoms appeared at 6 days post-inoculation (DPI, i.e., with a 2 day-delay as compared to the untreated control. Moreover, at 8 DPI, quercetin, scopoletin, and scoparone significantly reduced disease incidence and severity by 69%–40% and 85%–70%, respectively, as compared to the control. At 14 DPI, scoparone was the most active molecule. Based on the results, these compounds might represent an interesting alternative to synthetic fungicides.

  9. Chemometric compositional analysis of phenolic compounds in fermenting samples and wines using different infrared spectroscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleixandre-Tudo, Jose Luis; Nieuwoudt, Helene; Aleixandre, Jose Luis; du Toit, Wessel

    2018-01-01

    The wine industry requires reliable methods for the quantification of phenolic compounds during the winemaking process. Infrared spectroscopy appears as a suitable technique for process control and monitoring. The ability of Fourier transform near infrared (FT-NIR), attenuated total reflectance mid infrared (ATR-MIR) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopies to predict compositional phenolic levels during red wine fermentation and aging was investigated. Prediction models containing a large number of samples collected over two vintages from several industrial fermenting tanks as well as wine samples covering a varying number of vintages were validated. FT-NIR appeared as the most accurate technique to predict the phenolic content. Although slightly less accurate models were observed, ATR-MIR and FT-IR can also be used for the prediction of the majority of phenolic measurements. Additionally, the slope and intercept test indicated a systematic error for the three spectroscopies which seems to be slightly more pronounced for HPLC generated phenolics data than for the spectrophotometric parameters. However, the results also showed that the predictions made with the three instruments are statistically comparable. The robustness of the prediction models was also investigated and discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Inhibition of cellulose enzymatic hydrolysis by laccase-derived compounds from phenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Taravilla, Alfredo; Tomás-Pejó, Elia; Demuez, Marie; González-Fernández, Cristina; Ballesteros, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    The presence of inhibitors compounds after pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials affects the saccharification and fermentation steps in bioethanol production processes. Even though, external addition of laccases selectively removes the phenolic compounds from lignocellulosic prehydrolysates, when it is coupled to saccharification step, lower hydrolysis yields are attained. Vanillin, syringaldehyde and ferulic acid are phenolic compounds commonly found in wheat-straw prehydrolysate after steam-explosion pretreatment. These three phenolic compounds were used in this study to elucidate the inhibitory mechanisms of laccase-derived compounds after laccase treatment. Reaction products derived from laccase oxidation of vanillin and syringaldehyde showed to be the strongest inhibitors. The presence of these products causes a decrement on enzymatic hydrolysis yield of a model cellulosic substrate (Sigmacell) of 46.6 and 32.6%, respectively at 24 h. Moreover, a decrease in more than 50% of cellulase and β-glucosidase activities was observed in presence of laccase and vanillin. This effect was attributed to coupling reactions between phenoxyl radicals and enzymes. On the other hand, when the hydrolysis of Sigmacell was performed in presence of prehydrolysate from steam-exploded wheat straw a significant inhibition on enzymatic hydrolysis was observed independently of laccase treatment. This result pointed out that the other components of wheat-straw prehydrolysate are affecting the enzymatic hydrolysis to a higher extent than the possible laccase-derived products. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  11. Synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolone and macrolide antibiotics with phenolic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euna eOh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The increasing resistance of Campylobacter to clinically-important antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones and macrolides, is a serious public health problem. The objective of this study is to investigate synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolones and macrolides in combination with phenolic compounds. Synergistic antimicrobial activity was measured by performing a checkerboard assay with ciprofloxacin and erythromycin in the presence of 21 phenolic compounds. Membrane permeability changes in C. jejuni by phenolic compounds were determined by measuring the level of intracellular uptake of 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN. Antibiotic accumulation assays were performed to evaluate the level of ciprofloxacin accumulation in C. jejuni. Six phenolic compounds, including p-coumaric acid, sinapic acid, caffeic acid, vanillic acid, gallic acid, and taxifolin, significantly increased the susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin in several human and poultry isolates. The synergistic antimicrobial effect was also observed in ciprofloxacin- and erythromycin-resistant C. jejuni strains. The phenolic compounds also substantially increased membrane permeability and antibiotic accumulation in C. jejuni. Interestingly, some phenolic compounds, such as gallic acid and taxifolin, significantly reduced the expression of the CmeABC multidrug efflux pump. Phenolic compounds increased the NPN accumulation in the cmeB mutant, indicating phenolic compounds may affect the membrane permeability. In this study, we successfully demonstrated that combinational treatment of C. jejuni with antibiotics and phenolic compounds synergistically inhibits C. jejuni by impacting both antimicrobial influx and efflux.

  12. Optimization of extraction of phenolic compounds from flax shives by pressurized low-polarity water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Mazza, G

    2006-10-04

    Pressurized low-polarity water (PLPW) extraction of phenolic compounds from flax shive was investigated using statistically based optimization and the "one-factor-at-a-time" method. Extraction variables examined using central composite design (CCD) included temperature, flow rate, and NaOH concentration of the extracting water. Extraction of phenolic compounds including p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, vanillic acid, syringic acid, vanillin, acetovanillone, and feruric acid was affected by temperature and NaOH concentration; and extraction of all phenolic compounds, except ferulic acid, increased with temperature and NaOH concentration of the extracting water. Flow rate had little effect on concentration of phenolic compounds at equilibrium, but the extraction rate at the early phase was higher for higher flow rates. The mechanism of PLPW extraction of flax shive phenolics was also investigated using a two-site kinetic model and a thermodynamic model. To determine the extraction mechanism, flow rate was varied from 0.3 to 4.0 mL/min while temperature and NaOH concentration were fixed at 180 degrees C and 0.47 M, respectively. The flow rate tests showed the extraction rates of total phenolic (TP) compounds increased with flow rate and can be described by a thermodynamic model. The results from the thermodynamic model demonstrated that a K(D) value of 30 agreed with the experimental data in the flow rate range of 0.3-4.0 mL/min. When the effect of the three independent variables was evaluated simultaneously using CCD, a maximum TP concentration of 5.8 g/kg of dry flax shive (DFS) was predicted from the combination of a high temperature (230.5 degrees C), a high initial concentration of NaOH (0.63 M), and a low flow rate (0.7 mL/min). Maximum TP concentration of 5.7 g/kg of DFS was obtained from extraction conditions of 180 degrees C, 0.3 or 0.5 mL/min, and 0.47 M NaOH at equilibrium. A second-order regression model generated by CCD predicted a maximum TP concentration of 5.8 g

  13. AMPK modulatory activity of olive-tree leaves phenolic compounds: Bioassay-guided isolation on adipocyte model and in silico approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Sánchez, Cecilia; Olivares-Vicente, Mariló; Rodríguez-Pérez, Celia; Herranz-López, María; Lozano-Sánchez, Jesús; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Encinar, José Antonio; Micol, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    Olive-tree polyphenols have demonstrated potential for the management of obesity-related pathologies. We aimed to explore the capacity of Olive-tree leaves extract to modulate triglyceride accumulation and AMP-activated protein kinase activity (AMPK) on a hypertrophic adipocyte model. Intracellular triglycerides and AMPK activity were measured on the hypertrophic 3T3-L1 adipocyte model by AdipoRed and immunofluorescence microscopy, respectively. Reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass detection with electrospray ionization (RP-HPLC-ESI-TOF/MS) was used for the fractionation of the extract and the identification of the compounds. In-silico molecular docking of the AMPK alpha-2, beta and gamma subunits with the identified compounds was performed. Olive-tree leaves extract decreased the intracellular lipid accumulation through AMPK-dependent mechanisms in hypertrophic adipocytes. Secoiridoids, cinnamic acids, phenylethanoids and phenylpropanoids, flavonoids and lignans were the candidates predicted to account for this effect. Molecular docking revealed that some compounds may be AMPK-gamma modulators. The modulatory effects of compounds over the alpha and beta AMPK subunits appear to be less probable. Olive-tree leaves polyphenols modulate AMPK activity, which may become a therapeutic aid in the management of obesity-associated disturbances. The natural occurrence of these compounds may have important nutritional implications for the design of functional ingredients.

  14. AMPK modulatory activity of olive–tree leaves phenolic compounds: Bioassay-guided isolation on adipocyte model and in silico approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Sánchez, Cecilia; Olivares-Vicente, Mariló; Rodríguez-Pérez, Celia; Herranz-López, María; Lozano-Sánchez, Jesús; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Encinar, José Antonio; Micol, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    Scope Olive-tree polyphenols have demonstrated potential for the management of obesity-related pathologies. We aimed to explore the capacity of Olive-tree leaves extract to modulate triglyceride accumulation and AMP-activated protein kinase activity (AMPK) on a hypertrophic adipocyte model. Methods Intracellular triglycerides and AMPK activity were measured on the hypertrophic 3T3-L1 adipocyte model by AdipoRed and immunofluorescence microscopy, respectively. Reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass detection with electrospray ionization (RP-HPLC-ESI-TOF/MS) was used for the fractionation of the extract and the identification of the compounds. In-silico molecular docking of the AMPK alpha-2, beta and gamma subunits with the identified compounds was performed. Results Olive-tree leaves extract decreased the intracellular lipid accumulation through AMPK-dependent mechanisms in hypertrophic adipocytes. Secoiridoids, cinnamic acids, phenylethanoids and phenylpropanoids, flavonoids and lignans were the candidates predicted to account for this effect. Molecular docking revealed that some compounds may be AMPK-gamma modulators. The modulatory effects of compounds over the alpha and beta AMPK subunits appear to be less probable. Conclusions Olive-tree leaves polyphenols modulate AMPK activity, which may become a therapeutic aid in the management of obesity-associated disturbances. The natural occurrence of these compounds may have important nutritional implications for the design of functional ingredients. PMID:28278224

  15. Ultrasound Assisted Extraction of Phenolic Compounds from Peaches and Pumpkins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altemimi, Ammar; Watson, Dennis G.; Choudhary, Ruplal; Dasari, Mallika R.; Lightfoot, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) method was used to optimize the extraction of phenolic compounds from pumpkins and peaches. The response surface methodology (RSM) was used to study the effects of three independent variables each with three treatments. They included extraction temperatures (30, 40 and 50°C), ultrasonic power levels (30, 50 and 70%) and extraction times (10, 20 and 30 min). The optimal conditions for extractions of total phenolics from pumpkins were inferred to be a temperature of 41.45°C, a power of 44.60% and a time of 25.67 min. However, an extraction temperature of 40.99°C, power of 56.01% and time of 25.71 min was optimal for recovery of free radical scavenging activity (measured by 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) reduction). The optimal conditions for peach extracts were an extraction temperature of 41.53°C, power of 43.99% and time of 27.86 min for total phenolics. However, an extraction temperature of 41.60°C, power of 44.88% and time of 27.49 min was optimal for free radical scavenging activity (judged by from DPPH reduction). Further, the UAE processes were significantly better than solvent extractions without ultrasound. By electron microscopy it was concluded that ultrasonic processing caused damage in cells for all treated samples (pumpkin, peach). However, the FTIR spectra did not show any significant changes in chemical structures caused by either ultrasonic processing or solvent extraction. PMID:26885655

  16. Removal of organic pollutants by surfactant modified zeolite: comparison between ionizable phenolic compounds and non-ionizable organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jie; Meng, Wenna; Wu, Deyi; Zhang, Zhenjia; Kong, Hainan

    2012-09-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the adsorption capability and mechanism of hexadecyltrimethylammonium modified zeolite, which was synthesized from coal fly ash, for the removal of ionizable phenolic compounds (phenol, p-chlorophenol and bisphenol A, with different pK(a)) and non-ionizable organic compounds (aniline, nitrobenzene, and naphthalene, with different hydrophobicity). The obtained zeolite was identified as type Na-P1 (Na(6)Al(6)Si(10)O(32)·12H(2)O, JCPDS code 39-0219), which is classified into the gismondine group with a pore size of 3.1 Å × 4.5 Å [100] and 2.8 Å × 4.8 Å [101]. The adsorption of the two kinds of organic compounds was due to loaded surfactant bilayer because modified zeolite showed great ability for the removal of organic chemicals while little adsorption by zeolite was observed. The isotherm data of ionizable compounds fitted well to the Langmuir model but those of non-ionizable chemicals followed a linear equation. Uptake of ionizable compounds depended greatly on pH, increasing at alkaline pH conditions. In contrary, adsorption of non-ionizable chemicals was essentially the same at all pH levels studied. The adsorption of both kinds of organic compounds correlated well to k(ow) value, suggesting that more hydrophobic organic contaminants are more easily retained by modified zeolite. Based on the different adsorption behavior, the uptake of non-ionizable pollutants was thought to be a single partitioning process into the surfactant bilayer. For ionizable compounds, however, interaction of the phenol group(s) with the positively charged "head" of surfactant additionally functions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Antioxidant activity relationship of phenolic compounds in Hypericum perforatum L.

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    Petrović Slobodan S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The St John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum; Clusiaceae has been used in traditional and modern medicine for a long time due to its high content of biologically active phenolics. The purpose of this work was to develop a method for their fractionation and identification, and to determine the most active antioxidant compounds in plant extract. Results An LC-MS method which enables fast qualitative and semiquantitative analysis was developed. The composition determined is in agreement with the previous results, where 6 flavonoids, 4 naphthodianthrones and 4 phloroglucinols have been identified. Significant antioxidant activity was determined for most of the fractions by DPPH assay (the lowest IC50 of 0.52 μg/ml, NO scavenging (6.11 μg/ml, superoxide scavenging (1.86 μg/ml, lipid peroxidation (0.0079 μg/ml and FRAP (the highest reduction capacity of 104 mg Fe equivalents/g assays. Conclusion LC-MS technique has been successfully applied for a quick separation and identification of the major components of H. perforatum fractions. Majority of the fractions analyzed have expressed a very high antioxidative activity when compared to synthetic antioxidants. The antioxidant activity could be attributed to flavonoids and phenolic acids, while phloroglucinols and naphthodianthrones showed no significant activity. It is demonstrated that it is possible to obtain, by fractionation, H. perforatum preparations with significantly increased phloroglucinols-to-naphthodianthrones ratio (up to 95:5.

  18. Identification and quantification of phenolic compounds from the forage legume sainfoin ( Onobrychis viciifolia ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regos, Ionela; Urbanella, Andrea; Treutter, Dieter

    2009-07-08

    Phenolic compounds of sainfoin ( Onobrychis viciifolia ) variety Cotswold Common are assumed to contribute to its nutritive value and bioactive properties. A purified acetone/water extract was separated by Sephadex LH-20 gel chromatography. Sixty-three phenolic and other aromatic compounds were identified by means of chemical, chromatographic, and spectroscopic methods. Reverse phase HPLC with diode array and chemical reaction detection was used to investigate the phenolic composition of different plant organs. All plant parts showed specific phenolic profiles. Moreover, there were considerable variations in the phenolic content among individual plants of the same variety. The three most abundant phenolic compounds were found to be arbutin [predominant in petiols, 17.7 mg/g of dry weight (DW)], rutin (predominant in leaves, 19.9 mg/g of DW), and catechin (predominant flavanol in petiols, 3.5 mg/g of DW). The present study reveals that the phenolic profile of sainfoin is even more complex than hitherto assumed.

  19. Profile of the Phenolic Compounds of Rosa rugosa Petals

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    Andrzej Cendrowski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rosa rugosa petals are a rich source of phenolic compounds, which determined their antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to determine the polyphenolic composition of not processed petals of Rosa rugosa collected from the commodity crops and to determine the variability of the contained therein polyphenols between harvesting seasons. Twenty polyphenols were identified by UPLC-ESI-MS. The main fraction of polyphenols was ellagitannins, which are 69 to 74% of the total polyphenols of the petals. In the petals of Rosa rugosa, four anthocyanins have been identified: cyanidin 3,5-di-O-glucoside, peonidin 3-O-sophoroside, peonidin 3,5-di-O-glucoside, and peonidin 3-O-glucoside, of which the predominant peonidin 3,5-di-O-glucoside represented approx. 85% of all the determined anthocyanin compounds. It was found that the petals of Rosa rugosa are a valuable source of bioactive compounds and can be considered as a healthy valuable resource.

  20. Olive Tree (Olea europeae L.) Leaves: Importance and Advances in the Analysis of Phenolic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaza, Leila; Taamalli, Amani; Nsir, Houda; Zarrouk, Mokhtar

    2015-11-03

    Phenolic compounds are becoming increasingly popular because of their potential role in contributing to human health. Experimental evidence obtained from human and animal studies demonstrate that phenolic compounds from Olea europaea leaves have biological activities which may be important in the reduction in risk and severity of certain chronic diseases. Therefore, an accurate profiling of phenolics is a crucial issue. In this article, we present a review work on current treatment and analytical methods used to extract, identify, and/or quantify phenolic compounds in olive leaves.

  1. Olive Tree (Olea europeae L.) Leaves: Importance and Advances in the Analysis of Phenolic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaza, Leila; Taamalli, Amani; Nsir, Houda; Zarrouk, Mokhtar

    2015-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are becoming increasingly popular because of their potential role in contributing to human health. Experimental evidence obtained from human and animal studies demonstrate that phenolic compounds from Olea europaea leaves have biological activities which may be important in the reduction in risk and severity of certain chronic diseases. Therefore, an accurate profiling of phenolics is a crucial issue. In this article, we present a review work on current treatment and analytical methods used to extract, identify, and/or quantify phenolic compounds in olive leaves. PMID:26783953

  2. Effects of extraction methods of phenolic compounds from Xanthium strumarium L. and their antioxidant activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Scherer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of extraction methods and solvents on overall yield, total phenolic content, antioxidant activity, and the composition of the phenolic compounds in Xanthium strumarium extracts were studied. The antioxidant activity was determined by using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH, and the composition of the phenolic compounds was determined by HPLC-DAD and LC/MS. All results were affected by the extraction method, especially by the solvent used, and the best results were obtained with the methanol extract. The methanolic and ethanolic extracts exhibited strong antioxidant activity, and the chlorogenic and ferulic acids were the most abundant phenolic compounds in the extracts.

  3. Variation in phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity in apple seeds of seven cultivars

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Ying; Fan, Mingtao; Ran, Junjian; Zhang, Tingjing; Sun, Huiye; Dong, Mei; Zhang, Zhe; Zheng, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenols are the predominant ingredients in apple seeds. However, few data are available on the phenolic profile or antioxidant activity in apple seeds in previous researches. In this study, low-molecular-weight phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity in seeds, peels, and flesh of seven apple cultivars grown in northwest China were measured and analyzed using HPLC and FRAP, DPPH, ABTS assays, respectively. HPLC analysis revealed phloridzin as the dominant phenolic compound in the seeds...

  4. Persistent Toxic Burdens of Halogenated Phenolic Compounds in Humans and Wildlife

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montano Garces, M.; Gutleb, A.C.; Murk, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Halogenated phenolic compounds (HPCs) including hydroxylated polychlorobiphenyls (OH-PCBs) and hydroxylated polybromodiphenyl-ethers (OH-PBDEs) can be persistent organic pollutant (POP) metabolites or natural marine compounds. Structurally similar to thyroid hormones (THs), they are retained in

  5. Liquid phase in situ hydrodeoxygenation of biomass-derived phenolic compounds to hydrocarbons over bifunctional catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junfeng Feng; Chung-yun Hse; Zhongzhi Yang; Kui Wang; Jianchun Jiang; Junming Xu

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to find an effective method for converting renewable biomass-derived phenolic compounds into hydrocarbons bio-fuel via in situ catalytic hydrodeoxygenation. The in situ hydrodeoxygenation of biomass-derived phenolic compounds was carried out in methanol-water solvent over bifunctional catalysts of Raney Ni and HZSM-5 or H-Beta. In the in...

  6. Effect of enzyme treatment during mechanical extraction of olive oil on phenolic compounds and polysaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vierhuis, E.; Maurizio, S.; Baldioli, M.; Schols, H.A.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Montedoro, G.F.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the use of cell-wall-degrading-enzyme preparations during the mechanical extraction process of virgin olive oil on the phenolic compounds and polysaccharides was investigated. The use of the enzyme preparations increased the concentration of phenolic compounds in the paste, oil, and

  7. Biodegradation of phenolic compounds with oxidases from sorghum and non-defined mixed bacterium media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obame, C. E. L.; Savadogo, P. W.; Mamoudou, D. H.; Dembele, R. H.; Traore, A. S.

    2009-07-01

    The biodegradation of the phenolic compounds is performed using oxidative enzymes, e. g. polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) and peroxidases (POXs). These oxidases displaying a wide spectrum for the oxidation of phenolic compounds were isolated either from sorghum or mixed bacteria. Spectrophotometric methods were used to assess the monophenolase and diphenolase activities of PPOs as well as the hydrogen-dependant oxidation of POXs. (Author)

  8. Biodegradation of phenolic compounds with oxidases from sorghum and non-defined mixed bacterium media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obame, C. E. L.; Savadogo, P. W.; Mamoudou, D. H.; Dembele, R. H.; Traore, A. S.

    2009-01-01

    The biodegradation of the phenolic compounds is performed using oxidative enzymes, e. g. polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) and peroxidases (POXs). These oxidases displaying a wide spectrum for the oxidation of phenolic compounds were isolated either from sorghum or mixed bacteria. Spectrophotometric methods were used to assess the monophenolase and diphenolase activities of PPOs as well as the hydrogen-dependant oxidation of POXs. (Author)

  9. Detection and quantification of phenolic compounds in olive oil by high resolution {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christophoridou, Stella [NMR Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Voutes, 71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Dais, Photis [NMR Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Voutes, 71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)], E-mail: dais@chemistry.uoc.gr

    2009-02-09

    High resolution {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy has been employed as a versatile and rapid method to analyze the polar fraction of extra virgin olive oils containing various classes of phenolic compounds. The strategy for identification of phenolic compounds is based on the NMR chemical shifts of a large number of model compounds assigned by using two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore, 2D NMR was applied to phenolic extracts in an attempt to discover additional phenolic compounds. The {sup 1}H NMR methodology was successful in detecting simple phenols, such as p-coumaric acid, vanillic acid, homovanillyl alcohol, vanillin, free tyrosol, and free hydroxytyrosol, the flavonols apigenin and luteolin, the lignans (+) pinoresinol, (+) 1-acetoxypinoresinol and syringaresinol, two isomers of the aldehydic form of oleuropein and ligstroside, the dialdehydic form of oleuropein and ligstroside lacking a carboxymethyl group, and finally total hydroxytyrosol and total tyrosol reflecting the total amounts of free and esterified hydroxytyrol and tyrosol, respectively. The absolute amount of each phenolic constituent was determined in the polar fraction by using anhydrous 1,3,5-triazine as an internal standard.

  10. Phenolic Compounds from the Leaves of Eucalyptus microcorys F. Muell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmara A. C. Fortes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new acylated glycoside, 4-O-( 4’,6’-di-O-galloyl- b - D -glucopyranosyl-trans-p-coumaric acid, named microcoryn ( 1 , together with sixteen known phenolic compounds, 5-O-(6'-O-galloyl- b - D -glucopyranosyl-gentisic acid (2, ellagic acid (3, gallic acid (4, kaempferol (5, quercetin (6, 3-O-galloyl- b - D -glucose (7, 2,3,6-tri-O-galloyl- b - D -glucose (8, 1,2,4,6-tetra-O-galloyl- b - D -glucose (9, 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl- b - D -glucose (10, 4,6-hexahydroxydiphenoyl- b - D -glucose (11, gemin D (12, tellimagrandin I (13, tellimagrandin II (14, isocoriariin F (15, oenothein C (16, and oenothein B (17 were isolated from the leaves of Eucalyptus microcorys . The structure of the new compound was elucidated by spectroscopic data, especially by 2D NMR techniques. This is the first phytochemical investigation of this plant’s leaf extract.

  11. Novel Magnetic Zinc Oxide Nanotubes for Phenol Adsorption: Mechanism Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa F. Elkady

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Considering the great impact of a material’s surface area on adsorption processes, hollow nanotube magnetic zinc oxide with a favorable surface area of 78.39 m2/g was fabricated with the assistance of microwave technology in the presence of poly vinyl alcohol (PVA as a stabilizing agent followed by sonic precipitation of magnetite nano-particles. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM micrographs identified the nanotubes’ morphology in the synthesized material with an average aspect ratio of 3. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis verified the combination of magnetite material with the hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO in the prepared material. The immobilization of magnetite nanoparticles on to ZnO was confirmed using vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM. The sorption affinity of the synthesized magnetic ZnO nanotube for phenolic compounds from aqueous solutions was examined as a function of various processing factors. The degree of acidity of the phenolic solution has great influence on the phenol sorption process on to magnetic ZnO. The calculated value of ΔH0 designated the endothermic nature of the phenol uptake process on to the magnetic ZnO nanotubes. Mathematical modeling indicated a combination of physical and chemical adsorption mechanisms of phenolic compounds on to the fabricated magnetic ZnO nanotubes. The kinetic process correlated better with the second-order rate model compared to the first-order rate model. This result indicates the predominance of the chemical adsorption process of phenol on to magnetic ZnO nanotubes.

  12. Echinacea standardization: analytical methods for phenolic compounds and typical levels in medicinal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, N B; Burgess, E J; Glennie, V L

    2001-04-01

    A proposed standard extraction and HPLC analysis method has been used to measure typical levels of various phenolic compounds in the medicinally used Echinacea species. Chicoric acid was the main phenolic in E. purpurea roots (mean 2.27% summer, 1.68% autumn) and tops (2.02% summer, 0.52% autumn), and echinacoside was the main phenolic in E. angustifolia (1.04%) and E. pallida roots (0.34%). Caftaric acid was the other main phenolic compound in E. purpurea roots (0.40% summer, 0.35% autumn) and tops (0.82% summer, 0.18% autumn), and cynarin was a characteristic component of E. angustifolia roots (0.12%). Enzymatic browning during extraction could reduce the measured levels of phenolic compounds by >50%. Colorimetric analyses for total phenolics correlated well with the HPLC results for E. purpurea and E. angustifolia, but the colorimetric method gave higher values.

  13. The role of humic and fulvic acids in the phototransformation of phenolic compounds in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calza, P., E-mail: paola.calza@unito.it; Vione, D.; Minero, C.

    2014-09-15

    Humic substances (HS) are known to act as photosensitizers toward the transformation of pollutants in the surface layer of natural waters. This study focused on the role played by HS toward the transformation of xenobiotics in seawater, with the purpose of assessing the prevailing degradation routes. Phenol was chosen as model xenobiotic and its transformation was investigated under simulated sunlight in the presence of terrestrial or marine humic and fulvic acids, in pure water at pH 8, artificial seawater (ASW) or natural seawater (NSW). The following parameters were determined: (1) the phenol degradation rate; (2) the variation in HS concentration with irradiation time; (3) the production of transformation products; (4) the influence of iron species on the transformation process. Faster transformation of phenol was observed with humic acids (HA) compared to fulvic acids (SRFA), and transformation induced by both HA and SRFA was faster in ASW than that in pure water. These observations can be explained by assuming an interplay between different competing and sometimes opposite processes, including the competition between chloride, bromide and dissolved oxygen for reaction with HS triplet states. The analysis of intermediates formed in the different matrices under study showed the formation of several hydroxylated (hydroquinone, 1,4-benzoquinone, resorcinol) and condensed compounds (2,2′-bisphenol, 4,4′-bisphenol, 4-phenoxyphenol). Although 1,4-benzoquinone was the main transformation product, formation of condensed molecules was significant with both HA and SRFA. Experiments on natural seawater spiked with HS confirmed the favored formation of condensed products, suggesting a key role of humic matter in dimerization reactions occurring in saline water. - Highlights: • Phenol transformation in seawater can be photosensitized by humic substances. • Dimeric species are peculiar intermediates formed in the process. • Phenol degradation occurred faster with

  14. Data on coffee composition and mass spectrometry analysis of mixtures of coffee related carbohydrates, phenolic compounds and peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Ana S P; Nunes, Fernando M; Simões, Cristiana; Maciel, Elisabete; Domingues, Pedro; Domingues, M Rosário M; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2017-08-01

    The data presented here are related to the research paper entitled "Transglycosylation reactions, a main mechanism of phenolics incorporation in coffee melanoidins: inhibition by Maillard reaction" (Moreira et al., 2017) [1]. Methanolysis was applied in coffee fractions to quantify glycosidically-linked phenolics in melanoidins. Moreover, model mixtures mimicking coffee beans composition were roasted and analyzed using mass spectrometry-based approaches to disclose the regulatory role of proteins in transglycosylation reactions extension. This article reports the detailed chemical composition of coffee beans and derived fractions. In addition, it provides gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) chromatograms and respective GC-MS spectra of silylated methanolysis products obtained from phenolic compounds standards, as well as the detailed identification of all compounds observed by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) analysis of roasted model mixtures, paving the way for the identification of the same type of compounds in other samples.

  15. Data on coffee composition and mass spectrometry analysis of mixtures of coffee related carbohydrates, phenolic compounds and peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana S.P. Moreira

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The data presented here are related to the research paper entitled “Transglycosylation reactions, a main mechanism of phenolics incorporation in coffee melanoidins: inhibition by Maillard reaction” (Moreira et al., 2017 [1]. Methanolysis was applied in coffee fractions to quantify glycosidically-linked phenolics in melanoidins. Moreover, model mixtures mimicking coffee beans composition were roasted and analyzed using mass spectrometry-based approaches to disclose the regulatory role of proteins in transglycosylation reactions extension. This article reports the detailed chemical composition of coffee beans and derived fractions. In addition, it provides gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS chromatograms and respective GC–MS spectra of silylated methanolysis products obtained from phenolic compounds standards, as well as the detailed identification of all compounds observed by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS analysis of roasted model mixtures, paving the way for the identification of the same type of compounds in other samples.

  16. Optimized Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction of Phenolic Compounds from Polygonum cuspidatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hung Kuo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study the phenolic compounds piceid, resveratrol and emodin were extracted from P. cuspidatum roots using ultrasound-assisted extraction. Multiple response surface methodology was used to optimize the extraction conditions of these phenolic compounds. A three-factor and three-level Box-Behnken experimental design was employed to evaluate the effects of the operation parameters, including extraction temperature (30–70 °C, ethanol concentration (40%–80%, and ultrasonic power (90–150 W, on the extraction yields of piceid, resveratrol, and emodin. The statistical models built from multiple response surface methodology were developed for the estimation of the extraction yields of multi-phenolic components. Based on the model, the extraction yields of piceid, resveratrol, and emodin can be improved by controlling the extraction parameters. Under the optimum conditions, the extraction yields of piceid, resveratrol and emodin were 10.77 mg/g, 3.82 mg/g and 11.72 mg/g, respectively.

  17. Phenolic compounds profile and antioxidant properties of six sweet cherry (Prunus avium) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Serena; Conte, Angela; Tagliazucchi, Davide

    2017-07-01

    Sweet cherry (Prunus avium) fruits are a nutritionally important food rich in dietary phenolic compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate the phenolic profile and chemometric discrimination of fruits from six cherry cultivars using a quantitative metabolomics approach, which combine non-targeted mass spectrometry and chemometric analysis. The assessment of the phenolic fingerprint of cherries allowed the tentative identification of 86 compounds. A total of 40 chlorogenic acids were identified in cherry fruit, which pointed out hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives as the main class of phenolics by number of compounds. Among the compounds detected, 40 have been reported for the first time in sweet cherry fruit. Hydroxycinnamic acids are also the quantitatively most represented class of phenolic compounds in the cherry cultivars with the exception of Lapins and Durone della Marca where the most representative class of phenolic compounds were anthocyanins and flavan-3-ols, respectively. This non-targeted approach allowed the tentative identification of the cultivar-compound relationships of these six cherry cultivars. Both anthocyanins and colorless phenolic compounds profile appeared to be cultivar-dependent. In detail, anthocyanins and flavonols patterns have the potential to be used for the determination of a varietal assignment of cherries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Use of phenolic compounds from olive mill wastewater as valuable ingredients for functional foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaso, Nicola; Formisano, Diego; Genovese, Alessandro

    2017-06-29

    Olive mill wastewater (OMW) is a pollutant by-product from the virgin olive oil production. Its high content in phenolic compounds makes them play an important role for their use in foods, for their high antioxidant significance. The present paper gives an overview on the techniques for OMW valuable ingredient separation, focusing on the most effective ones for their use in food products as functional ingredients. We report on effective methods to recover OMW phenolics, and give several examples on the use these extracts in foods. When added into vegetable oils, their effect on retarding lipid oxidation improves the oxidative status of the product, whilst several challenges need to be faced. OMW phenolic extracts were also used in food emulsions, milk products or other model systems, showing promising results and little or no negative impact on the sensory characteristics or other properties. Their possible use as antimicrobial agents is also another promising approach, as positive results were obtained when applied in meat products. Other examples of using natural phenolic extracts from other sources are suggested also for OMW extracts, to expand their use and thus to improve the nutritional and technological quality of foods.

  19. Phenolic Compounds Protect Cultured Hippocampal Neurons against Ethanol-Withdrawal Induced Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna E. Jung

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol withdrawal is linked to elevated oxidative damage to neurons. Here we report our findings on the contribution of phenolic antioxidants (17β-estradiol, p-octyl-phenol and 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol to counterbalance sudden ethanol withdrawal-initiated oxidative events in hippocampus-derived cultured HT-22 cells. We showed that ethanol withdrawal for 4 h after 24-h ethanol treatment provoked greater levels of oxidative damage than the preceding ethanol exposure. Phenolic antioxidant treatment either during ethanol exposure or ethanol withdrawal only, however, dose-dependently reversed cellular oxidative damage, as demonstrated by the significantly enhanced cell viability, reduced malondialdehyde production and protein carbonylation, compared to untreated cells. Interestingly, the antioxidant treatment schedule had no significant impact on the observed neuroprotection. In addition, the efficacy of the three phenolic compounds was practically equipotent in protecting HT-22 cells in spite of predictions based on an in silico study and a cell free assay of lipid peroxidation. This finding implies that free-radical scavenging may not be the sole factor responsible for the observed neuroprotection and warrants further studies to establish, whether the HT-22 line is indeed a suitable model for in vitro screening of antioxidants against EW-related neuronal damage.

  20. Determination of Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Leaves from Wild Rubus L. Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Oszmiański

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-six different wild blackberry leaf samples were harvested from various localities throughout southeastern Poland. Leaf samples were assessed regarding their phenolic compound profiles and contents by LC/MS QTOF, and their antioxidant activity by ABTS and FRAP. Thirty-three phenolic compounds were detected (15 flavonols, 13 hydroxycinnamic acids, three ellagic acid derivatives and two flavones. Ellagic acid derivatives were the predominant compounds in the analyzed leaves, especially sanguiin H-6, ellagitannins, lambertianin C, and casuarinin. The content of phenolic compounds was significantly correlated with the antioxidant activity of the analyzed samples. The highest level of phenolic compounds was measured for R. perrobustus, R. wimmerianus, R. pedemontanus and R. grabowskii. The study showed that wild blackberry leaves can be considered a good source of antioxidant compounds. There is clear potential for the utilization of blackberry leaves as a food additive, medicinal source or herbal tea.

  1. Determination of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity in leaves from wild Rubus L. species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oszmiański, Jan; Wojdyło, Aneta; Nowicka, Paulina; Teleszko, Mirosława; Cebulak, Tomasz; Wolanin, Mateusz

    2015-03-18

    Twenty-six different wild blackberry leaf samples were harvested from various localities throughout southeastern Poland. Leaf samples were assessed regarding their phenolic compound profiles and contents by LC/MS QTOF, and their antioxidant activity by ABTS and FRAP. Thirty-three phenolic compounds were detected (15 flavonols, 13 hydroxycinnamic acids, three ellagic acid derivatives and two flavones). Ellagic acid derivatives were the predominant compounds in the analyzed leaves, especially sanguiin H-6, ellagitannins, lambertianin C, and casuarinin. The content of phenolic compounds was significantly correlated with the antioxidant activity of the analyzed samples. The highest level of phenolic compounds was measured for R. perrobustus, R. wimmerianus, R. pedemontanus and R. grabowskii. The study showed that wild blackberry leaves can be considered a good source of antioxidant compounds. There is clear potential for the utilization of blackberry leaves as a food additive, medicinal source or herbal tea.

  2. Two new phenolic compounds and antitumor activities of asparinin A from Asparagus officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-Mei; Cai, Jin-Long; Wang, Le; Wang, Wen-Xiang; Ai, Hong-Lian; Mao, Zi-Chao

    2017-02-01

    Two new phenolic acid compounds, asparoffin C (1) and asparoffin D (2), together with four known compounds, asparenyol (3), gobicusin B (4), 1-methoxy-2-hydroxy-4-[5-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)-3-penten-1-ynyl] phenol (5), and asparinin A (6), have been isolated from the stems of Asparagus officinalis. The structures were established by extensive spectroscopic methods (MS and 1D and 2D NMR). Compound 6 has obvious antitumor activities both in vitro and in vivo.

  3. Phenolic compounds and bioactive properties of wild German and Roman chamomiles

    OpenAIRE

    Guimarães, Rafaela; Barros, Lillian; Dueñas, Montserrat; Calhelha, Ricardo C.; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Queiroz, Maria João R.P.; Ferreira, Isabel C.F.R.

    2012-01-01

    Natural products represent a rich source of biologically active compounds and are an example of molecular diversity, with recognized potential in drug discovery. In the present work, methanolic extracts of Matricaria recutita L. (German chamomile) and Chamaemelum nobile L. (Roman chamomile) and their decoction and infusion (the most consumed preparations of these herbs) were submitted to an analysis of phenolic compounds and bioactivity evaluation. Phenolic compounds were characterized by HPL...

  4. Determination of Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Leaves from Wild Rubus L. Species

    OpenAIRE

    Oszmiański, Jan; Wojdyło, Aneta; Nowicka, Paulina; Teleszko, Mirosława; Cebulak, Tomasz; Wolanin, Mateusz

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-six different wild blackberry leaf samples were harvested from various localities throughout southeastern Poland. Leaf samples were assessed regarding their phenolic compound profiles and contents by LC/MS QTOF, and their antioxidant activity by ABTS and FRAP. Thirty-three phenolic compounds were detected (15 flavonols, 13 hydroxycinnamic acids, three ellagic acid derivatives and two flavones). Ellagic acid derivatives were the predominant compounds in the analyzed leaves, especially ...

  5. Non-phenolic antioxidant compounds from Buddleja asiatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Sayed, Mortada M; Abdel-Hameed, El-Sayed S; Ahmed, Wafaa S; el-Wakil, Eman A

    2008-01-01

    The methanol extract of the leaves of Buddleja asiatica Lour. (Loganiaceae) showed antioxidant activity toward the well known in vitro antioxidant tests such as total antioxidant capacity by the phosphomolybdenum method, free radical scavenging activity by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl scavenging assay (DPPH assay) and hydrogen peroxide scavenging methods. Due to the high scavenging activity of the n-butanol successive fraction toward DPPH and H2O2 (SC50 = 11.99 and 18.54 microg/ml, respectively), this extract was subjected to chromatographic separation and isolation. Four non-phenolic compounds were isolated and identified on the basis of spectroscopic and chemical analyses: 1-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-2-methoxy-3-(2-hydroxy-triaconta-3,12-dienoate)-glycerol (1), 3-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->4)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)]-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)]-beta-D-fucopyranosyl-olean-11,13(18)-diene-3 beta,23,28-triol (2), 3-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->4)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)]-beta-D-fucopyranosyl-olean-11,13(18)-diene-3,23,28-triol (3), and 3-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->4)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)]-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->2)]-beta-D-glucuronopyranosyl-acid-olean-11,13(18)-diene-3 beta,23,28-triol (4). The four compounds were evaluated as antioxidant agents using the three antioxidant bioassay tests.

  6. Bioactive compounds from brewer’s spent grain: phenolic compounds, fatty acids and in vitro antioxidant capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline da Rosa Almeida

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Brewer's spent grain (BSG was characterized by physicochemical, total phenolic compound and flavonoids contents. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by four different assays. The chromatographic analyses were used to quantify the phenolic compounds and the fatty acids in BSG. Ethanolic extracts were tested to evaluate antibacterial activity. The higher concentration of total phenolic compounds for BSG was obtained in the extraction with ethanol 20%. BSG showed an antioxidant potential for all tests evaluated. In the case of chromatographic analysis, phenolic acids and flavonoids, such as syringic acid and catechin, respectively, were detected in high quantities. Regarding to the fatty acids profile, polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as linoleic and oleic acids, were found in significant amounts. No antibacterial activity was reported for bacterial cultures and concentrations tested. BSG may be considered a protein source, rich in fiber, polyunsaturated fatty acids and bioactive compounds with antioxidant potential.

  7. Adsorption of phenolic compounds from aqueous solutions by a water-compatible hypercrosslinked polymeric adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aimin; Zhang, Quanxing; Zhang, Gencheng; Chen, Jinlong; Fei, Zhenghao; Liu, Fuqiang

    2002-06-01

    A water-compatible hypercrosslinked polymeric adsorbent (NJ-8) for adsorbing and removing phenolic compounds from their aqueous solutions was prepared. This product can be used directly without a wetting process. Its adsorption property toward four phenolic compounds, phenol, p-cresol, p-chlorophenol, and p-nitrophenol was tested using the commercial Amberlite XAD-4 as a reference. The capacities of equilibrium adsorption for all four phenolic compounds on the NJ-8 from their aqueous solutions are around two times as high as that of Amberlite XAD4 within the temperature range 283-323 K, which may contribute to their micropore structure and the partial polarity on the network. Freundlich isotherm equations, as well as relative adsorption capacities and isosteric adsorption enthalpies for the four phenolic compounds, indicate that the adsorption of phenolic compounds on the NJ-8 resin is a physical adsorption process. Mini-column adsorption studies for phenol on Amberlite XAD4 and NJ-8 resins show that the breakthrough adsorption capacities are 0.54 and 0.99 mmol/ml, and the total capacities are 0.62 and 1.37 mmol/ml, while no extra acetone was needed to remove the adsorbed phenol from NJ-8 as from Amberlite XAD4.

  8. Removal of organic pollutants by surfactant modified zeolite: Comparison between ionizable phenolic compounds and non-ionizable organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Jie; Meng, Wenna [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 800, Dongchuan Rd., Shanghai 200240 (China); Wu, Deyi, E-mail: dywu@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 800, Dongchuan Rd., Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang, Zhenjia; Kong, Hainan [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 800, Dongchuan Rd., Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surfactant modified zeolite could greatly retain organic pollutants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uptake of organic compounds was due to the loaded surfactant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer k{sub ow} is crucial for the uptake of both ionizable and non-ionizable organic solutes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer pK{sub a} is another factor affecting adsorption process of ionizable organic pollutants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption mechanisms of the two kinds of organic pollutants were proposed. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to examine the adsorption capability and mechanism of hexadecyltrimethylammonium modified zeolite, which was synthesized from coal fly ash, for the removal of ionizable phenolic compounds (phenol, p-chlorophenol and bisphenol A, with different pK{sub a}) and non-ionizable organic compounds (aniline, nitrobenzene, and naphthalene, with different hydrophobicity). The obtained zeolite was identified as type Na-P1 (Na{sub 6}Al{sub 6}Si{sub 10}O{sub 32}{center_dot}12H{sub 2}O, JCPDS code 39-0219), which is classified into the gismondine group with a pore size of 3.1 Angstrom-Sign Multiplication-Sign 4.5 Angstrom-Sign [1 0 0] and 2.8 Angstrom-Sign Multiplication-Sign 4.8 Angstrom-Sign [1 0 1]. The adsorption of the two kinds of organic compounds was due to loaded surfactant bilayer because modified zeolite showed great ability for the removal of organic chemicals while little adsorption by zeolite was observed. The isotherm data of ionizable compounds fitted well to the Langmuir model but those of non-ionizable chemicals followed a linear equation. Uptake of ionizable compounds depended greatly on pH, increasing at alkaline pH conditions. In contrary, adsorption of non-ionizable chemicals was essentially the same at all pH levels studied. The adsorption of both kinds of organic compounds correlated well to k{sub ow} value, suggesting that more hydrophobic organic contaminants are more easily retained

  9. Comparison of phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty samples of sorghum beers “dolo” were selected from traditionally fermented household manufacturers from Burkina Faso. Dolo samples were screened for their total phenolic content, proanthocyanidins and putative antioxidant capacities, and were compared with industrial beers and wines. Total phenols were ...

  10. Phenolic Melatonin-Related Compounds: Their Role as Chemical Protectors against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annia Galano

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There is currently no doubt about the serious threat that oxidative stress (OS poses to human health. Therefore, a crucial strategy to maintain a good health status is to identify molecules capable of offering protection against OS through chemical routes. Based on the known efficiency of the phenolic and melatonin (MLT families of compounds as antioxidants, it is logical to assume that phenolic MLT-related compounds should be (at least equally efficient. Unfortunately, they have been less investigated than phenols, MLT and its non-phenolic metabolites in this context. The evidence reviewed here strongly suggests that MLT phenolic derivatives can act as both primary and secondary antioxidants, exerting their protection through diverse chemical routes. They all seem to be better free radical scavengers than MLT and Trolox, while some of them also surpass ascorbic acid and resveratrol. However, there are still many aspects that deserve further investigations for this kind of compounds.

  11. IN VIVO STUDY OF PHENOLIC COMPOUNDS ROLE ON ANTIHYPERCHOLESTEROL ACTIVITY OF VIRGIN COCONUT OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Joko Raharjo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of phenolic compounds on antihypercholeserol activity of Virgin Coconut Oil (VCO has been investigated. The in vivo studies ware carried out by treatment of two groups of Wistar white mouse (Ratus norvegicus using high phenolic VCO and low phenolic VCO respectively, followed by analysis of lipid profile in blood and liver serum of the mouse. In addition a group of hypercholesterol mouse was treated with low phenolic VCO and the blood serum lipid profile was compared with untreated hypercholesterol mouse. The results show that phenolic compound play an important role on antihypercholesterol of VCO. Group of mouse treated with high phenolic VCO have better lipid profile (blood serum: total cholesterol: 70 mg/dL, triglyceride: 76 mg/dL, HDL: 20 mg/dL, LDL: 35 mg/dL; liver serum: total cholesterol:7 mg/dL, triglyceride: 19 mg/dL compared with the group treated with low phenolic VCO (blood serum: total cholesterol: 82 mg/dL, triglyceride: 100 mg/dL, HDL: 21 mg/dL, LDL: 41 mg/dL; liver serum: total cholesterol: 9 mg/dL, triglyceride: 34 mg/dL. Hypercholesterol mouse tests shown that low phenolic VCO treatment result in decreasing of blood serum cholesterol level by 52.10% which was not significantly different compared to untreated mouses (decreasing of blood serum cholesterol level by 48.61%.   Keywords: antihypercholesterol, phenolic compound, VCO, in vivo

  12. Characterization and discrimination of phenolic compounds using Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy and chemometric tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pompeu, DR.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Description of the subject. Phenolic compounds (PCs are the most abundant secondary metabolites in plants. This work was part of a study that sought to develop rapid screening FT-Raman methods for identifying and quantifying classes and/or types of PCs in the dry extracts of plant products. Objectives. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman coupled with chemometric tools was used to characterize and discriminate four families of phenolic compounds: two important classes of phenolic acids, hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acids, as well as their derivatives and flavonoids. Method. For this study, 25 standards of phenolic compounds were used (47 standards in total, taking account of the different brands. Repeatability and reproducibility studies were conducted to verify the Raman assignments of gallic acid. Raman characterization with the most significant spectral bands of phenolic compounds was done using spectra ranging from 1,800 to 50 cm-1. A Fisher test was applied to pre-processed Raman spectra (SNV and 20 Raman scattering signals were used to differentiate each class of phenolic compounds. Results. Hydroxybenzoic acids, hydroxycinnamic acids, their derivatives and flavonoids have been characterized by Raman spectroscopy; bands have been identified and differentiated within and between groups. Conclusions. The scattering intensities located around 1,600-1,699, 1,300-1,400 and below 200 cm-1 were responsible for differentiating 100% of phenolic compound families, classes and subclasses.

  13. Mixture-Amount Design and Response Surface Modeling to Assess the Effects of Flavonoids and Phenolic Acids on Developmental Performance of Anastrepha ludens

    OpenAIRE

    Pascacio-Villafán, Carlos; Lapointe, Stephen; Williams, Trevor; Sivinski, John; Niedz, Randall; Aluja, Martín

    2014-01-01

    Host plant resistance to insect attack and expansion of insect pests to novel hosts may to be modulated by phenolic compounds in host plants. Many studies have evaluated the role of phenolics in host plant resistance and the effect of phenolics on herbivore performance, but few studies have tested the joint effect of several compounds. Here, we used mixture-amount experimental design and response surface modeling to study the effects of a variety of phenolic compounds on the development and s...

  14. Characterization of Phenolic Compounds in Pinus laricio Needles and Their Responses to Prescribed Burnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila Ferrat

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Fire is a dominant ecological factor in Mediterranean-type ecosystems. Management strategies include prescribed (controlled burning, which has been used in the management of several species, such as Pinus nigra ssp laricio var. Corsicana, a pine endemic to Corsica of great ecological and economic importance. The effects of prescribed burning on Pinus laricio have been little studied. The first aim of this study was to characterize total and simple phenolic compounds in Pinus laricio. The second aim was to understand: i the short term (one to three months and medium term (three years effects of prescribed burning, and ii the effects of periodic prescribed burning on the production of phenolic compounds in Pinus laricio. The first result of this study is the presence of total and simple phenolic compounds in the needles of Pinus laricio. 3-Vanillyl propanol is the major compound. After a prescribed burning, the synthesis of total phenolic compounds increases in Pinus laricio for a period of three months. Total phenolic compounds could be used as bioindicators for the short-term response of Pinus laricio needles to prescribed burning. Simple phenolic compounds do not seem to be good indicators of the impact of prescribed burning because prescribed burnings are low in intensity.

  15. Berry and Citrus Phenolic Compounds Inhibit Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV: Implications in Diabetes Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfeng Fan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Beneficial health effects of fruits and vegetables in the diet have been attributed to their high flavonoid content. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV is a serine aminopeptidase that is a novel target for type 2 diabetes therapy due to its incretin hormone regulatory effects. In this study, well-characterized anthocyanins (ANC isolated from berry wine blends and twenty-seven other phenolic compounds commonly present in citrus, berry, grape, and soybean, were individually investigated for their inhibitory effects on DPP-IV by using a luminescence assay and computational modeling. ANC from blueberry-blackberry wine blends strongly inhibited DPP-IV activity (IC50, 0.07 ± 0.02 to >300 μM. Of the twenty-seven phenolics tested, the most potent DPP-IV inhibitors were resveratrol (IC50, 0.6 ± 0.4 nM, luteolin (0.12 ± 0.01 μM, apigenin (0.14 ± 0.02 μM, and flavone (0.17 ± 0.01 μM, with IC50 values lower than diprotin A (4.21 ± 2.01 μM, a reference standard inhibitory compound. Analyses of computational modeling showed that resveratrol and flavone were competitive inhibitors which could dock directly into all three active sites of DPP-IV, while luteolin and apigenin docked in a noncompetitive manner. Hydrogen bonding was the main binding mode of all tested phenolic compounds with DPP-IV. These results indicate that flavonoids, particularly luteolin, apigenin, and flavone, and the stilbenoid resveratrol can act as naturally occurring DPP-IV inhibitors.

  16. Sensory Characteristics of Various Concentrations of Phenolic Compounds Potentially Associated with Smoked Aroma in Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This research describes the sensory odor characteristics of 19 phenolic compounds (11 phenol derivatives, six guaiacol derivatives, and two syringol derivatives that have been associated with smoked aroma in previous literature. Seven concentrations varying from 1 to 100,000 ppm of each chemical were examined. A highly trained descriptive panel used a recently published lexicon for smoky aroma and flavor and found that smoked aroma compounds have many different attributes that make up smokiness. Musty/dusty, musty/earthy, pungent, acid, smoky, woody, burnt, ashy, cedar, creosote or petroleum-like collectively imparted smoked aroma. Most of the phenolic compounds were described as having smoky characteristics at low concentrations, generally at 1 and 10 ppm, except 3,4-dimethylphenol at 5000 ppm. 2,6-Dimethylphenol was not associated with smoky characteristics. This research is the first to evaluate a set of phenolic compounds for their sensory characteristics using a professionally developed set of sensory attributes.

  17. Bioactive amines and phenolic compounds in cocoa beans are affected by fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Carmo Brito, Brenda de Nazaré; Campos Chisté, Renan; da Silva Pena, Rosinelson; Abreu Gloria, Maria Beatriz; Santos Lopes, Alessandra

    2017-08-01

    Cocoa is the target of increased scientific research as it is one of the richest source of bioactive compounds. The formation of bioactive amines and their changes in cocoa beans during seven days of traditional fermentation was investigated for the first time. In addition, total phenolic compounds, anthocyanins contents and the scavenging capacity against ABTS radical were determined to monitor the fermentation process. Only two biogenic amines (tryptamine and tyramine) and two polyamines (spermidine and spermine) were detected in cocoa beans during fermentation. Fermentation was characterized by three stages: i) high levels of tryptamine, phenolics, and scavenging capacity; ii) high contents of spermine, total biogenic amines and total polyamines; and iii) the highest spermidine levels and total acidity, but the lowest total phenolic compounds and anthocyanins contents. The scavenging capacity of cocoa beans during fermentation correlated with total phenolic compounds and anthocyanins contents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Matricaría recutita L. (chamomile) decoction as a source of phenolic compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Caleja, Cristina; Dias, Maria Inês; Barros, Lillian; Oliveira, M.B.P.P.; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Ferreira, Isabel C.F.R.

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic herbs have been used to prepare several infüsions and decoctions with claimed beneficiai health effects, many of them attributed to the presence of phenolic compounds (hydrophilic molecules highly abundant in those aqueous preparations) (Guimarães et al., 2013). In fact antioxidant, antimicrobial and antitumor properties, among others, of phenolic compounds have been extensively reported (Kahkonen et al., 1999; Rauha et al., 2000). In the present work, Matricaria recu...

  19. Optimization of microwave assisted extraction (MAE) and soxhlet extraction of phenolic compound from licorice root

    OpenAIRE

    Karami, Zohreh; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra; Mirzaee, Habib Allah; Khomeiri, Morteza; Mahoonak, Alireza Sadeghi; Aydani, Emad

    2014-01-01

    In present study, response surface methodology was used to optimize extraction condition of phenolic compounds from licorice root by microwave application. Investigated factors were solvent (ethanol 80 %, methanol 80 % and water), liquid/solid ratio (10:1–25:1) and time (2–6 min). Experiments were designed according to the central composite rotatable design. The results showed that extraction conditions had significant effect on the extraction yield of phenolic compounds and antioxidant capac...

  20. Effect of phenolic compounds extracted from sunflower seeds on native lipoxygenase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Kubicka, E.; Jędrychowski, L.; Amarowicz, R.

    1999-01-01

    Extracts of lipoxygenase were obtained from sunflower seeds using 12 different extraction mixtures, and lipoxygenase activity and content of phenolic compounds in the extracts were determined. The content of phenolic compounds was determined as the ratio of optical densities at 320/280nm. Statistical analysis of the results for the extracts showed a significant correlation between the lipoxygenase activity and the OD320nm/OD280nm ratio with r = 0....

  1. Phenolic Compounds Present Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi Influence the Lowering of Blood Pressure in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima Glória, Lorena; Barreto de Souza Arantes, Mariana; Menezes de Faria Pereira, Silvia; de Souza Vieira, Guilherme; Xavier Martins, Camilla; Ribeiro de Carvalho Junior, Almir; Antunes, Fernanda; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; José Curcino Vieira, Ivo; Leandro da Cruz, Larissa; Siqueira de Almeida Chaves, Douglas; de Paiva Freitas, Silvério; Barros de Oliveira, Daniela

    2017-10-23

    This study identified two phenolic compounds in Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi fruits: naringenin (first report in this species) and gallic acid. Their structures were elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data (¹H-, 13 C-NMR) and a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique. A high content of phenolics (659.21 mg of gallic acid equivalents/g of sample-Folin-Ciocalteau method) and total flavonoids (140.69 mg of rutin equivalents/g of sample-aluminum chloride method) were quantified in S. terebinthifolius , as well as high antioxidant activity (77.47%-2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, DPPH method). The antihypertensive activity related to its phenolic content was investigated. After intravenous infusion in Wistar rats, these phenolics significantly reduced ( p terebinthifolius fruits is related to the phenolic compounds present in the plant, which are potent antioxidants and inhibit oxidative stress, mainly in the central nervous system.

  2. Interactions between wine phenolic compounds and human saliva in astringency perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Estévez, Ignacio; Ramos-Pineda, Alba María; Escribano-Bailón, María Teresa

    2018-03-01

    Astringency is a complex perceptual phenomenon involving several sensations that are perceived simultaneously. The mechanism leading to these sensations has been thoroughly and controversially discussed in the literature and it is still not well understood since there are many contributing factors. Although we are still far from elucidating the mechanisms whereby astringency develops, the interaction between phenolic compounds and proteins (from saliva, oral mucosa or cells) seems to be most important. This review summarizes the recent trends in the protein-phenol interaction, focusing on the effect of the structure of the phenolic compound on the interaction with salivary proteins and on methodologies based on these interactions to determine astringency.

  3. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity in red fruits produced in organic farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana M. A. Soutinho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work were studied three red fruits (raspberry, gooseberry and blueberry produced in organic mode, to evaluate the variations in the content of phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity along maturation. The phenols were extracted from the fruits with two solvents (methanol and acetone and were quantified by the Folin-Ciocalteu method. The antioxidant activity was determined with two methods (HPPH and ABTS. Furthermore, HPLC was used to identify and quantify some phenolic compounds present in the fruits analyzed. The results showed that the total phenolic compounds in all fruits decreased along maturation, either in the methanol or acetone extracts (23 % and 20 % reduction, on average, for methanol and acetone extracts, respectively, although in methanol extracts the levels of phenolic compounds were always higher (0.54 and 0.21 mg GAE/g. The blueberry showed higher level of total phenolics in methanol extract (average 0.67 mg GAE/g, while in the acetone extract it was gooseberry (average 0.31 mg GAE/g. At the end of maturation, all fruits studied had similar values of antioxidant capacity as determined by DPPH method (0.52 mmol Trolox/g. For the ABTS method, blueberries showed higher values of antioxidant activity (6.01 mmol Trolox/g against 3.01 and 2.66 mmol Trolox/g, for raspberry and gooseberry, respectively. Furthermore, the HPLC analysis allowed to identify monomeric anthocyanins and phenolic acids in the three fruits studied.

  4. Methodologies for the Extraction of Phenolic Compounds from Environmental Samples: New Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Mahugo Santana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic derivatives are among the most important contaminants present in the environment. These compounds are used in several industrial processes to manufacture chemicals such as pesticides, explosives, drugs and dyes. They also are used in the bleaching process of paper manufacturing. Apart from these sources, phenolic compounds have substantial applications in agriculture as herbicides, insecticides and fungicides. However, phenolic compounds are not only generated by human activity, but they are also formed naturally, e.g., during the decomposition of leaves or wood. As a result of these applications, they are found in soils and sediments and this often leads to wastewater and ground water contamination. Owing to their high toxicity and persistence in the environment, both, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA and the European Union have included some of them in their lists of priority pollutants. Current standard methods of phenolic compounds analysis in water samples are based on liquid–liquid extraction (LLE while Soxhlet extraction is the most used technique for isolating phenols from solid matrices. However, these techniques require extensive cleanup procedures that are time-intensive and involve expensive and hazardous organic solvents, which are undesirable for health and disposal reasons. In the last years, the use of news methodologies such as solid-phase extraction (SPE and solid-phase microextraction (SPME have increased for the extraction of phenolic compounds from liquid samples. In the case of solid samples, microwave assisted extraction (MAE is demonstrated to be an efficient technique for the extraction of these compounds. In this work we review the developed methods in the extraction and determination of phenolic derivatives in different types of environmental matrices such as water, sediments and soils. Moreover, we present the new approach in the use of micellar media coupled with SPME process for the

  5. Optimization of antioxidant phenolic compounds extraction from quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carciochi, Ramiro Ariel; Manrique, Guillermo Daniel; Dimitrov, Krasimir

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to optimize the extraction conditions of phenolic and flavonoids compounds from quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) seeds using ultrasound assistance technology. A randomized central composite face-centered design was used to evaluate the effect of extraction temperature, ethanol concentration in the solvent, and ultrasound power on the total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC) and antioxidant activity by response surface analysis. Predicted model equations were obtained to describe the experimental data regarding TPC, TFC and antioxidant activity, with significant variation in the linear, quadratic, and interaction effects of the independent variables. Regression analysis showed that more than 88 % of the variability was explained by the models. The best extraction conditions obtained by simultaneous maximization of the responses were: extraction temperature of 60 °C, 80 % ethanol as solvent and non-application of ultrasounds. Under the optimal conditions, the corresponding predicted response values were 103.6 mg GAE/100 g dry weight (dw), 25.0 mg quercetin equiv./100 g dw and 28.6 % DPPH radical scavenging, for TPC, TFC and antioxidant activity, respectively. The experimental values agreed with those predicted within a 95 % confidence level, indicating the suitability of the employed model. HPLC analysis of the obtained extracts confirmed the highest phenolic compound yield in the extract obtained under optimal extraction conditions. Considering the characteristics of the antioxidant-rich extracts obtained, they could be consider for potential application in the food industry, as nutraceutical and functional foods ingredient or well as replacement of synthetic antioxidants.

  6. Antioxidant activity of olive pulp and olive oil phenolic compounds of the arbequina cultivar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelló, José-Ramón; Vuorela, Satu; Romero, Maria-Paz; Motilva, Maria-José; Heinonen, Marina

    2005-03-23

    The aim of this study was to characterize antioxidant activities of phenolic compounds that appear in olive pulp and olive oils using both radical scavenging and antioxidant activity tests. Antiradical and antioxidant activities of olive pulp and olive oil phenolic compounds were due mainly to the presence of a 3,4-dihydroxy moiety linked to an aromatic ring, and the effect depended on the polarity of the phenolic compound. Glucosides and more complex phenolics exhibited higher antioxidant activities toward oxidation of liposomes, whereas in bulk lipids aglycons were more potent antioxidants with the exception of oleuropein. Lignans acted as antioxidants only in liposomes, which could partly be due to their chelating activity, because liposome oxidation was initiated by cupric acetate. The antioxidant activity of virgin olive oil is principally due to the dialdehydic form of elenolic acid linked to hydroxytyrosol (3,4-DHPEA-EDA), a secoiridoid derivative (peak RT 36, structure unidentified), and luteolin.

  7. Analysis of Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Wild Blackberry Fruits

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    Jan Oszmiański

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Twenty three different wild blackberry fruit samples were assessed regarding their phenolic profiles and contents (by LC/MS quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF and antioxidant activity (ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP and 2,2-azinobis (3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS by two different extraction methods. Thirty four phenolic compounds were detected (8 anthocyanins, 15 flavonols, 3 hydroxycinnamic acids, 6 ellagic acid derivatives and 2 flavones. In samples, where pressurized liquid extraction (PLE was used for extraction, a greater increase in yields of phenolic compounds was observed, especially in ellagic acid derivatives (max. 59%, flavonols (max. 44% and anthocyanins (max. 29%, than after extraction by the ultrasonic technique extraction (UAE method. The content of phenolic compounds was significantly correlated with the antioxidant activity of the analyzed samples. Principal component analysis (PCA revealed that the PLE method was more suitable for the quantitative extraction of flavonols, while the UAE method was for hydroxycinnamic acids.

  8. Dietary fiber and phenolic compounds as functional ingredients: interaction and possible effect after ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós-Sauceda, A E; Palafox-Carlos, H; Sáyago-Ayerdi, S G; Ayala-Zavala, J F; Bello-Perez, L A; Alvarez-Parrilla, E; de la Rosa, L A; González-Córdova, A F; González-Aguilar, G A

    2014-06-01

    Dietary fiber and phenolic compounds are two recognized dietary factors responsible for potential effects on human health; therefore, they have been widely used to increase functionality of some foods. This paper focuses on showing the use of both substances as functional ingredients for enriching foods, and at the same time, describes the use of a single material that combines the properties of the two types of substances. The last part of the work describes some facts related to the interaction between dietary fiber and phenolic compounds, which could affect the bioaccessibility and absorption of phenolics in the gut. In this sense, the purpose of the present review is to compile and analyze evidence relating to the use of dietary fiber and phenolic compounds to enhance technological and nutritional properties of foods and hypothesize some of the possible effects in the gut after their ingestion.

  9. Inhibition of β-galactosidase and α-glucosidase synthesis in petroleum refinery effluent bacteria by phenolic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon C. Okpokwasili

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of α-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.20 and β-galactosidase (EC 3.2.1.23 biosynthesis by phenolic compounds (phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, 4-bromophenol and 3,5-dimethylphenol in Escherichia coli, Bacillus and Pseudomonas species isolated from petroleum refinery wastewater was assessed. At sufficient concentrations, phenols inhibited the induction of α-glucosidase and β-galactosidase. The patterns of these toxic effects can be mathematically described with logistic and sigmoid dose-response models. The median inhibitory concentrations (IC50 varied among the phenols, the bacteria and enzymes. Quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR models based on the logarithm of the octanol–water partition coefficient (log10Kow were developed for each bacterium. The correlation coefficients varied between 0.84and 0.99 for the enzymes. The test results indicated α-glucosidase and β-galactosidase biosynthesis as important microbial indices for evaluation of toxicity of phenolic compounds.

  10. Phenolic compounds of apple cultivars resistant or susceptible to Venturia inaequalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arici, Serife Evrim; Kafkas, Ebru; Kaymak, Suat; Koc, Namik Kemal

    2014-07-01

    Phenolic compounds play an important role in the plant defense mechanism and are responsible for antioxidant capacity in fruits and vegetables. It is known that the phenolics can determine in the leaves of plants which are resistant/susceptible to fungal infections. This study investigated the total phenolic compounds, content of shikimic acid from 33 different apple cultivars leaves infected with Venturia inaequalis [(Cke). Wint.] cultured in Fruit Research Station, in Egirdir, Isparta, Turkey. Leaves of apple cultivars were collected three times in an interval of 30 d from July to September in 2010, and analyzed using HPLC methods to detect changes in the amount of the phenolic compounds and shikimic acid. Total phenolic compounds and shikimic acid in resistant/moderate susceptible apple cultivars were higher than susceptible apple cultuvars, although not statistically different between resistant and susceptible apples. The content of shikimic acid was statistically higher only in the leaves of the domestic cultivar Ankara güzeli on all three dates. Recently, there have been increased studies trying to explain the resistance mechanism in plants. Natural resistance genes are investigated in some apple cultivars and new resistance varieties which have resistant genes are identified daily. Our study hold to determine the relationship between the phenolic compounds and the expression of resistance seems to be promising.

  11. TLC Fingerprint analysis of phenolic and flavonoid compounds in some Iranian Salvia spp., a chemotaxonomic approach

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    Marzieh Fotovvat

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Salvia is an important genus of Lamiaceae which phenolic compounds are the main secondary metabolites of its members. The objective of this study was to investigate the diversity of phenolic and flavonoid compounds in the leaves and flowers from 41 wild populations of 27 Salvia species from Iran by TLC method and evaluation of their significance as chemical markers for taxonomic purposes. Rosmarinic acid, salvianolic acids A and B, apigenin, rutine, scutellarin and baicalin were characterized as the main compounds of the studied Salvia species. Based on the dendrogram obtained from the didtribution patterns of phenolic compounds using cluster analysis by UPGMA method, the Salvia species were studied chemotaxonomically. Results showed that the patterns of phenolic compounds in the leaf and flower organs were similar in populations of a species, while they were different among the species. It seems that substantial differences in the patterns of these compounds at inter-species level were mainly due to genetic differences. The results from classification of the species by cluster analysis of the phenolic data supported their grouping according to their classical taxonomy in the Flora Iranica. This suggests the importance of these compounds as chemical markers for the classification of Salvia species at inter-species and subgenus levels.

  12. Profiling of the Major Phenolic Compounds and Their Biosynthesis Genes in Sophora flavescens Aiton

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    Jeongyeo Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sophorae Radix (Sophora flavescens Aiton has long been used in traditional medicine in East Asia due to the various biological activities of its secondary metabolites. Endogenous contents of phenolic compounds (phenolic acid, flavonol, and isoflavone and the main bioactive compounds of Sophorae Radix were analyzed based on the qualitative HPLC analysis and evaluated in different organs and at different developmental stages. In total, 11 compounds were detected, and the composition of the roots and aerial parts (leaves, stems, and flowers was significantly different. trans-Cinnamic acid and p-coumaric acid were observed only in the aerial parts. Large amounts of rutin and maackiain were detected in the roots. Four phenolic acid compounds (benzoic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and chlorogenic acid and four flavonol compounds (kaempferol, catechin hydrate, epicatechin, and rutin were higher in aerial parts than in roots. To identify putative genes involved in phenolic compounds biosynthesis, a total of 41 transcripts were investigated. Expression patterns of these selected genes, as well as the multiple isoforms for the genes, varied by organ and developmental stage, implying that they are involved in the biosynthesis of various phenolic compounds both spatially and temporally.

  13. Ultrasonic-assisted extraction of phenolic and antioxidative compounds from lizard tail (Houttuynia cordata Thunb.

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    Trakul Prommajak

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Lizard tail (Houttuynia cordata Thunb. is an Asian herb which has many biological activities, including antioxidative property from polyphenolic compounds. Response surface methodology and Box-Behnken design were employed to study the effect of extraction temperature (30 to 70°C, extraction time (10 to 30 min, ethanol concentration (30 to 70%, and solvent to sample ratio (2 to 6 ml/g on ultrasonic-assisted extraction of phenolic compounds from lizard tail and antioxidant capacity of the herb extract. Extraction temperature was the most relevant factor on the responses. Optimal condition was the extraction temperature of 70°C for 30 min, using 60% ethanol concentration at the solvent to sample ratio of 5 ml/g. Model adequacies were confirmed by extraction at the optimal condition and normality of standardized residuals.

  14. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of selected medicinal plants containing phenolic and flavonoid compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Ravipati, Anjaneya S; Koyyalamudi, Sundar Rao; Jeong, Sang Chul; Reddy, Narsimha; Smith, Paul T; Bartlett, John; Shanmugam, Kirubakaran; Münch, Gerald; Wu, Ming Jie

    2011-12-14

    The antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and cytotoxic activities of water and ethanol extracts of 14 Chinese medicinal plants were investigated and also their total phenolics and flavonoid contents measured. The antioxidant activity was evaluated in a biological assay using Saccharomyces cerevisiae , whereas the radical scavenging activity was measured using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. Total phenolics and flavonoid contents were estimated by Folin-Ciocalteu and aluminum chloride methods, respectively. The anti-inflammatory activities of the plant extracts were determined by measuring the inhibition of production of nitric oxide (NO) and TNF-α in LPS and IFN-γ activated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Their cytotoxic activities against macrophages were determined by Alamar Blue assay. Four plants, namely, Scutellaria baicalensis , Taxillus chinensis , Rheum officinale , and Sophora japonica , showed significant antioxidant activity in both yeast model and also free radical scavenging methods. The ethanol extract of S. japonica showed highest levels of phenolics and flavonoids (91.33 GAE mg/g and 151.86 QE mg/g, respectively). A positive linear correlation between antioxidant activity and the total phenolics and flavonoid contents indicates that these compounds are likely to be the main antioxidants contributing to the observed activities. Five plant extracts (S. baicalensis, T. chinensis, S. japonica, Mahonia fortunei , and Sophora flavescens ) exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity by in vitro inhibition of the production of NO and TNF-α with low IC(50) values. These findings suggest that some of the medicinal herbs studied in this paper are good sources of antioxidants.

  15. Determination of the major phenolic compounds in pomegranate juices by HPLC−DAD−ESI-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Verardo, Vito; Toselli, Moreno; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza

    2013-06-05

    Traditionally, pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) has been consumed as fresh fruit or as pomegranate juice. In this study, the main phenolic compounds of 12 pomegranate varieties and 5 pomegranate clones were determined by HPLC−DAD−ESI-MS. Two chromatographic methods with a fused-core C18 column and a classical HPLC system were developed. Thirteen anthocyanins and fourteen other phenolic compounds were determined in the pomegranate juices. As far as we are concerned, a new flavonol-glycoside, phellatin or its isomer amurensin, has been tentatively identified for the first time in pomegranate juices. Total phenolic content ranged from 580.8 to 2551.3 mg/L of pomegranate juice. Anthocyanins varied between 20 to 82% of total phenolic content. Flavonoids were 1.6-23.6% of total phenolic compounds, while phenolic acids and ellagitannins were in the range 16.4-65.8%. The five clones reported a phenolic content comparable with that of the other pomegranate samples.

  16. Comparison of phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-10-09

    Oct 9, 2012 ... Thirty samples of sorghum beers “dolo” were selected from traditionally fermented household manufacturers from Burkina Faso. Dolo samples were screened for their total phenolic content, proanthocyanidins and putative antioxidant capacities, and were compared with industrial beers and wines.

  17. Antifungal activity of extracts and phenolic compounds from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-17

    Jun 17, 2009 ... (naringin, rutin, luteolin and kaempferol). The results of present study provide scientific basis for the use of the plant extract in the future development as antifungal, antibacterial, antioxidant and anti- inflammatory agent. Key words: Barringtonia racemosa, antifungal, HPLC, phenolic acids, flavonoids.

  18. Antioxidative and antibacterial activities of phenolic compounds from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... inhibitory concentrations (MIC) against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, with respective values of 0.13 mg/mL and 0.25 mg/mL. The difference in phenolic content could explain the difference in biological activity between the two Ficus species. Keywords: drepanocitosis, radical scavenging, tannins, flavonoids, ...

  19. Effects of furan derivatives and phenolic compounds on electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catal, Tunc [Department of Biological and Ecological Engineering, Oregon State University, 116 Gilmore Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Department of Wood Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, 102 97331, Corvallis, OR (United States); Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Istanbul Technical University, 34469-Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey); Fan, Yanzhen; Liu, Hong [Department of Biological and Ecological Engineering, Oregon State University, 116 Gilmore Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Li, Kaichang [Department of Wood Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, 102 97331, Corvallis, OR (United States); Bermek, Hakan [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Istanbul Technical University, 34469-Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2008-05-15

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive fuel source for MFCs due to its renewable nature and ready availability. Furan derivatives and phenolic compounds could be potentially formed during the pre-treatment process of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, voltage generation from these compounds and the effects of these compounds on voltage generation from glucose in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were examined. Except for 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (5-HMF), all the other compounds tested were unable to be utilized directly for electricity production in MFCs in the absence of other electron donors. One furan derivate, 5-HMF and two phenolic compounds, trans-cinnamic acid and 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid did not affect electricity generation from glucose at a concentration up to 10 mM. Four phenolic compounds, including syringaldeyhde, vanillin, trans-4-hydroxy-3-methoxy, and 4-hydroxy cinnamic acids inhibited electricity generation at concentrations above 5 mM. Other compounds, including 2-furaldehyde, benzyl alcohol and acetophenone, inhibited the electricity generation even at concentrations less than 0.2 mM. This study suggests that effective electricity generation from the hydrolysates of lignocellulosic biomass in MFCs may require the employment of the hydrolysis methods with low furan derivatives and phenolic compounds production, or the removal of some strong inhibitors prior to the MFC operation, or the improvement of bacterial tolerance against these compounds through the enrichment of new bacterial cultures or genetic modification of the bacterial strains. (author)

  20. Effects of furan derivatives and phenolic compounds on electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catal, Tunc; Fan, Yanzhen; Li, Kaichang; Bermek, Hakan; Liu, Hong

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive fuel source for MFCs due to its renewable nature and ready availability. Furan derivatives and phenolic compounds could be potentially formed during the pre-treatment process of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, voltage generation from these compounds and the effects of these compounds on voltage generation from glucose in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were examined. Except for 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (5-HMF), all the other compounds tested were unable to be utilized directly for electricity production in MFCs in the absence of other electron donors. One furan derivate, 5-HMF and two phenolic compounds, trans-cinnamic acid and 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid did not affect electricity generation from glucose at a concentration up to 10 mM. Four phenolic compounds, including syringaldeyhde, vanillin, trans-4-hydroxy-3-methoxy, and 4-hydroxy cinnamic acids inhibited electricity generation at concentrations above 5 mM. Other compounds, including 2-furaldehyde, benzyl alcohol and acetophenone, inhibited the electricity generation even at concentrations less than 0.2 mM. This study suggests that effective electricity generation from the hydrolysates of lignocellulosic biomass in MFCs may require the employment of the hydrolysis methods with low furan derivatives and phenolic compounds production, or the removal of some strong inhibitors prior to the MFC operation, or the improvement of bacterial tolerance against these compounds through the enrichment of new bacterial cultures or genetic modification of the bacterial strains.

  1. Development of methods for identification of phenolic compounds in tansy flowers

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    Маргарита Юріївна Золотайкіна

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tanacetum vulgare L. is widespread herb in Ukraine, having a substantial resource base. The absence of national normative documentation for this type of herbal material points to the relevance of research in this area and development of modern methods for identification of phenolic compounds as a main group of biologically active substances.Aim. Development of harmonized with European Pharmacopoeia (PhEur requirements method for identification of phenolic compounds in Tansy flowers.Methods. For the purpose mentioned above, a standardized TLC-method described in the State Pharmacopoeia of Ukraine (SPhU monographs for identification of phenolic compounds in different types of herbal material was used. Validation parameters of the method for the studied herb were determined.Results. A TLC method for identification of phenolic compounds in Tansy flowers considering modern PhEur approaches to standardization of herbs was developed. Validation of the identification method was carried out for the following validation parameters: specificity, robustness, and precision. This method was offered for implementation to the SPhU monograph «Tansy flowers».Conclusion. TLC method for identification of phenolic compounds in Tansy flowers was developed for the first time. As a result of validation of the given method for identification of phenolic compounds, by validation parameters (specificity, robustness, and precision, following chromatography conditions were selected: Silica gel coated Aluminum-backed TLC plates, application volume for both test samples and reference samples was 10 μl, mobile phase: formic acid concentrated – water – methyl ethyl ketone – ethyl acetate (10:10:30:50 V/V/V/V, detection – spraying with solutions of aminoethyl diphenylborinate in methanol and macrogol in methanol and view under 365 nm UV. The method for quantitative determination of phenolic compounds in Tansy flowers was offered for implementation in «Tansy flowers

  2. Effect of Brewing Duration on the Antioxidant and Hepatoprotective Abilities of Tea Phenolic and Alkaloid Compounds in a t-BHP Oxidative Stress-Induced Rat Hepatocyte Model

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    Laura Braud

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tea is an interesting source of antioxidants capable of counteracting the oxidative stress implicated in liver diseases. We investigated the impact of antioxidant molecules provided by a mixture of teas’ leaves (green, oolong, pu-erh after different infusion durations in the prevention of oxidative stress in isolated rat hepatocytes, by comparison with pure epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, the main representative of tea catechins. Dried aqueous tea extracts (ATE obtained after 5, 15 and 30 min infusion time were characterized for total polyphenols (gallic acid equivalent, catechins, gallic acid and caffeine (HPLC-DAD/ESI-MS contents, and for scavenging ability against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical. Hepatoprotection was evaluated through hepatocyte viability tests using tert-butyl hydroperoxide as a stress inducer, (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, neutral red uptake, real-time cellular impedance and mitochondrial function tests. We showed that a 5-min incubation time is sufficient for an optimal bioaccessibility of tea compounds with the highest antioxidative ability, which decreases for longer durations. A 4-h pretreatment of cells with ATE significantly prevented cell death by regulating reactive oxygen species production and maintaining mitochondrial integrity. Pure EGCG, at doses similar in ATE (5–12 µM, was inefficient, suggesting a plausible synergy of several water-soluble tea compounds to explain the ATE beneficial effects.

  3. Olive Mill Wastewater (OMW) Phenol Compounds Degradation by Means of a Visible Light Activated Titanium Dioxide-Based Photocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuomo, Francesca; Venditti, Francesco; Cinelli, Giuseppe; Ceglie, Andrea; Lopez, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    The use of titanium dioxide as heterogeneous photocatalyst is drawing considerable attention for water and air purification and remediation. Recently, TiO2 particles have been modified in order to make this material attractive for industrial and environmental remediation usage. In the present study, phenolic compounds of olive mill wastewater (OMW) were degraded in the presence of glucose-doped titanium particles (CDT) through a photocatalysis process activated by visible light. The photocatalyst effectiveness towards the polluted wastewater from olive oil industry was tested on systems having different initial concentrations of phenols and in the presence of different amounts of CDT. For kinetic analysis the role of Ti/TPh ratio (amount of catalyst/amount of total phenols) was investigated. The rate constant (k2) and the amounts of species adsorbed on adsorbent at equilibrium (qe) of each reaction were calculated by fitting kinetics data to a second-order kinetic adsorption model. The results collected at different Ti/TPh ratios showed that the amount of phenols that can be removed from the water solution linearly increases with the Ti/TPh ratio till a maximum value (optimal ratio) at which no further degradation of phenolic compounds was obtainable. Such kind of parameter allows to identify the optimal value of catalyst and the initial substrate concentration for a high level of degradation. The results showed in this study can have an important impact for an applicative point of view.

  4. Application of HPLC-DAD Technique for Determination of Phenolic Compounds in Bee Pollen Loads

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    Waś Ewa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A method was elaborated to determine phenolic compounds (vanillin, caffeic, p-coumaric and salicylic acids, and flavonoids: rutin, hesperetin, quercetin, pinocembrin, apigenin, kaempferol, isorhamnetin, chrysin, and acacetin in bee pollen loads using highperformance liquid chromatography with a diode array detector (HPLC-DAD. Phenolic compounds from bee pollen were isolated on Cleanert C18-SPE columns (500 mg/6 mL, Agela Technologies. Polyphenols were identified by comparing the retention times and spectra of compounds found in pollen load samples with the ones of the standard mixture. Quantitative analysis was conducted using the external standard method. In addition, basic validation parameters for the method were determined. For the identified compounds (except for the salicylic acid, satisfactory (≥0.997 linear correlations were obtained. The elaborated method showed high repeatability and inter-laboratory reproducibility. Variability coeffcients of the majority of phenolic compounds did not exceed 10% in conditions of repeatability and inter-laboratory reproducibility, and for the total polyphenolic content they were 1.7 and 5.1%, respectively. The pollen load samples (n = 15 differed in qualitative and quantitative composition of the phenolic compounds. In all the samples, we identified the p-coumaric and salicylic acids and flavonoids rutin, hesperetin, and apigenin nevertheless, these compounds’ contents significantly differed among individual samples. The total phenolic content in the tested samples of pollen loads ranged from 0.653 to 5.966 mg/100 g (on average 2.737 mg/100 g.

  5. Phenolic compound profiles and their corresponding antioxidant Capacity of purple pitaya (Hylocereus sp.) genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, Patricia; Stintzing, Florian C; Carle, Reinhold

    2007-01-01

    Folin-Ciocalteu and TEAC (Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity) assay together with the spectrophotometric determination of betalains were applied to investigate the correlation between phenolics and their contribution to the antioxidant capacity of five different Costa Rican genotypes of purple pitaya (Hylocereus sp.) and of H. polyrhizus fruits. Maximum antioxidant capacity, total phenolic and betalain contents were observed in the genotype 'Lisa'. While non-betalainic phenolic compounds contributed only to a minor extent, betalains were responsible for the major antioxidant capacity of purple pitaya juices evaluated. The phenolic pattern of each genotype was also thoroughly investigated using liquid chromatography coupled to positive electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry. In addition to the well known betalains previously reported in Hylocereus fruits, several biosynthetic precursors were detected. Notably, decarboxylated and dehydrogenated betalains were identified as genuine compounds of the juices. Some of these compounds were previously described as artifacts upon heat exposure. Moreover, gallic acid was identified for the first time in pitaya fruits. While the phenolic profiles generally differed between genotypes, phenolic compound composition of 'Rosa' resembled that of H. polyrhizus with respect to total contents of betacyanins, betalainic precursors, phyllocactin and cyclo-Dopa malonyl-glucosides.

  6. Electrochemical Incineration of Phenolic Compounds from the Hydrocarbon Industry Using Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Medel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical incineration using boron-doped diamond electrodes was applied to samples obtained from a refinery and compared to the photo-electro-Fenton process in order to selectively eliminate the phenol and phenolic compounds from a complex matrix. Due to the complex chemical composition of the sample, a pretreatment to the sample in order to isolate the phenolic compounds was applied. The effects of the pretreatment and of pH on the degradation of the phenolic compounds were evaluated. The results indicate that the use of a boron-doped diamond electrode in an electrochemical incineration process mineralizes 99.5% of the phenolic sample content. Working in acidic medium (pH = 1, and applying 2 A at 298 K under constant stirring for 2 hours, also results in the incineration of the reaction intermediates reflected by 97% removal of TOC. In contrast, the photo-electro-Fenton process results in 99.9% oxidation of phenolic compounds with only a 25.69% removal of TOC.

  7. Characterization and quantitation of low and high molecular weight phenolic compounds in apple seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, Matthias; Bayha, Sandra; Carle, Reinhold; Kammerer, Dietmar R

    2012-02-08

    The phenolic constituents of seeds of 12 different apple cultivars were fractionated by sequential extraction with aqueous acetone (30:70, v/v) and ethyl acetate after hexane extraction of the lipids. Low molecular weight phenolic compounds were individually quantitated by RP-HPLC-DAD. The contents of extractable and nonextractable procyanidins were determined by applying RP-HPLC following thiolysis and n-butanol/HCl hydrolysis, respectively. As expected, the results revealed marked differences of the ethyl acetate extracts, aqueous acetone extracts, and insoluble residues with regard to contents and mean degrees of polymerization of procyanidins. Total phenolic contents in the defatted apple seed residues ranged between 18.4 and 99.8 mg/g. Phloridzin was the most abundant phenolic compound, representing 79-92% of monomeric polyphenols. Yields of phenolic compounds significantly differed among the cultivars under study, with seeds of cider apples generally being richer in phloridzin and catechins than seeds of dessert apple cultivars. This is the first study presenting comprehensive data on the contents of phenolic compounds in apple seeds comprising extractable and nonextractable procyanidins. Furthermore, the present work points out a strategy for the sustainable and complete exploitation of apple seeds as valuable agro-industrial byproducts, in particular as a rich source of phloridzin and antioxidant flavanols.

  8. Chromatographic analysis of phenol compounds in six natural populations of Anthyllis vulneraria (L.

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    Andzrej Kalinowski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin-layer chromatography was used to study the phenol composition in individual plants from six natural populations of Anthyllis collected from three distinct geographic regions of Poland. The results showed a variability of the phenols in the examined populations. The populations from Wielkopolska region proved to be most variable, showing the greatest number of phenols. The lowest number of the phenols studies was found in the Tatry populations. Each population showed its own particular spectrum of phenolic compounds. It was found that the populations originating from similar habitats showed more common spots than those from different regions. Populations from the Tatra region were found to differ most from the rest.

  9. Analysis of phenolic compounds for poultry feed by supercritical fluid chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenolic compounds have generated interest as components in functional feed formulations due to their anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, and anti-fungal properties. These compounds may have greater significance in the future as the routine use of antibiotics is reduced and the prevalence of resistant bac...

  10. Antioxidant capacity and major phenol compounds of horticultural plant materials not usually used.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burri, Stina C M; Ekholm, Anders; Håkansson, Åsa; Tornberg, Eva; Rumpunen, Kimmo

    2017-11-01

    Horticultural plant materials not usually used from onion, carrot, beetroot, sea buckthorn, black and red currants as well as a wastewater powder from olive oil production were analyzed for total phenols content (FC), ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), radical scavenging capacity (ABTS), and for major phenolic compounds by HPLC-MS. Antioxidant capacity and phenol content varied significantly between species and cultivars, with extracts of sea buckthorn leaves being superior. In different species, different phenolic compounds were closely associated with FRAP, ABTS and FC. For instance, hydrolysable tannins were major antioxidants in sea buckthorn whereas quercetin was the major antioxidant in onion peel and skin. This study shows that horticultural plant materials usually left in the field or waste materials from processing may have high antioxidant properties, and that extracts of these materials therefore could be of potential interest for development of antioxidant food additives.

  11. Influence of gamma irradiation on phenolic compounds of minimally processed baby carrots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirashima, Fabiana K.; Fabbri, Adriana D.T.; Sagretti, Juliana M.A.; Nunes, Thaise C.F.; Sabato, Suzy F., E-mail: fmayumi@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Galvao, Natascha S.; Lanfer-Marquez, Ursula M., E-mail: lanferum@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FCF/USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas

    2013-07-01

    Consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables provide several health benefits including risk reduction of oxidative stress-related diseases. These benefits have been associated with bioactive compounds, mainly phenolic compounds. Minimally processed products are a growing segment in food retail establishments due its practicality and convenience without significantly altering fresh-like characteristics. To extend the shelf life of these products, an application of ionizing radiation is an alternative, based on a physical and non-thermal method of preservation. The effect of irradiation on phenolic compounds of minimally processed baby carrots have not been reported in literature yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of phenolic compounds in baby carrots after the irradiation process. Samples of minimally processed baby carrots were purchased at a local supermarket and irradiated with doses of 0.5 and 1.0 kGy. Phenolic compounds were extracted from shredded carrots with MeOH and analyzed spectrophotometrically by the Folin Ciocalteau method using a gallic acid standard curve. The results showed that the phenolic contents decreased significantly (p<0.05) with increasing radiation dose. In non-irradiated baby carrots (control), the levels of phenolic compounds were about 330 μg eq. gallic acid/g, while irradiated samples with 0.5 kGy, showed an approximately 10% reduction when compared with the control. An irradiation dose of 1.0 kGy caused a loss of 20%. Although the radiation has affected the phenolic content, the process seems to be interesting by maintaining their fresh-like characteristics. (author)

  12. Influence of gamma irradiation on phenolic compounds of minimally processed baby carrots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirashima, Fabiana K.; Fabbri, Adriana D.T.; Sagretti, Juliana M.A.; Nunes, Thaise C.F.; Sabato, Suzy F.; Galvao, Natascha S.; Lanfer-Marquez, Ursula M.

    2013-01-01

    Consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables provide several health benefits including risk reduction of oxidative stress-related diseases. These benefits have been associated with bioactive compounds, mainly phenolic compounds. Minimally processed products are a growing segment in food retail establishments due its practicality and convenience without significantly altering fresh-like characteristics. To extend the shelf life of these products, an application of ionizing radiation is an alternative, based on a physical and non-thermal method of preservation. The effect of irradiation on phenolic compounds of minimally processed baby carrots have not been reported in literature yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of phenolic compounds in baby carrots after the irradiation process. Samples of minimally processed baby carrots were purchased at a local supermarket and irradiated with doses of 0.5 and 1.0 kGy. Phenolic compounds were extracted from shredded carrots with MeOH and analyzed spectrophotometrically by the Folin Ciocalteau method using a gallic acid standard curve. The results showed that the phenolic contents decreased significantly (p<0.05) with increasing radiation dose. In non-irradiated baby carrots (control), the levels of phenolic compounds were about 330 μg eq. gallic acid/g, while irradiated samples with 0.5 kGy, showed an approximately 10% reduction when compared with the control. An irradiation dose of 1.0 kGy caused a loss of 20%. Although the radiation has affected the phenolic content, the process seems to be interesting by maintaining their fresh-like characteristics. (author)

  13. The regulation by phenolic compounds of soil organic matter dynamics under a changing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyungjin; Freeman, Chris; Kang, Hojeong; Choi, Sung-Uk

    2015-01-01

    Phenolics are the most abundant plant metabolites and are believed to decompose slowly in soils compared to other soil organic matter (SOM). Thus, they have often been considered as a slow carbon (C) pool in soil dynamics models. Here, however, we review changes in our concept about the turnover rate of phenolics and quantification of different types of phenolics in soils. Also, we synthesize current research on the degradation of phenolics and their regulatory effects on decomposition. Environmental changes, such as elevated CO2, warming, nitrogen (N) deposition, and drought, could influence the production and form of phenolics, leading to a change in SOM dynamics, and thus we also review the fate of phenolics under environmental disturbances. Finally, we propose the use of phenolics as a tool to control rates of SOM decomposition to stabilize organic carbon in ecosystems. Further studies to clarify the role of phenolics in SOM dynamics should include improving quantification methods, elucidating the relationship between phenolics and soil microorganisms, and determining the interactive effects of combinations of environmental changes on the phenolics production and degradation and subsequent impact on SOM processing.

  14. Phenolic compounds of green tea: Health benefits and technological application in food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Lorenzo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Green tea has been an important beverage for humans since ancient times, widely consumed and considered to have health benefits by traditional medicine in Asian countries. Green tea phenolic compounds are predominately composed of catechin derivatives, although other compounds such as flavonols and phenolic acids are also present in lower proportion. The bioactivity exerted by these compounds has been associated with reduced risk of severe illnesses such as cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Particularly, epigallocatechin gallate has been implicated in alteration mechanisms with protective effect in these diseases as indicated by several studies about the effect of green tea consumption and mechanistic explanation through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The biological activity of green tea phenolic compounds also promotes a protective effect by antioxidant mechanisms in biological and food systems, preventing the oxidative damage by acting over either precursors or reactive species. Extraction of phenolic compounds influences the antioxidant activity and promotes adequate separation from green tea leaves to enhance the yield and/or antioxidant activity. Application of green tea phenolic compounds is of great interest because the antioxidant status of the products is enhanced and provides the product with additional antioxidant activity or reduces the undesirable changes of oxidative reactions while processing or storing food. In this scenario, meat and meat products are greatly influenced by oxidative deterioration and microbial spoilage, leading to reduced shelf life. Green tea extracts rich in phenolic compounds have been applied to increase shelf life with comparable effect to synthetic compounds, commonly used by food industry. Green tea has great importance in general health in technological application, however more studies are necessary to elucidate the impact in pathways related to other diseases and food

  15. Comparison of AOPs Efficiencies on Phenolic Compounds Degradation

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    Lourdes Hurtado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a comparison of the performances of different AOPs in the phenol and 4-chlorophenol (4-CP degradation at lab and pilot scale is presented. It was found that, in the degradation of phenol, the performance of a coupled electro-oxidation/ozonation process is superior to that observed by a photo-Fenton process. Phenol removal rate was determined to be 0.83 mg L−1 min−1 for the coupled process while the removal rate for photo-Fenton process was only 0.52 mg L−1 min−1. Regarding 4-CP degradation, the complete disappearance of the molecule was achieved and the efficiency decreasing order was as follows: coupled electro-oxidation/ozonation > electro-Fenton-like process > photo-Fenton process > heterogeneous photocatalysis. Total organic carbon was completely removed by the coupled electro-oxidation/ozonation process. Also, it was found that oxalic acid is the most recalcitrant by-product and limits the mineralization degree attained by the technologies not applying ozone. In addition, an analysis on the energy consumption per removed gram of TOC was conducted and it was concluded that the less energy consumption is achieved by the coupled electro-oxidation/ozonation process.

  16. Foliar phenolic compounds of ten wild species of Verbenacea as antioxidants and specific chemomarkers

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    J. A. Ávila-Reyes

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The family Verbenaceae hosts important species used in traditional medicine of many countries. The taxonomic controversies concerning the specific delimitation of several of its species make it difficult to guarantee the botanical origin of herbal preparations based on species of this family. To contribute to the development of both specific chemomarkers and a quality control tool to authenticate the botanical origin of herbal preparations of Verbenacea species, we determined the foliar HPLC-DAD phenolic profiles and the antioxidant properties of 10 wild species of this family occurring in Mexico. The contents of phenols and flavonoids varied significantly among species. Priva mexicana showed the highest levels of total phenolics (53.4 mg g-1 dry tissue and Verbena carolina had the highest levels of flavonoids (17.89 mg g-1 dry tissue. Relevant antioxidant properties revealed by antiradical and reducing power were found for the analyzed species. These properties varied significantly in a species-dependent manner. The phenolic compounds accumulated were flavones and phenolic acids. Flavones were the only type of flavonoids found. The results of a cluster analysis showed that the compounds were accumulated in species-specific profiles. The phenolic profiles are proposed as valuable chemomarkers that can become a useful tool for the quality control concerning the botanical origin of herbal medicinal preparations based on the species analyzed. In addition, phenolic profiles could contribute importantly to solve the taxonomic controversies concerning species delimitation in the family Verbenaceae.

  17. Identification and characterisation of phenolic compounds extracted from Moroccan olive mill wastewater

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    Inass Leouifoudi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Olive mill wastewater, hereafter noted as OMWW was tested for its composition in phenolic compounds according to geographical areas of olive tree, i.e. the plain and the mountainous areas of Tadla-Azilal region (central Morocco. Biophenols extraction with ethyl acetate was efficient and the phenolic extract from the mountainous areas had the highest concentration of total phenols' content. Fourier-Transform-Middle Infrared (FT-MIR spectroscopy of the extracts revealed vibration bands corresponding to acid, alcohol and ketone functions. Additionally, HPLC-ESI-MS analyses showed that phenolic alcohols, phenolic acids, flavonoids, secoiridoids and derivatives and lignans represent the most abundant phenolic compounds. Nüzhenide, naringenin and long chain polymeric substances were also detected. Mountainous areas also presented the most effective DPPH scavenging potential compared to plain areas; IC50 values were 11.7 ± 5.6 µg/ml and 30.7 ± 4.4 µg/ml, respectively. OMWW was confirmed as a rich source of natural phenolic antioxidant agents.

  18. PHENOLIC COMPOUNDS OF WATER-ETHANOLIC EXTRACT OF MENTHA LONGIFOLIA L

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    O. A. Grebennikova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article represents data about qualitative and quantitative composition of phenolic compounds in water-ethanol extract of perspective clone of Mentha longifolia L. of NBE-NSC selection. Phenolic substances content in water-ethanol extract amounted to 3003.3 mg/100g. 13 components were determined in the extract. The extract contains caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid isomers, rosmarinic acid and glycosides of luteolin. Rosmarinic acid (50.2% prevails among phenolic substances of Mentha longifolia extract. The conclusion is that the use of this extract is possible to create products with high biological value

  19. Anti-Campylobacter Activities and Resistance Mechanisms of Natural Phenolic Compounds in Campylobacter

    OpenAIRE

    Klan?nik, Anja; Mo?ina, Sonja Smole; Zhang, Qijing

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Campylobacter is a major foodborne pathogen and alternative antimicrobials are needed to prevent or decrease Campylobacter contamination in foods or food producing animals. The objectives of this study are to define the anti-Campylobacter activities of natural phenolic compounds of plant origin and to determine the roles of bacterial drug efflux systems in the resistance to these natural phenolics in Campylobacter jejuni. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Anti-Campylobacter activiti...

  20. Plant growth and phenolic compounds in the rhizosphere soil of wild oat (Avena fatua L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eIannucci

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to determine the pattern of dry matter (DM accumulation and the evolution of phenolic compounds in the rhizosphere soil from tillering to the ripe seed stages of wild oat (Avena fatua L., a widespread annual grassy weed. Plants were grown under controlled conditions and harvested 13 times during the growing season. At each harvest, shoot and root DM and phenolic compounds in the rhizosphere soil were determined. The maximum DM production (12.6 g/plant was recorded at 122 days after sowing (DAS; kernel hard stage. The increase in total aerial DM with age coincided with reductions in the leaf/stem and source/sink ratios, and an increase in the shoot/root ratio. HPLC analysis shows production of seven phenolic compounds in the rhizosphere soil of wild oat, in order of their decreasing levels: syringic acid, vanillin, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, syringaldehyde, ferulic acid, p-cumaric acid and vanillic acid. The seasonal distribution for the total phenolic compounds showed two peaks of maximum concentrations, at the stem elongation stage (0.71 μg/kg; 82 DAS and at the heading stage (0.70 μg/kg; 98 DAS. Thus wild oat roots exude allelopathic compounds, and the levels of these phenolics in the rhizosphere soil vary according to plant maturity.

  1. Antioxidative activities and phenolic compounds of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo) seeds and amaranth (Amaranthus caudatus) grain extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiretti, Pier Giorgio; Meineri, Giorgia; Gai, Francesco; Longato, Erica; Amarowicz, Ryszard

    2017-09-01

    Phenolic compounds were extracted from pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo) seed and amaranth (Amaranthus caudatus) grain into 80% (v/v) methanol. The extracts obtained were characterised by the contents of total phenolic compounds (TPC), trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and antiradical activity against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH · ) radical. The content of individual phenolic compounds was determined by HPLC-DAD method. Pumpkin seeds showed the higher content of TPC than that from amaranth. The TEAC values of both extracts were similar each other. The lower value of FRAP was observed for pumpkin seed. Phenolic compound present in amaranth grain exhibited strongest antiradical properties against DPPH radical. Several peaks were present on the HPLC chromatograms of two extracts. The UV-DAD spectra confirmed the presence of vanillic acid derivatives in the amaranth grain. The three main phenolic compound present in pumpkin seed were characterised by UV-DAD spectra with maximum at 258, 266 and 278 nm.

  2. Influence of Laccase and Tyrosinase on the Antioxidant Capacity of Selected Phenolic Compounds on Human Cell Lines

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    Matthias Riebel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenolic compounds affect the color, odor and taste of numerous food products of plant origin. In addition to the visual and gustatory properties, they serve as radical scavengers and have antioxidant effects. Polyphenols, especially resveratrol in red wine, have gained increasing scientific and public interest due to their presumptive beneficial impact on human health. Enzymatic oxidation of phenolic compounds takes place under the influence of polyphenol oxidases (PPO, including tyrosinase and laccase. Several studies have demonstrated the radical scavenger effect of plants, food products and individual polyphenols in vitro, but, apart from resveratrol, such impact has not been proved in physiological test systems. Furthermore, only a few data exist on the antioxidant capacities of the enzymatic oxidation products of phenolic compounds generated by PPO. We report here first results about the antioxidant effects of phenolic substances, before and after oxidation by fungal model tyrosinase and laccase. In general, the common chemical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay and the biological tests using two different types of cell cultures (monocytes and endothelial cells delivered similar results. The phenols tested showed significant differences with respect to their antioxidant activity in all test systems. Their antioxidant capacities after enzymatic conversion decreased or increased depending on the individual PPO used.

  3. Effect of fungal infection on phenolic compounds during the storage of coffee beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This work was undertaken to study the effect of Aspergillus infection on phenolic compounds in beans from four cultivars of the coffee plant (Coffea arabica L.. The effects of storage conditions of the coffee beans were also examined. Methodology and results: Beans from four varieties of coffee were artificially infected with three species of Aspergillus: A. niger, A. melleus and A. alliacus, and stored at 0, 8 and 25 ± 2 °C. After 3, 6 and 9 months, the contents of phenolic compounds in the beans were determined using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Conclusion, significance and impact study: The results of this study showed that phenolic compounds were qualitatively and quantitatively higher in the inoculated beans as compared with the uninfected control beans, reflecting a possible induced defense mechanism in the infected beans. Increased storage periods resulted in higher levels of phenols, but the average total, bound and free phenols did not differ between the cultivars tested. Effective control of Apergillus infection in coffee beans can prevent such changes in phenolics that may affect their commercial value.

  4. Phenolic Compounds in Extra Virgin Olive Oil Stimulate Human Osteoblastic Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martínez, Olga; De Luna-Bertos, Elvira; Ramos-Torrecillas, Javier; Ruiz, Concepción; Milia, Egle; Lorenzo, María Luisa; Jimenez, Brigida; Sánchez-Ortiz, Araceli; Rivas, Ana

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to clarify the effects of phenolic compounds and extracts from different extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) varieties obtained from fruits of different ripening stages on osteoblast cells (MG-63) proliferation. Cell proliferation was increased by hydroxytyrosol, luteolin, apigenin, p-coumaric, caffeic, and ferulic acids by approximately 11-16%, as compared with controls that were treated with one vehicle alone, while (+)-pinoresinol, oleuropein, sinapic, vanillic acid and derivative (vanillin) did not affect cell proliferation. All phenolic extracts stimulated MG-63 cell growth, and they induced higher cell proliferation rates than individual compounds. The most effective EVOO phenolic extracts were those obtained from the Picual variety, as they significantly increased cell proliferation by 18-22%. Conversely, Arbequina phenolic extracts increased cell proliferation by 9-13%. A decline in osteoblast proliferation was observed in oils obtained from olive fruits collected at the end of the harvest period, as their total phenolic content decreases at this late stage. Further research on the signaling pathways of olive oil phenolic compounds involved in the processes and their metabolism should be carried out to develop new interventions and adjuvant therapies using EVOO for bone health (i.e.osteoporosis) in adulthood and the elderly.

  5. High Throughput Screening of Natural Phenolic Compounds Against Migration of Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nasrollahi, Samila

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we hypothesize that natural phenolic compounds may present a new class of chemotherapeutics against migration of metastatic triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC). In this project we will screen a small library of phenolic compounds to test this hypothesis, identify compounds that show efficacy against TNBC cell migration, and elucidate underlying molecular mechanisms.

  6. Phenols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirschberger, W.

    1942-10-22

    The damand for phenol greatly increased after the development of synthetics. The only source for their production was coal. The amount obtained depended greatly on the temperature at which the coal had been treated. The phenol content of low-temperature carbonization tars was higher than from high-temperature coke ovens and the temperatures used in hydrogenation had been found to be particularly advantageous. The yields, referred to coal, were about forty times as high with pressure hydrogenation as from coke ovens. Calculated to the coal used, 4% to 5% useful phenols were obtained during coal hydrogenation and these consisted of about 20% phenols, 35% cresols, and 45% xylenols. The proportion was similar with brown coal, but the recovery of the pure materials was made more difficult by the presence of other oxygenated substances. The most common method of phenol production from oils and the off-waters was the extraction with sodium hydroxide, followed by setting the phenols free with carbon dioxide. The phenosolvan process (extraction with water and distillation), the tricresyl phosphate process, the Fresol process (with methyl alcohol), and the method of extraction with superheated steam were also discussed. Leuna was the only hydrogenation works that recovered phenols on an industrial scale.

  7. Identification and Phytotoxicity Assessment of Phenolic Compounds in Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. monilifera (Boneseed.

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    Md Abdullah Yousuf Al Harun

    Full Text Available Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. monilifera (boneseed, a weed of national significance in Australia, threatens indigenous species and crop production through allelopathy. We aimed to identify phenolic compounds produced by boneseed and to assess their phytotoxicity on native species. Phenolic compounds in water and methanol extracts, and in decomposed litter-mediated soil leachate were identified using HPLC, and phytotoxicity of identified phenolics was assessed (repeatedly through a standard germination bioassay on native Isotoma axillaris. The impact of boneseed litter on native Xerochrysum bracteatum was evaluated using field soil in a greenhouse. Collectively, we found the highest quantity of phenolic compounds in boneseed litter followed by leaf, root and stem. Quantity varied with extraction media. The rank of phenolics concentration in boneseed was in the order of ferulic acid > phloridzin > catechin > p-coumaric acid and they inhibited germination of I. axillaris with the rank of ferulic acid > catechin > phloridzin > p-coumaric acid. Synergistic effects were more severe compared to individual phenolics. The litter-mediated soil leachate (collected after15 days exhibited strong phytotoxicity to I. axillaris despite the level of phenolic compounds in the decomposed leachate being decreased significantly compared with their initial level. This suggests the presence of other unidentified allelochemicals that individually or synergistically contributed to the phytotoxicity. Further, the dose response phytotoxic impacts exhibited by the boneseed litter-mediated soil to native X. bracteatum in a more naturalistic greenhouse experiment might ensure the potential allelopathy of other chemical compounds in the boneseed invasion. The reduction of leaf relative water content and chlorophyll level in X. bracteatum suggest possible mechanisms underpinning plant growth inhibition caused by boneseed litter allelopathy. The presence of a substantial

  8. Olive oils from Algeria: Phenolic compounds, antioxidant and antibacterial activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laincer, F.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The phenolic compositions, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities against six bacteria of phenolic extracts of olive oil varieties from eleven Algerian varieties were investigated. The antioxidant activity was assessed by determining the scavenging effect on the DPPH and ABTS.+ radicals. The antimicrobial activity was measured as a zone of inhibition and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC on human harmful and foodborne pathogens. The results show that total phenols was significantly (p .+ radicals (r = 0.76. Among the bacteria tested, S. aureus and to a lesser extent B. subtilis showed the highest sensitivity; the MIC varied from 0.6 to 1.6 mg·mL-1 and 1.2 to 1.8 mg·mL-1, respectively. The results reveal that Algerian olive oils may constitute a good source of antioxidant and antimicrobial agents.Se ha estudiado la composición fenólica y las actividades antioxidante y antimicrobiana, contra seis bacterias, de extractos de aceites de oliva de once variedades argelinas. La actividad antioxidante se evaluó mediante la determinación del efecto captador de radicales de DPPH y ABTS.+. La actividad antimicrobiana se midió como zona de inhibición y como concentración inhibitoria mínima (MIC sobre bacterias perjudiciales humanas y agentes patógenos transmitidos por los alimentos. Los resultados mostraron que los fenoles totales está significativamente (p .+ (r= 0,76. Entre las bacterias ensayadas, S. aureus y, en menor grado B. subtilis mostraron la mayor sensibilidad; el MIC varió de 0,6 a 1,6 mg·mL-1 y 1,2 a 1,8 mg·mL-1 respectivamente. Los resultados muestran que los aceites de oliva argelinos pueden constituir una buena fuente de antioxidantes y agentes antimicrobianos.

  9. Evaluation of phenolic compounds in mate (Ilex paraguariensis) processed by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furgeri, C.; Nunes, T.C.F.; Fanaro, G.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares, IPEN-CNEN/SP, Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes-Laboratory de Deteccao de Alimentos Irradiados, Av. Professor Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, CEP: 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Souza, M.F.F.; Bastos, D.H.M. [Faculdade de Saude Publica, FSP/USP, Departamento de Nutricao-Av. Dr. Arnaldo, 715, CEP: 01246-904 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Villavicencio, A.L.C.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares, IPEN-CNEN/SP, Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes-Laboratory de Deteccao de Alimentos Irradiados, Av. Professor Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, CEP: 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: villavic@ipen.br

    2009-07-15

    The radiation food processing has been demonstrating great effectiveness in the attack of pathogenic agents, while little compromising nutritional value and sensorial properties of foods. The mate (Ilex paraguariensis), widely consumed product in South America, generally in the form of infusions with hot or cold water, calls of chimarrao or terere, it is cited in literature as one of the best sources phenolic compounds. The antioxidants action of these constituent has been related to the protection of the organism against the free radicals, generated in alive, currently responsible for the sprouting of some degenerative illness as cancer, arteriosclerosis, rheumatic arthritis and cardiovascular clutters among others. The objective of that work was to evaluate the action of the processing for gamma radiation in phenolic compounds of terere beverage in the doses of 0, 3, 5, 7 and 10 kGy. The observed results do not demonstrate significant alterations in phenolic compounds of terere beverage processed by gamma radiation.

  10. Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction of Total Phenolic Compounds from Inula helenium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE of phenolic compounds from Inula helenium was studied. Effects of ethanol concentration, ultrasonic time, solid-liquid ratio, and number of extractions were investigated. An orthogonal array was constructed to optimize UAE process. The optimized extraction conditions were as follows: ethanol concentration, 30%; solid-liquid ratio, 1 : 20; number of extractions, 2 times; extraction time, 30 min. Under the optimal conditions, the yield of total phenolic compounds and chlorogenic acid was 6.13±0.58 and 1.32±0.17 mg/g, respectively. The results showed that high amounts of phenolic compounds can be extracted from I. helenium by ultrasound-assisted extraction technology.

  11. Ocean acidification increases the accumulation of toxic phenolic compounds across trophic levels

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Peng

    2015-10-27

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations are causing ocean acidification (OA), altering carbonate chemistry with consequences for marine organisms. Here we show that OA increases by 46–212% the production of phenolic compounds in phytoplankton grown under the elevated CO2 concentrations projected for the end of this century, compared with the ambient CO2 level. At the same time, mitochondrial respiration rate is enhanced under elevated CO2 concentrations by 130–160% in a single species or mixed phytoplankton assemblage. When fed with phytoplankton cells grown under OA, zooplankton assemblages have significantly higher phenolic compound content, by about 28–48%. The functional consequences of the increased accumulation of toxic phenolic compounds in primary and secondary producers have the potential to have profound consequences for marine ecosystem and seafood quality, with the possibility that fishery industries could be influenced as a result of progressive ocean changes.

  12. Evaluation of phenolic compounds in mate (Ilex paraguariensis) processed by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furgeri, C.; Nunes, T.C.F.; Fanaro, G.B.; Souza, M.F.F.; Bastos, D.H.M.; Villavicencio, A.L.C.H.

    2009-01-01

    The radiation food processing has been demonstrating great effectiveness in the attack of pathogenic agents, while little compromising nutritional value and sensorial properties of foods. The mate (Ilex paraguariensis), widely consumed product in South America, generally in the form of infusions with hot or cold water, calls of chimarrao or terere, it is cited in literature as one of the best sources phenolic compounds. The antioxidants action of these constituent has been related to the protection of the organism against the free radicals, generated in alive, currently responsible for the sprouting of some degenerative illness as cancer, arteriosclerosis, rheumatic arthritis and cardiovascular clutters among others. The objective of that work was to evaluate the action of the processing for gamma radiation in phenolic compounds of terere beverage in the doses of 0, 3, 5, 7 and 10 kGy. The observed results do not demonstrate significant alterations in phenolic compounds of terere beverage processed by gamma radiation.

  13. Enrichment of Phenolic Compounds from Olive Mill Wastewater and In Vitro Evaluation of Their Antimicrobial Activities

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    Saleh Abu-Lafi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of olive oil generates massive quantities of by-product called olive mill wastewater (OMWW. The uncontrolled disposal of OMWW poses serious environmental problems. The OMWW effluent is rich in several polyphenolic compounds. Liquid-liquid extraction of OMWW using ethyl acetate solvent was used to enrich phenolic compounds under investigation. Total phenolic and flavonoid content and antioxidant activity of the extract were determined. HPLC coupled to photodiode array (PDA detector was used to analyze the main three phenolic compounds of OMWW, namely, hydroxytyrosol, tyrosol, and oleuropein. The antimicrobial activity of the extract was also investigated. Additionally, the OMWW extract was used as natural preservative and antioxidants for olive oil. Results showed that OMWW is very rich in phenolic compounds and has strong antioxidant activity. HPLC analysis showed that the extract contains mainly hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol but no oleuropein. The OMWW extract showed also positive activities as antibacterial (gram positive and gram negative and antifungal as well as activities against yeast. The addition of OMWW extract to olive oil samples has an effect on the stability of olive oil as reflected by its acid value, peroxide value, K232 and K270, and total phenolic content.

  14. Identification of Phenolic Compounds and Evaluation of Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Properties of Euphorbia Tirucalli L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keline Medeiros de Araújo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive compounds extracted from natural sources can benefit human health. The aim of this work was to determine total phenolic content and antioxidant activity in extracts of Euphorbia tirucalli L. followed by identification and quantification of the phenolic compounds, as well as their antibacterial activities. Antioxidant activities were determined by DPPH and ABTS•+ assay. Identification of phenolic compounds was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, and antimicrobial activities were verified by agar dilution methods and MIC values. Total phenolic content ranged from 7.73 to 30.54 mg/100 g gallic acid equivalent. Extracts from dry plants showed higher antioxidant activities than those from fresh ones. The DPPH EC50 values were approximately 12.15 μg/mL and 16.59 μg/mL, respectively. Antioxidant activity measured by the ABTS method yielded values higher than 718.99 μM trolox/g for dry plants, while by the Rancimat® system yielded protection factors exceeding 1 for all extracts, comparable to synthetic BHT. Ferulic acid was the principal phenolic compound identified and quantified through HPLC-UV in all extracts. The extracts proved effective inhibitory potential for Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus. These results showed that extracts of Euphorbia tirucalli L. have excellent antioxidant capacity and moderate antimicrobial activity. These can be attributed to the high concentration of ferulic acid.

  15. Antimicrobial Activity of the Phenolic Compounds of Prunus mume against Enterobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Takahiko; Ota, Kana; Inaba, Nobuya; Kishida, Kunihiro; Koyama, Hajime A

    2018-01-01

    Mume fruit, the Japanese apricot (Prunus mume SIEB. et ZUCC.), is popular in Japan and is mostly consumed in the pickled form called umeboshi. This fruit is known to have anti-microbial properties, but the principal constituents responsible for the antimicrobial properties have not yet been elucidated. We investigated the antimicrobial activities of the phenolic compounds in P. mume against enterobacteria. In this study, growth inhibitory activities were measured as an index of the antibacterial activities. The phenolic compounds were prepared from a byproduct of umeboshi called umesu or umezu (often translated as "mume vinegar"). Umesu or umezu phenolics (UP) contain approximately 20% phenolic compounds with p-coumaric acid as a standard and do not contain citric acid. We observed the inhibitory effects of UP against the growth of some enterobacteria, at a relatively high concentration (1250-5000 µg/mL). Alkali hydrolysates of UP (AHUP) exhibited similar antibacterial activities, but at much lower concentrations of 37.5-300 µg/mL. Since AHUP comprises hydroxycinnamic acids such as caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, and ferulic acid, the antibacterial activities of each of these acids were examined. Our study shows that the phenolic compounds in P. mume other than citric acid contribute to its antimicrobial activity against enterobacteria in the digestive tract.

  16. The effect of supplementation with three commercial inactive dry yeasts on the colour, phenolic compounds, polysaccharides and astringency of a model wine solution and red wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Royo, Elena; Esteruelas, Mireia; Kontoudakis, Nikolaos; Fort, Francesca; Canals, Joan Miquel; Zamora, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays supplementing red wines with commercial inactive dry yeasts is a widespread practice in winemaking because it leads to better balanced wines through increased mouthfeel and smooth astringency. The aim of this article is to study, in a red wine and in a model wine solution, how supplementation with three commercial inactive dry yeasts affects chemical composition and astringency. This will give us a better understanding of the action mechanism involved. The results suggest that this action mechanism is related to two different phenomena. The first is that inactive yeasts release polysaccharides and oligosaccharides which can increase mouthfeel and inhibit interactions between salivary protein and tannins. The second is that they have a direct effect on the precipitation or absorption of proanthocyanidins, especially the larger polymers, which have been described as the most astringent. It can be concluded that supplementation with inactive yeasts is indeed a useful tool for smoothing the astringency of red wines. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Promising Potential of Dietary (Poly)Phenolic Compounds in the Prevention and Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Tania R; Alves, Marco G; Casal, Susana; Oliveira, Pedro F; Silva, Branca M

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is reaching alarming proportions worldwide, particularly because it is increasingly affecting younger people. This reflects the sedentary lifestyle and inappropriate dietary habits, especially due to the advent of processed foods in modern societies. Thus, unsurprisingly, the first medical recommendation to patients with clinically evident DM is the alteration in their eating behaviour, particularly regarding carbohydrates and total energy intake. Despite individual and cultural preferences, human diet makes available a large amount of phytochemicals with therapeutic potential. Phenolic compounds are the most abundant class of phytochemicals in edible plants, fruits and beverages. These compounds have strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities that have been associated with specific features of their chemical structure. Among others, such properties make them promising antidiabetic agents and several mechanisms of action have already been proposed. Herein, we discuss the recent findings on the potential of dietary phenolic compounds for the prevention and/or treatment of (pre)diabetes, and associated complications. A broad range of studies supports the innate potential of phenolic compounds to protect against DM-associated deleterious effects. Their antidiabetic activity has been demonstrated by: i) regulation of carbohydrate metabolism; ii) improvement of glucose uptake; iii) protection of pancreatic β-cells; iv) enhancement of insulin action and v) regulation of crucial signalling pathways to cell homeostasis. Dietary phenolic compounds constitute an easy, safe and cost-effective way to combat the worrying scenario of DM. The interesting particularities of phenolic compounds reinforce the implementation of a (poly)phenolic-rich nutritional regime, not only for (pre)diabetic patients, but also for non-diabetic people. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Antioxidant activity and phenolic compounds from Colchicum luteum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ethanolic extract from corms of the Colchicum luteum Baker (Liliaceae) was investigated phytochemically. During phytochemical studies, compounds 1 - 4 were isolated from the n-butanol fraction. These compounds were identified as colchicines 1, β - Lumicolchicine 2, chlorogenic acid 3 and 3', 4', ...

  19. Sensitive amperometric biosensor for phenolic compounds based on graphene-silk peptide/tyrosinase composite nanointerface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ying; Ma, Ming; Wang, Zhengguo; Zhan, Guoqing; Li, Buhai; Wang, Xian; Fang, Huaifang; Zhang, Huijuan; Li, Chunya

    2013-06-15

    New graphene-silk peptide (Gr-SP) nanosheets were prepared and successfully fabricated with tyrosinase (Tyr) as a novel biosensor for the determination of phenolic compounds. The Gr-SP nanosheets were fully characterized with transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV/Vis and FTIR spectra. The developed biosensors were also characterized with scanning electronic microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Using bisphenol A (BPA) as a model substrate in the sensing system, a number of key factors including the volume of Gr-SP-Tyr solution, the applied potential, pH values, temperature, and the Tyr/Gr-SP ratio that influence the analytical performance of the biosensor were investigated. The biosensor gave a linear response on the concentration ranges of 0.001-16.91 μM for catechol with the sensitivity of 7634 mA M(-1)cm(-2), 0.0015-21.12 μM for phenol with the sensitivity of 4082 mA M(-1)cm(-2), and 0.002-5.48 μM for BPA with the sensitivity of 2511 mA M(-1)cm(-2). The low detection limits were estimated to be 0.23, 0.35 and 0.72 nM (S/N=3) for catechol, phenol and BPA, respectively. The biosensors also exhibit good repeatability and long-term stability. The practical application of the biosensor was also demonstrated by the determination of BPA leaching from commercial plastic drinking bottles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. PHENOLIC COMPOUND FROM THE STEM BARK OF MANGGIS HUTAN (Garcinia bancana Miq. AND THEIR ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY

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    Muharni Muharni

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A phenolic compoud, (--epicatechin, was isolated from  the stem bark of Garcinia bancana. The structure of this compound was determined base on spectroscopic  data such as including UV, IR, 1-D, 2-D NMR, and comparison with the reported data. Biological activity of this compound at free radical scavenging activity by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH and inhibitory xanthine oxidase(XO activity showed that (-- epicathechin active at two methods with IC50 value 8.1 and 8.6 mg/mL respectively.   Keywords: phenolic, (--epicatechin, Garcinia  bancana, DPPH, XO

  1. Biofortification (Se: Does it increase the content of phenolic compounds in virgin olive oil (VOO?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto D'Amato

    Full Text Available Extra-Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO is a fundamental component of the Mediterranean diet and it may contain several anti-oxidant substances, such as phenols. Previous research has shown that this food may be enriched in phenols by spraying a sodium-selenate solution (100 mg L-1 Se onto the crop canopy before flowering. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of this Se-fertilization before flowering (cv. Leccino on the phenolic profile of EVOOs, and test to what extent such effects depend on the weather pattern, as observed in two contrasting experimental seasons (2013 and 2014. Results showed that Se-fertilisation enriched EVOOs both in selenium (up to 120 μg kg-1 and in phenols (up to 401 mg kg-1. This latter enrichment was related to an increase in PAL (L-Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyase activities and it was largely independent on the climatic pattern. Considering the phenolic profile, oleacein, ligustroside, aglycone and oleocanthal were the most affected compounds and were increased by 57, 50 and 32%, respectively. All these compounds, especially oleacein, have been shown to exert a relevant anti-oxidant activity, contributing both to the shelf-life of EVOOs and to positive effects on human health. It is suggested that Se-fertilisation of olive trees before flowering may be an interesting practice, particularly with poor cultivars and cold and rainy weather patterns, which would normally lead to the production of EVOOs with unfavourable phenolic profile.

  2. Phenolic compounds and carotenoids in pumpkin fruit and related traditional products

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    Zdunić Gordana M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pumpkin fruit is used in a diet since ancient times especially in rural communities. The major contributory factors of nutritional and medicinal value of pumpkins are carotenoids, polysaccharides, vitamins, minerals, and phenolic compounds. Due to a very large fruit that it is not easy to consume a whole as well as short shelf-life of fresh-cut pumpkin, different ways of conserving and processing are performed. In our study, total carotenoids, total phenolics and individual phenolics in fresh pumpkin and pumpkin traditional products such as sweet in wine, jam and juice, which are typical for northern parts of Serbia, were studied. Total carotenoids ranged from 27.6 μg/g of pumpkin sweet in wine to 86.3 μg/g of fresh fruit, while the amount of total phenolics varied between 93.0 μg GAE/g of pumpkin juice and 905.9 μg GAE/g of fresh fruit. Eight phenolic compounds were identified in the investigated samples and among them phenolic acids dominated. Among flavonoids, flavanon glycoside hesperidin was detected. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 46013

  3. Characterization of phenolic compounds, carotenoids, vitamins and antioxidant activities of selected Malaysian wild edible plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jin Yi; Matanjun, Patricia; Ooi, Yasmin Beng Houi; Chia, Kah Fei

    2013-08-01

    This study was carried out to characterize phenolic compounds, carotenoids, vitamins and the antioxidant activity of selected wild edible plants. Plant extracts were purified, and phenolic compounds comprising 11 phenolic acids (hydroxybenzoic acid and hydrocinnamic acid) and 33 flavonoids (including catechin, glycosides and aglycones) were analysed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography - Diode Array Detector (HPLC-DAD). Furthermore, the contents of ascorbic acid and tocopherol ((α and γ tocopherol) and carotenoids (lutein and β-carotene) were also determined. The major phenolics identified consisted of glycosides of flavones (apigenin and luteolin) and flavonols (kaempferol and quercetin). Among the phenolic acids identified after hydrolysis, coumaric acid was the predominant phenolic acid in all the extracts of wild plants. Ascorbic acid [53.8 mg/100 g fresh weight (FW)] and β-carotene (656.5 mg/100 g FW) showed the highest content in the leaf of Heckeria umbellatum. In conclusion, the leaves of H. umbellatum, Aniseia martinicensis and Gonostegia hirta have excellent potential in the future to emerge as functional ingredients.

  4. The influence of beverage composition on delivery of phenolic compounds from coffee and tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2010-04-26

    Epidemiological data suggest that consumption of coffee and tea is associated with a reduced risk of several chronic and degenerative diseases including cardiovascular disorders, diabetes, obesity and neurodegenerative disorders. Both coffee and tea are a rich source of phenolic compounds including chlorogenic acids in coffee; and flavan-3-ols as well as complex theaflavins and thearubigens in tea. Coffee and tea are two of the most commonly consumed beverages in the world and thus represent a significant opportunity to positively affect disease risk and outcomes globally. Central to this opportunity is a need to better understand factors that may affect the bioavailability of specific phenolic components from coffee and tea based beverages. An overview of the phenolic composition of coffee and tea is discussed in the context of how processing and composition might influence phenolic profiles and bioavailability of individual phenolic components. Specifically, the impact of beverage formulation, the extent and type of processing and the influence of digestion on stability, bioavailability and metabolism of bioactive phenolics from tea and coffee are discussed. The impact of co-formulation with ascorbic acid and other phytochemicals are discussed as strategies to improve absorption of these health promoting phytochemicals. A better understanding of how the beverage composition impacts phenolic profiles and their bioavailability is critical to development of beverage products designed to deliver specific health benefits. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Systematic Review of the Efficacy of Bioactive Compounds in Cardiovascular Disease: Phenolic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar D. Rangel-Huerta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD is rising and is the prime cause of death in all developed countries. Bioactive compounds (BAC can have a role in CVD prevention and treatment. The aim of this work was to examine the scientific evidence supporting phenolic BAC efficacy in CVD prevention and treatment by a systematic review. Databases utilized were Medline, LILACS and EMBASE, and all randomized controlled trials (RCTs with prospective, parallel or crossover designs in humans in which the effects of BAC were compared with that of placebo/control were included. Vascular homeostasis, blood pressure, endothelial function, oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers were considered as primary outcomes. Cohort, ecological or case-control studies were not included. We selected 72 articles and verified their quality based on the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network, establishing diverse quality levels of scientific evidence according to two features: the design and bias risk of a study. Moreover, a grade of recommendation was included, depending on evidence strength of antecedents. Evidence shows that certain polyphenols, such as flavonols can be helpful in decreasing CVD risk factors. However, further rigorous evidence is necessary to support the BAC effect on CVD prevention and treatment.

  6. Antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds in lentil seeds (Lens culinaris L.

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    Dragišić-Maksimović Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant activities of methanol extracts of lentil seeds (Lens culinaris L. have been investigated in this work. Scarce reference data describe lentil seeds as rich in polyphenols, which are reported to exhibit bioactive properties due to their capability to reduce or quench reactive oxygen species. The content and composition of phenolics is highly dependent of the cultivars, environments/growth conditions and method of analysis. Therefore, this study is an effort in investigation of phenolics content and composition in lentil seeds trying to prove the contribution of identified phenolics to antioxidant capacity. HPLC measurements revealed that lentil seeds contain gallic acid, epicatechin, catechin, protocatechuic acid, rutin, p-coumaric acid and umbeliferone. Their DPPH radical scavenging activity was in descending order from gallic acid to umbeliferone. The presented results contribute to knowledge of the implications in dietary intake of phenolic compounds from lentil seeds.

  7. Effect of drying method on volatile compounds, phenolic profile and antioxidant capacity of guava powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Juliana C; Lago, Mabel G; Castelo-Branco, Vanessa N; Oliveira, Felipe R; Torres, Alexandre Guedes; Perrone, Daniel; Monteiro, Mariana

    2016-04-15

    We studied the chemical composition of oven and freeze dried guava powders for future use as antioxidant-rich flavour enhancers. Among thirty-one volatiles in guava powders, terpenes were predominant, even after both drying processes. In contrast, esters and aldehydes, volatiles characteristic of fresh guava fruit, appeared to have been decreased by drying. Insoluble phenolics were predominant and among the sixteen compounds identified, quercetin-3-O-rutinoside and naringenin corresponded to 56% of total phenolics. Drying processes decreased total phenolics contents by up to 44%. Oven drying promoted the release of insoluble flavonoids, generating mainly quercetin. Antioxidant capacity also decreased due to both drying processes, but guava powders still presented similar antioxidant capacity in comparison to other tropical fruit powders. Our results suggest that oven drying is a viable option for the production of a functional ingredient that would improve the phenolic content of cereal foods while adding desirable guava flavour. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Standardization of Tragopogon graminifolius DC. Extract Based on Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activity

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    Mohammad Hosein Farzaei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tragopogon graminifolius DC. (TG, Compositae family, is traditionally used for the treatment of various diseases like gastrointestinal and hepatic disorders. The aim of the present study is to standardize extracts from TG used for preparation of different dosage forms in traditional Iranian medicine (TIM based on phenolic compounds. For this purpose, total phenolic content and some phenolic compounds were determined in ethanolic extracts from aerial part and root of TG by HPLC method. Furthermore, antioxidant activity was evaluated using DPPH-HPLC methods. Caffeic acid, gallic acid, ρ-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and catechin were detected in root and aerial part of TG. ρ-Coumaric acid (6.357 ± 0.014 mg·g−1 was dominant phenolic compound in aerial part followed by ferulic acid (1.24 ± 0.018 mg·g−1. Also, ρ-coumaric acid (2.685 ± 0.031 mg·g−1 was highly abundant in root, followed by catechin (2.067 ± 0.021 mg·g−1. Antioxidant activity of root extract (460.45 ± 0.78 µg Vit.E.E·mL−1 was better than that of aerial part. Generally, phenolic compounds are one of the major constituents of TG and could be used as markers for standardization of dosage forms prepared from this plant. Also, TG demonstrated significant antioxidant activity using DPPH-HPLC method. Phenolic compounds of TG may be responsible for its marked antioxidant properties.

  9. Ultrasound Assisted Extraction for the Recovery of Phenolic Compounds from Vegetable Sources

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    Nelly Medina-Torres

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable sources and agro-industrial residues represent an important source of phenolic compounds that are useful in a wide range of applications, especially those with biological activities. Conventional techniques of phytochemical extraction have been associated with a high consumption of organic solvents that limits the application of bioactive extracts, leading to the implementation of novel extraction technologies using mechanisms such as Ultrasound Assisted Extraction (UAE. In the present review, an analysis of the involved variables in the extraction yield of phenolic compounds through UAE is presented, highlighting the advantages of this technology based on the results obtained in various optimized studies. A comparison with other technologies and a proposal of its possible application for agro industrial residues as raw material of phenolic compounds is also indicated. Finally, it is concluded that UAE is a technology that is placed within the area of Sustainable Chemistry since it promotes the use of renewable raw materials through the extraction of phenolic compounds, implementing the substitution of organic solvents with solvents that do not present toxic effects, lowering the energy consumption when compared to conventional methods and minimizing process times and temperatures, which is useful for the extraction of thermo-labile compounds.

  10. Continuous extraction of phenolic compounds from pomegranate peel using high voltage electrical discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jun; He, Lang; Yan, Liang-Gong

    2017-09-01

    Pomegranate peel, a waste generated from fruit processing industry, is a potential source of phenolic compounds that are known for their anti-oxidative properties. In this study, a continuous high voltage electrical discharge (HVED) extraction system was for the first time designed and optimized for phenolic compounds from pomegranate peel. The optimal conditions for HVED were: flow rate of materials 12mL/min, electrodes gap distance 3.1mm (corresponding to 29kV/cm of electric field intensity) and liquid to solid ratio 35mL/g. Under these conditions, the experimental yield of phenolic compounds was 196.7±6.4mg/g, which closely agreed with the predicted value (199.83mg/g). Compared with the warm water maceration, HVED method possessed higher efficiency for the extraction of phenolic compounds. The results demonstrated that HVED technique could be a very effective method for continuous extraction of natural compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Composition and Concentration of Phenolic Compounds of ‘Auksis’ Apple Grown on Various Rootstocks

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    Kviklys Darius

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The trial was carried out at the Institute of Horticulture, Lithuanian Research Centre for Agriculture and Forestry in 2013-2015. Cv. ‘Auksis’ was tested on 12 rootstocks: B.396, B.9, M.9, M.26, P 22, P 59, P 61, P 62, P 66, P 67, PB.4, and Pure 1. Accumulation of phenolic compounds depended on fruit yield and average fruit weight. On average, significantly lower concentration among rootstocks occurred when apple trees had abundant yield and fruits were smaller. On average chlorogenic acid constituted 50% and total procyanidins 28% of total phenols in ‘Auksis’ fruits. Flavonoid concentration most depended on rootstock and the highest variation was recorded. More than 50% difference occurred between the highest total flavonoid concentration in apples on PB.4 and the lowest on M.9 rootstocks. Low variability of total procyanidin concentration among rootstocks was observed. Differences between the highest and lowest concentration was 15%. Total concentration of phenolic compounds differed among rootstocks by 29-35% depending on the year. Differences in accumulation of phenolic compounds depended on rootstock genotype but not on yield or fruit weight. PB.4 and P 67 rootstocks had the highest, and M.9, P 62 and M.26 had the lowest concentration of total phenol in ‘Auksis’ fruits

  12. Leaf phenolic compounds in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) induced by exposure to moderately elevated ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saviranta, Niina M.M. [University of Kuopio, Department of Biosciences, Institute of Applied Biotechnology, Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Oksanen, Elina [University of Joensuu, Faculty of Biosciences, Natural Product Research Laboratories, Box 111, 80101 Joensuu (Finland); Karjalainen, Reijo O., E-mail: reijo.karjalainen@uku.f [University of Kuopio, Department of Biosciences, Institute of Applied Biotechnology, Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); AgriFood Research Finland, 31600 Jokioinen (Finland)

    2010-02-15

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.), an important feed crop in many parts of the world, is exposed to elevated ozone over large areas. Plants can limit ozone-induced damages by various defence mechanisms. In this work, changes in the concentrations of antioxidant phenolic compounds induced by slightly elevated levels of ozone were determined in red clover leaves by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. 31 different phenolics were identified and the most abundant isoflavones and flavonoids were biochanin A glycoside malonate (G-M), formononetin-G-M and quercetin-G-M. Elevated ozone (mean 32.4 ppb) increased the total phenolic content of leaves and also had minor effects on the concentrations of individual compounds. Elevated ozone increased the net photosynthesis rate of red clover leaves before visible injuries by 21-23%. This study thus suggests that the concentrations of phenolics in red clover leaves change in response to slightly elevated ozone levels. - Concentrations of antioxidant phenolic compounds from red clover can be influenced by elevated ozone.

  13. European marketable grain legume seeds: Further insight into phenolic compounds profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Sara C Q; Taveira, Marcos; Cabrita, Ana R J; Fonseca, António J M; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B

    2017-01-15

    Twenty-nine mature raw varieties of grain legume seeds (chickpeas, field peas, faba beans, common vetch and lupins) produced in Europe were investigated for their phenolic profile by means of high performance liquid chromatography coupled to diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). To the best of our knowledge, this study reported for the first time the phenolic composition of mature raw seeds of chickpea type Desi, field pea and common vetch. Phenolic acids were predominant compounds in chickpeas, field peas and common vetch compared to flavonoids, whereas the opposite was observed for lupin seeds. Yellow lupins presented the highest levels of total phenolic compounds followed by narrow-leafed lupins (in average 960 and 679mg/kg, dry basis, respectively), whereas Kabuli chickpeas got the lowest ones (in average 47mg/kg, dry basis). Principal component analysis revealed that flavones and total levels of phenolic compounds were responsible for nearly 51% of total data variability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification and quantification of phenolic compounds in edible wild leafy vegetables by UHPLC/Orbitrap-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambanelli, Elisa; Filippo D'Antuono, L; Romero-González, Roberto; Garrido Frenich, Antonia

    2018-02-01

    A recent interest in edible wild leafy vegetables has been documented. Consumers often associate these species with health promotion. In this study, several wild species of the Asteraceae family and Knautia integrifolia (Dipsacaceae) were locally documented for their use in traditional cuisine and sampled from the wild. Phenolic compounds were identified and quantified by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry. Hydroxycinnamic acids ranging from 1388 to 53 076 mg kg -1 dry weight (DW) were the most abundant compounds in all species (69-98% of the total phenolic content) except Tragopogon pratensis. Thirty compounds were identified as flavonoids, mostly as glycosidic forms of luteolin, apigenin, kaempferol and quercetin. The sum of flavonoids ranged between 212 and 12 598 mg kg -1 DW; they represented 65% of the total phenolic content for T. pratensis. Three anthocyanins were detected, representing in most cases less than 1% of the total phenolic content (3-627 mg kg -1 DW). Higher anthocyanin contents were observed for Cichorium types. Different phenolic profiles were observed between species, especially considering the class of flavonoids. Individual species may be of some interest for their content of specific minor flavonoids. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Protective effect of Spirulina platensis enriched in phenolic compounds against hepatotoxicity induced by CCl4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepekçi, Remziye Aysun; Polat, Sait; Çelik, Ahmet; Bayat, Nuray; Saygideger, Saadet Demirörs

    2013-12-01

    Phenolic compounds make up the major secondary metabolites with high pharmaceutical potential. Microalgae were reported to contain low amounts of phenolic compounds. The present study aimed to investigate the hepatoprotective potential of biomass of Spirulina platensis enriched in phenolic compounds. The protective effects of the biomass of S. platensis with low amounts of phenolics (SP1) and with high amounts of phenolics (SP2) against CCl4-induced acute hepatotoxicity were evaluated in rats. The increased levels of ALT, AST and MDA along with decreased activities of SOD and CAT were significantly (p<0.01) ameliorated by SP2. Histological examinations revealed that SP2 was more potent than SP1 in protecting the liver from toxic injury of CCl4 and preserving the hepatocyte ultrastructure. The lesions including necrosis, lymphocyte infiltration, ballooning degeneration and hepatocyte injury as irregular lamellar organisation, dilations in endoplasmic reticulums and the presence of great number of cytoplasmic vacuolization were healed by SP2. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Retardation of quality changes in camel meat sausages by phenolic compounds and phenolic extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqsood, Sajid; Manheem, Kusaimah; Abushelaibi, Aisha; Kadim, Isam Tawfik

    2016-11-01

    Impact of tannic acid (TA), date seed extract (DSE), catechin (CT) and green tea extract (GTE) on lipid oxidation, microbial load and textural properties of camel meat sausages during 12 days of refrigerated storage was investigated. TA and CT showed higher activities in all antioxidative assays compared to DSE and GTE. Lipid oxidation and microbial growth was higher for control sausages when compared to other samples. TA and CT at a level of 200 mg/kg were more effective in retarding lipid oxidation and lowering microbial count (P sensorial qualities of camel meat sausages compared to phenolic extracts (GTE and DSE) over 12 days of storage at 4°C. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  17. Modelling of Phenol Contamination in Wonorejo Estuary, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntoyo; Sakinah, W.

    2017-07-01

    Phenol as a part of marine pollution in Wonorejo estuary has been a concern today. Mass death of clams and decreasing growth of shrimps often occur in this area. The citizens made assumption that source of marine pollution from Sidoarjo mud disaster. This paper investigates the distribution of phenol from modelling with MIKE 21, Eco Lab module. Measurement were done in Wonorejo estuary to get a validation of modelling. Modelling result shows phenol concentration in northern Wonorejo estuary is higher than other areas. Hence, it was concluded that the phenol source is not from Sidoarjo mud disaster.

  18. Phenolic compounds in cultures of tissues of tea plants and the effect of light on their synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koretskaya, T.F.; Zaprometov, M.N.

    1975-01-01

    Stem and leaf calluses of tea plants (Camellia sinensis) retain the capacity for synthesis of phenolic compounds. The content of phenolic compounds comprises 2 to 5 percent of dry weight, the main share (80 to 95 percent) belonging to catechins and leucoanthocyans, including their polymeric forms. The following compounds were detected in callus tissue: (--)-epicatechin, (+)-catechin, two leucoanthocyans, and several unidentified phenolic compounds that fluoresce in UV. (--)-Epicatechin is predominant. In contrast to tissues of an intact plant, the callus does not contain gallocatechins or free gallic acid under the given cultivation conditions. The content of phenolic compounds changes in proportion to callus growth, their greatest amount being formed during the phase of intensive growth. Light stimulates synthesis of phenolic compounds, including the most reduced group of flavonoids, viz., leucoanthocyans and catechins.

  19. Phenolic compounds, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of the wild cherry (Prunus avium L. stem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademović Zahida

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the total phenolic content, evaluate antioxidant propertie and antimicrobial potential, and identify phenolic compounds in alcoholic and aqueous extracts of the wild cherry (Prunus avium L. stems collected in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Alcoholic extracts had higher contents of phenolic and flavonoid components, as well as the antioxidant and ferric reducing antioxidant capacity in comparison to aqueous extracts. All extracts were characterized by HPLC analysis. Furthermore, for the first time, the antimicrobial properties of wild cherry stem extracts were evaluated. Quercetin and (+-catechin were the main compounds identified in the alcoholic extract, followed by chlorogenic acid and rutin. Quercetin was also the major component detected in aqueous extracts. Besides, alcoholic extract showed better antibacterial properties against Staphylococcus aureus as a representative gram-positive bacteria than infusion, whereas none of the samples showed antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and fungus Candida albicans.

  20. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate and related phenol compounds redirect the amyloidogenic aggregation pathway of ataxin-3 towards non-toxic aggregates and prevent toxicity in neural cells and Caenorhabditis elegans animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visentin, Cristina; Pellistri, Francesca; Natalello, Antonino; Vertemara, Jacopo; Bonanomi, Marcella; Gatta, Elena; Penco, Amanda; Relini, Annalisa; De Gioia, Luca; Airoldi, Cristina; Regonesi, Maria E; Tortora, Paolo

    2017-09-01

    The protein ataxin-3 (ATX3) triggers an amyloid-related neurodegenerative disease when its polyglutamine stretch is expanded beyond a critical threshold. We formerly demonstrated that the polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) could redirect amyloid aggregation of a full-length, expanded ATX3 (ATX3-Q55) towards non-toxic, soluble, SDS-resistant aggregates. Here, we have characterized other related phenol compounds, although smaller in size, i.e. (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGC), and gallic acid (GA). We analysed the aggregation pattern of ATX3-Q55 and of the N-terminal globular Josephin domain (JD) by assessing the time course of the soluble protein, as well its structural features by FTIR and AFM, in the presence and the absence of the mentioned compounds. All of them redirected the aggregation pattern towards soluble, SDS-resistant aggregates. They also prevented the appearance of ordered side-chain hydrogen bonding in ATX3-Q55, which is the hallmark of polyQ-related amyloids. Molecular docking analyses on the JD highlighted three interacting regions, including the central, aggregation-prone one. All three compounds bound to each of them, although with different patterns. This might account for their capability to prevent amyloidogenesis. Saturation transfer difference NMR experiments also confirmed EGCG and EGC binding to monomeric JD. ATX3-Q55 pre-incubation with any of the three compounds prevented its calcium-influx-mediated cytotoxicity towards neural cells. Finally, all the phenols significantly reduced toxicity in a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strain expressing an expanded ATX3. Overall, our results show that the three polyphenols act in a substantially similar manner. GA, however, might be more suitable for antiamyloid treatments due to its simpler structure and higher chemical stability. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. A Novel Phenolic Compound, Chloroxynil, Improves Agrobacterium-Mediated Transient Transformation in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Cutler, Sean; Isobe, Sachiko

    2015-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is a commonly used method for plant genetic engineering. However, the limitations of Agrobacterium host-plant interactions and the complexity of plant tissue culture often make the production of transgenic plants difficult. Transformation efficiency in many legume species, including soybean and the common bean, has been reported to be quite low. To improve the transformation procedure in legumes, we screened for chemicals that increase the transformation efficiency of Lotus japonicus, a model legume species. A Chemical library was screened and chemicals that increase in transient transformation efficiency of L. japonicus accession, Miyakojima MG-20 were identified. The transient transformation efficiency was quantified by reporter activity in which an intron-containing reporter gene produces the GUS protein only when the T-DNA is expressed in the plant nuclei. We identified a phenolic compound, chloroxynil, which increased the genetic transformation of L. japonicus by Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105. Characterization of the mode of chloroxynil action indicated that it enhanced Agrobacterium-mediated transformation through the activation of the Agrobacterium vir gene expression, similar to acetosyringone, a phenolic compound known to improve Agrobacterium-mediated transformation efficiency. Transient transformation efficiency of L. japonicus with 5 μM chloroxynil was 60- and 6- fold higher than that of the control and acetosyringone treatment, respectively. In addition, transgenic L. japonicus lines were successfully generated by 5 μM chloroxynil treatment.Furthermore, we show that chloroxynil improves L. japonicus transformation by Agrobacterium strain GV3101 and rice transformation. Our results demonstrate that chloroxynil significantly improves Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation efficiency of various agriculturally important crops.

  2. Exploratory Characterization of Phenolic Compounds with Demonstrated Anti-Diabetic Activity in Guava Leaves at Different Oxidation States

    OpenAIRE

    D?az-de-Cerio, Elixabet; Verardo, Vito; G?mez-Caravaca, Ana Mar?a; Fern?ndez-Guti?rrez, Alberto; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Psidium guajava L. is widely used like food and in folk medicine all around the world. Many studies have demonstrated that guava leaves have anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic activities, among others, and that these activities belong mainly to phenolic compounds, although it is known that phenolic composition in guava tree varies throughout seasonal changes. Andalusia is one of the regions in Europe where guava is grown, thus, the aim of this work was to study the phenolic compounds ...

  3. Phenolic compounds from Miconia myriantha inhibiting Candida aspartic proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X C; Jacob, M R; Pasco, D S; ElSohly, H N; Nimrod, A C; Walker, L A; Clark, A M

    2001-10-01

    Assay-guided fractionation of the ethanol extract of the twigs and leaves of Miconia myriantha yielded two new compounds, mattucinol-7-O-[4' ',6' '-O-(S)-hexahydroxydiphenoyl]-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1) and mattucinol-7-O-[4' ',6' '-di-O-galloyl]-beta-D-glucopyranoside (2), along with mattucinol-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (3), ellagic acid (4), 3,3'-di-O-methyl ellagic acid-4-O-beta-D-xylopyranoside, and gallic acid. Complete (1)H and (13)C NMR assignments of compound 1, which possesses a hexahydroxydiphenoyl unit, were achieved using the HMBC technique optimized for small couplings to enhance the four-bond and two-bond H/C correlations. Compounds 1 and 4 showed inhibitory effects against Candida albicans secreted aspartic proteases, with IC(50) of 8.4 and 10.5 microM, respectively.

  4. Effect of Microwave-Assisted Extraction on the Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Capacity of Blackthorn Flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanja Lovrić

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was undertaken to investigate the influence of extraction parameters during microwave-assisted extraction on total phenolic content, total flavonoids, total hydroxycinnamic acids and total flavonols of blackthorn flowers as well as to evaluate the antioxidant capacity by two different methods (2,2-diphenyl-1 picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging capacity and ferric reducing antioxidant power assays. The investigated extraction parameters were: solvent type and volume fraction of alcohol in solvent (50 and 70 % aqueous solutions of ethanol and methanol, extraction time (5, 15 and 25 min and extraction temperature (40, 50 and 60 °C controlled by microwave power of 100, 200 and 300 W. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA was used to evaluate the differences at a 95 % confidence level (p≤0.05. The obtained results show that aqueous solution of ethanol was more appropriate solvent for extraction of phenolic compounds (total flavonoids, total hydroxycinnamic acids and total flavonols than aqueous solution of methanol. The amount of phenolic compounds was higher in 70 % aqueous solution of ethanol or methanol, while higher antioxidant capacity was observed in 50 % aqueous solution of methanol. Higher temperature of extraction improved the amount of phenolic compounds and also antioxidant capacity determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging capacity assay. Extensive duration of extraction (15- to 25-minute interval has a significant effect only on the increase of total phenolic content, while specific phenolic compound content and antioxidant capacity were the highest when microwave extraction time of 5 min was applied.

  5. Antioxidant activity and phenolic compounds in organic red wine using different winemaking techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulero, Juana; Zafrilla, Pilar; Cayuela, Jose M; Martínez-Cachá, Adela; Pardo, Francisco

    2011-04-01

    Wine phenolic composition depends on the grapes used to make wine and on vinification conditions. The occurrence of these biological compounds has stimulated numerous studies focused on understanding the mechanisms that influence their concentrations in wine. This article studied the effect of different vinification techniques on the antioxidant activity and on the phenolic compounds of red wine made from the variety of Monastrell grapes obtained by organic culture. To this purpose, 3 different vinification procedures were carried out: vinification after prolonged maceration, vinification with the addition of enological enzymes, and traditional vinification procedures (used as control).The results showed similar values of antioxidant activity in all 3 types of wine elaborated and found no differences in the concentrations of the different types of phenolic compounds in wine made with the 3 different methods. The evolution of antioxidant activity and phenolic compounds tested in wines during 3 mo of storage showed a similar pattern. Organic wine has acquired an important role in the economic world and its important, working in oenology to research in this field.

  6. Polarographic methods of investigation of radiochemical transformations of phenol compounds induced by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norbaev, N.

    1977-01-01

    Electron polarography was used for studies on radiochemical changes in phenol compounds following exposure to gamma radiation. The amount of quinones 3 to 4 h after irradiation increased in chlorogenic acid, pyrocatechol, and quercetin; the amount of quinones decreased 24 h after irradiation. (HLW)

  7. Bark as potential source of chemical substances for industry: analysis of content of selected phenolic compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maršík, Petr; Kotyza, Jan; Rezek, Jan; Vaněk, Tomáš

    -, č. 1 (2013), s. 4-9 ISSN 1804-0195 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC10026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : bark * extraction * phenolic compounds Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics http://www.wasteforum.cz/cisla/WF_1_2013.pdf#page=4

  8. Bioprocessing of wheat bran improves in vitro bioaccessibility and colonic metabolism of phenolic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mateo Anson, N.; Selinheimo, E.; Havenaar, R.; Aura, A.-M.; Mattila, I.; Lehtinen, P.; Bast, A.; Poutanen, K.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.

    2009-01-01

    Ferulic acid (FA) is the most abundant phenolic compound in wheat grain, mainly located in the bran. However, its bioaccessibility from the bran matrix is extremely low. Different bioprocessing techniques involving fermentation or enzymatic and fermentation treatments of wheat bran were developed

  9. Evaluation of the effect of germination on phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities in Sorghum varieties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dicko, M.H.; Gruppen, H.; Traore, A.S.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2005-01-01

    The screening of 50 sorghum varieties showed that, on average, germination did not affect the content in total phenolic compounds but decreased the content of proanthocyanidins, 3-deoxyanthocyanidins, and flavan-4-ols. Independent of germination, there are intervarietal differences in antioxidant

  10. Some Phenolic Compounds Increase the Nitric Oxide Level in Endothelial Cells in Vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appeldoorn, M.M.; Venema, D.P.; Peters, T.H.F.; Koenen, M.E.; Arts, I.C.W.; Vincken, J.P.; Gruppen, H.; Keijer, J.; Hollman, P.C.H.

    2009-01-01

    The vasorelaxing properties of chocolate and wine might relate to the presence of phenolic compounds. One of the potential mechanisms involved is stimulation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production, as NO is a major regulator of vasodilatation. This study aimed to develop an in vitro assay using

  11. Some phenolic compounds increase the nitric oxide level in endothelial cells in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appeldoorn, M.M.; Venema, D.P.; Peters, T.H.F.; Koenen, M.E.; Arts, I.C.W.; Vincken, J.-P.; Gruppen, H.; Keuer, J.; Hollman, P.C.H.

    2009-01-01

    The vasorelaxing properties of chocolate and wine might relate to the presence of phenolic compounds. One of the potential mechanisms involved is stimulation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production, as NO is a major regulator of vasodilatation. This study aimed to develop an in vitro assay using

  12. Antioxidant and antimicrobial effects of phenolic compounds extracts of Northeast Portugal honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevinho, Letícia; Pereira, Ana Paula; Moreira, Leandro; Dias, Luís G; Pereira, Ermelinda

    2008-12-01

    Phenolic compounds of dark and clear honeys from Trás-os-Montes of Portugal were extracted with Amberlite XAD-2 and evaluated for their antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. The antioxidant effect was studied using the in vitro test capacity of scavenge the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical and of reducing power of iron (III)/ferricyanide complex. The antimicrobial activity was screened using three Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus lentus) and three Gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli). The results obtained from the partial identification of honey phenolic compounds by high-performance liquid chromatography with a diode array detector showed that p-hydroxibenzoic acid, cinnamic acid, naringenin, pinocembrin and chrysin are the phenolic compounds present in most of the samples analyzed. Antioxidant potential was dependent of honey extract concentration and the results showed that dark honey phenolic compounds had higher activity than the obtained from clear honey. In the biological assays, results showed that S. aureus were the most sensitive microrganisms and B. subtilis, S. lentus, K. pneumoniae and E. coli were each moderately sensitive to the antimicrobial activity of honey extracts. Nevertheless, no antimicrobial activity was observed in the test with P. aeruginosa.

  13. Phenolic compounds of Triplaris gardneriana can protect cells against oxidative stress and restore oxidative balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almeida, de Thiago Silva; Neto, José Joaquim Lopes; Sousa, de Nathanna Mateus; Pessoa, Igor Parra; Vieira, Leonardo Rogério; Medeiros, De Jackeline Lima; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Hamers, Astrid R.M.; Farias, Davi Felipe; Peijnenburg, Ad; Carvalho, Ana Fontenele Urano

    2017-01-01

    This work aimed to add value to an underexploited plant species from Brazil, Triplaris gardneriana. To that, the phenolic compounds profile of its seed ethanolic extract and fractions was examined by HPLC and the antioxidant capacity assessed using chemical assays as well as in vitro cell imaging.

  14. Characterization and quantification of phenolic compounds of extra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-03-19

    Mar 19, 2014 ... 'Mediterranean diet' (Harwood and Yaqoob, 2002). Olive oil has a long history and is associated with a low incidence of coronary-vascular disease (Wahrburg et al.,. 2002). Its oxidative stability and flavour characteristics are associated with its lipid composition and the presence of minor compounds such ...

  15. Content of Phenolic Compounds in the Genus Carduus L. from Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliya Zhelev

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemical screening of the content of total polyphenols, flavonoids, phenolic acids and anthocyanins in Bulgarian Carduus L. species was carried out. The plant materials (inflorescences from all of the 14 species found in Bulgaria has been collected from natural habitats from different floristic regions, during the period 2011-2013. Chemical analysis of the specimens was carried out in accordance with 11 Russian and 7 European Pharmacopoeia. For some of the plant species the obtained results are the first published data about content of phenolic compounds. The content of flavonoids (1,8-3,2% and total phenols(1,7-2,3% was higher in comparison with this of phenolic acids (0,6-2,4% and anthocyanins (0,5-1,5%. The highest content of total phenols and antocyanins was determined in the Carduus thracicus. The three species Carduus thoermeri, Carduus nutans and Carduus candicans ssp. globifer were characterized with the highest content of flavonoids. The highest content of phenolic acids was determined in the Carduus armatus.

  16. Heteroconjugation-based capillary electrophoretic separation of phenolic compounds in acetonitrile and propylene carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuldvee, Ruth; Vaher, Merike; Koel, Mihkel; Kaljurand, Mihkel

    2003-05-01

    A mixture of methyl- and hydroxy-substituted phenols was separated by capillary electrophoresis in pure acetonitrile and propylene carbonate. Interactions between undissociated phenolic compounds and the background electrolytes were investigated. In the present work, benzyltriethylammonium chloride, tetrabutylammonium acetate, and two room temperature-molten salts, 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium trifluoroacetate and 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium heptafluorobutanoate, were used as background electrolytes. The formation of a negative complex between background electrolyte anion and neutral phenolic compound was observed and the formation constant calculated. The formation constants for anion-analyte complexes were approximately the same in propylene carbonate and in acetonitrile. In both solvents the formation constants were the highest for acetate and the lowest for trifluoroacetate. The separation of analytes was slightly influenced by the nature of the solvent: in acetonitrile the resolution between peaks was higher for 1,3-dihydroxyphenol and 1,3,5-trihydroxyphenol, in propylene carbonate 3-methylphenol and phenol were better separated. It was demonstrated that traces of water influence the mobilities of anion-phenol complexes in propylene carbonate.

  17. Phenolic Compounds Present Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi Influence the Lowering of Blood Pressure in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena de Lima Glória

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study identified two phenolic compounds in Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi fruits: naringenin (first report in this species and gallic acid. Their structures were elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR data (1H-, 13C-NMR and a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC technique. A high content of phenolics (659.21 mg of gallic acid equivalents/g of sample—Folin-Ciocalteau method and total flavonoids (140.69 mg of rutin equivalents/g of sample—aluminum chloride method were quantified in S. terebinthifolius, as well as high antioxidant activity (77.47%—2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, DPPH method. The antihypertensive activity related to its phenolic content was investigated. After intravenous infusion in Wistar rats, these phenolics significantly reduced (p < 0.05 the systolic, median, and diastolic arterial pressures of individuals. The rotarod test was performed to determine the mechanism of action of the sample vasorelaxant effect. It was found that its action exceeded that of the positive control used (diazepam. This confirmed the vasodilatory activity exerted by S. terebinthifolius fruits is related to the phenolic compounds present in the plant, which are potent antioxidants and inhibit oxidative stress, mainly in the central nervous system.

  18. Intestinal Permeability and Cellular Antioxidant Activity of Phenolic Compounds from Mango (Mangifera indica cv. Ataulfo) Peels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Ordaz, Ramón; Antunes-Ricardo, Marilena; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A; González-Aguilar, Gustavo A

    2018-02-08

    Mango ( Mangifera indica cv. Ataulfo) peel contains bound phenolics that may be released by alkaline or acid hydrolysis and may be converted into less complex molecules. Free phenolics from mango cv. Ataulfo peel were obtained using a methanolic extraction, and their cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) and permeability were compared to those obtained for bound phenolics released by alkaline or acid hydrolysis. Gallic acid was found as a simple phenolic acid after alkaline hydrolysis along with mangiferin isomers and quercetin as aglycone and glycosides. Only gallic acid, ethyl gallate, mangiferin, and quercetin were identified in the acid fraction. The acid and alkaline fractions showed the highest CAA (60.5% and 51.5%) when tested at 125 µg/mL. The value of the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) across the Caco-2/HT-29 monolayer of gallic acid from the alkaline fraction was higher (2.61 × 10 -6 cm/s) than in the other fractions and similar to that obtained when tested pure (2.48 × 10 -6 cm/s). In conclusion, mango peels contain bound phenolic compounds that, after their release, have permeability similar to pure compounds and exert an important CAA. This finding can be applied in the development of nutraceuticals using this important by-product from the mango processing industry.

  19. Phenolic Compounds from Olea europaea L. Possess Antioxidant Activity and Inhibit Carbohydrate Metabolizing Enzymes In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Dekdouk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic composition and biological activities of fruit extracts from Italian and Algerian Olea europaea L. cultivars were studied. Total phenolic and tannin contents were quantified in the extracts. Moreover 14 different phenolic compounds were identified, and their profiles showed remarkable quantitative differences among analysed extracts. Moreover antioxidant and enzymatic inhibition activities were studied. Three complementary assays were used to measure their antioxidant activities and consequently Relative Antioxidant Capacity Index (RACI was used to compare and easily describe obtained results. Results showed that Chemlal, between Algerian cultivars, and Coratina, among Italian ones, had the highest RACI values. On the other hand all extracts and the most abundant phenolics were tested for their efficiency to inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzymes. Leccino, among all analysed cultivars, and luteolin, among identified phenolic compounds, were found to be the best inhibitors of α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzymes. Results demonstrated that Olea europaea fruit extracts can represent an important natural source with high antioxidant potential and significant α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory effects.

  20. Total phenolic and phytosterol compounds and the radical scavenging activity of germinated Australian sweet lupin flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumiyati; Jayasena, Vijay; James, Anthony P

    2013-12-01

    In addition to their favourable nutritional profile, legumes also contain a range of bioactive compounds such as phenolic compounds and phytosterols which may protect against chronic diseases including cancer and cardiovascular disease. Germination of some legume seeds has been previously reported to increase the concentration of the bioactive compounds. In this study, the effect of germination of Australian Sweet Lupin (ASL) seeds for 9 days on the concentration of some bioactive compounds and the radical scavenging activity in the resulting flour was determined. The concentration of total phenolic compounds in methanolic extracts of germinated ASL flour was determined using Folin Ciocalteu reagent and phytosterols in oil extracts were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. The methanolic and oil extracts were also used to determine radical scavenging activity toward 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl. In the methanolic extracts of germinated ASL flour, phenolic contents and the antioxidant activity were significantly increased following germination (700 and 1400 %, respectively). Analysis of the oil extracts of germinated ASL flour revealed that the concentration of phytosterols and the antioxidant activity were also increased significantly compared to ungerminated ASL flour (300 and 800 %, respectively). The relative proportion of phytosterols in germinated ASL flour was: β-sitosterol (60 %), stigmasterol (30 %) and campesterol (10 %). Germination increases the concentration of bioactive compounds and the radical scavenging activity in the germinated ASL flour.

  1. Bioactive phenolic compounds from aerial parts of Plinia glomerata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Cláudia; Nart, Viviane; Malheiros, Angela; de Souza, Márcia Maria; Fischer, Luiz; Delle Monache, Giuliano; Della Monache, Franco; Cechinel Filho, Valdir

    2007-01-01

    The present work describes the antinociceptive properties and chemical composition of the aerial parts of Plinia glomerata (Myrtaceae). Both of the extracts evaluated, acetonic and methanolic, showed potent antinociceptive action, when analyzed against acetic acid-induced abdominal constrictions in mice, with calculated ID50 (mg/kg, i. p.) values of 24.8 and 3.3, respectively. Through usual chromatographic techniques with an acetonic extract, the following compounds were obtained: 3,4,3'-trimethoxy flavellagic acid (1), 3,4,3'-trimethoxy flavellagic acid 4'-O-glucoside (3) and quercitrin (4), which were identified based on spectroscopic data. Compounds 1 (ID50 = 3.9 mg/kg, i. p., or 10.8 micromol/kg) and 3 (ID50 = 1.3 mg/kg or 2.5 micromol/kg) were notably more active than some well-known analgesic drugs used here for comparison.

  2. Investigating the synergistic antioxidant effects of some flavonoid and phenolic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hajimehdipoor

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic and flavonoid compounds are secondary metabolites of plants which possess various activities such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-diabetes and anticancer effects. It has been established that these compounds can scavenge free radicals produced in the body. Because of this ability, not only the plants containing phenolic and flavonoid compounds but also, the pure compounds are used in medicinal products for prevention and treatment of many disorders. Considering that the golden aim of the pharmaceutical industries is using the most effective compounds with lower concentrations, determination of the best combination of the compounds with synergistic effects is important. In the present study, synergistic antioxidant effects of four phenolic compounds including caffeic acid, gallic acid, rosmarinic acid, chlorogenic acid and two flavonoids,  rutin and quercetin, have been investigated by FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power method. The synergistic effect was assessed by comparing the experimental antioxidant activity of the mixtures with calculated theoretical values and the interactions of the compounds were determined. The results showed that combination of gallic acid and caffeic acid demonstrated considerable synergistic effects (137.8% while other combinations were less potent. Among examined substances, rutin was the only one which had no effect on the other compounds. The results of ternary combinations of compounds demonstrated antagonistic effects in some cases. This was more considerable in mixture of rutin, caffeic acid, rosmarinic acid (-21.8%, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, rosmarinic acid (-20%, rutin, rosmarinic acid, gallic acid (-18.5% and rutin, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid (-15.8%, while, combination of quercetin, gallic acid, caffeic acid (59.4% and quercetin, gallic acid, rutin (55.2% showed the most synergistic effects. It was concluded that binary and ternary combination of quercetin, rutin, caffeic acid

  3. Componential profile and amylase inhibiting activity of phenolic compounds from Calendula officinalis L. leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olennikov, Daniil N; Kashchenko, Nina I

    2014-01-01

    An ethanolic extract and its ethyl acetate-soluble fraction from leaves of Calendula officinalis L. (Asteraceae) were found to show an inhibitory effect on amylase. From the crude extract fractions, one new phenolic acid glucoside, 6'-O-vanilloyl-β-D-glucopyranose, was isolated, together with twenty-four known compounds including five phenolic acid glucosides, five phenylpropanoids, five coumarins, and nine flavonoids. Their structures were elucidated based on chemical and spectral data. The main components, isoquercitrin, isorhamnetin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, and quercetin-3-O-(6''-acetyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside, exhibited potent inhibitory effects on amylase.

  4. USAGE OF MUSHROOM AGARICUS BISPORUS TYROSINASE FOR SEPARATION OF PHENOLIC COMPOUNDS MIXTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Romanovskaya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The new method of phenolic compounds mixtures separation in solutions was developed, based on the oxidation of one of the mixture component using immobilized in PVC partially purified tyrosinase and the next removal of the oxidation products with a help of potassium alum. The biocatalyst obtained had carried out oxidation of phenol or pyrocatechol (0,5-10 mmol/dm3 with quantitative degree of bioconversion in the presence of resorcinol, hydroquinone or p-nitrophenol, which are not oxidized, with reservation of their initial concentrations (35-65 mmol/dm3 in solution, during 4 cycles in batch reactor

  5. Towards semisynthetic natural compounds with a biaryl axis: Oxidative phenol coupling in Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugentobler, Katharina Gloria; Müller, Michael

    2018-04-01

    Regio- and stereoselective phenol coupling is difficult to achieve using synthetic strategies. However, in nature, cytochrome P450 enzyme-mediated routes are employed to achieve complete axial stereo- and regiocontrol in the biosynthesis of compounds with potent bioactivity. Here, we report a synthetic biology approach whereby the bicoumarin metabolic pathway in Aspergillus niger was specifically tailored towards the formation of new coupling products. This strategy represents a manipulation of the bicoumarin pathway in A. niger via interchange of the phenol-coupling biocatalyst and could be applied to other components of the pathway to access a variety of atropisomeric natural product derivatives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Phenolic compounds: The inhibition effect on polyol pathway enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Hatice Esra; Beydemir, Şükrü

    2017-03-25

    The polyol pathway called as sorbitol way is a small part of glycose metabolism. The pathway is regarded as an important element in the pathogenesis of various diabetic complications in individuals with diabetes mellitus. The pathway plays a crucial role in hyperglycemia. The polyol pathway contains two enzymes as aldose reductase (AR) and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH). In the present study, AR and SDH were purified from sheep liver by using simple chromatographic methods. AR was purified with a yield of 2.11% and approximately 162 fold and SDH was purified with a yield of 0.53% and approximately 9.07 purification fold. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was performed to check the purity and determine the subunit molecular weights of the enzymes. Subunit molecular weights of AR and SDH were 38.82 kDa and 37.74 kDa, respectively. Optimal pH, optimal ionic strength, optimal temperature, activation energy, activation enthalpy, Q 10 value and stable pH were determined as 5.5, 10 mM, 50 °C, 2.16 kcal, 1.52 kcal, 1.33 and 8.0 for AR enzyme, respectively. The kinetic parameters K m and V max for AR were determined as 0.45 mM and 0.55 EU/mL, respectively. These parameters were studied for only AR in the present study, because it was previously studied for SDH. IC 50 values of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, salicylic acid, p-coumaric acid, ellagic acid, gallic acid, ferrulic acid and caffeic acid on AR and SDH activities were found as 120, 92.0, 49.0, 39.0, 40.0, 690, 7.00, 103, 84.0, 3.00 μM for AR enzyme and 5060, 8350, 6730, 7070, 5780, 24.0, 13.0, 26.0, 17.0, 21.0 μM for SDH enzyme, respectively. According to these results, caffeic acid was the strongest inhibitor for AR activity compared to the other phenolic acids and ellagic acid was also the strongest inhibitor for SDH activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Determination of phenolic compounds in air by using cyclodextrin-silica hybrid microporous composite samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri-Aucejo, Adela R; Ponce-Català, Patricia; Belenguer-Sapiña, Carolina; Amorós, Pedro

    2015-03-01

    An analytical method for the determination of phenolic compounds in air samples based on the use of cyclodextrin-silica hybrid microporous composite samplers is proposed. The method allows the determination of phenol, guaiacol, cresol isomers, eugenol, 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol in workplaces according to the Norm UNE-EN 1076:2009 for active sampling. Therefore, the proposed method offers an alternative for the assessment of the occupational exposure to phenol and cresol isomers. The detection limits of the proposed method are lower than those for the NIOSH Method 2546. Storage time of samples almost reaches 44 days. Recovery values for phenol, guaiacol, o-cresol, m-cresol, p-cresol, 4-ethylguaiacol, eugenol and 4-ethylphenol are 109%, 99%, 102%, 94%, 94%, 91%, 95% and 102%, respectively with a coefficient of variation below 6%. The method has been applied to the assessment of exposure in different areas of a farm and regarding the quantification of these compounds in the vapors generated by burning incense sticks and an essential oil marketed as air fresheners. The acquired results are comparable with those provided from a reference method for a 95% of confidence level. The possible use of these samplers for the sampling of other toxic compounds such as phthalates is evaluated by qualitative analysis of extracts from incense sticks and essential oil samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Composition and health effects of phenolic compounds in hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) of different origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Baoru; Liu, Pengzhan

    2012-06-01

    Epicatechin, aglycons and glycosides of B-type oligomeric procyanidins and flavonols, phenolic acids and C-glycosyl flavones are the major groups of phenolic compounds in hawthorn (Crataegus spp). The total content of phenolic compounds is higher in the leaves and flowers than in the fruits. Procyanidins dominate in the fruits, whereas flavonol glycosides and C-glycosyl flavones are most abundant in the leaves. Genotype and developmental/ripening stage have strong impacts. Procyanidin glycosides and C-glycosyl flavones may be chemotaxonomic markers differentiating species and varieties of hawthorn. Future research shall improve the separation, identification and quantification of procyanidins with degree of polymerisation (DP) ≥ 6, procyanidin glycosides, C-glycosyl flavones and some flavonol glycosides. In vitro and animal studies have shown cardioprotective, hypolipidaemic, hypotensive, antioxidant, radical-scavenging and anti-inflammatory potentials of hawthorn extracts, suggesting different phenolic compounds as the major bioactive components. However, the varying and insufficiently defined composition of the extracts investigated, as a result of different raw materials and extraction methods, makes comparison of the studies very difficult. Clinical evidence indicates that some hawthorn extracts may increase the exercise tolerance of patients with congestive heart failure. More clinical studies are needed to establish the effects of hawthorn, especially in healthy humans. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. The effects of dietary phenolic compounds on cytokine and antioxidant production by A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauliard, Benoit; Grieve, Douglas; Wilson, Rhoda; Crozier, Alan; Jenkins, Carol; Mullen, William D; Lean, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Levels of inflammatory cytokines are raised in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A diet rich in antioxidant vitamins may protect against the development of COPD. This study examined the effects of phenolic compounds and food sources on cytokine and antioxidant production by A549 cells. The effects of the following phenolic compounds on basal and interleukin (IL)-1-stimulated release of IL-8, IL-6, and reduced glutathione (GSH) were examined: resveratrol; Bouvrage, a commercially available raspberry juice (Ella Drinks Ltd., Alloa, Clacksmannanshire, UK); and quercetin 3'-sulfate. Purification of the raspberry juice by high-performance liquid chromatography gave three fractions: Fraction 1 contained phenolic acid and vitamin C, Fraction 2 contained flavonoids and ellagic acid, and Fraction 3 contained anthocyanins and ellagitannins. IL-8 production was increased in the presence of IL-1 (165 vs. 6,011 pg/mL, P or =50 micromol/mL significantly inhibited IL-8 and IL-6 production. Similar findings were made with raspberry juice at concentrations > or =25 microL/mL, and Fractions 1 and 3 were best able to inhibit IL-8 production. Quercetin 3'-sulfate, at 25 micromol/mL, inhibited IL-8 and IL-6 production. The changes observed in IL-8 were paralleled by changes in tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Thus, phenolic compounds can significantly alter cytokine and antioxidant production.

  10. Dietary nutritional profile and phenolic compounds consumption in school children of highlands of Argentine Northwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, M C; Bassett, M N; Sammán, N C

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this work was to assess dietary patterns and consumption of phenolic compounds from fruits and vegetables byschoolchildren of high altitude regions from northwest of Argentina. A nutritional survey including food-frequency consumption, 24-h dietary recall and anthropometric measurements was applied to 241 children from 6 to 12years old. The amounts of the different classes of phenolic compounds were established from Food Composition Tables available in phenol-explorer website. Statistics analyses were performed using IBM SPSS 20.0. Nutritional status assessment showed underweight (2.2%), low weight (12.7%), overweight (12.7%) and obesity (7.4%). Mean intake of phenolic compounds was 412mg/day. Most consumed foods were infusions and sugar products, consumption of vegetables, fruits and dairy products were low compared to recommendations for this age. Considering that polyphenols have protective health effects, its low consumption could be a risk of development of chronic non communicable diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Grape Juices: A Chemical and Sensory View

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    Fernanda Cosme

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The search for food products that promote health has grown over the years. Phenolic compounds present in grapes and in their derivatives, such as grape juices, represent today a broad area of research, given the benefits that they have on the human health. Grape juice can be produced from any grape variety once it has attained appropriate maturity. However, only in traditional wine producing regions, grape juices are produced from Vitis vinifera grape varieties. For example, Brazilian grape juices are essentially produced from Vitis labrusca grape varieties, known as American or hybrid, as they preserve their characteristics such as the natural flavour after pasteurisation. Grapes are one of the richest sources of phenolic compounds among fruits. Therefore, grape juices have been broadly studied due to their composition in phenolic compounds and their potential beneficial effects on human health, specifically the ability to prevent various diseases associated with oxidative stress, including cancers, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, this review will address grape juices phenolic composition, with a special focus on the potential beneficial effects on human health and on the grape juice sensory impact.

  12. Colorimetric study of malvidin-3-O-glucoside copigmented by phenolic compounds: The effect of molar ratio, temperature, pH, and ethanol content on color expression of red wine model solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Yang, Xue-Shan; Li, Ning-Ning; Zhu, Xia; Sheng, Wen-Jun; He, Fei; Duan, Chang-Qing; Han, Shun-Yu

    2017-12-01

    In the recent research, the copigmentations of malvidin-3-O-glucoside with eight types of phenolic copigments have been investigated. The influence of the pigment/copigment molar ratio, the reaction temperature, the pH and the ethanol content of solutions has been examined. The results showed that the copigmentation effect was dependent on not only the particular structures of the phenolic compounds but also the factors of the reaction systems. The increase of the copigment concentration can strengthen the copigmentation effect, improve the solution color, and enhance the red-purple features. Different temperatures had different influences on the copigmentation reactions. The destruction of the copigmentation complexes can result in the hypsochromic shift of the reaction solution when the temperature was higher than 20°C. The bathochromic shift of the solution gradually progressed with the increase of the pH value. A significant copigmentation feature was spotted when pH reached 3.0, which demonstrates obvious red-purple characterization. The addition of the ethanol weakened the copigmentation effect. According to measurement through color analysis, it was found that the color differences caused by ethanol in red wine were typically attributed to quantitative changes. Remarkably, all of the above delicate color deviations caused by the structural or environmental factors can be precisely and conveniently depicted via the CIELAB space analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Seasonal Variation of Triterpenes and Phenolic Compounds in Australian Centella asiatica (L.) Urb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Ali; Tongkao-on, Wannit; Li, Kong M; Razmovski-Naumovski, Valentina; Chan, Kelvin; Li, George Q

    2015-01-01

    Specific triterpenes, phenolic acids and flavonoids in Centella asiatica have been found to be bioactive. Harvesting the plant when these putative bioactive compounds are at their highest concentrations would provide consistency in their chemical profile, thus ensuring the quality and efficacy of derived medicinal products. The aim of the study was to determine the impact of harvesting time on the contents of major triterpenoid and phenolic compounds in C. asiatica. Australian C. asiatica was collected from a designated area in different months. The principal triterpenes (asiaticoside, madecassoside, asiatic acid and madecassic acid), flavonoid compounds (rutin, quercetin and kaempferol) and chlorogenic acid were quantitatively determined by HPLC-DAD analysis. Triterpenoid, kaempferol and chlorogenic acid content showed significant variation (p asiatica in summer returns the highest yield of the target triterpenoids, kaempferol and chlorogenic acid. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Riboflavin Phototransformation on the Changes of Antioxidant Capacities in Phenolic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juhee; Seol, Nam Gyu; Kim, Mi-Ja; Lee, JaeHwan

    2016-08-01

    Eight phenolic compounds including: p-coumaric acid, vanillic acid, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, trolox, quercetin, curcumin, and resveratrol were treated with riboflavin (RF) photosensitization and in vitro antioxidant capacities of the mixtures were determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2' azino bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Mixtures containing p-coumaric acid and vanillic acid under RF photosensitization showed increases in ferric ion reducing ability and radical scavenging activity of DPPH, whereas mixtures of other compounds had decreases in both radical scavenging ability and ferric reducing antioxidant power. Hydroxycoumaric acid and conjugated hydroxycoumaric and coumaric acids were tentatively identified from RF photosensitized p-coumaric acid, whereas dimmers of vanillic acid were tentatively identified from RF photosensitized vanillic acid. RF photosensitization may be a useful method to enhance antioxidant properties like ferric ion reducing abilities of some selected phenolic compounds. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  15. Antioxidant capacity manipulation in transgenic potato tuber by changes in phenolic compounds content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukaszewicz, Marcin; Matysiak-Kata, Iwona; Skala, Jacek; Fecka, Izabela; Cisowski, Wojciech; Szopa, Jan

    2004-03-24

    The main goal of this study was to generate potato tubers with increased levels of flavonoids and thus modified antioxidant capacities. To accomplish this, the vector carrying multigene construct was prepared and several transgenic plants were generated, all overexpressing key biosynthesis pathway enzymes. The single-gene overexpression or simultaneous expression of genes encoding chalcone synthase (CHS), chalcone isomerase (CHI), and dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR) resulted in a significant increase of measured phenolic acids and anthocyanins. The increase in phenolic compounds synthesis is accompanied by decreases in starch and glucose levels in transgenic plants. The flavonoids-enriched plants showed improved antioxidant capacity; however, there is a complex relationship between antioxidant capacity and flavonoids content, suggesting the great participation of other compounds in the antioxidant potential of the plants. These other compounds are not yet recognized.

  16. Immunostimulatory effects of the phenolic compounds from lichens on nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iracilda Z. Carlos

    Full Text Available The effects of isolated compounds from Brazilian lichens and their derivatives on H2O2 and NO production were studied using murine macrophages as a part of an attempt to understand their possible immunomodulatory properties. The compound cytotoxicity was studied using MTT assay. Macrophage stimulation was evaluated by the determination of NO (Griess assay and H2O2 (horseradish peroxidase/phenol red in supernatants of peritoneal macrophage cultures of Swiss mice. This research demonstrated stimulatory activities of some phenolic compounds isolated from lichens and their derivatives on H2O2 and NO production. Structure-activity relationships suggest several synthetic directions for further improvement of immunological activity.

  17. Bioaccessibility of Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Capacity of Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Marika; Lucas-Gonzalez, Raquel; Sayas-Barberá, Estrella; Fernández-López, Juana; Pérez-Álvarez, José A; Viuda-Martos, Manuel

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate (i) the phenol and flavonoid recovery and bioaccessibility indexes and (ii) the antioxidant activity of both types of non-defatted and defatted chia seeds during the in vitro gastrointestinal digestion. The ground samples were subjected to in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion, and the resultant fractions were extracted and subjected to spectrophotometric assays. The results pointed to increasing concentrations of polyphenolic compounds during digestion, although only a low-medium percentage of phenols and a low percentage of flavonoids were available for absorption in the intestinal tract. In addition, the high level of fats seemed to have a negative effect on the bioaccessibility of flavonoids. Further studies should be undertaken to better understand the stabilization of the bioactive compounds of chia and to improve their bioaccessibility. Meanwhile, the present study represents a solid base for studying the bioavailability of bioactive compounds of chia seeds.

  18. Yeast α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Phenolic Compounds Isolated from Gynura medica Leaf

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    Chao Tan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gynura medica leaf extract contains significant amounts of flavonols and phenolic acids and exhibits powerful hypoglycemic activity against diabetic rats in vivo. However, the hypoglycemic active constituents that exist in the plant have not been fully elaborated. The purpose of this study is to isolate and elaborate the hypoglycemic activity compounds against inhibition the yeast α-glucosidase in vitro. Seven phenolic compounds including five flavonols and two phenolic acids were isolated from the leaf of G. medica. Their structures were identified by the extensive NMR and mass spectral analyses as: kaempferol (1, quercetin (2, kaempferol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside (4, rutin (5, chlorogenic acid (6 and 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid methyl ester (7. All of the compounds except 1 and 3 were isolated for the first time from G. medica. Compounds 1–7 were also assayed for their hypoglycemic activity against yeast α-glucosidase in vitro. All of the compounds except 1 and 6 showed good yeast α-glucosidase inhibitory activity with the IC50 values of 1.67 mg/mL, 1.46 mg/mL, 0.38 mg/mL, 0.10 mg/mL and 0.53 mg/mL, respectively.

  19. Effects of plant antimicrobial phenolic compounds on virulence of the genus Pectobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Janak Raj; Burdman, Saul; Lipsky, Alexander; Yedidia, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Pectobacterium spp. are among the most devastating necrotrophs, attacking more than 50% of angiosperm plant orders. Their virulence strategy is based mainly on the secretion of exoenzymes that degrade the cell walls of their hosts, providing nutrients to the bacteria, but conversely, exposing the bacteria to plant defense compounds. In the present study, we screened plant-derived antimicrobial compounds, mainly phenolic acids and polyphenols, for their ability to affect virulence determinants including motility, biofilm formation and extracellular enzyme activities of different Pectobacteria: Pectobacterium carotovorum, P. brasiliensis, P. atrosepticum and P. aroidearum. In addition, virulence assays were performed on three different plant hosts following exposure of the bacteria to selected phenolic compounds. These experiments showed that cinnamic, coumaric, syringic and salicylic acids and catechol can considerably reduce disease severity, ranging from 20 to 100%. The reduced disease severity was not only the result of reduced bacterial growth, but also of a direct effect of the compounds on important bacterial virulence determinants, including pectolytic and proteolytic exoenzyme activities, that were reduced by 50-100%. This is the first report revealing a direct effect of phenolic compounds on virulence factors in a wide range of Pectobacterium strains. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Solid lipid nanoparticles as oral delivery systems of phenolic compounds: Overcoming pharmacokinetic limitations for nutraceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Sara; Madureira, Ana Raquel; Campos, Débora; Sarmento, Bruno; Gomes, Ana Maria; Pintado, Manuela; Reis, Flávio

    2017-06-13

    Drug delivery systems, accompanied by nanoparticle technology, have recently emerged as prominent solutions to improve the pharmacokinetic properties, namely bioavailability, of therapeutic and nutraceutical agents. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have received much attention from researchers due to their potential to protect or improve drug properties. SLNs have been reported to be an alternative system to traditional carriers, such as emulsions, liposomes, and polymeric nanoparticles. Phenolic compounds are widespread in plant-derived foodstuffs and therefore abundant in our diet. Over the last decades, phenolic compounds have received considerable attention due to several health promoting properties, mostly related to their antioxidant activity, which can have important implications for health. However, most of these compounds have been associated with poor bioavailability being poorly absorbed, rapidly metabolized and eliminated, which compromises its biological and pharmacological benefits. This paper provides a systematic review of the use of SLNs as oral delivery systems of phenolic compounds, in order to overcome pharmacokinetic limitations of these compounds and improved nutraceutical potential. In vitro studies, as well as works describing topical and oral treatments will be revisited and discussed. The classification, synthesis, and clinical application of these nanomaterials will be also considered in this review article.

  1. Betalains and phenolic compounds of leaves and stems of Alternanthera brasiliana and Alternanthera tenella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deladino, L; Alvarez, I; De Ancos, B; Sánchez-Moreno, C; Molina-García, A D; Schneider Teixeira, A

    2017-07-01

    Betacyanins and phenolic compounds from acetonitrile:acidified water extracts of Alternanthera brasiliana and Alternanthera tenella were characterized and quantified using a high-performance liquid chromatography system coupled with diode array and electrospray mass spectrometry detection. Four betacyanins (amaranthine, isoamaranthine, betanin and isobetanin) were tentatively identified and quantified. Twenty eight phenolic compounds of four different families (hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acids, flavones and flavonols) were separated and characterized on the basis of their accurate MS and MS/MS information out of which ten compounds were confirmed by authentic standards. These plant species could be considered as an especially rich source of natural bioactive compounds and potential food colorants. A. brasiliana showed the highest betacyanin and polyphenols content (89μg/g and 35,243μg/g, respectively). Among polyphenols, flavonols were the more abundant (kaempferol-glucoside, kaempferol-rutinoside and kaempferol-rhamnosyl-rhamnosyl-glycoside). Meanwhile, A. tenella showed a different polyphenols profile with flavones as major compounds (glucopyranosil-vitexin and vitexin). As a novelty, pentosyl-vitexin and pentosyl-isovitexin were detected for the first time in Alternanthera plants. Both A. brasiliana and A. tenella leaves showed high total polyphenol content and in vitro antioxidant activity (FRAP). These results provide an analytical base concerning the phenolic and betalains composition and the antioxidant properties of two members of the promising Alternanthera gender, for subsequent applications, such as functional food ingredients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Microwave Assisted Extraction of Phenolic Compounds from Four Different Spices

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    Alberto Ritieni

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Spices and herbs are known not only for their taste, aroma and flavour, but also for their medical properties and value. Both spices and herbs have been used for centuries in traditional medical systems to cure various kinds of illnesses such as common cold, diabetes, cough and cancers. The aim of this work was the comparison between two different extractive techniques in order to get qualitative and quantitative data regarding bioactive compounds of four different spices (Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Coriandrum sativum, Cuminum cyminum, Crocus sativus. The plants were extracted employing ultrasonication and microwave-assisted extractions. The efficiency of extraction of bioactive compounds obtained with the microwave extraction process was in general about four times higher than that resulting from sonication extraction. The various extracts obtained were analyzed for their antioxidant activity using ABTS, DPPH and FRAP assays and for their total polyphenolic content. It can be concluded that microwave-assisted extractions provide significant advantages in terms of extraction efficiency and time savings.

  3. Effect of phenolic compounds on the growth of selected probiotic and pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Ordaz, R; Wall-Medrano, A; Goñi, M G; Ramos-Clamont-Montfort, G; Ayala-Zavala, J F; González-Aguilar, G A

    2018-01-01

    Fruit extracts from different tissues (pulp, seed and peel) have shown antimicrobial and prebiotic activities related to their phenolic profile, although structure-specific evaluations have not been reported yet. The effect of five phenolic compounds (catechin and gallic, vanillic, ferulic and protocatechuic acids) identified in different fruits, particularly in mango, was evaluated on the growth of two probiotic (Lactobacillus rhamnosusGG ATCC 53103 and Lactobacillus acidophilusNRRLB 4495) and two pathogenic (Escherichia coli 0157:H7 ATCC 43890 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ATCC 14028) bacteria. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) of phenolic acids ranged from 15-20 mmol l -1 and 20-30 mmol l -1 against E. coli and S. Typhimurium, respectively. For catechin, the MIC and MBC were 35 mmol l -1 and >35 mmol l -1 against E. coli and S. Typhimurium, respectively. The presence of catechin and gallic, protocatechuic and vanillic acids in MRS broth without dextrose allowed the growth of lactobacilli. Catechin combined with protocatechuic or vanillic acid mildly allowed the growth of both probiotics. In conclusion, phenolic compounds can selectively inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria without affecting the viability of probiotics. This study provides relevant information about the effects of phenolic compounds commonly present in fruit and vegetables on the growth of probiotic and pathogenic bacteria. The compounds selectively allowed the growth of probiotic lactobacilli (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus acidophilus) and inhibited pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium) at the same concentration (20 mmol l -1 ). These findings can contribute to the formulation of nutraceutical products, such as synbiotics, that can restore or maintain an optimal composition of human microbiota, potentially improving the overall health of the consumer. © 2017 The

  4. From Olive Fruits to Olive Oil: Phenolic Compound Transfer in Six Different Olive Cultivars Grown under the Same Agronomical Conditions

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    Nassima Talhaoui

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds are responsible of the nutritional and sensory quality of extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO. The composition of phenolic compounds in EVOO is related to the initial content of phenolic compounds in the olive-fruit tissues and the activity of enzymes acting on these compounds during the industrial process to produce the oil. In this work, the phenolic composition was studied in six major cultivars grown in the same orchard under the same agronomical and environmental conditions in an effort to test the effects of cultivars on phenolic composition in fruits and oils as well as on transfer between matrices. The phenolic fractions were identified and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry. A total of 33 phenolic compounds were determined in the fruit samples and a total of 20 compounds in their corresponding oils. Qualitative and quantitative differences in phenolic composition were found among cultivars in both matrices, as well as regarding the transfer rate of phenolic compounds from fruits to oil. The results also varied according to the different phenolic groups evaluated, with secoiridoids registering the highest transfer rates from fruits to oils. Moreover, wide-ranging differences have been noticed between cultivars for the transfer rates of secoiridoids (4.36%–65.63% of total transfer rate and for flavonoids (0.18%–0.67% of total transfer rate. ‘Picual’ was the cultivar that transferred secoiridoids to oil at the highest rate, whereas ‘Changlot Real’ was the cultivar that transferred flavonoids at the highest rates instead. Principal-component analysis confirmed a strong genetic effect on the basis of the phenolic profile both in the olive fruits and in the oils.

  5. From Olive Fruits to Olive Oil: Phenolic Compound Transfer in Six Different Olive Cultivars Grown under the Same Agronomical Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talhaoui, Nassima; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; León, Lorenzo; De la Rosa, Raúl; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2016-03-04

    Phenolic compounds are responsible of the nutritional and sensory quality of extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO). The composition of phenolic compounds in EVOO is related to the initial content of phenolic compounds in the olive-fruit tissues and the activity of enzymes acting on these compounds during the industrial process to produce the oil. In this work, the phenolic composition was studied in six major cultivars grown in the same orchard under the same agronomical and environmental conditions in an effort to test the effects of cultivars on phenolic composition in fruits and oils as well as on transfer between matrices. The phenolic fractions were identified and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry. A total of 33 phenolic compounds were determined in the fruit samples and a total of 20 compounds in their corresponding oils. Qualitative and quantitative differences in phenolic composition were found among cultivars in both matrices, as well as regarding the transfer rate of phenolic compounds from fruits to oil. The results also varied according to the different phenolic groups evaluated, with secoiridoids registering the highest transfer rates from fruits to oils. Moreover, wide-ranging differences have been noticed between cultivars for the transfer rates of secoiridoids (4.36%-65.63% of total transfer rate) and for flavonoids (0.18%-0.67% of total transfer rate). 'Picual' was the cultivar that transferred secoiridoids to oil at the highest rate, whereas 'Changlot Real' was the cultivar that transferred flavonoids at the highest rates instead. Principal-component analysis confirmed a strong genetic effect on the basis of the phenolic profile both in the olive fruits and in the oils.

  6. Distribution of Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidative Activities of Rice Kernel and Their Relationships with Agronomic Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kesarwani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenolic and antioxidant activity of ethanolic extract of two Japonica rice cultivars, Taikeng no. 16 (medium and slender grain and Kaohsiung no. 139 (short and round grain, grown under organic and conventional farming were examined. Analyses shows that Kaohsiung no. 139 contains the highest amount of secondary metabolites and continuous farming can increase its production. Results also suggest that phenolic content under different agronomic practices, has not shown significant differences but organically grown rice has proven to be better in higher accumulation of other secondary metabolites (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, flavonoid content, and ferrous chelating capacity. In nutshell, genetic traits and environment have significant effect on phenolic compounds and the least variation reported under agronomic practices.

  7. Determination of phenolic compounds in Yucca gloriosa bark and root by LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoro, Paola; Skhirtladze, Alexandre; Bassarello, Carla; Perrone, Angela; Kemertelidze, Ether; Pizza, Cosimo; Piacente, Sonia

    2008-08-05

    On the basis of the biological activities shown by yuccaols and gloriosaols from Yucca schidigera and Yucca gloriosa, the content of yuccaols and gloriosaols in two different parts of Y. gloriosa (roots and bark), was determined for each single compound, and compared with phenolic determination in Y. schidigera bark, concluding that Y. gloriosa bark and roots are rich sources of phenolic derivatives structurally related to resveratrol. LC/ESIMS (liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray mass spectrometry) qualitative and an LC/ESIMS/MS (liquid chromatography coupled to tandem electrospray mass spectrometry) quantitative studies of the phenolic fraction of Y. gloriosa were performed. LC/ESIMS/MS multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method previously described for yuccaols in Y. schidigera was applied and optimised for separation and determination of gloriosaols and yuccaols in Y. gloriosa. Due to the sensitivity and the repeatability of the assay, we suggest this method as suitable for industrial quality control of raw materials and final products.

  8. Comparative study of phenolic compounds in Cabernet Sauvignon wines made in traditional and Ganimede fermenters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Bianxia; He, Fei; Yang, Lili; Chen, Feng; Reeves, Malcolm J; Li, Jingming

    2013-12-15

    Chemical profiles of anthocyanin and non-anthocyanin phenolics of Cabernet Sauvignon wine made by two different winemaking techniques (traditional vinification and Ganimede method) were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Particularly, effect of extraction on and subsequent stability of the phenolic compounds from the end of fermentation to bottling were investigated. The results showed that the total anthocyanin content was higher in the young wines produced in the Ganimede fermenter. The anthocyanin contents in these wines subsequently decreased significantly after two years of ageing. By contrast, the traditional vinification was slightly better than the Ganimede to yield the non-anthocyanin phenolics. This indicates that the Ganimede fermenter might be suitable for the production of brightly coloured red wines for early consumption, which could save time and labour cost for industrial production of highquality wines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Phenolic compounds as cultivar- and variety-distinguishing factors in some plant products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepacka, Joanna; Gujska, Elżbieta; Michalak, Joanna

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether phenolic compounds in some varieties of buckwheat, winter and spring barley and peas can be used as factors which distinguish selected cultivars and varieties of plant material. It was observed that the content of total phenolics might be useful as a cultivar-distinguishing factor for all the plant materials analyzed, but it was a distinguishing factor for only some varieties. Individual cultivars and varieties were best distinguished by the content of syringic acid. The levels of syringic and vanillic acids were in reverse proportion to the total amount of phenolics soluble in methanol and a positive correlation between syringic and ferulic acid was observed. Moreover, the protein content of plant material was analyzed and a significant (p ≤ 0.05) correlation between this component and ferulic and vanillic acids was noted.

  10. Subcritical Water Technology for Extraction of Phenolic Compounds from Chlorella sp. Microalgae and Assessment on Its Antioxidant Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Siti Maisurah; Kamal, Siti Mazlina Mustapa; Harun, Mohd Razif; Omar, Rozita; Siajam, Shamsul Izhar

    2017-07-03

    Chlorella sp . microalgae is a potential source of antioxidants and natural bioactive compounds used in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In this study, a subcritical water (SW) technology was applied to determine the phenolic content and antioxidant activity of Chlorella sp . This study focused on maximizing the recovery of Chlorella sp. phenolic content and antioxidant activity measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay as a function of extraction temperature (100-250 °C), time (5-20 min) and microalgae concentration (5-20 wt. %) using response surface methodology. The optimal operating conditions for the extraction process were found to be 5 min at 163 °C with 20 wt. % microalgae concentration, which resulted in products with 58.73 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g phenolic content and 68.5% inhibition of the DPPH radical. Under optimized conditions, the experimental values were in close agreement with values predicted by the model. The phenolic content was highly correlated (R² = 0.935) with the antioxidant capacity. Results indicated that extraction by SW technology was effective and that Chlorella sp . could be a useful source of natural antioxidants.

  11. Compound semiconductor device modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Miles, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Compound semiconductor devices form the foundation of solid-state microwave and optoelectronic technologies used in many modern communication systems. In common with their low frequency counterparts, these devices are often represented using equivalent circuit models, but it is often necessary to resort to physical models in order to gain insight into the detailed operation of compound semiconductor devices. Many of the earliest physical models were indeed developed to understand the 'unusual' phenomena which occur at high frequencies. Such was the case with the Gunn and IMPATI diodes, which led to an increased interest in using numerical simulation methods. Contemporary devices often have feature sizes so small that they no longer operate within the familiar traditional framework, and hot electron or even quantum­ mechanical models are required. The need for accurate and efficient models suitable for computer aided design has increased with the demand for a wider range of integrated devices for operation at...

  12. Bioavailability and metabolism of phenolic compounds from wholegrain wheat and aleurone-rich wheat bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresciani, Letizia; Scazzina, Francesca; Leonardi, Roberto; Dall'Aglio, Elisabetta; Newell, Michael; Dall'Asta, Margherita; Melegari, Camilla; Ray, Sumantra; Brighenti, Furio; Del Rio, Daniele

    2016-11-01

    This work aimed at investigating absorption, metabolism, and bioavailability of phenolic compounds after consumption of wholegrain bread or bread enriched with an aleurone fraction. Two commercially available breads were consumed by 15 participants on three occasions and matched for either the amount of ferulic acid in the bread or the amount of bread consumed. Urine was collected for 48 h from all the volunteers for phenolic metabolite quantification. Blood samples were collected for 24 h following bread consumption in five participants. A total of 12 and 4 phenolic metabolites were quantified in urine and plasma samples, respectively. Metabolites were sulfate and glucuronic acid conjugates of phenolic acids, and high concentrations of ferulic acid-4'-O-sulfate, dihydroferulic acid-4'-O-sulfate, and dihydroferulic acid-O-glucuronide were observed. The bioavailability of ferulic acid was significantly higher from the aleurone-enriched bread when all ferulic acid metabolites were accounted for. The study shows that low amounts of aleurone-enriched bread resulted in equivalent plasma levels of ferulic acid as wholegrain bread. This could suggest that, if the absorbed phenolic metabolites after wholegrain product intake exert health benefits, equal levels could be reached through the consumption of lower doses of refined products enriched in aleurone fraction. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Phenolic compounds in hawthorn (Crataegus grayana) fruits and leaves and changes during fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengzhan; Kallio, Heikki; Yang, Baoru

    2011-10-26

    Phenolics in the fruits and leaves of Crataegus grayana were identified by HPLC-UV-ESI-MS. The contents of these compounds and their changes during autumn were also analyzed. Epicatechin [1-7 mg/g dry mass (DM) in fruits and 1-10 mg/g DM in leaves), procyanidins B2 (2-4 and 1-8 mg/g DM) and C1 (2-4 and 1-8 mg/g DM), hyperoside (0.5-1 and 2-11 mg/g DM), and a quercetin-pentoside (0.3-0.5 and 2-6 mg/g DM) were the major phenolics in both fruits and leaves. C-Glycosyl flavones were present in leaves (2-5 mg/g DM), whereas only trace levels were found in fruits. Ideain and 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid were found only in fruits. An additional 11 phenolics were identified/tentatively identified. Total phenolic contents reached highest levels by the end of August in fruits and by the end of September in leaves. The compositional profiles of phenolics in fruits and leaves of C. grayana were different from those of other Crataegus species.

  14. Degradation and mineralization of phenol compounds with goethite catalyst and mineralization prediction using artificial intelligence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhana Tisa

    Full Text Available The efficiency of phenol degradation via Fenton reaction using mixture of heterogeneous goethite catalyst with homogeneous ferrous ion was analyzed as a function of three independent variables, initial concentration of phenol (60 to 100 mg /L, weight ratio of initial concentration of phenol to that of H2O2 (1: 6 to 1: 14 and, weight ratio of initial concentration of goethite catalyst to that of H2O2 (1: 0.3 to 1: 0.7. More than 90 % of phenol removal and more than 40% of TOC removal were achieved within 60 minutes of reaction. Two separate models were developed using artificial neural networks to predict degradation percentage by a combination of Fe3+ and Fe2+ catalyst. Five operational parameters were employed as inputs while phenol degradation and TOC removal were considered as outputs of the developed models. Satisfactory agreement was observed between testing data and the predicted values (R2Phenol = 0.9214 and R2TOC= 0.9082.

  15. Consequences of plant phenolic compounds for productivity and health of ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghorn, Garry C; McNabb, Warren C

    2003-05-01

    Plant phenolic compounds are diverse in structure but are characterised by hydroxylated aromatic rings (e.g. flavan-3-ols). They are categorised as secondary metabolites, and their function in plants is often poorly understood. Many plant phenolic compounds are polymerised into larger molecules such as the proanthocyanidins (PA; condensed tannins) and lignins. Only the lignins, PA, oestrogenic compounds and hydrolysable tannins will be considered here. Lignins slow the physical and microbial degradation of ingested feed, because of resilient covalent bonding with hemicellulose and cellulose, rather than any direct effects on the rumen per se. The PA are prevalent in browse and are expressed in the foliage of some legumes (e.g. Lotus spp.), but rarely in grasses. They reduce the nutritive value of poor-quality diets, but can also have substantial benefits for ruminant productivity and health when improved temperate forages are fed. Beneficial effects are dependent on the chemical and physical structure, and concentration of the PA in the diet, but they have been shown to improve live-weight gain, milk yield and protein concentration, and ovulation rate. They prevent bloat in cattle, reduce gastrointestinal nematode numbers, flystrike and CH4 production. Some phenolic compounds (e.g. coumestans) cause temporary infertility, whilst those produced by Fusarium fungi found in pasture, silage or stored grains can cause permanent infertility. The HT may be toxic because products of their metabolism can cause liver damage and other metabolic disorders.

  16. Effect of fermentation conditions on content of phenolic compounds in red wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puškaš Vladimir S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The evidence of compounds that increase the nutritive value of red wines has been presented in a number of papers. These compounds include catechins and proanthocyanidins among others. Their protective effect on the cardiovascular system and anticarcinogenic properties has been proved. The effect of maceration conditions and increased solid grape parts content, seed in the first place, on the content of phenolic compounds of wine was investigated. Several micro-trials were performed with Cabernet sauvignon sort; in some variants time and temperature of maceration were varied, while the ratio of residual stem and content of seed was increased several times, resulting in a significant change of phenolic compounds content in the obtained wine samples. The presence of ripe stem yielded good results, but only during six days of maceration, while in the case of longer maceration, the change of colour quality was negative. Supplementary quantities of seeds during maceration resulted in an increase of total phenols and catechins. A significant influence on colour of wines was also observed, especially in wines obtained applying shorter maceration.

  17. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitory properties of phenolic sulfonamides derived from dopamine related compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulya Göcer

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of some phenolic sulfonamides were determined on the cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isoenzyme I and II (hCA I and II. Both isoenzymes were purified separately from human erythrocytes, using the Sepharose-4B-l-tyrosine-sulfanilamide affinity column chromatography method. In continuation of the study, we identified the inhibitory effects of phenolic sulfonamides 1–4 on the esterase activity of hCA I, and II. The inhibitory effects of phenolic sulfonamides 1–4 were tested on human carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes hCA I, and II. Among the compounds 1–4, compound 1 was concluded to show the best inhibitory effects. According to our data, IC50 values of compound 1 were found as 3.55 and 2.94 μM for hCA I, and hCA II, respectively. On the other hand, Ki values of this compound were found as 0.827 and 0.745 μM for both isoenzymes, respectively.

  18. Phenolic compounds of Triplaris gardneriana can protect cells against oxidative stress and restore oxidative balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Thiago Silva; Neto, José Joaquim Lopes; de Sousa, Nathanna Mateus; Pessoa, Igor Parra; Vieira, Leonardo Rogério; de Medeiros, Jackeline Lima; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Hamers, Astrid R M; Farias, Davi Felipe; Peijnenburg, Ad; Carvalho, Ana Fontenele Urano

    2017-09-01

    This work aimed to add value to an underexploited plant species from Brazil, Triplaris gardneriana. To that, the phenolic compounds profile of its seed ethanolic extract and fractions was examined by HPLC and the antioxidant capacity assessed using chemical assays as well as in vitro cell imaging. Twelve compounds were quantified and classified as either phenolic acids or flavonoids. The fractionation process did not generate fractions with different compositions except for chloroformic fraction, which showed only 6 out of 12 standard compounds used. DPPH assay revealed samples with a concentration-dependent radical scavenging activity, being methanolic fraction the one with the largest activity (SC 50 11.45±0.02μg/mL). Lipid peroxidation assessment, in the presence and absence of stress inducer, showed that particularly the ethanol extract (IC 50 26.75±0.08μg/mL) and the ethyl acetate fraction (IC 50 6.14±0.03μg/mL) could inhibit lipid peroxidation. The ethyl acetate fraction performed best in chelating iron (48% complexation at 1000μg/mL). Cell imaging experiments showed that the ethanolic extract could protect cells against oxidative stress as well as restore the oxidative balance upon stress induction. In conclusion, T. gardneriana seeds showed a promising phenolic compounds profile and antioxidant activity that may be further exploited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Distribution and chemotaxonomic significance of phenolic compounds in Spermacoce verticillata (L. G. Mey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iasmim C. Lima

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Context: Spermacoce verticillata, known as “poaia and vassourinha de botão”, is a species widely used in Brazilian traditional medicine as anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and analgesic. It is a native species, small, upright perennial, and broadly distributed throughout Brazil. Until now, few chemical studies have focused on the phenolic composition of this species. Aims: Evaluate the phytochemical profile of phenolic compounds from Spermacoce verticillata and search new compounds that have chemotaxonomic significance. Methods: Leaves of S. verticillata were extracted using distilled water. The extract (SVL was purified by several chromatography processes. Extract and compounds were analyzed by HPLC-DAD and NMR. Results: Phytochemical analysis led to identification, for the first time, of three compounds (1-3 for the specie. Chlorogenic acid (1 was identified by HPLC-DAD compared with reported in the literature. Quercetin-3-O-rutinoside (rutin (2 and kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside (3 were isolated from butanolic fraction and identified by spectroscopic analysis comparison with data reported in the literature. The flavonoid rutin is the major compound in SVL followed by kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside and chlorogenic acid. Conclusions: This is the first report for these compounds (1-3 in S. verticillata. The presence of these three new compounds indicates chemical markers of the species for this genus and family. This information is extremely important because increases the resources for chemotaxonomic classification of these species.

  20. Addition of Phenols Compounds to Meat Dough Intended for Salami Manufacture and its Antioxidant Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, Enrico; Fasolato, Luca; Cardazzo, Barbara; Carraro, Lisa; Taticchi, Agnese; Balzan, Stefania

    2014-08-28

    A purified extract of phenols compounds (65% of phenolic content of which decarboxymethyl oleuropein aglycone represented 45% of the wet mass) obtained from vegetation water (a by-product of oil mill) was added to a ground meat dough intended for salami manufacture in two concentration levels: 75 and 150 mg/100 g of dough (F1 and F2, respectively). The control batch was composed of lean and fat cuts of pork in 70:30 ratio, 2.7% salt and a mixed starter culture of staphylococci and pediococci. After stuffing into natural casings, salamis were aged until they reached a total weight loss of 30%. The product was then sliced and packaged in a protective atmosphere (nitrogen:carbon dioxide 80:20) and placed in a refrigerator thermostat (2-4°C) with alternating 12 h of artificial light and darkness. The samples were analysed for the measurement of pH, water activity, organic acidity, peroxide number and secondary products of lipid peroxidation at the time of slicing and after 10, 20 and 30 days of storage into the refrigerated thermostat. The pH and water activity were not substantially different between the control and the two enriched batches. The peroxide number and secondary products of lipid peroxidation values in the two batches with phenols were at least substantially lower than the control sample. In conclusion, the phenol compounds obtained from vegetation water have shown no interference with the ripening process while protecting the dough from oxidation.

  1. Major Phenolic Compounds, Antioxidant Capacity and Antidiabetic Potential of Rice Bean (Vigna umbellata L. in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yao

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Interest in edible beans as nutraceuticals is increasing. In the present study, the individual phenolic acids, the total phenolic content (TPC, the total flavonoid content (TFC, and the antioxidant and antidiabetic potential of 13 varieties of rice beans from China were investigated. Eight phenolic compounds (catechin, epicatechin, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, vitexin, isovitexin, sinapic acid, quercetin were analyzed on an ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC mass spectrometry (MS system. The rice bean varieties had significant differences in total phenolic compounds (ranging from 123.09 ± 10.35 to 843.75 ± 30.15 μg/g, in TPC (ranging from 3.27 ± 0.04 to 6.43 ± 0.25 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE/g, in TFC (ranging from 55.95 ± 11.16 to 320.39 ± 31.77 mg catechin (CE/g, in antioxidant activity (ranging from 39.87 ± 1.37 to 46.40 ± 2.18 μM·TE/g, in α-glucosidase inhibition activity (ranging from 44.32 ± 2.12 to 68.71 ± 2.19 and in advanced glycation end products formation inhibition activity (ranging from 34.11 ± 0.59 to 75.75 ± 0.33. This study is the first report on phytochemistry and biological activities in rice beans.

  2. Preparative Separation of Phenolic Compounds from Halimodendron halodendron by High-Speed Counter-Current Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Three phenolic compounds, p-hydroxybenzoic acid (1, isorhamnetin-3-O-β-D-rutinoside (2, and 3,3'-di-O-methylquercetin (5, along with a phenolic mixture were successfully separated from the ethyl acetate crude extract of Halimodendron halodendron by high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC with chloroform-methanol-water-acetic acid (4:3:2:0.05, v/v as the two-phase solvent system. The phenolic mixture from HSCCC was further separated by preparative HPLC and purified by Sephadex LH-20 to afford quercetin (3 and 3-O-methylquercetin (4. Seven hundred mg of ethyl acetate crude extract was separated by HSCCC to obtain six fractions which were then analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The HSCCC separation obtained total of 80 mg of the mixture of quercetin (3 and 3-O-methylquercetin (4 (26.43% and 71.89%, respectively in fraction 2, 14 mg of 3,3'-di-O-methylquercetin (5 at 95.14% of purity in fraction 3, 15 mg of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (1 at 92.83% of purity in fraction 5, 12 mg of isorhamnetin-3-O-β-D-rutinoside (2 at 97.99% of purity in fraction 6. This is the first time these phenolic compounds have been obtained from H. halodendron, and their chemical structures identified by means of physicochemical and spectrometric analysis.

  3. Antibacterial activity of sphagnum acid and other phenolic compounds found in Sphagnum papillosum against food-borne bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellegård, H; Stalheim, T; Hormazabal, V; Granum, P E; Hardy, S P

    2009-07-01

    To identify the phenolic compounds in the leaves of Sphagnum papillosum and examine their antibacterial activity at pH appropriate for the undissociated forms. Bacterial counts of overnight cultures showed that whilst growth of Staphylococcus aureus 50084 was impaired in the presence of milled leaves, the phenol-free fraction of holocellulose of S. papillosum had no bacteriostatic effect. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of an acetone-methanol extract of the leaves detected eight phenolic compounds. Antibacterial activity of the four dominating phenols specific to Sphagnum leaves, when assessed in vitro as minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), were generally >2.5 mg ml(-1). MIC values of the Sphagnum-specific compound 'sphagnum acid' [p-hydroxy-beta-(carboxymethyl)-cinnamic acid] were >5 mg ml(-1). No synergistic or antagonistic effects of the four dominating phenols were detected in plate assays. Sphagnum-derived phenolics exhibit antibacterial activity in vitro only at concentrations far in excess of those found in the leaves. We have both identified the phenolic compounds in S. papillosum and assessed their antibacterial activity. Our data indicate that phenolic compounds in isolation are not potent antibacterial agents and we question their potency against food-borne pathogens.

  4. Heat capacities of aqueous polar aromatic compounds over a wide range of conditions. Part I: phenol, cresols, aniline, and toluidines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Censky, Miroslav; Hnedkovsky, Lubomir; Majer, Vladimir

    2005-01-01

    The heat capacities of dilute aqueous solutions of phenol (hydroxybenzene), three cresols (2-, 3- and 4-methylhydroxybenzene), aniline (aminobenzene) and three toluidines (2-, 3- and 4-methylaminobenzene) were determined using a modified flow Picker-type high temperature calorimeter. The measurements were performed at temperatures between (303 and 623) K or 573 K for compounds containing hydroxy or amino group, respectively, and at several pressures up to 30 MPa. Standard heat capacities (partial molar heat capacities at infinite dilution) obtained from the experimental data exhibit a strong increase with temperature above 500 K consistent with the evolution of the standard volumes reported earlier. The data for aqueous phenol were used for testing several semiempiric models proposed for description of the standard thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutes. Their ability to reproduce the temperature and pressure dependence of standard heat capacities and to extrapolate towards higher conditions were examined

  5. Removal of hard COD, nitrogenous compounds and phenols from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-07-04

    Jul 4, 2015 ... granular sludge from an UASB reactor treating binary mixture of cathecol and resorcinol in an aqueous solution. IPCBEE 17 128–133. SEN D and RANDALL CW (2008) Improved computational model. (Aquifas) for activated sludge, integrated fixed-film activated sludge, and moving-bed biofilm reactor ...

  6. Determination of total phenolic compound contents and antioxidant capacity of persimmon skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mohamadi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to the adverse side effects of synthetic antioxidants, the search for natural and safe antioxidants has become crucial. In this study, the total phenolic compound contents and antioxidants activity of persimmon skin was investigated. The extraction was carried out by means of maceration method using ethanol and methanol solvents with ratio of 1 part persimmon skin to 5 parts of solvents. Afterwards, the total phenolic compounds and antioxidants activity was measured. According to the results, ethanolic and methanolic extracts contained 255.6 and 214.15 mg gallic acid per 100 g of persimmon skin, respectively. Moreover, ethanolic extracts showed a higher activity for scavenging free radicals compared to methanolic extracts.

  7. Elicitation Phenolic Compounds in Cell Culture of Vitis vinifera L. by Phaeomoniella chlamydospora

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    Sák Martin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro cell cultures of Vitis vinifera L. cv. St. Laurent were treated with two elicitors - synthetic methyl jasmonate and natural, prepared from grapevine plant infected with the Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, the agent causing the Esca disease of grapevine. Efficiency of phenolic compounds production after elicitation of cell culture was analysed immediately after treatment (15 min, 30 min, 60 min and later (after 24, 48, and 72 hours. The cell growth and content of phenolic compounds (+-catechin, (--epicatechin, p-coumaric acid, syringaldehyde, rutin, vanillic acid, and trans-resveratrol were analysed in cultivated cells as well as in cultivation medium. Pch-treatment increased production of total polyphenols the most significantly 15 min after the elicitation and in optimal time was 2.86 times higher than in nonelicited culture and 1.44 times higher than in MeJa induced cell culture.

  8. Anti-inflammatory properties of phenolic compounds and crude extract from Porphyra dentata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazłowska, Katarzyna; Hsu, Todd; Hou, Chia-Chung; Yang, Wen-Chin; Tsai, Guo-Jane

    2010-03-02

    Porphyra dentata, a red edible seaweed, has long been used worldwide in folk medicine for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as hypersensitivity, lymphadenitis, bronchitis. To clarify the anti-inflammatory role of Porphyra dentata crude extract and its identified phenolic compounds by investigating their effect on the nitric oxide (NO)/inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) transcription pathway in macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. Porphyra dentata crude extract was prepared with methanol. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) hyphenated to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and UV detection were utilized to analyze the extract fingerprints. Nitrite measurement, iNOS promoter activity and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) enhancer activity were used to assess the anti-inflammatory effect in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenged mouse RAW 264.7 cell line. Phenolic compounds (catechol, rutin and hesperidin) were identified in the crude extract of Porphyra dentata. The crude extract and the phenolic compounds inhibited the production of NO in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Catechol was a more potent suppressor of the up-regulation of iNOS promoter and NF-kappaB enhancer than rutin and yet, hesperidin alone failed to inhibit either activity. Our results indicate that catechol and rutin, but not hesperidin, are primary bioactive phenolic compounds in the crude extract to suppress NO production in LPS-stimulated macrophages via NF-kappaB-dependent iNOS gene transcription. The data also explain the anti-inflammatory use and possible mechanism of Porphyra dentata in iNOS implicated diseases. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of Roasting on Fatty Acids, Tocopherols, Phytosterols, and Phenolic Compounds Present in Plukenetia huayllabambana Seed

    OpenAIRE

    Chirinos, Rosana; Zorrilla, Daniela; Aguilar-Galvez, Ana; Pedreschi, Romina; Campos, David

    2016-01-01

    The effect of roasting of Plukenetia huayllabambana seeds on the fatty acids, tocopherols, phytosterols, and phenolic compounds was evaluated. Additionally, the oxidative stability of the seed during roasting was evaluated through free fatty acids, peroxide, and p-anisidine values in the seed oil. Roasting conditions corresponded to 100, 120, 140, and 160°C for 10, 20, and 30 min, respectively. Results indicate that roasting temperatures higher than 120°C significantly affect the content of t...

  10. INVESTIGATION OF PHENOLIC COMPOUNDS IN EXTRACTS FROM THE LEAVES OF LAURUS NOBILIS L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Nasuhova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laurus nobilis L. is an evergreen dioecious, rarely monecious plant up to 15 m high. Its natural area includes Mediterranean countries. For a long time this plant has been actively cultivated as a decorative plant in (Europe, Russia, USA and others as well as in Turkey, Algeria, Morocco, Spain, France, Italy, Portugal, Mexico and Russia. Chemical composition of the Laurus leaves include essential oil components, sesquiterpenic lactones and phenolic compounds as the principal active groups of compounds.The aim of the study was the identification of phenolic compounds in water and water alcohol extracts from leaves of Laurus nobilis.Materials and methods. Examinations of qualitative composition of phenolic complex in extracts from Laurus samples under study were carried out using «Hitachi Chromaster» high-performance liquid chromatographer with «Column Oven 5310», «Pump 5110» and «UV-detector 5410».Results and discussion. The samples of Laurus nobilis leaves gathered in outskirts of Alushta (Republic of Crimea in July 2016 were the objects if the study. We identified caffeic, gallic, and chicoric acids, epigallocatechin gallate, luteolin-7-glycoside in the extracts obtained using ethanol 70%. And caffeic, gallic, isoferulic acids, dicoumarin, epicatechin, kaempferol, and isoquercitrin in ethanol 40% extracts. In water extracts we found the presence of ascorbic, gallic, and vanillic acids, epicatechin, quercetin-3-glycoside and kaempferol-3-galactoside.Conclusion. As the result of the Laurus nobilis leaves samples study, gathered in Alushta outskirts, ascorbic acid and 13 phenolic compounds were identified in water and water-alcohol (40% and 70% extracts using high performance liquid chromatography. Isoferulic and chicoric acids, epigallocatechin gallate, dicoumarin, kaempferol, isoquercitrin, kaempferol-3-galactoside and luteolin-7-glycoside were identified in Laurus nobilis leaves for the first time. 

  11. Stability of phenolic compounds of the propolis processed by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Andrea H.; Mastro, Nelida L. del

    2002-01-01

    Propolis is the generic term of a resin of different colors and consistency collected by bees, Apis mellifera, from diverse parts of plants, buds and resinous exudates. It possesses antibacterial , antifungal and antiviral properties and many other biological activities such as antiinflammatory, antiulcer, local anaesthetic, antitumor, etc. The aim of this work is to study the effect of 60 Co ionizing radiation on the stability of phenolic compounds of propolis. (author)

  12. Copigmentation effect of phenolic compounds on red currant juice anthocyanins during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Kopjar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Copigmentation has been suggested as a main colour stabilising mechanism in plants protecting the coloured flavylium cation from the nucleophilic attack by the water molecule. In this study influence of phenolic compounds addition (catechol, 4-methyl catechol, (+-catechin and gallic acid on stability of red currant juice anthocyanins (copigment:pigment molar ratio 50:1 and 100:1 during 30 days of storage at 4 °C was investigated. Stability of anthocyanins was evaluated through determination of anthocyanins, total colour difference (ΔE*, kinetic parameters and anthocyanin retention. The initial anthocyanin content of red currant juice was 44.34 mg/100 g. During storage degradation of anthocyanins occurred. After storage anthocyanin content of red currant juice was 38.87 mg/100 mL. However, in samples with addition of phenolic compounds degradation was less pronounced due to formation of pigment-copigment complex (i.e. copigmentation. Anthocyanin content in samples with addition of phenolic compounds ranged from 39.2 to 43.83 mg/100 mL, depending on phenolic compound, its concentration and storage time. The lowest degradation was observed when gallic acid was added. Monitoring only λmax of absorption spectrum of juices, one can get incomplete picture of colour stability of red currant juice. It was important to monitor total colour change (ΔE* with CIELAB colour system since all parameters are taken into account. The lowest ΔE*, after 30 days of storage, had samples with addition of catechol and (+-catechin (0.83 and 0.86, respectively, while the highest values had samples with addition of gallic acid (1.26.

  13. Geographic variability of selected phenolic compounds in fresh berries of two Cornus species

    OpenAIRE

    Popović, Zorica; Matić, Rada; Bajić-Ljubičić, Jasna; Tešević, Vele; Bojović, Srđan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the chemical variability of Cornus mas and Cornus sanguinea on the basis of the content of six selected phenolic compounds in fruit extracts. Fruits were sampled at the time of full ripening, mid-September, from two localities that differed in terms of orographic and environmental conditions. Fresh fruit extracts were analyzed by LC–MS/MS to determine the presence and contents of neochlorogenic acid, quercitrin, isoquercetin, hyperoside, rutoside and q...

  14. Optimization of autohydrolysis conditions to extract antioxidant phenolic compounds from spent coffee grounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballesteros, Lina F.; Ramirez, Monica J.; Orrego, Carlos E.

    2017-01-01

    Autohydrolysis, which is an eco-friendly technology that employs only water as extraction solvent, was used to extract antioxidant phenolic compounds from spent coffee grounds (SCG). Experimental assays were carried out using different temperatures (160–200 °C), liquid/solid ratios (5–15 ml/g SCG......) and extraction times (10–50 min) in order to determine the conditions that maximize the extraction results. The optimum conditions to produce extracts with high content of phenolic compounds (40.36 mg GAE/g SCG) and high antioxidant activity (FRAP = 69.50 mg Fe(II)/g SCG, DPPH = 28.15 mg TE/g SCG, ABTS = 31.......46 mg TE/g SCG, and TAA = 66.21 mg α-TOC/g SCG) consisted in using 15 ml water/g SCG, at 200 °C during 50 min. Apart from being a green technology, autohydrolysis under optimized conditions was demonstrated to be an efficient method to extract antioxidant phenolic compounds from SCG....

  15. Content of Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Capacity in Fruits of Apricot Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Skutkova

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Research on natural compounds is increasingly focused on their effects on human health. In this study, we were interested in the evaluation of nutritional value expressed as content of total phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity of new apricot (Prunus armeniaca L. genotypes resistant against Plum pox virus (PPV cultivated on Department of Fruit Growing of Mendel University in Brno. Fruits of twenty one apricot genotypes were collected at the onset of consumption ripeness. Antioxidant capacities of the genotypes were determined spectrometrically using DPPH• (1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radicals scavenging test, TEAC (Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity, and FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Powermethods. The highest antioxidant capacities were determined in the genotypes LE-3228 and LE-2527, the lowest ones in the LE-985 and LE-994 genotypes. Moreover, close correlation (r = 0.964 was determined between the TEAC and DPPH assays. Based on the antioxidant capacity and total polyphenols content, a clump analysis dendrogram of the monitored apricot genotypes was constructed. In addition, we optimized high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem electrochemical and spectrometric detection and determined phenolic profile consisting of the following fifteen phenolic compounds: gallic acid, 4-aminobenzoic acid, chlorogenic acid, ferulic acid, caffeic acid, procatechin, salicylic acid, p-coumaric acid, the flavonols quercetin and quercitrin, the flavonol glycoside rutin, resveratrol, vanillin, and the isomers epicatechin, (–- and (+- catechin.

  16. Inhibitory effects of furan derivatives and phenolic compounds on dark hydrogen fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Richen; Cheng, Jun; Ding, Lingkan; Song, Wenlu; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-11-01

    The inhibitory effects of furan derivatives [i.e. furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF)] and phenolic compounds (i.e. vanillin and syringaldehyde) on dark hydrogen fermentation from glucose were comparatively evaluated. Phenolic compounds exhibited stronger inhibition on hydrogen production and glucose consumption than furan derivatives under the same 15mM concentration. Furan derivatives were completely degraded after 72h fermentation, while over 55% of phenolic compounds remained unconverted after 108h fermentation. The inhibition coefficients of vanillin (14.05) and syringaldehyde (11.21) were higher than those of 5-HMF (4.35) and furfural (0.64). Vanillin exhibited the maximum decrease of hydrogen yield (17%). The consumed reducing power by inhibitors reduction from R-CHO to RCH2OH was a possible reason contributed to the decreased hydrogen yield. Vanillin exhibited the maximum delay of peak times of hydrogen production rate and glucose consumption. Soluble metabolites and carbon conversion efficiency decreased with inhibitors addition, which were consistent with hydrogen production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimizing a culture medium for biomass and phenolic compounds production using Ganoderma lucidum

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    Carlos Andrés Zárate-Chaves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work was aimed at optimizing a culture medium for biomass production and phenolic compounds by using Ganoderma lucidum. The culture was optimized in two stages; a Plackett-Burman design was used in the first one for identifying key components in the medium and a central composite design was used in the second one for optimizing their concentration. Both responses (biomass and phenolic compounds were simultaneously optimized by the latter methodology regarding desirability, and the optimal concentrations obtained were 50.00 g/L sucrose, 13.29 g/L yeast extract and 2.99 g/L olive oil. Maximum biomass production identified in these optimal conditions was 9.5 g/L and that for phenolic compounds was 0.0452 g/L, this being 100% better than that obtained in the media usually used in the laboratory. Similar patterns regarding chemical characterization and biological activity towards Aspergillus sp., from both fruiting body and mycelium-derived secondary metabolites and extracts obtained in the proposed medium were observed. It was shown that such statistical methodologies are useful for optimizing fermentation and, in the specific case of G. lucidum, optimizing processes for its production and its metabolites in submerged culture as an alternative to traditional culture.

  18. Optimization of microwave assisted extraction (MAE) and soxhlet extraction of phenolic compound from licorice root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Zohreh; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra; Mirzaee, Habib Allah; Khomeiri, Morteza; Mahoonak, Alireza Sadeghi; Aydani, Emad

    2015-06-01

    In present study, response surface methodology was used to optimize extraction condition of phenolic compounds from licorice root by microwave application. Investigated factors were solvent (ethanol 80 %, methanol 80 % and water), liquid/solid ratio (10:1-25:1) and time (2-6 min). Experiments were designed according to the central composite rotatable design. The results showed that extraction conditions had significant effect on the extraction yield of phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacities. Optimal condition in microwave assisted method were ethanol 80 % as solvent, extraction time of 5-6 min and liquid/solid ratio of 12.7/1. Results were compared with those obtained by soxhlet extraction. In soxhlet extraction, Optimum conditions were extraction time of 6 h for ethanol 80 % as solvent. Value of phenolic compounds and extraction yield of licorice root in microwave assisted (MAE), and soxhlet were 47.47 mg/g and 16.38 %, 41.709 mg/g and 14.49 %, respectively. These results implied that MAE was more efficient extracting method than soxhlet.

  19. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ruoshui [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Guo, Mond [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Lin, Kuan-ting [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Hebert, Vincent R. [Food and Environmental Laboratory, Washington State, University-TriCities, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Zhang, Jinwen [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Wolcott, Michael P. [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Quintero, Melissa [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K. [Chemical and Biological Process Development Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Chen, Xiaowen [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Lab, 1617 Cole Blvd Golden CO 80127 USA; Zhang, Xiao [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA

    2016-07-04

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high-value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) including 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPC yields obtained were 18 and 22 % based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL, respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47 %. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  20. [The content of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity ready to eat desserts for infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipiak-Florkiewicz, Agnieszka; Dereń, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the content of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity in ready-to-eat desserts for babies. The experimental material consisted of six kinds of fruit desserts taken from the market in 2008, in which the content of dry matter phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity levels on the basis of free radical quenching ability ABTS were determined. The largest share of dry matter was found in apricot mousse with apples and bananas (16.9%). The largest amounts of phenolic compounds were found in the cream with apple and wild rose (186.3 mg/100 g) and apple with forest fruits (170.7 mg/100 g). The highest antioxidant activity among the desserts was determined in cream with apple and wild rose (14.2 micromol Trolox/g) and apple mousse with peaches (12.8 micromol Trolox/g). The antioxidant capacity of the remaining examined purée was slightly lower and ranged from 11.4-11.7 micromol Trolox/g.

  1. Involvement of phenolic compounds in the susceptibility of bananas to crown rot. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassois, L.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Crown rot of bananas, caused by a fungal parasitic complex, is one of the main quality defects of exported bananas. Major variations in the susceptibility of bananas to crown rot have been observed in different production zones. The physiological state of the banana fruit at harvest is said to influence its response to pathogenic attack and thus to modulate its susceptibility to crown rot. The susceptibility of bananas to this disease, however, appears to be influenced by many pre-harvest factors, although the underlying defense mechanisms have not been clearly identified. A recent report based on molecular analyses suggests that phenolic compounds might be involved in the different variations in the susceptibility of bananas to crown rot. Results of other earlier studies point to an involvement of phenolic compounds in the defensive reactions of banana plants against various pathogens. The present paper reviews the current state of knowledge on the variations in the susceptibility of bananas to crown rot and takes stock of what is known about phenolic compounds in relation to their potential involvement in the defense mechanisms of the banana plant.

  2. Characterization of phenolic compounds in chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seeds, fiber flour and oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Alves, Sheila Cristina; Vendramini-Costa, Débora Barbosa; Betim Cazarin, Cinthia Baú; Maróstica Júnior, Mário Roberto; Borges Ferreira, João Pedro; Silva, Andreia Bento; Prado, Marcelo Alexandre; Bronze, Maria Rosário

    2017-10-01

    The consumption of chia seeds products has increased recently and it has been suggested that the inclusion of this functional food in a daily human diet could contribute to improve consumers' health. However, a better knowledge about the composition of these products is mandatory. In this work, the phenolic compounds from commercial samples of chia seed, fiber flour and oil were extracted using an ultrasound-assisted methodology and were separated and identified by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer. Methanol:water extracts were prepared and submitted to an acidic hydrolysis. Crude and hydrolyzed extracts were analyzed and phenolic compounds found were mainly caffeic acid and danshensu and its derivatives, such as rosmarinic and salvianolic acids. TPC was higher in the hydrolyzed extracts. These results supply new information about the main phenolic compounds presents in chia, which are important dietary sources of natural antioxidants for prevention of diseases caused by oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ruoshui [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Guo, Mond [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Lin, Kuan-ting [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Hebert, Vincent R. [Food and Environmental Laboratory, Washington State, University-TriCities, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Zhang, Jinwen [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Wolcott, Michael P. [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Quintero, Melissa [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K. [Chemical and Biological Process Development Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Chen, Xiaowen [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Lab, 1617 Cole Blvd Golden CO 80127 USA; Zhang, Xiao [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA

    2016-07-04

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer as well as its complex side chain structures, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) inclduing 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPCs yields obtained were 18% and 22% based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47%. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  4. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity and Total Phenol Compounds of Punica granatum Hydro-Alcoholic Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Ahmadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Punica granatum is a non-productive form of a plant and is used for the treatment of diseases in traditional medicine. In this study, we evaluate the antibacterial activity and the total phenol compounds of Punica granatum. Materials & Methods: Disk and well diffusion methods and MIC were used to evaluate the antibacterial activity of hydro-alcoholic extract on S. aureus and E. coli compared to standard commercial antibiotic disks. Measurement of phenol compounds were performed by Seevers and Daly colorimetric methods (Folin-ciocalteu indicator. Results: 35 and 29 mm inhibition zones in S. aureus and 22 and 17 mm inhibition zones in E. coli were shown by disk and well diffusion method, respectively. Also, 7.8 mg/ml concentration of extract showed the MIC points for two bacteria. Phenol compound of extract was 233.15±5.1 mg/g of extraction. Conclusion: Antibacterial effect of Punica granatum compared to antibiotics indicates the strong activity against examined bacteria. Extensive antibacterial study of Punica granatum is suggested.

  5. Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activity of Juices from Ten Iranian Pomegranate Cultivars Depend on Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Akhavan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities of ten juices from arils and whole pomegranate cultivars grown in Iran were studied. Phenolic contents and antioxidant activities of juices from whole pomegranate fruit were significantly higher than juices from pomegranate arils, but the variety has a greater influence than the processing method. The main phenolics in the studied juices were punicalagin A (5.40–285 mg/L, punicalagin B (25.9–884 mg/L, and ellagic acid (17.4–928 mg/L. The major and minor anthocyanins of cyanidin 3,5-diglucoside (0.7–94.7 mg/L, followed by cyanidin 3-glucoside (0.5–52.5 mg/L, pelargonidin 3,5-diglucoside + delphinidin 3-glucoside (0–10.3 mg/L, delphinidin 3,5-diglucoside (0–7.68 mg/L, pelargonidin 3-glucoside (0–9.40 mg/L, and cyanidin-pentoside (0–1.13 mg/L were identified; the latter anthocyanin as well as cyanidin-pentoside-hexoside and delphinidin-pentoside were detected for the first time in Iranian pomegranates. The total phenolic contents were in the range of 220–2931 mg/100 mL. The results indicate that the pomegranate phenolics are not only influenced by extraction method but also—and even more—affected by the cultivar. Moreover, a good correlation was observed between total phenolic content and ABTS and FRAP methods in all pomegranate juices (>0.90. The results of current research can help to select the pomegranate cultivars for commercial juice production.

  6. Effect of drying of figs (Ficus carica L.) on the contents of sugars, organic acids, and phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatnar, Ana; Klancar, Urska; Stampar, Franci; Veberic, Robert

    2011-11-09

    Fresh figs were subjected to two different drying processes: sun-drying and oven-drying. To assess their effect on the nutritional and health-related properties of figs, sugars, organic acids, single phenolics, total phenolics, and antioxidant activity were determined before and after processing. Samples were analyzed three times in a year, and phenolic compounds were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). In figs, monomer sugars predominate, which is important nutritional information, and the content of sugars as well as organic acids in fresh figs was lower than in dried fruits. However, the best sugar/organic acid ratio was measured after the sun-drying process. Analysis of individual phenolic compounds revealed a higher content of all phenolic groups determined after the oven-drying process, with the exception of cyanidin-3-O-rutinoside. Similarly, higher total phenolic content and antioxidant activity were detected after the drying process. With these results it can be concluded that the differences in analyzed compounds in fresh and dried figs are significant. The differences between the sun-dried and oven-dried fruits were determined in organic acids, sugars, chlorogenic acid, catechin, epicatechin, kaempferol-3-O-glucoside, luteolin-8-C-glucoside, and total phenolic contents. The results indicate that properly dried figs can be used as a good source of phenolic compounds.

  7. Potential of LC Coupled to Fluorescence Detection in Food Metabolomics: Determination of Phenolic Compounds in Virgin Olive Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina P. Monasterio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A powerful chromatographic method coupled to a fluorescence detector was developed to determine the phenolic compounds present in virgin olive oil (VOO, with the aim to propose an appropriate alternative to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. An excitation wavelength of 285 nm was selected and four different emission wavelengths (316, 328, 350 and 450 nm were simultaneously recorded, working therefore on “multi-emission” detection mode. With the use of commercially available standards and other standards obtained by semipreparative high performance liquid chromatography, it was possible to identify simple phenols, lignans, several complex phenols, and other phenolic compounds present in the matrix under study. A total of 26 phenolic compounds belonging to different chemical families were identified (23 of them were susceptible of being quantified. The proposed methodology provided detection and quantification limits within the ranges of 0.004–7.143 μg·mL−1 and 0.013–23.810 μg·mL−1, respectively. As far as the repeatability is concerned, the relative standard deviation values were below 0.43% for retention time, and 9.05% for peak area. The developed methodology was applied for the determination of phenolic compounds in ten VOOs, both monovarietals and blends. Secoiridoids were the most abundant fraction in all the samples, followed by simple phenolic alcohols, lignans, flavonoids, and phenolic acids (being the abundance order of the latter chemical classes logically depending on the variety and origin of the VOOs.

  8. Evaluation of Nutritive Value, Phenolic Compounds and in vitro Digestion Charactristics of Barberry (Berberis Vulgaris Foliage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Jalal Modaresi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This study was intended to evaluate the nutritional value, phenolic compounds and digestibility coefficients of barberry leaves. Berberis vulgaris is one of the major crops in the province. The province has more than 70 percent and 95 percent of the total area under cultivation of barberry. Waste and foliage of barberry harvest traditionally used to feed livestock Tannin concentration greater than 3 to 4 percent in food, can have negative effects on digestibility in ruminants and in particular to reduce the absorption of dietary protein. So it can be expected that high amounts of tannins within waste foliage of barberry reduce its efficiency in ruminants to be fed. Several studies have shown that the addition of certain compounds such as urea, polyethylene Due to the high volume of barberry foliage that remains after harvesting and the possibility of its use in animal nutrition, this study tried to determine some nutrient compounds, phenolic compounds and degradation parameters were barberry leaves. In addition, in this study to determine the best additives are effective in reducing the concentration of tannins and phenolic compounds, urea, polyethylene glycol, sodium hydroxide and calcium hydroxide were compared. Materials and method As the samples were dried by the sun for 6 days. The amount of 5% by weight (dry matter basis urea, polyethylene glycol, sodium hydroxide or calcium hydroxide that was prepared with distilled water, was sprayed on 5 kg of the sample and thoroughly mixed. Each of the treatments were prepared in triplicate. Treatments include: 1 control (foliage without additives, 2 foliage with 5% solution of urea, 3 foliage with 5% polyethylene glycol, 4 foliage with 5% sodium hydroxide, 5 with 5% calcium hydroxide was foliage. The sample were kept in anaerobic plastic containers for 3 days and then opened and dried at room temperature. Samples were analyzed for crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent

  9. Effects of blending wheatgrass juice on enhancing phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities of traditional kombucha beverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tzu-Ying; Li, Jia-Shiun; Chen, Chinshuh

    2015-12-01

    Traditional kombucha is a fermented black tea extract and sugar. Sweetened black tea (10% w/v) and wheatgrass juice (WGJ) were mixed in various ratios and used as fermentation substrate for enhancing phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity. Starter, comprising of yeast (Dekkera bruxellensis) and acetic acid bacteria (Gluconacetobacter rhaeticus and Gluconobacter roseus), was inoculated at 20% (v/v), and fermented statically at 29 ± 1°C for 12 days. The results showed that the total phenolic and flavonoid contents and antioxidant activity of the modified kombucha were higher than those of traditional preparations. All WGJ-blended kombucha preparations were characterized as having higher concentrations of various phenolic compounds such as gallic acid, catechin, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, rutin, and chlorogenic acid as compared to traditional ones. Addition of WGJ resulted in the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging ability of kombucha being > 90%, while the oxygen radical absorbance capacity increased from 5.0 μmol trolox equivalents/mL to 12.8 μmol trolox equivalents/mL as the ratio of WGJ increased from 0% to 67% (v/v). The highest antioxidant activity was obtained using a 1:1 (v/v) black tea decoction to WGJ ratio and 3 days of fermentation, producing various types of phenolic acids. These results suggest that intake of fermented black tea enhanced with wheatgrass juice is advantageous over traditional kombucha formulas in terms of providing various complementary phenolics and might have more potential to reduce oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Effects of blending wheatgrass juice on enhancing phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities of traditional kombucha beverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Ying Sun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditional kombucha is a fermented black tea extract and sugar. Sweetened black tea (10% w/v and wheatgrass juice (WGJ were mixed in various ratios and used as fermentation substrate for enhancing phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity. Starter, comprising of yeast (Dekkera bruxellensis and acetic acid bacteria (Gluconacetobacter rhaeticus and Gluconobacter roseus, was inoculated at 20% (v/v, and fermented statically at 29 ± 1°C for 12 days. The results showed that the total phenolic and flavonoid contents and antioxidant activity of the modified kombucha were higher than those of traditional preparations. All WGJ-blended kombucha preparations were characterized as having higher concentrations of various phenolic compounds such as gallic acid, catechin, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, rutin, and chlorogenic acid as compared to traditional ones. Addition of WGJ resulted in the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH scavenging ability of kombucha being > 90%, while the oxygen radical absorbance capacity increased from 5.0 μmol trolox equivalents/mL to 12.8 μmol trolox equivalents/mL as the ratio of WGJ increased from 0% to 67% (v/v. The highest antioxidant activity was obtained using a 1:1 (v/v black tea decoction to WGJ ratio and 3 days of fermentation, producing various types of phenolic acids. These results suggest that intake of fermented black tea enhanced with wheatgrass juice is advantageous over traditional kombucha formulas in terms of providing various complementary phenolics and might have more potential to reduce oxidative stress.

  11. Iridoids, Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activity of Edible Honeysuckle Berries (Lonicera caerulea var. kamtschatica Sevast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Z. Kucharska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Iridoid and polyphenol profiles of 30 different honeysuckle berry cultivars and genotypes were studied. Compounds were identified by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS in positive and negative ion modes and quantified by HPLC-PDA. The 50 identified compounds included 15 iridoids, 6 anthocyanins, 9 flavonols, 2 flavanonols (dihydroflavonols, 5 flavones, 6 flavan-3-ols, and 7 phenolic acids. 8-epi-Loganic acid, pentosyl-loganic acid, taxifolin 7-O-dihexoside, and taxifolin 7-O-hexoside were identified in honeysuckle berries for the first time. Iridoids and anthocyanins were the major groups of bioactive compounds of honeysuckle constituents. The total content of quantified iridoids and anthocyanins was between 128.42 mg/100 g fresh weight (fw (‘Dlinnoplodnaya’ and 372 mg/100 g fw (‘Kuvshinovidnaya’ and between 150.04 mg/100 g fw (‘Karina’ and 653.95 mg/100 g fw (‘Amur’, respectively. Among iridoids, loganic acid was the dominant compound, and it represented between 22% and 73% of the total amount of quantified iridoids in honeysuckle berry. A very strong correlation was observed between the antioxidant potential and the quantity of anthocyanins. High content of iridoids in honeysuckle berries can complement antioxidant properties of phenolic compounds.

  12. Phenolic compounds and in vitro antioxidant activity of selected species of seaweeds from Danish coast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farvin, Sabeena; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Water and ethanolic extracts of 16 species of seaweeds collected along the Danish coasts were screened for antioxidant activities using four in vitro antioxidant assays (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity, reducing power, ferrous ion-chelating and liposome model system...... extraction than water. Polysiphonia fucoides and all the Fucus species tested showed highest radical scavenging activity, reducing power, inhibition of oxidation in liposome model system and in fish oil and were high in phenolic content. These seaweeds could be potential rich sources of natural antioxidants...... for protection of foods against oxidation. In general, the various antioxidative assays correlated well with the total phenolic content, indicating that algal polyphenols are active components in these extracts. However, in some of the antioxidative assays some species with low total phenolic content also showed...

  13. Production of anthraquinones, phenolic compounds and biological activities from hairy root cultures of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruvengadam, Muthu; Praveen, Nagella; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Chung, Ill-Min

    2014-05-01

    Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. is a highly important medicinal plant producing anthraquinones (emodin and physcion) and phenolic compounds which has pharmaceutical use. In vitro seedling explants such as roots, internodals, nodals and leaves were inoculated with A. rhizogenes strain KCTC 2703. Transformed roots were induced from internodals and leaf explants. Six transgenic clones of hairy roots were established and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) using rolC specific primers. Hairy roots cultured using MS liquid medium supplemented with 30 g/l sucrose showed highest accumulation of biomass (99.05 g/l FW [fresh weight] and 10.95 g/l DW [dry weight]) and highest production of anthraquinones content (emodin 211.32 μg/g DW and physcion 353.23 μg/g DW) were observed at 20 days. Nearly 9.5-fold increment of biomass was evident in suspension cultures at 20 days of culture and hairy root biomass produced in suspension cultures possessed 3.7- and 3.5-fold higher content of emodin and physcion, respectively, when compared with the untransformed control roots. MS basal liquid medium was superior for the growth of hairy roots and production of anthraquinones compared with other culture media evaluated (SH, B5 and N6), with MS-basal liquid medium supplemented with 30 g/l sucrose was optimal for secondary metabolite production. A total of 23 polyphenolic compounds were identified and quantified from P. multiflorum untransformed and hairy roots, which includes hydroxybenzoic acids, hydroxycinnamic acids, flavonols and other groups of phenolic compounds. The ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) analysis of the phenolic compounds profile revealed that pyrogallol, hesperidin, naringenin and formononetin were higher in hairy roots compared to untransformed roots. The total phenolics, flavonoids content, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity was high in hairy roots compared to untransformed roots. This is the first

  14. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of Italian extra virgin olive oil Monti Iblei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvano, Fabio; La Fauci, Luca; Graziani, Giulia; Ferracane, Rosalia; Masella, Roberta; Di Giacomo, Claudia; Scacco, Antonio; D'Archivio, Massimo; Vanella, Luca; Galvano, Giacomo

    2007-12-01

    The profile of phenolic compounds, antioxidant capacity, oxidative stability, and chemical characteristics (free acidity, peroxide value, specific extinction K232 and K270 values, and DeltaK) of 22 commercial extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) samples coming from the denomination of protected origin (DPO) Monti Iblei and obtained from olives harvested in the period September-December 2005 in the production area of the province of Siracusa (Sicily, Italy) were evaluated. The content of total phenols, expressed as gallic acid equivalents, ranged from 14.80 to 121.20 mg/100 g, with a mean value of 53.72 mg/100 g, mainly attributable to deacetoxyligstroside aglycone, deacetoxyoleuropein aglycone, oleuropein aglycone, and ligstroside aglycone. The mean values of Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and of oxidative stability were 54.76 and 11.99 hours, respectively. Both TEAC and oxidative stability were positively correlated to the phenol content and to the percentage of inclusion of the olive cultivar "Tonda Iblea." The high mean content of phenols, besides conferring prolonged oxidative stability, likely confers to the DPO Monti Iblei EVOO marked potential beneficial effects for human health.

  15. Impact of phenolic compounds and related enzymes in Sorghum varieties for resistance and susceptibility to biotic and abiotic stresses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dicko, M.H.; Gruppen, H.; Barro, C.; Traore, A.S.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Contents of phenolic compounds and related enzymes before and after sorghum grain germination were compared between varieties either resistant or susceptible to biotic (sooty stripe, sorghum midge, leaf anthracnose, striga, and grain molds) and abiotic (lodging, drought resistance, and photoperiod

  16. Immobilization of Bacillus sp. in mesoporous activated carbon for degradation of sulphonated phenolic compound in wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekaran, G., E-mail: ganesansekaran@gmail.com [Environmental Technology Division, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), Adyar, Chennai-600 020 (India); Karthikeyan, S. [Environmental Technology Division, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), Adyar, Chennai-600 020 (India); Gupta, V.K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee-247 667 (India); Department of Chemistry, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Boopathy, R.; Maharaja, P. [Environmental Technology Division, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), Adyar, Chennai-600 020 (India)

    2013-03-01

    Xenobiotic compounds are used in considerable quantities in leather industries besides natural organic and inorganic compounds. These compounds resist biological degradation and thus they remain in the treated wastewater in the unaltered molecular configurations. Immobilization of organisms in carrier matrices protects them from shock load application and from the toxicity of chemicals in bulk liquid phase. Mesoporous activated carbon (MAC) has been considered in the present study as the carrier matrix for the immobilization of Bacillus sp. isolated from Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP) employed for the treatment of wastewater containing sulphonated phenolic (SP) compounds. Temperature, pH, concentration, particle size and mass of MAC were observed to influence the immobilization behavior of Bacillus sp. The percentage immobilization of Bacillus sp. was the maximum at pH 7.0, temperature 20 Degree-Sign C and at particle size 300 {mu}m. Enthalpy, free energy and entropy of immobilization were - 46.9 kJ mol{sup -1}, - 1.19 kJ mol{sup -1} and - 161.36 J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1} respectively at pH 7.0, temperature 20 Degree-Sign C and particle size 300 {mu}m. Higher values of {Delta}H{sup 0} indicate the firm bonding of the Bacillus sp. in MAC. Degradation of aqueous sulphonated phenolic compound by Bacillus sp. immobilized in MAC followed pseudo first order rate kinetics with rate constant 1.12 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} min{sup -1}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Degradation on phenolic syntan using immobilized activated carbon as catalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bacillus sp. immobilized cell reactor removed all refractory organic loads. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The removal mechanism is due to co-metabolism between carbon and organisms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The organics are completely metabolized rather than adsorption.

  17. Solid-Liquid Extraction Kinetics of Total Phenolic Compounds (TPC from Red Dates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bee Lin Chua

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Red dates are one of the most famous herbal plants in making traditional Chinese medicine. They contain large amount of bioactive compounds. The objectives of this research were to optimise the crude extract yield and total phenolic compounds (TPC yield from red dates using response surface methodology (RSM and model the extraction kinetics of TPC yield from red dates. Date fruits were dried in an oven under temperatures 50°C, 60°C, 70°C and 80°C until a constant weight was obtained. The optimum drying temperature was 60°C as it gave the highest crude extract yield and TPC yield. Besides that, single factor experiments were used to determine the optimum range of four extraction parameters which were: liquid-solid ratio (10-30 ml/g; ultrasonic power (70-90%; extraction temperature (50-70°C; and extraction time (40-60min. The optimum range of the four parameters were further optimised using the Box-Behken Design (BBD of RSM. The extraction conditions that gave the highest crude extract yield and TPC yield were chosen. The optimum value for liquid-solid ratio, ultrasonic power, extraction temperature and extraction time were 30ml/g, 70%, 60°C and 60 min respectively. The two equations generated from RSM were reliable and can be used to predict the crude extract yield and TPC yield. The higher the extraction temperature, liquid-solid ratio, and extraction time and lower ultrasonic power, the higher the crude extract and TPC yield. Finally, the results of TPC yield versus time based on the optimum extraction parameters from RSM optimisation were fitted into three extraction kinetic models (Peleg’s model, Page’s model and Ponomaryov’s model. It was found that the most suitable kinetic model to represent the extraction process of TPC from red dates was Page’s model due to its coefficient of determination (R2 was the closest to unity, 0.9663 while its root mean square error (RMSE was the closest to zero, 0.001534.

  18. Metabolic and Microbial Modulation of the Large Intestine Ecosystem by Non-Absorbed Diet Phenolic Compounds: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Juana I. Mosele; Alba Macià; Maria-José Motilva

    2015-01-01

    Phenolic compounds represent a diverse group of phytochemicals whose intake is associated with a wide spectrum of health benefits. As consequence of their low bioavailability, most of them reach the large intestine where, mediated by the action of local microbiota, a series of related microbial metabolites are accumulated. In the present review, gut microbial transformations of non-absorbed phenolic compounds are summarized. Several studies have reached a general consensus that unbalanced die...

  19. Gamma irradiation of air-dried olive leaves : effective decontamination and impact on the antioxidative properties and on phenolic compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Aouidi, F.; Ayari, S.; Ferhi, H.; Roussos, Sevastianos; Hamdi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Olive leaves are commercialized for their antioxidative value due to their valuable phenolic compounds. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation on microbial load, on antioxidative properties and on phenolic compounds of air-dried olive leaves. Irradiation was applied up to 25 kGy (5 kGy intervals) to powdered and intact samples. Total aerobic bacteria, yeast and mold, and lactic acid bacteria were counted after gamma irradiation. Decontamination was obtained at 20 ...

  20. Subcritical water extraction of flavoring and phenolic compounds from cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum zeylanicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuwijitjaru, Pramote; Sayputikasikorn, Nucha; Samuhasaneetoo, Suched; Penroj, Parinda; Siriwongwilaichat, Prasong; Adachi, Shuji

    2012-01-01

    Cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) powder was treated with subcritical water at 150 and 200°C in a semi-continuous system at a constant flow rate (3 mL/min) and pressure (6 MPa). Major flavoring compounds, i.e., cinnamaldehyde, cinnamic acid, cinnamyl alcohol and coumarin, were extracted at lower recoveries than the extraction using methanol, suggesting that degradation of these components might occur during the subcritical water treatment. Caffeic, ferulic, p-coumaric, protocatechuic and vanillic acids were identified from the subcritical water treatment. Extraction using subcritical water was more effective to obtain these acids than methanol (50% v/v) in both number of components and recovery, especially at 200°C. Subcritical water treatment at 200°C also resulted in a higher total phenolic content and DPPH radical scavenging activity than the methanol extraction. The DPPH radical scavenging activity and total phenolic content linearly correlated but the results suggested that the extraction at 200°C might result in other products that possessed a free radical scavenging activity other than the phenolic compounds.

  1. Influence of freezing skin grapes to extract phenolic compounds during red wine maceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alegria M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wine quality depends on phenolic and aromatic compounds that are mainly located in skins and seeds of grapes and can be better extracted if suitable extraction technologies are applied. An increase in extractability has impact in the mouth feel, color and age ability of the wines. Using liquid or solid CO2 is a way to promote the breakdown of the cells membranes and enhance extraction of these compounds and protecting grapes and wine from oxidation. The main goal was to test the impact of solid CO2 addition to destemmed grapes with a new CO2 dispenser equipment in order to freeze the berry skins and improve the phenolic extraction in an economic and sustainable way in cv. Cabernet Sauvignon and Pinot Noir. The experiment designed for both cultivars was a treatment with CO2 addition and a control without CO2 addition each one with three replicates. Destemmed grapes submitted to carbonic snow reached temperature of the skins between − 1 and − 4 °C during four minutes under equipment treatment. The consumption of carbon dioxide was estimated around 0.3(kg ⋅kg−1CO2 per berries. Wines of Cabernet Sauvignon and Pinot noir from fresh grapes and frozen grapes were made and were being compared in phenolic composition and sensory attributes.

  2. Application and potential of capillary electroseparation methods to determine antioxidant phenolic compounds from plant food material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-Fernández, Elena; Gómez-Romero, María; Carrasco-Pancorbo, Alegría; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto

    2010-12-15

    Antioxidants are one of the most common active ingredients of nutritionally functional foods which can play an important role in the prevention of oxidation and cellular damage inhibiting or delaying the oxidative processes. In recent years there has been an increased interest in the application of antioxidants to medical treatment as information is constantly gathered linking the development of human diseases to oxidative stress. Within antioxidants, phenolic molecules are an important category of compounds, commonly present in a wide variety of plant food materials. Their correct determination is pivotal nowadays and involves their extraction from the sample, analytical separation, identification, quantification and interpretation of the data. The aim of this review is to provide an overview about all the necessary steps of any analytical procedure to achieve the determination of phenolic compounds from plant matrices, paying particular attention to the application and potential of capillary electroseparation methods. Since it is quite complicated to establish a classification of plant food material, and to structure the current review, we will group the different matrices as follows: fruits, vegetables, herbs, spices and medicinal plants, beverages, vegetable oils, cereals, legumes and nuts and other matrices (including cocoa beans and bee products). At the end of the overview, we include two sections to explain the usefulness of the data about phenols provided by capillary electrophoresis and the newest trends. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A novel tyrosinase biosensor based on hydroxyapatite-chitosan nanocomposite for the detection of phenolic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Limin; Zhang Li [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, 158 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116012 (China); Zhang Xiaobing, E-mail: xbzhang@hnu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, 158 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116012 (China); Huan Shuangyan; Shen Guoli; Yu Ruqin [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, 158 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116012 (China)

    2010-04-30

    A novel tyrosinase biosensor based on hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nano-HA)-chitosan nanocomposite has been developed for the detection of phenolic compounds. The uniform and size controlled nano-HA was synthesized by hydrothermal method, and its morphological characterization was examined by transmission electron microscope (TEM). Tyrosinase was then immobilized on a nano-HA-chitosan nanocomposite-modified gold electrode. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were used to characterize the sensing film. The prepared biosensor was applied to determine phenolic compounds by monitoring the reduction signal of the biocatalytically produced quinone species at -0.2 V (vs. saturated calomel electrode). The effects of the pH, temperature and applied potential on the biosensor performance were investigated, and experimental conditions were optimized. The biosensor exhibited a linear response to catechol over a wide concentration range from 10 nM to 7 {mu}M, with a high sensitivity of 2.11 x 10{sup 3} {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2}, and a limit of detection down to 5 nM (based on S/N = 3). The apparent Michaelis-Menten constants of the enzyme electrode were estimated to be 3.16, 1.31 and 3.52 {mu}M for catechol, phenol and m-cresol, respectively. Moreover, the stability and reproducibility of this biosensor were evaluated with satisfactory results.

  4. Antioxidant and Nitrite-Scavenging Capacities of Phenolic Compounds from Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L. Tops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Sun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane tops were extracted with 50% ethanol and fractionated by petroleum ether, ethyl acetate (EtOAc, and n-butyl alcohol successively. Eight phenolic compounds in EtOAc extracts were purified through silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatographies, and then identified by nuclear magnetic resonance and electrospray ionization mass spectra. The results showed that eight phenolic compounds from EtOAc extracts were identified as caffeic acid, cis-p-hydroxycinnamic acid, quercetin, apigenin, albanin A, australone A, moracin M, and 5'-geranyl-5,7,2',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone. The antioxidant and nitrite-scavenging capacities of different solvent extracts correlated positively with their total phenolic (TP contents. Amongst various extracts, EtOAc extracts possessed the highest TP content and presented the strongest oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC, 1,1'-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical-scavenging capacity, 2,2'-azobis-3-ethylbenthiaazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS radical-scavenging capacity, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP and nitrite-scavenging capacity. Thus, sugarcane tops could be promoted as a source of natural antioxidant.

  5. Principal components of phenolics to characterize red Vinho Verde grapes: anthocyanins or non-coloured compounds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopico-García, M S; Fique, A; Guerra, L; Afonso, J M; Pereira, O; Valentão, P; Andrade, P B; Seabra, R M

    2008-06-15

    Phenolic profile of 10 different varieties of red "Vinho Verde" grapes (Azal Tinto, Borraçal, Brancelho, Doçal, Espadeiro, Padeiro de Basto, Pedral, Rabo de ovelha, Verdelho and Vinhão), from Minho (Portugal) were studied. Nine Flavonols, four phenolic acids, three flavan-3-ols, one stilben and eight anthocyanins were determined. Malvidin-3-O-glucoside was the most abundant anthocyanin while the main non-coloured compound was much more heterogeneous: catechin, epicatechin, myricetin-3-O-glucoside, quercetin-3-O-glucoside or syringetin-3-O-glucoside. Anthocyanin contents ranged from 42 to 97%. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to analyse the date and study the relations between the samples and their phenolic profiles. Anthocyanin profile proved to be a good marker to characterize the varieties even considering different origin and harvest. "Vinhão" grapes showed anthocyanins levels until twenty four times higher than the rest of the samples, with 97% of these compounds.

  6. Changes in content of major phenolic compounds during leaf development of sea buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Morgenstern

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Content of total phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity (FRAP were investigated in the leaves of three sea buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides L. cultivars: ‘Otradnaja’, ‘Gibrid Pertjika’ and ‘Ljubitelskaja’, at different dates. In addition, major phenolic compounds (catechin, kaempferol, quercetin, epigallocatechin, kaempferol-3-O-glucoside, quercetin-3-O-galactoside, isorhamnetin-3-O-glucoside, rutin, gallic acid, procyanidin monomer glycoside, procyanidin dimer aglycone and hydrolyzable tannins I–III were determined in ‘Ljubitelskaja’. Antioxidant capacity and the content of total phenolic compounds fluctuated during April, May and June, and then increased until the end of July, when the highest values were observed. Total phenolic compounds were strongly correlated with FRAP. Levels were generally higher in ‘Ljubitelskaja’ than in ‘Otradnaja’ and ‘Gibrid Pertjika’. In ‘Ljubitelskaja’, hydrolyzable tannins I–III occurred in higher amounts than did any of the other studied phenolic compounds. The developmental stage of the leaves (harvesting date had a strong influence on content of phenolic compounds and should be carefully considered when harvesting sea buckthorn leaves for different purposes.

  7. Aqueous extract of Psidium guajava leaves: phenolic compounds and inhibitory potential on digestive enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simão, Anderson A; Marques, Tamara R; Marcussi, Silvana; Corrêa, Angelita D

    2017-01-01

    Leaves of Psidium guajava L. (guava) have been widely used in the popular way for prevention and treatment of various diseases. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory potential of leaves aqueous extract from three cultivars of P. guajava (Pedro Sato, Paluma and Século XXI) on α-amylase, α-glycosidase, lipase, and trypsin enzymes, in the presence or not of simulated gastric fluid and to determine the content of phenolic compounds by high performance liquid chromatography. All cultivars presented the same composition in phenolic compounds, but in different proportions. The compounds identified are gallic acid, epigallocatechin gallate, syringic acid, o-coumaric acid, resveratrol, quercetin, and catechin (which was the major compound in all the cultivars evaluated). In the absence of simulated gastric fluid, it was observed different inhibitions exercised by the leaves aqueous extracts from three cultivars of P. guajava on each enzyme. In presence of simulated gastric fluid, all cultivars showed increase in the inhibition of lipase and α-glycosidase, and decrease in inhibition of α-amylase and trypsin enzymes. These results indicate that P. guajava leaves aqueous extracts from all cultivars evaluated possess potential of use as an adjuvant in the treatment of obesity and other dyslipidemias.

  8. Emerging role of phenolic compounds as natural food additives in fish and fish products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqsood, Sajid; Benjakul, Soottawat; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2013-01-01

    Chemical and microbiological deteriorations are principal causes of quality loss of fish and fish products during handling, processing, and storage. Development of rancid odor and unpleasant flavor, changes of color and texture as well as lowering nutritional value in fish can be prevented by appropriate use of additives. Due to the potential health hazards of synthetic additives, natural products, especially antioxidants and antimicrobial agents, have been intensively examined as safe alternatives to synthetic compounds. Polyphenols (PP) are the natural antioxidants prevalent in fruits, vegetables, beverages (tea, wine, juices), plants, seaweeds, and some herbs and show antioxidative and antimicrobial activities in different fish and fish products. The use of phenolic compounds also appears to be a good alternative for sulphiting agent for retarding melanosis in crustaceans. Phenolic compounds have also been successfully employed as the processing aid for texture modification of fish mince and surimi. Thus, plant polyphenolic compounds can serve as potential additives for preventing quality deterioration or to retain the quality of fish and fish products.

  9. Electrochemical oxidation behavior of some hazardous phenolic compounds in acidic solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nady

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical oxidation of phenol, resorcinol and pyrogallol was investigated in sulfuric acid solution. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, EIS, were used. The mechanism of the electrochemical oxidation process was proposed and discussed. The process includes a selective oxidation and PtOx formation. EIS measurements were carried out to further examine the reaction kinetics involved in the phenolic compounds electro-oxidation. The EIS responses were found to be strongly dependent on electrode potentials. The result showed the presence of an oxidation peak in the region around 1 V vs SCE to all conditions evaluated. In cyclic voltammetric experiments a gradual decrease of the oxidation peak with the number of cycles was observed. This suggests the deactivation or blockage of the electrode surface by the adsorption of substances and/or phenoxy radical polymerization.

  10. Determination of phenolic compounds and evaluation of antioxidant capacity of Campomanesia adamantium leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutinho, I.D.; Coelho, R.G.; Honda, N.K.; Silva, J.R.M.; Cardoso, C.A.L. [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: claudia@uems.br; Kataoka, V.M.F. [Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul, Dourados, MS (Brazil). Curso de Quimica; Vilegas, W. [UNESP, Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Organica

    2008-10-15

    Five flavanones and three chalcones were isolated from Campomanesia adamantium Berg. (Myrtaceae) leaves. The contents of these compounds were determined by HPLC. The phenolic contents were also determined. The monitoring of the antioxidant activity was carried out by inhibition of peroxidation using the linoleic acid system and radical-scavenging (DPPH). The plants were collected from 4 distinct cities of the Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil. The different samples exhibited a range of 4.67-232.35 mg/g chalcones and 15.62-50.71 mg/g flavanones and phenolic contents of the 7.24-21.19 mg/g gallic acid. All extracts showed high antioxidant activity with a wide range of the radical-scavenging (DPPH) from 52.0 to 92.2 % and inhibition oxidation of linoleic acid from 14.6 to 94.2%. (author)

  11. Wild leafy vegetables consumed in Buhera District of Zimbabwe and their phenolic compounds content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipurura, Batsirai; Muchuweti, Maud; Kasiyamhuru, Abisha

    2013-01-01

    A questionnaire was used to gather information on the wild leafy vegetables consumed. The phenolic concentrations were determined by the vanillin, butanol, and tannin binding assays. Seventy-nine traditional vegetables were mentioned by the respondents and 20 of these were classified according to their species. The contents of flavonoids varied from 1.2 mg/g for Cleome gynandra to 8.0 mg/g for Bidens pilosa. The levels of proanthocyanidins ranged from 1.9 mg/g for lettuce to 11.2 mg/g for Bidens pilosa. The tannin contents of the vegetables ranged from 5.7 mg/g for Cleome gynandra to 8.3 mg/g for Bidens pilosa. The present study showed that these vegetables are valuable sources of phenolic compounds as compared to some exotic species.

  12. Adsorption of phenolic compounds from aqueous solutions by aminated hypercrosslinked polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhen-mao; Li, Ai-min; Cai, Jian-guo; Wang, Chun; Zhang, Quan-xin

    2007-01-01

    Two novel polymers (NJ-1 and NJ-2) were synthesized by chemically modified a hypercrosslinked polymer NJ-0 with dimethylamine and trimethylamine, respectively. The comparison of the adsorption properties of the three polymers toward phenol, resorcin and phloroglucin was made. The study focused on the static equilibrium adsorption behaviors and the adsorption thermodynamics. Freundlich equation was found to fit the adsorption results well. The effect of amino groups introduced onto the surface of the resin and the structure of phenolic compounds on the adsorption were also studied. The hydrogen-bonding interaction and electrostatic interaction could happen between the amino groups and the adsorbates. The adsorption impetus increased as quantity of hydroxyl groups increased, but the adsorption capacity decreased due to the drop of the matching degree of the aperture of resins and the diameter of adsorbate molecules.

  13. Addition of phenols compounds to meat dough intended for salami manufacture and its antioxidant effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Novelli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A purified extract of phenols compounds (65% of phenolic content of which decarboxymethyl oleuropein aglycone represented 45% of the wet mass obtained from vegetation water (a by-product of oil mill was added to a ground meat dough intended for salami manufacture in two concentration levels: 75 and 150 mg/100 g of dough (F1 and F2, respectively. The control batch was composed of lean and fat cuts of pork in 70:30 ratio, 2.7% salt and a mixed starter culture of staphylococci and pediococci. After stuffing into natural casings, salamis were aged until they reached a total weight loss of 30%. The product was then sliced and packaged in a protective atmosphere (nitrogen:carbon dioxide 80:20 and placed in a refrigerator thermostat (2-4°C with alternating 12 h of artificial light and darkness. The samples were analysed for the measurement of pH, water activity, organic acidity, peroxide number and secondary products of lipid peroxidation at the time of slicing and after 10, 20 and 30 days of storage into the refrigerated thermostat. The pH and water activity were not substantially different between the control and the two enriched batches. The peroxide number and secondary products of lipid peroxidation values in the two batches with phenols were at least substantially lower than the control sample. In conclusion, the phenol compounds obtained from vegetation water have shown no interference with the ripening process while protecting the dough from oxidation.

  14. The Comparative Analysis of Phenolic Compounds Accumulation in Leaves of Various Kinds of Kalanchoe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. SAZHINA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available One of actual problems of modern pharmacology is creation of new medicines on the basis of vegetable raw materials. In this plan some succulents present a great interest in particular some kinds of the genus Kalanchoe, such as Kalanchoe pinnata (K.pinnata and Kalanchoe Daigremontiana (K.daigremontiana. Their leaves contain useful mineral salts, organic acids and the numerous phenolic compounds (PC. Education and accumulation of these PC depends on genetic features of a plant and numerous factors of environment. Besides, these representatives of a secondary metabolism cause biological, including antioxidant activity (AOA of this or that species of a plant, that is ability its component to inhibit oxidizing free radical processes. Use of modern methods of antioxidant properties research for plant extracts or juice of this or that plant allow to study and reveal their medicinal value at higher level.In the present work the comparative analysis of measurement results of the total phenols content and their activity in leave juice of various kinds of Kalanchoe (Kalanchoe L. is carried out by ammetric and chemiluminescence methods for the purpose of identification among them the most active producers of phenol metabolites. Objects of research were juice samples of 34 kinds of the genus Kalanchoe, grown up in a succulent collection in Timiryazev Institute of plant physiology RAS (Moscow, Russia. Among the studied samples two most active from the point of view of their antioxidant properties Kalanchoe kinds: K.scapigera and K.rhombopilosa are revealed. Both methods show considerably higher values of the phenol metabolite content in leave juice of these plants and their AOA in comparison with K.pinnata and K.daigremontiana. For possible expansion for use of specified types of Kalanchoe as sources of biologically active compounds, additional researches of biochemical structure, antibacterial, antimicrobic and other properties of these plant components is

  15. Callus induction and bioactive phenolic compounds production from Byrsonima verbascifolia (L. DC. (Malpighiaceae

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    Ana Hortência Fonsêca Castro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study developed a methodology for callus induction in leaf segments of B. verbascifolia and evaluated the bioactive phenolic compounds production. Leaf explants were cultured in MS medium with 30 g L-1 sucrose, solidified with 7 g L- 1 agar supplemented with 2,4-D (0; 4.52; 9.05; 18.10 µM and BAP (0; 4.44; 8.88; 17.75 µM in the presence and absence of light. Forty-five days after inoculation we assessed the percentage of callus induction, color, consistency, fresh and dry matter, total phenols, flavonoids, tannins contents, and chromatographic profile by HPLC-DAD method. Callus induction occurred only in medium with growth regulators. Maximal induction (100% was found in medium containing 2,4-D combined with BAP in the presence and absence of light. We obtained friable and compact callus in yellow, green, and red. Culture media containing 4.52 µM 2,4-D + 4.44 µM BAP induced 100% of friable callus with higher fresh and dry weight in the absence of light. The callus produced higher amounts of total phenols and flavonoids than the initial explant. Total tannins were detected only in callus induced in media containing 17.75 µM BAP and 4.52 µM 2,4-D + 17.75 µM BAP, and were not found in the initial explant. The bioactive phenolic compounds detected are derived from benzoic, p-coumaric, cinnamic, gallic acids, and catechins.

  16. Enhanced extraction of phenolic compounds from coffee industry’s residues through solid state fermentation by Penicillium purpurogenum

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    Lady Rossana PALOMINO García

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of agroindustrial residues is an economical solution to industrial biotechnology. Coffee husk and pulp are abounding residues from coffee industry which can be used as substrates in solid state fermentation process, thus allowing a liberation and increase in the phenolic compound content with high added value. By employing statistical design, initial moisture content, pH value in the medium, and the incubation temperature were evaluated, in order to increase the polyphenol content in a process of solid state fermentation by Penicillium purpurogenum. The main phenolic compounds identified through HPLC in fermented coffee residue were chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, and rutin. Data obtained through HPLC with the radical absorbance capacity assay suggest the fermented coffee husk and pulp extracts potential as a source of phenolic acids and flavonoids. Results showed good perspectives when using P. purpurogenum strain to enhance the liberation of phenolic compounds in coffee residues.

  17. Characterization and quantification of phenolic compounds in four tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) farmers' varieties in northeastern Portugal homegardens.

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    Barros, Lillian; Dueñas, Montserrat; Pinela, José; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Buelga, Celestino Santos; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2012-09-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) is one of the most widely consumed fresh and processed vegetables in the world, and contains bioactive key components. Phenolic compounds are one of those components and, according to the present study, farmers' varieties of tomato cultivated in homegardens from the northeastern Portuguese region are a source of phenolic compounds, mainly phenolic acid derivatives. Using HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS, it was concluded that a cis p-coumaric acid derivative was the most abundant compound in yellow (Amarelo) and round (Batateiro) tomato varieties, while 4-O-caffeolyquinic acid was the most abundant in long (Comprido) and heart (Coração) varieties. The most abundant flavonoid was quercetin pentosylrutinoside in the four tomato varieties. Yellow tomato presented the highest levels of phenolic compounds (54.23 μg/g fw), including phenolic acids (43.30 μg/g fw) and flavonoids (10.93 μg/g fw). The phenolic compounds profile obtained for the studied varieties is different from other tomato varieties available in different countries, which is certainly related to genetic features, cultivation conditions, and handling and storage methods associated to each sample.

  18. Compositions of phenolic compounds, amino acids and reducing sugars in commercial potato varieties and their effects on acrylamide formation.

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    Zhu, Fan; Cai, Yi-Zhong; Ke, Jinxia; Corke, Harold

    2010-10-01

    Potato is consumed as an important source of carbohydrate and other nutrients as well as a good source of phenolics. Acrylamide is a potential carcinogen formed during frying of potato products. This study investigated the compositions of phenolic compounds, amino acids and reducing sugars in 16 commercial potato varieties from eight countries and analysed the relationships between these compositions and the levels of acrylamide generated by heating (185 °C, 25 min) potato powders. Major phenolic compounds in the tested potato varieties were identified as hydroxycinnamoylquinic/hydroxycinnamoyl derivatives by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Great variations in the contents of phenolic compounds, free reducing sugars and amino acids as well as wide variations in acrylamide concentration were found among the different potato varieties. Correlation analysis revealed that fructose (r = 0.956***), glucose (r = 0.826***) and asparagine (r = 0.842***) were positively correlated with acrylamide formation. Interestingly, it was observed that higher levels of phenolic compounds were related to lower levels of acrylamide (r = - 0.692*). Careful selection of potato varieties with lower levels of fructose, glucose and asparagine and higher levels of phenolic compounds may mitigate acrylamide formation during thermal processing of potato products. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Phenolic compounds isolated from Dioscorea zingiberensis protect against pancreatic acinar cells necrosis induced by sodium taurocholate.

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    Du, Dan; Jin, Tao; Zhang, Rui; Hu, Liqiang; Xing, Zhihua; Shi, Na; Shen, Yan; Gong, Meng

    2017-03-15

    One new bibenzyl (1) and one new phenanthrene (2), together with two known bibenzyls (3-4) and four known diarylheptanoids (5-8) were isolated from the rhizomes of Dioscorea zingiberensis. The structures of 1-2 were elucidated by spectroscopic methods including 1D and 2D NMR. Phenols 1-8 were evaluated for their anti-pancreatitic activities on sodium taurocholate (NaT)-induced pancreatic acinars necrosis. Notably, 0.5mM of compound 6 exhibited comparable inhibitory effect with 5mM of caffeine. Furthermore, compound 6 prevented the ATP depletion and excessive ROS production which could be also involved in mitochondria-mediated injuries in acute pancreatitis. As a result, compound 6 has been demonstrated to be a potential candidate for mediating mitochondrial dysfunction to prevent pancreatic necrosis. This study is also the first report on the isolation of bibenzyls and diarylheptanoids from this plant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An Overview of Plant Phenolic Compounds and Their Importance in Human Nutrition and Management of Type 2 Diabetes

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    Derong Lin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the biosynthesis process of phenolic compounds in plants is summarized, which includes the shikimate, pentose phosphate and phenylpropanoid pathways. Plant phenolic compounds can act as antioxidants, structural polymers (lignin, attractants (flavonoids and carotenoids, UV screens (flavonoids, signal compounds (salicylic acid and flavonoids and defense response chemicals (tannins and phytoalexins. From a human physiological standpoint, phenolic compounds are vital in defense responses, such as anti-aging, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-proliferative activities. Therefore, it is beneficial to eat such plant foods that have a high antioxidant compound content, which will cut down the incidence of certain chronic diseases, for instance diabetes, cancers and cardiovascular diseases, through the management of oxidative stress. Furthermore, berries and other fruits with low-amylase and high-glucosidase inhibitory activities could be regarded as candidate food items in the control of the early stages of hyperglycemia associated with type 2 diabetes.

  1. Nutritional Composition and Antioxidant Capacity in Edible Flowers: Characterisation of Phenolic Compounds by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MSn

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    Inmaculada Navarro-González

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Edible flowers are commonly used in human nutrition and their consumption has increased in recent years. The aim of this study was to ascertain the nutritional composition and the content and profile of phenolic compounds of three edible flowers, monks cress (Tropaeolum majus, marigold (Tagetes erecta and paracress (Spilanthes oleracea, and to determine the relationship between the presence of phenolic compounds and the antioxidant capacity. Proximate composition, total dietary fibre (TDF and minerals were analysed according to official methods: total phenolic compounds (TPC were determined with Folin-Ciocalteu’s reagent, whereas antioxidant capacity was evaluated using Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC and Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC assays. In addition, phenolic compounds were characterised by HPLC-DAD-MSn. In relation to the nutritional value, the edible flowers had a composition similar to that of other plant foods, with a high water and TDF content, low protein content and very low proportion of total fat—showing significant differences among samples. The levels of TPC compounds and the antioxidant capacity were significantly higher in T. erecta, followed by S. oleracea and T. majus. Thirty-nine different phenolic compounds were tentatively identified, with flavonols being the major compounds detected in all samples, followed by anthocyanins and hydroxycynnamic acid derivatives. In T. erecta small proportions of gallotannin and ellagic acid were also identified.

  2. Impact of bioaccessibility and bioavailability of phenolic compounds in biological systems upon the antioxidant activity of the ethanolic extract of Triplaris gardneriana seeds.

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    Neto, José Joaquim Lopes; de Almeida, Thiago Silva; de Medeiros, Jackeline Lima; Vieira, Leonardo Rogério; Moreira, Thaís Borges; Maia, Ana Isabel Vitorino; Ribeiro, Paulo Riceli Vasconcelos; de Brito, Edy Sousa; Farias, Davi Felipe; Carvalho, Ana Fontenele Urano

    2017-04-01

    The most studied bioactive potential of phenolic compounds corresponds to antioxidant activity, which in turn, is associated with a reduction in the incidence of various human diseases. However, the total quantity of these bioactive substances in foods and medicinal preparations does not reflect the amount absorbed and metabolized by the body. The present study aimed to investigate the bioaccessibility of Triplaris gardneriana seeds ethanolic extract (EETg) by determination of phenolic composition and antioxidant activities before and after in vitro digestion as well as to estimate its bioavailability by chemical analysis of plasma and urine in animal models after oral administration. The bioaccessibility indexes of phenolic compounds in EETg were 48.65 and 69.28% in the presence and absence of enzymes, respectively. Among the identified phenolics classes, flavonoids, represented by galloylated procyanidins type B, proved to be more bioaccessible, 81.48 and 96.29% in the post-intestinal phase with and without enzymes, respectively. The oral administration in Wistar rats resulted in a significant decrease in plasma of the total antioxidant capacity, TAC, by FRAP assay 4h after beginning the experiment. For urine samples, an increase in TAC by DPPH and FRAP was observed from 1 and 4h after administration, respectively. UPLC-QTOF analysis of urine detected 2 metabolites originated from the degradation of phenolic compounds, i.e. hippuric acid and phenylacetil glycine. These results suggest that phenolic compounds in T. gardneriana are unstable under gastrointestinal conditions, being flavonoids the components with higher bioaccessibility; besides that, they showed limited bioavailability due to their rapid biotransformation and urinary elimination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Polyhydroxybutyrate and phenolic compounds microalgae electrospun nanofibers: A novel nanomaterial with antibacterial activity.

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    Kuntzler, Suelen Goettems; Almeida, Ana Claudia Araujo de; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; Morais, Michele Greque de

    2018-03-02

    Polymer nanofibers produced by electrospinning are promising for use in food packaging because of their nanometric diameter, which provides a barrier to external conditions above the possible incorporation of the active compounds. The microalga Spirulina sp. LEB 18 synthesizes bioproducts, such as polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), which is biodegradable and has similar mechanical and thermal properties to polymers of petrochemical origin. Moreover, phenolic compounds of microalgae have antibacterial, antifungal, and antioxidant activities, which is a differential for the development of packaging. The objective of the study was to develop a nanomaterial with antibacterial action from bioproducts of microalgal origin. PHB nanofibers containing phenolic compounds presented average diameter of 810±85nm exhibited hydrophobicity, which gave protection to the food relative to the moisture outside the package. These nanofibers showed inhibition of the growth of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 with a zone of 7.5±0.4mm. Thermal and mechanical properties have confirmed the potential applicability of this material as food packaging. This new nanomaterial combines a packaging function to protect products and to be biodegradable with the antibacterial activity that prevents the proliferation of microorganisms and ensures the quality and preservation of food. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Identification of Phenolic Compounds from Hancornia speciosa (Apocynaceae) Leaves by UHPLC Orbitrap-HRMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Katherine Xavier; Dias, Clarice Noleto; Nascimento, Yuri Mangueira; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; Langassner, Silvana Maria Zucolotto; Wessjohann, Ludger A; Tavares, Josean Fechine

    2017-01-15

    Apocynaceae is a botanical family distributed mainly in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. In Brazil, they comprise about 90 genera and 850 species, inhabiting various types of vegetation. Within this large botanical family, the genus Hancornia is considered monotypic, with its only species Hancornia speciosa Gomes. Antihypertensive, antidiabetic, and antiviral activities are described for this species. Despite having been the target of some studies, knowledge of its chemical composition is still limited. In this study, the phenolics of H. speciosa leaves were analyzed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled to Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). As a result, 14 compounds were identified viz. protocatechuic acid, catechin, and quercetin, and another 14 were putatively identified viz. B- and C-type procyanidins, while just one compound remained unknown. From the identified compounds, 17 are reported for the first time viz. coumaroylquinic acid isomers and eriodyctiol. The results show that Hancornia speciosa can serve as source of valuable phenolics.

  5. Effects of lactone, ketone, and phenolic compounds on methane production and metabolic intermediates during anaerobic digestion.

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    Wikandari, Rachma; Sari, Noor Kartika; A'yun, Qurrotul; Millati, Ria; Cahyanto, Muhammad Nur; Niklasson, Claes; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2015-02-01

    Fruit waste is a potential feedstock for biogas production. However, the presence of fruit flavors that have antimicrobial activity is a challenge for biogas production. Lactones, ketones, and phenolic compounds are among the several groups of fruit flavors that are present in many fruits. This work aimed to investigate the effects of two lactones, i.e., γ-hexalactone and γ-decalactone; two ketones, i.e., furaneol and mesifurane; and two phenolic compounds, i.e., quercetin and epicatechin on anaerobic digestion with a focus on methane production, biogas composition, and metabolic intermediates. Anaerobic digestion was performed in a batch glass digester incubated at 55 °C for 30 days. The flavor compounds were added at concentrations of 0.05, 0.5, and 5 g/L. The results show that the addition of γ-decalactone, quercetin, and epicathechin in the range of 0.5-5 g/L reduced the methane production by 50 % (MIC50). Methane content was reduced by 90 % with the addition of 5 g/L of γ-decalactone, quercetin, and epicathechin. Accumulation of acetic acid, together with an increase in carbon dioxide production, was observed. On the contrary, γ-hexalactone, furaneol, and mesifurane increased the methane production by 83-132 % at a concentration of 5 g/L.

  6. EXTRACTION OF PHENOLIC COMPOUNDS FROM PETAI LEAVES (PARKIA SPECIOSA HASSK. USING MICROWAVE AND ULTRASOUND ASSISTED METHODS

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    Buanasari Buanasari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant has an activity to neutralize free radical compound that the body needs to avoid damage cells and tissues. Phenolic is one of the compounds that have an antioxidant activity. The influences of ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE and microwave-assisted extraction (MAE conditions on phenolic compounds of Parkia speciosa Hassk. leaves were investigated. The effects of temperature (40°C, 50°C, 60°C and 70°C, time (10, 30 and 50 minutes and material-solvent ratio (1:10, 1:13, 1:15 were evaluated based on the yield, total phenolic content (TPC and antioxidant activity. The result showed that the highest yield (15.82% was obtained at 1:15 (w/w of material-solvent ratio, 50°C of temperature and 50 minutes of extraction time for MAE. The highest yield of UAE is 15.53% that sample was obtained at 1:13 (w/w of material-solvent ratio, 60°C of optimal temperature and 30 minutes extraction time. The highest IC50 of UAE method extract was 52.55 ppm, while the extract obtained using MAE method was 50.44 ppm. UAE is more stable at higher temperatures. Time and solvent which was used more efficient than MAE. Extract of petai leaves (Parkia speciosa Hassk. were very potential to be used as a source of natural antioxidants because they have IC50 values from 41.39 to 66.00 ppm. Its antioxidants capacity is ranged from strong to very strong capacity.

  7. HPLC-ED Analysis of Phenolic Compounds in Three Bosnian Crataegus Species

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    Dušan Čulum

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the qualitative and quantitative determination of selected phenolic compounds in three Crataegus species grown in Bosnia. Crataegus plants are consumed for medicinal purposes and as foodstuff in the form of canned fruit, jam, jelly, tea, and wine. Two samples of plant material, dry leaves with flowers, and berries of three Crataegus species—Crataegus rhipidophylla Gand., Crataegus x subsphaericea Gand., and Crataegus x macrocarpa Hegetschw.—were analyzed. Twelve ethanolic extracts were isolated from the selected plant material using Soxhlet and ultrasound extraction, respectively. Soxhlet extraction proved to be more effective than ultrasound extraction. A simple and sensitive method, high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, HPLC-ED, was used for the simultaneous determination of phenolic acids and flavonoids in Crataegus species. The content of gallic acid in the extracts ranged from 0.001 to 0.082 mg/g dry weight (DW, chlorogenic acid from 0.19 to 8.70 mg/g DW, and rutin from 0.03 to 13.49 mg/g DW. Two flavonoids, vitexin and hyperoside, commonly found in chemotaxonomic investigations of Crataegus species, were not detected in the examined extracts. In general, leaves with flowers samples are richer in gallic acid and rutin, whereas the berries samples are richer in chlorogenic acid. Distinct similarities were found in the relative distribution of gallic acid among the three species. Extracts of C. x macrocarpa had the highest content of all detected compounds, while significant differences were found in rutin content, depending on the plant organ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting content of phenolic compounds in Crataegus rhipidophylla Gand., Crataegus x subsphaericea, and Crataegus x macrocarpa from Bosnia.

  8. [Phenolic compounds in leaves insertions of Mentha × villosa Huds. cv. Snežná].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekeľová, Daniela; Bittner Fialová, Silvia; Tóth, Jaroslav; Czigle, Szilvia

    Lamiaceae plants mostly accumulate active ingredients in their leaves. The subfamily Nepetoideae, including the genus Mentha L., is characterized by the presence of essential oil and antioxidant phenolics, chiefly hydroxycinnamic acids with predominance of rosmarinic acid, and flavonoids. Mentha × piperita and M. spicata are the most broadly used mints in both medicine and industry, while M. x villosa is less known in our country. Herbal drugs in the form of leaves are usually analysed unpartitioned, while single leaves insertions have only been studied occasionally. Therefore, the aim of this work was the quantification of the active compounds content in the leaves pairs of Mentha × villosa Huds. cv. Snežná, using pharmacopoeial methods: total hydroxycinnamic derivatives expressed as rosmarinic acid (THD) and luteolin-type flavonoids. THD content ranged from 6.7% to 9.4% in the leaves pairs water extracts, and from 6.6% to 14.0% in methanol extracts. Flavonoids contents, expressed as luteolin-7-O-glucoside, ranged from 4.0% to 8.8% in water extracts, and from 4.0% to 10.5% in methanol extracts. Antioxidant activity (DPPH) expressed as SC50 ranged from 10.2 to 16.9 μg.ml-1 (drug dry weight) in water extracts, and from 10.7 to 21.6 μg.ml-1 in methanol extracts. The highest content of phenolic compounds as well as the highest antioxidant activity were found to be in the top sheet, while the lowest content of phenolic compounds and lowest antioxidant activity were detected in the leaves of the middle stem part.Key words: Mentha × villosa Huds cv. Snežná hydroxycinnamic derivatives rosmarinic acid luteolin-7-O-glucoside DPPH.

  9. The role of gamma irradiation on the extraction of phenolic compounds in onion (Allium cepa L.)

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    Yang, Eun In; Lee, Eun Mi; Kim, Young Soo; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2012-08-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on the content of total phenolic compounds, especially quercetin (Q), in onion (Allium cepa L.) skin was investigated. Onion skin extracts contained two predominant flavonoid compounds, Q and quercetin-4'-glucoside (Q4'G). After 10 kGy gamma irradiation, the yield of Q in the extracts increased significantly from 36.8 to 153.9 μg/ml of the extract, and the Q4'G content decreased slightly from 165.0 to 134.1 μg/ml. In addition, the total phenolic compound content also increased after irradiation at 10 kGy, from 228.0 μg/g of fresh weight to 346.6 μg/g; negligible changes (237.1-256.7 μg/g) occurred at doses of up to 5 kGy. As we expected, radical-scavenging activity was enhanced remarkably (by 88.8%) in the 10 kGy irradiated sample. A dose-dependent increase in the peak intensity of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra was observed in all irradiated samples, with a maximum increase at 10 kGy. The intensity relative to that of the control was 0.15, and it increased to 1.10 in 10 kGy irradiated samples. The optimum gamma irradiation dose, which is sufficient to break the chemical or physical bonds and release soluble phenols of low molecular weight in onion skin, is about 10 kGy.

  10. Phenolic Compounds from Halimodendron halodendron (Pall. Voss and Their Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities

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    Jihua Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Halimodendron halodendron has been used as forage in northwestern China for a long time. Its young leaves and flowers are edible and favored by indigenous people. In this study, eleven phenolic compounds were bioassay-guided and isolated from the aerial parts of H. halodendron for the first time. They were identified by means of physicochemical and spectrometric analysis as quercetin (1, 3,5,7,8,4'-pentahydroxy-3'-methoxy flavone (2, 3-O-methylquercetin (3, 3,3'-di-O-methylquercetin (4, 3,3'-di-O-methylquercetin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5, isorhamentin-3-O-β-D-rutinoside (6, 8-O-methylretusin (7, 8-O-methylretusin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (8, salicylic acid (9, p-hydroxybenzoic acid (ferulic acid (10, and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy cinnamic acid (11. They were sorted as flavonols (1–6, soflavones (7 and 8, and phenolic acids (9–11. Among the compounds, flanools 1–4 revealed a strong antibacterial activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values of 50–150 μg/mL, and median inhibitory concentration (IC50 values of 26.8–125.1 μg/mL. The two isoflavones (7 and 8 showed moderate inhibitory activity on the test bacteria. Three phenolic acids (9, 10 and 11 showed strong antibacterial activity with IC50 values of 28.1–149.7 μg/mL. Antifungal activities of the compounds were similar to their antibacterial activities. All these phenolic compounds showed significant antimicrobial activity with a broad spectrum as well as antioxidant activity based on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging and β-carotene-linoleic acid bleaching assays. In general, the flavonol aglycones with relatively low polarity exhibited stronger activities than the glycosides. The results suggest the potential of this plant as a source of functional food ingredients and provide support data for its utilization as forage as well.

  11. Effects of phenolic compounds in propolis on digestive and ruminal parameters in dairy cows

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    Sílvia Cristina de Aguiar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Four rumen-cannulated primiparous lactating cows were studied in a 4 × 4 Latin square design experiment to evaluate the effects of propolis-based products (PBP with different concentrations of propolis and alcohol levels on total digestibility, (TD, ruminal digestibility (RD, intestinal digestibility (ID, pH, ruminal ammonia-nitrogen production (NH3-N, rumen microbial synthesis, and blood parameters. The feed consisted of 591.9 g/kg corn silage and 408.1 g/kg concentrate (dry matter [DM] basis, and treatments differed with regard to the inclusion (via ruminal cannula or exclusion of PBP as follows: control (without the PBP, PBP B1 (3.81 mg of phenolic compounds/kg of ingested DM, PBP C1 (3.27 mg of phenolic compounds/kg of ingested DM, and PBP C3 (1.93 mg of phenolic compounds/kg of ingested DM. Inclusion of PBP reduced the RD of dietary crude protein (CP. Treatment PBP C1 reduced ruminal NH3-N production, while PBP B1 increased the ID of CP relative to that in the control. These findings indicate that propolis had a positive effect on rumen nitrogen metabolism. Rumen pH, efficiency of microbial protein synthesis, and blood parameters were not affected by addition of PBP, but there were significant effects on the other parameters when the treatments containing propolis were contrasted. Higher TD of DM (0.717 vs. 0.685, OM (0.737 vs. 0.703, and CP (0.760 vs. 0.739, as well as higher NDF (0.622 vs. 0.558 and TDN (0.747 vs. 0.712 were observed when comparing PBP C1 with C3. Inclusion of propolis in diets for dairy cows have positive effects on protein metabolism in the rumen. Variation in the amounts of phenolic compounds in the different PBP may explain the diverse effects on the digestive parameters evaluated.

  12. Electrochemical detoxification of phenolic compounds in lignocellulosic hydrolysate for Clostridium fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Min; Min, Kyoungseon; Choi, Okkyoung; Kim, Ki-Yeon; Woo, Han Min; Kim, Yunje; Han, Sung Ok; Um, Youngsoon

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is being preferred as a feedstock in the biorefinery, but lignocellulosic hydrolysate usually contains inhibitors against microbial fermentation. Among these inhibitors, phenolics are highly toxic to butyric acid-producing and butanol-producing Clostridium even at a low concentration. Herein, we developed an electrochemical polymerization method to detoxify phenolic compounds in lignocellulosic hydrolysate for efficient Clostridium fermentation. After the electrochemical detoxification for 10h, 78%, 77%, 82%, and 94% of p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, vanillin, and syringaldehyde were removed, respectively. Furthermore, 71% of total phenolics in rice straw hydrolysate were removed without any sugar-loss. Whereas the cell growth and metabolite production of Clostridium tyrobutyricum and Clostridium beijerinckii were completely inhibited in un-detoxified hydrolysate, those in detoxifying rice straw hydrolysate were recovered to 70-100% of the control cultures. The electrochemical detoxification method described herein provides an efficient strategy for producing butanol and butyric acid through Clostridium fermentation with lignocellulosic hydrolysate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Optimization of Phenolic Compounds Extraction from Flax Shives and Their Effect on Human Fibroblasts

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    Magdalena Czemplik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to evaluate the most effective technique for extraction of phenolics present in flax shives and to assess their effect on human fibroblasts. Flax shives are by-products of fibre separation, but they were found to be a rich source of phenolic compounds and thus might have application potential. It was found that the optimal procedure for extraction of phenolics was hydrolysis enhanced by the ultrasound with NaOH for 24 h at 65°C and subsequent extraction with ethyl acetate. The influence of the flax shives extract on fibroblast growth and viability was assessed using the MTT and SRB tests. Moreover, the influence of flax shives extract on the extracellular matrix remodelling process was verified. The 20% increase of the viability was observed upon flax shives extract treatment and the decrease of mRNA collagen genes, an increase of matrix metalloproteinase gene expression, and reduction in levels of interleukin 6, interleukin 10, and suppressor of cytokinin signaling 1 mRNA were observed. Alterations in MCP-1 mRNA levels were dependent on flax shives extract concentration. Thus, we suggested the possible application of flax shives extract in the wound healing process.

  14. Phenolic compounds in mono-cultivar extra virgin olive oils from Algeria

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    Douzane, M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The high oxidative stability of virgin olive oil is related to its high monounsaturated/polyunsaturated ratio and to the presence of antioxidant compounds, such as tocopherols and phenols. In this paper, the isolation of phenolic compounds from virgin olive oil from several Algerian varieties was tested and discussed in order to know its potential uses and benefits. Quantification of phenolic and o-diphenolic substances was performed using the traditional Folin-Ciocalteau method and the sodium molybdate reaction, respectively. The qualitative and quantitative characterizations of phenolic compounds were carried out by HPLC. The experimental results show that tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol and 4-HBA (4-hydroxybenzoic acid are the main individual phenolic compounds identified in the varieties studied. The varieties with large fruits (Grosse du Hamma, Aghenfas, Azeradj, Aguenaou, Aberkane, Bouchouk de Guergour, X-Aghenfas, Rougette de Guelma, Sigoise are clearly distinguished from the varieties with medium-sized and small fruits by having the highest levels of individual phenolic compounds. Moreover, varieties with small fruits (Hamra, Chemlal, Boughenfas, Limli, Aimel and Mekki presented the highest levels of oleuropein.La alta estabilidad oxidativa de los aceites de oliva vírgenes está relacionada con su alta relación de ácidos grasos monoinsaturados/poliinsaturados y con la presencia de componentes antioxidantes, como tocoferoles y polifenoles. En este trabajo se llevó acabo un aislamiento y cuantificación de compuestos fenólicos de aceites de oliva virgenes de variedades argelinas, con el fin de conocer sus potenciales usos y beneficios. La cuantificación de los componentes fenólicos y o-difenólicos se realizó por método tradicional de Folin-Ciocalteu y mediante la reacción con molibdato de sodio, respectivamente. Los compuestos fenólicos individuales cualitativos y cuantitativos en los extractos y en una mezcla estándar fueron

  15. Metabolic and Microbial Modulation of the Large Intestine Ecosystem by Non-Absorbed Diet Phenolic Compounds: A Review

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    Juana I. Mosele

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds represent a diverse group of phytochemicals whose intake is associated with a wide spectrum of health benefits. As consequence of their low bioavailability, most of them reach the large intestine where, mediated by the action of local microbiota, a series of related microbial metabolites are accumulated. In the present review, gut microbial transformations of non-absorbed phenolic compounds are summarized. Several studies have reached a general consensus that unbalanced diets are associated with undesirable changes in gut metabolism that could be detrimental to intestinal health. In terms of explaining the possible effects of non-absorbed phenolic compounds, we have also gathered information regarded their influence on the local metabolism. For this purpose, a number of issues are discussed. Firstly, we consider the possible implications of phenolic compounds in the metabolism of colonic products, such as short chain fatty acids (SCFA, sterols (cholesterol and bile acids, and microbial products of non-absorbed proteins. Due to their being recognized as affective antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents, the ability of phenolic compounds to counteract or suppress pro-oxidant and/or pro-inflammatory responses, triggered by bowel diseases, is also presented. The modulation of gut microbiota through dietetic maneuvers including phenolic compounds is also commented on. Although the available data seems to assume positive effects in terms of gut health protection, it is still insufficient for solid conclusions to be extracted, basically due to the lack of human trials to confirm the results obtained by the in vitro and animal studies. We consider that more emphasis should be focused on the study of phenolic compounds, particularly in their microbial metabolites, and their power to influence different aspects of gut health.

  16. Study on the presence and influence of phenolic compounds in callogenesis and somatic embryo development of cocoa (Theobroma cacao L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulistyani Pancaningtyas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cocoa (Theobroma cacao L. like most tropical trees is recalcitrant in tissue culture. Somatic embryogenesis is generally efficient micropropagation technique to multiply elite material. However, Somatic embryogenesis in cocoa is difficult and this species is considered as recalcitrant. One of the factors often considered as a component of in vitro recalsitrance is a high phenolic content and oxidation of these compounds. In cocoa tissue culture accumulate large amounts of poliphenolics compounds which probably impair further development. This study was conducted to investigate the composition of phenolic compounds in cocoa flower and leaves, and their changes troughout the somatic embryogenesis process. Calli were induced in cacao floral and leaves explants on a half-strenght Murashige and Skoog medium containing 30 g/L Glucose and combination of 2,4 dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4 D with kinetin (kin. Total polyphenol content was observed on Sulawesi 1 cocoa clone. Embryogenic and non-embryogenic callus were also compared. The percentage of callus production from flower tissue is 85%, percentage of embryogenic callus 40 %, although the percentage of somatic embryo production from embryogenic callus callus is 70%. The conservation of callus into somatic embryos followed by decline in phenol content and an increase in peroxidase. The synthesis kinetics for these compounds in calli, under different somatic embryogenesis conditions, revealed a higher concentration under non-embryogenic conditions. So that, phenolic compound can influence the production of calli and an absence the phenolic compound can enhance production of somatic embryo.

  17. Influence of phenolic compounds on the growth and arginine deiminase system in a wine lactic acid bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María R. Alberto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of seven phenolic compounds, normally present in wine, on the growth and arginine deiminase system (ADI of Lactobacillus hilgardii X1B, a wine lactic acid bacterium, was established. This system provides energy for bacterial growth and produces citrulline that reacts with ethanol forming the carcinogen ethyl carbamate (EC, found in some wines. The influence of phenolic compounds on bacterial growth was compound dependent. Growth and final pH values increased in presence of arginine. Arginine consumption decreased in presence of protocatechuic and gallic acids (31 and 17%, respectively and increased in presence of quercetin, rutin, catechin and the caffeic and vanillic phenolic acids (between 10 and 13%, respectively. ADI enzyme activities varied in presence of phenolic compounds. Rutin, quercetin and caffeic and vanillic acids stimulated the enzyme arginine deiminase about 37-40%. Amounts of 200 mg/L gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme between 53 and 100%, respectively. Ornithine transcarbamylase activity was not modified at all concentrations of phenolic compounds. As gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme that produces citrulline, precursor of EC, these results are important considering the formation of toxic compounds.

  18. Phenolic Compounds in Different Beer Brands: A Qualitative Comparison of Differente Brands and their Relationship with Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Cardoso Maciel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, we have observed a great interest in food that, besides nutrition, provides functional activities in relation to the prevention of some physiological disorders.The presence of phenolic compounds in some kinds of food makes them able to prevent some diseases, such as cancer, arteriosclerosis, heart diseases, inflammations, as well as other benefits, because they behave like antioxidant agents in the organism. Considering that beer is one of the most consumed drinks by Brazilian people and it also has as part of its composition some compounds like the phenolic ones, our research aimed at performing a qualitative and comparative analysis using the phenolic compounds in five different brands of "Pilsen" beer that are more consumed by the population, in relation to their effects to health. To identify the compounds, two methods were used, chromogenic reactions and thin layer chromatography, methods that were efficient for this research. Compounds from the group of flavonoids, flavanones, catechins and tannins, beside some phenolic acids, such as the caffeic, the para-coumarica and ferulic ones were found in beer. Such substances provide beer with an antioxidant power that presents benefits for the health of those who drink it, no matter the brand, because they showed the same pattern of phenolic compounds, having, this way, mainly an antiatherosclerotic, anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic, antithrombotic action, among others.

  19. Phenolic compounds from Bursera simaruba Sarg. bark: phytochemical investigation and quantitative analysis by tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldini, Mariateresa; Montoro, Paola; Piacente, Sonia; Pizza, Cosimo

    2009-03-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the methanolic extract of Bursera simaruba bark led to the isolation of 11 compounds, including lignans yatein, beta-peltatin-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, hinokinin and bursehernin, and three natural compounds namely 3,4-dimetoxyphenyl-1-O-beta-D-(6-sulpho)-glucopyranoside, 3,4,5-trimetoxyphenyl 1-O-beta-D-(6-sulpho)-glucopyranoside and 3,4-diidroxyphenylethanol-1-O-beta-D-(6-sulpho)-glucopyranoside. Their structures were established by NMR and ESI/MS experiments. Additionally, an LC-ESI/MS qualitative study on the phenolic compounds and an LC-ESI/MS/MS quantitative study on the lignans found in the methanolic extract of B. simaruba bark were performed to give value to the plant as source of these biological active compounds. Quantitative analyses results confirmed that compounds yatein, beta-peltatin-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, hinokinin and bursehernin are major compounds in the bark and, in particular, beta-peltatin-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside appears to be the most abundant.

  20. A new parameter to simultaneously assess antioxidant activity for multiple phenolic compounds present in food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Xue, Xuejia; Li, Huan; Tay-Chan, Su Chin; Ong, Seng Poon; Tian, Edmund Feng

    2017-08-15

    In this work, we established a new methodology to simultaneously assess the relative reaction rates of multiple antioxidant compounds in one experimental set-up. This new methodology hypothesizes that the competition among antioxidant compounds towards limiting amount of free radical (in this article, DPPH) would reflect their relative reaction rates. In contrast with the conventional detection of DPPH decrease at 515nm on a spectrophotometer, depletion of antioxidant compounds treated by a series of DPPH concentrations was monitored instead using liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight (LC-QTOF). A new parameter, namely relative antioxidant activity (RAA), has been proposed to rank these antioxidants according to their reaction rate constants. We have investigated the applicability of RAA using pre-mixed standard phenolic compounds, and also extended this application to two food products, i.e. red wine and green tea. It has been found that RAA correlates well with the reported k values. This new parameter, RAA, provides a new perspective in evaluating antioxidant compounds present in food and herbal matrices. It not only realistically reflects the antioxidant activity of compounds when co-existing with competitive constituents; and it could also quicken up the discovery process in the search for potent yet rare antioxidants from many herbs of food/medicinal origins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Antiradical activity and amount of phenolic compounds in extracts obtained from some plant raw materials containing methylxanthine alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sroka Zbigniew

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Raw materials containing methylxanthine alkaloids such as yerba mate, guaraná, white and green tea, coffee seeds, chocolate and cacao seed powder and extracts obtained from these raw materials were investigated for their antioxidant features and the amount of phenolic compounds. The level of phenolic compounds was measured with the colorimetric method using Folin-Ciocalteu’s phenol reagent and antioxidant features was determined with the use of DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical. Amounts of phenolic compounds were presented in percentages per mass of extracts and mass of raw materials. Antiradical potential was shown as the number of TAUDPPH units per mg of extracts and g of raw materials. The highest number of antiradical units TAUDPPH as well as the amount of phenolic compounds was calculated for white tea and its extracts and lowest for chocolate. The correlation coefficient between the content of phenolics and antiradical features of raw materials is equal to r=0.994.

  2. Exploratory Characterization of Phenolic Compounds with Demonstrated Anti-Diabetic Activity in Guava Leaves at Different Oxidation States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-de-Cerio, Elixabet; Verardo, Vito; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Psidium guajava L. is widely used like food and in folk medicine all around the world. Many studies have demonstrated that guava leaves have anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic activities, among others, and that these activities belong mainly to phenolic compounds, although it is known that phenolic composition in guava tree varies throughout seasonal changes. Andalusia is one of the regions in Europe where guava is grown, thus, the aim of this work was to study the phenolic compounds present in Andalusian guava leaves at different oxidation states (low, medium, and high). The phenolic compounds in guava leaves were determined by HPLC-DAD-ESI-QTOF-MS. The results obtained by chromatographic analysis reported that guava leaves with low degree of oxidation had a higher content of flavonols, gallic, and ellagic derivatives compared to the other two guava leaf samples. Contrary, high oxidation state guava leaves reported the highest content of cyanidin-glucoside that was 2.6 and 15 times higher than guava leaves with medium and low oxidation state, respectively. The QTOF platform permitted the determination of several phenolic compounds with anti-diabetic properties and provided new information about guava leaf phenolic composition that could be useful for nutraceutical production. PMID:27187352

  3. Exploratory Characterization of Phenolic Compounds with Demonstrated Anti-Diabetic Activity in Guava Leaves at Different Oxidation States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-de-Cerio, Elixabet; Verardo, Vito; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2016-05-11

    Psidium guajava L. is widely used like food and in folk medicine all around the world. Many studies have demonstrated that guava leaves have anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic activities, among others, and that these activities belong mainly to phenolic compounds, although it is known that phenolic composition in guava tree varies throughout seasonal changes. Andalusia is one of the regions in Europe where guava is grown, thus, the aim of this work was to study the phenolic compounds present in Andalusian guava leaves at different oxidation states (low, medium, and high). The phenolic compounds in guava leaves were determined by HPLC-DAD-ESI-QTOF-MS. The results obtained by chromatographic analysis reported that guava leaves with low degree of oxidation had a higher content of flavonols, gallic, and ellagic derivatives compared to the other two guava leaf samples. Contrary, high oxidation state guava leaves reported the highest content of cyanidin-glucoside that was 2.6 and 15 times higher than guava leaves with medium and low oxidation state, respectively. The QTOF platform permitted the determination of several phenolic compounds with anti-diabetic properties and provided new information about guava leaf phenolic composition that could be useful for nutraceutical production.

  4. Exploratory Characterization of Phenolic Compounds with Demonstrated Anti-Diabetic Activity in Guava Leaves at Different Oxidation States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elixabet Díaz-de-Cerio

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Psidium guajava L. is widely used like food and in folk medicine all around the world. Many studies have demonstrated that guava leaves have anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic activities, among others, and that these activities belong mainly to phenolic compounds, although it is known that phenolic composition in guava tree varies throughout seasonal changes. Andalusia is one of the regions in Europe where guava is grown, thus, the aim of this work was to study the phenolic compounds present in Andalusian guava leaves at different oxidation states (low, medium, and high. The phenolic compounds in guava leaves were determined by HPLC-DAD-ESI-QTOF-MS. The results obtained by chromatographic analysis reported that guava leaves with low degree of oxidation had a higher content of flavonols, gallic, and ellagic derivatives compared to the other two guava leaf samples. Contrary, high oxidation state guava leaves reported the highest content of cyanidin-glucoside that was 2.6 and 15 times higher than guava leaves with medium and low oxidation state, respectively. The QTOF platform permitted the determination of several phenolic compounds with anti-diabetic properties and provided new information about guava leaf phenolic composition that could be useful for nutraceutical production.

  5. Antibacterial, Antiradical Potential and Phenolic Compounds of Thirty-One Polish Mushrooms.

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    Natalia Nowacka

    Full Text Available Among many sources of natural bioactive substances, mushrooms constitute a huge and almost unexplored group. Fungal compounds have been repeatedly reported to exert biological effects which have prompted their use in pharmaceutical and cosmetic industry. Therefore, the aim of this study was analysis of chemical composition and biological activity of 31 wild growing mushroom species (including saprophytic and parasitic from Poland.Qualitative and quantitative LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of fourteen phenolic acids in the mushrooms analysed was performed. Moreover, total phenolic content was determined by the modified Folin-Ciocalteau method. Antioxidative activity of ethanolic extracts towards DPPH• free radical was examined. Antibacterial activity against Gram-positive (S. epidermidis, S. aureus, B. subtilis, M. luteus and Gram-negative (E. coli, K. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa, P. mirabilis microbial strains was analyzed.As a result, the first such broad report on polyphenolic composition, antiradical and antimicrobial potential of wild growing Polish mushrooms was developed. Mushroom extracts were found to contain both benzoic (protocatechuic, 4-OH-benzoic, vanillic, syringic and cinnamic acid derivatives (caffeic, p-coumaric, ferulic. Total phenolic content in mushrooms ranged between 2.79 and 53.13 mg gallic acid equivalent /g of dried extract in Trichaptum fuscoviolaceum and Fomes fomentarius, respectively. Fungi showed much differentiated antiradical activity, from highly active F. fomentarius to poorly effective Russula fragilis (IC50 1.39 to 120.54 mg per mg DPPH•, respectively. A quite considerable relationship between phenolic content and antiradical activity has been demonstrated. Mushrooms varied widely in antimicrobial potential (MIC from 0.156 to 5 mg/ml. Generally, a slightly higher activity against Gram-positive than Gram-negative strains was observed. This is the first study concerning the chemical composition and biological activity

  6. A mechanistic kinetic model for phenol degradation by the Fenton process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Ricardo F F; Moraes, José E F; Machulek, Amilcar; Pinto, José M

    2010-04-15

    The objective of this paper is to develop and validate a mechanistic model for the degradation of phenol by the Fenton process. Experiments were performed in semi-batch operation, in which phenol, catechol and hydroquinone concentrations were measured. Using the methodology described in Pontes and Pinto [R.F.F. Pontes, J.M. Pinto, Analysis of integrated kinetic and flow models for anaerobic digesters, Chemical Engineering Journal 122 (1-2) (2006) 65-80], a stoichiometric model was first developed, with 53 reactions and 26 compounds, followed by the corresponding kinetic model. Sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the most influential kinetic parameters of the model that were estimated with the obtained experimental results. The adjusted model was used to analyze the impact of the initial concentration and flow rate of reactants on the efficiency of the Fenton process to degrade phenol. Moreover, the model was applied to evaluate the treatment cost of wastewater contaminated with phenol in order to meet environmental standards. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Phenolic Compounds from the Roots of Rhodiola crenulata and Their Antioxidant and Inducing IFN-γ Production Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Jiang-Tao; Li, Chen-Yang; Wang, Chun-Hua; Wang, Yue-Fei; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Hong-Tao; Zhu, Yan; Jiang, Miao-Miao; Gao, Xiu-Mei

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, two new phenolic compounds 1 and 11, a pair of lignan isomers 12 and 13 with their absolute configurations established for the first time, were isolated from the ethanol extract of the roots of Rhodiola crenulata, together with 13 known phenolic compounds, and their structures were elucidated via NMR, HRESIMS, UV, IR and CD analyses. All the isolated compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antioxidant activities using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2′-...

  8. RP-HPTLC densitometric determination and validation of vanillin and related phenolic compounds in accelerated solvent extract of Vanilla planifolia*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Upendra Kumar; Sharma, Nandini; Gupta, Ajai Prakash; Kumar, Vinod; Sinha, Arun Kumar

    2007-12-01

    A simple, fast and sensitive RP-HPTLC method is developed for simultaneous quantitative determination of vanillin and related phenolic compounds in ethanolic extracts of Vanilla planifolia pods. In addition to this, the applicability of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) as an alternative to microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and Soxhlet extraction was also explored for the rapid extraction of phenolic compounds in vanilla pods. Good separation was achieved on aluminium plates precoated with silica gel RP-18 F(254S) in the mobile phase of methanol/water/isopropanol/acetic acid (30:65:2:3, by volume). The method showed good linearity, high precision and good recovery of compounds of interest. ASE showed good extraction efficiency in less time as compared to other techniques for all the phenolic compounds. The present method would be useful for analytical research and for routine analysis of vanilla extracts for their quality control.

  9. Phenolic compounds and saponins in quinoa samples (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) grown under different saline and nonsaline irrigation regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Iafelice, Giovanna; Lavini, Antonella; Pulvento, Cataldo; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza; Marconi, Emanuele

    2012-05-09

    Quinoa is a pseudocereal from South America that has received increased interest around the world because it is a good source of different nutrients and rich in antioxidant compounds. Thus, this study has focused on the effects of different agronomic variables, such as irrigation and salinity, on the phenolic and saponin profiles of quinoa. It was observed that irrigation with 25% of full water restitution, with and without the addition of salt, was associated with increases in free phenolic compounds of 23.16 and 26.27%, respectively. In contrast, bound phenolic compounds were not affected by environmental stresses. Saponins decreased if samples were exposed to drought and saline regimens. In situations of severe water deficit, the saponins content decreased 45%, and 50% when a salt stress was added. The results suggest that irrigation and salinity may regulate the production of bioactive compounds in quinoa, influencing its nutritional and industrial values.

  10. Altered transport and metabolism of phenolic compounds in obesity and diabetes: implications for functional food development and assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interest in application of phenolic compounds from diet or supplements for prevention of chronic diseases has grown significantly, but efficacy of such approaches in humans is largely dependent on the bioavailability and metabolism of these compounds. While food and dietary factors have been the foc...

  11. Optimized methodology for the simultaneous extraction of glucosinolates, phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity from maca (Lepidium meyenii)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campos, D.; Chirinos, R.; Barreto, O.; Noratto, G.; Pedreschi Plasencia, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    Maca is a highly appreciated Andean crop with multiple attributed health claims due to its assortment of bioactive compounds. The extraction parameters of glucosinolates (GLs), total phenolic compounds (TPC) and antioxidant capacity (AC) of maca (Lepidium meyenii) hypocotyls were optimized using

  12. Effect of alcoholic fermentation in the content of phenolic compounds in cider processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Nogueira

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the effect of alcoholic fermentation on the content of phenol compounds of five cider apple varieties. The initial content in the apple juice samples, as determined by HPLC, varied from 188.4 to 2776.17 m mg.L-1. In three of them (DC, PJ, GU, the total phenol compounds remained unaffected by fermentation. However, in two (DM, KE, the final values were lower (55 and 313 mg.L-1. In these apple cider, the values of caffeic acid increased from 6.6 mg.L-1 to 41.8 mg.L-1. The catechin content increased during the process, approximately 13 mg.L-1 independent of the variety. The other phenols class did not present any modifications due to the alcoholic fermentation, maintaining the phenolic compounds of original clarified apple juice in the cider.O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar o efeito da fermentação alcoólica no teor de compostos fenólicos de cinco mostos de maçãs industriais. Os compostos fenólicos foram analisados por HPLC. Os mostos apresentaram fenóis totais entre 188,4 a 2776,17 mg.L-1. Os teores de fenóis durante a fermentação permaneceram os mesmos para as variedades DC, PJ e GU, entretanto, em DM e KE foi observada uma diminuição dos teores de fenóis (55 e 313 mg.L-1, respectivamente. Em KE o teor do ácido caféico aumentou de 6,6 mg.L-1 para 41,8 mg.L-1. O teor de catequinas aumentou cerca de 13 mg.L-1 durante o processo, independente da variedade. As outras classes de fenóis não apresentaram modificações com a fermentação alcoólica, permanecendo na sidra os compostos fenólicos do suco de maçã clarificado.

  13. Interactions between iron, phenolic compounds, emulsifiers, and pH in omega-3-enriched oil-in-water emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; Haahr, Anne-Mette; Becker, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    The behavior of antioxidants in emulsions is influenced by several factors such as pH and emulsifier type. This study aimed to evaluate the interaction between selected food emulsifiers, phenolic compounds, iron, and pH and their effect on the oxidative stability of n-3 polyunsaturated lipids...... products. When iron was present, the pH was crucial for the formation of lipid oxidation products. At pH 3 some phenolic compounds, especially caffeic acid, reduced Fe3+ to Fe2+, and Fe2+ increased lipid oxidation at this pH compared to pH 6. Among the evaluated phenols, caffeic acid had the most...... significant effects, as caffeic acid was found to be prooxidative irrespective of pH, emulsifier type, and presence of iron, although the degrees of lipid oxidation were different at the different experimental conditions. The other evaluated phenols were prooxidative at pH 3 in Citrem-stabilized emulsions...

  14. Influence of technological processes on phenolic compounds, organic acids, furanic derivatives, and antioxidant activity of whole-lemon powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Salas, Patricia; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Arráez-Román, David; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Guerra-Hernández, Eduardo; García-Villanova, Belén; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto

    2013-11-15

    The healthy properties of citrus fruits have been attributed to ascorbic acid and phenolic compounds, mainly to flavonoids. Flavonoids are important phytonutrients because they have a wide range of biological effects that provide health-related properties. In this context, this study seeks to characterise the phenolic compounds in lemon and their stability in different drying processes (freeze-drying and vacuum-drying) and storage conditions (-18 and 50°C for 1 and 3months). A powerful high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to DAD and electrospray-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-TOF-MS) method has been applied for the separation, identification, and quantification of 19 phenolic compounds and 4 organic acids. To our knowledge, two hydroxycinnamic acids have been identified for the first time in lemon. Folin-Ciocalteu was applied to determine total phenolic compounds and TEAC, FRAP, and ORAC were applied to determine the antioxidant capacity of lemon. Total phenolic content significantly differed in the samples analysed, vacuum-dried lemon showing the highest phenolic content, followed by freeze-dried lemon and, finally, vacuum-dried lemon stored at 50°C for 1 and 3months. The content in furanic compounds was determined to evaluate the heat damage in lemon and it was showed an increase with the thermal treatment because of the triggering of Maillard reaction. As exception of ORAC, antioxidant-capacity assays were not correlated to phenolic content by HPLC due to the formation of antioxidant compounds during Maillard reaction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of phenolic compounds and radical scavenging activity of Echinacea spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellati, Federica; Benvenuti, Stefania; Magro, Lara; Melegari, Michele; Soragni, Fabrizia

    2004-04-16

    The aim of this study was to set up and validate an RP-LC method with DAD-detection to quantify caffeic acid derivatives in various Echinacea spp. Samples were extracted with 80% methanol. The analyses were carried out on a Lichrospher RP-18 column (125 mm x 4 mm i.d., 5 microm), with a mobile phase gradient, which increases the acetonitrile level in a phosphoric acid solution (0.1%). The flow rate was 1.5 ml/min. Detection was set at 330 nm. This method allowed the identification and quantification of caftaric acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, cynarin, echinacoside and cichoric acid in Echinacea roots and derivatives. The total phenolic content was 10.49 mg/g for E. angustifolia, 17.83 mg/g for E. pallida and 23.23 mg/g for E. purpurea. Among Echinacea commercial herbal medicines, a certain variability in the concentrations of phenolic compounds was observed. The radical scavenging activity of Echinacea methanolic extracts was evaluated in vitro with a spectrophotometric method based on the reduction of an alcoholic 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH*) radical solution at 517 nm in the presence of a hydrogen donating antioxidant. As for pure compounds, echinacoside had the highest capacity to quench DPPH* radicals (EC50 = 6.6 microM), while caftaric acid had the lowest (EC50 = 20.5 microM). The average EC50 values for E. purpurea, E. pallida and E. angustifolia were 134, 167 and 231 microg/ml, respectively. The radical scavenging activity of Echinacea root extracts reflected their phenolic composition. The results indicate that Echinacea roots and derivatives are a good source of natural antioxidants and could be used to prevent free-radical-induced deleterious effects.

  16. Monitoring of phenolic compounds and surfactants in water of Ganga Canal, Haridwar (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Richa; Singh, Prashant; Mohan, Manindra; Singh, Rakesh; Aswal, Ravinder Singh

    2013-12-01

    The Ganga Canal emerging out from Ganga River has great ritual importance among pilgrims and tourists at Haridwar, Uttarakhand, India. The Canal is being polluted due to mass bathing, washing, disposal of sewage, industrial waste and these human activities are deteriorating its water quality. To determine the impact of these activities, Ganga Canal water quality at five sites between Haridwar and Roorkee namely Pantdweep, Har Ki Pauri, Singhdwar, Piran Kaliyar and Old Bridge, Roorkee has been analyzed for organic pollutants phenolic compounds and surfactants, which have rarely been assessed and reported so far. The results of analysis show that phenolic compounds are not present in water samples of selected five sites during bi-monthly monitoring from January 2012 to November 2012. The Har Ki Pauri, Singhdwar, Piran Kaliyar and Old Bridge, Roorkee sites have been detected with surfactant concentrations (1.18, 1.63, 3.2 and 2.5 mg/l) more than permissible limit (1.00 mg/l). Also at most of the sites, surfactants' concentration crossed the desirable limit of BIS during the period of analysis. This distribution of surfactants in water has potential risk for skin diseases and cancer and requires regular monitoring with appropriate measures.

  17. An Optimised Aqueous Extract of Phenolic Compounds from Bitter Melon with High Antioxidant Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sing Pei Tan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bitter melon (Momordica charantia L. is a tropical fruit claimed to have medicinal properties associated with its content of phenolic compounds (TPC. The aim of the study was to compare water with several organic solvents (acetone, butanol, methanol and 80% ethanol for its efficiency at extracting the TPC from freeze-dried bitter melon powder. The TPC of the extracts was measured using the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent and their antioxidant capacity (AC was evaluated using three assays. Before optimisation, the TPC and AC of the aqueous extract were 63% and 20% lower, respectively, than for the best organic solvent, 80% ethanol. However, after optimising for temperature (80 °C, time (5 min, water-to-powder ratio (40:1 mL/g, particle size (1 mm and the number of extractions of the same sample (1×, the TPC and the AC of the aqueous extract were equal or higher than for 80% ethanol. Furthermore, less solvent (40 mL water/g and less time (5 min were needed than was used for the 80% ethanol extract (100 mL/g for 1 h. Therefore, this study provides evidence to recommend the use of water as the solvent of choice for the extraction of the phenolic compounds and their associated antioxidant activities from bitter melon.

  18. Antioxidant and antimicrobial phenolic compounds from extracts of cultivated and wild-grown Tunisian Ruta chalepensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Ouerghemmi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant and antibacterial activities of phenolic compounds from cultivated and wild Tunisian Ruta chalepensis L. leaves, stems, and flowers were assessed. The leaves and the flowers exhibited high but similar total polyphenol, flavonoid, and tannin content. Moreover, two organs showed strong, although not significantly different, total antioxidant activity, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl scavenging ability, and reducing power. Investigation of the phenolic composition showed that vanillic acid and coumarin were the major compounds in the two organs, with higher percentages in the cultivated organs than in the spontaneous organs. Furthermore, R. chalepensis extracts showed marked antibacterial properties against human pathogen strains, and the activity was organ- and origin-dependent. Spontaneous stems had the strongest activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. From these results, it was concluded that domestication of Ruta did not significantly affect its chemical composition and consequently the possibility of using R. chalpensis organs as a potential source of natural antioxidants and as an antimicrobial agent in the food industry.

  19. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of phenolic compound extracted from new verbascum species growing in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saltan, F.Z.; Sokmen, M.; Akin, M.; Saracoglu, H.T.; Gokturk, R.S.; Ahmad, M.; Ali, M.; Shah, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial and antioxidant potential of the aerial parts of four new Verbascum L. (Scrophulariaceae) species namely, Verbascum bellum Hub.-Mor., Verbascum detersile Boiss. and Heldr., Verbascum myriocarpum Boiss. and Heldr. and Verbascum pestalozzae Boiss., growing in Turkey. Plant materials were extracted with chloroform, ethylacetate and methanol for antimicrobial tests. These extracts were assayed against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria by the microdilution method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of the Verbascum species varied between 150-0.59 mg/ml. In general, ethylacetate extract was effective for E. coli (ATCC 25922, 1.88 mg/ml). Ethyl acetate extract of V. pestalozzae exhibited the highest effect on P. aeroginosa (ATCC 29853, 0.59 mg/ml). The antioxidant capacity of the studied species was only tested with methanol extracts. Their antioxidant action was tested by DPPH and beta-carotene-linoleic acid methods. While V. pestalozzae (IC/sub 50/=15 mu g/ml) exhibited the strongest activity in DPPH assay, V. detersile and V. pestalozzae provided an excellent inhibition effect (100% RAA) in the beta-caroten- linoleic acid system. HPLC analysis of methanol extracts was also carried out to determine the composition of the phenolic compounds responsible for the activity. Methanol extracts were also subjected to HPLC analysis to determine their phenolic compound profile. (author)

  20. Effect of phenolic compounds extracted from sunflower seeds on native lipoxygenase activity

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    Kubicka, E.

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Extracts of lipoxygenase were obtained from sunflower seeds using 12 different extraction mixtures, and lipoxygenase activity and content of phenolic compounds in the extracts were determined. The content of phenolic compounds was determined as the ratio of optical densities at 320/280nm. Statistical analysis of the results for the extracts showed a significant correlation between the lipoxygenase activity and the OD320nm/OD280nm ratio with r = 0.619. However, after dialysis of the extracts, no correlation was found.

    Efecto de los compuestos fenólicos extraídos de semillas de girasol sobre la actividad lipoxigenasa nativa. Se obtuvieron extractos de lipoxigenasa de semillas de girasol usando 12 mezclas de extracción diferentes, y se determinó la actividad lipoxigenasa y el contenido en compuestos fenólicos. Este último se llevó a cabo mediante medida de la relación de absorbancias a 320/280nm. El análisis estadístico de los resultados para los extractos mostró una correlación entre la actividad lipoxigenasa y la relación OD320nm/OD280nm con r = 0,619. Sin embargo, después de la diálisis de los extractos, no se observó esta correlación.

  1. Effects of extrusion, infrared and microwave processing on Maillard reaction products and phenolic compounds in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilić, Slađana; Mogol, Burçe Ataç; Akıllıoğlu, Gül; Serpen, Arda; Delić, Nenad; Gökmen, Vural

    2014-01-15

    The Maillard reaction indicators furosine, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), acrylamide and color were determined to evaluate heat effects induced during extrusion, infrared and microwave heating of soybean. In addition, the present paper aimed to study changes in the phenolic compounds, as well as in the overall antioxidant properties of different soybean products in relation to heating at 45-140 °C during the processes. Soybean proteins were highly sensible to Maillard reaction and furosine was rapidly formed under slight heating conditions during extrusion and infrared heating. Microwave heating at lower temperatures for a longer time yielded lower acrylamide levels in the final soybean products, as a result of its partial degradation. However, during infrared heating, acrylamide formation greatly increased with decreasing moisture content. After a short time of extrusion and infrared heating at 140 °C and microwave heating at 135 °C for 5 min, concentrations of HMF increased to 11.34, 26.21 and 34.97 µg g(-1), respectively. The heating conditions caused formation of acrylamide, HMF and furosine in high concentration. The results indicate that the complex structure of soybeans provides protection of phenolic compounds from thermal degradation, and that Maillard reaction products improved the antioxidant properties of heat-treated soybean. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Characterisation of commercial aromatised vinegars: phenolic compounds, volatile composition and antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejudo-Bastante, María J; Durán-Guerrero, Enrique; Natera-Marín, Ramón; Castro-Mejías, Remedios; García-Barroso, Carmelo

    2013-04-01

    Nineteen commercially available aromatised vinegars, which were representative of this type of product, were tested to ascertain their phenolic and volatile composition and antioxidant activity. The aromatised vinegars came from different raw materials such as fruits, spices, herbs and vegetables. The antioxidant activity was determined by means of photochemiluminescence, phenolic profile by using ultra performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection, and the volatile composition was determined by using stir bar sorptive extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Nine polyphenolic compounds and 141 volatile compounds were identified. Vinegar aromatised with black truffle and rosemary obtained the highest values of antioxidant activity, followed by those aromatised with lemon, tarragon, aromatic herbs and vegetables. Antioxidant activity was highly correlated with the presence of trans-p-coutaric acid, trans-caftaric acid, 5-hydroxy-methylfurfural and furfural. Moreover, (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol was exclusive to the vinegar aromatised with tarragon, while p-menth-1,8-ol, dimethyl styrene, 4-methyl acetophenone and nootkatone were only found in vinegar aromatised with lemon. On the basis of the results from the cluster analysis of cases, it can be concluded that the grouping responds more to the trademark of each vinegar than to the raw material. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Composition of phenolic compounds and antioxidant attributes of Cyclea gracillima Diels extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jau-Tien Lin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclea gracillima Diels is a Taiwanese native medicinal herb. However, there are currently few relevant reports on its biochemical activity. In this study, the antioxidant attributes of the ethanol and hot water extracts of this herb were assayed using in vitro models, including the following: 2,2-diphenyl-1-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl-hydrazyl radical scavenging, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, reducing power, and chelating ferrous ions. The following biochemical models were also assayed: inhibition of human low density lipoprotein oxidation, inhibition of human erythrocyte hemolysis, and scavenging oxygen radicals in human blood. The composition and content of flavonoids and phenolic acids in these extracts were also analyzed. The results showed that these extracts with high polyphenol levels presented remarkable antioxidant effects in all assays, especially when extracted with ethanol. Six phenolic acids (mainly ferulic acid, sinapic acid, and syringic acid and 12 flavonoids (mainly narigenin, myricetin, naringin, and apigenin were found in these extracts.

  4. Effect of phenolic compounds and osmotic stress on the expression of penicillin biosynthetic genes from Penicillium chrysogenum var. halophenolicum strain

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    Sumaya Ferreira Guedes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenol and phenolic compounds are aromatic pollutants that inhibit biological treatment of wastewaters. Penicillium chrysogenum var. halophenolicum is a halotolerant fungus that previously showed the ability to degrade phenol and resorcinol in high salinity conditions. The presence of the penicillin biosynthetic cluster in P. chrysogenum var. halophenolicum was recently described. In this article, we examined the expression of pcbAB, pcbC and penDE, genes responsible for δ-(L-α-aminoadipyl-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase, isopenicillin N synthase and isopenicillin N acyltransferase activities, respectively, in P. chrysogenum var. halophenolicum. A quantitative PCR (qPCR approach was used to determine how these genes were expressed in media with 2% and 5.9% NaCl supplemented with phenol, catechol, hydroquinone and resorcinol as the sole carbon source. The effect of salt on the capability of P. chrysogenum var. halophenolicum to degrade aromatic compounds was measured using HPLC. qPCR analysis of RNA extracted from P. chrysogenum var. halophenolicum indicated that the expression levels of pcbAB, pcbC and penDE decreased in high saline concentrations compared to the levels expressed in media with glucose. High concentrations of salt significantly repress the expression of pcbAB and penDE. The pcbC gene was expressed differentially in catechol containing medium. There was no evident relationship between the expression levels of penicillin biosynthetic genes and yields of penicillin. Meanwhile, the presence of phenol and phenolic compounds seems to positively influence the antibiotic production; high concentrations of salt stimulated penicillin production. These results support the hypothesis that phenol, phenolic compounds and high concentrations of salt could act like a stress factor for P. chrysogenum var. halophenolicum resulting in higher yields of β-lactam antibiotic production.

  5. Enhanced accumulation of phytosterols and phenolic compounds in cyclodextrin-elicited cell suspension culture of Daucus carota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miras-Moreno, Begoña; Almagro, Lorena; Pedreño, M A; Sabater-Jara, Ana Belén

    2016-09-01

    In this work, suspension-cultured cells of Daucus carota were used to evaluate the effect of β-cyclodextrins on the production of isoprenoid and phenolic compounds. The results showed that the phytosterols and phenolic compounds were accumulated in the extracellular medium (15100μgL(-1) and 477.46μgL(-1), respectively) in the presence of cyclodextrins. Unlike the phytosterol and phenolic compound content, β-carotene (1138.03μgL(-1)), lutein (25949.54μgL(-1)) and α-tocopherol (8063.82μgL(-1)) chlorophyll a (1625.13μgL(-1)) and b (9.958 (9958.33μgL(-1)) were mainly accumulated inside the cells. Therefore, cyclodextrins were able to induce the cytosolic mevalonate pathway, increasing the biosynthesis of phytosterols and phenolic compounds, and accumulate them outside the cells. However, in the absence of these cyclic oligosaccharidic elicitors, carrot cells mainly accumulated carotenoids through the methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway. Therefore, the use of cyclodextrins would allow the extracellular accumulation of both phytosterols and phenolic compounds by diverting the carbon flux towards the cytosolic mevalonate/phenylpropanoid pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Phenolic compounds in strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) fruits: Composition in 27 cultivars and changes during ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaby, Kjersti; Mazur, Sebastian; Nes, Arnfinn; Skrede, Grete

    2012-05-01

    Phenolic compounds in fruits of 27 cultivars of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) grown in Norway were characterised and quantified by HPLC-DAD-MS(n). Total phenolic content, calculated as the sum of the individual compounds, varied 2.3-fold among cultivars, i.e., from 57 to 133mg/100g of fw. There were significant differences among cultivars in concentration of all phenolic compounds. The highest variation between cultivars was found for cinnamoyl glucose (0.6-24.9mg/100g of fw). Concentration of anthocyanins, the most abundant class of phenolic compounds in the majority of the cultivars, varied from 8.5 to 65.9mg/100g of fw. Flavan-3-ols (11-45mg/100g of fw) and ellagitannins (7.7-18.2mg/100g of fw) contributed on average 28% and 14% to total phenolic contents in the strawberry cultivars, respectively. In three cultivars harvested at three stages of ripeness, anthocyanins and cinnamic acid conjugates were the compounds most affected by ripening. The anthocyanin profile for the individual cultivars was only slightly affected by ripening and growing conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Phytochemical study of phenolic compounds of labrador tea (Lédum palústre L.

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    Валентина Петровна Гапоненко

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This work is devoted a phytochemical study of biologically active substances in herb of Labrador Tea (Lédum palústre L., as well as investigation of the possibility of complex use of raw materials in order to create on its basis new herbal medicines.Methods. The object of the study served as the herb Labrador Tea. Separation of isolated substances was performed by adsorption and partition chromatography on various adsorbents. The structure of the isolated compounds was determined based on physicochemical methods: paper (PC and the thin layer (TLC chromatography, UV, IR and NMR spectroscopy in comparison with the original valid standards of flavonoids. Acid hydrolys was used for the determination of the flavonoid aglycone composition. The content of total flavonoids was determined by differential spectrophotometry at a wavelength of 412 nm from the reaction with aluminum chloride based on the hyperoside-standard (Ukrainian scientific Pharmacopoeial center for quality of medicines (Pharmacopoeial center, Kharkоv.Results. During this study we found more than 40 of phenolic compounds and identified 31compounds. The phytochemical analysis showed the presence of flavonols (11 compounds, catechins (5. Hydroxycinnamic acids represented by caffeic, ferulic, chlorogenic acids. Besides that, it were found phenolic glycoside arbutin, coumarins - coumarin, umbelliferon, scopoletin, esculetin and esculin, tannins – metyl gallate, pyrogallol.Conclusions. The following biologically active substances were defined for the first time: flavonoids – 5-methyl-kaempferol, avicularin, polistahozid, quercitrin; coumarins – esculetin, esculin; as well as hydroxycinnamic acids – ferulic, chlorogenic, neochlorogenic of Labrador Tea. The obtained data justify the prospectivefor creation of new and effective herbal medicines from Labrador Tea

  8. Phenolic compounds in cherry ( Prunus avium ) heartwood with a view to their use in cooperage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Miriam; Cadahía, Estrella; Esteruelas, Enrique; Muñoz, Angel Ma; Fernández De Simón, Brígida; Hernández, Teresa; Estrella, Isabel

    2010-04-28

    The phenolic and tannic composition of heartwood extracts from Prunus avium , commonly known as cherry tree, before and after toasting in cooperage were studied using HPLC-DAD and HPLC-DAD/ESI-MS. Nonflavonoid (16 compounds) and flavonoid (27 compounds) polyphenols were identified, 12 of them in only a tentative way. The nonflavonoids found were lignin constituents, and their pattern is different compared to oak, since they include compounds such as protocatechuic acid and aldehyde, p-coumaric acid, methyl vanillate, methyl syringate, and benzoic acid, but not ellagic acid, and only a small quantity of gallic acid. In seasoned wood we found a great variety of flavonoid compounds which have not been found in oak wood for cooperage, mainly, in addition to the flavan-3-ols (+)-catechin, a B-type procyanidin dimer, and a B-type procyanidin trimer, the flavanones naringenin, isosakuranetin, and eriodictyol and the flavanonols aromadendrin and taxifolin. Seasoned and toasted cherry wood showed different ratios of flavonoid to nonflavonoid compounds, since toasting results in the degradation of flavonoids, and the formation of nonflavonoids from lignin degradation. On the other hand, the absence of hydrolyzable tannins in cherry wood, which are very important in oak wood, is another particular characteristic of this wood that should be taken into account when considering its use in cooperage.

  9. Mango-bagasse functional-confectionery: vehicle for enhancing bioaccessibility and permeability of phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Cazares, Luz Abril; Hernández-Navarro, Fátima; Ramírez-Jiménez, Aurea K; Campos-Vega, Rocío; Reyes-Vega, María de la Luz; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe; Morales-Sánchez, Eduardo; Wall-Medrano, Abraham; Gaytán-Martínez, Marcela

    2017-11-15

    Functional confectionery can be exploited as a vehicle for the protection of phenolic compounds (PCs) and for enhancing absorption during the gastrointestinal (GI) process. In this study, a confection containing 20% of mango bagasse (MB), gelatin and pectin was formulated. The PC profile, antioxidant capacity, in vitro bioaccessibility and apparent permeability (Papp) during mouth-stomach-intestine digestion (15, 30, 60, 120 min) and in vitro colonic fermentation (6, 12, 24 h) were evaluated for MB and the mango bagasse confection (MBC). HPLC-DAD analysis showed that mangiferin (830.69 μg g -1 ) was the most abundant compound in MBC. Total PCs (4.14 mg g -1 ), quercetin (244.83 μg g -1 ), and gallic acid (GA) (285.43 μg g -1 ) were highly bioaccessible mainly at the intestine at 60-120 min of digestion. GA was the most bioaccessible compound. Total flavonoids (TFs) and condensed tannins (CTs) had the maximum bioaccessibility in the mouth and stomach, respectively. For the permeability studies, PCs showed efflux rather than uptake in the intestine. Those compounds that exhibited intestinal absorption were mangiferin > GA > total PCs > TFs, whereas quercetin and CT absorption was negligible. The antioxidant capacity remained unchanged along the GI, mangiferin and quercetin being the most likely compounds to exert this activity. Overall results indicate that MBC has higher bioaccessibility, absorption and antioxidant capacity than MB, suggesting an effective protective role of gelatin and pectin, giving insight into the potential of MBC as a functional food.

  10. LC-PDA-ESI-MSn analysis of phenolic and iridoid compounds from Globularia spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friščić, Maja; Bucar, Franz; Hazler Pilepić, Kroata

    2016-12-01

    Plants produce a great number of metabolites with potentially useful biological activities. Species from the genus Globularia (Plantaginaceae) are known as sources of different phenolic and iridoid compounds. Globularia alypum L. is a medicinal plant used as a healing agent in many Mediterranean countries. Similarities in phytochemical composition are often observed for related species. For Globularia spp., such findings were mostly based on identification of several isolated compounds from distinct species. To our knowledge, this is the first study that enables simultaneous comparison of phytochemical profiles from several members of the genus Globularia. Liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry was used for the analysis of methanolic extracts of aerial parts obtained from four Globularia species (G. alypum, G. punctata, G. cordifolia and G. meridionalis). In total, 85 compounds were identified or tentatively identified based on comparison of their retention time, UV and MS n (up to MS 4 ) spectra to those of standard compounds and/or to literature data. Among these, high relative amounts of bioactive molecules such as globularin, globularifolin, asperuloside and verbascoside (acteoside) were found. Apart from providing new insights into the phytochemistry and chemotaxonomy of selected Globularia species, results of this study complement existing MS/MS spectral data and could enable easier mass spectrometric profiling of certain bioactive compounds such as iridoids and phenylethanoids in related plant species, genera and families. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. The phenolic compounds: a commercial argument in the economic war to come on the quality of olive oil?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servili Maurizio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The quality of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO is deeply related to the amount of its minor compounds, chiefly volatile and phenolic compounds, which confer the sensory note and the remarkable nutritional and biological properties of this traditional Mediterranean fruit juice. Several agronomic aspects and technological factors affect the qualitative and quantitative composition of these compounds in EVOO. The most abundant natural antioxidants of EVOO are tocopherols, carotenoids and hydrophilic phenols. The EVOO phenols represent a group of secondary plant metabolites not often present in other oils and fats. The class of the hydrophilic phenols includes phenolic alcohols and acids, flavonoids, lignans and secoiridoids. The latter group is exclusively found in the Oleacease family plants of which the olive is the only edible fruit and it is considered as the most important fraction from a biological point of view. In particular, the secoiridoids are the most relevant phenols associated to health and biological proprieties and, at the same time, they are responsible for the bitter and pungency sensory notes of EVOO. The new approach to the EVOO extraction technologies is oriented towards the improvement of the virgin olive oil healthy and sensory properties by optimizing the oil mechanical extraction process conditions.

  12. Phenolic compounds involved in grafting incompatibility of Vitis spp: development and validation of an analytical method for their quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canas, Sara; Assunção, Maria; Brazão, João; Zanol, Geni; Eiras-Dias, José Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Graft incompatibility of Vitis spp is an unresolved worldwide problem with important economic consequences. Grafting comprises a complex set of morphological and physiological alterations, in which the phenolic compounds seem to be strongly involved. Therefore, a detailed analysis and recognition of structural phenolic compounds diversity in the two partners of a Vitis graft is of great importance to evaluate their role as markers of graft establishment. To optimise a sample extraction method, and to develop and validate a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for the simultaneous determination of phenolic acids and flavonols in the graft union so as to understand their behaviour in the metabolism of the scion-rootstock system, using compatible and incompatible combinations of a Syrah cultivar and two rootstocks (R110 and SO4). Sixty extracts of Vitis grafting tissues were prepared and analysed by HPLC for the qualitative and quantitative determination of their phenolic profile. Among the phenolic compounds identified in the samples, one benzoic acid (gallic acid), three cinnamic acids (caffeic acid, ferulic acid and sinapic acid) and two flavonols (catechin and epicatechin) are potentially suitable as markers of graft incompatibility. The method developed presents good performance and lends itself readily for application in routine analysis of the phenolic composition of Vitis grafting tissues to distinguish compatible and incompatible combinations in the graft callusing stage. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Interactions between iron, phenolic compounds, emulsifiers, and pH in omega-3-enriched oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; Haahr, Anne-Mette; Becker, Eleonora Miquel; Skibsted, Leif H; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2008-03-12

    The behavior of antioxidants in emulsions is influenced by several factors such as pH and emulsifier type. This study aimed to evaluate the interaction between selected food emulsifiers, phenolic compounds, iron, and pH and their effect on the oxidative stability of n-3 polyunsaturated lipids in a 10% oil-in-water emulsion. The emulsifiers tested were Tween 80 and Citrem, and the phenolic compounds were naringenin, rutin, caffeic acid, and coumaric acid. Lipid oxidation was evaluated at all levels, that is, formation of radicals (ESR), hydroperoxides (PV), and secondary volatile oxidation products. When iron was present, the pH was crucial for the formation of lipid oxidation products. At pH 3 some phenolic compounds, especially caffeic acid, reduced Fe(3+) to Fe(2+), and Fe(2+) increased lipid oxidation at this pH compared to pH 6. Among the evaluated phenols, caffeic acid had the most significant effects, as caffeic acid was found to be prooxidative irrespective of pH, emulsifier type, and presence of iron, although the degrees of lipid oxidation were different at the different experimental conditions. The other evaluated phenols were prooxidative at pH 3 in Citrem-stabilized emulsions and had no significant effect at pH 6 in Citrem- or Tween-stabilized emulsions on the basis of the formation of volatiles. The results indicated that phenol-iron complexes/nanoparticles were formed at pH 6.

  14. [Pollution status of phenolic compounds in the soil and sediment from a chemical industrial park along the Yangtze River].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiexia; Wei, Enze; Xian, Qiming

    2014-08-01

    A determination method of 12 phenolic compounds in soil and sediment samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis coupled with accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) for clean-up was developed. The method detection limits (MDLs) varied from 0. 410 μg/kg to 13. 1 μg/kg (dry weight), and the average recoveries ranged from 70. 7% to 122% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 1. 2% to 16%. Based on this method, the levels of 12 phenolic compounds were investigated in 17 soil surrounding a chemical industrial park along the Yangtze River and seven sediment samples collected in the river. It was found that 11 of the 12 phenolic compounds were detected in all of the 24 samples, and only hydroquinone was below the MDL. The contents of the total 12 phenolic compounds were 10. 16-30. 66 mg/kg in the soil and 18. 00-29. 83 mg/kg in the sediment, with the average contents of 18. 26 and 22. 51 mg/kg respectively. It showed that 4-nitro- phenol, 4-chloro-3-methylphenol, 2-chlorohydroquinone, 2-methyl-4,6-dinitrophenol and 2,4,6- trichlorophenol were five major phenolic contaminants in the soil and sediment in this study. The pollution levels of the 12 phenolic compounds were low in the soil of the chemical industrial park as well as in the sediment of the Yangtze River, which implied a comparatively low risk for the environment.

  15. Differential Effects of Thidiazuron on Production of Anticancer Phenolic Compounds in Callus Cultures of Fagonia indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tariq; Abbasi, Bilal Haider; Khan, Mubarak Ali; Shinwari, Zabta Khan

    2016-04-01

    Fagonia indica, a very important anticancer plant, has been less explored for its in vitro potential. This is the first report on thidiazuron (TDZ)-mediated callogenesis and elicitation of commercially important phenolic compounds. Among the five different plant growth regulators tested, TDZ induced comparatively higher fresh biomass, 51.0 g/100 mL and 40.50 g/100 mL for stem and leaf explants, respectively, after 6 weeks of culture time. Maximum total phenolic content (202.8 μg gallic acid equivalent [GAE]/mL for stem-derived callus and 161.3 μg GAE/mL for leaf-derived callus) and total flavonoid content (191.03 μg quercetin equivalent [QE]/mL for stem-derived callus and 164.83 μg QE/mL for leaf-derived callus) were observed in the optimized callus cultures. The high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) data indicated higher amounts of commercially important anticancer secondary metabolites such as gallic acid (125.10 ± 5.01 μg/mL), myricetin (32.5 ± 2.05 μg/mL), caffeic acid (12.5 ± 0.52 μg/mL), catechin (9.4 ± 1.2 μg/mL), and apigenin (3.8 ± 0.45 μg/mL). Owing to the greater phenolic content, a better 2-2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity (69.45 % for stem explant and 63.68 % for leaf explant) was observed in optimized calluses. The unusually higher biomass and the enhanced amount of phenolic compounds as a result of lower amounts of TDZ highlight the importance of this multipotent hormone as elicitor in callus cultures of F. indica.

  16. Molecular modeling of inorganic compounds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Comba, Peter; Hambley, Trevor W; Martin, Bodo

    2009-01-01

    ... mechanics to inorganic and coordination compounds. Initially, simple metal complexes were modeled, but recently the field has been extended to include organometallic compounds, catalysis and the interaction of metal ions with biological macromolecules. The application of molecular mechanics to coordination compounds is complicated by the numbe...

  17. Reduced graphene oxide nanosheets decorated with Au-Pd bimetallic alloy nanoparticles towards efficient photocatalytic degradation of phenolic compounds in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabdhara, Gitashree; Boruah, Purna K.; Borthakur, Priyakshree; Hussain, Najrul; Das, Manash R.; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M.; Malgras, Victor; Wu, Kevin C.-W.; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-04-01

    Reduced graphene oxide nanosheets decorated with Au-Pd bimetallic alloy nanoparticles are successfully prepared via a chemical approach consisting of reducing the metal precursors using ascorbic acid as reductant at an elevated temperature. The prepared nanocomposite is employed as a photocatalyst for the degradation of organic contaminants such as phenol, 2-chlorophenol (2-CP), and 2-nitrophenol (2-NP). The complete degradation of phenol is achieved after 300 min under natural sunlight irradiation whereas the degradation of 2-CP and 2-NP is completed after 180 min. The activity of the photocatalyst is evaluated considering several parameters such as the initial phenol concentration, the photocatalyst loading, and the pH of the solution. The degradation kinetics of all the compounds is carefully studied and found to follow a linear Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. Furthermore, the reusability of the photocatalyst is successfully achieved up to five cycles and the catalyst exhibits an excellent stability.Reduced graphene oxide nanosheets decorated with Au-Pd bimetallic alloy nanoparticles are successfully prepared via a chemical approach consisting of reducing the metal precursors using ascorbic acid as reductant at an elevated temperature. The prepared nanocomposite is employed as a photocatalyst for the degradation of organic contaminants such as phenol, 2-chlorophenol (2-CP), and 2-nitrophenol (2-NP). The complete degradation of phenol is achieved after 300 min under natural sunlight irradiation whereas the degradation of 2-CP and 2-NP is completed after 180 min. The activity of the photocatalyst is evaluated considering several parameters such as the initial phenol concentration, the photocatalyst loading, and the pH of the solution. The degradation kinetics of all the compounds is carefully studied and found to follow a linear Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. Furthermore, the reusability of the photocatalyst is successfully achieved up to five cycles and the catalyst

  18. Phenolic Compounds and Antimicrobial Activity of Olive (Olea europaea L. Cv. Cobrançosa Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Pereira

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the determination of phenolic compounds in olive leaves by reversed-phase HPLC/DAD, and the evaluation of their in vitro activity against several microorganisms that may be causal agents of human intestinal and respiratory tract infections, namely Gram positive (Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, Gram negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae and fungi (Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Seven phenolic compounds were identified and quantified: caffeic acid, verbascoside, oleuropein, luteolin 7-O-glucoside, rutin, apigenin 7-O-glucoside and luteolin 4’-O-glucoside. At low concentrations olive leafs extracts showed an unusual combined antibacterial and antifungal action, which suggest their great potential as nutraceuticals, particulalry as a source of phenolic compounds.

  19. Reaction of bromine and chlorine with phenolic compounds and natural organic matter extracts--Electrophilic aromatic substitution and oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criquet, Justine; Rodriguez, Eva M; Allard, Sebastien; Wellauer, Sven; Salhi, Elisabeth; Joll, Cynthia A; von Gunten, Urs

    2015-11-15

    Phenolic compounds are known structural moieties of natural organic matter (NOM), and their reactivity is a key parameter for understanding the reactivity of NOM and the disinfection by-product formation during oxidative water treatment. In this study, species-specific and/or apparent second order rate constants and mechanisms for the reactions of bromine and chlorine have been determined for various phenolic compounds (phenol, resorcinol, catechol, hydroquinone, phloroglucinol, bisphenol A, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, gallic acid, hesperetin and tannic acid) and flavone. The reactivity of bromine with phenolic compounds is very high, with apparent second order rate constants at pH 7 in the range of 10(4) to 10(7) M(-1) s(-1). The highest value was recorded for the reaction between HOBr and the fully deprotonated resorcinol (k = 2.1 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)). The reactivity of phenolic compounds is enhanced by the activating character of the phenolic substituents, e.g. further hydroxyl groups. With the data set from this study, the ratio between the species-specific rate constants for the reactions of chlorine versus bromine with phenolic compounds was confirmed to be about 3000. Phenolic compounds react with bromine or chlorine either by oxidation (electron transfer, ET) or electrophilic aromatic substitution (EAS) processes. The dominant process mainly depends on the relative position of the hydroxyl substituents and the possibility of quinone formation. While phenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and bisphenol A undergo EAS, hydroquinone, catechol, gallic acid and tannic acid, with hydroxyl substituents in ortho or para positions, react with bromine by ET leading to quantitative formation of the corresponding quinones. Some compounds (e.g. phloroglucinol) show both partial oxidation and partial electrophilic aromatic substitution and the ratio observed for the pathways depends on the pH. For the reaction of six NOM extracts with bromine, electrophilic aromatic substitution

  20. Identification of phenolic compounds by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in seventeen species of wild mushrooms in Central Mexico and determination of their antioxidant activity and bioactive compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahia, Elhadi M; Gutiérrez-Orozco, Fabiola; Moreno-Pérez, Marco A

    2017-07-01

    Wild mushrooms are important for the diet of some communities in Mexico. However, limited information exists on their chemical composition, contribution to the diet, and health effects. We characterized seventeen wild mushroom species growing in the state of Queretaro in Central Mexico. Most species analyzed were edible, but also included nonedible, medicinal, poisonous and toxic specimens. Whole mushrooms (caps and stipes) were characterized for water content, color, and total content of phenolic compounds, flavonoids and anthocyanins. In vitro antioxidant capacity was measured by FRAP and DPPH assays. Phenolic compounds were identified and quantified by HPLC-mass spectrometry. All species analyzed were found to possess antioxidant activity in vitro and a wide range of phenolic and organic compounds were identified. Our results add to the limited information available on the composition and potential nutritional and health value of wild mushrooms. Further analyses of their bioactivities are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Antiproliferative activity of New Zealand propolis and phenolic compounds vs human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchpole, Owen; Mitchell, Kevin; Bloor, Stephen; Davis, Paul; Suddes, Amanda

    2015-10-01

    New Zealand propolis is a "European" type propolis obtained by honey bees mainly from exudates of poplar. European type propolis is known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties and this activity has been attributed to some of the main constituents such as chrysin and CAPE (caffeic acid phenethyl ester). As part of our studies on how New Zealand propolis might benefit gastro-intestinal health, we carried out in vitro bioactivity-guided fractionation of "Bio30™" propolis using both anti-inflammatory (TNF-α, COX-1, COX-2) and anti-colon cancer (DLD-1 colon cancer cell viability) assays; and determined the phenolic compounds responsible for the activity. The New Zealand wax-free Bio30™ propolis tincture solids had very high levels of the dihydroflavonoids pinocembrin and pinobanksin-3-O-acetate, and high levels of the dimethylallyl, benzyl and 3-methyl-3-butenyl caffeates relative to CAPE. The DLD-1 assays identified strong anti-proliferative activity associated with these components as well as chrysin, galangin and CAPE and a number of lesser known or lower concentration compounds including benzyl ferulate, benzyl isoferulate, pinostrobin, 5-phenylpenta-2,4-dienoic acid and tectochrysin. The phenolic compounds pinocembrin, pinobanksin-3-O-acetate, tectochrysin, dimethylallyl caffeate, 3-methyl-3-butenyl caffeate, benzyl ferulate and benzyl isoferulate also showed good broad spectrum activity in anti-proliferative assays against three other gastro-intestinal cancer cell lines; HCT-116 colon carcinoma, KYSE-30 oesophageal squamous cancer, and NCI-N87 gastric carcinoma. Activity is also observed in anti-inflammatory assays although it appears to be limited to one of the first cytokines in the inflammatory cascade, TNF-α. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Reductive dehalogenation of brominated phenolic compounds by microorganisms associated with the marine sponge Aplysina aerophoba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Young-Beom; Rhee, Sung-Keun; Fennell, Donna E; Kerkhof, Lee J; Hentschel, Ute; Häggblom, Max M

    2003-07-01

    Marine sponges are natural sources of brominated organic compounds, including bromoindoles, bromophenols, and bromopyrroles, that may comprise up to 12% of the sponge dry weight. Aplysina aerophoba sponges harbor large numbers of bacteria that can amount to 40% of the biomass of the animal. We postulated that there might be mechanisms for microbially mediated degradation of these halogenated chemicals within the sponges. The capability of anaerobic microorganisms associated with the marine sponge to transform haloaromatic compounds was tested under different electron-accepting conditions (i.e., denitrifying, sulfidogenic, and methanogenic). We observed dehalogenation activity of sponge-associated microorganisms with various haloaromatics. 2-Bromo-, 3-bromo-, 4-bromo-, 2,6-dibromo-, and 2,4,6-tribromophenol, and 3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxybenzoate were reductively debrominated under methanogenic and sulfidogenic conditions with no activity observed in the presence of nitrate. Monochlorinated phenols were not transformed over a period of 1 year. Debromination of 2,4,6-tribromophenol, and 2,6-dibromophenol to 2-bromophenol was more rapid than the debromination of the monobrominated phenols. Ampicillin and chloramphenicol inhibited activity, suggesting that dehalogenation was mediated by bacteria. Characterization of the debrominating methanogenic consortia by using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis indicated that different 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) phylotypes were enriched on the different halogenated substrates. Sponge-associated microorganisms enriched on organobromine compounds had distinct 16S rDNA TRFLP patterns and were most closely related to the delta subgroup of the proteobacteria. The presence of homologous reductive dehalogenase gene motifs in the sponge-associated microorganisms suggested that reductive dehalogenation might be coupled to dehalorespiration.

  3. Optimizing extraction conditions of crude fiber, phenolic compounds, flavonoids and antioxidant activity of date seed powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Hanan S; Hashim, Isameldin B; Altubji, Sabreen I

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to optimize the extraction conditions of crude fiber, phenolic compounds, flavonoids, and antioxidant activity from date seeds powder, using Response Surface Methodology. A central composite design with four independent variables; concentration of ethanol (X 1  = 25, 50 and 75% v/v), solvent: sample ratio (X 2  = 40:1, 50:1 and 60:1 v/w), temperature (X 3  = 45, 55 and 65 °C), and extraction time (X 4  = 1, 2 and 3 h) and a three level face centered cube design were used. A total of twenty nine experimental runs with five replicates at the central point were used to study the response variables using two extraction cycles. Maximum phenolic compound content (71.6 mg GAE/100 g) was extracted using 50% ethanol solution with 40:1 solvent: sample ratio for 1 h at 55 °C. While the maximum antioxidant activity (55.02 µmol Fe(II)/g) was obtained using similar ethanol concentration and solvent: sample ratio except at lower temperature (45 °C) for 2 h. On other hand, the maximum flavonoids content (455.77 mg CEQ/100 g) was reached by using 50% concentration, 50:1 solvent: sample ratio at 65 °C for 3 h. In contrast, the content of fiber was not affected by the different extraction conditions. Results indicate that using combination of extracted conditions, have a great potential for extracting all depending compounds except crude fiber.

  4. Rapid and comprehensive evaluation of (poly)phenolic compounds in pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) juice by UHPLC-MSn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Pedro; Calani, Luca; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Galaverna, Gianni; García-Viguera, Cristina; Bruni, Renato; Crozier, Alan; Del Rio, Daniele

    2012-12-13

    The comprehensive identification of phenolic compounds in food and beverages is a crucial starting point for assessing their biological, nutritional, and technological properties. Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) has been described as a rich source of (poly)phenolic components, with a broad array of different structures (phenolic acids, flavonoids, and hydrolyzable tannins) and a quick, high throughput, and accurate screening of its complete profile is still lacking. In the present work, a method for UHPLC separation and linear ion trap mass spectrometric (MSn) characterization of pomegranate juice phenolic fraction was optimized by comparing several different analytical conditions. The best solutions for phenolic acids, anthocyanins, flavonoids, and ellagitannins have been delineated and more than 70 compounds have been identified and fully characterized in less than one hour total analysis time. Twenty-one compounds were tentatively detected for the first time in pomegranate juice. The proposed fingerprinting approach could be easily translated to other plant derived food extracts and beverages containing a wide array of phytochemical compounds.

  5. In vitro bioaccessibility, transepithelial transport and antioxidant activity of Urtica dioica L. phenolic compounds in nettle based food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Gianpiero; Tedeschi, Paola; Meca, Giuseppe; Bertelli, Davide; Mañes, Jordi; Brandolini, Vincenzo; Maietti, Annalisa

    2016-10-12

    Nettle (Urtica dioica L.) is a well-known plant with a wide historical background use of stems, roots and leaves. Nettle leaves are an excellent source of phenolic compounds, principally 3-caffeoylquinic acid (3-CQA), caffeoylmalic acid (CMA) and rutin. The aim of this work was to evaluate the bioaccessibility (BAC), the bioavailability (BAV) and the antioxidant activity of nettle phenolic compounds present in foods and supplements. The BAC of nettle phenolics was evaluated with an in vitro dynamic digestion of real food matrices: the type of food matrix and chemical characteristic affected the kinetics of release and solubilization, with the highest BAC after duodenal digestion. A study of duodenal trans epithelial transport evidenced low bioavailability of native forms of 3-CQA, CMA and rutin. Simulation of colonic metabolism confirmed that phenolic compounds are fermented by gut microflora, confirming the need for further investigations on the impact of phenolic compounds at the large intestine level. Photochemiluminescence assay of the simulated digestion fluids demonstrated that ingestion of Urtica based foods contributes to create an antioxidant environment against superoxide anion radicals in the entire gastrointestinal tract (GIT).

  6. Processing ‘Ataulfo’ Mango into Juice Preserves the Bioavailability and Antioxidant Capacity of Its Phenolic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Elena Quirós-Sauceda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The health-promoting effects of phenolic compounds depend on their bioaccessibility from the food matrix and their consequent bioavailability. We carried out a randomized crossover pilot clinical trial to evaluate the matrix effect (raw flesh and juice of ‘Ataulfo’ mango on the bioavailability of its phenolic compounds. Twelve healthy male subjects consumed a dose of mango flesh or juice. Blood was collected for six hours after consumption, and urine for 24 h. Plasma and urine phenolics were analyzed by electrochemical detection coupled to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-ECD. Five compounds were identified and quantified in plasma. Six phenolic compounds, plus a microbial metabolite (pyrogallol were quantified in urine, suggesting colonic metabolism. The maximum plasma concentration (Cmax occurred 2–4 h after consumption; excretion rates were maximum at 8–24 h. Mango flesh contributed to greater protocatechuic acid absorption (49%, mango juice contributed to higher chlorogenic acid absorption (62%. Our data suggests that the bioavailability and antioxidant capacity of mango phenolics is preserved, and may be increased when the flesh is processed into juice.

  7. Evaluation of phenolic compounds content and in vitro antioxidant activity of red wines produced from Vitis labrusca grapes

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    Daniel Braga de Lima

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Wine production in the northern Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil, specifically the communes of Colombo and Almirante Tamandaré, is based mainly on the utilization of Vitis labrusca grapes var. Bordô (Ives. Total sugar content, pH, and total acidity were analyzed in red wine samples from 2007 and 2008 vintages following official methods of analysis. Moreover, total phenolic, flavonoid, and tannin contents were analyzed by colorimetric methodologies and the antioxidant activity was determined using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical methodology. Phenolic compounds were identified by high performance liquid chromatography. The total phenolic content of wine samples presented concentrations varying between 1582.35 and 2896.08 mg gallic acid.L-1 since the major part corresponds to flavonoid content. In these compounds' concentration range, a direct relationship between phenolic compounds content and levels of antioxidant activity was not observed. Among the identified phenolic compounds, chlorogenic, caffeic, and syringic acids were found to be the major components. Using three principal components, it was possible to explain 81.36% of total variance of the studied samples. Principal Components Analysis does not differentiate between vintages.

  8. A metabolite-profiling approach to assess the uptake and metabolism of phenolic compounds from olive leaves in SKBR3 cells by HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirantes-Piné, R; Zurek, G; Barrajón-Catalán, E; Bäßmann, C; Micol, V; Segura-Carretero, A; Fernández-Gutiérrez, A

    2013-01-01

    Olive leaves, an easily available natural low-cost material, constitute a source of extracts with significant antitumor activity that inhibits cell proliferation in several breast-cancer-cell models. In this work, a metabolite-profiling approach has been used to assess the uptake and metabolism of phenolic compounds from an olive-leaf extract in the breast-cancer-cell line SKBR3 to evaluate the compound or compounds responsible for the cytotoxic activity. For this, the extract was firstly characterized quantitatively by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS). Then, SKBR3 cells were incubated with 200 μg/mL of the olive-leaf extract at different times (15 min, 1, 2, 24, and 48 h). A metabolite-profiling approach based on HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS was used to determine the intracellular phenolic compounds, enabling the identification of 16 intact phenolic compounds from the extract and four metabolites derived from these compounds in the cell cytoplasm. The major compounds found within the cells were oleuropein, luteolin-7-O-glucoside and its metabolites luteolin aglycone and methyl-luteolin glucoside, as well as apigenin, and verbascoside. Neither hydroxytyrosol nor any of its metabolites were found within the cells at any incubation time. It is proposed that the major compounds responsible for the cytotoxic activity of the olive-leaf extract in SKBR3 cells are oleuropein and the flavones luteolin and apigenin, since these compounds showed high uptake and their antitumor activity has been previously reported. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Simple quantification of phenolic compounds present in the minor fraction of virgin olive oil by LC-DAD-FLD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy-Caballero, M P; Acedo-Valenzuela, M I; Galeano-Díaz, T

    2012-11-15

    This paper presents the results of the study on the extraction, identification and quantification of a group of important phenolic compounds in virgin olive oil (VOO) samples, obtained from olives of various varieties, by liquid chromatography coupled to UV-vis and fluorescence detection. Sixteen phenolic compounds belonging to different families have been identified and quantified spending a total time of 25 min. The linearity was examined by establishing the external standard calibration curves. Four order linear ranges and limits of detection ranging from 0.02 to 0.6 μg mL(-1) and 0.006 to 0.3 μg mL(-1) were achieved using UV-vis and fluorescence detection, respectively. Regarding the real samples, for the determination of the phenolic compounds in higher concentrations (hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol) a simple liquid-liquid extraction with ethanol was used to make the sample compatible with the mobile phase. Recovery values close to 100% were obtained. However, a previous solid phase extraction with Diol cartridges was necessary to concentrate and separate the minor phenolic compounds of the main interferences. The parameters affecting this step were carefully optimized and, after that, recoveries near 80-100% were obtained for the rest of the studied phenolic compounds. Also, the limits of detection were improved 15 times. Finally, the standard addition method was carried out for each of the analytes and no matrix effect was found, so the quantification of the 16 phenolic compounds from different monovarietal VOO was carried out by using the corresponding external standard calibration plot. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Total phenolic compounds, antioxidant potential and α-glucosidase inhibition by Tunisian Euphorbia paralias L.

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    Malek Besbes Hlila

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the potential antioxidant and anti-α-glucosidase inhibitory activities of Tunisian Euphorbia paralias L. leaves and stems extracts and their composition of total polyphenol and flavonoids. Methods: The different samples were tested for their antiradical activities by using 2, 2’- azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assays. In α-glucosidase activity, α-glucosidase (0.3 IU/mL and substrate, 2500 µmol/ L p-nitrophenyl α-D-glucopyranoside were used; absorbance was registered at 405 nm. Results: The leaves acetonic extract exhibited the strongest α-glucosidase inhibition [IC50 = (0.0035 ± 0.001 µg/mL], which was 20-fold more active than the standard product (acarbose [IC50 = (0.07 ± 0.01 µg/mL]. Acetonic extract of the leaves exhibited the highest quantity of total phenolic [(95.54 ± 0.04 µg gallic acid equivalent/mg] and flavonoid [(55.16 ± 0.25 µg quercetin equivalent/mg]. The obtained findings presented also that this extract was detected with best antioxidant capacity [IC50 = (0.015 ± 0.01 µg/mL] against DPPH and a value of IC50 equal to (0.02 ± 0.01 µg/mL against ABTS. Positive relationship between polyphenolic content of the tested Euphorbia paralias L. leaves and stems extracts and its antioxidant activity (DPPH and ABTS was detected. Elevated positive linear correlation was got between ABTS and total phenolic (R2 = 0.751. Conclusions: The findings clearly demonstrate that the use of a polar solvent enables extraction of significant quantities of phenol compounds and flavonoids.

  11. Biochemical parameters as biomarkers for the early recognition of environmental pollution in Scots pine trees. Pt.1. Phenolic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haertling, S.; Schulz, H. [UFZ - Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Leipzig (Germany). Sektion Chemische Oekotoxikologie

    1998-05-01

    Within a series of regular projects investigating the suitability of biochemical parameters as biomarkers for the early recognition of environmental pollution, the levels of selected phenolic compounds were determined in Scots pine needles (Pinus sylvestris L.) from young and adult trees at three field sites with different SO{sub 2} pollution (Roesa>Taura>Neuglobsow). Young trees showed no differences in the levels of soluble phenolics in case of increasing loads of SO{sub 2}, whereas the concentration of the soluble phenolic component catechin in previous needles of adult trees altered significantly. In current year`s needles, differences were only found in the presence of high SO{sub 2} deposition. In contrast to catechin, picein and total phenolics remained unaffected. The concentration of catechin in the previous year`s needles of adult trees correlated positively with needle necroses. The phenolic components of the cell walls of pine needles were also analysed. The main phenolic compounds were identified as p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid. Differences in the levels of p-coumaric acid were detected in the needles of adult trees between the three sites, with the highest levels being measured at the site with the lowest pollution (Neuglobsow). However, changes in the p-coumaric acid content in young trees were low. No site-related differences were found regarding ferulic acid in adult and young pines. The findings are discussed and compared with data reported in the literature. (orig.)

  12. Optimisation of ultrasonic-assisted extraction of phenolic compounds, antioxidants, and anthocyanins from sugar beet molasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingshun; Zhao, Yi; Yu, Shujuan

    2015-04-01

    Response surface methodology was used to optimise experimental conditions for ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE) of functional components from sugar beet molasses. The central composite design (CCD) was used for the optimisation of extraction parameters in terms of total phenolic contents, antioxidant activities and anthocyanins. Result suggested the optimal conditions obtained by RSM for UAE from sugar beet molasses were as follows: HCl concentration 1.55-1.72 mol/L, ethanol concentration 57-63% (v/v), extraction temperature 41-48 °C, and extraction time 66-73 min. In the optimal conditions, the experimental total phenolic contents were 17.36 mg GAE/100mL, antioxidant activity was 16.66 mg TE/g, and total anthocyanins were 31.81 mg/100g of the sugar beet molasses extract, which were well matched the predicted values. Teen compounds, i.e. gallic acid, vanillin, hydroxybenzoic acid, syringic acid, cyanidin-3-O-rutinoside, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside, catechin, delphinidin-3-O-rutinoside, delphinidin-3-O-glucuronide and ferulic acid were determined by HPLC-DAD-MS/MS in sugar beet molasses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of hydroalcoholic extracts of wild and cultivated murtilla (Ugni molinae Turcz.

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    Thalita Riquelme Augusto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade a considerable increase in the number of studies addressing the use of antioxidants from natural sources has led to the identification and understanding of the potential mechanisms of biologically active components. This results from the fact that they can be used to replace synthetic antioxidants commonly used in food. Murtilla (Ugni molinae Turcz is a native berry grown in Chile, and in the present study, the phenolic composition and antioxidant activity of its fruits were studied. Hydroalcoholic extracts of dehydrated fruits from two genotypes of murtilla (Ugni molinae Turcz. were produced. Extracts of wild murtilla and 14-4 genotype fruits had 19.35 and 40.28mg GAE/g for Total Phenolic Compounds, 76.48, and 134.35μmol TEAC/g for DPPH, and 157.04 and 293.99 μmol TEAC/g for ABTS, respectively. Components such as quercetin, epicatechin, and gallic, benzoic and hydrocaffeic acids were identified by CG/MS analysis. All of them showed antioxidant activity. Therefore, it is possible to say that the hydroalcoholic extracts of murtilla have antioxidant potential to be used in lipidic food.

  14. Phenolic Compounds from the Fermentation of Cultivars Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot from the Slovenian Coastal Region

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    Marin Berovič

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Large scale fermentation of the cultivars Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot from the Slovenian coastal region was performed in Bücher-Vaslin roto tank vinificators. Six different areas, Prade, Kortina, Škocijan, Ankaran, Labor and Hrvatini, were selected for this study to investigate total phenols, anthocyanins, tannins and colour density, as well as pH, titratable acidity, sugar content and ethanol. Anthocyanins and phenolic compounds were found to be in generally higher concentrations (up to 4240 mg/L in Cabernet Sauvignon. Prolongation of the fermentation phase with Merlot gave even reduced concentrations of anthocyanins, a phenomenon which was not observed in Cabernet Sauvignon. The highest concentration of anthocyanins was found in Merlot from the Kortina location (735 mg/L, and in Cabernet Sauvignon from the Labor location (998 mg/L. The highest concentration of tannins (1828 mg/L was found in the grapes of Cabernet Sauvignon from the Ankaran location, while in Merlot 1280 mg/L was detected in a sample from the Prade area. The tone of colour and its intensity reached full maturity in Cabernet Sauvignon. Merlot from the Kortina location reached the highest colour density of 1.57, while in a sample of Cabernet Sauvignon from Hrvatini colour density was 2.89. Only small differences were detected in colour quality between Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon.

  15. Bionanoconjugates of tyrosinase and peptide-derivatised gold nanoparticles for biosensing of phenolic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, J.; Vorobieva, E.; Gralheira, D.; Osório, I.; Soares, L.; Vale, N.; Pereira, E.; Gomes, P.; Franco, R.

    2011-03-01

    Bionanoconjugates of the enzyme tyrosinase (TYR) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalised with a peptide (CALNN) were produced in solution and characterised. The formation of stable TYR-AuNP:CALNN bionanoconjugates (BNCs) was supported by a decrease of the surface charge of the BNCs as determined by ζ-potential and an increase in hydrodynamic diameter as determined by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). UV/Vis studies of pH-induced aggregation revealed distinct protonation patterns for the BNCs when compared with AuNP:CALNN alone, further substantiating BNC formation. Activity studies of the BNCs for the reduction of di-phenols in solution indicated that TYR not only remains active after conjugation, but interestingly its activity in the BNCs is higher than for the free enzyme. In conclusion, AuNP:CALNN can provide a suitable platform for the immobilisation of TYR, leading to BNCs with increased enzyme activity and a wider pH working range, with promising uses in electrochemical biosensors for the detection of mono- and di-phenolic compounds.

  16. Influence of environmental factors on the concentration of phenolic compounds in leaves of Lafoensia pacari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Leite Sampaio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Lafoensia pacari A. St.-Hil., Lythraceae, a plant from the Cerrado known as pacari or dedaleiro, is widely used as an antipyretic, wound healing, anti-inflammatory, antidiarrheal and in the treatment of gastritis and cancer. Notable among the metabolite groups identified in leaves of L. pacari are the polyphenols, such as tannins and flavonoids, related to the pharmacological activities of pacari. Studies on the influence of environmental factors over production of major groups of secondary metabolites in pacari are important because they contribute data for its cultivation and harvest, and establish quantitative parameters of secondary metabolites in the plant drug. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of environmental factors on concentrations of phenolic metabolites in the leaves of L. pacari. Compounds quantified in the leaves were: total phenols, tannins by protein precipitation, hydrolysable tannins, total flavonoids, ellagic acid and mineral nutrients, while soil fertility was also analyzed, all over a period of one year. The data were analyzed using multivariate analysis, and the results suggest that metabolite concentrations in the leaves of this plant are influenced by seasonal factors, in particular the temperature and foliar micronutrients (Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn.

  17. Influence of environmental factors on the concentration of phenolic compounds in leaves of Lafoensia pacari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Leite Sampaio

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Lafoensia pacari A. St.-Hil., Lythraceae, a plant from the Cerrado known as pacari or dedaleiro, is widely used as an antipyretic, wound healing, anti-inflammatory, antidiarrheal and in the treatment of gastritis and cancer. Notable among the metabolite groups identified in leaves of L. pacari are the polyphenols, such as tannins and flavonoids, related to the pharmacological activities of pacari. Studies on the influence of environmental factors over production of major groups of secondary metabolites in pacari are important because they contribute data for its cultivation and harvest, and establish quantitative parameters of secondary metabolites in the plant drug. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of environmental factors on concentrations of phenolic metabolites in the leaves of L. pacari. Compounds quantified in the leaves were: total phenols, tannins by protein precipitation, hydrolysable tannins, total flavonoids, ellagic acid and mineral nutrients, while soil fertility was also analyzed, all over a period of one year. The data were analyzed using multivariate analysis, and the results suggest that metabolite concentrations in the leaves of this plant are influenced by seasonal factors, in particular the temperature and foliar micronutrients (Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn.

  18. Characterisation of various grape seed oils by volatile compounds, triacylglycerol composition, total phenols and antioxidant capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bail, Stefanie; Stuebiger, Gerald; Krist, Sabine; Unterweger, Heidrun; Buchbauer, Gerhard

    2008-06-01

    Grape seed oil (Oleum vitis viniferae) representing a promising plant fat, mainly used for culinary and pharmaceutical purposes as well as for various technical applications, was subject of the present investigation. HS-SPME-GC-MS was applied to study volatile compounds in several seed oil samples from different grape oils. The triacylglycerol (TAG) composition of these oils was analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS/MS. In addition the total phenol content and the antioxidant capacity (using TEAC) of these oils were determined. The headspace of virgin grape oils from white and red grapes was dominated by ethyl octanoate (up to 27.5% related to the total level of volatiles), ethylacetate (up to 25.0%), ethanol (up to 22.7%), acetic acid (up to 17.2%), ethyl hexanoate (up to 17.4%) and 3-methylbutanol (up to 11.0%). Triacylglycerol composition was found to be dominated by LLL (up to 41.8%), LLP (up to 24.3%), LLO (up to 16.3%) and LOO (up to 11.7%), followed by LOP (up to 9.3%) and LOS/OOO (up to 4.3%). Total phenol content ranged between 59μg/g and 115.5μg/g GAE. Antioxidant capacity (TEAC) was analyzed to range between 0.09μg/g and 1.16μg/g. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. MICROWAVE-ASSISTED EXTRACTION OF PHENOLIC COMPOUNDS FROM POLYGONUM MULTIFLORUM THUNB. ROOTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quoc, Le Pham Tan; Muoi, Nguyen Van

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the best extraction conditions for total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant capacity (AC) of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. root using microwave-assisted extraction (MAE). The raw material used was Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. root powder. Five factors such as solvent type, solvent concentrations, solvent/material ratio, extraction time and microwave power were studied; TPC and AC values were determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method and DPPH free radical scavenging activity measurement, respectively. In addition, studies involved assaying the HPLC test of extracts and SEM of samples. Optimal results pointed to acetone as the solvent, acetone concentration of 60%, solvent/material ratio of 40/1 (v/w), extraction time of 5 mins and microwave power of 127 W. TPC and AC obtained were approximates 44.3 ±0.13 mg GAE/g DW and 341.26 ±1.54 μmol TE/g DW, respectively. The effect of microwaving on the cell destruction of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. root was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Some phenolic compounds were determined by the HPLC method, for instance, gallic acid, catechin and resveratrol. These factors significantly affected TPC and AC. We can use acetone as a solvent with microwave-assisted extraction to achieve the best result.

  20. Toward the understanding of the molecular basis for the inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2 by phenolic compounds present in Uruguayan propolis and grape pomace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, Margot; Alvareda, Elena; Iribarne, Federico; Miranda, Pablo; Espinosa, Victoria; Aguilera, Sara; Pardo, Helena

    2016-12-01

    Propolis and grape pomace have significant amounts of phenols which can take part in anti-inflammatory mechanisms. As the cyclooxygenases 1 and 2 (COX-1 and COX-2) are involved in said mechanisms, the possibility for a selective inhibition of COX-2 was analyzed in vitro and in silico. Propolis and grape pomace from Uruguayan species were collected, extracted in hydroalcoholic mixture and analyzed. Based on phenols previously identified, and taking as reference the crystallographic structures of COX-1 and COX-2 in complex with the commercial drug Celecoxib, a molecular docking procedure was devised to adjust 123 phenolic molecular models at the enzyme-binding sites. The most important results of this work are that the extracts have an overall inhibition activity very similar in COX-1 and COX-2, i.e. they do not possess selective inhibition activity for COX-2. Nevertheless, 10 compounds of the phenolic database turned out to be more selective and 94 phenols resulted with similar selectivity than Celecoxib, an outcome that accounts for the overall experimental inhibition measures. Binding site environment observations showed increased polarity in COX-2 as compared with COX-1, suggesting that polarity is the key for selectivity. Accordingly, the screening of molecular contacts pointed to the residues: Arg106, Gln178, Leu338, Ser339, Tyr341, Tyr371, Arg499, Ala502, Val509, and Ser516, which would explain, at the atomic level, the anti-inflammatory effect of the phenolic compounds. Among them, Gln178 and Arg499 appear to be essential for the selective inhibition of COX-2.

  1. Chemical constituents from red algae Bostrychia radicans (Rhodomelaceae): new amides and phenolic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Ana Ligia Leandrini de; Silva, Denise B. da; Lopes, Norberto P.; Debonsi, Hosana M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FCFRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto. Dept. de Quimica e Fisica; Yokoya, Nair S., E-mail: hosana@fcfrp.usp.br [Instituto de Botanica, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Secao de Ficologia

    2012-07-01

    This study describes the isolation and structural determination of two amides, isolated for the first time: N,4-dihydroxy-N-(2'-hydroxyethyl)-benzamide (0.019%) and N,4-dihydroxy-N-(2'-hydroxyethyl)-benzeneacetamide (0.023%). These amides, produced by the red macroalgae Bostrychia radicans, had their structures assigned by NMR spectral data and MS analyses. In addition, this chemical study led to the isolation of cholesterol, heptadecane, squalene, trans-phytol, neophytadiene, tetradecanoic and hexadecanoic acids, methyl hexadecanoate and methyl 9-octadecenoate, 4-(methoxymethyl)-phenol, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, methyl 4-hydroxybenzeneacetate, methyl 2-hydroxy-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propanoate, hydroquinone, methyl 4-hydroxymandelate, methyl 4-hydroxybenzoate, 4-hydroxybenzeneacetic acid and (4-hydroxyphenyl)-oxo-acetaldehyde. This is the first report concerning these compounds in B. radicans, contributing by illustrating the chemical diversity within the Rhodomelaceae family. (author)

  2. Molecular mechanisms explaining the possible effects of phenolic compounds on reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aubets-Fusté

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present review is to evaluate the possible association between phenolic compounds and cardiovascular disease, proposing that their regular consumption in Western diets could be beneficial for protecting patients against cardiovascular disease. An extensive research of scientific literature was performed in the following electronic specialized databases (PubMed central (PMC-NBCI, Elsevier Journal, Scielo Spain, Scirus, Science Direct, Web of Science, including studies in animals, cells, and humans, to establish the effect of polyphenols in the prevention and development of cardiovascular disease was conducted. The in vitro, animal and human studies show the potential ability of polyphenols to act against cardiovascular disease as a result of their antioxidant effect and vasodilatation and their capacity to improve lipid profile while reducing the concentration of low-density lipoproteins. Polyphenols consumption in Western diets could be beneficial for protecting patients against cardiovascular disease.

  3. Absorption Profile of (Poly)Phenolic Compounds after Consumption of Three Food Supplements Containing 36 Different Fruits, Vegetables, and Berries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresciani, Letizia; Martini, Daniela; Mena, Pedro; Tassotti, Michele; Calani, Luca; Brigati, Giacomo; Brighenti, Furio; Holasek, Sandra; Malliga, Daniela-Eugenia; Lamprecht, Manfred; Del Rio, Daniele

    2017-02-26

    The market of plant-based nutraceuticals and food supplements is continuously growing due to the increased consumer demand. The introduction of new products with relevant nutritional characteristics represents a new way of providing bioactive compounds and (poly)phenols to consumers, becoming a strategy to ideally guarantee the health benefits attributed to plant foodstuffs and allowing the increase of daily bioactive compound intake. A paramount step in the study of nutraceuticals is the evaluation of the bioavailability and metabolism of their putatively active components. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the absorption profile of the (poly)phenolic compounds contained in three different plant-based food supplements, made of 36 different plant matrices, which were consumed by 20 subjects in an open one-arm study design. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 1, 2, 5, and 10 h after capsule intake. Twenty quantifiable metabolites deriving from different (poly)phenolic compounds were identified. Results showed that the consumption of the three capsules allowed the effective absorption of several (poly)phenolic compounds and metabolites appearing at different times in plasma, thereby indicating different absorption profiles. The capsules thus ensured potential health-promoting molecules to be potentially available to target tissues and organs.

  4. Antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of phenolic compounds from the roots of Ulmus macrocarpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Joo-Hee; Kim, Seung-Bum; Park, Kwan-Hee; Lee, Min-Won

    2011-09-01

    The roots of Ulmus macrocarpa Hance (Ulmaceae) have been used as an oriental traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammation, ulcers, cancers, and parasites. Activity guided isolation from the roots of U. macrocarpa yielded three flavonoids [catechin 7-O-β-D-apiofuranoside (1), (+)-catechin (2), taxifolin 6-C-glucopyranoside (3)], and one coumarin [fraxin (4)]. To investigate the antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of these compounds, DPPH radical scavenging activity and inhibitory activity against nitric oxide (NO) production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells were examined and the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxidase-2 (COX-2) were measured by RT-PCR and Western Blotting in HaCaT cells. Compounds 1, 2, and 3 showed moderate antioxidative activities compared with L-ascorbic acid as a positive control. NO production was reduced and the expressions of iNOS and COX-2 and their mRNA were inhibited by the addition of samples (1-4). These results suggest that the phenolic compounds from the roots of U. macrocarpa might be developed as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents.

  5. Impact of Roasting on Fatty Acids, Tocopherols, Phytosterols, and Phenolic Compounds Present in Plukenetia huayllabambana Seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Chirinos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of roasting of Plukenetia huayllabambana seeds on the fatty acids, tocopherols, phytosterols, and phenolic compounds was evaluated. Additionally, the oxidative stability of the seed during roasting was evaluated through free fatty acids, peroxide, and p-anisidine values in the seed oil. Roasting conditions corresponded to 100, 120, 140, and 160°C for 10, 20, and 30 min, respectively. Results indicate that roasting temperatures higher than 120°C significantly affect the content of the studied components. The values of acidity, peroxide, and p-anisidine in the sacha inchi oil from roasted seeds increased during roasting. The treatment of 100°C for 10 min successfully maintained the evaluated bioactive compounds in the seed and quality of the oil, while guaranteeing a higher extraction yield. Our results indicate that P. huayllabambana seed should be roasted at temperatures not higher than 100°C for 10 min to obtain snacks with high levels of bioactive compounds and with high oxidative stability.

  6. Preparation of free, soluble conjugate, and insoluble-bound phenolic compounds from peels of rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum) and evaluation of antioxidant activities in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liping; Zhang, Huilin; Zhuang, Yongliang

    2012-02-01

    The soluble phenolic compounds of rambutan peels (RP) were extracted by microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and the operating parameters were optimized. The optimal conditions obtained were ethanol concentration of 80.85%, extraction time of 58.39 s, and the ratio of liquid to solid of 24.51:1. The soluble phenolic content by MAE was 213.76 mg GAE/g DW. The free, soluble conjugate, and insoluble-boaund phenolic compounds were prepared by alkaline hydrolysis, and the contents of 3 fractions were 185.12, 27.98 and 9.37 mg GAE/g DW, respectively. The contents of syringic acid and p-coumaric acid were high in the free fraction, showing 16.86 and 19.44 mg/g DW, and the soluble conjugate and insoluble-bound phenolics were mainly composed of gallic acid and caffeic acid. Furthermore, the antioxidant activities of 3 fractions were evaluated in 5 model systems. Results indicated that the free fraction had high antioxidant activities, compared with the soluble conjugate and insoluble-bound fractions. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  7. Characterisation of phenolic compounds by HPLC-TOF/IT/MS in buds and open flowers of 'Chemlali' olive cultivar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taamalli, Amani; Abaza, Leila; Arráez Román, David; Segura Carretero, Antonio; Fernández Gutiérrez, Alberto; Zarrouk, Mokhtar; Nabil, Ben Youssef

    2013-01-01

    Plant phenolics are secondary metabolites that constitute one of the most widely occurring groups of phytochemicals that play several important functions in plants. In olive (Olea europaea L), there is not enough information about the occurrence of these compounds in buds and flowers. To conduct a comprehensive characterisation of buds and open flowers from the olive cultivar 'Chemlali'. The polar fraction of buds and open flowers was extracted using solid-liquid extraction with hydro-alcoholic solvent. Then extracts were analysed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to electrospray ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI/TOF/MS) and electrospray ionisation ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry (ESI/IT/MS²) operating in negative ion mode. Phenolic compounds from different classes including secoiridoids, flavonoids, simple phenols, cinnamic acid derivatives and lignans were tentatively identified in both extracts. Qualitatively, no significant difference was observed between flower buds and open flowers extracts. However, quantitatively the secoiridoids presented higher percentage of total phenols in open flowers (41.7%) than in flower buds (30.5%) in contrast to flavonoids, which decreased slightly from 38.1 to 26.7%. Cinnamic acid derivatives and simple phenols did not show any change. Lignans presented the lowest percentage in both extracts with an increase during the development of the flower bud to open flower. The HPLC-TOF/IT/MS allowed the characterisation, for the first time, of the phenolic profile of extracts of 'Chemlali' olive buds and open flowers, proving to be a very useful technique for the characterisation and structure elucidation of phenolic compounds. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Non-Nutrient, Naturally Occurring Phenolic Compounds with Antioxidant Activity for the Prevention and Treatment of Periodontal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Varela-López

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the main factors able to explain the pathophysiological mechanism of inflammatory conditions that occur in periodontal disease is oxidative stress. Given the emerging understanding of this relationship, host-modulatory therapies using antioxidants could be interesting to prevent or slow the breakdown of soft and hard periodontal tissues. In this context, non-nutrient phenolic compounds of various foods and plants have received considerable attention in the last decade. Here, studies focusing on the relationship between different compounds of this type with periodontal disease have been collected. Among them, thymoquinone, coenzyme Q (CoQ, mangiferin, resveratrol, verbascoside and some flavonoids have shown to prevent or ameliorate periodontal tissues damage in animal models. However evidence regarding this effect in humans is poor and only limited to topical treatments with CoQ and catechins. Along with animal experiments, in vitro studies indicate that possible mechanisms by which these compounds might exert their protective effects include antioxidative properties, oxygen and nitrogen scavenging abilities, and also inhibitory effects on cell signaling cascades related to inflammatory processes which have an effect on RNS or ROS production as well as on antioxidant defense systems.

  9. Phenolic compounds distribution along the lenght of Scots pine needles in a polluted and control environment and its connection with necroses formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian J. Giertych

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds distribution was studied along the length of Scots pine needles from trees in a polluted and a control site. There is no significant difference in the content of total phenols between the studied sites. There are significant differences in distribution of phenolics along the length of needles. The highest content is in the tip part of the needle and the lowest at the base. This kind of distribution suggests a role of these compounds in the processes of necroses formation. The content of phenolic compounds is positively correlated with the toxic elements - fluorine and aluminium and negatively with the macroelements - phosphorus, potassium and magnesium.

  10. Carotenoids, Phenolic Compounds and Tocopherols Contribute to the Antioxidative Properties of Some Microalgae Species Grown on Industrial Wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safafar, Hamed; van Wagenen, Jonathan Myerson; Møller, Per

    2015-01-01

    sp., and Desmodesmus sp. (Chlorophyta), were screened for their antioxidant properties using different in vitro assays. Natural antioxidants, including pigments, phenolics, and tocopherols, were measured in methanolic extracts of microalgae biomass. Highest and lowest concentrations of pigments......This study aimed at investigating the potential of microalgae species grown on industrial waste water as a new source of natural antioxidants. Six microalgae from different classes, including Phaeodactylum sp. (Bacillariophyceae), Nannochloropsis sp. (Eustigmatophyceae), Chlorella sp., Dunaniella......, phenolic compounds, and tocopherols were found in Desmodesmus sp. and Phaeodactylum tricornuotom microalgae species, respectively. The results of each assay were correlated to the content of natural antioxidants in microalgae biomass. Phenolic compounds were found as major contributors to the antioxidant...

  11. Profiling the Phenolic Compounds of the Four Major Seed Coat Types and Their Relation to Color Genes in Lentil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirali, Mahla; Purves, Randy W; Vandenberg, Albert

    2017-05-26

    Phenolic compounds can provide antioxidant health benefits for humans, and foods such as lentils can be valuable dietary sources of different subclasses of these secondary metabolites. This study used LC-MS analyses to compare the phenolic profiles of lentil genotypes with four seed coat background colors (green, gray, tan, and brown) and two cotyledon colors (red and yellow) grown at two locations. The mean area ratio per mg sample (MARS) values of various phenolic compounds in lentil seeds varied with the different seed coat colors conferred by specific genotypes. Seed coats of lentil genotypes with the homozygous recessive tgc allele (green and gray seed coats) had higher MARS values of flavan-3-ols, proanthocyanidins, and some flavonols. This suggests lentils featuring green and gray seed coats might be more promising as health-promoting foods.

  12. Data on changes in red wine phenolic compounds and headspace aroma compounds after treatment of red wines with chitosans with different structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Filipe-Ribeiro

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Data in this article presents the changes on phenolic compounds and headspace aroma abundance of a red wine spiked with 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol and treated with a commercial crustacean chitin (CHTN, two commercial crustacean chitosans (CHTB, CHTD, one fungal chitosan (CHTF, one additional chitin (CHTNA and one additional chitosan (CHTC produced by alkaline deacetylation of CHTN and CHTB, respectively. Chitin and chitosans presented different structural features, namely deacetylation degree (DD, average molecular weight (MW, sugar and mineral composition (“Reducing the negative sensory impact of volatile phenols in red wine with different chitosan: effect of structure on efficiency” (Filipe-Ribeiro et al., 2018 [1]. Statistical data is also shown, which correlates the changes in headspace aroma abundance of red wines with the chitosans structural features at 10 g/h L application dose. Keywords: Red wine, 4-Ethylphenol, 4-Ethylguaiacol, Chitosan, Chitin, Chromatic characteristics, Phenolic compounds, Headspace aroma abundance

  13. Study on the presence and influence of phenolic compounds in callogenesis and somatic embryo development of cocoa (Theobroma cacao L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulistyani Pancaningtyas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cocoa (Theobroma cacao L. like most tropical trees is recalcitrant in tissue culture. Somatic embryogenesis is generally efficient micropropagation technique to multiply elite material. However, Somatic embryogenesis in cocoa is difficult and this species is considered as recalcitrant. One of the factors often considered as a component of in vitro recalsitrance is a high phenolic content and oxidation of these compounds. In cocoa tissue culture accumulate large amounts of poliphenolics compounds which probably impair further development. This study was conducted to investigate the composition of phenolic compounds in cocoa flower and leaves, and their changes troughout the somatic embryogenesis process. Calli were induced in cacao floral and leaves explants on a half-strenght Murashige and Skoog medium containing 30 g/L Glucose and combination of 2,4 dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4 D with kinetin (kin. Total polyphenol content was observed on Sulawesi 1 cocoa clone. Embryogenic and non-embryogenic callus were also compared. The percentage of callus production from flower tissue is 85%, percentage of embryogenic callus 40 %, although  the percentage of somatic embryo production from embryogenic callus callus is 70%. The conservation of callus into somatic embryos followed by decline in phenol content and an increase in peroxidase. The synthesis kinetics for these compounds in calli, under different somatic embryogenesis conditions, revealed a higher concentration under non-embryogenic conditions. So that, phenolic compound can influence the production of calli and an absence the phenolic compound can enhance production of somatic embryo.Kata kunci: Theobroma cacao L., polifenol, embrio somatik, kalus, flavonoid, katekin, in vitro recalcitance

  14. Phenolic compounds from Byrsonima crassifolia L. bark: phytochemical investigation and quantitative analysis by LC-ESI MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldini, Mariateresa; Montoro, Paola; Pizza, Cosimo

    2011-08-25

    Phytochemical investigation of the methanolic extract of Byrsonima crassifolia's bark led to the isolation of 8 known phenolic compounds 5-O-galloylquinic acid, 3-O-galloylquinic acid, 3,4-di-O-galloylquinic acid, 3,5-di-O-galloylquinic acid, 3,4,5-tri-O-galloylquinic acid, (+)-epicatechin-3-gallate along with (+)-catechin and (+)-epicatechin. Due to their biological value, in the present study, a high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method, working in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, has been developed to quantify these compounds. B. crassifolia bark resulted in a rich source of phenolic compounds and particularly of galloyl derivates. The proposed analytical method is promising to be applied to other galloyl derivatives to quantify these bioactive compounds in raw material and final products. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of novel techniques to extract phenolic compounds from Romanian cultivars of Prunus domestica L. and their biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocan, Andrei; Diuzheva, Alina; Carradori, Simone; Andruch, Vasil; Massafra, Chiara; Moldovan, Cadmiel; Sisea, Cristian; Petzer, Jacobus P; Petzer, Anél; Zara, Susi; Marconi, Guya Diletta; Zengin, Gokhan; Crișan, Gianina; Locatelli, Marcello

    2018-04-21

    In the present work, fourteen cultivars of Prunus domestica were analysed to investigate their phenolic pattern with the purpose of using the leaves as potential resources of bioactive compounds in the pharmaceutical and food industry. Microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and sugaring-out liquid-liquid extraction techniques were optimized in order to obtain an exhaustive multi-component panel of phenolic compounds. The best phenolic-enriched recovery was achieved using MAE in water:methanol (30:70), and this procedure was further applied for quantitative analysis of phenolic compounds in real samples. In order to prove the safeness of these extracts, the biological potential of the Prunus cultivars was tested by several in vitro antioxidant and enzyme inhibitory assays. Moreover, their cytotoxicity was evaluated on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs), and in most of the cases the treatment with different concentrations of extracts didn't show cytotoxicity up to 500 μg/mL. Only 'Carpatin' and 'Minerva' cultivars, at 250 and 500 μg/mL, reduced partially cell viability of HGFs population. Noteworthy, Centenar cultivar was the most active for the α-glucosidase inhibition (6.77 mmolACAE/g extract), whereas Ialomița cultivar showed the best antityrosinase activity (23.07 mgKAE/g extract). Overall, leaves of P. domestica represent a rich alternative source of bioactive compounds. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Effects of γ-Irradiation of Wild Thyme (Thymus serpyllum L. on the Phenolic Compounds Profile of Its Ethanolic Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janiak Michał A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The presented study revealed that there were changes in the phenolic compounds profile of extract of wild thyme (Thymus serpyllum L. after γ-irradiation at the dose of 5 kGy. Ethanolic extracts of irradiated and non-irradiated herb were prepared and their compounds were analyzed by RP-HPLC-DAD technique. Between thirty two detected constituents, twelve phenolic compounds classified as hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acids derivatives, flavones and flavanones were identified. Among them, caffeic acid derivatives and flavones predominated with the highest content of rosmarinic acid and luteolin-7-O-glucoside, respectively. Additionally, thymol was recognized in the analyzed extracts. γ-Irradiation slightly affected the quantitative profile of phenolic compounds of a wild thyme ethanolic extract. Only four constituents differed significantly (P<0.05 in terms of their content in the irradiated and non-irradiated samples. The content of phenolic acids (p-coumaric and caffeic acids decreased and that of flavonoid aglycons (luteolin and eriodictyol increased after the γ-ray treatment.

  17. Sacha Inchi (Plukenetia volubilis): a seed source of polyunsaturated fatty acids, tocopherols, phytoserols, phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chirinos, R.; Zuloeta, G.; Pedreschi Plasencia, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA), phytosterols, tocopherols, phenolic compounds, total carotenoids and hydrophilic and lipophilic ORAC antioxidant capacities were evaluated in 16 cultivars of Sacha inchi (SI) seeds with the aim to valorise them and offer more information on the functional properties of SI seeds. A

  18. Phenolic compound contents and antioxidant activity in plants with nutritional and/or medicinal properties form the Peruvian Andean region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chirinos, R.; Pedreschi Plasencia, R.P.; Rogez, H.

    2013-01-01

    Total phenolic compounds (TPC) and antioxidant activities using different assays (DPPH, ABTS and ORAC) in fruits, grains, leaves, seeds, roots and tubers from 27 different Peruvian Andean plants used in folk medicine or/and as food by the native population were evaluated in order to use these as

  19. Impact of sorghum processing on phytate, phenolic compounds and in vitro solubility of iron and zinc in thick porridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kayodé, A.P.P.; Linnemann, A.R.; Nout, M.J.R.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2007-01-01

    This study focussed on the impact of process variables on levels of phytate and phenolic compounds, and in vitro solubility of iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) in sorghum porridges, a major staple in semi-arid tropics. The aim was to identify practices that enhance the mineral availability in this type of

  20. Phenolic Compounds, Volatiles, and Sensory Characteristics of Twelve Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium L.) Cultivars Grown in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayaloglu, Ali Adnan; Demir, Nurullah

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports the phenolic, anthocyanin, and volatile compounds and sensory characteristics of 12 cultivars of sweet cherries including cvs. Belge, Bing, Dalbasti, Durona di Cesena, Lambert, Merton Late, Starks Gold, Summit, Sweetheart, Van, Vista, and 0-900 Ziraat. Eight individual phenolic compounds were determined by the HPLC-DAD method. Among these cherries, cvs. Bing, Durona di Cesena, and Lambert contained higher levels of total individual phenolic compounds than the other cultivars. Six anthocyanins were detected in cherries and cyanidin-3-O-rutinoside was principal and it was the highest level in cv. Bing. The major volatiles found were 1-hexanol, (E)-2-hexen-1-ol, benzylalcohol, hexenal, (E)-2-hexenal, and benzaldehyde. Sensory evaluation of the cherries showed that cvs. Belge, Bing, Dalbasti, and Summit have higher textural and flavor scores than others. It was concluded that the same compounds for phenolic or volatiles profiles of sweet cherries were similar in qualitative; however, quantitative differences were observed in these cultivars. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  1. Verification of presence of caprolactam in sprouted achenes of Fagopyrum esculentum Moench and its influence on plant phenolic compound content

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalinová, J.; Tříska, Jan; Vrchotová, Naděžda; Moos, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 157, 15 Aug (2014), s. 380-384 ISSN 0308-8146 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA MŠk(CZ) LD11016 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Common buckwheat * Exudates * Seeds * Germination * Phenolic compounds inhibition * Rutin Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing Impact factor: 3.391, year: 2014

  2. The Daily Dynamics of Phenolic Compounds Content and Guaiacol-Peroksidase Activity in Leaves and Flowers of Alchemilla subcrenata and Veronica chamaedrys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhivetev M.A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The daily dynamics of peroxidase activity and the total content of phenolic compounds in leaves and inflorescences of Alchemilla subcrenata Buser and Veronica chamaedrys L. were studied. Significant changes in the content of phenolic compounds and activity peroksidase depending on the time of day was shown.

  3. Identification and quantification of a major anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory phenolic compound found in basil, lemon, thyme, mint, oregano, rosemary, sage, and thyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basil, lemon thyme, mint, oregano, rosemary, sage, and thyme are in the mint family of plants that are used as culinary herbs world-wide. These herbs contain phenolic compounds that are believed to have strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Therefore, the major phenolic compounds fr...

  4. Identification of seed coat phenolic compounds from differently colored pea varieties and characterization of their antioxidant activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisavljević Nemanja S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenolic composition of seed coats in four differently colored pea varieties (Pisum sativum L. was investigated using UHPLC-LTQ OrbiTrap MS. The obtained findings revealed that the seed coats of the examined pea genotypes possess a unique phenolic composition compared to previously studied European cultivars. In total, 41 phenolic compounds have been identified. The seed coats of the studied cultivars contained certain amounts of rosmarinic acid, rutin, galangin, morin, naringin, hesperetin and pinocembrin as well as ten flavonol glycosides that had not been reported previously. Additionally, the total phenolic content, antioxidant activity and metal chelating capacity of extracts was determined using Folin-Ciocalteu’s method, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging assay, ferric ion-reducing capacity and ferrous ion-chelating capacity assay, respectively. Dark colored genotypes MBK 168 and MBK 173 possessed the highest total phenolic contents as well the strongest antioxidant activities. On the other hand, bright colored genotypes MBK 88 and MBK 90 exhibited the strongest metal-chelating capacities. The examined pea seed coats may be considered as important potential contributors to human health due to the presence of bioactive phenolic constituents. In addition, our results could be used as a guideline for breeding new pea cultivars with high antioxidant activities applicable in the formulation of functional food products. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173005 i br. 172017

  5. Genetic variation of carotenoids, vitamin E and phenolic compounds in Provitamin A biofortified maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzhingi, Tawanda; Palacios-Rojas, Natalia; Miranda, Alejandra; Cabrera, Maria L; Yeum, Kyung-J; Tang, Guangwen

    2017-02-01

    Biofortified maize is not only a good vehicle for provitamin A carotenoids for vitamin A deficient populations in developing countries but also a source of vitamin E, tocochromanols and phenolic compounds, which have antioxidant properties. Using high-performance liquid chromatography and a total antioxidant performance assay, the present study analyzed the antioxidant variation and antioxidant activity of 36 provitamin A improved maize hybrids and one common yellow maize hybrid. The ranges of major carotenoids in provitamin A carotenoids biofortified maize were zeaxanthin [1.2-13.2 µg g -1 dry weight (DW)], β-cryptoxanthin (1.3-8.8 µg g -1 DW) and β-carotene (1.3-8.0 µg g -1 DW). The ranges of vitamin E compounds identified in provitamin A carotenoids biofortified maize were α-tocopherol (3.4-34.3 µg g -1 DW), γ-tocopherol (5.9-54.4 µg g -1 DW), α-tocotrienol (2.6-19.5 µg g -1 DW) and γ-tocotrienol (45.4 µg g -1 DW). The ranges of phenolic compounds were γ-oryzanol (0.0-0.8 mg g -1 DW), ferulic acid (0.4-3.6 mg g -1 DW) and p-coumaric acid (0.1-0.45 mg g -1 DW). There was significant correlation between α-tocopherol and cis isomers of β-carotene (P < 0.01). Tocotrienols were correlated with α-tocopherol and γ-oryzanol (P < 0.01). Genotype was significant in determining the variation in β-cryptoxanthin, β-carotene, α-tocopherol and γ-tocopherol contents (P < 0.01). A genotype × environment interaction was observed for γ-tocopherol content (P < 0.01). © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Glycosylation of phenolic compounds by the site-mutated β-galactosidase from Lactobacillus bulgaricus L3.

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    Lili Lu

    Full Text Available β-Galactosidases can transfer the galactosyl from lactose or galactoside donors to various acceptors and thus are especially useful for the synthesis of important glycosides. However, these enzymes have limitations in the glycosylation of phenolic compounds that have many physiological functions. In this work, the β-galactosidase from Lactobacillus bulgaricus L3 was subjected to site-saturation mutagenesis at the W980 residue. The recombinant pET-21b plasmid carrying the enzyme gene was used as the template for mutation. The mutant plasmids were transformed into Escherichia coli cells for screening. One recombinant mutant, W980F, exhibited increased yield of glycoside when using hydroquinone as the screening acceptor. The enzyme was purified and the effects of the mutation on enzyme properties were determined in detail. It showed improved transglycosylation activity on novel phenolic acceptors besides hydroquinone. The yields of the glycosides produced from phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol were increased by 7.6% to 53.1%. Moreover, it generated 32.3% glycosides from the pyrogallol that could not be glycosylated by the wild-type enzyme. Chemical structures of these glycoside products were further determined by MS and NMR analysis. Thus, a series of novel phenolic galactosides were achieved by β-galactosidase for the first time. This was a breakthrough in the enzymatic galactosylation of the challenging phenolic compounds of great values.

  7. Effect of Spanish style processing on the phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of Algerian green table olives

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    Mettouchi, S.; Sacchi, R.; Ould Moussa, Z.E.D.; Paduano, A.; Savarese, M.; Tamendjari, A.

    2016-07-01

    The study was carried out on seven Algerian olive cultivars to report the effect of Spanish style processing on individual and total phenolic compounds and the changes that occur in antioxidant capacity. The results indicate that the treatment leads to losses in phenolic contents which are cultivar dependent. Sigoise is the least affected variety (12.25%) and Azzeradj from Seddouk the most affected one (94.80%). The phenolic profile shows drastic changes after processing. Hydroxytyrosol is dominant in processed olives (14.42–545.42 mg·100 g−1) while oleuropein is the major phenolic compound in fresh olives (994.27 mg·100 g−1). As a consequence to the loss in phenolic content, substantial reductions in the antioxidant activities of the extracts are noted. They are estimated to be 13.12–92.75% in scavenging activity against the DPPH radical, 37.78–93.98% in reducing capacity, 59.45–97.94% in the hydrogen peroxide radical and 7.26–51.66% in the inhibition bleaching of β-carotene. Among the processed varieties, only Sigoise presented a positive value of RACI (relative antioxidant capacity index). (Author)

  8. Glycosylation of phenolic compounds by the site-mutated β-galactosidase from Lactobacillus bulgaricus L3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lili; Xu, Lijuan; Guo, Yuchuan; Zhang, Dayu; Qi, Tingting; Jin, Lan; Gu, Guofeng; Xu, Li; Xiao, Min

    2015-01-01

    β-Galactosidases can transfer the galactosyl from lactose or galactoside donors to various acceptors and thus are especially useful for the synthesis of important glycosides. However, these enzymes have limitations in the glycosylation of phenolic compounds that have many physiological functions. In this work, the β-galactosidase from Lactobacillus bulgaricus L3 was subjected to site-saturation mutagenesis at the W980 residue. The recombinant pET-21b plasmid carrying the enzyme gene was used as the template for mutation. The mutant plasmids were transformed into Escherichia coli cells for screening. One recombinant mutant, W980F, exhibited increased yield of glycoside when using hydroquinone as the screening acceptor. The enzyme was purified and the effects of the mutation on enzyme properties were determined in detail. It showed improved transglycosylation activity on novel phenolic acceptors besides hydroquinone. The yields of the glycosides produced from phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol were increased by 7.6% to 53.1%. Moreover, it generated 32.3% glycosides from the pyrogallol that could not be glycosylated by the wild-type enzyme. Chemical structures of these glycoside products were further determined by MS and NMR analysis. Thus, a series of novel phenolic galactosides were achieved by β-galactosidase for the first time. This was a breakthrough in the enzymatic galactosylation of the challenging phenolic compounds of great values.

  9. Quantification of Phenolic Compounds and In Vitro Radical Scavenging Abilities with Leaf Extracts from Two Varieties of Psidium guajava L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarena-Tello, Julio César; Martínez-Flores, Héctor Eduardo; Garnica-Romo, Ma Guadalupe; Padilla-Ramírez, José Saúl; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Alvarez-Cortes, Osvaldo; Bartolomé-Camacho, María Carmen; Rodiles-López, José Octavio

    2018-02-27

    Guava leaf ( Psidium guajava L.) extracts are used in both traditional medicine and the pharmaceutical industry. The antioxidant compounds in P. guajava leaves can have positive effects including anti-inflammatory, anti-hyperglycemic, hepatoprotective, analgesic, anti-cancer effects, as well as protecting against cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, phenolic compounds and in vitro antioxidant capacity were measured in extracts obtained with polar and non-polar solvents from leaves of two varieties of guava, Calvillo Siglo XXI and Hidrozac. The quantity of total phenolics and total flavonoids were expressed as equivalents of gallic acid and quercetin, respectively. Hydroxyl radical, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), and Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity using fluorescein (ORAC-FL) in vitro tests were used to assess the radical scavenging abilities of the extracts. The total phenolics were higher in the aqueous fraction of the variety Calvillo Siglo XXI, while in the Hidrozac variety total phenolics were higher in the acetone and chloroform fractions. Total flavonoids were higher in all fractions in the variety Calvillo Siglo XXI. Total phenolics showed a highly positive correlation for ORAC-FL, and a moderately positive correlation with hydroxyl radicals. Finally, total flavonoids showed a slightly positive correlation for ORAC-FL and hydroxyl radicals. Both varieties of guava leaf extract showed excellent antioxidant properties.

  10. Quantification of Phenolic Compounds and In Vitro Radical Scavenging Abilities with Leaf Extracts from Two Varieties of Psidium guajava L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Flores, Héctor Eduardo; Garnica-Romo, Ma. Guadalupe; Padilla-Ramírez, José Saúl; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Alvarez-Cortes, Osvaldo; Bartolomé-Camacho, María Carmen; Rodiles-López, José Octavio

    2018-01-01

    Guava leaf (Psidium guajava L.) extracts are used in both traditional medicine and the pharmaceutical industry. The antioxidant compounds in P. guajava leaves can have positive effects including anti-inflammatory, anti-hyperglycemic, hepatoprotective, analgesic, anti-cancer effects, as well as protecting against cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, phenolic compounds and in vitro antioxidant capacity were measured in extracts obtained with polar and non-polar solvents from leaves of two varieties of guava, Calvillo Siglo XXI and Hidrozac. The quantity of total phenolics and total flavonoids were expressed as equivalents of gallic acid and quercetin, respectively. Hydroxyl radical, 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), and Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity using fluorescein (ORAC-FL) in vitro tests were used to assess the radical scavenging abilities of the extracts. The total phenolics were higher in the aqueous fraction of the variety Calvillo Siglo XXI, while in the Hidrozac variety total phenolics were higher in the acetone and chloroform fractions. Total flavonoids were higher in all fractions in the variety Calvillo Siglo XXI. Total phenolics showed a highly positive correlation for ORAC-FL, and a moderately positive correlation with hydroxyl radicals. Finally, total flavonoids showed a slightly positive correlation for ORAC-FL and hydroxyl radicals. Both varieties of guava leaf extract showed excellent antioxidant properties. PMID:29495514

  11. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of selected medicinal plants and fungi containing phenolic and flavonoid compounds

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    Diaz Patricia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aims to determine the relationship between the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of the thirteen herbs and two fungi extracts, and their total phenolic and flavonoid contents. Methods Antioxidant activities were evaluated by four assays: an antioxidant activity assay using Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a DPPH ((2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay to assess free radical scavenging, an assay assessing ferrous ions or iron (II chelating ability, and a ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP assay. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu and aluminium chloride methods, respectively. Anti-inflammatory activities were determined by measuring the inhibition of nitric oxide and TNF-α production in lipopolysaccharide- and interferon-γ-activated J774A.1 macrophages. Their cytotoxicities against macrophages were determined by MTT assay. Results A positive linear correlation between antioxidant activities and the total phenolic and flavonoid content of the plant extracts was found. The plant extracts with high phenolic and flavonoid content also exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity with good cell viability. Conclusion The selected herbs could be a rich source of antioxidants and free radical scavenging compounds. The levels of phenolic and flavonoid compounds were correlated with the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of the extracts from the herbs.

  12. Quantification of Phenolic Compounds and In Vitro Radical Scavenging Abilities with Leaf Extracts from Two Varieties of Psidium guajava L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio César Camarena-Tello

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Guava leaf (Psidium guajava L. extracts are used in both traditional medicine and the pharmaceutical industry. The antioxidant compounds in P. guajava leaves can have positive effects including anti-inflammatory, anti-hyperglycemic, hepatoprotective, analgesic, anti-cancer effects, as well as protecting against cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, phenolic compounds and in vitro antioxidant capacity were measured in extracts obtained with polar and non-polar solvents from leaves of two varieties of guava, Calvillo Siglo XXI and Hidrozac. The quantity of total phenolics and total flavonoids were expressed as equivalents of gallic acid and quercetin, respectively. Hydroxyl radical, 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, and Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity using fluorescein (ORAC-FL in vitro tests were used to assess the radical scavenging abilities of the extracts. The total phenolics were higher in the aqueous fraction of the variety Calvillo Siglo XXI, while in the Hidrozac variety total phenolics were higher in the acetone and chloroform fractions. Total flavonoids were higher in all fractions in the variety Calvillo Siglo XXI. Total phenolics showed a highly positive correlation for ORAC-FL, and a moderately positive correlation with hydroxyl radicals. Finally, total flavonoids showed a slightly positive correlation for ORAC-FL and hydroxyl radicals. Both varieties of guava leaf extract showed excellent antioxidant properties.

  13. Antibacterial activity of isolated phenolic compounds from cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) against Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Celia; Quirantes-Piné, Rosa; Uberos, José; Jiménez-Sánchez, Cecilia; Peña, Alejandro; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Phenolic compounds from a cranberry extract were isolated in order to assess their contribution to the antibacterial activity against uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli (UPEC). With this purpose, a total of 25 fractions from a cranberry extract were isolated using semipreparative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and characterized based on the results obtained by reversed-phase HPLC coupled to mass spectrometry detection. Then, the effects on UPEC surface hydrophobicity and biofilm formation of the cranberry extract as well as the purest fractions (a total of 13) were tested. As expected, the whole extract presented a powerful antibacterial activity against UPEC while the selected fractions presented a different behavior. Myricetin and quercitrin significantly decreased (p < 0.05) E. coli biofilm formation compared with the control, while dihydroferulic acid glucuronide, procyanidin A dimer, quercetin glucoside, myricetin and prodelphinidin B led to a significant decrease of the surface hydrophobicity compared with the control. The results suggest that apart from proanthocyanidins, other compounds, mainly flavonoids, can act against E. coli biofilm formation and also modify UPEC surface hydrophobicity in vitro, one of the first steps of adhesion.

  14. Novel Protein-Based Solid-Biosensor for Determining Pro-oxidant Activity of Phenolic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyüz, Esin; Başkan, Kevser Sözgen; Tütem, Esma; Apak, Reşat

    2017-07-19

    To develop a protein-based biosensor measuring the pro-oxidant activities of phenolic compounds, egg white proteins were precipitated with calcium chloride to obtain an insoluble calcium proteinate complex. This biosensor was used for the determination of Cu(II)-induced pro-oxidant activity of antioxidants such as gallic acid, catechin, epicatechin, quercetin, chlorogenic acid and myricetin, and ascorbic acid. This assay involved the reduction of Cu(II) ions to Cu(I) by antioxidant compounds (simultaneously giving rise to reactive oxygen species) and binding of the formed Cu(I) to the solid biosensor. The protein-bound Cu(I), an indicator of pro-oxidant activity of antioxidants on proteins, was colorimetrically determined at 450 nm with neocuproine (Nc). The method was applied to synthetic mixtures and herbal (sage, green tea, mint, and marjoram) infusions, and its findings were compared to those of a modified carbonyl detection assay. This low-cost biosensor can be prepared in large quantities and used for a long time.

  15. Influence of TiO2 Nanoparticles on Growth and Phenolic Compounds Production in Photosynthetic Microorganisms

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    Mattia Comotto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (pure anatase and 15% N doped anatase on the growth of Chlorella vulgaris, Haematococcus pluvialis, and Arthrospira platensis was investigated. Results showed that pure anatase can lead to a significant growth inhibition of C. vulgaris and A. platensis (17.0 and 74.1%, resp., while for H. pluvialis the nanoparticles do not cause a significant inhibition. Since in these stress conditions photosynthetic microorganisms can produce antioxidant compounds in order to prevent cell damages, we evaluated the polyphenols content either inside the cells or released in the medium. Although results did not show a significant difference in C. vulgaris, the phenolic concentrations of two other microorganisms were statistically affected by the presence of titanium dioxide. In particular, 15% N doped anatase resulted in a higher production of extracellular antioxidant compounds, reaching the concentration of 65.2 and 68.0 mg gDB-1 for H. pluvialis and A. platensis, respectively.

  16. Bioactive compounds and phenolic-linked functionality of powdered tropical fruit residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Roberta T P; Borges, Kátia C; Medeiros, Maria F; Genovese, Maria I

    2012-12-01

    Tropical fruit residues consisting of seeds, peels and residual pulp generated as by-products of fruit processing industry were investigated for bioactive compounds, the in vitro antioxidant capacity as well as alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase inhibitory activities. Cyanidin, quercetin, ellagic acid (EA) and proanthocyanidins were found in acerola, jambolan, pitanga and cajá-umbu residue powders. Acerola powder had the highest phenolic content (8839.33 mg catechin equivalents (CE)/100 g) and also high-ascorbic acid (AA) concentration (2748.03 mg/100 g), followed by jambolan and pitanga. The greatest 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) inhibition was observed for jambolan (436.76 mmol Trolox eq/g) followed by pitanga (206.68 mmol Trolox eq/g) and acerola (192.60 mmol Trolox eq/g), while acerola had the highest ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay result (7.87 mmol Trolox eq/g). All fruit powders exhibited enzymatic inhibition against alpha-amylase (IC50 ranging from 3.40 to 49.5 mg CE/mL) and alpha-glucosidase (IC50 ranging from 1.15 to 2.37 mg CE/mL). Therefore, acerola, jambolan and pitanga dried residues are promising natural ingredients for food and nutraceutical manufacturers, due to their rich bioactive compound content.

  17. Elicitation Enhanced the Production of Phenolic Compounds and Biological Activities in Hairy Root Cultures of Bitter melon ( Momordica charantia L.

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    Ill-Min Chung

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Momordica charantia (Cucurbitaceae is an important vegetable and also medicinal crop which produces the bioactive compounds for various biological activities with potential uses in human health. The present investigation relates to elicitors of jasmonic acid (JA and salicylic acid (SA to enhance biomass accumulation and phenolic compound production in hairy root cultures of M. charantia. Hairy root cultures were elicited with JA and SA at 0, 25, 50 and 100 μM concentrations respectively. The adding of elicitation to the hairy root cultures on the 15th day of culture and the roots were harvested on day 25. Cultures supplemented with 100 μM JA and SA enhanced the phenolic compounds significantly compared to that of non-elicited hairy root cultures. The biomass of hairy root culture significantly increased by SA whereas decreased in JA elicitation at 100 μM. JA and SA-elicited hairy root cultures significantly produced a higher amount of phenolic compounds (12811.23 and 11939.37µg/g, total phenolic (4.1 and 3.7 mg/g and flavonoid (3.5 and 3.2 mg/g contents than non-elicited hairy root cultures (10964.25 µg/g, 2.8 and 2.5 mg/g. JA and SA-elicited hairy root cultures were significantly higher antioxidant activity of DPPH (84 and 78%, reducing potential (0.53 and 0.48, phosphomolybdenum (3.6 and 3.2 mg/g and ferrous ion chelating assays (80 and 74% than non-elicited hairy root cultures. The higher antimicrobial and anticancer activity were exhibited in JA and SA-elicited than non-elicited hairy root cultures. This protocol can be developed