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Sample records for model oxidative stress

  1. Oxidative stress

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    Osredkar Joško

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The human organism is exposed to the influence of various forms of stress, either physical, psychological or chemical, which all have in common that they may adversely affect our body. A certain amount of stress is always present and somehow directs, promotes or inhibits the functioning of the human body. Unfortunately, we are now too many and too often exposed to excessive stress, which certainly has adverse consequences. This is especially true for a particular type of stress, called oxidative stress. All aerobic organisms are exposed to this type of stress because they produce energy by using oxygen. For this type of stress you could say that it is rather imperceptibly involved in our lives, as it becomes apparent only at the outbreak of certain diseases. Today we are well aware of the adverse impact of radicals, whose surplus is the main cause of oxidative stress. However, the key problem remains the detection of oxidative stress, which would allow us to undertake timely action and prevent outbreak of many diseases of our time. There are many factors that promote oxidative stress, among them are certainly a fast lifestyle and environmental pollution. The increase in oxidative stress can also trigger intense physical activity that is directly associated with an increased oxygen consumption and the resulting formation of free radicals. Considering generally positive attitude to physical activity, this fact may seem at first glance contradictory, but the finding has been confimed by several studies in active athletes. Training of a top athlete daily demands great physical effort, which is also reflected in the oxidative state of the organism. However, it should be noted that the top athletes in comparison with normal individuals have a different defense system, which can counteract the negative effects of oxidative stress. Quite the opposite is true for irregular or excessive physical activity to which the body is not adapted.

  2. Oxidative stress in toxicology: established mammalian and emerging piscine model systems.

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    Kelly, K A; Havrilla, C M; Brady, T C; Abramo, K H; Levin, E D

    1998-07-01

    Interest in the toxicological aspects of oxidative stress has grown in recent years, and research has become increasingly focused on the mechanistic aspects of oxidative damage and cellular responses in biological systems. Toxic consequences of oxidative stress at the subcellular level include lipid peroxidation and oxidative damage to DNA and proteins. These effects are often used as end points in the study of oxidative stress. Typically, mammalian species have been used as models to study oxidative stress and to elucidate the mechanisms underlying cellular damage and response, largely because of the interest in human health issues surrounding oxidative stress. However, it is becoming apparent that oxidative stress also affects aquatic organisms exposed to environmental pollutants. Research in fish has demonstrated that mammalian and piscine systems exhibit similar toxicological and adaptive responses to oxidative stress. This suggests that piscine models, in addition to traditional mammalian models, may be useful for further understanding the mechanisms underlying the oxidative stress response.

  3. Evidence of Oxidative Stress in Autism Derived from Animal Models

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    Xue Ming

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder that leads to deficits in social interaction, communication and restricted, repetitive motor movements. Autism is a highly heritable disorder, however, there is mounting evidence to suggest that toxicant-induced oxidative stress may play a role. The focus of this article will be to review our animal model of autism and discuss our evidence that oxidative stress may be a common underlying mechanism of neurodevelopmental damage. We have shown that mice exposed to either methylmercury (MeHg or valproic acid (VPA in early postnatal life display aberrant social, cognitive and motor behavior. Interestingly, early exposure to both compounds has been clinically implicated in the development of autism. We recently found that Trolox, a water-soluble vitamin E derivative, is capable of attenuating a number of neurobehavioral alterations observed in mice postnatally exposed to MeHg. In addition, a number of other investigators have shown that oxidative stress plays a role in neural injury following MeHg exposure both in vitro and in vivo. New data presented here will show that VPA-induced neurobehavioral deficits are attenuated by vitamin E as well and that the level of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, a marker of astrocytic neural injury, is altered following VPA exposure. Collectively, these data indicate that vitamin E and its derivative are capable of protecting against neurobehavioral deficits induced by both MeHg and VPA. This antioxidant protection suggests that oxidative stress may be a common mechanism of injury leading to aberrant behavior in both our animal model as well as in the human disease state.

  4. Oxidative stress in toxicology: established mammalian and emerging piscine model systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, K.A.; Havrilla, C M; Brady, T C; Abramo, K H; Levin, E.D.

    1998-01-01

    Interest in the toxicological aspects of oxidative stress has grown in recent years, and research has become increasingly focused on the mechanistic aspects of oxidative damage and cellular responses in biological systems. Toxic consequences of oxidative stress at the subcellular level include lipid peroxidation and oxidative damage to DNA and proteins. These effects are often used as end points in the study of oxidative stress. Typically, mammalian species have been used as models to study o...

  5. Oxidative stress

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    Stevanović Jelka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The unceasing need for oxygen is in contradiction to the fact that it is in fact toxic to mammals. Namely, its monovalent reduction can have as a consequence the production of short-living, chemically very active free radicals and certain non-radical agents (nitrogen-oxide, superoxide-anion-radicals, hydroxyl radicals, peroxyl radicals, singlet oxygen, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid, and others. There is no doubt that they have numerous positive roles, but when their production is stepped up to such an extent that the organism cannot eliminate them with its antioxidants (superoxide-dismutase, glutathione-peroxidase, catalase, transferrin, ceruloplasmin, reduced glutathion, and others, a series of disorders is developed that are jointly called „oxidative stress.“ The reactive oxygen species which characterize oxidative stress are capable of attacking all main classes of biological macromolecules, actually proteins, DNA and RNA molecules, and in particular lipids. The free radicals influence lipid peroxidation in cellular membranes, oxidative damage to DNA and RNA molecules, the development of genetic mutations, fragmentation, and the altered function of various protein molecules. All of this results in the following consequences: disrupted permeability of cellular membranes, disrupted cellular signalization and ion homeostasis, reduced or loss of function of damaged proteins, and similar. That is why the free radicals that are released during oxidative stress are considered pathogenic agents of numerous diseases and ageing. The type of damage that will occur, and when it will take place, depends on the nature of the free radicals, their site of action and their source. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173034, br. 175061 i br. 31085

  6. In vitro model suggests oxidative stress involved in keratoconus disease

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    Karamichos, D.; Hutcheon, A. E. K.; Rich, C. B.; Trinkaus-Randall, V.; Asara, J. M.; Zieske, J. D.

    2014-04-01

    Keratoconus (KC) affects 1:2000 people and is a disorder where cornea thins and assumes a conical shape. Advanced KC requires surgery to maintain vision. The role of oxidative stress in KC remains unclear. We aimed to identify oxidative stress levels between human corneal keratocytes (HCKs), fibroblasts (HCFs) and keratoconus cells (HKCs). Cells were cultured in 2D and 3D systems. Vitamin C (VitC) and TGF-β3 (T3) were used for 4 weeks to stimulate self-assembled extracellular matrix (ECM). No T3 used as controls. Samples were analyzed using qRT-PCR and metabolomics. qRT-PCR data showed low levels of collagen I and V, as well as keratocan for HKCs, indicating differentiation to a myofibroblast phenotype. Collagen type III, a marker for fibrosis, was up regulated in HKCs. We robustly detected more than 150 metabolites of the targeted 250 by LC-MS/MS per condition and among those metabolites several were related to oxidative stress. Lactate levels, lactate/malate and lactate/pyruvate ratios were elevated in HKCs, while arginine and glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio were reduced. Similar patterns found in both 2D and 3D. Our data shows that fibroblasts exhibit enhanced oxidative stress compared to keratocytes. Furthermore the HKC cells exhibit the greatest level suggesting they may have a myofibroblast phenotype.

  7. Protective mechanisms of Cucumis sativus in diabetes-related models of oxidative stress and carbonyl stress

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    Himan Heidari

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: It can be concluded that C. sativus has protective effects in diabetes complications and can be considered a safe and suitable candidate for decreasing the oxidative stress and carbonyl stress that is typically observed in diabetes mellitus.

  8. Oxidative airway inflammation leads to systemic and vascular oxidative stress in a murine model of allergic asthma.

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    Al-Harbi, Naif O; Nadeem, A; Al-Harbi, Mohamed M; Imam, F; Al-Shabanah, Othman A; Ahmad, Sheikh F; Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M; Bahashwan, Saleh A

    2015-05-01

    Oxidant-antioxidant imbalance plays an important role in repeated cycles of airway inflammation observed in asthma. It is when reactive oxygen species (ROS) overwhelm antioxidant defenses that a severe inflammatory state becomes apparent and may impact vasculature. Several studies have shown an association between airway inflammation and cardiovascular complications; however so far none has investigated the link between airway oxidative stress and systemic/vascular oxidative stress in a murine model of asthma. Therefore, this study investigated the contribution of oxidative stress encountered in asthmatic airways in modulation of vascular/systemic oxidant-antioxidant balance. Rats were sensitized intraperitoneally with ovalbumin (OVA) in the presence of aluminum hydroxide followed by several intranasal (i.n.) challenges with OVA. Rats were then assessed for airway and vascular inflammation, oxidative stress (ROS, lipid peroxides) and antioxidants measured as total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and thiol content. Challenge with OVA led to increased airway inflammation and oxidative stress with a concomitant increase in vascular inflammation and oxidative stress. Oxidative stress in the vasculature was significantly inhibited by antioxidant treatment, N-acetyl cysteine; whereas hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhalation worsened it. Therefore, our study shows that oxidative airway inflammation is associated with vascular/systemic oxidative stress which might predispose these patients to increased cardiovascular risk.

  9. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and dysregulated iron homeostatis in rat models of cardiovascular disease

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    Underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) is considered a risk factor for the exacerbation of air pollution health effects. Therefore, rodent models of CVD are increasingly used to examine mechanisms ofvariation in susceptibility. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and altere...

  10. Temperature Dependent Residual Stress Models for Ultra-High-Temperature Ceramics on High Temperature Oxidation

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    Wang, Ruzhuan; Li, Weiguo

    2016-11-01

    The strength of SiC-depleted layer of ultra-high-temperature ceramics on high temperature oxidation degrades seriously. The research for residual stresses developed within the SiC-depleted layer is important and necessary. In this work, the residual stress evolutions in the SiC-depleted layer and the unoxidized substrate in various stages of oxidation are studied by using the characterization models. The temperature and oxidation time dependent mechanical/thermal properties of each phase in SiC-depleted layer are considered in the models. The study shows that the SiC-depleted layer would suffer from large tensile stresses due to the great temperature changes and the formation of pores on high temperature oxidation. The stresses may lead to the cracking and even the delamination of the oxidation layer.

  11. Temperature Dependent Residual Stress Models for Ultra-High-Temperature Ceramics on High Temperature Oxidation

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    Wang, Ruzhuan; Li, Weiguo

    2017-08-01

    The strength of SiC-depleted layer of ultra-high-temperature ceramics on high temperature oxidation degrades seriously. The research for residual stresses developed within the SiC-depleted layer is important and necessary. In this work, the residual stress evolutions in the SiC-depleted layer and the unoxidized substrate in various stages of oxidation are studied by using the characterization models. The temperature and oxidation time dependent mechanical/thermal properties of each phase in SiC-depleted layer are considered in the models. The study shows that the SiC-depleted layer would suffer from large tensile stresses due to the great temperature changes and the formation of pores on high temperature oxidation. The stresses may lead to the cracking and even the delamination of the oxidation layer.

  12. Oxidative Stress Associated with Neuronal Apoptosis in Experimental Models of Epilepsy

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    Marisela Méndez-Armenta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is considered one of the most common neurological disorders worldwide. Oxidative stress produced by free radicals may play a role in the initiation and progression of epilepsy; the changes in the mitochondrial and the oxidative stress state can lead mechanism associated with neuronal death pathway. Bioenergetics state failure and impaired mitochondrial function include excessive free radical production with impaired synthesis of antioxidants. This review summarizes evidence that suggest what is the role of oxidative stress on induction of apoptosis in experimental models of epilepsy.

  13. Integrative Model of Oxidative Stress Adaptation in the Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans.

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    Chandrasekaran Komalapriya

    Full Text Available The major fungal pathogen of humans, Candida albicans, mounts robust responses to oxidative stress that are critical for its virulence. These responses counteract the reactive oxygen species (ROS that are generated by host immune cells in an attempt to kill the invading fungus. Knowledge of the dynamical processes that instigate C. albicans oxidative stress responses is required for a proper understanding of fungus-host interactions. Therefore, we have adopted an interdisciplinary approach to explore the dynamical responses of C. albicans to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. Our deterministic mathematical model integrates two major oxidative stress signalling pathways (Cap1 and Hog1 pathways with the three major antioxidant systems (catalase, glutathione and thioredoxin systems and the pentose phosphate pathway, which provides reducing equivalents required for oxidative stress adaptation. The model encapsulates existing knowledge of these systems with new genomic, proteomic, transcriptomic, molecular and cellular datasets. Our integrative approach predicts the existence of alternative states for the key regulators Cap1 and Hog1, thereby suggesting novel regulatory behaviours during oxidative stress. The model reproduces both existing and new experimental observations under a variety of scenarios. Time- and dose-dependent predictions of the oxidative stress responses for both wild type and mutant cells have highlighted the different temporal contributions of the various antioxidant systems during oxidative stress adaptation, indicating that catalase plays a critical role immediately following stress imposition. This is the first model to encapsulate the dynamics of the transcriptional response alongside the redox kinetics of the major antioxidant systems during H2O2 stress in C. albicans.

  14. Integrative Model of Oxidative Stress Adaptation in the Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans.

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    Komalapriya, Chandrasekaran; Kaloriti, Despoina; Tillmann, Anna T; Yin, Zhikang; Herrero-de-Dios, Carmen; Jacobsen, Mette D; Belmonte, Rodrigo C; Cameron, Gary; Haynes, Ken; Grebogi, Celso; de Moura, Alessandro P S; Gow, Neil A R; Thiel, Marco; Quinn, Janet; Brown, Alistair J P; Romano, M Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The major fungal pathogen of humans, Candida albicans, mounts robust responses to oxidative stress that are critical for its virulence. These responses counteract the reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are generated by host immune cells in an attempt to kill the invading fungus. Knowledge of the dynamical processes that instigate C. albicans oxidative stress responses is required for a proper understanding of fungus-host interactions. Therefore, we have adopted an interdisciplinary approach to explore the dynamical responses of C. albicans to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Our deterministic mathematical model integrates two major oxidative stress signalling pathways (Cap1 and Hog1 pathways) with the three major antioxidant systems (catalase, glutathione and thioredoxin systems) and the pentose phosphate pathway, which provides reducing equivalents required for oxidative stress adaptation. The model encapsulates existing knowledge of these systems with new genomic, proteomic, transcriptomic, molecular and cellular datasets. Our integrative approach predicts the existence of alternative states for the key regulators Cap1 and Hog1, thereby suggesting novel regulatory behaviours during oxidative stress. The model reproduces both existing and new experimental observations under a variety of scenarios. Time- and dose-dependent predictions of the oxidative stress responses for both wild type and mutant cells have highlighted the different temporal contributions of the various antioxidant systems during oxidative stress adaptation, indicating that catalase plays a critical role immediately following stress imposition. This is the first model to encapsulate the dynamics of the transcriptional response alongside the redox kinetics of the major antioxidant systems during H2O2 stress in C. albicans.

  15. Chemometrics models for assessment of oxidative stress risk in chrome-electroplating workers.

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    Zendehdel, Rezvan; Shetab-Boushehri, Seyed Vahid; Azari, Mansoor R; Hosseini, Vajihe; Mohammadi, Hamidreza

    2015-04-01

    Oxidative stress is the main cause of hexavalant chromium-induced damage in chrome electroplating workers. The main goal of this study is toxicity analysis and the possibility of toxicity risk categorizing in the chrome electroplating workers based on oxidative stress parameters as prognostic variables. We assessed blood chromium levels and biomarkers of oxidative stress such as lipid peroxidation, thiol (SH) groups and antioxidant capacity of plasma. Data were subjected to principle component analysis (PCA) and artificial neuronal network (ANN) to obtain oxidative stress pattern for chrome electroplating workers. Blood chromium levels increased from 4.42 ppb to 10.6 ppb. Induction of oxidative stress was observed by increased in lipid peroxidation (22.38 ± 10.47 μM versus 14.74 ± 4.82 μM, p < 0.0008), decreased plasma antioxidant capacity (3.17 ± 1.35 μM versus 7.74 ± 4.45 μM, p < 0.0001) and plasma total thiol (SH groups) (0.21 ± 0.07 μM versus 0.45 ± 0.41 μM, p < 0.0042) in comparison to controls. Based on the oxidative parameters, two groups were identified by PCA methods. One category is workers with the risk of oxidative stress and second group is subjects with probable risk of oxidative stress induction. ANN methods can predict oxidative-risk category for assessment of toxicity induction in chrome electroplaters. The result showed multivariate modeling can be interpreted as the induced biochemical toxicity in the workers exposed to hexavalent chromium. Different occupation groups were assessed on the basis of risk level of oxidative stress which could further justify proceeding engineering control measures.

  16. Modelling and engineering of stress based controlled oxidation effects for silicon nanostructure patterning

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    Han, Xiang-Lei; Larrieu, Guilhem; Krzeminski, Christophe

    2013-12-01

    Silicon nanostructure patterning with tight geometry control is an important challenge at the bottom level. In that context, stress based controlled oxidation appears to be an efficient tool for precise nanofabrication. Here, we investigate the stress-retarded oxidation phenomenon in various silicon nanostructures (nanobeams, nanorings and nanowires) at both the experimental and the theoretical levels. Different silicon nanostructures have been fabricated by a top-down approach. Complex dependence of the stress build-up on the nano-object’s dimension, shape and size has been demonstrated experimentally and physically explained by modelling. For the oxidation of a two-dimensional nanostructure (nanobeam), relative independence to size effects has been observed. On the other hand, radial stress increase with geometry downscaling of a one-dimensional nanostructure (nanowire) has been carefully emphasized. The study of shape engineering by retarded oxidation effects for vertical silicon nanowires is finally discussed.

  17. Oxidative Stress in BPH

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    Murat Savas

    2009-01-01

    The present study has shown that there were not relationship between potency of oxidative stress and BPH. Further well designed studies should be planned to find out whether the oxidative stress-related parameters play role in BPH as an interesting pathology in regard of the etiopathogenesis. Keywords: benign prostatic hyperplasia, oxidative stress, prostate

  18. Oxidative Stress in Neurodegeneration

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    Varsha Shukla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases. Major source of oxidative stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS is related to mitochondria as an endogenous source. Although there is ample evidence from tissues of patients with neurodegenerative disorders of morphological, biochemical, and molecular abnormalities in mitochondria, it is still not very clear whether the oxidative stress itself contributes to the onset of neurodegeneration or it is part of the neurodegenerative process as secondary manifestation. This paper begins with an overview of how oxidative stress occurs, discussing various oxidants and antioxidants, and role of oxidative stress in diseases in general. It highlights the role of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The last part of the paper describes the role of oxidative stress causing deregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 hyperactivity associated with neurodegeneration.

  19. Influence of Turmeric Rhizome Powder diets on decreasing oxidative stress caused by heat stress inbroiler model

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    Seyyed Javad Hosseini-Vashan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS increases during oxidative stress conditions, which stimulates diabetes, inflammatory reactions, rheumatism and anemia. Some antioxidant properties of turmeric rhizome powder (TRP were revealed by previous researchers. The present study was conducted to evaluate the influence of TRP on decreasing effects of oxidative stress resulted from heat stress in broiler chickens.   Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, two-hundred-sixty-four 1-day-old broilers were divided into 3 dietary treatments. The dietary treatments involved 0(control, 0.4 and 0.8% turmeric rhizome powder (cases. In order to create oxidative stress, the ambient temperature was daily raised from 21 to 33oc for 5 hours (11a.m-4p.m throughout the 28th-42nd days. Blood lipids, Glutathione peroxidase (GPx ,superoxide dismutase (SOD, and Tiobarbituric acid reaction score (TBARS were determined at the end of the experiment.   Results: The results revealed that total cholesterol and triglyceride were not affected. The 0.4 TRP diet decreased blood LDL (46.7±3.01 compared to basal group (52.0±2.17. HDL increased in broilers fed 0.8% TRP (74.0 ± 3.87 compared to chickens with basal diet (63.7± 2.98. Enzyme activity of GPx improved in broilers fed TRP diets (225.9± 11.52 as compared to chickens with basal diet(183.1± 8.52 however, the TRP diet did not affect enzyme activity of SOD (P > 0.05. The TBARS index decreased in broilers fed TRP (0.76 ± 0.0052 in basal vs.0.49 ± 0.0032 in 0.8% TRP.   Conclusion: The major bioactive component of TRP is Curcumin that can improve the antioxidant properties under oxidative stress and high ambient temperature.

  20. Oxidative stress and myocarditis.

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    Tada, Yuko; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide are produced highly in myocarditis. ROS, which not only act as effectors for pathogen killing but also mediate signal transduction in the stress responsive pathways, are closely related with both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, oxidative stress overwhelming the capacity of anti-oxidative system generated in severe inflammation has been suggested to damage tissues and exacerbate inflammation. Oxidative stress worsens the autoimmunological process of myocarditis, and suppression of the anti-oxidative system and long-lasting oxidative stress could be one of the pathological mechanisms of cardiac remodeling leading to inflammatory cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is considered to be one of the promising treatment targets of myocarditis. Evidences of anti-oxidative treatments in myocarditis have not been fully established. Basic strategies of anti-oxidative treatments include inhibition of ROS production, activation of anti-oxidative enzymes and elimination of generated free radicals. ROS are produced by mitochondrial respiratory chain reactions and enzymes including NADPH oxidases, cyclooxygenase, and xanthine oxidase. Other systems involved in inflammation and stress response, such as NF-κB, Nrf2/Keap1, and neurohumoral factors also influence oxidative stress in myocarditis. The efficacy of anti-oxidative treatments could also depend on the etiology and the phases of myocarditis. We review in this article the pathological significance of ROS and oxidative stress, and the potential anti-oxidative treatments in myocarditis.

  1. Oxidative stress-driven parvalbumin interneuron impairment as a common mechanism in models of schizophrenia

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    Steullet, P; Cabungcal, J-H; Coyle, J; Didriksen, M; Gill, K; Grace, A A; Hensch, T K; LaMantia, A-S; Lindemann, L; Maynard, T M; Meyer, U; Morishita, H; O'Donnell, P; Puhl, M; Cuenod, M; Do, K Q

    2017-01-01

    Parvalbumin inhibitory interneurons (PVIs) are crucial for maintaining proper excitatory/inhibitory balance and high-frequency neuronal synchronization. Their activity supports critical developmental trajectories, sensory and cognitive processing, and social behavior. Despite heterogeneity in the etiology across schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder, PVI circuits are altered in these psychiatric disorders. Identifying mechanism(s) underlying PVI deficits is essential to establish treatments targeting in particular cognition. On the basis of published and new data, we propose oxidative stress as a common pathological mechanism leading to PVI impairment in schizophrenia and some forms of autism. A series of animal models carrying genetic and/or environmental risks relevant to diverse etiological aspects of these disorders show PVI deficits to be all accompanied by oxidative stress in the anterior cingulate cortex. Specifically, oxidative stress is negatively correlated with the integrity of PVIs and the extracellular perineuronal net enwrapping these interneurons. Oxidative stress may result from dysregulation of systems typically affected in schizophrenia, including glutamatergic, dopaminergic, immune and antioxidant signaling. As convergent end point, redox dysregulation has successfully been targeted to protect PVIs with antioxidants/redox regulators across several animal models. This opens up new perspectives for the use of antioxidant treatments to be applied to at-risk individuals, in close temporal proximity to environmental impacts known to induce oxidative stress. PMID:28322275

  2. Therapeutic attenuation of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in neurotoxin models of Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Stack, Edward C.; Ferro, Joellyn L.; Kim, Jinho; Del Signore, Steven J.; Goodrich, Sarah; Matson, Samantha; Hunt, Bonnie B.; Cormier, Kerry; Smith, Karen; Matson, Wayne R.; Ryu, Hoon; Ferrante, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic attenuation of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in neurotoxin models of Parkinson?s disease correspondence: Corresponding author. GRECC Unit 182B, Bedford VA Medical Center, 200 Springs Road, Bedford, MA 01730, USA. Tel.: +1 781 687 2908; fax: +1 781 687 3515. (Ferrante, Robert J.) (Ferrante, Robert J.) Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine - Boston--> , MA 02118--> ...

  3. Oxidative stress contributes to outcome severity in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia

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    Patricia P. Jumbo-Lucioni

    2013-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a genetic disorder that results from profound loss of galactose-1P-uridylyltransferase (GALT. Affected infants experience a rapid escalation of potentially lethal acute symptoms following exposure to milk. Dietary restriction of galactose prevents or resolves the acute sequelae; however, many patients experience profound long-term complications. Despite decades of research, the mechanisms that underlie pathophysiology in classic galactosemia remain unclear. Recently, we developed a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia and demonstrated that, like patients, GALT-null Drosophila succumb in development if exposed to galactose but live if maintained on a galactose-restricted diet. Prior models of experimental galactosemia have implicated a possible association between galactose exposure and oxidative stress. Here we describe application of our fly genetic model of galactosemia to the question of whether oxidative stress contributes to the acute galactose sensitivity of GALT-null animals. Our first approach tested the impact of pro- and antioxidant food supplements on the survival of GALT-null and control larvae. We observed a clear pattern: the oxidants paraquat and DMSO each had a negative impact on the survival of mutant but not control animals exposed to galactose, and the antioxidants vitamin C and α-mangostin each had the opposite effect. Biochemical markers also confirmed that galactose and paraquat synergistically increased oxidative stress on all cohorts tested but, interestingly, the mutant animals showed a decreased response relative to controls. Finally, we tested the expression levels of two transcripts responsive to oxidative stress, GSTD6 and GSTE7, in mutant and control larvae exposed to galactose and found that both genes were induced, one by more than 40-fold. Combined, these results implicate oxidative stress and response as contributing factors in the acute galactose sensitivity of GALT-null Drosophila and, by

  4. Oxidative stress contributes to outcome severity in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia P; Hopson, Marquise L; Hang, Darwin; Liang, Yongliang; Jones, Dean P; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2013-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a genetic disorder that results from profound loss of galactose-1P-uridylyltransferase (GALT). Affected infants experience a rapid escalation of potentially lethal acute symptoms following exposure to milk. Dietary restriction of galactose prevents or resolves the acute sequelae; however, many patients experience profound long-term complications. Despite decades of research, the mechanisms that underlie pathophysiology in classic galactosemia remain unclear. Recently, we developed a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia and demonstrated that, like patients, GALT-null Drosophila succumb in development if exposed to galactose but live if maintained on a galactose-restricted diet. Prior models of experimental galactosemia have implicated a possible association between galactose exposure and oxidative stress. Here we describe application of our fly genetic model of galactosemia to the question of whether oxidative stress contributes to the acute galactose sensitivity of GALT-null animals. Our first approach tested the impact of pro- and antioxidant food supplements on the survival of GALT-null and control larvae. We observed a clear pattern: the oxidants paraquat and DMSO each had a negative impact on the survival of mutant but not control animals exposed to galactose, and the antioxidants vitamin C and α-mangostin each had the opposite effect. Biochemical markers also confirmed that galactose and paraquat synergistically increased oxidative stress on all cohorts tested but, interestingly, the mutant animals showed a decreased response relative to controls. Finally, we tested the expression levels of two transcripts responsive to oxidative stress, GSTD6 and GSTE7, in mutant and control larvae exposed to galactose and found that both genes were induced, one by more than 40-fold. Combined, these results implicate oxidative stress and response as contributing factors in the acute galactose sensitivity of GALT-null Drosophila and

  5. Paeoniflorin Attenuated Oxidative Stress in Rat COPD Model Induced by Cigarette Smoke

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    Jinpei Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Paeoniflorin (PF, a monoterpene glucoside, might have an effect on the oxidative stress. However, the mechanism is still unknown. In this study, we made the COPD model in Sprague-Dawley (SD rats by exposing them to the smoke of 20 cigarettes for 1 hour/day and 6 days/week, for 12 weeks, 24 weeks, or 36 weeks. Our findings suggested that smoke inhalation can trigger the oxidative stress from the very beginning. A 24-week treatment of PF especially in the dosage of 40 mg/kg·d can attenuate oxygen stress by partially quenching reactive oxygen species (ROS and upregulating antioxidant enzymes via an Nrf2-dependent mechanism.

  6. Increased pulmonary arteriolar tone associated with lung oxidative stress and nitric oxide in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

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    Roberts, Andrew M; Jagadapillai, Rekha; Vaishnav, Radhika A; Friedland, Robert P; Drinovac, Robert; Lin, Xingyu; Gozal, Evelyne

    2016-09-01

    Vascular dysfunction and decreased cerebral blood flow are linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Loss of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) and oxidative stress in human cerebrovascular endothelium increase expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and enhance production of the Aβ peptide, suggesting that loss of endothelial NO contributes to AD pathology. We hypothesize that decreased systemic NO bioavailability in AD may also impact lung microcirculation and induce pulmonary endothelial dysfunction. The acute effect of NO synthase (NOS) inhibition on pulmonary arteriolar tone was assessed in a transgenic mouse model (TgAD) of AD (C57BL/6-Tg(Thy1-APPSwDutIowa)BWevn/Mmjax) and age-matched wild-type controls (C57BL/6J). Arteriolar diameters were measured before and after the administration of the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME Lung superoxide formation (DHE) and formation of nitrotyrosine (3-NT) were assessed as indicators of oxidative stress, inducible NOS (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) expression as indicators of inflammation. Administration of L-NAME caused either significant pulmonary arteriolar constriction or no change from baseline tone in wild-type (WT) mice, and significant arteriolar dilation in TgAD mice. DHE, 3-NT, TNF-α, and iNOS expression were higher in TgAD lung tissue, compared to WT mice. These data suggest L-NAME could induce increased pulmonary arteriolar tone in WT mice from loss of bioavailable NO In contrast, NOS inhibition with L-NAME had a vasodilator effect in TgAD mice, potentially caused by decreased reactive nitrogen species formation, while significant oxidative stress and inflammation were present. We conclude that AD may increase pulmonary microvascular tone as a result of loss of bioavailable NO and increased oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that AD may have systemic microvascular implications beyond central neural control mechanisms.

  7. Determination of oxidative stress and effect of erdosteine on rhinitis medicamentosa in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokuyucu, Recep; Cevik, Cengiz; Ozler, Gul Soylu; Ozgur, Tumay; Arli, Cengiz; Sefil, Fatih; Yonden, Zafer

    2014-11-05

    We aimed to determine the presence of oxidative stress in rhinitis medicamentosa (RM) and to evaluate the effect of erdosteine (ED) on mucosal changes in a rat model. Twenty-four male rats were used in this experimental study. Three groups were created. Group 1 (n=8) was the control group. Two puffs of 0.05% oxymetazolin were sprayed into the nasal cavities of the remaining rats (n=16) three times daily for eight weeks. One of these 16 rats was scarified at the end of the eight weeks and examined to confirm the presence of RM. Seven of the remaining 16 rats were killed, and venous blood samples were taken (Group 2). Group 3 (n=8) received 10mg/kg of an ED suspension orally for seven days. All rats were put on formalin for light microscopy. The total antioxidant status (TAS) was similar in all groups (p=0.073). The total oxidative status (TOS) of the RM group was significantly higher than that of the control group and RM+ED group (Group 3) (p=0.003 and p=0.011, respectively). The pathological recovery of the nasal mucosa of the rats was similar in the RM+ED and control groups. The TOS was high in this RM rat model, and oxidative stress was associated with RM. ED significantly ameliorated nasal mucosal changes induced by RM, suggesting that oxidative stress may play an important role in the pathophysiology of this condition.

  8. Oxidative stress and ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch-Machin, M A; Bowman, A

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress is the resultant damage due to redox imbalances (increase in destructive free radicals [reactive oxygen species (ROS)] and reduction in antioxidant protection/pathways) and is linked to ageing in many tissues including skin. In ageing skin there are bioenergetic differences between keratinocytes and fibroblasts which provide a potential ageing biomarker. The differences in skin bioenergy are part of the mitochondrial theory of ageing which remains one of the most widely accepted ageing theories describing subsequent increasing free radical generation. Mitochondria are the major source of cellular oxidative stress and form part of the vicious cycle theory of ageing. External and internal sources of oxidative stress include UVR/IR, pollution (environment), lifestyle (exercise and diet), alcohol and smoking all of which may potentially impact on skin although many exogenous actives and endogenous antioxidant defence systems have been described to help abrogate the increased stress. This also links to differences in skin cell types in terms of the UVR action spectrum for nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage (the latter a previously described UVR biomarker in skin). Recent work associates bioenergy production and oxidative stress with pigment production thereby providing another additional potential avenue for targeted anti-ageing intervention in skin. This new data supporting the detrimental effects of the numerous wavelengths of UVR may aid in the development of cosmetic/sunscreen design to reduce the effects of photoageing. Recently, complex II of the mitochondrial electron transport chain appears to be more important than previously thought in the generation of free radicals (suggested predominantly by non-human studies). We investigated the relationship between complex II and ageing using human skin as a model tissue. The rate of complex II activity per unit of mitochondria was determined in fibroblasts and keratinocytes cultured from skin covering

  9. Oxidative stress is increased in C. elegans models of Huntington's disease but does not contribute to polyglutamine toxicity phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiela, Emily; Dues, Dylan J; Senchuk, Megan M; Van Raamsdonk, Jeremy M

    2016-12-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an adult onset neurodegenerative disorder for which there is currently no cure. While HD patients and animal models of the disease exhibit increased oxidative damage, it is currently uncertain to what extent oxidative stress contributes to disease pathogenesis. In this work, we use a genetic approach to define the role of oxidative stress in HD. We find that a C. elegans model of HD expressing a disease-length polyglutamine tract in the body wall muscle is hypersensitive to oxidative stress and shows an upregulation of antioxidant defense genes, indicating that the HD worm model has increased levels of oxidative stress. To determine whether this increase in oxidative stress contributes to the development of polyglutamine-toxicity phenotypes in this HD model, we examined the effect of deleting individual superoxide dismutase (sod) genes in the HD worm model. As predicted, we found that deletion of sod genes in the HD worm model resulted in a clear increase in sensitivity to oxidative stress. However, we found that increasing oxidative stress in the HD worm model did not exacerbate deficits caused by polyglutamine toxicity. We confirmed these observations in two worm models expressing disease-length polyglutamine tracts in neurons. Furthermore, we found that treatment with antioxidants failed to rescue movement deficits or decrease aggregation in HD worm models. Combined, this suggests that the increase in oxidative stress in worm models of HD does not contribute to the phenotypic deficits observed in these worms, and provides a possible explanation for the failure of antioxidants in HD clinical trials.

  10. Early life and oxidative stress in psychiatric disorders: what can we learn from animal models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhillaj, Emanuela; Morgese, Maria Grazia; Trabace, Luigia

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex pathology characterized by the occurrence of a variety of symptoms classified as positive, negative and cognitive. Although the exact etiopathogenesis of this disorder has not been unraveled yet, many theories have been endorsed during the last years. Among these, the neurochemical theories have been the most suited, considering the dopaminergic and glutamatergic dysfunctions to be mainly responsible for psychotic symptoms. However, the lack of efficacy of the available drugs, namely antipsychotics, toward negative and cognitive symptoms led to hypothesize alternative approaches. In this regard, the neurodevelopmental theory of schizophrenia has emerged, proposing the association between the occurrence of environmental risk factors in early-life and the development of psychosis in late-life. In particular, exposure to early life stressing situations, such as pre- and peri-natal stress, has been suggested as a risk factor to d evelop psychopathologies in adulthood in people genetically predisposed. A crucial support in favor of this hypothesis came from neurodevelopmental animal models of schizophrenia, such as maternal malnutrition, maternal deprivation, maternal infections as well as post-weaning social isolation rearing. Moreover, data from these models, corroborated by clinical findings, indicate that oxidative and nitrosative stress play a crucial role in the etiopathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. In the present work, we reviewed the recent progress in literature regarding data available from animal models linking oxidative and nitrosative stress to psychiatric disorders in order to evaluate novel biomarkers of pathology as well as novel therapeutical targets.

  11. 1,4-Dihydropyridine Derivatives: Dihydronicotinamide Analogues-Model Compounds Targeting Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velena, Astrida; Zarkovic, Neven; Gall Troselj, Koraljka; Bisenieks, Egils; Krauze, Aivars; Poikans, Janis; Duburs, Gunars

    2016-01-01

    Many 1,4-dihydropyridines (DHPs) possess redox properties. In this review DHPs are surveyed as protectors against oxidative stress (OS) and related disorders, considering the DHPs as specific group of potential antioxidants with bioprotective capacities. They have several peculiarities related to antioxidant activity (AOA). Several commercially available calcium antagonist, 1,4-DHP drugs, their metabolites, and calcium agonists were shown to express AOA. Synthesis, hydrogen donor properties, AOA, and methods and approaches used to reveal biological activities of various groups of 1,4-DHPs are presented. Examples of DHPs antioxidant activities and protective effects of DHPs against OS induced damage in low density lipoproteins (LDL), mitochondria, microsomes, isolated cells, and cell cultures are highlighted. Comparison of the AOA of different DHPs and other antioxidants is also given. According to the data presented, the DHPs might be considered as bellwether among synthetic compounds targeting OS and potential pharmacological model compounds targeting oxidative stress important for medicinal chemistry.

  12. 1,4-Dihydropyridine Derivatives: Dihydronicotinamide Analogues—Model Compounds Targeting Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrida Velena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many 1,4-dihydropyridines (DHPs possess redox properties. In this review DHPs are surveyed as protectors against oxidative stress (OS and related disorders, considering the DHPs as specific group of potential antioxidants with bioprotective capacities. They have several peculiarities related to antioxidant activity (AOA. Several commercially available calcium antagonist, 1,4-DHP drugs, their metabolites, and calcium agonists were shown to express AOA. Synthesis, hydrogen donor properties, AOA, and methods and approaches used to reveal biological activities of various groups of 1,4-DHPs are presented. Examples of DHPs antioxidant activities and protective effects of DHPs against OS induced damage in low density lipoproteins (LDL, mitochondria, microsomes, isolated cells, and cell cultures are highlighted. Comparison of the AOA of different DHPs and other antioxidants is also given. According to the data presented, the DHPs might be considered as bellwether among synthetic compounds targeting OS and potential pharmacological model compounds targeting oxidative stress important for medicinal chemistry.

  13. 1,4-Dihydropyridine Derivatives: Dihydronicotinamide Analogues—Model Compounds Targeting Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velena, Astrida; Zarkovic, Neven; Gall Troselj, Koraljka; Bisenieks, Egils; Krauze, Aivars; Poikans, Janis; Duburs, Gunars

    2016-01-01

    Many 1,4-dihydropyridines (DHPs) possess redox properties. In this review DHPs are surveyed as protectors against oxidative stress (OS) and related disorders, considering the DHPs as specific group of potential antioxidants with bioprotective capacities. They have several peculiarities related to antioxidant activity (AOA). Several commercially available calcium antagonist, 1,4-DHP drugs, their metabolites, and calcium agonists were shown to express AOA. Synthesis, hydrogen donor properties, AOA, and methods and approaches used to reveal biological activities of various groups of 1,4-DHPs are presented. Examples of DHPs antioxidant activities and protective effects of DHPs against OS induced damage in low density lipoproteins (LDL), mitochondria, microsomes, isolated cells, and cell cultures are highlighted. Comparison of the AOA of different DHPs and other antioxidants is also given. According to the data presented, the DHPs might be considered as bellwether among synthetic compounds targeting OS and potential pharmacological model compounds targeting oxidative stress important for medicinal chemistry. PMID:26881016

  14. Real-world exposure of airborne particulate matter triggers oxidative stress in an animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Guohui; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Sun, Qinghua; Zhang, Kezhong

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a strong link between air pollution and the increase of cardio-pulmonary mortality and morbidity. In particular, inhaled airborne particulate matter (PM) exposure is closely associated with the pathogenesis of air pollution-induced systemic diseases. In this study, we exposed C57BIV6 mice to environmentally relevant PM in fine and ultra fine ranges (diameter < 2.5 μm, PM2.5) using a “real-world” airborne PM exposure system. We investigated the pathophysiologic impact of PM2.5 exposure in the animal model and in cultured primary pulmonary macrophages. We demonstrated that PM2.5 exposure increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in blood vessels in vivo. Furthermore, in vitro PM2.5 exposure experiment suggested that PM2.5 could trigger oxidative stress response, reflected by an increased expression of the anti-oxidative stress enzymes superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) and heme oxygenase-1(HO-1), in mouse primary macrophages. Together, the results obtained through our “real-world” PM exposure approach demonstrated the pathophysiologic effect of ambient PM2.5 exposure on triggering oxidative stress in the specialized organ and cell type of an animal model. Our results and approach will be informative for the research in air pollution-associated physiology and pathology. PMID:21383899

  15. Nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide alterations in chronically stressed rats: a model for nitric oxide in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shang-Feng; Lu, Yun-Rong; Shi, Li-Gen; Wu, Xue-Yan; Sun, Bo; Fu, Xin-Yan; Luo, Jian-Hong; Bao, Ai-Min

    2014-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and NO synthase-1 (NOS1) are involved in the stress response and in depression. We compared NOS-NO alterations in rats exposed to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) with alterations in major depressive disorder (MDD) in humans. In the hypothalamus of male CUS rats we determined NOS activity, and in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) we determined NOS1-immunoreactive (ir) cell densities and co-localization of NOS1 with stress-related neuropeptides corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), vasopressin (AVP) or oxytocin (OXT). We measured plasma NO levels and cortisol in male medicine-naïve MDD patients and plasma NO and corticosterone (CORT) in CUS rats. In the CUS rat total NOS activity in the hypothalamus (P=0.018) and NOS1-ir cell density in the PVN were both significantly decreased (P=0.018), while NOS1 staining was mainly expressed in OXT-ir neurons in this nucleus. Interestingly, plasma NO levels were significantly increased both in male CUS rats (P=0.001) and in male MDD patients (Pdepression.

  16. Staphylococcal response to oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosmarie eGaupp

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococci are a versatile genus of bacteria that are capable of causing acute and chronic infections in diverse host species. The success of staphylococci as pathogens is due in part to their ability to mitigate endogenous and exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress. Endogenous oxidative stress is a consequence of life in an aerobic environment; whereas, exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress are often due to the bacteria’s interaction with host immune systems. To overcome the deleterious effects of oxidative and nitrosative stress, staphylococci have evolved protection, detoxification, and repair mechanisms that are controlled by a network of regulators. In this review, we summarize the cellular targets of oxidative stress, the mechanisms by which staphylococci sense oxidative stress and damage, oxidative stress protection and repair mechanisms, and regulation of the oxidative stress response. When possible, special attention is given to how the oxidative stress defense mechanisms help staphylococci control oxidative stress in the host.

  17. Assessment of oxidative stress parameters of brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mice in acute stress model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulay Hacioglu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Exposing to stress may be associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Therefore, high level of oxidative stress may eventually give rise to accumulation of oxidative damage and development of numerous neurodegenerative diseases. It has been presented that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF supports neurons against various neurodegenerative conditions. Lately, there has been growing evidence that changes in the cerebral neurotrophic support and especially in the BDNF expression and its engagement with ROS might be important in various disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Hence, we aimed to investigate protective effects of BDNF against stress-induced oxidative damage. Materials and Methods: Five- to six-month-old male wild-type and BDNF knock-down mice were used in this study. Activities of catalase (CAT and superoxide dismutase (SOD enzymes, and the amount of malondialdehyde (MDA were assessed in the cerebral homogenates of studied groups in response to acute restraint stress. Results: Exposing to acute physiological stress led to significant elevation in the markers of oxidative stress in the cerebral cortexes of experimental groups. Conclusion: As BDNF-deficient mice were observed to be more susceptible to stress-induced oxidative damage, it can be suggested that there is a direct interplay between oxidative stress indicators and BDNF levels in the brain.

  18. Erythropoietin and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, Kenneth; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Hou, Jinling; Shang, Yan Chen

    2008-05-01

    Unmitigated oxidative stress can lead to diminished cellular longevity, accelerated aging, and accumulated toxic effects for an organism. Current investigations further suggest the significant disadvantages that can occur with cellular oxidative stress that can lead to clinical disability in a number of disorders, such as myocardial infarction, dementia, stroke, and diabetes. New therapeutic strategies are therefore sought that can be directed toward ameliorating the toxic effects of oxidative stress. Here we discuss the exciting potential of the growth factor and cytokine erythropoietin for the treatment of diseases such as cardiac ischemia, vascular injury, neurodegeneration, and diabetes through the modulation of cellular oxidative stress. Erythropoietin controls a variety of signal transduction pathways during oxidative stress that can involve Janus-tyrosine kinase 2, protein kinase B, signal transducer and activator of transcription pathways, Wnt proteins, mammalian forkhead transcription factors, caspases, and nuclear factor kappaB. Yet, the biological effects of erythropoietin may not always be beneficial and may be poor tolerated in a number of clinical scenarios, necessitating further basic and clinical investigations that emphasize the elucidation of the signal transduction pathways controlled by erythropoietin to direct both successful and safe clinical care.

  19. Fatty acid oxidation changes and the correlation with oxidative stress in different preeclampsia-like mouse models.

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    Xiaoyan Ding

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD expression is decreased in placenta of some cases of preeclampsia (PE which may result in free fatty acid (FFA increased. High FFA level will induce oxidative stress, so abnormal long-chain fatty acid-oxidation may participate in the pathogenesis of PE through oxidative stress pathway. METHODS: PE-like groups were ApoC3 transgenic mice with abnormal fatty acid metabolism, classical PE-like models with injection of Nw-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NA or lipopolysaccharide (LPS and the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS mouse model with β2GPI injection (ApoC3+NS, ApoC3+L-NA, L-NA, LPS and β2GPI groups. The control group was wild-type mice with normal saline injection. Except for β2GPI mice, the other mice were subdivided into pre-implantation (Pre and mid-pregnancy (Mid subgroups by injection time. RESULTS: All PE-like groups showed hypertension and proteinuria except ApoC3+NS mice only showed hypertension. Serum FFA levels increased significantly except in LPS group compared to controls (P<0.05. LCHAD mRNA and protein expression in the liver and placenta was significantly higher for ApoC3+NS, ApoC3+L-NA and β2GPI mice and lower for L-NA mice than controls (P<0.05 but did not differ between LPS mice and controls. P47phox mRNA and protein expression in the liver significantly increased in all PE-like groups except LPS group, while P47phox expression in the placenta only significantly increased in L-NA and β2GPI groups. CONCLUSIONS: Abnormal long-chain fatty acid-oxidation may play a different role in different PE-like models and in some cases participate in the pathogenesis of PE through oxidative stress pathway.

  20. Oxidative stress and age-related changes in T cells: is thalassemia a model of accelerated immune system aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatreh-Samani, Mahdi; Esmaeili, Nafiseh; Soleimani, Masoud; Asadi-Samani, Majid; Ghatreh-Samani, Keihan; Shirzad, Hedayatolah

    2016-01-01

    Iron overload in β-thalassemia major occurs mainly due to blood transfusion, an essential treatment for β-thalassemia major patients, which results in oxidative stress. It has been thought that oxidative stress causes elevation of immune system senescent cells. Under this condition, cells normally enhance in aging, which is referred to as premature immunosenescence. Because there is no animal model for immunosenescence, most knowledge on the immunosenescence pattern is based on induction of immunosenescence. In this review, we describe iron overload and oxidative stress in β-thalassemia major patients and how they make these patients a suitable human model for immunosenescence. We also consider oxidative stress in some kinds of chronic virus infections, which induce changes in the immune system similar to β-thalassemia major. In conclusion, a therapeutic approach used to improve the immune system in such chronic virus diseases, may change the immunosenescence state and make life conditions better for β-thalassemia major patients.

  1. Hydroxycitric acid ameliorates inlfammation and oxidative stress in mouse models of multiple sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahdi Goudarzvand; Shahin Khadem Azarian; Abbas Mirshaifey; Gholamreza Azizi; Sanaz Afraei; Somaye Yaslianifard; Saleh Ghiasy; Ghazal Sadri; Mustafa Kalvandi; Tina Alinia; Ali Mohebbi; Reza Yazdani

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxycitric acid (HCA) is derived primarily from the Garcinia plant and is widely used for its anti-in-lfammatory effects. Multiple sclerosis can cause an inlfammatory demyelination and axonal damage. In this study, to validate the hypothesis that HCA exhibits therapeutic effects on multiple sclerosis, we established female C57BL/6 mouse models of multiple sclerosis,i.e., experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, using Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA) emulsion containing myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (35–55). Treatment with HCA at 2 g/kg/d for 3 weeks obviously improved the symptoms of nerve injury of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice, decreased serum interleulin-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, nitric oxide, and malondialdehyde levels, and increased superoxide dismutase and glutathione reduc-tase activities. hTese ifndings suggest that HCA exhibits neuroprotective effects on multiple sclerosis-caused nerve injury through ameliorating inlfammation and oxidative stress.

  2. Infliximab improves endothelial dysfunction in a mouse model of antiphospholipid syndrome: Role of reduced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhamou, Ygal; Miranda, Sébastien; Armengol, Guillaume; Harouki, Najah; Drouot, Laurent; Zahr, Noel; Thuillez, Christian; Boyer, Olivier; Levesque, Hervé; Joannides, Robinson; Richard, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), induces endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and systemic inflammation that may be mediated by TNFα. Thus, we investigated the possible protective effect of the anti-TNFα antibody infliximab (5μg/g) on endothelial function in a mouse APS model (induced by injection of purified human anti-β2GP1-IgG). Seven days after anti-β2GPI-IgG injection, we observed an increase in plasma sVCAM-1 and sE-selectin levels and in aortic mRNA expression of VCAM-1 and E-selectin. This was associated with a decreased endothelium-dependent relaxation of isolated mesenteric arteries to acetylcholine, together with decreased mesenteric eNOS mRNA expression and increased eNOS uncoupling, accompanied by increased iNOS and gp91phox mRNA and increased left ventricular GSH/GSSH ratio. Infliximab significantly improved the NO-mediated relaxing responses to acetylcholine, and induced a decrease in iNOS and gp91phox mRNA expression. The õpro-adhesive and pro-coagulant phenotypes induced by the anti-β2GP1-IgG were also reversed. This study provides the first evidence that TNFα antagonism improves endothelial dysfunction in APS and suggests that endothelial dysfunction is mediated by TNFα and oxidative stress. Therefore, infliximab may be of special relevance in clinical practice.

  3. Daily sesame oil supplement attenuates joint pain by inhibiting muscular oxidative stress in osteoarthritis rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Dur-Zong; Chu, Pei-Yi; Jou, I-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis, affecting approximately 15% of the population. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of sesame oil in controlling OA pain in rats. Rat joint pain was induced by medial meniscal transection in Sprague-Dawley rats and assessed by using hindlimb weight distribution method. Muscular oxidative stress was assessed by determining lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species and circulating antioxidants. Sesame oil significantly decreased joint pain compared with positive control group in a dose-dependent manner. Sesame oil decreased lipid peroxidation in muscle but not in serum. Further, sesame oil significantly decreased muscular superoxide anion and peroxynitrite generations but increased muscular glutathione and glutathione peroxidase levels. Further, sesame oil significantly increased nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor (Nrf2) expression compared with positive control group. We concluded that daily sesame oil supplement may attenuate early joint pain by inhibiting Nrf2-associated muscular oxidative stress in OA rat model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Oxidative stress, neuroendocrine function and behavior in an animal model of extended longevity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berry, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Stress and oxidative stress (OS) might act synergistically to exacerbate the neuronal decay associated with aging. Recent evidence has shown a redox regulation of the function of the glucocorticoid receptors as nuclear transcription factors. The lack of the p66Shc gene reduces OS and increases lifes

  5. Oxidative stress, neuroendocrine function and behavior in an animal model of extended longevity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berry, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Stress and oxidative stress (OS) might act synergistically to exacerbate the neuronal decay associated with aging. Recent evidence has shown a redox regulation of the function of the glucocorticoid receptors as nuclear transcription factors. The lack of the p66Shc gene reduces OS and increases

  6. Sir2 is induced by oxidative stress in a yeast model of Huntington disease and its activation reduces protein aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorolla, M Alba; Nierga, Clara; Rodríguez-Colman, M José; Reverter-Branchat, Gemma; Arenas, Alicia; Tamarit, Jordi; Ros, Joaquim; Cabiscol, Elisa

    2011-06-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of CAG trinucleotide repeats, leading to an elongated polyglutamine sequence (polyQ) in the huntingtin protein. Misfolding of mutant polyQ proteins with expanded tracts results in aggregation, causing cytotoxicity. Oxidative stress in HD has been documented in humans as important to disease progression. Using yeast cells as a model of HD, we report that when grown at high glucose concentration, cells expressing mutant polyQ do not show apparent oxidative stress. At higher cell densities, when glucose becomes limiting and cells are metabolically shifting from fermentation to respiration, protein oxidation and catalase activity increases in relation to the length of the polyQ tract. Oxidative stress, either endogenous as a result of mutant polyQ expression or exogenously generated, increases Sir2 levels. Δ sir2 cells expressing expanded polyQ lengths show signs of oxidative stress even at the early exponential phase. In a wild-type background, isonicotinamide, a Sir2 activator, decreases mutant polyQ aggregation and the stress generated by expanded polyQ. Taken together, these results describe mutant polyQ proteins as being more toxic in respiring cells, causing oxidative stress and an increase in Sir2 levels. Activation of Sir2 would play a protective role against this toxicity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Oxidative stress & male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makker, Kartikeya; Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh

    2009-04-01

    The male factor is considered a major contributory factor to infertility. Apart from the conventional causes for male infertility such as varicocoele, cryptorchidism, infections, obstructive lesions, cystic fibrosis, trauma, and tumours, a new and important cause has been identified: oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a result of the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants in the body. It is a powerful mechanism that can lead to sperm damage, deformity and eventually, male infertility. This review discusses the physiological need for ROS and their role in normal sperm function. It also highlights the mechanism of production and the pathophysiology of ROS in relation to the male reproductive system and enumerate the benefits of incorporating antioxidants in clinical and experimental settings.

  8. Levels of oxidative stress parameters and the protective effects of melatonin in psychosis model rat testis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bekir S.Parlaktas; Birsen Ozyurt; Huseyin Ozyurt; Ayten T.Tunc; Ali Akbas

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effects of melatonin on antioxidant enzyme levels and histopathologic changes in dizocilpine (MK-801)-induced psychosis model rat testis. Methods: A total of 24 adult male Wistar-Albino rats were divided into three groups with 8 in each. Group Ⅰ was used as control. Rats in Group Ⅱ were injected with MK-801 (0.5 mg/kg body weight i.p. for 5 days). In addition to MK-801, melatonin (50 mg/kg body weight i.p. once a day for 5 days) was injected into the rats in Group Ⅲ. The testes were harvested bilaterally for biochemical and histopathological examinations. Antioxidant enzyme activities, malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl and nitric oxide (NO) levels in tes-ticular tissues were analyzed using spectrophotometric analysis methods. Histopathological examinations of the testes were also performed. Results: MK-801 induced testicular damage, which resulted in significant oxidative stress (OS) by increasing the levels of antioxidant enzymes. The malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl and NO levels were increased in testicular tissues of rats. Treatment with melatonin led to significant decrease in oxidative injury.Administration of melatonin also reduced the detrimental histopathologic effects caused by MK-801. Conclusion:The results of the present study showed that MK-801 cause OS in testicular tissues of rats and treatment with melatonin can reduce the harmful effects of MK-801.

  9. Interrelation Between Oxidative Stress and Complement Activation in Models of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol-Lereis, Luciana M; Schäfer, Nicole; Kuhn, Laura B; Rohrer, Bärbel; Pauly, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Millions of individuals older than 50-years suffer from age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Associated with this multifactorial disease are polymorphisms of complement factor genes and a main environmental risk factor-oxidative stress. Until now the linkage between these risk factors for AMD has not been fully understood. Recent studies, integrating results on oxidative stress, complement activation, epidemiology and ocular pathology suggested the following sequence in AMD-etiology: initially, chronic oxidative stress results in modification of proteins and lipids in the posterior of the eye; these tissue alterations trigger chronic inflammation, involving the complement system; and finally, invasive immune cells facilitate pathology in the retina. Here, we summarize the results for animal studies which aim to elucidate this molecular interplay of oxidative events and tissue-specific complement activation in the eye.

  10. Oxidative Stress in Myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosch-Morell Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myopia affected approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide in 2000, and it is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Although optical problems can be corrected by optics or surgical procedures, normal myopia and high myopia are still an unsolved medical problem. They frequently predispose people who have them to suffer from other eye pathologies: retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hemorrhage, cataracts, and so on being one of the main causes of visual deterioration and blindness. Genetic and environmental factors have been associated with myopia. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge in the underlying physiopathological molecular mechanisms has not permitted an adequate diagnosis, prevention, or treatment to be found. Nowadays several pieces of evidence indicate that oxidative stress may help explain the altered regulatory pathways in myopia and the appearance of associated eye diseases. On the one hand, oxidative damage associated with hypoxia myopic can alter the neuromodulation that nitric oxide and dopamine have in eye growth. On the other hand, radical superoxide or peroxynitrite production damage retina, vitreous, lens, and so on contributing to the appearance of retinopathies, retinal detachment, cataracts and so on. The objective of this review is to suggest that oxidative stress is one of the key pieces that can help solve this complex eye problem.

  11. Oxidative stress in myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Bosch-Morell; Salvador, Mérida; Amparo, Navea

    2015-01-01

    Myopia affected approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide in 2000, and it is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Although optical problems can be corrected by optics or surgical procedures, normal myopia and high myopia are still an unsolved medical problem. They frequently predispose people who have them to suffer from other eye pathologies: retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hemorrhage, cataracts, and so on being one of the main causes of visual deterioration and blindness. Genetic and environmental factors have been associated with myopia. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge in the underlying physiopathological molecular mechanisms has not permitted an adequate diagnosis, prevention, or treatment to be found. Nowadays several pieces of evidence indicate that oxidative stress may help explain the altered regulatory pathways in myopia and the appearance of associated eye diseases. On the one hand, oxidative damage associated with hypoxia myopic can alter the neuromodulation that nitric oxide and dopamine have in eye growth. On the other hand, radical superoxide or peroxynitrite production damage retina, vitreous, lens, and so on contributing to the appearance of retinopathies, retinal detachment, cataracts and so on. The objective of this review is to suggest that oxidative stress is one of the key pieces that can help solve this complex eye problem.

  12. Alzheimer's Proteins, Oxidative Stress, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction Interplay in a Neuronal Model of Alzheimer's Disease

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    Antonella Bobba

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss the interplay between beta-amyloid (A peptide, Tau fragments, oxidative stress, and mitochondria in the neuronal model of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs in which the molecular events reminiscent of AD are activated. The identification of the death route and the cause/effect relationships between the events leading to death could be helpful to manage the progression of apoptosis in neurodegeneration and to define antiapoptotic treatments acting on precocious steps of the death process. Mitochondrial dysfunction is among the earliest events linked to AD and might play a causative role in disease onset and progression. Recent studies on CGNs have shown that adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT impairment, due to interaction with toxic N-ter Tau fragment, contributes in a significant manner to bioenergetic failure and mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings open a window for new therapeutic strategies aimed at preserving and/or improving mitochondrial function.

  13. Cardiovascular disease-related parameters and oxidative stress in SHROB rats, a model for metabolic syndrome.

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    Eunice Molinar-Toribio

    Full Text Available SHROB rats have been suggested as a model for metabolic syndrome (MetS as a situation prior to the onset of CVD or type-2 diabetes, but information on descriptive biochemical parameters for this model is limited. Here, we extensively evaluate parameters related to CVD and oxidative stress (OS in SHROB rats. SHROB rats were monitored for 15 weeks and compared to a control group of Wistar rats. Body weight was recorded weekly. At the end of the study, parameters related to CVD and OS were evaluated in plasma, urine and different organs. SHROB rats presented statistically significant differences from Wistar rats in CVD risk factors: total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, apoA1, apoB100, abdominal fat, insulin, blood pressure, C-reactive protein, ICAM-1 and PAI-1. In adipose tissue, liver and brain, the endogenous antioxidant systems were activated, yet there was no significant oxidative damage to lipids (MDA or proteins (carbonylation. We conclude that SHROB rats present significant alterations in parameters related to inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, thrombotic activity, insulin resistance and OS measured in plasma as well as enhanced redox defence systems in vital organs that will be useful as markers of MetS and CVD for nutrition interventions.

  14. Caenorhabditis elegans: A Useful Model for Studying Metabolic Disorders in Which Oxidative Stress Is a Contributing Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Arriola, Elizabeth; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model organism that is invaluable for experimental research because it can be used to recapitulate most human diseases at either the metabolic or genomic level in vivo. This organism contains many key components related to metabolic and oxidative stress networks that could conceivably allow us to increase and integrate information to understand the causes and mechanisms of complex diseases. Oxidative stress is an etiological factor that influences numerous human diseases, including diabetes. C. elegans displays remarkably similar molecular bases and cellular pathways to those of mammals. Defects in the insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling pathway or increased ROS levels induce the conserved phase II detoxification response via the SKN-1 pathway to fight against oxidative stress. However, it is noteworthy that, aside from the detrimental effects of ROS, they have been proposed as second messengers that trigger the mitohormetic response to attenuate the adverse effects of oxidative stress. Herein, we briefly describe the importance of C. elegans as an experimental model system for studying metabolic disorders related to oxidative stress and the molecular mechanisms that underlie their pathophysiology. PMID:24955209

  15. Caenorhabditis elegans: A Useful Model for Studying Metabolic Disorders in Which Oxidative Stress Is a Contributing Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Moreno-Arriola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model organism that is invaluable for experimental research because it can be used to recapitulate most human diseases at either the metabolic or genomic level in vivo. This organism contains many key components related to metabolic and oxidative stress networks that could conceivably allow us to increase and integrate information to understand the causes and mechanisms of complex diseases. Oxidative stress is an etiological factor that influences numerous human diseases, including diabetes. C. elegans displays remarkably similar molecular bases and cellular pathways to those of mammals. Defects in the insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling pathway or increased ROS levels induce the conserved phase II detoxification response via the SKN-1 pathway to fight against oxidative stress. However, it is noteworthy that, aside from the detrimental effects of ROS, they have been proposed as second messengers that trigger the mitohormetic response to attenuate the adverse effects of oxidative stress. Herein, we briefly describe the importance of C. elegans as an experimental model system for studying metabolic disorders related to oxidative stress and the molecular mechanisms that underlie their pathophysiology.

  16. Antioxidant properties of mesenchymal stem cells against oxidative stress in a murine model of colitis.

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    da Costa Gonçalves, Fabiany; Grings, Mateus; Nunes, Natália Schneider; Pinto, Fernanda Otesbelgue; Garcez, Tuane Nerissa Alves; Visioli, Fernanda; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Paz, Ana Helena

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effects of oxidative stress injury in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice treated with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Mice exposed to oral administration of 2% DSS over 7 days presented a high disease activity index and an intense colonic inflammation. Systemic infusion of MSC protected from severe colitis, reducing weight loss and diarrhea while lowering the infiltration of inflammatory cells. Moreover, toxic colitis injury increased oxidative stress. Administration of DSS decreased reduced glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and increased thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances levels in the colon. No alteration was found in catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. Otherwise, MSC transplantation was able to prevent the decrease of GSH levels and SOD activity suggestive of an antioxidant property of MSC. The oxidative stress is a pathomechanism underlying the pathophysiology of colitis and MSC play an important role in preventing the impairment of antioxidants defenses in inflamed colon.

  17. NMR Metabolomics Show Evidence for Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress in a Mouse Model of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

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    Selen, Ebru Selin; Bolandnazar, Zeinab; Tonelli, Marco; Bütz, Daniel E; Haviland, Julia A; Porter, Warren P; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M

    2015-08-07

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with metabolic and endocrine disorders in women of reproductive age. The etiology of PCOS is still unknown. Mice prenatally treated with glucocorticoids exhibit metabolic disturbances that are similar to those seen in women with PCOS. We used an untargeted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics approach to understand the metabolic changes occurring in the plasma and kidney over time in female glucocorticoid-treated (GC-treated) mice. There are significant changes in plasma amino acid levels (valine, tyrosine, and proline) and their intermediates (2-hydroxybutyrate, 4-aminobutyrate, and taurine), whereas in kidneys, the TCA cycle metabolism (citrate, fumarate, and succinate) and the pentose phosphate (PP) pathway products (inosine and uracil) are significantly altered (p metabolic substrates in the plasma and kidneys of treated mice are associated with altered amino acid metabolism, increased cytoplasmic PP, and increased mitochondrial activity, leading to a more oxidized state. This study identifies biomarkers associated with metabolic dysfunction in kidney mitochondria of a prenatal gluococorticoid-treated mouse model of PCOS that may be used as early predictive biomarkers of oxidative stress in the PCOS metabolic disorder in women.

  18. Therapeutic effects of hydrogen saturated saline on rat diabetic model and insulin resistant model via reduction of oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qi-jin; ZHA Xiao-juan; KANG Zhi-min; XU Mao-jin; HUANG Qin; ZOU Da-jin

    2012-01-01

    Background Molecular hydrogen,as a novel antioxidant,has been proven effective in treating many diseases.This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effects of hydrogen saturated saline in treatment of a rat model of diabetes mellitus and a rat model of insulin resistant.Methods A rat diabetes mellitus model was established by feeding a high fat/high carbohydrate diet followed by injection of a small dose of streptozotocin,and an insulin resistant model was induced with a high glucose and high fat diet.Hydrogen saturated saline was administered to rats with both models conditions on a daily basis for eight weeks.A pioglitazone-treated group and normal saline-treated group served as positive and negative controls.The general condition,body weight,blood glucose,blood lipids,and serum insulin levels of rats were examined at the 8th week after treatment.The oxidative stress indices,including serum superoxide dismutase (SOD),glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were also evaluated after eight weeks of treatment using the commercial kits.Results Hydrogen saturated saline showed great efficiency in improving the insulin sensitivity and lowering blood glucose and lipids.Meanwhile,the therapeutic effects of hydrogen saturated saline were superior to those of pioglitazone.Hydrogen saturated saline markedly attenuated the MDA level and elevated the levels of antioxidants SOD and GSH.Conclusion Hydrogen saturated saline may improve the insulin resistance and alleviate the symptoms of diabetes mellitus by reducing the oxidative stress and enhancing the anti-oxidant system.

  19. alpha-Synuclein budding yeast model: toxicity enhanced by impaired proteasome and oxidative stress.

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    Sharma, Nijee; Brandis, Katrina A; Herrera, Sara K; Johnson, Brandon E; Vaidya, Tulaza; Shrestha, Ruja; Debburman, Shubhik K

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder that results from the selective loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Misfolding and aggregation of the protein alpha-synuclein, oxidative damage, and proteasomal impairment are all hypotheses for the molecular cause of this selective neurotoxicity. Here, we describe a Saccharomyces cerevisiae model to evaluate the misfolding, aggregation, and toxicity-inducing ability of wild-type alpha-synuclein and three mutants (A30P, A53T, and A30P/A53T), and we compare regulation of these properties by dysfunctional proteasomes and by oxidative stress. We found prominent localization of wild-type and A53T alpha-synuclein near the plasma membrane, supporting known in vitro lipid-binding ability. In contrast, A30P was mostly cytoplasmic, whereas A30P/A53T displayed both types of fluorescence. Surprisingly, alpha-synuclein was not toxic to several yeast strains tested. When yeast mutants for the proteasomal barrel (doa3-1) were evaluated, delayed alpha-synuclein synthesis and membrane association were observed; yeast mutant for the proteasomal cap (sen3-1) exhibited increased accumulation and aggregation of alpha-synuclein. Both sen3-1and doa3-1 mutants exhibited synthetic lethality with alpha-synuclein. When yeasts were challenged with an oxidant (hydrogen peroxide), alpha-synuclein was extremely lethal to cells that lacked manganese superoxide dismutase Mn-SOD (sod2Delta) but not to cells that lacked copper, zinc superoxide dismutase Cu,Zn-SOD (sod1Delta). Despite the toxicity, sod2Delta cells never displayed intracellular aggregates of alpha-synuclein. We suggest that the toxic alpha-synuclein species in yeast are smaller than the visible aggregates, and toxicity might involve alpha-synuclein membrane association. Thus, yeasts have emerged effective organisms for characterizing factors and mechanisms that regulate alpha-synuclein toxicity.

  20. A blueberry enriched diet attenuates nephropathy in a rat model of hypertension via reduction in oxidative stress

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    Objective: To assess renoprotective effects of a blueberry-enriched diet in a rat model of hypertension. Background: Oxidative stress (OS) appears to be involved in the development of hypertension and related renal injury. Pharmacological antioxidants can attenuate hypertension and hypertension-indu...

  1. Oxidative stress accelerates amyloid deposition and memory impairment in a double-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamaru, Takuya; Kamimura, Naomi; Yokota, Takashi; Iuchi, Katsuya; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Takami, Shinya; Akashiba, Hiroki; Shitaka, Yoshitsugu; Katsura, Ken-Ichiro; Kimura, Kazumi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2015-02-05

    Oxidative stress is known to play a prominent role in the onset and early stage progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). For example, protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation levels are increased in patients with mild cognitive impairment. Here, we created a double-transgenic mouse model of AD to explore the pathological and behavioral effects of oxidative stress. Double transgenic (APP/DAL) mice were constructed by crossing Tg2576 (APP) mice, which express a mutant form of human amyloid precursor protein (APP), with DAL mice expressing a dominant-negative mutant of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), in which oxidative stress is enhanced. Y-maze and object recognition tests were performed at 3 and 6 months of age to evaluate learning and memory. The accumulation of amyloid plaques, deposition of phosphorylated-tau protein, and number of astrocytes in the brain were assessed histopathologically at 3, 6, 9, and 12-15 months of age. The life span of APP/DAL mice was significantly shorter than that of APP or DAL mice. In addition, they showed accelerated amyloid deposition, tau phosphorylation, and gliosis. Furthermore, these mice showed impaired performance on Y-maze and object recognition tests at 3 months of age. These data suggest that oxidative stress accelerates cognitive dysfunction and pathological insults in the brain. APP/DAL mice could be a useful model for exploring new approaches to AD treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Carnitine Deficiency and Oxidative Stress Provoke Cardiotoxicity in an Ifosfamide-Induced Fanconi Syndrome Rat Model

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    Mohamed M. Sayed-Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to hemorrhagic cystitis, Fanconi Syndrome is a serious clinical side effect during ifosfamide (IFO therapy. Fanconi syndrome is a generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubule which is characterized by excessive urinary excretion of glucose, phosphate, bicarbonate, amino acids and other solutes excreted by this segment of the nephron including L-carnitine. Carnitine is essential cofactor for β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in the myocardium. IFO therapy is associated with increased urinary carnitine excretion with subsequent secondary deficiency of the molecule. Cardiac abnormalities in IFO-treated cancer patients were reported as isolated clinical cases. This study examined whether carnitine deficiency and oxidative stress, secondary to Fanconi Syndrome, provoke IFO-induced cardiomyopathy as well as exploring if carnitine supplementation using Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC could offer protection against this toxicity. In the current study, an animal model of carnitine deficiency was developed in rats by D-carnitine-mildronate treatment Adult male Wistar albino rats were assigned to one of six treatment groups: the first three groups were injected intraperitoneally with normal saline, D-carnitine (DC, 250 mg/kg/day combined with mildronate (MD, 200 mg/kg/day and PLC (250 mg/kg/day, respectively, for 10 successive days. The 4th, 5th and 6th groups were injected with the same doses of normal saline, DC-MD and PLC, respectively for 5 successive days before and 5 days concomitant with IFO (50 mg/kg/day. IFO significantly increased serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN, urinary carnitine excretion and clearance, creatine phosphokinase isoenzyme (CK-MB, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, intramitochondrial acetyl-CoA/CoA-SH and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS in cardiac tissues and significantly decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP and total carnitine and reduced glutathione (GSH content in cardiac tissues. In carnitine

  3. Oxidative stress affects FET proteins localization and alternative pre-mRNA processing in cellular models of ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetoni, Francesca; Caporossi, Daniela; Paronetto, Maria Paola

    2014-10-01

    FUS/TLS, EWS and TAF15 are members of the FET family of DNA and RNA binding proteins, involved in multiple steps of DNA and RNA processing and implicated in the regulation of gene expression and cell-signaling. All members of the FET family contribute to human pathologies, as they are involved in sarcoma translocations and neurodegenerative diseases. Mutations in FUS/TLS, in EWSR1 and in TAF15 genescause Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), a fatal human neurodegenerative disease that affects primarily motor neurons and is characterized by the progressive loss of motor neurons and degradation of the neuromuscular junctions.ALS-associated FET mutations cause FET protein relocalization into cytoplasmic aggregates, thus impairing their normal function. Protein aggregation has been suggested as a co-opting factor during the disease pathogenesis. Cytoplasmic mislocalization of FET proteins contributes to the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates that may alter RNA processing and initiate motor neuron degeneration. Interestingly, oxidative stress, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of ALS, triggers the accumulation of mutant FUS in cytoplasmic stress granules where it binds and sequester wild-type FUS.In order to evaluate the role of FET proteins in ALS and their involvement in the response to oxidative stress, we have developed cellular models of ALS expressing ALS-related FET mutants in neuroblastoma cell lines. Upon treatment with sodium arsenite, cells were analysed by immunofluorescence to monitor the localization of wild-type and mutated FET proteins. Furthermore, we have characterized signal transduction pathways and cell survival upon oxidative stress in our cellular models of ALS. Interestingly, we found that EWS mutant proteins display a different localization from FUS mutants and neither wild-type nor mutated EWS protein translocate into stress granules upon oxidative stress treatment. Collectively, our data provide a new link between the oxidative stress

  4. Oxidative Stress and Epilepsy: Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Carlos Clayton Torres; Almeida, Anália Barbosa; Araújo, Paulo Victor Pontes; de Abreu, Rita Neuma Dantas Cavalcante; Chaves, Edna Maria Camelo; do Vale, Otoni Cardoso; Macêdo, Danielle Silveira; Woods, David John; Fonteles, Marta Maria de França; Vasconcelos, Silvania Maria Mendes

    2012-01-01

    Backgrounds. The production of free radicals has a role in the regulation of biological function, cellular damage, and the pathogenesis of central nervous system conditions. Epilepsy is a highly prevalent serious brain disorder, and oxidative stress is regarded as a possible mechanism involved in epileptogenesis. Experimental studies suggest that oxidative stress is a contributing factor to the onset and evolution of epilepsy. Objective. A review was conducted to investigate the link between oxidative stress and seizures, and oxidative stress and age as risk factors for epilepsy. The role of oxidative stress in seizure induction and propagation is also discussed. Results/Conclusions. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are involved in neuronal death and seizures. There is evidence that suggests that antioxidant therapy may reduce lesions induced by oxidative free radicals in some animal seizure models. Studies have demonstrated that mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with chronic oxidative stress and may have an essential role in the epileptogenesis process; however, few studies have shown an established link between oxidative stress, seizures, and age. PMID:22848783

  5. Role of Renin-Angiotensin System and Oxidative Stress on Vascular Inflammation in Insulin Resistence Model

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    N. F. Renna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available (1 This study aims to demonstrate the causal involvement of renin angiotensin system (RAS and oxidative stress (OS on vascular inflammation in an experimental model of metabolic syndrome (MS achieved by fructose administration to spontaneously hypertensive rats (FFHR during 12 weeks. (2 Chronic treatment with candesartan (C (10 mg/kg per day for the last 6 weeks or 4OH-Tempol (T (10−3 mmol/L in drinking water for the last 6 weeks reversed the increment in metabolic variables and systolic blood pressure. In addition, chronic C treatment reverted cardiovascular remodeling but not T. (3 Furthermore, chronic treatment with C was able to completely reverse the expression of NF-κB and VCAM-1, but T only reduced the expression. C reduced the expression of proatherogenic cytokines as CINC2, CINC3, VEGF, Leptin, TNF-alpha, and MCP-1 and also significantly reduced MIP-3, beta-NGF, and INF-gamma in vascular tissue in this experimental model. T was not able to substantially modify the expression of these cytokines. (4 The data suggest the involvement of RAS in the expression of inflammatory proteins at different vascular levels, allowing the creation of a microenvironment suitable for the creation, perpetuation, growth, and destabilization of vascular injury.

  6. Effect of Centella asiatica on Oxidative Stress and Lipid Metabolism in Hyperlipidemic Animal Models

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    Yun Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperlipidemia and many other metabolic diseases are related to oxidative stress. Centella asiatica is a traditional Chinese medicine whose antioxidant effect in vitro has been reported. We are interested in whether it possesses this effect in vivo and hence modulates lipid metabolism. Therefore, experiments were carried out on mice and golden hamsters regarding its antioxidant and hypolipidemic effect. We observed that a fraction (CAF3 of the ethanol extract (CAE of Centella asiatica had a cholesterol decrease of 79% and a triglyceride decrease of 95% in acute mice model, so CAF3 was further investigated in high-fat-fed hamster model. It was shown that CAF3 increased SOD and GSH-Px activities and decreased MDA level, and it also improved TC, TG, LDL-C, HDL-C, AST, and ALT levels. L-CAT and SR-BI gene expression in hamsters were increased. Taken together, our data suggest that the CAF3 fraction of Centella asiatica has antioxidant and hypolipidemic properties.

  7. Platinum nanozymes recover cellular ROS homeostasis in an oxidative stress-mediated disease model

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    Moglianetti, Mauro; de Luca, Elisa; Pedone, Deborah; Marotta, Roberto; Catelani, Tiziano; Sartori, Barbara; Amenitsch, Heinz; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the use of nanomaterials as biomimetic enzymes has attracted great interest. In this work, we show the potential of biocompatible platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) as antioxidant nanozymes, which combine abundant cellular internalization and efficient scavenging activity of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus simultaneously integrating the functions of nanocarriers and antioxidant drugs. Careful toxicity assessment and intracellular tracking of Pt NPs proved their cytocompatibility and high cellular uptake, with compartmentalization within the endo/lysosomal vesicles. We have demonstrated that Pt NPs possess strong and broad antioxidant properties, acting as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase enzymes, with similar or even superior performance than natural enzymes, along with higher adaptability to the changes in environmental conditions. We then exploited their potent activity as radical scavenging materials in a cellular model of an oxidative stress-related disorder, namely human Cerebral Cavernous Malformation (CCM) disease, which is associated with a significant increase in intracellular ROS levels. Noteworthily, we found that Pt nanozymes can efficiently reduce ROS levels, completely restoring the cellular physiological homeostasis.In recent years, the use of nanomaterials as biomimetic enzymes has attracted great interest. In this work, we show the potential of biocompatible platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) as antioxidant nanozymes, which combine abundant cellular internalization and efficient scavenging activity of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus simultaneously integrating the functions of nanocarriers and antioxidant drugs. Careful toxicity assessment and intracellular tracking of Pt NPs proved their cytocompatibility and high cellular uptake, with compartmentalization within the endo/lysosomal vesicles. We have demonstrated that Pt NPs possess strong and broad antioxidant properties, acting as superoxide

  8. Understanding DNA Under Oxidative Stress and Sensitization: The Role of Molecular Modeling

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    Antonio eMonari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA is constantly exposed to damaging threats coming from oxidative stress, i.e. from the presence of free radicals and reactive oxygen species. Sensitization from exogenous and endogenous compounds that strongly enhance the frequency of light-induced lesions also plays an important role. The experimental determination of DNA lesions, though a difficult subject, is somehow well established and allows to elucidate even extremely rare DNA lesions. In parallel, molecular modeling has become fundamental to clearly understand the fine mechanisms related to DNA defects induction. Indeed, it offers an unprecedented possibility to get access to an atomistic or even electronic resolution. Ab initio molecular dynamics may also describe the time-evolution of the molecular system and its reactivity. Yet the modeling of DNA (photo-reactions does necessitate elaborate multi-scale methodologies to tackle a damage induction reactivity that takes place in a complex environment. The double-stranded DNA environment is first characterized by a very high flexibility, that dynamical effects are to be taken into account, but also a strongly inhomogeneous electrostatic embedding. Additionally, one aims at capturing more subtle effects, such as the sequence selectivity which is of critical important for DNA damage. The structure and dynamics of the DNA/sensitizers complexes, as well as the photo-induced electron- and energy-transfer phenomena taking place upon sensitization, should be carefully modeled. Finally the factors inducing different repair ratios for different lesions should also be rationalized.In this review we will critically analyze the different computational strategies used to model DNA lesions. A clear picture of the complex interplay between reactivity and structural factors will be sketched. The use of proper multi-scale modeling leads to the in-depth comprehension of DNA lesions mechanism and also to the rational design of new chemo-therapeutic agents.

  9. Asymmetric dimethylarginine exacerbates Aβ-induced toxicity and oxidative stress in human cell and Caenorhabditis elegans models of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yunfeng; Yue, Wenhui; Quan, Xin; Wang, Yue; Zhao, Baolu; Lu, Zhongbing

    2015-02-01

    Growing evidence suggests a strong association between cardiovascular risk factors and incidence of Alzheimer disease (AD). Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), the endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, has been identified as an independent cardiovascular risk factor and is also increased in plasma of patients with AD. However, whether ADMA is involved in the pathogenesis of AD is unknown. In this study, we found that ADMA content was increased in a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans β-amyloid (Aβ) overexpression model, strain CL2006, and in human SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing the Swedish mutant form of human Aβ precursor protein (APPsw). Moreover, ADMA treatment exacerbated Aβ-induced paralysis and oxidative stress in CL2006 worms and further elevated oxidative stress and Aβ secretion in APPsw cells. Knockdown of type 1 protein arginine N-methyltransferase to reduce ADMA production failed to show a protective effect against Aβ toxicity, but resulted in more paralysis in CL2006 worms as well as increased oxidative stress and Aβ secretion in APPsw cells. However, overexpression of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 1 (DDAH1) to promote ADMA degradation significantly attenuated oxidative stress and Aβ secretion in APPsw cells. Collectively, our data support the hypothesis that elevated ADMA contributes to the pathogenesis of AD. Our findings suggest that strategies to increase DDAH1 activity in neuronal cells may be a novel approach to attenuating AD development.

  10. Interpretation of metabolic memory phenomenon using a physiological systems model: What drives oxidative stress following glucose normalization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronova, Veronika; Zhudenkov, Kirill; Helmlinger, Gabriel; Peskov, Kirill

    2017-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is generally associated with oxidative stress, which plays a key role in diabetes-related complications. A complex, quantitative relationship has been established between glucose levels and oxidative stress, both in vitro and in vivo. For example, oxidative stress is known to persist after glucose normalization, a phenomenon described as metabolic memory. Also, uncontrolled glucose levels appear to be more detrimental to patients with diabetes (non-constant glucose levels) vs. patients with high, constant glucose levels. The objective of the current study was to delineate the mechanisms underlying such behaviors, using a mechanistic physiological systems modeling approach that captures and integrates essential underlying pathophysiological processes. The proposed model was based on a system of ordinary differential equations. It describes the interplay between reactive oxygen species production potential (ROS), ROS-induced cell alterations, and subsequent adaptation mechanisms. Model parameters were calibrated using different sources of experimental information, including ROS production in cell cultures exposed to various concentration profiles of constant and oscillating glucose levels. The model adequately reproduced the ROS excess generation after glucose normalization. Such behavior appeared to be driven by positive feedback regulations between ROS and ROS-induced cell alterations. The further oxidative stress-related detrimental effect as induced by unstable glucose levels can be explained by inability of cells to adapt to dynamic environment. Cell adaptation to instable high glucose declines during glucose normalization phases, and further glucose increase promotes similar or higher oxidative stress. In contrast, gradual ROS production potential decrease, driven by adaptation, is observed in cells exposed to constant high glucose. PMID:28178319

  11. Sleep Deprivation and Oxidative Stress in Animal Models: A Systematic Review

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    Gabriel Villafuerte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Because the function and mechanisms of sleep are partially clear, here we applied a meta-analysis to address the issue whether sleep function includes antioxidative properties in mice and rats. Given the expansion of the knowledge in the sleep field, it is indeed ambitious to describe all mammals, or other animals, in which sleep shows an antioxidant function. However, in this paper we reviewed the current understanding from basic studies in two species to drive the hypothesis that sleep is a dynamic-resting state with antioxidative properties. We performed a systematic review of articles cited in Medline, Scopus, and Web of Science until March 2015 using the following search terms: Sleep or sleep deprivation and oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, glutathione, nitric oxide, catalase or superoxide dismutase. We found a total of 266 studies. After inclusion and exclusion criteria, 44 articles were included, which are presented and discussed in this study. The complex relationship between sleep duration and oxidative stress is discussed. Further studies should consider molecular and genetic approaches to determine whether disrupted sleep promotes oxidative stress.

  12. Hepatocyte cytotoxicity induced by hydroperoxide (oxidative stress model) or glyoxal (carbonylation model): prevention by bioactive nut extracts or catechins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banach, Monica S; Dong, Qiang; O'Brien, Peter J

    2009-03-16

    Carbonyl and oxidative stress play important roles in the development of diabetic complications and have been shown to be augmented by various natural compounds and pharmacological agents. Nuts are a rich source of bioactive compounds and antioxidants and various beneficial health effects of nuts have been reported. This study was conducted to evaluate the cytoprotectiveness of various nut extracts and bioactive compounds found in nuts for decreasing cytotoxicity, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation in cell toxicity models of diabetes-related carbonyl (glyoxal) and oxidative stress (hydroperoxide). Methanol, ethyl acetate or water were used to prepare crude hazelnut and walnut extracts, which were then used to screen for in vitro cytoprotection of freshly isolated rat hepatocytes against these toxins. The order of protection by nut extracts against hydroperoxide induced cell death was: walnut methanolic extract>walnut aqueous extract>lipophilic walnut extract>hazelnut aqueous extract>hazelnut methanolic extract whereas the lipophilic hazelnut extract did not protect against cell death. The order of protection against lipid peroxidation was the same except for the hazelnut methanolic extract, which prevented lipid peroxidation better than the hazelnut aqueous extract. Catechin, epicatechin and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) were investigated for possible protective effects against carbonyl stress cell death and protein carbonylation in hepatocytes. Catechin protected against glyoxal induced cell death and protein carbonylation, and even elicited protection when added to hepatocytes 30 min after the addition of glyoxal. When catechin and epicatechin were compared for protectiveness against glyoxal induced carbonyl stress in hepatocytes, epicatechin protected more effectively than catechin against cell death and protein carbonylation at 120 min. Both compounds also elicited better protection when premixed with glyoxal before addition to hepatocytes, compared

  13. Oxidants and antioxidants relevance in rats' pulmonary induced oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamfir, C; Eloaie Zugun, F; Cojocaru, E; Tocan, L

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Even if the reactive oxygen species were discovered, described and detailed a long time ago, there is still little data about the mechanisms of oxidative stress, their tissular effects and about an efficient antioxidant strategy, involving animal experimental models. It has been shown that the lung is one of the most exposed organs to the oxidative stress. The particular effects of different types of oxidative stress on lungs were investigated in this experimental study, in order to quantify the intensity and the extent of the pulmonary damage, featuring the antioxidant enzymatic protective role. Methods: The study of lung injury was performed on four distinct groups of Wistar rats: a control group versus a group exposed to continuous light deprivation versus a group exposed to nitrofurantoin versus a group exposed to continuous light deprivation, to nitrofurantoin and vitamin C. Pulmonary samples were taken and treated for microscopic analysis. A qualitative immunohistochemical estimation of pulmonary superoxide dismutase 1(SOD 1) was performed. Blood tests were used in order to reveal the presence and intensity of oxidative stress. Results: Continuous light deprivation and the chronic administration of nitrofurantoin acted as oxidants with a certain involvement in lung damage– vascular and alveolar wall disturbances. Adding an antioxidant, such as vitamin C, considerably improved lung reactivity to oxidative stress. Conclusion: The chronic exposure to oxidants in the induced oxidative stress sustains the development of specific lung alterations. SOD 1 positive reaction underlines the complex enzymatic defense in oxidative stress. PMID:22567046

  14. BRCA1 and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Weon Yi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1 has been well established as a tumor suppressor and functions primarily by maintaining genome integrity. Genome stability is compromised when cells are exposed to oxidative stress. Increasing evidence suggests that BRCA1 regulates oxidative stress and this may be another mechanism in preventing carcinogenesis in normal cells. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS is implicated in carcinogenesis and is used strategically to treat human cancer. Thus, it is essential to understand the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. In this review, we briefly summarize BRCA1’s many binding partners and mechanisms, and discuss data supporting the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. Finally, we consider its significance in prevention and/or treatment of BRCA1-related cancers.

  15. Intestinal motility disorder induced by free radicals: a new model mimicking oxidative stress in gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Ilaria; Campolongo, Patrizia; Valeri, Pacifico; Romanelli, Luca; Palmery, Maura

    2002-12-01

    Literature data suggest that the inflamed intestine may be subjected to a considerable oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to simulate the oxidative stress in the gastrointestinal tract and to explore its effect on intestinal motility. This was attained by treating isolated segments from the rabbit jejunum and from the guinea pig ileum with 2,2'-Azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (ABAP), which generates peroxyl radicals by thermal decomposition. Treatment of intestinal segments with ABAP reduced the muscarinic cholinergic response to acetylcholine in both preparations and induced a dose-dependent inhibition of the spontaneous contractions in the jejunum, also in the presence of tetrodotoxin. ABAP was found to inhibit the contractile response induced by BaCl(2) in guinea pig ileum preparations. This effect was not dose-dependent and it was reversed by Bay-K 8644, which activates voltage operated L-type calcium channels. The rapid and reversible effects of ABAP suggest that it might directly affect L-type calcium channels before lipoperoxidation induction. In conclusion, the results of the present study show that ABAP could be a useful tool to simulate early contractility dysfunctions mediated by oxidative stress.

  16. Metal-related oxidative stress in birds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivula, Miia J., E-mail: miikoi@utu.f [Department of Biology, Section of Ecology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Eeva, Tapio, E-mail: teeva@utu.f [Department of Biology, Section of Ecology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland)

    2010-07-15

    Metals can cause oxidative stress by increasing the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which render antioxidants incapable of defence against growing amounts of free radicals. Metal toxicity is related to their oxidative state and reactivity with other compounds. Our aim is to review the mechanisms on how metals cause oxidative stress and what is known about metal-induced oxidative stress in wildlife. Taking birds as model organisms, we summarize the mechanisms responsible for antioxidant depletion and give a view of how to detect metal-induced oxidative stress in birds by using different biomarkers. The mechanisms producing the harmful effects of oxidative stress are complex with different biomolecular mechanisms associated with ecotoxicological and ecological aspects. The majority of the studies concerning metals and ROS related to oxidative stress have focused on the biomolecular level, but little is known about the effects at the cellular level or at the level of individuals or populations. - Free-living birds can be used as effective indicators of metal-induced oxidative stress.

  17. Is the Oxidative Stress Really a Disease?

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    Fogarasi Erzsébet

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is an imbalance between free radicals or other reactive species and the antioxidant activity of the organism. Oxidative stress can induce several illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer and Parkinson. The biomarkers of oxidative stress are used to test oxidative injury of biomolecules. The indicators of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy- 2-nonenal, 2-propenal, isoprostanes, of protein oxidation (carbonylated proteins, tyrosine derivatives, of oxidative damage of DNA, and other biomarkers (glutathione level, metallothioneins, myeloperoxidase activity are the most used oxidative stress markers. Diseases caused by oxidative stress can be prevented with antioxidants. In human body are several enzymes with antioxidant capacity (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and spin traps. Antioxidants are synthetized in the organism (glutathione or arrive in the body by nutrition (ascorbic acid, vitamin E, carotenoids, flavonoids, resveratrol, xanthones. Different therapeutic strategies to reduce oxidative stress with the use of synthetic molecules such as nitrone-based antioxidants (phenyl-α-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN, 2,4-disulphophenyl- N-tert-butylnitrone (NXY-059, stilbazulenyl nitrone (STAZN, which scavenge a wide variety of free radical species, increase endogenous antioxidant levels and inhibits free radical generation are also tested in animal models.

  18. Limited Link between Oxidative Stress and Ochratoxin A—Induced Renal Injury in an Acute Toxicity Rat Model

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    Liye Zhu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ochratoxin A (OTA displays nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. However, in the acute toxicity rat model, there is no evidence on the relationship between OTA and nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. Based on this, the integrated analysis of physiological status, damage biomarkers, oxidative stress, and DNA damage were performed. After OTA treatment, the body weight decreased and AST, ALP, TP, and BUN levels in serum increased. Hydropic degeneration, swelling, vacuolization, and partial drop occurred in proximal tubule epithelial cells. PCNA and Kim-1 were dose-dependently increased in the kidney, but Cox-2 expression and proliferation were not found in the liver. In OTA-treated kidneys, the mRNA expressions of Kim-1, Cox-2, Lcn2, and Clu were dose-dependently increased. The mRNA expressions of Vim and Cox-2 were decreased in OTA-treated livers. Some oxidative stress indicators were altered in the kidneys (ROS and SOD and livers (SOD and GSH. DNA damage and oxidative DNA damage were not found. In conclusion, there is a limited link between oxidative stress and OTA-induced renal injury in an acute toxicity rat model.

  19. Limited Link between Oxidative Stress and Ochratoxin A—Induced Renal Injury in an Acute Toxicity Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liye; Yu, Tao; Qi, Xiaozhe; Gao, Jing; Huang, Kunlun; He, Xiaoyun; Luo, Haoshu; Xu, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) displays nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. However, in the acute toxicity rat model, there is no evidence on the relationship between OTA and nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. Based on this, the integrated analysis of physiological status, damage biomarkers, oxidative stress, and DNA damage were performed. After OTA treatment, the body weight decreased and AST, ALP, TP, and BUN levels in serum increased. Hydropic degeneration, swelling, vacuolization, and partial drop occurred in proximal tubule epithelial cells. PCNA and Kim-1 were dose-dependently increased in the kidney, but Cox-2 expression and proliferation were not found in the liver. In OTA-treated kidneys, the mRNA expressions of Kim-1, Cox-2, Lcn2, and Clu were dose-dependently increased. The mRNA expressions of Vim and Cox-2 were decreased in OTA-treated livers. Some oxidative stress indicators were altered in the kidneys (ROS and SOD) and livers (SOD and GSH). DNA damage and oxidative DNA damage were not found. In conclusion, there is a limited link between oxidative stress and OTA-induced renal injury in an acute toxicity rat model. PMID:27983637

  20. Early hippocampal oxidative stress is a direct consequence of seizures in the rapid electrical amygdala kindling model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashindranath, Maithili; McLean, Karen J; Trounce, Ian A; Cotton, Richard G H; Cook, Mark J

    2010-08-01

    Epilepsy is characterised by recurrent seizures, which are manifestations of aberrant cortical neuronal firing. It is unclear whether oxidative stress is a cause or consequence of seizure-related hippocampal neuronal loss or whether it occurs concomitantly with the initiation of cell death pathways. We utilised the rapid electrical amygdala kindling (REAK) model which does not induce cell death to examine early seizure-induced oxidative stress in wildtype and superoxide dismutase 2 (Sod2) +/- mice, which lack 50% of Sod2 activity and are therefore known to be more susceptible to mitochondrial oxidative stress. A significant increase in lipid peroxidation and superoxide production was noted in the hippocampi of wildtype mice and a more delayed response observed in Sod2 +/- mice at early time-points post-seizures, but protein carbonylation levels appeared unchanged. A 10-fold increase in superoxide production was seen in the Sod2 +/- CA2 neurons, indicating that Sod2 plays an important role in protecting the CA2 region of the hippocampus from seizure-induced free radical damage. Early hippocampal cell death was undetectable in wildtype or Sod2 +/- mice post-seizures. We were able to demonstrate that hippocampal oxidative stress occurred as a direct consequence of seizures rather than downstream of activation of cell death pathways. We were also able to show that this increase in oxidative stress was not sufficient to cause cell death within the time window investigated. Our data indicates that a possible upregulation of endogenous antioxidant activity might exist within selective hippocampal sectors in the Sod2 +/- mice that are as yet unknown.

  1. A new oxidative stress model, 2,2-azobis(2-amidinopropane dihydrochloride induces cardiovascular damages in chicken embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Rong He

    Full Text Available It is now well established that the developing embryo is very sensitive to oxidative stress, which is a contributing factor to pregnancy-related disorders. However, little is known about the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS on the embryonic cardiovascular system due to a lack of appropriate ROS control method in the placenta. In this study, a small molecule called 2,2-azobis(2-amidinopropane dihydrochloride (AAPH, a free radicals generator, was used to study the effects of oxidative stress on the cardiovascular system during chick embryo development. When nine-day-old (stage HH 35 chick embryos were treated with different concentrations of AAPH inside the air chamber, it was established that the LD50 value for AAPH was 10 µmol/egg. At this concentration, AAPH was found to significantly reduce the density of blood vessel plexus that was developed in the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM of HH 35 chick embryos. Impacts of AAPH on younger embryos were also examined and discovered that it inhibited the development of vascular plexus on yolk sac in HH 18 embryos. AAPH also dramatically repressed the development of blood islands in HH 3+ embryos. These results implied that AAPH-induced oxidative stress could impair the whole developmental processes associated with vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Furthermore, we observed heart enlargement in the HH 40 embryo following AAPH treatment, where the left ventricle and interventricular septum were found to be thickened in a dose-dependent manner due to myocardiac cell hypertrophy. In conclusion, oxidative stress, induced by AAPH, could lead to damage of the cardiovascular system in the developing chick embryo. The current study also provided a new developmental model, as an alternative for animal and cell models, for testing small molecules and drugs that have anti-oxidative activities.

  2. Erdosteine ameliorates PTZ-induced oxidative stress in mice seizure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, Atilla; Aladag, M Arif; Kocer, Abdulkadir; Boluk, Ayhan; Gurel, Ahmet; Armutcu, Ferah

    2005-05-30

    The role of oxygen-derived free radicals has been suggested in genesis of epilepsy and in the post seizure neuronal death. The aim of this study was to investigate whether erdosteine has a preventive effect against epilepsy and postepileptic oxidative stress. The mice (n=27) were divided into three groups: (i) PTZ-induced-epilepsy group (n=9); (ii) PTZ-induced-epilepsy+erdosteine group (n=9); (iii) control group (n=9). The animals were observed for a period of 30 min for latency to first seizure onset, total seizure duration, the number of seizure episodes. Then they were sacrificed and the brains were quickly removed, and frozen for biochemical analysis. Malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and xanthine oxidase (XO) activities were carried out in the brain tissue. The latent period between PTZ induction and seizure are longer in the PTZ+erdosteine group than in PTZ-induced-epilepsy group (Perdosteine group. SOD level did not change in this group. While MDA and XO levels are significantly lower, SOD level is significantly higher in the PTZ+erdosteine group compared to PTZ and control groups (Perdosteine treatment both may increase latent interval between seizures and may decrease oxidative stress, thus may ameliorate neuronal death in brain during seizures. It may be used as an adjunct therapy in epilepsy.

  3. Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defense

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by living organisms as a result of normal cellular metabolism and environmental factors, such as air pollutants or cigarette smoke. ROS are highly reactive molecules and can damage cell structures such as carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins and alter their functions. The shift in the balance between oxidants and antioxidants in favor of oxidants is termed “oxidative stress.” Regulation of reducing and oxidizing (redox) state i...

  4. Astaxanthin improves behavioral disorder and oxidative stress in prenatal valproic acid-induced mice model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amin, Md Mamun; Rahman, Md Mahbubur; Khan, Fazlur Rahman; Zaman, Fahmida; Mahmud Reza, Hasan

    2015-06-01

    Prenatal exposure to valproic acid on gestational day 12.5 may lead to the impaired behavior in the offspring, which is similar to the human autistic symptoms. To the contrary, astaxanthin shows neuroprotective effect by its antioxidant mechanism. We aimed to (i) develop mice model of autism and (ii) investigate the effect of astaxanthin on such model animals. Valproic acid (600 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally to the pregnant mice on gestational day 12.5. Prenatal valproic acid-exposed mice were divided into 2 groups on postnatal day 25 and astaxanthin (2mg/kg) was given to the experimental group (VPA_AST, n=10) while saline was given to the control group (VPA, n=10) for 4 weeks. Behavioral test including social interaction, open field and hot-plate were conducted on postnatal day 25 and oxidative stress markers such as lipid peroxidation, advanced protein oxidation product, nitric oxide, glutathione, and activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase were estimated on postnatal day 26 to confirm mice model of autism and on postnatal day 56 to assess the effect of astaxanthin. On postnatal day 25, prenatal valproic acid-exposed mice exhibited (i) delayed eye opening (ii) longer latency to respond painful stimuli, (iii) poor sociability and social novelty and (iv) high level of anxiety. In addition, an increased level of oxidative stress was found by determining different oxidative stress markers. Treatment with astaxanthin significantly (pAstaxanthin improves the impaired behavior in animal model of autism presumably by its antioxidant activity.

  5. An Abnormal Nitric Oxide Metabolism Contributes to Brain Oxidative Stress in the Mouse Model for the Fragile X Syndrome, a Possible Role in Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Cabello, Elena; Garcia-Guirado, Francisco; Calvo-Medina, Rocio; el Bekay, Rajaa; Perez-Costillas, Lucia; Quintero-Navarro, Carolina; Sanchez-Salido, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fragile X syndrome is the most common genetic cause of mental disability. Although many research has been performed, the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis is unclear and needs further investigation. Oxidative stress played major roles in the syndrome. The aim was to investigate the nitric oxide metabolism, protein nitration level, the expression of NOS isoforms, and furthermore the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 subunit in different brain areas on the fragile X mouse model. Methods. This study involved adult male Fmr1-knockout and wild-type mice as controls. We detected nitric oxide metabolism and the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κBp65 subunit, comparing the mRNA expression and protein content of the three NOS isoforms in different brain areas. Results. Fmr1-KO mice showed an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism and increased levels of protein tyrosine nitrosylation. Besides that, nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 and inducible nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly increased in the Fmr1-knockout mice. mRNA and protein levels of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly decreased in the knockout mice. However, the epithelial nitric oxide synthase isoform displayed no significant changes. Conclusions. These data suggest the potential involvement of an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism in the pathogenesis of the fragile X syndrome. PMID:26788253

  6. An Abnormal Nitric Oxide Metabolism Contributes to Brain Oxidative Stress in the Mouse Model for the Fragile X Syndrome, a Possible Role in Intellectual Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Lima-Cabello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fragile X syndrome is the most common genetic cause of mental disability. Although many research has been performed, the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis is unclear and needs further investigation. Oxidative stress played major roles in the syndrome. The aim was to investigate the nitric oxide metabolism, protein nitration level, the expression of NOS isoforms, and furthermore the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 subunit in different brain areas on the fragile X mouse model. Methods. This study involved adult male Fmr1-knockout and wild-type mice as controls. We detected nitric oxide metabolism and the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κBp65 subunit, comparing the mRNA expression and protein content of the three NOS isoforms in different brain areas. Results. Fmr1-KO mice showed an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism and increased levels of protein tyrosine nitrosylation. Besides that, nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 and inducible nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly increased in the Fmr1-knockout mice. mRNA and protein levels of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly decreased in the knockout mice. However, the epithelial nitric oxide synthase isoform displayed no significant changes. Conclusions. These data suggest the potential involvement of an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism in the pathogenesis of the fragile X syndrome.

  7. Anticonvulsant drugs, oxidative stress and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Rasgado, L A; Ceballos Reyes, G M; Vega-Diaz, M F

    2011-01-01

    Nitric Oxide (NO) is thought to play a fundamental role in the genesis and the spreading of epileptiform hyperactivity, although its function is unclear and controversial. As a free radical, NO may cause oxidative stress, which is emerging as an important mechanism in the etiology of seizure-induced neuronal death. Here we investigated the role of NO in seizure mechanisms through oxidative stress generation by studying the effect of anticonvulsant drugs such as amino oxyacetic acid (AAOA), valproate (VALP), diazepam (DIAZ) and gabapentin (GBPTNA) on oxidative stress in the brain, estimated as free carbonyls by the method of Dalle and Rossi, and by measuring NO by the indirect method based on the Griess reaction. Results show that, except for AAOA and VALP, anticonvulsants did not significantly affect or decreased free carbonyls, but reversed the oxidative stress produced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced convulsions. Anticonvulsants except AAOA diminished NO levels and with the exception of VALP, counteracted the increase in NO generated by PTZ. Anticonvulsants decreased oxidative stress and NO especially in hippocampus (HI) and cortex (CX), and reversed PTZ effects on both parameters. PTZ diminished NO in HI, which could be explained since PTZ caused an increase on endothelial NO synthase but a decrease in neuronal NOS expression in this brain area. Since the drugs studied are modulating GABA levels, our results suggest that seizures generated by alterations in GABAergic transmission produce oxidative stress caused by NO, which can be reversed by anticonvulsants. The effects described differ among the brain regions studied and the NO synthase isoform affected.

  8. Vanillin Attenuated Behavioural Impairments, Neurochemical Deficts, Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis Against Rotenone Induced Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanalakshmi, Chinnasamy; Janakiraman, Udaiyappan; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Justin Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Kalandar, Ameer; Khan, Mohammed Abdul Sattar; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2016-08-01

    Vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde), a pleasant smelling organic aromatic compound, is widely used as a flavoring additive in food, beverage, cosmetic and drug industries. It is reported to cross the blood brain barrier and also displayed antioxidant and neuroprotective activities. We previously reported the neuroprotective effect of vanillin against rotenone induced in in vitro model of PD. The present experiment was aimed to analyze the neuroprotective effect of vanillin on the motor and non-motor deficits, neurochemical variables, oxidative, anti-oxidative indices and the expression of apoptotic markers against rotenone induced rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Rotenone treatment exhibited motor and non-motor impairments, neurochemical deficits, oxidative stress and apoptosis, whereas oral administration of vanillin attenuated the above-said indices. However further studies are needed to explore the mitochondrial protective and anti-inflammatory properties of vanillin, as these processes play a vital role in the cause and progression of PD.

  9. Chronic oxidative-nitrosative stress impairs coronary vasodilation in metabolic syndrome model rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagota, Satomi; Maruyama, Kana; Tada, Yukari; Fukushima, Kazuhito; Umetani, Keiji; Wakuda, Hirokazu; Shinozuka, Kazumasa

    2013-07-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a combination of clinical disorders that together increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. SHRSP.Z-Lepr(fa)/IzmDmcr (SHRSP.ZF) rats with MetS show impaired nitric oxide-mediated relaxation in coronary and mesenteric arteries, and angiotensin II receptor type 1 blockers protect against dysfunction and oxidative-nitrosative stress independently of metabolic effects. We hypothesize that superoxide contributes to functional deterioration in SHRSP.ZF rats. To test our hypothesis, we studied effects of treatment with tempol, a membrane-permeable radical scavenger, on impaired vasodilation in SHRSP.ZF rats. Tempol did not alter body weight, high blood pressure, or metabolic abnormalities, but prevented impairment of acetylcholine-induced and nitroprusside-induced vasodilation in the coronary and mesenteric arteries. Furthermore, tempol reduced the levels of serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and 3-nitrotyrosine content in mesenteric arteries. Systemic administration of tempol elevated the expression of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) above basal levels in mesenteric arteries of SHRSP.ZF rats. However, acute treatment with tempol or ebselen, a peroxynitrite scavenger, did not ameliorate impaired relaxation of isolated mesenteric arteries. No nitration of tyrosine residues in sGC was observed; however, sGC mRNA expression levels in the arteries of SHRSP.ZF rats were lower than those in the arteries of Wistar-Kyoto rats. Levels of Thr(496)- and Ser(1177)-phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were lower in arteries of SHRSP.ZF rats, and acetylcholine decreased Thr(496)-phosphorylated eNOS levels. These results indicated that prolonged superoxide production, leading to oxidative-nitrosative stress, was associated with impaired vasodilation in SHRSP.ZF rats with MetS. Down-regulated sGC expression may be linked to dysfunction, while reduced NO bioavailability/eNOS activity and modified s

  10. Oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikam, Shashikant; Nikam, Padmaja; Ahaley, S K; Sontakke, Ajit V

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the cascade, leading to dopamine cell degeneration in Parkinson's disease. However, oxidative stress is intimately linked to other components of the degenerative process, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, nitric oxide toxicity and inflammation. It is therefore difficult to determine whether oxidative stress leads to or is a consequence of, these events. Oxidative stress was assessed by estimating lipid peroxidation product in the form of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, nitric oxide in the form of nitrite & nitrate. Enzymatic antioxidants in the form of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, ceruloplasmin and non enzymatic antioxidant vitamins e.g. vitamin E and C in either serum or plasma or erythrocyte in 40 patients of Parkinson's disease in the age group 40-80 years. Trace elements e.g. copper, zinc and selenium were also estimated. Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and nitric oxide levels were Significantly high but superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, ceruloplasmin, vitamin-E, vitamin-C, copper, zinc and selenium levels were significantly low in Parkinson's disease when compared with control subjects. Present study showed that elevated oxidative stress may be playing a role in dopaminergic neuronal loss in substentia nigra pars compacta and involved in pathogenesis of the Parkinson's disease.

  11. Oxidative stress and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David G; Gongora, Maria Carolina

    2009-05-01

    This review has summarized some of the data supporting a role of ROS and oxidant stress in the genesis of hypertension. There is evidence that hypertensive stimuli, such as high salt and angiotensin II, promote the production of ROS in the brain, the kidney, and the vasculature and that each of these sites contributes either to hypertension or to the untoward sequelae of this disease. Although the NADPH oxidase in these various organs is a predominant source, other enzymes likely contribute to ROS production and signaling in these tissues. A major clinical challenge is that the routinely used antioxidants are ineffective in preventing or treating cardiovascular disease and hypertension. This is likely because these drugs are either ineffective or act in a non-targeted fashion, such that they remove not only injurious ROS Fig. 5. Proposed role of T cells in the genesis of hypertension and the role of the NADPH oxidase in multiple cells/organs in modulating this effect. In this scenario, angiotensin II stimulates an NADPH oxidase in the CVOs of the brain, increasing sympathetic outflow. Sympathetic nerve terminals in lymph nodes activate T cells, and angiotensin II also directly activates T cells. These stimuli also activate expression of homing signals in the vessel and likely the kidney, which attract T cells to these organs. T cells release cytokines that stimulate the vessel and kidney NADPH oxidases, promoting vasoconstriction and sodium retention. SFO, subfornical organ. 630 Harrison & Gongora but also those involved in normal cell signaling. A potentially important and relatively new direction is the concept that inflammatory cells such as T cells contribute to hypertension. Future studies are needed to understand the interaction of T cells with the CNS, the kidney, and the vasculature and how this might be interrupted to provide therapeutic benefit.

  12. Edaravone attenuates ischemia-reperfusion injury by inhibiting oxidative stress in a canine lung transplantation model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jin-zhi; SHEN Bao-zhong; LI Ye; ZHANG Tong; XU Wan-hai; LIU Xiao-wei; LU Hong-guang

    2008-01-01

    .Conclusions Edaravone attenuates IR-induced lung injury and preserves lung function by inhibiting oxidative stress and decreasing leukocyte extravasation in a canine lung transplantation model.

  13. LINK BETWEEN OXIDATIVE STRESS AND INSULIN RESISTANCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan-fang Li; Jian Li

    2007-01-01

    Many studies on oxidative stress, insulin resistance, and antioxidant treatment have shown that increased oxidative stress may accelerate the development of diabetic complications through the excessive glucose and free fatty acids metabolism in diabetic and insulin-resistant states. Many pathogenic mechanisms such as insulin receptor substrate phosphorylation are involved in insulin resistance induced by oxidative stress. And antioxidant treatments can show benefits in animal models of diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance. However, negative evidence from large clinical trials suggests that new and more powerful antioxidants need to be studied to demonstrate whether antioxidants can be effective in treating diabetic complications. Furthermore, it appears that oxidative stress is only one of the factors contributing to diabetic complications. Thus, antioxidant treatment would most likely be more effective if it were coupled with other treatments for diabetic complications.

  14. The Mood Stabilizer Lithium Potentiates the Antidepressant-Like Effects and Ameliorates Oxidative Stress Induced by Acute Ketamine in a Mouse Model of Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuing, Lisa; Liu, Guangping; Liao, Hsiao-Mei; Linares, Gabriel R.; Lin, Dora

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evidence suggests that mammalian target of rapamycin activation mediates ketamine’s rapid but transient antidepressant effects and that glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibits this pathway. However, ketamine has associated psychotomimetic effects and a high risk of abuse. The mood stabilizer lithium is a glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitor with strong antisuicidal properties. Here, we used a mouse stress model to investigate whether adjunct lithium treatment would potentiate ketamine’s antidepressant-like effects. Methods: Mice received chronic restraint stress and long-term pre- or postketamine lithium treatment in drinking water. The effects of lithium on ketamine-induced antidepressant-like effects, activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling pathways, oxidative stress, and dendritic spine density in the brain of mice were investigated. Results: Subtherapeutic (600mg/L) lithium-pretreated mice exhibited an antidepressant-like response to an ineffective ketamine (2.5mg/kg, intraperitoneally) challenge in the forced swim test. Both the antidepressant-like effects and restoration of dendritic spine density in the medial prefrontal cortex of stressed mice induced by a single ketamine (50mg/kg) injection were sustained by postketamine treatment with 1200mg/L of lithium for at least 2 weeks. These benefits of lithium treatments were associated with activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling pathways in the prefrontal cortex. Acute ketamine (50mg/kg) injection also significantly increased lipid peroxidation, catalase activity, and oxidized glutathione levels in stressed mice. Notably, these oxidative stress markers were completely abolished by pretreatment with 1200mg/L of lithium. Conclusions: Our results suggest a novel therapeutic strategy and justify the use of lithium in patients who benefit from ketamine. PMID:25548109

  15. Reduction of the Oxidative Stress Status Using Steviol Glycosides in a Fish Model (Cyprinus carpio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livier Mireya Sánchez-Aceves

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Steviol glycosides are sweetening compounds from the Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni plant. This product is considered safe for human consumption and was approved as a food additive by the Food and Drugs Administration (FDA and European Food Safety Authority (EFSA. Its effects on the ecosystem have not been studied in depth; therefore, it is necessary to carry out ecotoxicological studies in organisms such as Cyprinus carpio. The present study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant activity by SGs on diverse tissues in C. carpio using oxidative stress (OS biomarkers. To test the antioxidant activity, carps were exposed to four systems: (1 SGs free control, (2 CCl4 0.5 mL/kg, (3 SGs 1 g/L, and (4 CCl4 0.5 mL/kg + SGs 1 g/L at 96 h. The following biomarkers were analyzed: lipoperoxidation (LPX, hydroperoxide content (HPC, and protein carbonyl content (PCC, as well as antioxidant activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT. It was found that both (3 and 4 systems’ exposure decreases LPX, CHP, PCC, SOD, and CAT with respect to the CCl4 system. The results of this study demonstrate that the concentrations of SGs used are not capable of generating oxidative stress and, on the contrary, would appear to induce an antioxidant effect.

  16. A comprehensive analysis of oxidative stress in the ozone-induced lung inflammation mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegman, Coen H; Li, Feng; Clarke, Colin J; Jazrawi, Elen; Kirkham, Paul; Barnes, Peter J; Adcock, Ian M; Chung, Kian F

    2014-03-01

    Ozone is an oxidizing environmental pollutant that contributes significantly to respiratory health. Exposure to increased levels of ozone has been associated with worsening of symptoms of patients with asthma and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). In the present study, we investigated the acute and chronic effects of ozone exposure-induced oxidative stress-related inflammation mechanics in mouse lung. In particular, we investigated the oxidative stress-induced effects on HDAC2 (histone deacetylase 2) modification and activation of the Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2) and HIF-1α (hypoxia-inducible factor-1α) signalling pathways. Male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to ozone (3 p.p.m.) for 3 h a day, twice a week for a period of 1, 3 or 6 weeks. Control mice were exposed to normal air. After the last exposure, mice were killed for BAL (bronchoalveolar lavage) fluid and lung tissue collection. BAL total cell counts were elevated at all of the time points studied. This was associated with increased levels of chemokines and cytokines in all ozone-exposed groups, indicating the presence of a persistent inflammatory environment in the lung. Increased inflammation and Lm (mean linear intercept) scores were observed in chronic exposed mice, indicating emphysematous changes were present in lungs of chronic exposed mice. The antioxidative stress response was active (indicated by increased Nrf2 activity and protein) after 1 week of ozone exposure, but this ability was lost after 3 and 6 weeks of ozone exposure. The transcription factor HIF-1α was elevated in 3- and 6-week ozone-exposed mice and this was associated with increased gene expression levels of several HIF-1α target genes including Hdac2 (histone deacetylase 2), Vegf (vascular endothelial growth factor), Keap1 (kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1) and Mif (macrophage migration inhibitory factor). HDAC2 protein was found to be phosphorylated and carbonylated in nuclear and cytoplasm fractions

  17. Oxidant Stress in Renal Inflammation: Mechanisms and Remedies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishola, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    Our overall hypothesis was that oxidant stress is a central player in renal inflammation; pharmacological reduction of oxidant stress should therefore relieve renal inflammation. We explored pro- and anti-oxidant mechanisms in three experimental renal injury models. OXIDANT-DEPENDENT RENAL

  18. Effects of phonophoresis with gold nanoparticles on oxidative stress parameters in a traumatic muscle injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Paulo Cesar Lock; Victor, Eduardo Ghisi; Notoya, Frederico de Souza; Scheffer, Debora da Luz; Silva, Luciano da; Cantú, Roberto Benavides; Martínez, Virginia Hidolina Collins; de Pinho, Ricardo Aurino; Paula, Marcos Marques da Silva

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of therapeutic pulsed ultrasound with gold nanoparticles on oxidative stress parameters after traumatic muscle injury in Wistar rats. The animals were randomly divided into nine groups (n = 6 each): sham (uninjured muscle); muscle injury without treatment; muscle injury and treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide (15 mg/kg); muscle injury and treatment with gold nanoparticles (27 µg); muscle injury and treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide + gold nanoparticles (Plus); muscle injury and therapeutic pulsed ultrasound; muscle injury and therapeutic pulsed ultrasound + dimethyl sulfoxide; muscle injury and therapeutic pulsed ultrasound + gold nanoparticles; and muscle injury and therapeutic pulsed ultrasound + Plus. Gastrocnemius injury was induced by a single-impact blunt trauma. Therapeutic pulsed ultrasound (6-min application, frequency 1.0 MHz, intensity 0.8 W/cm(2)) was used 2, 12, 24, and 48 h after trauma. Mitochondrial superoxide generation, lipid peroxidation, and protein carbonylation, and the activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase were evaluated. The increase in the superoxide production and TBARS and carbonyl levels observed in the control group after muscle damage were reduced in animals exposed to therapeutic pulsed ultrasound plus nanoparticles. Similarly, antioxidants enzymes showed a decreased activity with the same treatment. Our work suggest that therapeutic pulsed ultrasound + dimethyl sulfoxide + gold nanoparticles has beneficial effects on the muscle healing process by inducing a decrease in oxidative stress parameters and most likely decreasing the deleterious effects of the inflammatory response.

  19. Mephedrone and nicotine: oxidative stress and behavioral interactions in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzynska, Barbara; Boguszewska-Czubara, Anna; Kruk-Slomka, Marta; Kurzepa, Jacek; Biala, Grazyna

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of our experiment was to examine the influence of co-administration of nicotine and mephedrone on anxiety-like behaviors, cognitive processes and the nicotine-induced behavioral sensitization as well as processes connected with induction of oxidative stress in the brain of male Swiss mice. The results revealed that co-administration of subthreshold doses of mephedrone and nicotine (0.05 mg/kg each) exerted marked anxiogenic profile in the elevated plus maze and displayed pro-cognitive action in the passive avoidance paradigm (nicotine 0.05 mg/kg and mephedrone 2.5 mg/kg). Furthermore, one of the main findings of the present study was that mephedrone, administered alone at the dose not affecting locomotor activity of mice (1 mg/kg), enhanced the expression of nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization. Moreover, mephedrone administered with nicotine decreased general antioxidant status and catalase activity as well as antioxidant enzymes activity in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex and increased concentration of malondialdehyde, an indicator of lipid peroxidation processes. Considering the likelihood that mephedrone is taken as a part of polydrug combination with nicotine, the effects of this combination on mammalian organisms have been confirmed in our study. Understanding the consequences of co-administration of psychoactive substances on the central nervous system and oxidative processes in the brain provide the important toxicological significance, and may be useful in polydrug intoxication treatment.

  20. Chokeberry Anthocyanin Extract as Pancreatic β-Cell Protectors in Two Models of Induced Oxidative Stress

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    Dumitriţa Rugină

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of a chokeberry anthocyanin extract (CAE on pancreatic β-cells (βTC3 exposed to hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2- and high glucose- (HG- induced oxidative stress conditions. In order to quantify individual anthocyanins high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC coupled to photodiode array (PDA was used. The identification of the fragment ion pattern of anthocyanins was carried out by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS. The results showed that physiologically achievable concentrations of CAE (1, 5, and 10 μM protect βTC3 against H2O2- and HG-induced cytotoxicity. Antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were increased in pancreatic β-cells pretreated with CAE compared to cells exposed to the prooxidant agents. GSH levels initially reduced after exposure to H2O2 and HG were restored by pretreatment with CAE. Insulin secretion in βTC3 cells was enhanced by CAE pretreatment. CAE restored the insulin pool and diminished the intracellular reactive oxygen species level in glucose-induced stress condition in βTC3 cells. These results demonstrate that anthocyanins from CAE were biologically active, showing a secretagogue potential and an antioxidative protection of enzymatic systems, conferring protection against H2O2 and glucose toxicity in βTC3 cells.

  1. Oxidative stress and leaf senescence

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    Sedigheh Hatami

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Senescence is an important developmental process that leads to the cell death through highly regulated genetically controlled processes in plants. Biotic and abiotic Oxidative stresses can also artificially induce senescence and increase the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS specifically in chloroplast. One of the important oxidative stresses is paraquat that induces deviation of electron from photosynthesis electron chain and lead to the production of more ROS in chloroplast. Plants have evolved special adoptive mechanism to reallocate nutrient to reproductive and juvenile organs in senescence and different oxidative stresses. Rubisco seems to be the most abundant protein in plants and is involved in many changes during senescence. Results In the present study, the effects of ROS on Rubisco during senescence and oxidative stresses were evaluated by measuring photosynthesis factors such as net photosynthesis rate (Pn, stomatal conductance (G, evaporation rate (E, intra cellular CO2 concentration (Ci, fluorescence and total protein during three stages of development. Our results showed that in paraquat treated plants, CO2 assimilation is the most effective factor that refers to Rubisco damages. The highest correlation and regression coefficient belonged to Ci, while correlation coefficient between photosynthesis rate and total protein was much smaller. Conclusion It appears in the early stage of oxidative stresses such as exposing to paraquat, ROS has the most effect on Rubisco activity that induces more susceptibility to Rubisco specific protease. Moreover, Rubisco deactivation acts as an initiative signal for Rubisco degradation.

  2. Organophosphorus insecticides chlorpyrifos and diazinon and oxidative stress in neuronal cells in a genetic model of glutathione deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Gennaro; Afsharinejad, Zhara; Guizzetti, Marina; Vitalone, Annabella; Kavanagh, Terrance J; Costa, Lucio G

    2007-03-01

    Over the past several years evidence has been accumulating from in vivo animal studies, observations in humans, and in vitro studies, that organophosphorus (OP) insecticides may induce oxidative stress. Such effects may contribute to some of the toxic manifestations of OPs, particularly upon chronic or developmental exposures. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of oxidative stress in the neurotoxicity of two commonly used OPs, chlorpyrifos (CPF) and diazinon (DZ), their oxygen analogs (CPO and DZO), and their "inactive" metabolites (TCP and IMP), in neuronal cells from a genetic model of glutathione deficiency. Cerebellar granule neurons from wild type mice (Gclm +/+) and mice lacking the modifier subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (Gclm -/-), the first and limiting step in the synthesis of glutathione (GSH), were utilized. The latter display very low levels of GSH and are more susceptible to the toxicity of agents that increase oxidative stress. CPO and DZO were the most cytotoxic compounds, followed by CPF and DZ, while TCP and IMP displayed lower toxicity. Toxicity was significantly higher (10- to 25-fold) in neurons from Gclm (-/-) mice, and was antagonized by various antioxidants. Depletion of GSH from Gclm (+/+) neurons significantly increased their sensitivity to OP toxicity. OPs increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation and in both cases the effects were greater in neurons from Gclm (-/-) mice. OPs did not alter intracellular levels of GSH, but significantly increased those of oxidized glutathione (GSSG). Cytotoxicity was not antagonized by cholinergic antagonists, but was decreased by the calcium chelator BAPTA-AM. These studies indicate that cytotoxicity of OPs involves generation of reactive oxygen species and is modulated by intracellular GSH, and suggest that it may involve disturbances in intracellular homeostasis of calcium.

  3. Adult neurogenesis transiently generates oxidative stress.

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    Noah M Walton

    Full Text Available An increasing body of evidence suggests that alterations in neurogenesis and oxidative stress are associated with a wide variety of CNS diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease, as well as routine loss of function accompanying aging. Interestingly, the association between neurogenesis and the production of reactive oxidative species (ROS remains largely unexamined. The adult CNS harbors two regions of persistent lifelong neurogenesis: the subventricular zone and the dentate gyrus (DG. These regions contain populations of quiescent neural stem cells (NSCs that generate mature progeny via rapidly-dividing progenitor cells. We hypothesized that the energetic demands of highly proliferative progenitors generates localized oxidative stress that contributes to ROS-mediated damage within the neuropoietic microenvironment. In vivo examination of germinal niches in adult rodents revealed increases in oxidized DNA and lipid markers, particularly in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus. To further pinpoint the cell types responsible for oxidative stress, we employed an in vitro cell culture model allowing for the synchronous terminal differentiation of primary hippocampal NSCs. Inducing differentiation in primary NSCs resulted in an immediate increase in total mitochondria number and overall ROS production, suggesting oxidative stress is generated during a transient window of elevated neurogenesis accompanying normal neurogenesis. To confirm these findings in vivo, we identified a set of oxidation-responsive genes, which respond to antioxidant administration and are significantly elevated in genetic- and exercise-induced model of hyperactive hippocampal neurogenesis. While no direct evidence exists coupling neurogenesis-associated stress to CNS disease, our data suggest that oxidative stress is produced as a result of routine adult neurogenesis.

  4. Good stress, bad stress and oxidative stress: insights from anticipatory cortisol reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschbacher, Kirstin; O'Donovan, Aoife; Wolkowitz, Owen M; Dhabhar, Firdaus S; Su, Yali; Epel, Elissa

    2013-09-01

    Chronic psychological stress appears to accelerate biological aging, and oxidative damage is an important potential mediator of this process. However, the mechanisms by which psychological stress promotes oxidative damage are poorly understood. This study investigates the theory that cortisol increases in response to an acutely stressful event have the potential to either enhance or undermine psychobiological resilience to oxidative damage, depending on the body's prior exposure to chronic psychological stress. In order to achieve a range of chronic stress exposure, forty-eight post-menopausal women were recruited in a case-control design that matched women caring for spouses with dementia (a chronic stress model) with similarly aged control women whose spouses were healthy. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing perceived stress over the previous month and provided fasting blood. Three markers of oxidative damage were assessed: 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2α) (IsoP), lipid peroxidation, 8-hydroxyguanosine (8-oxoG) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), reflecting oxidative damage to RNA/DNA respectively. Within approximately one week, participants completed a standardized acute laboratory stress task while salivary cortisol responses were measured. The increase from 0 to 30 min was defined as "peak" cortisol reactivity, while the increase from 0 to 15 min was defined as "anticipatory" cortisol reactivity, representing a cortisol response that began while preparing for the stress task. Women under chronic stress had higher 8-oxoG, oxidative damage to RNA (pcortisol reactivity would mediate the relationship between perceived stress and elevated oxidative stress damage, but only among women under chronic stress. Consistent with this model, bootstrapped path analysis found significant indirect paths from perceived stress to 8-oxoG and IsoP (but not 8-OHdG) via anticipatory cortisol reactivity, showing the expected relations among chronically stressed

  5. Cardiopulmonary Bypass and Oxidative Stress

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    Mustafa Zakkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB revolutionized cardiac surgery and contributed immensely to improved patients outcomes. CPB is associated with the activation of different coagulation, proinflammatory, survival cascades and altered redox state. Haemolysis, ischaemia, and perfusion injury and neutrophils activation during CPB play a pivotal role in oxidative stress and the associated activation of proinflammatory and proapoptotic signalling pathways which can affect the function and recovery of multiple organs such as the myocardium, lungs, and kidneys and influence clinical outcomes. The administration of agents with antioxidant properties during surgery either intravenously or in the cardioplegia solution may reduce ROS burst and oxidative stress during CPB. Alternatively, the use of modified circuits such as minibypass can modify both proinflammatory responses and oxidative stress.

  6. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling and perivascular adipose oxidative stress and inflammation contribute to vascular dysfunction in a rodent model of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Chiara; Ebrahimian, Talin; Angulo, Orlando; Paradis, Pierre; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2009-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome represents a constellation of cardiovascular risk factors that promote the development of cardiovascular disease. Oxidative stress is a mediator of endothelial dysfunction and vascular remodeling. We investigated vascular dysfunction in the metabolic syndrome and the oxidant mechanisms involved. New Zealand obese (NZO) mice with metabolic syndrome and New Zealand black control mice were studied. NZO mice showed insulin resistance and increased visceral fat and blood pressure compared with New Zealand black mice. Mesenteric resistance arteries from NZO mice exhibited increased media:lumen ratio and media cross-sectional area, demonstrating hypertrophic vascular remodeling. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine, assessed by pressurized myography, was impaired in NZO mice, not affected by N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, inhibitor of endothelial NO synthase, and improved by the antioxidant Tempol, suggesting reduced NO bioavailability and increased oxidative stress. Dimer:monomer ratio of endothelial NO synthase was decreased in NZO mice compared with New Zealand black mice, suggesting endothelial NO synthase uncoupling. Furthermore, vascular superoxide and peroxynitrite production was increased, as well as adhesion molecule expression. Perivascular adipose tissue of NZO mice showed increased superoxide production and NADPH oxidase activity, as well as adipocyte hypertrophy, associated with inflammatory Mac-3-positive cell infiltration. Vasoconstriction to norepinephrine decreased in the presence of perivascular adipose tissue in New Zealand black mice but was unaffected by perivascular adipose tissue in NZO mice, suggesting loss of perivascular adipose tissue anticontractile properties. Our data suggest that this rodent model of metabolic syndrome is associated with perivascular adipose inflammation and oxidative stress, hypertrophic resistance artery remodeling, and endothelial dysfunction, the latter a result of decreased NO

  7. Deep-Trap Stress Induced Leakage Current Model for Nominal and Weak Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamohara, Shiro; Hu, Chenming; Okumura, Tsugunori

    2008-08-01

    We have developed a model of the stress-induced leakage current (SILC) based on the inelastic trap-assisted tunneling (ITAT) by introducing a trap with a deep energy level of 3.6 eV from the bottom of the conduction band. This model can explain both of two field dependencies, i.e., a field dependence of the direct tunneling (DT) for A-mode SILC and that of the Fowler-Nordheim (FN) tunneling for B-mode SILC by analytical equations of a common form. For simple analytical equations, we introduce the most favorable trap position (MFTP), which gives the largest contribution to the leakage current. The trap area density for A-mode SILC of around 1×1010 cm-2 and the area density of the leakage paths for B-mode SILC of 1×102 cm-2 were obtained by comparisons between the experimental results and the present model.

  8. Hemoglobin oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croci, S.; Ortalli, I.; Pedrazzi, G. [University of Parma, Istituto di Scienze Fisiche, INFM-Udr Parma (Italy); Passeri, G. [University of Parma, Dipartimento di Medicina Interna e Scienze Biomediche (Italy); Piccolo, P. [University of Parma, Istituto di Clinica chirurgica Generale, Toracica e Vascolare (Italy)

    2000-07-15

    Venous blood obtained from healthy donors and from patients suffering from breast cancer have been treated with acetylphenylhydrazine (APH) for different time. Moessbauer spectra of the packed red cells have been recorded and compared. The largest difference occurs after 50 min of treatment with APH where the patient samples show a broad spectral pattern indicating an advanced hemoglobin oxidation. These results may have some relevance in early cancer diagnosis.

  9. Increased oxidative stress and apoptosis in the hypothalamus of diabetic male mice in the insulin receptor substrate-2 knockout model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canelles, Sandra; Argente, Jesús; Barrios, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Insulin receptor substrate-2-deficient (IRS2−/−) mice are considered a good model to study the development of diabetes because IRS proteins mediate the pleiotropic effects of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin on metabolism, mitogenesis and cell survival. The hypothalamus might play a key role in the early onset of diabetes, owing to its involvement in the control of glucose homeostasis and energy balance. Because some inflammatory markers are elevated in the hypothalamus of diabetic IRS2−/− mice, our aim was to analyze whether the diabetes associated with the absence of IRS2 results in hypothalamic injury and to analyze the intracellular mechanisms involved. Only diabetic IRS2−/− mice showed increased cell death and activation of caspase-8 and -3 in the hypothalamus. Regulators of apoptosis such as FADD, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and p53 were also increased, whereas p-IκB and c-FLIPL were decreased. This was accompanied by increased levels of Nox-4 and catalase, enzymes involved in oxidative stress. In summary, the hypothalamus of diabetic IRS2−/− mice showed an increase in oxidative stress and inflammatory markers that finally resulted in cell death via substantial activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Conversely, non-diabetic IRS2−/− mice did not show cell death in the hypothalamus, possibly owing to an increase in the levels of circulating IGF-I and in the enhanced hypothalamic IGF-IR phosphorylation that would lead to the stimulation of survival pathways. In conclusion, diabetes in IRS2-deficient male mice is associated with increased oxidative stress and apoptosis in the hypothalamus. PMID:27013528

  10. Oxidative Stress and Protein Quality Control Systems in the Aged Canine Brain as a Model for Human Neurodegenerative Disorders

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    Mariarita Romanucci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aged dogs are considered the most suitable spontaneous animal model for studying normal aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Elderly canines naturally develop cognitive dysfunction and neuropathological hallmarks similar to those seen in humans, especially Alzheimer’s disease-like pathology. Pet dogs also share similar living conditions and diets to humans. Oxidative damage accumulates in the canine brain during aging, making dogs a valid model for translational antioxidant treatment/prevention studies. Evidence suggests the presence of detective protein quality control systems, involving ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs, in the aged canine brain. Further studies on the canine model are needed to clarify the role of age-related changes in UPS activity and HSP expression in neurodegeneration in order to design novel treatment strategies, such as HSP-based therapies, aimed at improving chaperone defences against proteotoxic stress affecting brain during aging.

  11. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Living cells continually generate reactive oxygen species (ROS through the respiratory chain during energetic metabolism. ROS at low or moderate concentration can play important physiological roles. However, an excessive amount of ROS under oxidative stress would be extremely deleterious. The central nervous system (CNS is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to its high oxygen consumption, weakly antioxidative systems and the terminal-differentiation characteristic of neurons. Thus, oxidative stress elicits various neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, chemotherapy could result in severe side effects on the CNS and peripheral nervous system (PNS of cancer patients, and a growing body of evidence demonstrates the involvement of ROS in drug-induced neurotoxicities as well. Therefore, development of antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs is a potentially beneficial strategy for clinical therapy. In this review, we summarize the source, balance maintenance and physiologic functions of ROS, oxidative stress and its toxic mechanisms underlying a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and the possible involvement of ROS in chemotherapy-induced toxicity to the CNS and PNS. We ultimately assess the value for antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs and provide our comments on the unmet needs.

  12. Update on the oxidative stress theory of aging: does oxidative stress play a role in aging or healthy aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Adam B; Richardson, Arlan; Pérez, Viviana I

    2010-03-01

    The oxidative stress theory of aging predicts that manipulations that alter oxidative stress/damage will alter aging. The gold standard for determining whether aging is altered is life span, i.e., does altering oxidative stress/damage change life span? Mice with genetic manipulations in their antioxidant defense system designed to directly address this prediction have, with few exceptions, shown no change in life span. However, when these transgenic/knockout mice are tested using models that develop various types of age-related pathology, they show alterations in progression and/or severity of pathology as predicted by the oxidative stress theory: increased oxidative stress accelerates pathology and reduced oxidative stress retards pathology. These contradictory observations might mean that (a) oxidative stress plays a very limited, if any, role in aging but a major role in health span and/or (b) the role that oxidative stress plays in aging depends on environment. In environments with minimal stress, as expected under optimal husbandry, oxidative damage plays little role in aging. However, under chronic stress, including pathological phenotypes that diminish optimal health, oxidative stress/damage plays a major role in aging. Under these conditions, enhanced antioxidant defenses exert an "antiaging" action, leading to changes in life span, age-related pathology, and physiological function as predicted by the oxidative stress theory of aging.

  13. An in vitro liver model - assessing oxidative stress and genotoxicity following exposure of hepatocytes to a panel of engineered nanomaterials

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    Kermanizadeh Ali

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following exposure via inhalation, intratracheal instillation or ingestion some nanomaterials (NM have been shown to translocate to the liver. Since oxidative stress has been implicated as a possible mechanism for NM toxicity this study aimed to investigate the effects of various materials (five titanium dioxide (TiO2, two zinc oxide (ZnO, two multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT and one silver (Ag NM on oxidative responses of C3A cell line as a model for potential detrimental properties of nanomaterials on the liver. Results We noted a dose dependant decrease in the cellular glutathione content following exposure of the C3A cells to Ag, the ZnO and the MWCNTs. Intracellular ROS levels were also measured and shown to increase significantly following exposure of the C3A to the low toxicity NMs (MWCNT and TiO2. The antioxidant Trolox in part prevented the detrimental effect of NMs on cell viability, and decreased the NM induced IL8 production after exposure to all but the Ag particulate. Following 4 hr exposure of the C3A cells to sub-lethal levels of the NMs, the largest amount of DNA damage was induced by two of the TiO2 samples (7 nm and the positively charged 10 nm particles. Conclusions All ten NMs exhibited effects on the hepatocyte cell line that were at least in part ROS/oxidative stress mediated. These effects included mild genotoxicity and IL8 production for all NM except the Ag possibly due to its highly cytotoxic nature.

  14. Space flight and oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight is associated with an increase in oxidative stress after return to 1g. The effect is more pronounced after long-duration space flight. The effects lasts for several weeks after landing. In humans there is increased lipid peroxidation in erythrocyte membranes, reduction in some blood antioxidants, and increased urinary excretion of 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine. Isoprostane 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine are markers for oxidative damage to lipids and DNA, respectively. The changes have been attributed to a combination of the energy deficiency that occurs during flight and substrate competition for amino acids occurring between repleting muscle and other tissues during the recovery phase. The observations in humans have been complemented by rodent studies. Most rodent studies showed increased production of lipid peroxidation products postflight and decreased antioxidant enzyme activity postflight. The rodent observations were attributed to the stress associated with reentry into Earth's gravity. Decreasing the imbalance between the production of endogenous oxidant defenses and oxidant production by increasing the supply of dietary antioxidants may lessen the severity of the postflight increase in oxidative stress.

  15. Airway oxidative stress causes vascular and hepatic inflammation via upregulation of IL-17A in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Naif O; Nadeem, Ahmed; Al-Harbi, Mohammed M; Ansari, Mushtaq A; AlSharari, Shakir D; Bahashwan, Saleh A; Attia, Sabry M; Al-Hosaini, Khaled A; Al Hoshani, Ali R; Ahmad, Sheikh F

    2016-05-01

    Oxidants are generated in asthmatic airways due to infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes and resident cells in the lung. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radical may leak into systemic circulation when generated in uncontrolled manner and may impact vasculature. Our previous studies have shown an association between airway inflammation and systemic inflammation; however so far none has investigated the impact of airway oxidative inflammation on hepatic oxidative stress and Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine markers in liver/vasculature in a murine model of asthma. Therefore, this study investigated the contribution of oxidative stress encountered in asthmatic airways in modulation of systemic/hepatic Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines balance and hepatic oxidative stress. Mice were sensitized intraperitoneally with cockroach extract (CE) in the presence of aluminum hydroxide followed by several intranasal (i.n.) challenges with CE. Mice were then assessed for systemic/hepatic inflammation through assessment of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines and oxidative stress (iNOS, protein nitrotyrosine, lipid peroxides and myeloperoxidase activity). Challenge with CE led to increased Th2/Th17 cytokines in blood/liver and hepatic oxidative stress. However, only Th17 related pro-inflammatory markers were upregulated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhalation in vasculature and liver, whereas antioxidant treatment, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) downregulated them. Hepatic oxidative stress was also upregulated by H2O2 inhalation, whereas NAC attenuated it. Therefore, our study shows that airway oxidative inflammation may contribute to systemic inflammation through upregulation of Th17 immune responses in blood/liver and hepatic oxidative stress. This might predispose these patients to increased risk for the development of cardiovascular disorders.

  16. Presymptomatic alterations in energy metabolism and oxidative stress in the APP23 mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, Daniela; Schuldt, Victoria; Forler, Stephanie; Zabel, Claus; Klose, Joachim; Rohe, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Glucose hypometabolism is the earliest symptom observed in the brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. In a former study, we analyzed the cortical proteome of the APP23 mouse model of AD at presymptomatic age (1 month) using a 2-D electrophoresis-based approach. Interestingly, long before amyloidosis can be observed in APP23 mice, proteins associated with energy metabolism were predominantly altered in transgenic as compared to wild-type mice indicating presymptomatic changes in energy metabolism. In the study presented here, we analyzed whether the observed changes were associated with oxidative stress and confirmed our previous findings in primary cortical neurons, which exhibited altered ADP/ATP levels if transgenic APP was expressed. Reactive oxygen species produced during energy metabolism have important roles in cell signaling and homeostasis as they modify proteins. We observed an overall up-regulation of protein oxidation status as shown by increased protein carbonylation in the cortex of presymptomatic APP23 mice. Interestingly, many carbonylated proteins, such as Vilip1 and Syntaxin were associated to synaptic plasticity. This demonstrates an important link between energy metabolism and synaptic function, which is altered in AD. In summary, we demonstrate that changes in cortical energy metabolism and increased protein oxidation precede the amyloidogenic phenotype in a mouse model for AD. These changes might contribute to synaptic failure observed in later disease stages, as synaptic transmission is particularly dependent on energy metabolism.

  17. Protopanaxtriol protects against 3-nitropropionic acid-induced oxidative stress in a rat model of Huntington's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Chu, Shi-feng; Li, Jian-ping; Zhang, Zhao; Yan, Jia-qing; Wen, Zhi-lin; Xia, Cong-yuan; Mou, Zheng; Wang, Zhen-zhen; He, Wen-bin; Guo, Xiao-feng; Wei, Gui-ning; Chen, Nai-hong

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Protopanaxtriol (Ppt) is extracted from Panax ginseng Mayer. In the present study, we investigated whether Ppt could protect against 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP)-induced oxidative stress in a rat model of Huntington's disease (HD) and explored the mechanisms of action. Methods: Male SD rats were treated with 3-NP (20 mg/kg on d 1, and 15 mg/kg on d 2–5, ip). The rats received Ppt (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, po) daily prior to 3-NP administration. Nimodipine (12 mg/kg, po) or N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, 100 mg/kg, po) was used as positive control drugs. The body weight and behavior were monitored within 5 d. Then the animals were sacrificed, neuronal damage in striatum was estimated using Nissl staining. Hsp70 expression was detected with immunohistochemistry. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured using dihydroethidium (DHE) staining. The levels of components in the Nrf2 pathway were measured with immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Results: 3-NP resulted in a marked reduction in the body weight and locomotion activity accompanied by progressive striatal dysfunction. In striatum, 3-NP caused ROS generation mainly in neurons rather than in astrocytes and induced Hsp70 expression. Administration of Ppt significantly alleviated 3-NP-induced changes of body weight and behavior, decreased ROS production and restored antioxidant enzymes activities in striatum. Moreover, Ppt directly scavenged free radicals, increased Nrf2 entering nucleus, and the expression of its downstream products heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H quinone oxidase 1 (NQO1) in striatum. Similar effects were obtained with the positive control drugs nimodipine or NAC. Conclusion: Ppt exerts a protective action against 3-NP-induced oxidative stress in the rat model of HD, which is associated with its anti-oxidant activity. PMID:25640478

  18. Photobiomodulation therapy associated with treadmill training in the oxidative stress in a collagen-induced arthritis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Solange Almeida; Dos Santos Vieira, Marcia Ataize; Simões, Maira Cécilia Brandão; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo

    2017-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by chronic and systemic inflammation, which leads to the destruction of the cartilage and bone and affects tissues in multiple joints. Oxidative stress has been implicated with regards to involvement in various disease conditions, such as diabetes mellitus and neurodegenerative, respiratory, cardiovascular, and RA diseases. In vivo experimental studies using photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) have shown positive effects in reducing lipid peroxidation and in increasing antioxidant activity. The regular practice of physical exercise has also been reported to be a beneficial treatment capable of reducing oxidative damage. Thus, the aim of this study was to analyze the effects of photobiomodulation therapy at 2- and 4-J doses associated with physical exercise on oxidative stress in an experimental model of RA in protein expression involving superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and/or catalase (CAT) on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). In this study, 24 male Wistar rats divided into four groups were submitted to an RA model (i.e., collagen-induced arthritis, CIA), with the first immunization performed at the base of the tail on days 0 and 7 were included. After 28 days, a third intraarticular dose was administered in both knees of the animals. After the last induction, PBMT was started immediately, transcutaneously at two points (i.e., the medial and lateral), with a total of 15 applications. Treadmill exercise was also started the day after the last induction, and lasted for 5 weeks. With respect to results, we obtained the decreases in the lipid peroxidation and the increases of the antioxidant activities of SOD, GPX and CAT, with physical exercise associated to PBMT in doses of 2 and 4 J. In conclusion, physical exercise associated with PBMT decreases lipid peroxidation and increases antioxidant activity.

  19. Oxidative Stress and Light-Evoked Responses of the Posterior Segment in a Mouse Model of Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Bruce A.; Grady, Edmund Michael; Khetarpal, Nikita; Patel, Akshar; Roberts, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To test the hypothesis that in a mouse model of diabetic retinopathy, oxidative stress is linked with impaired light-evoked expansion of choroidal thickness and subretinal space (SRS). Methods. We examined nondiabetic mice (wild-type, wt) with and without administration of manganese, nondiabetic mice deficient in rod phototransduction (transducin alpha knockout; GNAT1−/−), and diabetic mice (untreated or treated with the antioxidant α-lipoic acid [LPA]). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to measure light-evoked increases in choroidal thickness and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) at 88% to 100% depth into the retina (i.e., the SRS layer). Results. Choroidal thickness values were similar (P > 0.05) between all untreated nondiabetic dark-adapted groups and increased significantly (P 0.05). In diabetic mice, the light-dependent increase in SRS ADC was significantly (P choroid thickness and its light-evoked expansion together with phototransduction-dependent changes in the SRS layer in mice in vivo. Because ADC MRI exploits an endogenous contrast mechanism, its translational potential is promising; it can also be performed in concert with manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI). Our data support a link between diabetes-related oxidative stress and rod, but not choroidal, pathophysiology. PMID:25574049

  20. Beneficial effect of melatonin treatment on inflammation, apoptosis and oxidative stress on pancreas of a senescence accelerated mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Sara; Kireev, Roman; García, Cruz; Forman, Katherine; Escames, Germaine; Vara, Elena; Tresguerres, Jesús A F

    2011-01-01

    This study has investigated the effect of aging on parameters of inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis in pancreas obtained from two types of male mice models: senescence-accelerated prone (SAMP8) and resistant mice (SAMR1). Animals of 2 (young) and 10 months of age (old) were used (n = 64). The influence of the administration of melatonin in the drinking water for one month at two different dosages (1 and 10mg/(kg day) on old SAMP8 mice on these parameters was also studied. SAMP8 mice showed with age a significant increase in the relative expression of pancreatic genes involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Furthermore the protein expression of several NFκB subunits was also enhanced. On the contrary aged SAMR1 mice did not show significant increases in these parameters. Melatonin administration to SAMP8 mice was able to reduce these age related alterations at the two used dosages. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Mangifera indica Fruit Extract Improves Memory Impairment, Cholinergic Dysfunction, and Oxidative Stress Damage in Animal Model of Mild Cognitive Impairment

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    Jintanaporn Wattanathorn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, the effective preventive paradigm against mild cognitive impairment (MCI is required. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether Mangifera indica fruit extract, a substance possessing antioxidant and cognitive enhancing effects, could improve memory impairment, cholinergic dysfunction, and oxidative stress damage in animal model of mild cognitive impairment. Male Wistar rats, weighing 180–200 g, were orally given the extract at doses of 12.5, 50, and 200 mg·kg−1 BW for 2 weeks before and 1 week after the bilateral injection of AF64A (icv. At the end of study, spatial memory, cholinergic neurons density, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px enzymes in hippocampus were determined. The results showed that all doses of extract could improve memory together with the decreased MDA level and the increased SOD and GSH-Px enzymes activities. The increased cholinergic neurons density in CA1 and CA3 of hippocampus was also observed in rats treated with the extract at doses of 50 and 200 mg·kg−1 BW. Therefore, our results suggested that M. indica, the potential protective agent against MCI, increased cholinergic function and the decreased oxidative stress which in turn enhanced memory. However, further researches are essential to elucidate the possible active ingredients and detail mechanism.

  2. Hemoglobin oxidative stress in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Rovere, F; Granata, A; Broccio, M; Zirilli, A; Broccio, G

    1995-01-01

    The role played by free radicals in carcinogenesis and their relationships with antioxidant pool and cancer have already been shown. Free radicals induce increased membrane permeability through membrane lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and histamine release from mast cells. Free radicals also cause oxyhemoglobin oxidative stress which increases methemoglobin and hemichromes. For this reason, we studied the in vitro formation of methemoglobin at 0' and 90', dosed following the HPLC method, after oxidative stress of blood by means of acetylphenylhydrazine in 40 subjects with cancer and 40 healthy donors. The results showed that methemoglobin formation was highly significant in tumors as compared to controls (P < 0.0001). The statistical analyses we carried out showed that metHb formation is not affected by age, sex, smoking habit, red blood cell number, Hb, Ht or tumor staging. This makes us believe that free radicals alter erythrocyte membrane permeability and predenaturate oxyhemoglobin so that erythrocyte membrane becomes more susceptible to new oxidative stress. This caused the abnormal response we found. Our results clearly underline the role played by free radicals in tumorous disease and provide a successful and easy method to detect early, even in a pre-clinical stage, the presence of tumorous alterations in the human body.

  3. Effect of fluoxetine and resveratrol on testicular functions and oxidative stress in a rat model of chronic mild stress-induced depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakr, H F; Abbas, A M; Elsamanoudy, A Z; Ghoneim, F M

    2015-08-01

    Our objective was to investigate the effects of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) with or without selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (fluoxetine) and anti-oxidant (resveratrol) on testicular functions and oxidative stress in rats. Fifty male rats were divided into 2 groups; control and CUMS. CUMS group was further subdivided into 4 subgroups administered water, fluoxetine, resveratrol and both. Sucrose intake, body weight gain, serum corticosterone, serotonin and testosterone levels, sperm count and motility, testicular malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione (GSH), and gene expression of steroidogenic acute-regulatory (StAR) protein and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage (P450scc) enzyme were evaluated. CUMS decreased sucrose intake, weight gain, anti-oxidants (SOD, catalase, GSH), testosterone, serotonin, StAR and cytochrome P450scc gene expression, sperm count and motility and increased malondialdehyde and corticosterone. Fluoxetine increased malondialdehyde, sucrose intake, weight gain, serotonin and decreased anti-oxidants, StAR and cytochrome P450scc gene expression, sperm count and motility, testosterone, corticosterone in stressed rats. Administration of resveratrol increased anti-oxidants, sucrose intake, weight gain, serotonin, StAR and cytochrome P450scc gene expression, testosterone, sperm count and motility, and decreased malondialdehyde and corticosterone in stressed rats with or without fluoxetine. In conclusion, CUMS induces testicular dysfunctions and oxidative stress. While treatment of CUMS rats with fluoxetine decreases the depressive behavior, it causes further worsening of testicular dysfunctions and oxidative stress. Administration of resveratrol improves testicular dysfunctions and oxidative stress that are caused by CUMS and further worsened by fluoxetine treatment.

  4. Hypoxia, Oxidative Stress and Fat

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    Nikolaus Netzer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disturbances in white adipose tissue in obese individuals contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Impaired insulin action in adipocytes is associated with elevated lipolysis and increased free fatty acids leading to ectopic fat deposition in liver and skeletal muscle. Chronic adipose tissue hypoxia has been suggested to be part of pathomechanisms causing dysfunction of adipocytes. Hypoxia can provoke oxidative stress in human and animal adipocytes and reduce the production of beneficial adipokines, such as adiponectin. However, time-dose responses to hypoxia relativize the effects of hypoxic stress. Long-term exposure of fat cells to hypoxia can lead to the production of beneficial substances such as leptin. Knowledge of time-dose responses of hypoxia on white adipose tissue and the time course of generation of oxidative stress in adipocytes is still scarce. This paper reviews the potential links between adipose tissue hypoxia, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and low-grade inflammation caused by adipocyte hypertrophy, macrophage infiltration and production of inflammatory mediators.

  5. Oxidative Stress in Schizophrenia: An Integrated Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitanihirwe, Byron K.Y.; Woo, Tsung-Ung W.

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been suggested to contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. In particular, oxidative damage to lipids, proteins, and DNA as observed in schizophrenia is known to impair cell viability and function, which may subsequently account for the deteriorating course of the illness. Currently available evidence points towards an alteration in the activities of enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant systems in schizophrenia. In fact, experimental models have demonstrated that oxidative stress induces behavioural and molecular anomalies strikingly similar to those observed in schizophrenia. These findings suggest that oxidative stress is intimately linked to a variety of pathophysiological processes, such as inflammation, oligodendrocyte abnormalities, mitochondrial dysfunction, hypoactive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and the impairment of fast-spiking gamma-aminobutyric acid interneurons.[bkyb1] Such self-sustaining mechanisms may progressively worsen producing the functional and structural consequences associated with schizophrenia. Recent clinical studies have shown antioxidant treatment to be effective in ameliorating schizophrenic symptoms. Hence, identifying viable therapeutic strategies to tackle oxidative stress and the resulting physiological disturbances provide an exciting opportunity for the treatment and ultimately prevention of schizophrenia. PMID:20974172

  6. The evaluation of non-enzymatic antioxidants effects in limiting tumor- associated oxidative stress, in a tumor rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorescu, R; Gruia, M I; Nacea, V; Nitu, C; Negoita, V; Glavan, D

    2015-01-01

    Active oxygen species are produced as a consequence of normal aerobic metabolism. Of these, free radicals are usually metabolized or inactivated in vivo by a team of antioxidants. Individual members are a trained team fighting antioxidants to prevent the generation of ROS, destroy or oxidizing potential of capture. In terms of physiological oxidative stress, induced tissue attack is minimal. A relative or absolute deficiency in the antioxidant defense may lead to increased oxidative stress and this event is associated with both the causes and consequences of diseases and cancer, included here. The aim of the study is to identify the role of antioxidant defense systems and the reduction of oxidative stress in dynamic growth and development of malignant tumors. Our in vivo study was developed and referred to carcinosarcoma carriers Wistar rats treated with non-enzymatic antioxidants: vitamin C, vitamin A, zinc salt (II), and arginine in various combinations. Treatment was initiated three weeks before tumor induction.

  7. Methane oxidation needs less stressed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoqi; Smaill, Simeon J; Clinton, Peter W

    2013-12-01

    Methane oxidation rates in soil are liable to be reduced by plant stress responses to climate change. Stressed plants exude ethylene into soil, which inhibits methane oxidation when present in the soil atmosphere. Here we discuss opportunities to use 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase to manage methane oxidation by regulating plant stress responses.

  8. Pancreatic Response to Gold Nanoparticles Includes Decrease of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation In Autistic Diabetic Model

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    Manar E. Selim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs have a wide range of applications in various fields. This study provides an understanding of the modulatory effects of AuNPs on an antioxidant system in male Wistar diabetic rats with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Normal littermates fed by control mothers were injected with citrate buffer alone and served as normal, untreated controls controlin this study. Diabetes mellitus (DM was induced by administering a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ (100 mg/kg to the pups of (ND diabetic group, which had been fasted overnight. Autistic pups from mothers that had received a single intraperitoneal injection of 600 mg/kg sodium valproate on day 12.5 after conception were randomly divided into 2 groups (n 2 7/group as follow; administering single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ ( (100 mg/kg to the overnight fasted autistic pups of (AD autistic diabetic group. The treatment was started on the 5th day after STZ injection with the same dose as in group II and it was considered as 1st day of treatment with gold nanoparticles for 7 days to each rat of (group IV treated autistic diabetic group(TAD at a dosage of 2.5 mg/kg. b. wt. Results: At this dose of administration AuNPs, the activities of hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and catalase were greater in group TAD compared with the control group (P 0.05 in the liver of autistic diabetic AuNPs -supplemented rats, whereas reduced glutathione was markedly higher than in control rats, especially after administration of AuNPs. Moreover, the kidney functions in addition to the fat profile scoring supported the protective potential of that dose of AuNPs. The beta cells revealed euchromatic nuclei with no evidence of separation of nuclear membrane. Conclusions: Our results showed that AuNPs improved many of the oxidative stress parameters (SOD, GPx and, CAT, plasma antioxidant capacity (ORAC and lipid profile

  9. Perinatal Oxidative Stress May Affect Fetal Ghrelin Levels in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong-Cheng Luo; Jean-François Bilodeau; Anne Monique Nuyt; Fraser, William D; Pierre Julien; Francois Audibert; Lin Xiao; Carole Garofalo; Emile Levy

    2015-01-01

    In vitro cell model studies have shown that oxidative stress may affect beta-cell function. It is unknown whether oxidative stress may affect metabolic health in human fetuses/newborns. In a singleton pregnancy cohort (n = 248), we studied maternal (24–28 weeks gestation) and cord plasma biomarkers of oxidative stress [malondialdehyde (MDA), F2-isoprostanes] in relation to fetal metabolic health biomarkers including cord plasma glucose-to-insulin ratio (an indicator of insulin sensitivity), p...

  10. Sperm Oxidative Stress Is Detrimental to Embryo Development: A Dose-Dependent Study Model and a New and More Sensitive Oxidative Status Evaluation

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    Letícia S. de Castro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our study aimed to assess the impact of sperm oxidative stress on embryo development by means of a dose-dependent model. In experiment 1, straws from five bulls were subjected to incubation with increasing H2O2 doses (0, 12.5, 25, and 50 μM. Motility parameters were evaluated by Computed Assisted System Analysis (CASA. Experiment 2 was designed to study a high (50 μM and low dose (12.5 μM of H2O2 compared to a control (0 μM. Samples were incubated and further used for in vitro fertilization. Analyses of motility (CASA, oxidative status (CellROX green and 2’-7’ dichlorofluorescein diacetate, mitochondrial potential (JC-1, chromatin integrity (AO, and sperm capacitation status (chlortetracycline were performed. Embryos were evaluated based on fast cleavage (30 h.p.i., cleavage (D=3, development (D=5, and blastocyst rates (D=8. We observed a dose-dependent deleterious effect of H2O2 on motility and increase on the percentages of positive cells for CellROX green, capacitated sperm, and AO. A decrease on cleavage and blastocyst rates was observed as H2O2 increased. Also, we detected a blockage on embryo development. We concluded that sperm when exposed to oxidative environment presents impaired motility traits, prooxidative status, and premature capacitation; such alterations resulting in embryo development fail.

  11. Skin aging and oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Sayeeda Ahsanuddin; Minh Lam; Baron, Elma D.

    2016-01-01

    Skin aging occurs through two main pathways, intrinsic and extrinsic. These pathways have significant interaction in contributing to the aging phenotype, which includes skin laxity, wrinkling, pigmentation irregularities, and the appearance of neoplastic skin lesions. Here, we review the critical role that oxidative stress plays in skin aging, including its effects on signaling pathways involved in skin matrix formation and degradation, proteasome activity, as well as DNA structure. Furthermo...

  12. Zn(II)-curcumin protects against hemorheological alterations, oxidative stress and liver injury in a rat model of acute alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chuan; Mei, Xue-Ting; Zheng, Yan-Ping; Xu, Dong-Hui

    2014-03-01

    Curcumin can chelate metal ions, forming metallocomplexes. We compared the effects of Zn(II)-curcumin with curcumin against hemorheological alterations, oxidative stress and liver injury in a rat model of acute alcoholism. Oral administration of Zn(II)-curcumin dose-dependently prevented the ethanol-induced elevation of serum malondialdehyde (MDA) content and reductions in glutathione level and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Zn(II)-curcumin also inhibited ethanol-induced liver injury. Additionally, Zn(II)-curcumin dose-dependently inhibited hemorheological abnormalities, including the ethanol-induced elevation of whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, blood viscosity at corrected hematocrit (45%), erythrocyte aggregation index, erythrocyte rigidity index and hematocrit. Compared to curcumin at the same dose, Zn(II)-curcumin more effectively elevated SOD activity, ameliorated liver injury and improved hemorheological variables. These results suggest that Zn(II)-curcumin protected the rats from ethanol-induced liver injury and hemorheological abnormalities via the synergistic effect of curcumin and zinc.

  13. Oxidative stress and glycemic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriello, A

    2000-02-01

    Oxidative stress is an acknowledged pathogenetic mechanism in diabetic complications. Hyperglycemia is a widely known cause of enhanced free radical concentration, whereas oxidative stress involvement in glycemic regulation is still debated. Glucose transport is a cascade of events starting from the interaction of insulin with its own receptor at the plasma membrane and ending with intracellular glucose metabolism. In this complex series of events, each step plays an important role and can be inhibited by a negative effect of oxidative stress. Several studies show that an acute increase in the blood glucose level may impair the physiological homeostasis of many systems in living organisms. The mechanisms through which acute hyperglycemia exerts these effects may be identified in the production of free radicals. It has been suggested that insulin resistance may be accompanied by intracellular production of free radicals. In adipocytes cultured in vitro, insulin increases the production of hydrogen peroxide, which has been shown to mimic the action of insulin. These data allow us to hypothesize that a vicious circle between hyperinsulinemia and free radicals could be operating: insulin resistance might cause elevated plasma free radical concentrations, which, in turn, might be responsible for a deterioration of insulin action, with hyperglycemia being a contributory factor. Data supporting this hypothesis are available. Vitamin E improves insulin action in healthy, elderly, and non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects. Similar results can be obtained by vitamin C administration.

  14. Hesperidin methyl chalcone inhibits oxidative stress and inflammation in a mouse model of ultraviolet B irradiation-induced skin damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Renata M; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Steffen, Vinicius S; Caviglione, Carla V; Vignoli, Josiane A; Baracat, Marcela M; Georgetti, Sandra R; Verri, Waldiceu A; Casagrande, Rubia

    2015-07-01

    Hesperidin methyl chalcone (HMC) is a safe flavonoid used to treat chronic venous diseases, but its effects and mechanisms on UVB irradiation-induced inflammation and oxidative stress have never been described in vivo. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of systemic administration of HMC in skin oxidative stress and inflammation induced by UVB irradiation. To induce skin damage, hairless mice were exposed to an acute UVB irradiation dose of 4.14 J/cm(2), and the dorsal skin samples were collected to evaluate oxidative stress and inflammatory response. The intraperitoneal treatment with HMC at the dose of 300 mg/kg inhibited UVB irradiation-induced skin edema, neutrophil recruitment, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity. HMC also protected the skin from UVB irradiation-induced oxidative stress by maintaining ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical (ABTS) scavenging ability and antioxidant levels (reduced glutathione and catalase). Corroborating, HMC inhibited UVB irradiation-induced superoxide anion generation and gp91phox (NADPH oxidase subunit) mRNA expression. Furthermore, the antioxidant effect of HMC resulted in lower production of inflammatory mediators, including lipid hydroperoxides and a wide range of cytokines. Taken together, these results unveil a novel applicability of HMC in the treatment of UVB irradiation-induced skin inflammation and oxidative stress.

  15. Protective Effect of Quercetin against Oxidative Stress and Brain Edema in an Experimental Rat Model of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yu-shu; Wang, Ju-lei; Feng, Da-yun; Qin, Huai-zhou; Wen, Hua; Yin, Zhong-min; Gao, Guo-dong; Li, Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Quercetin has been demonstrated to play an important role in altering the progression of ischemic brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases by protecting against oxidative stress. The effects of quercetin on brain damage after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), however, have not been investigated. This study was designed to explore the effects of quercetin on oxidative stress and brain edema after experimental SAH using four equal groups (n = 16) of adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, including a sham group, an SAH + vehicle group, an SAH + quercetin10 group, and an SAH + quercetin50 group. The rat SAH model was induced by injection of 0.3 ml of non-heparinised arterial blood into the prechiasmatic cistern. In the SAH + quercetin10 and SAH + quercetin50 groups, doses of 10 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg quercetin, respectively, were directly administered by intraperitoneal injection at 30 min, 12 h, and 24 h after SAH induction. Cerebral tissue samples were extracted for enzymatic antioxidant determination, lipid peroxidation assay, caspase-3 activity and water content testing 48 h after SAH. Treatment with a high dose (50 mg/kg) of quercetin markedly enhanced the activities of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and treatment with this dose significantly reduced the level of malondialdehyde (MDA). Caspase-3 and brain edema was ameliorated and neurobehavioral deficits improved in rats that received the high dose of quercetin. The findings suggest that the early administration of optimal dose of quercetin may ameliorate brain damage and provide neuroprotection in the SAH model, potentially by enhancing the activity of endogenous antioxidant enzymes and inhibiting free radical generation. PMID:24516353

  16. Synergistic antioxidant action of vitamin E and rutin SNEDDS in ameliorating oxidative stress in a Parkinson’s disease model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shrestha; Narang, Jasjeet K.; Ali, Javed; Baboota, Sanjula

    2016-09-01

    Purpose. Oxidative stress is the leading cause in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. Rutin is a naturally occurring strong antioxidant molecule with wide therapeutic applications. It suffers from the problem of low oral bioavailability which is due to its poor aqueous solubility. Methods. In order to increase the solubility self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) of rutin were prepared. The oil, surfactant and co-surfactant were selected based on solubility/miscibility studies. Optimization was done by a three-factor, four-level (34) Box-Behnken design. The independent factors were oil, surfactant and co-surfactant concentration and the dependent variables were globule size, self-emulsification time, % transmittance and cumulative percentage of drug release. The optimized SNEDDS formulation (RSE6) was evaluated for various release studies. Antioxidant activity was assessed by various in vitro tests such as 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and reducing power assay. Oxidative stress models which had Parkinson’s-type symptoms were used to determine the antioxidant potential of rutin SNEDDS in vivo. Permeation was assessed through confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results. An optimized SNEDDS formulation consisting of Sefsol + vitamin E-Solutol HS 15-Transcutol P at proportions of 25:35:17.5 (w/w) was prepared and characterized. The globule size and polydispersity index of the optimized formulation was found to be 16.08 ± 0.02 nm and 0.124 ± 0.01, respectively. A significant (p < 0.05) increase in the percentage of drug release was achieved in the case of the optimized formulation as compared to rutin suspension. Pharmacokinetic study showed a 2.3-fold increase in relative oral bioavailability. The optimized formulation had significant in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activity. Conclusion. Rutin SNEDDS have been successfully prepared and they can serve as an effective tool in enhancing the oral bioavailability and efficacy of rutin, thus helping

  17. Mitochondrial oxidative stress causes hyperphosphorylation of tau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melov, Simon; Adlard, Paul A; Morten, Karl; Johnson, Felicity; Golden, Tamara R; Hinerfeld, Doug; Schilling, Birgit; Mavros, Christine; Masters, Colin L; Volitakis, Irene; Li, Qiao-Xin; Laughton, Katrina; Hubbard, Alan; Cherny, Robert A; Gibson, Brad; Bush, Ashley I

    2007-06-20

    Age-related neurodegenerative disease has been mechanistically linked with mitochondrial dysfunction via damage from reactive oxygen species produced within the cell. We determined whether increased mitochondrial oxidative stress could modulate or regulate two of the key neurochemical hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD): tau phosphorylation, and beta-amyloid deposition. Mice lacking superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) die within the first week of life, and develop a complex heterogeneous phenotype arising from mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Treatment of these mice with catalytic antioxidants increases their lifespan and rescues the peripheral phenotypes, while uncovering central nervous system pathology. We examined sod2 null mice differentially treated with high and low doses of a catalytic antioxidant and observed striking elevations in the levels of tau phosphorylation (at Ser-396 and other phospho-epitopes of tau) in the low-dose antioxidant treated mice at AD-associated residues. This hyperphosphorylation of tau was prevented with an increased dose of the antioxidant, previously reported to be sufficient to prevent neuropathology. We then genetically combined a well-characterized mouse model of AD (Tg2576) with heterozygous sod2 knockout mice to study the interactions between mitochondrial oxidative stress and cerebral Ass load. We found that mitochondrial SOD2 deficiency exacerbates amyloid burden and significantly reduces metal levels in the brain, while increasing levels of Ser-396 phosphorylated tau. These findings mechanistically link mitochondrial oxidative stress with the pathological features of AD.

  18. Methylglyoxal promotes oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Cristina M; Matafome, Paulo; Crisóstomo, Joana; Rodrigues, Lisa; Fernandes, Rosa; Pereira, Paulo; Seiça, Raquel M

    2012-05-01

    Modern diets can cause modern diseases. Research has linked a metabolite of sugar, methylglyoxal (MG), to the development of diabetic complications, but the exact mechanism has not been fully elucidated. The present study was designed to investigate whether MG could directly influence endothelial function, oxidative stress and inflammation in Wistar and Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, an animal model of type 2 diabetes. Wistar and GK rats treated with MG in the drinking water for 3 months were compared with the respective control rats. The effects of MG were investigated on NO-dependent vasorelaxation in isolated rat aortic arteries from the different groups. Insulin resistance, NO bioavailability, glycation, a pro-inflammatory biomarker monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and vascular oxidative stress were also evaluated. Methylglyoxal treated Wistar rats significantly reduced the efficacy of NO-dependent vasorelaxation (pMethylglyoxal treated GK rats significantly aggravated endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, AGEs accumulation and diminished NO bioavailability when compared with control GK rats. These results indicate that methylglyoxal induced endothelial dysfunction in normal Wistar rats and aggravated the endothelial dysfunction present in GK rats. The mechanism is at least in part by increasing oxidative stress and/or AGEs formation with a concomitant increment of inflammation and a decrement in NO bioavailability. The present study provides further evidence for methylglyoxal as one of the causative factors in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and development of macrovascular diabetic complication.

  19. Mitochondrial oxidative stress causes hyperphosphorylation of tau.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Melov

    Full Text Available Age-related neurodegenerative disease has been mechanistically linked with mitochondrial dysfunction via damage from reactive oxygen species produced within the cell. We determined whether increased mitochondrial oxidative stress could modulate or regulate two of the key neurochemical hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD: tau phosphorylation, and beta-amyloid deposition. Mice lacking superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2 die within the first week of life, and develop a complex heterogeneous phenotype arising from mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Treatment of these mice with catalytic antioxidants increases their lifespan and rescues the peripheral phenotypes, while uncovering central nervous system pathology. We examined sod2 null mice differentially treated with high and low doses of a catalytic antioxidant and observed striking elevations in the levels of tau phosphorylation (at Ser-396 and other phospho-epitopes of tau in the low-dose antioxidant treated mice at AD-associated residues. This hyperphosphorylation of tau was prevented with an increased dose of the antioxidant, previously reported to be sufficient to prevent neuropathology. We then genetically combined a well-characterized mouse model of AD (Tg2576 with heterozygous sod2 knockout mice to study the interactions between mitochondrial oxidative stress and cerebral Ass load. We found that mitochondrial SOD2 deficiency exacerbates amyloid burden and significantly reduces metal levels in the brain, while increasing levels of Ser-396 phosphorylated tau. These findings mechanistically link mitochondrial oxidative stress with the pathological features of AD.

  20. Mechanism of Oxidative Stress in Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Gandhi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological tissues require oxygen to meet their energetic demands. However, the consumption of oxygen also results in the generation of free radicals that may have damaging effects on cells. The brain is particularly vulnerable to the effects of reactive oxygen species due to its high demand for oxygen, and its abundance of highly peroxidisable substrates. Oxidative stress is caused by an imbalance in the redox state of the cell, either by overproduction of reactive oxygen species, or by dysfunction of the antioxidant systems. Oxidative stress has been detected in a range of neurodegenerative disease, and emerging evidence from in vitro and in vivo disease models suggests that oxidative stress may play a role in disease pathogenesis. However, the promise of antioxidants as novel therapies for neurodegenerative diseases has not been borne out in clinical studies. In this review, we critically assess the hypothesis that oxidative stress is a crucial player in common neurodegenerative disease and discuss the source of free radicals in such diseases. Furthermore, we examine the issues surrounding the failure to translate this hypothesis into an effective clinical treatment.

  1. Oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueping Chen; Chunyan Guo; Jiming Kong

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are constantly produced in aerobic organisms as by-products of normal oxygen metabolism and include free radicals such as superoxide anion (O2-) and hydroxyl radical (OH-), and non-radical hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The mitochondrial respiratory chain and enzymatic reactions by various enzymes are endogenous sources of reactive oxygen species. Exogenous reactive oxygen species -inducing stressors include ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and divergent oxidizing chemicals. At low concentrations, reactive oxygen species serve as an important second messenger in cell signaling; however, at higher concentrations and long-term exposure, reactive oxygen species can damage cellular macromolecules such as DNA, proteins, and lipids, which leads to necrotic and apoptotic cell death. Oxidative stress is a condition of imbalance between reactive oxygen species formation and cellular antioxidant capacity due to enhanced ROS generation and/or dysfunction of the antioxidant system. Biochemical alterations in these macromolecular components can lead to various pathological conditions and human diseases, especially neurodegenerative diseases. Neurodegenerative diseases are morphologically featured by progressive cell loss in specific vulnerable neuronal cells, often associated with cytoskeletal protein aggregates forming inclusions in neurons and/or glial cells. Deposition of abnormal aggregated proteins and disruption of metal ions homeostasis are highly associated with oxidative stress. The main aim of this review is to present as much detailed information as possible that is available on various neurodegenerative disorders and their connection with oxidative stress. A variety of therapeutic strategies designed to address these pathological processes are also described. For the future therapeutic direction, one specific pathway that involves the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 is receiving considerable attention.

  2. Oxidative stress and hepatitis C virus

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The disproportionate imbalance between the systemic manifestation of reactive oxygen species and body’s ability to detoxify the reactive intermediates is referred to as oxidative stress. Several biological processes as well as infectious agents, physiological or environmental stress, and perturbed antioxidant response can promote oxidative stress. Oxidative stress usually happens when cells are exposed to more electrically charged reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H2O2 or O2-. The cells’ ...

  3. Periodontal treatment decreases plasma oxidized LDL level and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Naofumi; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Ekuni, Daisuke; Yamanaka, Reiko; Morita, Manabu

    2011-12-01

    Periodontitis induces excessive production of reactive oxygen species in periodontal lesions. This may impair circulating pro-oxidant/anti-oxidant balance and induce the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in blood. The purpose of this study was to monitor circulating oxidized LDL and oxidative stress in subjects with chronic periodontitis following non-surgical periodontal treatment. Plasma levels of oxidized LDL and oxidative stress in 22 otherwise healthy non-smokers with chronic periodontitis (mean age 44.0 years) were measured at baseline and at 1 and 2 months after non-surgical periodontal treatment. At baseline, chronic periodontitis patients had higher plasma levels of oxidized LDL and oxidative stress than healthy subjects (p surgical periodontal treatment were effective in decreasing oxLDL, which was positively associated with a reduction in circulating oxidative stress.

  4. The implications of oxidative stress and antioxidant therapies in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Clinical aspects and animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Miruna Balmus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, including Crohn′s disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, is a chronic inflammatory disorder characterized by alternating phases of clinical relapse and remission. The etiology of IBD remains largely unknown, although a combination of patient′s immune response, genetics, microbiome, and environment plays an important role in disturbing intestinal homeostasis, leading to development and perpetuation of the inflammatory cascade in IBD. As chronic intestinal inflammation is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, oxidative and nitrosative stress has been proposed as one of the major contributing factor in the IBD development. Substantial evidence suggests that IBD is associated with an imbalance between increased ROS and decreased antioxidant activity, which may explain, at least in part, many of the clinical pathophysiological features of both CD and UC patients. Hereby, we review the presently known oxidant and antioxidant mechanisms involved in IBD-specific events, the animal models used to determine these specific features, and also the antioxidant therapies proposed in IBD patients.

  5. Ameliorative effect of Sida cordifolia in rotenone induced oxidative stress model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Navneet; Gajbhiye, Asmita

    2013-12-01

    Present study focused on the evaluation of aqueous extract of Sida cordifolia (AESC), and its different fractions; hexane (HFSC), chloroform (CFSC) and aqueous (AFSC), against rotenone induced biochemical, neurochemical, histopathological and behavioral alterations in a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). An estimation of the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), glutathione (GSH) and catalase (CAT) along with superoxide anion generation (SAG) in different brain regions (cortex, midbrain and cerebellum) was carried out to assess biochemical changes. Behavioral evaluation tests (catalepsy, rearing behavior and posture instability) and neurochemical estimations (norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin level) along with histopathological evaluations of different brain regions were also performed. The varying doses (50, 100, 250mg/kg; p.o.) of different test treatments (AESC, HFSC, CFSC and AFSC) were co-administered along with rotenone (2mg/kg; s.c.), for a period of 35 days to rats of various groups and compared with rotenone per se (negative control) and l-deprenyl (positive control; 10mg/kg; p.o.) treated groups for the above mentioned parameters. The increase in catalepsy and posture instability along with decrease in rearing behavior observed due to rotenone treatment was significantly attenuated by co-treatment with varying doses of AESC and AFSC. Results of the histopathological studies of different brain regions of rats showed eosinophilic lesions in the mid brain region due to rotenone treatment. The eosinophilic lesions were significantly attenuated in co-treated groups of AESC-100mg/kg and AFSC-100mg/kg. Rotenone induced oxidative damage, revealed by increased level of TBARS, SAG and decreased level of GSH and CAT in mid brain region of rats, was attenuated by the co-treatment of AESC and AFSC. The rotenone induced decrease of dopamine level in the midbrain region of rats was also attenuated by co-treatment of AESC-100mg/kg and AFSC

  6. Evidence for contribution of vascular NAD(P)H oxidase to increased oxidative stress in animal models of diabetes and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonta, Toshiyo; Inoguchi, Toyoshi; Tsubouchi, Hirotaka; Sekiguchi, Naotaka; Kobayashi, Kunihisa; Matsumoto, Shingo; Utsumi, Hideo; Nawata, Hajime

    2004-07-01

    It is well established that oxidative stress is enhanced in diabetes. However, the major in vivo source of oxidative stress is not clear. Here we show that vascular NAD(P)H oxidase may be a major source of oxidative stress in diabetic and obese models. In vivo electron spin resonance (ESR)/spin probe was used to evaluate systemic oxidative stress in vivo. The signal decay rate of the spin probe (spin clearance rate; SpCR) significantly increased in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats 2 weeks after the onset of diabetes. This increase was completely normalized by treatment with the antioxidants alpha-tocopherol (40 mg/kg) and superoxide dismutase (5000 units/kg), and was significantly inhibited by treatment with a PKC-specific inhibitor, CGP41251 (50 mg/kg), and a NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor, apocynin (5 mg/kg). Both obese ob/ob mice (10 weeks old) with mild hyperglycemia and Zucker fatty rats (11 weeks old) with normoglycemia exhibited significantly increased SpCR as compared with controls. Again, this increase was inhibited by treatment with both CGP41251 and apocynin. Oral administration of insulin sensitizer, pioglitazone (10 mg/kg), for 7 days also completely normalized SpCR values. These results suggest that vascular NAD(P)H oxidase may be a major source of increased oxidative stress in diabetes and obesity.

  7. Management of oxidative stress by microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirulis, Judith T; Scott, J Ashley; Ross, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current research on oxidative stress in eukaryotic microalgae and the antioxidant compounds microalgae utilize to control oxidative stress. With the potential to exploit microalgae for the large-scale production of antioxidants, interest in how microalgae manage oxidative stress is growing. Microalgae can experience increased levels of oxidative stress and toxicity as a result of environmental conditions, metals, and chemicals. The defence mechanisms for microalgae include antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidases, and glutathione reductase, as well as non-enzymatic antioxidant molecules such as phytochelatins, pigments, polysaccharides, and polyphenols. Discussed herein are the 3 areas the literature has focused on, including how conditions stress microalgae and how microalgae respond to oxidative stress by managing reactive oxygen species. The third area is how beneficial microalgae antioxidants are when administered to cancerous mammalian cells or to rodents experiencing oxidative stress.

  8. Oxidative stress, aging, and central nervous system disease in the canine model of human brain aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Elizabeth; Rofina, Jaime; Zicker, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Decline in cognitive functions that accompany aging in dogs may have a biologic basis, and many of the disorders associated with aging in dogs may be mitigated through dietary modifications that incorporate specific nutraceuticals. Based on previous research and the results of laboratory and clinical studies, antioxidants may be one class of nutraceutical that provides benefits to aged dogs. Brains of aged dogs accumulate oxidative damage to proteins and lipids, which may lead to dysfunction of neuronal cells. The production of free radicals and lack of increase in compensatory antioxidant enzymes may lead to detrimental modifications to important macromolecules within neurons. Reducing oxidative damage through food ingredients rich in a broad spectrum of antioxidants significantly improves, or slows the decline of, learning and memory in aged dogs.

  9. Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Csányi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the special issue “Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease” authors were invited to submit papers that investigate key questions in the field of cardiovascular free radical biology. The original research articles included in this issue provide important information regarding novel aspects of reactive oxygen species (ROS-mediated signaling, which have important implications in physiological and pathophysiological cardiovascular processes. The issue also included a number of review articles that highlight areas of intense research in the fields of free radical biology and cardiovascular medicine.

  10. Oxidative Stress and HPV Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico De Marco

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Extensive experimental work has conclusively demonstrated that infection with certain types of human papillomaviruses, the so-called high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV, represent a most powerful human carcinogen. However, neoplastic growth is a rare and inappropriate outcome in the natural history of HPV, and a number of other events have to concur in order to induce the viral infection into the (very rare neoplastic transformation. From this perspective, a number of putative viral, host, and environmental co-factors have been proposed as potential candidates. Among them oxidative stress (OS is an interesting candidate, yet comparatively underexplored. OS is a constant threat to aerobic organisms being generated during mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, as well as during inflammation, infections, ionizing irradiation, UV exposure, mechanical and chemical stresses. Epithelial tissues, the elective target for HPV infection, are heavily exposed to all named sources of OS. Two different types of cooperative mechanisms are presumed to occur between OS and HPV: I The OS genotoxic activity and the HPV-induced genomic instability concur independently to the generation of the molecular damage necessary for the emergence of neoplastic clones. This first mode is merely a particular form of co-carcinogenesis; and II OS specifically interacts with one or more molecular stages of neoplastic initiation and/or progression induced by the HPV infection. This manuscript was designed to summarize available data on this latter hypothesis. Experimental data and indirect evidences on promoting the activity of OS in viral infection and viral integration will be reviewed. The anti-apoptotic and pro-angiogenetic role of NO (nitric oxide and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase will be discussed together with the OS/HPV cooperation in inducing cancer metabolism adaptation. Unexplored/underexplored aspects of the OS interplay with the HPV-driven carcinogenesis

  11. The Effects of Quercetin on Acute Lung Injury and Biomarkers of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in the Rat Model of Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerin, Fethullah; Sener, Umit; Erman, Hayriye; Yilmaz, Ahsen; Aydin, Bayram; Armutcu, Ferah; Gurel, Ahmet

    2016-04-01

    Experimental studies indicate that sepsis causes remote organ injury although the molecular mechanism has not been clearly defined. In this report, the role of oxidative damage, and inflammation on lung injury, following sepsis model by cecal ligation and puncture, and the effects of quercetin, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory flavonoid, in the lung tissue were investigated. In the present study, we found that administration of single-dose quercetin before cecal ligation and puncture procedure, while markedly diminishing the levels of YKL-40 and oxidant molecules (xanthine oxidase (XO), nitric oxide (NO), and malondialdehyde (MDA)), increases the antioxidant enzymes levels. Quercetin is beneficial to acute lung injury by decreasing the levels of oxidative stress markers and increasing the antioxidant enzyme activities. Quercetin also causes a decrease in the serum levels of YKL-40 and periostin in the oxidative lung injury induced by the experimental sepsis model.

  12. Effect of cerebrolysin on oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in an experimental rat model of myocardial ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshra, V; Atwa, A

    2016-09-01

    Apoptosis plays a role in the process of tissue damage after myocardial infarction (MI). This study was designed to investigate the possible effect of cerebrolysin against apoptosis triggered by oxidative cell stress in myocardial ischemia induced by isoproterenol in rat. Rats were pretreated with cerebrolysin 5 mL/kg intraperitoneally for 7 days and intoxicated with isoproterenol (ISO, 85 mg/kg, sc) on the last 2 days. Hearts were excised and stained to detect the infarction size. Serum levels of cardiotoxicity indices as creatine kinase isoenzyme (CK-MB) and troponin I (cTnI) as well as the cardiac oxidative stress parameters as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and superoxide dismutase were estimated. The expression of prodeath gene p53 and antideath gene Bcl-2 was also assessed from the excised heart tissues. Leakage of cardiac enzymes, elevated oxidative stress markers, and apoptotic indices confirmed the MI occurring as a consequence of isoproterenol-induced ischemia. Cerebrolysin pretreatment caused significant attenuation of the oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in the ischemic myocardial tissue. These findings provided an evidence that cerebrolysin could protect rat myocardium against ischemic insult that was attributed to its antioxidant as well as its anti-apoptotic properties.

  13. Neuroinflammatory and oxidative stress phenomena in MPS IIIA mouse model: the positive effect of long-term aspirin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfi, Audrey; Richard, Magali; Gandolphe, Christelle; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Thérond, Patrice; Scherman, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    Sanfilippo disease (MPS IIIA) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from sulfamidase deficiency, which is characterized by severe neurological impairment. Various tissues of MPS IIIA mice accumulate undegraded glycosaminoglycans and mimic the human neurodegenerative disorder, and are an excellent tool to both delineate disease pathogenesis and test potential therapies. The relationship between abnormal glycosaminoglycan storage and neurodysfunction remains ill defined. Pathways such as inflammation or oxidative stress have been highlighted in many neurodegenerative disorders, including lysosomal storage diseases, as major components of the neuropathology. By using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we have compared the expression of selected genes in normal and MPS IIIA mouse cerebral tissues, focusing on inflammation, apoptosis and oxidative stress-related genes. We have identified several genes strongly over-expressed in the central nervous system of a MPS IIIA mouse, reflecting a neurological deterioration state. We have used these genes as markers to follow-up a long-term aspirin treatment. Aspirin treatment led to the normalization of inflammation- and oxidative stress-related mRNA levels in treated MPS IIIA mouse brains. A biochemical correction of an oxidative stress phenomenon both in the brain and peripheral organs of treated MPS IIIA mice was also obtained. These results suggest that anti-inflammatory intervention may be of potential benefit in MPS IIIA disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Oxidative stress, rRNA genes, and antioxidant enzymes in pathogenesis of schizophrenia and autism: modeling and clinical advices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porokhovnik, L N; Pasekov, V P; Egolina, N A; Tsvetkova, T G; Kosiakova, N V; Gorbachevskaia, N L; Sukhotina, N K; Kozlovskaia, G V; Sorokin, A B; Korovina, N Iu; Liapunova, N A

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomal genes (RG), or genes for rRNA, are represented by multiple tandem repeats in eukaryotic genomes, and just a part of them is transcriptionally active. The quantity of active copies is a stable genome feature which determines the cell's capability for rapid synthesis of proteins, necessary to cope with stress conditions. Low number of active RG copies leads to reduced stress resistance and elevated risk of multifactorial disorders (MFD). Oxidative stress (OS) in the brain cells is believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of infantile autism (IA) and schizophrenia, i.e., MFDs with a manifested genetic predisposition. With autism, OS markers are found almost in every research, whilst with schizophrenia, the OS data are contradictory. Earlier, in a sample of patients with schizophrenia, we have found significantly higher quantity of active RG copies than at the average in healthy population. Here we have estimated the number of active RG copies in a sample of patients with IA (n = 51) and revealed significantly lower mean value than in healthy population. A novel mathematical model of the dynamic pattern of OS has been proposed. The model is realized as an ordinary differential equation system, supposing induction of antioxidant protection enzymes being mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), with the subsequent decrease of ROS content in a cell. The rate of synthesis of antioxidant protection enzymes is limited by the ribosome synthesis rate which depends on the number of active RG copies. Analysis of the model showed that the system always approaches a single stable equilibrium point along a damped oscillation trajectory, which in some degree resembles the dynamics of 'predator-prey' interaction in Lotka-Volterra model. The stationary ROS level inversely depends on the number of active RG copies. Our study explains the inconsistency of clinical data of OS in schizophrenia and suggests a novel criterion for discriminative cytogenetic diagnostics of

  15. Transcriptome-Based Modeling Reveals that Oxidative Stress Induces Modulation of the AtfA-Dependent Signaling Networks in Aspergillus nidulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erzsébet Orosz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the molecular functions of the master stress-response regulator AtfA in Aspergillus nidulans, transcriptomic analyses of the atfA null mutant and the appropriate control strains exposed to menadione sodium bisulfite- (MSB-, t-butylhydroperoxide- and diamide-induced oxidative stresses were performed. Several elements of oxidative stress response were differentially expressed. Many of them, including the downregulation of the mitotic cell cycle, as the MSB stress-specific upregulation of FeS cluster assembly and the MSB stress-specific downregulation of nitrate reduction, tricarboxylic acid cycle, and ER to Golgi vesicle-mediated transport, showed AtfA dependence. To elucidate the potential global regulatory role of AtfA governing expression of a high number of genes with very versatile biological functions, we devised a model based on the comprehensive transcriptomic data. Our model suggests that an important function of AtfA is to modulate the transduction of stress signals. Although it may regulate directly only a limited number of genes, these include elements of the signaling network, for example, members of the two-component signal transduction systems. AtfA acts in a stress-specific manner, which may increase further the number and diversity of AtfA-dependent genes. Our model sheds light on the versatility of the physiological functions of AtfA and its orthologs in fungi.

  16. Long-lasting effects of maternal separation on an animal model of post-traumatic stress disorder: effects on memory and hippocampal oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Luisa A; Alvares, Lucas O; Noschang, Cristie; Engelke, Douglas; Andreazza, Ana C; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto S; Quillfeldt, Jorge A; Dalmaz, Carla

    2012-04-01

    Adverse early life events, such as periodic maternal separation, may alter the normal pattern of brain development and subsequently the vulnerability to a variety of mental disorders in adulthood. Patients with a history of early adversities show higher frequency of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study was undertaken to verify if repeated long-term separation of pups from dams would affect memory and oxidative stress parameters after exposure to an animal model of PTSD. Nests of Wistar rats were divided into intact and subjected to maternal separation (incubator at 32°C, 3 h/day) during post-natal days 1-10. When adults, the animals were subdivided into exposed or not to a PTSD model consisting of exposure to inescapable footshock, followed by situational reminders. One month after exposure to the shock, the animals were exposed to a memory task (Morris water maze) and another month later animals were sacrificed and DNA breaks and antioxidant enzymes activities were measured in the hippocampus. Rats exposed to shock or maternal separation plus shock showed long-lasting effects on spatial memory, spending more time in the opposite quadrant of the water maze. This effect was higher in animals subjected to both maternal separation and shock. Both shock and maternal separation induced a higher score of DNA breaks in the hippocampus. No differences were observed on antioxidant enzymes activities. In conclusion, periodic maternal separation may increase the susceptibility to the effects of a stressor applied in adulthood on performance in the water maze. Increased DNA breaks in hippocampus was induced by both, maternal separation and exposure to shock.

  17. Oxidative stress and anti-oxidative mobilization in burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Arti; Parihar, Mordhwaj S; Milner, Stephen; Bhat, Satyanarayan

    2008-02-01

    A severe burn is associated with release of inflammatory mediators which ultimately cause local and distant pathophysiological effects. Mediators including Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and Reactive Nitrogen Species (RNS) are increased in affected tissue, which are implicated in pathophysiological events observed in burn patients. The purpose of this article is to understand the role of oxidative stress in burns, in order to develop therapeutic strategies. All peer-reviewed, original and review articles published in the English language literature relevant to the topic of oxidative stress in burns in animals and human subjects were selected for this review and the possible roles of ROS and RNS in the pathophysiology of burns are discussed. Both increased xanthine oxidase and neutrophil activation appear to be the oxidant sources in burns. Free radicals have been found to have beneficial effects on antimicrobial action and wound healing. However following a burn, there is an enormous production of ROS which is harmful and implicated in inflammation, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, immunosuppression, infection and sepsis, tissue damage and multiple organ failure. Thus clinical response to burn is dependent on the balance between production of free radicals and its detoxification. Supplementation of antioxidants in human and animal models has proven benefit in decreasing distant organ failure suggesting a cause and effect relationship. We conclude that oxidative damage is one of the mechanisms responsible for the local and distant pathophysiological events observed after burn, and therefore anti-oxidant therapy might be beneficial in minimizing injury in burned patients.

  18. Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Morales-González

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a chronic disease of multifactorial origin and can be defined as an increase in the accumulation of body fat. Adipose tissue is not only a triglyceride storage organ, but studies have shown the role of white adipose tissue as a producer of certain bioactive substances called adipokines. Among adipokines, we find some inflammatory functions, such as Interleukin-6 (IL-6; other adipokines entail the functions of regulating food intake, therefore exerting a direct effect on weight control. This is the case of leptin, which acts on the limbic system by stimulating dopamine uptake, creating a feeling of fullness. However, these adipokines induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, generating a process known as oxidative stress (OS. Because adipose tissue is the organ that secretes adipokines and these in turn generate ROS, adipose tissue is considered an independent factor for the generation of systemic OS. There are several mechanisms by which obesity produces OS. The first of these is the mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids, which can produce ROS in oxidation reactions, while another mechanism is over-consumption of oxygen, which generates free radicals in the mitochondrial respiratory chain that is found coupled with oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. Lipid-rich diets are also capable of generating ROS because they can alter oxygen metabolism. Upon the increase of adipose tissue, the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx, was found to be significantly diminished. Finally, high ROS production and the decrease in antioxidant capacity leads to various abnormalities, among which we find endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by a reduction in the bioavailability of vasodilators, particularly nitric oxide (NO, and an increase in endothelium-derived contractile factors, favoring atherosclerotic disease.

  19. Etiologies of sperm oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Sabeti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sperm is particularly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS during critical phases of spermiogenesis. However, the level of seminal ROS is restricted by seminal antioxidants which have beneficial effects on sperm parameters and developmental potentials. Mitochondria and sperm plasma membrane are two major sites of ROS generation in sperm cells. Besides, leukocytes including polymer phonuclear (PMN leukocytes and macrophages produce broad category of molecules including oxygen free radicals, non-radical species and reactive nitrogen species. Physiological role of ROS increase the intracellular cAMP which then activate protein kinase in male reproductive system. This indicates that spermatozoa need small amounts of ROS to acquire the ability of nuclear maturation regulation and condensation to fertilize the oocyte. There is a long list of intrinsic and extrinsic factors which can induce oxidative stress to interact with lipids, proteins and DNA molecules. As a result, we have lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation, axonemal damage, denaturation of the enzymes, over generation of superoxide in the mitochondria, lower antioxidant activity and finally abnormal spermatogenesis. If oxidative stress is considered as one of the main cause of DNA damage in the germ cells, then there should be good reason for antioxidant therapy in these conditions

  20. In vitro acute exposure to DEHP affects oocyte meiotic maturation, energy and oxidative stress parameters in a large animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ambruosi

    Full Text Available Phthalates are ubiquitous environmental contaminants because of their use in plastics and other common consumer products. Di-(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP is the most abundant phthalate and it impairs fertility by acting as an endocrine disruptor. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of in vitro acute exposure to DEHP on oocyte maturation, energy and oxidative status in the horse, a large animal model. Cumulus cell (CC apoptosis and oxidative status were also investigated. Cumulus-oocyte complexes from the ovaries of slaughtered mares were cultured in vitro in presence of 0.12, 12 and 1200 µM DEHP. After in vitro maturation (IVM, CCs were removed and evaluated for apoptosis (cytological assessment and TUNEL and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS levels. Oocytes were evaluated for nuclear chromatin configuration. Matured (Metaphase II stage; MII oocytes were further evaluated for cytoplasmic energy and oxidative parameters. DEHP significantly inhibited oocyte maturation when added at low doses (0.12 µM; P<0.05. This effect was related to increased CC apoptosis (P<0.001 and reduced ROS levels (P<0.0001. At higher doses (12 and 1200 µM, DEHP induced apoptosis (P<0.0001 and ROS increase (P<0.0001 in CCs without affecting oocyte maturation. In DEHP-exposed MII oocytes, mitochondrial distribution patterns, apparent energy status (MitoTracker fluorescence intensity, intracellular ROS localization and levels, mt/ROS colocalization and total SOD activity did not vary, whereas increased ATP content (P<0.05, possibly of glycolytic origin, was found. Co-treatment with N-Acetyl-Cysteine reversed apoptosis and efficiently scavenged excessive ROS in DEHP-treated CCs without enhancing oocyte maturation. In conclusion, acute in vitro exposure to DEHP inhibits equine oocyte maturation without altering ooplasmic energy and oxidative stress parameters in matured oocytes which retain the potential to be fertilized and develop into

  1. Oxidative stress in neonatology: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutinati, M; Pantaleo, M; Roncetti, M; Piccinno, M; Rizzo, A; Sciorsci, R L

    2014-02-01

    Free radicals are highly reactive oxidizing agents containing one or more unpaired electrons. Both in human and veterinary neonathology, it is generally accepted that oxidative stress functions as an important catalysator of neonatal disease. Soon after birth, many sudden physiological and environmental conditions make the newborn vulnerable for the negative effects of oxidative stress, which potentially can impair neonatal vitality. As a clinician, it is important to have in depth knowledge about factors affecting maternal/neonatal oxidative status and the cascades of events that enrol when the neonate is subjected to oxidative stress. This report aims at providing clinicians with an up-to-date review about oxidative stress in neonates across animal species. It will be emphasized which handlings and treatments that are applied during neonatal care or resuscitation can actually impose oxidative stress upon the neonate. Views and opinions about maternal and/or neonatal antioxydative therapy will be shared.

  2. Mitochondrial alterations and oxidative stress in an acute transient mouse model of muscle degeneration: implications for muscular dystrophy and related muscle pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadasan-Nair, Renjini; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Mishra, Sudha; Sunitha, Balaraju; Mythri, Rajeswara Babu; Nalini, Atchayaram; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Harsha, Hindalahalli Chandregowda; Kolthur-Seetharam, Ullas; Srinivas Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda

    2014-01-03

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) and inflammatory myopathies (IMs) are debilitating skeletal muscle disorders characterized by common pathological events including myodegeneration and inflammation. However, an experimental model representing both muscle pathologies and displaying most of the distinctive markers has not been characterized. We investigated the cardiotoxin (CTX)-mediated transient acute mouse model of muscle degeneration and compared the cardinal features with human MDs and IMs. The CTX model displayed degeneration, apoptosis, inflammation, loss of sarcolemmal complexes, sarcolemmal disruption, and ultrastructural changes characteristic of human MDs and IMs. Cell death caused by CTX involved calcium influx and mitochondrial damage both in murine C2C12 muscle cells and in mice. Mitochondrial proteomic analysis at the initial phase of degeneration in the model detected lowered expression of 80 mitochondrial proteins including subunits of respiratory complexes, ATP machinery, fatty acid metabolism, and Krebs cycle, which further decreased in expression during the peak degenerative phase. The mass spectrometry (MS) data were supported by enzyme assays, Western blot, and histochemistry. The CTX model also displayed markers of oxidative stress and a lowered glutathione reduced/oxidized ratio (GSH/GSSG) similar to MDs, human myopathies, and neurogenic atrophies. MS analysis identified 6 unique oxidized proteins from Duchenne muscular dystrophy samples (n = 6) (versus controls; n = 6), including two mitochondrial proteins. Interestingly, these mitochondrial proteins were down-regulated in the CTX model thereby linking oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. We conclude that mitochondrial alterations and oxidative damage significantly contribute to CTX-mediated muscle pathology with implications for human muscle diseases.

  3. Oxidative Stress in Cystinosis Patients

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    Maria Helena Vaisbich

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Nephropathic cystinosis (NC is a severe systemic disease and cysteamine improves its prognosis. Lysosomal cystine accumulation is the hallmark of cystinosis and is regarded as the primary defect due to mutations in the CTNS gene. However, there is great evidence that cystine accumulation itself is not responsible for all abnormalities observed in NC. Studies have demonstrated altered ATP metabolism, increased apoptosis, and cell oxidation. An increased number of autophagosomes and autophagic vacuoles have been observed in cystinotic fibroblasts and renal epithelial cells, suggesting that altered autophagy plays a role in NC, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species. Therefore, cystinosis patients can be more susceptible to oxidative stress (OS and it can contribute to the progression of the renal disease. Our goal was to evaluate a marker of OS (serum TBARS in NC children, and to compare the results with those observed in healthy controls and correlated with renal function parameters. Methods: The study included patients aged under 18 years, with good adherence to the treatment and out of renal replacement therapy. The following parameters were evaluated: serum creatinine, BUN, creatinine clearance estimated by stature and serum TBARS levels. Results: We selected 20 patients aged 8.0 ±3.6 years and observed serum TBARS levels of 4.03 ±1.02 nmol/ml. Serum TBARS levels in the 43 healthy controls, aged 7.4 ±1.1 years, were 1.60 ±0.04 nmol/ml. There was a significant difference between the plasma TBARS levels among the 2 groups (p Conclusion: An increased level of serum TBARS in patients with NC was observed and this abnormality was not correlated with the renal function status degree. This is the first report that shows increased oxidative stress in serum of NC patients.

  4. Radical-free biology of oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Free radical-induced macromolecular damage has been studied extensively as a mechanism of oxidative stress, but large-scale intervention trials with free radical scavenging antioxidant supplements show little benefit in humans. The present review summarizes data supporting a complementary hypothesis for oxidative stress in disease that can occur without free radicals. This hypothesis, which is termed the “redox hypothesis,” is that oxidative stress occurs as a consequence of disruption of thi...

  5. Oxidative Stress in Patients With Nongenital Warts

    OpenAIRE

    Sezai Sasmaz; Ozer Arican; Ergul Belge Kurutas

    2005-01-01

    Comparison of oxidative stress status between subjects with or without warts is absent in the literature. In this study, we evaluated 31 consecutive patients with warts (15 female, 16 male) and 36 control cases with no evidence of disease to determine the effects of oxidative stress in patients with warts. The patients were classified according to the wart type, duration, number, and location of lesions. We measured the indicators of oxidative stress such as catalase (CAT), glucose-6-phosphat...

  6. Impact of Oxidative Stress in Fetal Programming

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    Loren P. Thompson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrauterine stress induces increased risk of adult disease through fetal programming mechanisms. Oxidative stress can be generated by several conditions, such as, prenatal hypoxia, maternal under- and overnutrition, and excessive glucocorticoid exposure. The role of oxidant molecules as signaling factors in fetal programming via epigenetic mechanisms is discussed. By linking oxidative stress with dysregulation of specific target genes, we may be able to develop therapeutic strategies that protect against organ dysfunction in the programmed offspring.

  7. Development and characterization of a hydrogen peroxide-resistant cholangiocyte cell line: A novel model of oxidative stress-related cholangiocarcinoma genesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanan, Raynoo [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Liver Fluke and Cholangiocarcinoma Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Techasen, Anchalee [Liver Fluke and Cholangiocarcinoma Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Faculty of Associated Medical Science, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Hou, Bo [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Jamnongkan, Wassana; Armartmuntree, Napat [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Liver Fluke and Cholangiocarcinoma Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Yongvanit, Puangrat, E-mail: puangrat@kku.ac.th [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Liver Fluke and Cholangiocarcinoma Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Murata, Mariko, E-mail: mmurata@doc.medic.mie-u.ac.jp [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan)

    2015-08-14

    Oxidative stress is a cause of inflammation–related diseases, including cancers. Cholangiocarcinoma is a liver cancer with bile duct epithelial cell phenotypes. Our previous studies in animal and human models indicated that oxidative stress is a major cause of cholangiocarcinoma development. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) can generate hydroxyl radicals, which damage lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, leading to cell death. However, some cells can survive by adapting to oxidative stress conditions, and selective clonal expansion of these resistant cells would be involved in oxidative stress-related carcinogenesis. The present study aimed to establish H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant cell line from an immortal cholangiocyte cell line (MMNK1) by chronic treatment with low-concentration H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (25 μM). After 72 days of induction, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant cell lines (ox-MMNK1-L) were obtained. The ox-MMNK1-L cell line showed H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant properties, increasing the expression of the anti-oxidant genes catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD2), and superoxide dismutase-3 (SOD3) and the enzyme activities of CAT and intracellular SODs. Furthermore, the resistant cells showed increased expression levels of an epigenetics-related gene, DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1), when compared to the parental cells. Interestingly, the ox-MMNK1-L cell line had a significantly higher cell proliferation rate than the MMNK1 normal cell line. Moreover, ox-MMNK1-L cells showed pseudopodia formation and the loss of cell-to-cell adhesion (multi-layers) under additional oxidative stress (100 μM H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). These findings suggest that H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant cells can be used as a model of oxidative stress-related cholangiocarcinoma genesis through molecular changes such as alteration of gene expression and epigenetic changes. - Highlights: • An H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant ox-MMNK1-L cells was established from

  8. Biphasic regulation of lysosomal exocytosis by oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Sreeram; Peña, Karina A; Chu, Charleen T; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2016-11-01

    Oxidative stress drives cell death in a number of diseases including ischemic stroke and neurodegenerative diseases. A better understanding of how cells recover from oxidative stress is likely to lead to better treatments for stroke and other diseases. The recent evidence obtained in several models ties the process of lysosomal exocytosis to the clearance of protein aggregates and toxic metals. The mechanisms that regulate lysosomal exocytosis, under normal or pathological conditions, are only beginning to emerge. Here we provide evidence for the biphasic effect of oxidative stress on lysosomal exocytosis. Lysosomal exocytosis was measured using the extracellular levels of the lysosomal enzyme beta-hexosaminidase (ß-hex). Low levels or oxidative stress stimulated lysosomal exocytosis, but inhibited it at high levels. Deletion of the lysosomal ion channel TRPML1 eliminated the stimulatory effect of low levels of oxidative stress. The inhibitory effects of oxidative stress appear to target the component of lysosomal exocytosis that is driven by extracellular Ca(2+). We propose that while moderate oxidative stress promotes cellular repair by stimulating lysosomal exocytosis, at high levels oxidative stress has a dual pathological effect: it directly causes cell damage and impairs damage repair by inhibiting lysosomal exocytosis. Harnessing these adaptive mechanisms may point to pharmacological interventions for diseases involving oxidative proteotoxicity or metal toxicity.

  9. Levels of inflammation and oxidative stress, and a role for taurine in dystropathology of the Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy dog model for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

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    Jessica R. Terrill

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD is a fatal skeletal muscle wasting disease presenting with excessive myofibre necrosis and increased inflammation and oxidative stress. In the mdx mouse model of DMD, homeostasis of the amino acid taurine is altered, and taurine administration drastically decreases muscle necrosis, dystropathology, inflammation and protein thiol oxidation. Since the severe pathology of the Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD dog model more closely resembles the human DMD condition, we aimed to assess the generation of oxidants by inflammatory cells and taurine metabolism in this species. In muscles of 8 month GRMD dogs there was an increase in the content of neutrophils and macrophages, and an associated increase in elevated myeloperoxidase, a protein secreted by neutrophils that catalyses production of the highly reactive hypochlorous acid (HOCl. There was also increased chlorination of tyrosines, a marker of HOCl generation, increased thiol oxidation of many proteins and irreversible oxidative protein damage. Taurine, which functions as an antioxidant by trapping HOCl, was reduced in GRMD plasma; however taurine was increased in GRMD muscle tissue, potentially due to increased muscle taurine transport and synthesis. These data indicate a role for HOCl generated by neutrophils in the severe dystropathology of GRMD dogs, which may be exacerbated by decreased availability of taurine in the blood. These novel data support continued research into the precise roles of oxidative stress and taurine in DMD and emphasise the value of the GRMD dogs as a suitable pre-clinical model for testing taurine as a therapeutic intervention for DMD boys.

  10. Evidence for protective effect of lipoic acid and desvenlafaxine on oxidative stress in a model depression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Márcia Calheiros Chaves; de Sousa, Caren Nádia Soares; Gomes, Patrícia Xavier Lima; de Oliveira, Gersilene Valente; Araújo, Fernanda Yvelize Ramos; Ximenes, Naiara Coelho; da Silva, Jéssica Calheiros; Vasconcelos, Germana Silva; Leal, Luzia Kalyne Almeida Moreira; Macêdo, Danielle; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes

    2016-01-04

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the neurobiology of depression. Here we investigated oxidative alterations in brain areas of animals submitted to the model of depression induced by corticosterone (CORT) and the effects of the antioxidant compound alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) alone or associated with the antidepressant desvenlafaxine (DVS) in these alterations. Female mice received vehicle or CORT (20 mg/kg) during 14 days. From the 15th to 21st days different animals received further administrations of: vehicle, DVS (10 or 20 mg/kg), ALA (100 or 200 mg/kg), or the combinations of DVS10+ALA100, DVS20+ALA100, DVS10+ALA200, or DVS20+ALA200. Twenty-four hours after the last drug administration prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (HC) and striatum (ST) were dissected for the determination of the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), reduced glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxidation (LP) levels. CORT significantly increased SOD activity in the PFC and HC, decreased GSH levels in the HC and increased LP in all brain areas studied when compared to saline-treated animals. Decrements of SOD activity were observed in all groups and brain areas studied when compared to controls and CORT. The hippocampal decrease in GSH was reversed by ALA100, DVS10+ALA100, DVS20+ALA100 and DVS20+ALA200. The same DVS+ALA combination groups presented increased levels of GSH in the PFC and ST. The greater GSH levels were observed in the PFC, HC and ST of DVS20+ALA200 mice. LP was reversed in the groups ALA200 (PFC), DVS10+ALA100, DVS20+ALA100 (PFC, HC and ST), and DVS20+ALA200 (PFC, HC). Our findings contribute to the previous preclinical evidences implicating ALA as a promising agent for augmentation therapy in depression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. KCHO-1(Mecasin), a novel herbal anti-inflammatory compound, attenuates oxidative stress in an animal model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kook, Myung Geun; Choi, Soon Won; Seo, Yoojin; Kim, Dong Woung; Song, Bong Keun; Son, Ilhong; Kim, Sungchul; Kang, Kyung-Sun

    2017-04-06

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by selective death of motor neurons in the central nervous system. The main cause of the disease is still elusive but several mutations have been associated with the disease process. In particular, mutant SOD1 protein causes oxidative stress by activating glia cells and contributes to the motor neuron degeneration. KCHO-1, a novel herbal combination compound, contains 30% ethanol and the extracts of nine herbs that have been commonly used in traditional medicine to prevent fatigue or inflammation. In this study, we investigated whether KCHO-1 administration could reduce oxidative stress in an ALS model. KCHO-1 administration to ALS model mice improved the motor function and delayed the disease onset. Furthermore, we found that KCHO-1 administration reduced oxidative stress through gp91(phox) and MAPK pathway both in classically activated microglia and in the spinal cord of hSOD1(G93A) transgenic mice. These data suggest that KCHO-1 play as an effective therapeutic agent for ALS by reducing oxidative stress.

  12. Simvastatin Attenuates the Oxidative Stress, Endothelial Thrombogenicity and the Inducibility of Atrial Fibrillation in a Rat Model of Ischemic Heart Failure

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    Kyoung-Im Cho

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Increased atrial oxidative stress has an important role in inducing and maintaining atrial fibrillation (AF, and the activation of the small GTPase Rac1 contributes to the oxidative stress. We investigated the relationship of Rac1, atrial endothelial thromboprotective markers and AF inducibility and if simvastatin has a potential beneficial effect on a myocardial infarction (MI-induced heart failure (HF rat model. Rats were randomized into three groups (shams, MI group and simvastatin treatment group and underwent echocardiography, AF induction studies and left atrial (LA fibrosis analysis. Atrial Rac 1, sodium calcium exchanger (INCX, sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS were measured. AF inducibility, AF duration and LA fibrosis were significantly higher in the MI group (p < 0.001 vs. sham, which were significantly reduced by simvastatin (p < 0.05 vs. MI. The reduced expressions of atrial eNOS, SERCA, thrombomodulin, tissue factor pathway inhibitor and tissue plasminogen activator in the MI group were significantly improved by simvastatin. Furthermore, the increased expression of atrial iNOS, INCX and Rac1 activity were significantly decreased by the simvastatin. Oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction and thrombogenicity are associated with the promotion of AF in a rat model of ischemic HF. These were associated with increased Rac1 activity, and simvastatin treatment prevents these changes.

  13. A neuronal model of Alzheimer's disease: an insight into the mechanisms of oxidative stress-mediated mitochondrial injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sompol, P; Ittarat, W; Tangpong, J; Chen, Y; Doubinskaia, I; Batinic-Haberle, I; Abdul, H M; Butterfield, D A; St Clair, D K

    2008-04-22

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with beta-amyloid accumulation, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. However, the effects of genetic mutation of AD on oxidative status and mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) production during neuronal development are unclear. To investigate the consequences of genetic mutation of AD on oxidative damages and production of MnSOD during neuronal development, we used primary neurons from new born wild-type (WT/WT) and amyloid precursor protein (APP) (NLh/NLh) and presenilin 1 (PS1) (P264L) knock-in mice (APP/PS1) which incorporated humanized mutations in the genome. Increasing levels of oxidative damages, including protein carbonyl, 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), were accompanied by a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential in both developing and mature APP/PS1 neurons compared with WT/WT neurons suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction under oxidative stress. Interestingly, developing APP/PS1 neurons were significantly more resistant to beta-amyloid 1-42 treatment, whereas mature APP/PS1 neurons were more vulnerable than WT/WT neurons of the same age. Consistent with the protective function of MnSOD, developing APP/PS1 neurons have increased MnSOD protein and activity, indicating an adaptive response to oxidative stress in developing neurons. In contrast, mature APP/PS1 neurons exhibited lower MnSOD levels compared with mature WT/WT neurons indicating that mature APP/PS1 neurons lost the adaptive response. Moreover, mature APP/PS1 neurons had more co-localization of MnSOD with nitrotyrosine indicating a greater inhibition of MnSOD by nitrotyrosine. Overexpression of MnSOD or addition of MnTE-2-PyP(5+) (SOD mimetic) protected against beta-amyloid-induced neuronal death and improved mitochondrial respiratory function. Together, the results demonstrate that compensatory induction of MnSOD in response to an early increase in oxidative stress protects developing neurons against

  14. Both Creatine and Its Product Phosphocreatine Reduce Oxidative Stress and Afford Neuroprotection in an In Vitro Parkinson’s Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-de-Saavedra, Maria D.; Romero, Alejandro; Egea, Javier; Ludka, Fabiana K.; Tasca, Carla I.; Farina, Marcelo; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S.; López, Manuela G.

    2014-01-01

    Creatine is the substrate for creatine kinase in the synthesis of phosphocreatine (PCr). This energetic system is endowed of antioxidant and neuroprotective properties and plays a pivotal role in brain energy homeostasis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of creatine and PCr against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in rat striatal slices, used as an in vitro Parkinson’s model. The possible involvement of the signaling pathway mediated by phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), protein kinase B (Akt), and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) was also evaluated. Exposure of striatal slices to 6-OHDA caused a significant disruption of the cellular homeostasis measured as 3-(4,5 dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide reduction, lactate dehydrogenase release, and tyrosine hydroxylase levels. 6-OHDA exposure increased the levels of reactive oxygen species and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances production and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential in rat striatal slices. Furthermore, 6-OHDA decreased the phosphorylation of Akt (Serine473) and GSK3β (Serine9). Coincubation with 6-OHDA and creatine or PCr reduced the effects of 6-OHDA toxicity. The protective effect afforded by creatine or PCr against 6-OHDA-induced toxicity was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. In conclusion, creatine and PCr minimize oxidative stress in striatum to afford neuroprotection of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25424428

  15. Both creatine and its product phosphocreatine reduce oxidative stress and afford neuroprotection in an in vitro Parkinson's model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Mauricio Peña; Martín-de-Saavedra, Maria D; Romero, Alejandro; Egea, Javier; Ludka, Fabiana K; Tasca, Carla I; Farina, Marcelo; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; López, Manuela G

    2014-01-01

    Creatine is the substrate for creatine kinase in the synthesis of phosphocreatine (PCr). This energetic system is endowed of antioxidant and neuroprotective properties and plays a pivotal role in brain energy homeostasis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of creatine and PCr against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in rat striatal slices, used as an in vitro Parkinson's model. The possible involvement of the signaling pathway mediated by phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), protein kinase B (Akt), and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) was also evaluated. Exposure of striatal slices to 6-OHDA caused a significant disruption of the cellular homeostasis measured as 3-(4,5 dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide reduction, lactate dehydrogenase release, and tyrosine hydroxylase levels. 6-OHDA exposure increased the levels of reactive oxygen species and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances production and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential in rat striatal slices. Furthermore, 6-OHDA decreased the phosphorylation of Akt (Serine(473)) and GSK3β (Serine(9)). Coincubation with 6-OHDA and creatine or PCr reduced the effects of 6-OHDA toxicity. The protective effect afforded by creatine or PCr against 6-OHDA-induced toxicity was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. In conclusion, creatine and PCr minimize oxidative stress in striatum to afford neuroprotection of dopaminergic neurons.

  16. Less Stress : Oxidative stress and glutathione kinetics in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Rook (Denise)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDue to immature antioxidant defenses, preterm infants are at susceptible to oxidative stress, which is associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity and periventricular leukomalacia. The general aim of this thesis was to study oxidative stress in preterm infants

  17. Less Stress : Oxidative stress and glutathione kinetics in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Rook (Denise)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDue to immature antioxidant defenses, preterm infants are at susceptible to oxidative stress, which is associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity and periventricular leukomalacia. The general aim of this thesis was to study oxidative stress in preterm infants

  18. Antibacterial activity of graphite, graphite oxide, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide: membrane and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaobin; Zeng, Tingying Helen; Hofmann, Mario; Burcombe, Ehdi; Wei, Jun; Jiang, Rongrong; Kong, Jing; Chen, Yuan

    2011-09-27

    Health and environmental impacts of graphene-based materials need to be thoroughly evaluated before their potential applications. Graphene has strong cytotoxicity toward bacteria. To better understand its antimicrobial mechanism, we compared the antibacterial activity of four types of graphene-based materials (graphite (Gt), graphite oxide (GtO), graphene oxide (GO), and reduced graphene oxide (rGO)) toward a bacterial model-Escherichia coli. Under similar concentration and incubation conditions, GO dispersion shows the highest antibacterial activity, sequentially followed by rGO, Gt, and GtO. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and dynamic light scattering analyses show that GO aggregates have the smallest average size among the four types of materials. SEM images display that the direct contacts with graphene nanosheets disrupt cell membrane. No superoxide anion (O(2)(•-)) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is detected. However, the four types of materials can oxidize glutathione, which serves as redox state mediator in bacteria. Conductive rGO and Gt have higher oxidation capacities than insulating GO and GtO. Results suggest that antimicrobial actions are contributed by both membrane and oxidation stress. We propose that a three-step antimicrobial mechanism, previously used for carbon nanotubes, is applicable to graphene-based materials. It includes initial cell deposition on graphene-based materials, membrane stress caused by direct contact with sharp nanosheets, and the ensuing superoxide anion-independent oxidation. We envision that physicochemical properties of graphene-based materials, such as density of functional groups, size, and conductivity, can be precisely tailored to either reducing their health and environmental risks or increasing their application potentials.

  19. Enhanced behavioral response by decreasing brain oxidative stress to 6-hydroxy-l-nicotine in Alzheimer's disease rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritcu, Lucian; Stefan, Marius; Brandsch, Roderich; Mihasan, Marius

    2015-03-30

    6-Hydroxy-l-nicotine (6HLN) is a nicotine metabolite resulted from nicotine degradation within Arthrobacter nicotinovorans with positive effects on spatial memory and oxidative stress damage. In the present study, the effects of 6HLN on spatial memory performance were assessed in scopolamine-treated rats. Scopolamine-induced memory impairments were observed, as measured by the Y-maze and radial arm-maze tasks. Decreased activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase along with decrease of total content of reduced glutathione were observed in the rat hippocampal homogenates of scopolamine-treated animals as compared with control. Production of malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation) significantly increased in the rat hippocampal homogenates of scopolamine-treated animals as compared with control, as a consequence of impaired antioxidant enzymes activities. Additionally, in scopolamine-treated rats 6HLN significantly improved memory formation and decreased oxidative stress, suggesting memory-enhancing and antioxidant effects. Therefore, our results suggest that administration of 6HLN ameliorates scopolamine-induced spatial memory impairment by attenuation of the oxidative stress in the rat hippocampus.

  20. Can garlic oil ameliorate diabetes-induced oxidative stress in a rat liver model? A correlated histological and biochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdultawab, Hanem Saad; Ayuob, Nasra N

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to characterise the structural changes in liver of an alloxan-induced diabetic rat and to explain such changes in terms of the biochemical changes in free radicals and antioxidants. In addition, it aimed to determine the potential ability of garlic oil to alter these changes. The study groups were: control (n=12), alloxan-induced diabetic rats (n=10) and alloxan-induced diabetic rats treated with garlic oil (10 mg/kg body weight (n=10)). Markers of oxidative stress were assessed. Small pieces of the liver were processed for transmission electron microscopic study. Garlic oil caused a significant decrease in levels of LPO in plasma (0.26 vs 0.53), erythrocyte lysate (14.4 vs 24.8) and liver tissue homogenate (1.04 vs 2.08), whereas those of thiols were significantly elevated (1.2 vs 0.46), (24 vs 15) in plasma and erythrocyte lysate respectively. SOD activity and G-S-T activity were significantly elevated in erythrocyte lysate (5.7 vs 3.3) (377 vs 179) and liver homogenate (1.4 vs 0.5) (752 vs 623) respectively after garlic oil administration. Ultrastructural study of the liver confirmed the ability of garlic to retard lipid peroxidation of cellular membranes induced by oxidative stress associated with diabetes. Therefore, garlic could normalise oxidative stress in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

  1. Investigation of oxidative stress involvement in hippocampus in epilepsy model induced by pilocarpine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, R M

    2009-10-25

    The relationship between free radical and scavenger enzymes has been found in the epileptic phenomena and reactive oxygen species have been implicated in seizure-induced neurodegeneration. Using the epilepsy model obtained by systemic administration of pilocarpine in rats, we investigated the lipid peroxidation, nitrite content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities in the hippocampus of rats during chronic period. The enzyme activities as well as the lipid peroxidation and nitrite concentrations were measured using spectrophotometric methods and the results compared to values obtained from saline-treated animals. The superoxide dismutase and catalase activities increased during the chronic phase. In addition, lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels increased in same period in the hippocampus of animals observed during spontaneous recurrent seizures. Previous studies showed that animals presenting seizures and submitted to 24h of status epilepticus showed normal levels of superoxide dismutase and increased in catalase activities as well as an increase in hippocampal lipid peroxidation and nitrite concentrations. These results show a direct evidence of lipid peroxidation and nitrite during seizure activity that could be responsible for neuronal damage in the hippocampus of rats, during the establishment of pilocarpine model of epilepsy.

  2. Caenorhabditis elegans: a model to investigate oxidative stress and metal dyshomeostasis in Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Mugure Chege

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease is characterized by progressive motor impairment attributed to progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Additional clinical manifestations include non-motor symptoms such as insomnia, depression, psychosis and cognitive impairment. Parkinson’s disease patients with mild cognitive impairment have an increased risk of developing dementia. The affected brain regions also show perturbed metal ion levels, primarily iron. These observations have led to speculation that metal ion dyshomeostasis plays a key role in the neuronal death of this disease. However, the mechanisms underlying this metal-associated neurodegeneration have yet to be completely elucidated.Mammalian models have traditionally been used to investigate Parkinson’s disease pathogenesis. However, alternate animal models are also being adopted, bringing to bear their respective experimental advantage. The nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, is one such system that has well-developed genetics, is amenable to transgenesis and has relatively low associated experimental costs. C. elegans has a well characterised neuronal network that includes a simple dopaminergic system. In this review we will discuss mechanisms thought to underlie Parkinson’s disease and the use of C. elegans to investigate these processes.

  3. Beetroot (Beta vulgaris L. Extract Ameliorates Gentamicin-Induced Nephrotoxicity Associated Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Apoptosis in Rodent Model

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    Ali A. El Gamal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was designed to investigate the protective effect of (Beta vulgaris L. beat root ethanolic extract (BVEE on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity and to elucidate the potential mechanism. Serum specific kidney function parameters (urea, uric acid, total protein, creatinine, and histopathology of kidney tissue were evaluated to access gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. The oxidative/nitrosative stress (Lipid peroxidation, MDA, NP-SH, Catalase, and nitric oxide levels was assessed. The inflammatory response (TNF-α, IL-6, MPO, NF-κB (p65, and NF-κB (p65 DNA binding and apoptotic marker (Caspase-3, Bax, and Bcl-2 were also evaluated. BVEE (250 and 500 mg/kg treatment along with gentamicin restored/increased the renal endogenous antioxidant status. Gentamicin-induced increased renal inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6, nuclear protein expression of NF-κB (p65, NF-κB-DNA binding activity, myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, and nitric oxide level were significantly down regulated upon BVEE treatment. In addition, BVEE treatment significantly reduced the amount of cleaved caspase 3 and Bax, protein expression and increased the Bcl-2 protein expression. BVEE treatment also ameliorated the extent of histologic injury and reduced inflammatory infiltration in renal tubules. These findings suggest that BVEE treatment attenuates renal dysfunction and structural damage through the reduction of oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis in the kidney.

  4. Oxidative stress in primary glomerular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markan, Suchita; Kohli, Harbir Singh; Sud, Kamal;

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the status of oxidative stress in patients with different primary glomerular diseases (PGD) which have differential predisposition to renal failure.......To evaluate the status of oxidative stress in patients with different primary glomerular diseases (PGD) which have differential predisposition to renal failure....

  5. Oxidative stress response in sugarcane

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    Luis Eduardo Soares Netto

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress response in plants is still poorly understood in comparison with the correspondent phenomenon in bacteria, yeast and mammals. For instance, nitric oxide is assumed to play various roles in plants although no nitric oxide synthase gene has yet been isolated. This research reports the results of a search of the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database for homologous sequences involved in the oxidative stress response. I have not found any gene similar to nitric oxide synthase in the SUCEST database although an alternative pathway for nitric oxide synthesis was proposed. I have also found several genes involved in antioxidant defense, e.g. metal chelators, low molecular weight compounds, antioxidant enzymes and repair systems. Ascorbate (vitamin C is a key antioxidant in plants because it reaches high concentrations in cells and is a substrate for ascorbate peroxidase, an enzyme that I found in different isoforms in the SUCEST database. I also found many enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of low molecular weight antioxidants, which may be potential targets for genetic manipulation. The engineering of plants for increased vitamin C and E production may lead to improvements in the nutritional value and stress tolerance of sugarcane. The components of the antioxidant defense system interact and their synthesis is probably closely regulated. Transcription factors involved in regulation of the oxidative stress response in bacteria, yeast and mammals differ considerably among themselves and when I used them to search the SUCEST database only genes with weak similarities were found, suggesting that these transcription regulators are not very conserved. The involvement of reactive oxygen species and antioxidants in plant defense against pathogens is also discussed.A resposta ao estresse oxidativo não é bem conhecida em plantas como em bactérias, leveduras e humanos. Por exemplo, assume-se que óxido nítrico tem várias fun

  6. Studies of benzamide- and thiol-based histone deacetylase inhibitors in models of oxidative-stress-induced neuronal death: identification of some HDAC3-selective inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yufeng; He, Rong; Chen, Yihua; D'Annibale, Melissa A; Langley, Brett; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2009-05-01

    We compare three structurally different classes of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors that contain benzamide, hydroxamate, or thiol groups as the zinc binding group (ZBG) for their ability to protect cortical neurons in culture from cell death induced by oxidative stress. This study reveals that none of the benzamide-based HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) provides any neuroprotection whatsoever, in distinct contrast to HDACIs that contain other ZBGs. Some of the sulfur-containing HDACIs, namely the thiols, thioesters, and disulfides present modest neuroprotective activity but show toxicity at higher concentrations. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the HDAC6-selective mercaptoacetamides that were reported previously provide the best protection in the homocysteic acid model of oxidative stress, thus further supporting their study in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. A STUDY OF OXIDATIVE STRESS IN DIABETES

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    Babu Rao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Non - enzymatic free radical mediated oxidation of biological molecules, membranes and tissues is associated with a variety of pathological events such as cancer, aging and diabetes mellitus . [1] Increased oxidative stress is seen in both types of diabetes me llitus namely type 1 and type 2, irrespective of duration, complications and treatment. In diabetes mellitus, oxidative stress seems primarily due to both an increased plasma free radical concentration and a sharp decline in antioxidant defences . [1] Among the causes of enhanced free radical production, hyperglycemia and hyper insulinemia seem to play a major role , [2,3] Hyperglycemia is the more easily modifiable factor among the two and good glycemic control can reduce the oxidative stress. Controversy pers ists regarding the other possible mechanisms of increased oxidative stress in diabetes and whether oxidative stress normalizes with adequate metabolic control alone. The role of oxidative stress and diabetic complications has been extensively investigated. Oxidative stress has been suggested to be involved in the genesis of both macro and micro angiopathy [4,5] Prospective trials are now underway addressing the controversial issues of possible role of pharmacological antioxidants in preventing or at least de laying the onset of diabetic complications.

  8. A blueberry-enriched diet attenuates nephropathy in a rat model of hypertension via reduction in oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie M Elks

    Full Text Available To assess renoprotective effects of a blueberry-enriched diet in a rat model of hypertension. Oxidative stress (OS appears to be involved in the development of hypertension and related renal injury. Pharmacological antioxidants can attenuate hypertension and hypertension-induced renal injury; however, attention has shifted recently to the therapeutic potential of natural products as antioxidants. Blueberries (BB have among the highest antioxidant capacities of fruits and vegetables.Male spontaneously hypertensive rats received a BB-enriched diet (2% w/w or an isocaloric control diet for 6 or 12 weeks or 2 days. Compared to controls, rats fed BB-enriched diet for 6 or 12 weeks exhibited lower blood pressure, improved glomerular filtration rate, and decreased renovascular resistance. As measured by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, significant decreases in total reactive oxygen species (ROS, peroxynitrite, and superoxide production rates were observed in kidney tissues in rats on long-term dietary treatment, consistent with reduced pathology and improved function. Additionally, measures of antioxidant status improved; specifically, renal glutathione and catalase activities increased markedly. Contrasted to these observations indicating reduced OS in the BB group after long-term feeding, similar measurements made in rats fed the same diet for only 2 days yielded evidence of increased OS; specifically, significant increases in total ROS, peroxynitrite, and superoxide production rates in all tissues (kidney, brain, and liver assayed in BB-fed rats. These results were evidence of "hormesis" during brief exposure, which dissipated with time as indicated by enhanced levels of catalase in heart and liver of BB group.Long-term feeding of BB-enriched diet lowered blood pressure, preserved renal hemodynamics, and improved redox status in kidneys of hypertensive rats and concomitantly demonstrated the potential to delay or attenuate development

  9. PARP inhibition ameliorates nephropathy in an animal model of type 2 diabetes: focus on oxidative stress, inflammation, and fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Esraa M; El-Maraghy, Nabila N; Ahmed, Ahmed F; Ali, Abdelmonim A; El-Bassossy, Hany M

    2017-02-21

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) enzyme contributes to nephropathy, a serious diabetic complication which may lead to end-stage renal disease. The study aims to investigate the effect of PARP over-activation on kidney functions in a type 2 diabetic rat model. The study also tests the therapeutic use of PARP inhibitors in diabetic nephropathy. Type 2 diabetes was induced in adult male rats by high-fructose/high-fat diet and low streptozotocin dose. Then, the PARP inhibitor 4-aminobenzamide (4-AB) was administered daily for 10 weeks. At the end, urine samples were collected to measure urine creatinine, albumin, and total proteins. PARP activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and nitrite content were measured in kidney tissue homogenate. Glucose, fructosamine, insulin, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were measured in serum. Furthermore, histological studies, collagen deposition, and immunofluorescence of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1) were carried out. PARP enzyme activity was significantly higher in the diabetic group and was significantly reduced by 4-AB administration. Diabetic animals had clear nephropathy indicated by proteinuria and increased albumin excretion rate (AER) which were significantly decreased by PARP inhibition. In addition, PARP inhibition increased creatinine clearance in diabetic animals and reduced renal TGF-β1 and glomerular fibrosis. Moreover, PARP inhibition alleviated the elevated serum TNF-α level, renal NFκB, nitrite, and the decrease in SOD activity in diabetic animals. However, PARP inhibition did not significantly affect neither hyperglycemia nor insulin sensitivity. PARP enzyme inhibition alleviates diabetic nephropathy through decreasing inflammation, oxidative stress, and renal fibrosis.

  10. Oxidative stress in the neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, R; Palomino, N; Robles, A

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the oxidative state of term and preterm neonates at the moment of birth and during the first days of life, and the influence of exposure to oxygen on the premature neonates.A total of 20 neonates were selected. Group A: 10 healthy full-term neonates, and Group B: 10 preterm neonates with no other pathology associated, requiring oxygen therapy. Venous samples were taken in cord at 3 and 72 h in Group A, and in cord at 3, 24 and 72 h and 7 days in Group B.Hydroperoxides, Q10 coenzyme (Co Q10) and alpha-tocopherol were measured within the erythrocyte membrane. Levels of hydroperoxides present in erythrocyte membrane were higher than normal both in Group A and in Group B at birth. This increase was greater in the group of premature neonates. Levels of alpha-tocopherol at birth increase significantly at 72 h in term neonates. Among the premature newborns, alpha-tocopherol levels are two to three times lower at birth and do not rise to higher levels as in the term neonate group. Fall in levels of Co Q10 in erythrocyte membranes is observed, and perhaps is due to the role of Co Q10 in maintaining the pool of reduced tocopherol. At birth, the neonate presents an increase of markers of oxidative stress and a decrease of their antioxidant defenses. This difference is greater as gestational age decreases. The application of oxygen therapy resulted in these levels which remain low throughout the study period.

  11. Chronic Dietary Supplementation of 4% Figs on the Modification of Oxidative Stress in Alzheimer’s Disease Transgenic Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraju Subash

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the changes in the plasma Aβ, oxidative stress/antioxidants, and membrane bound enzymes in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of Alzheimer’s disease (AD transgenic mice (Tg2576 after dietary supplementation of Omani figs fruits for 15 months along with spatial memory and learning test. AD Tg mice on control diet without figs showed significant impairment in spatial learning ability compared to the wild-type mice on same diet and figs fed Tg mice as well. Significant increase in oxidative stress and reduced antioxidant status were observed in AD Tg mice. 4% figs treated AD Tg mice significantly attenuated oxidative damage, as evident by decreased lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyls and restoration of antioxidant status. Altered activities of membrane bound enzymes (Na+ K+ ATPase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE in AD Tg mice brain regions and was restored by figs treatment. Further, figs supplementation might be able to decrease the plasma levels of Aβ (1–40, 1–42 significantly in Tg mice suggesting a putative delay in the formation of plaques, which might be due to the presence of high natural antioxidants in figs. But this study warrants further extensive investigation to find a novel lead for a therapeutic target for AD from figs.

  12. β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) uptake by the animal model, Daphnia magna and subsequent oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterhuizen-Londt, Maranda; Wiegand, Claudia; Downing, Tim G

    2015-06-15

    β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), produced by cyanobacteria, is a neurotoxin implicated in Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC). BMAA concentrations in cyanobacteria are lower than those thought to be necessary to result in neurological damage thus bioaccumulation or biomagnification is required to achieve concentrations able to cause neurodegeneration. Many cyanobacteria produce BMAA and uptake routes into the food web require examination. In this study we investigate the uptake of BMAA by adult phytoplanktivorus Daphnia magna via exposure to dissolved pure BMAA and BMAA containing cyanobacteria, as well as the subsequent oxidative stress response in the daphnia. Free BMAA and protein-associated BMAA were quantified by LC-MS/MS. Dissolved BMAA was taken up and was found as free BMAA in D. magna. No protein-associated BMAA was detected in D. magna after a 24-h exposure period. No BMAA was detectable in D. magna after exposure to BMAA containing cyanobacteria. BMAA inhibited the oxidative stress defence and biotransformation enzymes within 24-h exposure in the tested Daphnia and could therefore impair the oxidant status and the capability of detoxifying other substances in D. magna. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The adjuvant effect induced by di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is mediated through oxidative stress in a mouse model of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Huihui; Chen, Shaohui; Mao, Lin; Li, Bing; Yuan, Ye; Li, Rui; Yang, Xu

    2014-09-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, as the most commonly used plasticizer, is considered to be related to the asthma prevalence. There are studies affirming that the DEHP has an adjuvant effect in the pathogenesis of allergy asthma. Oxidative stress is one possible pathway for DEHP-adjuvant effect. Thus, this study explored whether DEHP could induce adjuvant effect in mouse asthma model via oxidative stress pathway. Male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into six groups: (1) saline group, (2) DEHP group, (3) ovalbumin (OVA) group, (4) DEHP+OVA group, (5) OVA+vitamin E (Vit E) group, (6) DEHP+OVA+Vit E group. The exposure dose of DEHP was 30 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day. After 18 days of the exposure protocol. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH) and malonaldehyde (MDA) levels and biomarkers related to asthma model were measured. Collectively, these data indicated higher ROS and MDA levels and lower GSH contents in DEHP+OVA group than that in OVA group, while Vit E, an antioxidant, could restore ROS, MDA and GSH levels to control levels and attenuate the DEHP and/or OVA effects. Our observations suggested that there was a relationship between oxidative stress and the adjuvant effect induced by DEHP in this mouse asthma model.

  14. Wheat peptides reduce oxidative stress and inhibit NO production through modulating μ-opioid receptor in a rat NSAID-induced stomach damage model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hong; Cai, Hui-Zhen; Wang, Shao-Kang; Yang, Li-Gang; Sun, Gui-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) induce tissue damage and oxidative stress in animal models of stomach damage. In the present study, the protective effects of wheat peptides were evaluated in a NSAID-induced stomach damage model in rats. Different doses of wheat peptides or distilled water were administered daily by gavage for 30 days before the rat stomach damage model was established by administration of NSAIDs (aspirin and indomethacin) into the digestive tract twice. The treatment of wheat peptides decreased the NSAID-induced gastric epithelial cell degeneration and oxidative stress and NO levels in the rats. Wheat peptides significantly increased the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities and decreased iNOS activity in stomach. The mRNA expression level of μ-opioid receptor was significantly decreased in wheat peptides-treated rats than that in in the control rats. The results suggest that NSAID drugs induced stomach damage in rats, wchih can be prevented by wheat peptides. The mechanisms for the protective effects were most likely through reducing NSAID-induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Apoptosis and oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Elena; Formichi, Patrizia; Battisti, Carla; Federico, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders affect almost 30 million individuals leading to disability and death. These disorders are characterized by pathological changes in disease-specific areas of the brain and degeneration of distinct neuron subsets. Despite the differences in clinical manifestations and neuronal vulnerability, the pathological processes appear similar, suggesting common neurodegenerative pathways. Apoptosis seems to play a key role in the progression of several neurologic disorders like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as demonstrated by studies on animal models and cell lines. On the other hand, research on human brains reported contradictory results. However, many dying neurons have been detected in brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases, and these conditions are often associated with significant cell loss accompanied by typical morphological features of apoptosis such as chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation, and activation of cysteine-proteases, caspases. Cell death and neurodegenerative conditions have been linked to oxidative stress and imbalance between generation of free radicals and antioxidant defenses. Multiple sclerosis, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases have been associated with reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide. Here we present an overview of the involvement of neuronal apoptosis and oxidative stress in the most important neurodegenerative diseases, mainly focusing the attention on several genetic disorders, discussing the interaction between primary genetic abnormalities and the apoptotic pathways.

  16. PARTICULATE MATTER, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particulate matter (PM), a component of air pollution has been epidemiologically associated with sudden deaths, cardiovascular and respiratory illnesses. The effects are more pronounced in patients with pre-existing conditions such as asthma, diabetes or obstructive pulmonary disorders. Clinical and experimental studies have historically focused on the cardiopulmonary effects of PM. However, since PM particles carry numerous biocontaminants that are capable of triggering free radical production and cytokine release, the possibility that PM may affect organs systems sensitive to oxidative stress must be considered. Four independent studies that summarize the neurochemical and neuropathological changes found in the brains of PM exposed animals are described here. These were recently presented at two 2007 symposia sponsored by the Society of Toxicology (Charlotte, NC) and the International Neurotoxicology Association (Monterey, CA). Particulates are covered with biocontaminants (e.g., endotoxins, mold, pollen) which convey free radical activity that can damage the lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins of target cells on contact and stimulate inflammatory cytokine release. Although, the historical focus of PM toxicity has been cardiopulmonary targets, it is now appreciated that inhaled nano-size (liver, kidneys, testes, lymph nodes) (Takenaka et aI

  17. Clinical Relevance of Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frijhoff, Jeroen; Winyard, Paul G; Zarkovic, Neven;

    2015-01-01

    SIGNIFICANCE: Oxidative stress is considered to be an important component of various diseases. A vast number of methods have been developed and used in virtually all diseases to measure the extent and nature of oxidative stress, ranging from oxidation of DNA to proteins, lipids, and free amino...... acids. RECENT ADVANCES: An increased understanding of the biology behind diseases and redox biology has led to more specific and sensitive tools to measure oxidative stress markers, which are very diverse and sometimes very low in abundance. CRITICAL ISSUES: The literature is very heterogeneous....... It is often difficult to draw general conclusions on the significance of oxidative stress biomarkers, as only in a limited proportion of diseases have a range of different biomarkers been used, and different biomarkers have been used to study different diseases. In addition, biomarkers are often measured...

  18. Oxidative Stress Related Diseases in Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Ozsurekci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We review oxidative stress-related newborn disease and the mechanism of oxidative damage. In addition, we outline diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and future directions. Many reports have defined oxidative stress as an imbalance between an enhanced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and the lack of protective ability of antioxidants. From that point of view, free radical-induced damage caused by oxidative stress seems to be a probable contributing factor to the pathogenesis of many newborn diseases, such as respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, patent ductus arteriosus, and retinopathy of prematurity. We share the hope that the new understanding of the concept of oxidative stress and its relation to newborn diseases that has been made possible by new diagnostic techniques will throw light on the treatment of those diseases.

  19. Effect of Antioxidants Supplementation or Restricted Diet on Oxidative Stress in a Rat Model of Diet-Induced Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Vahidinia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Obesity is independently associated with increased oxidative stress in men and women. Natural antioxidants showed substantial antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities in vivo. The aim of this study was to examine the preventive effect of antioxidant supplements and/or restricted diet on the stress oxidative index (8-Iso-PGF2α and total antioxidant capacity (TAC in obese rats induced by a high-fat (HF diet. Material and Methods: In this experimental study forty-eight male Wister rats were randomly assigned to HF purified diet (61% kcal from fat ad libitum, HF restricted (30%, HF supplemented with astaxanthin, vitamin E and C (HFS, HFS restricted (30% for 12 weeks. Their daily food intake and weekly body weight gain were measured. Serum 8-Iso-PGF2α and TAC measured by EIA methods. Results: Energy intake was not significant in HF with HFS (58.8 and 58.6 kcal/rat/d, respectively and in HF restricted with HFS restricted (41.7 and 41.6 kcal/rat/d, respectively. Serum 8-Iso-PGF2α in HF was 1416.2±443.5 and in HF restricted was 1209.4±424.4pg/ml (p>0.05 and equal for other groups. The lowest TAC was seen in HF and highest was in HFS (0.36±0.43 and 3.0±1.13 mM, respectively (p<0.001. Conclusions: These results suggest that antioxidant supplements and caloric restriction may improved TAC and partially suppress stress oxidative index in high fat diet induced obese rats. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2011;18(1:48-56

  20. Amelioration of anti-tuberculosis drug induced oxidative stress in kidneys by Spirulina fusiformis in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sherry Joseph; Sabina, Evan Prince

    2016-08-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a rare complication caused by anti-tuberculosis therapy-induced oxidative stress. The Cyanobacterium Spirulina fusiformis Voronikhin belonging to Oscillatoriaceae family is used traditionally as a source of antioxidants against oxidative stress. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of S. fusiformis in modifying isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RIF)-induced changes in Wistar rat kidneys. Animals were divided into six groups: normal control rats; toxic control (INH & RIF-50 mg/kg b.w./d each; p.o.); INH & RIF + S. fusiformis (400 mg/kg b.w./d); INH & RIF + S. fusiformis (800 mg/kg b.w./d); S. fusiformis (800 mg/kg b.w./d) alone-treated rats; INH & RIF + silymarin (25 mg/kg b.w./d). Study duration was 28 d after which blood and kidneys were analyzed. We also studied the binding and interactions of the transcription factors Liver X Receptor (LXR) and Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) with INH, RIF, and representative active compounds of S. fusiformis by in silico methods. INH & RIF treatment caused significant (p< 0.05) decrease in antioxidant levels and significant (p< 0.05) increase in the levels of creatinine, urea, and uric acid showing impaired kidney function. Spirulina fusiformis ameliorated these effects in a dose dependent manner. Histological examination of kidneys supported these findings. Results of the in silico analyses showed that selected active components of S. fusiformis interact with LXR and FXR and could be a possible mechanism of action. S. fusiformis rendered protection against anti-tuberculosis drugs-induced oxidative stress in kidney tissues of rats.

  1. Can Melatonin Act as an Antioxidant in Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress Model in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solaleh Emamgholipour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We aimed to investigate the possible effects of melatonin on gene expressions and activities of MnSOD and catalase under conditions of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Materials and Methods. PBMCs were isolated from healthy subjects and treated as follows: (1 control (only with 0.1% DMSO for 12 h; (2 melatonin (1 mM for 12 h; (3 H2O2 (250 μM for 2 h; (4 H2O2 (250 μM for 2 h following 10 h pretreatment with melatonin (1 mM. The gene expression was evaluated by real-time PCR. MnSOD and catalase activities in PBMCs were determined by colorimetric assays. Results. Pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin significantly augmented expression and activity of MnSOD which were diminished by H2O2. Melatonin treatment of PBMCs caused a significant upregulation of catalase by almost 2-fold in comparison with untreated cells. However, activity and expression of catalase increased by 1.5-fold in PBMCs under H2O2-induced oxidative stress compared with untreated cell. Moreover, pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin resulted in a significant 1.8-fold increase in catalase expression compared to PBMCs treated only with H2O2. Conclusion. It seems that melatonin could prevent from undesirable impacts of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on MnSOD downregulation. Moreover, melatonin could promote inductive effect of H2O2 on catalase mRNA expression.

  2. Today’s oxidative stress markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Czerska

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress represents a situation where there is an imbalance between the reactive oxygen species (ROS and the availability and the activity of antioxidants. This balance is disturbed by increased generation of free radicals or decreased antioxidant activity. It is very important to develop methods and find appropriate biomarkers that may be used to assess oxidative stress in vivo. It is significant because appropriate measurement of such stress is necessary in identifying its role in lifestyle-related diseases. Previously used markers of oxidative stress, such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS or malondialdehyde (MDA, are progressively being supplemented by new ones, such as isoprostanes (IsoPs and their metabolites or allantoin. This paper is focusing on the presentation of new ones, promising markers of oxidative stress (IsoPs, their metabolites and allantoin, taking into account the advantage of those markers over markers used previously. Med Pr 2015;66(3:393–405

  3. S-adenosylmethionine reduces airway inflammation and fibrosis in a murine model of chronic severe asthma via suppression of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sun-Young; Hong, Gyong Hwa; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Park, Sunjoo; Park, So Young; Shin, Bomi; Kim, Tae-Bum; Moon, Hee-Bom; Cho, You Sook

    2016-06-03

    Increased oxidative stress has an important role in asthmatic airway inflammation and remodeling. A potent methyl donor, S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), is known to protect against tissue injury and fibrosis through modulation of oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of SAMe on airway inflammation and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma. A mouse model was generated by repeated intranasal challenge with ovalbumin and Aspergillus fungal protease twice a week for 8 weeks. SAMe was orally administered every 24 h for 8 weeks. We performed bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid analysis and histopathological examination. The levels of various cytokines and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) were measured in the lung tissue. Cultured macrophages and fibroblasts were employed to evaluate the underlying anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic mechanisms of SAMe. The magnitude of airway inflammation and fibrosis, as well as the total BAL cell counts, were significantly suppressed in the SAMe-treated groups. A reduction in T helper type 2 pro-inflammatory cytokines and HNE levels was observed in mouse lung tissue after SAMe administration. Macrophages cultured with SAMe also showed reduced cellular oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Moreover, SAMe treatment attenuated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-induced fibronectin expression in cultured fibroblasts. SAMe had a suppressive effect on airway inflammation and fibrosis in a mouse model of chronic asthma, at least partially through the attenuation of oxidative stress and TGF-β-induced fibronectin expression. The results of this study suggest a potential role for SAMe as a novel therapeutic agent in chronic asthma.

  4. Periodontitis and increase in circulating oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Tomofuji

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are products of normal cellular metabolism. However, excessive production of ROS oxidizes DNA, lipids and proteins, inducing tissue damage. Studies have shown that periodontitis induces excessive ROS production in periodontal tissue. When periodontitis develops, ROS produced in the periodontal lesion diffuse into the blood stream, resulting in the oxidation of blood molecules (circulating oxidative stress. Such oxidation may be detrimental to systemic health. For instance, previous animal studies suggested that experimental periodontitis induces oxidative damage of the liver and descending aorta by increasing circulating oxidative stress. In addition, it has been revealed that clinical parameters in chronic periodontitis patients showed a significant improvement 2 months after periodontal treatment, which was accompanied by a significant reduction of reactive oxygen metabolites in plasma. Improvement of periodontitis by periodontal treatment could reduce the occurrence of circulating oxidative stress. Furthermore, recent studies indicate that the increase in circulating oxidative stress following diabetes mellitus and inappropriate nutrition damages periodontal tissues. In such cases, therapeutic approaches to systemic oxidative stress might be necessary to improve periodontal health.

  5. Oxidative stress and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A

    2008-01-01

    Slowing the rate of progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a critical part of the management of affected dogs and cats. Renal oxidant stress is a previously unrecognized factor in the progression of canine CKD and is likely to be similarly important in feline CKD. Renin-angiotensin antagonism, calcium channel antagonism, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, and antihypertensive and antiproteinuric therapy are commonly recommended for dogs and cats with CKD. These therapies would be expected to reduce renal oxidant stress by decreasing reactive oxygen species generation. Newer data indicate that dietary supplementation with specific antioxidants is an important consideration for limiting renal oxidant stress and progression of CKD.

  6. Interferon-¿ regulates oxidative stress during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, C.; Penkowa, Milena; Saez-Torres, I.;

    2002-01-01

    Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress......Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress...

  7. Infrared dielectric properties of low-stress silicon oxide

    CERN Document Server

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Brown, Ari D; Miller, Kevin H

    2016-01-01

    Silicon oxide thin films play an important role in the realization of optical coatings and high-performance electrical circuits. Estimates of the dielectric function in the far- and mid-infrared regime are derived from the observed transmittance spectrum for a commonly employed low-stress silicon oxide formulation. The experimental, modeling, and numerical methods used to extract the dielectric function are presented.

  8. Infrared Dielectric Properties of Low-Stress Silicon Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Wollack, Edward J.; Brown, Ari D.; Miller, Kevin H.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon oxide thin films play an important role in the realization of optical coatings and high-performance electrical circuits. Estimates of the dielectric function in the far- and mid-infrared regime are derived from the observed transmittance spectrum for a commonly employed low-stress silicon oxide formulation. The experimental, modeling, and numerical methods used to extract the dielectric function are presented.

  9. Pre-Conditioning with CDP-Choline Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Induced Cardiac Myocyte Death in a Hypoxia/Reperfusion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pacheco, Héctor; Méndez-Domínguez, Aurelio; Hernández, Salomón; López-Marure, Rebeca; Vazquez-Mellado, Maria J.; Aguilar, Cecilia; Rocha-Zavaleta, Leticia

    2014-01-01

    Background. CDP-choline is a key intermediate in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, which is an essential component of cellular membranes, and a cell signalling mediator. CDP-choline has been used for the treatment of cerebral ischaemia, showing beneficial effects. However, its potential benefit for the treatment of myocardial ischaemia has not been explored yet. Aim. In the present work, we aimed to evaluate the potential use of CDP-choline as a cardioprotector in an in vitro model of ischaemia/reperfusion injury. Methods. Neonatal rat cardiac myocytes were isolated and subjected to hypoxia/reperfusion using the coverslip hypoxia model. To evaluate the effect of CDP-choline on oxidative stress-induced reperfusion injury, the cells were incubated with H2O2 during reperfusion. The effect of CDP-choline pre- and postconditioning was evaluated using the cell viability MTT assay, and the proportion of apoptotic and necrotic cells was analyzed using the Annexin V determination by flow cytometry. Results. Pre- and postconditioning with 50 mg/mL of CDP-choline induced a significant reduction of cells undergoing apoptosis after hypoxia/reperfusion. Preconditioning with CDP-choline attenuated postreperfusion cell death induced by oxidative stress. Conclusion. CDP-choline administration reduces cell apoptosis induced by oxidative stress after hypoxia/reperfusion of cardiac myocytes. Thus, it has a potential as cardioprotector in ischaemia/reperfusion-injured cardiomyocytes. PMID:24578622

  10. Laser Acupuncture at HT7 Acupoint Improves Cognitive Deficit, Neuronal Loss, Oxidative Stress, and Functions of Cholinergic and Dopaminergic Systems in Animal Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Sutalangka, Chatchada

    2014-01-01

    To date, the therapeutic strategy against cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD) is still not in satisfaction level and requires novel effective intervention. Based the oxidative stress reduction and cognitive enhancement induced by laser acupuncture at HT7, the beneficial effect of laser acupuncture at HT7 against cognitive impairment in PD has been focused. In this study, we aimed to determine the effect of laser acupuncture at HT7 on memory impairment, oxidative stress status, and the functions of both cholinergic and dopaminergic systems in hippocampus of animal model of PD. Male Wistar rats, weighing 180-220 g, were induced unilateral lesion at right substantianigra by 6-OHDA and were treated with laser acupuncture continuously at a period of 14 days. The results showed that laser acupuncture at HT7 enhanced memory and neuron density in CA3 and dentate gyrus. The decreased AChE, MAO-B, and MDA together with increased GSH-Px in hippocampus of a 6-OHDA lesion rats were also observed. In conclusion, laser acupuncture at HT7 can improve neuron degeneration and memory impairment in animal model of PD partly via the decreased oxidative stress and the improved cholinergic and dopaminergic functions. More researches concerning effect of treatment duration are still required.

  11. Cytoprotection by almond skin extracts or catechins of hepatocyte cytotoxicity induced by hydroperoxide (oxidative stress model) versus glyoxal or methylglyoxal (carbonylation model).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qiang; Banaich, Monica S; O'Brien, Peter J

    2010-04-29

    Oxidative and carbonyl stress are detrimental in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, as well as in other chronic diseases. However, this process may be decreased by dietary bioactive compounds. Almond skin is an abundant source of bioactive compounds and antioxidants, including polyphenolic flavonoids, which may contribute to the decrease in oxidative and carbonyl stress. In this study, four Almond Skin Extracts (ASEI, ASEII, ASEIII, and ASEIV) were prepared by different methods and evaluated for their antioxidant activity. The order of the polyphenol content (total muM gallic acid equivalents) of the four extracts was found to be, in decreasing order of effectiveness: ASEI>ASEIII>ASEIV>ASEII. The order of Ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP, microM FeSO(4)/g) value, in decreasing order was ASEI (216)>ASEIII (176)>ASEIV (89)>ASEII (85). The order of ASE effectiveness for decreasing protein carbonyation induced by the copper Fenton reaction was ASEI>ASEIV>ASEII>ASEIII. The order of antioxidant effectiveness for inhibiting tertiary-butyl hydroperoxide (TBH) induced microsomal lipid peroxidation was ASEI>ASEIV>ASEII, ASEIII. Also, the order of ASE effectiveness for inhibiting TBH induced hepatocyte cell death was: ASEIII, ASEIV>ASEI, ASEII. Catechin also protected hepatocytes from TBH induced hepatocyte, lipid peroxidation and cytotoxicity. In a cell free model, equimolar concentrations of catechin or epicatechin rescued serum albumin from protein carbonylation induced by methylglyoxal (MGO). Catechin, epicatechin and ASEI all decreased gloxal induced hepatocyte cell death and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in GSH-depleted hepatocytes. Catechin and epicatechin protected against GO or MGO induced hepatocyte cell death, protein carbonylation and ROS formation. Catechin was more effective than epicatechin. Our results suggest that (a) bioactive almond skin constituents in the non-lipophilic polyphenol extract were the most effective at protecting

  12. Response of Mouse Zygotes Treated with Mild Hydrogen Peroxide as a Model to Reveal Novel Mechanisms of Oxidative Stress-Induced Injury in Early Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Our study aimed to develop embryo models to evaluate the impact of oxidative stress on embryo development. Mouse zygotes, which stayed at G1 phase, were treated with prepared culture medium (containing 0.00, 0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04, 0.05, or 0.1 mM hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)) for 30 min in experiment 1. The dose-effects of H2O2 on embryo development were investigated via comparisons of the formation rate at each stage (2- and 4-cell embryos and blastocysts). Experiment 2 was carried out to compare behaviors of embryos in a mild oxidative-stressed status (0.03 mM H2O2) with those in a control (0 mM H2O2). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, variation of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), expression of γH2AX, and cell apoptosis rate of blastocyst were detected. We observed a dose-dependent decrease on cleavage and blastocyst rates. Besides, higher level of ROS, rapid reduction of MMP, and the appearance of γH2AX revealed that embryos are injured early in mild oxidative stress. Additionally, γH2AX may involve during DNA damage response in early embryos. And the apoptotic rate of blastocyst may significantly increase when DNA damage repair is inadequate. Most importantly, our research provides embryo models to study cell cycle regulation and DNA damage response under condition of different levels of oxidative stress.

  13. Sex-dependent mitochondrial respiratory impairment and oxidative stress in a rat model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarest, Tyler G; Schuh, Rosemary A; Waddell, Jaylyn; McKenna, Mary C; Fiskum, Gary

    2016-06-01

    Increased male susceptibility to long-term cognitive deficits is well described in clinical and experimental studies of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. While cell death signaling pathways are known to be sexually dimorphic, a sex-dependent pathophysiological mechanism preceding the majority of secondary cell death has yet to be described. Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to cell death following cerebral hypoxic-ischemia (HI). Several lines of evidence suggest that there are sex differences in the mitochondrial metabolism of adult mammals. Therefore, this study tested the hypothesis that brain mitochondrial respiratory impairment and associated oxidative stress is more severe in males than females following HI. Maximal brain mitochondrial respiration during oxidative phosphorylation was two-fold more impaired in males following HI. The endogenous antioxidant glutathione was 30% higher in the brain of sham females compared to males. Females also exhibited increased glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity following HI injury. Conversely, males displayed a reduction in mitochondrial GPx4 protein levels and mitochondrial GPx activity. Moreover, a 3-4-fold increase in oxidative protein carbonylation was observed in the cortex, perirhinal cortex, and hippocampus of injured males, but not females. These data provide the first evidence for sex-dependent mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction and oxidative damage, which may contribute to the relative male susceptibility to adverse long-term outcomes following HI. Lower basal GSH levels, lower post-hypoxic mitochondrial glutathione peroxidase (mtGPx) activity, and mitochondrial glutathione peroxidase 4 (mtGPx4) protein levels may contribute to the susceptibility of the male brain to oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction following neonatal hypoxic-ischemia (HI). Treatment of male pups with acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) protects against the loss of mtGPx activity, mtGPx4 protein, and increases in protein

  14. Fipronil insecticide toxicology: oxidative stress and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Martínez, María Aránzazu; Wu, Qinghua; Ares, Irma; Martínez-Larrañaga, María Rosa; Anadón, Arturo; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-11-01

    Fipronil (FIP) is widely used across the world as a broad-spectrum phenylpyrazole insecticide and veterinary drug. FIP was the insecticide to act by targeting the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor and has favorable selective toxicity towards insects rather than mammals. However, because of accidental exposure, incorrect use of FIP or widespread FIP use leading to the contamination of water and soil, there is increasing evidence that FIP could cause a variety of toxic effects on animals and humans, such as neurotoxic, hepatotoxic, nephrotoxic, reproductive, and cytotoxic effects on vertebrate and invertebrates. In the last decade, oxidative stress has been suggested to be involved in the various toxicities induced by FIP. To date, few reviews have addressed the toxicity of FIP in relation to oxidative stress. The focus of this article is primarily intended to summarize the progress in research associated with oxidative stress as a possible mechanism for FIP-induced toxicity as well as metabolism. The present review reports that studies have been conducted to reveal the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress as a result of FIP treatment and have correlated them with various types of toxicity. Furthermore, the metabolism of FIP was also reviewed, and during this process, various CYP450 enzymes were involved and oxidative stress might occur. The roles of various compounds in protecting against FIP-induced toxicity based on their anti-oxidative effects were also summarized to further understand the role of oxidative stress in FIP-induced toxicity.

  15. Oxidative stress and the ageing endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Giovanni; Salvioli, Stefano; Franceschi, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    Ageing is a process characterized by a progressive decline in cellular function, organismal fitness and increased risk of age-related diseases and death. Several hundred theories have attempted to explain this phenomenon. One of the most popular is the 'oxidative stress theory', originally termed the 'free radical theory'. The endocrine system seems to have a role in the modulation of oxidative stress; however, much less is known about the role that oxidative stress might have in the ageing of the endocrine system and the induction of age-related endocrine diseases. This Review outlines the interactions between hormones and oxidative metabolism and the potential effects of oxidative stress on ageing of endocrine organs. Many different mechanisms that link oxidative stress and ageing are discussed, all of which converge on the induction or regulation of inflammation. All these mechanisms, including cell senescence, mitochondrial dysfunction and microRNA dysregulation, as well as inflammation itself, could be targets of future studies aimed at clarifying the effects of oxidative stress on ageing of endocrine glands.

  16. Effects of gamma oryzanol on factors of oxidative stress and sepsis-induced lung injury in experimental animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmira Zolali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective (s: There is corroborating evidence to substantiate redox imbalance and oxidative stress in sepsis that finally leads to organ damage or even death. Gamma oryzanol (GO is one of the major bioactive components in rice bran has been considered to function as an antioxidant. The present study was carried out to evaluate the antioxidant activity of gamma oryzanol in vitro and its efficacy in sepsis. Materials and Methods: To induce sepsis, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP method was performed on the rats. A study group of forty male Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: sham group; CLP group; 50 mg/kg GO- treated CLP group and 100 mg/kg GO- treated CLP group. GO was administered with an oral gavage 2 hr prior to inducing sepsis. Tissue and blood samples were collected 12 hr after CLP to prepare tissue sections for histopathological study and assay the oxidative stress biomarkers including: SOD (Superoxide Dismutase, TAC (total antioxidant capacity, MDA (Malondialdehyde, MPO (Myeloperoxidase and PAI-1 (Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1. Data are given as mean ± SD. The ANOVA with Tukey post hoc test was used to determine the differences between groups and P Results: TAC level increased in GO- treated CLP groups (P

  17. Diphenyl Diselenide Protects Against Mortality, Locomotor Deficits and Oxidative Stress in Drosophila melanogaster Model of Manganese-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedara, Isaac A; Abolaji, Amos O; Rocha, Joao B T; Farombi, Ebenezer O

    2016-06-01

    Several experimental and epidemiological reports have associated manganese exposure with induction of oxidative stress and locomotor dysfunctions. Diphenyl diselenide (DPDS) is widely reported to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in in vitro and in vivo studies via multiple biochemical mechanisms. The present study investigated the protective effect of DPDS on manganese-induced toxicity in Drosophila melanogaster. The flies were exposed, in a dietary regimen, to manganese alone (30 mmol per kg) or in combination with DPDS (10 and 20 µmol per kg) for 7 consecutive days. Exposure to manganese significantly (p manganese-exposed flies. Additionally, the significant decreases in the total thiol level, activities of catalase and glutathione-S-transferase were accompanied with significant increases in the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in flies exposed to manganese alone. Dietary supplementation with DPDS significantly augmented the antioxidant status and prevented manganese-induced oxidative stress in the treated flies. Collectively, the present data highlight that DPDS may be a promising chemopreventive drug candidate against neurotoxicity resulting from acute manganese exposure.

  18. Chronic Cigarette Smoking Impairs Erectile Function through Increased Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis, Decreased nNOS, Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Contents in a Rat Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Ching Huang

    Full Text Available Cigarette use is an independent risk factor for the development of erectile dysfunction (ED. While the association between chronic smoking and ED is well established, the fundamental mechanism(s of cigarette-related ED are incompletely understood, partly due to no reliable animal model of smoking-induced ED. The present study was designed to validate an in vivo rat model of chronic cigarette-induced ED. Forty 12-week old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups. Ten rats served as control group and were exposed only to room air. The remaining 30 rats were passively exposed to cigarette smoke (CS for 4 weeks (n = 10, 12 weeks (n = 10, and 24 weeks (n = 10. At the 24-week time point all rats were assessed with intracavernous pressure (ICP during cavernous nerve electrostimulation. Blood and urine were collected to measure serum testosterone and oxidative stress, respectively. Corporal tissue was assessed by Western blot for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS. Penile tissues were subjected to immunohistochemistry for endothelial, smooth muscle, and apoptotic content. Mean arterial pressure (MAP was significantly higher in 24-week cigarette exposed animals compared to the control animals. Mean ICP/MAP ratio and cavernosal smooth muscle/endothelial contents were significantly lower in the 12- and 24-week rats compared to control animals. Oxidative stress was significantly higher in the 24-week cigarette exposed group compared to control animals. Mean nNOS expression was significantly lower, and apoptotic index significantly higher, in CS-exposed animals compared to control animals. These findings indicate that the rat model exposure to CS increases apoptosis and oxidative stress and decreases nNOS, endothelial and smooth muscle contents, and ICP in a dose dependent fashion. The rat model is a useful tool for further study of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of CS-related ED.

  19. Temporal changes of oxidative stress markers in Escherichia coli K1-induced experimental meningitis in a neonatal rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giridharan, Vijayasree V; Simões, Lutiana R; Dagostin, Valdemira S; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Rezin, Gislaine T; Florentino, Drielly; Muniz, Jhonata P; Collodel, Allan; Petronilho, Fabricia; Quevedo, Joao; Barichello, Tatiana

    2017-07-13

    Despite advances in antimicrobial therapy and advanced critical care neonatal bacterial meningitis has a mortality rate of over 10% and induces neurological sequelae in 20-50% of cases. Escherichia coli K1 (E. coli K1) is the most common gram-negative organism causing neonatal meningitis and is the second most common cause behind group B streptococcus. We previously reported that an E. coli K1 experimental meningitis infection in neonatal rats resulted in habituation and aversive memory impairment and a significant increase in cytokine levels in adulthood. In this present study, we investigated the oxidative stress profile including malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, carbonyl protein formation, myeloperoxidase activity (MPO) activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and catalase (CAT) activity 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96h after E. coli K1 experimental meningitis infection. In addition, sulfhydryl groups, nitrite and nitrate levels and activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes were also measured in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of neonatal rats. The results from this study demonstrated a significant increase in MDA, protein carbonyls and MPO activity and a simultaneous decrease in SOD activity in the hippocampus of the neonatal meningitis survivors but the same was not observed in frontal cortex. In addition, we also observed a significant increase in complex IV activity in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of meningitis survivor rats. Thus, the results from this study reaffirmed the possible role of oxidative stress, nitric oxide and its related compounds in the complex pathophysiology of E. coli K1-induced bacterial meningitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Chaperones, but not oxidized proteins, are ubiquitinated after oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kästle, Marc; Reeg, Sandra; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina;

    2012-01-01

    After oxidative stress proteins which are oxidatively modified are degraded by the 20S proteasome. However, several studies documented an enhanced ubiquitination of yet unknown proteins. Since ubiqutination is a prerequisite for degradation by the 26S proteasome in an ATP-dependent manner......, we were able to confirm an increase of ubiquitinated proteins 16h upon oxidative stress. Therefore, we isolated ubiquitinated proteins from hydrogen peroxide treated cells, as well as from control and lactacystin, an irreversible proteasome inhibitor, treated cells, and identified some......, ubiquitinated proteins confirm the thesis that ubiquitination upon oxidative stress is no random process to degrade the mass of oxidized proteins, but concerns a special group of functional proteins....

  1. Oxidative stress in a model of toxic demyelination in rat brain: the effect of piracetam and vinpocetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; Khadrawy, Yasser A; Salem, Neveen A; Sleem, Amany A

    2011-06-01

    We studied the role of oxidative stress and the effect of vinpocetine (1.5, 3 or 6 mg/kg) and piracetam (150 or 300 mg/kg) in acute demyelination of the rat brain following intracerebral injection of ethidium bromide (10 μl of 0.1%). ethidium bromide caused (1) increased malondialdehyde (MDA) in cortex, hippocampus and striatum; (2) decreased total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in cortex, hippocampus and striatum; (3) decreased reduced glutathione (GSH) in cortex and hippocampus (4); increased serum nitric oxide and (5) increased striatal (but not cortical or hippocampal) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. MDA decreased in striatum and cortex by the lower doses of vinpocetine or piracetam but increased in cortex and hippocampus and in cortex, hypothalamus and striatum by the higher dose of vinpocetine or piracetam, respectively along with decreased TAC. GSH increased by the higher dose of piracetam and by vinpocetine which also decreased serum nitric oxide. Vinpocetine and piracetam displayed variable effects on regional AChE activity.

  2. Oxidative stress in patients with nongenital warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasmaz, Sezai; Arican, Ozer; Kurutas, Ergul Belge

    2005-08-31

    Comparison of oxidative stress status between subjects with or without warts is absent in the literature. In this study, we evaluated 31 consecutive patients with warts (15 female, 16 male) and 36 control cases with no evidence of disease to determine the effects of oxidative stress in patients with warts. The patients were classified according to the wart type, duration, number, and location of lesions. We measured the indicators of oxidative stress such as catalase (CAT), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the venous blood by spectrophotometry. There was a statistically significant increase in levels of CAT, G6PD, SOD activities and MDA in the patients with warts compared to the control group (Pstress that might have a negative effect on the prognosis of the disease. Therefore, we propose an argument for the appropriateness to give priority to immunomodulatory treatment alternatives instead of destructive methods in patients with demonstrated oxidative stress.

  3. Oxidative stress and bivalves: a proteomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B McDonagh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Bivalves are of major importance in aquatic ecology, aquaculture, are widely used as sentinel species in environmental toxicology and show remarkable plasticity to molecular oxygen. Excess reactive oxygen species (ROS arising from molecular oxygen can cause oxidative stress and this is also a consequence of exposure to many common environmental pollutants. Indices of oxidative stress have therefore found favor as biomarkers of exposure and effect in environmental toxicology. However, there is a growing body of literature on the use of discovery-led proteomics methods to detect oxidative stress in bivalves. This is because proteins absorb up to 70 % of ROS leading to complication of the proteome. This article explores the background to these developments and assesses the practice and future potential of proteomics in the study of oxidative stress in bivalves.

  4. Effect of ATRA on Contents of liver Retinoids, Oxidative Stress and Hepatic Injury in Rat Model of Extrahepatic Cholestasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Haiyan; DAN Zili; WANG Hui; LIN Jusheng

    2007-01-01

    The effects of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) administration on the concentration of retinoids (RA and vitamin A) in liver, oxidative stress and the hepatic injury in a rat model of com-mon bile duct ligation (CBDL)-induced liver injury were investigated. Female rats were subjected to a sham (n=5) or CBDL (n=48). Two weeks after operation, rats undergoing CBDL were randomized to receive treatment with either ATRA at three different doses (0.1, 1.5, 7.5 mg/kg) dissolved in bean oil or only bean oil every day over a 4-week experimental period. Rats were killed and blood samples were collected from the heart for determination of the serum transaminase. The contents of retinoids in rat liver were detected by using HPLC. Malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and superox-ide dismutase (SOD) levels in liver were determined by a spectrophotometric method according to the instruction of the kits. Liver pathologic changes were observed under the light microscopy and electron microscopy. The results showed that compared with sham-operated group, the levels of reti-noids in the liver tissue were significantly decreased in the CBDL group (P<0.01). ATRA (0.1 mg/kg) administration in CBDL rats partially restored the contents of retinoids (P<0.05). Liver RA and vita-min A contents in CBDL group were significantly increased after ATRA (1.5 and 7.5 mg/kg) sup-plementation as compared with sham-operated group (P<0.05). However, in ATRA-treated CBDL group, hepatic GSH level and SOD activity, depressed by CBDL, and hepatic MDA level, increased by CBDL were returned to those in sham-operated group (P<0.05). The histologic observation of liver tissues indicated that ATRA treatment notably alleviated hepatocellular swelling, steatosis, the swelling of mitochondria and proliferation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER). Treatment with ATRA could reduce levels of serum transaminase as compared with sham-operated group, more greatly in 1.5 and 7.5 mg/kg ATRA-treated groups than in 0.1 mg

  5. Oxidative stress and bivalves: a proteomic approach

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Bivalves are of major importance in aquatic ecology, aquaculture, are widely used as sentinel species in environmental toxicology and show remarkable plasticity to molecular oxygen. Excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) arising from molecular oxygen can cause oxidative stress and this is also a consequence of exposure to many common environmental pollutants. Indices of oxidative stress have therefore found favor as biomarkers of exposure and effect in environmental toxicology. However, there i...

  6. Oxidative stress effects of thinner inhalation

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Thinners are chemical mixtures used as industrial solvents. Humans can come into contact with thinner by occupational exposure or by intentional inhalation abuse. Thinner sniffing causes damage to the brain, kidney, liver, lung, and reproductive system. We discuss some proposed mechanism by which thinner induces damage. Recently, the induction of oxidative stress has been suggested as a possible mechanism of damage. This paper reviews the current evidence for oxidative stress effects induced ...

  7. Role of Oxidative Stress in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Khandrika, Lakshmipathi; Kumar, Binod; Koul, Sweaty; Maroni, Paul; Koul, Hari K.

    2009-01-01

    As prostate cancer and aberrant changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) become more common with aging, ROS signaling may play an important role in the development and progression of this malignancy. Increased ROS, otherwise known as oxidative stress, is a result of either increased ROS generation or a loss of antioxidant defense mechanisms. Oxidative stress is associated with several pathological conditions including inflammation and infection. ROS are products of normal cellular metabolism ...

  8. Mechanisms of oxidative stress and vascular dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedeljkovic, Z; Gokce, N; Loscalzo, J

    2003-01-01

    The endothelium regulates vascular homoeostasis through local elaboration of mediators that modulate vascular tone, platelet adhesion, inflammation, fibrinolysis, and vascular growth. Impaired vascular function contributes to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndromes. There is growing pathophysiological evidence that increased generation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress participates in proatherogenic mechanisms of vascular dysfunction and atherothrombosis. In this review, the role of oxidative stress in mechanisms of vascular dysfunction is discussed, and potential antioxidant strategies are reviewed. PMID:12743334

  9. Impact of oxidative stress on pregnancy outcome in albino rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Al-Naemi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulative reports documented that oxidative stress is implicated in many human and animal diseases. However, the reports concerning the effect of oxidative stress on pregnancy outcome are limited and scarce. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of oxidative stress on pregnancy outcome and to assess the antioxidant effect of vitamin C and E on oxidative stress parameters in blood and placental tissue samples in experimental pregnant animals model exposed to oxidative stress. Wister Albino rats were used in this work to investigate the effects of oxidative stress exposure (addition of H2O2 to the drinking water on pregnancy outcome. Rats were divided into 5 groups, as follows: Group I (included 7 normal pregnant rats which served as control group. Group II (exposed to 1 % H2O2 included 7 pregnant rats, the rats were allowed to become pregnant and received (1% H2O2 in drinking water from day 7th till the day 19th of pregnancy. Group III (exposed to 3% H2O2 included 8 pregnant rats. Same as group 2, but the rats were exposed to a higher concentration of H2O2 (3% in drinking water. Group IV (included 8 pregnant rats. Pregnant rats received vitamins C and E without induction of oxidative stress. Group V (included 8 pregnant rats.induction of oxidative stress by 1% H2O2 with vitamins supplementation in the pregnant rats. Serum total antioxidants capacity (TAC, serum and placental tissue oxidative stress biomarker; 8-iso prostaglandin F2α (8-Isoprostane were measured using specific ELISA kits. Also placental tissues of pregnant rats were isolated and put directly in 10% formalin prepared for histopathological examination. Results revealed a significant decrease in the median values of the body weight and total serum antioxidants capacity (TAC in groups II and III of rats compared with the control group. A significant higher median value of TAC obtained in the groups IV and V when compared with the control group. Significant higher

  10. Phototherapy with blue and green mixed-light is as effective against unconjugated jaundice as blue light and reduces oxidative stress in the Gunn rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Yumiko; Morimoto, Yukihiro; Uchiike, Takao; Kamamoto, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Tamaki; Arai, Ikuyo; Nishikubo, Toshiya; Takahashi, Yukihiro

    2015-07-01

    Phototherapy using blue light-emitting diodes (LED) is effective against neonatal jaundice. However, green light phototherapy also reduces unconjugated jaundice. We aimed to determine whether mixed blue and green light can relieve jaundice with minimal oxidative stress as effectively as either blue or green light alone in a rat model. Gunn rats were exposed to phototherapy with blue (420-520 nm), filtered blue (FB; 440-520 nm withoutgreen), and green (490-590 nm) LED irradiation for 24h. The effects of phototherapy are expressed as ratios of serum total (TB) and unbound (UB) bilirubin before and after exposure to each LED. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was measured by HPLC before and after exposure to each LED to determine photo-oxidative stress. Values green LED, respectively. In contrast, urinary 8-OHdG increased to 2.03, 1.25, 0.96, 1.36, 1.31, and 1.23 after exposure to blue, filtered blue, FB50, mixed, green LED, and control, indicating side-effects (> 1.00), respectively. Blue plus green phototherapy is as effective as blue phototherapy and it attenuates irradiation-induced oxidative stress. Combined blue and green spectra might be effective against neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of tobacco smoke on oxytocin concentrations and selected oxidative stress parameters in plasma during pregnancy and post-partum - an experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napierala, M; Merritt, T A; Mazela, J; Jablecka, K; Miechowicz, I; Marszalek, A; Florek, E

    2017-02-01

    Tobacco smoking is a serious threat to life and health of society. Among the most vulnerable to the toxic effects of tobacco smoke are foetuses and newborns. The objective of the research was to assess the impact of tobacco smoke exposure on oxytocin levels and biochemical oxidative stress parameters during pregnancy and after birth in an experimental model. In the experiment, exposure to tobacco smoke of gravid and non-gravid rats was monitored. A reliable biomarker of exposure - cotinine - was used in the process and it was determined by means of high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection, which ensured high analytical accuracy and precision. Determination of oxytocin was performed by means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The levels of selected oxidative stress parameters: total protein concentration, uric acid, trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, protein S-nitrosylation and lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) were measured by spectrophotometric methods. The effect of prenatal and postnatal exposure to tobacco smoke was a lower medium body mass of rat foetuses and pups. Oxidative stress during pregnancy, additionally intensified by tobacco smoke exposure, led to adaptive changes in properties of plasmatic antioxidant barriers. Moreover, the disturbance of oxidoreductive balance by tobacco smoke affects oxytocin fluctuations, what was observed in this study during lactation period. Therefore, women who smoke may breastfeed their children less frequently and for a shorter period.

  12. A combined supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids and micronutrients (folic acid, vitamin B12) reduces oxidative stress markers in a rat model of pregnancy induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemse, Nisha G; Kale, Anvita A; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2014-01-01

    Our earlier studies have highlighted that an altered one carbon metabolism (vitamin B12, folic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid) is associated with preeclampsia. Preeclampsia is also known to be associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. The current study examines whether maternal folic acid, vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation given either individually or in combination can ameliorate the oxidative stress markers in a rat model of pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH). Pregnant Wistar rats were assigned to control and five treatment groups: PIH; PIH + vitamin B12; PIH + folic acid; PIH + Omega-3 fatty acids and PIH + combined micronutrient supplementation (vitamin B12 + folic acid + omega-3 fatty acids). L-Nitroarginine methylester (L-NAME; 50 mg/kg body weight/day) was used to induce hypertension during pregnancy. Blood Pressure (BP) was recorded during pregnancy and dams were dissected at d20 of gestation. Animals from the PIH group demonstrated higher (pvitamin B12 and DHA) may play a role in reducing oxidative stress and inflammation in preeclampsia.

  13. A comprehensive study of oxidative stress in sudden hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Fatih; Muderris, Togay; Yalciner, Gokhan; Sevil, Ergun; Bercin, Sami; Ergin, Merve; Babademez, Mehmet Ali; Kiris, Muzaffer

    2017-03-01

    Little is known about the association between idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) and oxidative stress. We investigated changes in a wide range of oxidants and antioxidants to create a comprehensive picture of oxidative imbalance. In the peripheral blood of 50 ISSNHL patients and 50 healthy subjects, total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant status (TAS), paraoxonase (PON), thiol/disulphide levels were measured. Moreover, a global oxidative stress index, reflecting both oxidative and antioxidant counterparts, was also calculated. One-way analysis between oxidative markers and severity of hearing loss were evaluated. The ISSNHL patients showed significantly higher TOS levels than controls (6.02 ± 3.17 vs. 4.5 ± 2.22; p = 0.018). The oxidative index was also significantly higher in patients than controls (0.39 ± 0.19 vs. 0.3 ± 0.14; p = 0.035). TAS, PON, native thiol, and total thiol were not altered. There was no statistical significance between oxidative markers and severity of hearing loss. The binary logistic regression model revealed that disulphide and TOS were associated with ISSNHL. There are alterations in a wide array of oxidants and antioxidants, with balance shifting toward increased oxidative stress in ISSNHL. Our findings may suggest endothelial dysfunction in ISSNHL etiopathogenesis.

  14. Acute heat stress induces oxidative stress in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hai; Decuypere, Eddy; Buyse, Johan

    2006-05-01

    The stress responses and possible oxidative damage in plasma, liver and heart were investigated in broiler chickens acutely exposed to high temperature. Eighty 5-week old broiler chickens were exposed to 32 degrees C for 6h. The extent of lipid peroxidation, activities of superoxide dismutase and total antioxidant power in plasma, liver and heart tissues were investigated. Meanwhile, the blood metabolites such as glucose, urate, triiodothyronine, thyroxine, corticosterone, ceruloplasmin and creatine kinase were measured before and after 3 and 6h of heat exposure. The results showed that oxidative stress could be induced in 5-week old broiler chickens by acute heat exposure (32 degrees C, 6h). The results suggest that the elevated body temperature can induce the metabolic changes that are involved in the induction of oxidative stress. The liver is more susceptible to oxidative stress than heart during acute heat exposure in broiler chickens. The oxidative stress should be considered as part of the stress response of broiler chickens to heat exposure.

  15. Oxidative Stress during the Progression of β-Amyloid Pathology in the Neocortex of the Tg2576 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcellotti, Sara; Fanelli, Francesca; Fracassi, Anna; Sepe, Sara; Cecconi, Francesco; Bernardi, Cinzia; Cimini, AnnaMaria; Cerù, Maria Paola; Moreno, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, characterized by progressive neurodegeneration. Pathogenetic mechanisms, triggered by β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation, include oxidative stress, derived from energy homeostasis deregulation and involving mitochondria and peroxisomes. We here addressed the oxidative stress status and the elicited cellular response at the onset and during the progression of Aβ pathology, studying the neocortex of Tg2576 model of AD. Age-dependent changes of oxidative damage markers, antioxidant enzymes, and related transcription factors were analysed in relation to the distribution of Aβ peptide and oligomers, by a combined molecular/morphological approach. Nucleic acid oxidative damage, accompanied by defective antioxidant defences, and decreased PGC1α expression are already detected in 3-month-old Tg2576 neurons. Conversely, PPARα is increased in these cells, with its cytoplasmic localization suggesting nongenomic, anti-inflammatory actions. At 6 months, when intracellular Aβ accumulates, PMP70 is downregulated, indicating impairment of fatty acids peroxisomal translocation and their consequent harmful accumulation. In 9-month-old Tg2576 neocortex, Aβ oligomers and acrolein deposition correlate with GFAP, GPX1, and PMP70 increases, supporting a compensatory response, involving astroglial peroxisomes. At severe pathological stages, when senile plaques disrupt cortical cytoarchitecture, antioxidant capacity is gradually lost. Overall, our data suggest early therapeutic intervention in AD, also targeting peroxisomes.

  16. Satureja bachtiarica ameliorate beta-amyloid induced memory impairment, oxidative stress and cholinergic deficit in animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soodi, Maliheh; Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Hajimehdipoor, Homa; Dashti, Abolfazl; Sepand, Mohammad Reza; Moradi, Shahla

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular deposition of Beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is the main finding in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which damages cholinergic neurons through oxidative stress and reduces the cholinergic neurotransmission. Satureja bachtiarica is a medicinal plant from the Lamiaceae family which was widely used in Iranian traditional medicine. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible protective effects of S. bachtiarica methanolic extract on Aβ induced spatial memory impairment in Morris Water Maze (MWM), oxidative stress and cholinergic neuron degeneration. Pre- aggregated Aβ was injected into the hippocampus of each rat bilaterally (10 μg/rat) and MWM task was performed 14 days later to evaluate learning and memory function. Methanolic extract of S.bachtiarica (10, 50 and 100 mg/Kg) was injected intraperitoneally for 19 consecutive days, after Aβ injection. After the probe test the brain tissue were collected and lipid peroxidation, Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and Cholin Acetyl Transferees (ChAT) immunorectivity were measured in the hippocampus. Intrahipocampal injection of Aβ impaired learning and memory in MWM in training days and probe trail. Methanolic extract of S. bachtiarica (50 and 100 mg/Kg) could attenuate Aβ-induced memory deficit. ChAT immunostaining revealed that cholinergic neurons were loss in Aβ- injected group and S. bachtiarica (100 mg/Kg) could ameliorate Aβ- induced ChAT reduction in the hippocampus. Also S. bachtiarica could ameliorate Aβ-induced lipid peroxidation and AChE activity increase in the hippocampus. In conclusion our study represent that S.bachtiarica methanolic extract can improve Aβ-induced memory impairment and cholinergic loss then we recommended this extract as a candidate for further investigation in treatment of AD.

  17. Oxidative Stress and Anesthesia in Diabetic Patients

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    Peivandi Yazdi A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Free radical and peroxide production lead to intracellular damage. On the other hand, free radicals are used by the human immune system to defend against pathogens. The aging process could be limited by oxidative stress in the short term. Chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus (DM are full-stress conditions in which remarkable metabolic functional destructions might happen. There is strong evidence regarding antioxidant impairment in diabetes. Performing a particular method for anesthesia in diabetic patients might prevent or modify excessive free radical formation and oxidative stress. It seems that prescribing antioxidant drugs could promote wound healing in diabetics.  

  18. Comparison of soluble guanylate cyclase stimulators and activators in models of cardiovascular disease associated with oxidative stress

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    Melissa H Costell

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC, the primary mediator of nitric oxide (NO bioactivity, exists as reduced (NO-sensitive and oxidized (NO-insensitive forms. We tested the hypothesis that the cardiovascular protective effects of NO-insensitive sGC activation would be potentiated under conditions of oxidative stress compared to NO-sensitive sGC stimulation. The cardiovascular effects of the NO-insensitive sGC activator GSK2181236A (a non-depressor dose and a higher dose which lowered mean arterial pressure [MAP] by 5-10mmHg and equi-efficacious doses of the NO-sensitive sGC stimulator BAY 60-4552 were assessed in Sprague Dawley rats during coronary artery ischemia/reperfusion (I/R and spontaneously hypertensive stroke prone rats (SHR-SP on a high salt/fat diet (HSFD. In I/R, neither compound reduced infarct size. In SHR-SP, HSFD increased MAP, urine output, microalbuminuria and mortality, caused left ventricular hypertrophy and impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. The low dose of BAY 60-4552 but not GSK2181236A decreased urine output and mortality. Conversely, the low dose of GSK2181236A attenuated cardiac hypertrophy. The high doses of both compounds similarly attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and mortality. In addition, the high dose of BAY 60-4552 reduced urine output, microalbuminuria and MAP. Neither compound improved endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. In SHR-SP aorta, the vasodilatory responses to the NO-dependent compounds carbachol and sodium nitroprusside were attenuated by HSFD. In contrast, the vasodilatory responses to GSK2181236A and BAY 60-4552 were unaltered by HSFD, indicating that reduced NO-bioavailability and not changes in the sGC oxidative state is responsible for the vascular dysfunction. In summary, GSK2181236A and BAY 60-4552 provide partial benefit against hypertension-induced end organ damage. The differential beneficial effects observed between these compounds could reflect tissue-specific changes in the s

  19. Comparison of soluble guanylate cyclase stimulators and activators in models of cardiovascular disease associated with oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costell, Melissa H; Ancellin, Nicolas; Bernard, Roberta E; Zhao, Shufang; Upson, John J; Morgan, Lisa A; Maniscalco, Kristeen; Olzinski, Alan R; Ballard, Victoria L T; Herry, Kenny; Grondin, Pascal; Dodic, Nerina; Mirguet, Olivier; Bouillot, Anne; Gellibert, Francoise; Coatney, Robert W; Lepore, John J; Jucker, Beat M; Jolivette, Larry J; Willette, Robert N; Schnackenberg, Christine G; Behm, David J

    2012-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), the primary mediator of nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity, exists as reduced (NO-sensitive) and oxidized (NO-insensitive) forms. We tested the hypothesis that the cardiovascular protective effects of NO-insensitive sGC activation would be potentiated under conditions of oxidative stress compared to those of NO-sensitive sGC stimulation. The cardiovascular effects of the NO-insensitive sGC activator GSK2181236A [a low, non-depressor dose, and a high dose which lowered mean arterial pressure (MAP) by 5-10 mmHg] and those of equi-efficacious doses of the NO-sensitive sGC stimulator BAY 60-4552 were assessed in (1) Sprague Dawley rats during coronary artery ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and (2) spontaneously hypertensive stroke prone rats (SHR-SP) on a high salt/fat diet (HSFD). In I/R, neither compound reduced infarct size 24 h after reperfusion. In SHR-SP, HSFD increased MAP, urine output, microalbuminuria, and mortality, caused left ventricular hypertrophy with preserved ejection fraction, and impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. The low dose of BAY 60-4552, but not that of GSK2181236A, decreased urine output, and improved survival. Conversely, the low dose of GSK2181236A, but not that of BAY 60-4552, attenuated the development of cardiac hypertrophy. The high doses of both compounds similarly attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and improved survival. In addition to these effects, the high dose of BAY 60-4552 reduced urine output and microalbuminuria and attenuated the increase in MAP to a greater extent than did GSK2181236A. Neither compound improved endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. In SHR-SP isolated aorta, the vasodilatory responses to the NO-dependent compounds carbachol and sodium nitroprusside were attenuated by HSFD. In contrast, the vasodilatory responses to both GSK2181236A and BAY 60-4552 were unaltered by HSFD, indicating that reduced NO-bioavailability and not changes in the oxidative state of sGC is responsible

  20. Oxidative stress involving changes in Nrf2 and ER stress in early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Sandra I; Costa, Rui O; Ferreira, Ildete L; Santana, Isabel; Caldeira, Gladys L; Padovano, Carmela; Fonseca, Ana C; Baldeiras, Inês; Cunha, Catarina; Letra, Liliana; Oliveira, Catarina R; Pereira, Cláudia M F; Rego, Ana Cristina

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress have been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression. In this study we analyzed whether oxidative stress involving changes in Nrf2 and ER stress may constitute early events in AD pathogenesis by using human peripheral blood cells and an AD transgenic mouse model at different disease stages. Increased oxidative stress and increased phosphorylated Nrf2 (p(Ser40)Nrf2) were observed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Moreover, we observed impaired ER Ca2+ homeostasis and increased ER stress markers in PBMCs from MCI individuals and mild AD patients. Evidence of early oxidative stress defense mechanisms in AD was substantiated by increased p(Ser40)Nrf2 in 3month-old 3xTg-AD male mice PBMCs, and also with increased nuclear Nrf2 levels in brain cortex. However, SOD1 protein levels were decreased in human MCI PBMCs and in 3xTg-AD mice brain cortex; the latter further correlated with reduced SOD1 mRNA levels. Increased ER stress was also detected in the brain cortex of young female and old male 3xTg-AD mice. We demonstrate oxidative stress and early Nrf2 activation in AD human and mouse models, which fails to regulate some of its targets, leading to repressed expression of antioxidant defenses (e.g., SOD-1), and extending to ER stress. Results suggest markers of prodromal AD linked to oxidative stress associated with Nrf2 activation and ER stress that may be followed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  1. Cardioprotective effect of the Hibiscus rosa sinensis flowers in an oxidative stress model of myocardial ischemic reperfusion injury in rat

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    Krishnamoorthy Karthikeyan K

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study investigates the cardioprotective effects of Hibiscus rosa sinensis in myocardial ischemic reperfusion injury, particularly in terms of its antioxidant effects. Methods The medicinal values of the flowers of Hibiscus rosa sinensis (Chinese rose have been mentioned in ancient literature as useful in disorders of the heart. Dried pulverized flower of Hibiscus rosa sinensis was administered orally to Wistar albino rats (150–200 gms in three different doses [125, 250 and 500 mg/kg in 2% carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC], 6 days per week for 4 weeks. Thereafter, rats were sacrificed; either for the determination of baseline changes in cardiac endogenous antioxidants [superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione and catalase] or the hearts were subjected to isoproterenol induced myocardial necrosis. Results There was significant increase in the baseline contents of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS [a measure of lipid per oxidation] with both doses of Hibiscus Rosa sinensis. In the 250 mg/kg treated group, there was significant increase in superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione, and catalase levels but not in the 125 and 500 mg/kg treated groups. Significant rise in myocardial thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and loss of superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione (suggestive of increased oxidative stress occurred in the vehicle treated hearts subjected to in vivo myocardial ischemic reperfusion injury. Conclusion It may be concluded that flower of Hibiscus rosa sinensis (250 mg/kg augments endogenous antioxidant compounds of rat heart and also prevents the myocardium from isoproterenol induced myocardial injury.

  2. Pathogenesis of Chronic Hyperglycemia: From Reductive Stress to Oxidative Stress

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    Liang-Jun Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic overnutrition creates chronic hyperglycemia that can gradually induce insulin resistance and insulin secretion impairment. These disorders, if not intervened, will eventually be followed by appearance of frank diabetes. The mechanisms of this chronic pathogenic process are complex but have been suggested to involve production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and oxidative stress. In this review, I highlight evidence that reductive stress imposed by overflux of NADH through the mitochondrial electron transport chain is the source of oxidative stress, which is based on establishments that more NADH recycling by mitochondrial complex I leads to more electron leakage and thus more ROS production. The elevated levels of both NADH and ROS can inhibit and inactivate glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, respectively, resulting in blockage of the glycolytic pathway and accumulation of glycerol 3-phospate and its prior metabolites along the pathway. This accumulation then initiates all those alternative glucose metabolic pathways such as the polyol pathway and the advanced glycation pathways that otherwise are minor and insignificant under euglycemic conditions. Importantly, all these alternative pathways lead to ROS production, thus aggravating cellular oxidative stress. Therefore, reductive stress followed by oxidative stress comprises a major mechanism of hyperglycemia-induced metabolic syndrome.

  3. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

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    Namrata eChaudhari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse but, inflammation and/or ER stress may be basic mechanisms increasing the severity or complicating the condition of the disease. Chronic ER stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR through endogenous or exogenous insults may result in impaired calcium and redox homeostasis, oxidative stress via protein overload thereby also influencing vital mitochondrial functions. Calcium released from the ER augments the production of mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS. Toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria disturb fundamental organelle functions. Sustained ER stress is known to potentially elicit inflammatory responses via UPR pathways. Additionally, ROS generated through inflammation or mitochondrial dysfunction could accelerate ER malfunction. Dysfunctional UPR pathways has been associated with a wide range of diseases including several neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, metabolic disorders, cancer, inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and others. In this review we have discussed the UPR signaling pathways, and networking between ER stress induced inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress and mitochondrial signaling events which further induce or exacerbate ER stress.

  4. Oxidative Stress in Patients With Nongenital Warts

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    Sezai Sasmaz

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparison of oxidative stress status between subjects with or without warts is absent in the literature. In this study, we evaluated 31 consecutive patients with warts (15 female, 16 male and 36 control cases with no evidence of disease to determine the effects of oxidative stress in patients with warts. The patients were classified according to the wart type, duration, number, and location of lesions. We measured the indicators of oxidative stress such as catalase (CAT, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and malondialdehyde (MDA in the venous blood by spectrophotometry. There was a statistically significant increase in levels of CAT, G6PD, SOD activities and MDA in the patients with warts compared to the control group (P<.05. However, we could not define a statistically significant correlation between these increased enzyme activities and MDA levels and the type, the duration, the number, and the location of lesions. We determined possible suppression of T cells during oxidative stress that might have a negative effect on the prognosis of the disease. Therefore, we propose an argument for the appropriateness to give priority to immunomodulatory treatment alternatives instead of destructive methods in patients with demonstrated oxidative stress.

  5. Diabetic Neuropathy and Oxidative Stress: Therapeutic Perspectives

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    Asieh Hosseini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy (DN is a widespread disabling disorder comprising peripheral nerves' damage. DN develops on a background of hyperglycemia and an entangled metabolic imbalance, mainly oxidative stress. The majority of related pathways like polyol, advanced glycation end products, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase, hexosamine, and protein kinase c all originated from initial oxidative stress. To date, no absolute cure for DN has been defined; although some drugs are conventionally used, much more can be found if all pathophysiological links with oxidative stress would be taken into account. In this paper, although current therapies for DN have been reviewed, we have mainly focused on the links between DN and oxidative stress and therapies on the horizon, such as inhibitors of protein kinase C, aldose reductase, and advanced glycation. With reference to oxidative stress and the related pathways, the following new drugs are under study such as taurine, acetyl-L-carnitine, alpha lipoic acid, protein kinase C inhibitor (ruboxistaurin, aldose reductase inhibitors (fidarestat, epalrestat, ranirestat, advanced glycation end product inhibitors (benfotiamine, aspirin, aminoguanidine, the hexosamine pathway inhibitor (benfotiamine, inhibitor of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (nicotinamide, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (trandolapril. The development of modern drugs to treat DN is a real challenge and needs intensive long-term comparative trials.

  6. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress

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    Yosuke Kayama

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD, cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF. HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS. ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease.

  7. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayama, Yosuke; Raaz, Uwe; Jagger, Ann; Adam, Matti; Schellinger, Isabel N; Sakamoto, Masaya; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Toyama, Kensuke; Spin, Joshua M; Tsao, Philip S

    2015-10-23

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD), cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF). HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease.

  8. Oxidative stress inhibits calpain activity in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttmann, R P; Johnson, G V

    1998-05-22

    In this study, the effects of oxidative stress on calpain-mediated proteolysis and calpain I autolysis in situ were examined. Calpain activity was stimulated in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells with the calcium ionophore, ionomycin. Calpain-mediated proteolysis of the membrane-permeable fluorescent substrate N-succinyl-L-leucyl-L-leucyl-L-valyl-L-tyrosine-7-amido-4-methylcouma rin, as well as the endogenous protein substrates microtubule-associated protein 2, tau and spectrin, was measured. Oxidative stress, induced by addition of either doxorubicin or 2-mercaptopyridine N-oxide, resulted in a significant decrease in the extent of ionophore-stimulated calpain activity of both the fluorescent compound and the endogenous substrates compared with control, normoxic conditions. Addition of glutathione ethyl ester, as well as other antioxidants, resulted in the retention/recovery of calpain activity, indicating that oxidation-induced calpain inactivation was preventable/reversible. The rate of autolytic conversion of the large subunit of calpain I from 80 to 78 to 76 kDa was decreased during oxidative stress; however, the extent of calpain autolysis was not altered. These data indicate that oxidative stress may reversibly inactivate calpain I in vivo.

  9. The impact of oxidative stress on hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trüeb, R M

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress reflects an imbalance between the systemic manifestation of reactive oxygen species and a biological system's ability to detoxify the reactive intermediates or to repair the resulting damage. Reactive oxygen species or free radicals are highly reactive molecules that can directly damage lipids, proteins, and DNA. They are generated by a multitude of endogenous and environmental challenges, while the body possesses endogenous defense mechanisms. With age, production of free radicals increases, while the endogenous defense mechanisms decrease. This imbalance leads to progressive damage of cellular structures, presumably resulting in the aging phenotype. While the role of oxidative stress has been widely discussed in skin aging, little focus has been placed on its impact on hair condition. Moreover, most literature on age-related hair changes focuses on alopecia, but it is equally important that the hair fibers that emerge from the scalp exhibit significant age-related changes that have equal impact on the overall cosmetic properties of hair. Sources of oxidative stress with impact on the pre-emerging fiber include: oxidative metabolism, smoking, UVR, and inflammation from microbial, pollutant, or irritant origins. Sources of oxidative stress with impact on the post-emerging fiber include: UVR (enhanced by copper), chemical insults, and oxidized scalp lipids. The role of the dermatologist is recognition and treatment of pre- and post-emerging factors for lifetime scalp and hair health.

  10. Treatment with Caffeic Acid and Resveratrol Alleviates Oxidative Stress Induced Neurotoxicity in Cell and Drosophila Models of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Ling; Chang, Jui-Chih; Lin, Wei-Yong; Li, Chien-Chun; Hsieh, Mingli; Chen, Haw-Wen; Wang, Tsu-Shing; Liu, Chin-San; Liu, Kai-Li

    2017-09-14

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat in the protein ataxin-3 which is involved in susceptibility to mild oxidative stress induced neuronal death. Here we show that caffeic acid (CA) and resveratrol (Res) decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS), mutant ataxin-3 and apoptosis and increased autophagy in the pro-oxidant tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBH)-treated SK-N-SH-MJD78 cells containing mutant ataxin-3. Furthermore, CA and Res improved survival and locomotor activity and decreased mutant ataxin-3 and ROS levels in tBH-treated SCA3 Drosophila. CA and Res also altered p53 and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and expression in tBH-treated cell and fly models of SCA3, respectively. Blockade of NF-κB activation annulled the protective effects of CA and Res on apoptosis, ROS, and p53 activation in tBH-treated SK-N-SH-MJD78 cells, which suggests the importance of restoring NF-κB activity by CA and Res. Our findings suggest that CA and Res may be useful in the management of oxidative stress induced neuronal apoptosis in SCA3.

  11. Cholesterol contributes to dopamine-neuronal loss in MPTP mouse model of Parkinson’s disease: Involvement of mitochondrial dysfunctions and oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Giri, Anirudha; Sandhir, Rajat

    2017-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a known contributor to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease while its role in the occurrence of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is only conjecture and far from conclusive. Altered antioxidant homeostasis and mitochondrial functions are the key mechanisms in loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) region of the midbrain in PD. Hypercholesterolemia is reported to cause oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in the cortex and hippocampus regions of the brain in rodents. However, the impact of hypercholesterolemia on the midbrain dopaminergic neurons in animal models of PD remains elusive. We tested the hypothesis that hypercholesterolemia in MPTP model of PD would potentiate dopaminergic neuron loss in SN by disrupting mitochondrial functions and antioxidant homeostasis. It is evident from the present study that hypercholesterolemia in naïve animals caused dopamine neuronal loss in SN with subsequent reduction in striatal dopamine levels producing motor impairment. Moreover, in the MPTP model of PD, hypercholesterolemia exacerbated MPTP-induced reduction of striatal dopamine as well as dopaminergic neurons in SN with motor behavioral depreciation. Activity of mitochondrial complexes, mainly complex-I and III, was impaired severely in the nigrostriatal pathway of hypercholesterolemic animals treated with MPTP. Hypercholesterolemia caused oxidative stress in the nigrostriatal pathway with increased generation of hydroxyl radicals and enhanced activity of antioxidant enzymes, which were further aggravated in the hypercholesterolemic mice with Parkinsonism. In conclusion, our findings provide evidence of increased vulnerability of the midbrain dopaminergic neurons in PD with hypercholesterolemia. PMID:28170429

  12. Therapeutic effect of aqueous extracts of three dietary spices and their mixture on lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in a rat model of chronic alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otunola, Gloria Aderonke; Afolayan, Anthony Jide

    2016-07-01

    The protective effect of aqueous extracts of three dietary spices, garlic, (Allium sativum), ginger (Zingiber officinale) and pepper (Capsicum frutescens) singly and combined was investigated using a rat model of chronic alcohol intake. Rats were given 30% ethanol, with or without aqueous extracts of garlic, ginger, pepper or mixture of the three administered at 200mg/kg body weight by oral gavage for 28 days. Lipid profile, lipid peroxidation, oxidative and antioxidative profiles of serum, faecal, liver, kidney, heart and brain tissues of the rats were analyzed. Alcohol treatment significantly elevated liver enzymes, lipid peroxidation, depleted antioxidant system and induced histopathological changes in the liver. These alterations were markedly ameliorated by treatment with aqueous extracts of the three spices singly or mixed at 200mg/kg body weight. These results suggest that aqueous extracts of garlic, ginger, pepper or a blend of the three protects against alcohol- induced hypercholesterolemia, lipid peroxidation, oxidative stress and liver damage.

  13. Comparative studies on the effects of clinically used anticonvulsants on the oxidative stress biomarkers in pentylenetetrazole-induced kindling model of epileptogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhar, Faizan; Malhi, Saima M; Simjee, Shabana U

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of epilepsy and contributes in underlying epileptogenesis process. Anticonvulsant drugs targeting the oxidative stress domain of epileptogenesis may provide better control of seizure. The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of clinically used anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) on the course of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced kindling and oxidative stress markers in mice. Six mechanistically heterogeneous anticonvulsants: phenobarbital, phenytoin, levetiracetam, pregabalin, topiramate, and felbamate were selected and their redox profiles were determined. Diazepam was used as a drug control for comparison. Kindling was induced by repeated injections of a sub-convulsive dose of PTZ (50 mg/kg, s.c.) on alternate days until seizure score 5 was evoked in the control kindled group. Anticonvulsants were administered daily. Following PTZ kindling, oxidative stress biomarkers were assessed in homogenized whole brain samples and estimated for the levels of nitric oxide, peroxide, malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, reduced glutathione, and activities of nitric oxide synthase and superoxide dismutase. Biochemical analysis revealed a significant increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species with a parallel decrease in endogenous anti-oxidants in PTZ-kindled control animals. Daily treatment with levetiracetam and felbamate significantly decreased the PTZ-induced seizure score as well as the levels of nitric oxide (panticonvulsant effect by the diversified mechanism of action such as levetiracetam, felbamate, and topiramate exhibited superior anti-oxidative stress activity in addition to their anticonvulsant activity.

  14. Drug-Induced Oxidative Stress and Toxicity

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    Damian G. Deavall

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are a byproduct of normal metabolism and have roles in cell signaling and homeostasis. Species include oxygen radicals and reactive nonradicals. Mechanisms exist that regulate cellular levels of ROS, as their reactive nature may otherwise cause damage to key cellular components including DNA, protein, and lipid. When the cellular antioxidant capacity is exceeded, oxidative stress can result. Pleiotropic deleterious effects of oxidative stress are observed in numerous disease states and are also implicated in a variety of drug-induced toxicities. In this paper, we examine the nature of ROS-induced damage on key cellular targets of oxidative stress. We also review evidence implicating ROS in clinically relevant, drug-related side effects including doxorubicin-induced cardiac damage, azidothymidine-induced myopathy, and cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.

  15. Oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and neurodegenerative diseases****

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunyan Guo; Li Sun; Xueping Chen; Danshen Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Oxidative stress is characterized by the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which can induce mitochondrial DNA mutations, damage the mitochondrial respiratory chain, alter membrane permeability, and influence Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial defense systems. Al these changes are implicated in the development of these neurodegenerative diseases, mediating or amplifying neuronal dysfunction and triggering neurodegeneration. This paper summarizes the contribution of oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage to the onset of neurodegenerative eases and discusses strategies to modify mitochondrial dysfunction that may be attractive thera-peutic interventions for the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Oxidative stress can alter the antigenicity of immunodominant peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiskopf, Daniela; Schwanninger, Angelika; Weinberger, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    APCs operate frequently under oxidative stress induced by aging, tissue damage, pathogens, or inflammatory responses. Phagocytic cells produce peroxides and free-radical species that facilitate pathogen clearance and can in the case of APCs, also lead to oxidative modifications of antigenic...... of antigenic peptides may affect T cell responses severely by binding T cell clones with different affinity. This may lead to an altered immune response against infectious agents as well as against tumor or autoantigens under oxidative stress conditions....... proteins and peptides. Little information is available presently about the consequences of such modifications on the immune response. To model oxidative modification of an immunodominant antigenic peptide, we oxidized the methionine residue of the human CMV pp65(495-503) (NLVPMVATV) peptide...

  17. Effects of carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum on postoperative adhesion formation and oxidative stress in a rat cecal abrasion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgic, Tahsin; Oymaci, Erkan; Bostanci, Erdal Birol; Cakir, Tebessum; Kece, Can; Erguder, Imge; Akoglu, Musa

    2015-09-01

    It is claimed that CO2 pneumoperitoneum (CP) is less adhesiogenic than laparotomy. Our aim in this study was to investigate the local oxidative stress responses and related adhesion formation resulting from exposure to CP. Forty-five rats were randomised into six groups. Group 1 underwent laparotomy only; in group 2, 6 mmHg CP was performed for 60 min; in group 3, the same procedure was carried out using 12 mmHg CP; in group 4, laparotomy and cecal-peritoneal abrasion were performed; in group 5, 6 mmHg CP was performed for 60 min, followed by laparotomy and cecal-peritoneal abrasion; in group 6, the same procedure was carried out using 12 mmHg CP. Groups 1, 2 and 3 were sacrificed immediately and used only for biochemical examination. The other groups were sacrificed on the 14th postoperative day. The total adhesion scores, thickness, quantity, extent and type of adhesions decreased steadily in groups 4, 5 and 6 (p CP is associated with less adhesion formation than laparotomy in the presence of similar antioxidant levels. The reduced adhesion formation is probably caused by a decreased inflammatory response. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Biomarkers of oxidative stress in antioxidant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfredo Mañon Rossi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are used regularly in medical practice to provide objective markers of health status of a person, as well as the physiological response of the body to a pharmacological therapeutic intervention. In the specific case of the use of antioxidant products (antioxidant therapy, it is necessary to measure both biomarkers of oxidative stress level of the person as those that are specific to a physiological or pathological progression of a disease disorder. This paper describes the main biomarkers of oxidative general and specific stress as well as laboratory techniques, which should be taken into account when measuring the effectiveness of antioxidant therapies.

  19. Oxidative stress in development: nature or nurture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennery, Phyllis A

    2010-10-15

    An unavoidable consequence of aerobic respiration is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These may negatively impact development. Nevertheless, a certain amount of oxidative stress is required to allow for the normal progression of embryonic and fetal growth. Alterations in placental oxidative stress results in altered placental function and ultimately altered fetal growth and/or developmental programming leading to long-term consequences into adulthood. This article reviews the role of redox in fetal development and will focus on how developmental programming is influenced by the fetal and placental redox state as well as discuss potential therapeutic interventions.

  20. Involvement of oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunomura, Akihiko; Castellani, Rudy J; Zhu, Xiongwei; Moreira, Paula I; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A

    2006-07-01

    Genetic and lifestyle-related risk factors for Alzheimer disease (AD) are associated with an increase in oxidative stress, suggesting that oxidative stress is involved at an early stage of the pathologic cascade. Moreover, oxidative stress is mechanistically and chronologically associated with other key features of AD, namely, metabolic, mitochondrial, metal, and cell-cycle abnormalities. Contrary to the commonly held notion that pathologic hallmarks of AD signify etiology, several lines of evidence now indicate that aggregation of amyloid-beta and tau is a compensatory response to underlying oxidative stress. Therefore, removal of proteinaceous accumulations may treat the epiphenomenon rather than the disease and may actually enhance oxidative damage. Although some antioxidants have been shown to reduce the incidence of AD, the magnitude of the effect may be modified by individual factors such as genetic predisposition (e.g. apolipoprotein E genotype) and habitual behaviors. Because caloric restriction, exercise, and intellectual activity have been experimentally shown to promote neuronal survival through enhancement of endogenous antioxidant defenses, a combination of dietary regimen of low total calorie and rich antioxidant nutrients and maintaining physical and intellectual activities may ultimately prove to be one of the most efficacious strategies for AD prevention.

  1. Oxidative Stress and Periodontal Disease in Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Erhan; Akalin, Ferda Alev; Genc, Tolga; Cinar, Nese; Erel, Ozcan; Yildiz, Bulent Okan

    2016-03-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the jaws and is more prevalent in obesity. Local and systemic oxidative stress may be an early link between periodontal disease and obesity. The primary aim of this study was to detect whether increased periodontal disease susceptibility in obese individuals is associated with local and systemic oxidative stress. Accordingly; we analyzed periodontal status and systemic (serum) and local (gingival crevicular fluid [GCF]) oxidative status markers in young obese women in comparison with age-matched lean women.Twenty obese and 20 lean women participated. Periodontal condition was determined by clinical periodontal indices including probing depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, gingival bleeding index, and plaque index. Anthropometric, hormonal, and metabolic measurements were also performed. Blood and GCF sampling was performed at the same time after an overnight fasting. Serum and GCF total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and total oxidant status (TOS) levels were determined, and oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated.Clinical periodontal analyses showed higher gingival index and gingival bleeding index in the obese group (P = 0.001 for both) with no significant difference in probing depth, clinical attachment level, and plaque index between the obese and the lean women. Oxidant status analyses revealed lower GCF and serum TAOC, and higher GCF and serum OSI values in the obese women (P periodontal indices showed significant correlations with body mass index, insulin, and lipid levels, and also oxidant status markers.Our results suggest that young obese, otherwise healthy, women show findings of early periodontal disease (gingival inflammation) compared with age-matched healthy lean women, and that local/periodontal oxidative stress generated by obesity seems to be associated with periodontal disease.

  2. Choline and Cystine Deficient Diets in Animal Models with Hepatocellular Injury: Evaluation of Oxidative Stress and Expression of RAGE, TNF-α, and IL-1β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Juliana Célia F; de Araújo, Orlando R P; Valentim, Iara B; de Andrade, Kívia Queiroz; Moura, Fabiana Andréa; Smaniotto, Salete; dos Santos, John Marques; Gasparotto, Juciano; Gelain, Daniel P; Goulart, Marília O F

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of diets deficient in choline and/or cystine on hepatocellular injury in animal models (young male Wistar rats, aged 21 days), by monitoring some of the oxidative stress biomarkers and the expression of RAGE, TNF-α, and IL-1β. The animals were divided into 6 groups (n = 10) and submitted to different diets over 30 days: AIN-93 diet (standard, St), AIN-93 choline deficient (CD) diet and AIN-93 choline and cystine deficient (CCD) diet, in the pellet (pl) and powder (pw) diet forms. Independently of the diet form, AIN-93 diet already led to hepatic steatosis and CD/CCD diets provoked hepatic damage. The increase of lipid peroxidation, represented by the evaluation of thiobarbituric acid reactive species, associated with the decrease of levels of antioxidant enzymes, were the parameters with higher significance toward redox profile in this model of hepatic injury. Regarding inflammation, in relation to TNF-α, higher levels were evidenced in CD(pl), while, for IL-1β, no significant alteration was detected. RAGE expression was practically the same in all groups, with exception of CCD(pw) versus CCD(pl). These results together confirm that AIN-93 causes hepatic steatosis and choline and/or cysteine deficiencies produce important hepatic injury associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory profiles.

  3. Choline and Cystine Deficient Diets in Animal Models with Hepatocellular Injury: Evaluation of Oxidative Stress and Expression of RAGE, TNF-α, and IL-1β

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Célia F. Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the effects of diets deficient in choline and/or cystine on hepatocellular injury in animal models (young male Wistar rats, aged 21 days, by monitoring some of the oxidative stress biomarkers and the expression of RAGE, TNF-α, and IL-1β. The animals were divided into 6 groups (n=10 and submitted to different diets over 30 days: AIN-93 diet (standard, St, AIN-93 choline deficient (CD diet and AIN-93 choline and cystine deficient (CCD diet, in the pellet (pl and powder (pw diet forms. Independently of the diet form, AIN-93 diet already led to hepatic steatosis and CD/CCD diets provoked hepatic damage. The increase of lipid peroxidation, represented by the evaluation of thiobarbituric acid reactive species, associated with the decrease of levels of antioxidant enzymes, were the parameters with higher significance toward redox profile in this model of hepatic injury. Regarding inflammation, in relation to TNF-α, higher levels were evidenced in CD(pl, while, for IL-1β, no significant alteration was detected. RAGE expression was practically the same in all groups, with exception of CCD(pw versus CCD(pl. These results together confirm that AIN-93 causes hepatic steatosis and choline and/or cysteine deficiencies produce important hepatic injury associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory profiles.

  4. Plasma levels of oxidative stress-responsive apoptosis inducing protein (ORAIP) in rats subjected to physicochemical oxidative stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Takako; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Murayama, Kimie; Seko, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is known to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of various disorders including atherosclerosis, aging and especially ischaemia/reperfusion injury. It causes cell damage that leads to apoptosis. However, the precise mechanism has been uncertain. Recently, we identified an apoptosis-inducing humoral factor in a hypoxia/reoxygenated medium of cardiac myocytes. We named this novel post-translationally modified secreted form of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) as oxidative stress-responsive apoptosis inducing protein (ORAIP). We developed a sandwich ELISA and confirmed that myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion markedly increased plasma levels of ORAIP. To investigate whether the role of ORAIP is common to various types of oxidative stress, we measured plasma ORAIP levels in rats subjected to three physicochemical models of oxidative stress including N2/O2 inhalation, cold/warm-stress (heat shock) and blood acidification. In all three models, plasma ORAIP levels significantly increased and reached a peak level at 10-30 min after stimulation, then decreased within 60 min. The (mean±S.E.M.) plasma ORAIP levels before and after (peak) stimulation were (16.4±9.6) and (55.2±34.2) ng/ml in N2/O2 inhalation, (14.1±12.4) and (34.3±14.6) ng/ml in cold/warm-stress, and (18.9±14.3) and (134.0±67.2) ng/ml in blood acidification study. These data strongly suggest that secretion of ORAIP in response to oxidative stress is universal mechanism and plays an essential role. ORAIP will be an important novel biomarker as well as a specific therapeutic target of these oxidative stress-induced cell injuries. © 2016 The Author(s).

  5. A combined supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids and micronutrients (folic acid, vitamin B12 reduces oxidative stress markers in a rat model of pregnancy induced hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha G Kemse

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Our earlier studies have highlighted that an altered one carbon metabolism (vitamin B12, folic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid is associated with preeclampsia. Preeclampsia is also known to be associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. The current study examines whether maternal folic acid, vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation given either individually or in combination can ameliorate the oxidative stress markers in a rat model of pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Pregnant Wistar rats were assigned to control and five treatment groups: PIH; PIH + vitamin B12; PIH + folic acid; PIH + Omega-3 fatty acids and PIH + combined micronutrient supplementation (vitamin B12 + folic acid + omega-3 fatty acids. L-Nitroarginine methylester (L-NAME; 50 mg/kg body weight/day was used to induce hypertension during pregnancy. Blood Pressure (BP was recorded during pregnancy and dams were dissected at d20 of gestation. RESULTS: Animals from the PIH group demonstrated higher (p<0.01 for both systolic and diastolic BP; lower (p<0.01 pup weight; higher dam plasma homocysteine (p<0.05 and dam and offspring malondialdehyde (MDA (p<0.01, lower (p<0.05 placental and offspring liver DHA and higher (p<0.01 tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-ά levels as compared to control. Individual micronutrient supplementation did not offer much benefit. In contrast, combined supplementation lowered systolic BP, homocysteine, MDA and placental TNF-ά levels in dams and liver MDA and protein carbonyl in the offspring as compared to PIH group. CONCLUSION: Key constituents of one carbon cycle (folic acid, vitamin B12 and DHA may play a role in reducing oxidative stress and inflammation in preeclampsia.

  6. Evaluation of the adaptogenic potential exerted by ginsenosides Rb1 and Rg1 against oxidative stress-mediated neurotoxicity in an in vitro neuronal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Moriano, Carlos; González-Burgos, Elena; Iglesias, Irene; Lozano, Rafael; Gómez-Serranillos, M Pilar

    2017-01-01

    Ginseng (Panax sp.) is a drug with multiple pharmacological actions that has been largely used in traditional medicines for the treatment of many health problems. In the therapy of neurodegenerative disorders, it has been employed due to its capacity to strengthen mental processes by enhancing cognitive performance and psychological function. Current work aimed at evaluating the adaptogenic potential of Rb1 and Rg1 against oxidative-stress mediated degeneration in a model of nervous cells. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction were achieved by exposing SH-SY5Y cells to the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone. The cytoprotective activity of pre-treatments with ginsenosides Rb1 and Rg1 against rotenone was assessed by determining biochemical markers regarding oxidative stress (ROS scavenging, glutathione and lipid peroxidation levels, SOD activity and Nrf2 activation) and apoptosis-related alterations (mitochondrial membrane potential, calcium levels, aconitase activity and pro/antiapoptotic proteins). Their capacity to cross the blood brain barrier was also estimated. At their optimal doses, ginsenosides Rb1 and Rg1 significantly ameliorated redox status within the cells; they reduced ROS and TBARS levels and improved the glutathione system, as well as they enhanced SOD activity and Nrf2 pathway activation. They protected neuronal cells against MMP loss, calcium homeostasis disruption and aconitase inhibition. Consequently, apoptotic cell death was attenuated by the pre-treatment with ginsenosides, as evidenced by the reduction in caspase-3 and Bax, and the increase in Bcl-2 expressions; also, lower levels of cytochrome C were found in the cytosol. Poor BBB permeation was demonstrated for both ginsenosides. In conclusion, ginsenosides Rb1 and Rg1 exhibit neuroprotective potential which is achieved, at least in part, via mitochondrial protection and the plausible involvement of Nrf2 pathway activation. Our results contribute to validate the

  7. The effect of ageing on neurogenesis and oxidative stress in the APP(swe)/PS1(deltaE9) mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Alison; Holscher, Christian

    2012-04-17

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterised by memory loss and impaired cognitive function. One of the hallmarks of AD is the formation of beta amyloid (Aβ) plaques. Aβ has neurodegenerative properties and aggregates in the brain, causing inflammation, oxidative stress and eventually neuronal loss. In AD, adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus is known to be impaired. We tested how ageing affects neurogenesis and oxidative stress in the commonly used APP(SWE)/PS1(ΔE9) mouse model of AD and their wild type (wt) littermate controls aged 3, 5, 10 and 15months. Progenitor cell proliferation in the DG of APP/PS1 was lower at 3, 5 and 10months compared to controls, while oxidative stress in APP/PS1 mice was increased in the cortex at 3 and 5months of age compared to controls. The numbers of new neurons in the DG were decreased in APP/PS1 mice at 10 and 15months. In APP/PS1 mice, Aβ plaques were evident in the cortex from 3months onward; however these were small and few. Plaque size and number consistently increased with age in APP/PS1 mice. These results show that the damage to the brain occurs already very early in the brain, and although neurogenesis is impaired, it is still active even in late stage AD. Therefore, therapies would have the best effects if started early, but promoting neurogenesis may act in a protective and reconstructive way even in later stages of AD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Phloroglucinol Protects the Urinary Bladder Via Inhibition of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in a Rat Model of Cyclophosphamide-induced Interstitial Cystitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Qiang He; Wei-Tao Zhang; Chang-Hua Shi; Fang-Ming Wang; Xiao-Jun Tian; Lu-Lin Ma

    2015-01-01

    Background:Phloroglucinol plays an important role in oxidative stress and inflammatory responses.The effects of phloroglucinol have been proven in various disease models.The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy and possible mechanisms of phloroglucinol in the treatment of interstitial cystitis (IC).Methods:Thirty-two female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were used in this study.IC was induced by intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide (CYP).Rats were randomly allocated to one of four groups (n =8 per group):A control group,which was injected with saline (75 mg/kg; i.p.) instead of CYP on days 1,4,and 7; a chronic IC group,which was injected with CYP (75 mg/kg; i.p.) on days 1,4,and 7; a high-dose (30 mg/kg) phloroglucinol-treated group; and a low-dose (15 mg/kg) phloroglucinol-treated group.On day 8,the rats in each group underwent cystometrography (CMG),and the bladders were examined for evidence of oxidative stress and inflammation.Statistical analysis was performed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by least square difference multiple comparison post-hoc test.Results:Histological evaluation showed that bladder inflammation in CYP-treated rats was suppressed by phloroglucinol.CMG revealed that the CYP treatment induced overactive bladder in rats that was reversed by phloroglucinol.Up-regulated tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 expression in the CYP-treated rats were also suppressed in the phloroglucinol treated rats.CYP treatment significantly increased myeloperoxidase activity as well as the decreased activities of catalase of the bladder,which was reversed by treatment with phloroglucinol.Conclusions:The application of phloroglucinol suppressed oxidative stress,inflammation,and overactivity in the bladder.This may provide a new treatment strategy for IC.

  9. Recent trends in the development of nanophytobioactive compounds and delivery systems for their possible role in reducing oxidative stress in Parkinson’s disease models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesan P

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Palanivel Ganesan,1,2 Hyun-Myung Ko,2 In-Su Kim,2 Dong-Kug Choi1,2 1Nanotechnology Research Center, Department of Applied Life Science, 2Department of Biotechnology, College of Biomedical and Health Science, Konkuk University, Chungju, Republic of Korea Abstract: Oxidative stress plays a very critical role in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease (PD, which is the second most common neurodegenerative disease among elderly people worldwide. Increasing evidence has suggested that phytobioactive compounds show enhanced benefits in cell and animal models of PD. Curcumin, resveratrol, ginsenosides, quercetin, and catechin are phyto-derived bioactive compounds with important roles in the prevention and treatment of PD. However, in vivo studies suggest that their concentrations are very low to cross blood–brain barrier thereby it limits bioavailability, stability, and dissolution at target sites in the brain. To overcome these problems, nanophytomedicine with the controlled size of 1–100 nm is used to maximize efficiency in the treatment of PD. Nanosizing of phytobioactive compounds enhances the permeability into the brain with maximized efficiency and stability. Several nanodelivery techniques, including solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, nanoliposomes, and nanoniosomes can be used for controlled delivery of nanobioactive compounds to brain. Nanocompounds, such as ginsenosides (19.9 nm synthesized using a nanoemulsion technique, showed enhanced bioavailability in the rat brain. Here, we discuss the most recent trends and applications in PD, including 1 the role of phytobioactive compounds in reducing oxidative stress and their bioavailability; 2 the role of nanotechnology in reducing oxidative stress during PD; 3 nanodelivery systems; and 4 various nanophytobioactive compounds and their role in PD. Keywords: Parkinson’s disease, phytobioactive compounds, nanotechnology delivery systems, nanocurcumin

  10. Potential Modulation of Sirtuins by Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sirtuins are a conserved family of NAD-dependent protein deacylases. Initially proposed as histone deacetylases, it is now known that they act on a variety of proteins including transcription factors and metabolic enzymes, having a key role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Seven isoforms are identified in mammals (SIRT1–7, all of them sharing a conserved catalytic core and showing differential subcellular localization and activities. Oxidative stress can affect the activity of sirtuins at different levels: expression, posttranslational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and NAD levels. Mild oxidative stress induces the expression of sirtuins as a compensatory mechanism, while harsh or prolonged oxidant conditions result in dysfunctional modified sirtuins more prone to degradation by the proteasome. Oxidative posttranslational modifications have been identified in vitro and in vivo, in particular cysteine oxidation and tyrosine nitration. In addition, oxidative stress can alter the interaction with other proteins, like SIRT1 with its protein inhibitor DBC1 resulting in a net increase of deacetylase activity. In the same way, manipulation of cellular NAD levels by pharmacological inhibition of other NAD-consuming enzymes results in activation of SIRT1 and protection against obesity-related pathologies. Nevertheless, further research is needed to establish the molecular mechanisms of redox regulation of sirtuins to further design adequate pharmacological interventions.

  11. Potential Modulation of Sirtuins by Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Leonardo; Escande, Carlos; Denicola, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are a conserved family of NAD-dependent protein deacylases. Initially proposed as histone deacetylases, it is now known that they act on a variety of proteins including transcription factors and metabolic enzymes, having a key role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Seven isoforms are identified in mammals (SIRT1-7), all of them sharing a conserved catalytic core and showing differential subcellular localization and activities. Oxidative stress can affect the activity of sirtuins at different levels: expression, posttranslational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and NAD levels. Mild oxidative stress induces the expression of sirtuins as a compensatory mechanism, while harsh or prolonged oxidant conditions result in dysfunctional modified sirtuins more prone to degradation by the proteasome. Oxidative posttranslational modifications have been identified in vitro and in vivo, in particular cysteine oxidation and tyrosine nitration. In addition, oxidative stress can alter the interaction with other proteins, like SIRT1 with its protein inhibitor DBC1 resulting in a net increase of deacetylase activity. In the same way, manipulation of cellular NAD levels by pharmacological inhibition of other NAD-consuming enzymes results in activation of SIRT1 and protection against obesity-related pathologies. Nevertheless, further research is needed to establish the molecular mechanisms of redox regulation of sirtuins to further design adequate pharmacological interventions.

  12. Potential Modulation of Sirtuins by Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Leonardo; Escande, Carlos; Denicola, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are a conserved family of NAD-dependent protein deacylases. Initially proposed as histone deacetylases, it is now known that they act on a variety of proteins including transcription factors and metabolic enzymes, having a key role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Seven isoforms are identified in mammals (SIRT1–7), all of them sharing a conserved catalytic core and showing differential subcellular localization and activities. Oxidative stress can affect the activity of sirtuins at different levels: expression, posttranslational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and NAD levels. Mild oxidative stress induces the expression of sirtuins as a compensatory mechanism, while harsh or prolonged oxidant conditions result in dysfunctional modified sirtuins more prone to degradation by the proteasome. Oxidative posttranslational modifications have been identified in vitro and in vivo, in particular cysteine oxidation and tyrosine nitration. In addition, oxidative stress can alter the interaction with other proteins, like SIRT1 with its protein inhibitor DBC1 resulting in a net increase of deacetylase activity. In the same way, manipulation of cellular NAD levels by pharmacological inhibition of other NAD-consuming enzymes results in activation of SIRT1 and protection against obesity-related pathologies. Nevertheless, further research is needed to establish the molecular mechanisms of redox regulation of sirtuins to further design adequate pharmacological interventions. PMID:26788256

  13. Peroxisomes,oxidative stress,and inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stanley; R; Terlecky; Laura; J; Terlecky; Courtney; R; Giordano

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes are intracellular organelles mediating a wide variety of biosynthetic and biodegradative reactions.Included among these are the metabolism of hydrogen peroxide and other reactive species,molecules whose levels help define the oxidative state of cells.Loss of oxidative equilibrium in cells of tissues and organs potentiates inflammatory responses which can ultimately trigger human disease.The goal of this article is to review evidence for connections between peroxisome function,oxidative stress,and inflammation in the context of human health and degenerative disease.Dysregulated points in this nexus are identified and potential remedial approaches are presented.

  14. P2X7 Receptor Antagonism Attenuates the Intermittent Hypoxia-induced Spatial Deficits in a Murine Model of Sleep Apnea Via Inhibiting Neuroinflammation and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Deng

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The P2X7R antagonism attenuates the CIH-induced neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and spatial deficits, demonstrating that the P2X7R is an important therapeutic target in the cognition deficits accompanied OSAS.

  15. Effects of Mild and Severe Oxidative Stress on BACE1 Expression and APP Amyloidogenic Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jiangli; Li, Qiao-Xin; Evin, Genevieve

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes methods for establishing oxidative stress conditions that do not induce cell death in a neuronal cell culture model. We termed these conditions "mild oxidative stress," as opposed to "severe oxidative stress," which results in significant cell loss. Mild oxidative stress resembles more closely what happens in the aging brain than severe oxidative stress. The protocols we have delineated include the preparation and maintenance of mouse primary cortical cultures, the induction of oxidative stress by treatment with hydrogen peroxide, the assessment of cell viability by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, the measurement of free radical production by the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) assay, and western blot analysis of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and β-site APP cleaving enzyme, BACE1, two key proteins associated with Alzheimer's disease pathology and oxidative stress.

  16. Laser Acupuncture at HT7 Acupoint Improves Cognitive Deficit, Neuronal Loss, Oxidative Stress, and Functions of Cholinergic and Dopaminergic Systems in Animal Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jintanaporn Wattanathorn; Chatchada Sutalangka

    2014-01-01

    To date, the therapeutic strategy against cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD) is still not in satisfaction level and requires novel effective intervention. Based the oxidative stress reduction and cognitive enhancement induced by laser acupuncture at HT7, the beneficial effect of laser acupuncture at HT7 against cognitive impairment in PD has been focused. In this study, we aimed to determine the effect of laser acupuncture at HT7 on memory impairment, oxidative stress status, an...

  17. Cardiac oxidative stress determination and myocardial morphology after a single ecstasy (MDMA) administration in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerretani, Daniela; Riezzo, Irene; Fiaschi, Anna Ida; Centini, Fabio; Giorgi, Giorgio; D'Errico, Stefano; Fiore, Carmela; Karch, Steven B; Neri, Margherita; Pomara, Cristoforo; Turillazzi, Emanuela; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2008-11-01

    Experimental and clinical data indicate that 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA) abuse can produce significant cardiovascular toxicity. A mechanism may be a direct toxic effect of redox active metabolites of MDMA. To evaluate the effect of a single MDMA dose on cellular antioxidant defence system and to investigate the morphology in male albino rats, total glutathione (GSH), oxidised glutathione (GSSG), ascorbic acid (AA), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDAL) were studied. The effects were evaluated at 3, 6, 16 and 24 h after MDMA administration. Antioxidant enzymes activity was significantly reduced: GPx (-24%) and SOD (-50%) after 3 h and GR (-19%) after 6 h from treatment. AA levels decrease (-37%) after 3 h and (-30%) after 6 h; MDAL level increased (+119%) after 3 h; GSH levels decreased after 3 (31.3%) and 6 h (37.9%) from MDMA treatment. GSSG content was not affected by ecstasy administration. Myocardial contraction band necrosis (CBN) was already visible in rats killed at 6 h. After 16 h, macrophagic monocytes around the necrotic myocardial cells were observed, and within 24 h, this infiltrate became more widespread with an early removal of the necrotic material. Calcium deposits were observed within ventricular cardiomyocytes with intact nuclei and sarcomeres. Single administration of MDMA can significantly alter the cellular antioxidant defence system and produce oxidative stress which may result in lipid peroxidation and disruption of Ca(2 +) homeostasis. The depression in Ca(2+) regulatory mechanism by reactive oxygen species ultimately results in intracellular Ca(2 +) overload, CBN and cell death.

  18. Chiral mercaptoacetamides display enantioselective inhibition of histone deacetylase 6 and exhibit neuroprotection in cortical neuron models of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalin, Jay H; Zhang, Hankun; Gaudrel-Grosay, Sophie; Vistoli, Giulio; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2012-03-05

    Mercaptoacetamide-based ligands have been designed as a new class of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors for possible use in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The thiol group of these compounds provides a key binding element for interaction with the catalytic zinc ion, and thus differs from the more typically employed hydroxamic acid based zinc binding groups. Herein we disclose the chemistry and biology of some substituted mercaptoacetamides with the intention of increasing HDAC6 isoform selectivity while maintaining potency similar to their hydroxamic acid analogues. The introduction of a stereocenter α to the thiol group was found to have a considerable impact on HDAC inhibitor potency. These new compounds were also profiled for their therapeutic potential in an in vitro model of stress-induced neuronal injury and were found to act as nontoxic neuroprotective agents. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Genetics of oxidative stress in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupérez, Azahara I; Gil, Angel; Aguilera, Concepción M

    2014-02-20

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease characterized by the excessive accumulation of fat in adipose tissue and peripheral organs. Its derived metabolic complications are mediated by the associated oxidative stress, inflammation and hypoxia. Oxidative stress is due to the excessive production of reactive oxygen species or diminished antioxidant defenses. Genetic variants, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidant defense system genes, could alter the efficacy of these enzymes and, ultimately, the risk of obesity; thus, studies investigating the role of genetic variations in genes related to oxidative stress could be useful for better understanding the etiology of obesity and its metabolic complications. The lack of existing literature reviews in this field encouraged us to gather the findings from studies focusing on the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidant enzymes, oxidative stress-producing systems and transcription factor genes concerning their association with obesity risk and its phenotypes. In the future, the characterization of these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in obese patients could contribute to the development of controlled antioxidant therapies potentially beneficial for the treatment of obesity-derived metabolic complications.

  20. Genetics of Oxidative Stress in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azahara I. Rupérez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a multifactorial disease characterized by the excessive accumulation of fat in adipose tissue and peripheral organs. Its derived metabolic complications are mediated by the associated oxidative stress, inflammation and hypoxia. Oxidative stress is due to the excessive production of reactive oxygen species or diminished antioxidant defenses. Genetic variants, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidant defense system genes, could alter the efficacy of these enzymes and, ultimately, the risk of obesity; thus, studies investigating the role of genetic variations in genes related to oxidative stress could be useful for better understanding the etiology of obesity and its metabolic complications. The lack of existing literature reviews in this field encouraged us to gather the findings from studies focusing on the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidant enzymes, oxidative stress-producing systems and transcription factor genes concerning their association with obesity risk and its phenotypes. In the future, the characterization of these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in obese patients could contribute to the development of controlled antioxidant therapies potentially beneficial for the treatment of obesity-derived metabolic complications.

  1. Neuro-oxidative-nitrosative stress in sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Møller, Kirsten; Bailey, Damian M

    2011-01-01

    Neuro-oxidative-nitrosative stress may prove the molecular basis underlying brain dysfunction in sepsis. In the current review, we describe how sepsis-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) trigger lipid peroxidation chain reactions throughout the cerebrovasculature and surrounding...

  2. Damage to dopaminergic neurons is mediated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen through the p53 pathway under conditions of oxidative stress in a cell model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da-Wei; Li, Guang-Ren; Zhang, Bei-Lin; Feng, Jing-Jing; Zhao, Hua

    2016-02-01

    Oxidative stress is widely considered as a central event in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). The mechanisms underlying the oxidative damage-mediated loss of dopaminergic neurons in PD are not yet fully understood. Accumulating evidence has indicated that oxidative DNA damage plays a crucial role in programmed neuronal cell death, and is considered to be at least partly responsible for the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in PD. This process involves a number of signaling cascades and molecular proteins. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a pleiotropic protein affecting a wide range of vital cellular processes, including chromatin remodelling, DNA repair and cell cycle control, by interacting with a number of enzymes and regulatory proteins. In the present study, the exposure of PC12 cells to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) led to the loss of cell viability and decreased the expression levels of PCNA in a dose- and time-dependent manner, indicating that this protein may be involved in the neurotoxic actions of MPP+ in dopaminergic neuronal cells. In addition, a significant upregulation in p53 expression was also observed in this cellular model of PD. p53 is an upstream inducer of PCNA and it has been recognized as a key contributor responsible for dopaminergic neuronal cell death in mouse models of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced PD. This indicates that MPP+-induced oxidative damage is mediated by the downregulation of PCNA through the p53 pathway in a cellular model of PD. Thus, our results may provide some novel insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of PD and provide new possible therapeutic targets for the treatment of PD.

  3. Pneumococcal gene complex involved in resistance to extracellular oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andisi, Vahid Farshchi; Hinojosa, Cecilia A; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Orihuela, Carlos J; Bijlsma, Jetta J E

    2012-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a gram-positive bacterium which is a member of the normal human nasopharyngeal flora but can also cause serious disease such as pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. Throughout its life cycle, S. pneumoniae is exposed to significant oxidative stress derived from endogenously produced hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and from the host through the oxidative burst. How S. pneumoniae, an aerotolerant anaerobic bacterium that lacks catalase, protects itself against hydrogen peroxide stress is still unclear. Bioinformatic analysis of its genome identified a hypothetical open reading frame belonging to the thiol-specific antioxidant (TlpA/TSA) family, located in an operon consisting of three open reading frames. For all four strains tested, deletion of the gene resulted in an approximately 10-fold reduction in survival when strains were exposed to external peroxide stress. However, no role for this gene in survival of internal superoxide stress was observed. Mutagenesis and complementation analysis demonstrated that all three genes are necessary and sufficient for protection against oxidative stress. Interestingly, in a competitive index mouse pneumonia model, deletion of the operon had no impact shortly after infection but was detrimental during the later stages of disease. Thus, we have identified a gene complex involved in the protection of S. pneumoniae against external oxidative stress, which plays an important role during invasive disease.

  4. Transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells decreases oxidative stress, apoptosis, and hippocampal damage in brain of a spontaneous stroke model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calió, Michele Longoni; Marinho, Darci Sousa; Ko, Gui Mi; Ribeiro, Renata Rodrigues; Carbonel, Adriana Ferraz; Oyama, Lila Missae; Ormanji, Milene; Guirao, Tatiana Pinoti; Calió, Pedro Luiz; Reis, Luciana Aparecida; Simões, Manuel de Jesus; Lisbôa-Nascimento, Telma; Ferreira, Alice Teixeira; Bertoncini, Clélia Rejane Antônio

    2014-05-01

    Stroke is the most common cause of motor disabilities and is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Adult stem cells have been shown to be effective against neuronal degeneration through mechanisms that include both the recovery of neurotransmitter activity and a decrease in apoptosis and oxidative stress. We chose the lineage stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP) as a model for stem cell therapy. SHRSP rats can develop such severe hypertension that they generally suffer a stroke at approximately 1 year of age. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) decrease apoptotic death and oxidative stress in existing SHRSP brain tissue. The results of qRT-PCR assays showed higher levels of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 gene in the MSC-treated animals, compared with untreated. Our study also showed that superoxide, apoptotic cells, and by-products of lipid peroxidation decreased in MSC-treated SHRSP to levels similar those found in the animal controls, Wistar Kyoto rats. In addition, we saw a repair of morphological damage at the hippocampal region after MSC transplantation. These data suggest that MSCs have neuroprotective and antioxidant potential in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

  5. Interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism, the generation of oxidative stress and the mitigative oxidative stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Andrea W U; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2015-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles are involved in light harvesting and light perception, electron-transfer reactions, and as co-factors for key enzymes and sensory proteins. Under conditions in which cells exhibit stress-induced imbalances of photosynthetic reactions, or light absorption exceeds the ability of the cell to use photoexcitation energy in synthesis reactions, redox imbalance can occur in photosynthetic cells. Such conditions can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with alterations in tetrapyrrole homeostasis. ROS accumulation can result in cellular damage and detrimental effects on organismal fitness, or ROS molecules can serve as signals to induce a protective or damage-mitigating oxidative stress signaling response in cells. Induced oxidative stress responses include tetrapyrrole-dependent and -independent mechanisms for mitigating ROS generation and/or accumulation. Thus, tetrapyrroles can be contributors to oxidative stress, but are also essential in the oxidative stress response to protect cells by contributing to detoxification of ROS. In this review, we highlight the interconnection and interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism with the occurrence of oxidative stress and protective oxidative stress signaling responses in photosynthetic organisms. Copyright © 2015 The Authprs. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism, the generation of oxidative stress and the mitigative oxidative stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea W.U. Busch

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tetrapyrroles are involved in light harvesting and light perception, electron-transfer reactions, and as co-factors for key enzymes and sensory proteins. Under conditions in which cells exhibit stress-induced imbalances of photosynthetic reactions, or light absorption exceeds the ability of the cell to use photoexcitation energy in synthesis reactions, redox imbalance can occur in photosynthetic cells. Such conditions can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS associated with alterations in tetrapyrrole homeostasis. ROS accumulation can result in cellular damage and detrimental effects on organismal fitness, or ROS molecules can serve as signals to induce a protective or damage-mitigating oxidative stress signaling response in cells. Induced oxidative stress responses include tetrapyrrole-dependent and -independent mechanisms for mitigating ROS generation and/or accumulation. Thus, tetrapyrroles can be contributors to oxidative stress, but are also essential in the oxidative stress response to protect cells by contributing to detoxification of ROS. In this review, we highlight the interconnection and interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism with the occurrence of oxidative stress and protective oxidative stress signaling responses in photosynthetic organisms.

  7. Engrailed Homeoprotein Protects Mesencephalic Dopaminergic Neurons from Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekaik, Hocine; Blaudin de Thé, François-Xavier; Fuchs, Julia; Massiani-Beaudoin, Olivia; Prochiantz, Alain; Joshi, Rajiv L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Engrailed homeoproteins are expressed in adult dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra. In Engrailed1 heterozygous mice, these neurons start dying at 6 weeks, are more sensitive to oxidative stress, and progressively develop traits similar to those observed following an acute and strong oxidative stress inflected to wild-type neurons. These changes include DNA strand breaks and the modification (intensity and distribution) of several nuclear and nucleolar heterochromatin marks. Engrailed1 and Engrailed2 are biochemically equivalent transducing proteins previously used to antagonize dopaminergic neuron death in Engrailed1 heterozygous mice and in mouse models of Parkinson disease. Accordingly, we show that, following an acute oxidative stress, a single Engrailed2 injection restores all nuclear and nucleolar heterochromatin marks, decreases the number of DNA strand breaks, and protects dopaminergic neurons against apoptosis. PMID:26411690

  8. Discovery of biomarkers for oxidative stress based on cellular metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ningli; Wei, Jianteng; Liu, Yewei; Pei, Dong; Hu, Qingping; Wang, Yu; Di, Duolong

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress has a close relationship with various pathologic physiology phenomena and the potential biomarkers of oxidative stress may provide evidence for clinical diagnosis or disease prevention. Metabolomics was employed to identify the potential biomarkers of oxidative stress. High-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector, mass spectrometry and partial least squares discriminate analysis were used in this study. The 10, 15 and 13 metabolites were considered to discriminate the model group, vitamin E-treated group and l-glutathione-treated group, respectively. Some of them have been identified, namely, malic acid, vitamin C, reduced glutathione and tryptophan. Identification of other potential biomarkers should be conducted and their physiological significance also needs to be elaborated.

  9. Colorectal Carcinogenesis: Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carini, Francesco; Mazzola, Margherita; Rappa, Francesca; Jurjus, Abdo; Geagea, Alice Gerges; Al Kattar, Sahar; Bou-Assi, Tarek; Jurjus, Rosalyn; Damiani, Provvidenza; Leone, Angelo; Tomasello, Giovanni

    2017-09-01

    One of the contributory causes of colon cancer is the negative effect of reactive oxygen species on DNA repair mechanisms. Currently, there is a growing support for the concept that oxidative stress may be an important etiological factor for carcinogenesis. The purpose of this review is to elucidate the role of oxidative stress in promoting colorectal carcinogenesis and to highlight the potential protective role of antioxidants. Several studies have documented the importance of antioxidants in countering oxidative stress and preventing colorectal carcinogenesis. However, there are conflicting data in the literature concerning its proper use in humans, since these studies did not yield definitive results and were performed mostly in vitro on cell populations, or in vivo in experimental animal models. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  10. Simvastatin and oxidative stress in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sanne Tofte; Andersen, Jon Thor Trærup; Nielsen, Torben Kjær

    2016-01-01

    Simvastatin reduces the blood concentration of cholesterol by inhibiting hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis, and thereby reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. In addition, simvastatin treatment leads to a reduction in fluxes......-blinded, placebo-controlled study in which subjects were treated with either 40 mg of simvastatin or placebo for 14 days. The endpoints were six biomarkers for oxidative stress, which represent intracellular oxidative stress to nucleic acids, lipid peroxidation and plasma antioxidants, that were measured in urine.......1% in the placebo group for DNA oxidation and 7.3% in the simvastatin group compared to 3.4% in the placebo group. The differences in biomarkers related to plasma were not statistically significant between the treatments groups, with the exception of total vitamin E levels, which, as expected, were reduced...

  11. Oxidative stress in benign prostate hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabaiou, N; Mabed, D; Lobaccaro, J M; Lahouel, M

    2016-02-01

    To assess the status of oxidative stress in benign prostate hyperplasia, a very common disease in older men which constitutes a public health problem in Jijel, prostate tissues were obtained by transvesical adenomectomy from 10 men with benign prostate hyperplasia. We measured the cytosolic levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) and cytosolic enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase. The development of benign prostate hyperplasia is accompanied by impaired oxidative status by increasing levels of MDA, depletion of GSH concentrations and a decrease in the activity of all the antioxidant enzymes studied. These results have allowed us to understand a part of the aetiology of benign prostate hyperplasia related to oxidative stress.

  12. Anticholinesterase Toxicity and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Milatovic

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticholinesterase compounds, organophosphates (OPs and carbamates (CMs are commonly used for a variety of purposes in agriculture and in human and veterinary medicine. They exert their toxicity in mammalian system primarily by virtue of acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibition at the synapses and neuromuscular junctions, leading into the signs of hypercholinergic preponderance. However, the mechanism(s involved in brain/muscle damage appear to be linked with alteration in antioxidant and the scavenging system leading to free radical-mediated injury. OPs and CMs cause excessive formation of F2-isoprostanes and F4-neuroprostanes, in vivo biomarkers of lipid peroxidation and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and of citrulline, a marker of NO/NOS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS generation. In addition, during the course of these excitatory processes and inhibition of AChE, a high rate of ATP consumption, coupled with the inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, compromise the cell's ability to maintain its energy levels and excessive amounts of ROS and RNS may be generated. Pretreatment with N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist memantine, in combination with atropine sulfate, provides significant protection against inhibition of AChE, increases of ROS/RNS, and depletion of high-energy phosphates induced by DFP/carbofuran. Similar antioxidative effects are observed with a spin trapping agent, phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN or chain breaking antioxidant vitamin E. This review describes the mechanisms involved in anticholinesterase-induced oxidative/nitrosative injury in target organs of OPs/CMs, and protection by various agents.

  13. Ovariectomy exacerbates oxidative stress and cardiopathy induced by adriamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan Rafael; Muntané, Jordi; Herencia, Carmen; Muñoz, Maria C; Bujalance, Inmaculada; Montilla, Pedro; Túnez, Issac

    2006-02-01

    Ovarian hormone depletion in ovariectomized experimental animals is a useful model with which to study the physiopathological consequences of menopause in women. It has been suggested that menopause is a risk factor for the induction of several cardiovascular disorders. In the present study we analyzed the effects of ovarian hormone depletion by ovariectomy (OVX) in a model of oxidative stress and cardiopathy induced by adriamycin (AD). To evaluate these effects, we measured parameters related to cardiac damage (creatinine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase) and oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione, nitric oxide and carbonyl proteins) in cardiac tissue and erythrocytes. OVX was found to alter all markers of oxidative stress and cell damage in cardiac tissue. Similarly, the OVX-derived loss of ovarian hormones enhanced cardiac damage and oxidative stress induced by AD. Our results suggest that antioxidant status in cardiac tissue and erythrocytes is seriously compromised by OVX during the cardiomyopathy induced by AD in experimental animals. In conclusion, the absence of hormones caused by OVX or menopause may induce or accelerate pre-existing cardiovascular dysfunctions.

  14. Piracetam improves mitochondrial dysfunction following oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Uta; Scherping, Isabel; Hauptmann, Susanne; Schuessel, Katin; Eckert, Anne; Müller, Walter E

    2006-01-01

    1.--Mitochondrial dysfunction including decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential and reduced ATP production represents a common final pathway of many conditions associated with oxidative stress, for example, hypoxia, hypoglycemia, and aging. 2.--Since the cognition-improving effects of the standard nootropic piracetam are usually more pronounced under such pathological conditions and young healthy animals usually benefit little by piracetam, the effect of piracetam on mitochondrial dysfunction following oxidative stress was investigated using PC12 cells and dissociated brain cells of animals treated with piracetam. 3.--Piracetam treatment at concentrations between 100 and 1000 microM improved mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production of PC12 cells following oxidative stress induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and serum deprivation. Under conditions of mild serum deprivation, piracetam (500 microM) induced a nearly complete recovery of mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels. Piracetam also reduced caspase 9 activity after SNP treatment. 4.--Piracetam treatment (100-500 mg kg(-1) daily) of mice was also associated with improved mitochondrial function in dissociated brain cells. Significant improvement was mainly seen in aged animals and only less in young animals. Moreover, the same treatment reduced antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase) in aged mouse brain only, which are elevated as an adaptive response to the increased oxidative stress with aging. 5.--In conclusion, therapeutically relevant in vitro and in vivo concentrations of piracetam are able to improve mitochondrial dysfunction associated with oxidative stress and/or aging. Mitochondrial stabilization and protection might be an important mechanism to explain many of piracetam's beneficial effects in elderly patients.

  15. Oxidative stress in obstructive nephropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dendooven, Amelie; Ishola, David A.; Nguyen, Tri Q.; Van der Giezen, Dionne M.; Kok, Robbert Jan; Goldschmeding, Roel; Joles, Jaap A.

    P>Unilateral ureteric obstruction (UUO) is one of the most commonly applied rodent models to study the pathophysiology of renal fibrosis. This model reflects important aspects of inflammation and fibrosis that are prominent in human kidney diseases. In this review, we present an overview of the

  16. [Effects of physical exercise on cognitive alterations and oxidative stress in an APP/PSN1 transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja-Galeano, Helios; Brioche, Thomas; Sanchís-Gomar, Fabián; Escrivá, Consuelo; Dromant, Mar; Gómez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Viña, José

    2012-01-01

    The beneficial effects of physical exercise, in both the treatment and the prevention of several diseases, have been extensively demonstrated. The most common dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD), is a disorder in which exercise induces significant improvement at pathophysiopathological and cognitive levels. In the present work, we studied the relationship between physical exercise, oxidative stress, and cognition in the double transgenic mice model (2×Tg) for AD, APP/PSN1. This model is mainly based on the cerebral deposition of amyloid β plaques. Eighteen ten-month-old mice were divided into four experimental groups: exercised 2×Tg (2×Tg-E) (n=5), rested 2×Tg (2×Tg-R) (n=5), exercised controls (control-E) (n=4) and rested controls (control-R) (n=4). We trained the animals for twelve weeks with a combination of forced exercise (treadmill running three days/week) and spontaneous wheel running. The animals were evaluated with physical and cognitive tests before and after the training period. We analyzed systemic and cortical oxidative damage and the induction of antioxidant enzymes. The 2×Tg-R mice showed a decrease in their grip strength and VO(2max) as they grew older which was prevented by training. The 2×Tg-E group showed better memory than the 2×Tg-R animals. All the trained groups demonstrated greater exploratory capacity and less anxiety than the sedentary animals. Systemic oxidative damage was slightly decreased in the 2×Tg, although we found no difference in the lipoperoxidation and in the induction of the antioxidant defense in cortex between groups. Physical exercise leads to improvements in the grip strength, VO(2max), cognition, and memory in 2×Tg mice. These improvements are not significantly related to changes in the antioxidant defenses or a reduction in the oxidative damage brought about by exercise. Copyright © 2012 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Hepatoprotective Effects of Antrodia cinnamomea: The Modulation of Oxidative Stress Signaling in a Mouse Model of Alcohol-Induced Acute Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yange Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the components of A. cinnamomea (AC mycelia were systematically analyzed. Subsequently, its hepatoprotective effects and the underlying mechanisms were explored using a mouse model of acute alcohol-induced liver injury. AC contained 25 types of fatty acid, 16 types of amino acid, 3 types of nucleotide, and 8 types of mineral. The hepatoprotective effects were observed after 2 weeks of AC treatment at doses of 75 mg/kg, 225 mg/kg, and 675 mg/kg in the mouse model. These effects were indicated by the changes in the levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, several oxidation-related factors, and inflammatory cytokines in serum and/or liver samples. AC reduced the incidence rate of necrosis, inflammatory infiltration, fatty droplets formation, and cell apoptosis in liver detecting via histological and TUNEL assay. In addition, AC reduced the expression of cleaved caspase-3, -8, and -9 and the levels of phosphor-protein kinase B (Akt and phosphor-nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB in the liver samples. Collectively, AC-mediated hepatoprotective effects in a mouse model of acute alcohol-induced liver injury are the result of reduction in oxidative stress. This may be associated with Akt/NF-κB signaling. These results provide valuable evidence to support the use of A. cinnamomea as a functional food and/or medicine.

  18. β-Caryophyllene, a phytocannabinoid attenuates oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, glial activation, and salvages dopaminergic neurons in a rat model of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Shreesh; Javed, Hayate; Azimullah, Sheikh; Haque, M Emdadul

    2016-07-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) area. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of β-caryophyllene (BCP) against rotenone-induced oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in a rat model of PD. In the present study, BCP was administered once daily for 4 weeks at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight prior to a rotenone (2.5 mg/kg body weight) challenge to mimic the progressive neurodegenerative nature of PD. Rotenone administration results in oxidative stress as evidenced by decreased activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and depletion of glutathione with a concomitant rise in lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde. Rotenone also significantly increased pro-inflammatory cytokines in the midbrain region and elevated the inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the striatum. Further, immunohistochemical analysis revealed loss of dopaminergic neurons in the SNc area and enhanced expression of ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule-1 (Iba-1) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), indicators of microglia activation, and astrocyte hypertrophy, respectively, as an index of inflammation. However, treatment with BCP rescued dopaminergic neurons and decreased microglia and astrocyte activation evidenced by reduced Iba-1 and GFAP expression. BCP in addition to attenuation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and inflammatory mediators such as COX-2 and iNOS, also restored antioxidant enzymes and inhibited lipid peroxidation as well as glutathione depletion. The findings demonstrate that BCP provides neuroprotection against rotenone-induced PD and the neuroprotective effects can be ascribed to its potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities.

  19. The herbal formula KH-204 is protective against erectile dysfunction by minimizing oxidative stress and improving lipid profiles in a rat model of erectile dysfunction induced by hypercholesterolaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hoon; Bae, Woong Jin; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Yuk, Seung Mo; Han, Dong Seok; Youn, Chang Shik; Kwon, Eun Bi; Hwang, Sung Yeoun; Kim, Sae Woong

    2017-02-24

    Hypercholesterolaemia (HC) is a major risk factor for ischemic heart disease and is also known to be a risk factor for erectile dysfunction (ED). ED caused by HC is thought to be related to HC-induced oxidative stress damage in the vascular endothelium and erectile tissue. KH-204 is an herbal formula with a strong antioxidant effect. We evaluated the effects of KH-204 on erectile function in a rat model of HC-induced ED. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (6 weeks old) were divided into normal control, high-fat and cholesterol diet (HFC), and HFC with KH-204 treatment (HFC + KH) groups (n = 12 each). Normal control group rats were fed normal chow diet. HFC and HFC + KH group rats were fed high-fat and cholesterol diets and treated with or without daily oral doses of KH-204 for 12 weeks. Subsequently, intracavernous pressure (ICP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were measured, and lipid profiles, expression of endothelial (eNOS) and neuronal (nNOS) nitric oxide synthase, oxidative stress (8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine), and ratio of smooth muscle cells and collagen fibres were evaluated in the serum and corpora tissue. Compared to the HFC group, the HFC + KH group showed statistically significant increases in peak ICP and ICP/MAP ratio, expression of eNOS and nNOS, and ratio of smooth muscle cells and collagen fibres (p < 0.05). The HFC + KH group also showed statistically significant decreases in oxidative stress (p < 0.05). Further the lipid profiles of this group were ameliorated compared to those of the HFC group (p < 0.05). The current study shows that the antioxidant and hypolipidemic effects of KH-204 are effective in ameliorating ED by restoring endothelial dysfunction and suggests that KH-204 may be a potential therapeutic agent for ED by correcting the fundamental cause of ED.

  20. Oxidative stress and Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Y

    2000-02-01

    Research in the field of molecular biology has helped to provide a better understanding of both the cascade of biochemical events that occurs with Alzheimer disease (AD) and the heterogeneous nature of the disease. One hypothesis that accounts for both the heterogeneous nature of AD and the fact that aging is the most obvious risk factor is that free radicals are involved. The probability of this involvement is supported by the fact that neurons are extremely sensitive to attacks by destructive free radicals. Furthermore, lesions are present in the brains of AD patients that are typically associated with attacks by free radicals (eg, damage to DNA, protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and advanced glycosylation end products), and metals (eg, iron, copper, zinc, and aluminum) are present that have catalytic activity that produce free radicals. beta-Amyloid is aggregated and produces more free radicals in the presence of free radicals; beta-amyloid toxicity is eliminated by free radical scavengers. Apolipoprotein E is subject to attacks by free radicals, and apolipoprotein E peroxidation has been correlated with AD. In contrast, apolipoprotein E can act as a free radical scavenger and this behavior is isoform dependent. AD has been linked to mitochondrial anomalies affecting cytochrome-c oxidase, and these anomalies may contribute to the abnormal production of free radicals. Finally, many free radical scavengers (eg, vitamin E, selegeline, and Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761) have produced promising results in relation to AD, as has desferrioxamine-an iron-chelating agent-and antiinflammatory drugs and estrogens, which also have an antioxidant effect.

  1. Lack of the P2X7 receptor protects against AMD-like defects and microparticle accumulation in a chronic oxidative stress-induced mouse model of AMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Kyle A; Lin, C M; Bowes Rickman, Catherine; Yang, Dongli

    2017-01-01

    The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is an ATP-gated ion channel that is a key player in oxidative stress under pathological conditions. The P2X7R is expressed in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and neural retina. Chronic oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Mice lacking Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1) developed chronic oxidative stress as well as AMD-like features, but whether the P2X7R plays a causative role in oxidative stress-induced AMD is unknown. Thus, the main purpose of this study was to test if concurrent knockout (KO) of P2X7R could block AMD-like defects seen in Sod1 KO mice. Using multiple approaches, we demonstrate that Sod1 KO causes AMD-like defects, including positive staining for oxidative stress markers, 3-nitrotyrosine and carboxymethyl lysine, thinning of the RPE and retina, thickening of Bruch's membrane, presence of basal laminar and linear deposits, RPE barrier disruption and accumulation of microglia/macrophages. Moreover, we find that Sod1 KO mice accumulate more microparticles (MPs) within RPE/choroid tissues. Concurrent KO of the P2X7R protects against AMD-like defects and MP accumulation in Sod1 KO mice. Together, we show for the first time, that deficiency of P2X7R prevents in vivo oxidative stress-induced accumulation of MPs and AMD-like defects. This work could potentially lead to novel therapies for AMD and other oxidative stress-driven diseases.

  2. Oxidative stress response in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Elida G; Jesuino, Rosália Santos Amorim; Dantas, Alessandra da Silva; Brígido, Marcelo de Macedo; Felipe, Maria Sueli S

    2005-06-30

    Survival of pathogenic fungi inside human hosts depends on evasion from the host immune system and adaptation to the host environment. Among different insults that Paracoccidioides brasiliensis has to handle are reactive oxygen and nitrogen species produced by the human host cells, and by its own metabolism. Knowing how the parasite deals with reactive species is important to understand how it establishes infection and survives within humans. The initiative to describe the P. brasiliensis transcriptome fostered new approaches to study oxidative stress response in this organism. By examining genes related to oxidative stress response, one can evaluate the parasite's ability to face this condition and infer about possible ways to overcome this ability. We report the results of a search of the P. brasiliensis assembled expressed sequence tag database for homologous sequences involved in oxidative stress response. We described several genes coding proteins involved in antioxidant defense, for example, catalase and superoxide dismutase isoenzymes, peroxiredoxin, cytochrome c peroxidase, glutathione synthesis enzymes, thioredoxin, and the transcription factors Yap1 and Skn7. The transcriptome analysis of P. brasiliensis reveals a pathogen that has many resources to combat reactive species. Besides characterizing the antioxidant defense system in P. brasiliensis, we also compared the ways in which different fungi respond to oxidative damage, and we identified the basic features of this response.

  3. Electromagnetic Fields, Oxidative Stress, and Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Consales

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic fields (EMFs originating both from both natural and manmade sources permeate our environment. As people are continuously exposed to EMFs in everyday life, it is a matter of great debate whether they can be harmful to human health. On the basis of two decades of epidemiological studies, an increased risk for childhood leukemia associated with Extremely Low Frequency fields has been consistently assessed, inducing the International Agency for Research on Cancer to insert them in the 2B section of carcinogens in 2001. EMFs interaction with biological systems may cause oxidative stress under certain circumstances. Since free radicals are essential for brain physiological processes and pathological degeneration, research focusing on the possible influence of the EMFs-driven oxidative stress is still in progress, especially in the light of recent studies suggesting that EMFs may contribute to the etiology of neurodegenerative disorders. This review synthesizes the emerging evidences about this topic, highlighting the wide data uncertainty that still characterizes the EMFs effect on oxidative stress modulation, as both pro-oxidant and neuroprotective effects have been documented. Care should be taken to avoid methodological limitations and to determine the patho-physiological relevance of any alteration found in EMFs-exposed biological system.

  4. Oxidative stress and life histories: unresolved issues and current needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speakman, John R; Blount, Jonathan D; Bronikowski, Anne M; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Isaksson, Caroline; Kirkwood, Tom B L; Monaghan, Pat; Ozanne, Susan E; Beaulieu, Michaël; Briga, Michael; Carr, Sarah K; Christensen, Louise L; Cochemé, Helena M; Cram, Dominic L; Dantzer, Ben; Harper, Jim M; Jurk, Diana; King, Annette; Noguera, Jose C; Salin, Karine; Sild, Elin; Simons, Mirre J P; Smith, Shona; Stier, Antoine; Tobler, Michael; Vitikainen, Emma; Peaker, Malcolm; Selman, Colin

    2015-12-01

    Life-history theory concerns the trade-offs that mold the patterns of investment by animals between reproduction, growth, and survival. It is widely recognized that physiology plays a role in the mediation of life-history trade-offs, but the details remain obscure. As life-history theory concerns aspects of investment in the soma that influence survival, understanding the physiological basis of life histories is related, but not identical, to understanding the process of aging. One idea from the field of aging that has gained considerable traction in the area of life histories is that life-history trade-offs may be mediated by free radical production and oxidative stress. We outline here developments in this field and summarize a number of important unresolved issues that may guide future research efforts. The issues are as follows. First, different tissues and macromolecular targets of oxidative stress respond differently during reproduction. The functional significance of these changes, however, remains uncertain. Consequently there is a need for studies that link oxidative stress measurements to functional outcomes, such as survival. Second, measurements of oxidative stress are often highly invasive or terminal. Terminal studies of oxidative stress in wild animals, where detailed life-history information is available, cannot generally be performed without compromising the aims of the studies that generated the life-history data. There is a need therefore for novel non-invasive measurements of multi-tissue oxidative stress. Third, laboratory studies provide unrivaled opportunities for experimental manipulation but may fail to expose the physiology underpinning life-history effects, because of the benign laboratory environment. Fourth, the idea that oxidative stress might underlie life-history trade-offs does not make specific enough predictions that are amenable to testing. Moreover, there is a paucity of good alternative theoretical models on which contrasting

  5. Oxidative stress and the high altitude environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Krzeszowiak

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years there has been considerable interest in mountain sports, including mountaineering, owing to the general availability of climbing clothing and equipment as well trainings and professional literature. This raised a new question for the environmental and mountain medicine: Is mountaineering harmful to health? Potential hazards include the conditions existing in the alpine environment, i.e. lower atmospheric pressure leading to the development of hypobaric hypoxia, extreme physical effort, increased UV radiation, lack of access to fresh food, and mental stress. A reasonable measure of harmfulness of these factors is to determine the increase in the level of oxidative stress. Alpine environment can stimulate the antioxidant enzyme system but under specific circumstances it may exceed its capabilities with simultaneous consumption of low-molecular antioxidants resulting in increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. This situation is referred to as oxidative stress. Rapid and uncontrolled proliferation of reactive oxygen species leads to a number of adverse changes, resulting in the above-average damage to the lipid structures of cell membranes (peroxidation, proteins (denaturation, and nucleic acids. Such situation within the human body cannot take place without resultant systemic consequences. This explains the malaise of people returning from high altitude and a marked decrease in their physical fitness. In addition, a theory is put forward that the increase in the level of oxidative stress is one of the factors responsible for the onset of acute mountain sickness (AMS. However, such statement requires further investigation because the currently available literature is inconclusive. This article presents the causes and effects of development of oxidative stress in the high mountains.

  6. Effect of folic acid on oxidative stress and behavioral changes in the animal model of schizophrenia induced by ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugno, Alexandra I; Canever, Lara; Heylmann, Alexandra S; Wessler, Patrícia G; Steckert, Amanda; Mastella, Gustavo A; de Oliveira, Mariana B; Damázio, Louyse S; Pacheco, Felipe D; Calixto, Octacílio P; Pereira, Flávio P; Macan, Tamires P; Pedro, Thayara H; Schuck, Patrícia F; Quevedo, João; Budni, Josiane

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have shown benefits for the supplementation of folic acid in schizophrenic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of folic acid addition on adult rats, over a period of 7 or 14 days. It also sets out to verify any potential protective action using an animal model of schizophrenia induced by ketamine, in behavioral and biochemical parameters. This study used two protocols (acute and chronic) for the administration of ketamine at a dose of 25 mg/kg (i.p.). The folic acid was given by oral route in doses of 5, 10 and 50 mg/kg, once daily, for 7 and/or 14 days in order to compare the protective effects of folic acid. Thirty minutes after the last administration of ketamine, the locomotor and social interaction activities were evaluated, and immediately the brain structure were removed for biochemical analysis. In this study, ketamine was administered in a single dose or in doses over the course of 7 days increasing the animal's locomotion. This study showed that the administration of folic acid over 7 days was unable to prevent hyper locomotion. In contrast, folic acid (10 and 50 mg/kg) administrated over a period of 14 days, was able to partially prevent the hyper locomotion. Our data indicates that both acute and chronic administrations of ketamine increased the time to first contact between the animals, while the increased latency for social contact was completely prevented by folic acid (5, 10 and 50 mg/kg). Chronic and acute administrations of ketamine also increased lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation in brain. Folic acid (10 and 50 mg/kg) supplements showed protective effects on the oxidative damage found in the different brain structures evaluated. All together, the results indicate that nutritional supplementation with folic acid provides promising results in an animal model of schizophrenia induced by ketamine.

  7. Construction and Experimental Validation of a Quantitative Kinetic Model of Nitric Oxide Stress in Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan L. Robinson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC are responsible for large outbreaks of hemorrhagic colitis, which can progress to life-threatening hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS due to the release of Shiga-like toxins (Stx. The presence of a functional nitric oxide (NO· reductase (NorV, which protects EHEC from NO· produced by immune cells, was previously found to correlate with high HUS incidence, and it was shown that NorV activity enabled prolonged EHEC survival and increased Stx production within macrophages. To enable quantitative study of EHEC NO· defenses and facilitate the development of NO·-potentiating therapeutics, we translated an existing kinetic model of the E. coli K-12 NO· response to an EHEC O157:H7 strain. To do this, we trained uncertain model parameters on measurements of [NO·] and [O2] in EHEC cultures, assessed parametric and prediction uncertainty with the use of a Markov chain Monte Carlo approach, and confirmed the predictive accuracy of the model with experimental data from genetic mutants lacking NorV or Hmp (NO· dioxygenase. Collectively, these results establish a methodology for the translation of quantitative models of NO· stress in model organisms to pathogenic sub-species, which is a critical step toward the application of these models for the study of infectious disease.

  8. Interplay between pro-inflammatory cytokines and brain oxidative stress biomarkers: evidence of parallels between butyl paraben intoxication and the valproic acid brain physiopathology in autism rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Hoda G; Ali, Elham H A; Elgoly, Amany H Mahmoud

    2015-02-01

    Butyl paraben is a preservative used in food, drugs and cosmetics. Neurotoxic effect was reported recently beside the potential estrogenic activity of parabens. There is controversy as to the potential harmful effects of butyl parabens, which are suspected to contribute to autism and learning disabilities. The purpose of this study was to examine the similarities between paraben intoxication signs in the rat brain and brain markers in an autistic like rat model. This study provides evidence of many parallels between the two, including (1) oxidative stress, (2) decreased reduced glutathione levels and elevated oxidised glutathione, (3) mitochondrial dysfunction, and (4) neuroinflammation and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in the brain (tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1-beta, and interleukin-6). (5) Increased protein oxidation reported by a significant increase in 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT)/tyrosine ratio. (6) A marked disturbance was found in the production of energy carriers (AMP, ATP and AMP/ATP ratio) in comparison with the control. The evidence suggests that paraben may, to some extent, either cause or contribute to the brain physiopathology in ASDs or pathogens that produce the brain pathology observed in the diagnosed rat model of ASD.

  9. Oxidative stress and stress signaling: menace of diabetic cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Loren E WOLD; Asli F CEYLAN-ISIK; Jun REN

    2005-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death in the diabetic population and is currently one of the leading causes of death in the United States and other industrialized countries. The health care expenses associated with cardiovascular disease are staggering, reaching more than US$350 billion in 2003. The risk factors for cardiovascular disease include high fat/cholesterol levels,alcoholism, smoking, genetics, environmental factors and hypertension, which are commonly used to gauge an individual's risk of cardiovascular disease and to track their progress during therapy. Most recently, these factors have become important in the early prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Oxidative stress, the imbalance between reactive oxygen species production and breakdown by endogenous antioxidants, has been implicated in the onset and progression of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure and diabetes-associated heart dysfunction (diabetic cardiomyopathy). Antioxidant therapy has shown promise in preventing the development of diabetic heart complications. This review focuses on recent advances in oxidative stress theory and antioxidant therapy in diabetic cardiomyopathy, with an emphasis on the stress signaling pathways hypothesized to be involved. Many of these stress signaling pathways lead to activation of reactive oxygen species, major players in the development and progression of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  10. Visualization of Oxidative Stress Induced by Experimental Periodontitis in Keap1-Dependent Oxidative Stress Detector-Luciferase Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Kota; Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Irie, Koichiro; Kunitomo, Muneyoshi; Uchida, Yoko; Fukuhara, Daiki; Morita, Manabu

    2016-11-16

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a Keap1-dependent oxidative stress detector-luciferase (OKD-LUC) mouse model would be useful for the visualization of oxidative stress induced by experimental periodontitis. A ligature was placed around the mandibular first molars for seven days to induce periodontitis. Luciferase activity was measured with an intraperitoneal injection of d-luciferin on days 0, 1, and 7. The luciferase activity in the periodontitis group was significantly greater than that in the control group at seven days. The expressions of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and malondialdehyde in periodontal tissue were significantly higher in the periodontitis group than in the control group. Immunofluorescent analysis confirmed that the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) occurred more frequently in the periodontitis group than in the control group. This study found that under oxidative stress induced by experimental periodontitis, the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway was activated and could be visualized from the luciferase activity in the OKD-LUC model. Thus, the OKD-LUC mouse model may be useful for exploring the mechanism underlying the relationship between the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway and periodontitis by enabling the visualization of oxidative stress over time.

  11. The role of oxidative stress in nervous system aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims-Robinson, Catrina; Hur, Junguk; Hayes, John M; Dauch, Jacqueline R; Keller, Peter J; Brooks, Susan V; Feldman, Eva L

    2013-01-01

    While oxidative stress is implicated in aging, the impact of oxidative stress on aging in the peripheral nervous system is not well understood. To determine a potential mechanism for age-related deficits in the peripheral nervous system, we examined both functional and morphological changes and utilized microarray technology to compare normal aging in wild-type mice to effects in copper/zinc superoxide dismutase-deficient (Sod1(-/-)) mice, a mouse model of increased oxidative stress. Sod1(-/-) mice exhibit a peripheral neuropathy phenotype with normal sensory nerve function and deficits in motor nerve function. Our data indicate that a decrease in the synthesis of cholesterol, which is vital to myelin formation, correlates with the structural deficits in axons, myelin, and the cell body of motor neurons in the Sod1(+/+) mice at 30 months and the Sod1(-/-) mice at 20 months compared with mice at 2 months. Collectively, we have demonstrated that the functional and morphological changes within the peripheral nervous system in our model of increased oxidative stress are manifested earlier and resemble the deficits observed during normal aging.

  12. Oxidative stress and pathology in muscular dystrophies: focus on protein thiol oxidation and dysferlinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, Jessica R; Radley-Crabb, Hannah G; Iwasaki, Tomohito; Lemckert, Frances A; Arthur, Peter G; Grounds, Miranda D

    2013-09-01

    The muscular dystrophies comprise more than 30 clinical disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Although the genetic basis for many of these disorders has been identified, the exact mechanism for pathogenesis generally remains unknown. It is considered that disturbed levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to the pathology of many muscular dystrophies. Reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress may cause cellular damage by directly and irreversibly damaging macromolecules such as proteins, membrane lipids and DNA; another major cellular consequence of reactive oxygen species is the reversible modification of protein thiol side chains that may affect many aspects of molecular function. Irreversible oxidative damage of protein and lipids has been widely studied in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and we have recently identified increased protein thiol oxidation in dystrophic muscles of the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This review evaluates the role of elevated oxidative stress in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other forms of muscular dystrophies, and presents new data that show significantly increased protein thiol oxidation and high levels of lipofuscin (a measure of cumulative oxidative damage) in dysferlin-deficient muscles of A/J mice at various ages. The significance of this elevated oxidative stress and high levels of reversible thiol oxidation, but minimal myofibre necrosis, is discussed in the context of the disease mechanism for dysferlinopathies, and compared with the situation for dystrophin-deficient mdx mice.

  13. Oxidative stress and Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier eBlesa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease is a chronic, progressive neurological disease that is associated with a loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of the brain. The molecular mechanisms underlying the loss of these neurons still remain elusive. Oxidative stress is thought to play an important role in dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Complex I deficiencies of the respiratory chain account for the majority of unfavorable neuronal degeneration in Parkinson’s Disease. Environmental factors, such as neurotoxins, insecticides like rotenone, pesticides like Paraquat, dopamine itself and genetic mutations in Parkinson’s Disease related proteins contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction which precedes reactive oxygen species formation. In this mini review, we give an update of the classical pathways involving these mechanisms of neurodegeneration, the biochemical and molecular events that mediate or regulate DA neuronal vulnerability, and the role of PD-related gene products in modulating cellular responses to oxidative stress in the course of the neurodegenerative process.

  14. Oxidative stress and Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesa, Javier; Trigo-Damas, Ines; Quiroga-Varela, Anna; Jackson-Lewis, Vernice R.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive neurological disease that is associated with a loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta of the brain. The molecular mechanisms underlying the loss of these neurons still remain elusive. Oxidative stress is thought to play an important role in dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Complex I deficiencies of the respiratory chain account for the majority of unfavorable neuronal degeneration in PD. Environmental factors, such as neurotoxins, pesticides, insecticides, dopamine (DA) itself, and genetic mutations in PD-associated proteins contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction which precedes reactive oxygen species formation. In this mini review, we give an update of the classical pathways involving these mechanisms of neurodegeneration, the biochemical and molecular events that mediate or regulate DA neuronal vulnerability, and the role of PD-related gene products in modulating cellular responses to oxidative stress in the course of the neurodegenerative process. PMID:26217195

  15. Metabolic syndrome and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Toshiro

    2009-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome is an obesity-associated collection of disorders, each of which contributes to cardiovascular risk. Metabolic syndrome is also associated with overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS contribute to the interrelationship between metabolic syndrome and salt-sensitive hypertension, which are both caused by obesity and excess salt consumption and are major threats to health in developed countries. ROS can induce insulin resistance, which is indispensable for the progression of metabolic syndrome, and salt-sensitive hypertension stimulates ROS production, thereby promoting the development of metabolic syndrome. Moreover, ROS activate mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and the sympathetic nervous system, which can contribute to the development of metabolic syndrome and salt-sensitive hypertension. Salt-induced progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is also accelerated in animal models with metabolic syndrome, probably owing to further stimulation of ROS overproduction and subsequent ROS-induced MR activation and sympathetic excitation. Therefore, ROS contribute to the progression of the metabolic syndrome itself and to the CVD accompanying it, particularly in conjunction with excessive salt consumption.

  16. Piracetam improves mitochondrial dysfunction following oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction including decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential and reduced ATP production represents a common final pathway of many conditions associated with oxidative stress, for example, hypoxia, hypoglycemia, and aging.Since the cognition-improving effects of the standard nootropic piracetam are usually more pronounced under such pathological conditions and young healthy animals usually benefit little by piracetam, the effect of piracetam on mitochondrial dysfunction fol...

  17. Study of Oxidative Stress in Vitiligo

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Vitiligo is an idiopathic, acquired, circumscribed, hypomelanotic skin disorder, characterized by milky white patches of different sizes and shapes. It is due to the destruction of melanocytes resulting in the absence of pigment production of the skin and mucosal surfaces. Oxidative stress has been implicated in pathophysiology of vitiligo. To study the activity of blood Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in vitiligo patients. A case–control study was conducted in whi...

  18. Oxidative stress in prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Udensi K. Udensi; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic hyperplasia (PH) is a common urologic disease that affects mostly elderly men. PH can be classified as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or prostate cancer (PCa) based on its severity. Oxidative stress (OS) is known to influence the activities of inflammatory mediators and other cellular processes involved in the initiation, promotion and progression of human neoplasms including prostate cancer. Scientific evidence also suggests that micronutrient supplementation may restore the a...

  19. Oxidative stress and male reproductive health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Aitken

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the major causes of defective sperm function is oxidative stress, which not only disrupts the integrity of sperm DNA but also limits the fertilizing potential of these cells as a result of collateral damage to proteins and lipids in the sperm plasma membrane. The origins of such oxidative stress appear to involve the sperm mitochondria, which have a tendency to generate high levels of superoxide anion as a prelude to entering the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. Unfortunately, these cells have very little capacity to respond to such an attack because they only possess the first enzyme in the base excision repair (BER pathway, 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (OGG1. The latter successfully creates an abasic site, but the spermatozoa cannot process the oxidative lesion further because they lack the downstream proteins (APE1, XRCC1 needed to complete the repair process. It is the responsibility of the oocyte to continue the BER pathway prior to initiation of S-phase of the first mitotic division. If a mistake is made by the oocyte at this stage of development, a mutation will be created that will be represented in every cell in the body. Such mechanisms may explain the increase in childhood cancers and other diseases observed in the offspring of males who have suffered oxidative stress in their germ line as a consequence of age, environmental or lifestyle factors. The high prevalence of oxidative DNA damage in the spermatozoa of male infertility patients may have implications for the health of children conceivedin vitro and serves as a driver for current research into the origins of free radical generation in the germ line.

  20. Role of mitochondrial oxidative stress in hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungvari, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    Based on mosaic theory, hypertension is a multifactorial disorder that develops because of genetic, environmental, anatomical, adaptive neural, endocrine, humoral, and hemodynamic factors. It has been recently proposed that oxidative stress may contribute to all of these factors and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the development of hypertension. Previous studies focusing on the role of vascular NADPH oxidases provided strong support of this concept. Although mitochondria represent one of the most significant sources of cellular ROS generation, the regulation of mitochondrial ROS generation in the cardiovascular system and its pathophysiological role in hypertension are much less understood. In this review, the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of hypertension and cross talk between angiotensin II signaling, pathways involved in mechanotransduction, NADPH oxidases, and mitochondria-derived ROS are considered. The possible benefits of therapeutic strategies that have the potential to attenuate mitochondrial oxidative stress for the prevention/treatment of hypertension are also discussed. PMID:24043248

  1. Effects of High-Intensity Swimming on Lung Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in a Murine Model of DEP-Induced Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo C M Ávila

    Full Text Available Studies have reported that exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs induces lung inflammation and increases oxidative stress, and both effects are susceptible to changes via regular aerobic exercise in rehabilitation programs. However, the effects of exercise on lungs exposed to DEP after the cessation of exercise are not clear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of high-intensity swimming on lung inflammation and oxidative stress in mice exposed to DEP concomitantly and after exercise cessation. Male Swiss mice were divided into 4 groups: Control (n = 12, Swimming (30 min/day (n = 8, DEP (3 mg/mL-10 μL/mouse (n = 9 and DEP+Swimming (n = 8. The high-intensity swimming was characterized by an increase in blood lactate levels greater than 1 mmoL/L between 10th and 30th minutes of exercise. Twenty-four hours after the final exposure to DEP, the anesthetized mice were euthanized, and we counted the number of total and differential inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF, measured the lung homogenate levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, INF-ϫ, IL-10, and IL-1ra using ELISA, and measured the levels of glutathione, non-protein thiols (GSH-t and NPSH and the antioxidant enzymes catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx in the lung. Swimming sessions decreased the number of total cells (p<0.001, neutrophils and lymphocytes (p<0.001; p<0.05 in the BALF, as well as lung levels of IL-1β (p = 0.002, TNF-α (p = 0.003, IL-6 (p = 0.0001 and IFN-ϫ (p = 0.0001. However, the levels of IL-10 (p = 0.01 and IL-1ra (p = 0.0002 increased in the swimming groups compared with the control groups, as did the CAT lung levels (p = 0.0001. Simultaneously, swimming resulted in an increase in the GSH-t and NPSH lung levels in the DEP group (p = 0.0001 and p<0.002. We concluded that in this experimental model, the high-intensity swimming sessions decreased the lung inflammation and oxidative stress status during DEP-induced lung

  2. Iron, Oxidative Stress and Gestational Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taifeng Zhuang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Both iron deficiency and hyperglycemia are highly prevalent globally for pregnant women. Iron supplementation is recommended during pregnancy to control iron deficiency. The purposes of the review are to assess the oxidative effects of iron supplementation and the potential relationship between iron nutrition and gestational diabetes. High doses of iron (~relative to 60 mg or more daily for adult humans can induce lipid peroxidation in vitro and in animal studies. Pharmaceutical doses of iron supplements (e.g., 10× RDA or more for oral supplements or direct iron supplementation via injection or addition to the cell culture medium for a short or long duration will induce DNA damage. Higher heme-iron intake or iron status measured by various biomarkers, especially serum ferritin, might contribute to greater risk of gestational diabetes, which may be mediated by iron oxidative stress though lipid oxidation and/or DNA damage. However, information is lacking about the effect of low dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily on lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and gestational diabetes. Randomized trials of low-dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily for pregnant women are warranted to test the relationship between iron oxidative stress and insulin resistance/gestational diabetes, especially for iron-replete women.

  3. Oxidative stress-mediated antibacterial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurunathan S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Sangiliyandi Gurunathan, Jae Woong Han, Ahmed Abdal Dayem, Vasuki Eppakayala, Jin-Hoi KimDepartment of Animal Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Seoul, South KoreaBackground: Graphene holds great promise for potential use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices due to its unique high carrier mobility, good optical transparency, large surface area, and biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effects of graphene oxide (GO and reduced graphene oxide (rGO in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, we used a novel reducing agent, betamercaptoethanol (BME, for synthesis of graphene to avoid the use of toxic materials. To uncover the impacts of GO and rGO on human health, the antibacterial activity of two types of graphene-based material toward a bacterial model P. aeruginosa was studied and compared.Methods: The synthesized GO and rGO was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, particle-size analyzer, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Further, to explain the antimicrobial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide, we employed various assays, such as cell growth, cell viability, reactive oxygen species generation, and DNA fragmentation.Results: Ultraviolet-visible spectra of the samples confirmed the transition of GO into graphene. Dynamic light-scattering analyses showed the average size among the two types of graphene materials. X-ray diffraction data validated the structure of graphene sheets, and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy was employed to investigate the morphologies of prepared graphene. Raman spectroscopy data indicated the removal of oxygen-containing functional groups from the surface of GO and the formation of graphene. The exposure of cells to GO and rGO induced the production of superoxide radical anion and loss of cell viability. Results suggest that the antibacterial activities are contributed to by loss of

  4. Protection by 6-aminonicotinamide against oxidative stress in cardiac cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofgaard, Johannes P; Sigurdardottir, Kristin Sigridur; Treiman, Marek

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress at the time of reperfusion is a major aspect of ischemia-reperfusion injury in heart as well as in other organs. There is a continuing interest in development of pharmacological approaches to alleviate this injury. 6-Aminonicotinamide (6AN) has been shown to diminish myocardial...... necrosis following global ischemia in an isolated rat heart, apparently by limiting the oxidative injury component. We therefore explored the antioxidative potential of 6AN in a model using H9C2(2-1) rat cardiac myoblasts exposed to H2O2 stress. Dependent on the specific protocol, 6AN pretreatment for 6....... The protective effect of 6AN was associated with a decrease in total cell content of the reduced glutathione (GSH) by 15-44%, indicative of an oxidative shift in the GSH/GSSG system redox potential. We propose that this redox shift caused an increased Ca2+ leak through ryanodine receptors, reflecting their known...

  5. The incretin analogue D-Ala2GIP reduces plaque load, astrogliosis and oxidative stress in an APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, A M; Hölscher, C

    2013-01-03

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus has been identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Insulin is a neuroprotective growth factor, and an impairment of insulin signalling has been found in AD brains. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), an incretin hormone, normalises insulin signalling and also acts as a neuroprotective growth factor. GIP plays an important role in memory formation, synaptic plasticity and cell proliferation. We have shown previously that the long-lasting incretin hormone analogue D-Ala(2)GIP protects memory formation and synaptic plasticity, reduces plaques, normalises the proliferation of stem cells, reduces the activation of microglia, and prevents the loss of synapses in the cortex of the APPswe/PS1deltaE9 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. D-Ala(2)GIP was injected for 35 days at 25 nmol/kg i.p. once daily in APP/PS1 male mice and wild-type (WT) littermates aged 6, 12 and 19 months. In a follow-up study, we analysed plaque load, the activation of astrocytes as a means of chronic inflammation in the brain, and oxidative stress in the brains of these mice (8-oxoguanine levels). D-Ala(2)GIP reduced the amyloid plaque load in 12- and 19-month-old mice, and the inflammation response as shown in the reduction of activated astrocytes in 12- and 19-month old APP/PS1 mice. Chronic oxidative stress in the brain was reduced in 12- and 19-month-old mice as shown in the reduction of 8-oxoguanine levels in the cortex of D-Ala(2)GIP-injected APP/PS1 mice. The results demonstrate that D-Ala(2)GIP has neuroprotective properties on key markers found in Alzheimer's disease. This finding shows that novel GIP analogues have the potential to be developed as novel therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A study of glutamate levels, NR1, NR2A, NR2B receptors and oxidative stress in rat model of Japanese encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Prashant Singh; Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee

    2017-03-15

    There is paucity of studies on the role of glutamate excitotoxicity in cell damage in Japanese encephalitis. In this study the glutamate levels and its NMDA receptors, and oxidative stress markers in different brain regions have been evaluated and correlated with neurobehavioral changes at different time points. Twelve day old Wistar rats were inoculated with 3×10(6)pfu/ml intracerebrally. The neurobehavioral effects were evaluated by spontaneous locomotor activity (SLA), grip strength and rota rod test on 10, 33 and 48days post inoculation (dpi). Glutamate level was evaluated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, mRNA gene expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor 1, 2A and 2B (NR1, NR2A and NR2B) were evaluated by real time PCR. Malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels were measured by spectrophotometer in different brain regions of JEV infected rats on 10, 33 and 48dpi. There was significant increase in motor deficit, grip strength and decreased locomotor activity on 10 and 33dpi. Glutamate levels were increased in thalamus, midbrain, frontal cortex, striatum and cerebellum on 10 and 33dpi and were followed by a recovery on 48dpi. Glutamate NMDR receptors NR1, NR2A and NR2B were reduced in thalamus, midbrain, frontal cortex, striatum and cerebellum on 10dpi which was followed by recovery after 33dpi. A significant increase in MDA level in thalamus, midbrain, frontal cortex, striatum and cerebellum was noted on 10 and 33dpi. The antioxidant GSH and GPx were significantly reduced in these brain regions on 10 and 33dpi. Glutamate, MDA, GSH and GPx correlated in different brain regions as the disease progress. Increased Glutamate level may be related to oxidative stress and may be responsible for behavioral alterations in rat model of Japanese encephalitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Opposing roles of p38 and JNK in a Drosophila model of TDP-43 proteinopathy reveal oxidative stress and innate immunity as pathogenic components of neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Lihong; Xie, Qijing; Tibbetts, Randal S.

    2015-01-01

    Pathological aggregation and mutation of the 43-kDa TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) are strongly implicated in the pathogenesis amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. TDP-43 neurotoxicity has been extensively modeled in mice, zebrafish, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila, where selective expression of TDP-43 in motoneurons led to paralysis and premature lethality. Through a genetic screen aimed to identify genetic modifiers of TDP-43, we found that the Drosophila dual leucine kinase Wallenda (Wnd) and its downstream kinases JNK and p38 influenced TDP-43 neurotoxicity. Reducing Wnd gene dosage or overexpressing its antagonist highwire partially rescued TDP-43-associated premature lethality. Downstream of Wnd, the JNK and p38 kinases played opposing roles in TDP-43-associated neurodegeneration. LOF alleles of the p38b gene as well as p38 inhibitors diminished TDP-43-associated premature lethality, whereas p38b GOF caused phenotypic worsening. In stark contrast, disruptive alleles of Basket (Bsk), the Drosophila homologue of JNK, exacerbated longevity shortening, whereas overexpression of Bsk extended lifespan. Among possible mechanisms, we found motoneuron-directed expression of TDP-43 elicited oxidative stress and innate immune gene activation that were exacerbated by p38 GOF and Bsk LOF, respectively. A key pathologic role for innate immunity in TDP-43-associated neurodegeneration was further supported by the finding that genetic suppression of the Toll/Dif and Imd/Relish inflammatory pathways dramatically extended lifespan of TDP-43 transgenic flies. We propose that oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are intrinsic components of TDP-43-associated neurodegeneration and that the balance between cytoprotective JNK and cytotoxic p38 signaling dictates phenotypic outcome to TDP-43 expression in Drosophila. PMID:25281658

  8. Effects of Lead and Cadmium on Brain Endothelial Cell Survival, Monolayer Permeability, and Crucial Oxidative Stress Markers in an in Vitro Model of the Blood-Brain Barrier

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    Shakila Tobwala

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress, which is the loss of balance between antioxidant defense and oxidant production in the cells, is implicated in the molecular mechanism of heavy metal-induced neurotoxicity. Given the key role of lead (Pb and cadmium (Cd in inducing oxidative stress, we investigated their role in disrupting the integrity and function of immortalized human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3. To study this, hCMEC/D3 cells were exposed to control media or to media containing different concentrations of Pb or Cd. Those exposed to Pb or Cd showed significantly higher oxidative stress than the untreated group, as indicated by cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS, glutathione (GSH levels, and catalase enzyme activity. Pb also induced oxidative stress-related disruption of the hCMEC/D3 cell monolayer, as measured by trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER, the dextran permeability assay, and the level of tight junction protein, zona occluden protein (ZO-2. However, no significant disruption in the integrity of the endothelial monolayer was seen with cadmium at the concentrations used. Taken together, these results show that Pb and Cd induce cell death and dysfunction in hCMEC/D3 cells and, in the case of Pb, barrier disruption. This suggests blood brain barrier (BBB dysfunction as a contributing mechanism in Pb and Cd neurotoxicities.

  9. l-Arginine Enhances Resistance against Oxidative Stress and Heat Stress in Caenorhabditis elegans

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    Heran Ma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant properties of l-arginine (l-Arg in vivo, and its effect on enhancing resistance to oxidative stress and heat stress in Caenorhabditis elegans were investigated. C. elegans, a worm model popularly used in molecular and developmental biology, was used in the present study. Here, we report that l-Arg, at a concentration of 1 mM, prolonged C. elegans life by 26.98% and 37.02% under oxidative and heat stress, respectively. Further experiments indicated that the longevity-extending effects of l-Arg may be exerted by its free radical scavenging capacity and the upregulation of aging-associated gene expression in worms. This work is important in the context of numerous recent studies that concluded that environment stresses are associated with an increased population death rate.

  10. Cardiovascular Complications of Sleep Apnea: Role of Oxidative Stress

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    Mohammad Badran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA occurs in 2% of middle-aged women and 4% of middle-aged men with a higher prevalence among obese subjects. This condition is considered as an independent risk factor for cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases. One of the major pathophysiological characteristics of OSA is intermittent hypoxia. Hypoxia can lead to oxidative stress and overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which can lead to endothelial dysfunction, a hallmark of atherosclerosis. Many animal models, such as the rodent model of intermittent hypoxia, mimic obstructive sleep apnea in human patients and allow more in-depth investigation of biological and cellular mechanisms of this condition. This review discusses the role of oxidative stress in cardiovascular disease resulting from OSA in humans and animal models.

  11. Oxidative Stress in Dilated Cardiomyopathy Caused by MYBPC3 Mutation

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    Thomas L. Lynch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathies can result from mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins including MYBPC3, which encodes cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C. However, whether oxidative stress is augmented due to contractile dysfunction and cardiomyocyte damage in MYBPC3-mutated cardiomyopathies has not been elucidated. To determine whether oxidative stress markers were elevated in MYBPC3-mutated cardiomyopathies, a previously characterized 3-month-old mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM expressing a homozygous MYBPC3 mutation (cMyBP-C(t/t was used, compared to wild-type (WT mice. Echocardiography confirmed decreased percentage of fractional shortening in DCM versus WT hearts. Histopathological analysis indicated a significant increase in myocardial disarray and fibrosis while the second harmonic generation imaging revealed disorganized sarcomeric structure and myocyte damage in DCM hearts when compared to WT hearts. Intriguingly, DCM mouse heart homogenates had decreased glutathione (GSH/GSSG ratio and increased protein carbonyl and lipid malondialdehyde content compared to WT heart homogenates, consistent with elevated oxidative stress. Importantly, a similar result was observed in human cardiomyopathy heart homogenate samples. These results were further supported by reduced signals for mitochondrial semiquinone radicals and Fe-S clusters in DCM mouse hearts measured using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. In conclusion, we demonstrate elevated oxidative stress in MYPBC3-mutated DCM mice, which may exacerbate the development of heart failure.

  12. Mechanisms of Nanoparticle-Induced Oxidative Stress and Toxicity

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    Amruta Manke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly emerging field of nanotechnology has offered innovative discoveries in the medical, industrial, and consumer sectors. The unique physicochemical and electrical properties of engineered nanoparticles (NP make them highly desirable in a variety of applications. However, these novel properties of NP are fraught with concerns for environmental and occupational exposure. Changes in structural and physicochemical properties of NP can lead to changes in biological activities including ROS generation, one of the most frequently reported NP-associated toxicities. Oxidative stress induced by engineered NP is due to acellular factors such as particle surface, size, composition, and presence of metals, while cellular responses such as mitochondrial respiration, NP-cell interaction, and immune cell activation are responsible for ROS-mediated damage. NP-induced oxidative stress responses are torch bearers for further pathophysiological effects including genotoxicity, inflammation, and fibrosis as demonstrated by activation of associated cell signaling pathways. Since oxidative stress is a key determinant of NP-induced injury, it is necessary to characterize the ROS response resulting from NP. Through physicochemical characterization and understanding of the multiple signaling cascades activated by NP-induced ROS, a systemic toxicity screen with oxidative stress as a predictive model for NP-induced injury can be developed.

  13. Oxidative Stress and Anxiety: Relationship and Cellular Pathways

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    Jaouad Bouayed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available High O2 consumption, modest antioxidant defenses and a lipid-rich constitution make the brain highly vulnerable to redox imbalances. Oxidative damage in the brain causes nervous system impairment. Recently, oxidative stress has also been implicated in depression, anxiety disorders and high anxiety levels. The findings which establish a link between oxidative stress and pathological anxiety have inspired a number of other recent studies focusing on the link between oxidative status and normal anxiety and also on a possible causal relationship between cellular oxidative stress and emotional stress. This review examines the recent discoveries made on the link between oxidative status and normal anxiety levels and the putative role of oxidative stress in genesis of anxiety. We discuss the different opinions and questions that exist in the field and review the methodological approaches that are being used to determine a causal relationship between oxidative and emotional stress.

  14. Role of oxidative stress in female reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ashok; Gupta, Sajal; Sharma, Rakesh K

    2005-07-14

    In a healthy body, ROS (reactive oxygen species) and antioxidants remain in balance. When the balance is disrupted towards an overabundance of ROS, oxidative stress (OS) occurs. OS influences the entire reproductive lifespan of a woman and even thereafter (i.e. menopause). OS results from an imbalance between prooxidants (free radical species) and the body's scavenging ability (antioxidants). ROS are a double-edged sword - they serve as key signal molecules in physiological processes but also have a role in pathological processes involving the female reproductive tract. ROS affect multiple physiological processes from oocyte maturation to fertilization, embryo development and pregnancy. It has been suggested that OS modulates the age-related decline in fertility. It plays a role during pregnancy and normal parturition and in initiation of preterm labor. Most ovarian cancers appear in the surface epithelium, and repetitive ovulation has been thought to be a causative factor. Ovulation-induced oxidative base damage and damage to DNA of the ovarian epithelium can be prevented by antioxidants. There is growing literature on the effects of OS in female reproduction with involvement in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia, hydatidiform mole, free radical-induced birth defects and other situations such as abortions. Numerous studies have shown that OS plays a role in the pathophysiology of infertility and assisted fertility. There is some evidence of its role in endometriosis, tubal and peritoneal factor infertility and unexplained infertility. This article reviews the role OS plays in normal cycling ovaries, follicular development and cyclical endometrial changes. It also discusses OS-related female infertility and how it influences the outcomes of assisted reproductive techniques. The review comprehensively explores the literature for evidence of the role of oxidative stress in conditions such as abortions, preeclampsia, hydatidiform mole, fetal embryopathies, preterm

  15. Role of oxidative stress in female reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Rakesh K

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In a healthy body, ROS (reactive oxygen species and antioxidants remain in balance. When the balance is disrupted towards an overabundance of ROS, oxidative stress (OS occurs. OS influences the entire reproductive lifespan of a woman and even thereafter (i.e. menopause. OS results from an imbalance between prooxidants (free radical species and the body's scavenging ability (antioxidants. ROS are a double-edged sword – they serve as key signal molecules in physiological processes but also have a role in pathological processes involving the female reproductive tract. ROS affect multiple physiological processes from oocyte maturation to fertilization, embryo development and pregnancy. It has been suggested that OS modulates the age-related decline in fertility. It plays a role during pregnancy and normal parturition and in initiation of preterm labor. Most ovarian cancers appear in the surface epithelium, and repetitive ovulation has been thought to be a causative factor. Ovulation-induced oxidative base damage and damage to DNA of the ovarian epithelium can be prevented by antioxidants. There is growing literature on the effects of OS in female reproduction with involvement in the pathophsiology of preeclampsia, hydatidiform mole, free radical-induced birth defects and other situations such as abortions. Numerous studies have shown that OS plays a role in the pathoysiology of infertility and assisted fertility. There is some evidence of its role in endometriosis, tubal and peritoneal factor infertility and unexplained infertility. This article reviews the role OS plays in normal cycling ovaries, follicular development and cyclical endometrial changes. It also discusses OS-related female infertility and how it influences the outcomes of assisted reproductive techniques. The review comprehensively explores the literature for evidence of the role of oxidative stress in conditions such as abortions, preeclampsia, hydatidiform mole, fetal

  16. Pathway and mechanism of oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Current hypotheses of pathogenesis of neuronal degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been proposed, including formation of free radicals, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory processes, genetic factors, environmental impact factors, apoptosis, and so on. Especially, oxidative stress plays an essential role in AD pathogenesis by the function of linking agent. Oxidative stress in AD mainly includes lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA oxidation. Lipid peroxidation plays a key role in the development and progression of AD. Protein oxidation is an important mechanism in AD. Oxidative damage to DNA may plays an important role in aging and AD.

  17. Autistic-Like Behaviors, Oxidative Stress Status, and Histopathological Changes in Cerebellum of Valproic Acid Rat Model of Autism Are Improved by the Combined Extract of Purple Rice and Silkworm Pupae

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    Nartnutda Morakotsriwan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the crucial role of oxidative stress on the pathophysiology of autism and the concept of synergistic effect, the benefit of the combined extract of purple rice and silkworm pupae (AP1 for autism disorder was the focus. Therefore, we aimed to determine the effect of AP1 on autistic-like behaviors, oxidative stress status, and histopathological change of cerebellum in valproic acid (VPA rat model of autism. VPA was injected on postnatal day (PND 14 and the animals were orally given AP1 at doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg·kg−1 BW between PND 14 and PND 40. The autism-like behaviors were analyzed via hot-plate, rotarod, elevated plus-maze, learning, memory, and social behavior tests. Oxidative stress and the histological change in the cerebellum were assessed at the end of study. AP1 treated rats improved behaviors in all tests except that in hot-plate test. The improvement of oxidative stress and Purkinje cell loss was also observed in the cerebellum of VPA-treated rats. Our data suggest that AP1 partially reduced autism-like behaviors by improving oxidative stress and Purkinje cell loss. Further research is required to identify the active ingredients in AP1 and gender difference effect.

  18. Autistic-Like Behaviors, Oxidative Stress Status, and Histopathological Changes in Cerebellum of Valproic Acid Rat Model of Autism Are Improved by the Combined Extract of Purple Rice and Silkworm Pupae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morakotsriwan, Nartnutda; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Kirisattayakul, Woranan; Chaisiwamongkol, Kowit

    2016-01-01

    Due to the crucial role of oxidative stress on the pathophysiology of autism and the concept of synergistic effect, the benefit of the combined extract of purple rice and silkworm pupae (AP1) for autism disorder was the focus. Therefore, we aimed to determine the effect of AP1 on autistic-like behaviors, oxidative stress status, and histopathological change of cerebellum in valproic acid (VPA) rat model of autism. VPA was injected on postnatal day (PND) 14 and the animals were orally given AP1 at doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg·kg(-1) BW between PND 14 and PND 40. The autism-like behaviors were analyzed via hot-plate, rotarod, elevated plus-maze, learning, memory, and social behavior tests. Oxidative stress and the histological change in the cerebellum were assessed at the end of study. AP1 treated rats improved behaviors in all tests except that in hot-plate test. The improvement of oxidative stress and Purkinje cell loss was also observed in the cerebellum of VPA-treated rats. Our data suggest that AP1 partially reduced autism-like behaviors by improving oxidative stress and Purkinje cell loss. Further research is required to identify the active ingredients in AP1 and gender difference effect.

  19. Fus1 KO mouse as a model of oxidative stress-mediated sporadic Alzheimer’s disease: circadian disruption and long-term spatial and olfactory memory impairments.

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    Guillermo Coronas-Samano

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient advances in the development of effective therapeutic treatments of sporadic Alzheimer's Disease (sAD to date are largely due to the lack of sAD-relevant animal models. While the vast majority of models do recapitulate AD's hallmarks of plaques and tangles by virtue of tau and/or beta amyloid overexpression, these models do not reflect the fact that in sAD (unlike familial AD these genes are not risk factors per se and that other mechanisms like oxidative stress, metabolic dysregulation and inflammation play key roles in AD etiology. Here we characterize and propose the Fus1 KO mice that lack a mitochondrial protein Fus1/Tusc2 as a new sAD model. To establish sAD relevance, we assessed sAD related deficits in Fus1 KO and WT adult mice of 4-5 months old, the equivalent human age when the earliest cognitive and olfactory sAD symptoms arise. Fus1 KO mice showed oxidative stress (increased levels of ROS, decreased levels of PRDX1, disruption of metabolic homeostasis (decreased levels of ACC2, increased phosphorylation of AMPK, autophagy (decreased levels of LC3-II, PKC (decreased levels of RACK1 and calcium signaling (decreased levels of Calb2 in the olfactory bulb and/or hippocampus. Mice were behaviorally tested using objective and accurate video tracking (Noldus, in which Fus1 KO mice showed clear deficits in olfactory memory (decreased habituation/cross-habituation in the short and long term, olfactory guided navigation memory (inability to reduce their latency to find the hidden cookie, spatial memory (learning impairments on finding the platform in the Morris water maze and showed more sleep time during the diurnal cycle. Fus1 KO mice did not show clear deficits in olfactory perception (cross-habituation, association memory (passive avoidance or in species-typical behavior (nest building and no increased anxiety (open field, light-dark box or depression/anhedonia (sucrose preference at this relatively young age. These

  20. Renal Dopamine Receptors, Oxidative Stress, and Hypertension

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    Ines Armando

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine, which is synthesized in the kidney, independent of renal nerves, plays an important role in the regulation of fluid and electrolyte balance and systemic blood pressure. Lack of any of the five dopamine receptor subtypes (D1R, D2R, D3R, D4R, and D5R results in hypertension. D1R, D2R, and D5R have been reported to be important in the maintenance of a normal redox balance. In the kidney, the antioxidant effects of these receptors are caused by direct and indirect inhibition of pro-oxidant enzymes, specifically, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced form (NADPH oxidase, and stimulation of anti-oxidant enzymes, which can also indirectly inhibit NADPH oxidase activity. Thus, stimulation of the D2R increases the expression of endogenous anti-oxidants, such as Parkinson protein 7 (PARK7 or DJ-1, paraoxonase 2 (PON2, and heme oxygenase 2 (HO-2, all of which can inhibit NADPH oxidase activity. The D5R decreases NADPH oxidase activity, via the inhibition of phospholipase D2, and increases the expression of HO-1, another antioxidant. D1R inhibits NADPH oxidase activity via protein kinase A and protein kinase C cross-talk. In this review, we provide an overview of the protective roles of a specific dopamine receptor subtype on renal oxidative stress, the different mechanisms involved in this effect, and the role of oxidative stress and impairment of dopamine receptor function in the hypertension that arises from the genetic ablation of a specific dopamine receptor gene in mice.

  1. Renal dopamine receptors, oxidative stress, and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Santiago; Villar, Van Anthony; Jose, Pedro A; Armando, Ines

    2013-08-27

    Dopamine, which is synthesized in the kidney, independent of renal nerves, plays an important role in the regulation of fluid and electrolyte balance and systemic blood pressure. Lack of any of the five dopamine receptor subtypes (D1R, D2R, D3R, D4R, and D5R) results in hypertension. D1R, D2R, and D5R have been reported to be important in the maintenance of a normal redox balance. In the kidney, the antioxidant effects of these receptors are caused by direct and indirect inhibition of pro-oxidant enzymes, specifically, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced form (NADPH) oxidase, and stimulation of anti-oxidant enzymes, which can also indirectly inhibit NADPH oxidase activity. Thus, stimulation of the D2R increases the expression of endogenous anti-oxidants, such as Parkinson protein 7 (PARK7 or DJ-1), paraoxonase 2 (PON2), and heme oxygenase 2 (HO-2), all of which can inhibit NADPH oxidase activity. The D5R decreases NADPH oxidase activity, via the inhibition of phospholipase D2, and increases the expression of HO-1, another antioxidant. D1R inhibits NADPH oxidase activity via protein kinase A and protein kinase C cross-talk. In this review, we provide an overview of the protective roles of a specific dopamine receptor subtype on renal oxidative stress, the different mechanisms involved in this effect, and the role of oxidative stress and impairment of dopamine receptor function in the hypertension that arises from the genetic ablation of a specific dopamine receptor gene in mice.

  2. Oxidative stress associated with exercise, psychological stress and life-style factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, P; Wallin, H; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.

    1996-01-01

    generation. Here, we review the effect of alcohol, air pollution, cigarette smoke, diet, exercise, non-ionizing radiation (UV and microwaves) and psychological stress on the development of oxidative stress. Regular exercise and carbohydrate-rich diets seem to increase the resistance against oxidative stress....... Air pollution, alcohol, cigarette smoke, non-ionizing radiation and psychological stress seem to increase oxidative stress. Alcohol in lower doses may act as an antioxidant on low density lipoproteins and thereby have an anti-atherosclerotic property....

  3. An in vitro liver model--assessing oxidative stress and genotoxicity following exposure of hepatocytes to a panel of engineered nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermanizadeh, Ali; Gaiser, Birgit K; Hutchison, Gary R

    2012-01-01

    Following exposure via inhalation, intratracheal instillation or ingestion some nanomaterials (NM) have been shown to translocate to the liver. Since oxidative stress has been implicated as a possible mechanism for NM toxicity this study aimed to investigate the effects of various materials (five...

  4. Effect of sodium salicylate on oxidative stress andinsulinresistanceinducedbyfreefattyacids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing He; Sheng Zhao; Wei Zhang; Yan Li; Ping Han

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been reported that high-dose salicy-lates improve free fatty acids (FFAs)-induced insulin resistance andβ-cell dysfunction in vitro, but the mechanism remains uncertain. In insulin-resistant rats, we found that the supplementation of sodium salicylate is associated with a reduction of plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), a marker of oxidative stress. Few studies have investigated the effects of salicylates on oxidative stress levels in insulin-resistant animal models. This study aimed to assess the effect of sodium salicylate on insulin sensitivity and to explore the potential mechanism by which it improves hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance. METHODS: Intralipid+heparin (IH), saline (SAL), or intralipid+heparin+sodium salicylate (IHS) were separately infused for 7 hours in normal Wistar rats. During the last 2 hours of the infusion, hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamping was performed with [6-3H] glucose tracer. Plasma glucose was measured using the glucose oxygenase method. Plasma insulin and C-peptide were determined by radioimmunoassay. MDA levels and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activity in the liver and skeletal muscle were measured with colorimetric kits. RESULTS: Compared with infusion of SAL, IH infusion increased hepatic glucose production (HGP), and decreased glucose utilization (GU) (P CONCLUSIONS: Short-term elevation of fatty acids induces insulin resistance by enhancing oxidative stress levels in the liver and muscle. The administration of the anti-inlfammatory drug sodium salicylate reduces the degree of oxidative stress, therefore improving hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance. IKK-β and NF-κB provide potential pathogenic links to oxidative stress.

  5. Iron Dextran Increases Hepatic Oxidative Stress and Alters Expression of Genes Related to Lipid Metabolism Contributing to Hyperlipidaemia in Murine Model

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    Maísa Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of iron dextran on lipid metabolism and to determine the involvement of oxidative stress. Fischer rats were divided into two groups: the standard group (S, which was fed the AIN-93M diet, and the standard plus iron group (SI, which was fed the same diet but also received iron dextran injections. Serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels were higher in the SI group than in the S group. Iron dextran was associated with decreased mRNA levels of pparα, and its downstream gene cpt1a, which is involved in lipid oxidation. Iron dextran also increased mRNA levels of apoB-100, MTP, and L-FABP indicating alterations in lipid secretion. Carbonyl protein and TBARS were consistently higher in the liver of the iron-treated rats. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was found between oxidative stress products, lfabp expression, and iron stores. In addition, a negative correlation was found between pparα expression, TBARS, carbonyl protein, and iron stores. In conclusion, our results suggest that the increase observed in the transport of lipids in the bloodstream and the decreased fatty acid oxidation in rats, which was promoted by iron dextran, might be attributed to increased oxidative stress.

  6. Oxidative stress inhibition and oxidant activity by fibrous clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia

    2015-09-01

    Fibrous clays (sepiolite, palygorskite) are produced at 1.2m tonnes per year and have a wide range of industrial applications needing to replace long-fibre length asbestos. However, information on the beneficial effects of fibrous clays on health remains scarce. This paper reports on the effect of sepiolite (Vallecas, Spain) and palygorskite (Torrejón El Rubio, Spain) on cell damage via oxidative stress (determined as the progress of lipid peroxidation, LP). The extent of LP was assessed using the Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances assay. The oxidant activity by fibrous clays was quantified using Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance. Sepiolite and palygorskite inhibited LP, whereby corresponding IC50 values were 6557±1024 and 4250±289μgmL(-1). As evidenced by dose-response experiments LP inhibition by palygorskite was surface-controlled. Fibrous clay surfaces did not stabilize HO species, except for suspensions containing 5000μgmL(-1). A strong oxidant (or weak anti-oxidant) activity favours the inhibition of LP by fibrous clays.

  7. Different Impacts of Cardiovascular Risk Factors on Oxidative Stress

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    Sebastian Blesa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to evaluate oxidative stress (OS status in subjects with different cardiovascular risk factors. With this in mind, we have studied three models of high cardiovascular risk: hypertension (HT with and without metabolic syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia (FH and familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCH with and without insulin resistance. Oxidative stress markers (oxidized/reduced glutathione ratio, 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine and malondialdehide together with the activity of antioxidant enzyme triad (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and activation of both pro-oxidant enzyme (NAPDH oxidase components and AGTR1 genes, as well as antioxidant enzyme genes (CuZn-SOD, CAT, GPX1, GSR, GSS and TXN were measured in mononuclear cells of controls (n = 20 and patients (n = 90 by assessing mRNA levels. Activity of some of these antioxidant enzymes was also tested. An increase in OS and pro-oxidant gene mRNA values was observed in patients compared to controls. The hypertensive group showed not only the highest OS values, but also the highest pro-oxidant activation compared to those observed in the other groups. In addition, in HT a significantly reduced antioxidant activity and mRNA induction of antioxidant genes were found when compared to controls and the other groups. In FH and FCH, the activation of pro-oxidant enzymes was also higher and antioxidant ones lower than in the control group, although it did not reach the values obtained in hypertensives. The thioredoxin system was more activated in patients as compared to controls, and the highest levels were in hypertensives. The increased oxidative status in the presence of cardiovascular risk factors is a consequence of both the activation of pro-oxidant mechanisms and the reduction of the antioxidant ones. The altered response of the main cytoplasmic antioxidant systems largely contributes to OS despite the apparent attempt of the thioredoxin system to

  8. Oxidative stress response pathways: Fission yeast as archetype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadakis, Manos A.; Workman, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    the transcriptional response of fission yeast cells to elevated levels of hydrogen peroxide. Particular attention is paid to the mechanisms that yeast cells employ to promote cell survival in conditions of intermediate and acute oxidative stress. The role of the Sty1/Spc1/Phh1 mitogen-activated protein kinase......Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a popular model eukaryotic organism to study diverse aspects of mammalian biology, including responses to cellular stress triggered by redox imbalances within its compartments. The review considers the current knowledge on the signaling pathways that govern...

  9. Oxidative stress response pathways: Fission yeast as archetype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Manos A; Workman, Christopher T

    2015-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a popular model eukaryotic organism to study diverse aspects of mammalian biology, including responses to cellular stress triggered by redox imbalances within its compartments. The review considers the current knowledge on the signaling pathways that govern the transcriptional response of fission yeast cells to elevated levels of hydrogen peroxide. Particular attention is paid to the mechanisms that yeast cells employ to promote cell survival in conditions of intermediate and acute oxidative stress. The role of the Sty1/Spc1/Phh1 mitogen-activated protein kinase in regulating gene expression at multiple levels is discussed in detail.

  10. Oxidative stress and antioxidant vitamins in leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta B. Trimbake

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leprosy is a disease of great antiquity and it still continues to be a significant public health problem in few countries including India .Of the various mechanisms that influence the pathogenesis of leprosy, oxidative stress is important which occurs due to derangement in the balance between ROS and natural antioxidants. Hence this study attempted to assess the oxidative stress and antioxidant status in terms of MDA and vitamin E, vitamin C respectively in leprosy. Methods: Hundred untreated leprosy patients (50 PB and 50 MB were studied and compared with 50 healthy controls. Serum Malondialdehyde (MDA and vitamin E, vitamin C was measured by spectrophotometric method. Serum malondialdehyde (MDA was measured as an indicator of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status was assessed by estimating serum vitamin E and vitamin C levels. Results: Significant rise in serum MDA (P <0.001 in both PB and MB leprosy was seen when compared with controls. The vitamin E level was significantly decreased in both PB and MB leprosy patients as compared to controls. The vitamin C level was significantly decrease (P<0.001 in MB leprosy patients as compared to controls. Conclusions: Elevated MDA levels indicate oxidative stress in leprosy patients, denoting its crucial involvement in the pathogenesis and tissue damage in leprosy. Hence MDA levels can be used to monitor prognosis, treatment and control of leprosy. Decreased vitamin E, C levels in leprosy can be improved by oral vitamin E, C supplementation. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(3.000: 226-229

  11. Effect of acute, slightly increased intra-abdominal pressure on intestinal permeability and oxidative stress in a rat model.

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    Yuxin Leng

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH is known as a common, serious complication in critically ill patients. Bacterial translocation and permeability changes are considered the pathophysiological bases for IAH-induced enterogenic endotoxemia and subsequent multiorgan failure. Nevertheless, the effects of slightly elevated intra-abdominal pressures (IAPs on the intestinal mucosa and the associated mechanisms remain unclear. METHODS: To investigate the acute effects of different nitrogen pneumoperitoneum grades on colonic mucosa, male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to six groups with different IAPs (0 [control], 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 mmHg, n = 6/group. During 90 min of exposure, we dynamically monitored the heart rate and noninvasive hemodynamic parameters. After gradual decompression, arterial blood gas analyses were conducted. Thereafter, structural injuries to the colonic mucosa were identified using light microscopy. Colon permeability was determined using the expression of tight junction proteins, combined with fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FD-4 absorption. The pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance was determined based on the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and antioxidant enzymes. RESULTS: IAH significantly affected the histological scores of the colonic mucosa, tight junction protein expression, mucosal permeability, and pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance. Interestingly, elevations of IAP that were lower than the threshold for IAH also showed a similar, undesirable effect. In the 8 mmHg group, mild hyponatremia, hypocalcemia, and hypoxemia occurred, accompanied by reduced blood and abdominal perfusion pressures. Mild microscopic inflammatory infiltration and increased MDA levels were also detected. Moreover, an 8-mm Hg IAP markedly inhibited the expression of tight junction proteins, although no significant differences in FD-4 permeability were observed between the 0- and 8-mmHg groups. CONCLUSIONS: Acute exposure to slightly

  12. The point about oxidative stress in molluscs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Manduzio

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available In the normal metabolism of the aerobic cell, oxygen is used for various biochemical reactions.Because of its two lone electrons of parallel spins, the molecular oxygen is stable. However, oxygengenerates Reactive Oxygenated Species or ROS by successive transfer of electrons. The ROS have astrong reactivity and can potentially interact with all other cellular components (lipids, proteins, DNA.They are at the origin of oxidations in chain by creating radicals. The cell has antioxidant systemswhich limit the effects of the ROS. These systems are composed of enzymes such as glutathionereductase, glutathione peroxidase, etc., and molecules of nonenzymatic nature like the reducedglutathione or vitamins. The production and the destruction of the radicals of oxygen coexist in a weakbalance. If this balance is broken in favour of the ROS, an oxidative stress is generated. Xenobioticscould influence this balance by catalysing production of ROS.

  13. Oxidative stress and antioxidants: Distress or eustress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niki, Etsuo

    2016-04-01

    There is a growing consensus that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are not just associated with various pathologies, but that they act as physiological redox signaling messenger with important regulatory functions. It is sometimes stated that "if ROS is a physiological signaling messenger, then removal of ROS by antioxidants such as vitamins E and C may not be good for human health." However, it should be noted that ROS acting as physiological signaling messenger and ROS removed by antioxidants are not the same. The lipid peroxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acids and cholesterol induce adaptive response and enhance defense capacity against subsequent oxidative insults, but it is unlikely that these lipid peroxidation products are physiological signaling messenger produced on purpose. The removal of ROS and inhibition of lipid peroxidation by antioxidants should be beneficial for human health, although it has to be noted also that they may not be an effective inhibitor of oxidative damage mediated by non-radical oxidants. The term ROS is vague and, as there are many ROS and antioxidants which are different in chemistry, it is imperative to explicitly specify ROS and antioxidant to understand the effects and role of oxidative stress and antioxidants properly.

  14. Flavonoids and oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotibrán, América Nitxin Castañeda; Ordaz-Téllez, María Guadalupe; Rodríguez-Arnaiz, Rosario

    2011-11-27

    Flavonoids are a family of antioxidants that are widely represented in fruits, vegetables, dry legumes, and chocolate, as well as in popular beverages, such as red wine, coffee, and tea. The flavonoids chlorogenic acid, kaempferol, quercetin and quercetin 3β-d-glycoside were investigated for genotoxicity using the wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART). This test makes use of two recessive wing cell markers: multiple wing hairs (mwh) and flare (flr(3)), which are mutations located on the left arm of chromosome 3 of Drosophila melanogaster and are indicative of both mitotic recombination and various types of mutational events. In order to test the antioxidant capacities of the flavonoids, experiments were conducted with various combinations of oxidants and polyphenols. Oxidative stress was induced using hydrogen peroxide, the Fenton reaction and paraquat. Third-instar transheterozygous larvae were chronically treated for all experiments. The data obtained in this study showed that, at the concentrations tested, the flavonoids did not induce somatic mutations or recombination in D. melanogaster with the exception of quercetin, which proved to be genotoxic at only one concentration. The oxidants hydrogen peroxide and the Fenton reaction did not induce mutations in the wing somatic assay of D. melanogaster, while paraquat and combinations of flavonoids produced significant numbers of small single spots. Quercetin 3β-d-glycoside mixed with paraquat was shown to be desmutagenic. Combinations of the oxidants with the other flavonoids did not show any antioxidant activity.

  15. Biocompatibility of implantable materials: An oxidative stress viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouthuy, Pierre-Alexis; Snelling, Sarah J B; Dakin, Stephanie G; Milković, Lidija; Gašparović, Ana Čipak; Carr, Andrew J; Žarković, Neven

    2016-12-01

    Oxidative stress occurs when the production of oxidants surpasses the antioxidant capacity in living cells. Oxidative stress is implicated in a number of pathological conditions such as cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases but it also has crucial roles in the regulation of cellular activities. Over the last few decades, many studies have identified significant connections between oxidative stress, inflammation and healing. In particular, increasing evidence indicates that the production of oxidants and the cellular response to oxidative stress are intricately connected to the fate of implanted biomaterials. This review article provides an overview of the major mechanisms underlying the link between oxidative stress and the biocompatibility of biomaterials. ROS, RNS and lipid peroxidation products act as chemo-attractants, signalling molecules and agents of degradation during the inflammation and healing phases. As chemo-attractants and signalling molecules, they contribute to the recruitment and activation of inflammatory and healing cells, which in turn produce more oxidants. As agents of degradation, they contribute to the maturation of the extracellular matrix at the healing site and to the degradation of the implanted material. Oxidative stress is itself influenced by the material properties, such as by their composition, their surface properties and their degradation products. Because both cells and materials produce and react with oxidants, oxidative stress may be the most direct route mediating the communication between cells and materials. Improved understanding of the oxidative stress mechanisms following biomaterial implantation may therefore help the development of new biomaterials with enhanced biocompatibility.

  16. Oxidative stress tolerance of early stage diabetic endothelial progenitor cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Sukmawati

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Primitive BM-EPCs showed vasculogenic dysfunction in early diabetes. However the oxidative stress is not denoted as the major initiating factor of its cause. Our results suggest that primitive BM-KSL cell has the ability to compensate oxidative stress levels in early diabetes by increasing the expression of anti-oxidative enzymes.

  17. Menopause as risk factor for oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Martha A; Zacarías-Flores, Mariano; Arronte-Rosales, Alicia; Correa-Muñoz, Elsa; Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of menopause (hypoestrogenism) as a risk factor for oxidative stress. We carried out a cross-sectional study with 187 perimenopausal women from Mexico City, including 94 premenopausal (mean ± SD age, 44.9 ± 4.0 y; estrogen, 95.8 ± 65.7 pg/mL; follicle-stimulating hormone, 13.6 ± 16.9 mIU/mL) and 93 postmenopausal (mean ± SD age, 52.5 ± 3.3 y; estrogen, 12.8 ± 6.8 pg/mL; follicle-stimulating hormone, 51.4 ± 26.9 mIU/mL) women. We measured lipoperoxides using a thiobarbituric acid-reacting substance assay, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities, and the total antioxidant status with the Randox kit. An alternative cutoff value for lipoperoxide level of 0.320 μmol/L or higher was defined on the basis of the 90th percentile of young healthy participants. All women answered the Menopause Rating Scale, the Athens Insomnia Scale, and a structured questionnaire about pro-oxidant factors, that is, smoking, consumption of caffeinated and alcoholic beverages, and physical activity. Finally, we measured weight and height and calculated body mass index. The lipoperoxide levels were significantly higher in the postmenopausal group than in the premenopausal group (0.357 ± 0.05 vs 0.331 ± 0.05 μmol/L, P = 0.001). Using logistic regression to control pro-oxidant variables, we found that menopause was the main risk factor for oxidative stress (odds ratio, 2.62; 95% CI, 1.35-5.11; P menopause rating score, insomnia score, and lipoperoxides, and this relationship was most evident in the postmenopausal group (menopause scale, r = 0.327 [P = 0.001]; insomnia scale, r = 0.209 [P < 0.05]). Our findings suggest that the depletion of estrogen in postmenopause could cause oxidative stress in addition to the known symptoms.

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and apoptosis revealed by proteomic and transcriptomic analyses of the striata in two mouse models of Parkinson’s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Mark H.; Qian, Weijun; Wang, Haixing; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Sforza, Daniel M.; Lacan, Goran; Liu, Dahai; Khan, Arshad H.; Cantor, Rita M.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Melega, William P.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.

    2008-02-10

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the changes in the nigrostriatal pathway in Parkinson disease (PD) are not completely understood. Here we use mass spectrometry and microarrays to study the proteomic and transcriptomic changes in the striatum of two mouse models of PD, induced by the distinct neurotoxins 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and methamphetamine (METH). Proteomic analyses resulted in the identification and relative quantification of 912 proteins with two or more unique peptides and 85 proteins with significant abundance changes following neurotoxin treatment. Similarly, microarray analyses revealed 181 genes with significant changes in mRNA following neurotoxin treatment. The combined protein and gene list provides a clearer picture of the potential mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration observed in PD. Functional analysis of this combined list revealed a number of significant categories, including mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress response and apoptosis. Additionally, codon usage and miRNAs may play an important role in translational control in the striatum. These results constitute one of the largest datasets integrating protein and transcript changes for these neurotoxin models with many similar endpoint phenotypes but distinct mechanisms.

  19. Reduced coupling of oxidative phosphorylation in vivo precedes electron transport chain defects due to mild oxidative stress in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Siegel

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and mitochondrial function are at the core of many degenerative conditions. However, the interaction between oxidative stress and in vivo mitochondrial function is unclear. We used both pharmacological (2 week paraquat (PQ treatment of wild type mice and transgenic (mice lacking Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1(-/- models to test the effect of oxidative stress on in vivo mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle. Magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy were used to measure mitochondrial ATP and oxygen fluxes and cell energetic state. In both models of oxidative stress, coupling of oxidative phosphorylation was significantly lower (lower P/O at rest in vivo in skeletal muscle and was dose-dependent in the PQ model. Despite this reduction in efficiency, in vivo mitochondrial phosphorylation capacity (ATPmax was maintained in both models, and ex vivo mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized muscle fibers was unchanged following PQ treatment. In association with the reduced P/O, PQ treatment led to a dose-dependent reduction in PCr/ATP ratio and increased phosphorylation of AMPK. These results indicate that oxidative stress uncouples oxidative phosphorylation in vivo and results in energetic stress in the absence of defects in the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

  20. Stress analysis of local blisters coupling Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Correlation between experimental results and continuous damage modelling for buckling in an iron oxide/phosphated iron system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panicaud, B., E-mail: benoit.panicaud@utt.fr [Universite de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), CNRS UMR 6279, 12 rue Marie Curie, 10010 Troyes (France); Grosseau-Poussard, J.L. [LEMMA, Pole Sciences et Technologie, Universite de La Rochelle, Av. M. Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex (France)

    2010-12-01

    In this present work, local stress development in the iron oxide layers growing on phosphated {alpha}-Fe at 400 deg. C in ambient air is investigated by Raman spectroscopy. Coupled with X-ray diffraction it enables to obtain directly local stresses' maps in the oxide layers. Use of Raman spectroscopy allows obtaining better accuracy on mechanical behaviour at local scale. This characterisation technique is very useful to study systems developing mechanical heterogeneities on surface, especially in case of buckling phenomenon. Investigations on particular local blisters have been done to measure some characteristic lengths at local scale. From local measurements, we are able to evaluate general effect of buckling from simplified scale transition. So, a macroscopic approach has been performed to calculate global stress evolution of the oxide layer, based on continuous damage mechanics. Consequently, it leads to good comparison between modelling and experimental values (global stresses versus oxidation time) in {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide.

  1. Study on oxidative stress condition of hyperuricemia quail model%高尿酸血症鹌鹑模型的氧化应激状态研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林志健; 张冰; 李丽玉; 朱春胜

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the oxidative stress condition in hyperuricemia quail model. Methods Hyperuricemia quail model were induced by purine rich diet. Uric acid metabolic enzymes and pentose phosphate pathway were determined. Serum anti - oxidase agents were also determined. Results Serum uric acid level increased in model group on 14th and 21st day. The level of XOD,AOD,G6PD,G6P,NAD-PH,GSH - PX,GSH - GR,MDA and GSH increased on 21st day. Serum SOD activities were decreased significantly. Conclusion Purine rich diet can induce quail hyperuricemia. XOD and pentose phosphate pathway were activated in hyperuricemia quail model. Quails in model group were under oxidative stress condition,with anti - oxidative ability decreased.%目的:观察高嘌呤饮食诱导的高尿酸血症鹌鹑模型体内氧化应激水平的变化。方法采用高嘌呤饮食诱导法建立高尿酸血症鹌鹑模型,通过检测尿酸代谢相关酶、磷酸戊糖途径及血清抗氧化能力,观察模型动物高血尿酸状态下的氧化应激情况。结果模型动物第14天、21天血清尿酸水平显著升高;第21天血清黄嘌呤氧化酶(XOD)、腺苷脱氨酶(ADA)、葡萄糖-6-磷酸脱氢酶(G6PD)活性显著升高;血清葡萄糖-6-磷酸(G6P)、还原型辅酶Ⅱ(NAD-PH)含量升高;血清过氧化物歧化酶( SOD)活性显著降低;血清谷胱甘肽过氧化物酶( GSH - PX)、谷胱甘肽还原酶(GSH - GR)活性及丙二醛(MDA)、还原型谷胱甘肽(GSH)含量显著升高。结论高嘌呤饮食诱导的高尿酸血症鹌鹑模型体内黄嘌呤氧化酶系统及磷酸戊糖途径活跃,抗氧化能力减弱,机体氧化应激水平升高。

  2. PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA: A CATECHOLAMINE AND OXIDATIVE STRESS DISORDER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacak, Karel

    2012-01-01

    The WHO classification of endocrine tumors defines pheochromocytoma as a tumor arising from chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla — an intra-adrenal paraganglioma. Closely related tumors of extra-adrenal sympathetic and parasympathetic paraganglia are classified as extra-adrenal paragangliomas. Almost all pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas produce catecholamines. The concentrations of catecholamines in pheochromocytoma tissues are enormous, potentially creating a volcano that can erupt at any time. Significant eruptions result in catecholamine storms called “attacks” or “spells”. Acute catecholamine crisis can strike unexpectedly, leaving traumatic memories of acute medical disaster that champions any intensive care unit. A very well-defined genotype-biochemical phenotype relationship exists, guiding proper and cost-effective genetic testing of patients with these tumors. Currently, the production of norepinephrine and epinephrine is optimally assessed by the measurement of their O-methylated metabolites, normetanephrine or metanephrine, respectively. Dopamine is a minor component, but some paragangliomas produce only this catecholamine or this together with norepinephrine. Methoxytyramine, the O-methylated metabolite of dopamine, is the best biochemical marker of these tumors. In those patients with equivocal biochemical results, a modified clonidine suppression test coupled with the measurement of plasma normetanephrine has recently been introduced. In addition to differences in catecholamine enzyme expression, the presence of either constitutive or regulated secretory pathways contributes further to the very unique mutation-dependent catecholamine production and release, resulting in various clinical presentations. Oxidative stress results from a significant imbalance between levels of prooxidants, generated during oxidative phosphorylation, and antioxidants. The gradual accumulation of prooxidants due to metabolic oxidative stress results in proto

  3. Revisiting an age-old question regarding oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edrey, Yael H.; Salmon, Adam B.

    2014-01-01

    Significant advances in maintaining health throughout life can be made through a clear understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that regulate aging. The Oxidative Stress Theory of Aging (OSTA) is likely the most well-studied mechanistic theory of aging and suggests that the rate of aging is controlled by accumulation of oxidative damage. To directly test the OSTA, aging has been measured in several lines of mice with genetic alteration of the expression of enzymatic antioxidants. Under its strictest interpretation, these studies do not support the OSTA, as modulation of antioxidant expression does not generally affect mouse lifespan. However, the incidence of many age-related diseases and pathologies is altered in these models suggesting that oxidative stress does significantly impact some aspects of the aging process. Further, oxidative stress may affect aging in disparate patterns among tissues or under different environmental conditions. In this review, we summarize the current literature regarding aging in antioxidant mutant mice and offer several interpretations on their support of the OSTA. PMID:24704971

  4. Tectonic stress - Models and magnitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.; Bergman, E. A.; Richardson, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that global data on directions of principal stresses in plate interiors can serve as a test of possible plate tectonic force models. Such tests performed to date favor force models in which ridge pushing forces play a significant role. For such models the general magnitude of regional deviatoric stresses is comparable to the 200-300 bar compressive stress exerted by spreading ridges. An alternative approach to estimating magnitudes of regional deviatoric stresses from stress orientations is to seek regions of local stress either demonstrably smaller than or larger than the regional stresses. The regional stresses in oceanic intraplate regions are larger than the 100-bar compression exerted by the Ninetyeast Ridge and less than the bending stresses (not less than 1 kbar) beneath Hawaii.

  5. Anti-aging effects of M2000 (β-D-mannuronic acid) as a novel immunosuppressive drug on the enzymatic and non-enzymatic oxidative stress parameters in an experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Soma; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Azizi, Gholamreza; Fattahi, Mohammad Javad; Rastkari, Noshin; Zavareh, Farzaneh Tofighi; Aghazadeh, Zahra; Mirshafiey, Abbas

    2017-05-01

    The anti-aging property of β-D-mannuronic acid (M2000) as a novel non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agent was investigated on several determinants relative to the oxidative stress in an animal model. Sprague-Dawley rats were used for evaluating the safety and efficacy properties of M2000 on some oxidative stress enzymes, including the following: mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD2), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX1), glutathione S-transferase (GST), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene expression by real-time PCR. Malondialdehyde (MDA), carbonyl protein (PCO) (the lipid and protein oxidation marker, respectively), and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were tested in serum by biochemical analysis. In addition, cortisol as a steroid hormone was surveyed by chemiluminescence immunoassay after 12 weeks of M2000 consumption. The rats were sacrificed 3 months after daily oral administration of M2000. Our findings revealed the favorable effects of M2000 on several antioxidant enzyme and gene expression, including SOD2, CAT, GPX1, and GST; however, our results were not statistically significant. Moreover, there was no significant difference in MDA and PCO as lipid and protein oxidation markers, TAC, and cortisol compared with the control group following M2000 consumption. A slight weight increase in the M2000-treated group was also observed. Our data showed the anti-aging property of M2000 as a novel designed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with immunosuppressive property on various oxidative stress determinants.

  6. β-Amyloid peptide increases levels of iron content and oxidative stress in human cell and Caenorhabditis elegans models of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Li; Nie, Guangjun; Zhang, Jie; Luo, Yunfeng; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhao, Baolu

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the deposition of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD); however, the underlying mechanism is still not clear. The abnormal interactions of Aβ with metal ions such as iron are implicated in the process of Aβ deposition and oxidative stress in AD brains. In this study, we observed that Aβ increased the levels of iron content and oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing the Swedish mutant form of human β-amyloid precursor protein (APPsw) and in Caenorhabditis elegans Aβ-expressing strain CL2006. Intracellular iron and calcium levels and reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide generation significantly increased in APPsw cells compared to control cells. The activity of superoxide dismutase and the antioxidant levels of APPsw cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. Moreover, iron treatment decreased cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential and aggravated oxidative stress damage as well as the release of Aβ1-40 from the APPsw cells. The iron homeostasis disruption in APPsw cells is very probably associated with elevated expression of the iron transporter divalent metal transporter 1, but not transferrin receptor. Furthermore, the C. elegans with Aβ-expression had increased iron accumulation. In aggregate, these results demonstrate that Aβ accumulation in neuronal cells correlated with neuronal iron homeostasis disruption and probably contributed to the pathogenesis of AD.

  7. Melamine Induces Oxidative Stress in Mouse Ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiao-Xin; Duan, Xing; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Xiong, Bo; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Melamine is a nitrogen heterocyclic triazine compound which is widely used as an industrial chemical. Although melamine is not considered to be acutely toxic with a high LD50 in animals, food contaminated with melamine expose risks to the human health. Melamine has been reported to be responsible for the renal impairment in mammals, its toxicity on the reproductive system, however, has not been adequately assessed. In the present study, we examined the effect of melamine on the follicle development and ovary formation. The data showed that melamine increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and induced granulosa cell apoptosis as well as follicle atresia. To further analyze the mechanism by which melamine induces oxidative stress, the expression and activities of two key antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) were analyzed, and the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) were compared between control and melamine-treated ovaries. The result revealed that melamine changed the expression and activities of SOD and GPX in the melamine-treated mice. Therefore, we demonstrate that melamine causes damage to the ovaries via oxidative stress pathway.

  8. Melamine Induces Oxidative Stress in Mouse Ovary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xin Dai

    Full Text Available Melamine is a nitrogen heterocyclic triazine compound which is widely used as an industrial chemical. Although melamine is not considered to be acutely toxic with a high LD50 in animals, food contaminated with melamine expose risks to the human health. Melamine has been reported to be responsible for the renal impairment in mammals, its toxicity on the reproductive system, however, has not been adequately assessed. In the present study, we examined the effect of melamine on the follicle development and ovary formation. The data showed that melamine increased reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, and induced granulosa cell apoptosis as well as follicle atresia. To further analyze the mechanism by which melamine induces oxidative stress, the expression and activities of two key antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPX were analyzed, and the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA were compared between control and melamine-treated ovaries. The result revealed that melamine changed the expression and activities of SOD and GPX in the melamine-treated mice. Therefore, we demonstrate that melamine causes damage to the ovaries via oxidative stress pathway.

  9. Oxidative stress: Biomarkers and novel therapeutic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, Kenneth; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Hou, Jinling; Shang, Yan Chen

    2010-03-01

    Oxidative stress significantly impacts multiple cellular pathways that can lead to the initiation and progression of varied disorders throughout the body. It therefore becomes imperative to elucidate the components and function of novel therapeutic strategies against oxidative stress to further clinical diagnosis and care. In particular, both the growth factor and cytokine erythropoietin (EPO) and members of the mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FoxOs) may offer the greatest promise for new treatment regimens since these agents and the cellular pathways they oversee cover a range of critical functions that directly influence progenitor cell development, cell survival and degeneration, metabolism, immune function, and cancer cell invasion. Furthermore, both EPO and FoxOs function not only as therapeutic targets, but also as biomarkers of disease onset and progression, since their cellular pathways are closely linked and overlap with several unique signal transduction pathways. However, biological outcome with EPO and FoxOs may sometimes be both unexpected and undesirable that can raise caution for these agents and warrant further investigations. Here we present the exciting as well as complicated role EPO and FoxOs possess to uncover the benefits as well as the risks of these agents for cell biology and clinical care in processes that range from stem cell development to uncontrolled cellular proliferation.

  10. [Selenium and oxidative stress in cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorozhanskaia, É G; Sviridova, S P; Dobrovol'skaia, M M; Zybrikhina, G N; Kashnia, Sh R

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify the features of violations of free-radical processes in blood serum of 94 untreated cancer patients with different localization of the tumor (cancer of the stomach, colon, breast, ovarian, hemoblastoses) were determined selenium levels and indicators of oxidative stress (sum of metabolites of nitrogen--NOx, the level of superoxide dismutase--Cu/ZnSOD and malondiialdehyde-MDA, and the activity of catalase). In addition, 40 patients with malignant liver disease and clinical signs of liver failure in the early postoperative period was carried out a comparative evaluation of the efficacy of selenium-containing drug "Selenaze" (sodium selenite pentahydrate). It was found that selenium levels in cancer patients by 25-30% below the norm of 110-120 mg/l at a rate of 73.0 +/- 2.6 mg/l. Low levels of NOx was detected in patients with all tumor localizations (22.1 +/- 1.1 microM, with normal range 28.4 +/- 0.9 microM). The exceptions were patients with extensive malignant process in the liver, in which the NOx levels were significantly higher than normal (p selenium levels by 10-12%, which was accompanied by a decrease in the content of SOD and NOx, and contributed to earlier recovery of detoxic and synthetic liver function. These findings point to an intensification of oxidative stress and metabolic disorders in the malignant process, which is the basis for metabolic correction.

  11. Nutritionally Mediated Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Muñoz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many sources of nutritionally mediated oxidative stress that trigger inflammatory cascades along short and long time frames. These events are primarily mediated via NFκB. On the short-term scale postprandial inflammation is characterized by an increase in circulating levels of IL-6 and TNF-α and is mirrored on the long-term by proinflammatory gene expression changes in the adipocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of obese individuals. Specifically the upregulation of CCL2/MCP-1, CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL4/MIP-1β, CXCL2/MIP-2α, and CXCL3/MIP-2β is noted because these changes have been observed in both adipocytes and PBMC of obese humans. In comparing numerous human intervention studies it is clear that pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory consumption choices mediate gene expression in humans adipocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Arachidonic acid and saturated fatty acids (SFAs both demonstrate an ability to increase pro-inflammatory IL-8 along with numerous other inflammatory factors including IL-6, TNFα, IL-1β, and CXCL1 for arachidonic acid and IGB2 and CTSS for SFA. Antioxidant rich foods including olive oil, fruits, and vegetables all demonstrate an ability to lower levels of IL-6 in PBMCs. Thus, dietary choices play a complex role in the mediation of unavoidable oxidative stress and can serve to exacerbate or dampen the level of inflammation.

  12. Vascular oxidant stress and inflammation in hyperhomocysteinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodorou, Louisa; Weiss, Norbert

    2007-11-01

    Elevated plasma levels of homocysteine are a metabolic risk factor for atherosclerotic vascular disease, as shown in numerous clinical studies that linked elevated homocysteine levels to de novo and recurrent cardiovascular events. High levels of homocysteine promote oxidant stress in vascular cells and tissue because of the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which have been strongly implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. In particular, ROS have been shown to cause endothelial injury, dysfunction, and activation. Elevated homocysteine stimulates proinflammatory pathways in vascular cells, resulting in leukocyte recruitment to the vessel wall, mediated by the expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells and circulating monocytes and neutrophils, in the infiltration of leukocytes into the arterial wall mediated by increased secretion of chemokines, and in the differentiation of monocytes into cholesterol-scavenging macrophages. Furthermore, it stimulates the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells followed by the production of extracellular matrix. Many of these events involve redox-sensitive signaling events, which are promoted by elevated homocysteine, and result in the formation of atherosclerotic lesions. In this article, we review current knowledge about the role of homocysteine on oxidant stress-mediated vascular inflammation during the development of atherosclerosis.

  13. Chasing great paths of Helmut Sies "Oxidative Stress".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majima, Hideyuki J; Indo, Hiroko P; Nakanishi, Ikuo; Suenaga, Shigeaki; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichiro; Matsui, Hirofumi; Minamiyama, Yukiko; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Yen, Hsiu-Chuan; Hawkins, Clare L; Davies, Michael J; Ozawa, Toshihiko; St Clair, Daret K

    2016-04-01

    Prof. Dr. Helmut Sies is a pioneer of "Oxidative Stress", and has published over 18 papers with the name of "Oxidative Stress" in the title. He has been Editor-in-Chief of the journal "Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics" for many years, and is a former Editor-in-Chief of the journal "Free Radical Research". He has clarified our understanding of the causes of chronic developing diseases, and has studied antioxidant factors. In this article, importance of "Oxidative Stress" and our mitochondrial oxidative stress studies; roles of mitochondrial ROS, effects of vitamin E and its homologues in oxidative stress-related diseases, effects of antioxidants in vivo and in vitro, and a mitochondrial superoxide theory for oxidative stress diseases and aging are introduced, and some of our interactions with Helmut are described, congratulating and appreciating his great path.

  14. A Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling Protein in Oxidative Stress Tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ow, David W.; Song, Wen

    2003-03-26

    Plants for effective extraction of toxic metals and radionuclides must tolerate oxidative stress. To identify genes that enhance oxidative stress tolerance, an S. pombe cDNA expression plasmid library was screened for the ability to yield hypertolerant colonies. Here, we report on the properties of one gene that confers hypertolerance to cadmium and oxidizing chemicals. This gene appears to be conserved in other organisms as homologous genes are found in human, mouse, fruitfly and Arabidopsis. The fruitfly and Arabidopsis genes likewise enhance oxidative stress tolerance in fission yeast. During oxidative stress, the amount of mRNA does not change, but protein fusions to GFP relocate from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. The same pattern is observed with the Arabidopsis homologue-GFP fusion protein. This behavior suggests a signaling role in oxidative stress tolerance and these conserved proteins may be targets for engineering stress tolerant plants for phytoremediation.

  15. Lemon balm extract (Melissa officinalis, L.) promotes melanogenesis and prevents UVB-induced oxidative stress and DNA damage in a skin cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sánchez, Almudena; Barrajón-Catalán, Enrique; Herranz-López, María; Castillo, Julián; Micol, Vicente

    2016-11-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is one of the main causes of a variety of cutaneous disorders, including photoaging and skin cancer. Its UVB component (280-315nm) leads to oxidative stress and causes inflammation, DNA damage, p53 induction and lipid and protein oxidation. Recently, an increase in the use of plant polyphenols with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties has emerged to protect human skin against the deleterious effects of sunlight. This study evaluates the protective effects of lemon balm extract (LBE) (Melissa Officinalis, L) and its main phenolic compound rosmarinic acid (RA) against UVB-induced damage in human keratinocytes. The LBE composition was determined by HPLC analysis coupled to photodiode array detector and ion trap mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization (HPLC-DAD-ESI-IT-MS/MS). Cell survival, ROS generation and DNA damage were determined upon UVB irradiation in the presence of LBE. The melanogenic capacity of LBE was also determined. RA and salvianolic acid derivatives were the major compounds, but caffeic acid and luteolin glucuronide were also found in LBE. LBE and RA significantly increased the survival of human keratinocytes upon UVB radiation, but LBE showed a stronger effect. LBE significantly decreased UVB-induced intracellular ROS production. Moreover, LBE reduced UV-induced DNA damage and the DNA damage response (DDR), which were measured as DNA strand breaks in the comet assay and histone H2AX activation, respectively. Finally, LBE promoted melanogenesis in the cell model. These results suggest that LBE may be considered as a candidate for the development of oral/topical photoprotective ingredients against UVB-induced skin damage. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) at different wavelengths and doses on oxidative stress and fibrogenesis parameters in an animal model of wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Paulo Cesar Lock; Silva, Luciano A; Freitas, Tiago P; Latini, Alexandra; Pinho, Ricardo A

    2011-01-01

    Gallium-arsenide (GaAs) and helium-neon (HeNe) lasers are the most commonly used low-energy lasers in physiotherapy for promoting wound healing and pain modulation. The aim of this study was investigate the effect of low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) at different wavelengths and doses on oxidative stress and fibrogenesis parameters in an animal model of wound healing. The animals were randomly divided into five groups (n=6): Controls (skin injured animals without local or systemic treatment), skin injury treated with HeNe 1 J/cm(2) (two seg); skin injury treated with HeNe 3 J/cm(2) (six seg); skin injury treated with GaAs 1 J/cm(2) (three seg); skin injury treated with GaAs 3 J/cm(2) (nine seg). A single circular wound measuring 8 mm in diameter was surgically created on the back of the animal. The rats were irradiated at 2, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h after skin injury. The parameters, namely hydroxyproline content, activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), and lipid (TBARS) and protein oxidation (carbonyl groups) measurements were assessed. In addition, wound size regression was also analyzed. The results showed an improvement in the wound healing reflected by the reduction in wound size and increased collagen synthesis. Moreover, a significant reduction in TBARS levels, carbonyl content, and SOD and CAT activities were observed after laser irradiation, particularly with the treatments HeNe laser 1 and 3 J/cm(2) dose and GaAs 3 J/cm(2) dose. The data strongly indicate that LPLI therapy is efficient in accelerating the skin wound healing process after wounding, probably by reducing the inflammatory phase and inducing collagen synthesis.

  17. Oxidative stress action in cellular aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Cristine de Oliveira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Various theories try to explain the biological aging by changing the functions and structure of organic systems and cells. During lifetime, free radicals in the oxidative stress lead to lipid peroxidation of cellular membranes, homeostasis imbalance, chemical residues formation, gene mutations in DNA, dysfunction of certain organelles, and the arise of diseases due to cell death and/or injury. This review describes the action of oxidative stress in the cells aging process, emphasizing the factors such as cellular oxidative damage, its consequences and the main protective measures taken to prevent or delay this process. Tests with antioxidants: vitamins A, E and C, flavonoids, carotenoids and minerals, the practice of caloric restriction and physical exercise, seeking the beneficial effects on human health, increasing longevity, reducing the level of oxidative stress, slowing the cellular senescence and origin of certain diseases, are discussed.Diferentes teorias tentam explicar o envelhecimento biológico através da alteração das funções e estrutura dos sistemas orgânicos e células. Ao longo da vida, os radicais livres presentes no estresse oxidativo conduzem à peroxidação dos lipídios das membranas celulares, desequilíbrio da homeostase, formação de resíduos químicos, mutações gênicas no DNA, disfunção de certas organelas, bem como ao surgimento de doenças devido à lesão e/ou morte celular. Nesta revisão descreve-se a ação do estresse oxidativo no processo de envelhecimento das células, enfatizando fatores como os danos oxidativos celulares, suas conseqüências e as principais medidas protetoras adotadas para se prevenir ou retardar este processo. Testes com antioxidantes: vitaminas A, E e C, flavonóides, carotenóides e minerais; a prática de restrição calórica e exercícios físicos, que buscam efeitos benéficos sobre a saúde humana, aumentando a longevidade, reduzindo o nível de estresse oxidativo

  18. Diabetes and the Brain: Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Muriach

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder associated with chronic complications including a state of mild to moderate cognitive impairment, in particular psychomotor slowing and reduced mental flexibility, not attributable to other causes, and shares many symptoms that are best described as accelerated brain ageing. A common theory for aging and for the pathogenesis of this cerebral dysfunctioning in diabetes relates cell death to oxidative stress in strong association to inflammation, and in fact nuclear factor κB (NFκB, a master regulator of inflammation and also a sensor of oxidative stress, has a strategic position at the crossroad between oxidative stress and inflammation. Moreover, metabolic inflammation is, in turn, related to the induction of various intracellular stresses such as mitochondrial oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, and autophagy defect. In parallel, blockade of autophagy can relate to proinflammatory signaling via oxidative stress pathway and NFκB-mediated inflammation.

  19. Oxidative stress in marine environments: biochemistry and physiological ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress-the production and accumulation of reduced oxygen intermediates such as superoxide radicals, singlet oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals-can damage lipids, proteins, and DNA. Many disease processes of clinical interest and the aging process involve oxidative stress in their underlying etiology. The production of reactive oxygen species is also prevalent in the world's oceans, and oxidative stress is an important component of the stress response in marine organisms exposed to a variety of insults as a result of changes in environmental conditions such as thermal stress, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, or exposure to pollution. As in the clinical setting, reactive oxygen species are also important signal transduction molecules and mediators of damage in cellular processes, such as apoptosis and cell necrosis, for marine organisms. This review brings together the voluminous literature on the biochemistry and physiology of oxidative stress from the clinical and plant physiology disciplines with the fast-increasing interest in oxidative stress in marine environments.

  20. Differential oxidative stress responses in castor semilooper, Achaea janata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavani, Ayinampudi; Chaitanya, R K; Chauhan, Vinod K; Dasgupta, Anwesha; Dutta-Gupta, Aparna

    2015-11-01

    Balance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the antioxidant (AO) defense mechanisms is vital for organism survival. Insects serve as an ideal model to elucidate oxidative stress responses as they are prone to different kinds of stress during their life cycle. The present study demonstrates the modulation of AO enzyme gene expression in the insect pest, Achaea janata (castor semilooper), when subjected to different oxidative stress stimuli. Antioxidant enzymes' (catalase (Cat), superoxide dismutase (Sod), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and glutathione peroxidase (Gpx)) partial coding sequences were cloned and characterized from larval whole body. Tissue expression studies reveal a unique pattern of AO genes in the larval tissues with maximum expression in the gut and fat body. Ontogeny profile depicts differential expression pattern through the larval developmental stages for each AO gene studied. Using quantitative RT-PCR, the expression pattern of these genes was monitored during sugar-induced (d-galactose feeding), infection-induced (Gram positive, Gram negative and non-pathogenic bacteria) and pesticide-induced oxidative stress (Bt Cry toxin). d-Galactose feeding differentially modulates the expression of AO genes in the larval gut and fat body. Immune challenge with Escherichia coli induces robust upregulation of AO genes when compared to Bacillus coagulans and Bacillus cereus in the larval fat body and gut. Cry toxin feeding predominantly induced GST upregulation in the gut. The current study suggests that though there are multiple ways of generation of oxidative stress in the insect, the organism tailors its response by insult- and tissue-specific recruitment of the antioxidant players and their differential regulation for each inducer.

  1. Screening of microRNAs associated with Alzheimer's disease using oxidative stress cell model and different strains of senescence accelerated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Qingfu; Niu, Jingya; Lu, Kang; Xie, Bing; Cui, Dongsheng; Xu, Shunjiang

    2014-03-15

    Oxidative stress plays a critical role in the etiology and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and the molecular mechanisms that control the neuron response to oxidative stress have been extensively studied. However, the effects of oxidative stress on miRNA expression in hippocampal neurons has not been investigated, and little is known about the roles of ROS-modulated miRNAs in cell function as yet. In this study, miRNA microarray technology was used to analyze the expression of miRNAs in the oxidative stressed primary hippocampal neurons, hippocampus of senescence accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) and prone 10 (SAMP10). The targets of co-regulated microRNAs were also selected for computational prediction using miRWalk software and functional analysis by the DAVID software. In addition, the changes of co-regulated microRNA expression were validated by quantitative real-time PCR. The results of microarray analysis showed that miR-329, miR-193b, miR-20a, miR-296, and miR-130b were all upregulated in H2O2-induced primary hippocampal neurons and different strains of senescence accelerated mice. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis showed that these co-regulated microRNAs may be involved in the regulation of cell growth, apoptosis, signal transmission and cancer development. In which, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was one of the most significant pathways to be affected by 83 target genes of miR-329, miR-193b, miR-20a miR-296, and miR-130b. The quantitative real-time PCR data confirmed the alterations of the co-upregulated miRNAs. These results suggested that oxidative stress alters the miRNA expression profile of hippocampal neurons, and the deregulated miRNAs might play potential roles in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study provided a strong basis for the future study aiming at contributions of miRNAs induced by oxidative stress in AD.

  2. Methanolic extract of Ruta graveolens L. inhibits inflammation and oxidative stress in adjuvant induced model of arthritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratheesh, M; Shyni, G L; Helen, A

    2009-04-01

    Ruta graveolens L. (Rutaceae) are traditionally used for the treatment of rheumatism, arthritis and other inflammatory conditions in the traditional medicine of India. The purpose of this study was to investigate anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects of methanolic extract of Ruta graveolens L. in adjuvant induced arthritis in rats. Methanolic extract of Ruta graveolens (MER) exhibited maximum percentage of oedema inhibition at a dose of 20 mg/kg on 21st day of adjuvant arthritis. The effect was higher than that of standard drug indomethacin. The activities of cycloxygenase-2 and myeloperoxidase and concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) were decreased and the activities of antioxidant enzymes, vitamins C & E and reduced glutathione level were increased on treatment with MER. The increment in ESR and total WBC, reduction in RBC count and haemoglobin and aberrant changes to the C-reactive protein (CRP) and ceruloplasmin levels observed in the arthritic animals were also found to be significantly restored in MER treated rats. Histopathology of paw tissue showed decreased oedema formation and cellular infiltration on supplementation with MER. Thus the results demonstrated the potential beneficiary effect of methanolic extract of Ruta graveolens on adjuvant induced arthritis in rats.

  3. Optical imaging of tissue mitochondrial redox state in intact rat lungs in two models of pulmonary oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Staniszewski, Kevin; Maleki, Sepideh; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Audi, Said; Ranji, Mahsa

    2012-04-01

    Ventilation with enhanced fractions of O(2) (hyperoxia) is a common and necessary treatment for hypoxemia in patients with lung failure, but prolonged exposure to hyperoxia causes lung injury. Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury of lung tissue is common in lung transplant or crush injury to the chest. These conditions are associated with apoptosis and decreased survival of lung tissue. The objective of this work is to use cryoimaging to evaluate the effect of exposure to hyperoxia and IR injury on lung tissue mitochondrial redox state in rats. The autofluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are electron carriers in ATP generation. These intrinsic fluorophores were imaged for rat lungs using low-temperature fluorescence imaging (cryoimaging). Perfused lungs from four groups of rats were studied: normoxia (control), control perfused with an mitochondrial complex IV inhibitor (potassium cyanide, KCN), rats exposed to hyperoxia (85% O(2)) for seven days, and from rats subjected to lung IR in vivo 24 hours prior to study. Each lung was sectioned sequentially in the transverse direction, and the images were used to reconstruct a three-dimensional (3-D) rendering. In KCN perfused lungs the respiratory chain was more reduced, whereas hyperoxic and IR lung tissue have a more oxidized respiratory chain than control lung tissue, consistent with previously measured mitochondrial dysfunction in both hyperoxic and IR lungs.

  4. Optical imaging of tissue mitochondrial redox state in intact rat lungs in two models of pulmonary oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Staniszewski, Kevin; Maleki, Sepideh; Jacobs, Elizabeth R.; Audi, Said

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Ventilation with enhanced fractions of O2 (hyperoxia) is a common and necessary treatment for hypoxemia in patients with lung failure, but prolonged exposure to hyperoxia causes lung injury. Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury of lung tissue is common in lung transplant or crush injury to the chest. These conditions are associated with apoptosis and decreased survival of lung tissue. The objective of this work is to use cryoimaging to evaluate the effect of exposure to hyperoxia and IR injury on lung tissue mitochondrial redox state in rats. The autofluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are electron carriers in ATP generation. These intrinsic fluorophores were imaged for rat lungs using low-temperature fluorescence imaging (cryoimaging). Perfused lungs from four groups of rats were studied: normoxia (control), control perfused with an mitochondrial complex IV inhibitor (potassium cyanide, KCN), rats exposed to hyperoxia (85% O2) for seven days, and from rats subjected to lung IR in vivo 24 hours prior to study. Each lung was sectioned sequentially in the transverse direction, and the images were used to reconstruct a three-dimensional (3-D) rendering. In KCN perfused lungs the respiratory chain was more reduced, whereas hyperoxic and IR lung tissue have a more oxidized respiratory chain than control lung tissue, consistent with previously measured mitochondrial dysfunction in both hyperoxic and IR lungs. PMID:22559688

  5. The role of oxidative stress and inflammation in cardiovascular aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junzhen; Xia, Shijin; Kalionis, Bill; Wan, Wenbin; Sun, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Age is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular disease, even in the absence of other traditional factors. Emerging evidence in experimental animal and human models has emphasized a central role for two main mechanisms of age-related cardiovascular disease: oxidative stress and inflammation. Excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide generated by oxidative stress and low-grade inflammation accompanying aging recapitulate age-related cardiovascular dysfunction, that is, left ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and diastolic dysfunction in the heart as well as endothelial dysfunction, reduced vascular elasticity, and increased vascular stiffness. We describe the signaling involved in these two main mechanisms that include the factors NF-κB, JunD, p66(Shc), and Nrf2. Potential therapeutic strategies to improve the cardiovascular function with aging are discussed, with a focus on calorie restriction, SIRT1, and resveratrol.

  6. Biologically Synthesized Gold Nanoparticles Ameliorate Cold and Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Feng Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to their unique physical, chemical, and optical properties, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs have recently attracted much interest in the field of nanomedicine, especially in the areas of cancer diagnosis and photothermal therapy. Because of the enormous potential of these nanoparticles, various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted for their synthesis. Synthetic antioxidants are dangerous to human health. Thus, the search for effective, nontoxic natural compounds with effective antioxidative properties is essential. Although AuNPs have been studied for use in various biological applications, exploration of AuNPs as antioxidants capable of inhibiting oxidative stress induced by heat and cold stress is still warranted. Therefore, one goal of our study was to produce biocompatible AuNPs using biological methods that are simple, nontoxic, biocompatible, and environmentally friendly. Next, we aimed to assess the antioxidative effect of AuNPs against oxidative stress induced by cold and heat in Escherichia coli, which is a suitable model for stress responses involving AuNPs. The response of aerobically grown E. coli cells to cold and heat stress was found to be similar to the oxidative stress response. Upon exposure to cold and heat stress, the viability and metabolic activity of E. coli was significantly reduced compared to the control. In addition, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA and leakage of proteins and sugars were significantly elevated, and the levels of lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH and adenosine triphosphate (ATP significantly lowered compared to in the control. Concomitantly, AuNPs ameliorated cold and heat-induced oxidative stress responses by increasing the expression of antioxidants, including glutathione (GSH, glutathione S-transferase (GST, super oxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase (CAT. These consistent physiology and biochemical data suggest that AuNPs can ameliorate cold and

  7. Berberine exerts an anticonvulsant effect and ameliorates memory impairment and oxidative stress in a pilocarpine-induced epilepsy model in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao F

    2014-11-01

    hippocampal CA1 region. Our data suggest that Ber exerts anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects on Pilo-induced epilepsy in rats. Simultaneously, Ber attenuates memory impairment. The beneficial effect may be partly due to mitigation of the oxidative stress burden. Keywords: status epilepticus, pilocarpine, memory impairment, oxidative stress, neuroprotection

  8. Oxidative and nitrosative stress in ammonia neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowrońska, Marta; Albrecht, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Increased ammonia accumulation in the brain due to liver dysfunction is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Fatal outcome of rapidly progressing (acute) HE is mainly related to cytotoxic brain edema associated with astrocytic swelling. An increase of brain ammonia in experimental animals or treatment of cultured astrocytes with ammonia generates reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the target tissues, leading to oxidative/nitrosative stress (ONS). In cultured astrocytes, ammonia-induced ONS is invariably associated with the increase of the astrocytic cell volume. Interrelated mechanisms underlying this response include increased nitric oxide (NO) synthesis which is partly coupled to the activation of NMDA receptors and increased generation of reactive oxygen species by NADPH oxidase. ONS and astrocytic swelling are further augmented by excessive synthesis of glutamine (Gln) which impairs mitochondrial function following its accumulation in there and degradation back to ammonia ("the Trojan horse" hypothesis). Ammonia also induces ONS in other cell types of the CNS: neurons, microglia and the brain capillary endothelial cells (BCEC). ONS in microglia contributes to the central inflammatory response, while its metabolic and pathophysiological consequences in the BCEC evolve to the vasogenic brain edema associated with HE. Ammonia-induced ONS results in the oxidation of mRNA and nitration/nitrosylation of proteins which impact intracellular metabolism and potentiate the neurotoxic effects. Simultaneously, ammonia facilitates the antioxidant response of the brain, by activating astrocytic transport and export of glutathione, in this way increasing the availability of precursors of neuronal glutathione synthesis.

  9. Oxidative stress and superoxide dismutase activity in brain of rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JTEkanem

    effect of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in brain homogenates of Wistar rats. Oxidative stress measured as ... SOD is an important enzyme family in living cells for maintaining ..... one unit of activity with oxidation rate of organic substrate in.

  10. Alterations in magnesium and oxidative status during chronic emotional stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernak, I; Savic, V; Kotur, J; Prokic, V; Kuljic, B; Grbovic, D; Veljovic, M

    2000-03-01

    Magnesium and oxidative status were investigated in young volunteers exposed to chronic stress (political intolerance, awareness of potential military attacks, permanent stand-by duty and reduced holidays more than 10 years) or subchronic stress consisting of everyday mortal danger in military actions lasting more than 3 months. Significant decreases in plasma ionized Mg2+, total Mg and ionized Ca2+ concentrations were found in both groups. Similarly, both study groups exhibited oxidative stress as assessed by increased plasma superoxide anions and malondialdehyde and modified antioxidant defense. There were no significant differences between the two stress groups. A negative correlation between magnesium balance and oxidative stress was observed suggesting that the same etiological factor (chronic stress) initiate decreases in both free and total magnesium concentrations and simultaneously increase oxidative stress intensity. These findings support the need for magnesium supplementation with antioxidant vitamins for people living in conditions of chronic stress.

  11. Methanolic extract of Piper nigrum fruits improves memory impairment by decreasing brain oxidative stress in amyloid beta(1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritcu, Lucian; Noumedem, Jaurès A; Cioanca, Oana; Hancianu, Monica; Kuete, Victor; Mihasan, Marius

    2014-04-01

    The present study analyzed the possible memory-enhancing and antioxidant proprieties of the methanolic extract of Piper nigrum L. fruits (50 and 100 mg/kg, orally, for 21 days) in amyloid beta(1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease. The memory-enhancing effects of the plant extract were studied by means of in vivo (Y-maze and radial arm-maze tasks) approaches. Also, the antioxidant activity in the hippocampus was assessed using superoxide dismutase-, catalase-, glutathione peroxidase-specific activities and the total content of reduced glutathione, malondialdehyde, and protein carbonyl levels. The amyloid beta(1-42)-treated rats exhibited the following: decrease of spontaneous alternations percentage within Y-maze task and increase of working memory and reference memory errors within radial arm-maze task. Administration of the plant extract significantly improved memory performance and exhibited antioxidant potential. Our results suggest that the plant extract ameliorates amyloid beta(1-42)-induced spatial memory impairment by attenuation of the oxidative stress in the rat hippocampus.

  12. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Huang, Ming Hua; Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Strand, Micheline K; Tarpy, David R; Rueppell, Olav

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked; considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and typically covaries with life expectancy. However, it is unclear whether stress-resistant, long-lived individuals avoid, repair, or tolerate molecular damage to survive longer than others. The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) is an emerging model system that is well-suited to address this question. Furthermore, this species is the most economically important pollinator, whose health may be compromised by pesticide exposure, including oxidative stressors. Here, we develop a protocol for inducing oxidative stress in honey bee males (drones) via Paraquat injection. After injection, individuals from different colony sources were kept in common social conditions to monitor their survival compared to saline-injected controls. Oxidative stress was measured in susceptible and resistant individuals. Paraquat drastically reduced survival but individuals varied in their resistance to treatment within and among colony sources. Longer-lived individuals exhibited higher levels of lipid peroxidation than individuals dying early. In contrast, the level of protein carbonylation was not significantly different between the two groups. This first study of oxidative stress in male honey bees suggests that survival of an acute oxidative stressor is due to tolerance, not prevention or repair, of oxidative damage to lipids. It also demonstrates colony differences in oxidative stress resistance that might be useful for breeding stress-resistant honey bees. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of rosuvastatin by regulation of oxidative stress in a dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung Kak; Cho, Jae Hee; Kim, Eui Joo; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Park, Dong Kyun; Kwon, Kwang An; Chung, Jun-Won; Kim, Kyoung Oh; Kim, Yoon Jae

    2017-07-07

    To evaluate the anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of rosuvastatin by regulation of oxidative stress in a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis model. An acute colitis mouse model was induced by oral administration of 5% DSS in the drinking water for 7 d. In the treated group, rosuvastatin (0.3 mg/kg per day) was administered orally before and after DSS administration for 21 d. On day 21, mice were sacrificed and the colons were removed for macroscopic examination, histology, and Western blot analysis. In the in vitro study, IEC-6 cells were stimulated with 50 ng/mL tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and then treated with or without rosuvastatin (2 μmol/L). The levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), inflammatory mediators, and apoptotic markers were measured. In DSS-induced colitis mice, rosuvastatin treatment significantly reduced the disease activity index and histological damage score compared to untreated mice (P analysis revealed that rosuvastatin treatment reduced the DSS-induced increase of serum IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-12 and IL-17, and G-CSF levels. The increased levels of cleaved caspase-3, caspase-7, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase in the DSS group were attenuated by rosuvastatin treatment. In vitro, rosuvastatin significantly reduced the production of ROS, inflammatory mediators and apoptotic markers in TNF-α-treated IEC-6 cells (P < 0.05). Rosuvastatin had the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects in DSS-induced colitis model. Therefore, it might be a candidate anti-inflammatory drug in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

  14. Modulation of the oscillatory mechanics of lung tissue and the oxidative stress response induced by arginase inhibition in a chronic allergic inflammation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristoteles, Luciana R C R B; Righetti, Renato F; Pinheiro, Nathalia Montouro; Franco, Rosana B; Starling, Claudia M; da Silva, Julie C P; Pigati, Patrícia Angeli; Caperuto, Luciana C; Prado, Carla M; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Martins, Milton A; Leick, Edna A; Tibério, Iolanda F L C

    2013-08-15

    The importance of the lung parenchyma in the pathophysiology of asthma has previously been demonstrated. Considering that nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and arginases compete for the same substrate, it is worthwhile to elucidate the effects of complex NOS-arginase dysfunction in the pathophysiology of asthma, particularly, related to distal lung tissue. We evaluated the effects of arginase and iNOS inhibition on distal lung mechanics and oxidative stress pathway activation in a model of chronic pulmonary allergic inflammation in guinea pigs. Guinea pigs were exposed to repeated ovalbumin inhalations (twice a week for 4 weeks). The animals received 1400 W (an iNOS-specific inhibitor) for 4 days beginning at the last inhalation. Afterwards, the animals were anesthetized and exsanguinated; then, a slice of the distal lung was evaluated by oscillatory mechanics, and an arginase inhibitor (nor-NOHA) or vehicle was infused in a Krebs solution bath. Tissue resistance (Rt) and elastance (Et) were assessed before and after ovalbumin challenge (0.1%), and lung strips were submitted to histopathological studies. Ovalbumin-exposed animals presented an increase in the maximal Rt and Et responses after antigen challenge (p<0.001), in the number of iNOS positive cells (p<0.001) and in the expression of arginase 2, 8-isoprostane and NF-kB (p<0.001) in distal lung tissue. The 1400 W administration reduced all these responses (p<0.001) in alveolar septa. Ovalbumin-exposed animals that received nor-NOHA had a reduction of Rt, Et after antigen challenge, iNOS positive cells and 8-isoprostane and NF-kB (p<0.001) in lung tissue. The activity of arginase 2 was reduced only in the groups treated with nor-NOHA (p <0.05). There was a reduction of 8-isoprostane expression in OVA-NOR-W compared to OVA-NOR (p<0.001). In this experimental model, increased arginase content and iNOS-positive cells were associated with the constriction of distal lung parenchyma. This functional alteration may be due

  15. Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome impairs erectile function through increased endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and corporal fibrosis in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y; Niu, X; Wang, G; Huang, J; Liu, M; Peng, B

    2016-11-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is an independent risk factor for the development of erectile dysfunction (ED). But the molecular mechanisms underlying the relationship between CP/CPPS and ED are still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of CP/CPPS on erectile function in a rat model and the possible mechanisms. A rat model of experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) was established to mimic human CP⁄CPPS. Then twenty 2-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into EAP group and control group. Intracavernosal pressure (ICP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were measured during cavernous nerve electrostimulation, the ratio of max ICP/MAP was calculated. Blood was collected to measure the levels of serum C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and testosterone, respectively. The expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in corpus cavernosum were detected. We also evaluated the smooth muscle/collagen ratio and apoptotic index (AI). The ratio of max ICP/MAP in EAP group were significantly lower than that in control group. The levels of serum CRP, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in EAP group were all significantly higher than these in control group. The expression of eNOS and cGMP levels in corpus cavernosum of EAP rats were significantly downregulated. Furthermore, decreased SOD activity and smooth muscle/collagen ratio, increased MDA levels and AI were found in corpus cavernosum of EAP rats. In conclusion, CP/CPPS impaired penile erectile function in a rat model. The declines of eNOS expression and cGMP levels in corpus cavernosum may be an important mechanism of CP/CPPS-induced ED. CP/CPPS also increased oxidative stress, cell apoptosis and decreased smooth muscle/collagen ratio in corpus cavernosum of rats, which were

  16. Oxidative Stress Is Related to the Deleterious Effects of Heme Oxygenase-1 in an In Vivo Neuroinflammatory Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Tronel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 induction is associated with beneficial or deleterious effects depending on the experimental conditions adopted and the neurodegenerative rodent models used. The present study aimed first to evaluate the effects of cerebral HO-1 induction in an in vivo rat model of neuroinflammation by intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid (QA and secondly to explore the role played by reactive oxygen species (ROS and free iron (Fe2+ derived from heme catabolism promoted by HO-1. Chronic I.P. treatment with the HO-1 inductor and substrate hemin was responsible for a significant dose-related increase of cerebral HO-1 production. Brain tissue loss, microglial activation, and neuronal death were significantly higher in rats receiving QA plus hemin (H-QA versus QA and controls. Significant increase of ROS production in H-QA rat brain was inhibited by the specific HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP which supports the idea that ROS level augmentation in hemin-treated animals is a direct consequence of HO-1 induction. The cerebral tissue loss and ROS level in hemin-treated rats receiving the iron chelator deferoxamine were significantly decreased, demonstrating the involvement of Fe2+in brain ROS production. Therefore, the deleterious effects of HO-1 expression in this in vivo neuroinflammatory model were linked to a hyperproduction of ROS, itself promoted by free iron liberation.

  17. Chronic fatigue syndrome: Harvey and Wessely's (biopsychosocial model versus a bio(psychosocial model based on inflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative stress pathways

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    Twisk Frank NM

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a recently published paper, Harvey and Wessely put forward a 'biopsychosocial' explanatory model for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS, which is proposed to be applicable to (chronic fatigue even when apparent medical causes are present. Methods Here, we review the model proposed by Harvey and Wessely, which is the rationale for behaviourally oriented interventions, such as cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT and graded exercise therapy (GET, and compare this model with a biological model, in which inflammatory, immune, oxidative and nitrosative (IO&NS pathways are key elements. Discussion Although human and animal studies have established that the pathophysiology of ME/CFS includes IO&NS pathways, these abnormalities are not included in the model proposed by Harvey and Wessely. Activation of IO&NS pathways is known to induce fatigue and somatic (F&S symptoms and can be induced or maintained by viral and bacterial infections, physical and psychosocial stressors, or organic disorders such as (autoimmune disorders. Studies have shown that ME/CFS and major depression are both clinical manifestations of shared IO&NS pathways, and that both disorders can be discriminated by specific symptoms and unshared or differentiating pathways. Interventions with CBT/GET are potentially harmful for many patients with ME/CFS, since the underlying pathophysiological abnormalities may be intensified by physical stressors. Conclusions In contrast to Harvey and Wessely's (biopsychosocial model for ME/CFS a bio(psychosocial model based upon IO&NS abnormalities is likely more appropriate to this complex disorder. In clinical practice, we suggest physicians should also explore the IO&NS pathophysiology by applying laboratory tests that examine the pathways involved.

  18. Oxidative stress in patients with endodontic pathologies

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    Vengerfeldt V

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Veiko Vengerfeldt,1 Reet Mändar,2,3 Mare Saag,1 Anneli Piir,2 Tiiu Kullisaar2 1Institute of Dental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tartu, 2Institute of Biomedicine and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tartu, 3Competence Centre on Health Technologies, Tartu, Estonia Background: Apical periodontitis (AP is an inflammatory disease affecting periradicular tissues. It is a widespread condition but its etiopathogenetic mechanisms have not been completely elucidated and the current treatment options are not always successful.Purpose: To compare oxidative stress (OxS levels in the saliva and the endodontium (root canal [RC] contents in patients with different endodontic pathologies and in endodontically healthy subjects.Patients and methods: The study group of this comparison study included 22 subjects with primary chronic apical periodontitis (pCAP, 26 with posttreatment or secondary chronic apical periodontitis (sCAP, eight with acute periapical abscess, 13 with irreversible pulpitis, and 17 healthy controls. Resting saliva samples were collected before clinical treatment. Pulp samples (remnants of the pulp, tooth tissue, and/or previous root filling material were collected under strict aseptic conditions using the Hedström file. The samples were frozen to −80°C until analysis. OxS markers (myeloperoxidase [MPO], oxidative stress index [OSI], 8-isoprostanes [8-EPI] were detected in the saliva and the endodontium. Results: The highest MPO and 8-EPI levels were seen in pCAP and pulpitis, while the highest levels of OSI were seen in pCAP and abscess patients, as well as the saliva of sCAP patients. Controls showed the lowest OxS levels in both RC contents and saliva. Significant positive correlations between OxS markers, periapical index, and pain were revealed. Patients with pain had significantly higher OxS levels in both the endodontium (MPO median 27.9 vs 72.6 ng/mg protein, p=0.004; OSI 6.0 vs 10.4, p<0

  19. Metabolomics changes in a rat model of obstructive jaundice: mapping to metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates and lipids as well as oxidative stress.

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    Long, Yue; Dong, Xin; Yuan, Yawei; Huang, Jinqiang; Song, Jiangang; Sun, Yumin; Lu, Zhijie; Yang, Liqun; Yu, Weifeng

    2015-07-01

    The study examined the global metabolic and some biochemical changes in rats with cholestasis induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). Serum samples were collected in male Wistar rats with BDL (n = 8) and sham surgery (n = 8) at day 3 after surgery for metabolomics analysis using a combination of reversed phase chromatography and hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) and quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS). The serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidative capacity (T-AOC), glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathion peroxidase (GSH-Px) were measured to estimate the oxidative stress state. Key changes after BDL included increased levels of l-phenylalanine, l-glutamate, l-tyrosine, kynurenine, l-lactic acid, LysoPC(c) (14:0), glycine and succinic acid and decreased levels of l-valine, PC(b) (19:0/0:0), taurine, palmitic acid, l-isoleucine and citric acid metabolism products. And treatment with BDL significantly decreased the levels of GSH, T-AOC as well as SOD, GSH-Px activities, and upregulated MDA levels. The changes could be mapped to metabolism of amino acids and lipids, Krebs cycle and glycolysis, as well as increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant capability. Our study indicated that BDL induces major changes in the metabolism of all 3 major energy substances, as well as oxidative stress.

  20. The Prophylactic Effect of Vitamin C on Oxidative Stress Indexes Following Exposure to Radio Frequency Wave Generated by a BTS Antenna Model in Rat Liver and Kidney

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    Gholamali Jelodar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radio frequency wave (RFW generated by base transceiver station (BTS has been reported to make deleterious effects on liver and kidney, possibly through oxidative stress. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of radiofrequency wave (RFW-induced oxidative stress in the liver and kidney and the prophylactic effect of vitamin C on this organs by measuring the antioxidant enzymes activity including: glutathione peroxidase (GPx, superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT, and malondialdehyde (MDA. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, thirty-two adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four experimental groups and treated daily for 45 days as follows: control, vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid 200 mg/kg of body weight/day by gavage, test (exposed to 900MHz RFW and the treated group (received vitamin C in addition to exposure to RFW. At the end of the experiment all animals were sacrificed and their liver and kidney were removed and were used for measurement of antioxidant enzymes and MDA activity. Results: The results indicate that exposure to RFW in the test group decreased antioxidant enzymes activity and increased MDA compared with the control groups (p<0.05. In the treated group vitamin C improved antioxidant enzymes activity and reduced MDA compared to the test group (p<0.05. Conclusion: It can be concluded that RFW causes oxidative stress in liver and kidney, and vitamin C improves the antioxidant enzymes activity and decreases MDA.

  1. Sesame oil improves functional recovery by attenuating nerve oxidative stress in a mouse model of acute peripheral nerve injury: role of Nrf-2.

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    Hsu, Che-Chia; Huang, Hui-Cheng; Wu, Po-Ting; Tai, Ta-Wei; Jou, I-Ming

    2016-12-01

    Peripheral nervous injury (PNI) is a common form of trauma in modern society, especially in sport players. Despite the advance of therapy for PNI, the recovery of function can never reach the preinjury level after treatments. Recently, inhibiting neural oxidative stress shows a beneficial effect in improving functional recovery after PNI. In addition, sesame oil has been reported to possess the excellent antioxidative properties. However, whether sesame oil can improve the functional recovery after PNI by its antioxidative effect has never been investigated. Thirty mice were randomly divided into five groups of six: group I mice received sham operation; group II mice received sciatic nerve crush; and groups III-V mice daily ingested 0.5, 1 and 2 ml/kg of sesame oil for 6 days, respectively, after sciatic nerve crush. Oxidative stress, GAP43 and nuclear Nrf2 levels as well as spinal somatosensory evoked potentials were assessed on day 6, while paw withdrawal latency and sciatic function index were assessed on days 0, 3, and 6. Sesame oil significantly decreased lipid peroxidation and increased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and GAP43 expression in sciatic nerve. Furthermore, sesame oil improved electrophysiological and functional assessments in mice with sciatic nerve crush. In conclusion, sesame oil may improve nerve functional recovery by attenuating nerve oxidative stress in mouse acute peripheral nerve injury. Further, application of natural product sesame oil may be an alternative approach for improving nerve functional recovery in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Oxidative stress and inflammation in liver carcinogenesis

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    Natalia Olaya

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Inflammation is a common response in the human liver. It is involved in chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, steatosis, ischemiareperfusion damage, hepatocarcinomas and in the development of metastasis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS production is part of the inflammatory processes. It is implicated in many physiological and pathological situations and can induce mutations in key cancer genes. Normally, this process is prevented by DNA repair enzymatic systems that maintain sequence fidelity during DNA replication. However, overproduction of free radicals in chronic inflammatory diseases is thought to saturate the ability of the cell to repair DNA damage prior to replications. Inflammation-induced genetic damage is not unique to the liver, and it might contribute to the development of mutations in several organs. An example is the chronic inflammatory response in ulcerative colitis that ultimately could lead to neoplasia.

    There is compelling evidence to suggest that most known environmental risk factors for HCC development lead to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Indeed, hepatitis C virus (HCV, alcohol and hepatitis B virus (HBV have all been associated with oxidative stress. Direct production of oxidative stress by HCV core protein has been shown. A link between oxidative stress and liver pathogenesis is also supported by the successful use of antioxidant therapy to treat liver injury caused by chronic HCV infection, although it is not currently used for effective therapy. Ethanol metabolism via the alcohol dehydrogenase pathway and microsomal ethanol oxidizing system contribute substantially to the production of acetaldehyde and generation of ROS. HBx via its association with mitochondria has been shown to induce oxidative stress which in turn leads to activation of a

  3. Vildagliptin preserves the mass and function of pancreatic β cells via the developmental regulation and suppression of oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress in a mouse model of diabetes.

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    Hamamoto, S; Kanda, Y; Shimoda, M; Tatsumi, F; Kohara, K; Tawaramoto, K; Hashiramoto, M; Kaku, K

    2013-02-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms by which vildagliptin preserved pancreatic β cell mass and function. Morphological, biochemical and gene expression profiles of the pancreatic islets were investigated in male KK-A(y) -TaJcl(KK-A(y) ) and C57BL/6JJcl (B6) mice aged 8 weeks which received either vildagliptin or a vehicle for 4 weeks. Body weight, food intake, fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin and active glucagon-like peptide-1 were unchanged with vildagliptin treatment in both mice. In KK-A(y) mice treated with vildagliptin, increased plasma triglyceride (TG) level and islet TG content were decreased, insulin sensitivity significantly improved, and the glucose tolerance ameliorated with increases in plasma insulin levels. Furthermore, vildagliptin increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, islet insulin content and pancreatic β cell mass in both strains. By vildagliptin, the expression of genes involved in cell differentiation/proliferation was upregulated in both strains, those related to apoptosis, endoplasmic reticulum stress and lipid synthesis was decreased and those related to anti-apoptosis and anti-oxidative stress was upregulated, in KK-A(y) mice. The morphological results were consistent with the gene expression profiles. Vildagliptin increases β cell mass by not only directly affecting cell kinetics but also by indirectly reducing cell apoptosis, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress in diabetic mice. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Oxidative stress decreases with elevation in the lizard Psammodromus algirus.

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    Reguera, Senda; Zamora-Camacho, Francisco J; Trenzado, Cristina E; Sanz, Ana; Moreno-Rueda, Gregorio

    2014-06-01

    Oxidative stress is considered one of the main ecological and evolutionary forces. Several environmental stressors vary geographically and thus organisms inhabiting different sites face different oxidant environments. Nevertheless, there is scarce information about how oxidative damage and antioxidant defences vary geographically in animals. Here we study how oxidative stress varies from lowlands (300-700 m asl) to highlands (2200-2500 m asl) in the lizard Psammodromus algirus. To accomplish this, antioxidant enzymatic activity (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione transferase, DT-diaphorase) and lipid peroxidation were assayed in tissue samples from the lizards' tail. Lipid peroxidation was higher in individuals from lowlands than from highlands, indicating higher oxidative stress in lowland lizards. These results suggest that environmental conditions are less oxidant at high elevations with respect to low ones. Therefore, our study shows that oxidative stress varies geographically, which should have important consequences for our understanding of geographic variation in physiology and life-history of organisms.

  5. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases

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    Sha Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed.

  6. Strategies for Reducing or Preventing the Generation of Oxidative Stress

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    B. Poljsak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of oxidative stress could be achieved in three levels: by lowering exposure to environmental pollutants with oxidizing properties, by increasing levels of endogenous and exogenous antioxidants, or by lowering the generation of oxidative stress by stabilizing mitochondrial energy production and efficiency. Endogenous oxidative stress could be influenced in two ways: by prevention of ROS formation or by quenching of ROS with antioxidants. However, the results of epidemiological studies where people were treated with synthetic antioxidants are inconclusive and contradictory. Recent evidence suggests that antioxidant supplements (although highly recommended by the pharmaceutical industry and taken by many individuals do not offer sufficient protection against oxidative stress, oxidative damage or increase the lifespan. The key to the future success of decreasing oxidative-stress-induced damage should thus be the suppression of oxidative damage without disrupting the wellintegrated antioxidant defense network. Approach to neutralize free radicals with antioxidants should be changed into prevention of free radical formation. Thus, this paper addresses oxidative stress and strategies to reduce it with the focus on nutritional and psychosocial interventions of oxidative stress prevention, that is, methods to stabilize mitochondria structure and energy efficiency, or approaches which would increase endogenous antioxidative protection and repair systems.

  7. Thyroid Hormones, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation

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    Antonio Mancini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and oxidative stress (OS are closely related processes, as well exemplified in obesity and cardiovascular diseases. OS is also related to hormonal derangement in a reciprocal way. Among the various hormonal influences that operate on the antioxidant balance, thyroid hormones play particularly important roles, since both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism have been shown to be associated with OS in animals and humans. In this context, the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS that typically manifests as reduced conversion of thyroxine (T4 to triiodothyronine (T3 in different acute and chronic systemic conditions is still a debated topic. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome are reviewed, together with the roles of deiodinases, the enzymes responsible for the conversion of T4 to T3, in both physiological and pathological situations. The presence of OS indexes in NTIS supports the hypothesis that it represents a condition of hypothyroidism at the tissue level and not only an adaptive mechanism to diseases.

  8. Thyroid Hormones, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation.

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    Mancini, Antonio; Di Segni, Chantal; Raimondo, Sebastiano; Olivieri, Giulio; Silvestrini, Andrea; Meucci, Elisabetta; Currò, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress (OS) are closely related processes, as well exemplified in obesity and cardiovascular diseases. OS is also related to hormonal derangement in a reciprocal way. Among the various hormonal influences that operate on the antioxidant balance, thyroid hormones play particularly important roles, since both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism have been shown to be associated with OS in animals and humans. In this context, the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) that typically manifests as reduced conversion of thyroxine (T4) to triiodothyronine (T3) in different acute and chronic systemic conditions is still a debated topic. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome are reviewed, together with the roles of deiodinases, the enzymes responsible for the conversion of T4 to T3, in both physiological and pathological situations. The presence of OS indexes in NTIS supports the hypothesis that it represents a condition of hypothyroidism at the tissue level and not only an adaptive mechanism to diseases.

  9. Epigenetics and Oxidative Stress in Aging

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    Amy Guillaumet-Adkins

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a multifactorial process characterized by the progressive loss of physiological functions, leading to an increased vulnerability to age-associated diseases and finally to death. Several theories have been proposed to explain the nature of aging. One of the most known identifies the free radicals produced by the mitochondrial metabolism as the cause of cellular and DNA damage. However, there are also several evidences supporting that epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, noncoding RNAs, and histone modifications, play a critical role in the molecular mechanism of aging. In this review, we explore the significance of these findings and argue how the interlinked effects of oxidative stress and epigenetics can explain the cause of age-related declines.

  10. Oxidative stress, free radicals and protein peroxides.

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    Gebicki, Janusz M

    2016-04-01

    Primary free radicals generated under oxidative stress in cells and tissues produce a cascade of reactive secondary radicals, which attack biomolecules with efficiency determined by the reaction rate constants and target concentration. Proteins are prominent targets because they constitute the bulk of the organic content of cells and tissues and react readily with many of the secondary radicals. The reactions commonly lead to the formation of carbon-centered radicals, which generally convert in vivo to peroxyl radicals and finally to semistable hydroperoxides. All of these intermediates can initiate biological damage. This article outlines the advantages of the application of ionizing radiations to studies of radicals, with particular reference to the generation of desired radicals, studies of the kinetics of their reactions and correlating the results with events in biological systems. In one such application, formation of protein hydroperoxides in irradiated cells was inhibited by the intracellular ascorbate and glutathione.

  11. Melatonin inhibits snake venom and antivenom induced oxidative stress and augments treatment efficacy.

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    Sharma, Rachana D; Katkar, Gajanan D; Sundaram, Mahalingam S; Swethakumar, Basavarajaiah; Girish, Kesturu S; Kemparaju, Kempaiah

    2017-05-01

    Snakebite is a neglected health hazard. Its patho-physiology has largely been focused on systemic and local toxicities; whereas, venom and antivenom induced oxidative stress has long been ignored. Antivenom therapy although neutralizes venom lethality and saves many lives, remains ineffective against oxidative stress. This prompted us to complement antivenom with an antioxidant molecule melatonin that would protect against oxidative stress and increase the efficacy of the existing snakebite therapy. Here we show that D. russelli and E. carinatus venoms induce strong oxidative stress that persists even after antivenom administration in mice model. Additionally, antivenoms also induce oxidative stress. Polyvalent antivenom induce more oxidative stress than monovalent antivenom. Strikingly, antivenom and melatonin together not only inhibit venom and antivenom induced oxidative stress but also significantly reduce the neutralizing antivenom dose. This study provides a therapeutic potential for enhancing the existing snakebite therapy. The combined treatment of antivenom+melatonin would prevent the upsurge of oxidative stress as well as minimize the antivenom load. Thus the investigation offers immense scope for physicians and toxinologists to reinvestigate, design new strategies and think beyond the conventional mode of antivenom therapy.

  12. Anti-oxidative effects of Rooibos tea (Aspalathus linearis on immobilization-induced oxidative stress in rat brain.

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    In-Sun Hong

    Full Text Available Exposure to chronic psychological stress may be related to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS or free radicals, and thus, long-term exposure to high levels of oxidative stress may cause the accumulation of oxidative damage and eventually lead to many neurodegenerative diseases. Compared with other organs, the brain appears especially susceptible to excessive oxidative stress due to its high demand for oxygen. In the case of excessive ROS production, endogenous defense mechanisms against ROS may not be sufficient to suppress ROS-associated oxidative damage. Dietary antioxidants have been shown to protect neurons against a variety of experimental neurodegenerative conditions. In particular, Rooibos tea might be a good source of antioxidants due to its larger proportion of polyphenolic compounds. An optimal animal model for stress should show the features of a stress response and should be able to mimic natural stress progression. However, most animal models of stress, such as cold-restraint, electric foot shock, and burn shock, usually involve physical abuse in addition to the psychological aspects of stress. Animals subjected to chronic restraint or immobilization are widely believed to be a convenient and reliable model to mimic psychological stress. Therefore, in the present study, we propose that immobilization-induced oxidative stress was significantly attenuated by treatment with Rooibos tea. This conclusion is demonstrated by Rooibos tea's ability to (i reverse the increase in stress-related metabolites (5-HIAA and FFA, (ii prevent lipid peroxidation (LPO, (iii restore stress-induced protein degradation (PD, (iv regulate glutathione metabolism (GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio, and (v modulate changes in the activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD and CAT.

  13. Sport and oxidative stress in oncological patients.

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    Knop, K; Schwan, R; Bongartz, M; Bloch, W; Brixius, K; Baumann, F

    2011-12-01

    Oxidative stress is thought to be an important factor in the onset, progression and recurrence of cancer. In order to investigate how it is influenced by physical activity, we measured oxidative stress and antioxidative capacity (aoC) in 12 women with breast cancer and 6 men with prostate cancer, before and after long hiking trips. Before the hike, the men had a ROS-concentration of 1.8±0.6 mM H2O2 and an aoC of 0.7±0.6 mM Trolox-equivalent (Tro), while the women had a ROS-concentration of 3.1±0.7 mM H2O2 and an aoC of 1.2±0.2 mM Tro. After the hike, women showed no significant change in ROS and a significant increase in aoC (1.3±0.2 mM Tro), while the ROS concentration in men increased significantly (2.1±0.3 mM H2O2) and their aoC decreased (0.25±0.1 mM Tro). After a regenerative phase, the ROS concentration of the men decreased to 1.7±0.4 mM H2O2 and their aoC recovered significantly (1.2±0.4 mM Tro), while the women presented no significant change in the concentration of H2O2 but showed an ulterior increase in antioxidant capacity (2.05±0.43 mM Tro). From this data we conclude that physical training programs as for example long distance hiking trips can improve the aoC in the blood of oncological patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. The Ethanol Extract of Osmanthus fragrans Flowers Reduces Oxidative Stress and Allergic Airway Inflammation in an Animal Model

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    Chien-Ya Hung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Osmanthus fragrans flower, a popular herb in Eastern countries, contains several antioxidant compounds. Ben Cao Gang Mu, traditional Chinese medical literature, describes the usefulness of these flowers for phlegm and stasis reduction, arrest of dysentery with blood in the bowel, and stomachache and diarrhea treatment. However, modern evidence regarding the therapeutic efficacy of these flowers is limited. This study was aimed at assessing the antioxidative effects of the ethanol extract of O. fragrans flowers (OFE in vivo and evaluating its antioxidant maintenance and therapeutic effect on an allergic airway inflammation in mice. After OFE’s oral administration to mice, the values obtained in the oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay as well as the glutathione concentration in the lungs and spleens of mice increased while thiobarbituric acid reactive substances decreased significantly, indicating OFE’s significant in vivo antioxidant activity. OFE was also therapeutically efficacious in a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced allergic airway inflammation. Orally administered OFE suppressed ovalbumin-specific IgE production and inflammatory cell infiltration in the lung. Moreover, the antioxidative state of the mice improved. Thus, our findings confirm the ability of the O. fragrans flowers to reduce phlegm and suggest that OFE may be useful as an antiallergic agent.

  15. Sargassum polycystum reduces hyperglycaemia, dyslipidaemia and oxidative stress via increasing insulin sensitivity in a rat model of type 2 diabetes.

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    Motshakeri, Mahsa; Ebrahimi, Mahdi; Goh, Yong Meng; Matanjun, Patricia; Mohamed, Suhaila

    2013-05-01

    Sargassum polycystum, a brown seaweed, contains various nutrients and bioactive compounds that have antioxidant and healing properties. The research hypothesises that antioxidants and pigments in dietary S. polycystum extracts can improve insulin sensitivity, blood sugar levels and blood lipid levels in a rat model of type 2 diabetes. The diabetes was induced by a high-sugar, high-fat diet for 16 weeks to enhance insulin resistance, followed by a low-dose intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (35 mg kg(-1) body weight). The doses of S. polycystum tested on diabetic rats were 150 and 300 mg kg(-1) body weight for the ethanolic extract or 150 and 300 mg kg(-1) for the water extract. Normal rats, untreated diabetic and metformin-treated diabetic rats (n = 6) were used as control. Both doses of the alcohol extract of S. polycystum and the 300 mg kg(-1) water extract, significantly reduced blood glucose and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1C ) levels. Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride levels and plasma atherogenic index were significantly decreased after 22 days treatment in all seaweed groups. Unlike metformin, S. polycystum did not significantly change plasma insulin in the rats, but increased the response to insulin. The consumption of either ethanolic or water extracts of S. polycystum dose dependently reduced dyslipidaemia in type 2 diabetic rats. S. polycystum is a potential insulin sensitiser, for a comestible complementary therapy in the management of type 2 diabetes which can help reduce atherogenic risk. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Overweight and Obesity-Induced Oxidative Stress in Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU-GEN ZHU; SHU-MEI ZHANG; JI-YUE WANG; WEI-QIANG XIAO; XIN-YU WANG; JUN-FU ZHOU

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether overweight and obesity might cause oxidative stress and potential oxidative damage in overweight and obese children, and to explore its possible mechanism. Methods Eighty-five overweight and obese children(OOC), and eighty-five age-matched healthy children (HC) were recruited in this case-control study. The present study analyzed spectrophotometrically vitamin C (VC), vitamin E (VE), and β-carotene (β-CAR) in plasma, as well as the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) in erythrocytes. Results Compared with those of VC, VE, β-CAR, SOD, CAT and MDA in the HC group, the average values of VC, VE, β-CAR, SOD, and CAT in the OOC group were significantly decreased (P<0.001), while the average value of MDA in the OOC group was significantly increased (P<0.001). The regression analysis demonstrated that VC, VE, β-CAR, SOD, and CAT were negatively correlated (P<0.05-0.01), and MDA was positively correlated with BMI (P<0.05). Fitting to the model of multiple stepwise regression of BMI on VC, VE, β-CAR, SOD, CAT, and MDA in 85 OOC was Y = 27.0041 + 0.2541MDA - 2.1448β-CAR - 0.0090CAT, where F =43.8088, P<0.001, r= 0.7866, r2= 0.6187, adjusted r2= 0.6046. The findings from the reliability analysis for VC, VE, β-CAR, SOD, CAT, and MDA used to reflect increased oxidative stress and potential oxidative damage in the OOC showed that the reliability coefficients (alpha, 6 items) = 0.7231, P<0.0001, and that the standardized item alpha = 0.9207, P<0.0001. Conclusion The present study suggests that there exists an increased oxidative stress in overweight and obese children.

  17. Chronic unpredictable mild stress generates oxidative stress and systemic inflammation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, Ana Laura; Jaime, Herlinda Bonilla; Escobar Villanueva, María Del Carmen; Padilla, Malinalli Brianza; Palacios, Gonzalo Vázquez; Aguilar, Francisco Javier Alarcón

    2016-07-01

    Stress is considered to be a causal agent of chronic degenerative diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, arthritis and Alzheimer's. Chronic glucocorticoid and catecholamine release into the circulation during the stress response has been suggested to activate damage mechanisms, which in the long term produce metabolic alterations associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. However, the consequences of stress in animal models for periods longer than 40days have not been explored. The goal of this work was to determine whether chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) produced alterations in the redox state and the inflammatory profile of rats after 20, 40, and 60days. CUMS consisted of random exposure of the animals to different stressors. The following activities were measured in the liver and pancreas: reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (LPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and protein oxidation. Similarly, serum cytokine levels (IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-10) were determined. CUMS activated the stress response from day 20 until day 60. In the liver and pancreas, GHS levels were decreased from day 40, whereas protein lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation were increased. This is the first work to report that the pancreas redox state is subject to chronic stress conditions. The TAC was constant in the liver and reduced in the pancreas. An increase in the TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 inflammatory markers and a decrease in the IL-10 level due to CUMS was shown, thereby resulting in the generation of a systemic inflammation state after 60days of treatment. Together, the CUMS consequences on day 60 suggest that both processes can contribute to the development of chronic degenerative diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. CUMS is an animal model that in addition to avoiding habituation activates damage mechanisms such as oxidative stress and low-grade chronic

  18. Influence of oxidative stress on disease development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božić Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is ever increasing data indicating the vmast contribution of oxidative stress to the pathogenesis of numerous diseases (atherosclerosis, hypertension, heart failure, diabetes mellitus, stroke, rheumatoid arthritis, and others. Thus, in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis the primary role is held by reactive oxygen species that are synthetized by endothelial cells of arterial blood vessels, leukocytes and macrophages. Furthermore, native particles of lipoproteins of small density become atherogenic through oxidation caused by reactive oxygen species. The oxidation of small-density lipoproteins stimulates the inflammatory process, and it in turn steps up adhesion and the inflow of monocytes and affects the synthesis and release of numerous proinflammatory cytokines involved in the further course of the process. One of the reasons for the development of arterial hypertension is the simultaneous activation of NAD(PH oxidase and 12/15-lipoxygenase, since it results in the stepped up production of reactive oxygen species. These stimulate the production of matrix metalloproteinase 2, which lead to vascular remodelling and to increased apoptosis of heart muscle cells. Stepped up apoptosis is linked with myocardial infarction, cardiomyopathies and the development of heart failure. The sensitivity of β-cells of the endocrine part of the pancreas to reactive oxygen species favor the naturally low concentrations of the collectors of free radicals in them, as well as an increase in the concentration of proinflammatory cytokines, glucosis and lipids that induce a reduction in the mass and function of β-cells. Hyperglycemia in diabetes mellitus causes tissue damage through non-enzyme glycosylation of intracellular and extracellular proteins, which results in: reduced enzyme activity, damaged nucleic acid, disrupted natural decomposition of proteins, and activation of cytotoxic pathways. These processes are the basis of the pathogenesis of numerous

  19. Oxidative Stress-Dependent Coronary Endothelial Dysfunction in Obese Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamez-Mendez, Ana María; Vargas-Robles, Hilda; Ríos, Amelia; Escalante, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is involved in several cardiovascular diseases including coronary artery disease and endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial Endothelium vasodilator and vasoconstrictor agonists play a key role in regulation of vascular tone. In this study, we evaluated coronary vascular response in an 8 weeks diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice model. Coronary perfusion pressure in response to acetylcholine in isolated hearts from obese mice showed increased vasoconstriction and reduced vasodilation responses compared with control mice. Vascular nitric oxide assessed in situ with DAF-2 DA showed diminished levels in coronary arteries from obese mice in both basal and acetylcholine-stimulated conditions. Also, released prostacyclin was decreased in heart perfusates from obese mice, along with plasma tetrahydrobiopterin level and endothelium nitric oxide synthase dimer/monomer ratio. Obesity increased thromboxane A2 synthesis and oxidative stress evaluated by superoxide and peroxynitrite levels, compared with control mice. Obese mice treated with apocynin, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, reversed all parameters to normal levels. These results suggest that after 8 weeks on a high-fat diet, the increase in oxidative stress lead to imbalance in vasoactive substances and consequently to endothelial dysfunction in coronary arteries.

  20. Influence of Oxidative Stress on Stored Platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Manasa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet storage and its availability for transfusion are limited to 5-6 days. Oxidative stress (OS is one of the causes for reduced efficacy and shelf-life of platelets. The studies on platelet storage have focused on improving the storage conditions by altering platelet storage solutions, temperature, and materials. Nevertheless, the role of OS on platelet survival during storage is still unclear. Hence, this study was conducted to investigate the influence of storage on platelets. Platelets were stored for 12 days at 22°C. OS markers such as aggregation, superoxides, reactive oxygen species, glucose, pH, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and antioxidant enzymes were assessed. OS increased during storage as indicated by increments in aggregation, superoxides, pH, conjugate dienes, and superoxide dismutase and decrements in glucose and catalase. Thus, platelets could endure OS till 6 days during storage, due to the antioxidant defense system. An evident increase in OS was observed from day 8 of storage, which can diminish the platelet efficacy. The present study provides an insight into the gradual changes occurring during platelet storage. This lays the foundation towards new possibilities of employing various antioxidants as additives in storage solutions.

  1. Oxidative stress in atherosclerosis and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankin, V Z; Lisina, M O; Arzamastseva, N E; Konovalova, G G; Nedosugova, L V; Kaminnyi, A I; Tikhaze, A K; Ageev, F T; Kukharchuk, V V; Belenkov, Yu N

    2005-07-01

    We measured the content of lipid peroxides in plasma LDL from patients with chronic CHD not accompanied by hypercholesterolemia; CHD and hypercholesterolemia; type 2 diabetes mellitus and decompensation of carbohydrate metabolism; and CHD, circulatory insufficiency, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (without hypercholesterolemia). The content of lipid peroxides in LDL isolated from blood plasma by differential ultracentrifugation in a density gradient was estimated by a highly specific method with modifications (reagent Fe(2+) xylene orange and triphenylphosphine as a reducing agent for organic peroxides). The content of lipid peroxides in LDL from patients was much higher than in controls (patients without coronary heart disease and diabetes). Hypercholesterolemia and diabetes can be considered as factors promoting LDL oxidation in vivo. Our results suggest that stimulation of lipid peroxidation in low-density lipoproteins during hypercholesterolemia and diabetes is associated with strong autooxidation of cholesterol and glucose during oxidative and carbonyl (aldehyde) stress, respectively. These data illustrate a possible mechanism of the progression of atherosclerosis in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  2. Chinese green tea consumption reduces oxidative stress, inflammation and tissues damage in smoke exposed rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wajdy Al-Awaida

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: Exposure of albino rat model to cigarette smoke caused oxidative stress, altered the cellular antioxidant defense system, induced apoptosis in lung tissue, inflammation and tissues damage, which could be prevented by supplementation of CGT.

  3. Residual Stresses Modeled in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freborg, A. M.; Ferguson, B. L.; Petrus, G. J.; Brindley, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications continue to increase as the need for greater engine efficiency in aircraft and land-based gas turbines increases. However, durability and reliability issues limit the benefits that can be derived from TBC's. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms that cause TBC failure is a key to increasing, as well as predicting, TBC durability. Oxidation of the bond coat has been repeatedly identified as one of the major factors affecting the durability of the ceramic top coat during service. However, the mechanisms by which oxidation facilitates TBC failure are poorly understood and require further characterization. In addition, researchers have suspected that other bond coat and top coat factors might influence TBC thermal fatigue life, both separately and through interactions with the mechanism of oxidation. These other factors include the bond coat coefficient of thermal expansion, the bond coat roughness, and the creep behavior of both the ceramic and bond coat layers. Although it is difficult to design an experiment to examine these factors unambiguously, it is possible to design a computer modeling "experiment" to examine the action and interaction of these factors, as well as to determine failure drivers for TBC's. Previous computer models have examined some of these factors separately to determine their effect on coating residual stresses, but none have examined all the factors concurrently. The purpose of this research, which was performed at DCT, Inc., in contract with the NASA Lewis Research Center, was to develop an inclusive finite element model to characterize the effects of oxidation on the residual stresses within the TBC system during thermal cycling as well as to examine the interaction of oxidation with the other factors affecting TBC life. The plasma sprayed, two-layer thermal barrier coating that was modeled incorporated a superalloy substrate, a NiCrAlY bond coat, and a ZrO2-8 wt % Y2O3 ceramic top coat. We

  4. An investigation of the neuroprotective effects of Curcumin in a model of Homocysteine - induced oxidative stress in the rat’s brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ataie

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available "n  "nBackground and the purpose of the study: Aging is the major risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases and oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of them. Oxidative stress can induce neuronal damages and modulate intracellular signaling, ultimately leading to neuronal death by apoptosis or necrosis. In this study, the possible antioxidant and neuroprotective properties of the natural polyphenolic antioxidant compound, curcumin against homocysteine (Hcy neurotoxicity was investigated. "nMethods: Curcumin (5, 15, 45 mg/kg was injected intraperitonealy (i.p. once daily for a period of 10 days beginning 5 days prior to Hcy (0.2 μmol/μl intracerebroventricular (i.c.v injection in rats. Biochemical and behavioral studies, including passive avoidance learning and locomotor activity tests were studied 24 hrs after the last curcumin or its vehicle injection. The cell density of hippocampus layers and apoptosis in rats' hippocampi by immunohistochical methods were also studied. Results and major conclusion:Results indicated that Hcy could induce lipid peroxidation and increase Malondialdehyde (MDA and Super Oxide Anion (SOA levels in rat's brain.Additionally, Hcy impaired memory retention in passive avoidance learning test. However, curcumin decreased MDA and SOA levels significantly and improved learning and memory in rats. On the other hand Hcy could induce cell death and apoptosis in rats' hippocampi which was inhibited by curcumin. These results suggest that Hcy may induce lipid peroxidation in rat's brain. and polyphenol treatment (curcumin improves learning and memory deficits by protecting the nervous system against Oxidative stress.

  5. Altered Gravity Induces Oxidative Stress in Drosophila Melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Hosamani, Ravikumar

    2015-01-01

    Altered gravity environments can induce increased oxidative stress in biological systems. Microarray data from our previous spaceflight experiment (FIT experiment on STS-121) indicated significant changes in the expression of oxidative stress genes in adult fruit flies after spaceflight. Currently, our lab is focused on elucidating the role of hypergravity-induced oxidative stress and its impact on the nervous system in Drosophila melanogaster. Biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches were combined to study this effect on the ground. Adult flies (2-3 days old) exposed to acute hypergravity (3g, for 1 hour and 2 hours) showed significantly elevated levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in fly brains compared to control samples. This data was supported by significant changes in mRNA expression of specific oxidative stress and antioxidant defense related genes. As anticipated, a stress-resistant mutant line, Indy302, was less vulnerable to hypergravity-induced oxidative stress compared to wild-type flies. Survival curves were generated to study the combined effect of hypergravity and pro-oxidant treatment. Interestingly, many of the oxidative stress changes that were measured in flies showed sex specific differences. Collectively, our data demonstrate that altered gravity significantly induces oxidative stress in Drosophila, and that one of the organs where this effect is evident is the brain.

  6. Curcumin alleviates oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daverey, Amita; Agrawal, Sandeep K

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress plays a critical role in various neurodegenerative diseases, thus alleviating oxidative stress is a potential strategy for therapeutic intervention and/or prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, alleviation of oxidative stress through curcumin is investigated in A172 (human glioblastoma cell line) and HA-sp (human astrocytes cell line derived from the spinal cord) astrocytes. H2O2 was used to induce oxidative stress in astrocytes (A172 and HA-sp). Data show that H2O2 induces activation of astrocytes in dose- and time-dependent manner as evident by increased expression of GFAP in A172 and HA-sp cells after 24 and 12h respectively. An upregulation of Prdx6 was also observed in A172 and HA-sp cells after 24h of H2O2 treatment as compared to untreated control. Our data also showed that curcumin inhibits oxidative stress-induced cytoskeleton disarrangement, and impedes the activation of astrocytes by inhibiting upregulation of GFAP, vimentin and Prdx6. In addition, we observed an inhibition of oxidative stress-induced inflammation, apoptosis and mitochondria fragmentation after curcumin treatment. Therefore, our results suggest that curcumin not only protects astrocytes from H2O2-induced oxidative stress but also reverses the mitochondrial damage and dysfunction induced by oxidative stress. This study also provides evidence for protective role of curcumin on astrocytes by showing its effects on attenuating reactive astrogliosis and inhibiting apoptosis.

  7. Protein Sulfenylation: A Novel Readout of Environmental Oxidant Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative stress is a commonly cited mechanism of toxicity of environmental agents. Ubiquitous environmental chemicals such as the diesel exhaust component 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ)induce oxidative stress by redox cycling, which generates hydrogen peroxide (H202). Cysteinylthio...

  8. Blood and Oxidative Stress (BOS): Soyuz mission "Eneide"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Angela Maria; Adorni, Laura; Montorfano, Gigliola; Negroni, Manuela; Zava, Stefania; Berra, Bruno

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this experiment was to assay astronaut antioxidant status, to analyse red blood cell membrane composition of astronauts prior and after flight and to study the correlation with oxidative stress that erythrocytes have undergone due to space radiations. Results obtained from this single case study, indicate that during a short time flight, erythrocytes decrease their antioxidant defences, to counteract oxidative stress.

  9. Protein Sulfenylation: A Novel Readout of Environmental Oxidant Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative stress is a commonly cited mechanism of toxicity of environmental agents. Ubiquitous environmental chemicals such as the diesel exhaust component 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ)induce oxidative stress by redox cycling, which generates hydrogen peroxide (H202). Cysteinylthio...

  10. FREE RADICALS, REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES, OXIDATIVE STRESSES AND THEIR CLASSIFICATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushchak, V I

    2015-01-01

    The phrases "free radicals" and "reactive oxygen species" (ROS) are frequently used interchangeably although this is not always correct. This article gives a brief description of two mentioned oxygen forms. During the first two-three decades after ROS discovery in biological systems (1950-1970 years) they were considered only as damaging agents, but later their involvement in organism protection and regulation of the expression of certain genes was found. The physiological state of increased steady-state ROS level along with certain physiological effects has been called oxidative stress. This paper describes ROS homeostasis and provides several classifications of oxidative stresses. The latter are based on time-course and intensity principles. Therefore distinguishing between acute and chronic stresses on the basis of the dynamics, and the basal oxidative stress, low intensity oxidative stress, strong oxidative stress, and finally a very strong oxidative stress based on the intensity of the action of the inductor of the stress are described. Potential areas of research include the development of this field with complex classification of oxidative stresses, an accurate identification of cellular targets of ROS action, determination of intracellular spatial and temporal distribution of ROS and their effects, deciphering the molecular mechanisms responsible for cell response to ROS attacks, and their participation in the normal cellular functions, i.e. cellular homeostasis and its regulation.

  11. Diversity in robustness of Lactococcus lactis strains during heat stress, oxidative stress, and spray drying stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, A.R.; Setyawati, M.C.; Bayjanov, J.R.; Alkema, W.; van Hijum, S.A.F.T.; Bron, P.A.; Hugenholtz, J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we tested 39 Lactococcus lactis strains isolated from diverse habitats for their robustness under heat and oxidative stress, demonstrating high diversity in survival (up to 4 log units). Strains with an L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype generally displayed more-robust phenotypes than s

  12. Oxidative desulfurization: kinetic modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, S; Uppaluri, R; Purkait, M K

    2009-01-30

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H(2)O(2) over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel.

  13. The role of oxidative stress in alcoholic liver injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosavljević Tatjana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Oxidative stress plays an important role in pathogenesis of alcoholic liver injury. The main source of free oxygen species is cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase, which can be induced by ethanol. Role of cytochrome P4502E1 in ethanol-induced oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species produced by this enzyme are more important in intracellular oxidative damage compared to species derived from activated phagocytes. Free radicals lead to lipid peroxidation, enzymatic inactivation and protein oxidation. Role of mitochondria in alcohol-induced oxidative stress. Production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species is increased, and glutathione content is decreased in chronically ethanolfed animals. Oxidative stress in mitochondria leads to mitochondrial DNA damage and has a dual effect on apoptosis. Role of Kupffer cells in alcohol-induced liver injury. Chronic ethanol consumption is associated with increased release of endotoxin from gut lumen into portal circulation. Endotoxin activates Kupffer cells, which then release proinflammatory cytokines and oxidants. Role of neutrophils in alcohol-induced liver injury. Alcoholic liver injury leads to the accumulation of neutrophils, which release reactive oxygen species and lysosomal enzymes and contribute to hepatocyte damage and necrosis. Role of nitric oxide in alcohol-induced oxidative stress. High amounts of nitric oxide contribute to the oxidative damage, mainly by generating peroxynitrites. Role of antioxidants in ethanol-induced oxidative stress. Chronic ethanol consumption is associated with reduced liver glutathione and α-tocopherol level and with reduced superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity. Conclusion. Oxidative stress in alcoholic liver disease is a consequence of increased production of oxidants and decreased antioxidant defense in the liver.

  14. Oxidative stress signaling to chromatin in health and disease

    KAUST Repository

    Kreuz, Sarah

    2016-06-20

    Oxidative stress has a significant impact on the development and progression of common human pathologies, including cancer, diabetes, hypertension and neurodegenerative diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress globally influences chromatin structure, DNA methylation, enzymatic and non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of histones and DNA-binding proteins. The effects of oxidative stress on these chromatin alterations mediate a number of cellular changes, including modulation of gene expression, cell death, cell survival and mutagenesis, which are disease-driving mechanisms in human pathologies. Targeting oxidative stress-dependent pathways is thus a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of these diseases. We summarize recent research developments connecting oxidative stress and chromatin regulation.

  15. Effects of Oxidative Stress on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells present in most fetal and adult tissues. Ex vivo culture-expanded MSCs are being investigated for tissue repair and immune modulation, but their full clinical potential is far from realization. Here we review the role of oxidative stress in MSC biology, as their longevity and functions are affected by oxidative stress. In general, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibit MSC proliferation, increase senescence, enhance adipogenic but reduce osteogenic differentiation, and inhibit MSC immunomodulation. Furthermore, aging, senescence, and oxidative stress reduce their ex vivo expansion, which is critical for their clinical applications. Modulation of sirtuin expression and activity may represent a method to reduce oxidative stress in MSCs. These findings have important implications in the clinical utility of MSCs for degenerative and immunological based conditions. Further study of oxidative stress in MSCs is imperative in order to enhance MSC ex vivo expansion and in vivo engraftment, function, and longevity. PMID:27413419

  16. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaviya, Rama [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Debra L., E-mail: laskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic.

  17. Berberine exerts an anticonvulsant effect and ameliorates memory impairment and oxidative stress in a pilocarpine-induced epilepsy model in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Gao, Ying; Liu, Yang-Feng; Wang, Li; Li, Ya-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Though new antiepileptic drugs are emerging, approximately a third of epileptic patients still suffer from recurrent convulsions and cognitive dysfunction. Therefore, we tested whether berberine (Ber), a vegetable drug, has an anticonvulsant property and attenuates memory impairment in a pilocarpine (Pilo)-induced epilepsy model in rats. The rats were injected with 400 mg/kg Pilo to induce convulsions, and Ber 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg were administrated by the intragastric route once daily 7 days before Pilo injection until the experiment was over. Convulsions were observed after Pilo injection. For the rats that developed status epilepticus (SE), malondialdehyde, glutathione levels, superoxide dismutase, and catalase activity in the hippocampus were measured 24 hours after SE. The rats received the Morris water-maze test 2 weeks after SE, and then were killed for fluoro-jade B staining to detect the degenerating neurons. We found Ber delayed latency to the first seizure and the time to develop SE in a dose-dependent manner. Malondialdehyde levels were decreased, while glutathione and catalase activity were strengthened in Ber-injected SE rats. In the Morris water-maze test, Ber decreased escape latency compared to saline-treated SE rats. Additionally, Ber reduced the number of fluoro-jade B-positive cells in the hippocampal CA1 region. Our data suggest that Ber exerts anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects on Pilo-induced epilepsy in rats. Simultaneously, Ber attenuates memory impairment. The beneficial effect may be partly due to mitigation of the oxidative stress burden.

  18. Comparative analysis of the protective effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on pulmonary contusion lung oxidative stress and serum copper and zinc levels in experimental rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sırmalı, Mehmet; Solak, Okan; Tezel, Cagatay; Sırmalı, Rana; Ginis, Zeynep; Atik, Dilek; Agackıran, Yetkin; Koylu, Halis; Delibas, Namık

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in the lungs by biochemical and histopathological analyses in an experimental isolated lung contusion model. Eighty-one male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. The animals were divided randomly into four groups: group 1 (n = 9) was defined as without contusion and without CAPE injection. Group 2 (n = 9) was defined as CAPE 10 μmol/kg injection without lung contusion. Group 3 (n = 36) was defined as contusion without CAPE-administrated group which consisted of four subgroups that were created according to analysis between days 0, 1, 2, and 3. Group 4 (n = 27) was defined as CAPE 10 μmol/kg administrated after contusion group divided into three subgroups according to analysis on days 1, 2, and 3. CAPE 10 μmol/kg was injected intraperitoneally 30 min after trauma and on days 1 and 2. Blood samples were obtained to measure catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and for blood gas analysis. Trace elements such as zinc and copper were measured in serum. The lung tissue was also removed for histopathological examination. Isolated lung contusion increased serum and tissue SOD and CAT activities and MDA levels (p  0.05). CAPE also had a significant beneficial effect on blood gases (p  0.05). CAPE appears to be effective in protecting against severe oxidative stress and tissue damage caused by pulmonary contusion in an experimental setting. Therefore, we conclude that administration of CAPE may be used for a variety of conditions associated with pulmonary contusion. Clinical use of CAPE may have the advantage of prevention of pulmonary contusion.

  19. Effect of Brewing Duration on the Antioxidant and Hepatoprotective Abilities of Tea Phenolic and Alkaloid Compounds in a t-BHP Oxidative Stress-Induced Rat Hepatocyte Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Braud

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tea is an interesting source of antioxidants capable of counteracting the oxidative stress implicated in liver diseases. We investigated the impact of antioxidant molecules provided by a mixture of teas’ leaves (green, oolong, pu-erh after different infusion durations in the prevention of oxidative stress in isolated rat hepatocytes, by comparison with pure epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, the main representative of tea catechins. Dried aqueous tea extracts (ATE obtained after 5, 15 and 30 min infusion time were characterized for total polyphenols (gallic acid equivalent, catechins, gallic acid and caffeine (HPLC-DAD/ESI-MS contents, and for scavenging ability against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical. Hepatoprotection was evaluated through hepatocyte viability tests using tert-butyl hydroperoxide as a stress inducer, (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, neutral red uptake, real-time cellular impedance and mitochondrial function tests. We showed that a 5-min incubation time is sufficient for an optimal bioaccessibility of tea compounds with the highest antioxidative ability, which decreases for longer durations. A 4-h pretreatment of cells with ATE significantly prevented cell death by regulating reactive oxygen species production and maintaining mitochondrial integrity. Pure EGCG, at doses similar in ATE (5–12 µM, was inefficient, suggesting a plausible synergy of several water-soluble tea compounds to explain the ATE beneficial effects.

  20. Oxidative stress response after laparoscopic versus conventional sigmoid resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Michael Tvilling; Kücükakin, Bülent; Lykkesfeldt, Jens;

    2012-01-01

    Surgery is accompanied by a surgical stress response, which results in increased morbidity and mortality. Oxidative stress is a part of the surgical stress response. Minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery may result in reduced oxidative stress compared with open surgery. Nineteen patients...... scheduled for sigmoid resection were randomly allocated to open or laparoscopic sigmoid resection in a double-blind, prospective clinical trial. Three biochemical markers of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, ascorbic acid, and dehydroascorbic acid) were measured at 6 different time points (preoperatively......, 1 h, 6 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h postoperatively). There were no statistical significant differences between laparoscopic and open surgery for any of the 3 oxidative stress parameters. Malondialdehyde was reduced 1 hour postoperatively (P...