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Sample records for model original full

  1. Full-F gyrofluid model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    A global electromagnetic gyrofluid model based on the full-F gyrokinetic model is derived. The gyrofluid moment variables are not split into fluctuating and equilibrium parts. Profiles are evolved freely, and gyro-averaging operators are not parametrized, but are functions of the gyrofluid moment...... variables. The fluid moment hierarchy is closed by approximating the gyrokinetic distribution function as a finite order Hermite-Laguerre polynomial and by determining closure approximations for terms involving the gyrokinetic gyro-averaging operator. The model exactly conserves the gyrokinetic full......-F energy invariant evaluated using the Hermite-Laguerre decomposition. The model is suited for qualitative studies of the interplay between turbulence, flows, and dynamically evolving profiles in magnetically confined plasmas....

  2. Model FRBR in origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Lúcia Pacheco

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This article aims at identifying the genesis of the studies the conceptual model Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR, published in 1998 by the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA with the proposal to develop new approach to the bibliographic record. Method. For this appealed to bibliographical research, primarily the sources of official information IFLA, in order to investigate the trajectory preceding the publication of the model and determine the intellectual debate on its elaboration. Results. It was found that the FRBR model was born with eminently practical purposes and generates a set of expectations about the reduction of cataloging costs, indicating a minimum level element in bibliographic records that meet the needs of the users associated with the various types of materials and contexts of use. Conclusions. The accumulation of scientific knowledge coupled with sustained and brought experiential dimension in the model, changes the paradigms of traditional cataloging, but model the final report does not present the foundations that support it.

  3. Full spectrum of the Rabi model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maciejewski, Andrzej J., E-mail: maciejka@astro.ia.uz.zgora.pl [J. Kepler Institute of Astronomy, University of Zielona Góra, Licealna 9, PL-65-417 Zielona Góra (Poland); Przybylska, Maria, E-mail: M.Przybylska@proton.if.uz.zgora.pl [Institute of Physics, University of Zielona Góra, Licealna 9, PL-65-417 Zielona Góra (Poland); Stachowiak, Tomasz, E-mail: stachowiak@cft.edu.pl [Center for Theoretical Physics PAS, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, PL-02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-01-03

    It is shown that in the Rabi model, for an integer value of the spectral parameter x, in addition to the finite number of the classical Judd states there exist infinitely many possible eigenstates. These eigenstates exist if the parameters of the problem are zeros of a certain transcendental function; in other words, there are infinitely many possible choices of parameters for which integer x belongs to the spectrum. Moreover, it is shown that the classical Judd eigenstates appear as degenerate cases of the confluent Heun function.

  4. Endolumenal endoscopic full-thickness resection of muscularis propria-originating gastric submucosal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yadong; Yu, Lianzhen; Yang, Shuping; Li, Xueliang; Ding, Jing; Chen, Li; Xu, Yinghong; Shi, Ruihua

    2014-03-01

    This study retrospectively reviewed 48 cases of gastric submucosal tumors (SMTs) treated by endolumenal endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFR) microsurgery in our gastrointestinal endoscopy center. From November 2009 to October 2012, 48 cases underwent endolumenal EFR for resection of muscularis propria-originating gastric SMTs. Characteristics of the 48 patients, clinical efficacy, safety of EFR, and post-EFR pathological diagnoses were evaluated retrospectively. EFR was successfully performed in 48 cases with 52 lesions. The median operation time was 59.72 minutes (range, 30-270 minutes; standard deviation, 39.72 minutes). The mean tumor size was 1.59 cm (range, 0.50-4.80 cm; standard deviation, 1.01 cm). During the EFR process, dual-channel gastroscopy was applied in 20 cases of SMTs, and paracentesis during the EFR process was applied in 9 cases. EFR for larger SMTs and gastric corpus-originating SMTs had longer operative times. Pathological diagnosis included 43 gastrointestinal stromal tumors, 4 leiomyomas, and 1 schwannoma. A larger tumor size was associated with higher risk of malignancy. No severe postoperative complications were observed. No tumor recurrences were confirmed in follow-up gastroscopy. The endolumenal EFR technique proved to be feasible and minimally invasive, even for the resection of large gastric tumors originating from the muscularis propria. However, more data on EFR must be obtained and analyzed.

  5. A full lifecycle bioenergetic model for bluefin tuna.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jusup, M.; Klanjscek, T.; Matsuda, H.; Kooijman, S.A.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    We formulated a full lifecycle bioenergetic model for bluefin tuna relying on the principles of Dynamic Energy Budget theory. Traditional bioenergetic models in fish research deduce energy input and utilization from observed growth and reproduction. In contrast, our model predicts growth and

  6. Model and Full Scale Predictions of a Carrier Flow Field

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gorski, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    .... These calculations are for a bare hull with skeg, bilge keels and outboard propeller shaft. The calculations indicate there are extensive differences between the model and full scale wakes entering the propeller disks...

  7. Study of the Half-Day/Full-Day Kindergarten Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInroy, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    This case study and problem analysis was an in-depth investigation of the half-day/full-day kindergarten model by utilizing interviews and focus groups to provide insight from parents, teachers, and other district personnel as to how the model has impacted the social, emotional, and academic development of the participating students. This study…

  8. Origin,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur de Vargas Giorgi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This essay tightens the “origin” concept, its manifestation through puzzles and their relationship to techniques of reproduction. Contrary to the hegemonic critique of aesthetic and cultural objects – critique that, settled on the appearance and notions of identity, tradition, canon, etc., undervalues the reproductions of "originals" –, the aim is to deliver these objects from formal hierarchization dispositives, that is, release them of what is ideal and positively imposed, so that the reproducibility is potentiated as producer of singularities, of apparitions. The effort is to keep the undecided character of puzzles (bodies, texts, images in which the origin is manifest, so that the logic of the spectacle is reverted into sense opening, instance in which the aesthetic becomes a “performance” before contemporary complexity. With the reproducibility, an origin survives in passage: continually restored, but incomplete, present in trace, in absence.

  9. Wind Farm Wake Models From Full Scale Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben; Bak, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    on real full scale data. The modelling is based on so called effective wind speed. It is shown that there is a wake for a wind direction range of up to 20 degrees. Further, when accounting for the wind direction it is shown that the two model structures considered can both fit the experimental data......This investigation is part of the EU FP7 project “Distributed Control of Large-Scale Offshore Wind Farms”. The overall goal in this project is to develop wind farm controllers giving power set points to individual turbines in the farm in order to minimise mechanical loads and optimise power. One...... control configuration examined is distributed control where turbines only communicate with their nearest upwind neighbors. Design of such controllers needs wake models and these models should ideally be distributed. This paper compares two simple multiple wake models for this purpose. The study is based...

  10. MCNP full-core modeling of the advanced test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.S.; Jahshan, S.N.; Nielson, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    A full-core Monte Carlo neutron and photon (MCNP) transport model has been completed for the advanced test reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This new model is a complete three-dimensional model that represents fuel elements, core structures, and target regions in adequate detail. The model can be used in evaluating heating and reaction rates in various target regions of the core. This model is especially useful in physics analysis of an asymmetric experiment loading in the core. The ATR is a light-water-cooled thermal reactor with aluminum/uranium-aluminide fuel plates grouped in arcuate fuel elements that form a serpentine arrangement, as shown in Fig. 1. The core is surrounded by a beryllium reflector. Nine test loops are nestled in the lobes of the serpentine core, and numerous other irradiation holes with varying dimensions and radiation environments are located in the reflector and in the core interior

  11. The Halo Model of Origin Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josiassen, Alexander; Lukas, Bryan A.; Whitwell, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    National origin has gained importance as a marketing tool for practitioners to sell their goods and services. However, because origin-image research has been troubled by several fundamental limitations, academia has become sceptical of the current status and strategic implications of the concept...

  12. Full waveform modelling and misfit calculation using the VERCE platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garth, Thomas; Spinuso, Alessandro; Casarotti, Emanuele; Magnoni, Federica; Krischner, Lion; Igel, Heiner; Schwichtenberg, Horst; Frank, Anton; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In recent years the increasing resolution of seismic imagining by full waveform inversion has opened new research perspectives and practices. These methods rely on harnessing the computational power of large supercomputers and new storage capabilities, to run large parallel codes to simulate the seismic wave field in three-dimensional geological settings. The VERCE platform is designed to make these full waveform techniques accessible to a far wider spectrum of the seismological community. VERCE empowers a broad base of seismology researchers to harvest the new opportunities provided by well-established high-performance wave simulation codes such as SPECFEM3D. It meets a range of seismic research needs by eliminating the technical difficulties associated with using these codes, allowing users to focus on their research questions. VERCE delivers this power to seismologists through its science gateway, supporting wave simulation codes on each of the provided computing resources. Users can design their waveform simulation scenarios making use of a library of pre-loaded meshes and velocity models, and services for selecting earthquake focal mechanisms, seismic stations and recorded waveforms from existing catalogues, such as the GCMT catalogue, and FDSN data sources. They can also supply their own mesh, velocity model, earthquake catalogue and seismic observations. They can submit the simulations onto different computing resources, where VERCE provides codes that are tuned and supported for those resources. The simulations can currently be run on a range of European supercomputers in the PRACE network, including superMUC at LRZ, GALILEO at CINECA and on selected resources like Drachenfels at SCAI and within the EGI network. The gateway automates and looks after all these stages, but supplies seismologists with a provenance system that allows them to manage a large series of runs, review progress, and explore the results. The platform automates misfit analysis between

  13. Numerical modelling of nonlinear full-wave acoustic propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.velasco@ccadet.unam.mx; Rendón, Pablo L., E-mail: pablo.rendon@ccadet.unam.mx [Grupo de Acústica y Vibraciones, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Apartado Postal 70-186, C.P. 04510, México D.F., México (Mexico)

    2015-10-28

    The various model equations of nonlinear acoustics are arrived at by making assumptions which permit the observation of the interaction with propagation of either single or joint effects. We present here a form of the conservation equations of fluid dynamics which are deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A two-dimensional, finite-volume method using Roe’s linearisation has been implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. This code, which has been written for parallel execution on a GPU, can be used to describe moderate nonlinear phenomena, at low Mach numbers, in domains as large as 100 wave lengths. Applications range from models of diagnostic and therapeutic HIFU, to parametric acoustic arrays and nonlinear propagation in acoustic waveguides. Examples related to these applications are shown and discussed.

  14. Superresolving Black Hole Images with Full-Closure Sparse Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Chelsea; Akiyama, Kazunori; Fish, Vincent

    2018-01-01

    It is believed that almost all galaxies have black holes at their centers. Imaging a black hole is a primary objective to answer scientific questions relating to relativistic accretion and jet formation. The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is set to capture images of two nearby black holes, Sagittarius A* at the center of the Milky Way galaxy roughly 26,000 light years away and the other M87 which is in Virgo A, a large elliptical galaxy that is 50 million light years away. Sparse imaging techniques have shown great promise for reconstructing high-fidelity superresolved images of black holes from simulated data. Previous work has included the effects of atmospheric phase errors and thermal noise, but not systematic amplitude errors that arise due to miscalibration. We explore a full-closure imaging technique with sparse modeling that uses closure amplitudes and closure phases to improve the imaging process. This new technique can successfully handle data with systematic amplitude errors. Applying our technique to synthetic EHT data of M87, we find that full-closure sparse modeling can reconstruct images better than traditional methods and recover key structural information on the source, such as the shape and size of the predicted photon ring. These results suggest that our new approach will provide superior imaging performance for data from the EHT and other interferometric arrays.

  15. The Full Ward-Takahashi Identity for Colored Tensor Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sánchez, Carlos I.

    2018-03-01

    Colored tensor models (CTM) is a random geometrical approach to quantum gravity. We scrutinize the structure of the connected correlation functions of general CTM-interactions and organize them by boundaries of Feynman graphs. For rank- D interactions including, but not restricted to, all melonic φ^4 -vertices—to wit, solely those quartic vertices that can lead to dominant spherical contributions in the large- N expansion—the aforementioned boundary graphs are shown to be precisely all (possibly disconnected) vertex-bipartite regularly edge- D-colored graphs. The concept of CTM-compatible boundary-graph automorphism is introduced and an auxiliary graph calculus is developed. With the aid of these constructs, certain U (∞)-invariance of the path integral measure is fully exploited in order to derive a strong Ward-Takahashi Identity for CTMs with a symmetry-breaking kinetic term. For the rank-3 φ^4 -theory, we get the exact integral-like equation for the 2-point function. Similarly, exact equations for higher multipoint functions can be readily obtained departing from this full Ward-Takahashi identity. Our results hold for some Group Field Theories as well. Altogether, our non-perturbative approach trades some graph theoretical methods for analytical ones. We believe that these tools can be extended to tensorial SYK-models.

  16. Seismic Full Waveform Modeling & Imaging in Attenuating Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng

    Seismic attenuation strongly affects seismic waveforms by amplitude loss and velocity dispersion. Without proper inclusion of Q parameters, errors can be introduced for seismic full waveform modeling and imaging. Three different (Carcione's, Robertsson's, and the generalized Robertsson's) isotropic viscoelastic wave equations based on the generalized standard linear solid (GSLS) are evaluated. The second-order displacement equations are derived, and used to demonstrate that, with the same stress relaxation times, these viscoelastic formulations are equivalent. By introducing separate memory variables for P and S relaxation functions, Robertsson's formulation is generalized to allow different P and S wave stress relaxation times, which improves the physical consistency of the Qp and Qs modelled in the seismograms.The three formulations have comparable computational cost. 3D seismic finite-difference forward modeling is applied to anisotropic viscoelastic media. The viscoelastic T-matrix (a dynamic effective medium theory) relates frequency-dependent anisotropic attenuation and velocity to reservoir properties in fractured HTI media, based on the meso-scale fluid flow attenuation mechanism. The seismic signatures resulting from changing viscoelastic reservoir properties are easily visible. Analysis of 3D viscoelastic seismograms suggests that anisotropic attenuation is a potential tool for reservoir characterization. To compensate the Q effects during reverse-time migration (RTM) in viscoacoustic and viscoelastic media, amplitudes need to be compensated during wave propagation; the propagation velocity of the Q-compensated wavefield needs to be the same as in the attenuating wavefield, to restore the phase information. Both amplitude and phase can be compensated when the velocity dispersion and the amplitude loss are decoupled. For wave equations based on the GSLS, because Q effects are coupled in the memory variables, Q-compensated wavefield propagates faster than

  17. Linearization of the full activated sludge model No 1 for interaction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhalla, Abdelhay; Houssou, Mohamed; Charif, Moussa

    2010-08-01

    This paper deals with the linearization of the full activated sludge model No 1 (ASM1) in the scope of interaction analysis. For consistency, the linearization procedure is developed and validated within the BSM1 simulation benchmark framework. It is based on reaction rate approximation by linear combinations of states. The linear rate models are identified and incorporated in the mass balance equations, yielding a linear locally equivalent to the ASM1 model. Linear models for anoxic and aerated compartments are proposed. It is observed that the presented models track very closely the nonlinear ASM1 responses to various influent data. The key feature of this linearization strategy is that the gotten linear version of the ASM1 model is linear time invariant (LTI) and that it conserves the states biological interpretation and the original ASM1 dimension. It allows, therefore, application of interaction analysis methods and makes it possible to determine motivated control configurations for the ASM1 model.

  18. Corporate psychopathy and the full-range leadership model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Cynthia; Neumann, Craig; Babiak, Paul; Hare, Robert D

    2015-06-01

    The B-Scan 360 is a relatively new, purpose-built measure of corporate psychopathy that addresses many of the issues inherent in studying psychopathy in organizations. The primary goal of the present study was to measure the relationship between employees' perception of psychopathic features in their supervisor and their rating of their supervisor on the Full-Range Model of Leadership. The second goal of the study was to test the B-Scan 360's factor structure and test its interrater reliability in an organizational sample. A total of 491 civic employees and 116 employees from a branch of a large financial company completed the B-Scan 360 as well as the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire on their direct supervisor. The B-Scan 360 and all of its four factors were positively correlated with passive leadership (Laissez-Faire leadership) and negatively correlated with positive leadership (both Transactional and Transformational leadership). Furthermore, results revealed the same four-factor structure and good interrater reliability for the B-Scan 360 in this business sample as previously reported for a general population. Overall, the results provide additional support for the B-Scan 360 as a measure of psychopathic traits in corporate settings. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. NACP Site: Terrestrial Biosphere Model Output Data in Original Format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains the original model output data submissions from the 24 terrestrial biosphere models (TBM) that participated in the North American...

  20. NACP Site: Terrestrial Biosphere Model Output Data in Original Format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains the original model output data submissions from the 24 terrestrial biosphere models (TBM) that participated in the North American Carbon...

  1. Endoscopic full-thickness resection without laparoscopic assistance for gastric submucosal tumors originated from the muscularis propria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping-Hong; Yao, Li-Qing; Qin, Xin-Yu; Cai, Ming-Yan; Xu, Mei-Dong; Zhong, Yun-Shi; Chen, Wei-Feng; Zhang, Yi-Qun; Qin, Wen-Zheng; Hu, Jian-Wei; Liu, Jing-Zheng

    2011-09-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy, safety, and feasibility of endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFR) for gastric submucosal tumors (SMTs) originated from the muscularis propria. Twenty-six patients with gastric SMTs originated from the muscularis propria were treated by EFR between July 2007 and January 2009. EFR technique consists of five major procedures: (1) injecting normal saline into the submucosa and precutting the mucosal and submucosal layer around the lesion; (2) a circumferential incision as deep as muscularis propria around the lesion by the endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) technique; (3) incision into serosal layer around the lesion with Hook knife; (4) completion of full-thickness incision to the tumor including the serosal layer with Hook, IT, or snare by gastroscopy without laparoscopic assistance; (5) closure of the gastric-wall defect with metallic clips. EFR was successfully performed in all 26 patients without laparoscopic assistance. The complete resection rate was 100%, and the mean operation time was 105 (range, 60-145) min. The mean resected lesion size was 2.8 (range, 1.2-4.5) cm. Pathological diagnosis of these lesions included gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) (16/26), leiomyomas (6/26), glomus tumors (3/26), and Schwannoma (1/26). No gastric bleeding, peritonitis sign, or abdominal abscess occurred after EFR. No lesion residual or recurrence was found during the follow-up period (mean, 8 months; range, 6-24 months). EFR seems to be an efficacious, safe, and minimally invasive treatment for patients with gastric SMT, which makes it possible to resect deep gastric lesion and provide precise pathological diagnosis of it. With the development of EFR, the indication of endoscopic resection may be expanded.

  2. Pile group program for full material modeling and progressive failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Strain wedge (SW) model formulation has been used, in previous work, to evaluate the response of a single pile or a group of piles (including its : pile cap) in layered soils to lateral loading. The SW model approach provides appropriate prediction f...

  3. A CP violetion model of cosmological origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truppel, W.L.

    1987-01-01

    It's presented a model of spontaneous violation of the CP symmetry whose mechanism of symmetry breaking is of cosmological nature. The main feature is the conformal coupling of the field of a λφ 4 theory with a background gravitational field. We show that, for the open Friedmann model of the universe, the reason of the critical temperaTure for the symmetry restoration to the equilibrium temperature of the universe rrmains constant, so that either the symmetry breaking never happened or, if happened, it can't be reverted by means of thermal effects. Upon coupling the boson to a fermion, this symmetry breaking id related to the CP non-conservation in two distinct ways: violating the P and T symmetries, and violating the C and T symmetries. (author) [pt

  4. Realistic full wave modeling of focal plane array pixels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campione, Salvatore [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electromagnetic Theory Dept.; Warne, Larry K. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electromagnetic Theory Dept.; Jorgenson, Roy E. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electromagnetic Theory Dept.; Davids, Paul [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Applied Photonic Microsystems Dept.; Peters, David W. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Applied Photonic Microsystems Dept.

    2017-11-01

    Here, we investigate full-wave simulations of realistic implementations of multifunctional nanoantenna enabled detectors (NEDs). We focus on a 2x2 pixelated array structure that supports two wavelengths of operation. We design each resonating structure independently using full-wave simulations with periodic boundary conditions mimicking the whole infinite array. We then construct a supercell made of a 2x2 pixelated array with periodic boundary conditions mimicking the full NED; in this case, however, each pixel comprises 10-20 antennas per side. In this way, the cross-talk between contiguous pixels is accounted for in our simulations. We observe that, even though there are finite extent effects, the pixels work as designed, each responding at the respective wavelength of operation. This allows us to stress that realistic simulations of multifunctional NEDs need to be performed to verify the design functionality by taking into account finite extent and cross-talk effects.

  5. Mathematical Modeling of the Origins of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The emergence of early metabolism - a network of catalyzed chemical reactions that supported self-maintenance, growth, reproduction and evolution of the ancestors of contemporary cells (protocells) was a critical, but still very poorly understood step on the path from inanimate to animate matter. Here, it is proposed and tested through mathematical modeling of biochemically plausible systems that the emergence of metabolism and its initial evolution towards higher complexity preceded the emergence of a genome. Even though the formation of protocellular metabolism was driven by non-genomic, highly stochastic processes the outcome was largely deterministic, strongly constrained by laws of chemistry. It is shown that such concepts as speciation and fitness to the environment, developed in the context of genomic evolution, also held in the absence of a genome.

  6. Vortex ring state by full-field actuator disc model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, J.N.; Shen, W.Z.; Munduate, X. [DTU, Dept. of Energy Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1997-08-01

    One-dimensional momentum theory provides a simple analytical tool for analysing the gross flow behavior of lifting propellers and rotors. Combined with a blade-element strip-theory approach, it has for many years been the most popular model for load and performance predictions of wind turbines. The model works well at moderate and high wind velocities, but is not reliable at small wind velocities, where the expansion of the wake is large and the flow field behind the rotor dominated by turbulent mixing. This is normally referred to as the turbulent wake state or the vortex ring state. In the vortex ring state, momentum theory predicts a decrease of thrust whereas the opposite is found from experiments. The reason for the disagreement is that recirculation takes place behind the rotor with the consequence that the stream tubes past the rotor becomes effectively chocked. This represents a condition at which streamlines no longer carry fluid elements from far upstream to far downstream, hence one-dimensional momentum theory is invalid and empirical corrections have to be introduced. More sophisticated analytical or semi-analytical rotor models have been used to describe stationary flow fields for heavily loaded propellers. In recent years generalized actuator disc models have been developed, but up to now no detailed computations of the turbulent wake state or the vortex ring state have been performed. In the present work the phenomenon is simulated by direct simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations, where the influence of the rotor on the flow field is modelled simply by replacing the blades by an actuator disc with a constant normal load. (EG) 13 refs.

  7. Domain-specific modeling enabling full code generation

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Domain-Specific Modeling (DSM) is the latest approach tosoftware development, promising to greatly increase the speed andease of software creation. Early adopters of DSM have been enjoyingproductivity increases of 500–1000% in production for over adecade. This book introduces DSM and offers examples from variousfields to illustrate to experienced developers how DSM can improvesoftware development in their teams. Two authorities in the field explain what DSM is, why it works,and how to successfully create and use a DSM solution to improveproductivity and quality. Divided into four parts, the book covers:background and motivation; fundamentals; in-depth examples; andcreating DSM solutions. There is an emphasis throughout the book onpractical guidelines for implementing DSM, including how toidentify the nece sary language constructs, how to generate fullcode from models, and how to provide tool support for a new DSMlanguage. The example cases described in the book are available thebook's Website, www.dsmbook....

  8. Calibration of Airframe and Occupant Models for Two Full-Scale Rotorcraft Crash Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Martin S.; Horta, Lucas G.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Two full-scale crash tests of an MD-500 helicopter were conducted in 2009 and 2010 at NASA Langley's Landing and Impact Research Facility in support of NASA s Subsonic Rotary Wing Crashworthiness Project. The first crash test was conducted to evaluate the performance of an externally mounted composite deployable energy absorber under combined impact conditions. In the second crash test, the energy absorber was removed to establish baseline loads that are regarded as severe but survivable. Accelerations and kinematic data collected from the crash tests were compared to a system integrated finite element model of the test article. Results from 19 accelerometers placed throughout the airframe were compared to finite element model responses. The model developed for the purposes of predicting acceleration responses from the first crash test was inadequate when evaluating more severe conditions seen in the second crash test. A newly developed model calibration approach that includes uncertainty estimation, parameter sensitivity, impact shape orthogonality, and numerical optimization was used to calibrate model results for the second full-scale crash test. This combination of heuristic and quantitative methods was used to identify modeling deficiencies, evaluate parameter importance, and propose required model changes. It is shown that the multi-dimensional calibration techniques presented here are particularly effective in identifying model adequacy. Acceleration results for the calibrated model were compared to test results and the original model results. There was a noticeable improvement in the pilot and co-pilot region, a slight improvement in the occupant model response, and an over-stiffening effect in the passenger region. This approach should be adopted early on, in combination with the building-block approaches that are customarily used, for model development and test planning guidance. Complete crash simulations with validated finite element models can be used

  9. Full thermomechanical coupling in modelling of micropolar thermoelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashkin, E. V.; Radayev, Y. N.

    2018-04-01

    The present paper is devoted to plane harmonic waves of displacements and microrotations propagating in fully coupled thermoelastic continua. The analysis is carried out in the framework of linear conventional thermoelastic micropolar continuum model. The reduced energy balance equation and the special form of the Helmholtz free energy are discussed. The constitutive constants providing fully coupling of equations of motion and heat conduction are considered. The dispersion equation is derived and analysed in the form bi-cubic and bi-quadratic polynoms product. The equation are analyzed by the computer algebra system Mathematica. Algebraic forms expressed by complex multivalued square and cubic radicals are obtained for wavenumbers of transverse and longitudinal waves. The exact forms of wavenumbers of a plane harmonic coupled thermoelastic waves are computed.

  10. Modeling X-linked ancestral origins in multiparental populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, Chaozhi

    2015-01-01

    The models for the mosaic structure of an individual's genome from multiparental populations have been developed primarily for autosomes, whereas X chromosomes receive very little attention. In this paper, we extend our previous approach to model ancestral origin processes along two X chromosomes

  11. An integrated factor analysis model for product eco-design based on full life cycle assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi fang Zhou

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Among the methods of comprehensive analysis for a product or an enterprise, there exist defects and deficiencies in traditional standard cost analyses and life cycle assessment methods. For example, some methods only emphasize one dimension (such as economic or environmental factors while neglecting other relevant dimensions. This paper builds a factor analysis model of resource value flow, based on full life cycle assessment and eco-design theory, in order to expose the relevant internal logic between these two factors. Design/methodology/approach: The model considers the efficient multiplication of resources, economic efficiency, and environmental efficiency as its core objectives. The model studies the status of resource value flow during the entire life cycle of a product, and gives an in-depth analysis on the mutual logical relationship of product performance, value, resource consumption, and environmental load to reveal the symptoms and potentials in different dimensions. Originality/value: This provides comprehensive, accurate and timely decision-making information for enterprise managers regarding product eco-design, as well as production and management activities. To conclude, it verifies the availability of this evaluation and analysis model using a Chinese SUV manufacturer as an example. 

  12. Fever of unknown origin: A value of 18F-FDG-PET/CT with integrated full diagnostic isotropic CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferda, Jiri; Ferdova, Eva; Zahlava, Jan; Matejovic, Martin; Kreuzberg, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of presented work is to evaluate the clinical value of 18 F-FDG-PET/CT in patients with fever of unknown origin (FUO) and to compare PET/CT finding with the results of the following investigation. Material and method: 48 patients (24 men, 24 women, mean age 57.6 years with range 15-89 years) underwent 18 F-FDG-PET/CT due to the fever of unknown origin. All examinations were performed using complex PET/CT protocol combined PET and whole diagnostic contrast enhanced CT with sub-millimeter spatial resolution (except patient with history of iodine hypersensitivity or sever renal impairment). CT data contained diagnostic images reconstructed with soft tissue and high-resolution algorithm. PET/CT finding were compared with results of biopsies, immunology, microbiology or autopsy. Results: The cause of FUO was explained according to the PET/CT findings and followed investigations in 44 of 48 cases-18 cases of microbial infections, nine cases of autoimmune inflammations, four cases of non-infectious granulomatous diseases, eight cases of malignancies and five cases of proved immunity disorders were found. In 46 cases, the PET/CT interpretation was correct. Only in one case, the cause was overlooked and the uptake in atherosclerotic changes of arteries was misinterpreted as vasculitis in the other. The reached sensitivity was 97% (43/44), and specificity 75% (3/4) respectively. Conclusion: In patients with fever of unknown origin, 18 F-FDG-PET/CT might enable the detection of its cause.

  13. Simple full micromagnetic model of exchange bias behavior in ferro/antiferromagnetic layered structures (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koon, Norman C.

    1997-04-01

    It is shown using full micromagnetic relaxation calculations that exchange bias behavior is predicted for single-crystal ferro/antiferromagnetic layers with a fully compensated interface. The particular example most fully studied has a bcc/bct lattice structure with a fully compensated (110) interface plane. Only bilinear Heisenberg exchange was assumed, with anisotropy only in the antiferromagnet. In spite of the intuitive notion that exchange coupling between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet across a fully compensated plane of the antiferromagnet should be zero, we find strong coupling, comparable to the bilinear exchange, with a 90° angle between the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic axes of layers far from the interface in absence of an applied field. Even though the 90° coupling has characteristics resembling "biquadratic" exchange, it originates entirely from frustrated bilinear exchange. The development of exchange bias is found to originate from the formation of a domain wall in the antiferromagnet via the strong 90° exchange coupling and pinning of the wall by the magnetocrystalline anisotropy in the antiferromagnet. Because the large demagnetizing factor of the ferromagnet tends to confine its magnetization to the plane, the exchange bias is found to depend mainly on the strength and the symmetry of the in-plane component of anisotropy. Although little effort was made to analyze specific systems, the model reproduces many of the qualitative features observed in real exchange bias systems and gives reasonable semiquantitative estimates for the bias field when exchange and anisotropy values consistent with real systems are used.

  14. Full Data of Yeast Interacting Proteins Database (Original Version) - Yeast Interacting Proteins Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E., Lingner, C., et al. (2000) Nucleic Acids Res. 28, 73-76.) are used for literature collection. Number of...ng co-occurrence of Prey and Bait in the literature, calculated by the calculation formula. Calculation form...don) 340, 245-246.) Data analysis method As the indicator of reliability of the interactions obtained by the experiment, the literatu...re information described about the yeast proteins and th

  15. Disentangling density-dependent dynamics using full annual cycle models and Bayesian model weight updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Orin J.; McGowan, Conor P.; Devers, Patrick K.

    2017-01-01

    Density dependence regulates populations of many species across all taxonomic groups. Understanding density dependence is vital for predicting the effects of climate, habitat loss and/or management actions on wild populations. Migratory species likely experience seasonal changes in the relative influence of density dependence on population processes such as survival and recruitment throughout the annual cycle. These effects must be accounted for when characterizing migratory populations via population models.To evaluate effects of density on seasonal survival and recruitment of a migratory species, we used an existing full annual cycle model framework for American black ducks Anas rubripes, and tested different density effects (including no effects) on survival and recruitment. We then used a Bayesian model weight updating routine to determine which population model best fit observed breeding population survey data between 1990 and 2014.The models that best fit the survey data suggested that survival and recruitment were affected by density dependence and that density effects were stronger on adult survival during the breeding season than during the non-breeding season.Analysis also suggests that regulation of survival and recruitment by density varied over time. Our results showed that different characterizations of density regulations changed every 8–12 years (three times in the 25-year period) for our population.Synthesis and applications. Using a full annual cycle, modelling framework and model weighting routine will be helpful in evaluating density dependence for migratory species in both the short and long term. We used this method to disentangle the seasonal effects of density on the continental American black duck population which will allow managers to better evaluate the effects of habitat loss and potential habitat management actions throughout the annual cycle. The method here may allow researchers to hone in on the proper form and/or strength of

  16. Full genome sequence analysis of a novel adenovirus of rhesus macaque origin indicates a new simian adenovirus type and species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouli, Daniel; Howell, Grant L; Legasse, Alfred W; Kahl, Christoph; Axthelm, Michael K; Hansen, Scott G; Früh, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Multiple novel simian adenoviruses have been isolated over the past years and their potential to cross the species barrier and infect the human population is an ever present threat. Here we describe the isolation and full genome sequencing of a novel simian adenovirus (SAdV) isolated from the urine of two independent, never co-housed, late stage simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaques. The viral genome sequences revealed a novel type with a unique genome length, GC content, E3 region and DNA polymerase amino acid sequence that is sufficiently distinct from all currently known human- or simian adenovirus species to warrant classifying these isolates as a novel species of simian adenovirus. This new species, termed Simian mastadenovirus D (SAdV-D), displays the standard genome organization for the genus Mastadenovirus containing only one copy of the fiber gene which sets it apart from the old world monkey adenovirus species HAdV-G, SAdV-B and SAdV-C.

  17. A Full-Body Layered Deformable Model for Automatic Model-Based Gait Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haiping; Plataniotis, Konstantinos N.; Venetsanopoulos, Anastasios N.

    2007-12-01

    This paper proposes a full-body layered deformable model (LDM) inspired by manually labeled silhouettes for automatic model-based gait recognition from part-level gait dynamics in monocular video sequences. The LDM is defined for the fronto-parallel gait with 22 parameters describing the human body part shapes (widths and lengths) and dynamics (positions and orientations). There are four layers in the LDM and the limbs are deformable. Algorithms for LDM-based human body pose recovery are then developed to estimate the LDM parameters from both manually labeled and automatically extracted silhouettes, where the automatic silhouette extraction is through a coarse-to-fine localization and extraction procedure. The estimated LDM parameters are used for model-based gait recognition by employing the dynamic time warping for matching and adopting the combination scheme in AdaBoost.M2. While the existing model-based gait recognition approaches focus primarily on the lower limbs, the estimated LDM parameters enable us to study full-body model-based gait recognition by utilizing the dynamics of the upper limbs, the shoulders and the head as well. In the experiments, the LDM-based gait recognition is tested on gait sequences with differences in shoe-type, surface, carrying condition and time. The results demonstrate that the recognition performance benefits from not only the lower limb dynamics, but also the dynamics of the upper limbs, the shoulders and the head. In addition, the LDM can serve as an analysis tool for studying factors affecting the gait under various conditions.

  18. A COMPOUND MODEL FOR THE ORIGIN OF EARTH'S WATER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izidoro, A.; Winter, O. C.; De Souza Torres, K.; Haghighipour, N.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important subjects of debate in the formation of the solar system is the origin of Earth's water. Comets have long been considered as the most likely source of the delivery of water to Earth. However, elemental and isotopic arguments suggest a very small contribution from these objects. Other sources have also been proposed, among which local adsorption of water vapor onto dust grains in the primordial nebula and delivery through planetesimals and planetary embryos have become more prominent. However, no sole source of water provides a satisfactory explanation for Earth's water as a whole. In view of that, using numerical simulations, we have developed a compound model incorporating both the principal endogenous and exogenous theories, and investigating their implications for terrestrial planet formation and water delivery. Comets are also considered in the final analysis, as it is likely that at least some of Earth's water has cometary origin. We analyze our results comparing two different water distribution models, and complement our study using the D/H ratio, finding possible relative contributions from each source and focusing on planets formed in the habitable zone. We find that the compound model plays an important role by showing greater advantage in the amount and time of water delivery in Earth-like planets.

  19. A Compound Model for the Origin of Earth's Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izidoro, A.; de Souza Torres, K.; Winter, O. C.; Haghighipour, N.

    2013-04-01

    One of the most important subjects of debate in the formation of the solar system is the origin of Earth's water. Comets have long been considered as the most likely source of the delivery of water to Earth. However, elemental and isotopic arguments suggest a very small contribution from these objects. Other sources have also been proposed, among which local adsorption of water vapor onto dust grains in the primordial nebula and delivery through planetesimals and planetary embryos have become more prominent. However, no sole source of water provides a satisfactory explanation for Earth's water as a whole. In view of that, using numerical simulations, we have developed a compound model incorporating both the principal endogenous and exogenous theories, and investigating their implications for terrestrial planet formation and water delivery. Comets are also considered in the final analysis, as it is likely that at least some of Earth's water has cometary origin. We analyze our results comparing two different water distribution models, and complement our study using the D/H ratio, finding possible relative contributions from each source and focusing on planets formed in the habitable zone. We find that the compound model plays an important role by showing greater advantage in the amount and time of water delivery in Earth-like planets.

  20. Modelling a full scale membrane bioreactor using Activated Sludge Model No.1: challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrue, F; Choubert, J M; Stricker, A E; Spérandio, M; Mietton-Peuchot, M; Racault, Y

    2010-01-01

    A full-scale membrane bioreactor (1,600 m(3) d(-1)) was monitored for modelling purposes during the summer of 2006. A complete calibration of the ASM1 model is presented, in which the key points were the wastewater characterisation, the oxygen transfer and the biomass kinetics. Total BOD tests were not able to correctly estimate the biodegradable fraction of the wastewater. Therefore the wastewater fractionation was identified by adjusting the simulated sludge production rate to the measured value. MLVSS and MLSS were accurately predicted during both calibration and validation periods (20 and 30 days). Because the membranes were immerged in the aeration tank, the coarse bubble and fine bubble diffusion systems coexisted in the same tank. This allowed five different aeration combinations, depending whether the 2 systems were operating separately or simultaneously, and at low speed or high speed. The aeration control maintained low DO concentrations, allowing simultaneous nitrification and denitrification. This made it difficult to calibrate the oxygen transfer. The nitrogen removal kinetics were determined using maximum nitrification rate tests and an 8-hour intensive sampling campaign. Despite the challenges encountered, a calibrated set of parameters was identified for ASM1 that gave very satisfactory results for the calibration period. Matching simulated and measured data became more difficult during the validation period, mainly because the dominant aeration configuration had changed. However, the merit of this study is to be the first effort to simulate a full-scale MBR plant.

  1. A model for the origin of solar wind stream interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundhausen, A.J.; Burlaga, L.F.

    1975-01-01

    The basic variations in solar wind properties that have been observed at 'stream interfaces' near 1 AU are explained by a gas dynamic model in which a radially propagating stream, produced by a temperature variation in the solar envelope, steepens nonlinearly while moving through interplanetary space. The region thus identified with the stream interface separates the ambient solar wind from the fresh hot material originally in the stream. However, the interface regions given by the present model are thicker than most stream interfaces observed in the solar wind, a fact suggesting that some additional physical process may be important in determining that thickness. Variations in the density, speed, or Alfven pressure alone appear not to produce streams with such an interface

  2. Improving salt marsh digital elevation model accuracy with full-waveform lidar and nonparametric predictive modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jeffrey N.; Parrish, Christopher E.; Ward, Larry G.; Burdick, David M.

    2018-03-01

    Salt marsh vegetation tends to increase vertical uncertainty in light detection and ranging (lidar) derived elevation data, often causing the data to become ineffective for analysis of topographic features governing tidal inundation or vegetation zonation. Previous attempts at improving lidar data collected in salt marsh environments range from simply computing and subtracting the global elevation bias to more complex methods such as computing vegetation-specific, constant correction factors. The vegetation specific corrections can be used along with an existing habitat map to apply separate corrections to different areas within a study site. It is hypothesized here that correcting salt marsh lidar data by applying location-specific, point-by-point corrections, which are computed from lidar waveform-derived features, tidal-datum based elevation, distance from shoreline and other lidar digital elevation model based variables, using nonparametric regression will produce better results. The methods were developed and tested using full-waveform lidar and ground truth for three marshes in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, U.S.A. Five different model algorithms for nonparametric regression were evaluated, with TreeNet's stochastic gradient boosting algorithm consistently producing better regression and classification results. Additionally, models were constructed to predict the vegetative zone (high marsh and low marsh). The predictive modeling methods used in this study estimated ground elevation with a mean bias of 0.00 m and a standard deviation of 0.07 m (0.07 m root mean square error). These methods appear very promising for correction of salt marsh lidar data and, importantly, do not require an existing habitat map, biomass measurements, or image based remote sensing data such as multi/hyperspectral imagery.

  3. Modeling X-linked ancestral origins in multiparental populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chaozhi

    2015-03-04

    The models for the mosaic structure of an individual's genome from multiparental populations have been developed primarily for autosomes, whereas X chromosomes receive very little attention. In this paper, we extend our previous approach to model ancestral origin processes along two X chromosomes in a mapping population, which is necessary for developing hidden Markov models in the reconstruction of ancestry blocks for X-linked quantitative trait locus mapping. The model accounts for the joint recombination pattern, the asymmetry between maternally and paternally derived X chromosomes, and the finiteness of population size. The model can be applied to various mapping populations such as the advanced intercross lines (AIL), the Collaborative Cross (CC), the heterogeneous stock (HS), the Diversity Outcross (DO), and the Drosophila synthetic population resource (DSPR). We further derive the map expansion, density (per Morgan) of recombination breakpoints, in advanced intercross populations with L inbred founders under the limit of an infinitely large population size. The analytic results show that for X chromosomes the genetic map expands linearly at a rate (per generation) of two-thirds times 1 - 10/(9L) for the AIL, and at a rate of two-thirds times 1 - 1/L for the DO and the HS, whereas for autosomes the map expands at a rate of 1 - 1/L for the AIL, the DO, and the HS. Copyright © 2015 Zheng.

  4. A Dirichlet Process Mixture Based Name Origin Clustering and Alignment Model for Transliteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyue Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In machine transliteration, it is common that the transliterated names in the target language come from multiple language origins. A conventional maximum likelihood based single model can not deal with this issue very well and often suffers from overfitting. In this paper, we exploit a coupled Dirichlet process mixture model (cDPMM to address overfitting and names multiorigin cluster issues simultaneously in the transliteration sequence alignment step over the name pairs. After the alignment step, the cDPMM clusters name pairs into many groups according to their origin information automatically. In the decoding step, in order to use the learned origin information sufficiently, we use a cluster combination method (CCM to build clustering-specific transliteration models by combining small clusters into large ones based on the perplexities of name language and transliteration model, which makes sure each origin cluster has enough data for training a transliteration model. On the three different Western-Chinese multiorigin names corpora, the cDPMM outperforms two state-of-the-art baseline models in terms of both the top-1 accuracy and mean F-score, and furthermore the CCM significantly improves the cDPMM.

  5. An adaptive radiation model for the origin of new genefunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francino, M. Pilar

    2004-10-18

    The evolution of new gene functions is one of the keys to evolutionary innovation. Most novel functions result from gene duplication followed by divergence. However, the models hitherto proposed to account for this process are not fully satisfactory. The classic model of neofunctionalization holds that the two paralogous gene copies resulting from a duplication are functionally redundant, such that one of them can evolve under no functional constraints and occasionally acquire a new function. This model lacks a convincing mechanism for the new gene copies to increase in frequency in the population and survive the mutational load expected to accumulate under neutrality, before the acquisition of the rare beneficial mutations that would confer new functionality. The subfunctionalization model has been proposed as an alternative way to generate genes with altered functions. This model also assumes that new paralogous gene copies are functionally redundant and therefore neutral, but it predicts that relaxed selection will affect both gene copies such that some of the capabilities of the parent gene will disappear in one of the copies and be retained in the other. Thus, the functions originally present in a single gene will be partitioned between the two descendant copies. However, although this model can explain increases in gene number, it does not really address the main evolutionary question, which is the development of new biochemical capabilities. Recently, a new concept has been introduced into the gene evolution literature which is most likely to help solve this dilemma. The key point is to allow for a period of natural selection for the duplication per se, before new function evolves, rather than considering gene duplication to be neutral as in the previous models. Here, I suggest a new model that draws on the advantage of postulating selection for gene duplication, and proposes that bursts of adaptive gene amplification in response to specific selection

  6. A model-building approach to the origin of flavor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, Erik

    2017-01-24

    In this thesis we link the recent anomalies reported in B meson and h→μτ decays to the smallness of neutrino masses and aspects of the flavor puzzle, including the hierarchy of the Yukawa couplings and the disparate fermion mixings. By formulating various new models we attempt to shed light on the potential common origin of the distinct measurements in the flavor sector. To this end, discrete symmetries are utilized in this work as the governing principle behind all fermion interactions. The first two models based on the S{sub 3} and the A{sub 4} symmetry, respectively, aim to unify the diverse fermion masses and mixings. Special features separate the frameworks from the flavor models in the literature that often lack testable predictions. While the first model provides interesting flavor-violating signatures in top quark decays, the second one ties the flavor to the grand unification scale in a novel way. In the three following models we focus on the anomalies that hint at lepton flavor and universality violation. We propose that the large flavor violation observed in h→μτ decays is dictated by the scalar mixing of an enlarged S{sub 4}-symmetric Higgs sector. By constructing two leptoquark models we show for the first time that leptoquark couplings shaped by a Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism can accommodate the B meson anomalies and simultaneously generate naturally-small neutrino masses. Emphasizing the importance of testability, we demonstrate how these models can be probed by future diphoton resonances, using the recent 750 GeV excess as an example scenario.

  7. Modeling Coevolution between Language and Memory Capacity during Language Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tao; Shuai, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Memory is essential to many cognitive tasks including language. Apart from empirical studies of memory effects on language acquisition and use, there lack sufficient evolutionary explorations on whether a high level of memory capacity is prerequisite for language and whether language origin could influence memory capacity. In line with evolutionary theories that natural selection refined language-related cognitive abilities, we advocated a coevolution scenario between language and memory capacity, which incorporated the genetic transmission of individual memory capacity, cultural transmission of idiolects, and natural and cultural selections on individual reproduction and language teaching. To illustrate the coevolution dynamics, we adopted a multi-agent computational model simulating the emergence of lexical items and simple syntax through iterated communications. Simulations showed that: along with the origin of a communal language, an initially-low memory capacity for acquired linguistic knowledge was boosted; and such coherent increase in linguistic understandability and memory capacities reflected a language-memory coevolution; and such coevolution stopped till memory capacities became sufficient for language communications. Statistical analyses revealed that the coevolution was realized mainly by natural selection based on individual communicative success in cultural transmissions. This work elaborated the biology-culture parallelism of language evolution, demonstrated the driving force of culturally-constituted factors for natural selection of individual cognitive abilities, and suggested that the degree difference in language-related cognitive abilities between humans and nonhuman animals could result from a coevolution with language.

  8. Model independent explorations of Majorana neutrino mass origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, James Phearl, Jr.

    The recent observation of nonzero neutrino mass is the first concrete indication of physics beyond the Standard Model. Their properties, unique among the other fermions, leads naturally to the idea of a Majorana neutrino mass term. Despite the strong theoretical prejudice toward this concept, it must be tested experimentally. This is indeed possible in the context of next generation experiments. Unfortunately, the scale of neutrino mass generation may be too large to explore directly, but useful information may still be extracted from independent experimental channels. Here I survey various model independent probes of Majorana neutrino mass origins. A brief introduction to the concepts relevant to the analysis is followed by a discussion of the physical ranges of neutrino mass and mixing parameters within the context of standard and non-standard interactions. Armed with this, I move on to systematically analyze the properties of radiatively generated neutrino masses induced by nonrenormalizable lepton number violating effective operators of mass dimensions five through eleven. By fitting these to the observed light mass scale, I extract predictions for neutrino mixing as well as neutrinoless double beta decay, rare meson/tau decays and collider phenomenology. I find that many such models are already constrained by current data and many more will be probed in the near future. I then move on demonstrate the utility of a low scale see saw mechanism via a viable 3+2+1 sterile neutrino model that satisfies all oscillation data as well as solves problems associated with supernova kicks and heavy element nucleosynthesis. From this I extract predictions for tritium and neutrinoless double beta decay searches. This is supplemented throughout by descriptions of practical limitations in addition to suggestions for future work.

  9. A model for the origin and mechanisms of CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y.

    1995-01-01

    In this talk I will show that the two-Higgs doublet model with vacuum CP violation and approximate global U(1) family symmetries may provide one of the simplest and attractive models for understanding the origin and mechanisms of CP violation. It is shown that the mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking provides not only a mechanism for generating masses of the bosons and fermions, but also a mechanism for creating CP-phases of the bosons and fermions, so that CP violation occurs, after spontaneous symmetry breaking, in all possible ways from a single CP phase of the vacuum and is generally classified into four types of CP-violating mechanism. A new type of CP-violating mechanism in the charged Higgs boson interactions of the fermions is emphasized and can provide a consistent description for both established and reported CP-, P-, and T-violating phenomena. Of particular importance is the new source of CP violation for charged Higgs boson interactions that lead to the value of ε'/ε as large as 10 -3 independent of the CKM phase. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  10. Models for the structure and origin of bipolar nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, M.

    1981-01-01

    The appearance of bipolar nebulae-symmetric reflection nebulae centered on evolved, mass-losing stars-can most simply be accounted for in terms of an axisymmetric distribution of outflowing dust in which the dust is concentrated towards an equatorial plane and declines monotonically with latitude above that plane. The symmetrically placed ''horns'' that can be seen radiating out of some bipolar nebulae, notably GL 2688, are a natural consequence of such a dust distribution if, at some latitude, the radial optical depth to starlight falls rapidly below unity. Several models of bipolar nebulae are presented. These structural models for bipolar nebulae lead in turn to an investigation of how such a geometry might arise. Although nonradial pulsation, rotationally forced mass ejection by a single star, and mass loss from a common envelope binary are all considered, the most attractive origin for bipolar nebulae is a binary star system in which the primary is evolving up the red giant branch to the point at which its radius approaches its tidal radius. If this occurs before corotation of the primary with the secondary's orbit can be achieved, then matter from the primary's enveloped can be gravitationally ejected from the system by the secondary, the ejected material being concentrated toward the system's equatorial plane. Numerical models of this phenomenon show that gravitational ejection from an asynchronous binary system easily leads to terminal outflow velocities in the observed range (20--50 km s -1 ), and that the rate of mass loss and the time scale over which the mass ejection takes place are consistent with observations if the particle density in the outer layers of the primary's atmosphere from which the material is extracted is in the range 10 14 --10 15 cm -3 . If this hypothesis is applicable, bipolar nebulae will probably become planetary nebulae, as previously suggested on observational grounds

  11. The use of model-test data for predicting full-scale ACV resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstell, B. G.; Harry, C. W.

    The paper summarizes the analysis of test data obtained with a 1/12-scale model of the Amphibious Assault Landing Craft (AALC) JEFF(B). The analysis was conducted with the objective of improving the accuracy of drag predictions for a JEFF(B)-type air-cushion vehicle (ACV). Model test results, scaled to full-scale, are compared with full-scale drag obtained in various sea states during JEFF(B) trials. From the results of this comparison, it is found that the Froude-scale model rough-water drag data is consistently greater than full-scale derived drag, and is a function of both wave height and craft forward speed. Results are presented indicating that Froude scaling model data obtained in calm water also causes an over-prediction of calm-water drag at full-scale. An empirical correction that was developed for use on a JEFF(B)-type craft is discussed.

  12. Dynamic Modelling and Identification of Precipitation Reactions in Full-Scale WWTP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbamba, Christian Kazadi; Tait, Stephan; Flores-Alsina, Xavier

    to a fast kinetic coefficient. Nonlinearity of the confidence regions also indicates that nonlinear and iterative techniques for parameter identification are required in estimating real parameter uncertainty. Additional experimental results and model analysis in full-scale WWTP will be presented in the full...

  13. NACP Regional: Original Observation Data and Biosphere and Inverse Model Outputs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains the originally-submitted observation measurement data, terrestrial biosphere model output data, and inverse model simulations that various...

  14. NACP Regional: Original Observation Data and Biosphere and Inverse Model Outputs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains the originally-submitted observation measurement data, terrestrial biosphere model output data, and inverse model simulations that...

  15. Modelling and simulation of containment on full scope simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Tingyun

    1996-01-01

    A multi-node containment thermal-hydraulic model has been developed and adapted in Full Scope Simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit with good realtime simulation effects. Containment pressure for LBLOCA calculated by the model is well agreed with those of CONTEMPT-4/MOD3

  16. Aeroelastic stability of full-span tiltrotor aircraft model in forward flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiquan LI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The existing full-span models of the tiltrotor aircraft adopted the rigid blade model without considering the coupling relationship among the elastic blade, wing and fuselage. To overcome the limitations of the existing full-span models and improve the precision of aeroelastic analysis of tiltrotor aircraft in forward flight, the aeroelastic stability analysis model of full-span tiltrotor aircraft in forward flight has been presented in this paper by considering the coupling among elastic blade, wing, fuselage and various components. The analytical model is validated by comparing with the calculation results and experimental data in the existing references. The influence of some structural parameters, such as the fuselage degrees of freedom, relative displacement between the hub center and the gravity center, and nacelle length, on the system stability is also investigated. The results show that the fuselage degrees of freedom decrease the critical stability velocity of tiltrotor aircraft, and the variation of the structural parameters has great influence on the system stability, and the instability form of system can change between the anti-symmetric and symmetric wing motions of vertical and chordwise bending. Keywords: Aeroelastic stability, Forward flight, Full-span model, Modal analysis, Tiltrotor aircraft

  17. Statistical models for the estimation of the origin-destination matrix from traffic counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselmo Ramalho Pitombeira Neto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In transportation planning, one of the first steps is to estimate the travel demand. The final product of the estimation process is an origin-destination (OD matrix, whose entries correspond to the number of trips between pairs of origin-destination zones in a study region. In this paper, we review the main statistical models proposed in the literature for the estimation of the OD matrix based on traffic counts. Unlike reconstruction models, statistical models do not aim at estimating the exact OD matrix corresponding to observed traffic volumes, but they rather aim at estimating the parameters of a statistical model of the population of OD matrices. Initially we define the estimation problem, emphasizing its underspecified nature, which has lead to the development of several models based on different approaches. We describe static models whose parameters are estimated by means of maximum likelihood, the method of moments, and Bayesian inference. We also describe  some recent dynamic models. Following that, we discuss research questions related to the underspecification problem, model assumptions and the estimation of the route choice matrix, and indicate promising research directions.

  18. Full employment and competition in the Aspen economic model: implications for modeling acts of terrorism.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprigg, James A.; Ehlen, Mark Andrew

    2004-11-01

    Acts of terrorism could have a range of broad impacts on an economy, including changes in consumer (or demand) confidence and the ability of productive sectors to respond to changes. As a first step toward a model of terrorism-based impacts, we develop here a model of production and employment that characterizes dynamics in ways useful toward understanding how terrorism-based shocks could propagate through the economy; subsequent models will introduce the role of savings and investment into the economy. We use Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool developed at Sandia, to demonstrate for validation purposes that a single-firm economy converges to the known monopoly equilibrium price, output, and employment levels, while multiple-firm economies converge toward the competitive equilibria typified by lower prices and higher output and employment. However, we find that competition also leads to churn by consumers seeking lower prices, making it difficult for firms to optimize with respect to wages, prices, and employment levels. Thus, competitive firms generate market ''noise'' in the steady state as they search for prices and employment levels that will maximize profits. In the context of this model, not only could terrorism depress overall consumer confidence and economic activity but terrorist acts could also cause normal short-run dynamics to be misinterpreted by consumers as a faltering economy.

  19. 1D-3D hybrid modeling-from multi-compartment models to full resolution models in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grein, Stephan; Stepniewski, Martin; Reiter, Sebastian; Knodel, Markus M; Queisser, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of cellular and network dynamics in the brain by means of modeling and simulation has evolved into a highly interdisciplinary field, that uses sophisticated modeling and simulation approaches to understand distinct areas of brain function. Depending on the underlying complexity, these models vary in their level of detail, in order to cope with the attached computational cost. Hence for large network simulations, single neurons are typically reduced to time-dependent signal processors, dismissing the spatial aspect of each cell. For single cell or networks with relatively small numbers of neurons, general purpose simulators allow for space and time-dependent simulations of electrical signal processing, based on the cable equation theory. An emerging field in Computational Neuroscience encompasses a new level of detail by incorporating the full three-dimensional morphology of cells and organelles into three-dimensional, space and time-dependent, simulations. While every approach has its advantages and limitations, such as computational cost, integrated and methods-spanning simulation approaches, depending on the network size could establish new ways to investigate the brain. In this paper we present a hybrid simulation approach, that makes use of reduced 1D-models using e.g., the NEURON simulator-which couples to fully resolved models for simulating cellular and sub-cellular dynamics, including the detailed three-dimensional morphology of neurons and organelles. In order to couple 1D- and 3D-simulations, we present a geometry-, membrane potential- and intracellular concentration mapping framework, with which graph- based morphologies, e.g., in the swc- or hoc-format, are mapped to full surface and volume representations of the neuron and computational data from 1D-simulations can be used as boundary conditions for full 3D simulations and vice versa. Thus, established models and data, based on general purpose 1D-simulators, can be directly coupled to the

  20. A model of cp violation having a cosmological origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, H.; Truppel, W.L.

    1990-08-01

    CP is spontaneously broken through a Higgs field conformally coupled to the open Friedmann spacetime. The effect grows as we go toward the origin of the universe, resisting to its equilibrium temperature. (author)

  1. Full-model wavenumber inversion: An emphasis on the appropriate wavenumber continuation

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2016-04-06

    A model of the earth can be described using a Fourier basis represented by its wavenumber content. In full-waveform inversion (FWI), the wavenumber description of the model is natural because our Born-approximation-based velocity updates are made up of wavefields. Our objective in FWI is to access all the model wavenumbers available in our limited aperture and bandwidth recorded data that are not yet accurately present in the initial velocity model. To invert for those model wavenumbers, we need to locate their imprint in the data. Thus, I review the relation between the model wavenumber buildup and the inversion process. Specifically, I emphasize a focus on the model wavenumber components and identified their individual influence on the data. Missing the energy for a single vertical low-model wavenumber from the residual between the true Marmousi model and some initial linearly increasing velocity model produced a worse least-squares fit to the data than the initial model itself, in which all the residual model wavenumbers were missing. This stern realization validated the importance of wavenumber continuation, specifically starting from the low-model wavenumbers, to higher (resolution) wavenumbers, especially those attained in an order dictated by the scattering angle filter. A numerical Marmousi example determined the important role that the scattering angle filter played in managing the wavenumber continuation from low to high. An application on the SEG2014 blind test data set with frequencies lower than 7 Hz muted out further validated the versatility of the scattering angle filtering.

  2. Modeling and control of isolated full bridge boost DC-DC converter implemented in FPGA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taeed, Fazel; Nymand, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an isolated full bridge boost converter (IFBC) firstly is modeled. In the modeling part, a small signal equivalent of the converter is developed. From the small signal model, the converter transfer function is derived. Based on the obtained transfer function, challenges of controller...... design are discussed. In the next step a digital PI controller is designed and implemented in a FPGA to control the output voltage. Using the injection transformer method the open loop transfer function in closed loop is measured and modeling results are verified by experimental results....

  3. A Full-Chain Network Model with Sliplinks and Binary Constraint Release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Jesper; Schieber, Jay D.

    2000-01-01

    A full-chain, mean-field, temporary network model is proposed. The model is inspired by the success of a recent reptation model, but contains no tubes. Instead, each chain uses a different (and smaller) set of dynamic variables: the position and age of each entanglement, and the number of Kuhn...... steps in chain strands between entanglements. The entanglements are assumed to move affinely, whereas the number of Kuhn steps varies stochastically from tension imbalances and Brownian forces. In the language of reptation, the model exhibits chain-length fluctuations, constraint release, chain...

  4. Northern Korean Peninsula 1-D velocity model from surface wave dispersion and full-waveform data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. J.; Rhie, J.; Kim, S.; Kang, T. S.; Cho, C.

    2016-12-01

    Monitoring seismic activities in the northern Korean Peninsula is important not only for understanding the characteristics of earthquakes but also for watching nuclear tests. To better monitor those natural and man-made seismic activities, reliable seismic velocity models are required. However, the seismic velocity structure of the region is not known well due to the lack of available seismic data directly measured in the region. This study presents 1-D velocity models of the region using two different datasets comprised of two-year-long continuous waveform and the 2013 North Korea nuclear test event waveform recorded at stations surrounding the region. Two reference 1-D models for the inland and offshore areas (Western East Sea) were estimated by 1-D inversion of surface wave dispersion measurements from ambient noise cross-correlations of the continuous waveform. To investigate the variations in the velocity models, many 1-D models for the paths between the 2013 nuclear test site and stations in China and South Korea were constructed by forward waveform modeling. The velocity variations are not significant for both models representing the inland and offshore paths, respectively. The 1-D models for the inland paths are similar to the models constructed for the southern Korean Peninsula. Interestingly, waveforms sampling through the offshore paths are not well explained by simple 1-D isotropic models. The preliminary result indicates that there exists radial anisotropy with SH being faster than SV by 3-5% in the upper mantle beneath the offshore northern Korean Peninsula, although further studies are necessary to explain the origin of anisotropy. A proper characterization of propagation effects along the offshore paths would be useful for monitoring future nuclear tests because many seismic stations in the eastern South Korea record waveforms sampling the offshore region from the nuclear test site to those stations.

  5. A Comparison of Averaged and Full Models to Study the Third-Body Perturbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Huaura Solórzano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a third-body travelling in a circular orbit around a main body on a massless satellite that is orbiting the same main body are studied under two averaged models, single and double, where expansions of the disturbing function are made, and the full restricted circular three-body problem. The goal is to compare the behavior of these two averaged models against the full problem for long-term effects, in order to have some knowledge of their differences. The single averaged model eliminates the terms due to the short period of the spacecraft. The double average is taken over the mean motion of the satellite and the mean motion of the disturbing body, so removing both short period terms. As an example of the methods, an artificial satellite around the Earth perturbed by the Moon is used. A detailed study of the effects of different initial conditions in the orbit of the spacecraft is made.

  6. Recent results of full-spatial scale modeling of fast ignition and shock ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, J.; May, J.; Mori, W. B.; Fiuza, F.; Marti, M.; Fonseca, R. A.; Davies, J. R.; Silva, L. O.

    2010-11-01

    We show recent results of full-spatial scale modeling of fast ignition and shock ignition, from both full-PIC and the recently developed hybrid-PIC capability of OSIRIS 2.0. Our results show full-scale modeling of fast ignition over full density and time scales, where laser absorption, electron beam divergence, and energy deposition in the compressed core will be addressed in a self-consistent manner. Full-PIC and hybrid-PIC simulations of isolated targets will be presented, illustrating the importance of this type of modeling in order to accurately infer the beam divergence and transport properties. We will also demonstrate the possibility of performing full-scale simulations of shock ignition with the new hybrid-PIC capability, using compressed target profiles from hydrodynamic simulations, and studying the self-consistent laser absorption, electron transport, and energy deposition that can lead to the generation of the shock required for ignition. Work supported by DOE under DE-FC02-04-ER54789 and DE-FG52-09NA29552, and NSF under NSF-Phy-0904039, FCT (Portugal), and the HiPER project. Simulations performed on Hoffman at UCLA, Thresher at SDSC, and Intrepid at ANL supported by Incite grant FastIgnitionPIC.

  7. Original article Rehabilitation model program for seriously ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Kegye

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Patients receiving cancer treatment start lifestyle changes mostly at the end of the treatment during the rehabilitation period. Most often, the first step is a dietary change and physical exercises built into the daily routine. Patients who do this in groups led by qualified therapists and based on professional counseling can build more effective and more permanent changes into their life. To develop a complex rehabilitation program which, in the short term, aims to familiarize patients with a lifestyle which harmonizes the physical, mental, spiritual and social spheres of life and, in the long term, to build it into their everyday life in order to ameliorate the physical and mental state and reduce the psychological symptoms and the isolation of patients. The physical component focuses on diet and exercise. The psycho-social-spiritual support focuses on discovering inner sources of strength, developing active coping mechanisms and helping to achieve more open communication. Participants and procedure In February and March 2011, 8 patients treated for malignant tumors participated in the model program. The components of the model program were psychotherapy, physiotherapy, cancer consultation, nutrition counseling, creative activities and walking. Results During the period of the model program the isolation of the patients decreased and their social support and ability of coping with the illness ameliorated. They reported an ease in anxiety and depression in their everyday activities. According to feedback, their communication with each other, with the staff and with their relatives became more open. Altogether this had advantageous effects on the functioning of the ward and the mood of the staff. Conclusions The rehabilitation program confirmed that beside individual psycho-social support, beneficial and economic psycho-social support can be provided for the patients in group form along with the most effective assignment of the

  8. An Efficient and Robust Numerical Solution of the Full-Order Multiscale Model of Lithium-Ion Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Beneš

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel and efficient numerical approach for solving the pseudo two-dimensional multiscale model of the Li-ion cell dynamics based on first principles, describing the ion diffusion through the electrolyte and the porous electrodes, electric potential distribution, and Butler-Volmer kinetics. The numerical solution is obtained by the finite difference discretization of the diffusion equations combined with an original iterative scheme for solving the integral formulation of the laws of electrochemical interactions. We demonstrate that our implementation is fast and stable over the expected lifetime of the cell. In contrast to some simplified models, it provides physically consistent results for a wide range of applied currents including high loads. The algorithm forms a solid basis for simulations of cells and battery packs in hybrid electric vehicles, with possible straightforward extensions by aging and heat effects.

  9. Research Note: Full-waveform inversion of the unwrapped phase of a model

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2013-12-06

    Reflections in seismic data induce serious non-linearity in the objective function of full- waveform inversion. Thus, without a good initial velocity model that can produce reflections within a half cycle of the frequency used in the inversion, convergence to a solution becomes difficult. As a result, we tend to invert for refracted events and damp reflections in data. Reflection induced non-linearity stems from cycle skipping between the imprint of the true model in observed data and the predicted model in synthesized data. Inverting for the phase of the model allows us to address this problem by avoiding the source of non-linearity, the phase wrapping phenomena. Most of the information related to the location (or depths) of interfaces is embedded in the phase component of a model, mainly influenced by the background model, while the velocity-contrast information (responsible for the reflection energy) is mainly embedded in the amplitude component. In combination with unwrapping the phase of data, which mitigates the non-linearity introduced by the source function, I develop a framework to invert for the unwrapped phase of a model, represented by the instantaneous depth, using the unwrapped phase of the data. The resulting gradient function provides a mechanism to non-linearly update the velocity model by applying mainly phase shifts to the model. In using the instantaneous depth as a model parameter, we keep track of the model properties unfazed by the wrapping phenomena. © 2013 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  10. Vascular stents: Coupling full 3-D with reduced-order structural models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avdeev, I; Shams, M

    2010-01-01

    Self-expanding nitinol stents are used to treat peripheral arterial disease. The peripheral arteries are subjected to a combination of mechanical forces such as compression, torsion, bending, and contraction. Most commercially available peripheral self-expanding stents are composed of a series of sub-millimeter V-shaped struts, which are laser-cut from a nitinol tube and surface-treated for better fatigue performance. The numerical stent models must accurately predict location and distribution of local stresses and strains caused by large arterial deformations. Full 3-D finite element non-linear analysis of an entire stent is computationally expensive to the point of being prohibitive, especially for longer stents. Reduced-order models based on beam or shell elements are fairly accurate in capturing global deformations, but are not very helpful in predicting stent failure. We propose a mixed approach that combines the full 3-D model and reduced-order models. Several global-local, full 3-D/reduced-order finite element models of a peripheral self-expanding stent were validated and compared with experimental data. The kinematic constraint method used to couple various elements together was found to be very efficient and easily applicable to commercial FEA codes. The proposed mixed models can be used to accurately predict stent failure based on realistic (patient-specific), non-linear kinematic behavior of peripheral arteries.

  11. Vascular stents: Coupling full 3-D with reduced-order structural models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdeev, I.; Shams, M.

    2010-06-01

    Self-expanding nitinol stents are used to treat peripheral arterial disease. The peripheral arteries are subjected to a combination of mechanical forces such as compression, torsion, bending, and contraction. Most commercially available peripheral self-expanding stents are composed of a series of sub-millimeter V-shaped struts, which are laser-cut from a nitinol tube and surface-treated for better fatigue performance. The numerical stent models must accurately predict location and distribution of local stresses and strains caused by large arterial deformations. Full 3-D finite element non-linear analysis of an entire stent is computationally expensive to the point of being prohibitive, especially for longer stents. Reduced-order models based on beam or shell elements are fairly accurate in capturing global deformations, but are not very helpful in predicting stent failure. We propose a mixed approach that combines the full 3-D model and reduced-order models. Several global-local, full 3-D/reduced-order finite element models of a peripheral self-expanding stent were validated and compared with experimental data. The kinematic constraint method used to couple various elements together was found to be very efficient and easily applicable to commercial FEA codes. The proposed mixed models can be used to accurately predict stent failure based on realistic (patient-specific), non-linear kinematic behavior of peripheral arteries.

  12. Development of a full ice-cream cone model for halo CME structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Yong-Jae

    2015-04-01

    The determination of three dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, source location) of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) is very important for space weather forecast. To estimate these parameters, several cone models based on a flat cone or a shallow ice-cream cone with spherical front have been suggested. In this study, we investigate which cone model is proper for halo CME morphology using 33 CMEs which are identified as halo CMEs by one spacecraft (SOHO or STEREO-A or B) and as limb CMEs by the other ones. From geometrical parameters of these CMEs such as their front curvature, we find that near full ice-cream cone CMEs (28 events) are dominant over shallow ice-cream cone CMEs (5 events). So we develop a new full ice-cream cone model by assuming that a full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths. This model is carried out by the following steps: (1) construct a cone for given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection points with the observed ones. We apply this model to several halo CMEs and compare the results with those from other methods such as a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model and a geometrical triangulation method.

  13. The Role of Stochastic Models in Interpreting the Origins of Biological Chirality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Lente

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes recent stochastic modeling efforts in the theoretical research aimed at interpreting the origins of biological chirality. Stochastic kinetic models, especially those based on the continuous time discrete state approach, have great potential in modeling absolute asymmetric reactions, experimental examples of which have been reported in the past decade. An overview of the relevant mathematical background is given and several examples are presented to show how the significant numerical problems characteristic of the use of stochastic models can be overcome by non-trivial, but elementary algebra. In these stochastic models, a particulate view of matter is used rather than the concentration-based view of traditional chemical kinetics using continuous functions to describe the properties system. This has the advantage of giving adequate description of single-molecule events, which were probably important in the origin of biological chirality. The presented models can interpret and predict the random distribution of enantiomeric excess among repetitive experiments, which is the most striking feature of absolute asymmetric reactions. It is argued that the use of the stochastic kinetic approach should be much more widespread in the relevant literature.

  14. Simulation of a turbine trip transient at Embalse NPP with full-circuit CATHENA model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiti, A., E-mail: arabiti@na-sa.com.ar [Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A., Embalse Nuclear Power Plant, Engineering Management Branch, Embalse (Argentina); Parrondo, A., E-mail: aparrondo@na-sa.com.ar [Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A., Engineering Management, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Serrano, P., E-mail: pserrano@na-sa.com.ar [Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A., Licensing Coordination Branch, Atucha II Project Branch (Unidad de Gestion), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sablayrolles, A.; Damiani, H., E-mail: asablayrolles@na-sa.com.ar, E-mail: hdamiani@na-sa.com.ar [Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A., Embalse Nuclear Power Plant, Embalse Life Extension Project Management, Embalse (Argentina)

    2015-07-01

    Embalse NPP is carrying on a Periodic Safety Review to deal with its life extension. This review includes tasks like Deterministic Analysis review for the Final Safety Analysis Report. In 2011, NA-SA (Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A.) issued a first CATHENA full-circuit model representing the current plant. This model is used in this work. The simulation presented here corresponds to a turbine trip that occurred at Embalse NPP. Consistency between the simulation and the real event is demonstrated. Furthermore, NASA is currently performing Safety Analysis with a new model developed jointly with AECL and Candu Energy which includes post refurbishment changes and other improvements. (author)

  15. Common mode noise modeling and its suppression in ultra-high efficiency full bridge boost converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makda, Ishtiyaq Ahmed; Nymand, Morten; Madawala, Udaya

    2013-01-01

    between input and output which is normally associated with high common mode noise generation. In this work, common mode noise sources in the converter are identified, and a common mode noise model is developed. Based on the established noise model, a practical CM filter is designed to comply......In this paper, common mode noise modeling of low-voltage high-current isolated full bridge boost dc-dc converters intended for fuel cell application is presented. Due to the tightly coupled primary and secondary windings of the transformer, such converter has inherently large capacitive coupling...

  16. Determination of CME 3D parameters based on a new full ice-cream cone model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Yong-Jae

    2017-08-01

    In space weather forecast, it is important to determine three-dimensional properties of CMEs. Using 29 limb CMEs, we examine which cone type is close to a CME three-dimensional structure. We find that most CMEs have near full ice-cream cone structure which is a symmetrical circular cone combined with a hemisphere. We develop a full ice-cream cone model based on a new methodology that the full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths. By applying this model to 12 SOHO/LASCO halo CMEs, we find that 3D parameters from our method are similar to those from other stereoscopic methods (i.e., a triangulation method and a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model). In addition, we derive CME mean density (ρmean=Mtotal/Vcone) based on the full ice-cream cone structure. For several limb events, we determine CME mass by applying the Solarsoft procedure (e.g., cme_mass.pro) to SOHO/LASCO C3 images. CME volumes are estimated from the full ice-cream cone structure. From the power-law relationship between CME mean density and its height, we estimate CME mean densities at 20 solar radii (Rs). We will compare the CME densities at 20 Rs with their corresponding ICME densities.

  17. Usefulness of high resolution coastal models for operational oil spill forecast: the "Full City" accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Broström

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Oil spill modeling is considered to be an important part of a decision support system (DeSS for oil spill combatment and is useful for remedial action in case of accidents, as well as for designing the environmental monitoring system that is frequently set up after major accidents. Many accidents take place in coastal areas, implying that low resolution basin scale ocean models are of limited use for predicting the trajectories of an oil spill. In this study, we target the oil spill in connection with the "Full City" accident on the Norwegian south coast and compare operational simulations from three different oil spill models for the area. The result of the analysis is that all models do a satisfactory job. The "standard" operational model for the area is shown to have severe flaws, but by applying ocean forcing data of higher resolution (1.5 km resolution, the model system shows results that compare well with observations. The study also shows that an ensemble of results from the three different models is useful when predicting/analyzing oil spill in coastal areas.

  18. A comparison of averaged and full models to study the third-body perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solórzano, Carlos Renato Huaura; Prado, Antonio Fernando Bertachini de Almeida

    2013-01-01

    The effects of a third-body travelling in a circular orbit around a main body on a massless satellite that is orbiting the same main body are studied under two averaged models, single and double, where expansions of the disturbing function are made, and the full restricted circular three-body problem. The goal is to compare the behavior of these two averaged models against the full problem for long-term effects, in order to have some knowledge of their differences. The single averaged model eliminates the terms due to the short period of the spacecraft. The double average is taken over the mean motion of the satellite and the mean motion of the disturbing body, so removing both short period terms. As an example of the methods, an artificial satellite around the Earth perturbed by the Moon is used. A detailed study of the effects of different initial conditions in the orbit of the spacecraft is made.

  19. A full-capture Hierarchical Bayesian model of Pollock's Closed Robust Design and application to dolphins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert William Rankin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a Hierarchical Bayesian version of Pollock's Closed Robust Design for studying the survival, temporary-migration, and abundance of marked animals. Through simulations and analyses of a bottlenose dolphin photo-identification dataset, we compare several estimation frameworks, including Maximum Likelihood estimation (ML, model-averaging by AICc, as well as Bayesian and Hierarchical Bayesian (HB procedures. Our results demonstrate a number of advantages of the Bayesian framework over other popular methods. First, for simple fixed-effect models, we show the near-equivalence of Bayesian and ML point-estimates and confidence/credibility intervals. Second, we demonstrate how there is an inherent correlation among temporary-migration and survival parameter estimates in the PCRD, and while this can lead to serious convergence issues and singularities among MLEs, we show that the Bayesian estimates were more reliable. Third, we demonstrate that a Hierarchical Bayesian model with carefully thought-out hyperpriors, can lead to similar parameter estimates and conclusions as multi-model inference by AICc model-averaging. This latter point is especially interesting for mark-recapture practitioners, for whom model-uncertainty and multi-model inference have become a major preoccupation. Lastly, we extend the Hierarchical Bayesian PCRD to include full-capture histories (i.e., by modelling a recruitment process and individual-level heterogeneity in detection probabilities, which can have important consequences for the range of phenomena studied by the PCRD, as well as lead to large differences in abundance estimates. For example, we estimate 8%-24% more bottlenose dolphins in the western gulf of Shark Bay than previously estimated by ML and AICc-based model-averaging. Other important extensions are discussed. Our Bayesian PCRD models are written in the BUGS-like JAGS language for easy dissemination and customization by the community of capture

  20. Full-range stress–strain behaviour of contemporary pipeline steels: Part I. Model description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertelé, Stijn; De Waele, Wim; Denys, Rudi; Verstraete, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    The stress–strain relationship of contemporary pipeline steels is often approximated by the relatively simple Ramberg–Osgood equation. However, these steels often show a more complex post-yield behaviour, which can result in significant errors. To address this limitation for cases where an accurate full-range description is needed, the authors developed a new ‘UGent’ stress–strain model which has two independent strain-hardening exponents. This paper compares the UGent model with the Ramberg–Osgood model for a wide range of experimental data, by means of least-squares curve fitting. A significant improvement is observed for contemporary pipeline steels with a yield-to-tensile ratio above 0.80. These steels typically exhibit two distinct stages of strain hardening. In contrast to the Ramberg–Osgood model, both stages are successfully described by the UGent model. A companion paper (Part II) discusses how to find appropriate model parameter values for the UGent model. - Highlights: ► Contemporary pipeline steels often show two strain-hardening stages. ► This phenomenon is progressively apparent as Y/T exceeds 0.80. ► Both stages cannot be simultaneously described by the Ramberg–Osgood model. ► A new “UGent” model provides significantly better descriptions. ► The improvement becomes more pronounced as Y/T increases.

  1. Determination of HCME 3-D parameters using a full ice-cream cone model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Yong-Jae; Lee, Harim

    2016-05-01

    It is very essential to determine three dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, source location) of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) for space weather forecast. Several cone models (e.g., an elliptical cone model, an ice-cream cone model, an asymmetric cone model) have been examined to estimate these parameters. In this study, we investigate which cone type is close to a halo CME morphology using 26 CMEs: halo CMEs by one spacecraft (SOHO or STEREO-A or B) and as limb CMEs by the other ones. From cone shape parameters of these CMEs such as their front curvature, we find that near full ice-cream cone type CMEs are much closer to observations than shallow ice-cream cone type CMEs. Thus we develop a new cone model in which a full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths. This model is carried out by the following steps: (1) construct a cone for given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, and (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection speeds with the observed ones. By applying this model to 12 SOHO/LASCO halo CMEs, we find that 3-D parameters from our method are similar to those from other stereoscopic methods (a geometrical triangulation method and a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model) based on multi-spacecraft data. We are developing a general ice-cream cone model whose front shape is a free parameter determined by observations.

  2. Error modeling and tolerance design of a parallel manipulator with full-circle rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanbing Ni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A method for improving the accuracy of a parallel manipulator with full-circle rotation is systematically investigated in this work via kinematic analysis, error modeling, sensitivity analysis, and tolerance allocation. First, a kinematic analysis of the mechanism is made using the space vector chain method. Using the results as a basis, an error model is formulated considering the main error sources. Position and orientation error-mapping models are established by mathematical transformation of the parallelogram structure characteristics. Second, a sensitivity analysis is performed on the geometric error sources. A global sensitivity evaluation index is proposed to evaluate the contribution of the geometric errors to the accuracy of the end-effector. The analysis results provide a theoretical basis for the allocation of tolerances to the parts of the mechanical design. Finally, based on the results of the sensitivity analysis, the design of the tolerances can be solved as a nonlinearly constrained optimization problem. A genetic algorithm is applied to carry out the allocation of the manufacturing tolerances of the parts. Accordingly, the tolerance ranges for nine kinds of geometrical error sources are obtained. The achievements made in this work can also be applied to other similar parallel mechanisms with full-circle rotation to improve error modeling and design accuracy.

  3. Full wave model of image formation in optical coherence tomography applicable to general samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Peter R T; Curatolo, Andrea; Sampson, David D

    2015-02-09

    We demonstrate a highly realistic model of optical coherence tomography, based on an existing model of coherent optical microscopes, which employs a full wave description of light. A defining feature of the model is the decoupling of the key functions of an optical coherence tomography system: sample illumination, light-sample interaction and the collection of light scattered by the sample. We show how such a model can be implemented using the finite-difference time-domain method to model light propagation in general samples. The model employs vectorial focussing theory to represent the optical system and, thus, incorporates general illumination beam types and detection optics. To demonstrate its versatility, we model image formation of a stratified medium, a numerical point-spread function phantom and a numerical phantom, based upon a physical three-dimensional structured phantom employed in our laboratory. We show that simulated images compare well with experimental images of a three-dimensional structured phantom. Such a model provides a powerful means to advance all aspects of optical coherence tomography imaging.

  4. Phasor model of full scale converter wind turbine for small-signal stability analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghiga, Radu; Wu, Qiuwei; Nielsen, Arne Hejde

    2017-01-01

    The small-signal stability analysis of power system electromechanical oscillations is a well-established field in control and stability assessment of power systems. The impact of large wind farms on small-signal stability of power systems has been a topic of high interest in recent years....... This study presents a phasor model of full scale converter wind turbines (WTs) implemented in MATLAB/SIMULINK for small-signal stability studies. The phasor method is typically used for dynamic studies of power systems consisting of large electric machines. It can also be applied to any linear system....... This represents an advantage in small-signal stability studies, which are based on modal analysis of the linearised model and are usually complemented with dynamic simulations. The proposed model can represent a single WT or an aggregated wind power plant. The implemented model for small-signal stability analysis...

  5. Full-Scale Approximations of Spatio-Temporal Covariance Models for Large Datasets

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Bohai

    2014-01-01

    Various continuously-indexed spatio-temporal process models have been constructed to characterize spatio-temporal dependence structures, but the computational complexity for model fitting and predictions grows in a cubic order with the size of dataset and application of such models is not feasible for large datasets. This article extends the full-scale approximation (FSA) approach by Sang and Huang (2012) to the spatio-temporal context to reduce computational complexity. A reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) algorithm is proposed to select knots automatically from a discrete set of spatio-temporal points. Our approach is applicable to nonseparable and nonstationary spatio-temporal covariance models. We illustrate the effectiveness of our method through simulation experiments and application to an ozone measurement dataset.

  6. Development and optimization of models for full-range reactor simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidlicka, R.

    1989-01-01

    The full-scale WWER-440 reactor simulator in Trnava, Czechoslovakia, comprises 20 models describing the primary circuit and 20 models describing the secondary circuit of nuclear power plants. With respect to the prospects of its further improvement, the main drawback of the adopted simulator conception is the inclusion of special electronics in the creation of the models. Also, the informative part of the simulator was imperfectly solved till 1987: the information system ORION, employed in nuclear power plants, was substituted by tables displayed on monochrome monitors. Now the ORION system is included. A further improvement emerged from the reconstruction owing to the use of a better computer with a larger memory capacity, which enabled part of the models to be transferred from the electronics to computer programs. The potential for applying complex programs to the description of the individual technological units of nuclear power plants improved as well. (Z.M.)

  7. Adjustment and Characterization of an Original Model of Chronic Ischemic Heart Failure in Pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Barandon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present and characterize an original experimental model to create a chronic ischemic heart failure in pig. Two ameroid constrictors were placed around the LAD and the circumflex artery. Two months after surgery, pigs presented a poor LV function associated with a severe mitral valve insufficiency. Echocardiography analysis showed substantial anomalies in radial and circumferential deformations, both on the anterior and lateral surface of the heart. These anomalies in function were coupled with anomalies of perfusion observed in echocardiography after injection of contrast medium. No demonstration of myocardial infarction was observed with histological analysis. Our findings suggest that we were able to create and to stabilize a chronic ischemic heart failure model in the pig. This model represents a useful tool for the development of new medical or surgical treatment in this field.

  8. A real-time core model for Kozloduy 6 full-scope replica control room simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgieva, E.G; Dinkov, Y.D

    2013-01-01

    A real-time version of the NEM code from the Pennsylvania State University is developed for VVER-1000 full-scope simulator applications. A VVER-1000 reactor core model is described. Combined with an enhanced thermal-hydraulics and I and C models the scope of Kozloduy 6 fullscope replica control room simulator is expanded to the whole range of plant operation modes ranging from cold shutdown (depressurized) to rated power, as well as deviations from normal operating modes and even beyond-design basis accidents. (authors)

  9. Mathematical modeling of pigment dispersion taking into account the full agglomerate particle size distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a mathematical model that can quantify the dispersion of pigments, with a focus on the mechanical breakage of pigment agglomerates. The underlying physical mechanism was assumed to be surface erosion of spherical pigment agglomerates. The full agglomerate......-based acrylic vehicle in a three-roll mill. When the linear rate of agglomerate surface erosion was taken to be proportional to the external agglomerate surface area, simulations of the volume-moment mean diameter over time were in good quantitative agreement with experimental data for all three pigments....... The only adjustable parameter used was an apparent rate constant for the linear agglomerate erosion rate. Model simulations, at selected values of time, for the full agglomerate particle size distribution were in good qualitative agreement with the measured values. A quantitative match of the experimental...

  10. Create full-scale predictive economic models on ROI and innovation with performance computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Earl C. [IDC Research, Inc., Framingham, MA (United States); Conway, Steve [IDC Research, Inc., Framingham, MA (United States)

    2017-10-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the world's largest buyer and user of supercomputers, awarded IDC Research, Inc. a grant to create two macroeconomic models capable of quantifying, respectively, financial and non-financial (innovation) returns on investments in HPC resources. Following a 2013 pilot study in which we created the models and tested them on about 200 real-world HPC cases, DOE authorized us to conduct a full-out, three-year grant study to collect and measure many more examples, a process that would also subject the methodology to further testing and validation. A secondary, "stretch" goal of the full-out study was to advance the methodology from association toward (but not all the way to) causation, by eliminating the effects of some of the other factors that might be contributing, along with HPC investments, to the returns produced in the investigated projects.

  11. Image processing of full-field strain data and its use in model updating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W; Mottershead, J E [Centre for Engineering Dynamics, School of Engineering, University of Liverpool, UK, L69 3GH (United Kingdom); Sebastian, C M; Patterson, E A, E-mail: wangweizhuo@gmail.com [Composite Vehicle Research Center, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI (United States)

    2011-07-19

    Finite element model updating is an inverse problem based on measured structural outputs, typically natural frequencies. Full-field responses such as static stress/strain patterns and vibration mode shapes contain valuable information for model updating but within large volumes of highly-redundant data. Pattern recognition and image processing provide feasible techniques to extract effective and efficient information, often known as shape features, from this data. For instance, the Zernike polynomials having the properties of orthogonality and rotational invariance are powerful decomposition kernels for a shape defined within a unit circle. In this paper, full field strain patterns for a specimen, in the form of a square plate with a circular hole, under a tensile load are considered. Effective shape features can be constructed by a set of modified Zernike polynomials. The modification includes the application of a weighting function to the Zernike polynomials so that high strain magnitudes around the hole are well represented. The Gram-Schmidt process is then used to ensure orthogonality for the obtained decomposition kernels over the domain of the specimen. The difference between full-field strain patterns measured by digital image correlation (DIC) and reconstructed using 15 shape features (Zernike moment descriptors, ZMDs) at different steps in the elasto-plastic deformation of the specimen is found to be very small. It is significant that only a very small number of shape features are necessary and sufficient to represent the full-field data. Model updating of nonlinear elasto-plastic material properties is carried out by adjusting the parameters of a FE model until the FE strain pattern converges upon the measured strains as determined using ZMDs.

  12. FEQinput—An editor for the full equations (FEQ) hydraulic modeling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancalle, David S.; Ancalle, Pablo J.; Domanski, Marian M.

    2017-10-30

    IntroductionThe Full Equations Model (FEQ) is a computer program that solves the full, dynamic equations of motion for one-dimensional unsteady hydraulic flow in open channels and through control structures. As a result, hydrologists have used FEQ to design and operate flood-control structures, delineate inundation maps, and analyze peak-flow impacts. To aid in fighting floods, hydrologists are using the software to develop a system that uses flood-plain models to simulate real-time streamflow.Input files for FEQ are composed of text files that contain large amounts of parameters, data, and instructions that are written in a format exclusive to FEQ. Although documentation exists that can aid in the creation and editing of these input files, new users face a steep learning curve in order to understand the specific format and language of the files.FEQinput provides a set of tools to help a new user overcome the steep learning curve associated with creating and modifying input files for the FEQ hydraulic model and the related utility tool, Full Equations Utilities (FEQUTL).

  13. An investigation of jogging biomechanics using the full-body lumbar spine model: Model development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raabe, Margaret E; Chaudhari, Ajit M W

    2016-05-03

    The ability of a biomechanical simulation to produce results that can translate to real-life situations is largely dependent on the physiological accuracy of the musculoskeletal model. There are a limited number of freely-available, full-body models that exist in OpenSim, and those that do exist are very limited in terms of trunk musculature and degrees of freedom in the spine. Properly modeling the motion and musculature of the trunk is necessary to most accurately estimate lower extremity and spinal loading. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a more physiologically accurate OpenSim full-body model. By building upon three previously developed OpenSim models, the full-body lumbar spine (FBLS) model, comprised of 21 segments, 30 degrees-of-freedom, and 324 musculotendon actuators, was developed. The five lumbar vertebrae were modeled as individual bodies, and coupled constraints were implemented to describe the net motion of the spine. The eight major muscle groups of the lumbar spine were modeled (rectus abdominis, external and internal obliques, erector spinae, multifidus, quadratus lumborum, psoas major, and latissimus dorsi), and many of these muscle groups were modeled as multiple fascicles allowing the large muscles to act in multiple directions. The resulting FBLS model׳s trunk muscle geometry, maximal isometric joint moments, and simulated muscle activations compare well to experimental data. The FBLS model will be made freely available (https://simtk.org/home/fullbodylumbar) for others to perform additional analyses and develop simulations investigating full-body dynamics and contributions of the trunk muscles to dynamic tasks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [The origins of the Islamic model of hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romana Romani, Francesca

    2002-01-01

    In this paper a new perspective is proposed regarding the most relevant factors in the origin and the first developments of the Islamic hospital in Abbasid Baghdad. Notably, the importance of the Persian contribution to the foundation of the first hospitals is questioned and the major focus is put on the role of Eastern Christian assistential institutions. The rise of the Islamic hospital is reconsidered in the frame of the wider process of urbanisation in the first Abbasid century. The Islamic bîmaristan brought about a new concept of assistance by offering a medical cure rather than care.

  15. One Curve Embedded Full-Bridge MMC Modeling Method with Detailed Representation of IGBT Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongyang, Yu; Zhengang, Lu; Xi, Yang

    2017-05-01

    Modular Multilevel Converter is more and more widely used in high voltage DC transmission system and high power motor drive system. It is a major topological structure for high power AC-DC converter. Due to the large module number, the complex control algorithm, and the high power user’s back ground, the MMC model used for simulation should be as accurate as possible to simulate the details of how MMC works for the dynamic testing of the MMC controller. But so far, there is no sample simulation MMC model which can simulate the switching dynamic process. In this paper, one curve embedded full-bridge MMC modeling method with detailed representation of IGBT characteristics is proposed. This method is based on the switching curve referring and sample circuit calculation, and it is sample for implementation. Based on the simulation comparison test under Matlab/Simulink, the proposed method is proved to be correct.

  16. Full-Scale Physical Modeling Of The System "Granular Media—Steel Sheet Piling"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovskyy, M. P.; Meshcheryakov, G. N.; Petrosyan, V. N.; Dubrovska, O. M.

    2011-12-01

    This paper considers the problem of determination of real parameters of the cross-sectional values of sheet piling walls made of U-profile piles (moment of inertia and section modulus) and their drivability regarding piles interaction with granular media (for example, sandy soil). Among main factors which influence on this one can mention soil friction in the interlocks and the transmission of longitudinal shear forces in the interlocks of the sheet piles. In reality granular media-interlock interaction depends mainly on installation method and properties of the granular media. Study of dependencies between applied forces and friction in the interlocks by full-scale physical modeling during press-in regarding pile-pile interaction and granular media properties was aiming to refine calculation model as well as to provide reliable numerical modeling and design of the considered system.

  17. Mathematical modeling of pigment dispersion taking into account the full agglomerate particle size distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    2017-01-01

    . The only adjustable parameter used was an apparent rate constant for the linear agglomerate erosion rate. Model simulations, at selected values of time, for the full agglomerate particle size distribution were in good qualitative agreement with the measured values. A quantitative match of the experimental...... particle size distribution was simulated. Data from two previous experimental investigations were used for model validation. The first concerns two different yellow organic pigments dispersed in nitrocellulose/ethanol vehicles in a ball mill and the second a red organic pigment dispersed in a solvent...... particle size distributions could be obtained using time-dependent fragment distributions, but this resulted in a very slight improvement in the simulated transient mean diameter only. The model provides a mechanistic understanding of the agglomerate breakage process that can be used, e...

  18. Model of Optimal Cargo Transport Structure by Full Container Ship on Predefined Sailing Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serđo Kos

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the mathematical model for solving theproblem of defining optimal cargo transport structure, occurringwhen, on a predefined sailing route, adequate number ofcontainers of various types, masses and sizes, possibly includingRO!RO cargo, is to be selected, i.e., a "container lot" is to beestablished in loading ports with the aim of gaining maximumship profit and, at the same time, of exploiting useful load andtransport capacity of container ship as much as possible. Theimplementation of the proposed model enables considerableincrease in the efficiency of container ship operations. Themodel was tested using a numerical example with real data.The applied post-optimal analysis examines the influence ofchange in some values of the mathematical model on the resultingoptimal program.

  19. Development and optimization of psychological stress model in mice using 2 level full factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kala, Manika; Shaikh, Muhammad Vaseem; Nivsarkar, Manish

    Psychological stress has long been a silent killer, impairing normal physiological functions and leading to a variety of diseased conditions. However, the existing animal models for studying psychological stress have been marred by their inherent limitations warranting further research in their development and optimization. In this study 2 5 full factorial design was utilized for the development and optimization of psychological stress model in mice by applying different stressors viz., slanted cage(X 1 ), restraint(X 2 ), no bedding(X 3 ), dirty bedding(X 4 ) and isolation(X 5 ) at two time duration levels of 30 and 60min. The development of behavioral changes like depression, anxiety and anhedonia was taken as criteria for development of stress. These responses were analyzed using Design Expert 7.1.6. (Stat-Ease, Inc., USA). The maximum effective responses obtained were taken as a criterion for optimization. The optimized model was applied to measure the change in serum cortisol level to confirm the stress development. The statistical data showed that a quadratic model was fitted to the data obtained. All the factors were found to have a significant role in the development of stress among which restraint, slanted cage and dirty bedding were found to be more causal (pstressed mice of optimized model (ppsychological stress development in mice. The study could lay a strong platform for the use of quality by design approach in the development of robust, efficient and resourceful animal models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Full field reservoir modeling of shale assets using advanced data-driven analytics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soodabeh Esmaili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbon production from shale has attracted much attention in the recent years. When applied to this prolific and hydrocarbon rich resource plays, our understanding of the complexities of the flow mechanism (sorption process and flow behavior in complex fracture systems - induced or natural leaves much to be desired. In this paper, we present and discuss a novel approach to modeling, history matching of hydrocarbon production from a Marcellus shale asset in southwestern Pennsylvania using advanced data mining, pattern recognition and machine learning technologies. In this new approach instead of imposing our understanding of the flow mechanism, the impact of multi-stage hydraulic fractures, and the production process on the reservoir model, we allow the production history, well log, completion and hydraulic fracturing data to guide our model and determine its behavior. The uniqueness of this technology is that it incorporates the so-called “hard data” directly into the reservoir model, so that the model can be used to optimize the hydraulic fracture process. The “hard data” refers to field measurements during the hydraulic fracturing process such as fluid and proppant type and amount, injection pressure and rate as well as proppant concentration. This novel approach contrasts with the current industry focus on the use of “soft data” (non-measured, interpretive data such as frac length, width, height and conductivity in the reservoir models. The study focuses on a Marcellus shale asset that includes 135 wells with multiple pads, different landing targets, well length and reservoir properties. The full field history matching process was successfully completed using this data driven approach thus capturing the production behavior with acceptable accuracy for individual wells and for the entire asset.

  1. Full modelling of the MOSAIC animal PET system based on the GATE Monte Carlo simulation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merheb, C; Petegnief, Y; Talbot, J N

    2007-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) systems dedicated to animal imaging are now widely used for biological studies. The scanner performance strongly depends on the design and the characteristics of the system. Many parameters must be optimized like the dimensions and type of crystals, geometry and field-of-view (FOV), sampling, electronics, lightguide, shielding, etc. Monte Carlo modelling is a powerful tool to study the effect of each of these parameters on the basis of realistic simulated data. Performance assessment in terms of spatial resolution, count rates, scatter fraction and sensitivity is an important prerequisite before the model can be used instead of real data for a reliable description of the system response function or for optimization of reconstruction algorithms. The aim of this study is to model the performance of the Philips Mosaic(TM) animal PET system using a comprehensive PET simulation code in order to understand and describe the origin of important factors that influence image quality. We use GATE, a Monte Carlo simulation toolkit for a realistic description of the ring PET model, the detectors, shielding, cap, electronic processing and dead times. We incorporate new features to adjust signal processing to the Anger logic underlying the Mosaic(TM) system. Special attention was paid to dead time and energy spectra descriptions. Sorting of simulated events in a list mode format similar to the system outputs was developed to compare experimental and simulated sensitivity and scatter fractions for different energy thresholds using various models of phantoms describing rat and mouse geometries. Count rates were compared for both cylindrical homogeneous phantoms. Simulated spatial resolution was fitted to experimental data for 18 F point sources at different locations within the FOV with an analytical blurring function for electronic processing effects. Simulated and measured sensitivities differed by less than 3%, while scatter fractions agreed

  2. Development of a Full Ice-cream Cone Model for Halo Coronal Mass Ejections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Harim, E-mail: nho0512@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: moonyj@khu.ac.kr [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-20

    It is essential to determine three-dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, and source location) of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for the space weather forecast. In this study, we investigate which cone type represents a halo CME morphology using 29 CMEs (12 Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) /Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) halo CMEs and 17 Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory ( STEREO )/Sun–Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation COR2 halo CMEs) from 2010 December to 2011 June. These CMEs are identified as halo CMEs by one spacecraft ( SOHO or one of STEREO A and B ) and limb ones by the other spacecraft (One of STEREO A and B or SOHO ). From cone shape parameters of these CMEs, such as their front curvature, we find that the CME observational structures are much closer to a full ice-cream cone type than a shallow ice-cream cone type. Thus, we develop a full ice-cream cone model based on a new methodology that the full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths to estimate the three-dimensional parameters of the halo CMEs. This model is constructed by carrying out the following steps: (1) construct a cone for a given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, and (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection speeds with the observed ones. By applying this model to 12 SOHO /LASCO halo CMEs, we find that 3D parameters from our method are similar to those from other stereoscopic methods (i.e., a triangulation method and a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model).

  3. Development of a Full Ice-cream Cone Model for Halo Coronal Mass Ejections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Harim

    2017-01-01

    It is essential to determine three-dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, and source location) of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for the space weather forecast. In this study, we investigate which cone type represents a halo CME morphology using 29 CMEs (12 Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) /Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) halo CMEs and 17 Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory ( STEREO )/Sun–Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation COR2 halo CMEs) from 2010 December to 2011 June. These CMEs are identified as halo CMEs by one spacecraft ( SOHO or one of STEREO A and B ) and limb ones by the other spacecraft (One of STEREO A and B or SOHO ). From cone shape parameters of these CMEs, such as their front curvature, we find that the CME observational structures are much closer to a full ice-cream cone type than a shallow ice-cream cone type. Thus, we develop a full ice-cream cone model based on a new methodology that the full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths to estimate the three-dimensional parameters of the halo CMEs. This model is constructed by carrying out the following steps: (1) construct a cone for a given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, and (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection speeds with the observed ones. By applying this model to 12 SOHO /LASCO halo CMEs, we find that 3D parameters from our method are similar to those from other stereoscopic methods (i.e., a triangulation method and a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model).

  4. Development of a Full Ice-cream Cone Model for Halo Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Harim

    2017-04-01

    It is essential to determine three-dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, and source location) of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for the space weather forecast. In this study, we investigate which cone type represents a halo CME morphology using 29 CMEs (12 Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) halo CMEs and 17 Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Sun-Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation COR2 halo CMEs) from 2010 December to 2011 June. These CMEs are identified as halo CMEs by one spacecraft (SOHO or one of STEREO A and B) and limb ones by the other spacecraft (One of STEREO A and B or SOHO). From cone shape parameters of these CMEs, such as their front curvature, we find that the CME observational structures are much closer to a full ice-cream cone type than a shallow ice-cream cone type. Thus, we develop a full ice-cream cone model based on a new methodology that the full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths to estimate the three-dimensional parameters of the halo CMEs. This model is constructed by carrying out the following steps: (1) construct a cone for a given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, and (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection speeds with the observed ones. By applying this model to 12 SOHO/LASCO halo CMEs, we find that 3D parameters from our method are similar to those from other stereoscopic methods (I.e., a triangulation method and a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model).

  5. A 3D Full-Stokes Calving Model Applied to a West Greenland Outlet Glacier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Joe; Christoffersen, Poul; Zwinger, Thomas; Råback, Peter; Chauché, Nolwenn; Hubbard, Alun; Toberg, Nick; Luckman, Adrian; Benn, Doug; Slater, Donald; Cowton, Tom

    2017-04-01

    Iceberg calving from outlet glaciers accounts for around half of all mass loss from both the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. The diverse nature of calving and its complex links to both internal dynamics and external climate make it challenging to incorporate into models of glaciers and ice sheets. Consequently, calving represents one of the most significant uncertainties in predictions of future sea level rise. Here, we present results from a new 3D full-Stokes calving model developed in Elmer/Ice and applied to Store Glacier, the second largest outlet glacier in West Greenland. The calving model implements the crevasse depth criterion, which states that calving occurs when surface and basal crevasses penetrate the full thickness of the glacier. The model also implements a new 3D rediscretization approach and a time-evolution scheme which allow the calving front to evolve realistically through time. We use the model to test Store's sensitivity to two seasonal environmental processes believed to significantly influence calving: submarine melt undercutting and ice mélange buttressing. Store Glacier discharges 13.9 km3 of ice annually, and this calving rate shows a strong seasonal trend. We aim to reproduce this seasonal trend by forcing the model with present day levels of submarine melting and ice mélange buttressing. Sensitivity to changes in these frontal processes was also investigated, by forcing the model with a) increased submarine melt rates acting over longer periods of time and b) decreased mélange buttressing force acting over a reduced period. The model displays a range of observed calving behaviour and provides a good match to the observed seasonal evolution of the Store's terminus. The results indicate that ice mélange is the primary driver of the observed seasonal advance of the terminus and the associated seasonal variation in calving rate. The model also demonstrates a significant influence from submarine melting on calving rate. The results

  6. The research and practice based on the full-time visitation model in clinical medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the higher medical colleges and universities teaching hospital carry certain clinical teaching tasks, but the traditional teaching pattern of "two stage", including the early stage of the theory of teaching, the late arrangement of clinical practice, had some drawbacks such as practice time is too concentrated and the chasm between students' theory and practice. It is suggested that students contact clinical diagnosis and treatment earlier, visit more patients and increase the ratio of visitation and course. But as more and more students flood into university, clinical visitation has turned into a difficulty to improve students’ ability. To resolve this problem, we have made some efficient practice and exploration in Rizhao City People's Hospital from September 2005 to July 2014. The students were divided into full-time visitation model group and “two stage” pattern group randomly. The single factors are of great difference between the two groups. The full-time visitation model in clinical medical education builds a new mode of practice of clinical practice teaching in the medical stuents' concept of doctor-patient communication, humanistic care to patients, basic theoretical knowledge, clinical practice skills and graduate admission rate increased significantly. Continuous improvement of OSCE exam is needed to make evaluation more scientific, objective and fair.

  7. Inverting reflections using full-waveform inversion with inaccurate starting models

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah

    2015-08-19

    We present a method for inverting seismic reflections using full-waveform inversion (FWI) with inaccurate starting models. For a layered medium, near-offset reflections (with zero angle of incidence) are unlikely to be cycle-skipped regardless of the low-wavenumber velocity error in the initial models. Therefore, we use them as a starting point for FWI, and the subsurface velocity model is then updated during the FWI iterations using reflection wavepaths from varying offsets that are not cycle-skipped. To enhance low-wavenumber updates and accelerate the convergence, we take several passes through the non-linear Gauss-Seidel iterations, where we invert traces from a narrow range of near offsets and finally end at the far offsets. Every pass is followed by applying smoothing to the cumulative slowness update. The smoothing is strong at the early stages and relaxed at later iterations to allow for a gradual reconstruction of the subsurface model in a multiscale manner. Applications to synthetic and field data, starting from inaccurate models, show significant low-wavenumber updates and flattening of common-image gathers after many iterations.

  8. Full-band Monte Carlo model with screened pseudopotential based phonon scattering rates for a lattice with basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuong Hoa; Hofmann, Karl R.; Paasch, Gernot

    2002-11-01

    In advanced full-band Monte Carlo (MC) models, the Nordheim approximation with a spherical Wigner-Seitz cell for a lattice with two atoms per elementary cell is still common, and in the most detailed work on silicon by Kunikiyo [et al.] [J. Appl. Phys. 74, 297 (1994)], the atomic positions in the cell have been incorrectly introduced in the phonon scattering rates. In this article the correct expressions for the phonon scattering rates based on the screened pseudopotential are formulated for the case of several atoms per unit cell. Furthermore, the simplest wave number dependent approximation is introduced, which contains an average of the cell structure factor and the acoustic and the optical deformation potentials as two parameters to be fitted. While the band structure is determined by the pseudopotential at the reciprocal lattice vectors, the phonon scattering rates are essentially determined by wave numbers below the smallest reciprocal lattice vector. Thus, in the phonon scattering rates, the pseudopotential form factor is modeled by the simple Ashcroft model potential, in contrast to the full band structure, which is calculated using a nonlocal pseudopotential scheme. The parameter in the Ashcroft model potential is determined using a method based on the equilibrium condition. For the screening of the pseudopotential form factor, the Lindhard dielectric function is used. Compared to the Nordheim approximation with a spherical Wigner-Seitz cell, the approximation results in up to 10% lower phonon scattering rates. Examples from a detailed comparison of the influence of the two deformation potentials on the electron and hole drift velocities are presented for Ge and Si at different temperatures. The results are prerequisite for a well-founded choice of the two deformation potentials as fit parameters and they provide an explanation of the differences between the two materials, the origin of the anisotropy of the drift velocities, and the origin of the dent in

  9. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Stability Analysis of Delayed Cournot Model in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Elsadany, A.A. (2010).Dynamics of a delayed duopoly game with bounded rationality. Mathematical and computer modeling, 52(9-10), 1479-1489. Kopel, M. (1996). Simple and complex adjustment dynamics in court. Duopoly model. Chaos, Solitons and Fractal, 7(12), 2013-2048. Peters, E. (1994). Fractal Market Analysis:.

  10. Calibration and Stokes Imaging with Full Embedded Element Primary Beam Model for the Murchison Widefield Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, M.; Colegate, T.; Sutinjo, A. T.; Ung, D.; Wayth, R.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Lenc, E.; Pindor, B.; Morgan, J.; Kaplan, D. L.; Bell, M. E.; Callingham, J. R.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, Bi-Qing; Gaensler, B. M.; Hancock, P. J.; Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; McKinley, B.; Offringa, A. R.; Procopio, P.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2017-11-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), located in Western Australia, is one of the low-frequency precursors of the international Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project. In addition to pursuing its own ambitious science programme, it is also a testbed for wide range of future SKA activities ranging from hardware, software to data analysis. The key science programmes for the MWA and SKA require very high dynamic ranges, which challenges calibration and imaging systems. Correct calibration of the instrument and accurate measurements of source flux densities and polarisations require precise characterisation of the telescope's primary beam. Recent results from the MWA GaLactic Extragalactic All-sky Murchison Widefield Array (GLEAM) survey show that the previously implemented Average Embedded Element (AEE) model still leaves residual polarisations errors of up to 10-20% in Stokes Q. We present a new simulation-based Full Embedded Element (FEE) model which is the most rigorous realisation yet of the MWA's primary beam model. It enables efficient calculation of the MWA beam response in arbitrary directions without necessity of spatial interpolation. In the new model, every dipole in the MWA tile (4 × 4 bow-tie dipoles) is simulated separately, taking into account all mutual coupling, ground screen, and soil effects, and therefore accounts for the different properties of the individual dipoles within a tile. We have applied the FEE beam model to GLEAM observations at 200-231 MHz and used false Stokes parameter leakage as a metric to compare the models. We have determined that the FEE model reduced the magnitude and declination-dependent behaviour of false polarisation in Stokes Q and V while retaining low levels of false polarisation in Stokes U.

  11. Multiple imputation of multiple multi-item scales when a full imputation model is infeasible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumpton, Catrin O; Morris, Tim; Hughes, Dyfrig A; White, Ian R

    2016-01-26

    Missing data in a large scale survey presents major challenges. We focus on performing multiple imputation by chained equations when data contain multiple incomplete multi-item scales. Recent authors have proposed imputing such data at the level of the individual item, but this can lead to infeasibly large imputation models. We use data gathered from a large multinational survey, where analysis uses separate logistic regression models in each of nine country-specific data sets. In these data, applying multiple imputation by chained equations to the individual scale items is computationally infeasible. We propose an adaptation of multiple imputation by chained equations which imputes the individual scale items but reduces the number of variables in the imputation models by replacing most scale items with scale summary scores. We evaluate the feasibility of the proposed approach and compare it with a complete case analysis. We perform a simulation study to compare the proposed method with alternative approaches: we do this in a simplified setting to allow comparison with the full imputation model. For the case study, the proposed approach reduces the size of the prediction models from 134 predictors to a maximum of 72 and makes multiple imputation by chained equations computationally feasible. Distributions of imputed data are seen to be consistent with observed data. Results from the regression analysis with multiple imputation are similar to, but more precise than, results for complete case analysis; for the same regression models a 39% reduction in the standard error is observed. The simulation shows that our proposed method can perform comparably against the alternatives. By substantially reducing imputation model sizes, our adaptation makes multiple imputation feasible for large scale survey data with multiple multi-item scales. For the data considered, analysis of the multiply imputed data shows greater power and efficiency than complete case analysis. The

  12. Building Subsurface Velocity Models with Sharp Interfaces Using Interface-Guided Seismic Full-Waveform Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Youzuo; Huang, Lianjie

    2017-11-01

    Reverse-time migration has the potential to image complex subsurface structures, including steeply-dipping fault zones, but the method requires an accurate velocity model. Acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion is a promising tool for high-resolution velocity model building. Because of the ill-posedness of acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion, it is a great challenge to obtain accurate velocity models containing sharp interfaces. To improve velocity model building, we develop an acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion method with an interface-guided modified total-variation regularization scheme to improve the inversion accuracy and robustness, particularly for models with sharp interfaces and steeply-dipping fault zones with widths much smaller than the seismic wavelength. The new regularization scheme incorporates interface information into seismic full-waveform inversion. The interface information of subsurface interfaces is obtained iteratively using migration imaging during waveform inversion. Seismic migration is robust for subsurface imaging. Our new acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion takes advantage of the robustness of migration imaging to improve velocity estimation. We use synthetic seismic data for a complex model containing sharp interfaces and several steeply-dipping fault zones to validate the improved capability of our new acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion method. Our inversion results are much better than those produced without using interface-guided regularization. Acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion with an interface-guided modified total-variation regularization scheme has the potential to accurately build subsurface velocity models with sharp interfaces and/or steep fault zones.

  13. A combined computational and structural model of the full-length human prolactin receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugge, Katrine; Papaleo, Elena; Haxholm, Gitte W.; Hopper, Jonathan T. S.; Robinson, Carol V.; Olsen, Johan G.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Kragelund, Birthe B.

    2016-05-01

    The prolactin receptor is an archetype member of the class I cytokine receptor family, comprising receptors with fundamental functions in biology as well as key drug targets. Structurally, each of these receptors represent an intriguing diversity, providing an exceptionally challenging target for structural biology. Here, we access the molecular architecture of the monomeric human prolactin receptor by combining experimental and computational efforts. We solve the NMR structure of its transmembrane domain in micelles and collect structural data on overlapping fragments of the receptor with small-angle X-ray scattering, native mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Along with previously published data, these are integrated by molecular modelling to generate a full receptor structure. The result provides the first full view of a class I cytokine receptor, exemplifying the architecture of more than 40 different receptor chains, and reveals that the extracellular domain is merely the tip of a molecular iceberg.

  14. Fuzzy-Skyhook Control for Active Suspension Systems Applied to a Full Vehicle Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aref M.A. Soliman

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, most modern vehicles are equipped with controlled suspension systems for improving the vehicle ride comfort. Therefore, this paper is concerned with a theoretical study for the ride comfort performance of the vehicle. The theoretical investigation includes a suggestion of an active suspension system controller using fuzzy-skyhook control theory, which offers new opportunities for the improvement of vehicle ride performance. The ride comfort of the active suspension system has been evaluated using a 7 degree of freedom full vehicle mathematical model. The simulation results are presented in the time and frequency domain, also in terms of RMS values, and it’s shown that the proposed active suspension system with fuzzy-skyhook control improved the vehicle ride quality in terms of body acceleration, suspension working space and dynamic tyre load in comparison with the passive and skyhook suspension systems.

  15. Wound Healing Effects of Rose Placenta in a Mouse Model of Full-Thickness Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Woo Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRosa damascena, a type of herb, has been used for wound healing in Eastern folk medicine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of rose placenta from R. damascena in a full-thickness wound model in mice.MethodsSixty six-week-old C57BL/6N mice were used. Full-thickness wounds were made with an 8-mm diameter punch. Two wounds were made on each side of the back, and wounds were assigned randomly to the control and experimental groups. Rose placenta (250 µg was injected in the experimental group, and normal saline was injected in the control group. Wound sizes were measured with digital photography, and specimens were harvested. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to assess the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1, and CD31. Vessel density was measured. Quantitative analysis using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for EGF was performed. All evaluations were performed on postoperative days 0, 2, 4, 7, and 10. Statistical analyses were performed using the paired t-test.Results On days 4, 7, and 10, the wounds treated with rose placenta were significantly smaller. On day 2, VEGF and EGF expression increased in the experimental group. On days 7 and 10, TGF-β1 expression decreased in the experimental group. On day 10, vessel density increased in the experimental group. The increase in EGF on day 2 was confirmed with ELISA.ConclusionsRose placenta was found to be associated with improved wound healing in a mouse full-thickness wound model via increased EGF release. Rose placenta may potentially be a novel drug candidate for enhancing wound healing.

  16. Phasor model of full scale converter wind turbine for small-signal stability analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gihga, Radu; Wu, Qiuwei; Nielsen, Arne Hejde

    2017-01-01

    The small-signal stability analysis of power system electromechanical oscillations is a well-established field in control and stability assessment of power systems. The impact of large wind farms on small-signal stability of power systems has been a topic of high interest in recent years. This study presents a phasor model of full scale converter wind turbines (WTs) implemented in MATLAB/SIMULINK for small-signal stability studies. The phasor method is typically used for dynamic studies of po...

  17. Real-Time Model and Simulation Architecture for Half- and Full-Bridge Modular Multilevel Converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashourloo, Mojtaba

    This work presents an equivalent model and simulation architecture for real-time electromagnetic transient analysis of either half-bridge or full-bridge modular multilevel converter (MMC) with 400 sub-modules (SMs) per arm. The proposed CPU/FPGA-based architecture is optimized for the parallel implementation of the presented MMC model on the FPGA and is beneficiary of a high-throughput floating-point computational engine. The developed real-time simulation architecture is capable of simulating MMCs with 400 SMs per arm at 825 nanoseconds. To address the difficulties of the sorting process implementation, a modified Odd-Even Bubble sorting is presented in this work. The comparison of the results under various test scenarios reveals that the proposed real-time simulator is representing the system responses in the same way of its corresponding off-line counterpart obtained from the PSCAD/EMTDC program.

  18. Application of numerical modelling in the design of a full-scale heated Tunnel Sealing Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, R.; Chandler, N.; Martino, J.; Dixon, D.

    2005-10-01

    The Tunnel Sealing Experiment (TSX) was a full-scale in situ demonstration of technology for constructing nearly water tight-seals in excavations through crystalline rock deep below the surface of the earth. The experiment has been carried out at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL's) Underground Research Laboratory near Lac du Bonnet, Canada, in support of international programs for geologic disposal of radioactive waste. The TSX, with partners from Canada, Japan, France and the United States, was carried under conditions of high pressure (up to 4 MPa) and elevated temperature (up to 85°C). Comparing numerical model predictions with eight years of data collected from approximately 900 sensors was an important component of this experiment. Model of Transport In Fractured/porous Media (MOTIF), a finite element computer program developed by AECL for simulating fully coupled or uncoupled fluid flow, solute transport and heat transport, was used to model both the ambient temperature and heated phases of the TSX. The plan to heat the water in the TSX to 85°C was developed using model predictions and a comparison of simulated results with measurements during heating of the water in the TSX to about 50°C. The three-dimensional MOTIF simulations were conducted in parallel with axisymmetric modelling using Fast Lagrangian Analysis of Continua (FLAC), which computed the heat loss from pipes that carried the heated water through the rock to and from the experiment. The numerical model was initially used to develop a plan for operation of the experiment heaters, and then subsequently used to predict temperatures and hydraulic heads in the TSX bulkhead seals and surrounding rock. Copyright

  19. Atucha II NPP full scope simulator modelling with the thermal hydraulic code TRACRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Pablo Rey; Ruiz, Jose Antonio; Rivero, Norberto

    2011-01-01

    In February 2010 NA-SA (Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A.) awarded Tecnatom the Atucha II full scope simulator project. NA-SA is a public company owner of the Argentinean nuclear power plants. Atucha II is due to enter in operation shortly. Atucha II NPP is a PHWR type plant cooled by the water of the Parana River and has the same design as the Atucha I unit, doubling its power capacity. Atucha II will produce 745 MWe utilizing heavy water as coolant and moderator, and natural uranium as fuel. A plant singular feature is the permanent core refueling. TRAC R T is the first real time thermal hydraulic six-equations code used in the training simulation industry for NSSS modeling. It is the result from adapting to real time the best estimate code TRACG. TRAC R T is based on first principle conservation equations for mass, energy and momentum for liquid and steam phases, with two phase flows under non homogeneous and non equilibrium conditions. At present, it has been successfully implemented in twelve full scope replica simulators in different training centers throughout the world. To ease the modeling task, TRAC R T includes a graphical pre-processing tool designed to optimize this process and alleviate the burden of entering alpha numerical data in an input file. (author)

  20. Fast Monte Carlo-simulator with full collimator and detector response modelling for SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohlberg, A.O.; Kajaste, M.T.

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC)-simulations have proved to be a valuable tool in studying single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-reconstruction algorithms. Despite their popularity, the use of Monte Carlo-simulations is still often limited by their large computation demand. This is especially true in situations where full collimator and detector modelling with septal penetration, scatter and X-ray fluorescence needs to be included. This paper presents a rapid and simple MC-simulator, which can effectively reduce the computation times. The simulator was built on the convolution-based forced detection principle, which can markedly lower the number of simulated photons. Full collimator and detector response look-up tables are pre-simulated and then later used in the actual MC-simulations to model the system response. The developed simulator was validated by comparing it against 123 I point source measurements made with a clinical gamma camera system and against 99m Tc software phantom simulations made with the SIMIND MC-package. The results showed good agreement between the new simulator, measurements and the SIMIND-package. The new simulator provided near noise-free projection data in approximately 1.5 min per projection with 99m Tc, which was less than one-tenth of SIMIND's time. The developed MC-simulator can markedly decrease the simulation time without sacrificing image quality. (author)

  1. Computational study on full-wave inversion based on the acoustic wave-equation; Onkyoha hado hoteishiki full wave inversion no model keisan ni yoru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T.; Sassa, K. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Uesaka, S. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-01

    The effect of initial models on full-wave inversion (FWI) analysis based on acoustic wave-equation was studied for elastic wave tomography of underground structures. At present, travel time inversion using initial motion travel time is generally used, and inverse analysis is conducted using the concept `ray,` assuming very high wave frequency. Although this method can derive stable solutions relatively unaffected by initial model, it uses only the data of initial motion travel time. FWI calculates theoretical waveform at each receiver using all of observed waveforms as data by wave equation modeling where 2-D underground structure is calculated by difference calculus under the assumption that wave propagation is described by wave equation of P wave. Although it is a weak point that FWI is easily affected by noises in an initial model and data, it is featured by high resolution of solutions. This method offers very excellent convergence as a proper initial model is used, resulting in sufficient performance, however, it is strongly affected by initial model. 2 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Manufactured analytical solutions for isothermal full-Stokes ice sheet models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sargent

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the detailed construction of a manufactured analytical solution to time-dependent and steady-state isothermal full-Stokes ice sheet problems. The solutions are constructed for two-dimensional flowline and three-dimensional full-Stokes ice sheet models with variable viscosity. The construction is done by choosing for the specified ice surface and bed a velocity distribution that satisfies both mass conservation and the kinematic boundary conditions. Then a compensatory stress term in the conservation of momentum equations and their boundary conditions is calculated to make the chosen velocity distributions as well as the chosen pressure field into exact solutions. By substituting different ice surface and bed geometry formulas into the derived solution formulas, analytical solutions for different geometries can be constructed.

    The boundary conditions can be specified as essential Dirichlet conditions or as periodic boundary conditions. By changing a parameter value, the analytical solutions allow investigation of algorithms for a different range of aspect ratios as well as for different, frozen or sliding, basal conditions. The analytical solutions can also be used to estimate the numerical error of the method in the case when the effects of the boundary conditions are eliminated, that is, when the exact solution values are specified as inflow and outflow boundary conditions.

  3. Full Life Cycle of Data Analysis with Climate Model Diagnostic Analyzer (CMDA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Zhai, C.; Pan, L.; Tang, B.; Zhang, J.; Bao, Q.; Malarout, N.

    2017-12-01

    We have developed a system that supports the full life cycle of a data analysis process, from data discovery, to data customization, to analysis, to reanalysis, to publication, and to reproduction. The system called Climate Model Diagnostic Analyzer (CMDA) is designed to demonstrate that the full life cycle of data analysis can be supported within one integrated system for climate model diagnostic evaluation with global observational and reanalysis datasets. CMDA has four subsystems that are highly integrated to support the analysis life cycle. Data System manages datasets used by CMDA analysis tools, Analysis System manages CMDA analysis tools which are all web services, Provenance System manages the meta data of CMDA datasets and the provenance of CMDA analysis history, and Recommendation System extracts knowledge from CMDA usage history and recommends datasets/analysis tools to users. These four subsystems are not only highly integrated but also easily expandable. New datasets can be easily added to Data System and scanned to be visible to the other subsystems. New analysis tools can be easily registered to be available in the Analysis System and Provenance System. With CMDA, a user can start a data analysis process by discovering datasets of relevance to their research topic using the Recommendation System. Next, the user can customize the discovered datasets for their scientific use (e.g. anomaly calculation, regridding, etc) with tools in the Analysis System. Next, the user can do their analysis with the tools (e.g. conditional sampling, time averaging, spatial averaging) in the Analysis System. Next, the user can reanalyze the datasets based on the previously stored analysis provenance in the Provenance System. Further, they can publish their analysis process and result to the Provenance System to share with other users. Finally, any user can reproduce the published analysis process and results. By supporting the full life cycle of climate data analysis

  4. Modeling the Test-Retest Statistics of a Localization Experiment in the Full Horizontal Plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsnowski, André; Maune, Steffen

    2016-10-01

    Two approaches to model the test-retest statistics of a localization experiment basing on Gaussian distribution and on surrogate data are introduced. Their efficiency is investigated using different measures describing directional hearing ability. A localization experiment in the full horizontal plane is a challenging task for hearing impaired patients. In clinical routine, we use this experiment to evaluate the progress of our cochlear implant (CI) recipients. Listening and time effort limit the reproducibility. The localization experiment consists of a 12 loudspeaker circle, placed in an anechoic room, a "camera silens". In darkness, HSM sentences are presented at 65 dB pseudo-erratically from all 12 directions with five repetitions. This experiment is modeled by a set of Gaussian distributions with different standard deviations added to a perfect estimator, as well as by surrogate data. Five repetitions per direction are used to produce surrogate data distributions for the sensation directions. To investigate the statistics, we retrospectively use the data of 33 CI patients with 92 pairs of test-retest-measurements from the same day. The first model does not take inversions into account, (i.e., permutations of the direction from back to front and vice versa are not considered), although they are common for hearing impaired persons particularly in the rear hemisphere. The second model considers these inversions but does not work with all measures. The introduced models successfully describe test-retest statistics of directional hearing. However, since their applications on the investigated measures perform differently no general recommendation can be provided. The presented test-retest statistics enable pair test comparisons for localization experiments.

  5. Salvus: A scalable software suite for full-waveform modelling & inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasiev, M.; Boehm, C.; van Driel, M.; Krischer, L.; Fichtner, A.

    2017-12-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI), whether at the lab, exploration, or planetary scale, requires the cooperation of five principal components. (1) The geometry of the domain needs to be properly discretized and an initial guess of the model parameters must be projected onto it; (2) Large volumes of recorded waveform data must be collected, organized, and processed; (3) Synthetic waveform data must be efficiently and accurately computed through complex domains; (4) Suitable misfit functions and optimization techniques must be used to relate discrepancies in data space to perturbations in the model; and (5) Some form of workflow management must be employed to schedule and run (1) - (4) in the correct order. Each one of these components can represent a formidable technical challenge which redirects energy from the true task at hand: using FWI to extract new information about some underlying continuum.In this presentation we give an overview of the current status of the Salvus software suite, which was introduced to address the challenges listed above. Specifically, we touch on (1) salvus_mesher, which eases the discretization of complex Earth models into hexahedral meshes; (2) salvus_seismo, which integrates with LASIF and ObsPy to streamline the processing and preparation of seismic data; (3) salvus_wave, a high-performance and scalable spectral-element solver capable of simulating waveforms through general unstructured 2- and 3-D domains, and (4) salvus_opt, an optimization toolbox specifically designed for full-waveform inverse problems. Tying everything together, we also discuss (5) salvus_flow: a workflow package designed to orchestrate and manage the rest of the suite. It is our hope that these developments represent a step towards the automation of large-scale seismic waveform inversion, while also lowering the barrier of entry for new applications. We include several examples of Salvus' use in (extra-) planetary seismology, non-destructive testing, and medical

  6. The two-process model : Origin and perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daan, S.; Hut, R. A.; Beersma, D.

    In the two-process model as developed in the early 1980's sleep is controlled by a process-S, representing the rise and fall of sleep demand resulting from prior sleep-wake history, interacting with a process-C representing circadian variation in sleep propensity. S and C together optimize sleep

  7. The origins of computer weather prediction and climate modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Peter

    2008-03-01

    Numerical simulation of an ever-increasing range of geophysical phenomena is adding enormously to our understanding of complex processes in the Earth system. The consequences for mankind of ongoing climate change will be far-reaching. Earth System Models are capable of replicating climate regimes of past millennia and are the best means we have of predicting the future of our climate. The basic ideas of numerical forecasting and climate modeling were developed about a century ago, long before the first electronic computer was constructed. There were several major practical obstacles to be overcome before numerical prediction could be put into practice. A fuller understanding of atmospheric dynamics allowed the development of simplified systems of equations; regular radiosonde observations of the free atmosphere and, later, satellite data, provided the initial conditions; stable finite difference schemes were developed; and powerful electronic computers provided a practical means of carrying out the prodigious calculations required to predict the changes in the weather. Progress in weather forecasting and in climate modeling over the past 50 years has been dramatic. In this presentation, we will trace the history of computer forecasting through the ENIAC integrations to the present day. The useful range of deterministic prediction is increasing by about one day each decade, and our understanding of climate change is growing rapidly as Earth System Models of ever-increasing sophistication are developed.

  8. The origins of computer weather prediction and climate modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Numerical simulation of an ever-increasing range of geophysical phenomena is adding enormously to our understanding of complex processes in the Earth system. The consequences for mankind of ongoing climate change will be far-reaching. Earth System Models are capable of replicating climate regimes of past millennia and are the best means we have of predicting the future of our climate. The basic ideas of numerical forecasting and climate modeling were developed about a century ago, long before the first electronic computer was constructed. There were several major practical obstacles to be overcome before numerical prediction could be put into practice. A fuller understanding of atmospheric dynamics allowed the development of simplified systems of equations; regular radiosonde observations of the free atmosphere and, later, satellite data, provided the initial conditions; stable finite difference schemes were developed; and powerful electronic computers provided a practical means of carrying out the prodigious calculations required to predict the changes in the weather. Progress in weather forecasting and in climate modeling over the past 50 years has been dramatic. In this presentation, we will trace the history of computer forecasting through the ENIAC integrations to the present day. The useful range of deterministic prediction is increasing by about one day each decade, and our understanding of climate change is growing rapidly as Earth System Models of ever-increasing sophistication are developed

  9. KdV-Burgers equation in a new continuum model based on full velocity difference model considering anticipation effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Rongjun; Ge, Hongxia; Wang, Jufeng

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, a new continuum model based on full velocity difference car following model is developed with the consideration of driver's anticipation effect. By applying the linear stability theory, the new model's linear stability is obtained. Through nonlinear analysis, the KdV-Burgers equation is derived to describe the propagating behavior of traffic density wave near the neutral stability line. Numerical simulation shows that the new model possesses the local cluster, and it is capable of explaining some particular traffic phenomena Numerical results show that when considering the effects of anticipation, the traffic jams can be suppressed efficiently. The key improvement of this new model is that the anticipation effect can improve the stability of traffic flow.

  10. Model for the origin of carboxylic acids in basinal brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seewald, Jeffrey S.

    2001-11-01

    Carboxylic acids are ubiquitous in basinal brines from petroleum-producing sedimentary basins. Although the absolute concentrations of individual short-chain acids vary systematically over many orders of magnitude, relative abundances are characterized by approximately constant ratios. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated that oxidation of aqueous n-alkanes proceeds through a sequence of reactions involving alkene, alcohol, ketone, and carboxylic acid reaction intermediaries. The highly specific nature of these reactions allows the relative distribution of carboxylic acids produced during oxidation of n-alkanes to be predicted quantitatively as a function of petroleum composition. A model based on the results of laboratory experiments was developed to account for the thermogenic production of aqueous carboxylic acids in sedimentary basins. Model predictions are highly consistent with the distribution of carboxylic acids observed in nature. This result suggests that hydrocarbon oxidation reactions may be pervasive during petroleum maturation in sedimentary basins. Likely oxidizing agents include ferric iron-bearing aluminosilicates, oxides, and hydroxides, pyrite, sulfate-bearing minerals, and water. Such chemical interactions allow inorganic sedimentary components to act as sources of oxygen for the formation of oxygenated organic alteration products. Accordingly, the absolute amount and timing of carboxylic acid generation may not be limited by the compositional evolution of kerogen, as suggested by previous models.

  11. The statistical multifragmentation model: Origins and recent advances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donangelo, R., E-mail: donangel@fing.edu.uy [Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de la República, Julio Herrera y Reissig 565, 11300, Montevideo (Uruguay); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, C.P. 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil); Souza, S. R., E-mail: srsouza@if.ufrj.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, C.P. 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, C.P. 15051, 91501-970 Porto Alegre - RS (Brazil)

    2016-07-07

    We review the Statistical Multifragmentation Model (SMM) which considers a generalization of the liquid-drop model for hot nuclei and allows one to calculate thermodynamic quantities characterizing the nuclear ensemble at the disassembly stage. We show how to determine probabilities of definite partitions of finite nuclei and how to determine, through Monte Carlo calculations, observables such as the caloric curve, multiplicity distributions, heat capacity, among others. Some experimental measurements of the caloric curve confirmed the SMM predictions of over 10 years before, leading to a surge in the interest in the model. However, the experimental determination of the fragmentation temperatures relies on the yields of different isotopic species, which were not correctly calculated in the schematic, liquid-drop picture, employed in the SMM. This led to a series of improvements in the SMM, in particular to the more careful choice of nuclear masses and energy densities, specially for the lighter nuclei. With these improvements the SMM is able to make quantitative determinations of isotope production. We show the application of SMM to the production of exotic nuclei through multifragmentation. These preliminary calculations demonstrate the need for a careful choice of the system size and excitation energy to attain maximum yields.

  12. Investigation of time and weather effects on crash types using full Bayesian multivariate Poisson lognormal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Basyouny, Karim; Barua, Sudip; Islam, Md Tazul

    2014-12-01

    Previous research shows that various weather elements have significant effects on crash occurrence and risk; however, little is known about how these elements affect different crash types. Consequently, this study investigates the impact of weather elements and sudden extreme snow or rain weather changes on crash type. Multivariate models were used for seven crash types using five years of daily weather and crash data collected for the entire City of Edmonton. In addition, the yearly trend and random variation of parameters across the years were analyzed by using four different modeling formulations. The proposed models were estimated in a full Bayesian context via Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation. The multivariate Poisson lognormal model with yearly varying coefficients provided the best fit for the data according to Deviance Information Criteria. Overall, results showed that temperature and snowfall were statistically significant with intuitive signs (crashes decrease with increasing temperature; crashes increase as snowfall intensity increases) for all crash types, while rainfall was mostly insignificant. Previous snow showed mixed results, being statistically significant and positively related to certain crash types, while negatively related or insignificant in other cases. Maximum wind gust speed was found mostly insignificant with a few exceptions that were positively related to crash type. Major snow or rain events following a dry weather condition were highly significant and positively related to three crash types: Follow-Too-Close, Stop-Sign-Violation, and Ran-Off-Road crashes. The day-of-the-week dummy variables were statistically significant, indicating a possible weekly variation in exposure. Transportation authorities might use the above results to improve road safety by providing drivers with information regarding the risk of certain crash types for a particular weather condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ring tests on high density polyethylene: Full investigation assisted by finite element modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laiarinandrasana, L.; Devilliers, C.; Oberti, S.; Gaudichet, E.; Fayolle, B.; Lucatelli, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to characterize the mechanical behavior of HDPE pipes, the ASTM D 2290-04 standard recommends carrying out tensile tests on notched rings, cut out from the pipe. This very simple test is also utilized to investigate the aging effect of the pipe by determining the strain at failure. Comparison between full ring and notched ring mechanical responses are discussed. Constitutive modeling including strain rate effects was performed by finite element analysis. This allowed a better understanding of the stress state in the cross section perpendicular to the loading direction. Additionally, the influence of a thin layer of oxidized HDPE in the inner wall of the ring was studied in the light of the finite element results.

  14. Modeled Full-Flight Aircraft Emissions Impacts on Air Quality and Their Sensitivity to Grid Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennam, L. P.; Vizuete, W.; Talgo, K.; Omary, M.; Binkowski, F. S.; Xing, J.; Mathur, R.; Arunachalam, S.

    2017-12-01

    Aviation is a unique anthropogenic source with four-dimensional varying emissions, peaking at cruise altitudes (9-12 km). Aircraft emission budgets in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere region and their potential impacts on upper troposphere and surface air quality are not well understood. Our key objective is to use chemical transport models (with prescribed meteorology) to predict aircraft emissions impacts on the troposphere and surface air quality. We quantified the importance of including full-flight intercontinental emissions and increased horizontal grid resolution. The full-flight aviation emissions in the Northern Hemisphere contributed 1.3% (mean, min-max: 0.46, 0.3-0.5 ppbv) and 0.2% (0.013, 0.004-0.02 μg/m3) of total O3 and PM2.5 concentrations at the surface, with Europe showing slightly higher impacts (1.9% (O3 0.69, 0.5-0.85 ppbv) and 0.5% (PM2.5 0.03, 0.01-0.05 μg/m3)) than North America (NA) and East Asia. We computed seasonal aviation-attributable mass flux vertical profiles and aviation perturbations along isentropic surfaces to quantify the transport of cruise altitude emissions at the hemispheric scale. The comparison of coarse (108 × 108 km2) and fine (36 × 36 km2) grid resolutions in NA showed 70 times and 13 times higher aviation impacts for O3 and PM2.5 in coarser domain. These differences are mainly due to the inability of the coarse resolution simulation to capture nonlinearities in chemical processes near airport locations and other urban areas. Future global studies quantifying aircraft contributions should consider model resolution and perhaps use finer scales near major aviation source regions.

  15. Variance Distribution in Sibling Relationships: Advantages of Multilevel Modeling Using Full Sibling Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Karyn

    2017-03-01

    The majority of research on sibling relationships has investigated only one or two siblings in a family, but there are many theoretical and methodological limitations to this single dyadic perspective. This study uses multiple siblings (541 adults) in 184 families, where 96 of these families had all siblings complete the study, to demonstrate the value in including full sibling groups when conducting research on sibling relationships. Two scales, positivity and willingness to sacrifice, are evaluated with a multilevel model to account for the nested nature of family relationships. The distribution of variance across three levels: relationship, individual, and family are computed, and results indicate that the relationship level explains the most variance in positivity, whereas the individual level explains the majority of variance in willingness to sacrifice. These distributions are affected by gender composition and family size. The results of this study highlight an important and often overlooked element of family research: The meaning of a scale changes based on its distribution of variance at these three levels. Researchers are encouraged to be cognizant of the variance distribution of their scales when studying sibling relationships and to incorporate more full sibling groups into their research methods and study design. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  16. Full scale simulation of MWI and LRI based GRACE-FO gravity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flechtner, Frank; Raimondo, Jean-Claude; Dobslaw, Henryk; Fagiolini, Elisa

    2014-05-01

    During 12 years of very successful operation in orbit, the US-German GRACE mission has demonstrated its outstanding capability to monitor mass motions in the Earth system with unprecedented accuracy and temporal resolution. These results have stimulated many novel research activities in hydrology, oceanography, glaciology, geophysics, and geodesy which also indicate that long term monitoring of such mass variations, possibly with improved spatial and temporal resolution, is a must for further understanding of phenomena such as ice mass los in Polar Regions and large glacier systems or the continental hydrological cycle. Due to the onboard battery situation, GRACE can likely not be operated further than 2015. Fortunately, a GRACE follow-on mission is currently being implemented jointly by JPL/NASA and GFZ and due for launch in August 2017. GRACE-FO will be based on GRACE heritage and lessons learnt during operation. Therefore, the prime SST (satellite-to-satellite tracking) instrument will be again the Microwave Ranging Instrument (MWI). Additionally, GRACE-FO will carry a Laser Ranging Interferometer (LRI) demonstrator which will have a factor of 10-50 improved SST measurement accuracy. We will present a multi-years full scale simulation based on realistic error assumptions for instrument noise and background models such as tidal and non-tidal mass variations. The results shall indicate what the users can expect in terms of precision and spatial and temporal resolution when using future GRACE-FO MWI and LRI based gravity models.

  17. PCL/PLA Polymer Composite Filament Fabrication using Full Factorial Design (DOE) for Fused Deposition Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, R. H. A.; Khairilhijra, K. Rd.; Wahab, M. S.; Sa’ude, N.; Ibrahim, M.; Marwah, O. M. F.; Yusof, M. S.; Rahman, M. N. A.; Ariffin, A. M. T.; Hassan, M. F.; Yunos, M. Z.; Adzila, S.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, Polycaprolactone / Polylactice Acid (PCL/PLA) composite are used to fabricate filament wire with the specific diameter, which is in the range of 1.75 to 1.80 mm. Full factorial experimental design technique was used to study the main effects and the interaction effects between operational parameter which is (A) die temperature, (B) roller puller speed, (C) spindle speed and (D) inlet temperature. Besides that, there are two levels (-1 and +1) and the response are filament wire diameter. There are 16 numbers of runs and plus 8 centre points per blocks which makes the runs into 24 runs. From the experiment it shows that there are four factor that are significant effects on the filament wire diameter which is A, B, C and BC. The optimum parameter setting are also determined and there are 10 suggestions to achieve the target with different setting of parameter. The margin error for confirmation run is below than 15% when the parameter set at 6 Hz spindle speed, 4.99 rpm roller puller, 100.31 °C die temperature and 79.65 °C inlet temperature which can be noted that the confirmation run result is acceptable. The optimization parameter setting can use to continue in Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM). Filament wire from PCL/PLA are succesfully fabricated with acceptable diameter size and ready to be used for Fused Depotion Modelling process (FDM).

  18. Updated activated sludge model number 1 parameter values for improved prediction of nitrogen removal in activated sludge processes: validation at 13 full-scale plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubert, Jean-Marc; Stricker, Anne-Emmanuelle; Marquot, Aurélien; Racault, Yvan; Gillot, Sylvie; Héduit, Alain

    2009-01-01

    The Activated Sludge Model number 1 (ASM1) is the main model used in simulation projects focusing on nitrogen removal. Recent laboratory-scale studies have found that the default values given 20 years ago for the decay rate of nitrifiers and for the heterotrophic biomass yield in anoxic conditions were inadequate. To verify the relevance of the revised parameter values at full scale, a series of simulations were carried out with ASM1 using the original and updated set of parameters at 20 degrees C and 10 degrees C. The simulation results were compared with data collected at 13 full-scale nitrifying-denitrifying municipal treatment plants. This work shows that simulations using the original ASM1 default parameters tend to overpredict the nitrification rate and underpredict the denitrification rate. The updated set of parameters allows more realistic predictions over a wide range of operating conditions.

  19. Comparison of full and quasi-static seismoelectric analytically based modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yongxin; Huang, Feng; Hu, Hengshan

    2017-10-01

    Quasi-static electromagnetic (EM) approximation was frequently used in numerical modeling of the seismoelectric wavefields, but the computational error it brings is unclear. In this study, we investigate the error caused by the quasi-static EM approximation based on a horizontally layered model. With such an approximation we obtain a simplified set of Pride's equations and present an analytically based algorithm to solve the seismoelectric responses to an explosive source. First, we solve the seismic wavefields by ignoring the influence of the converted EM fields on the propagation of the seismic waves. Second, we simplify Maxwell equations to a Poisson equation of the electric potential, from which the EM signals are solved. The solved EM signals are compared with the solutions solved from the full Pride's equations to investigate the error caused by the quasi-static EM approximation. The result shows that the quasi-static EM approximation causes the loss of the electric field accompanying the S waves and yields errors in modeling the coseismic magnetic fields accompanying the S waves. The errors tend to become smaller when increasing the frequency and decreasing the salinity, implying that the quasi-static EM approximation seems to be more suitable for simulating the coseismic EM signals under high-frequency and low-salinity conditions. The quasi-static EM approximation also affects the simulation of the interfacial EM waves. Only under the condition that the wavelength of the EM wave is much larger than the source-receiver distance, the quasi-static method is valid in simulating the EM wave.

  20. Probing the Structure of Kepler ZZ Ceti Stars with Full Evolutionary Models-based Asteroseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Alejandra D.; Córsico, A. H.; Castanheira, B. G.; De Gerónimo, F. C.; Kepler, S. O.; Koester, D.; Kawka, A.; Althaus, L. G.; Hermes, J. J.; Bonato, C.; Gianninas, A.

    2017-12-01

    We present an asteroseismological analysis of four ZZ Ceti stars observed with the Kepler spacecraft: GD 1212, SDSS J113655.17+040952.6, KIC 11911480, and KIC 4552982, based on a grid of full evolutionary models of DA white dwarf (WD) stars. We employ a grid of carbon–oxygen core models, characterized by a detailed and consistent chemical inner profile for the core and the envelope. In addition to the observed periods, we take into account other information from the observational data, such as amplitudes, rotational splittings, and period spacing, as well as photometry and spectroscopy. For each star, we present an asteroseismological model that closely reproduces their observed properties. The asteroseismological stellar mass and effective temperature of the target stars are (0.632+/- 0.027 {M}ȯ , 10737 ± 73 K) for GD 1212, (0.745+/- 0.007 {M}ȯ , 11110 ± 69 K) for KIC 4552982, (0.5480+/- 0.01 {M}ȯ , 12,721 ± 228 K) for KIC11911480, and (0.570+/- 0.01 {M}ȯ , 12,060 ± 300 K) for SDSS J113655.17+040952.6. In general, the asteroseismological values are in good agreement with the spectroscopy. For KIC 11911480 and SDSS J113655.17+040952.6 we derive a similar seismological mass, but the hydrogen envelope is an order of magnitude thinner for SDSS J113655.17+040952.6, which is part of a binary system and went through a common envelope phase.

  1. Full parameter scan of the Zee model: exploring Higgs lepton flavor violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrero-García, Juan [ARC Center of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, University of Adelaide,Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Department of Physics, School of Engineering Sciences, KTH Royal Institute of Technology,AlbaNova University Center, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Ohlsson, Tommy; Riad, Stella; Wirén, Jens [Department of Physics, School of Engineering Sciences, KTH Royal Institute of Technology,AlbaNova University Center, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-04-21

    We study the general Zee model, which includes an extra Higgs scalar doublet and a new singly-charged scalar singlet. Neutrino masses are generated at one-loop level, and in order to describe leptonic mixing, both the Standard Model and the extra Higgs scalar doublets need to couple to leptons (in a type-III two-Higgs doublet model), which necessarily generates large lepton flavor violating signals, also in Higgs decays. Imposing all relevant phenomenological constraints and performing a full numerical scan of the parameter space, we find that both normal and inverted neutrino mass orderings can be fitted, although the latter is disfavored with respect to the former. In fact, inverted ordering can only be accommodated if θ{sub 23} turns out to be in the first octant. A branching ratio for h→τμ of up to 10{sup −2} is allowed, but it could be as low as 10{sup −6}. In addition, if future expected sensitivities of τ→μγ are achieved, normal ordering can be almost completely tested. Also, μe conversion is expected to probe large parts of the parameter space, excluding completely inverted ordering if no signal is observed. Furthermore, non-standard neutrino interactions are found to be smaller than 10{sup −6}, which is well below future experimental sensitivity. Finally, the results of our scan indicate that the masses of the additional scalars have to be below 2.5 TeV, and typically they are lower than that and therefore within the reach of the LHC and future colliders.

  2. Full-wave algorithm to model effects of bedding slopes on the response of subsurface electromagnetic geophysical sensors near unconformities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainath, Kamalesh; Teixeira, Fernando L.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a full-wave pseudo-analytical numerical electromagnetic (EM) algorithm to model subsurface induction sensors, traversing planar-layered geological formations of arbitrary EM material anisotropy and loss, which are used, for example, in the exploration of hydrocarbon reserves. Unlike past pseudo-analytical planar-layered modeling algorithms that impose parallelism between the formation's bed junctions, our method involves judicious employment of Transformation Optics techniques to address challenges related to modeling relative slope (i.e., tilting) between said junctions (including arbitrary azimuth orientation of each junction). The algorithm exhibits this flexibility, both with respect to loss and anisotropy in the formation layers as well as junction tilting, via employing special planar slabs that coat each ;flattened; (i.e., originally tilted) planar interface, locally redirecting the incident wave within the coating slabs to cause wave fronts to interact with the flattened interfaces as if they were still tilted with a specific, user-defined orientation. Moreover, since the coating layers are homogeneous rather than exhibiting continuous material variation, a minimal number of these layers must be inserted and hence reduces added simulation time and computational expense. As said coating layers are not reflectionless however, they do induce artificial field scattering that corrupts legitimate field signatures due to the (effective) interface tilting. Numerical results, for two half-spaces separated by a tilted interface, quantify error trends versus effective interface tilting, material properties, transmitter/receiver spacing, sensor position, coating slab thickness, and transmitter and receiver orientation, helping understand the spurious scattering's effect on reliable (effective) tilting this algorithm can model. Under the effective tilting constraints suggested by the results of said error study, we finally exhibit responses of sensors

  3. Relative efficiency of joint-model and full-conditional-specification multiple imputation when conditional models are compatible: The general location model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Shaun R; Hughes, Rachael A

    2016-09-05

    Estimating the parameters of a regression model of interest is complicated by missing data on the variables in that model. Multiple imputation is commonly used to handle these missing data. Joint model multiple imputation and full-conditional specification multiple imputation are known to yield imputed data with the same asymptotic distribution when the conditional models of full-conditional specification are compatible with that joint model. We show that this asymptotic equivalence of imputation distributions does not imply that joint model multiple imputation and full-conditional specification multiple imputation will also yield asymptotically equally efficient inference about the parameters of the model of interest, nor that they will be equally robust to misspecification of the joint model. When the conditional models used by full-conditional specification multiple imputation are linear, logistic and multinomial regressions, these are compatible with a restricted general location joint model. We show that multiple imputation using the restricted general location joint model can be substantially more asymptotically efficient than full-conditional specification multiple imputation, but this typically requires very strong associations between variables. When associations are weaker, the efficiency gain is small. Moreover, full-conditional specification multiple imputation is shown to be potentially much more robust than joint model multiple imputation using the restricted general location model to mispecification of that model when there is substantial missingness in the outcome variable. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Carbon dioxide laser ablation with immediate autografting in a full-thickness porcine burn model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatter, R D; Goldberg, J S; Schomacker, K T; Compton, C C; Flotte, T J; Bua, D P; Greaves, K W; Nishioka, N S; Sheridan, R L

    1998-08-01

    To compare the long-term clinical and histologic outcome of immediate autografting of full-thickness burn wounds ablated with a high-power continuous-wave CO2 laser to sharply débrided wounds in a porcine model. Continuous-wave CO2 lasers have performed poorly as tools for burn excision because the large amount of thermal damage to viable subeschar tissues precluded successful autografting. However, a new technique, in which a high-power laser is rapidly scanned over the eschar, results in eschar vaporization without significant damage to underlying viable tissues, allowing successful immediate autografting. Full-thickness paravertebral burn wounds measuring 36 cm2 were created on 11 farm swine. Wounds were ablated to adipose tissue 48 hours later using either a surgical blade or a 150-Watt continuous-wave CO2 laser deflected by an x-y galvanometric scanner that translated the beam over the tissue surface, removing 200 microm of tissue per scan. Both sites were immediately autografted and serially evaluated clinically and histologically for 180 days. The laser-treated sites were nearly bloodless. The mean residual thermal damage was 0.18+/-0.05 mm. The mean graft take was 96+/-11% in manual sites and 93+/-8% in laser sites. On postoperative day 7, the thickness of granulation tissue at the graft-wound bed interface was greater in laser-debrided sites. By postoperative day 180, the manual and laser sites were histologically identical. Vancouver scar assessment revealed no differences in scarring at postoperative day 180. Long-term scarring, based on Vancouver scar assessments and histologic evaluation, was equivalent at 6 months in laser-ablated and sharply excised sites. Should this technology become practical, the potential clinical implications include a reduction in surgical blood loss without sacrifice of immediate engraftment rates or long-term outcome.

  5. Fever of unknown origin: A value of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT with integrated full diagnostic isotropic CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferda, Jiri [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Charles University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Plzen (Czech Republic); Radiodiagnostic Clinic, Charles University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Plzen (Czech Republic)], E-mail: ferda@fnplzen.cz; Ferdova, Eva [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Charles University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Plzen (Czech Republic); Radiodiagnostic Clinic, Charles University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Plzen (Czech Republic); Zahlava, Jan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Charles University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Plzen (Czech Republic); Matejovic, Martin [Ist Internal Department, Charles University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Plzen (Czech Republic); Kreuzberg, Boris [Radiodiagnostic Clinic, Charles University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Plzen (Czech Republic)

    2010-03-15

    Aim: The aim of presented work is to evaluate the clinical value of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT in patients with fever of unknown origin (FUO) and to compare PET/CT finding with the results of the following investigation. Material and method: 48 patients (24 men, 24 women, mean age 57.6 years with range 15-89 years) underwent {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT due to the fever of unknown origin. All examinations were performed using complex PET/CT protocol combined PET and whole diagnostic contrast enhanced CT with sub-millimeter spatial resolution (except patient with history of iodine hypersensitivity or sever renal impairment). CT data contained diagnostic images reconstructed with soft tissue and high-resolution algorithm. PET/CT finding were compared with results of biopsies, immunology, microbiology or autopsy. Results: The cause of FUO was explained according to the PET/CT findings and followed investigations in 44 of 48 cases-18 cases of microbial infections, nine cases of autoimmune inflammations, four cases of non-infectious granulomatous diseases, eight cases of malignancies and five cases of proved immunity disorders were found. In 46 cases, the PET/CT interpretation was correct. Only in one case, the cause was overlooked and the uptake in atherosclerotic changes of arteries was misinterpreted as vasculitis in the other. The reached sensitivity was 97% (43/44), and specificity 75% (3/4) respectively. Conclusion: In patients with fever of unknown origin, {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT might enable the detection of its cause.

  6. Global sensitivity analysis in the identification of cohesive models using full-field kinematic data

    KAUST Repository

    Alfano, Marco

    2015-03-01

    Failure of adhesive bonded structures often occurs concurrent with the formation of a non-negligible fracture process zone in front of a macroscopic crack. For this reason, the analysis of damage and fracture is effectively carried out using the cohesive zone model (CZM). The crucial aspect of the CZM approach is the precise determination of the traction-separation relation. Yet it is usually determined empirically, by using calibration procedures combining experimental data, such as load-displacement or crack length data, with finite element simulation of fracture. Thanks to the recent progress in image processing, and the availability of low-cost CCD cameras, it is nowadays relatively easy to access surface displacements across the fracture process zone using for instance Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The rich information provided by correlation techniques prompted the development of versatile inverse parameter identification procedures combining finite element (FE) simulations and full field kinematic data. The focus of the present paper is to assess the effectiveness of these methods in the identification of cohesive zone models. In particular, the analysis is developed in the framework of the variance based global sensitivity analysis. The sensitivity of kinematic data to the sought cohesive properties is explored through the computation of the so-called Sobol sensitivity indexes. The results show that the global sensitivity analysis can help to ascertain the most influential cohesive parameters which need to be incorporated in the identification process. In addition, it is shown that suitable displacement sampling in time and space can lead to optimized measurements for identification purposes.

  7. Assessment of yellow fever epidemic risk: an original multi-criteria modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Briand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Yellow fever (YF virtually disappeared in francophone West African countries as a result of YF mass vaccination campaigns carried out between 1940 and 1953. However, because of the failure to continue mass vaccination campaigns, a resurgence of the deadly disease in many African countries began in the early 1980s. We developed an original modeling approach to assess YF epidemic risk (vulnerability and to prioritize the populations to be vaccinated. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We chose a two-step assessment of vulnerability at district level consisting of a quantitative and qualitative assessment per country. Quantitative assessment starts with data collection on six risk factors: five risk factors associated with "exposure" to virus/vector and one with "susceptibility" of a district to YF epidemics. The multiple correspondence analysis (MCA modeling method was specifically adapted to reduce the five exposure variables to one aggregated exposure indicator. Health districts were then projected onto a two-dimensional graph to define different levels of vulnerability. Districts are presented on risk maps for qualitative analysis in consensus groups, allowing the addition of factors, such as population migrations or vector density, that could not be included in MCA. The example of rural districts in Burkina Faso show five distinct clusters of risk profiles. Based on this assessment, 32 of 55 districts comprising over 7 million people were prioritized for preventive vaccination campaigns. CONCLUSION: This assessment of yellow fever epidemic risk at the district level includes MCA modeling and consensus group modification. MCA provides a standardized way to reduce complexity. It supports an informed public health decision-making process that empowers local stakeholders through the consensus group. This original approach can be applied to any disease with documented risk factors.

  8. Modelling the Geographical Origin of Rice Cultivation in Asia Using the Rice Archaeological Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Fabio; Stevens, Chris J.; Weisskopf, Alison; Castillo, Cristina; Qin, Ling; Bevan, Andrew; Fuller, Dorian Q.

    2015-01-01

    We have compiled an extensive database of archaeological evidence for rice across Asia, including 400 sites from mainland East Asia, Southeast Asia and South Asia. This dataset is used to compare several models for the geographical origins of rice cultivation and infer the most likely region(s) for its origins and subsequent outward diffusion. The approach is based on regression modelling wherein goodness of fit is obtained from power law quantile regressions of the archaeologically inferred age versus a least-cost distance from the putative origin(s). The Fast Marching method is used to estimate the least-cost distances based on simple geographical features. The origin region that best fits the archaeobotanical data is also compared to other hypothetical geographical origins derived from the literature, including from genetics, archaeology and historical linguistics. The model that best fits all available archaeological evidence is a dual origin model with two centres for the cultivation and dispersal of rice focused on the Middle Yangtze and the Lower Yangtze valleys. PMID:26327225

  9. Monitoring accumulation sediment characteristics in full scale sewer physical model with urban wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro-Picallo, Manuel; Naves, Juan; Anta, Jose; Suárez, Joaquín; Puertas, Jerónimo

    2017-07-01

    A series of experiments were carried out with real wastewater in a pilot flume located at A Coruña wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) (Spain). A full scale model was developed to test a circular (300 mm inner diameter) and an equivalent area egg-shaped plastic pipe under controlled experimental conditions (pipe slope 2-5‰, averaged discharge Q = 4 L/s). Velocity profiles and sediment accumulation in the pipe invert was daily measured. Within the 7-11 days, the average sediment accumulation rate found in the circular pipe was between 1.4 and 3.8 mm/d. The sediment height depended on the input wastewater sediment distribution and organic content. The egg-shaped pipe presented no sediment deposit for the same downstream boundary conditions, although biofilms were attached to the walls of both pipes. Besides, wastewater quality was monitored continuously and sediment composition was studied at the end of experiments. Two types of sediment were recorded: a granular bed deposit (ρ = 1,460 kg/m 3 , d 50 = 202 μm) and wall biofilms (ρ = 1,190 kg/m 3 , d 50 = 76 μm).

  10. Revascularization of human acellular dermis in full-thickness abdominal wall reconstruction in the rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Nathan G; Rodriguez, Eduardo D; Byrnes, Colman K; Girotto, John A; Goldberg, Nelson H; Silverman, Ronald P

    2003-05-01

    This study investigates whether human acellular dermis (Alloderm; LifeCell, Branchburg, NJ) revascularizes when used to reconstruct abdominal wall defects in rabbits. This could prove useful in infected situations in which prosthetic mesh is suboptimal. Twenty-five rabbits were randomly assigned to one of three groups: primary closure (n = 5), expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (GoreTex; W.L. Gore, Flagstaff, AZ) repair (n = 10), or AlloDerm (LifeCell) repair (n = 10). The rabbits in the primary closure group received a 7 cm x 0.5 cm full-thickness abdominal wall defect that was closed primarily. A 7 cm x 3 cm full-thickness abdominal wall defect was created in the other two groups. The defects were repaired with a GoreTex Mycromesh (W.L. Gore), or AlloDerm (LifeCell) patch. At 30 days, the following endpoints were evaluated: (1) incidence of herniation; (2) presence of intra-abdominal adhesions; (3) the breaking strength of the patch-fascial interface; and (4) evaluation of graft vascularization by fluorescein dye infusion and histological analysis. There was no incidence of herniation in any of the rabbits. Visceral adhesions to the patch were found in all animals in the Gore-Tex (W.L. Gore) group but in none in the AlloDerm (LifeCell) group. The size of the patch was unchanged in all the rabbits except for two rabbits in the AlloDerm (LifeCell) group that stretched 1 cm in the transverse dimension. The change in size was not statistically significant (p = 0.17) when compared with the change in size in the Gore-Tex (W.L. Gore) group. The mean breaking strength of the primary closure group was significantly higher (521.2 N/mm2 +/- 223.0) than that of the two patch-repair groups (p Gore-Tex (W.L. Gore) fascial interface (337.0 N/mm2 +/- 141.2). Fluorescein dye infusion and histological analysis confirmed vascularization of the AlloDerm (LifeCell) graft. This study demonstrates that AlloDerm (LifeCell) does become vascularized when used as a fascial interposition

  11. Modeling and Control of a Dual-Input Isolated Full-Bridge Boost Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhe; Thomsen, Ole Cornelius; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a steady-state model, a large-signal (LS) model and an ac small-signal (SS) model for a recently proposed dual-input transformer-isolated boost converter are derived respectively by the switching flow-graph (SFG) nonlinear modeling technique. Based upon the converter’s model, the c....... The measured experimental results match the simulation results fairly well on both input source dynamic and step load transient responses....

  12. Origin of the Earth: A proposal of new model called ABEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigenori Maruyama

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Earth was born as a dry planet without atmosphere and ocean components at 4.56 Ga, with subsequent secondary accretion of bio-elements, such as carbon (C, hydrogen (H, oxygen (O, and nitrogen (N which peaked at 4.37–4.20 Ga. This two-step formation model of the Earth we refer to as the advent of bio-elements model (ABEL Model and the event of the advent of bio-elements (water component as ABEL Bombardment. It is clear that the solid Earth originated from enstatite chondrite-like dry material based on the similarity in oxygen isotopic composition and among other isotopes. On the other hand, Earth's water derives primarily from carbonaceous chondrite material based on the hydrogen isotopic ratio. We present our ABEL model to explain this enigma between solid Earth and water, as well as secondary accretion of oxidizing bio-elements, which became a precursor to initiate metabolism to emerge life on a highly reductive planet. If ABEL Bombardment had not occurred, life never would have emerged on the Earth. Therefore, ABEL Bombardment is one of the most important events for this planet to evolve into a habitable planet. The chronology of ABEL Bombardment is informed through previous researches of the late heavy bombardment and the late veneer model. ABEL Bombardment is considered to have occurred during 4.37–4.20 Ga, which is the concept to redefine the standard late heavy bombardment and the late veneer models. Also, ABEL Bombardment is the trigger of the transition from stagnant lid tectonics to plate tectonics on this planet because of the injection of volatiles into the initial dry Earth.

  13. Literature review of the passenger airline business models : Full service carrier, low-cost carrier and charter airlines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmona Benitez, R.B.; Lodewijks, G.

    2008-01-01

    The deregulation and liberalization of the air transportation industry have developed three main passenger business models: full service carriers, low-cost carriers, and charter airlines. Deregulation removed regulated fares and routes increasing competition and yields. Airlines business models main

  14. Three-dimensional reactor model for the Paks NPP full-scope simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyori, C.; Hegyi, G.; Hozer, Z.; Kereszturi, A.; Maraczy, C.

    1993-01-01

    The reactor model includes thermohydraulic and neutron-physical components. The thermohydraulic model is based on the SMABRE code developed at the Technical Research Centre of Finland for the analysis of loss-of-coolant transients in PWRs. The fuel rod model will be replaced by a new software module providing a comprehensive description of the behavior of fuel rods during reactor transients and hypothetical accidents. The calculation is performed in four individual models: fuel rod temperature model, fuel rod internal pressure model, fuel rod deformation model and fuel rod failure model. In the neutron-physical model the core is calculated with nodes for all of the 349 fuel assemblies, and each assembly is calculated in ten layers. (Z.S.) 1 fig., 5 refs

  15. Full Semantics Preservation in Model Transformation - A Comparison of Proof Techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hülsbusch, Mathias; König, Barbara; Rensink, Arend; Semenyak, Maria; Soltenborn, Christian; Wehrheim, Heike

    Model transformation is a prime technique in modern, model-driven software design. One of the most challenging issues is to show that the semantics of the models is not affected by the transformation. So far, there is hardly any research into this issue, in particular in those cases where the source

  16. Large-scale collection and annotation of full-length enriched cDNAs from a model halophyte, Thellungiella halophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seki Motoaki

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thellungiella halophila (also known as Thellungiella salsuginea is a model halophyte with a small plant size, short life cycle, and small genome. It easily undergoes genetic transformation by the floral dipping method used with its close relative, Arabidopsis thaliana. Thellungiella genes exhibit high sequence identity (approximately 90% at the cDNA level with Arabidopsis genes. Furthermore, Thellungiella not only shows tolerance to extreme salinity stress, but also to chilling, freezing, and ozone stress, supporting the use of Thellungiella as a good genomic resource in studies of abiotic stress tolerance. Results We constructed a full-length enriched Thellungiella (Shan Dong ecotype cDNA library from various tissues and whole plants subjected to environmental stresses, including high salinity, chilling, freezing, and abscisic acid treatment. We randomly selected about 20 000 clones and sequenced them from both ends to obtain a total of 35 171 sequences. CAP3 software was used to assemble the sequences and cluster them into 9569 nonredundant cDNA groups. We named these cDNAs "RTFL" (RIKEN Thellungiella Full-Length cDNAs. Information on functional domains and Gene Ontology (GO terms for the RTFL cDNAs were obtained using InterPro. The 8289 genes assigned to InterPro IDs were classified according to the GO terms using Plant GO Slim. Categorical comparison between the whole Arabidopsis genome and Thellungiella genes showing low identity to Arabidopsis genes revealed that the population of Thellungiella transport genes is approximately 1.5 times the size of the corresponding Arabidopsis genes. This suggests that these genes regulate a unique ion transportation system in Thellungiella. Conclusion As the number of Thellungiella halophila (Thellungiella salsuginea expressed sequence tags (ESTs was 9388 in July 2008, the number of ESTs has increased to approximately four times the original value as a result of this effort. Our

  17. Enabling full-field physics-based optical proximity correction via dynamic model generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Michael; Clifford, Chris; Raghunathan, Ananthan; Fenger, Germain; Adam, Kostas

    2017-07-01

    As extreme ultraviolet lithography becomes closer to reality for high volume production, its peculiar modeling challenges related to both inter and intrafield effects have necessitated building an optical proximity correction (OPC) infrastructure that operates with field position dependency. Previous state-of-the-art approaches to modeling field dependency used piecewise constant models where static input models are assigned to specific x/y-positions within the field. OPC and simulation could assign the proper static model based on simulation-level placement. However, in the realm of 7 and 5 nm feature sizes, small discontinuities in OPC from piecewise constant model changes can cause unacceptable levels of edge placement errors. The introduction of dynamic model generation (DMG) can be shown to effectively avoid these dislocations by providing unique mask and optical models per simulation region, allowing a near continuum of models through the field. DMG allows unique models for electromagnetic field, apodization, aberrations, etc. to vary through the entire field and provides a capability to precisely and accurately model systematic field signatures.

  18. Pediatric 320-row cardiac computed tomography using electrocardiogram-gated model-based full iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirota, Go; Maeda, Eriko; Namiki, Yoko; Bari, Razibul; Abe, Osamu [The University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ino, Kenji [The University of Tokyo Hospital, Imaging Center, Tokyo (Japan); Torigoe, Rumiko [Toshiba Medical Systems, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-10-15

    Full iterative reconstruction algorithm is available, but its diagnostic quality in pediatric cardiac CT is unknown. To compare the imaging quality of two algorithms, full and hybrid iterative reconstruction, in pediatric cardiac CT. We included 49 children with congenital cardiac anomalies who underwent cardiac CT. We compared quality of images reconstructed using the two algorithms (full and hybrid iterative reconstruction) based on a 3-point scale for the delineation of the following anatomical structures: atrial septum, ventricular septum, right atrium, right ventricle, left atrium, left ventricle, main pulmonary artery, ascending aorta, aortic arch including the patent ductus arteriosus, descending aorta, right coronary artery and left main trunk. We evaluated beam-hardening artifacts from contrast-enhancement material using a 3-point scale, and we evaluated the overall image quality using a 5-point scale. We also compared image noise, signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio between the algorithms. The overall image quality was significantly higher with full iterative reconstruction than with hybrid iterative reconstruction (3.67±0.79 vs. 3.31±0.89, P=0.0072). The evaluation scores for most of the gross structures were higher with full iterative reconstruction than with hybrid iterative reconstruction. There was no significant difference between full and hybrid iterative reconstruction for the presence of beam-hardening artifacts. Image noise was significantly lower in full iterative reconstruction, while signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were significantly higher in full iterative reconstruction. The diagnostic quality was superior in images with cardiac CT reconstructed with electrocardiogram-gated full iterative reconstruction. (orig.)

  19. A Fovea Localization Scheme Using Vessel Origin-Based Parabolic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yuan Yu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available At the center of the macula, fovea plays an important role in computer-aided diagnosis. To locate the fovea, this paper proposes a vessel origin (VO-based parabolic model, which takes the VO as the vertex of the parabola-like vasculature. Image processing steps are applied to accurately locate the fovea on retinal images. Firstly, morphological gradient and the circular Hough transform are used to find the optic disc. The structure of the vessel is then segmented with the line detector. Based on the characteristics of the VO, four features of VO are extracted, following the Bayesian classification procedure. Once the VO is identified, the VO-based parabolic model will locate the fovea. To find the fittest parabola and the symmetry axis of the retinal vessel, an Shift and Rotation (SR-Hough transform that combines the Hough transform with the shift and rotation of coordinates is presented. Two public databases of retinal images, DRIVE and STARE, are used to evaluate the proposed method. The experiment results show that the average Euclidean distances between the located fovea and the fovea marked by experts in two databases are 9.8 pixels and 30.7 pixels, respectively. The results are stronger than other methods and thus provide a better macular detection for further disease discovery.

  20. Validation of Simulation Model for Full Scale Wave Simulator and Discrete Fuild Power PTO System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Hedegaard; Pedersen, Henrik C.; Hansen, Rico Hjerm

    2014-01-01

    In controller development for large scale machinery a good simulation model may serve as a time and money saving factor as well as a safety precaution. Having good models enables the developer to design and test control strategies in a safe and possibly less time consuming environment...

  1. Validation of Simulation Model for Full Scale Wave Simulator and Discrete Fuild Power PTO System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Hedegaard; Pedersen, Henrik C.; Hansen, Rico Hjerm

    2014-01-01

    In controller development for large scale machinery a good simulation model may serve as a time and money saving factor as well as a safety precaution. Having good models enables the developer to design and test control strategies in a safe and possibly less time consuming environment. For applic...

  2. Modelling Force Transfer Around Openings of Full-Scale Shear Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom Skaggs; Borjen Yeh; Frank Lam; Minghao Li; Doug Rammer; James Wacker

    2011-01-01

    Wood structural panel (WSP) sheathed shear walls and diaphragms are the primary lateralload-resisting elements in wood-frame construction. The historical performance of lightframe structures in North America has been very good due, in part, to model building codes that are designed to preserve life safety. These model building codes have spawned continual improvement...

  3. On the origin of crossover interference: A chromosome oscillatory movement (COM model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hultén Maj A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is now nearly a century since it was first discovered that crossovers between homologous parental chromosomes, originating at the Prophase stage of Meiosis I, are not randomly placed. In fact, the number and distribution of crossovers are strictly regulated with crossovers/chiasmata formed in optimal positions along the length of individual chromosomes, facilitating regular chromosome segregation at the first meiotic division. In spite of much research addressing this question, the underlying mechanism(s for the phenomenon called crossover/chiasma interference is/are still unknown; and this constitutes an outstanding biological enigma. Results The Chromosome Oscillatory Movement (COM model for crossover/chiasma interference implies that, during Prophase of Meiosis I, oscillatory movements of the telomeres (attached to the nuclear membrane and the kinetochores (within the centromeres create waves along the length of chromosome pairs (bivalents so that crossing-over and chiasma formation is facilitated by the proximity of parental homologs induced at the nodal regions of the waves thus created. This model adequately explains the salient features of crossover/chiasma interference, where (1 there is normally at least one crossover/chiasma per bivalent, (2 the number is correlated to bivalent length, (3 the positions are dependent on the number per bivalent, (4 interference distances are on average longer over the centromere than along chromosome arms, and (5 there are significant changes in carriers of structural chromosome rearrangements. Conclusions The crossover/chiasma frequency distribution in humans and mice with normal karyotypes as well as in carriers of structural chromosome rearrangements are those expected on the COM model. Further studies are underway to analyze mechanical/mathematical aspects of this model for the origin of crossover/chiasma interference, using string replicas of the homologous chromosomes at the

  4. Full spectrum of the two-photon and the two-mode quantum Rabi models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dossa, Anselme F., E-mail: anselme.dossa@imsp-uac.org, E-mail: ansdossa@gmail.com; Avossevou, Gabriel Y. H., E-mail: gabriel.avossevou@imsp-uac.org, E-mail: gavossevou@gmail.com [Unité de Recherche en Physique Théorique (URPT), Institut de Mathématiques et de Sciences Physiques (IMSP), Université d' Abomey-Calavi - UAC, 01 BP 613 Porto-Novo (Benin)

    2014-10-15

    This paper is concerned with the rigorous analytical determination of the spectrum of the two-photon and the two-mode quantum Rabi models. To reach this goal, we exploit the hidden symmetries in these models by means of the unitary and similarity transformations in addition to the Bargmann-Fock space description. In each case, the purely quantum mechanical problem of the Rabi model studied is reduced to solutions for differential equations. This eventually gives a third-order differential equation for each of these models, which is reduced to a second-order differential equation by additional transformations. The analytical expressions of the wave functions describing the energy levels are obtained in terms of the confluent hypergeometric functions.

  5. Trojan War displayed as a full annihilation-diffusion-reaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, J. C.

    2017-02-01

    The diffusive pair annihilation model with embedded topological domains and archaeological data is applied in an analysis of the hypothetical Trojan-Greek war during the late Bronze Age. Estimations of parameter are explicitly made for critical dynamics of the model. In particular, the 8-metre walls of Troy could be viewed as the effective shield that provided the technological difference between the two armies. Suggestively, the numbers in The Iliad are quite sound, being in accord with Lanchester's laws of warfare.

  6. A numerical model for calculating vibration from a railway tunnel embedded in a full-space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, M. F. M.; Hunt, H. E. M.

    2007-08-01

    Vibration generated by underground railways transmits to nearby buildings causing annoyance to inhabitants and malfunctioning to sensitive equipment. Vibration can be isolated through countermeasures by reducing the stiffness of railpads, using floating-slab tracks and/or supporting buildings on springs. Modelling of vibration from underground railways has recently gained more importance on account of the need to evaluate accurately the performance of vibration countermeasures before these are implemented. This paper develops an existing model, reported by Forrest and Hunt, for calculating vibration from underground railways. The model, known as the Pipe-in-Pipe model, has been developed in this paper to account for anti-symmetrical inputs and therefore to model tangential forces at the tunnel wall. Moreover, three different arrangements of supports are considered for floating-slab tracks, one which can be used to model directly-fixed slabs. The paper also investigates the wave-guided solution of the track, the tunnel, the surrounding soil and the coupled system. It is shown that the dynamics of the track have significant effect on the results calculated in the wavenumber-frequency domain and therefore an important role on controlling vibration from underground railways.

  7. Bayesian Approaches for Origin-Destination Modeling and Traffic Assignment Inference

    OpenAIRE

    Perrakis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is related to the topic of origin-destination (OD) analysis and to relative aspects surrounding this topic within the domain of transportation. In essence, an OD matrix summarizes the travel-demand of a given geographical area and is the basic input to the last modeling phase of any sequential traveldemand forecasting model which involves a traffic assignment procedure. The core of this dissertation is a new methodological approach to OD modeling. The approach is statistical...

  8. 75 FR 20518 - Special Conditions: Cirrus Design Corporation Model SF50 Airplane; Full Authority Digital Engine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    ... Airplane; Full Authority Digital Engine Control (FADEC) System AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... takeoff weight will be at or below 6000 lbs with a range at economy cruise of roughly 1000 nm. Cirrus... classified as catastrophic, but that the digital engine control must provide an equivalent reliability to...

  9. Endoluminal compression clip : full-thickness resection of the mesenteric bowel wall in a porcine model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopelman, Yael; Siersema, Peter D.; Nir, Yael; Szold, Amir; Bapaye, Amol; Segol, Ori; Willenz, Ehud P.; Lelcuk, Shlomo; Geller, Alexander; Kopelman, Doron

    2009-01-01

    Background: Performing a full-thickness intestinal wall resection Of a sessile polyp located on the mesenteric side with a compression clip may lead to compression of mesenteric vessels. The application of such a clip may therefore cause a compromised blood supply in the particular bowel segment,

  10. Modelling of coal combustion enhanced through plasma-fuel systems in full-scale boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.S. Askarova; Z. Jankoski; E.I. Karpenko; E.I. Lavrischeva; F.C. Lockwood; V.E. Messerle; A.B. Ustimenko [al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan). Department of Physics

    2005-07-01

    Plasma activation promotes more effective and environmental friendly low-rank coal combustion. This work presents numerical modelling results of plasma thermochemical preparation of pulverized coal for ignition and combustion in the furnace of a utility boiler. Two kinetic mathematical models were used in the investigation of the processes of air-fuel mixture plasma activation, ignition and combustion. A 1D kinetic code, PLASMA-COAL, calculates the concentrations of species, temperatures and velocities of treated coal-air mixtures in a burner incorporating a plasma source. It gives initial data for 3D-modeling of power boilers furnaces by the code FLOREAN. A comprehensive image of plasma activated coal combustion processes in a furnace of pulverised coal fired boiler was obtained. The advantages of the plasma technology are clearly demonstrated. 15 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. A full 3D time-dependent electromagnetic model for Roebel cables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Zermeno, Victor Manuel; Grilli, Francesco; Sirois, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    High temperature superconductor Roebel cables are well known for their large current capacity and low AC losses. For this reason they have become attractive candidates for many power applications. The continuous transposition of their strands reduces the coupling losses while ensuring better...... current sharing among them. However, since Roebel cables have a true 3D structure and are made of several high aspect ratio coated conductors, modelling and simulation of their electromagnetic properties is very challenging. Therefore, a realistic model taking into account the actual layout of the cable...... layout, this work represents a further step into achieving 3D simulation of superconducting devices for real applications....

  12. Modeling of containment response for Krsko NPP Full Scope Simulator verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kljenak, I.; Skerlavaj, A.

    2000-01-01

    Containment responses during the first 10000 s of Anticipated Transient Without Scram and Small Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident scenarios in the Krsko two-loop Westinghouse pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant were simulated with the CONTAIN computer code. Sources of coolant were obtained from simulations with the RELAP5 code. The simulations were carried out so that the results could be used for the verification of the Krsko Full Scope Simulator. (author)

  13. Cognitive flexibility deficits in a mouse model for the absence of full-length dystrophin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmelink, E; Aartsma-Rus, A; Smit, A B; Verhage, M; Loos, M; van Putten, M

    2016-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscle-wasting disorder, caused by mutations in the DMD gene and the resulting lack of dystrophin. The DMD gene has seven promoters, giving rise to multiple full-length and shorter isoforms. Besides the expression of dystrophin in muscles, the majority of dystrophin isoforms is expressed in brain and dystrophinopathy can lead to cognitive deficits, including intellectual impairments and deficits in executive function. In contrast to the muscle pathology, the impact of the lack of dystrophin on the brain is not very well studied. Here, we study the behavioral consequences of a lack of full-length dystrophin isoforms in mdx mice, particularly with regard to domains of executive functions and anxiety. We observed a deficit in cognitive flexibility in mdx mice in the absence of motor dysfunction or general learning impairments using two independent behavioral tests. In addition, increased anxiety was observed, but its expression depended on the context. Overall, these results suggest that the absence of full-length dystrophin in mice has specific behavioral effects that compare well to deficits observed in DMD patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  14. Principles of 5D modeling, full integration of 3D space, time and scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oosterom, P.; Stoter, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach for data modelling in five dimensions. Apart from three dimensions for geometrical representation and a fourth dimension for time, we identify scale as fifth dimensional characteristic. Considering scale as an extra dimension of geographic information, fully

  15. FISIC - a full-wave code to model ion cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruecken, T.

    1988-08-01

    We present a user manual for the FISIC code which solves the integrodifferential wave equation in the finite Larmor radius approximation in fully toroidal geometry to simulate ICRF heating experiments. The code models the electromagnetic wave field as well as antenna coupling and power deposition profiles in axisymmetric plasmas. (orig.)

  16. Determinants of Students' Outcome: A Full-Fledged Structural Equation Modelling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musah, Mohammed Borhandden; Ali, Hairuddin Bin Mohd; Al-Hudawi, Shafeeq Hussain Vazhathodi; Tahir, Lokman Mohd; Daud, Khadijah Binti; Hamdan, Abdul Rahim

    2015-01-01

    The vibrant demand for academic excellence in the twenty-first century has brought diverse determinants of students' outcome into play. However, few studies have validated the instruments and examined the mediating effect between exogenous and endogenous variables of the student outcome model. This study, therefore, investigates the psychometric…

  17. Full activated sludge model no. 1 calibration experience at a medium-size WWTP in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, C; Loaiza-Navia, J; Esparza-Soto, M

    2009-01-01

    As part of the efforts done to introduce the practice of modeling in Latin America, this research carried out at the North-East WWTP of Monterrey represents the first comprehensive modeling case in Mexico. The main objective was to reproduce the organic carbon removal and sludge production rates of the plant, based on ASM1. Different intermediate studies were performed prior to the calibration of the model: influent characterization, tracer tests and hydraulics modeling, sludge settling tests and respirometry. Two fractionation methods (STOWA protocol and Influent-advisor) were compared, showing no equivalent patterns. A stepwise sequence of calibration was developed and successfully applied. The hydraulics of the reactors at the plant was reproduced by use of a series of 3 to 5 CSTRs. The waste and return activated sludge flowrates (Q(WAS) and Q(RAS)) were corrected based on the inorganic and total suspended solids mass balances. The Vesilind settling constants were measured (V(o) and r(hind)), while the flocculent zone settling parameter (r(floc)) was adjusted to calibrate the secondary clarifier. In ASM1, the adjusted parameters were the COD soluble inert fraction (frS(I)) and the particulate substrate fraction (FrX(S)). All other ASM1 parameters were kept at their default values. The steady-state calibrated model (in GPS-X) adequately described the quality of the effluent (carbon and nitrogen) as well as the sludge composition (M. Liquor and WAS). This case study provides voluntarily detailed data to allow its wide use for training and teaching purposes.

  18. WEIBULL MULTIPLICATIVE MODEL AND MACHINE LEARNING MODELS FOR FULL-AUTOMATIC DARK-SPOT DETECTION FROM SAR IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Taravat

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As a major aspect of marine pollution, oil release into the sea has serious biological and environmental impacts. Among remote sensing systems (which is a tool that offers a non-destructive investigation method, synthetic aperture radar (SAR can provide valuable synoptic information about the position and size of the oil spill due to its wide area coverage and day/night, and all-weather capabilities. In this paper we present a new automated method for oil-spill monitoring. A new approach is based on the combination of Weibull Multiplicative Model and machine learning techniques to differentiate between dark spots and the background. First, the filter created based on Weibull Multiplicative Model is applied to each sub-image. Second, the sub-image is segmented by two different neural networks techniques (Pulsed Coupled Neural Networks and Multilayer Perceptron Neural Networks. As the last step, a very simple filtering process is used to eliminate the false targets. The proposed approaches were tested on 20 ENVISAT and ERS2 images which contained dark spots. The same parameters were used in all tests. For the overall dataset, the average accuracies of 94.05 % and 95.20 % were obtained for PCNN and MLP methods, respectively. The average computational time for dark-spot detection with a 256 × 256 image in about 4 s for PCNN segmentation using IDL software which is the fastest one in this field at present. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach is very fast, robust and effective. The proposed approach can be applied to the future spaceborne SAR images.

  19. Modelling and Testing of Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter Towards Full Scale Deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmeggiani, Stefano

    carried out aimed at quantifying design loads in the mooring system of the WD-DanWEC unit, as well as identifying viable force-reduction strategies which would allow significant savings in design cost (estimated up to 65%). According to these results, the most cost-effective real mooring solutions....... This is mainly due to the development of an updated overtopping model specifically suited to Wave Dragon, which allows greater quality to predictions of the primary energy absorption of the device compared to previous versions. At the same time an equitable approach has been described and used in the performance...... will need to be identified by means of time-domain analyses. To do so, a numerical model has been calibrated for the application with the results from the complete hydrodynamic characterization of Wave Dragon, which has been carried out based on experimental data and numerical analysis. Overall...

  20. A multi-channel objective model for the Full-Reference assessment of color pictures

    OpenAIRE

    De Simone, Francesca; Ansorge, Michael; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach for the design of a full reference objective quality metric for the assessment of color pictures. Our goal is to build a multi-channel metric based on the perceptual weighting of single-channel metrics. A psycho-visual experiment is thus designed in order to determine the values of the weighting factors. This metric is expected to provide a new useful tool for the quality assessment of compressed pictures in the framework of codec performance evaluation.

  1. Integrated modeling and robust control for full-envelope flight of robotic helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Civita, Marco

    Robotic helicopters have attracted a great deal of interest from the university, the industry, and the military world. They are versatile machines and there is a large number of important missions that they could accomplish. Nonetheless, there are only a handful of documented examples of robotic-helicopter applications in real-world scenarios. This situation is mainly due to the poor flight performance that can be achieved and---more important---guaranteed under automatic control. Given the maturity of control theory, and given the large body of knowledge in helicopter dynamics, it seems that the lack of success in flying high-performance controllers for robotic helicopters, especially by academic groups and by small industries, has nothing to do with helicopters or control theory as such. The problem lies instead in the large amount of time and resources needed to synthesize, test, and implement new control systems with the approach normally followed in the aeronautical industry. This thesis attempts to provide a solution by presenting a modeling and control framework that minimizes the time, cost, and both human and physical resources necessary to design high-performance flight controllers. The work is divided in two main parts. The first consists of the development of a modeling technique that allows the designer to obtain a high-fidelity model adequate for both real-time simulation and controller design, with few flight, ground, and wind-tunnel tests and a modest level of complexity in the dynamic equations. The second consists of the exploitation of the predictive capabilities of the model and of the robust stability and performance guarantees of the Hinfinity loop-shaping control theory to reduce the number of iterations of the design/simulated-evaluation/flight-test-evaluation procedure. The effectiveness of this strategy is demonstrated by designing and flight testing a wide-envelope high-performance controller for the Carnegie Mellon University robotic

  2. Knowledge-based instantiation of full atomic detail into coarse-grain RNA 3D structural models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonikas, Magdalena A; Radmer, Randall J; Altman, Russ B

    2009-12-15

    The recent development of methods for modeling RNA 3D structures using coarse-grain approaches creates a need to bridge low- and high-resolution modeling methods. Although they contain topological information, coarse-grain models lack atomic detail, which limits their utility for some applications. We have developed a method for adding full atomic detail to coarse-grain models of RNA 3D structures. Our method [Coarse to Atomic (C2A)] uses geometries observed in known RNA crystal structures. Our method rebuilds full atomic detail from ideal coarse-grain backbones taken from crystal structures to within 1.87-3.31 A RMSD of the full atomic crystal structure. When starting from coarse-grain models generated by the modeling tool NAST, our method builds full atomic structures that are within 1.00 A RMSD of the starting structure. The resulting full atomic structures can be used as starting points for higher resolution modeling, thus bridging high- and low-resolution approaches to modeling RNA 3D structure. Code for the C2A method, as well as the examples discussed in this article, are freely available at www.simtk.org/home/c2a. russ.altman@stanford.edu

  3. The full Keller-Segel model is well-posed on nonsmooth domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, D.; Meinlschmidt, H.; Rehberg, J.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we prove that the full Keller-Segel system, a quasilinear strongly coupled reaction-crossdiffusion system of four parabolic equations, is well-posed in the sense that it always admits an unique local-in-time solution in an adequate function space, provided that the initial values are suitably regular. The proof is done via an abstract solution theorem for nonlocal quasilinear equations by Amann and is carried out for general source terms. It is fundamentally based on recent nontrivial elliptic and parabolic regularity results which hold true even on rather general nonsmooth spatial domains. For space dimensions 2 and 3, this enables us to work in a nonsmooth setting which is not available in classical parabolic systems theory. Apparently, there exists no comparable existence result for the full Keller-Segel system up to now. Due to the large class of possibly nonsmooth domains admitted, we also obtain new results for the ‘standard’ Keller-Segel system consisting of only two equations as a special case. This work is dedicated to Prof Willi Jäger.

  4. Characterization of a viscoelastic heterogeneous object with an effective model by nonlinear full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesgouez, A.

    2018-05-01

    The determination of equivalent viscoelastic properties of heterogeneous objects remains challenging in various scientific fields such as (geo)mechanics, geophysics or biomechanics. The present investigation addresses the issue of the identification of effective constitutive properties of a binary object by using a nonlinear and full waveform inversion scheme. The inversion process, without any regularization technique or a priori information, aims at minimizing directly the discrepancy between the full waveform responses of a bi-material viscoelastic cylindrical object and its corresponding effective homogeneous object. It involves the retrieval of five constitutive equivalent parameters. Numerical simulations are performed in a laboratory-scale two-dimensional configuration: a transient acoustic plane wave impacts the object and the diffracted fluid pressure, solid stress or velocity component fields are determined using a semi-analytical approach. Results show that the retrieval of the density and of the real parts of both the compressional and the shear wave velocities have been carried out successfully regarding the number and location of sensors, the type of sensors, the size of the searching space, the frequency range of the incident plane pressure wave, and the change in the geometric or mechanical constitution of the bi-material object. The retrieval of the imaginary parts of the wave velocities can reveal in some cases the limitations of the proposed approach.

  5. High frequency magnetic field technique: mathematical modelling and development of a full scale water fraction meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cimpan, Emil

    2004-09-15

    This work is concerned with the development of a new on-line measuring technique to be used in measurements of the water concentration in a two component oil/water or three component (i.e. multiphase) oil/water/gas flow. The technique is based on using non-intrusive coil detectors and experiments were performed both statically (medium at rest) and dynamically (medium flowing through a flow rig). The various coil detectors were constructed with either one or two coils and specially designed electronics were used. The medium was composed by air, machine oil, and water having different conductivity values, i.e. seawater and salt water with various conductivities (salt concentrations) such as 1 S/m, 4.9 S/m and 9.3 S/m. The experimental measurements done with the different mixtures were further used to mathematically model the physical principle used in the technique. This new technique is based on measuring the coil impedance and signal frequency at the self-resonance frequency of the coil to determine the water concentration in the mix. By using numerous coils it was found, experimentally, that generally both the coil impedance and the self-resonance frequency of the coil decreased as the medium conductivity increased. Both the impedance and the self-resonance frequency of the coil depended on the medium loss due to the induced eddy currents within the conductive media in the mixture, i.e. water. In order to detect relatively low values of the medium loss, the self-resonance frequency of the coil and also of the magnetic field penetrating the media should be relatively high (within the MHz range and higher). Therefore, the technique was called and referred to throughout the entire work as the high frequency magnetic field technique (HFMFT). To practically use the HFMFT, it was necessary to circumscribe an analytical frame to this technique. This was done by working out a mathematical model that relates the impedance and the self-resonance frequency of the coil to the

  6. Wind-induced response of CN-Tower: comparison of model and full scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monbaliu, J.; Ruigrok, C.; Isyumov, N.

    1985-01-01

    The approximately 555-m high CN Communications Tower in Toronto has now been operational for nearly a decade. The action of wind on this tower was extensively tested at the Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel Laboratory during the design of the tower. This study provided information on the overall wind loads and responses of the structure, the action of wind on various components, and its effects on the tower performance including transmission quality. A program of monitoring and recording the wind induced response and various meteorological data was started in 1977. This paper presents some results of that program and makes comparisons with wind tunnel model data. (author)

  7. Mass Limit for the standard model Higgs boson with the full LEP I ALEPH data sample

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Büscher, V; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    background from the electroweak process e+e- --> l+ l- q qbar. This search results in a 95% C.L. lower limit on the Higgs boson mass of $63.9$~\\Gcs. The reaction e+e- --> HZ* is used to search for the standard model Higgs boson in the H nu nubar and the H l+ l- channels. The data sample corresponds to about 4.5 million hadronic Z decays collected by the ALEPH experiment at LEP from 1989 to 1995 at centre-of-mass energies at and around the Z peak. Three candidate events are found in the H mu+ mu- channel, in agreement with the expected

  8. Testing a Model of Resistance to Peer Pressure among Mexican-Origin Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamaca, Mayra Y.; Umana-Taylor, Adriana J.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the factors associated with resistance to peer pressure toward antisocial behaviors among a sample of Mexican-origin adolescents (n=564) living in a large Southwestern city in the U.S. A model examining the influence of generational status, emotional autonomy from parents, and self-esteem on resistance to peer pressure was…

  9. A modelling approach to determine the origin of urban ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowsdale, Sam A.; Lerner, David N.

    2007-04-01

    A simple modelling approach was developed to link patterns of urban land-use with ground water flow and chemistry in three dimensions and was applied to characterize the origin of recharge in the aquifer beneath the old industrial city of Nottingham, UK. The approach involved dividing land uses into types, and times into periods, and assigning the recharge from each an individual tracer-solute with a unit concentration. The computer code MT3DMS was used to track the multiple tracer-solutes in transient, three-dimensional simulations of the important urban aquifer. A depth-specific hydrochemical dataset collected in parallel supported the model predictions. At depth under the industrial area studied, a large component of ground water originated of older agricultural origin, with relatively low nitrate concentrations. Shallower ground water originated mainly from residential and industrial areas, with higher nitrate concentrations probably arising from leaking sewers and contaminated land. The results highlighted the spectrum of ground water from different origins that amalgamate even at short well screens in a non-pumped borehole and remind us that the non-point-source pollution of ground water from anthropogenic activities will involve more years of slow degradation of quality.

  10. Mass limit for the standard model Higgs boson with the full LEP I ALEPH data sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bonvicini, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Giehl, I.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Choi, Y.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Büscher, V.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Lan Wu, Sau; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    The reaction e +e - → HZ ∗ is used to search for the standard model Higgs boson in the Hν overlineν and the Hℓ +ℓ - channels. The data sample corresponds to about 4.5 million hadronic Z decays collected by the ALEPH experiment at LEP from 1989 to 1995 at centre-of-mass energies at and around the Z peak. Three candidate events are found in the H μ+μ- channel, in agreement with the expected background from the electroweak process e +e -ℓ +ℓ -q overlineq. This search results in a 95% C.L. lower limit on the Higgs boson mass of 63.9 GeV/ c2.

  11. An origin of the universe: a model alternative to Big Bang

    OpenAIRE

    Mercik, Andrzej; Mercik, Szymon

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new approach to the model of an origin of the universe built by Oscar Klein and Hannes Alfv\\'{e}n. Some modifications of assumptions underlying the model result in a possible scenario of the universe creation consistent with observations. We explain the large scale structre of the universe and we estimate the Hubble constant value as well as the number of galaxies in the universe. The model does not require many assumptions made in the model based on the Big Bang idea.

  12. Modeling Cellular Networks with Full Duplex D2D Communication: A Stochastic Geometry Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Konpal S.

    2016-08-24

    Full-duplex (FD) communication is optimistically promoted to double the spectral efficiency if sufficient self-interference cancellation (SIC) is achieved. However, this is not true when deploying FD-communication in a large-scale setup due to the induced mutual interference. Therefore, a large-scale study is necessary to draw legitimate conclusions about gains associated with FD-communication. This paper studies the FD operation for underlay device-to-device (D2D) communication sharing the uplink resources in cellular networks. We propose a disjoint fine-tuned selection criterion for the D2D and FD modes of operation. Then, we develop a tractable analytical paradigm, based on stochastic geometry, to calculate the outage probability and rate for cellular and D2D users. The results reveal that even in the case of perfect SIC, due to the increased interference injected to the network by FD-D2D communication, having all proximity UEs transmit in FD-D2D is not beneficial for the network. However, if the system parameters are carefully tuned, non-trivial network spectral-efficiency gains (64% shown) can be harvested. We also investigate the effects of imperfect SIC and D2D-link distance distribution on the harvested FD gains.

  13. Pulsating electromagnetic fields (PEMF) used to treat full thickness defects in the rabbit model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andino, R.V.; Feldman, D. (Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham (United States))

    1991-03-15

    Skin ulcers have historically been treated by passive therapy. One active treatment, PEMF, has shown promise. The objective of this study was, therefore, to examine the effects of a current induced by a PEMF on full thickness defects in white New Zealand rabbits. It was hypothesized that the induced current would increase neutrophil, macrophage, and fibroblast proliferation during the wound healing process. This in turn, would lead to an increase in collagen deposition in the wound and thus increase the healing rate. A device which produces a 2.8 mTesla magnetic field at a frequency of 75 Hz was donated by the EBI Corp. and modified so that a rabbit could be fit between its two induction coils. Two rabbits with four 3 x 3 cm wounds each were stimulated for 3.5 hours/day for 1 week and two rabbits with identical wounds were stimulated for the same time period daily but for 2 weeks. These wounds were compared to unstimulated controls. Preliminary results indicate that the healing rate in the PEMF animals increased by about 25-30% and the number of neutrophils is greater in the one week stimulated group. In the two week stimulated group, the collagen deposition is greater, denser and in alignment.

  14. Parametric soil water retention models: a critical evaluation of expressions for the full moisture range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Madi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Few parametric expressions for the soil water retention curve are suitable for dry conditions. Furthermore, expressions for the soil hydraulic conductivity curves associated with parametric retention functions can behave unrealistically near saturation. We developed a general criterion for water retention parameterizations that ensures physically plausible conductivity curves. Only 3 of the 18 tested parameterizations met this criterion without restrictions on the parameters of a popular conductivity curve parameterization. A fourth required one parameter to be fixed. We estimated parameters by shuffled complex evolution (SCE with the objective function tailored to various observation methods used to obtain retention curve data. We fitted the four parameterizations with physically plausible conductivities as well as the most widely used parameterization. The performance of the resulting 12 combinations of retention and conductivity curves was assessed in a numerical study with 751 days of semiarid atmospheric forcing applied to unvegetated, uniform, 1 m freely draining columns for four textures. Choosing different parameterizations had a minor effect on evaporation, but cumulative bottom fluxes varied by up to an order of magnitude between them. This highlights the need for a careful selection of the soil hydraulic parameterization that ideally does not only rely on goodness of fit to static soil water retention data but also on hydraulic conductivity measurements. Parameter fits for 21 soils showed that extrapolations into the dry range of the retention curve often became physically more realistic when the parameterization had a logarithmic dry branch, particularly in fine-textured soils where high residual water contents would otherwise be fitted.

  15. Analysis, scale modeling, and full-scale tests of low-level nuclear-waste-drum response to accident environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerta, M.; Lamoreaux, G.H.; Romesberg, L.E.; Yoshimura, H.R.; Joseph, B.J.; May, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes extensive full-scale and scale-model testing of 55-gallon drums used for shipping low-level radioactive waste materials. The tests conducted include static crush, single-can impact tests, and side impact tests of eight stacked drums. Static crush forces were measured and crush energies calculated. The tests were performed in full-, quarter-, and eighth-scale with different types of waste materials. The full-scale drums were modeled with standard food product cans. The response of the containers is reported in terms of drum deformations and lid behavior. The results of the scale model tests are correlated to the results of the full-scale drums. Two computer techniques for calculating the response of drum stacks are presented. 83 figures, 9 tables.

  16. Analysis, scale modeling, and full-scale tests of low-level nuclear-waste-drum response to accident environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, M.; Lamoreaux, G. H.; Romesberg, L. E.; Yoshimura, H. R.; Joseph, B. J.; May, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Extensive full scale and scale model testing of 55 gallon drums used for shipping low level radioactive waste materials are described. The tests conducted include static crush, single can impact tests, and side impact tests of eight stacked drums. Static crush forces were measured and crush energies calculated. The tests were performed in full, quarter, and eight scale with different types of waste materials. The full scale drums were modeled with standard food product cans. The response of the containers is reported in terms of drum deformations and lid behavior. The results of the scale model tests are correlated to the results of the full scale drums. Two computer techniques for calculating the response of drum stacks are presented.

  17. Model-based control structure design of a full-scale WWTP under the retrofitting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, V C; Lafuente, J; Baeza, J A

    2015-01-01

    The anoxic-oxic (A/O) municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) of Manresa (Catalonia, Spain) was studied for a possible conversion to an anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A2/O) configuration to promote enhanced biological phosphorus removal. The control structure had to be redesigned to satisfy the new necessity to control phosphorus concentration, besides ammonium and nitrate concentrations (main pollutant concentrations). Thereby, decentralized control structures with proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers and centralized control structures with model-predictive controllers (MPC) were designed and tested. All the designed control structures had their performance systematically tested regarding effluent quality and operating costs. The centralized control structure, A2/O-3-MPC, achieved the lowest operating costs with the best effluent quality using the A2/O plant configuration for the Manresa WWTP. The controlled variables used in this control structure were ammonium in the effluent, nitrate at the end of the anoxic zone and phosphate at the end of the anaerobic zone, while the manipulated variables were the internal and external recycle flow rates and the dissolved oxygen setpoint in the aerobic reactors.

  18. Modeling and characterization of VCSEL-based avionics full-duplex ethernet (AFDX) gigabit links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Khadijetou S.; Rissons, A.; Gambardella, E.; Bajon, D.; Mollier, J.-C.

    2008-02-01

    Low cost and intrinsic performances of 850 nm Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) compared to Light Emitting Diodes make them very attractive for high speed and short distances data communication links through optical fibers. Weight saving and Electromagnetic Interference withstanding requirements have led to the need of a reliable solution to improve existing avionics high speed buses (e.g. AFDX) up to 1Gbps over 100m. To predict and optimize the performance of the link, the physical behavior of the VCSEL must be well understood. First, a theoretical study is performed through the rate equations adapted to VCSEL in large signal modulation. Averaged turn-on delays and oscillation effects are analytically computed and analyzed for different values of the on- and off state currents. This will affect the eye pattern, timing jitter and Bit Error Rate (BER) of the signal that must remain within IEEE 802.3 standard limits. In particular, the off-state current is minimized below the threshold to allow the highest possible Extinction Ratio. At this level, the spontaneous emission is dominating and leads to significant turn-on delay, turn-on jitter and bit pattern effects. Also, the transverse multimode behavior of VCSELs, caused by Spatial Hole Burning leads to some dispersion in the fiber and degradation of BER. VCSEL to Multimode Fiber coupling model is provided for prediction and optimization of modal dispersion. Lastly, turn-on delay measurements are performed on a real mock-up and results are compared with calculations.

  19. Brief communication: human cranial variation fits iterative founder effect model with African origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Cramon-Taubadel, Noreen; Lycett, Stephen J

    2008-05-01

    Recent studies comparing craniometric and neutral genetic affinity matrices have concluded that, on average, human cranial variation fits a model of neutral expectation. While human craniometric and genetic data fit a model of isolation by geographic distance, it is not yet clear whether this is due to geographically mediated gene flow or human dispersal events. Recently, human genetic data have been shown to fit an iterative founder effect model of dispersal with an African origin, in line with the out-of-Africa replacement model for modern human origins, and Manica et al. (Nature 448 (2007) 346-349) have demonstrated that human craniometric data also fit this model. However, in contrast with the neutral model of cranial evolution suggested by previous studies, Manica et al. (2007) made the a priori assumption that cranial form has been subject to climatically driven natural selection and therefore correct for climate prior to conducting their analyses. Here we employ a modified theoretical and methodological approach to test whether human cranial variability fits the iterative founder effect model. In contrast with Manica et al. (2007) we employ size-adjusted craniometric variables, since climatic factors such as temperature have been shown to correlate with aspects of cranial size. Despite these differences, we obtain similar results to those of Manica et al. (2007), with up to 26% of global within-population craniometric variation being explained by geographic distance from sub-Saharan Africa. Comparative analyses using non-African origins do not yield significant results. The implications of these results are discussed in the light of the modern human origins debate. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Full experimental modelling of a liver tissue mimicking phantom for medical ultrasound studies employing different hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciaro, Sergio; Conversano, Francesco; Musio, Stefano; Casciaro, Ernesto; Demitri, Christian; Sannino, Alessandro

    2009-04-01

    Tissue mimicking phantoms have been widely reported to be an important tool for development, optimisation and performance testing of ultrasound-based diagnostic techniques. In particular, modern applications of tissue mimicking phantoms often include characterisation of the nonlinear behaviour of experimental ultrasound contrast agents. In such cases, the tissue-mimicking materials should be chosen not only based on the values of their density, speed of sound and attenuation coefficient, but also considering their effect on the appearance of "native harmonics" due to nonlinear distortion of ultrasound signal during propagation. In a previous paper it was demonstrated that a cellulose-based hydrogel is suitable to simulate nonlinear acoustical behaviour of liver tissue for thicknesses up to 8 cm. In this paper we present the experimental characterisation of the nonlinear acoustical behaviour of a different polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA)-based hydrogel, in order to assess whether and how it can improve the performances and overcome some limitations of the cellulose-based hydrogel as liver tissue-mimicking material. Samples of pig liver tissue, cellulose-based hydrogel and PEGDA-based hydrogel were insonified in a through-transmission set-up, employing 2.25-MHz pulses with different mechanical index (MI) values. Second harmonic and first harmonic amplitudes were extracted from the spectra of received signals and their difference was then used to compare sample behaviours. Obtained results show how a new more accurate and combined experimental model of linear and nonlinear acoustical behaviour of liver tissue is feasible. In fact, a further confirmation of the cellulose-based hydrogel effectiveness to precisely simulate the liver tissue for penetration depths up to 8 cm was provided, and it was also shown that the employment of the PEGDA-based hydrogel can extend the range of useful tissue-mimicking material thicknesses up to 11 cm, moreover allowing a

  1. The Development of High-speed Full-function Storm Surge Model and the Case Study of 2013 Typhoon Haiyan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Y. L.; Wu, T. R.; Lin, C. Y.; Chuang, M. H.; Lin, C. W.

    2016-02-01

    An ideal storm surge operational model should feature as: 1. Large computational domain which covers the complete typhoon life cycle. 2. Supporting both parametric and atmospheric models. 3. Capable of calculating inundation area for risk assessment. 4. Tides are included for accurate inundation simulation. Literature review shows that not many operational models reach the goals for the fast calculation, and most of the models have limited functions. In this paper, a well-developed COMCOT (COrnell Multi-grid Coupled of Tsunami Model) tsunami model is chosen as the kernel to establish a storm surge model which solves the nonlinear shallow water equations on both spherical and Cartesian coordinates directly. The complete evolution of storm surge including large-scale propagation and small-scale offshore run-up can be simulated by nested-grid scheme. The global tide model TPXO 7.2 established by Oregon State University is coupled to provide astronomical boundary conditions. The atmospheric model named WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting Model) is also coupled to provide metrological fields. The high-efficiency thin-film method is adopted to evaluate the storm surge inundation. Our in-house model has been optimized by OpenMp (Open Multi-Processing) with the performance which is 10 times faster than the original version and makes it an early-warning storm surge model. In this study, the thorough simulation of 2013 Typhoon Haiyan is performed. The detailed results will be presented in Oceanic Science Meeting of 2016 in terms of surge propagation and high-resolution inundation areas.

  2. The “sanctity” of marriage – an archaeology of a socio-religious construct: Mythological origins, forms and models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Dreyer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to argue that the sexual difference between female and male should be regarded as soteriologically indifferent. Though a biological reality of being human, sexuality is profoundly influenced by social constructs and the institution of marriage itself is a social construct. In this article the biological and social aspects are taken into account in a theological approach which on the one hand is interested in the relationship between God and human beings, and on the other in the way in which the Bible elucidates sexuality and marriage. The article indicates that the idea of sexual intercourse between a man and a woman as being equal to Godgiven “holy matrimony” has mythological origins. It focuses on these origins and on the multifarious forms of marital arrangements and models.

  3. Numerical investigation of full scale coal combustion model of tangentially fired boiler with the effect of mill ducting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achim, Daniela; Naser, J.; Morsi, Y. S.; Pascoe, S.

    2009-11-01

    In this paper a full scale combustion model incorporating upstream mill ducting of a large tangentially fired boiler with flue gas recirculation was examined numerically. Lagrangian particle tracking was used to determine the coal particle paths and the Eddy Dissipation Model for the analysis of the gas phase combustion. Moreover volatiles and gaseous char products, given off by the coal particles were modelled by Arrhenius single phase reactions and a transport equation was solved for each material given off by the particles. Thermal, prompt, fuel and reburn NO x models with presumed probability density functions were used to model NO x production and the discrete transfer radiation model was used to model radiation heat transfer. Generally, the findings indicated reasonable agreement with observed qualitative and quantitative data of incident heat flux on the walls. The model developed here could be used for a range of applications in furnace design and optimisation of gas emissions of coal fired boiler plants.

  4. Original analytic solution of a half-bridge modelled as a statically indeterminate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oanta, Emil M.; Panait, Cornel; Raicu, Alexandra; Barhalescu, Mihaela

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents an original computer based analytical model of a half-bridge belonging to a circular settling tank. The primary unknown is computed using the force method, the coefficients of the canonical equation being calculated using either the discretization of the bending moment diagram in trapezoids, or using the relations specific to the polygons. A second algorithm based on the method of initial parameters is also presented. Analyzing the new solution we came to the conclusion that most of the computer code developed for other model may be reused. The results are useful to evaluate the behavior of the structure and to compare with the results of the finite element models.

  5. Virulence Studies of Different Sequence Types and Geographical Origins of Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 in a Mouse Model of Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Auger

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Multilocus sequence typing previously identified three predominant sequence types (STs of Streptococcus suis serotype 2: ST1 strains predominate in Eurasia while North American (NA strains are generally ST25 and ST28. However, ST25/ST28 and ST1 strains have also been isolated in Asia and NA, respectively. Using a well-standardized mouse model of infection, the virulence of strains belonging to different STs and different geographical origins was evaluated. Results demonstrated that although a certain tendency may be observed, S. suis serotype 2 virulence is difficult to predict based on ST and geographical origin alone; strains belonging to the same ST presented important differences of virulence and did not always correlate with origin. The only exception appears to be NA ST28 strains, which were generally less virulent in both systemic and central nervous system (CNS infection models. Persistent and high levels of bacteremia accompanied by elevated CNS inflammation are required to cause meningitis. Although widely used, in vitro tests such as phagocytosis and killing assays require further standardization in order to be used as predictive tests for evaluating virulence of strains. The use of strains other than archetypal strains has increased our knowledge and understanding of the S. suis serotype 2 population dynamics.

  6. Implementation and Evaluation of the Virtual Fields Method: Determining Constitutive Model Parameters From Full-Field Deformation Data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Sharlotte Lorraine Bolyard; Scherzinger, William M.

    2014-09-01

    The Virtual Fields Method (VFM) is an inverse method for constitutive model parameter identication that relies on full-eld experimental measurements of displacements. VFM is an alternative to standard approaches that require several experiments of simple geometries to calibrate a constitutive model. VFM is one of several techniques that use full-eld exper- imental data, including Finite Element Method Updating (FEMU) techniques, but VFM is computationally fast, not requiring iterative FEM analyses. This report describes the im- plementation and evaluation of VFM primarily for nite-deformation plasticity constitutive models. VFM was successfully implemented in MATLAB and evaluated using simulated FEM data that included representative experimental noise found in the Digital Image Cor- relation (DIC) optical technique that provides full-eld displacement measurements. VFM was able to identify constitutive model parameters for the BCJ plasticity model even in the presence of simulated DIC noise, demonstrating VFM as a viable alternative inverse method. Further research is required before VFM can be adopted as a standard method for constitu- tive model parameter identication, but this study is a foundation for ongoing research at Sandia for improving constitutive model calibration.

  7. A NetCDF version of the two-dimensional energy balance model based on the full multigrid algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelin Zhuang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A NetCDF version of the two-dimensional energy balance model based on the full multigrid method in Fortran is introduced for both pedagogical and research purposes. Based on the land–sea–ice distribution, orbital elements, greenhouse gases concentration, and albedo, the code calculates the global seasonal surface temperature. A step-by-step guide with examples is provided for practice.

  8. Gaussian Mixture Model with Variable Components for Full Waveform LiDAR Data Decomposition and RJMCMC Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Quanhua

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Full waveform LiDAR data record the signal of the backscattered laser pulse. The elevation and the energy information of ground targets can be effectively obtained by decomposition of the full waveform LiDAR data. Therefore, waveform decomposition is the key to full waveform LiDAR data processing. However, in waveform decomposition, determining the number of the components is a focus and difficult problem. To this end, this paper presents a method which can automatically determine the number. First of all, a given full waveform LiDAR data is modeled on the assumption that energy recorded at elevation points satisfy Gaussian mixture distribution. The constraint function is defined to steer the model fitting the waveform. Correspondingly, a probability distribution based on the function is constructed by Gibbs. The Bayesian paradigm is followed to build waveform decomposition model. Then a RJMCMC (reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo scheme is used to simulate the decomposition model, which determines the number of the components and decomposes the waveform into a group of Gaussian distributions. In the RJMCMC algorithm, the move types are designed, including updating parameter vector, splitting or merging Gaussian components, birth or death Gaussian component. The results obtained from the ICESat-GLAS waveform data of different areas show that the proposed algorithm is efficient and promising.

  9. Computational study on full-wave inversion based on the elastic wave-equation; Dansei hado hoteishiki full wave inversion no model keisan ni yoru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uesaka, S. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Watanabe, T.; Sassa, K. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    Algorithm is constructed and a program developed for a full-wave inversion (FWI) method utilizing the elastic wave equation in seismic exploration. The FWI method is a method for obtaining a physical property distribution using the whole observed waveforms as the data. It is capable of high resolution which is several times smaller than the wavelength since it can handle such phenomena as wave reflection and dispersion. The method for determining the P-wave velocity structure by use of the acoustic wave equation does not provide information about the S-wave velocity since it does not consider S-waves or converted waves. In an analysis using the elastic wave equation, on the other hand, not only P-wave data but also S-wave data can be utilized. In this report, under such circumstances, an inverse analysis algorithm is constructed on the basis of the elastic wave equation, and a basic program is developed. On the basis of the methods of Mora and of Luo and Schuster, the correction factors for P-wave and S-wave velocities are formulated directly from the elastic wave equation. Computations are performed and the effects of the hypocenter frequency and vibration transmission direction are examined. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Radar Echo Scattering Modeling and Image Simulations of Full-scale Convex Rough Targets at Terahertz Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Jingkun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Echo simulation is a precondition for developing radar imaging systems, algorithms, and subsequent applications. Electromagnetic scattering modeling of the target is key to echo simulation. At terahertz (THz frequencies, targets are usually of ultra-large electrical size that makes applying classical electromagnetic calculation methods unpractical. In contrast, the short wavelength makes the surface roughness of targets a factor that cannot be ignored, and this makes the traditional echo simulation methods based on point scattering hypothesis in applicable. Modeling the scattering characteristics of targets and efficiently generating its radar echoes in THz bands has become a problem that must be solved. In this paper, a hierarchical semi-deterministic modeling method is proposed. A full-wave algorithm of rough surfaces is used to calculate the scattered field of facets. Then, the scattered fields of all facets are transformed into the target coordinate system and coherently summed. Finally, the radar echo containing phase information can be obtained. Using small-scale rough models, our method is compared with the standard high-frequency numerical method, which verifies the effectiveness of the proposed method. Imaging results of a full-scale cone-shape target is presented, and the scattering model and echo generation problem of the full-scale convex targets with rough surfaces in THz bands are preliminary solved; this lays the foundation for future research on imaging regimes and algorithms.

  11. Wind Loads on Ships and Offshore Structures Determined by Model Tests, CFD and Full-Scale Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Christian

    1998-01-01

    Wind loads on ships and offshore structures have until recently been determined only by model tests, or by statistical methods based on model tests. By the development of Computational Fluid Dynamics or CFD there is now a realistic computational alternative. In principle, both methods should...... be validated systematically against full-scale measurements, but due to the great practical difficulties involved, this is almost never done. In this investigation, wind loads on a seagoing ferry and on a semisubmersible platform have been determined by model tests and by CFD. On the ferry, full......-scale measurements have been carried out as well. The CFD method also offers the possibility of a computational estimate of scale effects related to wind tunnel model testing. An example of such an estimate on the ferry is discussed. This work has been published in more details in Proceedings of BOSS'97, Aage et al...

  12. Literature review of the passenger airline business models: Full service carrier, low-cost carrier and charter airlines

    OpenAIRE

    Carmona Benitez, R.B.; Lodewijks, G.

    2008-01-01

    The deregulation and liberalization of the air transportation industry have developed three main passenger business models: full service carriers, low-cost carriers, and charter airlines. Deregulation removed regulated fares and routes increasing competition and yields. Airlines business models main objectives are to minimize operation costs and fares, and to maximize profits based on cost leadership, differentiation and focus strategy. This paper presents a literature review about airline bu...

  13. TWEETS AND FACEBOOK POSTS, THE NOVELTY TECHNIQUES IN THE CREATION OF ORIGIN-DESTINATION MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. Malema

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Social media and big data have emerged to be a useful source of information that can be used for planning purposes, particularly transportation planning and trip-distribution studies. Cities in developing countries such as South Africa often struggle with out-dated, unreliable and cumbersome techniques such as traffic counts and household surveys to conduct origin and destination studies. The emergence of ubiquitous crowd sourced data, big data, social media and geolocation based services has shown huge potential in providing useful information for origin and destination studies. Perhaps such information can be utilised to determine the origin and destination of commuters using the Gautrain, a high-speed railway in Gauteng province South Africa. To date little is known about the origins and destinations of Gautrain commuters. Accordingly, this study assesses the viability of using geolocation-based services namely Facebook and Twitter in mapping out the network movements of Gautrain commuters. Explorative Spatial Data Analysis (ESDA, Echo-social and ArcGis software were used to extract social media data, i.e. tweets and Facebook posts as well as to visualize the concentration of Gautrain commuters. The results demonstrate that big data and geolocation based services have the significant potential to predict movement network patterns of commuters and this information can thus, be used to inform and improve transportation planning. Nevertheless use of crowd sourced data and big data has privacy concerns that still need to be addressed.

  14. Darwin's diagram of divergence of taxa as a causal model for the origin of species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzat, Juan L

    2014-03-01

    On the basis that Darwin's theory of evolution encompasses two logically independent processes (common descent and natural selection), the only figure in On the Origin of Species (the Diagram of Divergence of Taxa) is often interpreted as illustrative of only one of these processes: the branching patterns representing common ancestry. Here, I argue that Darwin's Diagram of Divergence of Taxa represents a broad conceptual model of Darwin's theory, illustrating the causal efficacy of natural selection in producing well-defined varieties and ultimately species. The Tree Diagram encompasses the idea that natural selection explains common descent and the origin of organic diversity, thus representing a comprehensive model of Darwin's theory on the origin of species. I describe Darwin's Tree Diagram in relation to his argumentative strategy under the vera causa principle, and suggest that the testing of his theory based on the evidence from the geological record, the geographical distribution of organisms, and the mutual affinities of organic beings can be framed under the hypothetico-deductive method. Darwin's Diagram of Divergence of Taxa therefore represents a broad conceptual model that helps understanding the causal construction of Darwin's theory of evolution, the structure of his argumentative strategy, and the nature of his scientific methodology.

  15. Introduction to the level-set full field modeling of laths spheroidization phenomenon in α/β titanium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polychronopoulou D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fragmentation of α lamellae and subsequent spheroidization of α laths in α/β titanium alloys occurring during and after deformation are well known phenomena. We will illustrate the development of a new finite element methodology to model them. This new methodology is based on a level set framework to model the deformation and the ad hoc simultaneous and/or subsequent interfaces kinetics. We will focus, at yet, on the modeling of the surface diffusion at the α/β phase interfaces and the motion by mean curvature at the α/α grain interfaces.

  16. A full coverage, high-resolution, topographic model of Greenland computed from a variety of digital elevation data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekholm, Simon

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, a new high-resolution elevation model of Greenland, including the ice sheet as well as the ice free regions, is presented. It is the first published full coverage model, computed with an average resolution of 2 km and providing an unprecedented degree of detail. The topography...... airborne laser data from the analysis and treating them as ground truth observations. The mean accuracy of the ice sheet elevations is estimated to be 12-13 m, and it is found that on surfaces of a slope between 0.2 degrees and 0.8 degrees, corresponding to approximately 50% of the ice sheet, the model...

  17. Source emission and model evaluation of formaldehyde from composite and solid wood furniture in a full-scale chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper describes the measurement and model evaluation of formaldehyde source emissions from composite and solid wood furniture in a full-scale chamber under dynamic conditions using ASTM D 6670-01 (2007). Four brands of the same type furniture product were tested. The data we...

  18. Mathematical toy model inspired by the problem of the adaptive origins of the sexual orientation continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Brian

    2016-09-01

    Same-sex sexual behaviour is ubiquitous in the animal kingdom, but its adaptive origins remain a prominent puzzle. Here, I suggest the possibility that same-sex sexual behaviour arises as a consequence of the competition between an evolutionary drive for a wide diversity in traits, which improves the adaptability of a population, and a drive for sexual dichotomization of traits, which promotes opposite-sex attraction and increases the rate of reproduction. This trade-off is explored via a simple mathematical `toy model'. The model exhibits a number of interesting features and suggests a simple mathematical form for describing the sexual orientation continuum.

  19. High Performance Reduced Order Models for Wind Turbines with Full-Scale Converters Applied on Grid Interconnection Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heverton A. Pereira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Wind power has achieved technological evolution, and Grid Code (GC requirements forced wind industry consolidation in the last three decades. However, more studies are necessary to understand how the dynamics inherent in this energy source interact with the power system. Traditional energy production usually contains few high power unit generators; however, Wind Power Plants (WPPs consist of dozens or hundreds of low-power units. Time domain simulations of WPPs may take too much time if detailed models are considered in such studies. This work discusses reduced order models used in interconnection studies of synchronous machines with full converter technology. The performance of all models is evaluated based on time domain simulations in the Simulink/MATLAB environment. A detailed model is described, and four reduced order models are compared using the performance index, Normalized Integral of Absolute Error (NIAE. Models are analyzed during wind speed variations and balanced voltage dip. During faults, WPPs must be able to supply reactive power to the grid, and this characteristic is analyzed. Using the proposed performance index, it is possible to conclude if a reduced order model is suitable to represent the WPPs dynamics on grid studies.

  20. The Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Original Brief Intellectual Disability Scale and Alternative Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammen, Priya Mary; Asokan, Minju K; Russell, Sushila; Tsheringla, Sherab; Shankar, SatyaRaj; C Nair, Muttathu K; Sudhakar Russell, Paul Swamidhas

    2018-01-01

    Brief Intellectual Disability Scale (BIDS) is a measure validated for identification of children with intellectual disabilities (IDs) in countries with low disability resources. Following the publication of the exploratory factor analysis of BIDS, the authors have documented the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of BIDS in this study. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted to document the CFA of the BIDS. Primary caregivers ( N = 124) of children with ID were recruited and rated the BIDS. We used alternative fit indices for the evaluation of comparative fit index (CFI) and root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) to evaluate the model fit. The 2-index fit strategy was used to select the best factor model. The model fit index for the original 3-factor model and alternative 2-factor and 1-factor models with 9 items of the BIDS was under identified along with another 3-factor, 7-item model. Another 1-factor, 7-item model was identified but did not satisfy the 2-index fit strategy. A short version of the scale with a 2-factor and 7-item model of BIDS presented the best fit indices of CFI = 0.952 and RMSEA = 0.069. Although the original factor structure of BIDS was not confirmed in this study, another alternative a priori model for the construct validity of BIDS was confirmed. Therefore, the BIDS factor structure has been revised, refined, and trimmed to the final 2-factor, 7-item shorter version. Further documentation of the diagnostic accuracy, validity, and reliability of this shorter version of BDI is recommended.

  1. Validation of a plant-wide phosphorus modelling approach with minerals precipitation in a full-scale WWTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazadi Mbamba, Christian; Flores-Alsina, Xavier; John Batstone, Damien; Tait, Stephan

    2016-09-01

    The focus of modelling in wastewater treatment is shifting from single unit to plant-wide scale. Plant-wide modelling approaches provide opportunities to study the dynamics and interactions of different transformations in water and sludge streams. Towards developing more general and robust simulation tools applicable to a broad range of wastewater engineering problems, this paper evaluates a plant-wide model built with sub-models from the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2-P (BSM2-P) with an improved/expanded physico-chemical framework (PCF). The PCF includes a simple and validated equilibrium approach describing ion speciation and ion pairing with kinetic multiple minerals precipitation. Model performance is evaluated against data sets from a full-scale wastewater treatment plant, assessing capability to describe water and sludge lines across the treatment process under steady-state operation. With default rate kinetic and stoichiometric parameters, a good general agreement is observed between the full-scale datasets and the simulated results under steady-state conditions. Simulation results show differences between measured and modelled phosphorus as little as 4-15% (relative) throughout the entire plant. Dynamic influent profiles were generated using a calibrated influent generator and were used to study the effect of long-term influent dynamics on plant performance. Model-based analysis shows that minerals precipitation strongly influences composition in the anaerobic digesters, but also impacts on nutrient loading across the entire plant. A forecasted implementation of nutrient recovery by struvite crystallization (model scenario only), reduced the phosphorus content in the treatment plant influent (via centrate recycling) considerably and thus decreased phosphorus in the treated outflow by up to 43%. Overall, the evaluated plant-wide model is able to jointly describe the physico-chemical and biological processes, and is advocated for future use as a tool for

  2. An original piecewise model for computing energy expenditure from accelerometer and heart rate signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Ugalde, Hector M; Garnotel, M; Doron, M; Jallon, P; Charpentier, G; Franc, S; Huneker, E; Simon, C; Bonnet, S

    2017-07-28

    Activity energy expenditure (EE) plays an important role in healthcare, therefore, accurate EE measures are required. Currently available reference EE acquisition methods, such as doubly labeled water and indirect calorimetry, are complex, expensive, uncomfortable, and/or difficult to apply on real time. To overcome these drawbacks, the goal of this paper is to propose a model for computing EE in real time (minute-by-minute) from heart rate and accelerometer signals. The proposed model, which consists of an original branched model, uses heart rate signals for computing EE on moderate to vigorous physical activities and a linear combination of heart rate and counts per minute for computing EE on light to moderate physical activities. Model parameters were estimated from a given data set composed of 53 subjects performing 25 different physical activities (light-, moderate- and vigorous-intensity), and validated using leave-one-subject-out. A different database (semi-controlled in-city circuit), was used in order to validate the versatility of the proposed model. Comparisons are done versus linear and nonlinear models, which are also used for computing EE from accelerometer and/or HR signals. The proposed piecewise model leads to more accurate EE estimations ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] J kg -1 min -1 and [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] J kg -1 min -1 on each validation database). This original approach, which is more conformable and less expensive than the reference methods, allows accurate EE estimations, in real time (minute-by-minute), during a large variety of physical activities. Therefore, this model may be used on applications such as computing the time that a given subject spent on light-intensity physical activities and on moderate to vigorous physical activities (binary classification accuracy of 0.8155).

  3. Results from a full coupling of the HIRHAM regional climate model and the MIKE SHE hydrological model for a Danish catchment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Andreas Dahl; Refsgaard, J.C.; Drews, Martin

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in the emerging research field of coupling of existing regional climate models (RCMs) and hydrology/land-surface models is the computational interaction between the models. Here we present results from a full two-way coupling of the HIRHAM RCM over a 4000 km × 2800 km domain at 11...

  4. Do we need full mesoscale models to simulate the urban heat island? A study over the city of Barcelona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Díez, Markel; Ballester, Joan; De Ridder, Koen; Hooyberghs, Hans; Lauwaet, Dirk; Rodó, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    As most of the population lives in urban environments, the simulation of the urban climate has become an important part of the global climate change impact assessment. However, due to the high resolution required, these simulations demand a large amount of computational resources. Here we present a comparison between a simplified fast urban climate model (UrbClim) and a widely used full mesoscale model, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, over the city of Barcelona. In order to check the advantages and disadvantages of each approach, both simulations were compared with station data and with land surface temperature observations retrieved by satellites, focusing on the urban heat island. The effect of changing the UrbClim boundary conditions was studied too, by using low resolution global reanalysis data (70 km) and a higher resolution forecast model (15 km). Finally, a strict comparison of the computational resources consumed by both models was carried out. Results show that, generally, the performance of the simple model is comparable to or better than the mesoscale model. The exception are the winds and the day-to-day correlation in the reanalysis driven run, but these problems disappear when taking the boundary conditions from a higher resolution global model. UrbClim was found to run 133 times faster than WRF, using 4x times higher resolution and, thus, it is an efficient solution for running long climate change simulations over large city ensembles.

  5. Full-range stress–strain behaviour of contemporary pipeline steels: Part II. Estimation of model parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertelé, Stijn; De Waele, Wim; Denys, Rudi; Verstraete, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary pipeline steels with a yield-to-tensile ratio above 0.80 often show two-stages of strain hardening, which cannot be simultaneously described by the standardized Ramberg–Osgood model. A companion paper (Part I) showed that the recently developed UGent model provides more accurate descriptions than the Ramberg–Osgood model, as it succeeds in describing both strain hardening stages. However, it may be challenging to obtain an optimal model fit in absence of full stress–strain data. This paper discusses on how to find suited parameter values for the UGent model, given a set of measurable tensile test characteristics. The proposed methodology shows good results for an extensive set of investigated experimental stress–strain curves. Next to some common tensile test characteristics, the 1.0% proof stress is needed. The authors therefore encourage the acquisition of this stress during tensile tests. - Highlights: ► An analytical procedure estimates UGent model parameters. ► The procedure requires a set of tensile test characteristics. ► The UGent model performs better than the Ramberg–Osgood model. ► Apart from common characteristics, the 1.0% proof stress is required. ► The authors encourage the acquisition of this 1.0% proof stress.

  6. A likelihood ratio model for the determination of the geographical origin of olive oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Własiuk, Patryk; Martyna, Agnieszka; Zadora, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Food fraud or food adulteration may be of forensic interest for instance in the case of suspected deliberate mislabeling. On account of its potential health benefits and nutritional qualities, geographical origin determination of olive oil might be of special interest. The use of a likelihood ratio (LR) model has certain advantages in contrast to typical chemometric methods because the LR model takes into account the information about the sample rarity in a relevant population. Such properties are of particular interest to forensic scientists and therefore it has been the aim of this study to examine the issue of olive oil classification with the use of different LR models and their pertinence under selected data pre-processing methods (logarithm based data transformations) and feature selection technique. This was carried out on data describing 572 Italian olive oil samples characterised by the content of 8 fatty acids in the lipid fraction. Three classification problems related to three regions of Italy (South, North and Sardinia) have been considered with the use of LR models. The correct classification rate and empirical cross entropy were taken into account as a measure of performance of each model. The application of LR models in determining the geographical origin of olive oil has proven to be satisfactorily useful for the considered issues analysed in terms of many variants of data pre-processing since the rates of correct classifications were close to 100% and considerable reduction of information loss was observed. The work also presents a comparative study of the performance of the linear discriminant analysis in considered classification problems. An approach to the choice of the value of the smoothing parameter is highlighted for the kernel density estimation based LR models as well. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A one-dimensional seismic model for Uturuncu volcano, Bolivia, and its impact on full moment tensor inversions

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Weisen

    2016-11-24

    Using receiver functions, Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion determined from ambient noise and teleseismic earthquakes, and Rayleigh wave horizontal to vertical ground motion amplitude ratios from earthquakes observed across the PLUTONS seismic array, we construct a one-dimensional (1-D) S-wave velocity (Vs) seismic model with uncertainties for Uturuncu volcano, Bolivia, located in the central Andes and overlying the eastward-subducting Nazca plate. We find a fast upper crustal lid placed upon a low-velocity zone (LVZ) in the mid-crust. By incorporating all three types of measurements with complimentary sensitivity, we also explore the average density and Vp/Vs (ratio of P-wave to S-wave velocity) structures beneath the young silicic volcanic field. We observe slightly higher Vp/Vs and a decrease in density near the LVZ, which implies a dacitic source of the partially molten magma body. We exploit the impact of the 1-D model on full moment tensor inversion for the two largest local earthquakes recorded (both magnitude ∼3), demonstrating that the 1-D model influences the waveform fits and the estimated source type for the full moment tensor. Our 1-D model can serve as a robust starting point for future efforts to determine a three-dimensional velocity model for Uturuncu volcano.

  8. Combined control effects of brake and active suspension control on the global safety of a full-car nonlinear model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchamna, Rodrigue; Youn, Edward; Youn, Iljoong

    2014-05-01

    This paper focuses on the active safety of a full-vehicle nonlinear model during cornering. At first, a previously developed electronic stability controller (ESC) based on vehicle simplified model is applied to the full-car nonlinear model in order to control the vehicle yaw rate and side-slip angle. The ESC system was shown beneficial not only in tracking the vehicle path as close as possible, but it also helped in reducing the vehicle roll angle and influences ride comfort and road-holding capability; to tackle that issue and also to have better attitude motion, making use of optimal control theory the active suspension control gain is developed from a vehicle linear model and used to compute the active suspension control force of the vehicle nonlinear model. The active suspension control algorithm used in this paper includes the integral action of the suspension deflection in order to make zero the suspension deflection steady state and keep the vehicle chassis flat. Keeping the chassis flat reduces the vehicle load transfer and that is helpful for road holding and yaw rate tracking. The effects of the two controllers when they work together are analysed using various computer simulations with different steering wheel manoeuvres.

  9. A Novel Integrated Approach to Modelling of Depletion-Induced Change in Full Permeability Tensor of Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Izadi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available More than half of all hydrocarbon reservoirs are Naturally Fractured Reservoirs (NFRs, in which production forecasting is a complicated function of fluid flow in a fracture-matrix system. Modelling of fluid flow in NFRs is challenging due to formation heterogeneity and anisotropy. Stress sensitivity and depletion effect on already-complex reservoir permeability add to the sophistication. Horizontal permeability anisotropy and stress sensitivity are often ignored or inaccurately taken into account when simulating fluid flow in NFRs. The aim of this paper is to present an integrated approach for evaluating the dynamic and true anisotropic nature of permeability in naturally fractured reservoirs. Among other features, this approach considers the effect of reservoir depletion on reservoir permeability tensor, allowing more realistic production forecasts. In this approach the NFR is discretized into grids for which an analytical model yields full permeability tensors. Then, fluid flow is modelled using the finite-element method to obtain pore-pressure distribution within the reservoir. Next, another analytical model evaluates the change in the aperture of individual fractures as a function of effective stress and rock mechanical properties. The permeability tensor of each grid is then updated based on the apertures obtained for the current time step. The integrated model proceeds according to the next prescribed time increments.

  10. Diagnostic and prognostic simulations with a full Stokes model accounting for superimposed ice of Midtre Lovénbreen, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Zwinger

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We present steady state (diagnostic and transient (prognostic simulations of Midtre Lovénbreen, Svalbard performed with the thermo-mechanically coupled full-Stokes code Elmer. This glacier has an extensive data set of geophysical measurements available spanning several decades, that allow for constraints on model descriptions. Consistent with this data set, we included a simple model accounting for the formation of superimposed ice. Diagnostic results indicated that a dynamic adaptation of the free surface is necessary, to prevent non-physically high velocities in a region of under determined bedrock depths. Observations from ground penetrating radar of the basal thermal state agree very well with model predictions, while the dip angles of isochrones in radar data also match reasonably well with modelled isochrones, despite the numerical deficiencies of estimating ages with a steady state model.

    Prognostic runs for 53 years, using a constant accumulation/ablation pattern starting from the steady state solution obtained from the configuration of the 1977 DEM show that: 1 the unrealistic velocities in the under determined parts of the DEM quickly damp out; 2 the free surface evolution matches well measured elevation changes; 3 the retreat of the glacier under this scenario continues with the glacier tongue in a projection to 2030 being situated ≈500 m behind the position in 1977.

  11. Linearized Flux Evolution (LiFE): A technique for rapidly adapting fluxes from full-physics radiative transfer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Crisp, David

    2018-05-01

    Solar and thermal radiation are critical aspects of planetary climate, with gradients in radiative energy fluxes driving heating and cooling. Climate models require that radiative transfer tools be versatile, computationally efficient, and accurate. Here, we describe a technique that uses an accurate full-physics radiative transfer model to generate a set of atmospheric radiative quantities which can be used to linearly adapt radiative flux profiles to changes in the atmospheric and surface state-the Linearized Flux Evolution (LiFE) approach. These radiative quantities describe how each model layer in a plane-parallel atmosphere reflects and transmits light, as well as how the layer generates diffuse radiation by thermal emission and by scattering light from the direct solar beam. By computing derivatives of these layer radiative properties with respect to dynamic elements of the atmospheric state, we can then efficiently adapt the flux profiles computed by the full-physics model to new atmospheric states. We validate the LiFE approach, and then apply this approach to Mars, Earth, and Venus, demonstrating the information contained in the layer radiative properties and their derivatives, as well as how the LiFE approach can be used to determine the thermal structure of radiative and radiative-convective equilibrium states in one-dimensional atmospheric models.

  12. High Efficiency Variable-Frequency Full-Bridge Converter with a Load Adaptive Control Method Based on the Loss Model

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Zhao; Haoyu Li; Yuan Liu; Zhenwei Li

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a load adaptive control method to improve the efficiency and dynamic performance of the Phase-Shifted Full-Bridge (PSFB) converter which works under a wide range of load conditions is presented. The proposed control method can be used as a battery charger since this application demands a wide range of load conditions. The composition of the PSFB converter’s losses and the loss analysis model are both discussed. According to this model, the optimum switching frequency which resu...

  13. VHP-Female full-body human CAD model for cross-platform FEM simulations: recent development and validations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankaria, Harshal; Jackson, Xavier J; Borwankar, Raunak; Srichandhru, Goutham N K; Le Tran, Anh; Yanamadala, Janakinadh; Noetscher, Gregory M; Nazarian, Ara; Louie, Sara; Makarov, Sergey N

    2016-08-01

    Simulation of the electromagnetic response of the human body relies heavily upon efficient computational models or phantoms. The first objective of this paper is to present an improved platform-independent full-body electromagnetic computational model (computational phantom), the Visible Human Project® (VHP)-Female v. 3.1 and to describe its distinct features and enhancements compared to VHP-Female v. 2.0. The second objective is to report phantom simulation for electric stimulation studies using the commercial FEM electromagnetic solver ANSYS MAXWELL.

  14. Weibull Multiplicative Model and Machine Learning Models for Full-Automatic Dark-Spot Detection from SAR Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taravat, A.; Del Frate, F.

    2013-09-01

    As a major aspect of marine pollution, oil release into the sea has serious biological and environmental impacts. Among remote sensing systems (which is a tool that offers a non-destructive investigation method), synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can provide valuable synoptic information about the position and size of the oil spill due to its wide area coverage and day/night, and all-weather capabilities. In this paper we present a new automated method for oil-spill monitoring. A new approach is based on the combination of Weibull Multiplicative Model and machine learning techniques to differentiate between dark spots and the background. First, the filter created based on Weibull Multiplicative Model is applied to each sub-image. Second, the sub-image is segmented by two different neural networks techniques (Pulsed Coupled Neural Networks and Multilayer Perceptron Neural Networks). As the last step, a very simple filtering process is used to eliminate the false targets. The proposed approaches were tested on 20 ENVISAT and ERS2 images which contained dark spots. The same parameters were used in all tests. For the overall dataset, the average accuracies of 94.05 % and 95.20 % were obtained for PCNN and MLP methods, respectively. The average computational time for dark-spot detection with a 256 × 256 image in about 4 s for PCNN segmentation using IDL software which is the fastest one in this field at present. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach is very fast, robust and effective. The proposed approach can be applied to the future spaceborne SAR images.

  15. On a quantum mechanical system theory of the origin of life: from the Stapp-model to the origin of natural symbols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balázs, András

    2016-01-01

    The Heisenberg-James-Stapp (quantum mechanical) mind model is surveyed and criticized briefly. The criticism points out that the model, while being essentially consistent concerning (human) consciousness, fundamentally lacks the evolutional point of view both onto- and phylogenetically. Ethology and other than Jamesian psychology is quoted and a quantum mechanical theoretical scheme is suggested to essentially extend Stapp's frame in an evolutionary context. It is proposed that its central supposition, spontaneous quantum measurement can be better utilized in an investigation of the origin of the "subjective" process, having come about concomitantly with the chemistry of the origin of life. We dwell on its applicability at this latter process, at its heart standing, it is supposed, the endophysical nonlinear "self-measurement" of (quantum mechanically describable) matter, and so our investigation is extended to this primeval phenomenon. It is suggested that the life phenomenon is an indirect C* → (W*) → C* quantum algebraic process transition, where the (W*) system would represent the living state. Summarized also are our previous results on an internalized, "reversed", time process, introduced originally by Gunji, which is subordinated to the external "forwards" time evolution, driving towards symmetry by gradual space-mappings, where the original splitting-up must have come about in a spontaneous symmetry breaking nonlinear "self-measurement" of matter in an endophysical World.

  16. Biomechanical Analysis of Human Abdominal Impact Responses and Injuries through Finite Element Simulations of a Full Human Body Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Jesse S; El-Jawahri, Raed; Barbat, Saeed; Prasad, Priya

    2005-11-01

    Human abdominal response and injury in blunt impacts was investigated through finite element simulations of cadaver tests using a full human body model of an average-sized adult male. The model was validated at various impact speeds by comparing model responses with available experimental cadaver test data in pendulum side impacts and frontal rigid bar impacts from various sources. Results of various abdominal impact simulations are presented in this paper. Model-predicted abdominal dynamic responses such as force-time and force-deflection characteristics, and injury severities, measured by organ pressures, for the simulated impact conditions are presented. Quantitative results such as impact forces, abdominal deflections, internal organ stresses have shown that the abdomen responded differently to left and right side impacts, especially in low speed impact. Results also indicated that the model exhibited speed sensitive response characteristics and the compressibility of the abdomen significantly influenced the overall impact response in the simulated impact conditions. This study demonstrates that the development of a validated finite element human body model can be useful for abdominal injury assessment. Internal organ injuries, which are difficult to detect in experimental studies with human cadavers due to the difficulty of instrumentation, may be more easily identified with a validated finite element model through stress-strain analysis.

  17. Dynamic Comparison of Three- and Four-Equation Reactor Core Models in a Full-Scope Power Plant Training Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto; Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose; Nunez-Carrera, Alejandro; Garcia-Gutierrez, Alfonso; Martinez-Mendez, Elizabeth Jeannette

    2004-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the dynamic behavior of a boiling water reactor in a full-scope power plant simulator for operator training is presented. Three- and four-equation reactor core models were used to examine three transients following tests described in acceptance test procedures: scram, loss of feedwater flow, and closure of main isolation valves. The three-equation model consists of water and steam mixture momentum, including mass and energy balances. The four-equation model is based on liquid and gas phase mass balances, together with a drift-flux approach for the analysis of phase separation. Analysis of the models showed that the scram transient was slightly different for three- and four-equation models. The drift-flux effects can explain such differences. Regarding the loss-of-feedwater transient, the predicted steam flow after scram is larger for the three-equation model. Finally, for the transient related to the closure of main steam isolation valves, the three-equation model provides slightly different results for the pressure change, which affects reactor level behavior

  18. GOCO05c: A New Combined Gravity Field Model Based on Full Normal Equations and Regionally Varying Weighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecher, T.; Pail, R.; Gruber, T.

    2017-05-01

    GOCO05c is a gravity field model computed as a combined solution of a satellite-only model and a global data set of gravity anomalies. It is resolved up to degree and order 720. It is the first model applying regionally varying weighting. Since this causes strong correlations among all gravity field parameters, the resulting full normal equation system with a size of 2 TB had to be solved rigorously by applying high-performance computing. GOCO05c is the first combined gravity field model independent of EGM2008 that contains GOCE data of the whole mission period. The performance of GOCO05c is externally validated by GNSS-levelling comparisons, orbit tests, and computation of the mean dynamic topography, achieving at least the quality of existing high-resolution models. Results show that the additional GOCE information is highly beneficial in insufficiently observed areas, and that due to the weighting scheme of individual data the spectral and spatial consistency of the model is significantly improved. Due to usage of fill-in data in specific regions, the model cannot be used for physical interpretations in these regions.

  19. Influence of Orthotropy on Biomechanics of Peri-Implant Bone in Complete Mandible Model with Full Dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The study was to investigate the impact of orthotropic material on the biomechanics of dental implant, based on a detailed mandible with high geometric and mechanical similarity. Materials and Methods. Multiple data sources were used to elaborate detailed biological structures and implant CAD models. In addition, an extended orthotropic material assignment methodology based on harmonic fields was used to handle the alveolar ridge region to generate compatible orthotropic fields. The influence of orthotropic material was compared with the commonly used isotropic model and simplified orthotropic model. Results. The simulation results showed that the values of stress and strain on the implant-bone interface almost increased in the orthotropic model compared to the isotropic case, especially for the cancellous bone. However, the local stress concentration was more obvious in the isotropic case compared to that in orthotropic case. The simple orthotropic model revealed irregular stress and strain distribution, compared to the isotropic model and the real orthotropic model. The influence of orthotropy was little on the implant, periodontal ligament, tooth enamel, and dentin. Conclusion. The orthotropic material has significant effect on stress and strain of implant-bone interface in the mandible, compared with the isotropic simulation. Real orthotropic mechanical properties of mandible should be emphasized in biomechanical studies of dental implants.

  20. Atomistic full-quantum transport model for zigzag graphene nanoribbon-based structures: Complex energy-band method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Nan; Luo, Win-Jet; Shyu, Feng-Lin; Chung, Hsien-Ching; Lin, Chiun-Yan; Wu, Jhao-Ying

    2018-01-01

    Using a non-equilibrium Green’s function framework in combination with the complex energy-band method, an atomistic full-quantum model for solving quantum transport problems for a zigzag-edge graphene nanoribbon (zGNR) structure is proposed. For transport calculations, the mathematical expressions from the theory for zGNR-based device structures are derived in detail. The transport properties of zGNR-based devices are calculated and studied in detail using the proposed method.

  1. Full-field initialized decadal predictions with the MPI earth system model: an initial shock in the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Jürgen; Pohlmann, Holger; Sienz, Frank; Marotzke, Jochem; Baehr, Johanna; Köhl, Armin; Modali, Kameswarrao; Polkova, Iuliia; Stammer, Detlef; Vamborg, Freja S. E.; Müller, Wolfgang A.

    2017-12-01

    Our decadal climate prediction system, which is based on the Max-Planck-Institute Earth System Model, is initialized from a coupled assimilation run that utilizes nudging to selected state parameters from reanalyses. We apply full-field nudging in the atmosphere and either full-field or anomaly nudging in the ocean. Full fields from two different ocean reanalyses are considered. This comparison of initialization strategies focuses on the North Atlantic Subpolar Gyre (SPG) region, where the transition from anomaly to full-field nudging reveals large differences in prediction skill for sea surface temperature and ocean heat content (OHC). We show that nudging of temperature and salinity in the ocean modifies OHC and also induces changes in mass and heat transports associated with the ocean flow. In the SPG region, the assimilated OHC signal resembles well OHC from observations, regardless of using full fields or anomalies. The resulting ocean transport, on the other hand, reveals considerable differences between full-field and anomaly nudging. In all assimilation runs, ocean heat transport together with net heat exchange at the surface does not correspond to OHC tendencies, the SPG heat budget is not closed. Discrepancies in the budget in the cases of full-field nudging exceed those in the case of anomaly nudging by a factor of 2-3. The nudging-induced changes in ocean transport continue to be present in the free running hindcasts for up to 5 years, a clear expression of memory in our coupled system. In hindcast mode, on annual to inter-annual scales, ocean heat transport is the dominant driver of SPG OHC. Thus, we ascribe a significant reduction in OHC prediction skill when using full-field instead of anomaly initialization to an initialization shock resulting from the poor initialization of the ocean flow.

  2. Full-wave reflection of lightning long-wave radio pulses from the ionospheric D region: Numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Abram R.; Shao, Xuan-Min; Holzworth, Robert

    2009-03-01

    A model is developed for calculating ionospheric reflection of electromagnetic pulses emitted by lightning, with most energy in the long-wave spectral region (f ~ 3-100 kHz). The building block of the calculation is a differential equation full-wave solution of Maxwell's equations for the complex reflection of individual plane waves incident from below, by the anisotropic, dissipative, diffuse dielectric profile of the lower ionosphere. This full-wave solution is then put into a summation over plane waves in an angular direct Fourier transform to obtain the reflection properties of curved wavefronts. This step models also the diffraction effects of long-wave ionospheric reflections observed at short or medium range (~200-500 km). The calculation can be done with any arbitrary but smooth dielectric profile versus altitude. For an initial test, this article uses the classic D region exponential profiles of electron density and collision rate given by Volland. With even these simple profiles, our model of full-wave reflection of curved wavefronts captures some of the basic attributes of observed reflected waveforms recorded with the Los Alamos Sferic Array. A follow-on article will present a detailed comparison with data in order to retrieve ionospheric parameters.

  3. Hybrid System Modeling and Full Cycle Operation Analysis of a Two-Stroke Free-Piston Linear Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Sun

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Free-piston linear generators (FPLGs have attractive application prospects for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs owing to their high-efficiency, low-emissions and multi-fuel flexibility. In order to achieve long-term stable operation, the hybrid system design and full-cycle operation strategy are essential factors that should be considered. A 25 kW FPLG consisting of an internal combustion engine (ICE, a linear electric machine (LEM and a gas spring (GS is designed. To improve the power density and generating efficiency, the LEM is assembled with two modular flat-type double-sided PM LEM units, which sandwich a common moving-magnet plate supported by a middle keel beam and bilateral slide guide rails to enhance the stiffness of the moving plate. For the convenience of operation processes analysis, the coupling hybrid system is modeled mathematically and a full cycle simulation model is established. Top-level systemic control strategies including the starting, stable operating, fault recovering and stopping strategies are analyzed and discussed. The analysis results validate that the system can run stably and robustly with the proposed full cycle operation strategy. The effective electric output power can reach 26.36 kW with an overall system efficiency of 36.32%.

  4. A Memory Hierarchy Model Based on Data Reuse for Full-Search Motion Estimation on High-Definition Digital Videos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Sandyra Bezerra Lopes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The motion estimation is the most complex module in a video encoder requiring a high processing throughput and high memory bandwidth, mainly when the focus is high-definition videos. The throughput problem can be solved increasing the parallelism in the internal operations. The external memory bandwidth may be reduced using a memory hierarchy. This work presents a memory hierarchy model for a full-search motion estimation core. The proposed memory hierarchy model is based on a data reuse scheme considering the full search algorithm features. The proposed memory hierarchy expressively reduces the external memory bandwidth required for the motion estimation process, and it provides a very high data throughput for the ME core. This throughput is necessary to achieve real time when processing high-definition videos. When considering the worst bandwidth scenario, this memory hierarchy is able to reduce the external memory bandwidth in 578 times. A case study for the proposed hierarchy, using 32×32 search window and 8×8 block size, was implemented and prototyped on a Virtex 4 FPGA. The results show that it is possible to reach 38 frames per second when processing full HD frames (1920×1080 pixels using nearly 299 Mbytes per second of external memory bandwidth.

  5. An automation of design and modelling tasks in NX Siemens environment with original software - generator module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbiciak, M.; Grabowik, C.; Janik, W.

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays the design constructional process is almost exclusively aided with CAD/CAE/CAM systems. It is evaluated that nearly 80% of design activities have a routine nature. These design routine tasks are highly susceptible to automation. Design automation is usually made with API tools which allow building original software responsible for adding different engineering activities. In this paper the original software worked out in order to automate engineering tasks at the stage of a product geometrical shape design is presented. The elaborated software works exclusively in NX Siemens CAD/CAM/CAE environment and was prepared in Microsoft Visual Studio with application of the .NET technology and NX SNAP library. The software functionality allows designing and modelling of spur and helicoidal involute gears. Moreover, it is possible to estimate relative manufacturing costs. With the Generator module it is possible to design and model both standard and non-standard gear wheels. The main advantage of the model generated in such a way is its better representation of an involute curve in comparison to those which are drawn in specialized standard CAD systems tools. It comes from fact that usually in CAD systems an involute curve is drawn by 3 points that respond to points located on the addendum circle, the reference diameter of a gear and the base circle respectively. In the Generator module the involute curve is drawn by 11 involute points which are located on and upper the base and the addendum circles therefore 3D gear wheels models are highly accurate. Application of the Generator module makes the modelling process very rapid so that the gear wheel modelling time is reduced to several seconds. During the conducted research the analysis of differences between standard 3 points and 11 points involutes was made. The results and conclusions drawn upon analysis are shown in details.

  6. The fuel cell model of abiogenesis: a new approach to origin-of-life simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barge, Laura M; Kee, Terence P; Doloboff, Ivria J; Hampton, Joshua M P; Ismail, Mohammed; Pourkashanian, Mohamed; Zeytounian, John; Baum, Marc M; Moss, John A; Lin, Chung-Kuang; Kidd, Richard D; Kanik, Isik

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we discuss how prebiotic geo-electrochemical systems can be modeled as a fuel cell and how laboratory simulations of the origin of life in general can benefit from this systems-led approach. As a specific example, the components of what we have termed the "prebiotic fuel cell" (PFC) that operates at a putative Hadean hydrothermal vent are detailed, and we used electrochemical analysis techniques and proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell components to test the properties of this PFC and other geo-electrochemical systems, the results of which are reported here. The modular nature of fuel cells makes them ideal for creating geo-electrochemical reactors with which to simulate hydrothermal systems on wet rocky planets and characterize the energetic properties of the seafloor/hydrothermal interface. That electrochemical techniques should be applied to simulating the origin of life follows from the recognition of the fuel cell-like properties of prebiotic chemical systems and the earliest metabolisms. Conducting this type of laboratory simulation of the emergence of bioenergetics will not only be informative in the context of the origin of life on Earth but may help in understanding whether life might emerge in similar environments on other worlds.

  7. Isotopes and trace elements as natal origin markers of Helicoverpa armigera--an experimental model for biosecurity pests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W Holder

    Full Text Available Protecting a nation's primary production sector and natural estate is heavily dependent on the ability to determine the risk presented by incursions of exotic insect species. Identifying the geographic origin of such biosecurity breaches can be crucial in determining this risk and directing the appropriate operational responses and eradication campaigns, as well as ascertaining incursion pathways. Reading natural abundance biogeochemical markers using mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for tracing ecological pathways as well as provenance determination of commercial products and items of forensic interest. However, application of these methods to trace insects has been underutilised to date and our understanding in this field is still in a phase of basic development. In addition, biogeochemical markers have never been considered in the atypical situation of a biosecurity incursion, where sample sizes are often small, and of unknown geographic origin and plant host. These constraints effectively confound the interpretation of the one or two isotope geo-location markers systems that are currently used, which are therefore unlikely to achieve the level of provenance resolution required in biosecurity interceptions. Here, a novel approach is taken to evaluate the potential for provenance resolution of insect samples through multiple biogeochemical markers. The international pest, Helicoverpa armigera, has been used as a model species to assess the validity of using naturally occurring δ2H, 87Sr/86Sr, 207Pb/206Pb and 208Pb/206Pb isotope ratios and trace element concentration signatures from single moth specimens for regional assignment to natal origin. None of the biogeochemical markers selected were individually able to separate moths from the different experimental regions (150-3000 km apart. Conversely, using multivariate analysis, the region of origin was correctly identified for approximately 75% of individual H. armigera samples. The

  8. The origin of Pasteurella multocida impacts pathology and inflammation when assessed in a mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Susanne E.; Chadfield, Mark S.; Sorensen, Dorte B.

    2016-01-01

    Host-pathogen interactions of Pasteurella multocida isolates of different origin were studied in a mouse model, focusing on pathology, bacterial load and expression of the metalloproteinase MMP9 and its inhibitor TIMP1. Intranasal inoculation with one of three doses (10(6), 10(4), 10(2) CFU...... dose dependent and consisted of exudative bronchopneumonia, abscess formation in liver and a lower bacterial load in lung and liver. Both isolates caused increased expression of MMP9 and TIMP1. In conclusion, evaluation and comparison of pathogenicity and host-pathogen interaction of P. multocida...

  9. Validation of a new model for the sizing of denitrification reactors, by testing full-scale plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboni, M; Torretta, V

    2017-06-01

    A new deterministic model for the calculation of the specific denitrification rate (SDNR), useful for the design of pre-denitrification reactors, was tested on eight full-scale activated sludge plants. The model represents the SDNR at 20°C (SDNR 20°C ) as a function of the sludge loading in the denitrification reactor (F:M DEN ) and the residual dissolved oxygen in the denitrification reactor (DO DEN ). The results proved the ability of the model in calculating the SDNR 20°C . The model shows a lower degree of adaptability for small-sized plants. SDNR 20°C proved to have a strong sensitivity to DO DEN , mainly in correspondence with low DO concentrations (less than 2 mg L -1 ). The sensitivity decreases at greater DO values, but with a progressively less marked gradient, up to becoming weak only at DO concentrations greater than 0.4-0.5 mg L -1 , which are rarely found in full-scale plants. DO concentrations measured in real-scale facilities are mostly in the range 0.2-0.4 mg L -1 . These concentrations cause adverse effects on the kinetics of nitrogen removal, and consequently on the denitrification performance. Thus, minimizing DO in the pre-denitrification reactor is relevant. The sensitivity of SDNR 20°C to F:M DEN was less important, as it is characterized by a growing linear behaviour with a low slope.

  10. Full Random Coefficients Multilevel Modeling of the Relationship between Land Use and Trip Time on Weekdays and Weekends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hyoung Tommy Gim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Interests in weekend trips are increasing, but few have studied how they are affected by land use. In this study, we analyze the relationship between compact land use characteristics and trip time in Seoul, Korea by comparing two research models, each of which uses the weekday and weekend data of the same travelers. To secure sufficient numbers of subjects and groups, full random coefficients multilevel models define the trip as level one and the neighborhood as level two, and find that level-two land use characteristics account for less variation in trip time than level-one individual characteristics. At level one, weekday trip time is found to be reduced by the choice of the automobile as a travel mode, but not by its ownership per se. In addition, it becomes reduced if made by high income travelers and extended to travel to quality jobs. Among four land use characteristics at level two, population density, road connectivity, and subway availability are shown to be significant in the weekday model. Only subway availability has a positive relationship with trip time and this finding is consistent with the level-one result that the choice of automobile alternatives increases trip time. The other land use characteristic, land use balance, turns out to be a single significant land use variable in the weekend model, implying that it is concerned mainly with non-work, non-mandatory travel.

  11. Three-dimensional velocity model of crustal structure in the southern Korean Peninsula and its full-waveform validations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhie, J.; Kim, S.; Woo, J. U.; Song, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    To obtain a high-resolution crustal three-dimensional (3-D) model, we incorporate multiple regional ambient noise datasets in different scales, which consist of 150 accelerometer stations (1-6 s group velocity), 37 regional broadband stations (5-30 s group and phase velocity), and longer period phase velocity maps from previous study (25-40 s phase velocity). A 3-D structure of shear wave velocity is constrained by integrating one-dimensional depth profiles from inversions of surface wave dispersions. The model estimation is carried out thoroughly in a trans-dimensional and hierarchical Bayesian inversion framework, such that the resulting model is less biased by arbitrary assumptions in the inversion process. To obtain P-wave velocity structure, then, a previous estimation of the variation of Vp/Vs ratio is applied. A 1-D velocity model will be replaced by this new 3-D model for determining accurate hypocenters and source processes of local earthquakes in the region. In addition, the new model will make more reliable seismic hazard analysis for scenario earthquakes possible. Before adopting the new model for various applications, it is necessary to validate it. To verify the validity of the model, full-waveform simulations for recent local earthquakes are performed. Two well observed moderate earthquakes occurred at NE and SW of the southern Korean Peninsula are considered for waveform simulations. The comparison between synthetic and observed waveforms shows that the new model reasonably well represents the seismic wave propagation characteristics in the southern Korean Peninsula.

  12. Simulating anchovy's full life cycle in the northern Aegean Sea (eastern Mediterranean): A coupled hydro-biogeochemical-IBM model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politikos, D.; Somarakis, S.; Tsiaras, K. P.; Giannoulaki, M.; Petihakis, G.; Machias, A.; Triantafyllou, G.

    2015-11-01

    A 3-D full life cycle population model for the North Aegean Sea (NAS) anchovy stock is presented. The model is two-way coupled with a hydrodynamic-biogeochemical model (POM-ERSEM). The anchovy life span is divided into seven life stages/age classes. Embryos and early larvae are passive particles, but subsequent stages exhibit active horizontal movements based on specific rules. A bioenergetics model simulates the growth in both the larval and juvenile/adult stages, while the microzooplankton and mesozooplankton fields of the biogeochemical model provide the food for fish consumption. The super-individual approach is adopted for the representation of the anchovy population. A dynamic egg production module, with an energy allocation algorithm, is embedded in the bioenergetics equation and produces eggs based on a new conceptual model for anchovy vitellogenesis. A model simulation for the period 2003-2006 with realistic initial conditions reproduced well the magnitude of population biomass and daily egg production estimated from acoustic and daily egg production method (DEPM) surveys, carried out in the NAS during June 2003-2006. Model simulated adult and egg habitats were also in good agreement with observed spatial distributions of acoustic biomass and egg abundance in June. Sensitivity simulations were performed to investigate the effect of different formulations adopted for key processes, such as reproduction and movement. The effect of the anchovy population on plankton dynamics was also investigated, by comparing simulations adopting a two-way or a one-way coupling of the fish with the biogeochemical model.

  13. Empirical assessment of the validity limits of the surface wave full ray theory using realistic 3-D Earth models

    KAUST Repository

    Parisi, Laura

    2016-02-10

    The surface wave full ray theory (FRT) is an efficient tool to calculate synthetic waveforms of surface waves. It combines the concept of local modes with exact ray tracing as a function of frequency, providing a more complete description of surface wave propagation than the widely used great circle approximation (GCA). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of the FRT approach to model teleseismic long-period surface waveforms (T ∼ 45–150 s) in the context of current 3-D Earth models to empirically assess its validity domain and its scope for future studies in seismic tomography. To achieve this goal, we compute vertical and horizontal component fundamental mode synthetic Rayleigh waveforms using the FRT, which are compared with calculations using the highly accurate spectral element method. We use 13 global earth models including 3-D crustal and mantle structure, which are derived by successively varying the strength and lengthscale of heterogeneity in current tomographic models. For completeness, GCA waveforms are also compared with the spectral element method. We find that the FRT accurately predicts the phase and amplitude of long-period Rayleigh waves (T ∼ 45–150 s) for almost all the models considered, with errors in the modelling of the phase (amplitude) of Rayleigh waves being smaller than 5 per cent (10 per cent) in most cases. The largest errors in phase and amplitude are observed for T ∼ 45 s and for the three roughest earth models considered that exhibit shear wave anomalies of up to ∼20 per cent, which is much larger than in current global tomographic models. In addition, we find that overall the GCA does not predict Rayleigh wave amplitudes well, except for the longest wave periods (T ∼ 150 s) and the smoothest models considered. Although the GCA accurately predicts Rayleigh wave phase for current earth models such as S20RTS and S40RTS, FRT\\'s phase errors are smaller, notably for the shortest wave periods considered (T

  14. Modeling the synergistic antibacterial effects of honey characteristics of different botanical origins from the Sahara Desert of Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadda eLAALLAM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Honey has multiple therapeutic properties due to its composition with diverse components.Objectives: This study aims to investigate the antimicrobial efficacy of Saharan honeys against bacterial pathogens, the variation of honey floral origins and its physicochemical characteristics.Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial activity of 32 samples of honey collected from the Algerian Sahara Desert was tested on four pathogenic bacteria; Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The botanical origin of honeys and their physicochemical properties were determined and their combined antibacterial effects were modeled using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM.Results: Out of the 32 study samples, 14 were monofloral and 18 were multifloral. The pollen density was on average 7.86 × 106 grains/10 g of honey, water content was 14.6%, electrical conductivity was 0.5 μS/cm, pH was 4.38±0 50, hydroxymethylfurfural content was 82 mg/kg of honey, total sugars = 83%, reducing sugars = 71%, and the concentration of proline = 525.5±550.2 mg/kg of honey. GLMM revealed that the antibacterial effect of honey varied significantly between bacteria and floral origins. This effect increased with increasing of water content and reducing sugars in honey, but it significantly decreased with increase of honey electrical conductivity. E. coli was the most sensitive species with an inhibition zone of 10.1±4.7 mm, while C. perfringens was the less sensitive with 3.9±5.4 mm. Honeys dominated by pollen of Fabaceae sp. were most effective with an overall antimicrobial activity equals to 13.5±4.7 mm.Conclusion: Saharan honeys, of certain botanical origins, have physicochemical and pollinic characteristics with relevant potential for antibacterial purposes. This encourages a more comprehensive characterization of honeys with in vivo and in vitro investigations.Keywords: Honey characterization; antibacterial effects

  15. Identifying the origin of waterbird carcasses in Lake Michigan using a neural network source tracking model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenow, Kevin P.; Ge, Zhongfu; Fara, Luke J.; Houdek, Steven C.; Lubinski, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Avian botulism type E is responsible for extensive waterbird mortality on the Great Lakes, yet the actual site of toxin exposure remains unclear. Beached carcasses are often used to describe the spatial aspects of botulism mortality outbreaks, but lack specificity of offshore toxin source locations. We detail methodology for developing a neural network model used for predicting waterbird carcass motions in response to wind, wave, and current forcing, in lieu of a complex analytical relationship. This empirically trained model uses current velocity, wind velocity, significant wave height, and wave peak period in Lake Michigan simulated by the Great Lakes Coastal Forecasting System. A detailed procedure is further developed to use the model for back-tracing waterbird carcasses found on beaches in various parts of Lake Michigan, which was validated using drift data for radiomarked common loon (Gavia immer) carcasses deployed at a variety of locations in northern Lake Michigan during September and October of 2013. The back-tracing model was further used on 22 non-radiomarked common loon carcasses found along the shoreline of northern Lake Michigan in October and November of 2012. The model-estimated origins of those cases pointed to some common source locations offshore that coincide with concentrations of common loons observed during aerial surveys. The neural network source tracking model provides a promising approach for identifying locations of botulinum neurotoxin type E intoxication and, in turn, contributes to developing an understanding of the dynamics of toxin production and possible trophic transfer pathways.

  16. Illuminating the origins of spectral properties of green fluorescent proteins via proteochemometric and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantasenamat, Chanin; Simeon, Saw; Owasirikul, Wiwat; Songtawee, Napat; Lapins, Maris; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Wikberg, Jarl E S

    2014-10-15

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has immense utility in biomedical imaging owing to its autofluorescent nature. In efforts to broaden the spectral diversity of GFP, there have been several reports of engineered mutants via rational design and random mutagenesis. Understanding the origins of spectral properties of GFP could be achieved by means of investigating its structure-activity relationship. The first quantitative structure-property relationship study for modeling the spectral properties, particularly the excitation and emission maximas, of GFP was previously proposed by us some years ago in which quantum chemical descriptors were used for model development. However, such simplified model does not consider possible effects that neighboring amino acids have on the conjugated π-system of GFP chromophore. This study describes the development of a unified proteochemometric model in which the GFP chromophore and amino acids in its vicinity are both considered in the same model. The predictive performance of the model was verified by internal and external validation as well as Y-scrambling. Our strategy provides a general solution for elucidating the contribution that specific ligand and protein descriptors have on the investigated spectral property, which may be useful in engineering novel GFP variants with desired characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Paleozoic Nymphal Wing Pads Support Dual Model of Insect Wing Origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Jakub; Pecharová, Martina; Nel, André; Hörnschemeyer, Thomas; Krzemińska, Ewa; Krzemiński, Wiesław; Engel, Michael S

    2017-01-23

    The appearance of wings in insects, early in their evolution [1], has been one of the more critical innovations contributing to their extraordinary diversity. Despite the conspicuousness and importance of wings, the origin of these structures has been difficult to resolve and represented one of the "abominable mysteries" in evolutionary biology [2]. More than a century of debate has boiled the matter down to two competing alternatives-one of wings representing an extension of the thoracic notum, the other stating that they are appendicular derivations from the lateral body wall. Recently, a dual model has been supported by genomic and developmental data [3-6], representing an amalgamation of elements from both the notal and pleural hypotheses. Here, we reveal crucial information from the wing pad joints of Carboniferous palaeodictyopteran insect nymphs using classical and high-tech techniques. These nymphs had three pairs of wing pads that were medially articulated to the thorax but also broadly contiguous with the notum anteriorly and posteriorly (details unobservable in modern insects), supporting their overall origin from the thoracic notum as well as the expected medial, pleural series of axillary sclerites. Our study provides support for the formation of the insect wing from the thoracic notum as well as the already known pleural elements of the arthropodan leg. These results support the unique, dual model for insect wing origins and the convergent reduction of notal fusion in more derived clades, presumably due to wing rotation during development, and they help to bring resolution to this long-standing debate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Phased Array Noise Source Localization Measurements of an F404 Nozzle Plume at Both Full and Model Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podboy, Gary G.; Bridges, James E.; Henderson, Brenda S.

    2010-01-01

    A 48-microphone planar phased array system was used to acquire jet noise source localization data on both a full-scale F404-GE-F400 engine and on a 1/4th scale model of a F400 series nozzle. The full-scale engine test data show the location of the dominant noise sources in the jet plume as a function of frequency for the engine in both baseline (no chevron) and chevron configurations. Data are presented for the engine operating both with and without afterburners. Based on lessons learned during this test, a set of recommendations are provided regarding how the phased array measurement system could be modified in order to obtain more useful acoustic source localization data on high-performance military engines in the future. The data obtained on the 1/4th scale F400 series nozzle provide useful insights regarding the full-scale engine jet noise source mechanisms, and document some of the differences associated with testing at model-scale versus fullscale.

  19. On the tsunami model of the origin of multi-ring basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Zengyuan; Zhang Bin; Chen Daohan.

    1990-03-01

    By use of the theory of shallow water waves generated by an impulsive pressure, the tsunami theory of the origin of multi-ring basins is rediscussed and an approximate formula used for calculating the ring location is derived. From the computed ring spacing of three multi-ring basins on the moon (Orientale, Moscoviense and Serenitatis South), it is shown that the tsunami model can only be applied to the area within the IV ring which signifies the rim of the excavated basin and the end of the fluidized region. In the frame of the tsunami model, no explanation for ring spacing is equally plausible for exterior rings as well as interior ones. (author). 14 refs, 1 tab

  20. Quantitative comparison of mathematical models to measure surface area of canine teeth prepared to receive full veneer crowns in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlyn eCollins

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was performed in order to determine if mathematical modeling of the canine teeth in dogs could be utilized to provide an accurate and reliable estimation of crown surface area that could be used in both a research and clinical setting.Materials and methods: Actual surface area (aSA calculations for 32 stone dies of clinical crown preparations were acquired utilizing a tridimensional (3D laser scanner and 3D computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM software applications. These calculations were used as a control. Seventeen unique mathematical models from 8 geometric shapes were used to calculate estimated surface area (eSA of each stone die. Linear association and agreement between eSA and aSA calculations were assessed with multiple statistical methods. Results: All methods of eSA showed a significant linear association with aSA. Five of the mathematical models [right elliptical frustum (H3, right elliptical cone (G3, right pyramidal cone (A3, right circular frustum (F2 and right circular cone (E1] were superior to the other 12 models.Conclusions: The H3 mathematical model based on the right elliptical frustum provided the most accurate estimate of crown surface area of dog teeth. However, H3 requires the use of laser scans and a 3D CAD software program. As a result, this model would be recommended for research applications. The E1 mathematical model was similar in accuracy to H3 and, given it requires only two measurements and a comparatively simple equation for calculation, this method would be recommended for clinical chair-side use.

  1. Mechanistic Model for Ash Deposit Formation in Biomass Suspension-Fired Boilers. Part 2: Model Verification by Use of Full Scale Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine Broholm; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    A model for deposit formation in suspension firing of biomass has been developed. The model describes deposit build-up by diffusion and subsequent condensation of vapors, thermoforesis of aerosols, convective diffusion of small particles, impaction of large particles and reaction. The model...... of some physical parameters related to the description of surface capture are suggested. Based on these examinations of the model ability to describe observed deposit formation rates, the proposed model can be regarded as a promising tool for description of deposit formation in full-scale biomass...... describes particle sticking or rebound by a combination of the description of (visco)elsatic particles impacting a solid surface and particle capture by a viscous surface. The model is used to predict deposit formation rates measured during tests conducted with probes in full-scale suspension-fired biomass...

  2. A model of accumulation of radionuclides in biosphere originating from groundwater contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaerdenaes, Annemieke [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Soil Sciences; Jansson, Per-Erik; Karlberg, Louise [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. Land and Water Resources

    2006-03-15

    The objective of this study is to introduce a module in CoupModel describing the transport and accumulation in the biosphere of a radionuclide originating from a ground water contamination. Two model approaches describing the plant uptake of a radionuclide were included, namely passive and active uptake. Passive uptake means in this study that the root uptake rate of a radionuclide is governed by water uptake. Normal mechanism for the passive water uptake is the convective flux of water from the soil to the plant. An example of element taken up passively is Ca. Active plant uptake is in this model defined as the root uptake rate of a radionuclide that is governed by carbon assimilation i.e. photosynthesis and plant growth. The actively taken up element can for example be an element essential to plant, but not available in high enough concentration by passive uptake alone, like the major nutrients N and P or an element that very well resembles a plant nutrient, like Cs resembles K. Active uptake of trace element may occur alone or in addition to passive uptake. Normal mechanism for the active uptake is molecular diffusion from the soil solution to the roots or via any other organism living in symbiosis with the roots like the mycorrhiza. Also a model approach describing adsorption was introduced. CoupModel dynamically couples and simulates the flows of water, heat, carbon and nitrogen in the soil/plant/atmosphere system. Any number of plants may be defined and are divided into roots, leaves, stem and grain. The soil is considered in one vertical profile that may be represented into a maximum of 100 layers. The model is the windows-successor and integrated version of the DOS-models SOIL and SOILN, which have been widely used on different ecosystems and climate regions during 25 years time period. To this soil/plant/atmosphere model were introduced a module describing accumulation of a radionuclide in the biosphere originating from groundwater contamination. The

  3. A model of accumulation of radionuclides in biosphere originating from groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaerdenaes, Annemieke; Jansson, Per-Erik; Karlberg, Louise

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this study is to introduce a module in CoupModel describing the transport and accumulation in the biosphere of a radionuclide originating from a ground water contamination. Two model approaches describing the plant uptake of a radionuclide were included, namely passive and active uptake. Passive uptake means in this study that the root uptake rate of a radionuclide is governed by water uptake. Normal mechanism for the passive water uptake is the convective flux of water from the soil to the plant. An example of element taken up passively is Ca. Active plant uptake is in this model defined as the root uptake rate of a radionuclide that is governed by carbon assimilation i.e. photosynthesis and plant growth. The actively taken up element can for example be an element essential to plant, but not available in high enough concentration by passive uptake alone, like the major nutrients N and P or an element that very well resembles a plant nutrient, like Cs resembles K. Active uptake of trace element may occur alone or in addition to passive uptake. Normal mechanism for the active uptake is molecular diffusion from the soil solution to the roots or via any other organism living in symbiosis with the roots like the mycorrhiza. Also a model approach describing adsorption was introduced. CoupModel dynamically couples and simulates the flows of water, heat, carbon and nitrogen in the soil/plant/atmosphere system. Any number of plants may be defined and are divided into roots, leaves, stem and grain. The soil is considered in one vertical profile that may be represented into a maximum of 100 layers. The model is the windows-successor and integrated version of the DOS-models SOIL and SOILN, which have been widely used on different ecosystems and climate regions during 25 years time period. To this soil/plant/atmosphere model were introduced a module describing accumulation of a radionuclide in the biosphere originating from groundwater contamination. The

  4. Development of microgravity, full body functional reach envelope using 3-D computer graphic models and virtual reality technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Patricia F.

    1994-01-01

    In microgravity conditions mobility is greatly enhanced and body stability is difficult to achieve. Because of these difficulties, optimum placement and accessibility of objects and controls can be critical to required tasks on board shuttle flights or on the proposed space station. Anthropometric measurement of the maximum reach of occupants of a microgravity environment provide knowledge about maximum functional placement for tasking situations. Calculations for a full body, functional reach envelope for microgravity environments are imperative. To this end, three dimensional computer modeled human figures, providing a method of anthropometric measurement, were used to locate the data points that define the full body, functional reach envelope. Virtual reality technology was utilized to enable an occupant of the microgravity environment to experience movement within the reach envelope while immersed in a simulated microgravity environment.

  5. Longitudinal and Integrative Tests of Family Stress Model Effects on Mexican-Origin Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Rebecca M. B.; Liu, Yu; Nair, Rajni L.; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2015-01-01

    The family stress model represents a common framework through which to examine the effects of environmental stressors on adolescent adjustment. The model suggests that economic and neighborhood stressors influence youth adjustment via disruptions to parenting. Incorporating integrative developmental theory, we examined the degree to which parents’ cultural value orientations mitigated the effects of stressors on parenting disruptions and the degree to which environmental adversity qualified the effect of parenting on adolescent adjustment. We tested the hypothesized Integrative Family Stress Model longitudinally in a sample of mother-youth dyads (N = 749) and father-youth dyads (N = 467) from Mexican origin families, across three times points spanning early to middle adolescence. Providing the first longitudinal evidence of family stress mediated effects, mothers’ perceptions of economic pressure were associated with increases in adolescent externalizing symptoms five years later via intermediate increases in harsh parenting. The remaining findings supported the notion that integrative developmental theory can inform family stress model hypothesis testing that is culturally and contextually relevant for wide range of diverse families and youth. For example, fathers’ perceptions of economic pressure and neighborhood danger had important implications for adolescent internalizing, via reductions in paternal warmth, but only at certain levels of neighborhood adversity. Mothers’ familism value orientations mitigated the effects of economic pressure on maternal warmth, protecting their adolescents from experiencing developmental costs associated with environmental stressors. Results are discussed in terms of identifying how integrative developmental theory intersects with the family stress model to set diverse youth on different developmental pathways. PMID:25751100

  6. Parental Modeling and Deidentification in Romantic Relationships Among Mexican-origin Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Sally I-Chun; Wheeler, Lorey A; Updegraff, Kimberly A; McHale, Susan M; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J; Perez-Brena, Norma J

    2017-10-01

    This study investigated youth's modeling of and de-identification from parents in romantic relationships, using two phases of data from adolescent siblings, mothers, and fathers in 246 Mexican-origin families. Each parent reported his/her marital satisfaction and conflict, and youth reported on parent-adolescent warmth and conflict at Time 1. Youth's reports of modeling of and de-identification from their mothers and fathers and three romantic relationship outcomes were assessed at Time 2. Findings revealed that higher parental marital satisfaction, lower marital conflict, and higher warmth and lower conflict in parent-adolescent relationships were associated with more modeling and less de-identification from parents. Moreover, higher de-identification was linked to a greater likelihood of youth being involved in a romantic relationship and cohabitation, whereas more modeling was linked to a lower likelihood of cohabitation and older age of first sex. Discussion underscores the importance of assessing parental modeling and de-identification and understanding correlates of these processes.

  7. Origin of the neutron skin thickness of 208Pb in nuclear mean-field models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centelles, M.; Roca-Maza, X.; Vinas, X.; Warda, M.

    2010-01-01

    We study whether the neutron skin thickness Δr np of 208 Pb originates from the bulk or from the surface of the nucleon density distributions, according to the mean-field models of nuclear structure, and find that it depends on the stiffness of the nuclear symmetry energy. The bulk contribution to Δr np arises from an extended sharp radius of neutrons, whereas the surface contribution arises from different widths of the neutron and proton surfaces. Nuclear models where the symmetry energy is stiff, as typical of relativistic models, predict a bulk contribution in Δr np of 208 Pb about twice as large as the surface contribution. In contrast, models with a soft symmetry energy like common nonrelativistic models predict that Δr np of 208 Pb is divided similarly into bulk and surface parts. Indeed, if the symmetry energy is supersoft, the surface contribution becomes dominant. We note that the linear correlation of Δr np of 208 Pb with the density derivative of the nuclear symmetry energy arises from the bulk part of Δr np . We also note that most models predict a mixed-type (between halo and skin) neutron distribution for 208 Pb. Although the halo-type limit is actually found in the models with a supersoft symmetry energy, the skin-type limit is not supported by any mean-field model. Finally, we compute parity-violating electron scattering in the conditions of the 208 Pb parity radius experiment (PREX) and obtain a pocket formula for the parity-violating asymmetry in terms of the parameters that characterize the shape of the 208 Pb nucleon densities.

  8. An automatic and accurate method of full heart segmentation from CT image based on linear gradient model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zili

    2017-07-01

    Heart segmentation is an important auxiliary method in the diagnosis of many heart diseases, such as coronary heart disease and atrial fibrillation, and in the planning of tumor radiotherapy. Most of the existing methods for full heart segmentation treat the heart as a whole part and cannot accurately extract the bottom of the heart. In this paper, we propose a new method based on linear gradient model to segment the whole heart from the CT images automatically and accurately. Twelve cases were tested in order to test this method and accurate segmentation results were achieved and identified by clinical experts. The results can provide reliable clinical support.

  9. Emu model of full-range femoral head osteonecrosis induced focally by an alternating freezing and heating insult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, M; Peng, J; Wang, A; Zhang, L; Liu, B; Ren, Z; Xu, W; Sun, J; Xu, Lx; Xiao, D; Qin, L; Lu, S; Wang, Y; Guo, Q Y

    2011-01-01

    The emu, a large bipedal bird with hip joint biomechanics similar to humans, was used to establish an experimental model of femoral head osteonecrosis and subsequent femoral head collapse. Focal lesions were induced in 20 adult male emus using an alternating liquid nitrogen freezing and radiofrequency heating insult. At 2, 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks post-surgery, hip magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed. Before the emus were sacrificed, barium sulphate was infused to the lower extremity to study blood vessel distribution patterns. Femoral samples were scanned by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and evaluated histologically. Hip MRI showed changes from broad oedema to femoral head collapse. Emus developed a crippled gait from post-operative week 6. Micro-CT scans and histology showed human-like osteonecrotic changes with an impaired local blood supply. The protocol resulted in consistent full-range osteonecrosis of the femoral head that may serve as a model for testing potential treatments.

  10. Applying neutron transmission physics and 3D statistical full-field model to understand 2D Bragg-edge imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Q.; Song, G.; Gorti, S.; Stoica, A. D.; Radhakrishnan, B.; Bilheux, J. C.; Kirka, M.; Dehoff, R.; Bilheux, H. Z.; An, K.

    2018-02-01

    Bragg-edge imaging, which is also known as neutron radiography, has recently emerged as a novel crystalline characterization technique. Modelling of this novel technique by incorporating various features of the underlying microstructure (including the crystallographic texture, the morphological texture, and the grain size) of the material remains a subject of considerable research and development. In this paper, Inconel 718 samples made by additive manufacturing were investigated by neutron diffraction and neutron radiography techniques. The specimen features strong morphological and crystallographic textures and a highly heterogeneous microstructure. A 3D statistical full-field model is introduced by taking details of the microstructure into account to understand the experimental neutron radiography results. The Bragg-edge imaging and the total cross section were calculated based on the neutron transmission physics. A good match was obtained between the model predictions and experimental results at different incident beam angles with respect to the sample build direction. The current theoretical approach has the ability to incorporate 3D spatially resolved microstructural heterogeneity information and shows promise in understanding the 2D neutron radiography of bulk samples. With further development to incorporate the heterogeneity in lattice strain in the model, it can be used as a powerful tool in the future to better understand the neutron radiography data.

  11. The "GEOMODEL" at Kiel University: A Hydrogeophysical full scale model to study pore water, contamination and structure of vadose soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagrey, S. A.; Rabbel, W.; Working Group Of Wateruse

    2003-04-01

    Erecting new improved GeoModel at Kiel University is based on our experiences with the pilot model for studying preferential flow processes and takes into account objectives of the EU - project "wateruse" for developing new high resolving techniques for hydro- and bio-geophysical studies. The GeoModel consists of a soil model (3x5x2m), computer room and monitoring chamber. A special irrigation device is installed above the model to simulate irrigations of different rates, intensities and contaminations (tracers). At the base a filter pebble layer divided into different segments for monitoring lateral distribution of discharge indicating for flowpaths and processes. A self developed vacuum aperture is installed to overcome effects of the hydraulic capillary barrier which is related to the abrupt jump in grain size at the soil sand-filter pebble interface. The concept of the GeoModel is to carry out controlled experiment with predefined boundary conditions (as in laboratory) on a full scale soil model (as in the field, i.e., no scale problems). The GeoModel, currently filled with silty sand is equipped with diverse fine electrode grids, radar hardware, TDR-, Tensiometer probes for measuring electrical resistivity, electromagnetic wave velocity and amplitude, water content and potential, respectively. The (infiltration) experiments aim at developing high resolution integrative spatiotemporal 3D techniques for monitoring flow processes of fluids and contaminants, mapping fine structure as preferential flow paths, root networks and trunk rings (which opens new applications in biogeophysics and geobiology), quantification of soil water content. The GeoModel serve for calibration of new instruments and techniques and is applied for special geotechnical and environmental experiments (e.g. anti-person mines, tracer experiments) as well as for technical courses for specialists. Also laboratory study of petrophysical parameters of soil material is carried out to establish

  12. High Efficiency Variable-Frequency Full-Bridge Converter with a Load Adaptive Control Method Based on the Loss Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a load adaptive control method to improve the efficiency and dynamic performance of the Phase-Shifted Full-Bridge (PSFB converter which works under a wide range of load conditions is presented. The proposed control method can be used as a battery charger since this application demands a wide range of load conditions. The composition of the PSFB converter’s losses and the loss analysis model are both discussed. According to this model, the optimum switching frequency which results in minimum power loss is adopted to improve the efficiency. The relationship between switching frequency and power loss is formulated over a wide load range. Indicated by this kind of relationship, the proposed controller adjusts the switching frequency at different load currents. Moreover, an adaptive gain adjustment controller is applied to replace the traditional controller, with the aim to improve the dynamic performance which is influenced by the changes of the switching frequency and load current. In addition, the experimental results show that the maximum improvement of efficiency is up to 20%. These results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed load adaptive control method.

  13. Application of Empirical Peleg Model to Study the Water Adsorption of Full Cream Milk in Drying Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashib, S. Abd; Rosli, H.; Suzihaque, M. U. H.; Zaki, N. A. Md; Ibrahim, U. K.

    2017-06-01

    The ability of spray dryer in producing full cream milk at different inlet temperatures and the effectiveness of empirical model used in order to interpret the drying process data is evaluated in this study. In this study, a lab-scale spray dryer was used to dry full cream milk into powder with inlet temperature from 100 to 160°C with a constant pump speed 4rpm. Peleg empirical model was chosen in order to manipulate the drying data into the mathematical equation. This research was carry out specifically to determine the equilibrium moisture content of full cream milk powder at various inlet temperature and to evaluate the effectiveness of Peleg empirical model equation in order to describe the moisture sorption curves for full cream milk. There were two conditions set for this experiments; in the first condition (C1), further drying process of milk powder in the oven at 98°C to 100°C while the second condition (C2) is mixing the milk powder with different salt solutions like Magnesium Chloride (MgCl), Potassium Nitrite (KNO2), Sodium Nitrite (NaNO2) and Ammonium Sulfate ((NH4)2SO4). For C1, the optimum temperature were 160°C with equilibrium moisture content at 3.16 weight dry basis and slowest sorption rates (dM/dt) at 0.0743 weight dry basis/hr. For C2, the best temperature for the mixture of dry samples with MgCl is at 115°C with equilibrium moisture content and sorption rates is -78.079 weight dry basis and 0.01 weight dry basis/hr. The best temperature for the mixture of milk powder with KNO2 is also at 115°C with equilibrium moisture content and sorption rates at -83.9645 weight dry basis and 0.0008 weight dry basis/hr respectively. For mixture of dry samples with NaNO2, the best temperature is 160°C with equilibrium moisture content and sorption rates at 84.1306 weight dry basis and 0.0013 weight dry basis/hr respectively. Lastly, the mixture of dry samples with ((NH4)2SO4 where the best temperature is at 115°C with equilibrium moisture content -83

  14. The origin of Venusian channels: Modelling of thermal erosion by lava

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussey, D. B. J.; Sorensen, S-A.; Guest, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    Magellan imagery has revealed that channels, apparently volcanic in origin, are abundant on the surface of Venus. There has been much debate about the origin of these channels. Are they the result of erosional (either thermal or mechanical) or constructional processes? A common characteristic of the simple sinuous channels is that they show evidence of erosion near their source and then become purely constructional, forming levees and in some cases roofing over completely. One method of showing that thermal erosion is capable of producing the type of channels seen is to use computer modeling incorporating the physical conditions on Venus and the physical characteristics of the different types of lava that may have been erupted. It is possible to calculate, relatively easily, two channel parameters. The first is the erosion rate, which combined with eruption duration, gives depth. The second is for how long after leaving the source the erupted lava will continue to be capable of thermal erosion before constructional processes dominate. Making assumptions about the rheology of the lava (e.g., assume it behaves as a Bingham plastic) along with the slope angle yields a flow velocity and therefore a distance over which thermal erosion will take place. Due to the resolution (both vertical and horizontal) of the Magellan altimetric data, the distance from the source that the channel is erosional can be much more accurately measured than the depth of the channel. This will remain the case until stereo imagery becomes available for large areas of the planet.

  15. A microhomology-mediated break-induced replication model for the origin of human copy number variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P J Hastings

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome structural changes with nonrecurrent endpoints associated with genomic disorders offer windows into the mechanism of origin of copy number variation (CNV. A recent report of nonrecurrent duplications associated with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease identified three distinctive characteristics. First, the majority of events can be seen to be complex, showing discontinuous duplications mixed with deletions, inverted duplications, and triplications. Second, junctions at endpoints show microhomology of 2-5 base pairs (bp. Third, endpoints occur near pre-existing low copy repeats (LCRs. Using these observations and evidence from DNA repair in other organisms, we derive a model of microhomology-mediated break-induced replication (MMBIR for the origin of CNV and, ultimately, of LCRs. We propose that breakage of replication forks in stressed cells that are deficient in homologous recombination induces an aberrant repair process with features of break-induced replication (BIR. Under these circumstances, single-strand 3' tails from broken replication forks will anneal with microhomology on any single-stranded DNA nearby, priming low-processivity polymerization with multiple template switches generating complex rearrangements, and eventual re-establishment of processive replication.

  16. Kinetic modelling and characterization of microbial community present in a full-scale UASB reactor treating brewery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enitan, Abimbola M; Kumari, Sheena; Swalaha, Feroz M; Adeyemo, J; Ramdhani, Nishani; Bux, Faizal

    2014-02-01

    The performance of a full-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating brewery wastewater was investigated by microbial analysis and kinetic modelling. The microbial community present in the granular sludge was detected using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and further confirmed using polymerase chain reaction. A group of 16S rRNA based fluorescent probes and primers targeting Archaea and Eubacteria were selected for microbial analysis. FISH results indicated the presence and dominance of a significant amount of Eubacteria and diverse group of methanogenic Archaea belonging to the order Methanococcales, Methanobacteriales, and Methanomicrobiales within in the UASB reactor. The influent brewery wastewater had a relatively high amount of volatile fatty acids chemical oxygen demand (COD), 2005 mg/l and the final COD concentration of the reactor was 457 mg/l. The biogas analysis showed 60-69% of methane, confirming the presence and activities of methanogens within the reactor. Biokinetics of the degradable organic substrate present in the brewery wastewater was further explored using Stover and Kincannon kinetic model, with the aim of predicting the final effluent quality. The maximum utilization rate constant U max and the saturation constant (K(B)) in the model were estimated as 18.51 and 13.64 g/l/day, respectively. The model showed an excellent fit between the predicted and the observed effluent COD concentrations. Applicability of this model to predict the effluent quality of the UASB reactor treating brewery wastewater was evident from the regression analysis (R(2) = 0.957) which could be used for optimizing the reactor performance.

  17. Carbonado: Physical and chemical properties, a critical evaluation of proposed origins, and a revised genetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Stephen E.

    2014-03-01

    Carbonado-diamond is the most controversial of all diamond types and is found only in Brazil, and the Central African Republic (Bangui). Neither an affinity to Earth's mantle, nor an origin in the crust can be unequivocally established. Carbonado-diamond is at least 3.8 Ga old, an age about 0.5 Ga older than the oldest diamonds yet reported in kimberlites and lamproites on Earth. Derived from Neo- to Mid-Proterozoic meta-conglomerates, the primary magmatic host rock has not been identified. Discovered in 1841, the material is polycrystalline, robust and coke-like, and is best described as a strongly bonded micro-diamond ceramic. It is characteristically porous, which precludes an origin at high pressures and high temperatures in Earth's deep interior, yet it is also typically patinated, with a glass-like surface that resembles melting. With exotic inclusions of highly reduced metals, carbides, and nitrides the origin of carbonado-diamond is made even more challenging. But the challenge is important because a new diamondiferous host rock may be involved, and the development of a new physical process for generating diamond is possibly assured. The combination of micro-crystals and random crystal orientation leads to extreme mechanical toughness, and a predicable super-hardness. The physical and chemical properties of carbonado are described with a view to the development of a mimetic strategy to synthesize carbonado and to duplicate its extreme toughness and super-hardness. Textural variations are described with an emphasis on melt-like surface features, not previously discussed in the literature, but having a very clear bearing on the history and genesis of carbonado. Selected physical properties are presented and the proposed origins, diverse in character and imaginatively novel, are critically reviewed. From our present knowledge of the dynamic Earth, all indications are that carbonado is unlikely to be of terrestrial origin. A revised model for the origin of

  18. Study of continuous irrigation negative-pressure treatment using an original ulceration model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Hitomi; Kajikawa, Akiyoshi; Ueda, Kazuki

    2013-06-01

    A continuous irrigation with intermittent aspiration (CIIA) method has previously been developed in the treatment of infected expander sites. For the purpose of treatment of infected wounds, a new intermittent negative pressure irrigation treatment (INPIT) has been developed that is a combination of CIIA with topical negative-pressure therapy. This study aims to investigate the efficacy of INPIT. The efficacy of irrigation was investigated by changing the conditions including the location and the number of irrigation tubes, flow volume, and the timetable of negative-pressure application using original ulcer models. Although the presence of side holes and increase in the number of tubes or flow volume improved the irrigation efficacy, non-washed-out areas remained. On the other hand, INPIT allowed more uniform and wide area washing even at low flow volume. The results suggest that INPIT is superior to general conventional continuous irrigation treatment in irrigation efficiency.

  19. Origins and consequences of technology acquirement by independent-living seniors: towards an integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, S T M; Luijkx, K G; Vrijhoef, H J M; Nieboer, M E; Aarts, S; van der Voort, C S; Rijnaard, M D; Wouters, E J M

    2017-08-22

    Living independently can be challenging for seniors. Technologies are expected to help older adults age in place, yet little empirical research is available on how seniors develop a need for technologies, how they acquire these technologies, and how these subsequently affect their lives. Aging is complex, dynamic and personal. But how does this translate to seniors' adoption and acceptance of technology? To better understand origins and consequences of technology acquirement by independent-living seniors, an explorative longitudinal qualitative field study was set up. Home visits were made to 33 community-dwelling seniors living in the Netherlands, on three occasions (2012-2014). Semi-structured interviews were conducted on the timeline of acquirements, and people and factors involved in acquirements. Additionally, participants were interviewed on experiences in using technologies since acquirement. Thematic analysis was employed to analyze interview transcripts, using a realist approach to better understand the contexts, mechanisms and outcomes of technology acquirements. Findings were accumulated in a new conceptual model: The Cycle of Technology Acquirement by Independent-Living Seniors (C-TAILS), which provides an integrative perspective on why and how technologies are acquired, and why these may or may not prove to be appropriate and effective, considering an independent-living senior's needs and circumstances at a given point in time. We found that externally driven and purely desire-driven acquirements led to a higher risk of suboptimal use and low levels of need satisfaction. Technology acquirement by independent-living seniors may be best characterized as a heterogeneous process with many different origins, pathways and consequences. Furthermore, technologies that are acquired in ways that are not congruent with seniors' personal needs and circumstances run a higher risk of proving to be ineffective or inappropriate. Yet, these needs and circumstances are

  20. Phylogenetic structural equation modelling reveals no need for an 'origin' of the leaf economics spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Chase M; Goolsby, Eric W; Humphreys, Devon P; Donovan, Lisa A

    2016-01-01

    The leaf economics spectrum (LES) is a prominent ecophysiological paradigm that describes global variation in leaf physiology across plant ecological strategies using a handful of key traits. Nearly a decade ago, Shipley et al. (2006) used structural equation modelling to explore the causal functional relationships among LES traits that give rise to their strong global covariation. They concluded that an unmeasured trait drives LES covariation, sparking efforts to identify the latent physiological trait underlying the 'origin' of the LES. Here, we use newly developed phylogenetic structural equation modelling approaches to reassess these conclusions using both global LES data as well as data collected across scales in the genus Helianthus. For global LES data, accounting for phylogenetic non-independence indicates that no additional unmeasured traits are required to explain LES covariation. Across datasets in Helianthus, trait relationships are highly variable, indicating that global-scale models may poorly describe LES covariation at non-global scales. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  1. Illuminating the Sierra Nevada Pn Shadow Zone with 2.5D Full-waveform Forward Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogolub, K. R.; Jones, C. H.; Roecker, S. W.

    2017-12-01

    Seismic phases from western California earthquakes to the east side of the Sierra Nevada have long been noted for their late arrival. Record sections within the range reveal low apparent velocities ( 7.4 km/s) accompanied by high ( 8.6 km/s) apparent velocities east of the range. On a subset of seismic stations in the range, the Pn phase often has anomalously low amplitude and, in some cases, no discernible Pn arrival at all. Despite several seismological experiments in the region, the cause of this Pn shadow zone remains adumbral. However, because the Pn raypath is near the Moho, the shadow zone is likely related to the foundering of dense lithospheric material from under the high part of the range. Using a 2.5D finite difference forward modeling waveform algorithm, we have tested a range of new and previously published seismic velocity models of the crust and upper mantle against the observed arrival times and waveforms across the Pn shadow zone. Our preliminary tests have shown that a subset of velocity models that contain a high wavespeed body under the Moho are capable of producing synthetic seismograms resembling the Pn observations. We explore the sensitivity of synthetic results to different model parameters in order to exclude some styles of lithospheric deformation and to determine a suite of candidate structures suitable for use with a full 2.5D waveform inversion. This is preparatory to future work that will also incorporate eastside and teleseismic sources to constrain the near-Moho structure of the Sierra, with the ultimate goal of resolving between different geodynamic interpretations of the foundering process.

  2. On the sensitivity of teleseismic full-waveform inversion to earth parametrization, initial model and acquisition design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, S.; Monteiller, V.; Combe, L.; Operto, S.; Nolet, G.

    2018-02-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is not yet a mature imaging technology for lithospheric imaging from teleseismic data. Therefore, its promise and pitfalls need to be assessed more accurately according to the specifications of teleseismic experiments. Three important issues are related to (1) the choice of the lithospheric parametrization for optimization and visualization, (2) the initial model and (3) the acquisition design, in particular in terms of receiver spread and sampling. These three issues are investigated with a realistic synthetic example inspired by the CIFALPS experiment in the Western Alps. Isotropic elastic FWI is implemented with an adjoint-state formalism and aims to update three parameter classes by minimization of a classical least-squares difference-based misfit function. Three different subsurface parametrizations, combining density (ρ) with P and S wave speeds (Vp and Vs) , P and S impedances (Ip and Is), or elastic moduli (λ and μ) are first discussed based on their radiation patterns before their assessment by FWI. We conclude that the (ρ, λ, μ) parametrization provides the FWI models that best correlate with the true ones after recombining a posteriori the (ρ, λ, μ) optimization parameters into Ip and Is. Owing to the low frequency content of teleseismic data, 1-D reference global models as PREM provide sufficiently accurate initial models for FWI after smoothing that is necessary to remove the imprint of the layering. Two kinds of station deployments are assessed: coarse areal geometry versus dense linear one. We unambiguously conclude that a coarse areal geometry should be favoured as it dramatically increases the penetration in depth of the imaging as well as the horizontal resolution. This results because the areal geometry significantly increases local wavenumber coverage, through a broader sampling of the scattering and dip angles, compared to a linear deployment.

  3. Global stratospheric hydrogen peroxide distribution from MIPAS-Envisat full resolution spectra compared to KASIMA model results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Versick

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available MIPAS-ENVISAT full resolution spectra were analyzed to obtain a global distribution of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in the stratosphere. H2O2 acts as reservoir gas for the HOx family (= H+OH+HO2 and thus, observations of H2O2 provide a better understanding of the HOx chemistry in the atmosphere. A retrieval approach based on constrained least squares fitting was developed and applied to small dedicated spectral analysis windows with maximum H2O2 information and minimum contribution of interfering gases. Due to a low signal to noise ratio in the measured spectra single profiles cannot be used for scientific interpretation and about 100 profiles have to be averaged temporally or spatially. Our retrievals of H2O2 from MIPAS measurements provide meaningful results between approximately 20 and 60 km. A possible impact by the high uncertainty of the reaction rate constant for HO2 + HO2→H2O2 + O2 in our 3D-CTM KASIMA is discussed. We find best agreement between model and observations for applying rate constants according to Christensen et al. (2002 however, a mismatch in vertical profile shape remains. The observations were compared to the model results of KASIMA focusing on low to mid latitudes. Good agreement in spatial distribution and in temporal evolution was found. Highest vmr of H2O2 in the stratosphere were observed and modeled in low latitudes shortly after equinox at about 30 km. The modelled diurnal cycle with lowest vmr shortly after sunrise and highest vmr in the afternoon is confirmed by the MIPAS observations.

  4. A numerical study of hypersonic flows using the full Navier-Stokes equations with different air models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon-Sang

    A two-dimensional, axisymmetric, full Navier-Stokes solver has been developed with equilibrium and nonequilibrium air models. The effects of a real gas are investigated numerically in the hypersonic flow regime. The code employs several different upwind schemes to examine their effect on the accuracy and stability of the numerical solutions. A finite volume method is used with curvilinear coordinates, and the first-order, up wind schemes are extended to second-order accuracy in space. The steady-state solutions are obtained using an approximately factorized implicit scheme, including fully implicit boundary conditions, to accelerate the convergence. The numerical accuracy is improved by introducing the closed-control-volume concept in the metric quantity calculations. This idea is verified by a blunt-nosed flow case with a scrambled grid. In general, the fastest convergence in an implicit scheme is obtained when the same residual and correction operators are applied. A new simplified Jacobian matrix is derived for Roe's flux difference splitting scheme because of the complexity involved in deriving the full Jacobian matrix, and which yields a faster convergence compared to the use of a different correction operator such as Steger-Warming's.

  5. Electrochromic Radiator Coupon Level Testing and Full Scale Thermal Math Modeling for Use on Altair Lunar Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Erika T.; Bower, Chad E.; Sheth, Rubik; Stephan, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    In order to control system and component temperatures, many spacecraft thermal control systems use a radiator coupled with a pumped fluid loop to reject waste heat from the vehicle. Since heat loads and radiation environments can vary considerably according to mission phase, the thermal control system must be able to vary the heat rejection. The ability to "turn down" the heat rejected from the thermal control system is critically important when designing the system. Electrochromic technology as a radiator coating is being investigated to vary the amount of heat rejected by a radiator. Coupon level tests were performed to test the feasibility of this technology. Furthermore, thermal math models were developed to better understand the turndown ratios required by full scale radiator architectures to handle the various operation scenarios encountered during a mission profile for the Altair Lunar Lander. This paper summarizes results from coupon level tests as well as the thermal math models developed to investigate how electrochromics can be used to increase turn down ratios for a radiator. Data from the various design concepts of radiators and their architectures are outlined. Recommendations are made on which electrochromic radiator concept should be carried further for future thermal vacuum testing.

  6. A Full-wave Model for Wave Propagation and Dissipation in the Inner Magnetosphere Using the Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeo, Ernest; Johnson, Jay R.; Kim, Eun-Hwa; Phillips, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    A wide variety of plasma waves play an important role in the energization and loss of particles in the inner magnetosphere. Our ability to understand and model wave-particle interactions in this region requires improved knowledge of the spatial distribution and properties of these waves as well as improved understanding of how the waves depend on changes in solar wind forcing and/or geomagnetic activity. To this end, we have developed a two-dimensional, finite element code that solves the full wave equations in global magnetospheric geometry. The code describes three-dimensional wave structure including mode conversion when ULF, EMIC, and whistler waves are launched in a two-dimensional axisymmetric background plasma with general magnetic field topology. We illustrate the capabilities of the code by examining the role of plasmaspheric plumes on magnetosonic wave propagation; mode conversion at the ion-ion and Alfven resonances resulting from external, solar wind compressions; and wave structure and mode conversion of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves launched in the equatorial magnetosphere, which propagate along the magnetic field lines toward the ionosphere. We also discuss advantages of the finite element method for resolving resonant structures, and how the model may be adapted to include nonlocal kinetic effects.

  7. A Full-wave Model for Wave Propagation and Dissipation in the Inner Magnetosphere Using the Finite Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest Valeo, Jay R. Johnson, Eun-Hwa and Cynthia Phillips

    2012-03-13

    A wide variety of plasma waves play an important role in the energization and loss of particles in the inner magnetosphere. Our ability to understand and model wave-particle interactions in this region requires improved knowledge of the spatial distribution and properties of these waves as well as improved understanding of how the waves depend on changes in solar wind forcing and/or geomagnetic activity. To this end, we have developed a two-dimensional, finite element code that solves the full wave equations in global magnetospheric geometry. The code describes three-dimensional wave structure including mode conversion when ULF, EMIC, and whistler waves are launched in a two-dimensional axisymmetric background plasma with general magnetic field topology. We illustrate the capabilities of the code by examining the role of plasmaspheric plumes on magnetosonic wave propagation; mode conversion at the ion-ion and Alfven resonances resulting from external, solar wind compressions; and wave structure and mode conversion of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves launched in the equatorial magnetosphere, which propagate along the magnetic field lines toward the ionosphere. We also discuss advantages of the finite element method for resolving resonant structures, and how the model may be adapted to include nonlocal kinetic effects.

  8. Peak capacity analysis of coal power in China based on full-life cycle cost model optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jinfang; Huang, Xinting

    2018-02-01

    13th five-year and the next period are critical for the energy and power reform of China. In order to ease the excessive power supply, policies have been introduced by National Energy Board especially toward coal power capacity control. Therefore the rational construction scale and scientific development timing for coal power are of great importance and paid more and more attentions. In this study, the comprehensive influence of coal power reduction policies is analyzed from diverse point of views. Full-life cycle cost model of coal power is established to fully reflect the external and internal cost. Then this model is introduced in an improved power planning optimization theory. The power planning and diverse scenarios production simulation shows that, in order to meet the power, electricity and peak balance of power system, China’s coal power peak capacity is within 1.15 ∼ 1.2 billion kilowatts before or after 2025. The research result is expected to be helpful to the power industry in 14th and 15th five-year periods, promoting the efficiency and safety of power system.

  9. Mapping 3D breast lesions from full-field digital mammograms using subject-specific finite element models

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, E.; Oliver, A.; Diaz, O.; Diez, Y.; Gubern-Mérida, A.; Martí, R.; Martí, J.

    2017-03-01

    Patient-specific finite element (FE) models of the breast have received increasing attention due to the potential capability of fusing images from different modalities. During the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to X-ray mammography registration procedure, the FE model is compressed mimicking the mammographic acquisition. Subsequently, suspicious lesions in the MRI volume can be projected into the 2D mammographic space. However, most registration algorithms do not provide the reverse information, avoiding to obtain the 3D geometrical information from the lesions localized in the mammograms. In this work we introduce a fast method to localize the 3D position of the lesion within the MRI, using both cranio-caudal (CC) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO) mammographic projections, indexing the tetrahedral elements of the biomechanical model by means of an uniform grid. For each marked lesion in the Full-Field Digital Mammogram (FFDM), the X-ray path from source to the marker is calculated. Barycentric coordinates are computed in the tetrahedrons traversed by the ray. The list of elements and coordinates allows to localize two curves within the MRI and the closest point between both curves is taken as the 3D position of the lesion. The registration errors obtained in the mammographic space are 9.89 +/- 3.72 mm in CC- and 8.04 +/- 4.68 mm in MLO-projection and the error in the 3D MRI space is equal to 10.29 +/- 3.99 mm. Regarding the uniform grid, it is computed spending between 0.1 and 0.7 seconds. The average time spent to compute the 3D location of a lesion is about 8 ms.

  10. A full description of the Three-ME model: Multi-sector macro-economic Model for the Evaluation of Environmental and Energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callonnec, Gael; Landa, Gissela; Malliet, Paul; Yeddir-Tamsamani, Yasser; Reynes, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    Since 2008, the ADEME and the OFCE are involved in a research convention to develop the model Three-ME. This document provides a full description of new version of the model. Three-ME is a new model of the French economy especially designed to evaluate the medium and long term impact of environmental and energy policies at the macro-economic and sector levels. To do so Three-ME combines two important features. Firstly, it has the main characteristics of neo-Keynesian models by assuming a slow adjustment of effective quantities and prices to their notional level, an endogenous money supply, a Taylor rule and a Philips curve. Compared to standard multi-sector CGEM, this has the advantage to allow for the existence of under-optimum equilibria such as the presence of involuntary unemployment. Secondly, Three-ME is a hybrid model in the sense that it combines the top-down approach of general equilibrium macro-economic models with elements of bottom-up models of energy models developed by engineers. As in bottom-up models, the amount of energy consumed is related to their use, that is the number of buildings or cars, and the energy class to which they belong. This hypothesis is more realistic compared to the assumption made in the majority of top-down models where energy consumption is usually directly related to income through a nested structure of utility function. (authors)

  11. VALIDATION OF FULL CORE GEOMETRY MODEL OF THE NODAL3 CODE IN THE PWR TRANSIENT BENCHMARK PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagor Malem Sembiring

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT VALIDATION OF FULL CORE GEOMETRY MODEL OF THE NODAL3 CODE IN THE PWR TRANSIENT BENCHMARK PROBLEMS. The coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic (T/H code, NODAL3 code, has been validated in some PWR static benchmark and the NEACRP PWR transient benchmark cases. However, the NODAL3 code have not yet validated in the transient benchmark cases of a control rod assembly (CR ejection at peripheral core using a full core geometry model, the C1 and C2 cases.  By this research work, the accuracy of the NODAL3 code for one CR ejection or the unsymmetrical group of CRs ejection case can be validated. The calculations by the NODAL3 code have been carried out by the adiabatic method (AM and the improved quasistatic method (IQS. All calculated transient parameters by the NODAL3 code were compared with the reference results by the PANTHER code. The maximum relative difference of 16% occurs in the calculated time of power maximum parameter by using the IQS method, while the relative difference of the AM method is 4% for C2 case.  All calculation results by the NODAL3 code shows there is no systematic difference, it means the neutronic and T/H modules are adopted in the code are considered correct. Therefore, all calculation results by using the NODAL3 code are very good agreement with the reference results. Keywords: nodal method, coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic code, PWR, transient case, control rod ejection.   ABSTRAK VALIDASI MODEL GEOMETRI TERAS PENUH PAKET PROGRAM NODAL3 DALAM PROBLEM BENCHMARK GAYUT WAKTU PWR. Paket program kopel neutronik dan termohidraulika (T/H, NODAL3, telah divalidasi dengan beberapa kasus benchmark statis PWR dan kasus benchmark gayut waktu PWR NEACRP.  Akan tetapi, paket program NODAL3 belum divalidasi dalam kasus benchmark gayut waktu akibat penarikan sebuah perangkat batang kendali (CR di tepi teras menggunakan model geometri teras penuh, yaitu kasus C1 dan C2. Dengan penelitian ini, akurasi paket program

  12. The origin of Pasteurella multocida impacts pathology and inflammation when assessed in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pors, Susanne E; Chadfield, Mark S; Sørensen, Dorte B; Offenberg, Hanne; Bisgaard, Magne; Jensen, Henrik E

    2016-04-01

    Host-pathogen interactions of Pasteurella multocida isolates of different origin were studied in a mouse model, focusing on pathology, bacterial load and expression of the metalloproteinase MMP9 and its inhibitor TIMP1. Intranasal inoculation with one of three doses (10(6), 10(4), 10(2)CFU) of an isolate from porcine pneumonia or fowl cholera showed marked differences between the two isolates. The avian isolate was highly pathogenic with severe signs of necrotizing pneumonia, liver necrosis and high bacterial load in lung and liver. Clinical signs and pathology related to the porcine isolate were dose dependent and consisted of exudative bronchopneumonia, abscess formation in liver and a lower bacterial load in lung and liver. Both isolates caused increased expression of MMP9 and TIMP1. In conclusion, evaluation and comparison of pathogenicity and host-pathogen interaction of P. multocida isolates from different hosts is possible in the intranasal murine model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Model for the Common Origin of Jupiter Family and Halley Type Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emel'yanenko, V. V.; Asher, D. J.; Bailey, M. E.

    2013-02-01

    A numerical simulation of the Oort cloud is used to explain the observed orbital distributions and numbers of Jupiter-family (JF) and Halley-type (HT) short-period (SP) comets. Comets are given initial orbits with perihelion distances between 5 and 36 au, and evolve under planetary, stellar and Galactic perturbations for 4.5 Gyr. This process leads to the formation of an Oort cloud (which we define as the region of semimajor axes a > 1,000 au), and to a flux of cometary bodies from the Oort cloud returning to the planetary region at the present epoch. The results are consistent with the dynamical characteristics of SP comets and other observed cometary populations: the near-parabolic flux, Centaurs, and high-eccentricity trans-Neptunian objects. To achieve this consistency with observations, the model requires that the number of comets versus initial perihelion distance is concentrated towards the outer planetary region. Moreover, the mean physical lifetime of observable comets in the inner planetary region ( q observed HT comets and nearly half of observed JF comets come from the Oort cloud, and initially (4.5 Gyr ago) from orbits concentrated near the outer planetary region. Comets that have been in the Oort cloud also return to the Centaur (5 observers. The model provides a unified picture for the origin of JF and HT comets. It predicts that the mean physical lifetime of all comets in the region q < 1.5 au is less than ˜200 revolutions.

  14. On The Origin of Neutrino Mass and Mixing in the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    McElrath, Bob

    2009-01-01

    One can describe cosmological relic neutrinos by adding Lagrange multipliers to the Standard Model Lagrangian for them. The two possible Lagrange multipliers are a chemical potential, which fixes the mean neutrino/anti-neutrino asymmetry, and a Majorana mass, which fixes the mean spin-entropy. Because these neutrinos originated from a thermal bath, their entropy should be maximal, implying that each state in the background is a symmetric superposition of a neutrino and anti-neutrino. Therefore the Standard Model must be augmented by a flavor-diagonal Majorana neutrino mass matrix. This impacts the propagator via tadpole diagrams due to self-interactions. In the low-energy limit, neutrino self-interactions are entirely off-diagonal because same-flavor four-fermion operators vanish by Pauli exclusion. These interactions must be diagonalized when propagating through a bath of neutrinos, using the U(3) global flavor symmetry. U(3) gets broken broken down to SO(3) by Majorana masses, and down to $A_4$ if the three...

  15. A Novel mouse model of enhanced proteostasis: Full-length human heat shock factor 1 transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, Anson; Wei, Rochelle; Halade, Dipti; Yoo, Si-Eun; Ran, Qitao; Richardson, Arlan

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Development of mouse overexpressing native human HSF1 in all tissues including CNS. → HSF1 overexpression enhances heat shock response at whole-animal and cellular level. → HSF1 overexpression protects from polyglutamine toxicity and favors aggresomes. → HSF1 overexpression enhances proteostasis at the whole-animal and cellular level. -- Abstract: The heat shock response (HSR) is controlled by the master transcriptional regulator heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 maintains proteostasis and resistance to stress through production of heat shock proteins (HSPs). No transgenic model exists that overexpresses HSF1 in tissues of the central nervous system (CNS). We generated a transgenic mouse overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 and observed a 2-4-fold increase in HSF1 mRNA and protein expression in all tissues studied of HSF1 transgenic (HSF1 +/0 ) mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates, including several regions of the CNS. Basal expression of HSP70 and 90 showed only mild tissue-specific changes; however, in response to forced exercise, the skeletal muscle HSR was more elevated in HSF1 +/0 mice compared to WT littermates and in fibroblasts following heat shock, as indicated by levels of inducible HSP70 mRNA and protein. HSF1 +/0 cells elicited a significantly more robust HSR in response to expression of the 82 repeat polyglutamine-YFP fusion construct (Q82YFP) and maintained proteasome-dependent processing of Q82YFP compared to WT fibroblasts. Overexpression of HSF1 was associated with fewer, but larger Q82YFP aggregates resembling aggresomes in HSF1 +/0 cells, and increased viability. Therefore, our data demonstrate that tissues and cells from mice overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 exhibit enhanced proteostasis.

  16. Parent of origin, mosaicism, and recurrence risk: probabilistic modeling explains the broken symmetry of transmission genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ian M; Stewart, Jonathan R; James, Regis A; Lupski, James R; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Olofsson, Peter; Shaw, Chad A

    2014-10-02

    Most new mutations are observed to arise in fathers, and increasing paternal age positively correlates with the risk of new variants. Interestingly, new mutations in X-linked recessive disease show elevated familial recurrence rates. In male offspring, these mutations must be inherited from mothers. We previously developed a simulation model to consider parental mosaicism as a source of transmitted mutations. In this paper, we extend and formalize the model to provide analytical results and flexible formulas. The results implicate parent of origin and parental mosaicism as central variables in recurrence risk. Consistent with empirical data, our model predicts that more transmitted mutations arise in fathers and that this tendency increases as fathers age. Notably, the lack of expansion later in the male germline determines relatively lower variance in the proportion of mutants, which decreases with paternal age. Subsequently, observation of a transmitted mutation has less impact on the expected risk for future offspring. Conversely, for the female germline, which arrests after clonal expansion in early development, variance in the mutant proportion is higher, and observation of a transmitted mutation dramatically increases the expected risk of recurrence in another pregnancy. Parental somatic mosaicism considerably elevates risk for both parents. These findings have important implications for genetic counseling and for understanding patterns of recurrence in transmission genetics. We provide a convenient online tool and source code implementing our analytical results. These tools permit varying the underlying parameters that influence recurrence risk and could be useful for analyzing risk in diverse family structures. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The full topology of the Laplacian of the electron density: scrutinising a physical basis for the VSEPR model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Nathaniel O J; Popelier, Paul L A

    2003-01-01

    Within the framework of quantum chemical topology (QCT) the function L(r), which equals the negative of the Laplacian of the electron density, has been proposed before as a physical basis for the valence shell electron pair repulsion (VSEPR) model. The availability of a new algorithm to integrate property densities over the basins of L(r) enabled a re-evaluation of this physical basis. We optimised a set of nine molecules at B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p) level and partitioned the corresponding L(r) function for each molecule into basins. For the first time we visualise these basins in L(r), by directly showing their boundaries. We identify the basins in L(r) with the domains of the VSEPR model. Observations drawn from the populations and volumes of L-basins are contrasted with the three subsidiary VSEPR postulates. We find unexpectedly small populations, nearer to one than to two, for non-hydrogen cores and bonding domains, and populations much larger than two for non-bonding domains. We conclude that non-bonding or lone pairs have larger domains than bonding pairs in the same valence shell, in accordance with VSEPR. We also confirm that double and triple bond domains are larger than single-bond domains. However we cannot substantiate the effect of the electronegativity of central atom or ligand on the volume of bonding domains. In summary, the full topology of L(r) supports two out of three subsidiary VSEPR postulates.

  18. Hydrocarbon origin and reservoir forming model research of Longwangmiao Formation, Moxi-Gaoshiti area, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindong Jin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the Longwangmiao gas reservoir in Moxi-Gaoshiti area, Sichuan Basin. Starting from the tectonic evolution perspective, though comparing biological marker compound and analyzing fluid inclusions, the oil & gas origin and accumulation evolution of Longwangmiao Formation are systematic studied with reference to the burial-thermal evolution of single well geological history in the study area. It is suggested that the oil & gas reservoir is generally characterized by early accumulation, multi-stage filling, late cracking and later adjustment. The oil and gas were mainly sourced from lower Cambrian Qiongzhusi Formation, partly from the Permian source rock. During the geological period, 3 major oil & gas fillings occurred in the Longwangmiao Formation, namely Caledonian-Hercynian filling that was small in scale and produced the first phase of paleo-oil reservoir that soon destroyed by Caledonian movement uplift, large-scale Permian filling that gave rise to the second-phase of paleo-oil reservoir and the Triassic-Jurassic filling that enriched the second phase of paleo-oil reservoir. Finally, the paleo-oil reservoir experienced an in-situ cracking during the cretaceous period that gave rise to a natural gas reservoir and left behind carbonaceous bitumen and oily bitumen in the holes of the Longwangmiao Formation.

  19. Mesoscale Model to Select the Ideal Location for New Vineyard Plantations in the Rioja Qualified Denomination of Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Martínez-Cámara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available La Rioja is the region where the top rated wines from Spain come from and also the origin of one of the most prestigious wines in the world. It is worldwide recognized, not only for the quality of the vine, but also for the many factors involved in the process that are controllable by the farmer, such as fertilizers, irrigation, etc. Likewise, there are other key factors, which cannot be controlled that play, however, a crucial role in the quality of the wine, such as temperature, radiation, humidity, and rainfall. This research is focused on two of these factors: temperature and irradiation. The objective of this paper is to be able to recognize these factors, so as to ensure a proper decision criterion when selecting the best location for new vineyard plantations. To achieve this objective, a mesoscale model MM5 is used, and its performance is assessed and compared using different parameters, from the grid resolution to the physical parameterization of the model. Finally, the study evaluates the impact of the different parameterizations and options for the simulation of meteorological variables particularly relevant when choosing new vineyard sites (rainfall frequency, temperature, and sun exposure.

  20. Fetal Origins of Life Stage Disease: A Zebrafish Model for the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the U.S., childhood obesity has more than doubled in children and quadrupled in adolescents in the past 30 years, affects 35% of adults, and costs the U.S. healthcare industry >$200 billion annually. The chemical environment in the womb may cause susceptibility to different life-stage and life-long metabolic diseases including obesity. The challenge is to understand if exposures during developmentally sensitive windows impact life-stage disease, such as obesity, by increasing adipose tissue mass. In vitro models lack the integrated systems approach needed to assess adipose development, while mammalian models are impractical in a screen of thousands of chemicals. Therefore, an obesogen screening method was developed to interrogate bioactivity using a full systems approach, in a vertebrate zebrafish model with complete metabolic activity, at a time when the full signaling repertoire is expressed and active, to optimally examine how chemical dose and duration impact life-stage adipose mass. A time-line for adipose depot formation was mapped in zebrafish 6−14 days post fertilization (dpf) using the lipophilic dye, Nile Red, in combination with fluorescent microscopy. Those time points were then used to investigate the impact of embryonic tributyltin chloride (TBT, a known obesogen) exposure (10nM daily renewal, 0−5dpf) on adipose mass. Fluorescent microscopy revealed adipose depots that were larger and appeared 2 days earlier in TBT treated compared to contro

  1. Activated sludge model 2d calibration with full-scale WWTP data: comparing model parameter identifiability with influent and operational uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Vinicius Cunha; Lafuente, Javier; Baeza, Juan Antonio

    2014-07-01

    The present work developed a model for the description of a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) (Manresa, Catalonia, Spain) for further plant upgrades based on the systematic parameter calibration of the activated sludge model 2d (ASM2d) using a methodology based on the Fisher information matrix. The influent was characterized for the application of the ASM2d and the confidence interval of the calibrated parameters was also assessed. No expert knowledge was necessary for model calibration and a huge available plant database was converted into more useful information. The effect of the influent and operating variables on the model fit was also studied using these variables as calibrating parameters and keeping the ASM2d kinetic and stoichiometric parameters, which traditionally are the calibration parameters, at their default values. Such an "inversion" of the traditional way of model fitting allowed evaluating the sensitivity of the main model outputs regarding the influent and the operating variables changes. This new approach is able to evaluate the capacity of the operational variables used by the WWTP feedback control loops to overcome external disturbances in the influent and kinetic/stoichiometric model parameters uncertainties. In addition, the study of the influence of operating variables on the model outputs provides useful information to select input and output variables in decentralized control structures.

  2. Steady-state simulations of the Greenland ice sheet using a three-dimensional full-Stokes model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddik, Hakime; Greve, Ralf; Zwinger, Thomas; Gagliardini, Olivier

    2010-05-01

    A three-dimensional, thermo-mechanically coupled model is applied to the Greenland ice sheet. The model implements the full-Stokes equations for the ice dynamics, and the system is solved with the finite-element method (FEM) using the open source multi-physics package Elmer (http://www.csc.fi/elmer/). The finite-element mesh for the computational domain has been created using the Greenland surface and bedrock DEM data with a spatial resolution of 5 km (Bamber and others, 2001). The study is particularly aimed at better understanding the ice dynamics near the major Greenland ice streams. For this purpose, mesh refinement to obtain improved computed solutions on these areas has been introduced. The meshing procedure starts with the bedrock footprint where a mesh with triangle elements and a resolution of 1 km are employed at the vicinities of the North-East Greenland Ice Stream (NEGIS) and the Jakobshavn (JIS), Kangerdlugssuaq (KL) and Helheim (HH) ice streams. A size function is then applied so that the mesh resolution becomes coarser away of the ice streams up to a maximum horizontal element size of 20 km. The final three-dimensional mesh is obtained by extruding the 2D footprint with 10 vertical layers, so that the resulting mesh contains 230760 prism elements and 132740 nodes. The numerical solution of the Stokes and the heat transfer equations involves direct and iterative solvers depending on the simulation case, and both methods are coupled with stabilization procedures. The boundary conditions are such that the temperature at the surface is parameterized as a function of the latitude and the surface elevation, the geothermal heat flux at the bedrock is prescribed as spatially constant and the lateral sides are open boundaries. The simulations have been conducted in order to obtain steady-state results for the velocity and temperature fields for the entire ice sheet. The model computes the results with both bedrock sliding and melting used alternatively so

  3. The Sensitivity of Atmospheric Dispersion Calculations in Near-field Applications: Modeling of the Full Scale RDD Experiments with Operational Models in Canada, Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebel, Luke; Bourgouin, Pierre; Chouhan, Sohan; Ek, Nils; Korolevych, Volodymyr; Malo, Alain; Bensimon, Dov; Erhardt, Lorne

    2016-05-01

    Three radiological dispersal devices were detonated in 2012 under controlled conditions at Defence Research and Development Canada's Experimental Proving Grounds in Suffield, Alberta. Each device comprised a 35-GBq source of (140)La. The dataset obtained is used in this study to assess the MLCD, ADDAM, and RIMPUFF atmospheric dispersion models. As part one of a two-part study, this paper focuses on examining the capabilities of the above three models and evaluating how well their predictions of air concentration and ground deposition match observations from the full-scale RDD experiments.

  4. A statistical model for estimating maternal-zygotic interactions and parent-of-origin effects of QTLs for seed development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanchun Li

    Full Text Available Proper development of a seed requires coordinated exchanges of signals among the three components that develop side by side in the seed. One of these is the maternal integument that encloses the other two zygotic components, i.e., the diploid embryo and its nurturing annex, the triploid endosperm. Although the formation of the embryo and endosperm contains the contributions of both maternal and paternal parents, maternally and paternally derived alleles may be expressed differently, leading to a so-called parent-of-origin or imprinting effect. Currently, the nature of how genes from the maternal and zygotic genomes interact to affect seed development remains largely unknown. Here, we present a novel statistical model for estimating the main and interaction effects of quantitative trait loci (QTLs that are derived from different genomes and further testing the imprinting effects of these QTLs on seed development. The experimental design used is based on reciprocal backcrosses toward both parents, so that the inheritance of parent-specific alleles could be traced. The computing model and algorithm were implemented with the maximum likelihood approach. The new strategy presented was applied to study the mode of inheritance for QTLs that control endoreduplication traits in maize endosperm. Monte Carlo simulation studies were performed to investigate the statistical properties of the new model with the data simulated under different imprinting degrees. The false positive rate of imprinting QTL discovery by the model was examined by analyzing the simulated data that contain no imprinting QTL. The reciprocal design and a series of analytical and testing strategies proposed provide a standard procedure for genomic mapping of QTLs involved in the genetic control of complex seed development traits in flowering plants.

  5. The Impact of Positive Role Models on the Success of Students Involved in Original Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danch, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    To maximize student understanding of the methods of science via performance of authentic scientific research, a mentorship program for middle school students was developed for the 2010 - 2011 school year. A population of 8th grade science students will be selected from a district middle school and be paired with secondary student mentors already conducting individual research as part of a successful preexisting science research program. Students will interact with mentors in a school setting to develop and implement original scientific research projects. Upon completion, students will present their findings at an interscholastic science symposium and/or an in-district science symposium. Students will also receive support from professional scientists at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey through interactive visitations and electronic communication. In an effort to provide diverse role models, mentors from a variety of racial, ethnic, and gender groups will participate. Student success will be evaluated through questionnaires, symposium participation and monitoring of future participation in authentic research programs as participants make the transition from middle to high school.

  6. The Standard Model Higgs as the origin of the hot Big Bang

    CERN Document Server

    Figueroa, Daniel G.

    2017-04-10

    If the Standard Model (SM) Higgs is weakly coupled to the inflationary sector, the Higgs is expected to be universally in the form of a condensate towards the end of inflation. The Higgs decays rapidly after inflation -- via non-perturbative effects -- into an out-of-equilibrium distribution of SM species, which thermalize soon afterwards. If the post-inflationary equation of state of the universe is stiff, $w \\simeq +1$, the SM species eventually dominate the total energy budget. This provides a natural origin for the relativistic thermal plasma of SM species, required for the onset the `hot Big Bang' era. The viability of this scenario requires the inflationary Hubble scale $H_*$ to be lower than the instability scale for Higgs vacuum decay, the Higgs not to generate too large curvature perturbations at cosmological scales, and the SM dominance to occur before Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. We show that successful reheating into the SM can only be obtained in the presence of a non-minimal coupling to gravity $\\x...

  7. A Developmental-Contextual Model of Depressive Symptoms in Mexican-Origin Female Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bámaca-Colbert, Mayra Y.; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J.; Gayles, Jochebed G.

    2011-01-01

    The current study tested a developmental-contextual model of depressive symptomatology among early and middle adolescent Mexican-origin females and their mothers. The final sample was comprised of 271 dyads. We examined the interrelations among cultural (i.e., acculturation dissonance), developmental (i.e., pubertal development and autonomy expectation discrepancies), and interpersonal (i.e., mother-daughter conflict and maternal supportive parenting) factors in predicting adolescents’ depressive symptoms. For both early and middle adolescents, maternal support was negatively associated with mother-daughter conflict and depressive symptoms. Importantly, mother-daughter autonomy expectation discrepancies were positively associated with mother-daughter conflict, but this association was found only among early adolescents. Further, mother-daughter acculturation dissonance was positively associated with mother-daughter conflict, but only among middle adolescents. Findings call for concurrently examining the interface of developmental, relational, and cultural factors in predicting female adolescents’ depressive symptomatology and the potential differences by developmental stage (e.g., early vs. middle adolescence) PMID:21967564

  8. Albergo Diffuso as a model of original hospitality and sustainable development of small historical villages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Dall'Ara

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper fits within the wider context related to the definition of restoration strategies and models, and revitalization of small historical towns and villages, focusing on touristic use and on the Albergo Diffuso (AD model. This latter, in its functional elements, includes solutions to solve degeneration and gradual depopulation problems, typical in these cases, by enhancing both tangible and intangible resources. The purpose of this research study was to verify, about 20 years after the first implementations, to what extent and by means of what type of intervention the AD model influenced regeneration processes of historical villages and refunctionalization of reused building heritage. By means of an exploratory investigation and an in situ monitoring activity, it was possible to outline an initial measurement of both direct and indirect results following the application of ADs. The activities confirmed the virtuosity of the model and identified both critical issues and strong points, directly connected to the type of users and to the sustainability features of the interventions.

  9. Simulations of the Greenland ice sheet 100 years into the future with the full Stokes model Elmer/Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddik, H.; Greve, R.; Zwinger, T.; Gillet-Chaulet, F.; Gagliardini, O.

    2011-12-01

    The full Stokes thermo-mechanically coupled model Elmer/Ice is applied to the Greenland ice sheet. Elmer/Ice employs the finite element method to solve the full Stokes equations, the temperature evolution equation and the evolution equation of the free surface. The general framework of this modeling effort is a contribution to the Sea-level Response to Ice Sheet Evolution (SeaRISE) assessment project, a community-organized effort to estimate the likely range of ice sheet contributions to sea level rise over the next few hundred years (http://tinyurl.com/srise-lanl, http://tinyurl.com/srise-umt). The present geometry (surface and basal topographies) is derived from data where the basal topography was created with the preservation of the troughs at the Jakobshavn Ice Stream, Helheim, Kangerdlussuaq and Petermann glaciers. A mesh of the computational domain is created using an initial footprint which contains elements of 5 km horizontal resolution and to limit the number elements on the footprint while maximizing the spatial resolution, an anisotropic mesh adaptation scheme is employed based on the Hessian matrix of the observed surface velocities. The adaptation is carried out with the tool YAMS and the final footprint is vertically extruded to form a 3D mesh of 320880 elements with 17 equidistant, terrain-following layers. The numerical solution of the Stokes and the heat transfer equations employs direct solvers with stabilization procedures. The boundary conditions are such that the temperature at the surface uses the present-day mean annual air temperature given by a parameterization or directly from the available data, the geothermal heat flux at the bedrock is given by data and the lateral sides are open boundaries. A non-linear Weertman law is used for the basal sliding. Results for the SeaRISE 2011 sensitivity experiments are presented so that six different experiments have been conducted, grouped in two sets. The Set C (three experiments) applies a change to

  10. Morphology effects on the bandgap of silicon nanocrystals—Numerically modelled by a full multi-grid method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthen Veettil, Binesh; König, Dirk; Huang, Shujuan; Patterson, Robert; Conibeer, Gavin

    2017-02-01

    Silicon nanocrystals embedded in a dielectric matrix have been considered a potential candidate for many optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications and have been under vigorous study in recent years. One of the main properties of interest in this application is the absorption bandgap, which is determined by the quantum confinement of silicon nanocrystals. The ability to predict the absorption bandgap is a key step in designing an optimum solar cell using this material. Although several higher level algorithms are available to predict the electronic confinement in these nanocrystals, most of them make regular-shape assumptions for the ease of computation. In this work, we present a model for the accurate prediction of the quantum confinement in silicon nanocrystals of non-regular shape by employing an efficient, self-consistent Full-Multi-Grid method. Confined energies in spherical, elongated, and arbitrarily shaped nanocrystals are calculated. The excited level calculations quantify the wavefunction coupling and energy level splitting arising due to the proximity of dots. The splitting magnitude was found to be as high as 0.1 eV for the 2 nm size silicon quantum dots. The decrease in confinement energy due to the elongation of dots was found to be more than 0.2 eV, and the trend was similar for different dielectric materials. Theoretical predictions were compared to the results from optical and structural characterisation and found to be in agreement. The loss of degeneracy in highly asymmetric quantum dots, such as a "horse-shoe" shaped quantum dot, significantly affects the excited state energies.

  11. The in vivo evaluation of tissue-based biomaterials in a rat full-thickness abdominal wall defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Nicholas; Ahswin, Helen; Smart, Neil; Bayon, Yves; Wohlert, Stephen; Hunt, John A

    2014-05-01

    Hernias are defects in which an anatomical fascia is breached resulting in ectopic positioning of an organ into an orifice which routinely does not contain it. Intervention often involves repositioning translocated organs and repair of damaged fascia using exogenous grafts. Despite hernia prevalence, repairs can still fail due to postoperative complications, such as chronic pain and decreased mobility. This study compared repair capacities and characterized the foreign body response elicited by a number of hernia repair grafts to deduce their bulk inflammatory properties while also concluding the point in their fabrication when these are inferred. Materials derived from human dermis (Alloderm(®) ), porcine dermis (Permacol™, patch A, patch D and Strattice(®) ), porcine small-intestinal submucosa (Surgisis™) and a synthetic (multifilament Surgipro™) were implanted into a rat full-thickness abdominal wall excision model, incubated for up to 2 years and characterized histopathologically. Surgisis™ resorbed the fastest of the materials tested (1-3 months) resulting in a mechanically stable parietal peritoneum. Decellularization using sodium dodecyl sulfate (patch A) stimulated a large early inflammatory response which ultimately may have contributed to increased resorption of porcine dermal matrix however the remaining materials typically persisted throughout the 2-year incubation. Cross-linking porcine dermis using 1,6-hexamethylene disocyanate (vs. an identical noncross-linked counterpart) showed no difference in cell recruitment or material integration over 2 years. Typically Strattice(®) and Alloderm(®) recruited larger early populations of cells than Permacol™; however, over extended periods of time in vivo this response normalized. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Advantages of using a fast urban boundary layer model as compared to a full mesoscale model to simulate the urban heat island of Barcelona

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Díez, Markel; Lauwaet, Dirk; Hooyberghs, Hans; Ballester, Joan; De Ridder, Koen; Rodó, Xavier

    2016-12-01

    As most of the population lives in urban environments, the simulation of the urban climate has become a key problem in the framework of the climate change impact assessment. However, the high computational power required by high-resolution (sub-kilometre) fully coupled land-atmosphere simulations using urban canopy parameterisations is a severe limitation. Here we present a study on the performance of UrbClim, an urban boundary layer model designed to be several orders of magnitude faster than a full-fledged mesoscale model. The simulations are evaluated with station data and land surface temperature observations from satellites, focusing on the urban heat island (UHI). To explore the advantages of using a simple model like UrbClim, the results are compared with a simulation carried out with a state-of-the-art mesoscale model, the Weather Research and Forecasting Model, which includes an urban canopy model. This comparison is performed with driving data from ERA-Interim reanalysis (70 km). In addition, the effect of using driving data from a higher-resolution forecast model (15 km) is explored in the case of UrbClim. The results show that the performance of reproducing the average UHI in the simple model is generally comparable to the one in the mesoscale model when driven with reanalysis data (70 km). However, the simple model needs higher-resolution data from the forecast model (15 km) to correctly reproduce the variability of the UHI at a daily scale, which is related to the wind speed. This lack of accuracy in reproducing the wind speed, especially the sea-breeze daily cycle, which is strong in Barcelona, also causes a warm bias in the reanalysis driven UrbClim run. We conclude that medium-complexity models as UrbClim are a suitable tool to simulate the urban climate, but that they are sensitive to the ability of the input data to represent the local wind regime. UrbClim is a well suited model for impact and adaptation studies at city scale without high

  13. Rock glaciers originating from mass movements: A new model based on field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitner, J. M.; Gruber, A.

    2009-04-01

    The morphological and geological conditions for the formation of rock glaciers in Alpine environments seem to be clear according to our present knowledge (BARSCH, 1996; HAEBERLI et al. 2006). All known examples derive from porous more or less coarse grained sedimentary bodies, either from moraines or, in most cases, from talus fans. In the latter case the debris accumulation originates overwhelmingly from physical weathering, rock falls or rock avalanches in proximity to rockwalls. However, in the course of geological mapping in the crystalline areas of Eastern and Northern Tyrol (Schober Gruppe, Tuxer Alpen) we found an additional setting. Some relict rock glaciers occur directly at the bulging toe of bedrock slopes, which had been affected by deep-seated gravitational slope deformations (REITNER, 2003; GRUBER, 2005). Furthermore rock glaciers are also present in ridge-top depressions and similar graben-like features that originated from gravitational processes in jointed bedrock. In all these cases talus fans with debris accumulation are missing in the source area of those rock glaciers. According to our model the disintegration of jointed rocks by creeping mass movements resulted in an increased volume of joint space. This enabled the formation of interstitial ice under permafrost conditions. Increased ice saturation led to the reduction of the angle of internal friction and finally to the initial formation of a rock glacier. Abundant material was provided for the further movement and thus for formation of quite large rock glaciers due to the previous and maybe still ongoing slope deformation. Most rock glaciers of this type originated from mass movements of sagging -type (Sackung sensu ZISCHINSKY, 1966), which illustrates the continuous transition from gravitational to periglacial creep process in high Alpine areas. All studied examples are of Lateglacial age according to the altitude in correspondence to the known amount of permafrost depression compared to

  14. Analysis, scale modeling, and full-scale test of a railcar and spent-nuclear-fuel shipping cask in a high-velocity impact against a rigid barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huerta, M.

    1981-06-01

    This report describes the mathematical analysis, the physical scale modeling, and a full-scale crash test of a railcar spent-nuclear-fuel shipping system. The mathematical analysis utilized a lumped-parameter model to predict the structural response of the railcar and the shipping cask. The physical scale modeling analysis consisted of two crash tests that used 1/8-scale models to assess railcar and shipping cask damage. The full-scale crash test, conducted with retired railcar equipment, was carefully monitored with onboard instrumentation and high-speed photography. Results of the mathematical and scale modeling analyses are compared with the full-scale test. 29 figures

  15. Modelling the transport of solid contaminants originated from a point source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgueiro, Dora V.; Conde, Daniel A. S.; Franca, Mário J.; Schleiss, Anton J.; Ferreira, Rui M. L.

    2017-04-01

    results obtained with STAV-2D show the formation of a shock wave, radially propagating from the point discharge, and secondary shocks originated by reflections at the basin walls. Laboratory results evidenced the presence of two main disturbances: a wave front near the side wall and another one resulting from dispersive processes. The dispersive phenomenon suggests the presence of oscillations, instead of the constant energy state that is characteristic of isolated rarefaction waves. The ability of the existing model to reproduce these details of the experiment is assessed and discussed. The validated two-layer hydrodynamics model is seen as a proxy for fluvial flows with different sediment concentration regions and can be used for the prediction and monitoring of spatial and temporal distribution of sediments and the adsorbed phases of contaminants. Acknowledgements This research was partially funded by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT) through project RECI/ECM-HID/0371/2012 and through a H2Doc - Environmental Hydraulics and Hydrology doctoral grant (PD/BD/113620/2015) and by the Laboratory of Hydraulic Constructions (LCH), École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne.

  16. Comparison of the original and revised structures of the Health Promotion Model in predicting construction workers' use of hearing protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronis, David L; Hong, OiSaeng; Lusk, Sally L

    2006-02-01

    Pender's health promotion model (HPM) has been revised, including substantial changes in its structure. The purpose of this study was to compare the fit and predictive usefulness of the original and revised structures of the HPM as applied to the use of hearing protection devices by 703 construction workers. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the two alternative forms of the model. Both forms of the model fit well, with the revised structure having a better fit and explaining more of the variance in use of hearing protection (28% vs. 18%). Results support the revised structure of the health promotion model (HPM) over the original form, and indicate it may be useful in understanding and predicting use of hearing protection. Copyright 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Analysing the origin of long-range interactions in proteins using lattice models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unger Ron

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-range communication is very common in proteins but the physical basis of this phenomenon remains unclear. In order to gain insight into this problem, we decided to explore whether long-range interactions exist in lattice models of proteins. Lattice models of proteins have proven to capture some of the basic properties of real proteins and, thus, can be used for elucidating general principles of protein stability and folding. Results Using a computational version of double-mutant cycle analysis, we show that long-range interactions emerge in lattice models even though they are not an input feature of them. The coupling energy of both short- and long-range pairwise interactions is found to become more positive (destabilizing in a linear fashion with increasing 'contact-frequency', an entropic term that corresponds to the fraction of states in the conformational ensemble of the sequence in which the pair of residues is in contact. A mathematical derivation of the linear dependence of the coupling energy on 'contact-frequency' is provided. Conclusion Our work shows how 'contact-frequency' should be taken into account in attempts to stabilize proteins by introducing (or stabilizing contacts in the native state and/or through 'negative design' of non-native contacts.

  18. P-wave velocity models of continental shelf of East Siberian Sea using the Laplace-domain full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S. G.; Hong, J. K.; Jin, Y. K.; Jang, U.; Niessen, F.; Baranov, B.

    2017-12-01

    2016 IBRV ARAON Arctic Cruise Leg-2, Expedition ARA07C was a multidisciplinary undertaking carried out in the East Siberian Sea (ESS) from August 25 to September 10, 2016. The program was conducted as a collaboration between the Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI), P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology (IORAS), and Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI). During this expedition, the multi-channel seismic (MCS) data were acquired on the continental shelf and the upper slope of the ESS, totaling 3 lines with 660 line-kilometers. The continental shelf of ESS is one of the widest shelf seas in the world and it is believed to cover the largest area of sub-sea permafrost in the Arctic. According to the present knowledge of the glacial history of the western Arctic Ocean, it is likely that during the LGM with a sea level approximately 120 m below present, the entire shelf area of the ESS was exposed to very cold air temperatures so that thick permafrost should have formed. Indeed, in water depths shallower than 80 m, sub-bottom profiles in the ESS recorded from the shelf edge to a latitude of 74°30' N in 60 m water depth exhibited acoustic facies, suggesting that at least relicts of submarine permafrost are present. In order to identify the existence and/or non-existence of subsea permafrost in our study area, we analyze the MCS data using the Laplace domain full waveform inversion (FWI). In case of the Canadian continental shelf of the Beaufort Sea, subsea permafrost has high seismic velocity values (over 2.6 km/sec) and strong refraction events were found in the MCS shotgathers. However, in the EES our proposed P-wave velocity models derived from FWI have neither found high velocity structures (over 2.6 km/sec) nor indicate strong refraction events by subsea permafrost. Instead, in 300 m depth below sea floor higher P-wave velocity structures (1.8 2.2 km/s) than normal subsea sediment layers were found, which are interpreted as cemented strata by glaciation activities.

  19. Investigating the Greenland ice sheet evolution under changing climate using a three-dimensional full-Stokes model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddik, H.; Greve, R.; Zwinger, T.; Gillet-Chaulet, F.; Gagliardini, O.

    2010-12-01

    A three-dimensional, thermo-mechanically coupled model is applied to the Greenland ice sheet. The model implements the full-Stokes equations for the ice dynamics, and the system is solved with the finite-element method (FEM) using the open source multi-physics package Elmer (http://www.csc.fi/elmer/). The finite-element mesh for the computational domain has been created using the Greenland surface and bedrock DEM data with a spatial resolution of 5 km (SeaRise community effort, based on Bamber and others, 2001). The study is particularly aimed at better understanding the ice dynamics near the major Greenland ice streams. The meshing procedure starts with the bedrock footprint where a mesh with triangle elements and a resolution of 5 km is constructed. Since the resulting mesh is unnecessarily dense in areas with slow ice dynamics, an anisotropic mesh adaptation procedure has been introduced. Using the measured surface velocities to evaluate the Hessian matrix of the velocities, a metric tensor is computed at the mesh vertices in order to define the adaptation scheme. The resulting meshed footprint obtained with the automatic tool YAMS shows a high density of elements in the vicinities of the North-East Greenland Ice Stream (NEGIS), the Jakobshavn ice stream (JIS) and the Kangerdlugssuaq (KL) and Helheim (HH) glaciers. On the other hand, elements with a coarser resolution are generated away from the ice streams and domain margins. The final three-dimensional mesh is obtained by extruding the 2D footprint with 21 vertical layers, so that the resulting mesh contains 400860 wedge elements and 233583 nodes. The numerical solution of the Stokes and the heat transfer equations involves direct and iterative solvers depending on the simulation case, and both methods are coupled with stabilization procedures. The boundary conditions are such that the temperature at the surface uses the present-day mean annual air temperature given by a parameterization or directly from the

  20. Study of Z' {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} in full simulation with regard to discrimination between models beyond the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, M

    2004-09-01

    Although experimental results so far agree with predictions of the standard model, it is widely felt to be incomplete. Many prospective theories beyond the standard model predict extra neutral gauge bosons, denoted by Z', which might be light enough to be accessible at the LHC. Observables sensitive to the properties of these extra gauge bosons might be used to discriminate between the different theories beyond the standard model. In the present work several of these observables (total decay width, leptonic cross-section and forward-backward asymmetries) are studied at generation level and with a full simulation in the ATLAS detector. The Z' {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} decay channel was chosen and 2 values for the mass of Z': 1.5 TeV and 4 TeV. Background is studied as well and it is confirmed that a Z' boson could easily be discovered at the chosen masses. It is shown that even in full simulation the studied observables can be determined with a good precision. In a next step a discrimination strategy has to be developed given the presented methods to extract the variables and their precision. (author)

  1. DNA replication origins in archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenfang eWu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication initiation, which starts at specific chromosomal site (known as replication origins, is the key regulatory stage of chromosome replication. Archaea, the third domain of life, use a single or multiple origin(s to initiate replication of their circular chromosomes. The basic structure of replication origins is conserved among archaea, typically including an AT-rich unwinding region flanked by several conserved repeats (origin recognition box, ORB that are located adjacent to a replication initiator gene. Both the ORB sequence and the adjacent initiator gene are considerably diverse among different replication origins, while in silico and genetic analyses have indicated the specificity between the initiator genes and their cognate origins. These replicator-initiator pairings are reminiscent of the oriC-dnaA system in bacteria, and a model for the negative regulation of origin activity by a downstream cluster of ORB elements has been recently proposed in haloarchaea. Moreover, comparative genomic analyses have revealed that the mosaics of replicator-initiator pairings in archaeal chromosomes originated from the integration of extrachromosomal elements. This review summarizes the research progress in understanding of archaeal replication origins with particular focus on the utilization, control and evolution of multiple replication origins in haloarchaea.

  2. A model for the origin and properties of flicker-induced geometric phosphenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rule

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a model for flicker phosphenes, the spontaneous appearance of geometric patterns in the visual field when a subject is exposed to diffuse flickering light. We suggest that the phenomenon results from interaction of cortical lateral inhibition with resonant periodic stimuli. We find that the best temporal frequency for eliciting phosphenes is a multiple of intrinsic (damped oscillatory rhythms in the cortex. We show how both the quantitative and qualitative aspects of the patterns change with frequency of stimulation and provide an explanation for these differences. We use Floquet theory combined with the theory of pattern formation to derive the parameter regimes where the phosphenes occur. We use symmetric bifurcation theory to show why low frequency flicker should produce hexagonal patterns while high frequency produces pinwheels, targets, and spirals.

  3. Determination of Odor Release in Hydrocolloid Model Systems Containing Original or Carboxylated Cellulose at Different pH Values Using Static Headspace Gas Chromatographic (SHS-GC Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pahn-Shick Chang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Static headspace gas chromatographic (SHS-GC analysis was performed to determine the release of 13 odorants in hydrocolloid model systems containing original or regio-selectively carboxylated cellulose at different pH values. The release of most odor compounds was decreased in the hydrocolloid solutions compared to control, with the amounts of 2-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and 2,3-butanedione released into the headspace being less than those of any other odor compound in the hydrocolloid model systems. However, there was no considerable difference between original cellulose-containing and carboxylated-cellulose containing systems in the release of most compounds, except for relatively long-chain esters such as ethyl caprylate and ethyl nonanoate. The release from the original and carboxylated cellulose solutions controlled to pH 10 was significantly higher than that from solutions adjusted to pH 4 and 7 in the case of some esters (ethyl acetate, methyl propionate, ethyl propionate, ethyl butyrate, butyl propionate, ethyl caproate and alcohols (2-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, in particular, ethyl butyrate and 3-methyl-1-butanol. In contrast, the release of 2,3-butanedione from both the original and carboxylated cellulose solutions was increased at pH 4 and 7 compared to that at pH 10 by about 70% and 130%, respectively. Our study demonstrated that the release of some odorants could be changed significantly by addition of both original and carboxylated cellulose in hydrocolloid model systems, but only minor effect was observed in pH of the solution.

  4. Effect of Anatomically Realistic Full-Head Model on Activation of Cortical Neurons in Subdural Cortical Stimulation—A Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Donghyeon; Jun, Sung Chan

    2016-06-01

    Electrical brain stimulation (EBS) is an emerging therapy for the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of EBS have been used to determine the optimal parameters for highly cost-effective electrotherapy. Recent notable growth in computing capability has enabled researchers to consider an anatomically realistic head model that represents the full head and complex geometry of the brain rather than the previous simplified partial head model (extruded slab) that represents only the precentral gyrus. In this work, subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) was found to offer a better understanding of the differential activation of cortical neurons in the anatomically realistic full-head model than in the simplified partial-head models. We observed that layer 3 pyramidal neurons had comparable stimulation thresholds in both head models, while layer 5 pyramidal neurons showed a notable discrepancy between the models; in particular, layer 5 pyramidal neurons demonstrated asymmetry in the thresholds and action potential initiation sites in the anatomically realistic full-head model. Overall, the anatomically realistic full-head model may offer a better understanding of layer 5 pyramidal neuronal responses. Accordingly, the effects of using the realistic full-head model in SuCS are compelling in computational modeling studies, even though this modeling requires substantially more effort.

  5. Validation of a plant-wide phosphorus modelling approach with minerals precipitation in a full-scale WWTP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbamba, Christian Kazadi; Flores Alsina, Xavier; Batstone, Damien John

    2016-01-01

    The focus of modelling in wastewater treatment is shifting from single unit to plant-wide scale. Plant wide modelling approaches provide opportunities to study the dynamics and interactions of different transformations in water and sludge streams. Towards developing more general and robust simula...

  6. Origin of Androgen-Insensitive Poorly Differentiated Tumors in the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy J. Huss

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Following castration, the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP model demonstrates rapid development of SV40-Tag-driven poorly differentiated tumors that express neuroendocrine cell markers. The cell population dynamics within the prostates of castrated TRAMP mice were characterized by analyzing the incorporation of 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd and the expression of SV40-Tag, synaptophysin, and androgen receptor (AR. Fourteen days postcastration, the remaining epithelial cells and adenocarcinoma cells were nonproliferative and lacked detectable SV40-Tag or synaptophysin expression. In contrast, morphologically distinct intraglandular foci were identified which expressed SV40-Tag, synaptophysin, and Ki67, but that lacked AR expression. These proliferative SV40-Tag and synaptophysin-expressing intraglandular foci were associated with the rare BrdUrd-retaining cells. These foci expanded rapidly in the postcastration prostate environment, in contrast to the AR- and SV40-Tag-expressing adenocarcinoma cells that lost SV40-Tag expression and underwent apoptosis after castration. Intraglandular foci of synaptophysin-expressing cells were also observed in the prostates of intact TRAMP mice at a comparable frequency; however, they did not progress to rapidly expanding tumors until much later in the life of the mice. This suggests that the foci of neuroendocrine-like cells that express SV40-Tag and synaptophysin, but lack AR, arise independent of androgen-deprivation and represent the source of the poorly differentiated tumors that are the lethal phenotype in the TRAMP model.

  7. A first step towards a consensus static in vitro model for simulating full-term infant digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, O; Bourlieu, C; De Oliveira, S C; Dellarosa, N; Laghi, L; Carrière, F; Capozzi, F; Dupont, D; Deglaire, A

    2018-02-01

    In vitro alternatives to clinical trials are used for studying human food digestion. For simulating infant digestion, only a few models, lacking physiological relevance, are available. Thanks to an extensive literature review of the in vivo infant digestive conditions, a gastrointestinal static in vitro model was developed for infants born at term and aged 28days. The model was applied to the digestion of a commercial infant formula. Kinetics of digestion, as well as the structural evolution, were compared with those obtained while submitting the same formula to the adult international consensus protocol of in vitro static digestion. The kinetics of proteolysis and lipolysis differed according to the physiological stage resulting mainly from the reduced level of enzymes and bile salts, as well as the higher gastric pH in the infant model. This in vitro static model of infant digestion is of interest for scientists, food or pharmaceutical manufacturers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An efficient multi-stage algorithm for full calibration of the hemodynamic model from BOLD signal responses

    KAUST Repository

    Zambri, Brian

    2017-02-22

    We propose a computational strategy that falls into the category of prediction/correction iterative-type approaches, for calibrating the hemodynamic model introduced by Friston et al. (2000). The proposed method is employed to estimate consecutively the values of the biophysiological system parameters and the external stimulus characteristics of the model. Numerical results corresponding to both synthetic and real functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) measurements for a single stimulus as well as for multiple stimuli are reported to highlight the capability of this computational methodology to fully calibrate the considered hemodynamic model. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Dataset for: An efficient multi-stage algorithm for full calibration of the hemodynamic model from BOLD signal responses

    KAUST Repository

    Djellouli, Rabia

    2017-01-01

    We propose a computational strategy that falls into the category of prediction/correction iterative-type approaches, for calibrating the hemodynamic model introduced by Friston et al. (2000). The proposed method is employed to estimate consecutively the values of the biophysiological system parameters and the external stimulus characteristics of the model. Numerical results corresponding to both synthetic and real functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) measurements for a single stimulus as well as for multiple stimuli are reported to highlight the capability of this computational methodology to fully calibrate the considered hemodynamic model.

  10. Development of Simplified and Dynamic Model for Double Glazing Unit Validated with Full-Scale Facade Element

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Mingzhe; Wittchen, Kim Bjarne; Heiselberg, Per

    2012-01-01

    The project aims at developing simplified calculation methods for the different features that influence energy demand and indoor environment behind “intelligent” glazed façades. This paper describes how to set up simplified model to calculate the thermal and solar properties (U and g value......) together with comfort performance (internal surface temperature of the glazing) of a double glazing unit. Double glazing unit is defined as 1D model with nodes representing different layers of material. Several models with different number of nodes and position of these are compared and verified in order...... of the simplified method is that the models are based on the standards EN 410 and EN 673 taking the thermal mass of the glazing into account. In addition, angle and spectral dependency of solar characteristic will also be considered during the calculation. Using the method, it is possible to calculate the whole...

  11. Full-vectorial propagation model and modified effective mode area of four-wave mixing in straight waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Kai; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Christensen, Jesper Bjerge

    2017-01-01

    We derive from Maxwell's equations full-vectorial nonlinear propagation equations of four-wave mixing valid in straight semiconductor-on-insulator waveguides. Special attention is given to the resulting effective mode area, which takes a convenient form known from studies in photonic crystal fibers......, but has not been introduced in the context of integrated waveguides. We show that the difference between our full-vectorial effective mode area and the scalar equivalent often referred to in the literature may lead to mistakes when evaluating the nonlinear refractive index and optimizing designs of new...

  12. Stochastic Simulation of a Full-Chain Reptation Model with Constraint Release, Chain-Length Fluctuations and Chain Stretching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Jesper; Schieber, Jay D.

    1999-01-01

    A self-consistent reptation model that includes chain stretching, chain-length fluctuations, segment connectivity and constraint release is used to predict transient and steady flows. Quantitative comparisons are made with entangledsolution data. The model is able to capture quantitatively all...... for differentmolecular weight, the transient and steady-state behavior of the extinction angle, and the stress relaxation in cessation of steady shear flow....

  13. Original Researc Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAGHAVENDRA

    equalizer and tasseled cap transformation were employed to the image data. RGB to IHS conversions and color combination of the original image data have also been made. The Vegetation index, NDVI, has also been used to measure the presence and state of vegetation so as to distinguish vegetated areas from others.

  14. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2013-03-28

    Mar 28, 2013 ... food production in sub-Saharan Africa coun. (Sanchez, 2010). Soil is the most precious vital natural resource and it must be mana. Original Research .... Exchangeable K and Na were measured by fl photometer. Exchangeable acidity determined by saturating the samples with. KCl solution and titrated with ...

  15. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    questionnaires and analyzed using cross tab revealed the transfer of ... informal enterprises with the rural economy. Original Research. 95 ... ise from the formal sectors ew (1994) accepts these is study of the dynamics of lared the informal tailoring inputs from intermediary of and this is economic of inputs. According to.

  16. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2013-06-20

    Jun 20, 2013 ... great value in Ethiopian socio-economic growt requires small capital, promote inter linkages as it is a base for medium and large enterprises, increased domestic saving investment. Also they help for bal development provision of goods and services. Original Research. 123. 3327 (Online) esearch Journal.

  17. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    , fatty makeup of compost and raised the tempera of composting dairy manure and bedding by average of 3.4°C during an 8-wk developm period. BD compost preparation are used to. Original Research. 32. 3327 (Online) esearch Journal.

  18. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2013-06-25

    Jun 25, 2013 ... the feeding practices (Kassahun, 2000). This involves the use of fodder bank, f trees, agro-industrial by-products such as, seed cake and urea to overcome CP shor. (ILCA, 1990). Supplementation of poor q roughage feed with suitable energy and p. Original Research. 38. 3327 (Online) esearch Journal.

  19. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2013-03-24

    Mar 24, 2013 ... approach is to create a pseudo alignment by taking random positions of the original alignment. Some columns of the alignment ... Table 1: Sequences selected for MSA: Inform contains the organism name from wh sequences. Sequence format. Sequence number. Sequence 1. Sequence 2. Sequence 3.

  20. Empirical modeling of single-wake advection and expansion using full-scale pulsed lidar-based measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machefaux, Ewan; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Troldborg, Niels

    2015-01-01

    and to obtain an estimate of the wake expansion in a fixed frame of reference. A comparison shows good agreement between the measured average expansion and the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) large eddy simulation–actuator line computations. Frandsen’s expansion model seems to predict the wake expansion......In the present paper, single-wake dynamics have been studied both experimentally and numerically. The use of pulsed lidar measurements allows for validation of basic dynamic wake meandering modeling assumptions. Wake center tracking is used to estimate the wake advection velocity experimentally...... fairly well in the far wake but lacks accuracy in the outer region of the near wake. An empirical relationship, relating maximum wake induction and wake advection velocity, is derived and linked to the characteristics of a spherical vortex structure. Furthermore, a new empirical model for single...

  1. Glial origin of mesenchymal stem cells in a tooth model system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaukua, Nina; Shahidi, Maryam Khatibi; Konstantinidou, Chrysoula; Dyachuk, Vyacheslav; Kaucka, Marketa; Furlan, Alessandro; An, Zhengwen; Wang, Longlong; Hultman, Isabell; Ahrlund-Richter, Lars; Blom, Hans; Brismar, Hjalmar; Lopes, Natalia Assaife; Pachnis, Vassilis; Suter, Ueli; Clevers, Hans; Thesleff, Irma; Sharpe, Paul; Ernfors, Patrik; Fried, Kaj; Adameyko, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells occupy niches in stromal tissues where they provide sources of cells for specialized mesenchymal derivatives during growth and repair. The origins of mesenchymal stem cells have been the subject of considerable discussion, and current consensus holds that perivascular cells

  2. Tweets and Facebook Posts, the Novelty Techniques in the Creation of Origin-Destination Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malema, H. K.; Musakwa, W.

    2016-06-01

    Social media and big data have emerged to be a useful source of information that can be used for planning purposes, particularly transportation planning and trip-distribution studies. Cities in developing countries such as South Africa often struggle with out-dated, unreliable and cumbersome techniques such as traffic counts and household surveys to conduct origin and destination studies. The emergence of ubiquitous crowd sourced data, big data, social media and geolocation based services has shown huge potential in providing useful information for origin and destination studies. Perhaps such information can be utilised to determine the origin and destination of commuters using the Gautrain, a high-speed railway in Gauteng province South Africa. To date little is known about the origins and destinations of Gautrain commuters. Accordingly, this study assesses the viability of using geolocation-based services namely Facebook and Twitter in mapping out the network movements of Gautrain commuters. Explorative Spatial Data Analysis (ESDA), Echo-social and ArcGis software were used to extract social media data, i.e. tweets and Facebook posts as well as to visualize the concentration of Gautrain commuters. The results demonstrate that big data and geolocation based services have the significant potential to predict movement network patterns of commuters and this information can thus, be used to inform and improve transportation planning. Nevertheless use of crowd sourced data and big data has privacy concerns that still need to be addressed.

  3. Full-vectorial propagation model and modified effective mode area of four-wave mixing in straight waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kai; Friis, Søren M M; Christensen, Jesper B; Christensen, Erik N; Shi, Xiaodong; Ding, Yunhong; Ou, Haiyan; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2017-09-15

    We derive from Maxwell's equations full-vectorial nonlinear propagation equations of four-wave mixing valid in straight semiconductor-on-insulator waveguides. Special attention is given to the resulting effective mode area, which takes a convenient form known from studies in photonic crystal fibers, but has not been introduced in the context of integrated waveguides. We show that the difference between our full-vectorial effective mode area and the scalar equivalent often referred to in the literature may lead to mistakes when evaluating the nonlinear refractive index and optimizing designs of new waveguides. We verify the results of our derivation by comparing it to experimental measurements in a silicon-on-insulator waveguide, taking tolerances on fabrication parameters into account.

  4. Linking accretion flow and particle acceleration in jets - II. Self-similar jet models with full relativistic MHD gravitational mass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polko, P.; Meier, D.L.; Markoff, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new, semi-analytic formalism to model the acceleration and collimation of relativistic jets in a gravitational potential. The gravitational energy density includes the kinetic, thermal and electromagnetic mass contributions. The solutions are close to self-similar throughout the

  5. Prediction uncertainty assessment of a systems biology model requires a sample of the full probability distribution of its parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourik, van S.; Braak, ter C.J.F.; Stigter, J.D.; Molenaar, J.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-parameter models in systems biology are typically ‘sloppy’: some parameters or combinations of parameters may be hard to estimate from data, whereas others are not. One might expect that parameter uncertainty automatically leads to uncertain predictions, but this is not the case. We illustrate

  6. Full title page pp iii Modeling erosion and overbank deposition during extreme flood conditions on the Carson River, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, R. W. H.; Warwick, J. J.; James, A. I.; Miller, J. R.

    2004-09-01

    The Carson River in west-central Nevada is one of the most mercury contaminated fluvial systems in North America. Most of its mercury is affiliated with channel bank material and floodplain deposits, with the movement of mercury through this system being highly dependent on sediment transport processes, particularly during overbank flows. To simulate these extreme situations, a United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) hydrodynamic model (RIVMOD) was modified to include the 'divided channel approach' to estimate floodplain depths and velocities. The RIVMOD code was also augmented to allow dynamic width increases in the channel. Calibrated bank erosion functions, developed for the US EPA water quality model (WASP5), suggest that bank erosion is significantly greater at flows above bankfull discharge when compared to flows confined to the main channel. Verification of the bank erosion model matched observed width increases in 7 out of 10 reaches, with general trends matched in two of the remaining three reaches. Results also indicate that a single major flood event is responsible for nearly 87% of the total mass eroded during the period from 1991 to 1997. Overbank deposition was modeled using separate functions for coarse suspended sediment and washload material. Overbank deposition results are also in good agreement with observed values.

  7. Starch Origin and Thermal Processing Affect Starch Digestion in a Minipig Model of Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Mößeler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although steatorrhea is the most obvious symptom of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI, enzymatic digestion of protein and starch is also impaired. Low praecaecal digestibility of starch causes a forced microbial fermentation accounting for energy losses and meteorism. To optimise dietetic measures, knowledge of praecaecal digestibility of starch is needed but such information from PEI patients is rare. Minipigs fitted with an ileocaecal fistula with (n=3 or without (n=3 pancreatic duct ligation (PL were used to estimate the rate of praecaecal disappearance (pcD of starch. Different botanical sources of starch (rice, amaranth, potato, and pea were fed either raw or cooked. In the controls (C, there was an almost complete pcD (>92% except for potato starch (61.5% which was significantly lower. In PL pcD of raw starch was significantly lower for all sources of starch except for amaranth (87.9%. Thermal processing increased pcD in PL, reaching values of C for starch from rice, potato, and pea. This study clearly underlines the need for precise specification of starch used for patients with specific dietetic needs like PEI. Data should be generated in suitable animal models or patients as tests in healthy individuals would not have given similar conclusions.

  8. Evolutionary profiling reveals the heterogeneous origins of classes of human disease genes: implications for modeling disease genetics in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Evan K; Schnitzler, Christine E; Havlak, Paul; Putnam, Nicholas H; Nguyen, Anh-Dao; Moreland, R Travis; Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2014-10-04

    The recent expansion of whole-genome sequence data available from diverse animal lineages provides an opportunity to investigate the evolutionary origins of specific classes of human disease genes. Previous studies have observed that human disease genes are of particularly ancient origin. While this suggests that many animal species have the potential to serve as feasible models for research on genes responsible for human disease, it is unclear whether this pattern has meaningful implications and whether it prevails for every class of human disease. We used a comparative genomics approach encompassing a broad phylogenetic range of animals with sequenced genomes to determine the evolutionary patterns exhibited by human genes associated with different classes of disease. Our results support previous claims that most human disease genes are of ancient origin but, more importantly, we also demonstrate that several specific disease classes have a significantly large proportion of genes that emerged relatively recently within the metazoans and/or vertebrates. An independent assessment of the synonymous to non-synonymous substitution rates of human disease genes found in mammals reveals that disease classes that arose more recently also display unexpected rates of purifying selection between their mammalian and human counterparts. Our results reveal the heterogeneity underlying the evolutionary origins of (and selective pressures on) different classes of human disease genes. For example, some disease gene classes appear to be of uncommonly recent (i.e., vertebrate-specific) origin and, as a whole, have been evolving at a faster rate within mammals than the majority of disease classes having more ancient origins. The novel patterns that we have identified may provide new insight into cases where studies using traditional animal models were unable to produce results that translated to humans. Conversely, we note that the larger set of disease classes do have ancient origins

  9. Original Researc Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAGHAVENDRA

    introdution of defects during the synthesis proces growth of the films. But, still the origin of ferromag is in debate. ... se (Mn), cobalt (Co) and nickel (Ni) doped zinc oxide (ZnO) ndidates for variety of practical application due to their spin of ... hexhydrate (Zn (NO3)26H2O), mangane hydrate (Co(NO3)2.6H2O), cobalt nitrate he.

  10. Full-scale testing and numerical modeling of a multistory masonry structure subjected to internal blast loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Brian Jarvis

    As military and diplomatic representatives of the United States are deployed throughout the world, they must frequently make use of local, existing facilities; it is inevitable that some of these will be load bearing unreinforced masonry (URM) structures. Although generally suitable for conventional design loads, load bearing URM presents a unique hazard, with respect to collapse, when exposed to blast loading. There is therefore a need to study the blast resistance of load bearing URM construction in order to better protect US citizens assigned to dangerous locales. To address this, the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte conducted three blast tests inside a decommissioned, coal-fired, power plant prior to its scheduled demolition. The power plant's walls were constructed of URM and provided an excellent opportunity to study the response of URM walls in-situ. Post-test analytical studies investigated the ability of existing blast load prediction methodologies to model the case of a cylindrical charge with a low height of burst. It was found that even for the relatively simple blast chamber geometries of these tests, simplified analysis methods predicted blast impulses with an average net error of 22%. The study suggested that existing simplified analysis methods would benefit from additional development to better predict blast loads from cylinders detonated near the ground's surface. A hydrocode, CTH, was also used to perform two and three-dimensional simulations of the blast events. In order to use the hydrocode, Jones Wilkins Lee (JWL) equation of state (EOS) coefficients were developed for the experiment's Unimax dynamite charges; a novel energy-scaling technique was developed which permits the derivation of new JWL coefficients from an existing coefficient set. The hydrocode simulations were able to simulate blast impulses with an average absolute error of 34.5%. Moreover, the hydrocode simulations

  11. Optical spectroscopy and system–bath interactions in molecular aggregates with full configuration interaction Frenkel exciton model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibt, Joachim; Sláma, Vladislav; Mančal, Tomáš, E-mail: mancal@karlov.mff.cuni.cz

    2016-12-20

    Highlights: • Standard Frenkel exciton model is extended to include inter-band coupling. • It is formally linked with configuration interaction method of quantum chemistry. • Spectral shifts due to inter-band coupling are found in molecular aggregates. • Effects of peak amplitude redistribution in two-dimensional spectra are found. - Abstract: Standard application of the Frenkel exciton model neglects resonance coupling between collective molecular aggregate states with different number of excitations. These inter-band coupling terms are, however, of the same magnitude as the intra-band coupling between singly excited states. We systematically derive the Frenkel exciton model from quantum chemical considerations, and identify it as a variant of the configuration interaction method. We discuss all non-negligible couplings between collective aggregate states, and provide compact formulae for their calculation. We calculate absorption spectra of molecular aggregate of carotenoids and identify significant band shifts as a result of inter-band coupling. The presence of inter-band coupling terms requires renormalization of the system–bath coupling with respect to standard formulation, but renormalization effects are found to be weak. We present detailed discussion of molecular dimer and calculate its time-resolved two-dimensional Fourier transformed spectra to find weak but noticeable effects of peak amplitude redistribution due to inter-band coupling.

  12. Secular variation in Western Europe during the first millennium BC New full vector data and comparison with geomagnetic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, G.; Chauvin, A.; Lanos, P.

    2011-12-01

    Archaeological structures in Western Europe are the most-used material to estimate the secular variation of the geomagnetic field during the last millennia. However there is still a lack of data especially for archaeointensities beyond the transition BC/AD, whereas already published data suggest very strong secular variation during the first millennium BC. This study presents 37 new archaeodirections and 18 new archaeointensities from France for the last 1500 years BC. Studied materials are kilns, hearths and two sets of pottery collections. Usual rock magnetism methods have been carried out to characterize magnetic grains. Archaeodirections were obtained by thermal and alternating fields demagnetization and they were corrected for thermal remanent magnetization anisotropy effects. Archaeointensities were determined with the classical Thellier-Thellier protocol with pTRM checks and take account of anisotropy and cooling rate effects. New Bayesian Western Europe secular variation curves for archaeodirection and archaeointensity were built with this new dataset and previously published data selected following reliability criteria. New curves present small variations of inclination during the last 1500 years BC. However for declination a very sharp maximum is observed around 800-750BC. Our new high-quality data set reveals also a regular decrease of archaeointensity between 800BC and the end of the first millennium BC. Our secular variation curves for France are very coherent with predicted directions computed with ARCH3K_cst.1 constrained model (Korte et al., 2009), but we note some discrepancies for archaeointensity between data and predicted values. ARCH3K_cst.1 constrained model built with archaeomagnetic and volcanic data seems more efficient than CALS3k.4 model (Korte & Constable, 2011), which includes archaeomagnetic, volcanic and sedimentary records. This study demonstrates consequently the central part of high-quality archaeomagnetic and volcanic data in the

  13. Full-waveform modeling of Zero-Offset Electromagnetic Induction for Accurate Characterization of Subsurface Electrical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadas, D.; André, F.; Vereecken, H.; Lambot, S.

    2009-04-01

    Water is a vital resource for human needs, agriculture, sanitation and industrial supply. The knowledge of soil water dynamics and solute transport is essential in agricultural and environmental engineering as it controls plant growth, hydrological processes, and the contamination of surface and subsurface water. Increased irrigation efficiency has also an important role for water conservation, reducing drainage and mitigating some of the water pollution and soil salinity. Geophysical methods are effective techniques for monitoring the vadose zone. In particular, electromagnetic induction (EMI) can provide in a non-invasive way important information about the soil electrical properties at the field scale, which are mainly correlated to important variables such as soil water content, salinity, and texture. EMI is based on the radiation of a VLF EM wave into the soil. Depending on its electrical conductivity, Foucault currents are generated and produce a secondary EM field which is then recorded by the EMI system. Advanced techniques for EMI data interpretation resort to inverse modeling. Yet, a major gap in current knowledge is the limited accuracy of the forward model used for describing the EMI-subsurface system, usually relying on strongly simplifying assumptions. We present a new low frequency EMI method based on Vector Network Analyzer (VNA) technology and advanced forward modeling using a linear system of complex transfer functions for describing the EMI loop antenna and a three-dimensional solution of Maxwell's equations for wave propagation in multilayered media. VNA permits simple, international standard calibration of the EMI system. We derived a Green's function for the zero-offset, off-ground horizontal loop antenna and also proposed an optimal integration path for faster evaluation of the spatial-domain Green's function from its spectral counterpart. This new integration path shows fewer oscillations compared with the real path and permits to avoid the

  14. [Treatment of acute full-thickness chondral defects with high molecular weight hyaluronic acid; an experimental model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, D; Espinosa, M; Calvo, R; Scheu, M; Valderrama, J J; Gallegos, M; Conget, P

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of 2 different protocols of intra-articular hyaluronic acid (HA, hylan G-F20) to articular cartilage regeneration in acute full-thickness chondral defects. Full-thickness chondral defects of 3 x 6 mm were performed into the lateral femoral condyles of New Zealand rabbits, treated with a single or three doses of HA. The animals were sacrified at 12 weeks and the regenerated tissue was evaluated by direct observation and histology with the ICRS scale. Macroscopically, in both groups treated with HA the defects were filled with irregular tissue with areas similar to hyaline cartilage and others in which depressed areas with exposed subchondral bone were observed. Histological analysis showed in both groups treated with HA a hyaline-like cartilage compared to control group. However, the score of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) scale did not show differences between the groups treated with HA. The use of single dose or 3 doses of AH in acute chondral lesions has a limited and similar benefit in articular cartilage regeneration. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Adenine Synthesis in a Model Prebiotic Reaction: Connecting Origin of Life Chemistry with Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Anumukonda, Lakshmi N.; Young, Avery; Lynn, David G.; Buckley, Ragan; Warrayat, Amena; Graves, Christina L.; Bean, Heather D.; Hud, Nicholas V.

    2011-01-01

    Many high school laboratory experiments demonstrate concepts related to biological evolution, but few exist that allow students to investigate life?s chemical origins. This series of laboratory experiments has been developed to allow students to explore and appreciate the deep connection that exists between prebiotic chemistry, chemical evolution, and contemporary biological systems. In the first experiment of the series, students synthesize adenine, one of the purine nucleobases of DNA and R...

  16. Local hidden variable modelling, classicality, quantum separability and the original Bell inequality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loubenets, Elena R

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a general condition sufficient for the validity of the original Bell inequality (1964) in a local hidden variable (LHV) frame. This condition can be checked experimentally and incorporates only as a particular case the assumption on perfect correlations or anticorrelations usually argued for this inequality in the literature. Specifying this general condition for a quantum bipartite case, we introduce the whole class of bipartite quantum states, separable and nonseparable, that (i) admit an LHV description under any bipartite measurements with two settings per site; (ii) do not necessarily exhibit perfect correlations and may even have a negative correlation function if the same quantum observable is measured at both sites, but (iii) satisfy the 'perfect correlation' version of the original Bell inequality for any three bounded quantum observables A 1 , A 2 = B 1 , B 2 at sites 'A' and 'B', respectively. Analysing the validity of this general LHV condition under classical and quantum correlation scenarios with the same physical context, we stress that, unlike the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality, the original Bell inequality distinguishes between classicality and quantum separability.

  17. Negative pressures in full-scale distribution system: field investigation, modelling, estimation of intrusion volumes and risk for public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Besner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Various investigations encompassing microbial characterization of external sources of contamination (soil and trenchwater surrounding water mains, flooded air-valve vaults, field pressure monitoring, and hydraulic and transient analyses were conducted in the same distribution system where two epidemiological studies showing an increase in gastrointestinal illness for people drinking tap water were conducted in the 1990's. Interesting results include the detection of microorganisms indicators of fecal contamination in all external sources investigated but at a higher frequency in the water from flooded air-valve vaults, and the recording of 18 negative pressure events in the distribution system during a 17-month monitoring period. Transient analysis of this large and complex distribution system was challenging and highlighted the need to consider field pressure data in the process.

  18. A new PLL system using full order observer and PLL system modeling in a single phase grid-connected inverter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ko, Youngjong; Park, Kiwoo; Lee, Kyo-Beum

    2011-01-01

    In a grid connected power conversion system, the phase angle information of a grid voltage is very essential for supplying power to the grid since it is used for active and reactive power control. A Phase Locked Loop (PLL) system is used and should be robust because often the actual grid voltages...... into fundamental and harmonic components and a virtual phase voltage is generated from the fundamental component using a Full Order Observer (FOO). Two virtual voltages are used as an input for the PLL system so the phase angle errors can be reduced and the output power quality can be improved. The dynamic...... are usually distorted by unexpected harmonics. However, conventional PLL systems have steady state errors when distorted voltages are used as a PLL input. Furthermore, using this distorted phase angle in the power control could reduce the output power quality. In this paper, the grid voltages are separated...

  19. Europe and the construction of "Celtic" models. The origins of ethnic-cultural paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López Jiménez, Óscar

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The particular archaeological reality in Europe during 19th and 20th centuries was the basis of modern Celtic studies. The imperialistic theories, which reproduced Germanic models, introduced a racist concept about the ancient societies and their social structures. The ethnic-cultural paradigm, created in these times, was part of a racist and deterministic world conception, and is present even nowadays. Each country had a different way to live this time of social changes and the intellectual activity was an image of it. In Spain the races of the European situation are still visible at the present day.

    La realidad arqueológica de Europa durante los siglos XIX al XX marcó de forma definitiva el panorama actual de la investigación sobre el mundo céltico. Las grandes teorías imperialistas, replicando modelos germánicos, dieron lugar a un concepto de las sociedades antiguas que trascendía más allá de lo histórico. El paradigma étnico-cultural, fruto de estos momentos, respondía a una concepción del mundo y la sociedad determinista y claramente racista, que pese a haber perdido su sentido hoy, todavía se encuentra soterrado en algunas formas de hacer Arqueología. Cada país vivió esta etapa de cambios sociales de forma diferente y su actividad académica así lo reflejó. En España, la compleja situación europea dejó una profunda huella de la que todavía hoy existen claras evidencias en la investigación prehistórica en general y céltica en particular.

  20. Analysis of cavern and well stability at the West Hackberry SPR site using a full-dome model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolik, Steven R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This report presents computational analyses that simulate the structural response of caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) West Hackberry site. The cavern field comprises 22 caverns. Five caverns (6, 7, 8, 9, 11) were acquired from industry and have unusual shapes and a history dating back to 1946. The other 17 caverns (101-117) were leached according to SPR standards in the mid-1980s and have tall cylindrical shapes. The history of the caverns and their shapes are simulated in a three-dimensional geomechanics model of the site that predicts deformations, strains, and stresses. Future leaching scenarios corresponding to oil drawdowns using fresh water are also simulated by increasing the volume of the caverns. Cavern pressures are varied in the model to capture operational practices in the field. The results of the finite element model are interpreted to provide information on the current and future status of subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The most significant results in this report are relevant to Cavern 6. The cavern is shaped like a bowl with a large ceiling span and is in close proximity to Cavern 9. The analyses predict tensile stresses at the edge of the ceiling during repressurization of Cavern 6 following workover conditions. During a workover the cavern is at low pressure to service a well. The wellhead pressures are atmospheric. When the workover is complete, the cavern is repressurized. The resulting elastic stresses are sufficient to cause tension around the edge of the large ceiling span. With time, these stresses relax to a compressive state because of salt creep. However, the potential for salt fracture and propagation exists, particularly towards Cavern 9. With only 200 feet of salt between the caverns, the operational consequences must be examined if the two caverns become connected. A critical time may be during a workover of Cavern 9 in part because of the operational vulnerabilities, but also because dilatant damage

  1. Development and assessment of a lysophospholipid-based deep learning model to discriminate geographical origins of white rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Nguyen Phuoc; Lim, Dong Kyu; Mo, Changyeun; Kim, Giyoung; Kwon, Sung Won

    2017-08-17

    Geographical origin determination of white rice has become the major issue of food industry. However, there is still lack of a high-throughput method for rapidly and reproducibly differentiating the geographical origins of commercial white rice. In this study, we developed a method that employed lipidomics and deep learning to discriminate white rice from Korea to China. A total of 126 white rice of 30 cultivars from different regions were utilized for the method development and validation. By using direct infusion-mass spectrometry-based targeted lipidomics, 17 lysoglycerophospholipids were simultaneously characterized within minutes per sample. Unsupervised data exploration showed a noticeable overlap of white rice between two countries. In addition, lysophosphatidylcholines (lysoPCs) were prominent in white rice from Korea while lysophosphatidylethanolamines (lysoPEs) were enriched in white rice from China. A deep learning prediction model was built using 2014 white rice and validated using two different batches of 2015 white rice. The model accurately discriminated white rice from two countries. Among 10 selected predictors, lysoPC(18:2), lysoPC(14:0), and lysoPE(16:0) were the three most important features. Random forest and gradient boosting machine models also worked well in this circumstance. In conclusion, this study provides an architecture for high-throughput classification of white rice from different geographical origins.

  2. Treatment plan evaluation for interstitial photodynamic therapy in a mouse model by Monte Carlo simulation with FullMonte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey eCassidy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo (MC simulation is recognized as the gold standard for biophotonic simulation, capturing all relevant physics and material properties at the perceived cost of high computing demands. Tetrahedral-mesh-based MC simulations particularly are attractive due to the ability to refine the mesh at will to conform to complicated geometries or user-defined resolution requirements. Since no approximations of material or light-source properties are required, MC methods are applicable to the broadest set of biophotonic simulation problems. MC methods also have other implementation features including inherent parallelism, and permit a continuously-variable quality-runtime tradeoff. We demonstrate here a complete MC-based prospective fluence dose evaluation system for interstitial PDT to generate dose-volume histograms on a tetrahedral mesh geometry description. To our knowledge, this is the first such system for general interstitial photodynamic therapy employing MC methods and is therefore applicable to a very broad cross-section of anatomy and material properties. We demonstrate that evaluation of dose-volume histograms is an effective variance-reduction scheme in its own right which greatly reduces the number of packets required and hence runtime required to achieve acceptable result confidence. We conclude that MC methods are feasible for general PDT treatment evaluation and planning, and considerably less costly than widely believed.

  3. Underwater floating robot-fish: a comparative analysis of the results of mathematical modelling and full-scale tests of the prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatsun Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a comparative analysis of the results of computer mathematical modelling of the motion of the underwater robot-fish implemented by using the MATLAB / Simulink package and fullscale tests of an experimental model developed in the laboratory of mechatronics and robotics of the SouthWest State University.

  4. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells: II. Origin, disease models and clinical aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Holm, Thomas Lindebo; Claesson, Mogens H

    2004-01-01

    of immune homeostasis and self-tolerance by counteracting the development and effector functions of potentially autoreactive T cells. We have in the previous APMIS review described the phenotype and physiology of Treg cells. The present overview deals with the thymic origin of Treg cells and their role......Autoimmune diseases afflict approximately 5% of the population and reflect a failure in the immune system to discriminate between self and non-self resulting in the breakdown of self-tolerance. Regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg cells) have been shown to play an important role in the maintenance...

  5. Mathematical model of chaotic oscillations and oscillatory entrainment in glycolysis originated from periodic substrate supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verveyko, D. V.; Verisokin, A. Yu.; Postnikov, E. B.

    2017-08-01

    We study the influence of periodic influx on a character of glycolytic oscillations within the forced Selkov system. We demonstrate that such a simple system demonstrates a rich variety of dynamical regimes (domains of entrainment of different order (Arnold tongues), quasiperiodic oscillations, and chaos), which can be qualitatively collated with the known experimental data. We determine detailed dynamical regimes exploring the map of Lyapunov characteristic exponents obtained in numerical simulations of the Selkov system with periodic influx. In addition, a special study of the chaotic regime and the scenario of its origin in this system was evaluated and discussed.

  6. Reaching control of a full-torso, modelled musculoskeletal robot using muscle synergies emergent under reinforcement learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, A; Holland, O E

    2014-01-01

    ‘Anthropomimetic’ robots mimic both human morphology and internal structure—skeleton, muscles, compliance and high redundancy—thus presenting a formidable challenge to conventional control. Here we derive a novel controller for this class of robot which learns effective reaching actions through the sustained activation of weighted muscle synergies, an approach which draws upon compelling, recent evidence from animal and human studies, but is almost unexplored to date in the musculoskeletal robot literature. Since the effective synergy patterns for a given robot will be unknown, we derive a reinforcement-learning approach intended to allow their emergence, in particular those patterns aiding linearization of control. Using an extensive physics-based model of the anthropomimetic ECCERobot, we find that effective reaching actions can be learned comprising only two sequential motor co-activation patterns, each controlled by just a single common driving signal. Factor analysis shows the emergent muscle co-activations can be largely reconstructed using weighted combinations of only 13 common fragments. Testing these ‘candidate’ synergies as drivable units, the same controller now learns the reaching task both faster and better. (paper)

  7. Demonstrating full-scale post-combustion CO2 capture for coal-fired power plants through dynamic modelling and simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Lawal, Adekola; Wang, Meihong; Stephenson, Peter; Obi, Okwose

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to provide insights into the design and operation of full-scale post-combustion CO2 capture for a 500MWe sub-critical power plant through dynamic modelling and simulation. The development and validation of the dynamic models of the power plant and CO2 capture plant are described. In addition, the scale-up of the CO2 capture plant from pilot plant scale (where it was validated) to full scale is discussed. Subsequently the manner in which the two plant models were linked is disc...

  8. REMO: A new protocol to refine full atomic protein models from C-alpha traces by optimizing hydrogen-bonding networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunqi; Zhang, Yang

    2009-08-15

    Protein structure prediction approaches usually perform modeling simulations based on reduced representation of protein structures. For biological utilizations, it is an important step to construct full atomic models from the reduced structure decoys. Most of the current full atomic model reconstruction procedures have defects which either could not completely remove the steric clashes among backbone atoms or generate final atomic models with worse topology similarity relative to the native structures than the reduced models. In this work, we develop a new protocol, called REMO, to generate full atomic protein models by optimizing the hydrogen-bonding network with basic fragments matched from a newly constructed backbone isomer library of solved protein structures. The algorithm is benchmarked on 230 nonhomologous proteins with reduced structure decoys generated by I-TASSER simulations. The results show that REMO has a significant ability to remove steric clashes, and meanwhile retains good topology of the reduced model. The hydrogen-bonding network of the final models is dramatically improved during the procedure. The REMO algorithm has been exploited in the recent CASP8 experiment which demonstrated significant improvements of the I-TASSER models in both atomic-level structural refinement and hydrogen-bonding network construction. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Behaviour of a new composite mesh for the repair of full-thickness abdominal wall defects in a rabbit model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Pascual

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Composite biomaterials designed for the repair of abdominal wall defects are composed of a mesh component and a laminar barrier in contact with the visceral peritoneum. This study assesses the behaviour of a new composite mesh by comparing it with two latest-generation composites currently used in clinical practice. METHODS: Defects (7x5cm created in the anterior abdominal wall of New Zealand White rabbits were repaired using a polypropylene mesh and the composites: Physiomesh(TM; Ventralight(TM and a new composite mesh with a three-dimensional macroporous polyester structure and an oxidized collagen/chitosan barrier. Animals were sacrificed on days 14 and 90 postimplant. Specimens were processed to determine host tissue incorporation, gene/protein expression of neo-collagens (RT-PCR/immunofluorescence, macrophage response (RAM-11-immunolabelling and biomechanical resistance. On postoperative days 7/14, each animal was examined laparoscopically to quantify adhesions between the visceral peritoneum and implant. RESULTS: The new composite mesh showed the lowest incidence of seroma in the short term. At each time point, the mesh surface covered with adhesions was greater in controls than composites. By day 14, the implants were fully infiltrated by a loose connective tissue that became denser over time. At 90 days, the peritoneal mesh surface was lined with a stable mesothelium. The new composite mesh induced more rapid tissue maturation than Physiomesh(TM, giving rise to a neoformed tissue containing more type I collagen. In Ventralight(TM the macrophage reaction was intense and significantly greater than the other composites at both follow-up times. Tensile strengths were similar for each biomaterial. CONCLUSIONS: All composites showed optimal peritoneal behaviour, inducing good peritoneal regeneration and scarce postoperative adhesion formation. A greater foreign body reaction was observed for Ventralight(TM. All composites induced

  10. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAGHAVENDRA

    ever increasing number of complaints about the quality skins available to local tanners and the ..... Data were analyzed using the general linear model procedure of SAS (2008). Mean differences were tested using Tukey honest significant differences test. The model for data analysis was: Yij = μ + Ti + Bi + Eij, Where Yij =.

  11. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAGHAVENDRA

    Abstract. In this work, the performance of eight prominent empiri model, in predicting path losses in build up area electromagnetic field strength measurements were co spectrum analyzer, along five predefined routes in Osu were compared with the model predictions. Path profile been observed on the received signal. For all ...

  12. On the origin of interdecadal oscillations in a coupled ocean–atmosphere model

    OpenAIRE

    Arzel, Olivier; De Verdière, Alain Colin; Huck, Thierry

    2007-01-01

    Interdecadal oscillations are analysed in a coupled ocean–atmosphere model made of a planetary geostrophic ocean model within an idealized geometry, coupled to a zonally-averaged tropospheric atmosphere model. The interdecadal variability that arises spontaneously in this coupled system is caused by intrinsic ocean dynamics, the coupled air-sea feedbacks being not essential. The spatial pattern of the variability bears some resemblance with observations and results obtained with atmosphere-oc...

  13. <Original Paper>Interaction Model of Mental Disability (IMMD) based on ICIDH

    OpenAIRE

    YAMANE, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    I propose an "Interaction Model of Mental Disability (IMMD)". Several models based on ICIDH are being proposed and tested around the world focusing on different aspects of disability. Though ICIDH is an inclusive model in health services, social security, insurance, education, and so on, the remarkable point of IMMD is to visualize the mutual relation of mental disability (impairment, disability and handicap) and other factors (environmental factors, personal factors). IMMD is a practical reh...

  14. Use of an innovative model to evaluate mobility in seniors with lower-limb amputations of vascular origin: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corriveau Hélène

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mobility of older individuals has often been only partially assessed, without considering all important aspects such as potential (available versus effective (used mobilities and the physical and psychosocial factors that modulate them. This study proposes a new model for evaluating mobility that considers all important aspects, applied here to lower-limb amputees with vascular origin. This model integrates the concepts of potential mobility (e.g. balance, speed of movement, effective mobility (e.g. life habits, movements in living areas and factors that modulate these two types of mobility (e.g. strength, sensitivity, social support, depression. The main objective was to characterize potential and effective mobility as well as mobility modulators in a small sample of people with lower-limb amputations of vascular origin with different characteristics. The second objective of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility of measuring all variables in the model in a residential context. Methods An observational and transversal design was used with a heterogeneous sample of 10 participants with a lower-limb amputation of vascular origin, aged 51 to 83, assessed between eight and 18 months after discharge from an acute care hospital. A questionnaire of participant characteristics and 16 reliable and valid measurements were used. Results The results show that the potential mobility indicators do not accurately predict effective mobility, i.e., participants who perform well on traditional measures done in the laboratory or clinic are not always those who perform well in the real world. The model generated 4 different profiles (categories of participants ranging from reduced to excellent potential mobility and low to excellent effective mobility, and characterized the modulating factors. The evaluations were acceptable in terms of the time taken (three hours and the overall measurements, with a few exceptions, which were

  15. Longitudinal and Integrative Tests of Family Stress Model Effects on Mexican Origin Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Rebecca M. B.; Liu, Yu; Nair, Rajni L.; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2015-01-01

    The family stress model represents a common framework through which to examine the effects of environmental stressors on adolescent adjustment. The model suggests that economic and neighborhood stressors influence youth adjustment via disruptions to parenting. Incorporating integrative developmental theory, we examined the degree to which parents'…

  16. Modeling the synergistic antibacterial effects of honey characteristics of different botanical origins from the Sahara Desert of Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laallam, Hadda; Boughediri, Larbi; Bissati, Samia; Menasria, Taha; Mouzaoui, Mohamed S; Hadjadj, Soumia; Hammoudi, Rokia; Chenchouni, Haroun

    2015-01-01

    Honey has multiple therapeutic properties due to its composition with diverse components. This study aims to investigate the antimicrobial efficacy of Saharan honeys against bacterial pathogens, the variation of honey floral origins, and its physicochemical characteristics. The antimicrobial activity of 32 samples of honey collected from the Algerian Sahara Desert was tested on four bacteria; Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus. The botanical origin of honeys and their physicochemical properties were determined and their combined antibacterial effects were modeled using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM). Out of the 32 study samples, 14 were monofloral and 18 were multifloral. The pollen density was on average 7.86 × 10(6) grains/10 g of honey, water content was 14.6%, electrical conductivity (EC) was 0.5 μS/cm, pH was 4.38 ± 0 50, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) content was 82 mg/kg of honey, total sugars = 83%, reducing sugars = 71%, and the concentration of proline = 525.5 ± 550.2 mg/kg of honey. GLMM revealed that the antibacterial effect of honey varied significantly between bacteria and floral origins. This effect increased with increasing of water content and reducing sugars in honey, but it significantly decreased with increase of honey EC. E. coli was the most sensitive species with an inhibition zone of 10.1 ± 4.7 mm, while C. perfringens was the less sensitive. Honeys dominated by pollen of Fabaceae sp. were most effective with an overall antimicrobial activity equals to 13.5 ± 4.7 mm. Saharan honeys, of certain botanical origins, have physicochemical and pollinic characteristics with relevant potential for antibacterial purposes. This encourages a more comprehensive characterization of honeys with in vivo and in vitro investigations.

  17. Modeling the synergistic antibacterial effects of honey characteristics of different botanical origins from the Sahara Desert of Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laallam, Hadda; Boughediri, Larbi; Bissati, Samia; Menasria, Taha; Mouzaoui, Mohamed S.; Hadjadj, Soumia; Hammoudi, Rokia; Chenchouni, Haroun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Honey has multiple therapeutic properties due to its composition with diverse components. Objectives: This study aims to investigate the antimicrobial efficacy of Saharan honeys against bacterial pathogens, the variation of honey floral origins, and its physicochemical characteristics. Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial activity of 32 samples of honey collected from the Algerian Sahara Desert was tested on four bacteria; Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus. The botanical origin of honeys and their physicochemical properties were determined and their combined antibacterial effects were modeled using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM). Results: Out of the 32 study samples, 14 were monofloral and 18 were multifloral. The pollen density was on average 7.86 × 106 grains/10 g of honey, water content was 14.6%, electrical conductivity (EC) was 0.5 μS/cm, pH was 4.38 ± 0 50, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) content was 82 mg/kg of honey, total sugars = 83%, reducing sugars = 71%, and the concentration of proline = 525.5 ± 550.2 mg/kg of honey. GLMM revealed that the antibacterial effect of honey varied significantly between bacteria and floral origins. This effect increased with increasing of water content and reducing sugars in honey, but it significantly decreased with increase of honey EC. E. coli was the most sensitive species with an inhibition zone of 10.1 ± 4.7 mm, while C. perfringens was the less sensitive. Honeys dominated by pollen of Fabaceae sp. were most effective with an overall antimicrobial activity equals to 13.5 ± 4.7 mm. Conclusion: Saharan honeys, of certain botanical origins, have physicochemical and pollinic characteristics with relevant potential for antibacterial purposes. This encourages a more comprehensive characterization of honeys with in vivo and in vitro investigations. PMID:26594206

  18. Measurement model as a means for studying the process of emotion origination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taymanov, R.; Baksheeva, Iu; Sapozhnikova, K.; Chunovkina, A.

    2016-11-01

    In the last edition of the International Vocabulary of Metrology the concept “measurement” was spread outside the field of physical quantities. This fact makes it relevant to analyze the experience of developing the models of multidimensional quantity measurements. The model of measurements of expected emotions caused by musical and other acoustic impacts, is considered. The model relies upon a hypothesis of a nonlinear conversion of acoustic signals to a neurophysiological reaction giving rise to emotion. Methods for checking this hypothesis as well as experimental results are given.

  19. Numerical investigation of Marine Hydrokinetic Turbines: methodology development for single turbine and small array simulation, and application to flume and full-scale reference models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaherchi Mozafari, Amir Teymour

    A hierarchy of numerical models, Single Rotating Reference Frame (SRF) and Blade Element Model (BEM), were used for numerical investigation of horizontal axis Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Turbines. In the initial stage the SRF and BEM were used to simulate the performance and turbulent wake of a flume- and a full-scale MHK turbine reference model. A significant level of understanding and confidence was developed in the implementation of numerical models for simulation of a MHK turbine. This was achieved by simulation of the flume-scale turbine experiments and comparison between numerical and experimental results. Then the developed numerical methodology was applied to simulate the performance and wake of the full-scale MHK reference model (DOE Reference Model 1). In the second stage the BEM was used to simulate the experimental study of two different MHK turbine array configurations (i.e. two and three coaxial turbines). After developing a numerical methodology using the experimental comparison to simulate the flow field of a turbine array, this methodology was applied toward array optimization study of a full-scale model with the goal of proposing an optimized MHK turbine configuration with minimal computational cost and time. In the last stage the BEM was used to investigate one of the potential environmental effects of MHK turbine. A general methodological approach was developed and experimentally validated to investigate the effect of MHK turbine wake on the sedimentation process of suspended particles in a tidal channel.

  20. Early-life stress origins of gastrointestinal disease: animal models, intestinal pathophysiology, and translational implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Calvin S.; Medland, Julia E.

    2015-01-01

    Early-life stress and adversity are major risk factors in the onset and severity of gastrointestinal (GI) disease in humans later in life. The mechanisms by which early-life stress leads to increased GI disease susceptibility in adult life remain poorly understood. Animal models of early-life stress have provided a foundation from which to gain a more fundamental understanding of this important GI disease paradigm. This review focuses on animal models of early-life stress-induced GI disease, with a specific emphasis on translational aspects of each model to specific human GI disease states. Early postnatal development of major GI systems and the consequences of stress on their development are discussed in detail. Relevant translational differences between species and models are highlighted. PMID:26451004

  1. Adenine Synthesis in a Model Prebiotic Reaction: Connecting Origin of Life Chemistry with Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anumukonda, Lakshmi N; Young, Avery; Lynn, David G; Buckley, Ragan; Warrayat, Amena; Graves, Christina L; Bean, Heather D; Hud, Nicholas V

    2011-12-01

    Many high school laboratory experiments demonstrate concepts related to biological evolution, but few exist that allow students to investigate life's chemical origins. This series of laboratory experiments has been developed to allow students to explore and appreciate the deep connection that exists between prebiotic chemistry, chemical evolution, and contemporary biological systems. In the first experiment of the series, students synthesize adenine, one of the purine nucleobases of DNA and RNA, from plausibly prebiotic precursor molecules. Students compare their product to authentic standards using thin-layer chromatography. The second and third experiments of the series allow students to extract DNA from a familiar organism, the strawberry, and hydrolyze it, releasing adenine, which they can then compare to the previously chemically-synthesized adenine. A fourth, optional experiment is included where the technique of thin-layer chromatography is introduced and chromatographic skills are developed for use in the other three experiments that comprise this series. Concepts relating to organic and analytical chemistry, as well as biochemistry and DNA structure, are incorporated throughout, allowing this series of laboratory experiments to be easily inserted into existing laboratory courses and to reinforce concepts already included in any high school chemistry or biology curriculum.

  2. An exsolution silica-pump model for the origin of myrmekite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, R.O.; Lindsley, D.H.

    1993-01-01

    Myrmekite, as defined here, is the microscopic intergrowth between vermicular quartz and modestly anorthitic plagioclase (calcic albite-oligoclase), intimately associated with potassium feldspar in plutonic rocks of granitic composition. Hypotheses previously invoked in explanation of myrmekite include: (1) direct crystallization; (2) replacement; (3) exsolution. The occurrence of myrmekite in paragneisses and its absence in rocks devold of discrete grains of potassium feldspar challenge those hypotheses based on direct crystallization or replacement. However, several lines of evidence indicate that myrmekite may in fact originate in response to kinetic effects associated with the exsolution of calcic alkali feldspar into discrete potassium feldspar and plagioclase phases. Exsolution of potassium feldspar system projected from [AlSi2O8] involves the exchange CaAlK-1Si-1, in which the AlSi-1 tetrahedral couple is resistant to intracrystalline diffusion. By contrast, diffusion of octahedral K proceeds relatively easily where it remains uncoupled to the tetrahedral exchange. We suggest here that where the ternary feldspar system is open to excess silica, the exchange reaction that produces potassium feldspar in the ternary plane is aided by the net-transfer reaction K+Si=Orthoclase, leaving behind indigenous Si that reports as modal quartz in the evolving plagioclase as the CaAl component is concomitantly incorporated in this same phase. Thus silica is "pumped" into the reaction volume from a "silica reservoir", a process that enhances redistribution of both Si and Al through the exsolving ternary feldspar. ?? 1993 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Original Researc Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAGHAVENDRA

    2015-03-08

    Mar 8, 2015 ... of a function give rise to different models. Some common functional forms are linear, Cobb-Douglas, quadratic, normalized quadratic, translog, generalized Leontief, and constant elasticity of substitution. The Cobb-Douglas functional form of production functions which was proposed by Wicksell (1851 ...

  4. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAGHAVENDRA

    Evolutionary analyses were conducted in MEGA6. (Tamura et al., 2013). The evolutionary history was inferred by using the Maximum Likelihood (ML) method based on the Kimura 2-parameter model (Kimura, 1980). The tree with the highest log likelihood (-1318.5755) is shown. Initial tree(s) for the heuristic search were.

  5. Origin of fumarolic fluids at Vulcano (Italy). Insights from isotope data and numerical modeling of hydrothermal circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todesco, Micol

    1997-10-01

    Hydrothermal activity is often associated with active volcanic systems. During quiescent times, geochemical monitoring of discharged fluids commonly is carried out to gain insights on the state of evolution of the whole volcanic system. The interest in geochemical monitoring derives from the observation that compositional variations of discharged fluids are commonly observed as a new eruptive phase is approaching. In particular, an increase in the gas components of direct magmatic origin may indicate a higher magma degassing rate at depth, potentially related to a renewal of explosive activity. Surveillance programs devoted to hazard mitigation in active volcanic areas generally include periodic analyses of discharged fluids at various locations on the volcanic edifice. Unfortunately, when significant changes are observed in gas composition, their correct interpretation in terms of system evolution is not always clear and straightforward. Several mechanisms may in fact be responsible for differences in the proportion of magmatic gases and shallower fluid components, and it is not always possible to recognize the magmatic gas fraction. Discrimination among fluids of different origin ideally is accomplished based on the isotope composition that each fluid acquires at the time of its generation. However, this isotope signature can be altered before the fluids reach the surface, because of mixing between fluids of different origin, or due to reactions that modify the original isotope composition. Thus, the interpretation of isotope data sometimes is quite complex and it can be highly misleading. In this work, the origin of the steam discharged at the hydrothermal system of Vulcano (Italy) was investigated by the means of a dual approach: first, the available isotope data on the discharged steam were analyzed. On the basis of on these and other data, a conceptual model of the hydrothermal system was developed and numerical simulations of a multiphase, multicomponent

  6. Bereday and Hilker: Origins of the "Four Steps of Comparison" Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adick, Christel

    2018-01-01

    The article draws attention to the forgotten ancestry of the "four steps of comparison" model (description--interpretation--juxtaposition--comparison). Comparativists largely attribute this to George Z. F. Bereday [1964. "Comparative Method in Education." New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston], but among German scholars, it is…

  7. Modelling the solar magnetism: from its internal origin to its manifestations at the surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouve, Laurene

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is part of the general study of dynamical processes involved in stars such as convection, rotation or magnetic fields and of their nonlinear interactions. The results of numerical simulations using the 2D finite element code STELEM and the pseudo-spectral 3D code ASH are presented. The first part of this work focuses on the global modeling of the solar dynamo. Through 2D simulations using mean-field theory, I studied the influence of a complex profile of meridional flow in Babcock-Leighton models. We show that there may be doubts about the ability of such models to reproduce the main characteristics of the solar cycle. In order to better constrain the effects of solar variability on the Earth climate, we present a first application in solar physics of sophisticated prediction methods which are used in meteorology. I also computed the first 3D MHD simulations in spherical geometry of a key step in the solar dynamo: the nonlinear evolution of magnetic structures from the base of the convection zone up to the surface where they produce active regions. Weak fields are likely to be modulated by convective motions, thus creating favored longitudes of emergence. If these structures are sufficiently arched, the orientation of bipolar spots corresponds to Joy's law. The introduction of an atmosphere in these models is a step towards a 3D global vision of our Sun. (author) [fr

  8. Broken-and-Intact Cell Model for Supercritical Fluid Extraction: Its Origin and Limits.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sovová, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 129, SI (2017), s. 3-8 ISSN 0896-8446. [Iberoamerican Conference on Supercritical Fluids ProSCiba 2016 /4./. Vina del Mar, 28.03.2016-01.04.2016] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : modelling * extraction kinetics * supercritical CO2 Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering OBOR OECD: Chemical process engineering Impact factor: 2.991, year: 2016

  9. A model for the origin of bursty star formation in galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2018-01-01

    We propose a simple analytic model to understand when star formation is time steady versus bursty in galaxies. Recent models explain the observed Kennicutt-Schmidt relation between star formation rate and gas surface densities in galaxies as resulting from a balance between stellar feedback and gravity. We argue that bursty star formation occurs when such an equilibrium cannot be stably sustained, and identify two regimes in which galaxy-scale star formation should be bursty: (i) at high redshift (z ≳ 1) for galaxies of all masses, and (ii) at low masses (depending on gas fraction) for galaxies at any redshift. At high redshift, characteristic galactic dynamical time-scales become too short for supernova feedback to effectively respond to gravitational collapse in galactic discs (an effect recently identified for galactic nuclei), whereas in dwarf galaxies star formation occurs in too few bright star-forming regions to effectively average out. Burstiness is also enhanced at high redshift owing to elevated gas fractions in the early Universe. Our model can thus explain the bursty star formation rates predicted in these regimes by recent high-resolution galaxy formation simulations, as well as the bursty star formation histories observationally inferred in both local dwarf and high-redshift galaxies. In our model, bursty star formation is associated with particularly strong spatiotemporal clustering of supernovae. Such clustering can promote the formation of galactic winds and our model may thus also explain the much higher wind mass loading factors inferred in high-redshift massive galaxies relative to their z ∼ 0 counterparts.

  10. Evaluation of uncertainties originating from the different modeling approaches applied to analyze regional groundwater flow in the Tono area of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijiri, Yuji; Saegusa, Hiromitsu; Sawada, Atsushi; Ono, Makoto; Watanabe, Kunio; Karasaki, Kenzi; Doughty, Christine; Shimo, Michito; Fumimura, Kenichi

    2009-01-01

    Qualitative evaluation of the effects of uncertainties originating from scenario development, modeling approaches, and parameter values is an important subject in the area of safety assessment for high-level nuclear waste disposal sites. In this study, regional-scale groundwater flow analyses for the Tono area, Japan were conducted using three continuous models designed to handle heterogeneous porous media. We evaluated the simulation results to quantitatively analyze uncertainties originating from modeling approaches. We found that porous media heterogeneity is the main factor which causes uncertainties. We also found that uncertainties originating from modeling approaches greatly depend on the types of hydrological structures and heterogeneity of hydraulic conductivity values in the domain assigned by modelers. Uncertainties originating from modeling approaches decrease as the amount of labor and time spent increase, and iterations between investigation and analyses increases.

  11. Test program of the drop tests with full scale and 1/2.5 scale models of spent nuclear fuel transport and storage cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuri, S.; Matsuoka, T.; Kishimoto, J.; Ishiko, D.; Saito, Y.; Kimura, T.

    2004-01-01

    MHI have been developing 5 types of spent nuclear fuel transport and storage cask (MSF cask fleet) as a cask line-up. In order to demonstrate their safety, a representative cask model for the cask fleet have been designed for drop test regulated in IAEA TS-R-1. The drop test with a full and a 1/2.5 scale models are to be performed. It describes the test program of the drop test and manufacturing process of the scale models used for the tests

  12. Analysis, Design, Modeling, and Control of an Interleaved-Boost Full-Bridge Three-Port Converter for Hybrid Renewable Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mira Albert, Maria del Carmen; Zhang, Zhe; Knott, Arnold

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the design, modeling, and control of an isolated dc-dc three-port converter (TPC) based on an interleaved-boost full-bridge converter with pulsewidth modulation (PWM) and phase-shift control for hybrid renewable energy systems. In the proposed topology, the switches are driven...

  13. Population balance modeling of full two-dimensional molecular weight and branching distributions for ldPE with topological scission in continuous stirred tank reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yaghini, N.; Iedema, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    A full extensive 2-dimensional (2D) model of low-density Polyethylene chain length/branching distribution is provided in this paper. 2D Population Balance Equations are solved by the Galerkinfinite element method to obtain the distributions, accounting for 2D 'topological scission'; a manner to

  14. Preliminary Evidence for Aortopathy and an X-Linked Parent-of-Origin Effect on Aortic Valve Malformation in a Mouse Model of Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Hinton

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome (TS, most frequently caused by X-monosomy (45,X, is characterized in part by cardiovascular abnormalities, including aortopathy and bicuspid aortic valve (BAV. There is a need for animal models that recapitulate the cardiovascular manifestations of TS. Extracellular matrix (ECM organization and morphometrics of the aortic valve and proximal aorta were examined in adult 39,XO mice (where the parental origin of the single X was paternal (39,XPO or maternal (39,XMO and 40,XX controls. Aortic valve morphology was normal (tricuspid in all of the 39,XPO and 40,XX mice studied, but abnormal (bicuspid or quadricuspid in 15% of 39,XMO mice. Smooth muscle cell orientation in the ascending aorta was abnormal in all 39,XPO and 39,XMO mice examined, but smooth muscle actin was decreased in 39,XMO mice only. Aortic dilation was present with reduced penetrance in 39,XO mice. The 39,XO mouse demonstrates aortopathy and an X-linked parent-of-origin effect on aortic valve malformation, and the candidate gene FAM9B is polymorphically expressed in control and diseased human aortic valves. The 39,XO mouse model may be valuable for examining the mechanisms underlying the cardiovascular findings in TS, and suggest there are important genetic modifiers on the X chromosome that modulate risk for nonsyndromic BAV and aortopathy.

  15. Transferable Measurements of Heredity in Models of the Origins of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttenberg, Nicholas; Laneuville, Matthieu; Ilardo, Melissa; Aubert-Kato, Nathanael

    2015-01-01

    We propose a metric which can be used to compute the amount of heritable variation enabled by a given dynamical system. A distribution of selection pressures is used such that each pressure selects a particular fixed point via competitive exclusion in order to determine the corresponding distribution of potential fixed points in the population dynamics. This metric accurately detects the number of species present in artificially prepared test systems, and furthermore can correctly determine the number of heritable sets in clustered transition matrix models in which there are no clearly defined genomes. Finally, we apply our metric to the GARD model and show that it accurately reproduces prior measurements of the model’s heritability. PMID:26480478

  16. Testing Secondary Models for the Origin of Radio Mini-Halos in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZuHone, J. A.; Brunetti, G.; Giacintucci, S.; Markevitch, M.

    2015-03-01

    We present an MHD simulation of the emergence of a radio minihalo in a galaxy cluster core in a “secondary” model, where the source of the synchrotron-emitting electrons is hadronic interactions between cosmic-ray protons with the thermal intracluster gas, an alternative to the “reacceleration model” where the cosmic ray electrons are reaccelerated by turbulence induced by core sloshing, which we discussed in an earlier work. We follow the evolution of cosmic-ray electron spectra and their radio emission using passive tracer particles, taking into account the time-dependent injection of electrons from hadronic interactions and their energy losses. We find that secondary electrons in a sloshing cluster core can generate diffuse synchrotron emission with luminosity and extent similar to observed radio minihalos. However, we also find important differences with our previous work. We find that the drop in radio emission at cold fronts is less prominent than that in our reacceleration-based simulations, indicating that in this flavor of the secondary model the emission is more spatially extended than in some observed minihalos. We also explore the effect of rapid changes in the magnetic field on the radio spectrum. While the resulting spectra in some regions are steeper than expected from stationary conditions, the change is marginal, with differences in the synchrotron spectral index of {Δ }α ≲ 0.15-0.25, depending on the frequency band. This is a much narrower range than claimed in the best-observed minihalos and produced in the reacceleration model. Our results provide important suggestions to constrain these models with future observations.

  17. Groundwater transport modeling of constituents originating from the Burial Grounds Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, P.F.; Shupe, M.G.; Spalding, C.P. [GeoTrans, Inc., Sterling, VA (US)

    1992-10-30

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), operates a number of sites for the land disposal of various leachable radionuclide, organic, and inorganic wastes. Located within the General Separations Area (GSA) of SRS are the Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF) and the Old Burial Ground (OBG). A portion of the LLRWDF has been designated as the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF). The OBG began receiving waste in 1952 and was closed in 1974. Various wastes, including transuranic, intermediate and low level beta-gamma, and solvents, were received during this period of operation. In 1969, prior to the closing of the OBG, a portion of the MWMF/LLRWDF (the MWMF) began receiving waste. GeoTrans, Inc. was contracted by WSRC to conduct a numerical modeling study to assess groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the vicinity of the MWMF in support of an Alternate Concentration Limits demonstration for the Part B permit. The project was divided into two phases: development of a groundwater flow model of the hydrogeologic system underlying the MWMF which includes the entire GSA, and development of a solute transport model to assess migration of 19 designated constituents of concern (COCs) over a period 30 years into the future. The first phase was completed in May of 1992 and the results documented in GeoTrans (1992). That report serves as the companion volume to the present contaminant transport modeling report. The transport study is intended to develop predictions of concentration and mass flux of the 19 COCs at downgradient exposure points over the 30 year period of interest. These results are to be used in human health and ecological risk assessments which are also being performed in support of the Part B permit.

  18. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells: II. Origin, disease models and clinical aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Holm, Thomas Lindebo; Claesson, Mogens H

    2004-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases afflict approximately 5% of the population and reflect a failure in the immune system to discriminate between self and non-self resulting in the breakdown of self-tolerance. Regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg cells) have been shown to play an important role in the maintenance ...... in disease models such as autoimmune gastritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Finally, we will consider some aspects of the therapeutic potential of Treg cells....

  19. Broken-and-Intact Cell Model for Supercritical Fluid Extraction: Its Origin and Limits.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sovová, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 129, SI (2017), s. 3-8 ISSN 0896-8446. [Iberoamerican Conference on Supercritical Fluid s ProSCiba 2016 /4./. Vina del Mar, 28.03.2016-01.04.2016] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : modelling * extraction kinetics * supercritical CO2 Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering OBOR OECD: Chemical process engineering Impact factor: 2.991, year: 2016

  20. Hydrodesulfurization and hydrodemetallization of different origin vacuum residues : new modeling approach.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira , Cristina; Tayakout-Fayolle , Melaz; Guibard , Isabelle; Lemos , Francisco

    2014-01-01

    International audience; In order to be able to upgrade the heaviest part of the crude oil one needs to remove several impurities, such as sulfur or metals. Residue hydrotreatment in fixed beds, under high hydrogen pressure can achieve high removal performances, with an industrial catalysts optimized staging. Despite the recent improvements, petroleum residues remain very difficult to describe and characterize in detail. Several kinetic models have been developed, but mostly they are feed depe...

  1. Original Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Natarajan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available History that comes to us as a chronology of events is really a collective existence that is evolving through several stages to develop Individuality in all members of the society. The human community, nation states, linguistic groups, local castes and classes, and families are the intermediate stages in development of the Individual. The social process moves through phases of survival, growth, development and evolution. In the process it organizes the consciousness of its members at successive levels from social external manners, formed behavior, value-based character and personality to culminate in the development of Individuality. Through this process, society evolves from physicality to Mentality. The power of accomplishment in society and its members develops progressively through stages of skill, capacity, talent, and ability. Original thinking is made possible by the prior development of thinking that organizes facts into information. The immediate result of the last world war was a shift in reliance from physical force and action to mental conception and mental activity on a global scale. At such times no problem need defy solution, if only humanity recognizes the occasion for thinking and Original Thinking. The apparently insoluble problems we confront are an opportunity to formulate a comprehensive theory of social evolution. The immediate possibility is to devise complete solutions to all existing problems, if only we use the right method of thought development.

  2. A possible gravitational origin of the Higgs field in the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flato, M.

    1988-01-01

    A standard model for weak and electromagnetic interactions with the inclusion of a partially quantized gravitational field g={g αβ } is considered. The imposition of the causality condition on g αβ reduces them to the form g αβ (x)=Ω(x)g αβ (x) where Ω(x) is a scalar quantum field and g αβ (x) is a dynamical c-number metric. Expressing Ω as a local function of some other scalar field φ, whose kinetic term has the conventional form, we get Ω(x)=-4/3G 0 :φ 2 (x): where G 0 is the Newton constant. The gravitational action integral S(g,φ) for g αβ and φ fields admits the spontaneous symmetry breaking. This implies that in the standard model with gravitational field included the scalar graviton field φ may play the role of Higgs field and may generate the masses of W and Z bosons, leptons and quarks. This shows that gravity may be responsible for all particle masses of the standard model. (orig.)

  3. Minimal agent based model for financial markets I. Origin and self-organization of stylized facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfi, V.; Cristelli, M.; Pietronero, L.; Zaccaria, A.

    2009-02-01

    We introduce a minimal agent based model for financial markets to understand the nature and self-organization of the stylized facts. The model is minimal in the sense that we try to identify the essential ingredients to reproduce the most important deviations of price time series from a random walk behavior. We focus on four essential ingredients: fundamentalist agents which tend to stabilize the market; chartist agents which induce destabilization; analysis of price behavior for the two strategies; herding behavior which governs the possibility of changing strategy. Bubbles and crashes correspond to situations dominated by chartists, while fundamentalists provide a long time stability (on average). The stylized facts are shown to correspond to an intermittent behavior which occurs only for a finite value of the number of agents N. Therefore they correspond to finite size effects which, however, can occur at different time scales. We propose a new mechanism for the self-organization of this state which is linked to the existence of a threshold for the agents to be active or not active. The feedback between price fluctuations and number of active agents represents a crucial element for this state of self-organized intermittency. The model can be easily generalized to consider more realistic variants.

  4. Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-16

    Sep 16, 2012 ... PLS model at full spectral range (380 – 1700 nm) was with correlation coefficient (r) =0.90 and standard error of prediction ... (380 – 950 nm), correlation coefficient (r) = 0.92 and standard error of prediction (SEP) = 0.58 mg/100g. Although HPLC is ..... fruits such as watermelon. REFERENCES. Ali, A., and ...

  5. How well-mixed is well mixed? Hydrodynamic-biokinetic model integration in an aerated tank of a full-scale water resource recovery facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Usman; Audenaert, Wim; Amerlinck, Youri; Maere, Thomas; Arnaldos, Marina; Nopens, Ingmar

    2017-10-01

    Current water resource recovery facility (WRRF) models only consider local concentration variations caused by inadequate mixing to a very limited extent, which often leads to a need for (rigorous) calibration. The main objective of this study is to visualize local impacts of mixing by developing an integrated hydrodynamic-biokinetic model for an aeration compartment of a full-scale WRRF. Such a model is able to predict local variations in concentrations and thus allows judging their importance at a process level. In order to achieve this, full-scale hydrodynamics have been simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) through a detailed description of the gas and liquid phases and validated experimentally. In a second step, full ASM1 biokinetic model was integrated with the CFD model to account for the impact of mixing at the process level. The integrated model was subsequently used to evaluate effects of changing influent and aeration flows on process performance. Regions of poor mixing resulting in non-uniform substrate distributions were observed even in areas commonly assumed to be well-mixed. The concept of concentration distribution plots was introduced to quantify and clearly present spatial variations in local process concentrations. Moreover, the results of the CFD-biokinetic model were concisely compared with a conventional tanks-in-series (TIS) approach. It was found that TIS model needs calibration and a single parameter set does not suffice to describe the system under both dry and wet weather conditions. Finally, it was concluded that local mixing conditions have significant consequences in terms of optimal sensor location, control system design and process evaluation.

  6. Comparison of intratumoral FDG and Cu-ATSM distributions in cancer tissue originated spheroid (CTOS) xenografts, a tumor model retaining the original tumor properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Takako; Yuan, Qinghua; Jin, Zhao-Hui; Aung, Winn; Yoshii, Yukie; Hasegawa, Sumitaka; Endo, Hiroko; Inoue, Masahiro; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Saga, Tsuneo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The intratumoral distributions of [ 18 F]FDG and [ 64 Cu]Cu-ATSM have been reported to be similar in adenocarcinomas but different in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in clinical studies. In the present study, we compared the intratumoral distributions of these two tracers in cancer tissue originated spheroid (CTOS) xenografts derived from adenocarcinoma and SCC, which retain the histological characteristics of the original tumors, and in cancer cell line xenografts of corresponding origin, to investigate the underlying mechanism of the distinct FDG and Cu-ATSM distribution patterns in adenocarcinoma and SCC. Methods: CTOSs derived from colon adenocarcinoma and lung SCC and cell lines established from colon adenocarcinoma and lung SCC, which were used for comparison, were subcutaneously transplanted into immunodeficient mice. One hour after administering [ 14 C]FDG and [ 64 Cu]Cu-ATSM, the intratumoral distributions were compared in the xenografts by using dual-tracer autoradiography. Adjacent sections were evaluated for necrosis, vasculature anatomy, Ki-67 antigen, and pimonidazole adducts using hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical staining. Results: There was a higher regional overlap of high FDG and Cu-ATSM accumulations in the adenocarcinoma CTOS xenografts than in the SCC CTOS xenografts, while the overlap in the adenocarcinoma cell line xenograft was lower than that observed in the SCC cell line. High FDG accumulation occurred primarily in proximity to necrotic or pimonidazole adduct positive regions, while high Cu-ATSM accumulation occurred primarily in live cell regions separate from the necrotic regions. The adenocarcinoma CTOS xenograft had the stereotypical glandular structure, resulting in more intricately mixed regions of live and necrotic cells compared to those observed in the SCC CTOS or the cell line xenografts. Conclusion: Tumor morphological characteristics, specifically the spatial distribution of live and necrotic cell

  7. Interstellar simulations using a unified microscopic-macroscopic Monte Carlo model with a full gas-grain network including bulk diffusion in ice mantles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Qiang; Herbst, Eric

    2014-01-01

    We have designed an improved algorithm that enables us to simulate the chemistry of cold dense interstellar clouds with a full gas-grain reaction network. The chemistry is treated by a unified microscopic-macroscopic Monte Carlo approach that includes photon penetration and bulk diffusion. To determine the significance of these two processes, we simulate the chemistry with three different models. In Model 1, we use an exponential treatment to follow how photons penetrate and photodissociate ice species throughout the grain mantle. Moreover, the products of photodissociation are allowed to diffuse via bulk diffusion and react within the ice mantle. Model 2 is similar to Model 1 but with a slower bulk diffusion rate. A reference Model 0, which only allows photodissociation reactions to occur on the top two layers, is also simulated. Photodesorption is assumed to occur from the top two layers in all three models. We found that the abundances of major stable species in grain mantles do not differ much among these three models, and the results of our simulation for the abundances of these species agree well with observations. Likewise, the abundances of gas-phase species in the three models do not vary. However, the abundances of radicals in grain mantles can differ by up to two orders of magnitude depending upon the degree of photon penetration and the bulk diffusion of photodissociation products. We also found that complex molecules can be formed at temperatures as low as 10 K in all three models.

  8. Origin of lavas from the Ninetyeast Ridge, Eastern Indian Ocean: An evaluation of fractional crystallization models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludden, J.N.; Thompson, G.; Bryan, W.B.; Frey, F.A.

    1980-08-10

    Ferrobasalts from DSDP sites 214 and 216 on the Ninetyeast Ridge are characterized by high absolute iron (FeO>12.9 wt %), FeO/MgO>1.9, and TiO/sub 2/>2.0 wt %. Their trace element abundances indicate a tholeiitic affinity; however, they are distinct from midocean ridge incompatible element-depleted tholeiites owing to higher contents of Ba, Zr, and Sr and flat to slightly light-REE-enriched, chondrite-normalized REE patterns. Calculations using major and trace element abundances and phase compositions are generally consistent with a model relating most major elements and phase compositions in site 214 and 216 ferrobasalts by fractionation of clinopyroxene and plagio-class. However, some incompatible element abundances for site 216 basalts are not consistent with the fractional crystallization models. Baslats from site 214 can be related to andesitic rocks from the same site by fractionating clinopyroxene, plagioclase and titanomagnetite. Site 254 basalts, at the southern end of the Ninetyeast Ridge, and island tholeiites in the southern Indian Ocean (Amsterdam-St. Paul or Kerguelen-Heard volcanic provinces) possibly represent the most recent activity associated with a hot spot forming the Ninetyeast Ridge. These incompatible-element-enriched tholeiites have major element compositions consistent with those expected for a parental liquid for the site 214 and 216 ferrobasalts. However, differences in the trace element contents of the basalts from the Ninetyeast Ridge sites are not consistent with simple fractional crystallization derivation but require either a complex melting model or a heterogeneous mantle source.

  9. Flow instability originating from particle configurations using the two-dimensional optimal velocity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiwata, Ryosuke; Sugiyama, Yuki

    2015-12-01

    The two-dimensional optimal velocity model has potential applications to pedestrian dynamics and the collective motion of animals. In this paper, we extend the linear stability analysis presented in a previous paper [A Nakayama et al., Phys. Rev. E. 77, 016105 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevE.77.016105] and investigate the effects of particle configuration on the stability of several wave modes of collective oscillations of moving particles. We find that, when a particle moves without interacting with particles that are positioned in a diagonally forward or backward direction, the stable region of the particle flow is completely removed by the elliptically polarized mode.

  10. Modeling indoor air pollution of outdoor origin in homes of SAPALDIA subjects in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Reto; Schindler, Christian; Eeftens, Marloes; Aguilera, Inmaculada; Ducret-Stich, Regina E; Ineichen, Alex; Davey, Mark; Phuleria, Harish C; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Künzli, Nino

    2015-09-01

    Given the shrinking spatial contrasts in outdoor air pollution in Switzerland and the trends toward tightly insulated buildings, the Swiss Cohort Study on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Diseases in Adults (SAPALDIA) needs to understand to what extent outdoor air pollution remains a determinant for residential indoor exposure. The objectives of this paper are to identify determining factors for indoor air pollution concentrations of particulate matter (PM), ultrafine particles in the size range from 15 to 300nm, black smoke measured as light absorbance of PM (PMabsorbance) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and to develop predictive indoor models for SAPALDIA. Multivariable regression models were developed based on indoor and outdoor measurements among homes of selected SAPALDIA participants in three urban (Basel, Geneva, Lugano) and one rural region (Wald ZH) in Switzerland, various home characteristics and reported indoor sources such as cooking. Outdoor levels of air pollutants were important predictors for indoor air pollutants, except for the coarse particle fraction. The fractions of outdoor concentrations infiltrating indoors were between 30% and 66%, the highest one was observed for PMabsorbance. A modifying effect of open windows was found for NO2 and the ultrafine particle number concentration. Cooking was associated with increased particle and NO2 levels. This study shows that outdoor air pollution remains an important determinant of residential indoor air pollution in Switzerland. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Stochastic model of angular distributions of fragments originating from the fission of excited compound nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiryanov, R. M.; Karpov, A. V.; Adeev, G. D.

    2008-08-01

    The anisotropy of angular distributions of fission fragments and the average multiplicity of prescission neutrons were calculated within a stochastic approach to fission dynamics on the basis of three-dimensional Langevin equations. This approach was combined with a Monte Carlo algorithm for the degree of freedom K (projection of the total angular momentum I onto the fission axis). The relaxation time τ K in the coordinate K was considered as a free parameter of the model; it was estimated on the basis of a fit to experimental data on the anisotropy of angular distributions. Specifically, the relaxation time τ K was estimated at 2 × 10-21 s for the compound nuclei 224Th and 225Pa and at 4 × 10-21 s for the heavier nuclei 248Cf, 254Fm, and 264Rf. The potential energy was calculated on the basis of the liquid-drop model with allowance for finiteness of the range of nuclear forces and for the diffuseness of the nuclear surface. A modified one-body viscosity mechanism featuring a coefficient k s that takes into account the reduction of the contribution from the wall formula was used to describe collective-energy dissipation. The coefficient k s was also treated as a free parameter and was estimated at 0.5 on the basis of a fit to experimental data on the average prescission multiplicity of neutrons.

  12. Origins of Tropospheric Ozone Interannual Variation (IAV) over Reunion: A Model Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junhua; Rodriguez, Jose M.; Thompson, Anne M.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Douglass, Anne R.; Olsen, Mark A.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Posny, Francoise

    2016-01-01

    Observations from long-term ozonesonde measurements show robust variations and trends in the evolution of ozone in the middle and upper troposphere over Reunion Island (21.1 degrees South Latitude, 55.5 degrees East Longitude) in June-August. Here we examine possible causes of the observed ozone variation at Reunion Island using hindcast simulations by the stratosphere-troposphere Global Modeling Initiative chemical transport model for 1992-2014, driven by assimilated Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) meteorological fields. Reunion Island is at the edge of the subtropical jet, a region of strong stratospheric-tropospheric exchange. Our analysis implies that the large interannual variation (IAV) of upper tropospheric ozone over Reunion is driven by the large IAV of the stratospheric influence. The IAV of the large-scale, quasi-horizontal wind patterns also contributes to the IAV of ozone in the upper troposphere. Comparison to a simulation with constant emissions indicates that increasing emissions do not lead to the maximum trend in the middle and upper troposphere over Reunion during austral winter implied by the sonde data. The effects of increasing emission over southern Africa are limited tothe lower troposphere near the surface in August-September.

  13. Intra-arch dimensional measurement validity of laser-scanned digital dental models compared with the original plaster models: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca Canto, G; Pachêco-Pereira, C; Lagravere, M O; Flores-Mir, C; Major, P W

    2015-05-01

    A systematic review was undertaken to evaluate the validity of intra-arch dimensional measurements made from laser-scanned digital dental models in comparison with measurements directly obtained from the original plaster casts (gold standard). Finally included articles were only those reporting studies that compared measurements from digital models produced from laser scanning against their plaster models. Measurements from the original plaster models should have been made using a manual or digital caliper (gold standard). Articles that used scans from impressions or digital photographs were discarded. Detailed individual search strategies for Cochrane, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PubMed, and LILACS were developed. The references cited in the selected articles were also checked for any references that could have been missed in the electronic database searches. A partial gray literature search was undertaken using Google Scholar. The methodology of selected studies was evaluated using the 14-item quality assessment tool for diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS). Only 16 studies were finally included for the qualitative/quantitative synthesis. The selected studies consistently agree that the validity of measurements obtained after using a laser scanner from plaster models is similar to direct measurements. Any stated differences would be unlikely clinically relevant. There is consistent scientific evidence to support the validity of measurements from digital dental models in comparison with intra-arch dimensional measurements directly obtained from them. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. ISABELLE full scale dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McInturff, A.D.; Dahl, P.F.; Kassner, D.; Lasky, C.; Robins, K.; Sampson, W.B.

    1975-01-01

    Data are presented on the various cosine theta type magnet models constructed at BNL in the development of ring magnets for ISABELLE, a pair of intersecting 200 GeV proton accelerating storage rings. The rings are to be filled with 30 GeV protons from the AGS and then accelerated to 200 GeV. The acceleration period is a 120 sec ramp from approximately 0.5 T to 4 T. The effect of mechanical precompression on training was studied by varying the interference fit between the coil (ISA IV) and its iron shield. The results were used to optimize the mechanical design of the full-size magnet models

  15. Evaluation of FRP Confinement Models for Substandard Rectangular RC Columns Based on Full-Scale Reversed Cyclic Lateral Loading Tests in Strong and Weak Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Farrokh Ghatte

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although many theoretical and experimental studies are available on external confinement of columns using fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP jackets, as well as numerous models proposed for the axial stress-axial strain relation of concrete confined with FRP jackets, they have not been validated with a sufficient amount and variety of experimental data obtained through full-scale tests of reinforced concrete (RC columns with different geometrical and mechanical characteristics. Particularly, no systematical experimental data have been presented on full-scale rectangular substandard RC columns subjected to reversed cyclic lateral loads along either their strong or weak axes. In this study, firstly, test results of five full-scale rectangular substandard RC columns with a cross-sectional aspect ratio of two (300 mm × 600 mm are briefly summarized. The columns were tested under constant axial load and reversed cyclic lateral loads along their strong or weak axes before and after retrofitting with external FRP jackets. In the second stage, inelastic lateral force-displacement relationships of the columns are obtained analytically, making use of the plastic hinge assumption and different FRP confinement models available in the literature. Finally, the analytical findings are compared with the test results for both strong and weak directions of the columns. Comparisons showed that use of different models for the stress-strain relationship of FRP-confined concrete can yield significantly non-conservative or too conservative retrofit designs, particularly in terms of deformation capacity.

  16. Molecular recognition of the environment and mechanisms of the origin of species in quantum-like modeling of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melkikh, Alexey V; Khrennikov, Andrei

    2017-11-01

    A review of the mechanisms of speciation is performed. The mechanisms of the evolution of species, taking into account the feedback of the state of the environment and mechanisms of the emergence of complexity, are considered. It is shown that these mechanisms, at the molecular level, cannot work steadily in terms of classical mechanics. Quantum mechanisms of changes in the genome, based on the long-range interaction potential between biologically important molecules, are proposed as one of possible explanation. Different variants of interactions of the organism and environment based on molecular recognition and leading to new species origins are considered. Experiments to verify the model are proposed. This bio-physical study is completed by the general operational model of based on quantum information theory. The latter is applied to model of epigenetic evolution. We briefly present the basics of the quantum-like approach to modeling of bio-informational processes. This approach is illustrated by the quantum-like model of epigenetic evolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Model Stitching Architecture for Continuous Full Flight-Envelope Simulation of Fixed-Wing Aircraft and Rotorcraft from Discrete Point Linear Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    14652 16807 Truth Iyy [ slug -ft2]Anchor Pt. Figure B.8: Verification of off-nominal pitch inertia extrapolation, CJ1 stitched model, control ...Izz [ slug -ft2]Anchor Pt. Figure C.10: Verification of off-nominal yaw inertia extrapolation, UH-60 stitched model, control derivatives. 172 -0.2 -0.1 0...and Control Derivatives 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 219 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT UNCLASSIFIED 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS

  18. Complexation modelling of uranium and other actinides by organic compounds of natural or synthetic origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouby, M.

    1998-01-01

    The future of nuclear wastes raises a lot of questions. Their resolution require an accurate knowledge of the physical, chemical and biological processes which affect the properties of radioelements constituting the wastes. 3 research themes have been approached. The experimental methods used are: neutronic activation analysis, UV-visible spectrophotometry and time-resolved induced laser spectro-fluorimetry. A part of the phenomena has been modelled by ionic strength correction models (as Davies or MSA). The main results have revealed: 1)the bio-sorption capacities of the microorganism (Mycobacterium phlei) for UO 2 2+ and NpO 2+ (in conditions where the specific adsorption capacities Qe(UO 2 2+ )=60 and Qe(NpO 2+ )=444 moles cations/g dry biomass 2)the retention capacities, in various leaching conditions, by this bacteria of the ions initially adsorbed 3)the complexation properties of 2 siderophores for the cations UO 2 2+ , U 4+ and Th 4+ . The thermodynamical equilibrium constants were determined for one of the siderophore: the pyoverdine A; they were such that KUO 2 2+ ≤KU 4+ ≤KTh 4+ 4)in very acidic media (HCl and HClO 4 until 12 M), the behaviour of the acylisoxazolone HPBI (1-phenyl-4-benzoyl-5-isoxazolone) and the value of its acidity thermodynamical constant is such that 0.13≤KATh≤0.32 at 25 degrees Celsius 5)the variations of the fluorescence properties of the uranyl cation in terms of the acidity of the concentrated media (HClO 4 and CF 3 SO 3 H) in which they are in solution; it seems that a complexation between the uranyl ion and the counter-ions present in solution occur. (O.M.)

  19. Kinematic models for the opening of the South China Sea: An upwelling divergent flow origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Hu, Jiwei; Yang, Dinghui; Song, Haibin; Wang, Zhenhua

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the kinematics of continent breakup and seafloor spreading in response to the upwelling divergent mantle flow using the optimal nearly-analytical discrete method. Modeling results show that a larger upwelling rate (Vz) in the upwelling divergent flow system favors the earlier development of continent breakup and seafloor spreading and the formation of narrow continental rifted margins and mantle exhumation; while a larger half divergent rate (Vx) favors the diffusive lithospheric thinning and the formation of wide continental rifted margins and mantle exhumation. The upwelling divergent flow-driven continent extension is strongly depth-dependent at the proximal margins, but it behaves approximately in a depth-uniform manner at the distal margins. Application of this model to the South China Sea (SCS) demonstrates that: (1) an upwelling flow operation with Vz = 0.3 cm/yr can explain the pre-spreading continent extension of the SCS between ca. 65 Ma and ca. 33 Ma; (2) the followed upwelling divergent flow with Vx = 2.5 cm/yr and Vz = 0.3 cm/yr can reproduce the seafloor spreading history at ca. 33-16 Ma in the SCS central oceanic basin; and (3) the post-16 Ma thermal cooling since the cessation of the SCS seafloor spreading contributed ∼1.2 km to the present-day bathymetry at the relict spreading ridge. The upwelling divergent flow with a high ratio of Vx/Vz was also likely responsible for the occurrence of the very wide rifted continental margins bounded the SCS. We suggest that an upwelling divergent mantle flow played a leading role in the opening of the SCS.

  20. Cellular Origin of Spontaneous Ganglion Cell Spike Activity in Animal Models of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Margolis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we review evidence that loss of photoreceptors due to degenerative retinal disease causes an increase in the rate of spontaneous ganglion spike discharge. Information about persistent spike activity is important since it is expected to add noise to the communication between the eye and the brain and thus impact the design and effective use of retinal prosthetics for restoring visual function in patients blinded by disease. Patch-clamp recordings from identified types of ON and OFF retinal ganglion cells in the adult (36–210 d old rd1 mouse show that the ongoing oscillatory spike activity in both cell types is driven by strong rhythmic synaptic input from presynaptic neurons that is blocked by CNQX. The recurrent synaptic activity may arise in a negative feedback loop between a bipolar cell and an amacrine cell that exhibits resonant behavior and oscillations in membrane potential when the normal balance between excitation and inhibition is disrupted by the absence of photoreceptor input.

  1. Simulation and optimization of ammonia removal at low temperature for a double channel oxidation ditch based on fully coupled activated sludge model (FCASM): a full-scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Sun, Peide; Wang, Ruyi; Han, Jingyi; Wang, Jianqiao; Song, Yingqi; Cai, Jing; Tang, Xiudi

    2013-09-01

    An optimal operating condition for ammonia removal at low temperature, based on fully coupled activated sludge model (FCASM), was determined in a full-scale oxidation ditch process wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The FCASM-based mechanisms model was calibrated and validated with the data measured on site. Several important kinetic parameters of the modified model were tested through respirometry experiment. Validated model was used to evaluate the relationship between ammonia removal and operating parameters, such as temperature (T), dissolved oxygen (DO), solid retention time (SRT) and hydraulic retention time of oxidation ditch (HRT). The simulated results showed that low temperature have a negative effect on the ammonia removal. Through orthogonal simulation tests of the last three factors and combination with the analysis of variance, the optimal operating mode acquired of DO, SRT, HRT for the WWTP at low temperature were 3.5 mg L(-1), 15 d and 14 h, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An automation of design and modelling tasks in NX Siemens environment with original software - cost module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbiciak, R.; Grabowik, C.; Janik, W.

    2015-11-01

    The design-constructional process is a creation activity which strives to fulfil, as well as it possible at the certain moment of time, all demands and needs formulated by a user taking into account social, technical and technological advances. Engineer knowledge and skills and their inborn abilities have the greatest influence on the final product quality and cost. They have also deciding influence on product technical and economic value. Taking into account above it seems to be advisable to make software tools that support an engineer in the process of manufacturing cost estimation. The Cost module is built with analytical procedures which are used for relative manufacturing cost estimation. As in the case of the Generator module the Cost module was written in object programming language C# in Visual Studio environment. During the research the following eight factors, that have the greatest influence on overall manufacturing cost, were distinguished and defined: (i) a gear wheel teeth type it is straight or helicoidal, (ii) a gear wheel design shape A, B with or without wheel hub, (iii) a gear tooth module, (iv) teeth number, (v) gear rim width, (vi) gear wheel material, (vii) heat treatment or thermochemical treatment, (viii) accuracy class. Knowledge of parameters (i) to (v) is indispensable for proper modelling of 3D gear wheels models in CAD system environment. These parameters are also processed in the Cost module. The last three parameters it is (vi) to (viii) are exclusively used in the Cost module. The estimation of manufacturing relative cost is based on indexes calculated for each particular parameter. Estimated in this way the manufacturing relative cost gives an overview of design parameters influence on the final gear wheel manufacturing cost. This relative manufacturing cost takes values from 0.00 to 1,00 range. The bigger index value the higher relative manufacturing cost is. Verification whether the proposed algorithm of relative manufacturing

  3. Dermatoglyphics--a possible biomarker in the neurodevelopmental model for the origin of mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed-Popova, Ferihan M; Mantarkov, Mladen J; Sivkov, Stefan T; Akabaliev, Valentin H

    2014-01-01

    Dermatoglyphic pattern formation and differentiation are complex processes which have been in the focus of research interest ever since dermatoglyphics became a science. The patterns' early differentiation and genetic uniqueness as well as the relatively simple methods used to obtain and store fingerprints make it possible to study the relationship between certain dermatoglyphic characteristics and the underlying pathological processes in a number of diseases, including mental disorders. The present review reports published data from fundamental and clinical studies on dermatoglyphics primarily in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder to lend additional support for the neurodevelopmental hypothesis in the etiology of these disorders. Following an analysis of the theories of dermatoglyphics formation and the complex association between ridge patterns and central nervous system in early embryogenesis, an attempt is made to present dermatoglyphics as possible biological markers of impaired neurodevelopment. The contradictory data in the literature on dermatoglyphics in mental disorders suggest the need for further studies on these biological markers in order to identify their place in the neurodevelopmental etiological model of these diseases.

  4. Starch Origin and Thermal Processing Affect Starch Digestion in a Minipig Model of Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mößeler, Anne; Vagt, Sandra; Beyerbach, Martin; Kamphues, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Although steatorrhea is the most obvious symptom of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI), enzymatic digestion of protein and starch is also impaired. Low praecaecal digestibility of starch causes a forced microbial fermentation accounting for energy losses and meteorism. To optimise dietetic measures, knowledge of praecaecal digestibility of starch is needed but such information from PEI patients is rare. Minipigs fitted with an ileocaecal fistula with (n = 3) or without (n = 3) pancreatic duct ligation (PL) were used to estimate the rate of praecaecal disappearance (pcD) of starch. Different botanical sources of starch (rice, amaranth, potato, and pea) were fed either raw or cooked. In the controls (C), there was an almost complete pcD (>92%) except for potato starch (61.5%) which was significantly lower. In PL pcD of raw starch was significantly lower for all sources of starch except for amaranth (87.9%). Thermal processing increased pcD in PL, reaching values of C for starch from rice, potato, and pea. This study clearly underlines the need for precise specification of starch used for patients with specific dietetic needs like PEI. Data should be generated in suitable animal models or patients as tests in healthy individuals would not have given similar conclusions.

  5. Origin of Ni-Cu Sulfide Deposits: Questioning 'High-Flux' Models'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, N. T.

    2015-12-01

    Magmatic sulfide ore bodies contain large amounts of sulfide with high concentrations of metals such as Ni, Cu and PGE. Their presence in relatively small intrusions commonly is attributed to the segregation and accumulation of sulfide droplets from magmas that flow rapidly through conduits. This 'high-flux' model is at odds with the following observations. Many ores appear to have been emplaced as magmatic breccias (Norilsk-Talnakh, Aguablanca) or crystal mushes (Jinchuan) containing a high proportion of sulfide. Such mixtures are very dense and could not have risen up through the crust from a deeper staging chamber. At Uitkomst and Platreef, screens of sedimentary rock maintaining the same orientation as adjacent sedimentary strata separate layers of ultramafic cumulates, some containing abundant sulfide ore. This geometry suggests that ultramafic mush and ore sulfides oozed into the sedimentary sequence, replacing less resistant strata. A mechanism explaining these observations is as follows: mafic-ultramafic intrusions both large and small do not differentiate in place but grow through the injection of magmas of differing compositions and crystallinity. Highly mafic magmas, particularly those charged with ferromagnesian crystals and sulfide, have high densities and they are injected into the lower parts of growing intrusions while less-dense, more evolved and/or plagioclase-rich magmas are injected at higher levels. Accumulation of sulfides probably occurs higher in the magma conduits and sulfide-rich mushes migrate or slump downwards in the conduit to form the ore bodies.

  6. Test of an 0.8-Scale Model of the AH-64 Apache in the NASA Langley Full- Scale Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    available test rigs - the NASA Generalized Rotor Model System (GRMS) and the Navy Hub and Pylon Evaluation Rig (HPER). Computer programs studying the...I, USAAVSCOM TM-87-D-5 V US ARMY AVIATION SYSTEMS COMMAND TEST OF AN 0.8-SCALE MODEL OF THE AH-64 APACHE IN THE NASA LANGLEY FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL...I% DTIC TAB [ Unan~nounced %] J st f iaton By- PDistributIon / . . AvnI1qbIlitV C -Idns... Dist l SP cI~o: *5* % , -- 5 ~V . - ~5 \\ .\\% TABLE OF

  7. THE ORIGIN OF THE HOT GAS IN THE GALACTIC HALO: CONFRONTING MODELS WITH XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henley, David B.; Shelton, Robin L.; Kwak, Kyujin; Joung, M. Ryan; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2010-01-01

    We compare the predictions of three physical models for the origin of the hot halo gas with the observed halo X-ray emission, derived from 26 high-latitude XMM-Newton observations of the soft X-ray background between l = 120 0 and l = 240 0 . These observations were chosen from a much larger set of observations as they are expected to be the least contaminated by solar wind charge exchange emission. We characterize the halo emission in the XMM-Newton band with a single-temperature plasma model. We find that the observed halo temperature is fairly constant across the sky (∼(1.8-2.4) x 10 6 K), whereas the halo emission measure varies by an order of magnitude (∼0.0005-0.006 cm -6 pc). When we compare our observations with the model predictions, we find that most of the hot gas observed with XMM-Newton does not reside in isolated extraplanar supernova (SN) remnants-this model predicts emission an order of magnitude too faint. A model of an SN-driven interstellar medium, including the flow of hot gas from the disk into the halo in a galactic fountain, gives good agreement with the observed 0.4-2.0 keV surface brightness. This model overpredicts the halo X-ray temperature by a factor of ∼2, but there are a several possible explanations for this discrepancy. We therefore conclude that a major (possibly dominant) contributor to the halo X-ray emission observed with XMM-Newton is a fountain of hot gas driven into the halo by disk SNe. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that the extended hot halo of accreted material predicted by disk galaxy formation models also contributes to the emission.

  8. Exploring the origin of broad-band emissions of Mrk 501 with a two-zone model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Maichang; Yang, Chuyuan; Wang, Jiancheng; Yang, Xiaolin

    2018-04-01

    We propose a two-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, including an inner gamma-ray emitting region with spherical shape and a conical radio emitting region located at the extended jet, to alleviate the long-standing "bulk Lorentz factor crisis" in blazars. In this model, the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of blazars are produced by considering the gamma-ray emitting region inverse Compton scattering of both the synchrotron photons itself and the ambient photons from the radio emitting region. Applying the model to Mrk 501, we obtain that the radio emitting region has a comoving length of ˜0.15 pc and is located at sub-parsec scale from the central engine by modeling the radio data; the flux of the Compton scattering of the ambient photons is so low that it can be neglected safely. The characteristic hard gamma-ray spectrum can be explained by the superposition of two SSC processes, and the model can approximately explain the very high energy (VHE) data. The insights into the spectral shape and the inter-band correlations under the flaring state will provide us with a diagnostic for the bulk Lorentz factor of radio emitting region, where the low and upper limits of 8 and 15 are preferred, and for the two-zone SSC model itself. In addition, our two-zone SSC model shows that the gamma-ray emitting region creates flare on the timescale of merely a few hours, and the long time outbursts more likely originate from the extended radio emitting region.

  9. Application of fuzzy neural networks for modeling of biodegradation and biogas production in a full-scale internal circulation anaerobic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Jujun; Chen, Xiaohong; Huang, Mingzhi; Zhang, Tao

    2017-01-02

    This paper presents the development and evaluation of three fuzzy neural network (FNN) models for a full-scale anaerobic digestion system treating paper-mill wastewater. The aim was the investigation of feasibility of the approach-based control system for the prediction of effluent quality and biogas production from an internal circulation (IC) anaerobic reactor system. To improve FNN performance, fuzzy subtractive clustering was used to identify model's architecture and optimize fuzzy rule, and a total of 5 rules were extracted in the IF-THEN format. Findings of this study clearly indicated that, compared to NN models, FNN models had smaller RMSE and MAPE as well as bigger R for the testing datasets than NN models. The proposed FNN model produced smaller deviations and exhibited a superior predictive performance on forecasting of both effluent quality and biogas (methane) production rates with satisfactory determination coefficients greater than 0.90. From the results, it was concluded that FNN modeling could be applied in IC anaerobic reactor for predicting the biodegradation and biogas production using paper-mill wastewater.

  10. Characterization of liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, in rat partial and full nigral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion models of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Jelsing, Jacob; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, have been demonstrated to promote neuroprotection in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) neurotoxin model of Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuron loss. In this report, we characterized the effect of a long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist, liraglutide (500µg/kg/day, s.c.) in the context of a partial or advanced (full) 6-OHDA induced nigral lesion in the rat. Rats received a low (3µg, partial lesion) or high (13.5µg, full lesion) 6-OHDA dose stereotaxically injected into the right medial forebrain bundle (n=17-20 rats per experimental group). Six weeks after induction of a partial nigral dopaminergic lesion, vehicle or liraglutide was administered for four weeks. In the full lesion model, vehicle dosing or liraglutide treatment was applied for a total of six weeks starting three weeks pre-lesion, or administered for three weeks starting on the lesion day. Quantitative stereology was applied to assess the total number of midbrain tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive dopaminergic neurons. As compared to vehicle controls, liraglutide had no effect on the rotational responsiveness to d-amphetamine or apomorphine, respectively. In correspondence, while numbers of TH-positive nigral neurons were significantly reduced in the lesion side (partial lesion ≈55%; full lesion ≈90%) liraglutide administration had no influence dopaminergic neuronal loss in either PD model setting. In conclusion, liraglutide showed no neuroprotective effects in the context of moderate or substantial midbrain dopaminergic neuronal loss and associated functional motor deficits in the rat 6-OHDA lesion model of PD. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Knowledge-based model of competition in restaurant industry: a qualitative study about culinary competence, creativity, and innovation in five full-service restaurants in Jakarta

    OpenAIRE

    NAPITUPULU JOSHUA H.; ASTUTI ENDANG SITI; HAMID DJAMHUR; RAHARDJO KUSDI

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to have an in-depth description in the form of the analysis of culinary competence, creativity and innovation that develops knowledge-based model of competence in full-service restaurant business. Studies on restaurant generally focused on customers more particularly customer’s satisfaction and loyalty, and very few studies discussed internal competitive factors in restaurant business. The study aims at filling out the research gap, using knowledge-based approach t...

  12. The IR obstruction to UV completion for Dante’s Inferno model with higher-dimensional gauge theory origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuuchi, Kazuyuki; Koyama, Yoji

    2016-01-01

    We continue our investigation of large field inflation models obtained from higher-dimensional gauge theories, initiated in our previous study http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1475-7516/2015/02/031. We focus on Dante’s Inferno model which was the most preferred model in our previous analysis. We point out the relevance of the IR obstruction to UV completion, which constrains the form of the potential of the massive vector field, under the current observational upper bound on the tensor to scalar ratio. We also show that in simple examples of the potential arising from DBI action of a D5-brane and that of an NS5-brane that the inflation takes place in the field range which is within the convergence radius of the Taylor expansion. This is in contrast to the well known examples of axion monodromy inflation where inflaton takes place outside the convergence radius of the Taylor expansion. This difference arises from the very essence of Dante’s Inferno model that the effective inflaton potential is stretched in the inflaton field direction compared with the potential for the original field.

  13. Characterization of liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, in rat partial and full nigral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion models of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille

    2016-01-01

    . In this report, we characterized the effect of a long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist, liraglutide (500µg/kg/day, s.c.) in the context of a partial or advanced (full) 6-OHDA induced nigral lesion in the rat. Rats received a low (3µg, partial lesion) or high (13.5µg, full lesion) 6-OHDA dose stereotaxically...... injected into the right medial forebrain bundle (n=17-20 rats per experimental group). Six weeks after induction of a partial nigral dopaminergic lesion, vehicle or liraglutide was administered for four weeks. In the full lesion model, vehicle dosing or liraglutide treatment was applied for a total of six...... weeks starting three weeks pre-lesion, or administered for three weeks starting on the lesion day. Quantitative stereology was applied to assess the total number of midbrain tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive dopaminergic neurons. As compared to vehicle controls, liraglutide had no effect...

  14. Full uncertainty quantification of N2O and NO emissions using the biogeochemical model LandscapeDNDC on site and regional scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Edwin; Santabarbara, Ignacio; Kiese, Ralf; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    Numerical simulation models are increasingly used to estimate greenhouse gas emissions at site to regional / national scale and are outlined as the most advanced methodology (Tier 3) in the framework of UNFCCC reporting. Process-based models incorporate the major processes of the carbon and nitrogen cycle of terrestrial ecosystems and are thus thought to be widely applicable at various conditions and spatial scales. Process based modelling requires high spatial resolution input data on soil properties, climate drivers and management information. The acceptance of model based inventory calculations depends on the assessment of the inventory's uncertainty (model, input data and parameter induced uncertainties). In this study we fully quantify the uncertainty in modelling soil N2O and NO emissions from arable, grassland and forest soils using the biogeochemical model LandscapeDNDC. We address model induced uncertainty (MU) by contrasting two different soil biogeochemistry modules within LandscapeDNDC. The parameter induced uncertainty (PU) was assessed by using joint parameter distributions for key parameters describing microbial C and N turnover processes as obtained by different Bayesian calibration studies for each model configuration. Input data induced uncertainty (DU) was addressed by Bayesian calibration of soil properties, climate drivers and agricultural management practices data. For the MU, DU and PU we performed several hundred simulations each to contribute to the individual uncertainty assessment. For the overall uncertainty quantification we assessed the model prediction probability, followed by sampled sets of input datasets and parameter distributions. Statistical analysis of the simulation results have been used to quantify the overall full uncertainty of the modelling approach. With this study we can contrast the variation in model results to the different sources of uncertainties for each ecosystem. Further we have been able to perform a fully

  15. The origin of felsic microgranitoid enclaves: Insights from plagioclase crystal size distributions and thermodynamic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Adriana; Pereira, Giovanna de Souza; Janasi, Valdecir de Assis; Higgins, Michael; Polo, Liza Angelica; Juriaans, Orlando Stanley; Ribeiro, Bruno Vieira

    2015-12-01

    Magma mixing is widely recognized in contemporary petrology as one of the primary igneous processes. Microgranitoid enclaves (MEs) are considered to be remnants of such mixing processes, and the term has a well-established genetic implication. However, microgranitoid enclaves span a wide range of compositions, and felsic varieties are also frequently reported. Nd-Sr isotope and textural data from felsic microgranitoid enclaves (FMEs), mafic microgranitoid enclaves (MMEs) and host granites from the Salto pluton, Itu Granitic Province, show that the cm-sized MMEs are dioritic, have medium-grained igneous textures and xenocrysts of alkali feldspar and quartz. The FMEs are cm- to meter-sized, have spheric shapes, show corrugated contacts with the host granites, and have resorbed feldspars and deformed quartz crystals interpreted as xenocrysts set in a fine-grained groundmass. Compared to the host granites, both MME and FME samples have increased FeO, MgO, TiO2, P2O5 and Zr contents, but their Sr and Nd isotope signatures are identical: FME 87Sr/86Sri = 0.7088-0.7063, εNdi = - 10.0 to - 10.2; MME 87Sr/86Sri = 0.7070, εNdi = - 10.5; host granite 87Sr/86Sri 0.7056-0.7060, εNdi = - 10.2 to - 10.3. These indicate that the enclaves derive from a similar source, although the melts from which they formed were probably hotter and chemically more primitive than their host granites. Crystal size distributions (CSDs) of plagioclase in samples drilled from rinds and cores of three FMEs show that the rind samples are systematically finer-grained than the samples from the cores, which indicates that the FMEs cooled inwards and contradict interpretations that the FMEs are autoliths. Thermal modeling suggests that a slightly more primitive, hotter magma would be thermally equilibrated with an evolved resident melt within weeks after mixing/mingling. Upon thermal equilibrium, the FMEs would have an increased crystal cargo, and the resulting touching framework would impart a solid

  16. Regeneration of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tendon Tear After Ultrasound-Guided Injection With Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Rabbit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gi-Young; Kwon, Dong Rak; Lee, Sang Chul

    2015-11-01

    Rotator cuff tendon tear is one of the most common causes of chronic shoulder pain and disability. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effects of ultrasound-guided human umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) injection to regenerate a full-thickness subscapularis tendon tear in a rabbit model by evaluating the gross morphology and histology of the injected tendon and motion analysis of the rabbit's activity. At 4 weeks after ultrasound-guided UCB-derived MSC injection, 7 of the 10 full-thickness subscapularis tendon tears were only partial-thickness tears, and 3 remained full-thickness tendon tears. The tendon tear size and walking capacity at 4 weeks after UCB-derived MSC injection under ultrasound guidance were significantly improved compared with the same parameters immediately after tendon tear. UCB-derived MSC injection under ultrasound guidance without surgical repair or bioscaffold resulted in the partial healing of full-thickness rotator cuff tendon tears in a rabbit model. Histology revealed that UCB-derived MSCs induced regeneration of rotator cuff tendon tear and that the regenerated tissue was predominantly composed of type I collagens. In this study, ultrasound-guided injection of human UCB-derived MSCs contributed to regeneration of the full-thickness rotator cuff tendon tear without surgical repair. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of local injection of MSCs into the rotator cuff tendon. The results of this study suggest that ultrasound-guided umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cell injection may be a useful conservative treatment for full-thickness rotator cuff tendon tear repair. ©AlphaMed Press.

  17. Technical comparison of the commercialized Racon model 21000 Portable, Reconfigurable Line Sensor (PRLS) and original Sandia/USAF prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blattman, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The military has been moving from a global strategic response with fixed site asset protection to regional tactical response requirements. This change necessitates high security sensor systems that can be easily relocated and rapidly placed in operation by unskilled operators. The Portable, Reconfigurable Line Sensor (PRLS) was developed by Sandia National Laboratories with United States Air Force funding. Racon, Inc. is now commercializing the PRLS through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRDA) with the United States Air Force. The commercialized design of the new PRLS bi-static radar sensor benefits from the extensive field testing of the original Sandia/USAF-developed engineering prototype systems of the 1980s. Tests conducted in hot, cold, wind, rain, and snow conditions verified exceptional intruder detection capability, resistance to spoofing attempts, and insusceptibility to mutual interference and nuisance alarms caused by birds or small animals. The use of 1990's implementation technology combined with extensive testing information has resulted in significant product performance enhancements as well as cost savings. This paper compares technical features of the original Sandia/USAF prototypes with the new commercialized Racon model 21000 Portable, Reconfigurable Line Sensor. The PRLS advances the art of outdoor security to meet the Relocatable Sensor System (RSS) challenge of the 1990s

  18. Genomic, RNAseq, and Molecular Modeling Evidence Suggests That the Major Allergen Domain in Insects Evolved from a Homodimeric Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Thomas A.; Perera, Lalith; London, Robert E.; Mueller, Geoffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    The major allergen domain (MA) is widely distributed in insects. The crystal structure of a single Bla g 1 MA revealed a novel protein fold in which the fundamental structure was a duplex of two subsequences (monomers), which had diverged over time. This suggested that the evolutionary origin of the MA structure may have been a homodimer of this smaller subsequence. Using publicly available genomic data, the distribution of the basic unit of this class of proteins was determined to better understand its evolutionary history. The duplication and divergence is examined at three distinct levels of resolution: 1) within the orders Diptera and Hymenoptera, 2) within one genus Drosophila, and 3) within one species Aedes aegypti. Within the family Culicidae, we have found two separate occurrences of monomers as independent genes. The organization of the gene family in A. aegypti shows a common evolutionary origin for its monomer and several closely related MAs. Molecular modeling of the A. aegypti monomer with the unique Bla g 1 fold confirms the distant evolutionary relationship and supports the feasibility of homodimer formation from a single monomer. RNAseq data for A. aegypti confirms that the monomer is expressed in the mosquito similar to other A. aegypti MAs after a blood meal. Together, these data support the contention that the detected monomer shares similar functional characteristics to related MAs in other insects. An extensive search for this domain outside of Insecta confirms that the MAs are restricted to insects. PMID:24253356

  19. On the Origins of Mars' Exospheric Nonthermal Oxygen Component as Observed by MAVEN and Modeled by HELIOSARES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, F.; Chaufray, J. Y.; Modolo, R.; Leclercq, L.; Curry, S.; Luhmann, J.; Lillis, R.; Hara, T.; McFadden, J.; Halekas, J.; Schneider, N.; Deighan, J.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Benna, M.; Johnson, R. E.; Gonzalez-Galindo, F.; Forget, F.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Eparvier, F. G.; Jakosky, B.

    2017-12-01

    The first measurements of the emission brightness of the oxygen atomic exosphere by Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission have clearly shown that it is composed of a thermal component produced by the extension of the upper atmosphere and of a nonthermal component. Modeling these measurements allows us to constrain the origins of the exospheric O and, as a consequence, to estimate Mars' present oxygen escape rate. We here propose an analysis of three periods of MAVEN observations based on a set of three coupled models: a hybrid magnetospheric model (LATmos HYbrid Simulation (LatHyS)), an Exospheric General Model (EGM), and the Global Martian Circulation model of the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD-GCM), which provide a description of Mars' environment from the surface up to the solar wind. The simulated magnetosphere by LatHyS is in good agreement with MAVEN Plasma and Field Package instruments data. The LMD-GCM modeled upper atmospheric profiles for the main neutral and ion species are compared to Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer/MAVEN data showing that the LMD-GCM can provide a satisfactory global view of Mars' upper atmosphere. Finally, we were able to reconstruct the expected emission brightness intensity from the oxygen exosphere using EGM. The good agreement with the averaged measured profiles by Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph during these three periods suggests that Mars' exospheric nonthermal component can be fully explained by the reactions of dissociative recombination of the O2+ ion in Mars' ionosphere, limiting significantly our ability to extract information from MAVEN observations of the O exosphere on other nonthermal processes, such as sputtering.

  20. Effective mass approximation versus full atomistic model to calculate the output characteristics of a gate-all-around germanium nanowire field effect transistor (GAA-GeNW-FET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayani, Amir Hossein; Voves, Jan; Dideban, Daryoosh

    2018-01-01

    Here, we compare the output characteristics of a gate-all-around germanium nanowire field effect transistor (GAA-GeNW-FET) with 2.36 nm2 square cross-section area using tight-binding (TB) sp3d5s∗ model (full atomistic model (FAM)) and effective mass approximation (EMA). Synopsys/QuantumWise Atomistix ToolKit (ATK) and Silvaco Atlas3D are used to consider the TB model and EMA, respectively. Results show that EMA predicted only one quantum state (QS) for quantum transport, whereas FAM predicted three QSs. A cosine function behavior is obtained by both methods for the first quantum state. The calculated bandgap value by EMA is almost twice smaller than that of the FAM. Also, a fluctuating current is predicted by both methods but in different oscillation values.

  1. Efficient Structure-Based Models for the McKibben Contraction Pneumatic Muscle Actuator: The Full Description of the Behaviour of the Contraction PMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Al-Ibadi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available To clarify the advantages of using soft robots in all aspects of life, the effective behaviour of the pneumatic muscle actuator (PMA must be known. In this work, the performances of the PMA are explained and modelled with three formulas. The first formula describes the pulling force of the actuator based on the structure parameters; furthermore, the formula presented is the generalised contraction force for wholly-pneumatic muscle actuators. The second important model is the length formula, which is modified to our previous work to fit different actuator structures. Based on these two models, the stiffness of the actuator is formulated to illustrate its variability at different air pressure amounts. In addition, these formulas will make the selection of proper actuators for any robot arm structure easier using the knowledge gained from their performance. On the other hand, the desired behaviour of this type of actuator will be predefined and controlled.

  2. A full-coordinate model of the polymerase domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and its interaction with a nucleic acid substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlik, R. F.; Meyer, D. J.; Shibata, M.; Roskwitalski, R.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.

    1994-01-01

    We present a full-coordinate model of residues 1-319 of the polymerase domain of HIV-I reverse transcriptase. This model was constructed from the x-ray crystallographic structure of Jacobo-Molina et al. (Jacobo-Molina et al., P.N.A.S. USA 90, 6320-6324 (1993)) which is currently available to the degree of C-coordinates. The backbone and side-chain atoms were constructed using the MAXSPROUT suite of programs (L. Holm and C. Sander, J. Mol. Biol. 218, 183-194 (1991)) and refined through molecular modeling. A seven base pair A-form dsDNA was positioned in the nucleic acid binding cleft to represent the template-primer complex. The orientation of the template-primer complex in the nucleic acid binding cleft was guided by the positions of phosphorus atoms in the crystal structure.

  3. The mouse and ferret models for studying the novel avian-origin human influenza A (H7N9) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lili; Bao, Linlin; Deng, Wei; Zhu, Hua; Chen, Ting; Lv, Qi; Li, Fengdi; Yuan, Jing; Xiang, Zhiguang; Gao, Kai; Xu, Yanfeng; Huang, Lan; Li, Yanhong; Liu, Jiangning; Yao, Yanfeng; Yu, Pin; Yong, Weidong; Wei, Qiang; Zhang, Lianfeng; Qin, Chuan

    2013-08-08

    The current study was conducted to establish animal models (including mouse and ferret) for the novel avian-origin H7N9 influenza virus. A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) virus was administered by intranasal instillation to groups of mice and ferrets, and animals developed typical clinical signs including body weight loss (mice and ferrets), ruffled fur (mice), sneezing (ferrets), and death (mice). Peak virus shedding from respiratory tract was observed on 2 days post inoculation (d.p.i.) for mice and 3-5 d.p.i. for ferrets. Virus could also be detected in brain, liver, spleen, kidney, and intestine from inoculated mice, and in heart, liver, and olfactory bulb from inoculated ferrets. The inoculation of H7N9 could elicit seroconversion titers up to 1280 in ferrets and 160 in mice. Leukopenia, significantly reduced lymphocytes but increased neutrophils were also observed in mouse and ferret models. The mouse and ferret model enables detailed studies of the pathogenesis of this illness and lay the foundation for drug or vaccine evaluation.

  4. The origin of the moon and the early history of the earth - A chemical model. Part 1: The moon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, H. St.C.

    1991-01-01

    The chemical implications of a giant impact model for the origin of the moon are examined, both for the moon and for the earth. The Impactor is taken to be an approximately Mars-sized body. It is argued that the likeliest bulk chemical composition of the moon is quite similar to that of the earth's mantle, and that this composition may be explained in detail if about 80% of the moon came from the primitive earth's mantle after segregation of the earth's core. The other 20% of the moon is modelled as coming from (a) the Impactor, which is constrained to be an oxidized, probably undifferentiated body of roughly CI chondritic composition (on a volatile free basis) and (b) a late stage veneer, with a composition and oxidation state similar to that of the H-group ordinary chondrites. This latter component is the source of all the volatile elements in the moon, which failed to condense from the earth-and Impactor-derived materials; this component constitutes about 4% of the moon. It is argued that Mo may behave as a volatile element under the relatively oxidising conditions necessary for the condensation of the proto-moon. The model accounts satisfactorily for most of the siderophile elements, including Fe, Ni, Co, W, P, and Cu. The relatively well-constrained lunar abundances of V, Cr, and Mn are also accounted for; their depletion in the moon is inherited from the earth's mantle

  5. Expression of proliferative and inflammatory markers in a full-thickness human skin equivalent following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, Adrienne T.; Hayden, Patrick J.; Casillas, Robert P.; Heck, Diane E.; Gerecke, Donald R.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Sulfur mustard is a potent vesicant that induces inflammation, edema and blistering following dermal exposure. To assess molecular mechanisms mediating these responses, we analyzed the effects of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, on EpiDerm-FT TM , a commercially available full-thickness human skin equivalent. CEES (100-1000 μM) caused a concentration-dependent increase in pyknotic nuclei and vacuolization in basal keratinocytes; at high concentrations (300-1000 μM), CEES also disrupted keratin filament architecture in the stratum corneum. This was associated with time-dependent increases in expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a marker of cell proliferation, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and phosphorylated histone H2AX, markers of DNA damage. Concentration- and time-dependent increases in mRNA and protein expression of eicosanoid biosynthetic enzymes including COX-2, 5-lipoxygenase, microsomal PGE 2 synthases, leukotriene (LT) A 4 hydrolase and LTC 4 synthase were observed in CEES-treated skin equivalents, as well as in antioxidant enzymes, glutathione S-transferases A1-2 (GSTA1-2), GSTA3 and GSTA4. These data demonstrate that CEES induces rapid cellular damage, cytotoxicity and inflammation in full-thickness skin equivalents. These effects are similar to human responses to vesicants in vivo and suggest that the full thickness skin equivalent is a useful in vitro model to characterize the biological effects of mustards and to develop potential therapeutics.

  6. Original Business Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrge, Christian; Kristiansen, Kristian Brøndum

    2017-01-01

    This extended abstract aims to design a research method for studying potential meaningful roles creativity may take in entrepreneurship training. It suggests an experimental setup using a 30 ECTS entrepreneurship course at a Danish university for conducting the experiments and the data collection...

  7. Comparison of Virtual Dental Implant Planning Using the Full Cross-Sectional and Transaxial Capabilities of Cone Beam Computed Tomography vs Reformatted Panoramic Imaging and 3D Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Moiz; Elathamna, Eiad N; Lin, Wei-Shao; Harris, Bryan T; Farman, Allan G; Scheetz, James P; Morton, Dean; Scarfe, William C

    2015-01-01

    To compare the choice and placement of virtual dental implants in the posterior edentulous bounded regions using the full cross-sectional and transaxial capabilities of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) vs reformatted panoramic images and three-dimensional (3D) virtual models. Fifty-two cases with posterior bounded edentulous regions (61 dental implant sites) were identified from a retrospective audit of 4,014 radiographic volumes. Two image sets were created from selected CBCT data: (1) a combination of reformatted panoramic imaging and a 3D model (PIref/3D), and (2) the full 3D power in CBCT image volume analyses (XS). One virtual implant was placed by consensus of three prosthodontists in each image set: PIref/3D and XS. The choice of implant length and the perceived need for ridge augmentation were recorded for implant placement in both test situations. All the virtual implant placements from both PIref/3D and XS image sets were inspected retrospectively using virtual 3D models, and the number of exposed threads on both the buccal and lingual/palatal aspects of the virtual dental implant was evaluated. The chi-square and paired t tests were used with the level of significance set at α = .05. Shorter implants were chosen more often using XS than PIref/3D (P = .001). Fewer threads were exposed when placed with XS than with PIref/3D (P = .001). The use of XS reduced the perceived need for ridge augmentation compared with PIref/3D (P = .001). The use of the full 3D power of CBCT (including cross-sectional images in all three orthagonal planes and transaxially) provides supplemental information that significantly changes the choice of virtual implant length and vertical position of the implant, and reduces the frequency of perceived need for ridge augmentation before implant placement.

  8. Rabbit Achilles tendon full transection model – wound healing, adhesion formation and biomechanics at 3, 6 and 12 weeks post-surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Meier Bürgisser

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available After tendon rupture repair, two main problems may occur: re-rupture and adhesion formation. Suitable non-murine animal models are needed to study the healing tendon in terms of biomechanical properties and extent of adhesion formation. In this study 24 New Zealand White rabbits received a full transection of the Achilles tendon 2 cm above the calcaneus, sutured with a 4-strand Becker suture. Post-surgical analysis was performed at 3, 6 and 12 weeks. In the 6-week group, animals received a cast either in a 180 deg stretched position during 6 weeks (adhesion provoking immobilization, or were re-casted with a 150 deg position after 3 weeks (adhesion inhibiting immobilization, while in the other groups (3 and 12 weeks a 180 deg position cast was applied for 3 weeks. Adhesion extent was analyzed by histology and ultrasound. Histopathological scoring was performed according to a method by Stoll et al. (2011, and the main biomechanical properties were assessed. Histopathological scores increased as a function of time, but did not reach values of healthy tendons after 12 weeks (only around 15 out of 20 points. Adhesion provoking immobilization led to an adhesion extent of 82.7±9.7%, while adhesion inhibiting immobilization led to 31.9±9.8% after 6 weeks. Biomechanical properties increased over time, however, they did not reach full strength nor elastic modulus at 12 weeks post-operation. Furthermore, the rabbit Achilles tendon model can be modulated in terms of adhesion formation to the surrounding tissue. It clearly shows the different healing stages in terms of histopathology and offers a suitable model regarding biomechanics because it exhibits similar biomechanics as the human flexor tendons of the hand.

  9. Efficiency and kinetic modeling of removal of nutrients and organic matter from a full-scale constructed wetland in Qasre-Shirin, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolmajid Gholizadeh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study assessed the removal of organic material and nutrients from full-scale subsurface flow (SSF constructed wetlands (CWs followed by anaerobic stabilization ponds under environmental conditions. Methods: The effluents were distributed evenly in 12 reed beds. Samples were taken twice monthly for a total of 6 months from several points in the wetland. Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD, chemical oxygen demand (COD, total suspended solids (TSS, and nutrient removal from the system and the longitudinal effect of the reed beds for removal of pollutions were determined. A full-scale model of flow, BOD, and nutrients in SSF in the CWs is presented. Results: The flow rate and concentrations of parameters indicated that removal of organic matter and nutrients in the cold months decreased rather than in the hot months, as expected. The removal efficiency for BOD, COD, and TSS and the strongest biological interactions showed no uniform trends. The beds showed the highest removal rates in the first few meters of bed. The hybrid Monod-Plug flow regime and the Stover-Kincannon models showed the best fit for the kinetics of the processes. Umax in the Stover-Kincannon model was 3.64 mg/l.d for nitrogen and 0.24 mg/l.d for phosphorus. These values are very low, which indicates lower consumption and inefficiency of the system for removing nitrogen and phosphorus. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the SSF in CWs are able to treat average wastewater as effectively as common mechanical systems at lower cost.

  10. The TOPOMOD-ITN project: unravel the origin of Earth's topography from modelling deep-surface processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccenna, C.; Funiciello, F.

    2012-04-01

    EC-Marie Curie Initial Training Networks (ITN) projects aim to improve the career perspectives of young generations of researchers. Institutions from both academic and industry sectors form a collaborative network to recruit research fellows and provide them with opportunities to undertake research in the context of a joint research training program. In this frame, TOPOMOD - one of the training activities of EPOS, the new-born European Research Infrastructure for Geosciences - is a funded ITN project designed to investigate and model how surface processes interact with crustal tectonics and mantle convection to originate and develop topography of the continents over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The multi-disciplinary approach combines geophysics, geochemistry, tectonics and structural geology with advanced geodynamic numerical/analog modelling. TOPOMOD involves 8 European research teams internationally recognized for their excellence in complementary fields of Earth Sciences (Roma TRE, Utrecht, GFZ, ETH, Cambridge, Durham, Rennes, Barcelona), to which are associated 5 research institutions (CNR-Italy, Univ. Parma, Univ. Lausanne, Univ. Montpellier, Univ. Mainz) , 3 high-technology enterprises (Malvern Instruments, TNO, G.O. Logical Consulting) and 1 large multinational oil and gas company (ENI). This unique network places emphasis in experience-based training increasing the impact and international visibility of European research in modeling. Long-term collaboration and synergy are established among the overmentioned research teams through 15 cross-disciplinary research projects that combine case studies in well-chosen target areas from the Mediterranean, the Middle and Far East, west Africa, and South America, with new developments in structural geology, geomorphology, seismology, geochemistry, InSAR, laboratory and numerical modelling of geological processes from the deep mantle to the surface. These multidisciplinary projects altogether aim to

  11. Methods for Quantifying the Uncertainties of LSIT Test Parameters, Test Results, and Full-Scale Mixing Performance Using Models Developed from Scaled Test Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Cooley, Scott K.; Kuhn, William L.; Rector, David R.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    This report discusses the statistical methods for quantifying uncertainties in 1) test responses and other parameters in the Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT), and 2) estimates of coefficients and predictions of mixing performance from models that relate test responses to test parameters. Testing at a larger scale has been committed to by Bechtel National, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to ''address uncertainties and increase confidence in the projected, full-scale mixing performance and operations'' in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

  12. Methods for Quantifying the Uncertainties of LSIT Test Parameters, Test Results, and Full-Scale Mixing Performance Using Models Developed from Scaled Test Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cooley, Scott K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kuhn, William L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rector, David R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report discusses the statistical methods for quantifying uncertainties in 1) test responses and other parameters in the Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT), and 2) estimates of coefficients and predictions of mixing performance from models that relate test responses to test parameters. Testing at a larger scale has been committed to by Bechtel National, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to “address uncertainties and increase confidence in the projected, full-scale mixing performance and operations” in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

  13. Estimates of peak electric fields induced by Transcranial magnetic stimulation in pregnant women as patients using an FEM full-body model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamadala, J; Noetscher, G M; Makarov, S N; Pascual-Leone, A

    2017-07-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for treatment of depression during pregnancy is an appealing alternative to fetus-threatening drugs. However, no studies to date have been performed that evaluate the safety of TMS for a pregnant mother patient and her fetus. A full-body FEM model of a pregnant woman with about 100 tissue parts has been developed specifically for the present study. This model allows accurate computations of induced electric field in every tissue given different locations of a shape-eight coil, a biphasic pulse, common TMS pulse durations, and using different values of the TMS intensity measured in SMT (Standard Motor Threshold) units. Our simulation results estimate the maximum peak values of the electric field in the fetal area for every fetal tissue separately and for the TMS intensity of one SMT unit.

  14. Modeling a cascade of effects: the role of speed and executive functioning in preterm/full-term differences in academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Susan A; Feldman, Judith F; Jankowski, Jeffery J

    2011-09-01

    This study identified deficits in executive functioning in pre-adolescent preterms and modeled their role, along with processing speed, in explaining preterm/full-term differences in reading and mathematics. Preterms (working memory, inhibition, and shifting. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that these executive functions, though correlated, were distinct from one another and from processing speed, which later proved to account for much of the intercorrelation among executive functions. In the best-fitting structural equation model, the negative effects of prematurity on achievement were completely mediated by the three executive functions and speed in a cascade of effects: prematurity → slower processing speed → poorer executive functioning (working memory) → lower achievement in math and reading. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Mesoscale model to select the ideal location for new vineyard plantations in the Rioja qualified denomination of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cámara, E; Blanco, J; Jiménez, E; Saenz-Díez, J C; Rioja, J

    2014-01-01

    La Rioja is the region where the top rated wines from Spain come from and also the origin of one of the most prestigious wines in the world. It is worldwide recognized, not only for the quality of the vine, but also for the many factors involved in the process that are controllable by the farmer, such as fertilizers, irrigation, etc. Likewise, there are other key factors, which cannot be controlled that play, however, a crucial role in the quality of the wine, such as temperature, radiation, humidity, and rainfall. This research is focused on two of these factors: temperature and irradiation. The objective of this paper is to be able to recognize these factors, so as to ensure a proper decision criterion when selecting the best location for new vineyard plantations. To achieve this objective, a mesoscale model MM5 is used, and its performance is assessed and compared using different parameters, from the grid resolution to the physical parameterization of the model. Finally, the study evaluates the impact of the different parameterizations and options for the simulation of meteorological variables particularly relevant when choosing new vineyard sites (rainfall frequency, temperature, and sun exposure).

  16. The magmatic model for the origin of Archean Au-quartz vein ore systems: an assessment of the evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spooner, E.T.C.

    1991-01-01

    The magmatic model for the origin of Archean Au-quartz vein ore systems suggests that Au was derived by partition between silicate (± sulphide) melts of certain compositions and H 2 O-CO 2 -NaCl magmatic fluids. Supporting evidence includes partial/structural geological relationships, timing relationships, H and C isotope geochemistry, probable primary Au enrichment in the Lamaque stocks, and fluid inclusion volatile geochemistry. Evidence is currently negative with respect to various within- and sub-greenstone belt metamorphic/deep crustal fluid models for primary Au mineralization; however a U-Pb age for vein stage 3 sphene from the Camflo deposit, Quebec which is ∼ 55-60 Ma younger than the host stock at 2685-2680 Ma indicates dissolution/reprecipitation of Au by late, (?) upper crustal saline fluids. Evidence is accumulating that epithermal-meso thermal Au-Ag mineralization in island arc and cordilleran settings may also have been magmatically derived ± high level fluid mixing from calc-alkaline, shoshonitic and other igneous compositions. (author)

  17. A three-dimensional full Stokes model of the grounding line dynamics: effect of a pinning point beneath the ice shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Favier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The West Antarctic ice sheet is confined by a large area of ice shelves, fed by inland ice through fast flowing ice streams. The dynamics of the grounding line, which is the line-boundary between grounded ice and the downstream ice shelf, has a major influence on the dynamics of the whole ice sheet. However, most ice sheet models use simplifications of the flow equations, as they do not include all the stress components, and are known to fail in their representation of the grounding line dynamics. Here, we present a 3-D full Stokes model of a marine ice sheet, in which the flow problem is coupled with the evolution of the upper and lower free surfaces, and the position of the grounding line is determined by solving a contact problem between the shelf/sheet lower surface and the bedrock. Simulations are performed using the open-source finite-element code Elmer/Ice within a parallel environment. The model's ability to cope with a curved grounding line and the effect of a pinning point beneath the ice shelf are investigated through prognostic simulations. Starting from a steady state, the sea level is slightly decreased to create a contact point between a seamount and the ice shelf. The model predicts a dramatic decrease of the shelf velocities, leading to an advance of the grounding line until both grounded zones merge together, during which an ice rumple forms above the contact area at the pinning point. Finally, we show that once the contact is created, increasing the sea level to its initial value does not release the pinning point and has no effect on the ice dynamics, indicating a stabilising effect of pinning points.

  18. Urban air quality modeling with full O 3-NO x-VOC chemistry: Implications for O 3 and PM air quality in a street canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minjoong J.; Park, Rokjin J.; Kim, Jae-Jin

    2012-02-01

    We examine transport and chemical transformation of reactive pollutants on an urban street using a computation fluid dynamics (CFD) model coupled with full photochemistry of reactive pollutants. An extensive comparison between simulated results and observations is conducted to evaluate the model, focusing on a field campaign occurred in Dongfeng Middle Street in Guangzhou, China. Observed CO and NO concentrations vary diurnally following traffic volumes. The model captures this observed diurnal variation and magnitudes of CO concentrations successfully. However, simulated NO concentration is three times higher than observation. This high bias is significantly reduced in the sensitivity simulation with lower NO x emissions. We find that oxidation products of O 3 photochemistry such as NO 2 and O 3 vary differently from primary pollutants, indicating important effects of photochemical reactions on their fates. The model appears to reproduce observed O 3 and NO 2 variability with time and altitude. Our analysis shows that high NO x concentrations in the urban street canyon may efficiently produce aerosol nitrate in the presence of NH 3. Simulated inorganic NO 3- aerosol concentration reaches up to 0.3 μg m -3 in July but increases an order of magnitude higher at lower temperature that favors partitioning of gas-phase HNO 3 to aerosol-phase, implying a serious concern for urban air quality in winter.

  19. Heparin requirements for full anticoagulation are higher for patients on dabigatran than for those on warfarin – a model-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edrich T

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Edrich,1,2 Gyorgy Frendl,2 Gregory Michaud,3 Ioannis Ch Paschalidis4 1Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine and General Intensive Care Medicine, Salzburg General Hospital and Paracelsus Private Medical University, Salzburg, Austria, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, 3Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 4Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Division of Systems Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA Purpose: Dabigatran (D is increasingly used for chronic anticoagulation in place of warfarin (W. These patients may present for catheter-based procedures requiring full anticoagulation with heparin. This study compares the heparin sensitivity of patients previously on dabigatran, on warfarin, or on no chronic anticoagulant during ablation of atrial fibrillation. Patients and methods: In a retrospective study of patients treated with D, W, or neither drug (N undergoing atrial ablation, the timing of heparin doses and resulting activated clotting times were collected. First, the initial activated clotting time response to the first heparin bolus was compared. Then, a non-linear mixed effects modelling (NONMEM analysis was performed, fitting a pharmacokinetic and -dynamic model to the entire anticoagulation course of each patient. Resulting model coefficients were used to compare the different patient groups. Results: Data for 66 patients on dabigatran, 95 patients on warfarin, and 27 patients on no anticoagulation were retrieved. The last dose of dabigatran or warfarin had occurred 27 hours and 15 hours before the procedure. Groups D and N both responded significantly less (P<0.05 to the initial heparin bolus than Group W (approximately 50%. Likewise, the model coefficients resulting from the fit to each group reflected a significantly lower heparin sensitivity in groups D and N compared to W. Clearances of the

  20. Full Scope Modeling and Analysis on the Secondary Circuit of Chinese Large-Capacity Advanced PWR Based on RELAP5 Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dao-gang Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chinese large-capacity advanced PWR under construction in China is a new and indispensable reactor type in the developing process of NPP fields. At the same time of NPP construction, accident sequences prediction and operators training are in progress. Since there are some possible events such as feedwater pumps trip in secondary circuit may lead to severe accident in NPP, training simulators and engineering simulators of CI are necessary. And, with an increasing proportion of nuclear power in China, NPP will participate in regulating peak load in power network, which requires accuracy calculation and control of secondary circuit. In order to achieve real-time and full scope simulation in the power change transient and accident scenarios, RELAP5/MOD 3.4 code has been adopted to model the secondary circuit for its advantage of high calculation accuracy. This paper describes the model of steady state and turbine load transient from 100% to 40% of secondary circuit using RELAP5 and provides a reasonable equivalent method to solve the calculation divergence problem caused by dramatic two-phase condition change while guaranteeing the heat transfer efficiency. The validation of the parameters shows that all the errors between the calculation values and design values are reasonable and acceptable.

  1. Ames interactive molecular model building system - A 3-D computer modelling system applied to the study of the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coeckelenbergh, Y.; Macelroy, R. D.; Rein, R.

    1978-01-01

    The investigation of specific interactions among biological molecules must take into consideration the stereochemistry of the structures. Thus, models of the molecules are essential for describing the spatial organization of potentially interacting groups, and estimations of conformation are required for a description of spatial organization. Both the function of visualizing molecules, and that of estimating conformation through calculations of energy, are part of the molecular modeling system described in the present paper. The potential uses of the system in investigating some aspects of the origin of life rest on the assumption that translation of conformation from genetic elements to catalytic elements would have been required for the development of the first replicating systems subject to the process of biological evolution.

  2. Origin of inflation in CFT driven cosmology. R{sup 2}-gravity and non-minimally coupled inflaton models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barvinsky, A.O. [Lebedev Physics Institute, Theory Department, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); UBC, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Pacific Institute for Theoretical Physics, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Kamenshchik, A.Yu. [Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Bologna (Italy); L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); INFN, Bologna (Italy); Nesterov, D.V. [Lebedev Physics Institute, Theory Department, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    We present a detailed derivation of the recently suggested new type of hill-top inflation [arXiv:1509.07270] originating from the microcanonical density matrix initial conditions in cosmology driven by conformal field theory (CFT). The cosmological instantons of topology S{sup 1} x S{sup 3}, which set up these initial conditions, have the shape of a garland with multiple periodic oscillations of the scale factor of the spatial S{sup 3}-section. They describe underbarrier oscillations of the inflaton and scale factor in the vicinity of the inflaton potential maximum, which gives a sufficient amount of inflation required by the known CMB data. We build the approximation of two coupled harmonic oscillators for these garland instantons and show that they can generate inflation consistent with the parameters of the CMB primordial power spectrum in the non-minimal Higgs inflation model and in R{sup 2} gravity. In particular, the instanton solutions provide smallness of inflationary slow-roll parameters ε and η < 0 and their relation ε ∝ η{sup 2} characteristic of these two models. We present the mechanism of formation of hill-like inflaton potentials, which is based on logarithmic loop corrections to the asymptotically shift-invariant tree-level potentials of these models in the Einstein frame. We also discuss the role of R{sup 2}-gravity as an indispensable finite renormalization tool in the CFT driven cosmology, which guarantees the nondynamical (ghost free) nature of its scale factor and special properties of its cosmological garland-type instantons. Finally, as a solution to the problem of hierarchy between the Planckian scale and the inflation scale we discuss the concept of a hidden sector of conformal higher spin fields. (orig.)

  3. Origin of inflation in CFT driven cosmology: R{sup 2}-gravity and non-minimally coupled inflaton models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barvinsky, A. O., E-mail: barvin@td.lpi.ru [Theory Department, Lebedev Physics Institute, Leninsky Prospect 53, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Department of Physics, Tomsk State University, Lenin Ave. 36, 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Pacific Institute for Theoretical Physics, UBC, 6224 Agricultural Road, V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Kamenshchik, A. Yu., E-mail: kamenshchik@bo.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna and INFN, Via Irnerio 46, 40126, Bologna (Italy); L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, 119334, Moscow (Russian Federation); Nesterov, D. V., E-mail: nesterov@td.lpi.it [Theory Department, Lebedev Physics Institute, Leninsky Prospect 53, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-11

    We present a detailed derivation of the recently suggested new type of hill-top inflation originating from the microcanonical density matrix initial conditions in cosmology driven by conformal field theory (CFT). The cosmological instantons of topology S{sup 1}×S{sup 3}, which set up these initial conditions, have the shape of a garland with multiple periodic oscillations of the scale factor of the spatial S{sup 3}-section. They describe underbarrier oscillations of the inflaton and scale factor in the vicinity of the inflaton potential maximum, which gives a sufficient amount of inflation required by the known CMB data. We build the approximation of two coupled harmonic oscillators for these garland instantons and show that they can generate inflation consistent with the parameters of the CMB primordial power spectrum in the non-minimal Higgs inflation model and in R{sup 2} gravity. In particular, the instanton solutions provide smallness of inflationary slow-roll parameters ϵ and η<0 and their relation ϵ∼η{sup 2} characteristic of these two models. We present the mechanism of formation of hill-like inflaton potentials, which is based on logarithmic loop corrections to the asymptotically shift-invariant tree-level potentials of these models in the Einstein frame. We also discuss the role of R{sup 2}-gravity as an indispensable finite renormalization tool in the CFT driven cosmology, which guarantees the non-dynamical (ghost free) nature of its scale factor and special properties of its cosmological garland-type instantons. Finally, as a solution to the problem of hierarchy between the Planckian scale and the inflation scale we discuss the concept of a hidden sector of conformal higher spin fields.

  4. Origin of inflation in CFT driven cosmology: R^2-gravity and non-minimally coupled inflaton models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barvinsky, A. O.; Kamenshchik, A. Yu.; Nesterov, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    We present a detailed derivation of the recently suggested new type of hill-top inflation [arXiv:1509.07270] originating from the microcanonical density matrix initial conditions in cosmology driven by conformal field theory (CFT). The cosmological instantons of topology S^1× S^3, which set up these initial conditions, have the shape of a garland with multiple periodic oscillations of the scale factor of the spatial S^3-section. They describe underbarrier oscillations of the inflaton and scale factor in the vicinity of the inflaton potential maximum, which gives a sufficient amount of inflation required by the known CMB data. We build the approximation of two coupled harmonic oscillators for these garland instantons and show that they can generate inflation consistent with the parameters of the CMB primordial power spectrum in the non-minimal Higgs inflation model and in R^2 gravity. In particular, the instanton solutions provide smallness of inflationary slow-roll parameters ɛ and η <0 and their relation ɛ ˜ η ^2 characteristic of these two models. We present the mechanism of formation of hill-like inflaton potentials, which is based on logarithmic loop corrections to the asymptotically shift-invariant tree-level potentials of these models in the Einstein frame. We also discuss the role of R^2-gravity as an indispensable finite renormalization tool in the CFT driven cosmology, which guarantees the non-dynamical (ghost free) nature of its scale factor and special properties of its cosmological garland-type instantons. Finally, as a solution to the problem of hierarchy between the Planckian scale and the inflation scale we discuss the concept of a hidden sector of conformal higher spin fields.

  5. Differing Efficacies of Lead Group A Streptococcal Vaccine Candidates and Full-Length M Protein in Cutaneous and Invasive Disease Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Rivera-Hernandez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS is an important human pathogen responsible for both superficial infections and invasive diseases. Autoimmune sequelae may occur upon repeated infection. For this reason, development of a vaccine against GAS represents a major challenge, since certain GAS components may trigger autoimmunity. We formulated three combination vaccines containing the following: (i streptolysin O (SLO, interleukin 8 (IL-8 protease (Streptococcus pyogenes cell envelope proteinase [SpyCEP], group A streptococcal C5a peptidase (SCPA, arginine deiminase (ADI, and trigger factor (TF; (ii the conserved M-protein-derived J8 peptide conjugated to ADI; and (iii group A carbohydrate lacking the N-acetylglucosamine side chain conjugated to ADI. We compared these combination vaccines to a “gold standard” for immunogenicity, full-length M1 protein. Vaccines were adjuvanted with alum, and mice were immunized on days 0, 21, and 28. On day 42, mice were challenged via cutaneous or subcutaneous routes. High-titer antigen-specific antibody responses with bactericidal activity were detected in mouse serum samples for all vaccine candidates. In comparison with sham-immunized mice, all vaccines afforded protection against cutaneous challenge. However, only full-length M1 protein provided protection in the subcutaneous invasive disease model.

  6. Red Deer Antler Extract Accelerates Hair Growth by Stimulating Expression of Insulin-like Growth Factor I in Full-thickness Wound Healing Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZhiHong Yang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate and evaluate the effects of red deer antlers on hair growth in the full-thickness wound healing model, Sprague-Dawley rats were given incision wounds through the full thickness of their dorsal skin and deer antler was applied for 40 days. At specified intervals thereafter (4, 8, 16, 32 and 40 days, the animals were sacrificed and the wound site skins were excised, processed, and sectioned. At post-injury days 16, 32 and 40, longer and more active new hair appeared around the healing wound of antler-treated skin. Histological studies showed that the antler extract markedly increases the depth, size, and number of hair follicles. Expression of IGF-I (insulin-like growth factor mRNA was detected by RT-PCR and real time RT-PCR. The result showed that the expression of IGF-I (days 16, 32, and 40 was obviously up-regulated in antler-treated skins compared to control skins. Similar results were seen in the ELISA analysis to quantify the IGF-I expression. These results support the notion that wound healing can cause hair growth by enhancing the expression of IGF-I. Deer antler extract appears to have the potential to promote hair growth and could be used in hair growth products.

  7. Membrane-bound human orphan cytochrome P450 2U1: Sequence singularities, construction of a full 3D model, and substrate docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducassou, Lionel; Dhers, Laura; Jonasson, Gabriella; Pietrancosta, Nicolas; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Mansuy, Daniel; André, François

    2017-09-01

    Human cytochrome P450 2U1 (CYP2U1) is an orphan CYP that exhibits several distinctive characteristics among the 57 human CYPs with a highly conserved sequence in almost all living organisms. We compared its protein sequence with those of the 57 human CYPs and constructed a 3D structure of a full-length CYP2U1 model bound to a POPC membrane. We also performed docking experiments of arachidonic acid (AA) and N-arachidonoylserotonin (AS) in this model. The protein sequence of CYP2U1 displayed two unique characteristics when compared to those of the human CYPs, the presence of a longer N-terminal region upstream of the putative trans-membrane helix (TMH) containing 8 proline residues, and of an insert of about 20 amino acids containing 5 arginine residues between helices A' and A. Its N-terminal part upstream of TMH involved an additional short terminal helix, in a manner similar to what was reported in the crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CYP51. Our model also showed a specific interaction between the charged residues of insert AA' and phosphate groups of lipid polar heads, suggesting a possible role of this insert in substrate recruitment. Docking of AA and AS in this model showed these substrates in channel 2ac, with the terminal alkyl chain of AA or the indole ring of AS close to the heme, in agreement with the reported CYP2U1-catalyzed AA and AS hydroxylation regioselectivities. This model should be useful to find new endogenous or exogenous CYP2U1 substrates and to interpret the regioselectivity of their hydroxylation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  8. Adapting an IPCC-Compliant Full Forest Carbon Accounting Model to Determine the Effects of Different Forest Management Strategies in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starrs, C.; Stewart, W.; Potts, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    As California experiences increasing rates of disturbance events such as wildfire, drought, and insect outbreaks, understanding how different management strategies affect long-term forest carbon stock changes in the forest and in harvested wood products used by society will be key to determining strategies to best maximize forest-related carbon sequestration in the future. California's forest area is roughly evenly split across three ownership types: private timberlands, National Forest timberlands, and reserved forests. Forest management strategies in California generally vary by these ownerships; management in reserved lands sequesters carbon within the forest (i.e. leaves wood in the forest), while on private and National Forest timberlands a significant amount of wood is removed from the forest and converted to harvested wood products. The Carbon Budget Model of the Canadian Forest Sector (CBM-CFS3) is an IPCC-compliant full forest carbon accounting model developed for use in Canada that has been adapted for use in other countries. Changes in natural disturbances in the forest and technological innovation in the use of harvested wood products could substantially alter future carbon trajectories of forests under different management regimes. A key advantage of the CBM-CFS3 model is that in addition to tracking live tree, dead tree, and dead organic matter (DOM) carbon pools in the forest, it also tracks carbon stock changes in harvested wood products. We calibrated the CBM-CFS3 model with US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data for seven forest types across three ownership types to predict carbon stock changes under different natural disturbance and harvested wood product utilization futures. Our results illustrate the importance of using a tractable model that can integrate future changes in forest carbon cycling to keep pace with our changing climate and usage of wood products.

  9. Rabbit Achilles tendon full transection model – wound healing, adhesion formation and biomechanics at 3, 6 and 12 weeks post-surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier Bürgisser, Gabriella; Calcagni, Maurizio; Bachmann, Elias; Fessel, Gion; Snedeker, Jess G.; Giovanoli, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT After tendon rupture repair, two main problems may occur: re-rupture and adhesion formation. Suitable non-murine animal models are needed to study the healing tendon in terms of biomechanical properties and extent of adhesion formation. In this study 24 New Zealand White rabbits received a full transection of the Achilles tendon 2 cm above the calcaneus, sutured with a 4-strand Becker suture. Post-surgical analysis was performed at 3, 6 and 12 weeks. In the 6-week group, animals received a cast either in a 180 deg stretched position during 6 weeks (adhesion provoking immobilization), or were re-casted with a 150 deg position after 3 weeks (adhesion inhibiting immobilization), while in the other groups (3 and 12 weeks) a 180 deg position cast was applied for 3 weeks. Adhesion extent was analyzed by histology and ultrasound. Histopathological scoring was performed according to a method by Stoll et al. (2011), and the main biomechanical properties were assessed. Histopathological scores increased as a function of time, but did not reach values of healthy tendons after 12 weeks (only around 15 out of 20 points). Adhesion provoking immobilization led to an adhesion extent of 82.7±9.7%, while adhesion inhibiting immobilization led to 31.9±9.8% after 6 weeks. Biomechanical properties increased over time, however, they did not reach full strength nor elastic modulus at 12 weeks post-operation. Furthermore, the rabbit Achilles tendon model can be modulated in terms of adhesion formation to the surrounding tissue. It clearly shows the different healing stages in terms of histopathology and offers a suitable model regarding biomechanics because it exhibits similar biomechanics as the human flexor tendons of the hand. PMID:27635037

  10. Rabbit Achilles tendon full transection model - wound healing, adhesion formation and biomechanics at 3, 6 and 12 weeks post-surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier Bürgisser, Gabriella; Calcagni, Maurizio; Bachmann, Elias; Fessel, Gion; Snedeker, Jess G; Giovanoli, Pietro; Buschmann, Johanna

    2016-09-15

    After tendon rupture repair, two main problems may occur: re-rupture and adhesion formation. Suitable non-murine animal models are needed to study the healing tendon in terms of biomechanical properties and extent of adhesion formation. In this study 24 New Zealand White rabbits received a full transection of the Achilles tendon 2 cm above the calcaneus, sutured with a 4-strand Becker suture. Post-surgical analysis was performed at 3, 6 and 12 weeks. In the 6-week group, animals received a cast either in a 180 deg stretched position during 6 weeks (adhesion provoking immobilization), or were re-casted with a 150 deg position after 3 weeks (adhesion inhibiting immobilization), while in the other groups (3 and 12 weeks) a 180 deg position cast was applied for 3 weeks. Adhesion extent was analyzed by histology and ultrasound. Histopathological scoring was performed according to a method by Stoll et al. (2011), and the main biomechanical properties were assessed. Histopathological scores increased as a function of time, but did not reach values of healthy tendons after 12 weeks (only around 15 out of 20 points). Adhesion provoking immobilization led to an adhesion extent of 82.7±9.7%, while adhesion inhibiting immobilization led to 31.9±9.8% after 6 weeks. Biomechanical properties increased over time, however, they did not reach full strength nor elastic modulus at 12 weeks post-operation. Furthermore, the rabbit Achilles tendon model can be modulated in terms of adhesion formation to the surrounding tissue. It clearly shows the different healing stages in terms of histopathology and offers a suitable model regarding biomechanics because it exhibits similar biomechanics as the human flexor tendons of the hand. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Evaluation of kinematics and injuries to restrained occupants in far-side crashes using full-scale vehicle and human body models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Mike W J; Umale, Sagar; Humm, John R; Yoganandan, Narayan; Hadagali, Prasanaah; Pintar, Frank A

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the current study was to perform a parametric study with different impact objects, impact locations, and impact speeds by analyzing occupant kinematics and injury estimations using a whole-vehicle and whole-body finite element-human body model (FE-HBM). To confirm the HBM responses, the biofidelity of the model was validated using data from postmortem human surrogate (PMHS) sled tests. The biofidelity of the model was validated using data from sled experiments and correlational analysis (CORA). Full-scale simulations were performed using a restrained Global Human Body Model Consortium (GHBMC) model seated on a 2001 Ford Taurus model using a far-side lateral impact condition. The driver seat was placed in the center position to represent a nominal initial impact condition. A 3-point seat belt with pretensioner and retractor was used to restrain the GHBMC model. A parametric study was performed using 12 simulations by varying impact locations, impacting object, and impact speed using the full-scale models. In all 12 simulations, the principal direction of force (PDOF) was selected as 90°. The impacting objects were a 10-in.-diameter rigid vertical pole and a movable deformable barrier. The impact location of the pole was at the C-pillar in the first case, at the B-pillar in the second case, and, finally, at the A-pillar in the third case. The vehicle and the GHBMC models were defined an initial velocity of 35 km/h (high speed) and 15 km/h (low speed). Excursion of the head center of gravity (CG), T6, and pelvis were measured from the simulations. In addition, injury risk estimations were performed on head, rib cage, lungs, kidneys, liver, spleen, and pelvis. The average CORA rating was 0.7. The shoulder belt slipped in B- and C-pillar impacts but somewhat engaged in the A-pillar case. In the B-pillar case, the head contacted the intruding struck-side structures, indicating higher risk of injury. Occupant kinematics depended on interaction with

  12. Relative power density distribution calculations of the Kori unit 1 pressurized water reactor with full-scope explicit modeling of monte carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. O.; Kim, J. K.

    1997-01-01

    Relative power density distributions of the Kori unit 1 pressurized water reactor calculated by Monte Carlo modeling with the MCNP code. The Kori unit 1 core is modeled on a three-dimensional representation of the one-eighth of the reactor in-vessel component with reflective boundaries at 0 and 45 degrees. The axial core model is based on half core symmetry and is divided into four axial segments. Fission reaction density in each rod is calculated by following 100 cycles with 5,000 test neutrons in each cycle after starting with a localized neutron source and ten noncontributing settle cycles. Relative assembly power distributions are calculated from fission reaction densities of rods in assembly. After 100 cycle calculations, the system coverages to a κ value of 1.00039 ≥ 0.00084. Relative assembly power distribution is nearly the same with that of the Kori unit 1 FSAR. Applicability of the full-scope Monte Carlo simulation in the power distribution calculation is examined by the relative root mean square error of 2.159%. (author)

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of irradiation of MTR fuel plates in the BR2 reactor using a full-scale 3-d model with inclined channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzminov, V. V; Koonen, E.; Ponsard, B.

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional full-scale Monte Carlo model of the BR2 reactor has been developed for simulation of irradiation conditions of materials and fuel loaded in various irradiation devices. This new reactor model includes a detailed geometrical description of the inclined reactor channels, the irradiation devices loaded in these channels including the materials to be tested/loaded in these devices, the burn-up of the BR2 fuel elements and the poisoning of the beryllium matrix. Recently a benchmark irradiation of new irradiation device for testing and qualification of MTR fuel plates has been performed. For this purpose the detailed irradiation conditions of fuel plates had to be predetermined. Monte Carlo calculations of neutron fluxes and heat load distributions in irradiated MTR fuel plates were performed taking into account the contents of all loaded experimental devices in the reactor channels. A comparison of the calculated and measured values of neutron fluxes and of heat loads in the BR2 reactor is presented in this paper. The comparison is part of the validation process of the new reactor model. It also serves to establish the capability to conduct a fuel plate irradiation program under requested and well- known irradiation conditions. (author)

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of irradiation of MTR fuel plates in the BR2 reactor using a full-scale 3-d model with inclined channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzminov, V. V [On leave from Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, 188300 St.Petersburg (Russian Federation); Koonen, E.; Ponsard, B. [BR2 Department SCK CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2002-07-01

    A three-dimensional full-scale Monte Carlo model of the BR2 reactor has been developed for simulation of irradiation conditions of materials and fuel loaded in various irradiation devices. This new reactor model includes a detailed geometrical description of the inclined reactor channels, the irradiation devices loaded in these channels including the materials to be tested/loaded in these devices, the burn-up of the BR2 fuel elements and the poisoning of the beryllium matrix. Recently a benchmark irradiation of new irradiation device for testing and qualification of MTR fuel plates has been performed. For this purpose the detailed irradiation conditions of fuel plates had to be predetermined. Monte Carlo calculations of neutron fluxes and heat load distributions in irradiated MTR fuel plates were performed taking into account the contents of all loaded experimental devices in the reactor channels. A comparison of the calculated and measured values of neutron fluxes and of heat loads in the BR2 reactor is presented in this paper. The comparison is part of the validation process of the new reactor model. It also serves to establish the capability to conduct a fuel plate irradiation program under requested and well- known irradiation conditions. (author)

  15. Full-Scale Modeling Explaining Large Spatial Variations of Nitrous Oxide Fluxes in a Step-Feed Plug-Flow Wastewater Treatment Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Pan, Yuting; van den Akker, Ben; Ye, Liu; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-08-04

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emission data collected from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) show huge variations between plants and within one plant (both spatially and temporarily). Such variations and the relative contributions of various N2O production pathways are not fully understood. This study applied a previously established N2O model incorporating two currently known N2O production pathways by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) (namely the AOB denitrification and the hydroxylamine pathways) and the N2O production pathway by heterotrophic denitrifiers to describe and provide insights into the large spatial variations of N2O fluxes in a step-feed full-scale activated sludge plant. The model was calibrated and validated by comparing simulation results with 40 days of N2O emission monitoring data as well as other water quality parameters from the plant. The model demonstrated that the relatively high biomass specific nitrogen loading rate in the Second Step of the reactor was responsible for the much higher N2O fluxes from this section. The results further revealed the AOB denitrification pathway decreased and the NH2OH oxidation pathway increased along the path of both Steps due to the increasing dissolved oxygen concentration. The overall N2O emission from this step-feed WWTP would be largely mitigated if 30% of the returned sludge were returned to the Second Step to reduce its biomass nitrogen loading rate.

  16. River discharge estimation from synthetic SWOT-type observations using variational data assimilation and the full Saint-Venant hydraulic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oubanas, Hind; Gejadze, Igor; Malaterre, Pierre-Olivier; Mercier, Franck

    2018-04-01

    The upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography satellite mission, to be launched in 2021, will measure river water surface elevation, slope and width, with an unprecedented level of accuracy for a remote sensing tool. This work investigates the river discharge estimation from synthetic SWOT observations, in the presence of strong uncertainties in the model inputs, i.e. the river bathymetry and bed roughness. The estimation problem is solved by a novel variant of the standard variational data assimilation, the '4D-Var' method, involving the full Saint-Venant 1.5D-network hydraulic model SIC2. The assimilation scheme simultaneously estimates the discharge, bed elevation and bed roughness coefficient and is designed to assimilate both satellite and in situ measurements. The method is tested on a 50 km-long reach of the Garonne River during a five-month period of the year 2010, characterized by multiple flooding events. First, the impact of the sampling frequency on discharge estimation is investigated. Secondly, discharge as well as the spatially distributed bed elevation and bed roughness coefficient are determined simultaneously. Results demonstrate feasibility and efficiency of the chosen combination of the estimation method and of the hydraulic model. Assimilation of the SWOT data results into an accurate estimation of the discharge at observation times, and a local improvement in the bed level and bed roughness coefficient. However, the latter estimates are not generally usable for different independent experiments.

  17. Deep-water Reservoir Modelling Using a volume-based approach on Full-Offset Seismic Data: Etim Field, Offshore Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nwaeri, E.; Zimbrick, G.; Proett, B.

    2002-01-01

    Reservoir characterization of deep-water deposits is a challenging task. Major issues to address include: (1) prediction of sand distribution away from well control, (2) definition of reservoir geometry and size, and (3) spatial placement of sand bodies in the geologic model. In a typical deep-water setting, lithostratigraphic correlation using well logs has been found to be unreliable. Seismic correlation is critical, but complications from mixed-impedance reservoir, and variations in frequency/phase content of available full stack data can arise.We describe a reservoir description workflow that utilizes both volume-and map-based conditioning tools, in the absence of AVO products. A good density of interpreted horizons was used to provide stratigraphic control on the volume interpretation techniques. Map pattern analysis of horizon slices helped focus environment of deposition (EOD) interpretations on key areas of reservoir development.A seismic wedge model helped develop an interpretation strategy and assess seismic data quality. Results showed that seed detection of trough-peak pairs gave a reasonable prediction of reservoir distribution at Etim.Seismic attributes were used to calibrate and predict net sand thickness. The predictions were integrated with EOD maps and well control to provide final net sand maps. Extracted geobodies from the sculpted seismic data were used to place sands in their proper position in the geologic model.The resulting geologic model preserves spatial positioning of the seismically derived reservoir elements and provides better definition of reservoir connectivity. This workflow is appropriate for fields where multi-volume (AVO) seismic data are unavailable and 3-D positioning of reservoir elements is required

  18. Demographic modelling with whole-genome data reveals parallel origin of similar Pundamilia cichlid species after hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Joana I; Sousa, Vitor C; Marques, David A; Selz, Oliver M; Wagner, Catherine E; Excoffier, Laurent; Seehausen, Ole

    2017-01-01

    Modes and mechanisms of speciation are best studied in young species pairs. In older taxa, it is increasingly difficult to distinguish what happened during speciation from what happened after speciation. Lake Victoria cichlids in the genus Pundamilia encompass a complex of young species and polymorphic populations. One Pundamilia species pair, P. pundamilia and P. nyererei, is particularly well suited to study speciation because sympatric population pairs occur with different levels of phenotypic differentiation and reproductive isolation at different rocky islands within the lake. Genetic distances between allopatric island populations of the same nominal species often exceed those between the sympatric species. It thus remained unresolved whether speciation into P. nyererei and P. pundamilia occurred once, followed by geographical range expansion and interspecific gene flow in local sympatry, or if the species pair arose repeatedly by parallel speciation. Here, we use genomic data and demographic modelling to test these alternative evolutionary scenarios. We demonstrate that gene flow plays a strong role in shaping the observed patterns of genetic similarity, including both gene flow between sympatric species and gene flow between allopatric populations, as well as recent and early gene flow. The best supported model for the origin of P. pundamilia and P. nyererei population pairs at two different islands is one where speciation happened twice, whereby the second speciation event follows shortly after introgression from an allopatric P. nyererei population that arose earlier. Our findings support the hypothesis that very similar species may arise repeatedly, potentially facilitated by introgressed genetic variation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES. PREVALENCE OF ANDROGENIC-. ANABOLIC STEROID USE IN. ADOLESCENTS IN TWO REGIONS. OF SOUTH AFRICA. Michael I lambert, Steven D Titlestad, Martin P Schwellnus. Objective. To determine the prevalence of androgenic- anabolic steroid (AAS) use among schoolchildren in two.

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    siderosomes), Golgi complex and ... containing proteins, ferritin and haemosiderin, in the jejunal epithelial cells of black children with pellagra as well as ... from 10 of the original 16 patients showed adequate ultrastructural preservation; tissue blocks of ...

  1. Eukaryotic origins

    OpenAIRE

    Lake, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The origin of the eukaryotes is a fundamental scientific question that for over 30 years has generated a spirited debate between the competing Archaea (or three domains) tree and the eocyte tree. As eukaryotes ourselves, humans have a personal interest in our origins. Eukaryotes contain their defining organelle, the nucleus, after which they are named. They have a complex evolutionary history, over time acquiring multiple organelles, including mitochondria, chloroplasts, smooth and rough endo...

  2. Performance test results of mock-up model test facility with a full-scale reaction tube for HTTR hydrogen production system. Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Hayashi, Koji; Kato, Michio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment] [and others

    2003-03-01

    Research on a hydrogen production system by steam reforming of methane, chemical reaction; CH{sub 4} + H