WorldWideScience

Sample records for model organism arabidopsis

  1. The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR): a model organism database providing a centralized, curated gateway to Arabidopsis biology, research materials and community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Seung Yon; Beavis, William; Berardini, Tanya Z; Chen, Guanghong; Dixon, David; Doyle, Aisling; Garcia-Hernandez, Margarita; Huala, Eva; Lander, Gabriel; Montoya, Mary; Miller, Neil; Mueller, Lukas A; Mundodi, Suparna; Reiser, Leonore; Tacklind, Julie; Weems, Dan C; Wu, Yihe; Xu, Iris; Yoo, Daniel; Yoon, Jungwon; Zhang, Peifen

    2003-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is the most widely-studied plant today. The concerted efforts of over 11 000 researchers and 4000 organizations around the world are generating a rich diversity and quantity of information and materials. This information is made available through a comprehensive on-line resource called the Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR) (http://arabidopsis.org), which is accessible via commonly used web browsers and can be searched and downloaded in a number of ways. In the last two years, efforts have been focused on increasing data content and diversity, functionally annotating genes and gene products with controlled vocabularies, and improving data retrieval, analysis and visualization tools. New information include sequence polymorphisms including alleles, germplasms and phenotypes, Gene Ontology annotations, gene families, protein information, metabolic pathways, gene expression data from microarray experiments and seed and DNA stocks. New data visualization and analysis tools include SeqViewer, which interactively displays the genome from the whole chromosome down to 10 kb of nucleotide sequence and AraCyc, a metabolic pathway database and map tool that allows overlaying expression data onto the pathway diagrams. Finally, we have recently incorporated seed and DNA stock information from the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (ABRC) and implemented a shopping-cart style on-line ordering system.

  2. Reciprocal transplants demonstrate strong adaptive differentiation of the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana in its native range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agren, Jon; Schemske, Douglas W

    2012-06-01

    To quantify adaptive differentiation in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, we conducted reciprocal transplant experiments for five years between two European populations, one near the northern edge of the native range (Sweden) and one near the southern edge (Italy). We planted seeds (years 1-3) and seedlings (years 4-5), and estimated fitness as the number of fruits produced per seed or seedling planted. In eight of the 10 possible site × year comparisons, the fitness of the local population was significantly higher than that of the nonlocal population (3.1-22.2 times higher at the southern site, and 1.7-3.6 times higher at the northern site); in the remaining two comparisons no significant difference was recorded. At both sites, the local genotype had higher survival than the nonlocal genotype, and at the Italian site, the local genotype also had higher fecundity. Across years, the relative survival of the Italian genotype at the northern site decreased with decreasing winter soil temperature. The results provide evidence of strong adaptive differentiation between natural populations of A. thaliana and indicate that differences in tolerance to freezing contributed to fitness variation at the northern site. In ongoing work, we explore the functional and genetic basis of this adaptive differentiation.

  3. Light, stress and herbivory : from photoprotection to trophic interactions using Arabidopsis thaliana as a model organism

    OpenAIRE

    Frenkel, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthesis is the most important process for nearly all life on earth. Photosynthetic organisms capture and transfer light energy from the sun into chemical energy which in turn provides a resource base for heterotrophic organisms. Natural light regimes are irregular and vary over magnitudes. At a certain light intensity, metabolic processes cannot keep up with the electron flow produced by the primary photoreactions, and thus reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced. ROS are highly rea...

  4. Stem cell organization in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendrich, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Growth of plant tissues and organs depends on continuous production of new cells, by niches of stem cells. Stem cells typically divide to give rise to one differentiating daughter and one non-differentiating daughter. This constant process of self-renewal ensures that the niches of stem cells or mer

  5. The development of Arabidopsis as a plant model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornneef, M.; Meinke, D.W.

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago, Arabidopsis thaliana emerged as the model organism of choice for research in plant biology. A consensus was reached about the need to focus on a single organism to integrate the classical disciplines of plant science with the expanding fields of genetics and molecular biology.

  6. Hemoglobin is essential for normal growth of Arabidopsis organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebelstrup, Kim Henrik; Hunt, Peter; Dennis, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    lines are viable but show a mutant phenotype affecting the regions where AHb1 is expressed. Arabidopsis lines with an insertional knockout or overexpression of AHb2, a class II 3-on-3 hemoglobin, were generated. Seedlings overexpressing AHb2 show enhanced survival of hypoxic stress. The AHb2 knockout......In Arabidopsis thaliana, the class I hemoglobin AHb1 is transiently expressed in the hydathodes of leaves and in floral buds from young inflorescences. Nitric oxide (NO) accumulates to high levels in these organs when AHb1 is silenced, indicating an important role in metabolizing NO. AHb1-silenced...... suggests that 3-on-3 hemoglobins apart from a role in hypoxic stress play a general role under non-stressed conditions where they are essential for normal development by controlling the level of NO which tends to accumulate in floral buds and leaf hydathodes of plants...

  7. Noise-plasticity correlations of gene expression in the multicellular organism Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirao, Koudai; Nagano, Atsushi J; Awazu, Akinori

    2015-12-21

    Gene expression levels exhibit stochastic variations among genetically identical organisms under the same environmental conditions (called gene expression "noise" or phenotype "fluctuation"). In yeast and Escherichia coli, positive correlations have been found between such gene expression noise and "plasticity" with environmental variations. To determine the universality of such correlations in both unicellular and multicellular organisms, we focused on the relationships between gene expression "noise" and "plasticity" in Arabidopsis thaliana, a multicellular model organism. In recent studies on yeast and E. coli, only some gene groups with specific properties of promoter architecture, average expression levels, and functions exhibited strong noise-plasticity correlations. However, we found strong noise-plasticity correlations for most gene groups in Arabidopsis; additionally, promoter architecture, functional essentiality of genes, and circadian rhythm appeared to have only a weak influence on the correlation strength. The differences in the characteristics of noise-plasticity correlations may result from three-dimensional chromosomal structures and/or circadian rhythm.

  8. Arabidopsis: an adequate model for dicot root systems?

    OpenAIRE

    Zobel, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis root system is frequently considered to have only three classes of root: primary, lateral, and adventitious. Research with other plant species has suggested up to 8 different developmental/functional classes of root for a given plant root system. If Arabidopsis has only three classes of root, it may not be an adequate model for eudicot plant root systems. Recent research, however, can be interpreted to suggest that pre-flowering Arabidopsis does have at least five (5) of th...

  9. Arabidopsis: An Adequate Model for Dicot Root Systems?

    OpenAIRE

    Zobel, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis root system is frequently considered to have only three classes of root: primary, lateral, and adventitious. Research with other plant species has suggested up to eight different developmental/functional classes of root for a given plant root system. If Arabidopsis has only three classes of root, it may not be an adequate model for eudicot plant root systems. Recent research, however, can be interpreted to suggest that pre-flowering Arabidopsis does have at least five (5) of t...

  10. Modelling the molecular interactions in the flower developmental network of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaufmann, K.; Nagasaki, M.; Jáuregui., R.

    2010-01-01

    We present a dynamical model of the gene network controlling flower development in Arabidopsis thaliana. The network is centered at the regulation of the floral organ identity genes (AP1, AP2, AP3, PI and AG) and ends with the transcription factor complexes responsible for differentiation of floral

  11. Gene Discovery and Functional Analyses in the Model Plant Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai-Ping Feng; John Mundy

    2006-01-01

    The present mini-review describes newer methods and strategies, including transposon and T-DNA insertions,TILLING, Deleteagene, and RNA interference, to functionally analyze genes of interest in the model plant Arabidopsis. The relative advantages and disadvantages of the systems are also discussed.

  12. Gene Discovery and Functional Analyses in the Model Plant Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Cai-ping; Mundy, J.

    2006-01-01

    The present mini-review describes newer methods and strategies, including transposon and T-DNA insertions, TILLING, Deleteagene, and RNA interference, to functionally analyze genes of interest in the model plant Arabidopsis. The relative advantages and disadvantages of the systems are also...

  13. MAB4-induced auxin sink generates local auxin gradients in Arabidopsis organ formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutani, Masahiko; Nakano, Yasukazu; Tasaka, Masao

    2014-01-21

    In Arabidopsis, leaves and flowers form cyclically in the shoot meristem periphery and are triggered by local accumulations of the plant hormone auxin. Auxin maxima are established by the auxin efflux carrier PIN-formed1 (PIN1). During organ formation, two distinct types of PIN1 polarization occur. First, convergence of PIN1 polarity in the surface of the meristem creates local auxin peaks. Second, basipetal PIN1 polarization causes auxin to move away from the surface in the middle of an incipient organ primordium, thought to contribute to vascular formation. Several mathematical models have been developed in attempts to explain the PIN1 localization pattern. However, the molecular mechanisms that control these dynamic changes are unknown. Here, we show that loss-of-function in the MACCHI-BOU 4 (MAB4) family genes, which encode nonphototropic hypocotyl 3-like proteins and regulate PIN endocytosis, cause deletion of basipetal PIN1 polarization, resulting in extensive auxin accumulation all over the meristem surface from lack of a sink for auxin. These results indicate that the MAB4 family genes establish inward auxin transport from the L1 surface of incipient organ primordia by basipetal PIN1 polarization, and that this behavior is essential for the progression of organ development. Furthermore, the expression of the MAB4 family genes depends on auxin response. Our results define two distinct molecular mechanisms for PIN1 polarization during organ development and indicate that an auxin response triggers the switching between these two mechanisms.

  14. POPCORN Functions in the Auxin Pathway to Regulate Embryonic Body Plan and Meristem Organization in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiang, D.Q.; Yang, H.; Venglat, P.; Cao, Y.G.; Wen, R.; Ren, M.Z.; Stone, S.; Wang, E.; Wang, H.; Xiao, W.; Weijers, D.; Berleth, T.; Laux, T.; Selvaraj, G.; Datla, R.

    2011-01-01

    The shoot and root apical meristems (SAM and RAM) formed during embryogenesis are crucial for postembryonic plant development. We report the identification of POPCORN (PCN), a gene required for embryo development and meristem organization in Arabidopsis thaliana. Map-based cloning revealed that PCN

  15. UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS Controls Meristem Identity and Organ Primordia Fate in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, M. D.; Haughn, G. W.

    1995-09-01

    A novel gene that is involved in regulating flower initiation and development has been identified in Arabidopsis. This gene has been designated UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO), with five corresponding nuclear recessive alleles designated ufo[middot]1 to ufo[middot]5. Under short day-length conditions, ufo homozygotes generate more coflorescences than do the wild type, and coflorescences often appear apical to the first floral shoot, resulting in a period of inflorescence development in which regions of floral and coflorescence shoots are produced alternately. ufo enhances the phenotype of weak leafy alleles, and the double mutant Ufo-1 Apetala1-1 produces only coflorescence-like shoots, suggesting that these two genes control different aspects of floral initiation. Floral development was also altered in Ufo plants. Ufo flowers have an altered organ number in all whorls, and organs in the first, second, and third whorls exhibit variable homeotic transformations. Ufo single and double mutant phenotypes suggest that the floral changes result from reduction in class B floral homeotic gene expression and fluctuations in the expression boundaries of class C function and FLO10. Surprisingly, in situ hybridization analysis revealed no obvious differences in expression pattern or level in developing Ufo flowers compared with that of the wild type for any class B or C gene studied. We propose that UFO acts in concert with known floral initiation genes and regulates the domains of floral homeotic gene function.

  16. Crossover Interference on Nucleolus Organizing Region-Bearing Chromosomes in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Sandy Y.; Horn, Sarah R.; Radford, Sarah J.; Housworth, Elizabeth A.; Stahl, Franklin W.; Copenhaver, Gregory P.

    2005-01-01

    In most eukaryotes, crossovers are not independently distributed along the length of a chromosome. Instead, they appear to avoid close proximity to one another—a phenomenon known as crossover interference. Previously, for three of the five Arabidopsis chromosomes, we measured the strength of interference and suggested a model wherein some crossovers experience interference while others do not. Here we show, using the same model, that the fraction of interference-insensitive crossovers is significantly smaller on the remaining two chromosomes. Since these two chromosomes bear the Arabidopsis NOR domains, the possibility that these chromosomal regions influence interference is discussed. PMID:15802520

  17. UFO: an Arabidopsis gene involved in both floral meristem and floral organ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, J Z; Meyerowitz, E M

    1995-05-01

    We describe the role of the UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) gene in Arabidopsis floral development based on a genetic and molecular characterization of the phenotypes of nine ufo alleles. UFO is required for the proper identity of the floral meristem and acts in three different aspects of the process that distinguishes flowers from shoots. UFO is involved in establishing the whorled pattern of floral organs, controlling the determinacy of the floral meristem, and activating the APETALA3 and PISTILLATA genes required for petal and stamen identity. In many respects, UFO acts in a manner similar to LEAFY, but the ufo mutant phenotype also suggests an additional role for UFO in defining boundaries within the floral primordia or controlling cell proliferation during floral organ growth. Finally, genetic interactions that prevent flower formation and lead to the generation of filamentous structures implicate UFO as a member of a new, large, and diverse class of genes in Arabidopsis necessary for flower formation.

  18. Gravity response mechanisms of lateral organs and the control of plant architecture in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, J.; Hangarter, R.

    Most research on gravity responses in plants has focused on primary roots and shoots, which typically grow in a vertical orientation. However, the patterns of lateral organ formation and their growth orientation, which typically are not vertical, govern plant architecture. For example, in Arabidopsis, when lateral roots emerge from the primary root, they grow at a nearly horizontal orientation. As they elongate, the roots slowly curve until they eventually reach a vertical orientation. The regulation of this lateral root orientation is an important component affecting the overall root system architecture. We have found that this change in orientation is not simply due to the onset of gravitropic competence, as non-vertical lateral roots are capable of both positive and negative gravitropism. Thus, the horizontal growth of the new lateral roots is determined by what is called the gravitropic set-point angle (GSA). In Arabidopsis shoots, rosette leaves and inflorescence branches also display GSA-dependent developmental changes in their orientation. The developmental control of the GSA of lateral organs in Arabidopsis provides us with a useful system for investigating the components involved in regulating directionality of tropistic responses. We have identified several Arabidopsis mutants that have either altered lateral root orientations, altered orientation of lateral organs in the shoot, or both, but maintain normal primary organ orientation. The mgsa ({m}odified {g}ravitropic {s}et-point {a}ngle) mutants with both altered lateral root and shoot orientation show that there are common components in the regulation of growth orientation in the different organs. Rosette leaves and lateral roots also have in common a regulation of positioning by red light. Further molecular and physiological analyses of the GSA mutants will provide insight into the basis of GSA regulation and, thus, a better understanding of how gravity controls plant architecture. [This work was

  19. The petunia ortholog of Arabidopsis SUPERMAN plays a distinct role in floral organ morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Hitoshi; Ferrario, Silvia; Angenent, Gerco C; Kobayashi, Akira; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2004-04-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SUPERMAN (SUP) plays a role in establishing a boundary between whorls 3 and 4 of flowers and in ovule development. We characterized a Petunia hybrida (petunia) homolog of SUP, designated PhSUP1, to compare with SUP. Genomic DNA of the PhSUP1 partially restored the stamen number and ovule development phenotypes of the Arabidopsis sup mutant. Two P. hybrida lines of transposon (dTph1) insertion mutants of PhSUP1 exhibited increased stamen number at the cost of normal carpel development, and ovule development was defective owing to aberrant growth of the integument. Unlike Arabidopsis sup mutants, phsup1 mutants also showed extra tissues connecting stamens, a petal tube and an ovary, and aberrancies in the development of anther and placenta. PhSUP1 transcripts occurred in the basal region of wild-type flowers around developing organ primordia in whorls 2 and 3 as well as in the funiculus of the ovule, concave regions of the placenta, and interthecal regions of developing anthers. Overexpression of PhSUP1 in P. hybrida resulted in size reduction of petals, leaves, and inflorescence stems. The shortening of inflorescence stems and petal tubes was primarily attributable to suppression of cell elongation, whereas a decrease in cell number was mainly responsible for the size reduction of petal limbs.

  20. Kontrolle der Expression des UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) Gens in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Hobe, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Die vorliegende Arbeit befaßt sich mit der Kontrolle des Expressionsmusters des UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) Gens von Arabidopsis thaliana. UFO wird im Sproß- und Blütenmeristemen aller Entwicklungsstadien der Pflanze exprimiert. In Blütenmeristemen agiert UFO als Kofaktor von LEAFY (LFY) bei der Aktivierung der Organidentitätsgene des zweiten und dritten Wirtels. UFO stellt also einen generellen Faktor der Musterbildung in Meristemen dar. Um regulatorische Gene, die die Expression von UFO bee...

  1. Advances in Arabidopsis research in China from 2006 to 2007

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Yan; ZUO JianRu; YANG WeiCai

    2007-01-01

    @@ Arabidopsis thaliana, a model plant species, has a number of advantages over other plant species as an experimental organism due to many of its genetic and genomic features. The Chinese Arabidopsis community has made significant contributions to plant biology research in recent years[1,2]. In 2006, studies of plant biology in China received more attention than ever before, especially those pertaining to Arabidopsis research. Here we briefly summarize recent advances in Arabidopsis research in China.

  2. A dynamic model for stem cell homeostasis and patterning in Arabidopsis meristems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Hohm

    Full Text Available Plants maintain stem cells in their meristems as a source for new undifferentiated cells throughout their life. Meristems are small groups of cells that provide the microenvironment that allows stem cells to prosper. Homeostasis of a stem cell domain within a growing meristem is achieved by signalling between stem cells and surrounding cells. We have here simulated the origin and maintenance of a defined stem cell domain at the tip of Arabidopsis shoot meristems, based on the assumption that meristems are self-organizing systems. The model comprises two coupled feedback regulated genetic systems that control stem cell behaviour. Using a minimal set of spatial parameters, the mathematical model allows to predict the generation, shape and size of the stem cell domain, and the underlying organizing centre. We use the model to explore the parameter space that allows stem cell maintenance, and to simulate the consequences of mutations, gene misexpression and cell ablations.

  3. Parallels between UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS and FIMBRIATA, genes controlling flower development in Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, G C; Goodrich, J; Wilkinson, M D; Simon, R; Haughn, G W; Coen, E S

    1995-09-01

    The unusual floral organs (ufo) mutant of Arabidopsis has flowers with variable homeotic organ transformations and inflorescence-like characteristics. To determine the relationship between UFO and previously characterized meristem and organ identity genes, we cloned UFO and determined its expression pattern. The UFO gene shows extensive homology with FIMBRIATA (FIM), a gene mediating between meristem and organ identity genes in Antirrhinum. All three UFO mutant alleles that we sequenced are predicted to produce truncated proteins. UFO transcripts were first detected in early floral meristems, before organ identity genes had been activated. At later developmental stages, UFO expression is restricted to the junction between sepal and petal primordia. Phenotypic, genetic, and expression pattern comparisons between UFO and FIM suggest that they are cognate homologs and play a similar role in mediating between meristem and organ identity genes. However, some differences in the functions and genetic interactions of UFO and FIM were apparent, indicating that changes in partially redundant pathways have occurred during the evolutionary divergence of Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum.

  4. Expression-based functional investigation of the organ-specific microRNAs in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Meng

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs play a pivotal role in plant development. The expression patterns of the miRNA genes significantly influence their regulatory activities. By utilizing small RNA (sRNA high-throughput sequencing (HTS data, the miRNA expression patterns were investigated in four organs (flowers, leaves, roots and seedlings of Arabidopsis. Based on a set of criteria, dozens of organ-specific miRNAs were discovered. A dominant portion of the organ-specific miRNAs identified from the ARGONAUTE 4-enriched sRNA HTS libraries were highly expressed in flowers. Additionally, the expression of the precursors of the organ-specific miRNAs was analyzed. Degradome sequencing data-based approach was employed to identify the targets of the organ-specific miRNAs. The miRNA-target interactions were used for network construction. Subnetwork analysis unraveled some novel regulatory cascades, such as the feedback regulation mediated by miR161, the potential self-regulation of the genes miR172, miR396, miR398 and miR860, and the miR863-guided cleavage of the SERRATE transcript. Our bioinformatics survey expanded the organ-specific miRNA-target list in Arabidopsis, and could deepen the biological view of the miRNA expression and their regulatory roles.

  5. One, two, three...models for trichome patterning in Arabidopsis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Marina; Hülskamp, Martin

    2009-10-01

    Trichome patterning in Arabidopsis rosette leaves serves as a model system to study how individual cells are determined in a regular spacing pattern from initially equivalent cells. A conserved gene cassette regulates this spacing pattern. bHLH, MYB, and WD40 factors are positive regulators of trichome development that are inhibited by R3 single-repeat MYB proteins. One positive regulator, the WD40-protein, and the negative regulators are mobile and are transported in opposite directions: the WD40 factor moves to the negative regulators away from trichome initials. This movement behavior and the genetic and molecular interactions between the contributing genes and proteins make it very difficult to derive the mechanistic core behind pattern formation. Attempts to develop mathematical models toward this end are critically discussed.

  6. Model of polar auxin transport coupled to mechanical forces retrieves robust morphogenesis along the Arabidopsis root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Arias, J. Roberto; Hernández-Hernández, Valeria; Benítez, Mariana; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R.; Barrio, Rafael A.

    2017-03-01

    Stem cells are identical in many scales, they share the same molecular composition, DNA, genes, and genetic networks, yet they should acquire different properties to form a functional tissue. Therefore, they must interact and get some external information from their environment, either spatial (dynamical fields) or temporal (lineage). In this paper we test to what extent coupled chemical and physical fields can underlie the cell's positional information during development. We choose the root apical meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana to model the emergence of cellular patterns. We built a model to study the dynamics and interactions between the cell divisions, the local auxin concentration, and physical elastic fields. Our model recovers important aspects of the self-organized and resilient behavior of the observed cellular patterns in the Arabidopsis root, in particular, the reverse fountain pattern observed in the auxin transport, the PIN-FORMED (protein family of auxin transporters) polarization pattern and the accumulation of auxin near the region of maximum curvature in a bent root. Our model may be extended to predict altered cellular patterns that are expected under various applied auxin treatments or modified physical growth conditions.

  7. The BIG gene is required for auxin-mediated organ growth in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaola; Lu, Wenwen; Ma, Yurong; Qin, Qianqian; Hou, Suiwen

    2013-04-01

    Control of organ size by cell expansion and cell proliferation is a fundamental process during development, but the importance of BIG in this process is still poorly understood. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a new allele mutant of BIG in Arabidopsis: big-j588. The mutant displayed small aerial organs that were characterized by reduced cell size in the epidermis and short roots with decreased cell numbers. The big-j588 axr1 double and big-j588 arf7 arf19 triple mutants displayed more severe defects in leaf expansion and root elongation than their parents, implying BIG is involved in auxin-dependent organ growth. Genetic analysis suggests that BIG may act synergistically with PIN1 to affect leaf growth. The PIN1 protein level decreased in both the root cells and the tips of leaf pavement cell lobes of big-j588. Further analysis showed that the auxin maxima in the roots and the leaves of big-j588 decreased. Therefore, we concluded that the small leaves and the short roots of big-j588 were associated with reduction of auxin maxima. Overall, our study suggested that BIG is required for Arabidopsis organ growth via auxin action.

  8. SHOOT MERISTEMLESS trafficking controls axillary meristem formation, meristem size and organ boundaries in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkunde, Rachappa; Kitagawa, Munenori; Xu, Xianfeng Morgan; Wang, Jing; Jackson, David

    2017-05-01

    The shoot stem cell niche, contained within the shoot apical meristem (SAM) is maintained in Arabidopsis by the homeodomain protein SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM). STM is a mobile protein that traffics cell-to-cell, presumably through plasmodesmata. In maize, the STM homolog KNOTTED1 shows clear differences between mRNA and protein localization domains in the SAM. However, the STM mRNA and protein localization domains are not obviously different in Arabidopsis, and the functional relevance of STM mobility is unknown. Using a non-mobile version of STM (2xNLS-YFP-STM), we show that STM mobility is required to suppress axillary meristem formation during embryogenesis, to maintain meristem size, and to precisely specify organ boundaries throughout development. STM and organ boundary genes CUP SHAPED COTYLEDON1 (CUC1), CUC2 and CUC3 regulate each other during embryogenesis to establish the embryonic SAM and to specify cotyledon boundaries, and STM controls CUC expression post-embryonically at organ boundary domains. We show that organ boundary specification by correct spatial expression of CUC genes requires STM mobility in the meristem. Our data suggest that STM mobility is critical for its normal function in shoot stem cell control. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A workflow for mathematical modeling of subcellular metabolic pathways in leaf metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eNägele

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade genome sequencing has experienced a rapid technological development resulting in numerous sequencing projects and applications in life science. In plant molecular biology, the availability of sequence data on whole genomes has enabled the reconstruction of metabolic networks. Enzymatic reactions are predicted by the sequence information. Pathways arise due to the participation of chemical compounds as substrates and products in these reactions. Although several of these comprehensive networks have been reconstructed for the genetic model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the integration of experimental data is still challenging. Particularly the analysis of subcellular organization of plant cells limits the understanding of regulatory instances in these metabolic networks in vivo. In this study, we develop an approach for the functional integration of experimental high-throughput data into such large-scale networks. We present a subcellular metabolic network model comprising 524 metabolic intermediates and 548 metabolic interactions derived from a total of 2769 reactions. We demonstrate how to link the metabolite covariance matrix of different Arabidopsis thaliana accessions with the subcellular metabolic network model for the inverse calculation of the biochemical Jacobian, finally resulting in the calculation of a matrix which satisfies a Lyaponov equation involving a covariance matrix. In this way, differential strategies of metabolite compartmentation and involved reactions were identified in the accessions when exposed to low temperature.

  10. LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN transcription factors direct callus formation in Arabidopsis regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingzhu Fan; Chongyi Xu; Ke Xu; Yuxin Hu

    2012-01-01

    The remarkable regeneration capability of plant tissues or organs under culture conditions has underlain an extensive practice for decades.The initial step in plant in vitro regeneration often involves the induction of a pluripotent cell mass termed callus,which is driven by the phytohormone auxin and occurs via a root development pathway.However,the key molecules governing callus formation remain unknown.Here we demonstrate that Arabidopsis LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD)/ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2-LIKE (ASL) transcription factors are involved in the control of callus formation program.The four LBD genes downstream of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTORs (ARFs),LBD16,LBD17,LBD18 and LBD29,are rapidly and dramatically induced by callus-inducing medium (CIM) in multiple organs.Ectopic expression of each of the four LBD genes in Arabidopsis is sufficient to trigger spontaneous callus formation without exogenous phytohormones,whereas suppression of LBD function inhibits the callus formation induced by CIM.Moreover,the callus triggered by LBD resembles that induced by CIM by characteristics of ectopically activated root meristem genes and efficient regeneration capacity.These findings define LBD transcription factors as key regulators in the callus induction process,thereby establishing a molecular link between auxin signaling and the plant regeneration program.

  11. Modelling of Arabidopsis LAX3 expression suggests auxin homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, Nathan; Péret, Benjamin; Porco, Silvana; Sairanen, Ilkka; Ljung, Karin; Bennett, Malcolm; King, John

    2015-02-07

    Emergence of new lateral roots from within the primary root in Arabidopsis has been shown to be regulated by the phytohormone auxin, via the expression of the auxin influx carrier LAX3, mediated by the ARF7/19 IAA14 signalling module (Swarup et al., 2008). A single cell model of the LAX3 and IAA14 auxin response was formulated and used to demonstrate that hysteresis and bistability may explain the experimentally observed 'all-or-nothing' LAX3 spatial expression pattern in cortical cells containing a gradient of auxin concentrations. The model was tested further by using a parameter fitting algorithm to match model output with qRT-PCR mRNA expression data following exogenous auxin treatment. It was found that the model is able to show good agreement with the data, but only when the exogenous auxin signal is degraded over time, at a rate higher than that measured in the experimental medium, suggesting the triggering of an endogenous auxin homeostasis mechanism. Testing the model over a more physiologically relevant range of extracellular auxin shows bistability and hysteresis still occur when using the optimised parameters, providing the rate of LAX3 active auxin transport is sufficiently high relative to passive diffusion.

  12. Genetics of the gravitropic set-point angle in lateral organs of Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, J.; Hangarter, R.

    Research on gravity responses in plants has mostly focused on primary roots and shoots, which typically orient to a vertical orientation. However, the distribution of lateral organs and their typically non-vertical growth orientation are critical for the determination of plant form. For example, in Arabidopsis, when lateral roots emerge from the primary root, they grow at a nearly horizontal orientation. As they elongate, the roots slowly curve until they eventually reach a vertical orientation. The regulation of this lateral root orientation is an important component affecting the overall root system architecture. We found that this change in orientation is not simply due to the onset of gravitropic competence, as non-vertical lateral roots are capable of both positive and negative gravitropism. Thus, the horizontal growth the new lateral roots is determined by what is called the gravitropic set-point angle (GSA). This developmental control of the GSA of lateral roots in Arabidopsis provides a useful system for investigating the components involved in regulating gravitropic responses. Using this system, we have identified several Arabidopsis mutants that have altered lateral root orientations but maintain normal primary root orientation. Two of these mutants also have altered orientation of their rosette leaves, indicating some common mechanisms in the positioning of root and shoot lateral organs. Rosette leaves and lateral roots also have in common a regulation of orientation by red light that may be due to red-light-dependent changes in the GSA. Further molecular and physiological analyses of the GSA mutants will provide insight into the basis of GSA regulation and, thus, a better understanding of how gravity controls plant architecture. [This work was supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration through grant no. NCC 2-1200.

  13. PHOSPHATIDYLSERINE SYNTHASE1 is Required for Inflorescence Meristem and Organ Development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengwu Liu; Hengfu Yin; Peng Gao; Xiaohe Hu; Jun Yang; Zhongchi Liu; Xiangdong Fu

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS),a quantitatively minor membrane phospholipid,is involved in many biological processes besides its role in membrane structure.One PS synthesis gene,PHOSPHATIDYLSERINE SYNTHASE1 (PSS1),has been discovered to be required for microspore development in Arabidopsis thaliana L.but how PSS1 affects postembryonic development is still largely unknown.Here,we show that PSS1 is also required for inflorescence meristem and organ development in Arabidopsis.Disruption of PSS1 causes severe dwarfism,smaller lateral organs and reduced size of inflorescence meristem.Morphological and molecular studies suggest that both cell division and cell elongation are affected in the pss1-1 mutant.RNA in situ hybridization and promoter GUS analysis show that expression of both WUSCHEL (WUS) and CLAVATA3 (CLV3) depend on PSS1.Moreover,the defect in meristem maintenance is recovered and the expression of WUS and CLV3 are restored in the pss1-1 clv1-1 double mutant.Both SHOOTSTEMLESS (STM) and BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP) are upregulated,and auxin distribution is disrupted in rosette leaves of pss1-1.However,expression of BP,which is also a regulator of internode development,is lost in the pss1-1 inflorescence stem.Our data suggest that PSS1 plays essential roles in inflorescence meristem maintenance through the WUS-CLV pathway,and in leaf and internode development by differentially regulating the class Ⅰ KNOX genes.

  14. Phosphatidylserine synthase 1 is required for inflorescence meristem and organ development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengwu; Yin, Hengfu; Gao, Peng; Hu, Xiaohe; Yang, Jun; Liu, Zhongchi; Fu, Xiangdong; Luo, Da

    2013-08-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS), a quantitatively minor membrane phospholipid, is involved in many biological processes besides its role in membrane structure. One PS synthesis gene, PHOSPHATIDYLSERINE SYNTHASE1 (PSS1), has been discovered to be required for microspore development in Arabidopsis thaliana L. but how PSS1 affects postembryonic development is still largely unknown. Here, we show that PSS1 is also required for inflorescence meristem and organ development in Arabidopsis. Disruption of PSS1 causes severe dwarfism, smaller lateral organs and reduced size of inflorescence meristem. Morphological and molecular studies suggest that both cell division and cell elongation are affected in the pss1-1 mutant. RNA in situ hybridization and promoter GUS analysis show that expression of both WUSCHEL (WUS) and CLAVATA3 (CLV3) depend on PSS1. Moreover, the defect in meristem maintenance is recovered and the expression of WUS and CLV3 are restored in the pss1-1 clv1-1 double mutant. Both SHOOTSTEMLESS (STM) and BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP) are upregulated, and auxin distribution is disrupted in rosette leaves of pss1-1. However, expression of BP, which is also a regulator of internode development, is lost in the pss1-1 inflorescence stem. Our data suggest that PSS1 plays essential roles in inflorescence meristem maintenance through the WUS-CLV pathway, and in leaf and internode development by differentially regulating the class I KNOX genes. © 2013 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  15. Arabidopsis SMALL ORGAN 4, a homolog of yeast NOP53, regulates cell proliferation rate during organ growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ran Zhang; Zhixiang Qin; Xiao Zhang; Yuxin Hu

    2015-01-01

    Cel proliferation is a fundamental event essential for plant organogenesis and contributes greatly to the final organ size. Although the control of cel proliferation in plants has been extensively studied, how the plant sets the cel number required for a single organ is largely elusive. Here, we describe the Arabidopsis SMALL ORGAN 4 (SMO4) that functions in the regulation of cell proliferation rate and thus final organ size. The smo4 mutant exhibits a reduced size of organs due to the decreased cell number, and further analysis reveals that such phenotype results from a retardation of the cell cycle progression during organ development. SMO4 encodes a homolog of NUCLEOLAR PROTEIN 53 (NOP53) in Saccharomy-ces cerevisiae and is expressed primarily in tissues undergoing cel proliferation. Nevertheless, further complementation tests show that SMO4 could not rescue the lethal defect of NOP53 mutant of S. cerevisiae. These results define SMO4 as an important regulator of cell proliferation during organ growth and suggest that SMO4 might have been evolutionarily divergent from NOP53.

  16. Sterility Caused by Floral Organ Degeneration and Abiotic Stresses in Arabidopsis and Cereal Grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Rae Smith

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural floral organ degeneration or abortion results in unisexual or fully sterile flowers, while abiotic stresses lead to sterility after initiation of floral reproductive organs. Since normal flower development is essential for plant sexual reproduction and crop yield, it is imperative to have a better understanding of plant sterility under regular and stress conditions. Here, we review the functions of ABC genes together with their downstream genes in floral organ degeneration and the formation of unisexual flowers in Arabidopsis and several agriculturally significant cereal grains. We further explore the roles of hormones, including auxin, brassinosteroids, jasmonic acid, gibberellic acid, and ethylene, in floral organ formation and fertility. We show that alterations in genes affecting hormone biosynthesis, hormone transport and perception cause loss of stamens/carpels, abnormal floral organ development, poor pollen production, which consequently result in unisexual flowers and male/female sterility. Moreover, abiotic stresses, such as heat, cold, and drought, commonly affect floral organ development and fertility. Sterility is induced by abiotic stresses mostly in male floral organ development, particularly during meiosis, tapetum development, anthesis, dehiscence, and fertilization. A variety of genes including those involved in heat shock, hormone signaling, cold tolerance, metabolisms of starch and sucrose, meiosis, and tapetum development are essential for plants to maintain normal fertility under abiotic stress conditions. Further elucidation of cellular, biochemical and molecular mechanisms about regulation of fertility will improve yield and quality for many agriculturally valuable crops.

  17. SCF(SAP) controls organ size by targeting PPD proteins for degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhibiao; Li, Na; Jiang, Shan; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun; Inzé, Dirk; Li, Yunhai

    2016-04-06

    Control of organ size by cell proliferation and growth is a fundamental process, but the mechanisms that determine the final size of organs are largely elusive in plants. We have previously revealed that the ubiquitin receptor DA1 regulates organ size by repressing cell proliferation in Arabidopsis. Here we report that a mutant allele of STERILE APETALA (SAP) suppresses the da1-1 mutant phenotype. We show that SAP is an F-box protein that forms part of a SKP1/Cullin/F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and controls organ size by promoting the proliferation of meristemoid cells. Genetic analyses suggest that SAP may act in the same pathway with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, which are negative regulators of meristemoid proliferation, to control organ size, but does so independently of DA1. Further results reveal that SAP physically associates with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, and targets them for degradation. These findings define a molecular mechanism by which SAP and PEAPOD control organ size.

  18. SHINE transcription factors act redundantly to pattern the archetypal surface of Arabidopsis flower organs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Xin Shi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Floral organs display tremendous variation in their exterior that is essential for organogenesis and the interaction with the environment. This diversity in surface characteristics is largely dependent on the composition and structure of their coating cuticular layer. To date, mechanisms of flower organ initiation and identity have been studied extensively, while little is known regarding the regulation of flower organs surface formation, cuticle composition, and its developmental significance. Using a synthetic microRNA approach to simultaneously silence the three SHINE (SHN clade members, we revealed that these transcription factors act redundantly to shape the surface and morphology of Arabidopsis flowers. It appears that SHNs regulate floral organs' epidermal cell elongation and decoration with nanoridges, particularly in petals. Reduced activity of SHN transcription factors results in floral organs' fusion and earlier abscission that is accompanied by a decrease in cutin load and modified cell wall properties. SHN transcription factors possess target genes within four cutin- and suberin-associated protein families including, CYP86A cytochrome P450s, fatty acyl-CoA reductases, GSDL-motif lipases, and BODYGUARD1-like proteins. The results suggest that alongside controlling cuticular lipids metabolism, SHNs act to modify the epidermis cell wall through altering pectin metabolism and structural proteins. We also provide evidence that surface formation in petals and other floral organs during their growth and elongation or in abscission and dehiscence through SHNs is partially mediated by gibberellin and the DELLA signaling cascade. This study therefore demonstrates the need for a defined composition and structure of the cuticle and cell wall in order to form the archetypal features of floral organs surfaces and control their cell-to-cell separation processes. Furthermore, it will promote future investigation into the relation between the

  19. SHINE transcription factors act redundantly to pattern the archetypal surface of Arabidopsis flower organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jian Xin; Malitsky, Sergey; De Oliveira, Sheron; Branigan, Caroline; Franke, Rochus B; Schreiber, Lukas; Aharoni, Asaph

    2011-05-01

    Floral organs display tremendous variation in their exterior that is essential for organogenesis and the interaction with the environment. This diversity in surface characteristics is largely dependent on the composition and structure of their coating cuticular layer. To date, mechanisms of flower organ initiation and identity have been studied extensively, while little is known regarding the regulation of flower organs surface formation, cuticle composition, and its developmental significance. Using a synthetic microRNA approach to simultaneously silence the three SHINE (SHN) clade members, we revealed that these transcription factors act redundantly to shape the surface and morphology of Arabidopsis flowers. It appears that SHNs regulate floral organs' epidermal cell elongation and decoration with nanoridges, particularly in petals. Reduced activity of SHN transcription factors results in floral organs' fusion and earlier abscission that is accompanied by a decrease in cutin load and modified cell wall properties. SHN transcription factors possess target genes within four cutin- and suberin-associated protein families including, CYP86A cytochrome P450s, fatty acyl-CoA reductases, GSDL-motif lipases, and BODYGUARD1-like proteins. The results suggest that alongside controlling cuticular lipids metabolism, SHNs act to modify the epidermis cell wall through altering pectin metabolism and structural proteins. We also provide evidence that surface formation in petals and other floral organs during their growth and elongation or in abscission and dehiscence through SHNs is partially mediated by gibberellin and the DELLA signaling cascade. This study therefore demonstrates the need for a defined composition and structure of the cuticle and cell wall in order to form the archetypal features of floral organs surfaces and control their cell-to-cell separation processes. Furthermore, it will promote future investigation into the relation between the regulation of organ

  20. Mediator subunit18 controls flowering time and floral organ identity in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengui Zheng

    Full Text Available Mediator is a conserved multi-protein complex that plays an important role in regulating transcription by mediating interactions between transcriptional activator proteins and RNA polymerase II. Much evidence exists that Mediator plays a constitutive role in the transcription of all genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II. However, evidence is mounting that specific Mediator subunits may control the developmental regulation of specific subsets of RNA polymerase II-dependent genes. Although the Mediator complex has been extensively studied in yeast and mammals, only a few reports on Mediator function in flowering time control of plants, little is known about Mediator function in floral organ identity. Here we show that in Arabidopsis thaliana, MEDIATOR SUBUNIT 18 (MED18 affects flowering time and floral organ formation through FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC and AGAMOUS (AG. A MED18 loss-of-function mutant showed a remarkable syndrome of later flowering and altered floral organ number. We show that FLC and AG mRNA levels and AG expression patterns are altered in the mutant. Our results support parallels between the regulation of FLC and AG and demonstrate a developmental role for Mediator in plants.

  1. Effects of aneuploidy on genome structure, expression, and interphase organization in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Huettel

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Aneuploidy refers to losses and/or gains of individual chromosomes from the normal chromosome set. The resulting gene dosage imbalance has a noticeable affect on the phenotype, as illustrated by aneuploid syndromes, including Down syndrome in humans, and by human solid tumor cells, which are highly aneuploid. Although the phenotypic manifestations of aneuploidy are usually apparent, information about the underlying alterations in structure, expression, and interphase organization of unbalanced chromosome sets is still sparse. Plants generally tolerate aneuploidy better than animals, and, through colchicine treatment and breeding strategies, it is possible to obtain inbred sibling plants with different numbers of chromosomes. This possibility, combined with the genetic and genomics tools available for Arabidopsis thaliana, provides a powerful means to assess systematically the molecular and cytological consequences of aberrant numbers of specific chromosomes. Here, we report on the generation of Arabidopsis plants in which chromosome 5 is present in triplicate. We compare the global transcript profiles of normal diploids and chromosome 5 trisomics, and assess genome integrity using array comparative genome hybridization. We use live cell imaging to determine the interphase 3D arrangement of transgene-encoded fluorescent tags on chromosome 5 in trisomic and triploid plants. The results indicate that trisomy 5 disrupts gene expression throughout the genome and supports the production and/or retention of truncated copies of chromosome 5. Although trisomy 5 does not grossly distort the interphase arrangement of fluorescent-tagged sites on chromosome 5, it may somewhat enhance associations between transgene alleles. Our analysis reveals the complex genomic changes that can occur in aneuploids and underscores the importance of using multiple experimental approaches to investigate how chromosome numerical changes condition abnormal phenotypes and

  2. Centering the Organizing Center in the Arabidopsis thaliana Shoot Apical Meristem by a Combination of Cytokinin Signaling and Self-Organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milad Adibi

    Full Text Available Plants have the ability to continously generate new organs by maintaining populations of stem cells throught their lives. The shoot apical meristem (SAM provides a stable environment for the maintenance of stem cells. All cells inside the SAM divide, yet boundaries and patterns are maintained. Experimental evidence indicates that patterning is independent of cell lineage, thus a dynamic self-regulatory mechanism is required. A pivotal role in the organization of the SAM is played by the WUSCHEL gene (WUS. An important question in this regard is that how WUS expression is positioned in the SAM via a cell-lineage independent signaling mechanism. In this study we demonstrate via mathematical modeling that a combination of an inhibitor of the Cytokinin (CK receptor, Arabidopsis histidine kinase 4 (AHK4 and two morphogens originating from the top cell layer, can plausibly account for the cell lineage-independent centering of WUS expression within SAM. Furthermore, our laser ablation and microsurgical experiments support the hypothesis that patterning in SAM occurs at the level of CK reception and signaling. The model suggests that the interplay between CK signaling, WUS/CLV feedback loop and boundary signals can account for positioning of the WUS expression, and provides directions for further experimental investigation.

  3. Centering the Organizing Center in the Arabidopsis thaliana Shoot Apical Meristem by a Combination of Cytokinin Signaling and Self-Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibi, Milad; Yoshida, Saiko; Weijers, Dolf; Fleck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Plants have the ability to continously generate new organs by maintaining populations of stem cells throught their lives. The shoot apical meristem (SAM) provides a stable environment for the maintenance of stem cells. All cells inside the SAM divide, yet boundaries and patterns are maintained. Experimental evidence indicates that patterning is independent of cell lineage, thus a dynamic self-regulatory mechanism is required. A pivotal role in the organization of the SAM is played by the WUSCHEL gene (WUS). An important question in this regard is that how WUS expression is positioned in the SAM via a cell-lineage independent signaling mechanism. In this study we demonstrate via mathematical modeling that a combination of an inhibitor of the Cytokinin (CK) receptor, Arabidopsis histidine kinase 4 (AHK4) and two morphogens originating from the top cell layer, can plausibly account for the cell lineage-independent centering of WUS expression within SAM. Furthermore, our laser ablation and microsurgical experiments support the hypothesis that patterning in SAM occurs at the level of CK reception and signaling. The model suggests that the interplay between CK signaling, WUS/CLV feedback loop and boundary signals can account for positioning of the WUS expression, and provides directions for further experimental investigation.

  4. The petunia ortholog of Arabidopsis SUPERMAN plays a distinct role in floral organ morphogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakagawa, H.; Ferrario, S.I.T.; Angenent, G.C.; Kobayashi, A.; Takatsuji, H.

    2004-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SUPERMAN (SUP) plays a role in establishing a boundary between whorls 3 and 4 of flowers and in ovule development. We characterized a Petunia hybrida (petunia) homolog of SUP, designated PhSUP1, to compare with SUP. Genomic DNA of the PhSUP1 partially restored the

  5. The petunia ortholog of Arabidopsis SUPERMAN plays a distinct role in floral organ morphogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakagawa, H.; Ferrario, S.I.T.; Angenent, G.C.; Kobayashi, A.; Takatsuji, H.

    2004-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SUPERMAN (SUP) plays a role in establishing a boundary between whorls 3 and 4 of flowers and in ovule development. We characterized a Petunia hybrida (petunia) homolog of SUP, designated PhSUP1, to compare with SUP. Genomic DNA of the PhSUP1 partially restored the

  6. Whole organ, venation and epidermal cell morphological variations are correlated in the leaves of Arabidopsis mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, José Manuel; Rubio-Díaz, Silvia; Dhondt, Stijn; Hernández-Romero, Diana; Sánchez-Soriano, Joaquín; Beemster, Gerrit T S; Ponce, María Rosa; Micol, José Luis

    2011-12-01

    Despite the large number of genes known to affect leaf shape or size, we still have a relatively poor understanding of how leaf morphology is established. For example, little is known about how cell division and cell expansion are controlled and coordinated within a growing leaf to eventually develop into a laminar organ of a definite size. To obtain a global perspective of the cellular basis of variations in leaf morphology at the organ, tissue and cell levels, we studied a collection of 111 non-allelic mutants with abnormally shaped and/or sized leaves, which broadly represent the mutational variations in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf morphology not associated with lethality. We used image-processing techniques on these mutants to quantify morphological parameters running the gamut from the palisade mesophyll and epidermal cells to the venation, whole leaf and rosette levels. We found positive correlations between epidermal cell size and leaf area, which is consistent with long-standing Avery's hypothesis that the epidermis drives leaf growth. In addition, venation parameters were positively correlated with leaf area, suggesting that leaf growth and vein patterning share some genetic controls. Positional cloning of the genes affected by the studied mutations will eventually establish functional links between genotypes, molecular functions, cellular parameters and leaf phenotypes.

  7. Verticillium longisporum infection induces organ-specific glucosinolate degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja eWitzel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The species Verticillium represents a group of highly destructive fungal pathogens, responsible for vascular wilt in a number of crops. The host response to infection by V. longisporum at the level of secondary plant metabolites has not been well explored. Natural variation in the glucosinolate (GLS composition of four Arabidopsis thaliana accessions was characterized: the accessions Bur-0 and Hi-0 accumulated alkenyl GLS, while 3-hydroxypropyl GLS predominated in Kn-0 and Ler-0. With respect to GLS degradation products, Hi-0 and Kn-0 generated mainly isothiocyanates, whereas Bur-0 released epithionitriles and Ler-0 nitriles. An analysis of the effect on the composition of both GLS and its breakdown products in the leaf and root following the plants' exposure to V. longisporum revealed a number of organ- and accession-specific alterations. In the less disease susceptible accessions Bur-0 and Ler-0, colonization depressed the accumulation of GLS in the rosette leaves but accentuated it in the roots. In contrast, in the root, the level of GLS breakdown products in three of the four accessions fell, suggestive of their conjugation or binding to a fungal target molecule(s. The plant-pathogen interaction influenced both the organ- and accession-specific formation of GLS degradation products.

  8. POPCORN functions in the auxin pathway to regulate embryonic body plan and meristem organization in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Daoquan; Yang, Hui; Venglat, Prakash; Cao, Yongguo; Wen, Rui; Ren, Maozhi; Stone, Sandra; Wang, Edwin; Wang, Hong; Xiao, Wei; Weijers, Dolf; Berleth, Thomas; Laux, Thomas; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Datla, Raju

    2011-12-01

    The shoot and root apical meristems (SAM and RAM) formed during embryogenesis are crucial for postembryonic plant development. We report the identification of POPCORN (PCN), a gene required for embryo development and meristem organization in Arabidopsis thaliana. Map-based cloning revealed that PCN encodes a WD-40 protein expressed both during embryo development and postembryonically in the SAM and RAM. The two pcn alleles identified in this study are temperature sensitive, showing defective embryo development when grown at 22°C that is rescued when grown at 29°C. In pcn mutants, meristem-specific expression of WUSCHEL (WUS), CLAVATA3, and WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX5 is not maintained; SHOOTMERISTEMLESS, BODENLOS (BDL) and MONOPTEROS (MP) are misexpressed. Several findings link PCN to auxin signaling and meristem function: ectopic expression of DR5(rev):green fluorescent protein (GFP), pBDL:BDL-GFP, and pMP:MP-β-glucuronidase in the meristem; altered polarity and expression of pPIN1:PIN1-GFP in the apical domain of the developing embryo; and resistance to auxin in the pcn mutants. The bdl mutation rescued embryo lethality of pcn, suggesting that improper auxin response is involved in pcn defects. Furthermore, WUS, PINFORMED1, PINOID, and TOPLESS are dosage sensitive in pcn, suggesting functional interaction. Together, our results suggest that PCN functions in the auxin pathway, integrating auxin signaling in the organization and maintenance of the SAM and RAM.

  9. Model plant systems in salinity and drought stress proteomics studies: a perspective on Arabidopsis and Sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngara, R; Ndimba, B K

    2014-11-01

    More than a decade after the sequencing of its genome, Arabidopsis still stands as the epitome of a model system in plant biology. Arabidopsis proteomics has also taught us great lessons on different aspects of plant growth, development and physiology. Without doubt our understanding of basic principles of plant biology would not have been this advanced if it were not for knowledge gained using Arabidopsis as a model system. However, with the projections of global climate change and rapid population growth, it is high time we evaluate the applicability of this model system in studies aimed at understanding abiotic stress tolerance and adaptation, with a particular emphasis on maintaining yield under hot and dry environmental conditions. Because of the innate nature of sorghum's tolerance to drought and moderate tolerance to salinity stresses, we believe sorghum is the next logical model system in such studies amongst cereals. In this acute view, we highlight the importance of Arabidopsis as a model system, briefly discuss its potential limitations in drought and salt stress studies, and present our views on the potential usefulness of sorghum as a model system for cereals in drought and salinity stress proteomic studies.

  10. Whole genome shotgun sequencing of Brassica oleracea and its application to gene discovery and annotation in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Ayele, Mulu; Haas, Brian J.; Kumar, Nikhil; Wu, Hank; Xiao, Yongli; Van Aken, Susan; Utterback, Teresa R.; WORTMAN, Jennifer R.; White, Owen R.; Town, Christopher D

    2005-01-01

    Through comparative studies of the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana and its close relative Brassica oleracea, we have identified conserved regions that represent potentially functional sequences overlooked by previous Arabidopsis genome annotation methods. A total of 454,274 whole genome shotgun sequences covering 283 Mb (0.44×) of the estimated 650 Mb Brassica genome were searched against the Arabidopsis genome, and conserved Arabidopsis genome sequences (CAGSs) were identified. Of these ...

  11. Adventitious root formation in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massoumi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Adventitious root (AR) formation is indispensable in vegetative propagation and is widely used. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms is needed to improve rooting treatments. We first established a system to study rooting in Arabidopsis, the model organism in plant biology but only occ

  12. Three-Dimensional Structure of Arabidopsis thaliana Lipase Predicted by Homology Modeling Method

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Triacylglycerol lipases have been thoroughly characterized in mammals and microorganisms. By contrast, very little is known about plant lipases. In this investigation, a homology model of Arabidopsis thaliana lipase (NP_179126) was constructed using a human gastric lipase (PDB ID: 1HLG), as a template for model building. This model was then assessed for stereochemical quality and side chain environment. Natural substrates: tributyrin, trioctanoin and triolen were docked into the model to inve...

  13. K-homology nuclear ribonucleoproteins regulate floral organ identity and determinacy in arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Encarnación Rodríguez-Cazorla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional control is nowadays considered a main checking point for correct gene regulation during development, and RNA binding proteins actively participate in this process. Arabidopsis thaliana FLOWERING LOCUS WITH KH DOMAINS (FLK and PEPPER (PEP genes encode RNA-binding proteins that contain three K-homology (KH-domain, the typical configuration of Poly(C-binding ribonucleoproteins (PCBPs. We previously demonstrated that FLK and PEP interact to regulate FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC, a central repressor of flowering time. Now we show that FLK and PEP also play an important role in the maintenance of the C-function during floral organ identity by post-transcriptionally regulating the MADS-box floral homeotic gene AGAMOUS (AG. Previous studies have indicated that the KH-domain containing protein HEN4, in concert with the CCCH-type RNA binding protein HUA1 and the RPR-type protein HUA2, facilitates maturation of the AG pre-mRNA. In this report we show that FLK and PEP genetically interact with HEN4, HUA1, and HUA2, and that the FLK and PEP proteins physically associate with HUA1 and HEN4. Taken together, these data suggest that HUA1, HEN4, PEP and FLK are components of the same post-transcriptional regulatory module that ensures normal processing of the AG pre-mRNA. Our data better delineates the roles of PEP in plant development and, for the first time, links FLK to a morphogenetic process.

  14. The size and sequence organization of the centromeric region of arabidopsis thaliana chromosome 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumekawa, N; Hosouchi, T; Tsuruoka, H; Kotani, H

    2000-12-31

    We have determined the size of the centromeric region of Arabidopsis thaliana chromosome 5, which corresponds to the genetically defined centromere by Copenhaver et al. (Science, 286, 2468-2474, 1999) on the basis of restriction analysis. As a large clone gap was present in the previously constructed contig map of the centromeric region, the restriction map of this region was constructed using Asc I, Not I, Apa I and Pme I and genomic DNA from a hypomethylated strain. The size of the centromeric region finally estimated by combination with the sequence data of cloned regions at both sides was 4.35 megabases (Mb). This value is over 2 Mb longer than those estimated in our previous work and also by Copenhaver et al. Combing this centromeric region with the physical map previously constructed, the entire length of chromosome 5 becomes 31 Mb. Although the internal moiety of the centromeric region has not been sequenced yet because of extremely high repetition, the result of sequence analysis from both sides toward the inside strongly suggests that the centromeric region is composed of the central 2.9-Mb domain consisting of mainly 180-bp repeats and Athila retrotransposons and flanking regions containing various types of transposons. On the basis of these observations, a structural model for the centromeric region is discussed.

  15. An ANN-GA model based promoter prediction in Arabidopsis thaliana using tilling microarray data

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Hrishikesh; Singh, Nitya; Misra, Krishna; Lahiri, Tapobrata

    2011-01-01

    Identification of promoter region is an important part of gene annotation. Identification of promoters in eukaryotes is important as promoters modulate various metabolic functions and cellular stress responses. In this work, a novel approach utilizing intensity values of tilling microarray data for a model eukaryotic plant Arabidopsis thaliana, was used to specify promoter region from non-promoter region. A feed-forward back propagation neural network model supported by genetic algorithm was ...

  16. Modulation of modeled microgravity on radiation-induced bystander effects in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ting [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Sun, Qiao [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Xu, Wei; Li, Fanghua [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Li, Huasheng; Lu, Jinying [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Wu, Lijun; Wu, Yuejin [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Liu, Min [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Bian, Po [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The effects of microgravity on the radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) were definitely demonstrated. • The effects of microgravity on RIBE might be divergent for different biological events. • The microgravity mainly modified the generation or transport of bystander signals at early stage. - Abstract: Both space radiation and microgravity have been demonstrated to have inevitable impact on living organisms during space flights and should be considered as important factors for estimating the potential health risk for astronauts. Therefore, the question whether radiation effects could be modulated by microgravity is an important aspect in such risk evaluation. Space particles at low dose and fluence rate, directly affect only a fraction of cells in the whole organism, which implement radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) in cellular response to space radiation exposure. The fact that all of the RIBE experiments are carried out in a normal gravity condition bring forward the need for evidence regarding the effect of microgravity on RIBE. In the present study, a two-dimensional rotation clinostat was adopted to demonstrate RIBE in microgravity conditions, in which the RIBE was assayed using an experimental system of root-localized irradiation of Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) plants. The results showed that the modeled microgravity inhibited significantly the RIBE-mediated up-regulation of expression of the AtRAD54 and AtRAD51 genes, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and transcriptional activation of multicopy P35S:GUS, but made no difference to the induction of homologous recombination by RIBE, showing divergent responses of RIBE to the microgravity conditions. The time course of interaction between the modeled microgravity and RIBE was further investigated, and the results showed that the microgravity mainly modulated the processes of the generation or translocation of the bystander signal(s) in roots.

  17. The Arabidopsis thaliana-Alternaria brassicicola pathosystem: A model interaction for investigating seed transmission of necrotrophic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochon, Stephanie; Terrasson, Emmanuel; Guillemette, Thomas; Iacomi-Vasilescu, Beatrice; Georgeault, Sonia; Juchaux, Marjorie; Berruyer, Romain; Debeaujon, Isabelle; Simoneau, Philippe; Campion, Claire

    2012-05-09

    Seed transmission constitutes a major component of the parasitic cycle for several fungal pathogens. However, very little is known concerning fungal or plant genetic factors that impact seed transmission and mechanisms underlying this key biological trait have yet to be clarified. Such lack of available data could be probably explained by the absence of suitable model pathosystem to study plant-fungus interactions during the plant reproductive phase. Here we report on setting up a new pathosystem that could facilitate the study of fungal seed transmission. Reproductive organs of Arabidopsis thaliana were inoculated with Alternaria brassicicola conidia. Parameters (floral vs fruit route, seed collection date, plant and silique developmental stages) that could influence the seed transmission efficiency were tested to define optimal seed infection conditions. Microscopic observations revealed that the fungus penetrates siliques through cellular junctions, replum and stomata, and into seed coats either directly or through cracks. The ability of the osmosensitive fungal mutant nik1Δ3 to transmit to A. thaliana seeds was analyzed. A significant decrease in seed transmission rate was observed compared to the wild-type parental strain, confirming that a functional osmoregulation pathway is required for efficient seed transmission of the fungus. Similarly, to test the role of flavonoids in seed coat protection against pathogens, a transparent testa Arabidopsis mutant (tt4-1) not producing any flavonoid was used as host plant. Unexpectedly, tt4-1 seeds were infected to a significantly lower extent than wild-type seeds, possibly due to over-accumulation of other antimicrobial metabolites. The Arabidopsis thaliana-Alternaria brassicicola pathosystem, that have been widely used to study plant-pathogen interactions during the vegetative phase, also proved to constitute a suitable model pathosystem for detailed analysis of plant-pathogen interactions during the reproductive

  18. The Arabidopsis thaliana-Alternaria brassicicola pathosystem: A model interaction for investigating seed transmission of necrotrophic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pochon Stephanie

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seed transmission constitutes a major component of the parasitic cycle for several fungal pathogens. However, very little is known concerning fungal or plant genetic factors that impact seed transmission and mechanisms underlying this key biological trait have yet to be clarified. Such lack of available data could be probably explained by the absence of suitable model pathosystem to study plant-fungus interactions during the plant reproductive phase. Results Here we report on setting up a new pathosystem that could facilitate the study of fungal seed transmission. Reproductive organs of Arabidopsis thaliana were inoculated with Alternaria brassicicola conidia. Parameters (floral vs fruit route, seed collection date, plant and silique developmental stages that could influence the seed transmission efficiency were tested to define optimal seed infection conditions. Microscopic observations revealed that the fungus penetrates siliques through cellular junctions, replum and stomata, and into seed coats either directly or through cracks. The ability of the osmosensitive fungal mutant nik1Δ3 to transmit to A. thaliana seeds was analyzed. A significant decrease in seed transmission rate was observed compared to the wild-type parental strain, confirming that a functional osmoregulation pathway is required for efficient seed transmission of the fungus. Similarly, to test the role of flavonoids in seed coat protection against pathogens, a transparent testa Arabidopsis mutant (tt4-1 not producing any flavonoid was used as host plant. Unexpectedly, tt4-1 seeds were infected to a significantly lower extent than wild-type seeds, possibly due to over-accumulation of other antimicrobial metabolites. Conclusions The Arabidopsis thaliana-Alternaria brassicicola pathosystem, that have been widely used to study plant-pathogen interactions during the vegetative phase, also proved to constitute a suitable model pathosystem for detailed analysis

  19. Structure and organ specificity of an anionic peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, L; Abelskov, A K; Mattsson, O

    1996-01-01

    The predominant peroxidase (pI 3.5) (E.C. 1.11.1.7) of an Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture was purified and partially sequenced. Oligonucleotides were designed and a specific probe was obtained. A cDNA clone was isolated from an Arabidopsis cell suspension cDNA library and completely...... sequenced. The cDNA clone comprised 1194 bp and encodes a 30 residue signal peptide and a 305 residue mature protein (Mr 31,966). The sequence of the mature protein is 95% identical to the well-characterized horseradish peroxidase HRP A2 and has therefore been designated ATP A2. Three introns at positions...

  20. BLADE-ON-PETIOLE1 and 2 Control Arabidopsis Lateral Organ Fate through Regulation of LOB-Domain and Adaxial-Abaxial Polarity Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continuous lateral organ formation is critical for higher plants to produce their characteristic architectures, but the regulatory pathways that specify organ cell fate are still poorly understood. Here, we report a novel function for BLADE-ON-PETIOLE1 (BOP1) and BOP2 in regulating Arabidopsis later...

  1. Sustainable funding for biocuration: The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR) as a case study of a subscription-based funding model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Leonore; Berardini, Tanya Z; Li, Donghui; Muller, Robert; Strait, Emily M; Li, Qian; Mezheritsky, Yarik; Vetushko, Andrey; Huala, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Databases and data repositories provide essential functions for the research community by integrating, curating, archiving and otherwise packaging data to facilitate discovery and reuse. Despite their importance, funding for maintenance of these resources is increasingly hard to obtain. Fueled by a desire to find long term, sustainable solutions to database funding, staff from the Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR), founded the nonprofit organization, Phoenix Bioinformatics, using TAIR as a test case for user-based funding. Subscription-based funding has been proposed as an alternative to grant funding but its application has been very limited within the nonprofit sector. Our testing of this model indicates that it is a viable option, at least for some databases, and that it is possible to strike a balance that maximizes access while still incentivizing subscriptions. One year after transitioning to subscription support, TAIR is self-sustaining and Phoenix is poised to expand and support additional resources that wish to incorporate user-based funding strategies. Database URL: www.arabidopsis.org.

  2. Teaching biology with model organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Dolores A.

    The purpose of this study is to identify and use model organisms that represent each of the kingdoms biologists use to classify organisms, while experiencing the process of science through guided inquiry. The model organisms will be the basis for studying the four high school life science core ideas as identified by the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS): LS1-From molecules to organisms, LS2-Ecosystems, LS3- Heredity, and LS4- Biological Evolution. NGSS also have identified four categories of science and engineering practices which include developing and using models and planning and carrying out investigations. The living organisms will be utilized to increase student interest and knowledge within the discipline of Biology. Pre-test and posttest analysis utilizing student t-test analysis supported the hypothesis. This study shows increased student learning as a result of using living organisms as models for classification and working in an inquiry-based learning environment.

  3. Identification of an Arabidopsis solute carrier critical for intracellular transport and inter-organ allocation of molybdate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasber, A; Klaumann, S; Trentmann, O; Trampczynska, A; Clemens, S; Schneider, S; Sauer, N; Feifer, I; Bittner, F; Mendel, R R; Neuhaus, H E

    2011-09-01

    Plants represent an important source of molybdenum in the human diet. Recently, MOT1 has been identified as a transport protein responsible for molybdate import in Arabidopsis thaliana L.; however, the function of the homologous protein MOT2 has not been resolved. Interestingly, MOT2-GFP analysis indicated a vacuolar location of this carrier protein. By site directed mutagenesis at the N-terminal end of MOT2, we identified a di-leucine motif that is essential for driving the protein into the vacuolar membrane. Molybdate quantification in isolated vacuoles showed that this organelle serves as an important molybdate store in Arabidopsis cells. When grown on soil, leaves from mot2 T-DNA mutants contained more molybdate, whereas mot2 seeds contained significantly less molybdate than corresponding wild-type (Wt) tissues. Remarkably, MOT2 mRNA accumulates in senescing leaves and mot2 leaves from plants that had finished their life cycle had 15-fold higher molybdate levels than Wt leaves. Reintroduction of the endogenous MOT2 gene led to a Wt molybdate phenotype. Thus, mot2 mutants exhibit impaired inter-organ molybdate allocation. As total concentrations of the molybdenum cofactor (Moco) and its precursor MPT correlates with leaf molybdate levels, we present novel evidence for an adjustment of Moco biosynthesis in response to cellular MoO₄²⁻ levels. We conclude that MOT2 is important for vacuolar molybdate export, an N-terminal di-leucine motif is critical for correct subcellular localisation of MOT2 and activity of this carrier is required for accumulation of molybdate in Arabidopsis seeds. MOT2 is a novel element in inter-organ translocation of an essential metal ion.

  4. Effect of modeled microgravity on radiation-induced adaptive response of root growth in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chenguang; Wang, Ting; Wu, Jingjing; Xu, Wei; Li, Huasheng; Liu, Min; Wu, Lijun; Lu, Jinying; Bian, Po

    2017-02-01

    Space particles have an inevitable impact on organisms during space missions; radio-adaptive response (RAR) is a critical radiation effect due to both low-dose background and sudden high-dose radiation exposure during solar storms. Although it is relevant to consider RAR within the context of microgravity, another major space environmental factor, there is no existing evidence as to its effects on RAR. In the present study, we established an experimental method for detecting the effects of gamma-irradiation on the primary root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana, in which RAR of root growth was significantly induced by several dose combinations. Microgravity was simulated using a two-dimensional rotation clinostat. It was shown that RAR of root growth was significantly inhibited under the modeled microgravity condition, and was absent in pgm-1 plants that had impaired gravity sensing in root tips. These results suggest that RAR could be modulated in microgravity. Time course analysis showed that microgravity affected either the development of radio-resistance induced by priming irradiation, or the responses of plants to challenging irradiation. After treatment with the modeled microgravity, attenuation in priming irradiation-induced expressions of DNA repair genes (AtKu70 and AtRAD54), and reduced DNA repair efficiency in response to challenging irradiation were observed. In plant roots, the polar transportation of the phytohormone auxin is regulated by gravity, and treatment with an exogenous auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) prevented the induction of RAR of root growth, suggesting that auxin might play a regulatory role in the interaction between microgravity and RAR of root growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Genome assembly and annotation of Arabidopsis halleri, a model for heavy metal hyperaccumulation and evolutionary ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briskine, Roman V; Paape, Timothy; Shimizu-Inatsugi, Rie; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Akama, Satoru; Sese, Jun; Shimizu, Kentaro K

    2016-09-27

    The self-incompatible species Arabidopsis halleri is a close relative of the self-compatible model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The broad European and Asian distribution and heavy metal hyperaccumulation ability make A. halleri a useful model for ecological genomics studies. We used long-insert mate-pair libraries to improve the genome assembly of the A. halleri ssp. gemmifera Tada mine genotype (W302) collected from a site with high contamination by heavy metals in Japan. After five rounds of forced selfing, heterozygosity was reduced to 0.04%, which facilitated subsequent genome assembly. Our assembly now covers 196 Mb or 78% of the estimated genome size and achieved scaffold N50 length of 712 kb. To validate assembly and annotation, we used synteny of A. halleri Tada mine with a previously published high-quality reference assembly of a closely related species, Arabidopsis lyrata. Further validation of the assembly quality comes from synteny and phylogenetic analysis of the HEAVY METAL ATPASE4 (HMA4) and METAL TOLERANCE PROTEIN1 (MTP1) regions using published sequences from European A. halleri for comparison. Three tandemly duplicated copies of HMA4, key gene involved in cadmium and zinc hyperaccumulation, were assembled on a single scaffold. The assembly will enhance the genomewide studies of A. halleri as well as the allopolyploid Arabidopsis kamchatica derived from A. lyrata and A. halleri. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Resources Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The ASK1 gene regulates development and interacts with the UFO gene to control floral organ identity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, D; Yang, M; Solava, J; Ma, H

    1999-09-01

    Normal flower development likely requires both specific and general regulators. We have isolated an Arabidopsis mutant ask1-1 (for -Arabidopsis skp1-like1-1), which exhibits defects in both vegetative and reproductive development. In the ask1-1mutant, rosette leaf growth is reduced, resulting in smaller than normal rosette leaves, and internodes in the floral stem are shorter than normal. Examination of cell sizes in these organs indicates that cell expansion is normal in the mutant, but cell number is reduced. In the mutant, the numbers of petals and stamens are reduced, and many flowers have one or more petals with a reduced size. In addition, all mutant flowers have short stamen filaments. Furthermore, petal/stamen chimeric organs are found in many flowers. These results indicate that the ASK1 gene affects the size of vegetative and floral organs. The ask1 floral phenotype resembles somewhat that of the Arabidopsis ufo mutants in that both genes affect whorls 2 and 3. We therefore tested for possible interactions between ASK1 and UFO by analyzing the phenotypes of ufo-2 ask1-1 double mutant plants. In these plants, vegetative development is similar to that of the ask1-1 single mutant, whereas the floral defects are more severe than those in either single mutant. Interior to the first whorl, the double mutant flowers have more sepals or sepal-like organs than are found in ufo-2, and less petals than ask1-1. Our results suggest that ASK1 interacts with UFO to control floral organ identity in whorls 2 and 3. This is very intriguing because ASK1 is very similar in sequence to the yeast SKP1 protein and UFO contains an F-box, a motif known to interact with SKP1 in yeast. Although the precise mechanism of ASK1 and UFO action is unknown, our results support the hypothesis that these two proteins physically interact in vivo. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. MODEL ORGANISMS USED IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OR MEDICAL RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey Govind

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A model organism is a non-human species that is studied to understand specific biological phenomena with the expectation that investigations made in the organism model will provide insight into the workings of other organisms. The model organisms are widely used to explore potential causes and treatments for human as well as animal diseases when experiments on animals or humans would be unfeasible or considered less ethical. Studying model organisms may be informative, but care must be taken when generalizing from one organism to another. Often, model organisms are chosen on the basis that they are amenable to experimental manipulation. When researchers look for an organism to use in their studies, they look for several traits. Among these are size, generation time, accessibility, manipulation, genetics, conservation of mechanisms and potential economic benefit. As comparative molecular biology has become more common, some researchers have sought model organisms from a wider assortment of lineages on the tree of life. There are many model organisms, such as viruses (e.g., Phage lambda virus, Tobacco mosaic virus, etc., bacteria (e.g., Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Vibrio fischeri, etc., algae (e.g., Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Emiliania huxleyi, etc., molds (e.g., Aspergillus nidulans, Neurospora crassa, etc., yeasts (e.g., Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ustilago maydis, etc., higher plants (e.g., Arabidopsis thaliana, Lemna gibba, Lotus japonicus, Nicotiana tabaccum, Oryza sativa, Physcomitrella patens, Zea mays, etc. and animals (e.g., Caenorhabditis elegans, guinea pig, hamster, mouse, rat, cat, chicken, dog, frog, Hydra, Drosophila melanogaster fruit fly, fish, etc..

  8. The allotetraploid Arabidopsis thaliana-Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. petraea as an alternative model system for the study of polyploidy in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Julien; Jean, Martine; Belzile, François

    2009-04-01

    Polyploidy is known to be common in plants and recent work has focused on the rapid changes in genome structure and expression that occur upon polyploidization. In Arabidopsis, much of this work has been done on a synthetic allotetraploid obtained by crossing a tetraploid Arabidopsis thaliana (2n = 4x = 20) with A. arenosa (2n = 4x = 32). To explore an alternative route to polyploidy in this model species, we have developed a synthetic allopolyploid by crossing two diploid species: A. thaliana (2n = 2x = 10) and Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. petraea (2n = 2x = 16). F(1) hybrids were easy to obtain and phenotypically more similar to A. lyrata. Spontaneous chromosome doubling events occurred in about 25% of the F(1)s, thus restoring fertility. The resulting allotetraploids (2n = 26) exhibited many genomic changes typically reported upon polyploidization. Nucleolar dominance was observed as only the A. lyrata rDNA loci were expressed in the F(1) and allotetraploids. Changes in the degree of methylation were observed at almost 25% of the loci examined by MSAP analysis. Finally, structural genomic alterations did occur as a large deletion covering a significant portion of the upper arm of chromosome II was detected but no evidence of increased mobility of transposons was obtained. Such allotetraploids derived from two parents with sequenced (or soon to be sequenced) genomes offer much promise in elucidating the various changes that occur in newly synthesized polyploids.

  9. MICROTUBULE ORGANIZATION 1 regulates structure and function of microtubule arrays during mitosis and cytokinesis in the Arabidopsis root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Eiko; Himmelspach, Regina; Rashbrooke, Madeleine C; Whittington, Angela T; Gale, Kevin R; Collings, David A; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O

    2006-01-01

    MICROTUBULE ORGANIZATION 1 (MOR1) is a plant member of the highly conserved MAP215/Dis1 family of microtubule-associated proteins. Prior studies with the temperature-sensitive mor1 mutants of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which harbor single amino acid substitutions in an N-terminal HEAT repeat, proved that MOR1 regulates cortical microtubule organization and function. Here we demonstrate by use of live cell imaging and immunolabeling that the mor1-1 mutation generates specific defects in the microtubule arrays of dividing vegetative cells. Unlike the universal cortical microtubule disorganization in elongating mor1-1 cells, disruption of mitotic and cytokinetic microtubule arrays was not detected in all dividing cells. Nevertheless, quantitative analysis identified distinct defects in preprophase bands (PPBs), spindles, and phragmoplasts. In nearly one-half of dividing cells at the restrictive temperature of 30 degrees C, PPBs were not detected prior to spindle formation, and those that did form were often disrupted. mor1-1 spindles and phragmoplasts were short and abnormally organized and persisted for longer times than in wild-type cells. The reduced length of these arrays predicts that the component microtubule lengths are also reduced, suggesting that microtubule length is a critical determinant of spindle and phragmoplast structure, orientation, and function. Microtubule organizational defects led to aberrant chromosomal arrangements, misaligned or incomplete cell plates, and multinucleate cells. Antiserum raised against an N-terminal MOR1 sequence labeled the full length of microtubules in interphase arrays, PPBs, spindles, and phragmoplasts. Continued immunolabeling of the disorganized and short microtubules of mor1-1 at the restrictive temperature demonstrated that the mutant mor1-1(L174F) protein loses function without dissociating from microtubules, providing important insight into the mechanism by which MOR1 may regulate microtubule length.

  10. Transcriptomes of Eight Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions Reveal Core Conserved, Genotype- and Organ-Specific Responses to Flooding Stress1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veen, Hans; Vashisht, Divya; Akman, Melis; Girke, Thomas; Mustroph, Angelika; Reinen, Emilie; Kooiker, Maarten; van Tienderen, Peter; Voesenek, Laurentius A.C.J.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change has increased the frequency and severity of flooding events, with significant negative impact on agricultural productivity. These events often submerge plant aerial organs and roots, limiting growth and survival due to a severe reduction in light reactions and gas exchange necessary for photosynthesis and respiration, respectively. To distinguish molecular responses to the compound stress imposed by submergence, we investigated transcriptomic adjustments to darkness in air and under submerged conditions using eight Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) accessions differing significantly in sensitivity to submergence. Evaluation of root and rosette transcriptomes revealed an early transcriptional and posttranscriptional response signature that was conserved primarily across genotypes, although flooding susceptibility-associated and genotype-specific responses also were uncovered. Posttranscriptional regulation encompassed darkness- and submergence-induced alternative splicing of transcripts from pathways involved in the alternative mobilization of energy reserves. The organ-specific transcriptome adjustments reflected the distinct physiological status of roots and shoots. Root-specific transcriptome changes included marked up-regulation of chloroplast-encoded photosynthesis and redox-related genes, whereas those of the rosette were related to the regulation of development and growth processes. We identified a novel set of tolerance genes, recognized mainly by quantitative differences. These included a transcriptome signature of more pronounced gluconeogenesis in tolerant accessions, a response that included stress-induced alternative splicing. This study provides organ-specific molecular resolution of genetic variation in submergence responses involving interactions between darkness and low-oxygen constraints of flooding stress and demonstrates that early transcriptome plasticity, including alternative splicing, is associated with the ability to cope

  11. Meristem Maintenance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Para, Alessia

    2004-01-01

    The shoot apical meristem (SAM) is the structure that shapes the aerial architecture of the plant, by producing lateral organs throughout development. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the SAM is always identifiable as a characteristic dome, whether it is found in the centre of a rosette of leaves or at the tip of an inflorescence. When senescence occurs and organogenesis ceases, the now inactive SAM still retains its characteristic appearance and it is never consumed into a terminal s...

  12. Arabidopsis hybrid speciation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmickl, Roswitha; Koch, Marcus A

    2011-08-23

    The genus Arabidopsis provides a unique opportunity to study fundamental biological questions in plant sciences using the diploid model species Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata. However, only a few studies have focused on introgression and hybrid speciation in Arabidopsis, although polyploidy is a common phenomenon within this genus. More recently, there is growing evidence of significant gene flow between the various Arabidopsis species. So far, we know Arabidopsis suecica and Arabidopsis kamchatica as fully stabilized allopolyploid species. Both species evolved during Pleistocene glaciation and deglaciation cycles in Fennoscandinavia and the amphi-Beringian region, respectively. These hybrid studies were conducted either on a phylogeographic scale or reconstructed experimentally in the laboratory. In our study we focus at a regional and population level. Our research area is located in the foothills of the eastern Austrian Alps, where two Arabidopsis species, Arabidopsis arenosa and A. lyrata ssp. petraea, are sympatrically distributed. Our hypothesis of genetic introgression, migration, and adaptation to the changing environment during the Pleistocene has been confirmed: We observed significant, mainly unidirectional gene flow between the two species, which has given rise to the tetraploid A. lyrata. This cytotype was able to escape from the narrow ecological niche occupied by diploid A. lyrata ssp. petraea on limestone outcrops by migrating northward into siliceous areas, leaving behind a trail of genetic differentiation.

  13. SLOW MOTION Is Required for Within-Plant Auxin Homeostasis and Normal Timing of Lateral Organ Initiation at the Shoot Meristem in Arabidopsis[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Daniel; Stacey, Nicola; Breuninger, Holger; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Müller, Dörte; Sicard, Adrien; Leyser, Ottoline; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Lenhard, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The regular arrangement of leaves and flowers around a plant's stem is a fascinating expression of biological pattern formation. Based on current models, the spacing of lateral shoot organs is determined by transient local auxin maxima generated by polar auxin transport, with existing primordia draining auxin from their vicinity to restrict organ formation close by. It is unclear whether this mechanism encodes not only spatial information but also temporal information about the plastochron (i.e., the interval between the formation of successive primordia). Here, we identify the Arabidopsis thaliana F-box protein SLOW MOTION (SLOMO) as being required for a normal plastochron. SLOMO interacts genetically with components of polar auxin transport, and mutant shoot apices contain less free auxin. However, this reduced auxin level at the shoot apex is not due to increased polar auxin transport down the stem, suggesting that it results from reduced synthesis. Independently reducing the free auxin level in plants causes a similar lengthening of the plastochron as seen in slomo mutants, suggesting that the reduced auxin level in slomo mutant shoot apices delays the establishment of the next auxin maximum. SLOMO acts independently of other plastochron regulators, such as ALTERED MERISTEM PROGRAM1 or KLUH/CYP78A5. We propose that SLOMO contributes to auxin homeostasis in the shoot meristem, thus ensuring a normal rate of the formation of auxin maxima and organ initiation. PMID:20139162

  14. APUM23, a PUF family protein, functions in leaf development and organ polarity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tengbo; Kerstetter, Randall A; Irish, Vivian F

    2014-03-01

    The normal biological function of leaves, such as intercepting light and exchanging gases, relies on proper differentiation of adaxial and abaxial polarity. KANADI (KAN) genes, members of the GARP family, are key regulators of abaxial identity in leaf morphogenesis. This study identified a mutant allele (apum23-3) of APUM23, which encodes a Pumilio/PUF domain protein and acts as an enhancer of the kan mutant. Arabidopsis APUM23 has been shown to function in pre-rRNA processing and play pleiotropic roles in plant development. The apum23-3 mutant also synergistically interacts with other leaf polarity mutants, affects proliferation of division-competent cells, and alters the expression of important leaf polarity genes. These phenotypes show that APUM23 has critical functions in plant development, particularly in polarity formation. The PUF gene family is conserved across kingdoms yet it has not been well characterized in plants. These results illuminating the functions of APUM23 suggest a novel role for PUF genes in Arabidopsis leaf development.

  15. The organization pattern of root border-like cells of Arabidopsis is dependent on cell wall homogalacturonan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Caroline; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Follet-Gueye, Marie Laure; Duponchel, Ludovic; Moreau, Myriam; Lerouge, Patrice; Driouich, Azeddine

    2009-07-01

    Border-like cells are released by Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root tips as organized layers of several cells that remain attached to each other rather than completely detached from each other, as is usually observed in border cells of many species. Unlike border cells, cell attachment between border-like cells is maintained after their release into the external environment. To investigate the role of cell wall polysaccharides in the attachment and organization of border-like cells, we have examined their release in several well-characterized mutants defective in the biosynthesis of xyloglucan, cellulose, or pectin. Our data show that among all mutants examined, only quasimodo mutants (qua1-1 and qua2-1), which have been characterized as producing less homogalacturonan, had an altered border-like cell phenotype as compared with the wild type. Border-like cells in both lines were released as isolated cells separated from each other, with the phenotype being much more pronounced in qua1-1 than in qua2-1. Further analysis of border-like cells in the qua1-1 mutant using immunocytochemistry and a set of anti-cell wall polysaccharide antibodies showed that the loss of the wild-type phenotype was accompanied by (1) a reduction in homogalacturonan-JIM5 epitope in the cell wall of border-like cells, confirmed by Fourier transform infrared microspectrometry, and (2) the secretion of an abundant mucilage that is enriched in xylogalacturonan and arabinogalactan-protein epitopes, in which the cells are trapped in the vicinity of the root tip.

  16. Genome assembly and annotation ofArabidopsis halleri, a model for heavy metal hyperaccumulation and evolutionary ecology

    OpenAIRE

    Briskine, Roman V; Paape, Timothy; Shimizu-Inatsugi, Rie; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Akama, Satoru; Sese, Jun; Kentaro K. Shimizu

    2016-01-01

    The self-incompatible species Arabidopsis halleri is a close relative of the self-compatible model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The broad European and Asian distribution and heavy metal hyperaccumulation ability makes A. halleri a useful model for ecological genomics studies.We used long-insert mate-pair libraries to improve the genome assembly of the A. halleri ssp.gemmifera Tada mine genotype (W302) collected from a site with high contamination by heavy metals in Japan. After five rounds of ...

  17. An ANN-GA model based promoter prediction in Arabidopsis thaliana using tilling microarray data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Hrishikesh; Singh, Nitya; Misra, Krishna; Lahiri, Tapobrata

    2011-01-01

    Identification of promoter region is an important part of gene annotation. Identification of promoters in eukaryotes is important as promoters modulate various metabolic functions and cellular stress responses. In this work, a novel approach utilizing intensity values of tilling microarray data for a model eukaryotic plant Arabidopsis thaliana, was used to specify promoter region from non-promoter region. A feed-forward back propagation neural network model supported by genetic algorithm was employed to predict the class of data with a window size of 41. A dataset comprising of 2992 data vectors representing both promoter and non-promoter regions, chosen randomly from probe intensity vectors for whole genome of Arabidopsis thaliana generated through tilling microarray technique was used. The classifier model shows prediction accuracy of 69.73% and 65.36% on training and validation sets, respectively. Further, a concept of distance based class membership was used to validate reliability of classifier, which showed promising results. The study shows the usability of micro-array probe intensities to predict the promoter regions in eukaryotic genomes. PMID:21887014

  18. Arabidopsis phospholipase D alpha 1-derived phosphatidic acid regulates microtubule organization and cell development under microtubule-interacting drugs treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qun; Qu, Yana; Wang, Qing; Song, Ping; Wang, Peipei; Jia, Qianru; Guo, Jinhe

    2017-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) and its product phosphatidic acid (PA) are emerging as essential regulators of cytoskeleton organization in plants. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of PA-mediated microtubule reorganization in plants remain largely unknown. In this study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches to analyze the function of Arabidopsis thaliana PLDα1 in the regulation of microtubule organization and cell development in response to microtubule-affecting drugs. Treatment with the microtubule-stabilizing drug paclitaxel resulted in less growth inhibition and decreased rightward slant of roots, longitudinal alignment of microtubules, and enhanced length of hypocotyl epidermal cells in the pldα1 mutant, the phenotype of which was rescued by exogenous application of PA. Moreover, the pldα1 mutant was sensitive to the microtubule-disrupting drugs oryzalin and propyzamide in terms of seedling survival ratio, left-skewing angle of roots and microtubule organization. In addition, both disruption and stabilization of microtubules induced by drugs activated PLDα1 activity. Our findings demonstrate that in A. thaliana, PLDα1/PA might regulate cell development by modulating microtubule organization in an activity-dependent manner.

  19. The arabidopsis IDD14, IDD15, and IDD16 cooperatively regulate lateral organ morphogenesis and gravitropism by promoting auxin biosynthesis and transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayong Cui

    Full Text Available The plant hormone auxin plays a critical role in regulating various aspects of plant growth and development, and the spatial accumulation of auxin within organs, which is primarily attributable to local auxin biosynthesis and polar transport, is largely responsible for lateral organ morphogenesis and the establishment of plant architecture. Here, we show that three Arabidopsis INDETERMINATE DOMAIN (IDD transcription factors, IDD14, IDD15, and IDD16, cooperatively regulate auxin biosynthesis and transport and thus aerial organ morphogenesis and gravitropic responses. Gain-of-function of each IDD gene in Arabidopsis results in small and transversally down-curled leaves, whereas loss-of-function of these IDD genes causes pleiotropic phenotypes in aerial organs and defects in gravitropic responses, including altered leaf shape, flower development, fertility, and plant architecture. Further analyses indicate that these IDD genes regulate spatial auxin accumulation by directly targeting YUCCA5 (YUC5, TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE of ARABIDOPSIS1 (TAA1, and PIN-FORMED1 (PIN1 to promote auxin biosynthesis and transport. Moreover, mutation or ectopic expression of YUC suppresses the organ morphogenic phenotype and partially restores the gravitropic responses in gain- or loss-of-function idd mutants, respectively. Taken together, our results reveal that a subfamily of IDD transcription factors plays a critical role in the regulation of spatial auxin accumulation, thereby controlling organ morphogenesis and gravitropic responses in plants.

  20. Genetic Dissection of Morphometric Traits Reveals That Phytochrome B Affects Nucleus Size and Heterochromatin Organization in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basten L. Snoek

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Microscopically visible chromatin is partitioned into two major components in Arabidopsis thaliana nuclei. On one hand, chromocenters are conspicuous foci of highly condensed “heterochromatic” domains that contain mostly repeated sequences. On the other hand, less condensed and gene-rich “euchromatin” emanates from these chromocenters. This differentiation, together with the dynamic nature of chromatin compaction in response to developmental and environmental stimuli, makes Arabidopsis a powerful system for studying chromatin organization and dynamics. Heterochromatin dynamics can be monitored by measuring the Heterochromatin Index, i.e., the proportion of nuclei displaying well-defined chromocenters, or the DNA fraction of chromocenters (relative heterochromatin fraction. Both measures are composite traits, thus their values represent the sum of effects of various underlying morphometric properties. We exploited genetic variation between natural occurring accessions to determine the genetic basis of individual nucleus and chromocenter morphometric parameters (area, perimeter, density, roundness, and heterogeneity that together determine chromatin compaction. Our novel reductionist genetic approach revealed quantitative trait loci (QTL for all measured traits. Genomic colocalization among QTL was limited, which suggests a complex genetic regulation of chromatin compaction. Yet genomic intervals of QTL for nucleus size (area and perimeter both overlap with a known QTL for heterochromatin compaction that is explained by natural polymorphism in the red/far-red light and temperature receptor Phytochrome B. Mutant analyses and genetic complementation assays show that Phytochrome B is a negative regulator of nucleus size, revealing that perception of climatic conditions by a Phytochrome-mediated hub is a major determinant for coordinating nucleus size and heterochromatin compaction.

  1. Systemic resistance induced by volatile organic compounds emitted by plant growth-promoting fungi in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hushna Ara Naznin

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOC were extracted and identified from plant growth-promoting fungi (PGPF, Phoma sp., Cladosporium sp. and Ampelomyces sp., using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Among the three VOC extracted, two VOC blends (emitted from Ampelomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp. significantly reduced disease severity in Arabidopsis plants against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst. Subsequently, m-cresol and methyl benzoate (MeBA were identified as major active volatile compounds from Ampelomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp., respectively, and found to elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR against the pathogen. Molecular signaling for disease suppression by the VOC were investigated by treating different mutants and transgenic Arabidopsis plants impaired in salicylic acid (SA or Jasmonic acid (JA/ethylene (ET signaling pathways with m-cresol and MeBA followed by challenge inoculation with Pst. Results show that the level of protection was significantly lower when JA/ET-impaired mutants were treated with MeBA, and in SA-, and JA/ET-disrupted mutants after m-cresol treatment, indicating the involvement of these signal transduction pathways in the ISR primed by the volatiles. Analysis of defense-related genes by real-time qRT-PCR showed that both the SA-and JA-signaling pathways combine in the m-cresol signaling of ISR, whereas MeBA is mainly involved in the JA-signaling pathway with partial recruitment of SA-signals. The ET-signaling pathway was not employed in ISR by the volatiles. Therefore, this study identified two novel volatile components capable of eliciting ISR that may be promising candidates in biological control strategy to protect plants from diseases.

  2. Systemic resistance induced by volatile organic compounds emitted by plant growth-promoting fungi in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naznin, Hushna Ara; Kiyohara, Daigo; Kimura, Minako; Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Shimizu, Masafumi; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) were extracted and identified from plant growth-promoting fungi (PGPF), Phoma sp., Cladosporium sp. and Ampelomyces sp., using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Among the three VOC extracted, two VOC blends (emitted from Ampelomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp.) significantly reduced disease severity in Arabidopsis plants against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst). Subsequently, m-cresol and methyl benzoate (MeBA) were identified as major active volatile compounds from Ampelomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp., respectively, and found to elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR) against the pathogen. Molecular signaling for disease suppression by the VOC were investigated by treating different mutants and transgenic Arabidopsis plants impaired in salicylic acid (SA) or Jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) signaling pathways with m-cresol and MeBA followed by challenge inoculation with Pst. Results show that the level of protection was significantly lower when JA/ET-impaired mutants were treated with MeBA, and in SA-, and JA/ET-disrupted mutants after m-cresol treatment, indicating the involvement of these signal transduction pathways in the ISR primed by the volatiles. Analysis of defense-related genes by real-time qRT-PCR showed that both the SA-and JA-signaling pathways combine in the m-cresol signaling of ISR, whereas MeBA is mainly involved in the JA-signaling pathway with partial recruitment of SA-signals. The ET-signaling pathway was not employed in ISR by the volatiles. Therefore, this study identified two novel volatile components capable of eliciting ISR that may be promising candidates in biological control strategy to protect plants from diseases.

  3. LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD)10 interacts with SIDECAR POLLEN/LBD27 to control pollen development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Jung; Kim, Mirim; Lee, Mi Rha; Park, Soon Ki; Kim, Jungmook

    2015-03-01

    During male gametophyte development in Arabidopsis thaliana, the microspores undergo an asymmetric division to produce a vegetative cell and a generative cell, which undergoes a second division to give rise to two sperm cells. SIDECAR POLLEN/LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD) 27 plays a key role in the asymmetric division of microspores. Here we provide molecular genetic evidence that a combinatorial role of LBD10 with LBD27 is crucial for male gametophyte development in Arabidopsis. Expression analysis, genetic transmission and pollen viability assays, and pollen development analysis demonstrated that LBD10 plays a role in the male gametophyte function primarily at germ cell mitosis. In the mature pollen of lbd10 and lbd10 expressing a dominant negative version of LBD10, LBD10:SRDX, aberrant microspores such as bicellular and smaller tricellular pollen appeared at a ratio of 10-15% with a correspondingly decreased ratio of normal tricellular pollen, whereas in lbd27 mutants, 70% of the pollen was aborted. All pollen in the lbd10 lbd27 double mutants was aborted and severely shrivelled compared with that of the single mutants, indicating that LBD10 and LBD27 are essential for pollen development. Gene expression and subcellular localization analyses of LBD10:GFP and LBD27:RFP during pollen development indicated that posttranscriptional and/or posttranslational controls are involved in differential accumulation and subcellular localization of LBD10 and LBD27 during pollen development, which may contribute in part to combinatorial and distinct roles of LBD10 with LBD27 in microspore development. In addition, we showed that LBD10 and LBD27 interact to form a heterodimer for nuclear localization.

  4. Metabolic Profiling of Intact Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves during Circadian Cycle Using 1H High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Augustijn, D.; Roy, U.; Schadewijk, van R.; Groot, de H.J.M.; Matysik, A.

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is the most widely used model organism for research in plant biology. While significant advances in understanding plant growth and development have been made by focusing on the molecular genetics of Arabidopsis, extracting and understanding the functional framework of metabolism

  5. A correlative microscopy approach relates microtubule behaviour, local organ geometry, and cell growth at the Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burian, Agata; Ludynia, Michal; Uyttewaal, Magalie; Traas, Jan; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier; Kwiatkowska, Dorota

    2013-12-01

    Cortical microtubules (CMTs) are often aligned in a particular direction in individual cells or even in groups of cells and play a central role in the definition of growth anisotropy. How the CMTs themselves are aligned is not well known, but two hypotheses have been proposed. According to the first hypothesis, CMTs align perpendicular to the maximal growth direction, and, according to the second, CMTs align parallel to the maximal stress direction. Since both hypotheses were formulated on the basis of mainly qualitative assessments, the link between CMT organization, organ geometry, and cell growth is revisited using a quantitative approach. For this purpose, CMT orientation, local curvature, and growth parameters for each cell were measured in the growing shoot apical meristem (SAM) of Arabidopsis thaliana. Using this approach, it has been shown that stable CMTs tend to be perpendicular to the direction of maximal growth in cells at the SAM periphery, but parallel in the cells at the boundary domain. When examining the local curvature of the SAM surface, no strict correlation between curvature and CMT arrangement was found, which implies that SAM geometry, and presumed geometry-derived stress distribution, is not sufficient to prescribe the CMT orientation. However, a better match between stress and CMTs was found when mechanical stress derived from differential growth was also considered.

  6. Integration of genome-scale modeling and transcript profiling reveals metabolic pathways underlying light and temperature acclimation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töpfer, Nadine; Caldana, Camila; Grimbs, Sergio; Willmitzer, Lothar; Fernie, Alisdair R; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2013-04-01

    Understanding metabolic acclimation of plants to challenging environmental conditions is essential for dissecting the role of metabolic pathways in growth and survival. As stresses involve simultaneous physiological alterations across all levels of cellular organization, a comprehensive characterization of the role of metabolic pathways in acclimation necessitates integration of genome-scale models with high-throughput data. Here, we present an integrative optimization-based approach, which, by coupling a plant metabolic network model and transcriptomics data, can predict the metabolic pathways affected in a single, carefully controlled experiment. Moreover, we propose three optimization-based indices that characterize different aspects of metabolic pathway behavior in the context of the entire metabolic network. We demonstrate that the proposed approach and indices facilitate quantitative comparisons and characterization of the plant metabolic response under eight different light and/or temperature conditions. The predictions of the metabolic functions involved in metabolic acclimation of Arabidopsis thaliana to the changing conditions are in line with experimental evidence and result in a hypothesis about the role of homocysteine-to-Cys interconversion and Asn biosynthesis. The approach can also be used to reveal the role of particular metabolic pathways in other scenarios, while taking into consideration the entirety of characterized plant metabolism.

  7. APS kinase from Arabidopsis thaliana: genomic organization, expression, and kinetic analysis of the recombinant enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S; Leustek, T

    1998-06-09

    The gene encoding 5'-adenylylsulfate (APS) kinase (EC 2.7.1.25) (APK) was cloned from Arabidopsis thaliana. There is a single APK locus in A. thaliana. The coding sequence of the gene is composed of 7 exons, interrupted by 6 introns. A transcriptional initiation site was detected 120 bp 5' of the initiation codon. APK mRNA is slightly more abundant in leaves than in roots of A. thaliana and its level does not change in response to sulfur starvation. The APK protein, synthesized in vitro, is able to enter isolated intact chloroplasts. Recombinant APS kinase shows maximal activity at 10 microM APS with 5 mM ATP, but it is inhibited at APS concentrations above 10 microM. The inhibition is alleviated at higher ATP concentrations. Reciprocal plot analysis showed that the theoretical Vmax is approximately 1.2 mumol min-1 mg-1 at 25 degrees C, pH 8.0; the K(m) values are 3.6 microM APS and 1.8 mM ATP.

  8. Homeotic Genes and the ABCDE Model for Floral Organ Formation in Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Murai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Floral organ formation has been the subject of intensive study for over 20 years, particularly in the model dicot species Arabidopsis thaliana. These studies have led to the establishment of a general model for the development of floral organs in higher plants, the so-called ABCDE model, in which floral whorl-specific combinations of class A, B, C, D, or E genes specify floral organ identity. In Arabidopsis, class A, B, C, D, E genes encode MADS-box transcription factors except for the class A gene APETALA2. Mutation of these genes induces floral organ homeosis. In this review, I focus on the roles of these homeotic genes in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum, particularly with respect to the ABCDE model. Pistillody, the homeotic transformation of stamens into pistil-like structures, occurs in cytoplasmic substitution (alloplasmic wheat lines that have the cytoplasm of the related wild species Aegilops crassa. This phenomenon is a valuable tool for analysis of the wheat ABCDE model. Using an alloplasmic line, the wheat ortholog of DROOPING LEAF (TaDL, a member of the YABBY gene family, has been shown to regulate pistil specification. Here, I describe the current understanding of the ABCDE model for floral organ formation in wheat.

  9. A dynamic genetic-hormonal regulatory network model explains multiple cellular behaviors of the root apical meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gómez, Mónica L; Azpeitia, Eugenio; Álvarez-Buylla, Elena R

    2017-04-01

    The study of the concerted action of hormones and transcription factors is fundamental to understand cell differentiation and pattern formation during organ development. The root apical meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana is a useful model to address this. It has a stem cell niche near its tip conformed of a quiescent organizer and stem or initial cells around it, then a proliferation domain followed by a transition domain, where cells diminish division rate before transiting to the elongation zone; here, cells grow anisotropically prior to their final differentiation towards the plant base. A minimal model of the gene regulatory network that underlies cell-fate specification and patterning at the root stem cell niche was proposed before. In this study, we update and couple such network with both the auxin and cytokinin hormone signaling pathways to address how they collectively give rise to attractors that correspond to the genetic and hormonal activity profiles that are characteristic of different cell types along A. thaliana root apical meristem. We used a Boolean model of the genetic-hormonal regulatory network to integrate known and predicted regulatory interactions into alternative models. Our analyses show that, after adding some putative missing interactions, the model includes the necessary and sufficient components and regulatory interactions to recover attractors characteristic of the root cell types, including the auxin and cytokinin activity profiles that correlate with different cellular behaviors along the root apical meristem. Furthermore, the model predicts the existence of activity configurations that could correspond to the transition domain. The model also provides a possible explanation for apparently paradoxical cellular behaviors in the root meristem. For example, how auxin may induce and at the same time inhibit WOX5 expression. According to the model proposed here the hormonal regulation of WOX5 might depend on the cell type. Our results

  10. Beyond Arabidopsis: the circadian clock in non-model plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClung, C Robertson

    2013-05-01

    Circadian clocks allow plants to temporally coordinate many aspects of their biology with the diurnal cycle derived from the rotation of Earth on its axis. Although there is a rich history of the study of clocks in many plant species, in recent years much progress in elucidating the architecture and function of the plant clock has emerged from studies of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. There is considerable interest in extending this knowledge of the circadian clock into diverse plant species in order to address its role in topics as varied as agricultural productivity and the responses of individual species and plant communities to global climate change and environmental degradation. The analysis of circadian clocks in the green lineage provides insight into evolutionary processes in plants and throughout the eukaryotes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Network modeling reveals prevalent negative regulatory relationships between signaling sectors in Arabidopsis immune signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanao Sato

    Full Text Available Biological signaling processes may be mediated by complex networks in which network components and network sectors interact with each other in complex ways. Studies of complex networks benefit from approaches in which the roles of individual components are considered in the context of the network. The plant immune signaling network, which controls inducible responses to pathogen attack, is such a complex network. We studied the Arabidopsis immune signaling network upon challenge with a strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae expressing the effector protein AvrRpt2 (Pto DC3000 AvrRpt2. This bacterial strain feeds multiple inputs into the signaling network, allowing many parts of the network to be activated at once. mRNA profiles for 571 immune response genes of 22 Arabidopsis immunity mutants and wild type were collected 6 hours after inoculation with Pto DC3000 AvrRpt2. The mRNA profiles were analyzed as detailed descriptions of changes in the network state resulting from the genetic perturbations. Regulatory relationships among the genes corresponding to the mutations were inferred by recursively applying a non-linear dimensionality reduction procedure to the mRNA profile data. The resulting static network model accurately predicted 23 of 25 regulatory relationships reported in the literature, suggesting that predictions of novel regulatory relationships are also accurate. The network model revealed two striking features: (i the components of the network are highly interconnected; and (ii negative regulatory relationships are common between signaling sectors. Complex regulatory relationships, including a novel negative regulatory relationship between the early microbe-associated molecular pattern-triggered signaling sectors and the salicylic acid sector, were further validated. We propose that prevalent negative regulatory relationships among the signaling sectors make the plant immune signaling network a "sector

  12. A petal breakstrength meter for Arabidopsis abscission studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker John C

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abscission is the regulated dropping of plant organs, such as leaves or flower petals. This process involves a break down of the cell wall between layers of cells in the abscission zone, causing the organ to become detached. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana undergoes floral organ abscission. Various experimental methods have been used to study Arabidopsis floral organ abscission, including measuring the petal breakstrength, or the amount of force required to pull a petal from the receptacle. Petal breakstrength provides a quantitative insight into the physical integrity of the petal abscission zone. Results We developed a petal breakstrength meter that allows rapid data acquisition on a personal computer. We present the design of the device and show its utility in measuring Arabidopsis petal breakstrength for abscission studies. Conclusion This petal breakstrength meter should enable researchers to perform the petal breakstrength assay as a routine part of the characterization of environmental and genetic factors affecting abscission.

  13. Reference: 539 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available dy, we isolated mutants defective in root amino acid uptake by screening Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ...urred, suggesting that LHT1 may fulfill an important function at this developmental stage. Based on the broad and unbiased screening...on of organic N from the soil. Comprehensive screening of Arabidopsis mutants suggests the lysine histidine

  14. DORNRÖSCHEN, DORNRÖSCHEN-LIKE, and PUCHI redundantly control floral meristem identity and organ initiation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, J W; Werr, W

    2017-06-15

    The biphasic floral transition in Arabidopsis thaliana involves many redundant intersecting regulatory networks. The related AP2 transcription factors DORNRÖSCHEN (DRN), DORNRÖSCHEN-LIKE (DRNL), and PUCHI individually execute well-characterized functions in diverse developmental contexts, including floral development. Here, we show that their combined loss of function leads to synergistic floral phenotypes, including reduced floral merosity in all whorls, which reflects redundant functions of all three genes in organ initiation rather than outgrowth. Additional loss of BLADE-ON-PETIOLE1 (BOP1) and BOP2 functions results in the complete conversion of floral meristems into secondary inflorescence shoots, demonstrating that all five genes define an essential regulatory network for establishing floral meristem identity, and we show that their functions converge to regulate LEAFY expression. Thus, despite their largely discrete spatiotemporal expression domains in the inflorescence meristem and early floral meristem, PUCHI, DRN, and DRNL interdependently contribute to cellular fate decisions. Auxin might represent one potential non-cell-autonomous mediator of their gene functions, because PUCHI, DRN, and DRNL all interact with auxin transport and biosynthesis pathways. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. BURSTING POLLEN is required to organize the pollen germination plaque and pollen tube tip in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoedemaekers, Karin; Derksen, Jan; Hoogstrate, Suzanne W; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Oh, Sung-Aeong; Twell, David; Mariani, Celestina; Rieu, Ivo

    2015-04-01

    Pollen germination may occur via the so-called germination pores or directly through the pollen wall at the site of contact with the stigma. In this study, we addressed what processes take place during pollen hydration (i.e. before tube emergence), in a species with extra-poral pollen germination, Arabidopsis thaliana. A T-DNA mutant population was screened by segregation distortion analysis. Histological and electron microscopy techniques were applied to examine the wild-type and mutant phenotypes. Within 1 h of the start of pollen hydration, an intine-like structure consisting of cellulose, callose and at least partly de-esterified pectin was formed at the pollen wall. Subsequently, this 'germination plaque' gradually extended and opened up to provide passage for the cytoplasm into the emerging pollen tube. BURSTING POLLEN (BUP) was identified as a gene essential for the correct organization of this plaque and the tip of the pollen tube. BUP encodes a novel Golgi-located glycosyltransferase related to the glycosyltransferase 4 (GT4) subfamily which is conserved throughout the plant kingdom. Extra-poral pollen germination involves the development of a germination plaque and BUP defines the correct plastic-elastic properties of this plaque and the pollen tube tip by affecting pectin synthesis or delivery.

  16. Structure-function relationship of a plant NCS1 member--homology modeling and mutagenesis identified residues critical for substrate specificity of PLUTO, a nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Witz, Sandra; Panwar, Pankaj; Schober, Markus; Deppe, Johannes; Pasha, Farhan Ahmad; Lemieux, M Joanne; Möhlmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    .... We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens...

  17. Genetic Dissection of Morphometric Traits Reveals that Phytochrome B Affects Nucleus Size and Heterochromatin Organization in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, L.B.; Pavlova, P.; Tessadori, F.; Fransz, P.F.; Zanten, van M.; Peeters, A.J.M.; Bourbousse, Clara; Barneche, Fredy; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.; Fransz, Paul; Zanten, van M.

    2017-01-01

    Microscopically visible chromatin is partitioned into two major components in Arabidopsis thaliana nuclei. Chromocenters on one hand are conspicuous foci of highly condensed 'heterochromatic' domains that contain mostly repeated sequences. On the other hand, less condensed and gene-rich

  18. Kinetic Modeling of the Arabidopsis Cryptochrome Photocycle: FADHo Accumulation Correlates with Biological Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procopio, Maria; Link, Justin; Engle, Dorothy; Witczak, Jacques; Ritz, Thorsten; Ahmad, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes are flavoprotein photoreceptors with multiple signaling roles during plant de-etiolation and development. Arabidopsis cryptochromes (cry1 and cry2) absorb light through an oxidized flavin (FADox) cofactor which undergoes reduction to both FADH° and FADH− redox states. Since the FADH° redox state has been linked to biological activity, it is important to estimate its concentration formed upon illumination in vivo. Here we model the photocycle of isolated cry1 and cry2 proteins with a three-state kinetic model. Our model fits the experimental data for flavin photoconversion in vitro for both cry1 and cry2, providing calculated quantum yields which are significantly lower in cry1 than for cry2. The model was applied to the cryptochrome photocycle in vivo using biological activity in plants as a readout for FADH° concentration. The fit to the in vivo data provided quantum yields for cry1 and cry2 flavin reduction similar to those obtained in vitro, with decreased cry1 quantum yield as compared to cry2. These results validate our assumption that FADH° concentration correlates with biological activity. This is the first reported attempt at kinetic modeling of the cryptochrome photocycle in relation to macroscopic signaling events in vivo, and thereby provides a theoretical framework to the components of the photocycle that are necessary for cryptochrome response to environmental signals. PMID:27446119

  19. Kinetic Modeling of the Arabidopsis Cryptochrome Photocycle: FADH(o) Accumulation Correlates with Biological Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procopio, Maria; Link, Justin; Engle, Dorothy; Witczak, Jacques; Ritz, Thorsten; Ahmad, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes are flavoprotein photoreceptors with multiple signaling roles during plant de-etiolation and development. Arabidopsis cryptochromes (cry1 and cry2) absorb light through an oxidized flavin (FADox) cofactor which undergoes reduction to both FADH° and FADH(-) redox states. Since the FADH° redox state has been linked to biological activity, it is important to estimate its concentration formed upon illumination in vivo. Here we model the photocycle of isolated cry1 and cry2 proteins with a three-state kinetic model. Our model fits the experimental data for flavin photoconversion in vitro for both cry1 and cry2, providing calculated quantum yields which are significantly lower in cry1 than for cry2. The model was applied to the cryptochrome photocycle in vivo using biological activity in plants as a readout for FADH° concentration. The fit to the in vivo data provided quantum yields for cry1 and cry2 flavin reduction similar to those obtained in vitro, with decreased cry1 quantum yield as compared to cry2. These results validate our assumption that FADH° concentration correlates with biological activity. This is the first reported attempt at kinetic modeling of the cryptochrome photocycle in relation to macroscopic signaling events in vivo, and thereby provides a theoretical framework to the components of the photocycle that are necessary for cryptochrome response to environmental signals.

  20. Vascular development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zheng-Hua; Freshour, Glenn; Hahn, Michael G; Burk, David H; Zhong, Ruiqin

    2002-01-01

    Vascular tissues, xylem and phloem, form a continuous network throughout the plant body for transport of water, minerals, and food. Characterization of Arabidopsis mutants defective in various aspects of vascular formation has demonstrated that Arabidopsis is an ideal system for investigating the molecular mechanisms controlling vascular development. The processes affected in these mutants include initiation or division of procambium or vascular cambium, formation of continuous vascular cell files, differentiation of procambium or vascular cambium into vascular tissues, cell elongation, patterned secondary wall thickening, and biosynthesis of secondary walls. Identification of the genes affected by some of these mutations has revealed essential roles in vascular development for a cytokinin receptor and several factors mediating auxin transport or signaling. Mutational studies have also identified a number of Arabidopsis mutants defective in leaf venation pattern or vascular tissue organization in stems. Genetic evidence suggests that the vascular tissue organization is regulated by the same positional information that determines organ polarity.

  1. The importance of localized auxin production for morphogenesis of reproductive organs and embryos in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Hélène S; Crhak Khaitova, Lucie; Mroue, Souad; Benková, Eva

    2015-08-01

    Plant sexual reproduction involves highly structured and specialized organs: stamens (male) and gynoecia (female, containing ovules). These organs synchronously develop within protective flower buds, until anthesis, via tightly coordinated mechanisms that are essential for effective fertilization and production of viable seeds. The phytohormone auxin is one of the key endogenous signalling molecules controlling initiation and development of these, and other, plant organs. In particular, its uneven distribution, resulting from tightly controlled production, metabolism and directional transport, is an important morphogenic factor. In this review we discuss how developmentally controlled and localized auxin biosynthesis and transport contribute to the coordinated development of plants' reproductive organs, and their fertilized derivatives (embryos) via the regulation of auxin levels and distribution within and around them. Current understanding of the links between de novo local auxin biosynthesis, auxin transport and/or signalling is presented to highlight the importance of the non-cell autonomous action of auxin production on development and morphogenesis of reproductive organs and embryos. An overview of transcription factor families, which spatiotemporally define local auxin production by controlling key auxin biosynthetic enzymes, is also presented.

  2. A noncanonical auxin-sensing mechanism is required for organ morphogenesis in arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simonini, Sara; Deb, Joyita; Moubayidin, Laila; Stephenson, Pauline; Valluru, Manoj; Freire-Rios, Alejandra; Sorefan, Karim; Weijers, Dolf; Friml, Jiří; Østergaard, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Tissue patterning in multicellular organisms is the output of precise spatio–temporal regulation of gene expression coupled with changes in hormone dynamics. In plants, the hormone auxin regulates growth and development at every stage of a plant’s life cycle. Auxin signaling occurs through bindin

  3. The UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS gene of Arabidopsis thaliana is an F-box protein required for normal patterning and growth in the floral meristem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samach, A; Klenz, J E; Kohalmi, S E; Risseeuw, E; Haughn, G W; Crosby, W L

    1999-11-01

    Genetic and molecular studies have suggested that the UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) gene, from Arabidopsis thaliana, is expressed in all shoot apical meristems, and is involved in the regulation of a complex set of developmental events during floral development, including floral meristem and floral organ identity. Results from in situ hybridization using genes expressed early in floral development as probes indicate that UFO controls growth of young floral primordia. Transgenic constructs were used to provide evidence that UFO regulates floral organ identity by activating or maintaining transcription of the class B organ-identity gene APETALA 3, but not PISTILLATA. In an attempt to understand the biochemical mode of action of the UFO gene product, we show here that UFO is an F-box protein that interacts with Arabidopsis SKP1-like proteins, both in the yeast two-hybrid system and in vitro. In yeast and other organisms both F-box proteins and SKP1 homologues are subunits of specific ubiquitin E3 enzyme complexes that target specific proteins for degradation. The protein selected for degradation by the complex is specified by the F-box proteins. It is therefore possible that the role of UFO is to target for degradation specific proteins controlling normal growth patterns in the floral primordia, as well as proteins that negatively regulate APETALA 3 transcription.

  4. Statistical modeling of nitrogen-dependent modulation of root system architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takao Araya; Takuya Kubo; Nicolaus von Wiren; Hideki Takahashi

    2016-01-01

    Plant root development is strongly affected by nutrient availability. Despite the importance of structure and function of roots in nutrient acquisition, statistical modeling approaches to evaluate dynamic and temporal modulations of root system architecture in response to nutrient availability have remained as widely open and exploratory areas in root biology. In this study, we developed a statistical modeling approach to investigate modulations of root system archi-tecture in response to nitrogen availability. Mathematical models were designed for quantitative assessment of root growth and root branching phenotypes and their dynamic relationships based on hierarchical configuration of primary and lateral roots formulating the fishbone-shaped root system architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana. Time-series datasets reporting dynamic changes in root developmental traits on different nitrate or ammonium concentrations were gener-ated for statistical analyses. Regression analyses unraveled key parameters associated with:(i) inhibition of primary root growth under nitrogen limitation or on ammonium;(i ) rapid progression of lateral root emergence in response to ammonium; and (i i) inhibition of lateral root elongation in the presence of excess nitrate or ammonium. This study provides a statistical framework for interpreting dynamic modulation of root system architecture, supported by meta-analysis of datasets displaying morphological responses of roots to diverse nitrogen supplies.

  5. Arabidopsis VILLIN2 and VILLIN3 are required for the generation of thick actin filament bundles and for directional organ growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Honing, Hannie S; Kieft, Henk; Emons, Anne Mie C; Ketelaar, Tijs

    2012-03-01

    In plant cells, actin filament bundles serve as tracks for myosin-dependent organelle movement and play a role in the organization of the cytoplasm. Although virtually all plant cells contain actin filament bundles, the role of the different actin-bundling proteins remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of the actin-bundling protein villin in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We used Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion lines to generate a double mutant in which VILLIN2 (VLN2) and VLN3 transcripts are truncated. Leaves, stems, siliques, and roots of vln2 vln3 double mutant plants are twisted, which is caused by local differences in cell length. Microscopy analysis of the actin cytoskeleton showed that in these double mutant plants, thin actin filament bundles are more abundant while thick actin filament bundles are virtually absent. In contrast to full-length VLN3, truncated VLN3 lacking the headpiece region does not rescue the phenotype of the vln2 vln3 double mutant. Our results show that villin is involved in the generation of thick actin filament bundles in several cell types and suggest that these bundles are involved in the regulation of coordinated cell expansion.

  6. Cyclin-like F-box protein plays a role in growth and development of the three model species Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, and Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boycheva I

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Irina Boycheva,1 Valya Vassileva,2 Miglena Revalska,1 Grigor Zehirov,2 Anelia Iantcheva1 1Department of Functional Genetics Legumes, 2AgroBioInstitute, Department of Plant Stress Molecular Biology, Institute of Plant Physiology and Genetics, Sofia, Bulgaria Abstract: In eukaryotes, F-box proteins are one of the main components of the SCF complex that belongs to the family of ubiquitin E3 ligases, which catalyze protein ubiquitination and maintain the balance between protein synthesis and degradation. In the present study, we clarified the role and function of the gene encoding cyclin-like F-box protein from Medicago truncatula using transgenic plants of the model species M. truncatula, Lotus japonicas, and Arabidopsis thaliana generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Morphological and transcriptional analyses combined with flow cytometry and histochemistry demonstrated the participation of this protein in many aspects of plant growth and development, including processes of indirect somatic embryogenesis and symbiotic nodulation. The cyclin-like F-box gene showed expression in all plant organs and tissues comprised of actively dividing cells. The observed variations in root and hypocotyl growth, leaf and silique development, ploidy levels, and leaf parameters in the obtained transgenic lines demonstrated the effects of this gene on organ development. Furthermore, knockdown of cyclin-like F-box led to accumulation of higher levels of the G2/M transition-specific gene cyclin B1:1 (CYCB1:1, suggesting its possible role in cell cycle control. Together, the collected data suggest a similar role of the cyclin-like F-box protein in the three model species, providing evidence for the functional conservation of the studied gene. Keywords: cyclin-like F-box, model legumes, Arabidopsis thaliana, plant growth, plant development, cell cycle

  7. Polyol specificity of recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana sorbitol dehydrogenase studied by enzyme kinetics and in silico modeling

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    María Francisca eAguayo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Polyols are enzymatically-produced plant compounds which can act as compatible solutes during periods of abiotic stress. NAD+-dependent SORBITOL DEHYDROGENASE (SDH, E.C. 1.1.1.14 from Arabidopsis thaliana L. (AtSDH is capable of oxidizing several polyols including sorbitol, ribitol and xylitol. In the present study, enzymatic assays using recombinant AtSDH demonstrated a higher specificity constant for xylitol compared to sorbitol and ribitol, all of which are C2 (S and C4 (R polyols. Enzyme activity was reduced by preincubation with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA, indicating a requirement for zinc ions. In humans, it has been proposed that sorbitol becomes part of a pentahedric coordination sphere of the catalytic zinc during the reaction mechanism. In order to determine the validity of this pentahedric coordination model in a plant SDH, homology modeling and Molecular Dynamics simulations of AtSDH ternary complexes with the three polyols were performed using crystal structures of human and Bemisia argentifolii (Genn. (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae SDHs as scaffolds. The results indicate that the differences in interaction with structural water molecules correlate very well with the observed enzymatic parameters, validate the proposed pentahedric coordination of the catalytic zinc ion in a plant SDH, and provide an explanation for why AtSDH shows a preference for polyols with a chirality of C2 (S and C4 (R.

  8. Arabidopsis thaliana model system reveals a continuum of responses to root endophyte colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandyam, Keerthi G; Roe, Judith; Jumpponen, Ari

    2013-04-01

    We surveyed the non-mycorrhizal model plant Arabidopsis thaliana microscopically for its ability to form dark septate endophyte (DSE) symbioses in field, greenhouse, and laboratory studies. The laboratory studies were also used to estimate host growth responses to 34 Periconia macrospinosa and four Microdochium sp. isolates. Consistent with broad host range observed in previous experiments, field-, greenhouse-, and laboratory-grown A. thaliana were colonized by melanized inter- and intracellular hyphae and microsclerotia or chlamydospores indicative of DSE symbiosis. Host responses to colonization were variable and depended on the host ecotype. On average, two A. thaliana accessions (Col-0 and Cvi-0) responded negatively, whereas one (Kin-1) was unresponsive, a conclusion consistent with our previous analyses with forbs native to the field site where the fungi originate. Despite the average negative responses, examples of positive responses were also observed, a conclusion also congruent with earlier studies. Our results suggest that A. thaliana has potential as a model for more detailed dissection of the DSE symbiosis. Furthermore, our data suggest that host responses are controlled by variability in the host and endophyte genotypes.

  9. Model Organisms Fact Sheet: Using Model Organisms to Study Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Model Organisms to Study Health and Disease Using Model Organisms to Study Health and Disease Tagline (Optional) ... and treating disease in humans. What is a model? The word model has many meanings, but in ...

  10. A Dynamic Gene Regulatory Network Model That Recovers the Cyclic Behavior of Arabidopsis thaliana Cell Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Elizabeth; García-Cruz, Karla; Azpeitia, Eugenio; Castillo, Aaron; Sánchez, María de la Paz; Álvarez-Buylla, Elena R.

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle control is fundamental in eukaryotic development. Several modeling efforts have been used to integrate the complex network of interacting molecular components involved in cell cycle dynamics. In this paper, we aimed at recovering the regulatory logic upstream of previously known components of cell cycle control, with the aim of understanding the mechanisms underlying the emergence of the cyclic behavior of such components. We focus on Arabidopsis thaliana, but given that many components of cell cycle regulation are conserved among eukaryotes, when experimental data for this system was not available, we considered experimental results from yeast and animal systems. We are proposing a Boolean gene regulatory network (GRN) that converges into only one robust limit cycle attractor that closely resembles the cyclic behavior of the key cell-cycle molecular components and other regulators considered here. We validate the model by comparing our in silico configurations with data from loss- and gain-of-function mutants, where the endocyclic behavior also was recovered. Additionally, we approximate a continuous model and recovered the temporal periodic expression profiles of the cell-cycle molecular components involved, thus suggesting that the single limit cycle attractor recovered with the Boolean model is not an artifact of its discrete and synchronous nature, but rather an emergent consequence of the inherent characteristics of the regulatory logic proposed here. This dynamical model, hence provides a novel theoretical framework to address cell cycle regulation in plants, and it can also be used to propose novel predictions regarding cell cycle regulation in other eukaryotes. PMID:26340681

  11. Trace concentrations of imazethapyr (IM) affect floral organs development and reproduction in Arabidopsis thaliana: IM-induced inhibition of key genes regulating anther and pollen biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Haifeng; Li, Yali; Sun, Chongchong; Lavoie, Michel; Xie, Jun; Bai, Xiaocui; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how herbicides affect plant reproduction and growth is critical to develop herbicide toxicity model and refine herbicide risk assessment. Although our knowledge of herbicides toxicity mechanisms at the physiological and molecular level in plant vegetative phase has increased substantially in the last decades, few studies have addressed the herbicide toxicity problematic on plant reproduction. Here, we determined the long-term (4-8 weeks) effect of a chiral herbicide, imazethapyr (IM), which has been increasingly used in plant crops, on floral organ development and reproduction in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. More specifically, we followed the effect of two IM enantiomers (R- and S-IM) on floral organ structure, seed production, pollen viability and the transcription of key genes involved in anther and pollen development. The results showed that IM strongly inhibited the transcripts of genes regulating A. thaliana tapetum development (DYT1: DYSFUNCTIONAL TAPETUM 1), tapetal differentiation and function (TDF1: TAPETAL DEVELOPMENT AND FUNCTION1), and pollen wall formation and developments (AMS: ABORTED MICROSPORES, MYB103: MYB DOMAIN PROTEIN 103, MS1: MALE STERILITY 1, MS2: MALE STERILITY 2). Since DYT1 positively regulates 33 genes involved in cell-wall modification (such as, TDF1, AMS, MYB103, MS1, MS2) that can catalyze the breakdown of polysaccharides to facilitate anther dehiscence, the consistent decrease in the transcription of these genes after IM exposure should hamper anther opening as observed under scanning electron microscopy. The toxicity of IM on anther opening further lead to a decrease in pollen production and pollen viability. Furthermore, long-term IM exposure increased the number of apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP sites) in the DNA of A. thaliana and also altered the DNA of A. thaliana offspring grown in IM-free soils. Toxicity of IM on floral organs development and reproduction was generally higher in the presence of the R

  12. Single-cell and coupled GRN models of cell patterning in the Arabidopsis thaliana root stem cell niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez-Buylla Elena R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent experimental work has uncovered some of the genetic components required to maintain the Arabidopsis thaliana root stem cell niche (SCN and its structure. Two main pathways are involved. One pathway depends on the genes SHORTROOT and SCARECROW and the other depends on the PLETHORA genes, which have been proposed to constitute the auxin readouts. Recent evidence suggests that a regulatory circuit, composed of WOX5 and CLE40, also contributes to the SCN maintenance. Yet, we still do not understand how the niche is dynamically maintained and patterned or if the uncovered molecular components are sufficient to recover the observed gene expression configurations that characterize the cell types within the root SCN. Mathematical and computational tools have proven useful in understanding the dynamics of cell differentiation. Hence, to further explore root SCN patterning, we integrated available experimental data into dynamic Gene Regulatory Network (GRN models and addressed if these are sufficient to attain observed gene expression configurations in the root SCN in a robust and autonomous manner. Results We found that an SCN GRN model based only on experimental data did not reproduce the configurations observed within the root SCN. We developed several alternative GRN models that recover these expected stable gene configurations. Such models incorporate a few additional components and interactions in addition to those that have been uncovered. The recovered configurations are stable to perturbations, and the models are able to recover the observed gene expression profiles of almost all the mutants described so far. However, the robustness of the postulated GRNs is not as high as that of other previously studied networks. Conclusions These models are the first published approximations for a dynamic mechanism of the A. thaliana root SCN cellular pattering. Our model is useful to formally show that the data now available are not

  13. Mathematical modelling of the diurnal regulation of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhilko, Alexandra; Bou-Torrent, Jordi; Pulido, Pablo; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2015-05-01

    Isoprenoid molecules are essential elements of plant metabolism. Many important plant isoprenoids, such as chlorophylls, carotenoids, tocopherols, prenylated quinones and hormones are synthesised in chloroplasts via the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Here we develop a mathematical model of diurnal regulation of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. We used both experimental and theoretical approaches to integrate mechanisms potentially involved in the diurnal control of the pathway. Our data show that flux through the MEP pathway is accelerated in light due to the photosynthesis-dependent supply of metabolic substrates of the pathway and the transcriptional regulation of key biosynthetic genes by the circadian clock. We also demonstrate that feedback regulation of both the activity and the abundance of the first enzyme of the MEP pathway (1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, DXS) by pathway products stabilizes the flux against changes in substrate supply and adjusts the flux according to product demand under normal growth conditions. These data illustrate the central relevance of photosynthesis, the circadian clock and feedback control of DXS for the diurnal regulation of the MEP pathway.

  14. A theoretical model for ROP localisation by auxin in Arabidopsis root hair cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J H Payne

    Full Text Available Local activation of Rho GTPases is important for many functions including cell polarity, morphology, movement, and growth. Although a number of molecules affecting Rho-of-Plants small GTPase (ROP signalling are known, it remains unclear how ROP activity becomes spatially organised. Arabidopsis root hair cells produce patches of ROP at consistent and predictable subcellular locations, where root hair growth subsequently occurs.We present a mathematical model to show how interaction of the plant hormone auxin with ROPs could spontaneously lead to localised patches of active ROP via a Turing or Turing-like mechanism. Our results suggest that correct positioning of the ROP patch depends on the cell length, low diffusion of active ROP, a gradient in auxin concentration, and ROP levels. Our theory provides a unique explanation linking the molecular biology to the root hair phenotypes of multiple mutants and transgenic lines, including OX-ROP, CA-rop, aux1, axr3, tip1, eto1, etr1, and the triple mutant aux1 ein2 gnom(eb.We show how interactions between Rho GTPases (in this case ROPs and regulatory molecules (in this case auxin could produce characteristic subcellular patterning that subsequently affects cell shape. This has important implications for research on the morphogenesis of plants and other eukaryotes. Our results also illustrate how gradient-regulated Turing systems provide a particularly robust and flexible mechanism for pattern formation.

  15. Competing mechanisms for perfluoroalkyl acid accumulation in plants revealed using an Arabidopsis model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Claudia E; LeFevre, Gregory H; Timofte, Anca E; Hussain, Fatima A; Sattely, Elizabeth S; Luthy, Richard G

    2016-05-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) bioaccumulate in plants, presenting a human exposure route if present in irrigation water. Curiously, accumulation of PFAAs in plant tissues is greatest for both the short-chain and long-chain PFAAs, generating a U-shaped relationship with chain length. In the present study, the authors decouple competing mechanisms of PFAA accumulation using a hydroponic model plant system (Arabidopsis thaliana) exposed to a suite of 10 PFAAs to determine uptake, depuration, and translocation kinetics. Rapid saturation of root concentrations occurred for all PFAAs except perfluorobutanoate, the least-sorptive (shortest-chain) PFAA. Shoot concentrations increased continuously, indicating that PFAAs are efficiently transported and accumulate in shoots. Tissue concentrations of PFAAs during depuration rapidly declined in roots but remained constant in shoots, demonstrating irreversibility of the translocation process. Root and shoot concentration factors followed the U-shaped trend with perfluoroalkyl chain length; however, when normalized to dead-tissue sorption, this relationship linearized. The authors therefore introduce a novel term, the "sorption normalized concentration factor," to describe PFAA accumulation in plants; because of their hydrophobicity, sorption is the determining factor for long-chain PFAAs, whereas the shortest-chain PFAAs are most effectively transported in the plant. The present study provides a mechanistic explanation for previously unexplained PFAA accumulation trends in plants and suggests that shorter-chained PFAAs may bioaccumulate more readily in edible portions.

  16. Analysis of the grape MYB R2R3 subfamily reveals expanded wine quality-related clades and conserved gene structure organization across Vitis and Arabidopsis genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arce-Johnson Patricio

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MYB superfamily constitutes the most abundant group of transcription factors described in plants. Members control processes such as epidermal cell differentiation, stomatal aperture, flavonoid synthesis, cold and drought tolerance and pathogen resistance. No genome-wide characterization of this family has been conducted in a woody species such as grapevine. In addition, previous analysis of the recently released grape genome sequence suggested expansion events of several gene families involved in wine quality. Results We describe and classify 108 members of the grape R2R3 MYB gene subfamily in terms of their genomic gene structures and similarity to their putative Arabidopsis thaliana orthologues. Seven gene models were derived and analyzed in terms of gene expression and their DNA binding domain structures. Despite low overall sequence homology in the C-terminus of all proteins, even in those with similar functions across Arabidopsis and Vitis, highly conserved motif sequences and exon lengths were found. The grape epidermal cell fate clade is expanded when compared with the Arabidopsis and rice MYB subfamilies. Two anthocyanin MYBA related clusters were identified in chromosomes 2 and 14, one of which includes the previously described grape colour locus. Tannin related loci were also detected with eight candidate homologues in chromosomes 4, 9 and 11. Conclusion This genome wide transcription factor analysis in Vitis suggests that clade-specific grape R2R3 MYB genes are expanded while other MYB genes could be well conserved compared to Arabidopsis. MYB gene abundance, homology and orientation within particular loci also suggests that expanded MYB clades conferring quality attributes of grapes and wines, such as colour and astringency, could possess redundant, overlapping and cooperative functions.

  17. The manipulation of auxin in the abscission zone cells of Arabidopsis flowers reveals that indoleacetic acid signaling is a prerequisite for organ shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Manojit M; González-Carranza, Zinnia H; Azam-Ali, Sayed; Tang, Shouya; Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Roberts, Jeremy A

    2013-05-01

    A number of novel strategies were employed to examine the role of indoleacetic acid (IAA) in regulating floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Analysis of auxin influx facilitator expression in β-glucuronidase reporter plants revealed that AUXIN RESISTANT1, LIKE AUX1, and LAX3 were specifically up-regulated at the site of floral organ shedding. Flowers from mutants where individual family members were down-regulated exhibited a reduction in the force necessary to bring about petal separation; however, the effect was not additive in double or quadruple mutants. Using the promoter of a polygalacturonase (At2g41850), active primarily in cells undergoing separation, to drive expression of the bacterial genes iaaL and iaaM, we have shown that it is possible to manipulate auxin activity specifically within the floral organ abscission zone (AZ). Analysis of petal breakstrength reveals that if IAA AZ levels are reduced, shedding takes place prematurely, while if they are enhanced, organ loss is delayed. The At2g41850 promoter was also used to transactivate the gain-of-function AXR3-1 gene in order to disrupt auxin signaling specifically within the floral organ AZ cells. Flowers from transactivated lines failed to shed their sepals, petals, and anthers during pod expansion and maturity, and these organs frequently remained attached to the plant even after silique desiccation and dehiscence had taken place. These observations support a key role for IAA in the regulation of abscission in planta and reveal, to our knowledge for the first time, a requirement for a functional IAA signaling pathway in AZ cells for organ shedding to take place.

  18. Organization customer behavior: Elected models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maričić Branko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper is dealing with business-to-business marketing issues with particular attention to some of models oriented to explain differences relative to FMCG marketing. Author describe the core principles of selected models including their basic features. In this paper some of models are in focus - Window and Webster-Window model as well as Sheets model, Nielsen model and Multivariation tools.

  19. Analysis of Arabidopsis with highly reduced levels of malate and fumarate sheds light on the role of these organic acids as storage carbon molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zell, Martina B; Fahnenstich, Holger; Maier, Alexandra; Saigo, Mariana; Voznesenskaya, Elena V; Edwards, Gerald E; Andreo, Carlos; Schleifenbaum, Frank; Zell, Christiane; Drincovich, María F; Maurino, Verónica G

    2010-03-01

    While malate and fumarate participate in a multiplicity of pathways in plant metabolism, the function of these organic acids as carbon stores in C(3) plants has not been deeply addressed. Here, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants overexpressing a maize (Zea mays) plastidic NADP-malic enzyme (MEm plants) were used to analyze the consequences of sustained low malate and fumarate levels on the physiology of this C(3) plant. When grown in short days (sd), MEm plants developed a pale-green phenotype with decreased biomass and increased specific leaf area, with thin leaves having lower photosynthetic performance. These features were absent in plants growing in long days. The analysis of metabolite levels of rosettes from transgenic plants indicated similar disturbances in both sd and long days, with very low levels of malate and fumarate. Determinations of the respiratory quotient by the end of the night indicated a shift from carbohydrates to organic acids as the main substrates for respiration in the wild type, while MEm plants use more reduced compounds, like fatty acids and proteins, to fuel respiration. It is concluded that the alterations observed in sd MEm plants are a consequence of impairment in the supply of carbon skeletons during a long dark period. This carbon starvation phenotype observed at the end of the night demonstrates a physiological role of the C(4) acids, which may be a constitutive function in plants.

  20. Comparative genomic analysis of 1047 completely sequenced cDNAs from an Arabidopsis-related model halophyte, Thellungiella halophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Masatomo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thellungiella halophila (also known as T. salsuginea is a model halophyte with a small size, short life cycle, and small genome. Thellungiella genes exhibit a high degree of sequence identity with Arabidopsis genes (90% at the cDNA level. We previously generated a full-length enriched cDNA library of T. halophila from various tissues and from whole plants treated with salinity, chilling, freezing stress, or ABA. We determined the DNA sequences of 20 000 cDNAs at both the 5'- and 3' ends, and identified 9569 distinct genes. Results Here, we completely sequenced 1047 Thellungiella full-length cDNAs representing abiotic-stress-related genes, transcription factor genes, and protein phosphatase 2C genes. The predicted coding sequences, 5'-UTRs, and 3'-UTRs were compared with those of orthologous genes from Arabidopsis for length, sequence similarity, and structure. The 5'-UTR sequences of Thellungiella and Arabidopsis orthologs shared a significant level of similarity, although the motifs were rearranged. While examining the stress-related Thellungiella coding sequences, we found a short splicing variant of T. halophila salt overly sensitive 1 (ThSOS1, designated ThSOS1S. ThSOS1S contains the transmembrane domain of ThSOS1 but lacks the C-terminal hydrophilic region. The expression level of ThSOS1S under normal growth conditions was higher than that of ThSOS1. We also compared the expression levels of Na+-transport-system genes between Thellungiella and Arabidopsis by using full-length cDNAs from each species as probes. Several genes that play essential roles in Na+ excretion, compartmentation, and diffusion (SOS1, SOS2, NHX1, and HKT1 were expressed at higher levels in Thellungiella than in Arabidopsis. Conclusions The full-length cDNA sequences obtained in this study will be essential for the ongoing annotation of the Thellungiella genome, especially for further improvement of gene prediction. Moreover, they will enable us to

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240652 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240652 J023098G11 At5g63090.2 68418.m07919 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-13 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241761 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241761 J065205C18 At5g63090.1 68418.m07918 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-32 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240652 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240652 J023098G11 At5g63090.1 68418.m07918 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-13 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240652 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240652 J023098G11 At5g63090.4 68418.m07921 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-13 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241761 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241761 J065205C18 At5g63090.3 68418.m07920 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-32 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241761 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241761 J065205C18 At5g63090.2 68418.m07919 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-32 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241761 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241761 J065205C18 At5g63090.4 68418.m07921 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-32 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240652 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240652 J023098G11 At5g63090.3 68418.m07920 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-13 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK105527 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105527 001-127-G05 At5g63090.4 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries prot...ein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-52 ...

  10. An overview of the gene regulatory network controlling trichome development in the model plant, Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitakanta ePattanaik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Trichomes are specialized epidermal cells located on aerial parts of plants and are associated with a wide array of biological processes. Trichomes protect plants from adverse conditions including UV light and herbivore attack and are also an important source of a number of phytochemicals. The simple unicellular trichomes of Arabidopsis serve as an excellent model to study molecular mechanism of cell differentiation and pattern formation in plants. The emerging picture suggests that the developmental process is controlled by a transcriptional network involving three major groups of transcription factors: the R2R3 MYB, basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH and WD40 repeat (WDR protein. These regulatory proteins form a trimeric activator complex that positively regulates trichome development. The single repeat R3 MYBs act as negative regulators of trichome development. They compete with the R2R3 MYBs to bind the bHLH factor and form a repressor complex. In addition to activator-repressor mechanism, a depletion mechanism may operate in parallel during trichome development. In this mechanism, the bHLH factor traps the WDR protein which results in depletion of WDR protein in neighboring cells. Consequently, the cells with high levels of bHLH and WDR proteins are developed into trichomes. A group of C2H2 zinc finger TFs has also been implicated in trichome development. Phytohormones, including gibberellins and jasmonic acid, play significant roles in this developmental process. Recently, microRNAs have been shown to be involved in trichome development. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that the activities of the key regulatory proteins involved in trichome development are controlled by the 26S/ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS, highlighting the complexity of the regulatory network controlling this developmental process. To complement several excellent recent relevant reviews, this review focuses on the transcriptional network and hormonal interplay

  11. Over-expression of Arabidopsis CAP causes decreased cell expansion leading to organ size reduction in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrero, Roberto A; Umeda, Masaaki; Yamamura, Saburo; Uchimiya, Hirofumi

    2003-04-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAP) are multifunctional proteins involved in Ras-cAMP signalling and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. It has recently been demonstrated that over-expression of AtCAP1 in transgenic arabidopsis plants causes severe morphological defects owing to loss of actin filaments. To test the generality of the function of AtCAP1 in plants, transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing an arabidopsis CAP (AtCAP1) under the regulation of a glucocorticoid-inducible promoter were produced. Over-expression of AtCAP1 in transgenic tobacco plants led to growth abnormalities, in particular a reduction in the size of leaves. Morphological alterations in leaves were the result of reduced elongation of epidermal and mesophyll cells.

  12. Polyploidization increases meiotic recombination frequency in Arabidopsis: a close look at statistical modeling and data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Luo, Zewei

    2012-04-18

    This paper is a response to Pecinka A, Fang W, Rehmsmeier M, Levy AA, Mittelsten Scheid, O: Polyploidization increases meiotic recombination frequency in Arabidopsis. BMC Biology 2011, 9:24.See research article at http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/9/24.

  13. Polyploidization increases meiotic recombination frequency in Arabidopsis: a close look at statistical modeling and data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper is a response to Pecinka A, Fang W, Rehmsmeier M, Levy AA, Mittelsten Scheid, O: Polyploidization increases meiotic recombination frequency in Arabidopsis. BMC Biology 2011, 9:24. See research article at http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/9/24

  14. Arabidopsis Ecotypes: A Model for Course Projects in Organismal Plant Biology & Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah; Ballard, Harvey E.

    2007-01-01

    We present an inquiry-based project using readily-available seed stocks of Arabidopsis. Seedlings are grown under simulated "common garden" conditions to test evolutionary and organismal principles. Students learn scientific method by developing hypotheses and selecting appropriate data and analyses for their experiments. Experiments can be…

  15. HANABA TARANU (HAN Bridges Meristem and Organ Primordia Boundaries through PINHEAD, JAGGED, BLADE-ON-PETIOLE2 and CYTOKININ OXIDASE 3 during Flower Development in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian Ding

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Shoot organ primordia are initiated from the shoot apical meristem and develop into leaves during the vegetative stage, and into flowers during the reproductive phase. Between the meristem and the newly formed organ primordia, a boundary with specialized cells is formed that separates meristematic activity from determinate organ growth. Despite interactions that have been found between boundary regulators with genes controlling meristem maintenance or primordial development, most boundary studies were performed during embryogenesis or vegetative growth, hence little is known about whether and how boundaries communicate with meristem and organ primordia during the reproductive stage. We combined genetic, molecular and biochemical tools to explore interactions between the boundary gene HANABA TARANU (HAN and two meristem regulators BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP and PINHEAD (PNH, and three primordia-specific genes PETAL LOSS (PTL, JAGGED (JAG and BLADE-ON-PETIOLE (BOP during flower development. We demonstrated the key role of HAN in determining petal number, as part of a set of complex genetic interactions. HAN and PNH transcriptionally promote each other, and biochemically interact to regulate meristem organization. HAN physically interacts with JAG, and directly stimulates the expression of JAG and BOP2 to regulate floral organ development. Further, HAN directly binds to the promoter and intron of CYTOKININ OXIDASE 3 (CKX3 to modulate cytokinin homeostasis in the boundary. Our data suggest that boundary-expressing HAN communicates with the meristem through the PNH, regulates floral organ development via JAG and BOP2, and maintains boundary morphology through CKX3 during flower development in Arabidopsis.

  16. A genetic screen for modifiers of UFO meristem activity identifies three novel FUSED FLORAL ORGANS genes required for early flower development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, J Z; Fletcher, J C; Chen, X; Meyerowitz, E M

    1998-06-01

    In a screen to identify novel genes required for early Arabidopsis flower development, we isolated four independent mutations that enhance the Ufo phenotype toward the production of filamentous structures in place of flowers. The mutants fall into three complementation groups, which we have termed FUSED FLORAL ORGANS (FFO) loci. ffo mutants have specific defects in floral organ separation and/or positioning; thus, the FFO genes identify components of a boundary formation mechanism(s) acting between developing floral organ primordia. FFO1 and FFO3 have specific functions in cauline leaf/stem separation and in first- and third-whorl floral organ separation, with FFO3 likely acting to establish and FFO1 to maintain floral organ boundaries. FFO2 acts at early floral stages to regulate floral organ number and positioning and to control organ separation within and between whorls. Plants doubly mutant for two ffo alleles display additive phenotypes, indicating that the FFO genes may act in separate pathways. Plants doubly mutant for an ffo gene and for ufo, lfy, or clv3 reveal that the FFO genes play roles related to those of UFO and LFY in floral meristem initiation and that FFO2 and FFO3 may act to control cell proliferation late in inflorescence development.

  17. HANABA TARANU (HAN) Bridges Meristem and Organ Primordia Boundaries through PINHEAD, JAGGED, BLADE-ON-PETIOLE2 and CYTOKININ OXIDASE 3 during Flower Development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lian; Yan, Shuangshuang; Jiang, Li; Zhao, Wensheng; Ning, Kang; Zhao, Jianyu; Liu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Xiaolan

    2015-09-01

    Shoot organ primordia are initiated from the shoot apical meristem and develop into leaves during the vegetative stage, and into flowers during the reproductive phase. Between the meristem and the newly formed organ primordia, a boundary with specialized cells is formed that separates meristematic activity from determinate organ growth. Despite interactions that have been found between boundary regulators with genes controlling meristem maintenance or primordial development, most boundary studies were performed during embryogenesis or vegetative growth, hence little is known about whether and how boundaries communicate with meristem and organ primordia during the reproductive stage. We combined genetic, molecular and biochemical tools to explore interactions between the boundary gene HANABA TARANU (HAN) and two meristem regulators BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP) and PINHEAD (PNH), and three primordia-specific genes PETAL LOSS (PTL), JAGGED (JAG) and BLADE-ON-PETIOLE (BOP) during flower development. We demonstrated the key role of HAN in determining petal number, as part of a set of complex genetic interactions. HAN and PNH transcriptionally promote each other, and biochemically interact to regulate meristem organization. HAN physically interacts with JAG, and directly stimulates the expression of JAG and BOP2 to regulate floral organ development. Further, HAN directly binds to the promoter and intron of CYTOKININ OXIDASE 3 (CKX3) to modulate cytokinin homeostasis in the boundary. Our data suggest that boundary-expressing HAN communicates with the meristem through the PNH, regulates floral organ development via JAG and BOP2, and maintains boundary morphology through CKX3 during flower development in Arabidopsis.

  18. Dynamics models of soil organic carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGLi-xia; PANJian-jun

    2003-01-01

    As the largest pool of terrestrial organic carbon, soils interact strongly with atmosphere composition, climate, and land change. Soil organic carbon dynamics in ecosystem plays a great role in global carbon cycle and global change. With development of mathematical models that simulate changes in soil organic carbon, there have been considerable advances in understanding soil organic carbon dynamics. This paper mainly reviewed the composition of soil organic matter and its influenced factors, and recommended some soil organic matter models worldwide. Based on the analyses of the developed results at home and abroad, it is suggested that future soil organic matter models should be developed toward based-process models, and not always empirical ones. The models are able to reveal their interaction between soil carbon systems, climate and land cover by technique and methods of GIS (Geographical Information System) and RS (Remote Sensing). These models should be developed at a global scale, in dynamically describing the spatial and temporal changes of soil organic matter cycle. Meanwhile, the further researches on models should be strengthen for providing theory basis and foundation in making policy of green house gas emission in China.

  19. An in silico assessment of gene function and organization of the phenylpropanoid pathway metabolic networks in Arabidopsis thaliana and limitations thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Michael A.; Collins, R. Eric; Anterola, Aldwin M.; Cochrane, Fiona C.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2003-01-01

    The Arabidopsis genome sequencing in 2000 gave to science the first blueprint of a vascular plant. Its successful completion also prompted the US National Science Foundation to launch the Arabidopsis 2010 initiative, the goal of which is to identify the function of each gene by 2010. In this study, an exhaustive analysis of The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) and The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR) databases, together with all currently compiled EST sequence data, was carried out in order to determine to what extent the various metabolic networks from phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) to the monolignols were organized and/or could be predicted. In these databases, there are some 65 genes which have been annotated as encoding putative enzymatic steps in monolignol biosynthesis, although many of them have only very low homology to monolignol pathway genes of known function in other plant systems. Our detailed analysis revealed that presently only 13 genes (two PALs, a cinnamate-4-hydroxylase, a p-coumarate-3-hydroxylase, a ferulate-5-hydroxylase, three 4-coumarate-CoA ligases, a cinnamic acid O-methyl transferase, two cinnamoyl-CoA reductases) and two cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases can be classified as having a bona fide (definitive) function; the remaining 52 genes currently have undetermined physiological roles. The EST database entries for this particular set of genes also provided little new insight into how the monolignol pathway was organized in the different tissues and organs, this being perhaps a consequence of both limitations in how tissue samples were collected and in the incomplete nature of the EST collections. This analysis thus underscores the fact that even with genomic sequencing, presumed to provide the entire suite of putative genes in the monolignol-forming pathway, a very large effort needs to be conducted to establish actual catalytic roles (including enzyme versatility), as well as the physiological function(s) for each member

  20. Modeling the Metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana: Application of Network Decomposition and Network Reduction in the Context of Petri Nets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Koch

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Motivation:Arabidopsis thaliana is a well-established model system for the analysis of the basic physiological and metabolic pathways of plants. Nevertheless, the system is not yet fully understood, although many mechanisms are described, and information for many processes exists. However, the combination and interpretation of the large amount of biological data remain a big challenge, not only because data sets for metabolic paths are still incomplete. Moreover, they are often inconsistent, because they are coming from different experiments of various scales, regarding, for example, accuracy and/or significance. Here, theoretical modeling is powerful to formulate hypotheses for pathways and the dynamics of the metabolism, even if the biological data are incomplete. To develop reliable mathematical models they have to be proven for consistency. This is still a challenging task because many verification techniques fail already for middle-sized models. Consequently, new methods, like decomposition methods or reduction approaches, are developed to circumvent this problem.Methods: We present a new semi-quantitative mathematical model of the metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana. We used the Petri net formalism to express the complex reaction system in a mathematically unique manner. To verify the model for correctness and consistency we applied concepts of network decomposition and network reduction such as transition invariants, common transition pairs, and invariant transition pairs.Results: We formulated the core metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana based on recent knowledge from literature, including the Calvin cycle, glycolysis and citric acid cycle, glyoxylate cycle, urea cycle, sucrose synthesis, and the starch metabolism. By applying network decomposition and reduction techniques at steady-state conditions, we suggest a straightforward mathematical modeling process. We demonstrate that potential steady-state pathways exist, which provide the

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242550 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242550 J080319D10 At2g35630.1 68415.m04369 microtubule organization 1 protein (MO...R1) identical to microtubule organization 1 protein GI:14317953 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-44 ...

  2. LASSO modeling of the Arabidopsis thaliana seed/seedling transcriptome: a model case for detection of novel mucilage and pectin metabolism genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilevski, Aleksandar; Giorgi, Federico M; Bertinetti, Luca; Usadel, Björn

    2012-10-01

    Whole genome transcript correlation-based approaches have been shown to be enormously useful for candidate gene detection. Consequently, simple Pearson correlation has been widely applied in several web based tools. That said, several more sophisticated methods based on e.g. mutual information or Bayesian network inference have been developed and have been shown to be theoretically superior but are not yet commonly applied. Here, we propose the application of a recently developed statistical regression technique, the LASSO, to detect novel candidates from high throughput transcriptomic datasets. We apply the LASSO to a tissue specific dataset in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana to identify novel players in Arabidopsis thaliana seed coat mucilage synthesis. We built LASSO models based on a list of genes known to be involved in a sub-pathway of Arabidopsis mucilage synthesis. After identifying a putative transcription factor, we verified its involvement in mucilage synthesis by obtaining knock-out mutants for this gene. We show that a loss of function of this putative transcription factor leads to a significant decrease in mucilage pectin.

  3. Arabidopsis in Wageningen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornneef, M.

    2013-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is the plant species that in the past 25 years has developed into the major model species in plant biology research. This was due to its properties such as short generation time, its small genome and its easiness to be transformed. Wageningen University has played an important r

  4. Project-matrix models of marketing organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutić Dragutin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike theory and practice of corporation organization, in marketing organization numerous forms and contents at its disposal are not reached until this day. It can be well estimated that marketing organization today in most of our companies and in almost all its parts, noticeably gets behind corporation organization. Marketing managers have always been occupied by basic, narrow marketing activities as: sales growth, market analysis, market growth and market share, marketing research, introduction of new products, modification of products, promotion, distribution etc. They rarely found it necessary to focus a bit more to different aspects of marketing management, for example: marketing planning and marketing control, marketing organization and leading. This paper deals with aspects of project - matrix marketing organization management. Two-dimensional and more-dimensional models are presented. Among two-dimensional, these models are analyzed: Market management/products management model; Products management/management of product lifecycle phases on market model; Customers management/marketing functions management model; Demand management/marketing functions management model; Market positions management/marketing functions management model. .

  5. A role for katanin in plant cell division: microtubule organization in dividing root cells of fra2 and lue1Arabidopsis thaliana mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Voulgari, Georgia; Papadopoulou, Galini

    2011-07-01

    Severing of microtubules by katanin has proven to be crucial for cortical microtubule organization in elongating and differentiating plant cells. On the contrary, katanin is currently not considered essential during cell division in plants as it is in animals. However, defects in cell patterning have been observed in katanin mutants, implying a role for it in dividing plant cells. Therefore, microtubule organization was studied in detail by immunofluorescence in dividing root cells of fra2 and lue1 katanin mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. In both, early preprophase bands consisted of poorly aligned microtubules, prophase spindles were multipolar, and the microtubules of expanding phragmoplasts were elongated, bended toward and connected to the surface of daughter nuclei. Accordingly, severing by katanin seems to be necessary for the proper organization of these microtubule arrays. In both fra2 and lue1, metaphase/anaphase spindles and initiating phragmoplasts exhibited typical organization. However, they were obliquely oriented more frequently than in the wild type. It is proposed that this oblique orientation may be due to prophase spindle multipolarity and results in a failure of the cell plate to follow the predetermined division plane, during cytokinesis, producing oblique cell walls in the roots of both mutants. It is therefore concluded that, like in animal cells, katanin is important for plant cell division, influencing the organization of several microtubule arrays. Moreover, failure in microtubule severing indirectly affects the orientation of the division plane. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Cardiac Electromechanical Models: From Cell to Organ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A Trayanova

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The heart is a multiphysics and multiscale system that has driven the development of the most sophisticated mathematical models at the frontiers of computation physiology and medicine. This review focuses on electromechanical (EM models of the heart from the molecular level of myofilaments to anatomical models of the organ. Because of the coupling in terms of function and emergent behaviors at each level of biological hierarchy, separation of behaviors at a given scale is difficult. Here, a separation is drawn at the cell level so that the first half addresses subcellular/single cell models and the second half addresses organ models. At the subcelluar level, myofilament models represent actin-myosin interaction and Ca-based activation. Myofilament models and their refinements represent an overview of the development in the field. The discussion of specific models emphasizes the roles of cooperative mechanisms and sarcomere length dependence of contraction force, considered the cellular basis of the Frank-Starling law. A model of electrophysiology and Ca handling can be coupled to a myofilament model to produce an EM cell model, and representative examples are summarized to provide an overview of the progression of field. The second half of the review covers organ-level models that require solution of the electrical component as a reaction-diffusion system and the mechanical component, in which active tension generated by the myocytes produces deformation of the organ as described by the equations of continuum mechanics. As outlined in the review, different organ-level models have chosen to use different ionic and myofilament models depending on the specific application; this choice has been largely dictated by compromises between model complexity and computational tractability. The review also addresses application areas of EM models such as cardiac resynchronization therapy and the role of mechano-electric coupling in arrhythmias and

  7. The Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — ZFIN serves as the zebrafish model organism database. It aims to: a) be the community database resource for the laboratory use of zebrafish, b) develop and support...

  8. Modeling Virtual Organization Architecture with the Virtual Organization Breeding Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paszkiewicz, Zbigniew; Picard, Willy

    While Enterprise Architecture Modeling (EAM) methodologies become more and more popular, an EAM methodology tailored to the needs of virtual organizations (VO) is still to be developed. Among the most popular EAM methodologies, TOGAF has been chosen as the basis for a new EAM methodology taking into account characteristics of VOs presented in this paper. In this new methodology, referred as Virtual Organization Breeding Methodology (VOBM), concepts developed within the ECOLEAD project, e.g. the concept of Virtual Breeding Environment (VBE) or the VO creation schema, serve as fundamental elements for development of VOBM. VOBM is a generic methodology that should be adapted to a given VBE. VOBM defines the structure of VBE and VO architectures in a service-oriented environment, as well as an architecture development method for virtual organizations (ADM4VO). Finally, a preliminary set of tools and methods for VOBM is given in this paper.

  9. Modeling Virtual Organization Architecture with the Virtual Organization Breeding Methodology

    CERN Document Server

    Paszkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    While Enterprise Architecture Modeling (EAM) methodologies become more and more popular, an EAM methodology tailored to the needs of virtual organizations (VO) is still to be developed. Among the most popular EAM methodologies, TOGAF has been chosen as the basis for a new EAM methodology taking into account characteristics of VOs presented in this paper. In this new methodology, referred as Virtual Organization Breeding Methodology (VOBM), concepts developed within the ECOLEAD project, e.g. the concept of Virtual Breeding Environment (VBE) or the VO creation schema, serve as fundamental elements for development of VOBM. VOBM is a generic methodology that should be adapted to a given VBE. VOBM defines the structure of VBE and VO architectures in a service-oriented environment, as well as an architecture development method for virtual organizations (ADM4VO). Finally, a preliminary set of tools and methods for VOBM is given in this paper.

  10. Modeling personnel turnover in the parametric organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1991-01-01

    A model is developed for simulating the dynamics of a newly formed organization, credible during all phases of organizational development. The model development process is broken down into the activities of determining the tasks required for parametric cost analysis (PCA), determining the skills required for each PCA task, determining the skills available in the applicant marketplace, determining the structure of the model, implementing the model, and testing it. The model, parameterized by the likelihood of job function transition, has demonstrated by the capability to represent the transition of personnel across functional boundaries within a parametric organization using a linear dynamical system, and the ability to predict required staffing profiles to meet functional needs at the desired time. The model can be extended by revisions of the state and transition structure to provide refinements in functional definition for the parametric and extended organization.

  11. Complex Systems and Self-organization Modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Bertelle, Cyrille; Kadri-Dahmani, Hakima

    2009-01-01

    The concern of this book is the use of emergent computing and self-organization modelling within various applications of complex systems. The authors focus their attention both on the innovative concepts and implementations in order to model self-organizations, but also on the relevant applicative domains in which they can be used efficiently. This book is the outcome of a workshop meeting within ESM 2006 (Eurosis), held in Toulouse, France in October 2006.

  12. The rules of gene expression in plants: Organ identity and gene body methylation are key factors for regulation of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez Rodrigo A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology is a widely used approach for monitoring genome-wide gene expression. For Arabidopsis, there are over 1,800 microarray hybridizations representing many different experimental conditions on Affymetrix™ ATH1 gene chips alone. This huge amount of data offers a unique opportunity to infer the principles that govern the regulation of gene expression in plants. Results We used bioinformatics methods to analyze publicly available data obtained using the ATH1 chip from Affymetrix. A total of 1887 ATH1 hybridizations were normalized and filtered to eliminate low-quality hybridizations. We classified and compared control and treatment hybridizations and determined differential gene expression. The largest differences in gene expression were observed when comparing samples obtained from different organs. On average, ten-fold more genes were differentially expressed between organs as compared to any other experimental variable. We defined "gene responsiveness" as the number of comparisons in which a gene changed its expression significantly. We defined genes with the highest and lowest responsiveness levels as hypervariable and housekeeping genes, respectively. Remarkably, housekeeping genes were best distinguished from hypervariable genes by differences in methylation status in their transcribed regions. Moreover, methylation in the transcribed region was inversely correlated (R2 = 0.8 with gene responsiveness on a genome-wide scale. We provide an example of this negative relationship using genes encoding TCA cycle enzymes, by contrasting their regulatory responsiveness to nitrate and methylation status in their transcribed regions. Conclusion Our results indicate that the Arabidopsis transcriptome is largely established during development and is comparatively stable when faced with external perturbations. We suggest a novel functional role for DNA methylation in the transcribed region as a key determinant

  13. The Organization Pattern of Root Border-Like Cells of Arabidopsis Is Dependent on Cell Wall Homogalacturonan12[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Caroline; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Follet-Gueye, Marie Laure; Duponchel, Ludovic; Moreau, Myriam; Lerouge, Patrice; Driouich, Azeddine

    2009-01-01

    Border-like cells are released by Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root tips as organized layers of several cells that remain attached to each other rather than completely detached from each other, as is usually observed in border cells of many species. Unlike border cells, cell attachment between border-like cells is maintained after their release into the external environment. To investigate the role of cell wall polysaccharides in the attachment and organization of border-like cells, we have examined their release in several well-characterized mutants defective in the biosynthesis of xyloglucan, cellulose, or pectin. Our data show that among all mutants examined, only quasimodo mutants (qua1-1 and qua2-1), which have been characterized as producing less homogalacturonan, had an altered border-like cell phenotype as compared with the wild type. Border-like cells in both lines were released as isolated cells separated from each other, with the phenotype being much more pronounced in qua1-1 than in qua2-1. Further analysis of border-like cells in the qua1-1 mutant using immunocytochemistry and a set of anti-cell wall polysaccharide antibodies showed that the loss of the wild-type phenotype was accompanied by (1) a reduction in homogalacturonan-JIM5 epitope in the cell wall of border-like cells, confirmed by Fourier transform infrared microspectrometry, and (2) the secretion of an abundant mucilage that is enriched in xylogalacturonan and arabinogalactan-protein epitopes, in which the cells are trapped in the vicinity of the root tip. PMID:19448034

  14. Molecular Modeling and Dynamic Simulation of Arabidopsis Thaliana Carotenoid Cleavage Dioxygenase Gene: A Comparison with Bixa orellana and Crocus Sativus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, R; Sneha, P; Rivera Madrid, Renata; Doss, C George Priya; Singh, Pooja; Siva, Ramamoorthy

    2017-09-01

    Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD) gene, ubiquitously found in numerous types of plants, are eminent in synthesizing the various volatile compounds (β-ionone, C13 -norisoprenoid, geranylacetone) known as apocarotenoids. These apocarotenoids have various biological functions such as volatile signals, allelopathic interaction and plant defense. In Arabidopsis genome sequence, four potential CCD genes have been identified namely CCD1, CCD4, CCD7, and CCD8. These four genes give rise to diverse biological functions with almost similar sequence identity. In this investigation, an in silico analysis was proposed to study CCD proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana, aiming at constructing three-dimensional (3D) structure for CCD1 proteins of Bixa orellana and Crocus sativus to observe the structural difference among AtCCD (A. thaliana CCD) proteins. The quality of modeled structures was evaluated using RAMPAGE, PSVS protein validation server and Q Mean server. Finally, we utilised molecular dynamics simulation to identify the stability of the predicted CCD protein structures. The molecular dynamic simulation also revealed that AtCCD4 protein showed lesser stability when compared to other CCD proteins. Overall results from molecular dynamics analysis predicted that BoCCD1, CsCCD1, and AtCCD1 show similar structural characteristics. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 2712-2721, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Condensing Organic Aerosols in a Microphysical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bauer, S.

    2015-12-01

    The condensation of organic aerosols is represented in a newly developed box-model scheme, where its effect on the growth and composition of particles are examined. We implemented the volatility-basis set (VBS) framework into the aerosol mixing state resolving microphysical scheme Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state (MATRIX). This new scheme is unique and advances the representation of organic aerosols in models in that, contrary to the traditional treatment of organic aerosols as non-volatile in most climate models and in the original version of MATRIX, this new scheme treats them as semi-volatile. Such treatment is important because low-volatility organics contribute significantly to the growth of particles. The new scheme includes several classes of semi-volatile organic compounds from the VBS framework that can partition among aerosol populations in MATRIX, thus representing the growth of particles via condensation of low volatility organic vapors. Results from test cases representing Mexico City and a Finish forrest condistions show good representation of the time evolutions of concentration for VBS species in the gas phase and in the condensed particulate phase. Emitted semi-volatile primary organic aerosols evaporate almost completely in the high volatile range, and they condense more efficiently in the low volatility range.

  16. Identification and Expression Profiling of Radiation-sensitive Genes Using Plant Model System, Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Sub; Kang, Si-Yong; Lee, Geung-Joo; Kim, Jin-Baek

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to characterize genes specifically expressed in response to ionizing energy (gamma-rays) of acute irradiation and elucidate signalling mechanisms via functional analysis of isolated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Recent improvements in DNA microarray technologies and bioinformatics have made it possible to look for common features of ionizing radiation-responsive genes and their regulatory regions. It has produced massive quantities of gene expression and other functional genomics data, and its application will increase in plant genomics. In this study, we used oligonucleotide microarrays to detect the Arabidopsis genes expressed differentially by a gamma-irradiation during the vegetative (VT, 21 DAG) and reproductive (RT, 28 DAG) stages. Wild-type (Ler) Arabidopsis was irradiated with gamma-rays with 100 and 800 Gy doses. Among the 21,500 genes represented in the Agilent chip, approximately 13,500 ({sup {approx}}61.4 %) responsive genes to {nu} -irradiation were expressed with signal intensity greater than 192 when compared to the combined control (non-irradiated vegetative and reproductive pool). Expression patterns of several radiation inducible genes were confirmed by RT-PCR and Northern blotting. Our microarray results may contribute to an overall understanding of the type and quantities of genes that are expressed by an acute gamma-irradiation. In addition, to investigate the oxidative damage caused by irradiation, RT-PCR analysis for the expression of antioxidant isoenzyme genes, and a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) observation for visualizing the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} scavenging activity in leaves were applied.

  17. A metasystem of framework model organisms to study emergence of new host-microbe adaptations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Gopalan

    Full Text Available An unintended consequence of global industrialization and associated societal rearrangements is new interactions of microbes and potential hosts (especially mammals and plants, providing an opportunity for the rapid emergence of host-microbe adaptation and eventual establishment of new microbe-related diseases. We describe a new model system comprising the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and several microbes, each representing different modes of interaction, to study such "maladaptations". The model microbes include human and agricultural pathogens and microbes that are commonly considered innocuous. The system has a large knowledge base corresponding to each component organism and is amenable to high-throughput automation assisted perturbation screens for identifying components that modulate host-pathogen interactions. This would aid in the study of emergence and progression of host-microbe maladaptations in a controlled environment.

  18. Putting "Organizations" into an Organization Theory Course: A Hybrid CAO Model for Teaching Organization Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, David R.; Venkatachary, Ranga

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a retrospective analysis of an instructor's multiyear redesign of a course on organization theory into what is called a hybrid Classroom-as-Organization model. It is suggested that this new course design served to apprentice students to function in quasi-real organizational structures. The authors further argue…

  19. Web Resources for Model Organism Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bixia Tang; Yanqing Wang; Junwei Zhu; Wenming Zhao

    2015-01-01

    An ever-growing number of resources on model organisms have emerged with the continued development of sequencing technologies. In this paper, we review 13 databases of model organisms, most of which are reported by the National Institutes of Health of the United States (NIH; http://www.nih.gov/science/models/). We provide a brief description for each database, as well as detail its data source and types, functions, tools, and availability of access. In addition, we also provide a quality assessment about these databases. Significantly, the organism databases instituted in the early 1990s––such as the Mouse Genome Database (MGD), Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD), and FlyBase––have developed into what are now comprehensive, core authority resources. Furthermore, all of the databases mentioned here update continually according to user feedback and with advancing technologies.

  20. FYVE zinc-finger proteins in the plant model Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, R B; La Cour, T; Albrethsen, J

    2001-01-01

    , named PRAF, consist of a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, a regulator of chromosome condensation (RCC1) guanine nucleotide exchange factor repeat domain, and a variant FYVE domain containing an Asn residue and a Tyr residue at positions corresponding to the PtdIns3P-interacting His(4) and Arg(6......Classic FYVE zinc-finger domains recognize the phosphoinositide signal PtdIns3P and share the basic (R/K)(1)(R/K)HHCR(6) (single-letter amino acid codes) consensus sequence. This domain is present in predicted PtdIns3P 5-kinases and lipases from Arabidopsis thaliana. Other Arabidopsis proteins......) of the basic motif. Dot-blot and liposome-binding assays were used in vitro to examine the phospholipid-binding ability of isolated PRAF domains. Whereas the PH domain preferentially bound PtdIns(4,5)P(2), the variant FYVE domain showed a weaker charge-dependent binding of phosphoinositides. In contrast...

  1. Mathematical Modeling Social Responsibility for Dynamic Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Chavoshbashi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic organizations as accountable organizations, for transparency and accountability to its stakeholders to stakeholders for their toward performance there should express their commitment to social responsibility are through their values and ensure that this commitment throughout the organization are now and thus will have a social responsibility for their mutual benefit, so there is more and more coherent in their ethical approach takes advantage and the community and stakeholders and the organization will have better performance and strengths. Because of interest in social responsibility, in this paper dynamic model is presented for Corporate Social Responsibility of Bionic organization. Model presented a new model is inspired by chaos theory and natural systems theory based on bifurcation in creation to be all natural systems, realizing the value of responsibility as one of the fundamental values of social and institutional development that the relationship between business and work environment in the global market economy and range will be specified. First Social Responsibility factors identified, then experts and scholars determine the weight of the components and technical coefficient for modeling and paired comparison has been done using MATLAB mathematical Software.

  2. Polymer models of chromosome (re)organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirny, Leonid

    Chromosome Conformation Capture technique (Hi-C) provides comprehensive information about frequencies of spatial interactions between genomic loci. Inferring 3D organization of chromosomes from these data is a challenging biophysical problem. We develop a top-down approach to biophysical modeling of chromosomes. Starting with a minimal set of biologically motivated interactions we build ensembles of polymer conformations that can reproduce major features observed in Hi-C experiments. I will present our work on modeling organization of human metaphase and interphase chromosomes. Our works suggests that active processes of loop extrusion can be a universal mechanism responsible for formation of domains in interphase and chromosome compaction in metaphase.

  3. Microtechnology-Based Multi-Organ Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hwan Lee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Drugs affect the human body through absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME processes. Due to their importance, the ADME processes need to be studied to determine the efficacy and side effects of drugs. Various in vitro model systems have been developed and used to realize the ADME processes. However, conventional model systems have failed to simulate the ADME processes because they are different from in vivo, which has resulted in a high attrition rate of drugs and a decrease in the productivity of new drug development. Recently, a microtechnology-based in vitro system called “organ-on-a-chip” has been gaining attention, with more realistic cell behavior and physiological reactions, capable of better simulating the in vivo environment. Furthermore, multi-organ-on-a-chip models that can provide information on the interaction between the organs have been developed. The ultimate goal is the development of a “body-on-a-chip”, which can act as a whole body model. In this review, we introduce and summarize the current progress in the development of multi-organ models as a foundation for the development of body-on-a-chip.

  4. Microtechnology-Based Multi-Organ Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hwan; Sung, Jong Hwan

    2017-05-21

    Drugs affect the human body through absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME) processes. Due to their importance, the ADME processes need to be studied to determine the efficacy and side effects of drugs. Various in vitro model systems have been developed and used to realize the ADME processes. However, conventional model systems have failed to simulate the ADME processes because they are different from in vivo, which has resulted in a high attrition rate of drugs and a decrease in the productivity of new drug development. Recently, a microtechnology-based in vitro system called "organ-on-a-chip" has been gaining attention, with more realistic cell behavior and physiological reactions, capable of better simulating the in vivo environment. Furthermore, multi-organ-on-a-chip models that can provide information on the interaction between the organs have been developed. The ultimate goal is the development of a "body-on-a-chip", which can act as a whole body model. In this review, we introduce and summarize the current progress in the development of multi-organ models as a foundation for the development of body-on-a-chip.

  5. Testing models for the leaf economics spectrum with leaf and whole-plant traits in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonder, Benjamin; Vasseur, François; Violle, Cyrille; Shipley, Bill; Enquist, Brian J; Vile, Denis

    2015-05-08

    The leaf economics spectrum (LES) describes strong relationships between multiple functional leaf traits that determine resource fluxes in vascular plants. Five models have been proposed to explain these patterns: two based on patterns of structural allocation, two on venation networks and one on resource allocation to cell walls and cell contents. Here we test these models using data for leaf and whole-plant functional traits. We use structural equation modelling applied to multiple ecotypes, recombinant inbred lines, near isogenic lines and vascular patterning mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana that express LES trait variation. We show that a wide variation in multiple functional traits recapitulates the LES at the whole-plant scale. The Wright et al. (2004) model and the Blonder et al. (2013) venation network model cannot be rejected by data, while two simple models and the Shipley et al. (2006) allocation model are rejected. Venation networks remain a key hypothesis for the origin of the LES, but simpler explanations also cannot be ruled out.

  6. New Federated Collaborative Networked Organization Model (FCNOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morcous M. Yassa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Formation of Collaborative Networked Organization (CNO usually comes upon expected business opportunities and needs huge of negotiation during its lifecycle, especially to increase the Dynamic Virtual Organization (DVO configuration automation. Decision makers need more comprehensive information about CNO system to support their decisions. Unfortunately, there is no single formal modeling, tool, approach or any comprehensive methodology that covers all perspectives. In spite of there are some approaches to model CNO have been existed, these approaches model the CNO either with respect to the technology, or business without considering organizational behavior, federation modeling, and external environments. The aim of this paper is to propose an integrated framework that combines the existed modeling perspectives, as well as, proposes new ones. Also, it provides clear CNO boundaries. By using this approach the view of CNO environment becomes clear and unified. Also, it minimizes the negotiations within CNO components during its life cycle, supports DVO configuration automation, as well as, helps decision making for DVO, and achieves harmonization between CNO partners. The proposed FCNOM utilizes CommonKADS methodology organization model for describing CNO components. Insurance Collaborative Network has been used as an example to proof the proposed FCNOM model.

  7. Organic production in a dynamic CGE model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lars Bo

    2004-01-01

    Concerns about the impact of modern agriculture on the environment have in recent years led to an interest in supporting the development of organic farming. In addition to environmental benefits, the aim is to encourage the provision of other “multifunctional” properties of organic farming...... such as rural amenities and rural development that are spillover benefit additional to the supply of food. In this paper we further develop an existing dynamic general equilibrium model of the Danish economy to specifically incorporate organic farming. In the model and input-output data each primary...... to illustrate the working of our theory by constructing a long term forecast for the development of the Danish economy. Moreover we simulate the effect of the recent agreed 2003 reform of the common agricultural policy....

  8. Safety Cultural Competency Modeling in Nuclear Organizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sa Kil; Oh, Yeon Ju; Luo, Meiling; Lee, Yong Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The nuclear safety cultural competency model should be supplemented through a bottom-up approach such as behavioral event interview. The developed model, however, is meaningful for determining what should be dealt for enhancing safety cultural competency of nuclear organizations. The more details of the developing process, results, and applications will be introduced later. Organizational culture include safety culture in terms of its organizational characteristics.

  9. Expanding on Successful Concepts, Models, and Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    If the goal of the AEP framework was to replace existing exposure models or databases for organizing exposure data with a concept, we would share Dr. von Göetz concerns. Instead, the outcome we promote is broader use of an organizational framework for exposure science. The f...

  10. RNA Polymerase V Functions in Arabidopsis Interphase Heterochromatin Organization Independently of the 24-nt siRNA-Directed DNA Methylation Pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olga Pontes; Pedro Costa-Nunes; Paul Vithayathil; Craig S.Pikaard

    2009-01-01

    In Arabidopsis,pericentromeric repeats,retroelements,and silenced rRNA genes are assembled into heterochromatin within nuclear structures known as chromocenters.The mechanisms governing higher-order heterochromatin organization are poorly understood but 24-nt small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are known to play key roles in heterochromatin formation.Nuclear RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV),RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 2 (RDR2),and DICER-LIKE 3 (DCL3) are required for biogenesis of 24-nt siRNAs that associate with ARGONAUTE 4 (AGO4).Nuclear RNA polymerase V (Pol V) collaborates with DRD1 (DEFICIENT IN RNA-DEPENDENT DNA METHYLATION 1) to generate transcripts at heterochromatic loci that are hypothesized to bind to siRNA-AGO4 complexes and subsequently recruit the de-novo DNA methylation and/or histone modifying machinery.Here,we report that decondensation of the major pericentromeric repeats and depletion of the heterochromatic mark histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation at chromocenters occurs specifically in pol V and drd1 mutants.Disruption of pericentromeric repeats condensation is coincident with transcriptional reactivation of specific classes of pericentromeric 180-bp repeats.We further demonstrate that Pol V functions independently of Pol IV,RDR2,and DCL3-mediated siRNA production to affect interphase heterochromatin organization,possibly by involving RNAs that recruit structural or chromatin-modifying proteins.

  11. The microtubule plus-end tracking proteins SPR1 and EB1b interact to maintain polar cell elongation and directional organ growth in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galva, Charitha; Kirik, Viktor; Lindeboom, Jelmer J; Kaloriti, Despoina; Rancour, David M; Hussey, Patrick J; Bednarek, Sebastian Y; Ehrhardt, David W; Sedbrook, John C

    2014-11-01

    The microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs) END BINDING1b (EB1b) and SPIRAL1 (SPR1) are required for normal cell expansion and organ growth. EB proteins are viewed as central regulators of +TIPs and cell polarity in animals; SPR1 homologs are specific to plants. To explore if EB1b and SPR1 fundamentally function together, we combined genetic, biochemical, and cell imaging approaches in Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that eb1b-2 spr1-6 double mutant roots exhibit substantially more severe polar expansion defects than either single mutant, undergoing right-looping growth and severe axial twisting instead of waving on tilted hard-agar surfaces. Protein interaction assays revealed that EB1b and SPR1 bind each other and tubulin heterodimers, which is suggestive of a microtubule loading mechanism. EB1b and SPR1 show antagonistic association with microtubules in vitro. Surprisingly, our combined analyses revealed that SPR1 can load onto microtubules and function independently of EB1 proteins, setting SPR1 apart from most studied +TIPs in animals and fungi. Moreover, we found that the severity of defects in microtubule dynamics in spr1 eb1b mutant hypocotyl cells correlated well with the severity of growth defects. These data indicate that SPR1 and EB1b have complex interactions as they load onto microtubule plus ends and direct polar cell expansion and organ growth in response to directional cues.

  12. The Microtubule Plus-End Tracking Proteins SPR1 and EB1b Interact to Maintain Polar Cell Elongation and Directional Organ Growth in Arabidopsis[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galva, Charitha; Kirik, Viktor; Lindeboom, Jelmer J.; Kaloriti, Despoina; Rancour, David M.; Hussey, Patrick J.; Bednarek, Sebastian Y.; Ehrhardt, David W.; Sedbrook, John C.

    2014-01-01

    The microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs) END BINDING1b (EB1b) and SPIRAL1 (SPR1) are required for normal cell expansion and organ growth. EB proteins are viewed as central regulators of +TIPs and cell polarity in animals; SPR1 homologs are specific to plants. To explore if EB1b and SPR1 fundamentally function together, we combined genetic, biochemical, and cell imaging approaches in Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that eb1b-2 spr1-6 double mutant roots exhibit substantially more severe polar expansion defects than either single mutant, undergoing right-looping growth and severe axial twisting instead of waving on tilted hard-agar surfaces. Protein interaction assays revealed that EB1b and SPR1 bind each other and tubulin heterodimers, which is suggestive of a microtubule loading mechanism. EB1b and SPR1 show antagonistic association with microtubules in vitro. Surprisingly, our combined analyses revealed that SPR1 can load onto microtubules and function independently of EB1 proteins, setting SPR1 apart from most studied +TIPs in animals and fungi. Moreover, we found that the severity of defects in microtubule dynamics in spr1 eb1b mutant hypocotyl cells correlated well with the severity of growth defects. These data indicate that SPR1 and EB1b have complex interactions as they load onto microtubule plus ends and direct polar cell expansion and organ growth in response to directional cues. PMID:25415978

  13. Structure-Function Relationship of a Plant NCS1 Member - Homology Modeling and Mutagenesis Identified Residues Critical for Substrate Specificity of PLUTO, a Nucleobase Transporter from Arabidopsis: e91343

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sandra Witz; Pankaj Panwar; Markus Schober; Johannes Deppe; Farhan Ahmad Pasha; M Joanne Lemieux; Torsten Möhlmann

    2014-01-01

    .... We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens...

  14. Interlinked nonlinear subnetworks underlie the formation of robust cellular patterns in Arabidopsis epidermis: a dynamic spatial model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padilla-Longoria Pablo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dynamical models are instrumental for exploring the way information required to generate robust developmental patterns arises from complex interactions among genetic and non-genetic factors. We address this fundamental issue of developmental biology studying the leaf and root epidermis of Arabidopsis. We propose an experimentally-grounded model of gene regulatory networks (GRNs that are coupled by protein diffusion and comprise a meta-GRN implemented on cellularised domains. Results Steady states of the meta-GRN model correspond to gene expression profiles typical of hair and non-hair epidermal cells. The simulations also render spatial patterns that match the cellular arrangements observed in root and leaf epidermis. As in actual plants, such patterns are robust in the face of diverse perturbations. We validated the model by checking that it also reproduced the patterns of reported mutants. The meta-GRN model shows that interlinked sub-networks contribute redundantly to the formation of robust hair patterns and permits to advance novel and testable predictions regarding the effect of cell shape, signalling pathways and additional gene interactions affecting spatial cell-patterning. Conclusion The spatial meta-GRN model integrates available experimental data and contributes to further understanding of the Arabidopsis epidermal system. It also provides a systems biology framework to explore the interplay among sub-networks of a GRN, cell-to-cell communication, cell shape and domain traits, which could help understanding of general aspects of patterning processes. For instance, our model suggests that the information needed for cell fate determination emerges from dynamic processes that depend upon molecular components inside and outside differentiating cells, suggesting that the classical distinction of lineage versus positional cell differentiation may be instrumental but rather artificial. It also suggests that interlinkage

  15. Phytoremediation of the organic Xenobiotic simazine by p450-1a2 transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Ehab; Hegazy, Ahmad K; El-Sharnouby, Mohamed E; Abd Elsalam, Hassan E

    2016-01-01

    The potential use of human P450-transgenic plants for phytoremediation of pesticide contaminated soils was tested in laboratory and greenhouse experiments. The transgenic P450 CYP1A2 gene Arabidopsis thaliana plants metabolize number of herbicides, insecticides and industrial chemicals. The P450 isozymes CYP1A2 expressed in A. thaliana were examined regarding the herbicide simazine (SIM). Transgenic A. thaliana plants expressing CYP1A2 gene showed significant resistance to SIM supplemented either in plant growth medium or sprayed on foliar parts. The results showed that SIM produces harmful effect on both rosette diameter and primary root length of the wild type (WT) plants. In transgenic A. thaliana lines, the rosette diameter and primary root length were not affected by SIM concentrations used in this experiment. The results indicate that CYP1A2 can be used as a selectable marker for plant transformation, allowing efficient selection of transgenic lines in growth medium and/or in soil-grown plants. The transgenic A. thaliana plants exhibited a healthy growth using doses of up to 250 μmol SIM treatments, while the non-transgenic A. thaliana plants were severely damaged with doses above 50 μmol SIM treatments. The transgenic A. thaliana plants can be used as phytoremediator of environmental SIM contaminants.

  16. Reference: 473 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Kyoko et al. 2006 Oct. Plant Cell 18(10):2493-505. Coordination between cell proliferation and differentiation is essential to creat...e organized and functional tissues. Arabidopsis thaliana stomata are created throug

  17. Reference: 185 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available organisms, we suggest that AtARP4 is likely to exert its effects on plant develop...nuclear actin-related protein AtARP4 in Arabidopsis has multiple effects on plant development, including ear

  18. Reference: 796 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America DeBolt...required for normal microtubule dynamics and organization in Arabidopsis. 46 18064-9 19004800 2008 Nov Pro

  19. Reference: 82 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ed as CRUMPLED LEAF (CRL), of Arabidopsis thaliana that affects the morphogenesis of all plant organs and di...protein localized in the outer envelope membrane of plastids affects the pattern of cell division, cell diff

  20. BLADE-ON-PETIOLE1 coordinates organ determinacy and axial polarity in Arabidopsis by directly activating ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continuous organ formation is a hallmark of plant development that requires organ-specific gene activity to establish determinacy and axial patterning, yet the molecular mechanisms that coordinate these events remain poorly understood. Here, we show that the organ-specific BTB-POZ domain proteins BL...

  1. Emergent organization in a model market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Avinash Chand; Manchanda, Kaustubh; Ramaswamy, Ramakrishna

    2017-09-01

    We study the collective behaviour of interacting agents in a simple model of market economics that was originally introduced by Nørrelykke and Bak. A general theoretical framework for interacting traders on an arbitrary network is presented, with the interaction consisting of buying (namely consumption) and selling (namely production) of commodities. Extremal dynamics is introduced by having the agent with least profit in the market readjust prices, causing the market to self-organize. In addition to examining this model market on regular lattices in two-dimensions, we also study the cases of random complex networks both with and without community structures. Fluctuations in an activity signal exhibit properties that are characteristic of avalanches observed in models of self-organized criticality, and these can be described by power-law distributions when the system is in the critical state.

  2. Emergent organization in a model market

    CERN Document Server

    Yadav, Avinash Chand; Ramaswamy, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    We study the collective behavior of interacting agents in a simple model of market economics originally introduced by N{\\o}rrelykke and Bak. A general theoretical framework for interacting traders on an arbitrary network is presented, with the interaction consisting of buying (namely, consumption) and selling (namely, production) of commodities. Extremal dynamics is introduced by having the agent with least profit in the market readjust prices, causing the market to self--organize. We study this model market on regular lattices in two--dimension as well as on random complex networks; in the critical state fluctuations in an activity signal exhibit properties that are characteristic of avalanches observed in models of self-organized criticality, and these can be described by power--law distributions.

  3. Self-organized model of cascade spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualdi, S.; Medo, M.; Zhang, Y.-C.

    2011-01-01

    We study simultaneous price drops of real stocks and show that for high drop thresholds they follow a power-law distribution. To reproduce these collective downturns, we propose a minimal self-organized model of cascade spreading based on a probabilistic response of the system elements to stress conditions. This model is solvable using the theory of branching processes and the mean-field approximation. For a wide range of parameters, the system is in a critical state and displays a power-law cascade-size distribution similar to the empirically observed one. We further generalize the model to reproduce volatility clustering and other observed properties of real stocks.

  4. Recursive self-organizing network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Barbara; Micheli, Alessio; Sperduti, Alessandro; Strickert, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Self-organizing models constitute valuable tools for data visualization, clustering, and data mining. Here, we focus on extensions of basic vector-based models by recursive computation in such a way that sequential and tree-structured data can be processed directly. The aim of this article is to give a unified review of important models recently proposed in literature, to investigate fundamental mathematical properties of these models, and to compare the approaches by experiments. We first review several models proposed in literature from a unifying perspective, thereby making use of an underlying general framework which also includes supervised recurrent and recursive models as special cases. We shortly discuss how the models can be related to different neuron lattices. Then, we investigate theoretical properties of the models in detail: we explicitly formalize how structures are internally stored in different context models and which similarity measures are induced by the recursive mapping onto the structures. We assess the representational capabilities of the models, and we shortly discuss the issues of topology preservation and noise tolerance. The models are compared in an experiment with time series data. Finally, we add an experiment for one context model for tree-structured data to demonstrate the capability to process complex structures.

  5. Study of natural variation for Zn deficiency tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campos, A.C.A.L.

    2015-01-01

    English summary Zinc is an important structural component and co-factor of proteins in all living organisms. The model plant species for genetic and molecular studies, Arabidopsis thaliana, expresses more than 2,000 proteins with one or more Zn binding domains. Low Zn availability

  6. Study of natural variation for Zn deficiency tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campos, A.C.A.L.

    2015-01-01

    English summary Zinc is an important structural component and co-factor of proteins in all living organisms. The model plant species for genetic and molecular studies, Arabidopsis thaliana, expresses more than 2,000 proteins with one or more Zn binding domains. Low Zn availability i

  7. Arabidopsis thaliana PECP1: enzymatic characterization and structural organization of the first plant phosphoethanolamine/phosphocholine phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Anett; Spinka, Michael; Köck, Margret

    2012-02-01

    Maintenance of cellular phosphate homeostasis is crucial for primary and energy metabolism. In plants, low exogenous phosphate availability activates adaptive responses that include the immediate liberation of Pi from phosphorylated metabolites by yet uncharacterized intracellular phosphatases. Based on transcriptional analyses, the Arabidopsis thaliana gene At1g17710, a member of the HAD (Haloacid Dehalogenase) superfamily, was one of the most promising candidates. Here, we show by recombinant protein production and analysis of purified protein that the gene At1g17710 encodes a phosphoethanolamine/phosphocholine phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.75). Thus, the gene product was termed AtPECP1. The present study demonstrates that the Mg(2+)-dependent enzyme exhibits pronounced specificity for both substrates. The enzyme displays a broad pH optimum ranging from pH 6 to pH 8. Comparison of K(m) values indicates a slightly higher affinity for phosphocholine (0.44 mM) than for phosphoethanolamine (1.16 mM). The catalytic efficiency, however, is markedly higher for phosphoethanolamine than for phosphocholine being 1.06 × 10(4)M(-1)s(-1) and 2.34 × 10(3)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. Size exclusion chromatography, native gel electrophoresis and SAXS experiments with recombinant protein clearly point to a rapid monomer-dimer equilibrium of protein subunits. Given its established substrate specificity the enzyme is likely to be involved in the liberation of inorganic phosphate from intracellular sources and is especially in demand under phosphate-deprived conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. DETORQUEO, QUIRKY, and ZERZAUST represent novel components involved in organ development mediated by the receptor-like kinase STRUBBELIG in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynette Fulton

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular signaling plays an important role in controlling cellular behavior in apical meristems and developing organs in plants. One prominent example in Arabidopsis is the regulation of floral organ shape, ovule integument morphogenesis, the cell division plane, and root hair patterning by the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase STRUBBELIG (SUB. Interestingly, kinase activity of SUB is not essential for its in vivo function, indicating that SUB may be an atypical or inactive receptor-like kinase. Since little is known about signaling by atypical receptor-like kinases, we used forward genetics to identify genes that potentially function in SUB-dependent processes and found recessive mutations in three genes that result in a sub-like phenotype. Plants with a defect in DETORQEO (DOQ, QUIRKY (QKY, and ZERZAUST (ZET show corresponding defects in outer integument development, floral organ shape, and stem twisting. The mutants also show sub-like cellular defects in the floral meristem and in root hair patterning. Thus, SUB, DOQ, QKY, and ZET define the STRUBBELIG-LIKE MUTANT (SLM class of genes. Molecular cloning of QKY identified a putative transmembrane protein carrying four C(2 domains, suggesting that QKY may function in membrane trafficking in a Ca(2+-dependent fashion. Morphological analysis of single and all pair-wise double-mutant combinations indicated that SLM genes have overlapping, but also distinct, functions in plant organogenesis. This notion was supported by a systematic comparison of whole-genome transcript profiles during floral development, which molecularly defined common and distinct sets of affected processes in slm mutants. Further analysis indicated that many SLM-responsive genes have functions in cell wall biology, hormone signaling, and various stress responses. Taken together, our data suggest that DOQ, QKY, and ZET contribute to SUB-dependent organogenesis and shed light on the mechanisms, which are dependent on

  9. Comparative molecular modeling study of Arabidopsis NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase and its hybrid protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuno Lee

    Full Text Available 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (Prxs play important roles in the protection of chloroplast proteins from oxidative damage. Arabidopsis NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase isotype C (AtNTRC was identified as efficient electron donor for chloroplastic 2-Cys Prx-A. There are three isotypes (A, B, and C of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR in Arabidopsis. AtNTRA contains only TrxR domain, but AtNTRC consists of N-terminal TrxR and C-terminal thioredoxin (Trx domains. AtNTRC has various oligomer structures, and Trx domain is important for chaperone activity. Our previous experimental study has reported that the hybrid protein (AtNTRA-(Trx-D, which was a fusion of AtNTRA and Trx domain from AtNTRC, has formed variety of structures and shown strong chaperone activity. But, electron transfer mechanism was not detected at all. To find out the reason of this problem with structural basis, we performed two different molecular dynamics (MD simulations on AtNTRC and AtNTRA-(Trx-D proteins with same cofactors such as NADPH and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD for 50 ns. Structural difference has found from superimposition of two structures that were taken relatively close to average structure. The main reason that AtNTRA-(Trx-D cannot transfer the electron from TrxR domain to Trx domain is due to the difference of key catalytic residues in active site. The long distance between TrxR C153 and disulfide bond of Trx C387-C390 has been observed in AtNTRA-(Trx-D because of following reasons: i unstable and unfavorable interaction of the linker region, ii shifted Trx domain, and iii different or weak interface interaction of Trx domains. This study is one of the good examples for understanding the relationship between structure formation and reaction activity in hybrid protein. In addition, this study would be helpful for further study on the mechanism of electron transfer reaction in NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase proteins.

  10. Modeling plasmonic efficiency enhancement in organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taff, Y; Apter, B; Katz, E A; Efron, U

    2015-09-10

    Efficiency enhancement of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells by means of the plasmonic effect is investigated by using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) optical simulations combined with analytical modeling of exciton dissociation and charge transport efficiencies. The proposed method provides an improved analysis of the cell performance compared to previous FDTD studies. The results of the simulations predict an 11.8% increase in the cell's short circuit current with the use of Ag nano-hexagons.

  11. Uncovering Arabidopsis membrane protein interactome enriched in transporters using mating-based split ubiquitin assays and classification models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin eChen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput data are a double-edged sword; for the benefit of large amount of data, there is an associated cost of noise. To increase reliability and scalability of high-throughput protein interaction data generation, we tested the efficacy of classification to enrich potential protein-protein interactions (pPPIs. We applied this method to identify interactions among Arabidopsis membrane proteins enriched in transporters. We validated our method with multiple retests. Classification improved the quality of the ensuing interaction network and was effective in reducing the search space and increasing true positive rate. The final network of 541 interactions among 239 proteins (of which 179 are transporters is the first protein interaction network enriched in membrane transporters reported for any organism. This network has similar topological attributes to other published protein interaction networks. It also extends and fills gaps in currently available biological networks in plants and allows building a number of hypotheses about processes and mechanisms involving signal-transduction and transport systems.

  12. Uncovering Arabidopsis Membrane Protein Interactome Enriched in Transporters Using Mating-Based Split Ubiquitin Assays and Classification Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Lalonde, Sylvie; Obrdlik, Petr; Noorani Vatani, Azam; Parsa, Saman A.; Vilarino, Cristina; Revuelta, Jose Luis; Frommer, Wolf B.; Rhee, Seung Y.

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput data are a double-edged sword; for the benefit of large amount of data, there is an associated cost of noise. To increase reliability and scalability of high-throughput protein interaction data generation, we tested the efficacy of classification to enrich potential protein–protein interactions. We applied this method to identify interactions among Arabidopsis membrane proteins enriched in transporters. We validated our method with multiple retests. Classification improved the quality of the ensuing interaction network and was effective in reducing the search space and increasing true positive rate. The final network of 541 interactions among 239 proteins (of which 179 are transporters) is the first protein interaction network enriched in membrane transporters reported for any organism. This network has similar topological attributes to other published protein interaction networks. It also extends and fills gaps in currently available biological networks in plants and allows building a number of hypotheses about processes and mechanisms involving signal-transduction and transport systems. PMID:22737156

  13. Patterning and lifetime of plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthase is dependent on actin organization in Arabidopsis interphase cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampathkumar, A.; Gutierrez, R.; McFarlane, H.E.; Bringmann, M.; Lindeboom, J.J.; Emons, A.M.C.; Samuels, L.; Ketelaar, T.; Ehrhardt, D.W.; Persson, S.

    2013-01-01

    The actin and microtubule cytoskeletons regulate cell shape across phyla, from bacteria to metazoans. In organisms with cell walls, the wall acts as a primary constraint of shape, and generation of specific cell shape depends on cytoskeletal organization for wall deposition and/or cell expansion. In

  14. Self-organized model of cascade spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Gualdi, Stanislao; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    We study simultaneous price drops of real stocks and show that for high drop thresholds they follow a power-law distribution. To reproduce these collective downturns, we propose a self-organized model of cascade spreading based on a probabilistic response of the system's elements to stress conditions. This model is solvable using the theory of branching processes and the mean-field approximation and displays a power-law cascade-size distribution-similar to the empirically observed one-over a wide range of parameters.

  15. Patterning and lifetime of plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthase is dependent on actin organization in Arabidopsis interphase cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Gutierrez, Ryan; McFarlane, Heather E; Bringmann, Martin; Lindeboom, Jelmer; Emons, Anne-Mie; Samuels, Lacey; Ketelaar, Tijs; Ehrhardt, David W; Persson, Staffan

    2013-06-01

    The actin and microtubule cytoskeletons regulate cell shape across phyla, from bacteria to metazoans. In organisms with cell walls, the wall acts as a primary constraint of shape, and generation of specific cell shape depends on cytoskeletal organization for wall deposition and/or cell expansion. In higher plants, cortical microtubules help to organize cell wall construction by positioning the delivery of cellulose synthase (CesA) complexes and guiding their trajectories to orient newly synthesized cellulose microfibrils. The actin cytoskeleton is required for normal distribution of CesAs to the plasma membrane, but more specific roles for actin in cell wall assembly and organization remain largely elusive. We show that the actin cytoskeleton functions to regulate the CesA delivery rate to, and lifetime of CesAs at, the plasma membrane, which affects cellulose production. Furthermore, quantitative image analyses revealed that actin organization affects CesA tracking behavior at the plasma membrane and that small CesA compartments were associated with the actin cytoskeleton. By contrast, localized insertion of CesAs adjacent to cortical microtubules was not affected by the actin organization. Hence, both actin and microtubule cytoskeletons play important roles in regulating CesA trafficking, cellulose deposition, and organization of cell wall biogenesis.

  16. Parsimonious higher-order hidden Markov models for improved array-CGH analysis with applications to Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Seifert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (Array-CGH is an important technology in molecular biology for the detection of DNA copy number polymorphisms between closely related genomes. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs are popular tools for the analysis of Array-CGH data, but current methods are only based on first-order HMMs having constrained abilities to model spatial dependencies between measurements of closely adjacent chromosomal regions. Here, we develop parsimonious higher-order HMMs enabling the interpolation between a mixture model ignoring spatial dependencies and a higher-order HMM exhaustively modeling spatial dependencies. We apply parsimonious higher-order HMMs to the analysis of Array-CGH data of the accessions C24 and Col-0 of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We compare these models against first-order HMMs and other existing methods using a reference of known deletions and sequence deviations. We find that parsimonious higher-order HMMs clearly improve the identification of these polymorphisms. Moreover, we perform a functional analysis of identified polymorphisms revealing novel details of genomic differences between C24 and Col-0. Additional model evaluations are done on widely considered Array-CGH data of human cell lines indicating that parsimonious HMMs are also well-suited for the analysis of non-plant specific data. All these results indicate that parsimonious higher-order HMMs are useful for Array-CGH analyses. An implementation of parsimonious higher-order HMMs is available as part of the open source Java library Jstacs (www.jstacs.de/index.php/PHHMM.

  17. Parsimonious higher-order hidden Markov models for improved array-CGH analysis with applications to Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Michael; Gohr, André; Strickert, Marc; Grosse, Ivo

    2012-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (Array-CGH) is an important technology in molecular biology for the detection of DNA copy number polymorphisms between closely related genomes. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are popular tools for the analysis of Array-CGH data, but current methods are only based on first-order HMMs having constrained abilities to model spatial dependencies between measurements of closely adjacent chromosomal regions. Here, we develop parsimonious higher-order HMMs enabling the interpolation between a mixture model ignoring spatial dependencies and a higher-order HMM exhaustively modeling spatial dependencies. We apply parsimonious higher-order HMMs to the analysis of Array-CGH data of the accessions C24 and Col-0 of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We compare these models against first-order HMMs and other existing methods using a reference of known deletions and sequence deviations. We find that parsimonious higher-order HMMs clearly improve the identification of these polymorphisms. Moreover, we perform a functional analysis of identified polymorphisms revealing novel details of genomic differences between C24 and Col-0. Additional model evaluations are done on widely considered Array-CGH data of human cell lines indicating that parsimonious HMMs are also well-suited for the analysis of non-plant specific data. All these results indicate that parsimonious higher-order HMMs are useful for Array-CGH analyses. An implementation of parsimonious higher-order HMMs is available as part of the open source Java library Jstacs (www.jstacs.de/index.php/PHHMM).

  18. MODEL ORGANISMS USED IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OR MEDICAL RESEARCH

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey Govind

    2011-01-01

    A model organism is a non-human species that is studied to understand specific biological phenomena with the expectation that investigations made in the organism model will provide insight into the workings of other organisms. The model organisms are widely used to explore potential causes and treatments for human as well as animal diseases when experiments on animals or humans would be unfeasible or considered less ethical. Studying model organisms may be informative, but care must be taken ...

  19. Exposure of beta-tubulin regions defined by antibodies on an Arabidopsis thaliana microtubule protofilament model and in the cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulimenko Tetyana

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The function of the cortical microtubules, composed of αβ-tubulin heterodimers, is linked to their organizational state which is subject to spatial and temporal modulation by environmental cues. The role of tubulin posttranslational modifications in these processes is largely unknown. Although antibodies against small tubulin regions represent useful tool for studying molecular configuration of microtubules, data on the exposure of tubulin epitopes on plant microtubules are still limited. Results Using homology modeling we have generated an Arabidopsis thaliana microtubule protofilament model that served for the prediction of surface exposure of five β-tubulin epitopes as well as tyrosine residues. Peptide scans newly disclosed the position of epitopes detected by antibodies 18D6 (β1-10, TUB2.1 (β426-435 and TU-14 (β436-445. Experimental verification of the results by immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the exposure of epitopes depended on the mode of fixation. Moreover, homology modeling showed that only tyrosines in the C-terminal region of β-tubulins (behind β425 were exposed on the microtubule external side. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed tyrosine phosphorylation of microtubules in plant cells, implying that β-tubulins could be one of the targets for tyrosine kinases. Conclusions We predicted surface exposure of five β-tubulin epitopes, as well as tyrosine residues, on the surface of A. thaliana microtubule protofilament model, and validated the obtained results by immunofluorescence microscopy on cortical microtubules in cells. The results suggest that prediction of epitope exposure on microtubules by means of homology modeling combined with site-directed antibodies can contribute to a better understanding of the interactions of plant microtubules with associated proteins.

  20. ZEITLUPE positively regulates hypocotyl elongation at warm temperature under light in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yuji; Takase, Tomoyuki; Kiyosue, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Hypocotyl cell elongation has been studied as a model to understand how cellular expansion contributes to plant organ growth. Hypocotyl elongation is affected by multiple environmental factors, including light quantity and light quality. Red light inhibits hypocotyl growth via the phytochrome signaling pathways. Proteins of the flavin-binding KELCH repeat F-box 1 / LOV KELCH protein 2 / ZEITLUPE family are positive regulators of hypocotyl elongation under red light in Arabidopsis. These proteins were suggested to reduce phytochrome-mediated inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. Here, we show that ZEITLUPE also functions as a positive regulator in warmth-induced hypocotyl elongation under light in Arabidopsis.

  1. Disease induction by human microbial pathogens in plant-model systems: potential, problems and prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarlen, van P.; Belkum, van A.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    Relatively simple eukaryotic model organisms such as the genetic model weed plant Arabidopsis thaliana possess an innate immune system that shares important similarities with its mammalian counterpart. In fact, some human pathogens infect Arabidopsis and cause overt disease with human symptomology.

  2. Recent Progress in Arabidopsis Research in China: A Preface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hong Xu

    2006-01-01

    @@ In 2002, a workshop on Arabidopsis research in China was held in Shanghai, when a small group of Chinese plant scientists was working on this model species. Since then, we have witnessed the rapid growth of Arabidopsis research in China. This special issue of Journal of Integrative Plant Biology is dedicated exclusively to the Fourth Workshop on Arabidopsis Research in China, scheduled on November 30, 2005, in Beijing. In addition to reports collected in this special issue, the Chinese Arabidopsis community has been able to make significant contributions to many research fields. Here, I briefly summarize recent advances in Arabidopsis research in China.

  3. Molecular genetic investigations of root gravitropism and other complex growth behaviors using Arabidopsis and Brachypodium as models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Patrick; Barker, Richard; Miller, Nathan; Su, Shih-Hao; Su, Shih-Heng

    2016-07-01

    When growing on hard surfaces, Arabidopsis roots tend to grown downward, as dictated by positive gravitropism. At the same time, surface-derived stimuli promote a wavy pattern of growth that is superimposed to a rightward root-skewing trend. This behavior is believed to facilitate obstacle avoidance in soil. To better understand these complex behaviors, we have isolated and characterized mutations that affect them. Some of these mutations were shown to affect gravitropism whereas others did not. Within the latter group, most of the mutations affected mechanisms that control anisotropic cell expansion. We have also characterized mutations that affect early steps of gravity signal transduction within the gravity-sensing columella cells of the root cap. Upon reorientation within the gravity field, starch-filled plastids sediment to the bottom-side of these cells, triggering a pathway that leads to re-localization of auxin efflux facilitators to the bottom membrane. Lateral auxin transport toward the bottom flank ensues, leading to gravitropic curvature. Several of the mutations we characterized affect genes that encode proteins associated with the vesicle trafficking pathway needed for this cell polarization. Other mutations were shown to affect components of the plastid outer envelope protein import complex (TOC). Their functional analysis suggests an active role for plastids in gravity signal transduction, beyond a simple contribution as sedimenting gravity susceptors. Because most cultivated crops are monocots, not dicots like Arabidopsis, we have also initiated studies of root-growth behavior with Brachypodium distachyon. When responding to a gravistimulus, the roots of Brachypodium seedlings develop a strong downward curvature that proceeds until the tip reaches a ~50-degree curvature. At that time, an oscillatory tip movement occurs while the root continues its downward reorientation. These root-tip oscillations also occur if roots are allowed to simply grow

  4. Expanding on Successful Concepts, Models, and Organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Tan, Yu-Mei; Edwards, Stephen W.; Leonard, Jeremy A.; Anderson, Kim A.; Corley, Richard A.; Kile, Molly L.; L. Massey Simonich, Staci; Stone, David; Tanguay, Robert L.; Waters, Katrina M.; Harper, Stacey L.; Williams, David E.

    2016-09-06

    In her letter to the editor1 regarding our recent Feature Article “Completing the Link between Exposure Science and Toxicology for Improved Environmental Health Decision Making: The Aggregate Exposure Pathway Framework” 2, Dr. von Göetz expressed several concerns about terminology, and the perception that we propose the replacement of successful approaches and models for exposure assessment with a concept. We are glad to have the opportunity to address these issues here. If the goal of the AEP framework was to replace existing exposure models or databases for organizing exposure data with a concept, we would share Dr. von Göetz concerns. Instead, the outcome we promote is broader use of an organizational framework for exposure science. The framework would support improved generation, organization, and interpretation of data as well as modeling and prediction, not replacement of models. The field of toxicology has seen the benefits of wide use of one or more organizational frameworks (e.g., mode and mechanism of action, adverse outcome pathway). These frameworks influence how experiments are designed, data are collected, curated, stored and interpreted and ultimately how data are used in risk assessment. Exposure science is poised to similarly benefit from broader use of a parallel organizational framework, which Dr. von Göetz correctly points out, is currently used in the exposure modeling community. In our view, the concepts used so effectively in the exposure modeling community, expanded upon in the AEP framework, could see wider adoption by the field as a whole. The value of such a framework was recognized by the National Academy of Sciences.3 Replacement of models, databases, or any application with the AEP framework was not proposed in our article. The positive role broader more consistent use of such a framework might have in enabling and advancing “general activities such as data acquisition, organization…,” and exposure modeling was discussed

  5. Comparison of mixed-model approaches for association mapping in rapeseed, potato, sugar beet, maize, and Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stich Benjamin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, several attempts have been made in plant genetics to detect QTL by using association mapping methods. The objectives of this study were to (i evaluate various methods for association mapping in five plant species and (ii for three traits in each of the plant species compare the Topt, the restricted maximum likelihood (REML estimate of the conditional probability that two genotypes carry at the same locus alleles that are identical in state but not identical by descent. In order to compare the association mapping methods based on scenarios with realistic estimates of population structure and familial relatedness, we analyzed phenotypic and genotypic data of rapeseed, potato, sugar beet, maize, and Arabidopsis. For the same reason, QTL effects were simulated on top of the observed phenotypic values when examining the adjusted power for QTL detection. Results The correlation between the Topt values identified using REML deviance profiles and profiles of the mean of squared difference between observed and expected P values was 0.83. Conclusion The mixed-model association mapping approaches using a kinship matrix, which was based on Topt, were more appropriate for association mapping than the recently proposed QK method with respect to the adherence to the nominal α level and the adjusted power for QTL detection. Furthermore, we showed that Topt differs considerably among the five plant species but only marginally among different traits.

  6. Modeling disordered morphologies in organic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Tobias; Danilov, Denis; Lennartz, Christian; Wenzel, Wolfgang

    2013-12-05

    Organic thin film devices are investigated for many diverse applications, including light emitting diodes, organic photovoltaic and organic field effect transistors. Modeling of their properties on the basis of their detailed molecular structure requires generation of representative morphologies, many of which are amorphous. Because time-scales for the formation of the molecular structure are slow, we have developed a linear-scaling single molecule deposition protocol which generates morphologies by simulation of vapor deposition of molecular films. We have applied this protocol to systems comprising argon, buckminsterfullerene, N,N-Di(naphthalene-1-yl)-N,N'-diphenyl-benzidine, mer-tris(8-hydroxy-quinoline)aluminum(III), and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester, with and without postdeposition relaxation of the individually deposited molecules. The proposed single molecule deposition protocol leads to formation of highly ordered morphologies in argon and buckminsterfullerene systems when postdeposition relaxation is used to locally anneal the configuration in the vicinity of the newly deposited molecule. The other systems formed disordered amorphous morphologies and the postdeposition local relaxation step has only a small effect on the characteristics of the disordered morphology in comparison to the materials forming crystals.

  7. Virtuous organization: A structural equation modeling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Zamahani

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available For years, the idea of virtue was unfavorable among researchers and virtues were traditionally considered as culture-specific, relativistic and they were supposed to be associated with social conservatism, religious or moral dogmatism, and scientific irrelevance. Virtue and virtuousness have been recently considered seriously among organizational researchers. The proposed study of this paper examines the relationships between leadership, organizational culture, human resource, structure and processes, care for community and virtuous organization. Structural equation modeling is employed to investigate the effects of each variable on other components. The data used in this study consists of questionnaire responses from employees in Payam e Noor University in Yazd province. A total of 250 questionnaires were sent out and a total of 211 valid responses were received. Our results have revealed that all the five variables have positive and significant impacts on virtuous organization. Among the five variables, organizational culture has the most direct impact (0.80 and human resource has the most total impact (0.844 on virtuous organization.

  8. Characterization of Plant Growth under Single-Wavelength Laser Light Using the Model Plant Arabidopsis Thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Ooi, Amanda

    2016-12-01

    Indoor horticulture offers a promising solution for sustainable food production and is becoming increasingly widespread. However, it incurs high energy and cost due to the use of artificial lighting such as high-pressure sodium lamps, fluorescent light or increasingly, the light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The energy efficiency and light quality of currently available lighting is suboptimal, therefore less than ideal for sustainable and cost-effective large-scale plant production. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-powered single-wavelength lasers for indoor horticulture. Lasers are highly energy-efficient and can be remotely guided to the site of plant growth, thus reducing on-site heat accumulation. Besides, laser beams can be tailored to match the absorption profiles of different plants. We have developed a prototype laser growth chamber and demonstrate that laser-grown plants can complete a full growth cycle from seed to seed with phenotypes resembling those of plants grown under LEDs. Importantly, the plants have lower expression of proteins diagnostic for light and radiation stress. The phenotypical, biochemical and proteomic data show that the singlewavelength laser light is suitable for plant growth and therefore, potentially able to unlock the advantages of this next generation lighting technology for highly energy-efficient horticulture. Furthermore, stomatal movement partly determines the plant productivity and stress management. Abscisic acid (ABA) induces stomatal closure by promoting net K+-efflux from guard cells through outwardrectifying K+ (K+ out) channels to regulate plant water homeostasis. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana guard cell outward-rectifying K+ (ATGORK) channel is a direct target for ABA in the regulation of stomatal aperture and hence gas exchange and transpiration. Addition of (±)-ABA, but not the biologically inactive (−)-isomer, increases K+ out channel activity in Vicia faba guard cell protoplast. A similar ABA

  9. Organic acid modeling and model validation: Workshop summary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, T.J.; Eilers, J.M.

    1992-08-14

    A workshop was held in Corvallis, Oregon on April 9--10, 1992 at the offices of E&S Environmental Chemistry, Inc. The purpose of this workshop was to initiate research efforts on the entitled ``Incorporation of an organic acid representation into MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) and testing of the revised model using Independent data sources.`` The workshop was attended by a team of internationally-recognized experts in the fields of surface water acid-bass chemistry, organic acids, and watershed modeling. The rationale for the proposed research is based on the recent comparison between MAGIC model hindcasts and paleolimnological inferences of historical acidification for a set of 33 statistically-selected Adirondack lakes. Agreement between diatom-inferred and MAGIC-hindcast lakewater chemistry in the earlier research had been less than satisfactory. Based on preliminary analyses, it was concluded that incorporation of a reasonable organic acid representation into the version of MAGIC used for hindcasting was the logical next step toward improving model agreement.

  10. Organic acid modeling and model validation: Workshop summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, T.J.; Eilers, J.M.

    1992-08-14

    A workshop was held in Corvallis, Oregon on April 9--10, 1992 at the offices of E S Environmental Chemistry, Inc. The purpose of this workshop was to initiate research efforts on the entitled Incorporation of an organic acid representation into MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) and testing of the revised model using Independent data sources.'' The workshop was attended by a team of internationally-recognized experts in the fields of surface water acid-bass chemistry, organic acids, and watershed modeling. The rationale for the proposed research is based on the recent comparison between MAGIC model hindcasts and paleolimnological inferences of historical acidification for a set of 33 statistically-selected Adirondack lakes. Agreement between diatom-inferred and MAGIC-hindcast lakewater chemistry in the earlier research had been less than satisfactory. Based on preliminary analyses, it was concluded that incorporation of a reasonable organic acid representation into the version of MAGIC used for hindcasting was the logical next step toward improving model agreement.

  11. Genome-wide identification of CCA1 targets uncovers an expanded clock network in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Nagel, Dawn H.; Doherty, Colleen J.; Pruneda-Paz, Jose L.; Schmitz, Robert J; Ecker, Joseph R.; Kay, Steve A.

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock, an endogenous time-keeping mechanism common to most species, allows organisms to coordinate biological processes with specific times of day. In plants, the role of the clock extends to almost every aspect of growth and development, including responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The core molecular components and circuits of the clock have been well studied in the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana; however, how this mechanism connects to clock-controlled outputs rema...

  12. Modeling charge transport in organic photovoltaic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jenny; Kwiatkowski, Joe J; Kirkpatrick, James; Frost, Jarvist M

    2009-11-17

    The performance of an organic photovoltaic cell depends critically on the mobility of charge carriers within the constituent molecular semiconductor materials. However, a complex combination of phenomena that span a range of length and time scales control charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors. As a result, it is difficult to rationalize charge transport properties in terms of material parameters. Until now, efforts to improve charge mobilities in molecular semiconductors have proceeded largely by trial and error rather than through systematic design. However, recent developments have enabled the first predictive simulation studies of charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors. This Account describes a set of computational methods, specifically molecular modeling methods, to simulate molecular packing, quantum chemical calculations of charge transfer rates, and Monte Carlo simulations of charge transport. Using case studies, we show how this combination of methods can reproduce experimental mobilities with few or no fitting parameters. Although currently applied to material systems of high symmetry or well-defined structure, further developments of this approach could address more complex systems such anisotropic or multicomponent solids and conjugated polymers. Even with an approximate treatment of packing disorder, these computational methods simulate experimental mobilities within an order of magnitude at high electric fields. We can both reproduce the relative values of electron and hole mobility in a conjugated small molecule and rationalize those values based on the symmetry of frontier orbitals. Using fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of molecular packing, we can quantitatively replicate vertical charge transport along stacks of discotic liquid crystals which vary only in the structure of their side chains. We can reproduce the trends in mobility with molecular weight for self-organizing polymers using a cheap, coarse

  13. The Arabidopsis DSO/ABCG11 transporter affects cutin metabolism in reproductive organs and suberin in roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikashvili, David; Shi, Jian Xin; Bocobza, Samuel; Franke, Rochus Benni; Schreiber, Lukas; Aharoni, Asaph

    2010-05-01

    Apart from its significance in the protection against stress conditions, the cuticular cover is essential for proper development of the diverse surface structures formed on aerial plant organs. This layer mainly consists of a cutin matrix, embedded and overlaid with cuticular waxes. Following their biosynthesis in epidermal cells, cutin and waxes were suggested to be exported across the plasma membrane by ABCG-type transporters such as DSO/ABCG11 to the cell wall and further to extracellular matrix. Here, additional aspects of DSO/ABCG11 function were investigated, predominantly in reproductive organs, which were not revealed in the previous reports. This was facilitated by the generation of a transgenic DSO/ABCG11 silenced line (dso-4) that displayed relatively subtle morphological and chemical phenotypes. These included altered petal and silique morphology, fusion of seeds, and changes in levels of cutin monomers in flowers and siliques. The dso-4 phenotypes corresponded to the strong DSO/ABCG11 gene expression in the embryo epidermis as well as in the endosperm tissues of the developing seeds. Moreover, the DSO/ABCG11 protein displayed polar localization in the embryo protoderm. Transcriptome analysis of the dso-4 mutant leaves and stems showed that reduced DSO/ABCG11 activity suppressed the expression of a large number of cuticle-associated genes, implying that export of cuticular lipids from the plasma membrane is a rate-limiting step in cuticle metabolism. Surprisingly, root suberin composition of dso-4 was altered, as well as root expression of two suberin biosynthetic genes. Taken together, this study provides new insights into cutin and suberin metabolism and their role in reproductive organs and roots development.

  14. Northern glacial refugia and altitudinal niche divergence shape genome-wide differentiation in the emerging plant model Arabidopsis arenosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolář, Filip; Fuxová, Gabriela; Záveská, Eliška; Nagano, Atsushi J; Hyklová, Lucie; Lučanová, Magdalena; Kudoh, Hiroshi; Marhold, Karol

    2016-08-01

    Quaternary climatic oscillations profoundly impacted temperate biodiversity. For many diverse yet undersampled areas, however, the consequences of this impact are still poorly known. In Europe, particular uncertainty surrounds the role of Balkans, a major hotspot of European diversity, in postglacial recolonization of more northerly areas, and the Carpathians, a debatable candidate for a northern 'cryptic' glacial refugium. Using genome-wide SNPs and microsatellites, we examined how the interplay of historical processes and niche shifts structured genetic diversity of diploid Arabidopsis arenosa, a little-known member of the plant model genus that occupies a wide niche range from sea level to alpine peaks across eastern temperate Europe. While the northern Balkans hosted one isolated endemic lineage, most of the genetic diversity was concentrated further north in the Pannonian Basin and the Carpathians, where it likely survived the last glaciation in northern refugia. Finally, a distinct postglacial environment in northern Europe was colonized by populations of admixed origin from the two Carpathian lineages. Niche differentiation along altitude-related bioclimatic gradients was the main trend in the phylogeny of A. arenosa. The most prominent niche shifts, however, characterized genetically only slightly divergent populations that expanded into narrowly defined alpine and northern coastal postglacial environments. Our study highlights the role of eastern central European mountains not only as refugia for unique temperate diversity but also sources for postglacial expansion into novel high-altitude and high-latitude niches. Knowledge of distinct genetic substructure of diploid A. arenosa also opens new opportunities for follow-up studies of this emerging model of evolutionary biology.

  15. Prediction of anther-expressed gene resulation in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG JiFeng; YANG JingJin; WANG Guan; YU QingBo; YANG ZhongNan

    2008-01-01

    Anther development in Arabidopsis, a popular model plant for plant biology and genetics, is controlled by a complex gene network. Despite the extensive use of this genus for genetic research, little is known about its regulatory network. In this paper, the direct transcriptional regulatory relationships between genes expressed in Arabidopsis anther development were predicted with an integrated bioinformatic method that combines mining of microarray data with promoter analysis. A total of 7710 transcription factor-gene pairs were obtained. The 80 direct regulatory relationships demonstrating the highest con-fidence were screened from the initial 7710 pairs; three of the 80 were validated by previous experi-ments. The results indicate that our predicted results were reliable. The regulatory relationships re-vealed by this research and described in this paper may facilitate further investigation of the molecular mechanisms of anther development. The bioinformatic method used in this work can also be applied to the prediction of gene regulatory relationships in other organisms.

  16. Cytogenetic tools for Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornneef, M.; Fransz, P.F.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.

    2003-01-01

    Although the first description of chromosomes of Arabidopsis dates as far back as 1907, little attention was paid to its cytogenetics for a long time. The spectacular interest in chromosome research for this species that now is the model plant species by excellence came with the introduction of mole

  17. A new atmospheric aerosol phase equilibrium model (UHAERO: organic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Amundson

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In atmospheric aerosols, water and volatile inorganic and organic species are distributed between the gas and aerosol phases in accordance with thermodynamic equilibrium. Within an atmospheric particle, liquid and solid phases can exist at equilibrium. Models exist for computation of phase equilibria for inorganic/water mixtures typical of atmospheric aerosols; when organic species are present, the phase equilibrium problem is complicated by organic/water interactions as well as the potentially large number of organic species. We present here an extension of the UHAERO inorganic thermodynamic model (Amundson et al., 2006c to organic/water systems. Phase diagrams for a number of model organic/water systems characteristic of both primary and secondary organic aerosols are computed. Also calculated are inorganic/organic/water phase diagrams that show the effect of organics on inorganic deliquescence behavior. The effect of the choice of activity coefficient model for organics on the computed phase equilibria is explored.

  18. A new atmospheric aerosol phase equilibrium model (UHAERO: organic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Amundson

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In atmospheric aerosols, water and volatile inorganic and organic species are distributed between the gas and aerosol phases in accordance with thermodynamic equilibrium. Within an atmospheric particle, liquid and solid phases can exist at equilibrium. Models exist for computation of phase equilibria for inorganic/water mixtures typical of atmospheric aerosols; when organic species are present, the phase equilibrium problem is complicated by organic/water interactions as well as the potentially large number of organic species. We present here an extension of the UHAERO inorganic thermodynamic model (Amundson et al., 2006c to organic/water systems. Phase diagrams for a number of model organic/water systems characteristic of both primary and secondary organic aerosols are computed. Also calculated are inorganic/organic/water phase diagrams that show the effect of organics on inorganic deliquescence behavior. The effect of the choice of activity coefficient model for organics on the computed phase equilibria is explored.

  19. Simulation of organ patterning on the floral meristem using a polar auxin transport model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon van Mourik

    Full Text Available An intriguing phenomenon in plant development is the timing and positioning of lateral organ initiation, which is a fundamental aspect of plant architecture. Although important progress has been made in elucidating the role of auxin transport in the vegetative shoot to explain the phyllotaxis of leaf formation in a spiral fashion, a model study of the role of auxin transport in whorled organ patterning in the expanding floral meristem is not available yet. We present an initial simulation approach to study the mechanisms that are expected to play an important role. Starting point is a confocal imaging study of Arabidopsis floral meristems at consecutive time points during flower development. These images reveal auxin accumulation patterns at the positions of the organs, which strongly suggests that the role of auxin in the floral meristem is similar to the role it plays in the shoot apical meristem. This is the basis for a simulation study of auxin transport through a growing floral meristem, which may answer the question whether auxin transport can in itself be responsible for the typical whorled floral pattern. We combined a cellular growth model for the meristem with a polar auxin transport model. The model predicts that sepals are initiated by auxin maxima arising early during meristem outgrowth. These form a pre-pattern relative to which a series of smaller auxin maxima are positioned, which partially overlap with the anlagen of petals, stamens, and carpels. We adjusted the model parameters corresponding to properties of floral mutants and found that the model predictions agree with the observed mutant patterns. The predicted timing of the primordia outgrowth and the timing and positioning of the sepal primordia show remarkable similarities with a developing flower in nature.

  20. Model for Railway Infrastructure Management Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordan Stojić

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The provision of appropriate quality rail services has an important role in terms of railway infrastructure: quality of infrastructure maintenance, regulation of railway traffic, line capacity, speed, safety, train station organization, the allowable lines load and other infrastructure parameters.The analysis of experiences in transforming the railway systems points to the conclusion that there is no unique solution in terms of choice for institutional rail infrastructure management modes, although more than nineteen years have passed from the beginning of the implementation of the Directive 91/440/EEC. Depending on the approach to the process of restructuring the national railway company, adopted regulations and caution in its implementation, the existence or absence of a clearly defined transport strategy, the willingness to liberalize the transport market, there are several different ways for institutional management of railway infrastructure.A hybrid model for selection of modes of institutional rail infrastructure management was developed based on the theory of artificial intelligence, theory of fuzzy sets and theory of multicriteria optimization.KEY WORDSmanagement, railway infrastructure, organizational structure, hybrid model

  1. Knowledge Management Model on Educational Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsina Ferdinandus

    2015-12-01

    Key Words: model, knowledge management, educational organizations Abstrak: Penelitian ini bertujuan mendeskripsikan proses knowledge management yang dilakukan pada SMA Negeri 1 Pulau-pulau Aru dan SMA Yos Sudarso Dobo di Kabupaten Kepulauan Aru. Penelitian ini menggunakan jenis penelitian kualitatif dengan rancangan studi multi kasus. Data dikumpulkan dengan teknik observasi, wawancara mendalam dan dokumentasi kemudian dianalisis dengan teknik analisis data kasus individu dan analisis data lintas kasus. Temuan penelitian ini menggambarkan (1 guru-guru sudah melakukan transformasi pengetahuan explicit to tacit dengan baik ketika melakukan persiapan pembelajaran, transformasi pengetahuan tacit to explicit belum dilakukan dengan baik, dan transformasi pengetahuan tacit to tacit sudah dilakukan dengan baik; (2  sosialisasi dilakukan dengan baik, namun belum maksimal; (3  kepala sekolah SMA Negeri 1 Pulau-pulau Aru lebih demokratis dan kepala sekolah SMA Yos Sudarso Dobo lebih paternalistis; (4 peningkatan berupa upaya memasukan pengetahuan dari luar sekolah sudah dilakukan oleh kedua sekolah; dan (5  proses knowledge capture di kedua sekolah sudah berjalan dengan baik. Kata kunci: model, knowledge management, organisasi pendidikan

  2. COMPUTER MODEL FOR ORGANIC FERTILIZER EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenko Lončarić

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of manures, composts and growing media quality should include enough properties to enable an optimal use from productivity and environmental points of view. The aim of this paper is to describe basic structure of organic fertilizer (and growing media evaluation model to present the model example by comparison of different manures as well as example of using plant growth experiment for calculating impact of pH and EC of growing media on lettuce plant growth. The basic structure of the model includes selection of quality indicators, interpretations of indicators value, and integration of interpreted values into new indexes. The first step includes data input and selection of available data as a basic or additional indicators depending on possible use as fertilizer or growing media. The second part of the model uses inputs for calculation of derived quality indicators. The third step integrates values into three new indexes: fertilizer, growing media, and environmental index. All three indexes are calculated on the basis of three different groups of indicators: basic value indicators, additional value indicators and limiting factors. The possible range of indexes values is 0-10, where range 0-3 means low, 3-7 medium and 7-10 high quality. Comparing fresh and composted manures, higher fertilizer and environmental indexes were determined for composted manures, and the highest fertilizer index was determined for composted pig manure (9.6 whereas the lowest for fresh cattle manure (3.2. Composted manures had high environmental index (6.0-10 for conventional agriculture, but some had no value (environmental index = 0 for organic agriculture because of too high zinc, copper or cadmium concentrations. Growing media indexes were determined according to their impact on lettuce growth. Growing media with different pH and EC resulted in very significant impacts on height, dry matter mass and leaf area of lettuce seedlings. The highest lettuce

  3. Formal Modelling of Goals in Organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popova, Viara; Sharpanskykh, Alexei

    2008-01-01

    Each organization exists or is created for the achievement of one or more goals. To ensure continued success, the organization should monitor its performance with respect to the formulated goals. In practice the performance of an organization is often evaluated by estimating its performance indicato

  4. The Time Is Right to Focus on Model Organism Metabolomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur S. Edison

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Model organisms are an essential component of biological and biomedical research that can be used to study specific biological processes. These organisms are in part selected for facile experimental study. However, just as importantly, intensive study of a small number of model organisms yields important synergies as discoveries in one area of science for a given organism shed light on biological processes in other areas, even for other organisms. Furthermore, the extensive knowledge bases compiled for each model organism enable systems-level understandings of these species, which enhance the overall biological and biomedical knowledge for all organisms, including humans. Building upon extensive genomics research, we argue that the time is now right to focus intensively on model organism metabolomes. We propose a grand challenge for metabolomics studies of model organisms: to identify and map all metabolites onto metabolic pathways, to develop quantitative metabolic models for model organisms, and to relate organism metabolic pathways within the context of evolutionary metabolomics, i.e., phylometabolomics. These efforts should focus on a series of established model organisms in microbial, animal and plant research.

  5. The Time Is Right to Focus on Model Organism Metabolomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, Arthur S.; Hall, Robert D.; Junot, Christophe; Karp, Peter D.; Kurland, Irwin J.; Mistrik, Robert; Reed, Laura K.; Saito, Kazuki; Salek, Reza M.; Steinbeck, Christoph; Sumner, Lloyd W.; Viant, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Model organisms are an essential component of biological and biomedical research that can be used to study specific biological processes. These organisms are in part selected for facile experimental study. However, just as importantly, intensive study of a small number of model organisms yields important synergies as discoveries in one area of science for a given organism shed light on biological processes in other areas, even for other organisms. Furthermore, the extensive knowledge bases compiled for each model organism enable systems-level understandings of these species, which enhance the overall biological and biomedical knowledge for all organisms, including humans. Building upon extensive genomics research, we argue that the time is now right to focus intensively on model organism metabolomes. We propose a grand challenge for metabolomics studies of model organisms: to identify and map all metabolites onto metabolic pathways, to develop quantitative metabolic models for model organisms, and to relate organism metabolic pathways within the context of evolutionary metabolomics, i.e., phylometabolomics. These efforts should focus on a series of established model organisms in microbial, animal and plant research. PMID:26891337

  6. The Time Is Right to Focus on Model Organism Metabolomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edison, Arthur; Hall, Robert; Junot, Christophe; Karp, Peter; Kurland, Irwin; Mistrik, Robert; Reed, Laura; Saito, Kazuki; Salek, Reza; Steinbeck, Christoph; Sumner, Lloyd; Viant, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Model organisms are an essential component of biological and biomedical research that can be used to study specific biological processes. These organisms are in part selected for facile experimental study. However, just as importantly, intensive study of a small number of model organisms yields

  7. The Time Is Right to Focus on Model Organism Metabolomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, Arthur S; Hall, Robert D; Junot, Christophe; Karp, Peter D; Kurland, Irwin J; Mistrik, Robert; Reed, Laura K; Saito, Kazuki; Salek, Reza M; Steinbeck, Christoph; Sumner, Lloyd W; Viant, Mark R

    2016-02-15

    Model organisms are an essential component of biological and biomedical research that can be used to study specific biological processes. These organisms are in part selected for facile experimental study. However, just as importantly, intensive study of a small number of model organisms yields important synergies as discoveries in one area of science for a given organism shed light on biological processes in other areas, even for other organisms. Furthermore, the extensive knowledge bases compiled for each model organism enable systems-level understandings of these species, which enhance the overall biological and biomedical knowledge for all organisms, including humans. Building upon extensive genomics research, we argue that the time is now right to focus intensively on model organism metabolomes. We propose a grand challenge for metabolomics studies of model organisms: to identify and map all metabolites onto metabolic pathways, to develop quantitative metabolic models for model organisms, and to relate organism metabolic pathways within the context of evolutionary metabolomics, i.e., phylometabolomics. These efforts should focus on a series of established model organisms in microbial, animal and plant research.

  8. Biochemical and structural properties of cyanases from Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Dan; Jiang, Lin; Lu, Lu; Wei, Chunhong; Li, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Cyanate is toxic to all organisms. Cyanase converts cyanate to CO₂ and NH₃ in a bicarbonate-dependent reaction. The biophysical functions and biochemical characteristics of plant cyanases are poorly studied, although it has been investigated in a variety of proteobacteria, cyanobacteria and fungi. In this study, we characterised plant cyanases from Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa (AtCYN and OsCYN). Prokaryotic-expressed AtCYN and OsCYN both showed cyanase activity in vitro. Temperature had a similar influence on the activity of both cyanases, but pH had a differential impact on AtCYN and OsCYN activity. Homology modelling provided models of monomers of AtCYN and OsCYN, and a coimmunoprecipitation assay and gel filtration indicated that AtCYN and OsCYN formed homodecamers. The analysis of single-residue mutants of AtCYN indicated that the conserved catalytic residues also contributed to the stability of the homodecamer. KCNO treatment inhibited Arabidopsis germination and early seedling growth. Plants containing AtCYN or OsCYN exhibited resistance to KCNO stress, which demonstrated that one role of cyanases in plants is detoxification. Transcription level of AtCYN was higher in the flower than in other organs of Arabidopsis. AtCYN transcription was not significantly affected by KCNO treatment in Arabidopsis, but was induced by salt stress. This research broadens our knowledge on plant detoxification of cyanate via cyanase.

  9. Biochemical and structural properties of cyanases from Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Qian

    Full Text Available Cyanate is toxic to all organisms. Cyanase converts cyanate to CO₂ and NH₃ in a bicarbonate-dependent reaction. The biophysical functions and biochemical characteristics of plant cyanases are poorly studied, although it has been investigated in a variety of proteobacteria, cyanobacteria and fungi. In this study, we characterised plant cyanases from Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa (AtCYN and OsCYN. Prokaryotic-expressed AtCYN and OsCYN both showed cyanase activity in vitro. Temperature had a similar influence on the activity of both cyanases, but pH had a differential impact on AtCYN and OsCYN activity. Homology modelling provided models of monomers of AtCYN and OsCYN, and a coimmunoprecipitation assay and gel filtration indicated that AtCYN and OsCYN formed homodecamers. The analysis of single-residue mutants of AtCYN indicated that the conserved catalytic residues also contributed to the stability of the homodecamer. KCNO treatment inhibited Arabidopsis germination and early seedling growth. Plants containing AtCYN or OsCYN exhibited resistance to KCNO stress, which demonstrated that one role of cyanases in plants is detoxification. Transcription level of AtCYN was higher in the flower than in other organs of Arabidopsis. AtCYN transcription was not significantly affected by KCNO treatment in Arabidopsis, but was induced by salt stress. This research broadens our knowledge on plant detoxification of cyanate via cyanase.

  10. Gene expression in response to cryoprotectant and liquid nitrogen exposure in Arabidopsis shoot tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabidopsis thaliana serves as an ideal model system to study cryopreservation at the molecular level. We have developed reliable cryopreservation methods for Arabidopsis shoot tips using Plant Vitrification Solution 2, Plant Vitrification Solution 3 and polyethylene glycol-glucose-dimethylsulfoxid...

  11. Self-Organized Criticality in a Random Network Model

    OpenAIRE

    Nirei, Makoto

    1998-01-01

    A new model of self-organized criticality is defined by incorporating a random network model in order to explain endogenous complex fluctuations of economic aggregates. The model can feature many globally interactive systems such as economies or societies.

  12. Study of Self-Organization Model of Multiple Mobile Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Li Shu-qin; Ceng Xian-yi; Xia De-shen

    2006-01-01

    A good organization model of multiple mobile robot should be able to improve the efficiency of the system, reduce the complication of robot interactions, and detract the difficulty of computation. From the sociology aspect of topology, structure and organization, this paper studies the multiple mobile robot organization formation and running mechanism in the dynamic, complicated and unknown environment. It presents and describes in detail a Hierarchical- Web Recursive Organization Model (HWRO...

  13. A Topological Model for C2 Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    functions of the organization, and the capabilities of its members, as these sets somehow efine the boundaries of organizational performance and the...and functions of the organization, and the capabilities of its members, as these sets somehow efine the boundaries of organizational performance and

  14. The Phenylpropanoid Pathway in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Christopher M.; Chapple, Clint

    2011-01-01

    The phenylpropanoid pathway serves as a rich source of metabolites in plants, being required for the biosynthesis of lignin, and serving as a starting point for the production of many other important compounds, such as the flavonoids, coumarins, and lignans. In spite of the fact that the phenylpropanoids and their derivatives are sometimes classified as secondary metabolites, their relevance to plant survival has been made clear via the study of Arabidopsis and other plant species. As a model system, Arabidopsis has helped to elucidate many details of the phenylpropanoid pathway, its enzymes and intermediates, and the interconnectedness of the pathway with plant metabolism as a whole. These advances in our understanding have been made possible in large part by the relative ease with which mutations can be generated, identified, and studied in Arabidopsis. Herein, we provide an overview of the research progress that has been made in recent years, emphasizing both the genes (and gene families) associated with the phenylpropanoid pathway in Arabidopsis, and the end products that have contributed to the identification of many mutants deficient in the phenylpropanoid metabolism: the sinapate esters. PMID:22303276

  15. Large-scale modeling provides insights into Arabidopsis's acclimation to changing light and temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töpfer, Nadine; Niokoloski, Zoran

    2013-09-01

    Classical flux balance analysis predicts steady-state flux distributions that maximize a given objective function. A recent study, Schuetz et al., (1) demonstrated that competing objectives constrain the metabolic fluxes in E. coli. For plants, with multiple cell types, fulfilling different functions, the objectives remain elusive and, therefore, hinder the prediction of actual fluxes, particularly for changing environments. In our study, we presented a novel approach to predict flux capacities for a large collection of metabolic pathways under eight different temperature and light conditions. (2) By integrating time-series transcriptomics data to constrain the flux boundaries of the metabolic model, we captured the time- and condition-specific state of the network. Although based on a single time-series experiment, the comparison of these capacities to a novel null model for transcript distribution allowed us to define a measure for differential behavior that accounts for the underlying network structure and the complex interplay of metabolic pathways.

  16. 3D Bioprinting of Tissue/Organ Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Falguni; Gantelius, Jesper; Svahn, Helene Andersson

    2016-04-04

    In vitro tissue/organ models are useful platforms that can facilitate systematic, repetitive, and quantitative investigations of drugs/chemicals. The primary objective when developing tissue/organ models is to reproduce physiologically relevant functions that typically require complex culture systems. Bioprinting offers exciting prospects for constructing 3D tissue/organ models, as it enables the reproducible, automated production of complex living tissues. Bioprinted tissues/organs may prove useful for screening novel compounds or predicting toxicity, as the spatial and chemical complexity inherent to native tissues/organs can be recreated. In this Review, we highlight the importance of developing 3D in vitro tissue/organ models by 3D bioprinting techniques, characterization of these models for evaluating their resemblance to native tissue, and their application in the prioritization of lead candidates, toxicity testing, and as disease/tumor models.

  17. Reference: 43 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iam L et al. 2003 Sep. Development 130(18):4249-58. The mechanisms regulating cell layer organisation in dev...eloping plant organs are fundamental to plant growth, but remain largely uninvestigated. We have studied the rece... is restricted to the L1 cell layer of most meristems and organ primordia, including those of the ovule inte...guments. Insertion mutations show that ARABIDOPSIS CRINKLY4 is required for regulation of cellular organisat...dant in anticlinal and the inner periclinal plasma membrane of 'outside' cells. We propose that ARABIDOPSIS

  18. The impact of Arabidopsis on human health: diversifying our portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alan M; Chory, Joanne; Dangl, Jeffery L; Estelle, Mark; Jacobsen, Steven E; Meyerowitz, Elliot M; Nordborg, Magnus; Weigel, Detlef

    2008-06-13

    Studies of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana may seem to have little impact on advances in medical research, yet a survey of the scientific literature shows that this is a misconception. Many discoveries with direct relevance to human health and disease have been elaborated using Arabidopsis, and several processes important to human biology are more easily studied in this versatile model plant.

  19. using stereochemistry models in teaching organic compounds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    (ii) provide the students with basic knowledge in chemical concepts and ... ethanol, ethan-l-ol and ethyl alcohol in some textbooks and they are the same. ... Considering class level, what is the performance of the students in naming organic.

  20. A Modeling Exercise for the Organic Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, Christine R.

    2010-01-01

    An in-class molecular modeling exercise is described. Groups of students are given molecular models to investigate and questions about the models to answer. This exercise is a quick and effective way to review nomenclature, stereochemistry, and conformational analysis.

  1. The Functions of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Matthew R.; Endres, Matthew W.; Cook, Rebecca T.; Gregory, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    One recently identified mechanism that regulates mRNA abundance is RNA silencing, and pioneering work in Arabidopsis thaliana and other genetic model organisms helped define this process. RNA silencing pathways are triggered by either self-complementary fold-back structures or the production of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) that gives rise to small RNAs (smRNAs) known as microRNAs (miRNAs) or small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs). These smRNAs direct sequence-specific regulation of various gene transcripts, repetitive sequences, viruses, and mobile elements via RNA cleavage, translational inhibition, or transcriptional silencing through DNA methylation and heterochromatin formation. Early genetic screens in Arabidopsis were instrumental in uncovering numerous proteins required for these important regulatory pathways. Among the factors identified by these studies were RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs), which are proteins that synthesize siRNA-producing dsRNA molecules using a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) molecule as a template. Recently, a growing body of evidence has implicated RDR-dependent RNA silencing in many different aspects of plant biology ranging from reproductive development to pathogen resistance. Here, we focus on the specific functions of the six Arabidopsis RDRs in RNA silencing, their ssRNA substrates and resulting RDR-dependent smRNAs, and the numerous biological functions of these proteins in plant development and stress responses. PMID:22303271

  2. Modelling water use efficiency in a dynamic environment: An example using Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialet-Chabrand, S; Matthews, J S A; Brendel, O; Blatt, M R; Wang, Y; Hills, A; Griffiths, H; Rogers, S; Lawson, T

    2016-10-01

    Intrinsic water use efficiency (Wi), the ratio of net CO2 assimilation (A) over stomatal conductance to water vapour (gs), is a complex trait used to assess plant performance. Improving Wi could lead in theory to higher productivity or reduced water usage by the plant, but the physiological traits for improvement and their combined effects on Wi have not been clearly identified. Under fluctuating light intensity, the temporal response of gs is an order of magnitude slower than A, which results in rapid variations in Wi. Compared to traditional approaches, our new model scales stoma behaviour at the leaf level to predict gs and A during a diurnal period, reproducing natural fluctuations of light intensity, in order to dissect Wi into traits of interest. The results confirmed the importance of stomatal density and photosynthetic capacity on Wi but also revealed the importance of incomplete stomatal closure under dark conditions as well as stomatal sensitivity to light intensity. The observed continuous decrease of A and gs over the diurnal period was successfully described by negative feedback of the accumulation of photosynthetic products. Investigation into the impact of leaf anatomy on temporal responses of A, gs and Wi revealed that a high density of stomata produces the most rapid response of gs but may result in lower Wi. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Self-Organizing Map Models of Language Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping eLi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Connectionist models have had a profound impact on theories of language. While most early models were inspired by the classic PDP architecture, recent models of language have explored various other types of models, including self-organizing models for language acquisition. In this paper we aim at providing a review of the latter type of models, and highlight a number of simulation experiments that we have conducted based on these models. We show that self-organizing connectionist models can provide significant insights into long-standing debates in both monolingual and bilingual language development.

  4. MODELING OF MANAGEMENT PROCESSES IN AN ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Iovan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available When driving any major change within an organization, strategy and execution are intrinsic to a project’s success. Nevertheless, closing the gap between strategy and execution remains a challenge for many organizations [1]. Companies tend to focus more on execution than strategy for quick results, instead of taking the time needed to understand the parts that make up the whole, so the right execution plan can be put in place to deliver the best outcomes. A large part of this understands that business operations don’t fit neatly within the traditional organizational hierarchy. Business processes are often messy, collaborative efforts that cross teams, departments and systems, making them difficult to manage within a hierarchical structure [2]. Business process management (BPM fills this gap by redefining an organization according to its end-to-end processes, so opportunities for improvement can be identified and processes streamlined for growth, revenue and transformation. This white paper provides guidelines on what to consider when using business process applications to solve your BPM initiatives, and the unique capabilities software systems provides that can help ensure both your project’s success and the success of your organization as a whole. majority of medium and small businesses, big companies and even some guvermental organizations [2].

  5. Novel features of radiation-induced bystander signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana demonstrated using root micro-grafting

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ting; Li, Fanghua; Xu, Wei; Bian, Po; Wu, Yuejin; WU, LIJUN

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been well demonstrated in whole organisms, as well as in single-cell culture models in vitro and multi-cellular tissues models in vitro, however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, including the temporal and spatial course of bystander signaling. The RIBE in vivo has been shown to exist in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana). Importantly, the unique plant grafting provides a delicate approach for studying the temporal and s...

  6. Structure-Function Relationship of a Plant NCS1 Member – Homology Modeling and Mutagenesis Identified Residues Critical for Substrate Specificity of PLUTO, a Nucleobase Transporter from Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witz, Sandra; Panwar, Pankaj; Schober, Markus; Deppe, Johannes; Pasha, Farhan Ahmad; Lemieux, M. Joanne; Möhlmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Plastidic uracil salvage is essential for plant growth and development. So far, PLUTO, the plastidic nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana is the only known uracil importer at the inner plastidic membrane which represents the permeability barrier of this organelle. We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens and validated by molecular dynamics simulations. Polar side chains of residues Glu-227 and backbones of Val-145, Gly-147 and Thr-425 are proposed to form the binding site for the three PLUTO substrates uracil, adenine and guanine. Mutational analysis and competition studies identified Glu-227 as an important residue for uracil and to a lesser extent for guanine transport. A differential response in substrate transport was apparent with PLUTO double mutants E227Q G147Q and E227Q T425A, both of which most strongly affected adenine transport, and in V145A G147Q, which markedly affected guanine transport. These differences could be explained by docking studies, showing that uracil and guanine exhibit a similar binding mode whereas adenine binds deep into the catalytic pocket of PLUTO. Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members. PMID:24621654

  7. Structure-function relationship of a plant NCS1 member--homology modeling and mutagenesis identified residues critical for substrate specificity of PLUTO, a nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witz, Sandra; Panwar, Pankaj; Schober, Markus; Deppe, Johannes; Pasha, Farhan Ahmad; Lemieux, M Joanne; Möhlmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Plastidic uracil salvage is essential for plant growth and development. So far, PLUTO, the plastidic nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana is the only known uracil importer at the inner plastidic membrane which represents the permeability barrier of this organelle. We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens and validated by molecular dynamics simulations. Polar side chains of residues Glu-227 and backbones of Val-145, Gly-147 and Thr-425 are proposed to form the binding site for the three PLUTO substrates uracil, adenine and guanine. Mutational analysis and competition studies identified Glu-227 as an important residue for uracil and to a lesser extent for guanine transport. A differential response in substrate transport was apparent with PLUTO double mutants E227Q G147Q and E227Q T425A, both of which most strongly affected adenine transport, and in V145A G147Q, which markedly affected guanine transport. These differences could be explained by docking studies, showing that uracil and guanine exhibit a similar binding mode whereas adenine binds deep into the catalytic pocket of PLUTO. Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members.

  8. Structure-function relationship of a plant NCS1 member--homology modeling and mutagenesis identified residues critical for substrate specificity of PLUTO, a nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Witz

    Full Text Available Plastidic uracil salvage is essential for plant growth and development. So far, PLUTO, the plastidic nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana is the only known uracil importer at the inner plastidic membrane which represents the permeability barrier of this organelle. We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens and validated by molecular dynamics simulations. Polar side chains of residues Glu-227 and backbones of Val-145, Gly-147 and Thr-425 are proposed to form the binding site for the three PLUTO substrates uracil, adenine and guanine. Mutational analysis and competition studies identified Glu-227 as an important residue for uracil and to a lesser extent for guanine transport. A differential response in substrate transport was apparent with PLUTO double mutants E227Q G147Q and E227Q T425A, both of which most strongly affected adenine transport, and in V145A G147Q, which markedly affected guanine transport. These differences could be explained by docking studies, showing that uracil and guanine exhibit a similar binding mode whereas adenine binds deep into the catalytic pocket of PLUTO. Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members.

  9. Structure-function relationship of a plant NCS1 member - Homology modeling and mutagenesis identified residues critical for substrate specificity of PLUTO, a nucleobase transporter from arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Witz, Sandra

    2014-03-12

    Plastidic uracil salvage is essential for plant growth and development. So far, PLUTO, the plastidic nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana is the only known uracil importer at the inner plastidic membrane which represents the permeability barrier of this organelle. We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens and validated by molecular dynamics simulations. Polar side chains of residues Glu-227 and backbones of Val-145, Gly-147 and Thr-425 are proposed to form the binding site for the three PLUTO substrates uracil, adenine and guanine. Mutational analysis and competition studies identified Glu-227 as an important residue for uracil and to a lesser extent for guanine transport. A differential response in substrate transport was apparent with PLUTO double mutants E227Q G147Q and E227Q T425A, both of which most strongly affected adenine transport, and in V145A G147Q, which markedly affected guanine transport. These differences could be explained by docking studies, showing that uracil and guanine exhibit a similar binding mode whereas adenine binds deep into the catalytic pocket of PLUTO. Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members. 2014 Witz et al.

  10. Arabidopsis genes involved in acyl lipid metabolism. A 2003 census of the candidates, a study of the distribution of expressed sequence tags in organs, and a web-based database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisson, Frédéric; Koo, Abraham J K; Ruuska, Sari; Schwender, Jörg; Pollard, Mike; Thelen, Jay J; Paddock, Troy; Salas, Joaquín J; Savage, Linda; Milcamps, Anne; Mhaske, Vandana B; Cho, Younghee; Ohlrogge, John B

    2003-06-01

    The genome of Arabidopsis has been searched for sequences of genes involved in acyl lipid metabolism. Over 600 encoded proteins have been identified, cataloged, and classified according to predicted function, subcellular location, and alternative splicing. At least one-third of these proteins were previously annotated as "unknown function" or with functions unrelated to acyl lipid metabolism; therefore, this study has improved the annotation of over 200 genes. In particular, annotation of the lipolytic enzyme group (at least 110 members total) has been improved by the critical examination of the biochemical literature and the sequences of the numerous proteins annotated as "lipases." In addition, expressed sequence tag (EST) data have been surveyed, and more than 3,700 ESTs associated with the genes were cataloged. Statistical analysis of the number of ESTs associated with specific cDNA libraries has allowed calculation of probabilities of differential expression between different organs. More than 130 genes have been identified with a statistical probability > 0.95 of preferential expression in seed, leaf, root, or flower. All the data are available as a Web-based database, the Arabidopsis Lipid Gene database (http://www.plantbiology.msu.edu/lipids/genesurvey/index.htm). The combination of the data of the Lipid Gene Catalog and the EST analysis can be used to gain insights into differential expression of gene family members and sets of pathway-specific genes, which in turn will guide studies to understand specific functions of individual genes.

  11. Spatio-temporal expression patterns of Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula defensin-like genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesfin Tesfaye

    Full Text Available Plant genomes contain several hundred defensin-like (DEFL genes that encode short cysteine-rich proteins resembling defensins, which are well known antimicrobial polypeptides. Little is known about the expression patterns or functions of many DEFLs because most were discovered recently and hence are not well represented on standard microarrays. We designed a custom Affymetrix chip consisting of probe sets for 317 and 684 DEFLs from Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula, respectively for cataloging DEFL expression in a variety of plant organs at different developmental stages and during symbiotic and pathogenic associations. The microarray analysis provided evidence for the transcription of 71% and 90% of the DEFLs identified in Arabidopsis and Medicago, respectively, including many of the recently annotated DEFL genes that previously lacked expression information. Both model plants contain a subset of DEFLs specifically expressed in seeds or fruits. A few DEFLs, including some plant defensins, were significantly up-regulated in Arabidopsis leaves inoculated with Alternaria brassicicola or Pseudomonas syringae pathogens. Among these, some were dependent on jasmonic acid signaling or were associated with specific types of immune responses. There were notable differences in DEFL gene expression patterns between Arabidopsis and Medicago, as the majority of Arabidopsis DEFLs were expressed in inflorescences, while only a few exhibited root-enhanced expression. By contrast, Medicago DEFLs were most prominently expressed in nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Thus, our data document salient differences in DEFL temporal and spatial expression between Arabidopsis and Medicago, suggesting distinct signaling routes and distinct roles for these proteins in the two plant species.

  12. Spatio-temporal expression patterns of Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula defensin-like genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, Mesfin; Silverstein, Kevin At; Nallu, Sumitha; Wang, Lin; Botanga, Christopher J; Gomez, S Karen; Costa, Liliana M; Harrison, Maria J; Samac, Deborah A; Glazebrook, Jane; Katagiri, Fumiaki; Gutierrez-Marcos, Jose F; Vandenbosch, Kathryn A

    2013-01-01

    Plant genomes contain several hundred defensin-like (DEFL) genes that encode short cysteine-rich proteins resembling defensins, which are well known antimicrobial polypeptides. Little is known about the expression patterns or functions of many DEFLs because most were discovered recently and hence are not well represented on standard microarrays. We designed a custom Affymetrix chip consisting of probe sets for 317 and 684 DEFLs from Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula, respectively for cataloging DEFL expression in a variety of plant organs at different developmental stages and during symbiotic and pathogenic associations. The microarray analysis provided evidence for the transcription of 71% and 90% of the DEFLs identified in Arabidopsis and Medicago, respectively, including many of the recently annotated DEFL genes that previously lacked expression information. Both model plants contain a subset of DEFLs specifically expressed in seeds or fruits. A few DEFLs, including some plant defensins, were significantly up-regulated in Arabidopsis leaves inoculated with Alternaria brassicicola or Pseudomonas syringae pathogens. Among these, some were dependent on jasmonic acid signaling or were associated with specific types of immune responses. There were notable differences in DEFL gene expression patterns between Arabidopsis and Medicago, as the majority of Arabidopsis DEFLs were expressed in inflorescences, while only a few exhibited root-enhanced expression. By contrast, Medicago DEFLs were most prominently expressed in nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Thus, our data document salient differences in DEFL temporal and spatial expression between Arabidopsis and Medicago, suggesting distinct signaling routes and distinct roles for these proteins in the two plant species.

  13. Arabidopsis  SABRE and CLASP interact to stabilize cell division plane orientation and planar polarity

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The orientation of cell division and the coordination of cell polarity within the plane of the tissue layer (planar polarity) contribute to shape diverse multicellular organisms. The root of Arabidopsis thaliana displays regularly oriented cell divisions, cell elongation and planar polarity providing a plant model system to study these processes. Here we report that the SABRE protein, which shares similarity with proteins of unknown function throughout eukaryotes, has important roles in orien...

  14. MARTINI Model for Physisorption of Organic Molecules on Graphite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gobbo, Cristian; Beurroies, Isabelle; de Ridder, David; Eelkema, Rienk; Marrink, Siewert J.; De Feyter, Steven; van Esch, Jan H.; de Vries, Alex H.

    2013-01-01

    An extension to the MARTINI coarse-grained model is presented to describe the adsorption of organic molecules on graphite surfaces. The model allows the study of the dynamics of the preferential adsorption of long-chain organic molecules from solvent and the formation of ordered structures on the su

  15. Yeast and filamentous fungi as model organisms in microbody research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klei, Ida J. van der; Veenhuis, Marten

    2006-01-01

    Yeast and filamentous fungi are important model organisms in microbody research. The value of these organisms as models for higher eukaryotes is underscored by the observation that the principles of various aspects of microbody biology are strongly conserved from lower to higher eukaryotes. This has

  16. The initiative on Model Organism Proteomes (iMOP) Session

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrimpf, Sabine P; Mering, Christian von; Bendixen, Emøke

    2012-01-01

    iMOP – the Initiative on Model Organism Proteomes – was accepted as a new HUPO initiative at the Ninth HUPO meeting in Sydney in 2010. A goal of iMOP is to integrate research groups working on a great diversity of species into a model organism community. At the Tenth HUPO meeting in Geneva...

  17. Modeling the Explicit Chemistry of Anthropogenic and Biogenic Organic Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madronich, Sasha [Univ. Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-12-09

    The atmospheric burden of Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) remains one of the most important yet uncertain aspects of the radiative forcing of climate. This grant focused on improving our quantitative understanding of SOA formation and evolution, by developing, applying, and improving a highly detailed model of atmospheric organic chemistry, the Generation of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) model. Eleven (11) publications have resulted from this grant.

  18. Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism: a comparative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiren Karathia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Model organisms are used for research because they provide a framework on which to develop and optimize methods that facilitate and standardize analysis. Such organisms should be representative of the living beings for which they are to serve as proxy. However, in practice, a model organism is often selected ad hoc, and without considering its representativeness, because a systematic and rational method to include this consideration in the selection process is still lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work we propose such a method and apply it in a pilot study of strengths and limitations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism. The method relies on the functional classification of proteins into different biological pathways and processes and on full proteome comparisons between the putative model organism and other organisms for which we would like to extrapolate results. Here we compare S. cerevisiae to 704 other organisms from various phyla. For each organism, our results identify the pathways and processes for which S. cerevisiae is predicted to be a good model to extrapolate from. We find that animals in general and Homo sapiens in particular are some of the non-fungal organisms for which S. cerevisiae is likely to be a good model in which to study a significant fraction of common biological processes. We validate our approach by correctly predicting which organisms are phenotypically more distant from S. cerevisiae with respect to several different biological processes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The method we propose could be used to choose appropriate substitute model organisms for the study of biological processes in other species that are harder to study. For example, one could identify appropriate models to study either pathologies in humans or specific biological processes in species with a long development time, such as plants.

  19. MODEL OF LEARNING ORGANIZATION IN BROADCASTING ORGANIZATION OF ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Najafbagy

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article tries to present a model of learning organization for Iran Broadcasting Organization which is under the management of the spiritual leader of Iran. The study is based on characteristics of Peter Senge’s original learning organization namely, personal stery, mental models, shared vision, team learning and systems thinking. The methodology was a survey research employed questionnaire among sample employees and managers of the Organization.Findings showed that the Organization is fairly far from an ffective learning organization.Moreover, it seems that employees’ performance in team learning and changes in mental models are more satisfactory than managers. Regarding other characteristics of learning organizations, there are similarities in learning attempts by employees and managers. The rganization lacks organizational vision, and consequently there is no shared vision in the Organization. It also is in need of organizational culture. As a kind of state-owned organization, there s no need of financial support which affect the need for learning organization. It also does not face the threat of sustainabilitybecause there is no competitive organization.Findings also show that IBO need a fundamental change in its rganizational learning process. In this context, the general idea is to unfreeze the mindset of leadership of IBO and creating a visionand organizational culture based on learning and staff development. Then gradually through incremental effective change and continual organizational learning process in dividual, team and organization levels engage in development and reinforcement of skills of personal mastery, mental models, shared vision, team learning and systems thinking, should lead IBO to learning organization.

  20. Integrated modelling of two xenobiotic organic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindblom, Erik Ulfson; Gernaey, K.V.; Henze, Mogens

    2006-01-01

    compounds, is carried out. Sorption and specific biological degradation processes are integrated with standardised water process models to model the fate of both compounds. Simulated mass flows of the two compounds during one dry weather day and one wet weather day are compared for realistic influent flow...... rate and concentration profiles. The wet weather day induces resuspension of stored sediments, which increases the pollutant load on the downstream system. The potential of the model to elucidate important phenomena related to origin and fate of the model compounds is demonstrated....

  1. Arabidopsis poly(A) polymerase PAPS1 limits founder-cell recruitment to organ primordia and suppresses the salicylic acid-independent immune response downstream of EDS1/PAD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, Gerda; Vi, Son Lang; Czesnick, Hjördis; Lange, Peggy; Holton, Nick; Giavalisco, Patrick; Zipfel, Cyril; Kappel, Christian; Lenhard, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Polyadenylation of pre-mRNAs by poly(A) polymerase (PAPS) is a critical process in eukaryotic gene expression. As found in vertebrates, plant genomes encode several isoforms of canonical nuclear PAPS enzymes. In Arabidopsis thaliana these isoforms are functionally specialized, with PAPS1 affecting both organ growth and immune response, at least in part by the preferential polyadenylation of subsets of pre-mRNAs. Here, we demonstrate that the opposite effects of PAPS1 on leaf and flower growth reflect the different identities of these organs, and identify a role for PAPS1 in the elusive connection between organ identity and growth patterns. The overgrowth of paps1 mutant petals is due to increased recruitment of founder cells into early organ primordia, and suggests that PAPS1 activity plays unique roles in influencing organ growth. By contrast, the leaf phenotype of paps1 mutants is dominated by a constitutive immune response that leads to increased resistance to the biotrophic oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis and reflects activation of the salicylic acid-independent signalling pathway downstream of ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1)/PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4). These findings provide an insight into the developmental and physiological basis of the functional specialization amongst plant PAPS isoforms.

  2. Evolutionary Model to Traditional Culture and Program Organization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-xiao; JIN Wei-xing; YANG De-qin

    2006-01-01

    To study the relationship between the evolutions of Chinese Traditional Culture (CTC) and program organization, an outline of the CTC is generalized by reviewing literature, and which is also compartmentalized into two aspects according to economic philosophy views: traditional philosophy aspect and value judgment. Based on three dimensions, which are the philosophy aspect (P), program organization model (P), and value judgment from economic philosophy views (V), and this evolution sequence, the CTC's influence on the program organization model in the evolution is discussed; then the cultural spatial evolution model for program organization based on the three dimensions (PPV) is constructed. From analyzing the plane matrix of P-P and empirical investigating on the organizational model of construction enterprises, it is found that the ancient Chinese government organizational model still has prevailing influence on the modern program organizational model in China.

  3. Mathematical models of cell self-organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Perthame

    2011-04-01

    More recently nonlinear hyperbolic and kinetic models also have been used to describe the phenomena at a smaller scale. We explain here some motivations for ‘microscopic’ descriptions, the mathematical difficulties arising in their analysis and how kinetic models can help in understanding the unity of these descriptions.

  4. Exploring Organic Mechanistic Puzzles with Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Gail; Schwartz, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The molecular modeling was used to reinforce more general skills such as deducing and drawing reaction mechanisms, analyzing reaction kinetics and thermodynamics and drawing reaction coordinate energy diagrams. This modeling was done through the design of mechanistic puzzles, involving reactions not familiar to the students.

  5. Reference: 749 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available former mutant had decreased electron transport rates, a lower DeltapH gradient across the grana membranes, r...the PSII particles of these plants were organized in unusual two-dimensional arrays in the grana membranes. ...d the electron transport rate in grana membranes of Arabidopsis. 4 1012-28 18381925 2008 Apr The Plant cell

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK071407 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ain protein 6 (LBD6) / asymmetric leaves2 (AS2) identical to SP|O04479 LOB domain protein 6 (ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-43 ... ...AK071407 J023089G14 At1g65620.1 LOB domain protein 6 / lateral organ boundaries dom

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK119575 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available main protein 6 (LBD6) / asymmetric leaves2 (AS2) identical to SP|O04479 LOB domain protein 6 (ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-43 ... ...AK119575 002-117-B04 At1g65620.1 LOB domain protein 6 / lateral organ boundaries do

  8. [Models of the organization of neonatal screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassio, A; Piazzi, S; Colli, C; Balsamo, A; Bozza, D; Salardi, S; Sprovieri, G; Cacciari, E

    1994-01-01

    The authors evaluate the different organizational strategies of a congenital hypothyroidism screening program. Positive and negative aspects of laboratory screening tests (TSH only, T4-supplemental TSH, TSH and T4), organization strategies (centralization or decentralization), recall and first follow-up criteria are examined. The authors consider that the necessity for an early diagnostic confirmation can be associated with a precise etiologic diagnosis and an evaluation of the prenatal severity of congenital hypothyroidism factors. Some European and North-American experiences are compared with the activity of a regional Italian screening center.

  9. Modeling the influence of organic acids on soil weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Corey; Harden, Jennifer; Maher, Kate

    2014-08-01

    Biological inputs and organic matter cycling have long been regarded as important factors in the physical and chemical development of soils. In particular, the extent to which low molecular weight organic acids, such as oxalate, influence geochemical reactions has been widely studied. Although the effects of organic acids are diverse, there is strong evidence that organic acids accelerate the dissolution of some minerals. However, the influence of organic acids at the field-scale and over the timescales of soil development has not been evaluated in detail. In this study, a reactive-transport model of soil chemical weathering and pedogenic development was used to quantify the extent to which organic acid cycling controls mineral dissolution rates and long-term patterns of chemical weathering. Specifically, oxalic acid was added to simulations of soil development to investigate a well-studied chronosequence of soils near Santa Cruz, CA. The model formulation includes organic acid input, transport, decomposition, organic-metal aqueous complexation and mineral surface complexation in various combinations. Results suggest that although organic acid reactions accelerate mineral dissolution rates near the soil surface, the net response is an overall decrease in chemical weathering. Model results demonstrate the importance of organic acid input concentrations, fluid flow, decomposition and secondary mineral precipitation rates on the evolution of mineral weathering fronts. In particular, model soil profile evolution is sensitive to kaolinite precipitation and oxalate decomposition rates. The soil profile-scale modeling presented here provides insights into the influence of organic carbon cycling on soil weathering and pedogenesis and supports the need for further field-scale measurements of the flux and speciation of reactive organic compounds.

  10. Modeling the influence of organic acids on soil weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Corey R.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Maher, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Biological inputs and organic matter cycling have long been regarded as important factors in the physical and chemical development of soils. In particular, the extent to which low molecular weight organic acids, such as oxalate, influence geochemical reactions has been widely studied. Although the effects of organic acids are diverse, there is strong evidence that organic acids accelerate the dissolution of some minerals. However, the influence of organic acids at the field-scale and over the timescales of soil development has not been evaluated in detail. In this study, a reactive-transport model of soil chemical weathering and pedogenic development was used to quantify the extent to which organic acid cycling controls mineral dissolution rates and long-term patterns of chemical weathering. Specifically, oxalic acid was added to simulations of soil development to investigate a well-studied chronosequence of soils near Santa Cruz, CA. The model formulation includes organic acid input, transport, decomposition, organic-metal aqueous complexation and mineral surface complexation in various combinations. Results suggest that although organic acid reactions accelerate mineral dissolution rates near the soil surface, the net response is an overall decrease in chemical weathering. Model results demonstrate the importance of organic acid input concentrations, fluid flow, decomposition and secondary mineral precipitation rates on the evolution of mineral weathering fronts. In particular, model soil profile evolution is sensitive to kaolinite precipitation and oxalate decomposition rates. The soil profile-scale modeling presented here provides insights into the influence of organic carbon cycling on soil weathering and pedogenesis and supports the need for further field-scale measurements of the flux and speciation of reactive organic compounds.

  11. Reference: 471 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available decays, with decreased Hsps during recovery. AT of sufficient duration is critical for sessile organisms suc... C, the mutant line was more sensitive to severe heat stress than the wild type after long but not short recovery...observed in HsfA2 knockout plants after 4 h recovery or 2 h prolonged heat stress. Immunoblot analysis showe...d that Hsa32 and class I small Hsp were less abundant in the mutant than in the wild type after long recov...ach by screening for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) T-DNA insertion mutants that show decreased thermotolerance after a long reco

  12. Comparing risk attitudes of organic and non-organic farmers with a Bayesian random coefficient model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardebroek, C.

    2006-01-01

    Organic farming is usually considered to be more risky than conventional farming, but the risk aversion of organic farmers compared with that of conventional farmers has not been studied. Using a non-structural approach to risk estimation, a Bayesian random coefficient model is used to obtain indivi

  13. Cleavage of INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID INDUCIBLE28 mRNA by microRNA847 upregulates auxin signaling to modulate cell proliferation and lateral organ growth in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Jing; Guo, Hui-Shan

    2015-03-01

    MicroRNAs function in a range of developmental processes. Here, we demonstrate that miR847 targets the mRNA of the auxin/indole acetic acid (Aux/IAA) repressor-encoding gene IAA28 for cleavage. The rapidly increased accumulation of miR847 in Arabidopsis thaliana coincided with reduced IAA28 mRNA levels upon auxin treatment. This induction of miR847 by auxin was abolished in auxin receptor tir1-1 and auxin-resistant axr1-3 mutants. Further analysis demonstrates that miR847 functions as a positive regulator of auxin-mediated lateral organ development by cleaving IAA28 mRNA. Importantly, the ectopic expression of miR847 increases the expression of cell cycle genes as well as the neoplastic activity of leaf cells, prolonging later-stage rosette leaf growth and producing leaves with serrated margins. Moreover, both miR847 and IAA28 mRNAs are specifically expressed in marginal meristems of rosette leaves and lateral root initiation sites. Our data indicate that auxin-dependent induction of miR847 positively regulates meristematic competence by clearing IAA28 mRNA to upregulate auxin signaling, thereby determining the duration of cell proliferation and lateral organ growth in Arabidopsis. IAA28 mRNA encodes an Aux/IAA repressor protein, which is degraded through the proteasome in response to auxin. Altered signal sensitization to IAA28 mRNA levels, together with targeted IAA28 degradation, ensures a robust signal derepression.

  14. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) determination of phase II metabolites of the mycotoxin zearalenone in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    BERTHILLER, F.; WERNER, U.; SULYOK, M.; KRSKA, R.; HAUSER, M.-T.; SCHUHMACHER, R.

    2010-01-01

    The biotransformation products of zearalenone, a Fusarium mycotoxin, were elucidated using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. After treatment of plant seedlings with 50 μM zearalenone, both the liquid media and the plant extracts were analysed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). An array of 17 different metabolites, most prominently glucosides, malonylglucosides, di-hexose- and hexose–pentose disaccharides of zearalenone, and α- and β-zearalenol, were detected in the samples. Time courses for the different zearalenone metabolites were recorded and they give a closer insight into the metabolism kinetics. A scheme proposing the zearalenone metabolism in A. thaliana is given. The aspect of food safety regarding the (potential) occurrence of masked mycotoxins in agricultural commodities is discussed. PMID:17071522

  15. Daphnia as an Emerging Epigenetic Model Organism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kami D. M. Harris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Daphnia offer a variety of benefits for the study of epigenetics. Daphnia’s parthenogenetic life cycle allows the study of epigenetic effects in the absence of confounding genetic differences. Sex determination and sexual reproduction are epigenetically determined as are several other well-studied alternate phenotypes that arise in response to environmental stressors. Additionally, there is a large body of ecological literature available, recently complemented by the genome sequence of one species and transgenic technology. DNA methylation has been shown to be altered in response to toxicants and heavy metals, although investigation of other epigenetic mechanisms is only beginning. More thorough studies on DNA methylation as well as investigation of histone modifications and RNAi in sex determination and predator-induced defenses using this ecologically and evolutionarily important organism will contribute to our understanding of epigenetics.

  16. Mining the active proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renier A. L. Van Der Hoorn

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Assigning functions to the >30.000 proteins encoded by the Arabidopsis genome is a challenging task of the Arabidopsis Functional Genomics Network. Although genome-wide technologies like proteomics and transcriptomics have generated a wealth of information that significantly accelerated gene annotation, protein activities are poorly predicted by transcript or protein levels as protein activities are post-translationally regulated. To directly display protein activities in Arabidopsis proteomes, we developed and applied Activity-based Protein Profiling (ABPP. ABPP is based on the use of small molecule probes that react with the catalytic residues of distinct protein classes in an activity-dependent manner. Labeled proteins are separated and detected from proteins gels and purified and identified by mass spectrometry. Using probes of six different chemotypes we have displayed of activities of 76 Arabidopsis proteins. These proteins represent over ten different protein classes that contain over 250 Arabidopsis proteins, including cysteine- serine- and metallo-proteases, lipases, acyltransferases, and the proteasome. We have developed methods for identification of in vivo labeled proteins using click-chemistry and for in vivo imaging with fluorescent probes. In vivo labeling has revealed novel protein activities and unexpected subcellular activities of the proteasome. Labeling of extracts displayed several differential activities e.g. of the proteasome during immune response and methylesterases during infection. These studies illustrate the power of ABPP to display the functional proteome and testify to a successful interdisciplinary collaboration involving chemical biology, organic chemistry and proteomics.

  17. MODELLING CONSUMERS' DEMAND FOR ORGANIC FOOD PRODUCTS: THE SWEDISH EXPERIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Manuchehr Irandoust

    2016-01-01

    This paper attempts to examine a few factors characterizing consumer preferences and behavior towards organic food products in the south of Sweden using a proportional odds model which captures the natural ordering of dependent variables and any inherent nonlinearities. The findings show that consumer's choice for organic food depends on perceived benefits of organic food (environment, health, and quality) and consumer's perception and attitudes towards labelling system, message framing, and ...

  18. Organic production in a dynamic CGE model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lars Bo

    2004-01-01

    accumulation relationship for land, and an explicit modeling of the rate of stock accumulation (i.e., of land investment). We assume that land is industry specific, with land rentals adjusting to ensure that land supply equals land demand for each industry. Once the decision has been made to transform land...

  19. Nematodes: Model Organisms in High School Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, TJ; Anderson, Margery; Dillman, Adler; Yourick, Debra; Jett, Marti; Adams, Byron J.; Russell, RevaBeth

    2007-01-01

    In a collaborative effort between university researchers and high school science teachers, an inquiry-based laboratory module was designed using two species of insecticidal nematodes to help students apply scientific inquiry and elements of thoughtful experimental design. The learning experience and model are described in this article. (Contains 4…

  20. Representational Translation with Concrete Models in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, Andrew T.; Hegarty, Mary; Dixon, Bonnie; Stieff, Mike

    2012-01-01

    In representation-rich domains such as organic chemistry, students must be facile and accurate when translating between different 2D representations, such as diagrams. We hypothesized that translating between organic chemistry diagrams would be more accurate when concrete models were used because difficult mental processes could be augmented by…

  1. Impact of ubiquitous inhibitors on the GUS gene reporter system: evidence from the model plants Arabidopsis, tobacco and rice and correction methods for quantitative assays of transgenic and endogenous GUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerola Paolo D

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The β-glucuronidase (GUS gene reporter system is one of the most effective and employed techniques in the study of gene regulation in plant molecular biology. Improving protocols for GUS assays have rendered the original method described by Jefferson amenable to various requirements and conditions, but the serious limitation caused by inhibitors of the enzyme activity in plant tissues has thus far been underestimated. Results We report that inhibitors of GUS activity are ubiquitous in organ tissues of Arabidopsis, tobacco and rice, and significantly bias quantitative assessment of GUS activity in plant transformation experiments. Combined with previous literature reports on non-model species, our findings suggest that inhibitors may be common components of plant cells, with variable affinity towards the E. coli enzyme. The reduced inhibitory capacity towards the plant endogenous GUS discredits the hypothesis of a regulatory role of these compounds in plant cells, and their effect on the bacterial enzyme is better interpreted as a side effect due to their interaction with GUS during the assay. This is likely to have a bearing also on histochemical analyses, leading to inaccurate evaluations of GUS expression. Conclusions In order to achieve reliable results, inhibitor activity should be routinely tested during quantitative GUS assays. Two separate methods to correct the measured activity of the transgenic and endogenous GUS are presented.

  2. Investigating ecological speciation in non-model organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foote, Andrew David

    2012-01-01

    Background: Studies of ecological speciation tend to focus on a few model biological systems. In contrast, few studies on non-model organisms have been able to infer ecological speciation as the underlying mechanism of evolutionary divergence. Questions: What are the pitfalls in studying ecological...... speciation in non-model organisms that lead to this bias? What alternative approaches might redress the balance? Organism: Genetically differentiated types of the killer whale (Orcinus orca) exhibiting differences in prey preference, habitat use, morphology, and behaviour. Methods: Review of the literature...... variation underlie reproductive isolation between sympatric killer whale types. Perhaps ecological speciation has occurred, but it is hard to prove. We will probably face this outcome whenever we wish to address non-model organisms – species in which it is not easy to apply experimental approaches...

  3. Self-organizing map models of language acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Zhao, Xiaowei

    2013-01-01

    Connectionist models have had a profound impact on theories of language. While most early models were inspired by the classic parallel distributed processing architecture, recent models of language have explored various other types of models, including self-organizing models for language acquisition. In this paper, we aim at providing a review of the latter type of models, and highlight a number of simulation experiments that we have conducted based on these models. We show that self-organizing connectionist models can provide significant insights into long-standing debates in both monolingual and bilingual language development. We suggest future directions in which these models can be extended, to better connect with behavioral and neural data, and to make clear predictions in testing relevant psycholinguistic theories. PMID:24312061

  4. Self-organizing map models of language acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Zhao, Xiaowei

    2013-11-19

    Connectionist models have had a profound impact on theories of language. While most early models were inspired by the classic parallel distributed processing architecture, recent models of language have explored various other types of models, including self-organizing models for language acquisition. In this paper, we aim at providing a review of the latter type of models, and highlight a number of simulation experiments that we have conducted based on these models. We show that self-organizing connectionist models can provide significant insights into long-standing debates in both monolingual and bilingual language development. We suggest future directions in which these models can be extended, to better connect with behavioral and neural data, and to make clear predictions in testing relevant psycholinguistic theories.

  5. Spatiotemporal modelling of hormonal crosstalk explains the level and patterning of hormones and gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type and mutant roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Simon; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Mudge, Anna; Rowe, James H; Topping, Jennifer F; Liu, Junli; Lindsey, Keith

    2015-01-01

    • Patterning in Arabidopsis root development is coordinated via a localized auxin concentration maximum in the root tip, requiring the regulated expression of specific genes. However, little is known about how hormone and gene expression patterning is generated. • Using a variety of experimental data, we develop a spatiotemporal hormonal crosstalk model that describes the integrated action of auxin, ethylene and cytokinin signalling, the POLARIS protein, and the functions of PIN and AUX1 auxin transporters. We also conduct novel experiments to confirm our modelling predictions. • The model reproduces auxin patterning and trends in wild-type and mutants; reveals that coordinated PIN and AUX1 activities are required to generate correct auxin patterning; correctly predicts shoot to root auxin flux, auxin patterning in the aux1 mutant, the amounts of cytokinin, ethylene and PIN protein, and PIN protein patterning in wild-type and mutant roots. Modelling analysis further reveals how PIN protein patterning is related to the POLARIS protein through ethylene signalling. Modelling prediction of the patterning of POLARIS expression is confirmed experimentally. • Our combined modelling and experimental analysis reveals that a hormonal crosstalk network regulates the emergence of patterns and levels of hormones and gene expression in wild-type and mutants. PMID:25906686

  6. Labour Quality Model for Organic Farming Food Chains

    OpenAIRE

    Gassner, B.; Freyer, B.; Leitner, H.

    2008-01-01

    The debate on labour quality in science is controversial as well as in the organic agriculture community. Therefore, we reviewed literature on different labour quality models and definitions, and had key informant interviews on labour quality issues with stakeholders in a regional oriented organic agriculture bread food chain. We developed a labour quality model with nine quality categories and discussed linkages to labour satisfaction, ethical values and IFOAM principles.

  7. Kineic Modelling of Degradation of Organic Compounds in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGZONGSHENG; ZHANGSHUIMING; 等

    1997-01-01

    A set of equations in suggested to describe the kinetics of degradation of organic ompounds applied to soils ad the kinetics of growth of the inolved microorganisms:-dx/dt=jx+kxm dm/dt=-fm+gxm where x is the concentration of organic compound at time t,m is the numer of microorganisms capable of degrading the organic compound at time t,while j,k,f and g are positive constants,This model can satisfactorily be used to explain the degradation curve of organic compounds and the growth curve of the involved microorganisms.

  8. BUSINESS PROCESS MODELLING FOR PROJECTS COSTS MANAGEMENT IN AN ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PĂTRAŞCU AURELIA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Using Information Technologies in organizations represents an evident progress for company, money economy, time economy and generates value for the organization. In this paper the author proposes to model the business processes for an organization that manages projects costs, because modelling is an important part of any software development process. Using software for projects costs management is essential because it allows the management of all operations according to the established parameters, the management of the projects groups, as well as the management of the projects and subprojects, at different complexity levels.

  9. Mathematical model for cyclodextrin alteration of bioavailability of organic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huihui; Cai, Xiyun; Chen, Jingwen

    2013-06-04

    While many cyclodextrin-based applications have been developed to assess or enhance bioavailability of organic pollutants, the choice of cyclodextrin (CD) is largely empirical, with little consideration of pollutant diversity and environmental matrix effects. This study aimed at developing a mathematical model for quantifying CD alteration of bioavailability of organic pollutants. Cyclodextrin appears to have multiple effects, together contributing to its bioavailability-enhancing property. Cyclodextrin is adsorbed onto the adsorbent matrix to different extents. The adsorbed CD is capable of sequestrating organic pollutants, highlighting the role of a pseudophase similar to solid environmental matrix. Aqueous CD can reduce adsorption of organic pollutants via inclusion complexation. The two effects cancel each other to a certain degree, which determines the levels of organic pollutants dissolved (comprising freely dissolved and CD-included forms). Additionally, the CD-included form is nearly identical in biological activity to the free form. A mathematical model of one variable (i.e., CD concentration) was derived to quantify effects of CD on the bioavailability of organic pollutants. Model analysis indicates that alteration of bioavailability of organic pollutants by CD depends on both CD (type and level) and environmental matrix. The selection of CD type and amendment level for a given application may be predicted by the model.

  10. A survey of financial planning models for health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, J R; Kaminsky, F C; McGee, F

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes "what if?" financial planning models developed for health care administrators and financial managers to study and evaluate the economic impact of changes in a health care organization's charge structure, operating policies, reimbursement plans, and services and resources. Models for inpatient and outpatient care systems are presented. The models are described in terms of input, output, and application. An assessment of the state of the art of financial planning and prospects for the future of what if?models are given.

  11. Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism to study nanotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Cynthia; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Cai, Yu; Bay, Boon-Huat; Baeg, Gyeong-Hun

    2015-05-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has been used as an in vivo model organism for the study of genetics and development since 100 years ago. Recently, the fruit fly Drosophila was also developed as an in vivo model organism for toxicology studies, in particular, the field of nanotoxicity. The incorporation of nanomaterials into consumer and biomedical products is a cause for concern as nanomaterials are often associated with toxicity in many in vitro studies. In vivo animal studies of the toxicity of nanomaterials with rodents and other mammals are, however, limited due to high operational cost and ethical objections. Hence, Drosophila, a genetically tractable organism with distinct developmental stages and short life cycle, serves as an ideal organism to study nanomaterial-mediated toxicity. This review discusses the basic biology of Drosophila, the toxicity of nanomaterials, as well as how the Drosophila model can be used to study the toxicity of various types of nanomaterials.

  12. Phytoremediation and its models for organic contaminated soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Soil pollution has been attracting considerable public attentions over the last decades. Sorts of traditional physiochemical methods have been used to remove the organic pollutants from soils. However, the enormous costs and low efficiencies associated with these remediation technologies limit their availabilities. Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that uses plants to cleanup pollutants in soils. As overwhelmingly positive results have been shown, phytoremediation is a most economical and effective remediation technique for organic contaminated soils. In this paper phytoremediation and its models for organic contaminated soils is overviewed. The mechanisms of phytoremediation mainly include the direct plant uptake of organic pollutants, degradation by plant-derived degradative enzymes, and stimulated biodegradation in plant rhizosphere. Phytoremediation efficiency is tightly related to physicochemical properties of organic pollutants, environmental characteristics, and plant types. It is no doubt that soil amendments such as surfactants change the solubilities and availabilities of organic pollutants in soils. However, little information is available about effects of soil amendments on phytoremediation efficiencies. Phytoremediation models have been developed to simulate and predict the environmental behavior of organic pollutants, and progress of models is illustrated. In many ways phytoremediation is still in its initial stage, and recommendations for the future research on phytoremediation are presented.

  13. Modeling secondary organic aerosol formation through cloud processing of organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chen

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Interest in the potential formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA through reactions of organic compounds in condensed aqueous phases is growing. In this study, the potential formation of SOA from irreversible aqueous-phase reactions of organic species in clouds was investigated. A new proposed aqueous-phase chemistry mechanism (AqChem is coupled with the existing gas-phase Caltech Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (CACM and the Model to Predict the Multiphase Partitioning of Organics (MPMPO that simulate SOA formation. AqChem treats irreversible organic reactions that lead mainly to the formation of carboxylic acids, which are usually less volatile than the corresponding aldehydic compounds. Zero-dimensional model simulations were performed for tropospheric conditions with clouds present for three consecutive hours per day. Zero-dimensional model simulations show that 48-h averaged SOA formation are increased by 27% for a rural scenario with strong monoterpene emissions and 7% for an urban scenario with strong emissions of aromatic compounds, respectively, when irreversible organic reactions in clouds are considered. AqChem was also incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ version 4.4 with CACM/MPMPO and applied to a previously studied photochemical episode (3–4 August 2004 focusing on the eastern United States. The CMAQ study indicates that the maximum contribution of SOA formation from irreversible reactions of organics in clouds is 0.28 μg m−3 for 24-h average concentrations and 0.60 μg m−3 for one-hour average concentrations at certain locations. On average, domain-wide surface SOA predictions for the episode are increased by 8.6% when irreversible, in-cloud processing of organics is considered.

  14. A Workforce Design Model: Providing Energy to Organizations in Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halm, Barry J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the change in performance realized by a professional services organization, which resulted in the Life Giving Workforce Design (LGWD) model through a grounded theory research design. This study produced a workforce design model characterized as an organizational blueprint that provides virtuous…

  15. Simple model of self-organized biological evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Jan; Derrida, Bernard; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Jackson, Andrew D.; Wettig, Tilo

    1994-08-01

    We give an exact solution of a recently proposed self-organized critical model of biological evolution. We show that the model has a power law distribution of durations of coevolutionary ``avalanches'' with a mean field exponent 3/2. We also calculate analytically the finite size effects which cut off this power law at times of the order of the system size.

  16. Modeling organic compounds in the estuarine and coastal environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W.P.M. Laane; D. van de Meent; P. de Voogt; J. Parsons; J. Hendriks; J. van Gils

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes the historical development and present applications of water-quality models for organic chemical compounds (e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)). Various types of water-quality models are described, varying in the amount of compar

  17. Fruit tree model for uptake of organic compounds from soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Rasmussen, D.; Samsoe-Petersen, L.

    2003-01-01

    soils, regressions or models are in use, which were not intended to be used for tree fruits. A simple model for uptake of neutral organic contaminants into fruits is developed. It considers xylem and phloem transport to fruits through the stem. The mass balance is solved for the steady...

  18. System identification of the Arabidopsis plant circadian system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Mathias; Somers, David E.; Kim, Pan-Jun

    2015-02-01

    The circadian system generates an endogenous oscillatory rhythm that governs the daily activities of organisms in nature. It offers adaptive advantages to organisms through a coordination of their biological functions with the optimal time of day. In this paper, a model of the circadian system in the plant Arabidopsis (species thaliana) is built by using system identification techniques. Prior knowledge about the physical interactions of the genes and the proteins in the plant circadian system is incorporated in the model building exercise. The model is built by using primarily experimentally-verified direct interactions between the genes and the proteins with the available data on mRNA and protein abundances from the circadian system. Our analysis reveals a great performance of the model in predicting the dynamics of the plant circadian system through the effect of diverse internal and external perturbations (gene knockouts and day-length changes). Furthermore, we found that the circadian oscillatory rhythm is robust and does not vary much with the biochemical parameters except those of a light-sensitive protein P and a transcription factor TOC1. In other words, the circadian rhythmic profile is largely a consequence of the network's architecture rather than its particular parameters. Our work suggests that the current experimental knowledge of the gene-to-protein interactions in the plant Arabidopsis, without considering any additional hypothetical interactions, seems to suffice for system-level modeling of the circadian system of this plant and to present an exemplary platform for the control of network dynamics in complex living organisms.

  19. Towards an Intelligent Project Based Organization Business Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alami Marrouni Oussama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Global economy is undergoing a recession phase that had made competition tougher and imposed new business framework. Businesses have to shift from the classical management approaches to an Intelligent Project Based Organization (IPBO model that provides flexibility and agility. IPBO model is intended to reinforce the proven advantages of Project Based Organization (PBO by the use of suitable Enterprise Intelligence (EI Systems. The goal of this paper is to propose an IPBO model that combines benefits of PBO and EI and helps overcoming their pitfalls

  20. Xanthusbase: adapting wikipedia principles to a model organism database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshinoff, Bradley I; Suen, Garret; Just, Eric M; Merchant, Sohel M; Kibbe, Warren A; Chisholm, Rex L; Welch, Roy D

    2007-01-01

    xanthusBase (http://www.xanthusbase.org) is the official model organism database (MOD) for the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. In many respects, M.xanthus represents the pioneer model organism (MO) for studying the genetic, biochemical, and mechanistic basis of prokaryotic multicellularity, a topic that has garnered considerable attention due to the significance of biofilms in both basic and applied microbiology research. To facilitate its utility, the design of xanthusBase incorporates open-source software, leveraging the cumulative experience made available through the Generic Model Organism Database (GMOD) project, MediaWiki (http://www.mediawiki.org), and dictyBase (http://www.dictybase.org), to create a MOD that is both highly useful and easily navigable. In addition, we have incorporated a unique Wikipedia-style curation model which exploits the internet's inherent interactivity, thus enabling M.xanthus and other myxobacterial researchers to contribute directly toward the ongoing genome annotation.

  1. Acetylsalicylic acid induces programmed cell death in Arabidopsis cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Heredia, José M; Hervás, Manuel; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Navarro, José A

    2008-06-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), a derivative from the plant hormone salicylic acid (SA), is a commonly used drug that has a dual role in animal organisms as an anti-inflammatory and anticancer agent. It acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenases (COXs), which catalyze prostaglandins production. It is known that ASA serves as an apoptotic agent on cancer cells through the inhibition of the COX-2 enzyme. Here, we provide evidences that ASA also behaves as an agent inducing programmed cell death (PCD) in cell cultures of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in a similar way than the well-established PCD-inducing agent H(2)O(2), although the induction of PCD by ASA requires much lower inducer concentrations. Moreover, ASA is herein shown to be a more efficient PCD-inducing agent than salicylic acid. ASA treatment of Arabidopsis cells induces typical PCD-linked morphological and biochemical changes, namely cell shrinkage, nuclear DNA degradation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from mitochondria and induction of caspase-like activity. However, the ASA effect can be partially reverted by jasmonic acid. Taking together, these results reveal the existence of common features in ASA-induced animal apoptosis and plant PCD, and also suggest that there are similarities between the pathways of synthesis and function of prostanoid-like lipid mediators in animal and plant organisms.

  2. An Ising model for metal-organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höft, Nicolas; Horbach, Jürgen; Martín-Mayor, Victor; Seoane, Beatriz

    2017-08-01

    We present a three-dimensional Ising model where lines of equal spins are frozen such that they form an ordered framework structure. The frame spins impose an external field on the rest of the spins (active spins). We demonstrate that this "porous Ising model" can be seen as a minimal model for condensation transitions of gas molecules in metal-organic frameworks. Using Monte Carlo simulation techniques, we compare the phase behavior of a porous Ising model with that of a particle-based model for the condensation of methane (CH4) in the isoreticular metal-organic framework IRMOF-16. For both models, we find a line of first-order phase transitions that end in a critical point. We show that the critical behavior in both cases belongs to the 3D Ising universality class, in contrast to other phase transitions in confinement such as capillary condensation.

  3. Quantitative divergence of the bacterial root microbiota in Arabidopsis thaliana relatives

    OpenAIRE

    Schlaeppi, K.; Dombrowski, N.; Oter, R. G.; Ver Loren van Themaat, E.; Schulze-Lefert, P

    2014-01-01

    All plants carry distinctive bacterial communities on and inside organs such as roots and leaves, collectively called the plant microbiota. How this microbiota diversifies in related plant species is unknown. We investigated the diversity of the bacterial root microbiota in the Brassicaceae family, including three Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes, its sister species Arabidopsis halleri and Arabidopsis lyrata, and Cardamine hirsuta. We show that differences in root microbiota profiles between the...

  4. The expanding epigenetic landscape of non-model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonasio, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetics studies the emergence of different phenotypes from a single genotype. Although these processes are essential to cellular differentiation and transcriptional memory, they are also widely used in all branches of the tree of life by organisms that require plastic but stable adaptation to their physical and social environment. Because of the inherent flexibility of epigenetic regulation, a variety of biological phenomena can be traced back to evolutionary adaptations of few conserved molecular pathways that converge on chromatin. For these reasons chromatin biology and epigenetic research have a rich history of chasing discoveries in a variety of model organisms, including yeast, flies, plants and humans. Many more fascinating examples of epigenetic plasticity lie outside the realm of model organisms and have so far been only sporadically investigated at a molecular level; however, recent progress on sequencing technology and genome editing tools have begun to blur the lines between model and non-model organisms, opening numerous new avenues for investigation. Here, I review examples of epigenetic phenomena in non-model organisms that have emerged as potential experimental systems, including social insects, fish and flatworms, and are becoming accessible to molecular approaches.

  5. Regional Persistent Organic Pollutants' Environmental Impact Assessment and Control Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurgis Staniskis

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The sources of formation, environmental distribution and fate of persistent organic pollutants (POPs are increasingly seen as topics to be addressed and solved at the global scale. Therefore, there are already two international agreements concerning persistent organic pollutants: the Protocol of 1998 to the 1979 Convention on the Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution on Persistent Organic Pollutants (Aarhus Protocol; and the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. For the assessment of environmental pollution of POPs, for the risk assessment, for the evaluation of new pollutants as potential candidates to be included in the POPs list of the Stokholmo or/and Aarhus Protocol, a set of different models are developed or under development. Multimedia models help describe and understand environmental processes leading to global contamination through POPs and actual risk to the environment and human health. However, there is a lack of the tools based on a systematic and integrated approach to POPs management difficulties in the region.

  6. Quantitative model studies for interfaces in organic electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, J. Michael

    2016-11-01

    In organic light-emitting diodes and similar devices, organic semiconductors are typically contacted by metal electrodes. Because the resulting metal/organic interfaces have a large impact on the performance of these devices, their quantitative understanding is indispensable for the further rational development of organic electronics. A study by Kröger et al (2016 New J. Phys. 18 113022) of an important single-crystal based model interface provides detailed insight into its geometric and electronic structure and delivers valuable benchmark data for computational studies. In view of the differences between typical surface-science model systems and real devices, a ‘materials gap’ is identified that needs to be addressed by future research to make the knowledge obtained from fundamental studies even more beneficial for real-world applications.

  7. MODELLING CONSUMERS' DEMAND FOR ORGANIC FOOD PRODUCTS: THE SWEDISH EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuchehr Irandoust

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to examine a few factors characterizing consumer preferences and behavior towards organic food products in the south of Sweden using a proportional odds model which captures the natural ordering of dependent variables and any inherent nonlinearities. The findings show that consumer's choice for organic food depends on perceived benefits of organic food (environment, health, and quality and consumer's perception and attitudes towards labelling system, message framing, and local origin. In addition, high willingness to pay and income level will increase the probability to buy organic food, while the cultural differences and socio-demographic characteristics have no effect on consumer behaviour and attitudes towards organic food products. Policy implications are offered.

  8. Reference: 134 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available eport the identification of the essential gene Fe-deficiency Induced Transcription Factor 1 (FIT1), which en...codes a putative transcription factor that regulates iron uptake responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Like the Fe...(III) chelate reductase FRO2 and high affinity Fe(II) transporter IRT1, FIT1 m...tant plants are chlorotic and die as seedlings but can be rescued by the addition of supplemental iron, pointing to a defe...ion and IRT1 at the level of protein accumulation. We propose a new model for iron uptake in Arabidopsis whe

  9. Lotka-Volterra competition models for sessile organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Matthew; Tanner, Jason E

    2008-04-01

    Markov models are widely used to describe the dynamics of communities of sessile organisms, because they are easily fitted to field data and provide a rich set of analytical tools. In typical ecological applications, at any point in time, each point in space is in one of a finite set of states (e.g., species, empty space). The models aim to describe the probabilities of transitions between states. In most Markov models for communities, these transition probabilities are assumed to be independent of state abundances. This assumption is often suspected to be false and is rarely justified explicitly. Here, we start with simple assumptions about the interactions among sessile organisms and derive a model in which transition probabilities depend on the abundance of destination states. This model is formulated in continuous time and is equivalent to a Lotka-Volterra competition model. We fit this model and a variety of alternatives in which transition probabilities do not depend on state abundances to a long-term coral reef data set. The Lotka-Volterra model describes the data much better than all models we consider other than a saturated model (a model with a separate parameter for each transition at each time interval, which by definition fits the data perfectly). Our approach provides a basis for further development of stochastic models of sessile communities, and many of the methods we use are relevant to other types of community. We discuss possible extensions to spatially explicit models.

  10. Modeling nanostructure-enhanced light trapping in organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Jost

    A promising approach for improving the power conversion efficiencies of organic solar cells (OSCs) is by incorporating nanostructures in their thin film architecture to improve the light absorption in the device’s active polymer layers. Here, we present a modelling framework for the prediction....... Diffraction by fractal metallic supergratings. Optics Express, 15(24), 15628–15636 (2007) [3] Goszczak, A. J. et al. Nanoscale Aluminum dimples for light trapping in organic thin films (submitted)...

  11. Beyond the thale: comparative genomics and genetics of Arabidopsis relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Daniel; Weigel, Detlef

    2015-05-01

    For decades a small number of model species have rightly occupied a privileged position in laboratory experiments, but it is becoming increasingly clear that our knowledge of biology is greatly improved when informed by a broader diversity of species and evolutionary context. Arabidopsis thaliana has been the primary model organism for plants, benefiting from a high-quality reference genome sequence and resources for reverse genetics. However, recent studies have made a group of species also in the Brassicaceae family and closely related to A. thaliana a focal point for comparative molecular, genomic, phenotypic and evolutionary studies. In this Review, we emphasize how such studies complement continued study of the model plant itself, provide an evolutionary perspective and summarize our current understanding of genetic and phenotypic diversity in plants.

  12. Modelling the formation of organic particles in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anttila, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kulmala, M.; Laaksonen, A.; O'Dowd, C.

    2003-12-01

    A modelling study investigating the formation of organic particles from inorganic, thermodynamically stable clusters was carried out. A recently-developed theory, the so-called nano-Köhler theory, which describes a thermodynamic equilibrium between a nanometer-size cluster, water and water-soluble organic compound, was implemented in a dynamical model along with a treatment of the appropriate aerosol and gas-phase processes. The obtained results suggest that both gaseous sulphuric acid and organic vapours contribute to organic particle formation. The initial growth of freshly-nucleated clusters having a diameter around 1 nm is driven by condensation of gaseous sulphuric acid and by a lesser extent cluster self-coagulation. After the clusters have reached sizes of around 2 nm in diameter, low-volatile organic vapours start to condense spontaneously into the clusters, thereby accelerating their growth to detectable sizes. A shortage of gaseous sulphuric acid or organic vapours limit, or suppress altogether, the particle formation, since freshly-nucleated clusters are rapidly coagulated away by pre-existing particles. The obtained modelling results were applied to explaining the observed seasonal cycle in the number of aerosol formation events in a continental forest site.

  13. Precisely parameterized experimental and computational models of tissue organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molitoris, Jared M; Paliwal, Saurabh; Sekar, Rajesh B; Blake, Robert; Park, JinSeok; Trayanova, Natalia A; Tung, Leslie; Levchenko, Andre

    2016-02-01

    Patterns of cellular organization in diverse tissues frequently display a complex geometry and topology tightly related to the tissue function. Progressive disorganization of tissue morphology can lead to pathologic remodeling, necessitating the development of experimental and theoretical methods of analysis of the tolerance of normal tissue function to structural alterations. A systematic way to investigate the relationship of diverse cell organization to tissue function is to engineer two-dimensional cell monolayers replicating key aspects of the in vivo tissue architecture. However, it is still not clear how this can be accomplished on a tissue level scale in a parameterized fashion, allowing for a mathematically precise definition of the model tissue organization and properties down to a cellular scale with a parameter dependent gradual change in model tissue organization. Here, we describe and use a method of designing precisely parameterized, geometrically complex patterns that are then used to control cell alignment and communication of model tissues. We demonstrate direct application of this method to guiding the growth of cardiac cell cultures and developing mathematical models of cell function that correspond to the underlying experimental patterns. Several anisotropic patterned cultures spanning a broad range of multicellular organization, mimicking the cardiac tissue organization of different regions of the heart, were found to be similar to each other and to isotropic cell monolayers in terms of local cell-cell interactions, reflected in similar confluency, morphology and connexin-43 expression. However, in agreement with the model predictions, different anisotropic patterns of cell organization, paralleling in vivo alterations of cardiac tissue morphology, resulted in variable and novel functional responses with important implications for the initiation and maintenance of cardiac arrhythmias. We conclude that variations of tissue geometry and topology

  14. TPR5 is involved in directional cell division and is essential for the maintenance of meristem cell organization in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotta, Naoyuki; Shantikumar, Lukram; Sakamoto, Takuya; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Fujiwara, Toru

    2016-04-01

    Root growth in plants is achieved through the co-ordination of cell division and expansion. In higher plants, the radial structure of the roots is formed during embryogenesis and maintained thereafter throughout development. Here we show that the tetratricopeptide repeat domain protein TPR5 is necessary for maintaining radial structure and growth rates in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. We isolated an A. thaliana mutant with reduced root growth and determined that TPR5 was the gene responsible for the phenotype. The root growth rate of the tpr5-1 mutant was reduced to ~60% of that in wild-type plants. The radial structure was disturbed by the occurrence of occasional extra periclinal cell divisions. While the number of meristematic cells was reduced in the tpr5 mutants, the cell length in the mature portion of the root did not differ from that of the wild type, suggesting that TPR5 is required for proper cell division but dispensable for cell elongation. Expression of the TPR5-GFP fusion protein driven by the TPR5 promoter displayed fluorescence in the cytoplasm of root meristems, but not in mature root regions. DNA staining revealed that frequencies of micronuclei were increased in root meristems of tpr5 mutants. From this study, we concluded that TPR5 is involved in preventing the formation of micronuclei and is necessary for both the activity and directionality of cell division in root meristems. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  15. Structure and function of centromeric and pericentromeric heterochromatin in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauriane eSimon

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The centromere is a specific chromosomal region where the kinetochore assembles to ensure the faithful segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis and meiosis. Centromeres are defined by a local enrichment of the specific histone variant CenH3 mostly at repetitive satellite sequences. A larger pericentromeric region containing repetitive sequences and transposable elements surrounds the centromere that adopts a particular chromatin state characterized by specific histone variants and post-translational modifications and forms a transcriptionally repressive chromosomal environment. In the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana centromeric and pericentromeric domains form conspicuous heterochromatin clusters called chromocenters in interphase. Here we discuss, using Arabidopsis as example, recent insight into mechanisms involved in maintenance and establishment of centromeric and pericentromeric chromatin signatures as well as in chromocenter formation.

  16. Proteomics of Arabidopsis seed germination and priming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallardo, K.; Job, C.; Groot, S.P.C.; Puype, M.; Demol, H.; Vandekerckhove, J.; Job, D.

    2003-01-01

    To better understand seed germination, a complex developmental process, we developed a proteome analysis of the model plant Arabidopsis for which complete genome sequence is now available. Among about 1,300 total seed proteins resolved in two-dimensional gels, changes in the abundance (up- and down-

  17. Modeling of Spatially Correlated Energetic Disorder in Organic Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordt, Pascal; Andrienko, Denis

    2016-01-12

    Mesoscale modeling of organic semiconductors relies on solving an appropriately parametrized master equation. Essential ingredients of the parametrization are site energies (driving forces), which enter the charge transfer rate between pairs of neighboring molecules. Site energies are often Gaussian-distributed and are spatially correlated. Here, we propose an algorithm that generates these energies with a given Gaussian distribution and spatial correlation function. The method is tested on an amorphous organic semiconductor, DPBIC, illustrating that the accurate description of correlations is essential for the quantitative modeling of charge transport in amorphous mesophases.

  18. Biobanking of a Marine Invertebrate Model Organism: The Sea Urchin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefania Paredes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The sea urchin has long been used as an invertebrate model organism in developmental biology, membrane transport and sperm oocyte interactions, and for the assessment of marine pollution. This review explores the effects of cryopreservation and biobanking in the biology and development of sea urchins, all the way from germaplasm through to juveniles. This review will provide an integral view of the process and all that is known so far about the biology of cryopreserved sea urchins, as well as provide an insight on the applications of the biobanking of these model organisms.

  19. Zinc tolerance and accumulation in stable cell suspension cultures and in vitro regenerated plants of the emerging model plant Arabidopsis halleri (Brassicaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Miranda-Vergara, Maria Cristina; Barkla, Bronwyn J

    2009-03-01

    Arabidopsis halleri is increasingly employed as a model plant for studying heavy metal hyperaccumulation. With the aim of providing valuable tools for studies on cellular physiology and molecular biology of metal tolerance and transport, this study reports the development of successful and highly efficient methods for the in vitro regeneration of A. halleri plants and production of stable cell suspension lines. Plants were regenerated from leaf explants of A. halleri via a three-step procedure: callus induction, somatic embryogenesis and shoot development. Efficiency of callus proliferation and regeneration depended on the initial callus induction media and was optimal in the presence of 1 mg L(-1) 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and 0.05 mg L(-1) benzylaminopurine. Subsequent shoot and root regeneration from callus initiated under these conditions reached levels of 100% efficiency. High friability of the callus supported the development of cell suspension cultures with minimal cellular aggregates. Characterization of regenerated plants and cell cultures determined that they maintained not only the zinc tolerance and requirement of the whole plant but also the ability to accumulate zinc; with plants accumulating up to 50.0 micromoles zinc g(-1) FW, and cell suspension cultures 30.9 micromoles zinc g(-1) DW. Together this work will provide the experimental basis for furthering our knowledge of A. halleri as a model heavy metal hyperaccumulating plant.

  20. A multi-scale model of the interplay between cell signalling and hormone transport in specifying the root meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, D; Larrieu, A; Lucas, M; Chopard, J; Byrne, H; Godin, C; King, J

    2016-09-07

    The growth of the root of Arabidopsis thaliana is sustained by the meristem, a region of cell proliferation and differentiation which is located in the root apex and generates cells which move shootwards, expanding rapidly to cause root growth. The balance between cell division and differentiation is maintained via a signalling network, primarily coordinated by the hormones auxin, cytokinin and gibberellin. Since these hormones interact at different levels of spatial organisation, we develop a multi-scale computational model which enables us to study the interplay between these signalling networks and cell-cell communication during the specification of the root meristem. We investigate the responses of our model to hormonal perturbations, validating the results of our simulations against experimental data. Our simulations suggest that one or more additional components are needed to explain the observed expression patterns of a regulator of cytokinin signalling, ARR1, in roots not producing gibberellin. By searching for novel network components, we identify two mutant lines that affect significantly both root length and meristem size, one of which also differentially expresses a central component of the interaction network (SHY2). More generally, our study demonstrates how a multi-scale investigation can provide valuable insight into the spatio-temporal dynamics of signalling networks in biological tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Modeling of the catalytic core of Arabidopsis thaliana Dicer-like 4 protein and its complex with double-stranded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickiewicz, Agnieszka; Sarzyńska, Joanna; Miłostan, Maciej; Kurzyńska-Kokorniak, Anna; Rybarczyk, Agnieszka; Łukasiak, Piotr; Kuliński, Tadeusz; Figlerowicz, Marek; Błażewicz, Jacek

    2017-02-01

    Plant Dicer-like proteins (DCLs) belong to the Ribonuclease III (RNase III) enzyme family. They are involved in the regulation of gene expression and antiviral defense through RNA interference pathways. A model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana encodes four DCL proteins (AtDCL1-4) that produce different classes of small regulatory RNAs. Our studies focus on AtDCL4 that processes double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) into 21 nucleotide trans-acting small interfering RNAs. So far, little is known about the structures of plant DCLs and the complexes they form with dsRNA. In this work, we present models of the catalytic core of AtDCL4 and AtDCL4-dsRNA complex constructed by computational methods. We built a homology model of the catalytic core of AtDCL4 comprising Platform, PAZ, Connector helix and two RNase III domains. To assemble the AtDCL4-dsRNA complex two modeling approaches were used. In the first method, to establish conformations that allow building a consistent model of the complex, we used Normal Mode Analysis for both dsRNA and AtDCL4. The second strategy involved template-based approach for positioning of the PAZ domain and manual arrangement of the Connector helix. Our results suggest that the spatial orientation of the Connector helix, Platform and PAZ relative to the RNase III domains is crucial for measuring dsRNA of defined length. The modeled complexes provide information about interactions that may contribute to the relative orientations of these domains and to dsRNA binding. All these information can be helpful for understanding the mechanism of AtDCL4-mediated dsRNA recognition and binding, to produce small RNA of specific size.

  2. Workshop meeting report Organs-on-Chips: human disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Stolpe, Anja; den Toonder, Jaap

    2013-09-21

    The concept of "Organs-on-Chips" has recently evolved and has been described as 3D (mini-) organs or tissues consisting of multiple and different cell types interacting with each other under closely controlled conditions, grown in a microfluidic chip, and mimicking the complex structures and cellular interactions in and between different cell types and organs in vivo, enabling the real time monitoring of cellular processes. In combination with the emerging iPSC (induced pluripotent stem cell) field this development offers unprecedented opportunities to develop human in vitro models for healthy and diseased organ tissues, enabling the investigation of fundamental mechanisms in disease development, drug toxicity screening, drug target discovery and drug development, and the replacement of animal testing. Capturing the genetic background of the iPSC donor in the organ or disease model carries the promise to move towards "in vitro clinical trials", reducing costs for drug development and furthering the concept of personalized medicine and companion diagnostics. During the Lorentz workshop (Leiden, September 2012) an international multidisciplinary group of experts discussed the current state of the art, available and emerging technologies, applications and how to proceed in the field. Organ-on-a-chip platform technologies are expected to revolutionize cell biology in general and drug development in particular.

  3. Stochastic models for plant microtubule self-organization and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Ezgi C; Dixit, Ram; Gautam, Natarajan

    2015-12-01

    One of the key enablers of shape and growth in plant cells is the cortical microtubule (CMT) system, which is a polymer array that forms an appropriately-structured scaffolding in each cell. Plant biologists have shown that stochastic dynamics and simple rules of interactions between CMTs can lead to a coaligned CMT array structure. However, the mechanisms and conditions that cause CMT arrays to become organized are not well understood. It is prohibitively time-consuming to use actual plants to study the effect of various genetic mutations and environmental conditions on CMT self-organization. In fact, even computer simulations with multiple replications are not fast enough due to the spatio-temporal complexity of the system. To redress this shortcoming, we develop analytical models and methods for expeditiously computing CMT system metrics that are related to self-organization and array structure. In particular, we formulate a mean-field model to derive sufficient conditions for the organization to occur. We show that growth-prone dynamics itself is sufficient to lead to organization in presence of interactions in the system. In addition, for such systems, we develop predictive methods for estimation of system metrics such as expected average length and number of CMTs over time, using a stochastic fluid-flow model, transient analysis, and approximation algorithms tailored to our problem. We illustrate the effectiveness of our approach through numerical test instances and discuss biological insights.

  4. Implementing Marine Organic Aerosols Into the GEOS-Chem Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew S.

    2015-01-01

    Marine-sourced organic aerosols (MOA) have been shown to play an important role in tropospheric chemistry by impacting surface mass, cloud condensation nuclei, and ice nuclei concentrations over remote marine and coastal regions. In this work, an online marine primary organic aerosol emission parameterization, designed to be used for both global and regional models, was implemented into the GEOS-Chem model. The implemented emission scheme improved the large under-prediction of organic aerosol concentrations in clean marine regions (normalized mean bias decreases from -79% when using the default settings to -12% when marine organic aerosols are added). Model predictions were also in good agreement (correlation coefficient of 0.62 and normalized mean bias of -36%) with hourly surface concentrations of MOA observed during the summertime at an inland site near Paris, France. Our study shows that MOA have weaker coastal-to-inland concentration gradients than sea-salt aerosols, leading to several inland European cities having > 10% of their surface submicron organic aerosol mass concentration with a marine source. The addition of MOA tracers to GEOS-Chem enabled us to identify the regions with large contributions of freshly-emitted or aged aerosol having distinct physicochemical properties, potentially indicating optimal locations for future field studies.

  5. Self-organized Criticality Model for Ocean Internal Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gang; LIN Min; QIAO Fang-Li; HOU Yi-Jun

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simple spring-block model for ocean internal waves based on the self-organized criticality (SOC). The oscillations of the water blocks in the model display power-law behavior with an exponent of-2 in the frequency domain, which is similar to the current and sea water temperature spectra in the actual ocean and the universal Garrett and Munk deep ocean internal wave model [Geophysical Fluid Dynamics 2 (1972) 225; J. Geophys. Res. 80 (1975) 291]. The influence of the ratio of the driving force to the spring coefficient to SOC behaviors in the model is also discussed.

  6. Financial market model based on self-organized percolation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chunxia; WANG Jie; ZHOU Tao; LIU Jun; XU Min; ZHOU Peiling; WANG Binghong

    2005-01-01

    Starting with the self-organized evolution of the trader group's structure, a parsimonious percolation model for stock market is established, which can be considered as a kind of betterment of the Cont-Bouchaud model. The return distribution of the present model obeys Lévy form in the center and displays fat-tail property, in accord with the stylized facts observed in real-life financial time series. Furthermore, this model reveals the power-law relationship between the peak value of the probability distribution and the time scales, in agreement with the empirical studies on the Hang Seng Index.

  7. Fumaric acid: an overlooked form of fixed carbon in Arabidopsis and other plant species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chia, D.W.; Yoder, T.J.; Reiter, W.D.; Gibson, S.I.

    2000-10-01

    Photoassimilates are used by plants for production of energy, as carbon skeletons and in transport of fixed carbon between different plant organs. Many studies have been devoted to characterizing the factors that. regulate photoassimilate concentrations in different plant species. Most studies examining photoassimilate concentrations in C{sub 3} plants have focused on analyzing starch and soluble sugars. However, work presented here demonstrates that a number of C{sub 3} plants, including the popular model organism Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., and agriculturally important plants, such as soybean [Glycine ma (L.) Merr.], contain significant quantities of furnaric acid. In fact, furnaric acid can accumulate to levels of several mg per g fresh weight in A-abidopsis leaves, often exceeding starch and soluble sugar levels. Furnaric acid is a component of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and, like starch and soluble sugars, can be metabolized to yield energy and carbon skeletons for production of other compounds. Fumaric acid concentrations increase with plant age and light intensity in Arabidopsis leaves. Arabidopsis phloem exudates contain significant quantities of fumaric acid, raising the possibility that fumaric acid may function in carbon transport.

  8. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Raymond E

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular Chlamydomonas to multicellular Volvox, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 μm to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms.

  9. There Is No Simple Model of the Plasma Membrane Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Schütz, Gerhard J.; Eggeling, Christian; Cebecauer, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Ever since technologies enabled the characterization of eukaryotic plasma membranes, heterogeneities in the distributions of its constituents were observed. Over the years this led to the proposal of various models describing the plasma membrane organization such as lipid shells, picket-and-fences, lipid rafts, or protein islands, as addressed in numerous publications and reviews. Instead of emphasizing on one model we in this review give a brief overview over current models and highlight how current experimental work in one or the other way do not support the existence of a single overarching model. Instead, we highlight the vast variety of membrane properties and components, their influences and impacts. We believe that highlighting such controversial discoveries will stimulate unbiased research on plasma membrane organization and functionality, leading to a better understanding of this essential cellular structure. PMID:27747212

  10. Arabidopsis thaliana as Bioindicator of Fungal VOCs in Indoor Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Richard; Yin, Guohua; Klich, Maren A.; Grimm, Casey; Bennett, Joan W.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the ability of Arabidopsis thaliana to detect different mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by the common indoor fungus, Aspergillus versicolor, and demonstrate the potential usage of the plant as a bioindicator to monitor fungal VOCs in indoor air. We evaluated the volatile production of Aspergillus versicolor strains SRRC 108 (NRRL 3449) and SRRC 2559 (ATCC 32662) grown on nutrient rich fungal medium, and grown under conditions to mimic the substrate encountered in the built environment where fungi would typically grow indoors (moist wallboard and ceiling tiles). Using headspace solid phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we analyzed VOC profiles of the two strains. The most abundant compound produced by both strains on all three media was 1-octen-3-ol. Strain SRRC 2559 made several terpenes not detected from strain SRRC 108. Using a split-plate bioassay, we grew Arabidopsis thaliana in a shared atmosphere with VOCs from the two strains of Aspergillus versicolor grown on yeast extract sucrose medium. The VOCs emitted by SRRC 2559 had an adverse impact on seed germination and plant growth. Chemical standards of individual VOCs from the Aspergillus versicolor mixture (2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-octen-3-ol, limonene, and β-farnesene), and β-caryophyllene were tested one by one in seed germination and vegetative plant growth assays. The most inhibitory compound to both seed germination and plant growth was 1-octen-3-ol. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis is a useful model for monitoring indoor air quality as it is sensitive to naturally emitted fungal volatile mixtures as well as to chemical standards of individual compounds, and it exhibits relatively quick concentration- and duration-dependent responses.

  11. Kinome profiling of Arabidopsis using arrays of kinase consensus substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieterse Corné MJ

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kinome profiling aims at the parallel analysis of kinase activities in a cell. Novel developed arrays containing consensus substrates for kinases are used to assess those kinase activities. The arrays described in this paper were already used to determine kinase activities in mammalian systems, but since substrates from many organisms are present we decided to test these arrays for the determination of kinase activities in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Kinome profiling using Arabidopsis cell extracts resulted in the labelling of many consensus peptides by kinases from the plant, indicating the usefulness of this kinome profiling tool for plants. Method development showed that fresh and frozen plant material could be used to make cell lysates containing active kinases. Dilution of the plant extract increased the signal to noise ratio and non-radioactive ATP enhances full development of spot intensities. Upon infection of Arabidopsis with an avirulent strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, we could detect differential kinase activities by measuring phosphorylation of consensus peptides. Conclusion We show that kinome profiling on arrays with consensus substrates can be used to monitor kinase activities in plants. In a case study we show that upon infection with avirulent P. syringae differential kinase activities can be found. The PepChip can for example be used to purify (unknown kinases that play a role in P. syringae infection. This paper shows that kinome profiling using arrays of consensus peptides is a valuable new tool to study signal-transduction in plants. It complements the available methods for genomics and proteomics research.

  12. Review of existing terrestrial bioaccumulation models and terrestrial bioaccumulation modeling needs for organic chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protocols for terrestrial bioaccumulation assessments are far less-developed than for aquatic systems. This manuscript reviews modeling approaches that can be used to assess the terrestrial bioaccumulation potential of commercial organic chemicals. Models exist for plant, inver...

  13. A dynamical phyllotaxis model to determine floral organ number.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho S Kitazawa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available How organisms determine particular organ numbers is a fundamental key to the development of precise body structures; however, the developmental mechanisms underlying organ-number determination are unclear. In many eudicot plants, the primordia of sepals and petals (the floral organs first arise sequentially at the edge of a circular, undifferentiated region called the floral meristem, and later transition into a concentric arrangement called a whorl, which includes four or five organs. The properties controlling the transition to whorls comprising particular numbers of organs is little explored. We propose a development-based model of floral organ-number determination, improving upon earlier models of plant phyllotaxis that assumed two developmental processes: the sequential initiation of primordia in the least crowded space around the meristem and the constant growth of the tip of the stem. By introducing mutual repulsion among primordia into the growth process, we numerically and analytically show that the whorled arrangement emerges spontaneously from the sequential initiation of primordia. Moreover, by allowing the strength of the inhibition exerted by each primordium to decrease as the primordium ages, we show that pentamerous whorls, in which the angular and radial positions of the primordia are consistent with those observed in sepal and petal primordia in Silene coeli-rosa, Caryophyllaceae, become the dominant arrangement. The organ number within the outmost whorl, corresponding to the sepals, takes a value of four or five in a much wider parameter space than that in which it takes a value of six or seven. These results suggest that mutual repulsion among primordia during growth and a temporal decrease in the strength of the inhibition during initiation are required for the development of the tetramerous and pentamerous whorls common in eudicots.

  14. Modeling organic matter stabilization during windrow composting of livestock effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudart, D; Paul, E; Robin, P; Paillat, J M

    2012-01-01

    Composting is a complex bioprocess, requiring a lot of empirical experiments to optimize the process. A dynamical mathematical model for the biodegradation of the organic matter during the composting process has been developed. The initial organic matter expressed by chemical oxygen demand (COD) is decomposed into rapidly and slowly degraded compartments and an inert one. The biodegradable COD is hydrolysed and consumed by microorganisms and produces metabolic water and carbon dioxide. This model links a biochemical characterization of the organic matter by Van Soest fractionating with COD. The comparison of experimental and simulation results for carbon dioxide emission, dry matter and carbon content balance showed good correlation. The initial sizes of the biodegradable COD compartments are explained by the soluble, hemicellulose-like and lignin fraction. Their sizes influence the amplitude of the carbon dioxide emission peak. The initial biomass is a sensitive variable too, influencing the time at which the emission peak occurs.

  15. Simple model of self-organized biological evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Boer, J.; Derrida, B.; Flyvbjerg, H.; Jackson, A.D.; Wettig, T. (Department of Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3800 (United States) The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 20 Clarkson Road, Cambridge, CB4 0EH (United Kingdom) Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75005 Paris (France) Service de Physique Theorique, Centre de Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, F-91191, Gif-Sur-Yvette (France) CONNECT, The Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark))

    1994-08-08

    We give an exact solution of a recently proposed self-organized critical model of biological evolution. We show that the model has a power law distribution of durations of coevolutionary avalanches'' with a mean field exponent 3/2. We also calculate analytically the finite size effects which cut off this power law at times of the order of the system size.

  16. BeetleBase: the model organism database for Tribolium castaneum

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Liangjiang; Wang, Suzhi; Li, Yonghua; Paradesi, Martin S. R.; Brown, Susan J

    2006-01-01

    BeetleBase () is an integrated resource for the Tribolium research community. The red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) is an important model organism for genetics, developmental biology, toxicology and comparative genomics, the genome of which has recently been sequenced. BeetleBase is constructed to integrate the genomic sequence data with information about genes, mutants, genetic markers, expressed sequence tags and publications. BeetleBase uses the Chado data model and software component...

  17. A two-site bipolaron model for organic magnetoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemans, W.; Bloom, F. L.; Bobbert, P. A.; Wohlgenannt, M.; Koopmans, B.

    2008-04-01

    The recently proposed bipolaron model for large "organic magnetoresistance" (OMAR) at room temperature is extended to an analytically solvable two-site scheme. It is shown that even this extremely simplified approach reproduces some of the key features of OMAR, viz., the possibility to have both positive and negative magnetoresistance, as well as its universal line shapes. Specific behavior and limiting cases are discussed. Extensions of the model, to guide future experiments and numerical Monte Carlo studies, are suggested.

  18. Unraveling the circadian clock in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Ma, Ligeng

    2013-02-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous timing system responsible for coordinating an organism's biological processes with its environment. Interlocked transcriptional feedback loops constitute the fundamental architecture of the circadian clock. In Arabidopsis, three feedback loops, the core loop, morning loop and evening loop, comprise a network that is the basis of the circadian clock. The components of these three loops are regulated in distinct ways, including transcriptional, post-transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms. The discovery of the DNA-binding and repressive activities of TOC1 has overturned our initial concept of its function in the circadian clock. The alternative splicing of circadian clock-related genes plays an essential role in normal functioning of the clock and enables organisms to sense environmental changes. In this review, we describe the regulatory mechanisms of the circadian clock that have been identified in Arabidopsis.

  19. Validation and Scenario Analysis of a Soil Organic Carbon Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yao; LIU Shi-liang; SHEN Qi-rong; ZONG Liang-gang; JIANG Ding-an; HUANG Hong-guang

    2002-01-01

    A model developed by the authors was validated against independent data sets. The data sets were obtained from field experiments of crop residue decomposition and a 7-year soil improvement in Yixing City, Jiangsu Province. Model validation indicated that soil organic carbon dynamics can be simulated from the weather variables of temperature, sunlight and precipitation, soil clay content and bulk density, grain yield of previous crops, qualities and quantities of the added organic matter. Model simulation in general agreed with the measurements. The comparison between computed and measured resulted in correlation coefficient γ2 values of 0.9291 * * * (n = 48) and 0. 6431 * * (n = 65) for the two experiments, respectively. Model prediction under three scenarios of no additional organic matter input, with an annual incorporation of rice and wheat straw at rates of 6.75t/ha and 9.0t/ha suggested that the soil organic carbon in Wanshi Township of Yixing City would be from an initial value of 7.85g/kg in 1983 to 6.30g/kg, 11.42g/kg and 13g/kg in 2014, respectively. Consequently, total nitrogen content of the soil was predicted to be respectively 0.49g/kg,0.89g/kg and 1.01g/kg under the three scenarios.

  20. Waste Reduction Model (WARM) Resources for Small Businesses and Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page provides a brief overview of how EPA’s Waste Reduction Model (WARM) can be used by small businesses and organizations. The page includes a brief summary of uses of WARM for the audience and links to other resources.

  1. An Integrated Model for Effective Knowledge Management in Chinese Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Xiaomi; Deng, Hepu; Wang, Yiwen; Chao, Lemen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide organizations in the Chinese cultural context with a conceptual model for an integrated adoption of existing knowledge management (KM) methods and to improve the effectiveness of their KM activities. Design/methodology/approaches: A comparative analysis is conducted between China and the western…

  2. Promoting Representational Competence with Molecular Models in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, Andrew T.; Gainer, Morgan; Padalkar, Shamin; Hegarty, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Mastering the many different diagrammatic representations of molecules used in organic chemistry is challenging for students. This article summarizes recent research showing that manipulating 3-D molecular models can facilitate the understanding and use of these representations. Results indicate that students are more successful in translating…

  3. Editorial: Plant organ abscission: from models to crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    The shedding of plant organs is a highly coordinated process essential for both vegetative and reproductive development (Addicott, 1982; Sexton and Roberts, 1982; Roberts et al., 2002; Leslie et al., 2007; Roberts and Gonzalez-Carranza, 2007; Estornell et al., 2013). Research with model plants, name...

  4. A Process Model for the Comprehension of Organic Chemistry Notation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havanki, Katherine L.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the cognitive processes individuals use when reading organic chemistry equations and factors that affect these processes, namely, visual complexity of chemical equations and participant characteristics (expertise, spatial ability, and working memory capacity). A six stage process model for the comprehension of organic…

  5. SOMPROF: A vertically explicit soil organic matter model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakhekke, M.C.; Beer, M.; Hoosbeek, M.R.; Kruijt, B.; Kabat, P.

    2011-01-01

    Most current soil organic matter (SOM) models represent the soil as a bulk without specification of the vertical distribution of SOM in the soil profile. However, the vertical SOM profile may be of great importance for soil carbon cycling, both on short (hours to years) time scale, due to

  6. Promoting Representational Competence with Molecular Models in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, Andrew T.; Gainer, Morgan; Padalkar, Shamin; Hegarty, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Mastering the many different diagrammatic representations of molecules used in organic chemistry is challenging for students. This article summarizes recent research showing that manipulating 3-D molecular models can facilitate the understanding and use of these representations. Results indicate that students are more successful in translating…

  7. Supramolecular organization of functional organic materials in the bulk and at organic/organic interfaces: a modeling and computer simulation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muccioli, Luca; D'Avino, Gabriele; Berardi, Roberto; Orlandi, Silvia; Pizzirusso, Antonio; Ricci, Matteo; Roscioni, Otello Maria; Zannoni, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    The molecular organization of functional organic materials is one of the research areas where the combination of theoretical modeling and experimental determinations is most fruitful. Here we present a brief summary of the simulation approaches used to investigate the inner structure of organic materials with semiconducting behavior, paying special attention to applications in organic photovoltaics and clarifying the often obscure jargon hindering the access of newcomers to the literature of the field. Special attention is paid to the choice of the computational "engine" (Monte Carlo or Molecular Dynamics) used to generate equilibrium configurations of the molecular system under investigation and, more importantly, to the choice of the chemical details in describing the molecular interactions. Recent literature dealing with the simulation of organic semiconductors is critically reviewed in order of increasing complexity of the system studied, from low molecular weight molecules to semiflexible polymers, including the challenging problem of determining the morphology of heterojunctions between two different materials.

  8. Ovule development, a new model for lateral organ formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Mara; Colombo, Lucia; Roig-Villanova, Irma

    2014-01-01

    In spermatophytes the ovules upon fertilization give rise to the seeds. It is essential to understand the mechanisms that control ovule number and development as they ultimately determine the final number of seeds and, thereby, the yield in crop plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, ovules arise laterally from a meristematic tissue within the carpel referred to as placenta. For a correct determination of the number of ovules, a precise establishment of the positions where ovule primordia emerge is needed, and a tight definition of the boundaries between ovules is therefore also required. In the last decades, few factors have been identified to be involved in the determination of ovule number. Recently, plant hormones have also been revealed as fundamental players in the control of the initiation of ovule formation. In this review we summarize the current knowledge about both the molecular and hormonal mechanisms that control ovule formation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  9. Ovule development, a new model for lateral organ formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara eCucinotta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In spermatophytes the ovules upon fertilization give rise to the seeds. It is essential to understand the mechanisms that control ovule number and development as they ultimately determine the final number of seeds and, thereby, the yield in crop plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, ovules arise laterally from a meristematic tissue within the carpel referred to as placenta. For a correct determination of the number of ovules, a precise establishment of the positions where ovule primordia emerge is needed, and a tight definition of the boundaries between ovules is therefore also required. In the last decades, few factors have been identified to be involved in the determination of ovule number. Recently, plant hormones have also been revealed as fundamental players in the control of the initiation of ovule formation. In this review we summarize the current knowledge about both the molecular and hormonal mechanisms that control ovule formation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  10. Modeling secondary organic aerosol formation through cloud processing of organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chen

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Interest in the potential formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA through reactions of organic compounds in condensed aqueous phases is growing. In this study, the potential formation of SOA from irreversible aqueous-phase reactions of organic species in clouds was investigated. A new proposed aqueous-phase chemistry mechanism (AqChem is coupled with the existing gas-phase Caltech Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (CACM and the Model to Predict the Multiphase Partitioning of Organics (MPMPO that simulate SOA formation. AqChem treats irreversible organic reactions that lead mainly to the formation of carboxylic acids, which are usually less volatile than the corresponding aldehydic compounds. Zero-dimensional model simulations were performed for tropospheric conditions with clouds present for three consecutive hours per day. Zero-dimensional model simulations show that 48-h average SOA formation is increased by 27% for a rural scenario with strong monoterpene emissions and 7% for an urban scenario with strong emissions of aromatic compounds, respectively, when irreversible organic reactions in clouds are considered. AqChem was also incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ version 4.4 with CACM/MPMPO and applied to a previously studied photochemical episode (3–4 August 2004 focusing on the eastern United States. The CMAQ study indicates that the maximum contribution of SOA formation from irreversible reactions of organics in clouds is 0.28 μg m−3 for 24-h average concentrations and 0.60 μg m−3 for one-hour average concentrations at certain locations. On average, domain-wide surface SOA predictions for the episode are increased by 9% when irreversible, in-cloud processing of organics is considered. Because aldehydes of carbon number greater than four are assumed to convert fully to the corresponding carboxylic acids upon reaction with OH in cloud droplets and this assumption may overestimate

  11. Reference: 584 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ing in Arabidopsis thaliana shoot and root stem cell organizers. 7137 811-4 17429400 2007 Apr Nature Hashimo...nda K et al. 2007 Apr. Nature 446(7137):811-4. Throughout the lifespan of a plant, which in some cases can l... 584 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u17429400i Sarkar Ana

  12. Natural genetic variation in Arabidopsis for responsiveness to plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintermans, P.C.A.; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2016-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) Pseudomonas simiae WCS417r stimulates lateral root formation and increases shoot growth in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). These plant growth-stimulating effects are partly caused by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by the bacterium.

  13. Sustainable Organic Farming For Environmental Health A Social Development Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ijun Rijwan Susanto

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In this study the researcher attempted 1 to understand the basic features of organic farming in The Paguyuban Pasundans Cianjur 2 to describe and understand how the stakeholders were are able to internalize the challenges of organic farming on their lived experiences in the community 3 to describe and understand how the stakeholders were are able to internalize and applied the values of benefits of organic farming in support of environmental health on their lived experiences in the community 4 The purpose was to describe and understand how the stakeholders who are able to articulate their ideas regarding the model of sustainable organic farming 5 The Policy Recommendation for Organic Farming. The researcher employed triangulation thorough finding that provides breadth and depth to an investigation offering researchers a more accurate picture of the phenomenon. In the implementation of triangulation researchers conducted several interviews to get saturation. After completion of the interview results are written compiled and shown to the participants to check every statement by every participant. In addition researchers also checked the relevant documents and direct observation in the field The participants of this study were the stakeholders namely 1 The leader of Paguyuban Pasundans Organic Farmer Cianjur PPOFC 2 Members of Paguyuban Pasundans Organic FarmersCianjur 3 Leader of NGO 4 Government officials of agriculture 5 Business of organic food 6 and Consumer of organic food. Generally the findings of the study revealed the following 1 PPOFC began to see the reality as the impact of modern agriculture showed in fertility problems due to contaminated soil by residues of agricultural chemicals such as chemical fertilizers and chemical pesticides. So he wants to restore the soil fertility through environmentally friendly of farming practices 2 the challenges of organic farming on their lived experiences in the community farmers did not

  14. Global Modeling of the Oceanic Source of Organic Aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelios Myriokefalitakis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The global marine organic aerosol budget is investigated by a 3-dimensional chemistry-transport model considering recently proposed parameterisations of the primary marine organic aerosol (POA and secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation from the oxidation of marine volatile organic compounds. MODIS and SeaWiFS satellite data of Chlorophyll-a and ECMWF solar incoming radiation, wind speed, and temperature are driving the oceanic emissions in the model. Based on the adopted parameterisations, the SOA and the submicron POA marine sources are evaluated at about 5 Tg yr−1 (∼1.5 Tg C yr−1 and 7 to 8 Tg yr−1 (∼4 Tg C yr−1, respectively. The computed marine SOA originates from the dimethylsulfide oxidation (∼78%, the potentially formed dialkyl amine salts (∼21%, and marine hydrocarbon oxidation (∼0.1%. Comparison of calculations with observations indicates an additional marine source of soluble organic carbon that could be partially encountered by marine POA chemical ageing.

  15. Accounting for microbial habitats in modeling soil organic matter dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenu, Claire; Garnier, Patricia; Nunan, Naoise; Pot, Valérie; Raynaud, Xavier; Vieublé, Laure; Otten, Wilfred; Falconer, Ruth; Monga, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    The extreme heterogeneity of soils constituents, architecture and inhabitants at the microscopic scale is increasingly recognized. Microbial communities exist and are active in a complex 3-D physical framework of mineral and organic particles defining pores of various sizes, more or less inter-connected. This results in a frequent spatial disconnection between soil carbon, energy sources and the decomposer organisms and a variety of microhabitats that are more or less suitable for microbial growth and activity. However, current biogeochemical models account for C dynamics at the macroscale (cm, m) and consider time- and spatially averaged relationships between microbial activity and soil characteristics. Different modelling approaches have intended to account for this microscale heterogeneity, based either on considering aggregates as surrogates for microbial habitats, or pores. Innovative modelling approaches are based on an explicit representation of soil structure at the fine scale, i.e. at µm to mm scales: pore architecture and their saturation with water, localization of organic resources and of microorganisms. Three recent models are presented here, that describe the heterotrophic activity of either bacteria or fungi and are based upon different strategies to represent the complex soil pore system (Mosaic, LBios and µFun). These models allow to hierarchize factors of microbial activity in soil's heterogeneous architecture. Present limits of these approaches and challenges are presented, regarding the extensive information required on soils at the microscale and to up-scale microbial functioning from the pore to the core scale.

  16. Model Based Fuzzy Expert System for Measuring Organization Knowledge Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houshang Taghizadeh

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model based on fuzzy set theory for determining the score of knowledge management in organization. The introduced model has five stages. In the first stage, input and output variable of model are characterized by available theories. Inputs are as follows: knowledge acquisition, knowledge storage, knowledge creation, knowledge sharing and knowledge transfer. The output is as follow score of knowledge management in organization. In the second stage, the input and output are converted into fuzzy numbers after classification. Inference rules are explained in the third stage. In the fourth stage, defuzzification is performed, and in the fifth stage, the devised system is tested. The test result shows that the presented model has high validity. Ultimately, by using the designed model, the score of knowledge management for Tabriz Kar machinery industry was calculated. The statistical population consists of 50 members of this organization. All the population has been studied. A questionnaire was devised, and its validity and reliability were confirmed. The result indicated that the score of knowledge management in Tabriz Kar machinery industry with the membership rank of 0.924 was at an average level and with the membership rank of 0.076 was at a high

  17. Modeling organic nitrogen conversions in activated sludge bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinia, Jacek; Pagilla, Krishna; Czerwionka, Krzysztof; Stensel, H David

    2011-01-01

    For biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems designed to maximize nitrogen removal, the effluent total nitrogen (TN) concentration may range from 2.0 to 4.0 g N/m(3) with about 25-50% in the form of organic nitrogen (ON). In this study, current approaches to modeling organic N conversions (separate processes vs. constant contents of organic fractions) were compared. A new conceptual model of ON conversions was developed and combined with Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d). The model addresses a new insight into the processes of ammonification, biomass decay and hydrolysis of particulate and colloidal ON (PON and CON, respectively). Three major ON fractions incorporated are defined as dissolved (DON) (model parameter set, the behaviors of both inorganic N forms (NH4-N, NOX-N) and ON forms (DON, CON) in the batch experiments were predicted. The challenges to accurately simulate and predict effluent ON levels from BNR systems are due to analytical methods of direct ON measurement (replacing TKN) and lack of large enough database (in-process measurements, dynamic variations of the ON concentrations) which can be used to determine parameter value ranges.

  18. THE MODEL OF EXTERNSHIP ORGANIZATION FOR FUTURE TEACHERS: QUALIMETRIC APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taisiya A. Isaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to present author’s model for bachelors – future teachers of vocational training. The model is been worked out from the standpoint of qualimetric approach and provides a pedagogical training.Methods. The process is based on the literature analysis of externship organization for students in higher education and includes the SWOT-analysis techniques in pedagogical training. The method of group expert evaluation is the main method of pedagogical qualimetry. Structural components of professional pedagogical competency of students-future teachers are defined. It allows us to determine a development level and criterion of estimation on mastering programme «Vocational training (branch-wise».Results. This article interprets the concept «pedagogical training»; its basic organization principles during students’ practice are stated. The methods of expert group formation are presented: self-assessment and personal data.Scientific novelty. The externship organization model for future teachers is developed. This model is based on pedagogical training, using qualimetric approach and the SWOT-analysis techniques. Proposed criterion-assessment procedures are managed to determine the developing levels of professional and pedagogical competency.Practical significance. The model is introduced into pedagogical training of educational process of Kalashnikov’s Izhevsk State Technical University, and can be used in other similar educational establishments.

  19. Self-organizing model of motor cortical activities during drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Siming H.; Si, Jennie; Schwartz, Andrew B.

    1996-05-01

    The population vector algorithm has been developed to combine the simultaneous direction- related activities of a population of motor cortical neurons to predict the trajectory of the arm movement. In our study, we consider a self-organizing model of a neural representation of the arm trajectory based on neuronal discharge rates. Self-organizing feature mapping (SOFM) is used to select the optimal set of weights in the model to determine the contribution of individual neuron to the overall movement. The correspondence between the movement directions and the discharge patterns of the motor cortical neurons is established in the output map. The topology preserving property of the SOFM is used to analyze real recorded data of a behavior monkey. The data used in this analysis were taken while the monkey was drawing spirals and doing the center out movement. Using such a statistical model, the monkey's arm moving directions could be well predicted based on the motor cortex neuronal firing information.

  20. Rotation in turbulence of aquatic organisms modeled as particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Variano, Evan; Byron, Margaret; Bellani, Gabriele

    2012-11-01

    We investigate which length and time scales are relevant for determining the rotation of aquatic organisms and their gametes. We are interested in parameter space beyond the Stokes regime, and also the effect of particle shape on rotation. We report experimental measurements that use custom-manufactured particles to model aquatic organisms, which are designed with the necessary optical properties so that we can measure their rotation, simultaneously with the vorticity statistics of the surrounding fluid. Lagrangian timeseries of particles' angular velocity allows investigation of rotational diffusion.

  1. Modeling stable isotope and organic carbon in hillslope stormflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas; Dohnal, Michal; Marx, Anne; Jankovec, Jakub; Sanda, Martin; Votrubova, Jana; Barth, Johannes A. C.; Cislerova, Milena

    2016-04-01

    Reliable prediction of water movement and fluxes of dissolved substances (such as stable isotopes and organic carbon) at both the hillslope and the catchment scales remains a challenge due to complex boundary conditions and soil spatial heterogeneity. In addition, microbially mediated transformations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are known to affect balance of DOC in soils, hence the transformations need to be included in a conceptual model of a DOC transport. So far, only few studies utilized stable isotope information in modeling and even fewer linked dissolved carbon fluxes to mixing and/or transport models. In this study, stormflow dynamics of oxygen-18 isotope and dissolved organic carbon was analyzed using a physically based modeling approach. One-dimensional dual-continuum vertical flow and transport model, based on Richards and advection-dispersion equations, was used to simulate the subsurface transport processes in a forest soil during several observed rainfall-runoff episodes. The transport of heat in the soil profile was described by conduction-advection equation. Water flow and transport of solutes and heat were assumed to take place in two mutually communicating porous domains, the soil matrix and the network of preferential pathways. The rate of microbial transformations of DOC was assumed to depend on soil water content and soil temperature. Oxygen-18 and dissolved organic carbon concentrations were observed in soil pore water, hillslope stormflow (collected in the experimental hillslope trench), and stream discharge (at the catchment outlet). The modeling was used to analyze the transformation of input solute signals into output hillslope signals observed in the trench stormflow. Signatures of oxygen-18 isotope in hillslope stormflow as well as isotope concentration in soil pore water were predicted reasonably well. Due to complex nature of microbial transformations, prediction of DOC rate and transport was associated with a high uncertainty.

  2. Rethinking transcriptional activation in the Arabidopsis circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogelmark, Karl; Troein, Carl

    2014-07-01

    Circadian clocks are biological timekeepers that allow living cells to time their activity in anticipation of predictable daily changes in light and other environmental factors. The complexity of the circadian clock in higher plants makes it difficult to understand the role of individual genes or molecular interactions, and mathematical modelling has been useful in guiding clock research in model organisms such as Arabidopsis thaliana. We present a model of the circadian clock in Arabidopsis, based on a large corpus of published time course data. It appears from experimental evidence in the literature that most interactions in the clock are repressive. Hence, we remove all transcriptional activation found in previous models of this system, and instead extend the system by including two new components, the morning-expressed activator RVE8 and the nightly repressor/activator NOX. Our modelling results demonstrate that the clock does not need a large number of activators in order to reproduce the observed gene expression patterns. For example, the sequential expression of the PRR genes does not require the genes to be connected as a series of activators. In the presented model, transcriptional activation is exclusively the task of RVE8. Predictions of how strongly RVE8 affects its targets are found to agree with earlier interpretations of the experimental data, but generally we find that the many negative feedbacks in the system should discourage intuitive interpretations of mutant phenotypes. The dynamics of the clock are difficult to predict without mathematical modelling, and the clock is better viewed as a tangled web than as a series of loops.

  3. Rethinking transcriptional activation in the Arabidopsis circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Fogelmark

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks are biological timekeepers that allow living cells to time their activity in anticipation of predictable daily changes in light and other environmental factors. The complexity of the circadian clock in higher plants makes it difficult to understand the role of individual genes or molecular interactions, and mathematical modelling has been useful in guiding clock research in model organisms such as Arabidopsis thaliana. We present a model of the circadian clock in Arabidopsis, based on a large corpus of published time course data. It appears from experimental evidence in the literature that most interactions in the clock are repressive. Hence, we remove all transcriptional activation found in previous models of this system, and instead extend the system by including two new components, the morning-expressed activator RVE8 and the nightly repressor/activator NOX. Our modelling results demonstrate that the clock does not need a large number of activators in order to reproduce the observed gene expression patterns. For example, the sequential expression of the PRR genes does not require the genes to be connected as a series of activators. In the presented model, transcriptional activation is exclusively the task of RVE8. Predictions of how strongly RVE8 affects its targets are found to agree with earlier interpretations of the experimental data, but generally we find that the many negative feedbacks in the system should discourage intuitive interpretations of mutant phenotypes. The dynamics of the clock are difficult to predict without mathematical modelling, and the clock is better viewed as a tangled web than as a series of loops.

  4. Effects of salt stress on wild type and vte4 mutant Arabidopsis thaliana: Model plant to engineer tolerance towards salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalatbari Amir Ali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major environmental constraints impairing plant distribution and yield is believed to be salt stress. Additionally, engineered abiotic stress resistance or/and tolerance is considered as an indispensable target in order to enhance plant productivity. In this study, the effects of salinity on physiological and morphological of wild type (Columbia-0 and vte4 mutant Arabidopsis thaliana were investigated under different NaCl concentrations. These salt treatments, including control condition, 50mM and 100mM NaCl were imposed on the plants. Each salt treatment was replicated three times in a complete randomized design with factorial arrangement. Wild type and mutant A.thaliana plants were subjected to the abiotic stress (salinity for up to 11 days to evaluate the parameters of growth, development and water relations. As a result, the performance of wild type plants was stronger than vte4 mutant under different salt treatments. Under control condition, rosette dry weight, maximum quantum efficiency (PSII and specific leaf area obtained the highest values of 13.85 mg, considered, wild type A.thaliana recorded higher value of 0.82 gW/gFW for relative water content (RWC under 50mM NaCl whereas mutant plants gained the value of 0.78 gW/gFW under the same condition. However, root mass fraction indicated an increase for both wild type and vte4 mutant plants after 11 days of salt stress onset. The reduction of water potential was observed for wild type and mutant A.thaliana where it scored -1.3 MPa and -1.4, respectively. As a conclusion, these findings implied that under different salt treatments morphological and physiological responses of wild type and vte4 mutant were affected in which wild type plants showed more tolerance. Lack of γ-tocopherol methyltransferase (γ -TMT gene in vte4 seemed to impair defence mechanism of this mutant against salinity.

  5. The re-establishment of desiccation tolerance in germinated Arabidopsis thaliana seeds and its associated transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Julio; Dekkers, Bas J W; Provart, Nicholas J; Ligterink, Wilco; Hilhorst, Henk W M

    2011-01-01

    The combination of robust physiological models with "omics" studies holds promise for the discovery of genes and pathways linked to how organisms deal with drying. Here we used a transcriptomics approach in combination with an in vivo physiological model of re-establishment of desiccation tolerance (DT) in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds. We show that the incubation of desiccation sensitive (DS) germinated Arabidopsis seeds in a polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution re-induces the mechanisms necessary for expression of DT. Based on a SNP-tile array gene expression profile, our data indicates that the re-establishment of DT, in this system, is related to a programmed reversion from a metabolic active to a quiescent state similar to prior to germination. Our findings show that transcripts of germinated seeds after the PEG-treatment are dominated by those encoding LEA, seed storage and dormancy related proteins. On the other hand, a massive repression of genes belonging to many other classes such as photosynthesis, cell wall modification and energy metabolism occurs in parallel. Furthermore, comparison with a similar system for Medicago truncatula reveals a significant overlap between the two transcriptomes. Such overlap may highlight core mechanisms and key regulators of the trait DT. Taking into account the availability of the many genetic and molecular resources for Arabidopsis, the described system may prove useful for unraveling DT in higher plants.

  6. The re-establishment of desiccation tolerance in germinated Arabidopsis thaliana seeds and its associated transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Maia

    Full Text Available The combination of robust physiological models with "omics" studies holds promise for the discovery of genes and pathways linked to how organisms deal with drying. Here we used a transcriptomics approach in combination with an in vivo physiological model of re-establishment of desiccation tolerance (DT in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds. We show that the incubation of desiccation sensitive (DS germinated Arabidopsis seeds in a polyethylene glycol (PEG solution re-induces the mechanisms necessary for expression of DT. Based on a SNP-tile array gene expression profile, our data indicates that the re-establishment of DT, in this system, is related to a programmed reversion from a metabolic active to a quiescent state similar to prior to germination. Our findings show that transcripts of germinated seeds after the PEG-treatment are dominated by those encoding LEA, seed storage and dormancy related proteins. On the other hand, a massive repression of genes belonging to many other classes such as photosynthesis, cell wall modification and energy metabolism occurs in parallel. Furthermore, comparison with a similar system for Medicago truncatula reveals a significant overlap between the two transcriptomes. Such overlap may highlight core mechanisms and key regulators of the trait DT. Taking into account the availability of the many genetic and molecular resources for Arabidopsis, the described system may prove useful for unraveling DT in higher plants.

  7. Patterning and Lifetime of Plasma Membrane-Localized Cellulose Synthase Is Dependent on Actin Organization in Arabidopsis Interphase Cells1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Gutierrez, Ryan; McFarlane, Heather E.; Bringmann, Martin; Lindeboom, Jelmer; Emons, Anne-Mie; Samuels, Lacey; Ketelaar, Tijs; Ehrhardt, David W.; Persson, Staffan

    2013-01-01

    The actin and microtubule cytoskeletons regulate cell shape across phyla, from bacteria to metazoans. In organisms with cell walls, the wall acts as a primary constraint of shape, and generation of specific cell shape depends on cytoskeletal organization for wall deposition and/or cell expansion. In higher plants, cortical microtubules help to organize cell wall construction by positioning the delivery of cellulose synthase (CesA) complexes and guiding their trajectories to orient newly synthesized cellulose microfibrils. The actin cytoskeleton is required for normal distribution of CesAs to the plasma membrane, but more specific roles for actin in cell wall assembly and organization remain largely elusive. We show that the actin cytoskeleton functions to regulate the CesA delivery rate to, and lifetime of CesAs at, the plasma membrane, which affects cellulose production. Furthermore, quantitative image analyses revealed that actin organization affects CesA tracking behavior at the plasma membrane and that small CesA compartments were associated with the actin cytoskeleton. By contrast, localized insertion of CesAs adjacent to cortical microtubules was not affected by the actin organization. Hence, both actin and microtubule cytoskeletons play important roles in regulating CesA trafficking, cellulose deposition, and organization of cell wall biogenesis. PMID:23606596

  8. The Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Subcommittee for Proteomics Assembles the Largest Proteome Database Resource for Plant Systems Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weckwerth, Wolfram; Baginsky, Sacha; Van Wijk, Klass; Heazlewood, Joshua; Millar, Harvey

    2009-12-01

    resources, and raw data have been deposited in PRIDE and PRIDE BioMart. Included in this database is an Arabidopsis proteome map that provides evidence for the expression of {approx}50% of all predicted gene models, including several alternative gene models that are not represented in The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR) protein database. A set of organ-specific biomarkers is provided, as well as organ-specific proteotypic peptides for 4105 proteins that can be used to facilitate targeted quantitative proteomic surveys. In the future, the AtProteome database will be linked to additional existing resources developed by MASCP members, such as PPDB, ProMEX, and SUBA. The most comprehensive study on the Arabidopsis chloroplast proteome, which includes information on chloroplast sorting signals, posttranslational modifications (PTMs), and protein abundances (analyzed by high-accuracy MS [Orbitrap]), was recently published by the van Wijk lab.2 These and previous data are available via the plant proteome database (PPDB; http://ppdb.tc.cornell.edu) for A. thaliana and maize. PPDB provides genome-wide experimental and functional characterization of the A. thaliana and maize proteomes, including PTMs and subcellular localization information, with an emphasis on leaf and plastid proteins. Maize and Arabidopsis proteome entries are directly linked via internal BLAST alignments within PPDB. Direct links for each protein to TAIR, SUBA, ProMEX, and other resources are also provided.

  9. Experimentation and modeling of organic photocontamination on lithographic optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Roderick R.; Liberman, Vladimir; Downs, Deanna K.

    2000-07-01

    Photodeposition of organic films on transparent substrates irradiated in the presence of trace levels of hydrocarbons has been experimentally investigated and a model is presented that describes the film growth behavior. The efficacy of a given organic precursor at forming a deposit is proportional to the product of its surface coverage and by its photon absorption cross section. These measurement are important in predicting the transmission characteristics of lithographic optics operating at 157-, 193-, and 248-nm wavelength. For example, a lens element irradiated continuously for one year in the presence of 1 part per billion of t-butyl benzene would exhibit a transmission of approximately 87 percent at 193 nm. The effects of oxygen- containing ambients are also documented, and methods for elimination and/or prevention of organic contamination are suggested.

  10. Organic livestock production systems as a model of sustainability development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Pauselli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic farming and livestock production offer effective means of satisfying consumer demand for healthy and safe foods and reducing the environmental pressure of agricultural production. In Mediterranean areas organic livestock production could be considered a feasible systems to improve rural development in unfavourable areas and to maintain rural landscape. Constrains, like pasture availability during the year, determine the evolution of different strategies in livestock rearing to improve or maintain net income of population. Moreover the evaluation of the sustainability using a holistic approach using assessment criteria like Life Cycle Assessment (LCA and Emergy Assessment could be considered models to evaluate organic and conventional livestock production sustainability and at the same time new research fields.

  11. IT Business Value Model for Information Intensive Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Gastaud Maçada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have highlighted the capacity Information Technology (IT has for generating value for organizations. Investments in IT made by organizations have increased each year. Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to analyze the IT Business Value for Information Intensive Organizations (IIO - e.g. banks, insurance companies and securities brokers. The research method consisted of a survey that used and combined the models from Weill and Broadbent (1998 and Gregor, Martin, Fernandez, Stern and Vitale (2006. Data was gathered using an adapted instrument containing 5 dimensions (Strategic, Informational, Transactional, Transformational and Infra-structure with 27 items. The instrument was refined by employing statistical techniques such as Exploratory and Confirmatory Factorial Analysis through Structural Equations (first and second order Model Measurement. The final model is composed of four factors related to IT Business Value: Strategic, Informational, Transactional and Transformational, arranged in 15 items. The dimension Infra-structure was excluded during the model refinement process because it was discovered during interviews that managers were unable to perceive it as a distinct dimension of IT Business Value.

  12. Modeling self-organizing traffic lights with elementary cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    There have been several highway traffic models proposed based on cellular automata. The simplest one is elementary cellular automaton rule 184. We extend this model to city traffic with cellular automata coupled at intersections using only rules 184, 252, and 136. The simplicity of the model offers a clear understanding of the main properties of city traffic and its phase transitions. We use the proposed model to compare two methods for coordinating traffic lights: a green-wave method that tries to optimize phases according to expected flows and a self-organizing method that adapts to the current traffic conditions. The self-organizing method delivers considerable improvements over the green-wave method. For low densities, the self-organizing method promotes the formation and coordination of platoons that flow freely in four directions, i.e. with a maximum velocity and no stops. For medium densities, the method allows a constant usage of the intersections, exploiting their maximum flux capacity. For high dens...

  13. Nonequilibrium drift-diffusion model for organic semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felekidis, Nikolaos; Melianas, Armantas; Kemerink, Martijn

    2016-07-01

    Two prevailing formalisms are currently used to model charge transport in organic semiconductor devices. Drift-diffusion calculations, on the one hand, are time effective but assume local thermodynamic equilibrium, which is not always realistic. Kinetic Monte Carlo models, on the other hand, do not require this assumption but are computationally expensive. Here, we present a nonequilibrium drift-diffusion model that bridges this gap by fusing the established multiple trap and release formalism with the drift-diffusion transport equation. For a prototypical photovoltaic system the model is shown to quantitatively describe, with a single set of parameters, experiments probing (1) temperature-dependent steady-state charge transport—space-charge limited currents, and (2) time-resolved charge transport and relaxation of nonequilibrated photocreated charges. Moreover, the outputs of the developed kinetic drift-diffusion model are an order of magnitude, or more, faster to compute and in good agreement with kinetic Monte Carlo calculations.

  14. Modeling regional secondary organic aerosol using the Master Chemical Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyi; Cleveland, Meredith; Ziemba, Luke D.; Griffin, Robert J.; Barsanti, Kelley C.; Pankow, James F.; Ying, Qi

    2015-02-01

    A modified near-explicit Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM, version 3.2) with 5727 species and 16,930 reactions and an equilibrium partitioning module was incorporated into the Community Air Quality Model (CMAQ) to predict the regional concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the eastern United States (US). In addition to the semi-volatile SOA from equilibrium partitioning, reactive surface uptake processes were used to simulate SOA formation due to isoprene epoxydiol, glyoxal and methylglyoxal. The CMAQ-MCM-SOA model was applied to simulate SOA formation during a two-week episode from August 28 to September 7, 2006. The southeastern US has the highest SOA, with a maximum episode-averaged concentration of ∼12 μg m-3. Primary organic aerosol (POA) and SOA concentrations predicted by CMAQ-MCM-SOA agree well with AMS-derived hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) and oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) urban concentrations at the Moody Tower at the University of Houston. Predicted molecular properties of SOA (O/C, H/C, N/C and OM/OC ratios) at the site are similar to those reported in other urban areas, and O/C values agree with measured O/C at the same site. Isoprene epoxydiol is predicted to be the largest contributor to total SOA concentration in the southeast US, followed by methylglyoxal and glyoxal. The semi-volatile SOA components are dominated by products from β-caryophyllene oxidation, but the major species and their concentrations are sensitive to errors in saturation vapor pressure estimation. A uniform decrease of saturation vapor pressure by a factor of 100 for all condensable compounds can lead to a 150% increase in total SOA. A sensitivity simulation with UNIFAC-calculated activity coefficients (ignoring phase separation and water molecule partitioning into the organic phase) led to a 10% change in the predicted semi-volatile SOA concentrations.

  15. Model Establishment for Simulating Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yao; LIU Shi-liang; SHEN Qi-rong; ZONG Liang-gang

    2002-01-01

    Assuming that decomposition of organic matter in soils follows the first-order kinetics reaction,a computer model was developed to simulate soil organic matter dynamics. Organic matter in soils is divided up into two parts that include incorporated organic carbon from crop residues or other organic fertilizer and soil intrinsic carbon. The incorporated organic carbon was assumed to consist of two components, labile-C and resistant-C. The model was represented by a differential equation of dCi/dt = Ki× fT × fw × fs × Ci ( i = l,r, S ) and an integral equation of Cit = Cio × EXP ( Ki X fT X fw X fs X t ). Effect of soil parameters of temperature, moisture and texture on the decomposition was functioned by the fT, fw and fs, respectively.Data from laboratory incubation experiments were used to determine the first-order decay rate Ki and the fraction of labile-C of crop residues by employing a nonlinear method. The values of K for the components of labile-C and resistant-C and the soil intrinsic carbon were evaluated to be 0. 025,0. 080 × 10-2 and 0. 065 ×10-3d-1, respectively. The labile-C fraction of wheat straw, wheat roots, rice straw and rice roots were0.50, 0.25, 0.40 and 0.20, respectively. These values are related to the initial residue carbon-to-nitrogen ratio ( C/N) and lignin content.

  16. Mobility dependent recombination models for organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenpfahl, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Modern solar cell technologies are driven by the effort to enhance power conversion efficiencies. A main mechanism limiting power conversion efficiencies is charge carrier recombination which is a direct function of the encounter probability of both recombination partners. In inorganic solar cells with rather high charge carrier mobilities, charge carrier recombination is often dominated by energetic states which subsequently trap both recombination partners for recombination. Free charge carriers move fast enough for Coulomb attraction to be irrelevant for the encounter probability. Thus, charge carrier recombination is independent of charge carrier mobilities. In organic semiconductors charge carrier mobilities are much lower. Therefore, electrons and holes have more time react to mutual Coulomb-forces. This results in the strong charge carrier mobility dependencies of the observed charge carrier recombination rates. In 1903 Paul Langevin published a fundamental model to describe the recombination of ions in gas-phase or aqueous solutions, known today as Langevin recombination. During the last decades this model was used to interpret and model recombination in organic semiconductors. However, certain experiments especially with bulk-heterojunction solar cells reveal much lower recombination rates than predicted by Langevin. In search of an explanation, many material and device properties such as morphology and energetic properties have been examined in order to extend the validity of the Langevin model. A key argument for most of these extended models is, that electron and hole must find each other at a mutual spatial location. This encounter may be limited for instance by trapping of charges in trap states, by selective electrodes separating electrons and holes, or simply by the morphology of the involved semiconductors, making it impossible for electrons and holes to recombine at high rates. In this review, we discuss the development of mobility limited

  17. Model evaluation of marine primary organic aerosol emission schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gantt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, several marine primary organic aerosol (POA emission schemes have been evaluated using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model in order to provide guidance for their implementation in air quality and climate models. These emission schemes, based on varying dependencies of chlorophyll a concentration ([chl a] and 10 m wind speed (U10, have large differences in their magnitude, spatial distribution, and seasonality. Model comparison with weekly and monthly mean values of the organic aerosol mass concentration at two coastal sites shows that the source function exclusively related to [chl a] does a better job replicating surface observations. Sensitivity simulations in which the negative U10 and positive [chl a] dependence of the organic mass fraction of sea spray aerosol are enhanced show improved prediction of the seasonality of the marine POA concentrations. A top-down estimate of submicron marine POA emissions based on the parameterization that compares best to the observed weekly and monthly mean values of marine organic aerosol surface concentrations has a global average emission rate of 6.3 Tg yr−1. Evaluation of existing marine POA source functions against a case study during which marine POA contributed the major fraction of submicron aerosol mass shows that none of the existing parameterizations are able to reproduce the hourly-averaged observations. Our calculations suggest that in order to capture episodic events and short-term variability in submicron marine POA concentration over the ocean, new source functions need to be developed that are grounded in the physical processes unique to the organic fraction of sea spray aerosol.

  18. Model evaluation of marine primary organic aerosol emission schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, B.; Johnson, M. S.; Meskhidze, N.; Sciare, J.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Ceburnis, D.; O'Dowd, C. D.

    2012-09-01

    In this study, several marine primary organic aerosol (POA) emission schemes have been evaluated using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model in order to provide guidance for their implementation in air quality and climate models. These emission schemes, based on varying dependencies of chlorophyll a concentration ([chl a]) and 10 m wind speed (U10), have large differences in their magnitude, spatial distribution, and seasonality. Model comparison with weekly and monthly mean values of the organic aerosol mass concentration at two coastal sites shows that the source function exclusively related to [chl a] does a better job replicating surface observations. Sensitivity simulations in which the negative U10 and positive [chl a] dependence of the organic mass fraction of sea spray aerosol are enhanced show improved prediction of the seasonality of the marine POA concentrations. A top-down estimate of submicron marine POA emissions based on the parameterization that compares best to the observed weekly and monthly mean values of marine organic aerosol surface concentrations has a global average emission rate of 6.3 Tg yr-1. Evaluation of existing marine POA source functions against a case study during which marine POA contributed the major fraction of submicron aerosol mass shows that none of the existing parameterizations are able to reproduce the hourly-averaged observations. Our calculations suggest that in order to capture episodic events and short-term variability in submicron marine POA concentration over the ocean, new source functions need to be developed that are grounded in the physical processes unique to the organic fraction of sea spray aerosol.

  19. Reference: 517 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available d isolated aleurone layers of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) were used in experiments designed to iden...tify components of the Arabidopsis seed that contribute to seed dormancy and to lea

  20. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  1. Dissecting genetic and environmental mutation signatures with model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia, Romulo; Tam, Annie S; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-08-01

    Deep sequencing has impacted on cancer research by enabling routine sequencing of genomes and exomes to identify genetic changes associated with carcinogenesis. Researchers can now use the frequency, type, and context of all mutations in tumor genomes to extract mutation signatures that reflect the driving mutational processes. Identifying mutation signatures, however, may not immediately suggest a mechanism. Consequently, several recent studies have employed deep sequencing of model organisms exposed to discrete genetic or environmental perturbations. These studies exploit the simpler genomes and availability of powerful genetic tools in model organisms to analyze mutation signatures under controlled conditions, forging mechanistic links between mutational processes and signatures. We discuss the power of this approach and suggest that many such studies may be on the horizon.

  2. Semantic network based component organization model for program mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王斌; 张尧学; 陈松乔

    2003-01-01

    Based on the definition of component ontology, an effective component classification mechanism and a facet named component relationship are proposed. Then an application domain oriented, hierarchical component organization model is established. At last a hierarchical component semantic network (HCSN) described by ontology interchange language(OIL) is presented and then its function is described. Using HCSN and cooperating with other components retrieving algorithms based on component description, other components information and their assembly or composite modes related to the key component can be found. Based on HCSN, component directory library is catalogued and a prototype system is constructed. The prototype system proves that component library organization based on this model gives guarantee to the reliability of component assembly during program mining.

  3. Cube Kohonen self-organizing map (CKSOM) model with new equations in organizing unstructured data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seng Poh; Haron, Habibollah

    2013-09-01

    Surface reconstruction by using 3-D data is used to represent the surface of an object and perform important tasks. The type of data used is important and can be described as either structured or unstructured. For unstructured data, there is no connectivity information between data points. As a result, incorrect shapes will be obtained during the imaging process. Therefore, the data should be reorganized by finding the correct topology so that the correct shape can be obtained. Previous studies have shown that the Kohonen self-organizing map (KSOM) could be used to solve data organizing problems. However, 2-D Kohonen maps are limited because they are unable to cover the whole surface of closed 3-D surface data. Furthermore, the neurons inside the 3-D KSOM structure should be removed in order to create a correct wireframe model. This is because only the outside neurons are used to represent the surface of an object. The aim of this paper is to use KSOM to organize unstructured data for closed surfaces. KSOM isused in this paper by testing its ability to organize medical image data because KSOM is mostly used in constructing engineering field data. Enhancements are added to the model by introducing class number and the index vector, and new equations are created. Various grid sizes and maximum iterations are tested in the experiments. Based on the results, the number of redundancies is found to be directly proportional to the grid size. When we increase the maximum iterations, the surface of the image becomes smoother. An area formula is used and manual calculations are performed to validate the results. This model is implemented and images are created using Dev C++ and GNUPlot.

  4. Mechanical models for the self-organization of tubular patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chin-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Organogenesis, such as long tubule self-organization, requires long-range coordination of cell mechanics to arrange cell positions and to remodel the extracellular matrix. While the current mainstream in the field of tissue morphogenesis focuses primarily on genetics and chemical signaling, the influence of cell mechanics on the programming of patterning cues in tissue morphogenesis has not been adequately addressed. Here, we review experimental evidence and propose quantitative mechanical models by which cells can create tubular patterns.

  5. Spatial self-organization in hybrid models of multicellular adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonforti, Adriano; Duran-Nebreda, Salva; Montañez, Raúl; Solé, Ricard

    2016-10-01

    Spatial self-organization emerges in distributed systems exhibiting local interactions when nonlinearities and the appropriate propagation of signals are at work. These kinds of phenomena can be modeled with different frameworks, typically cellular automata or reaction-diffusion systems. A different class of dynamical processes involves the correlated movement of agents over space, which can be mediated through chemotactic movement or minimization of cell-cell interaction energy. A classic example of the latter is given by the formation of spatially segregated assemblies when cells display differential adhesion. Here, we consider a new class of dynamical models, involving cell adhesion among two stochastically exchangeable cell states as a minimal model capable of exhibiting well-defined, ordered spatial patterns. Our results suggest that a whole space of pattern-forming rules is hosted by the combination of physical differential adhesion and the value of probabilities modulating cell phenotypic switching, showing that Turing-like patterns can be obtained without resorting to reaction-diffusion processes. If the model is expanded allowing cells to proliferate and die in an environment where diffusible nutrient and toxic waste are at play, different phases are observed, characterized by regularly spaced patterns. The analysis of the parameter space reveals that certain phases reach higher population levels than other modes of organization. A detailed exploration of the mean-field theory is also presented. Finally, we let populations of cells with different adhesion matrices compete for reproduction, showing that, in our model, structural organization can improve the fitness of a given cell population. The implications of these results for ecological and evolutionary models of pattern formation and the emergence of multicellularity are outlined.

  6. System-level insights into the cellular interactome of a non-model organism: inferring, modelling and analysing functional gene network of soybean (Glycine max).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yungang; Guo, Maozu; Zou, Quan; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunyu; Liu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Cellular interactome, in which genes and/or their products interact on several levels, forming transcriptional regulatory-, protein interaction-, metabolic-, signal transduction networks, etc., has attracted decades of research focuses. However, such a specific type of network alone can hardly explain the various interactive activities among genes. These networks characterize different interaction relationships, implying their unique intrinsic properties and defects, and covering different slices of biological information. Functional gene network (FGN), a consolidated interaction network that models fuzzy and more generalized notion of gene-gene relations, have been proposed to combine heterogeneous networks with the goal of identifying functional modules supported by multiple interaction types. There are yet no successful precedents of FGNs on sparsely studied non-model organisms, such as soybean (Glycine max), due to the absence of sufficient heterogeneous interaction data. We present an alternative solution for inferring the FGNs of soybean (SoyFGNs), in a pioneering study on the soybean interactome, which is also applicable to other organisms. SoyFGNs exhibit the typical characteristics of biological networks: scale-free, small-world architecture and modularization. Verified by co-expression and KEGG pathways, SoyFGNs are more extensive and accurate than an orthology network derived from Arabidopsis. As a case study, network-guided disease-resistance gene discovery indicates that SoyFGNs can provide system-level studies on gene functions and interactions. This work suggests that inferring and modelling the interactome of a non-model plant are feasible. It will speed up the discovery and definition of the functions and interactions of other genes that control important functions, such as nitrogen fixation and protein or lipid synthesis. The efforts of the study are the basis of our further comprehensive studies on the soybean functional interactome at the genome

  7. Numerical model of multilayer organic light-emitting devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Yue; Rao Hai-Bo

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model of multilayer organic light-emitting devices is presented in this article.This model is based on the drift-diffusion equations which include charge injection,transport,space charge effects,trapping,heterojunction interface and recombination process.The device structure in the simulation is ITO/CuPc(20 nm)/NPD(40 nm)/Alq3(60 nm)/LiF/Al.There are two heterojunctions which should be dealt with in the simulation.The Ⅰ-Ⅴ characteristics,carrier distribution and recombination rate of a device are calculated.The simulation results and measured data are in good agreement.

  8. Conceptual hierarchical modeling to describe wetland plant community organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, A.M.; Guntenspergen, G.R.; Allen, T.F.H.

    2010-01-01

    Using multivariate analysis, we created a hierarchical modeling process that describes how differently-scaled environmental factors interact to affect wetland-scale plant community organization in a system of small, isolated wetlands on Mount Desert Island, Maine. We followed the procedure: 1) delineate wetland groups using cluster analysis, 2) identify differently scaled environmental gradients using non-metric multidimensional scaling, 3) order gradient hierarchical levels according to spatiotem-poral scale of fluctuation, and 4) assemble hierarchical model using group relationships with ordination axes and post-hoc tests of environmental differences. Using this process, we determined 1) large wetland size and poor surface water chemistry led to the development of shrub fen wetland vegetation, 2) Sphagnum and water chemistry differences affected fen vs. marsh / sedge meadows status within small wetlands, and 3) small-scale hydrologic differences explained transitions between forested vs. non-forested and marsh vs. sedge meadow vegetation. This hierarchical modeling process can help explain how upper level contextual processes constrain biotic community response to lower-level environmental changes. It creates models with more nuanced spatiotemporal complexity than classification and regression tree procedures. Using this process, wetland scientists will be able to generate more generalizable theories of plant community organization, and useful management models. ?? Society of Wetland Scientists 2009.

  9. Self-organized Collaboration Network Model Based on Module Emerging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongyong; Lu, Lan; Liu, Qiming

    Recently, the studies of the complex network have gone deep into many scientific fields, such as computer science, physics, mathematics, sociology, etc. These researches enrich the realization for complex network, and increase understands for the new characteristic of complex network. Based on the evolvement characteristic of the author collaboration in the scientific thesis, a self-organized network model of the scientific cooperation network is presented by module emerging. By applying the theoretical analysis, it is shown that this network model is a scale-free network, and the strength degree distribution and the module degree distribution of the network nodes have the same power law. In order to make sure the validity of the theoretical analysis for the network model, we create the computer simulation and demonstration collaboration network. By analyzing the data of the network, the results of the demonstration network and the computer simulation are consistent with that of the theoretical analysis of the model.

  10. TBP-associated factors in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, Clara; Clerici, Elena; Mizzi, Luca; Colombo, Lucia; Kater, Martin M

    2004-11-24

    Initiation of transcription mediated by RNA polymerase II requires a number of transcription factors among which TFIID is the major core promoter recognition factor. TFIID is composed of highly conserved factors which include the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and about 14 TBP-associated factors (TAFs). Since TAFs play important roles in transcription they have been extensively studied in organisms like yeast, Drosophila and human. Surprisingly, TAFs have been poorly characterized in plants. With the completion of the Arabidopsis genome sequence, it is possible to search for TAFs, since many of them have conserved amino acid sequences. Mining the genome of Arabidopsis for TAFs resulted in the identification of 18 putative Arabidopsis TAFs (AtTAFs). We have analyzed their protein structure and their genomic localisation. Expression profiling by RT-PCR showed that these TAFs are expressed in all parts of the plant which is in agreement with their general role in transcription. These analyses in combination with their evolutionary conservation with TAFs of other organisms are discussed.

  11. Modelling nitrous oxide emissions from organic soils in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppelt, Thomas; Dechow, Rene; Gebbert, Sören; Freibauer, Annette

    2013-04-01

    The greenhouse gas emission potential of peatland ecosystems are mandatory for a complete annual emission budget in Europe. The GHG-Europe project aims to improve the modelling capabilities for greenhouse gases, e.g., nitrous oxide. The heterogeneous and event driven fluxes of nitrous oxide are challenging to model on European scale, especially regarding the upscaling purpose and certain parameter estimations. Due to these challenges adequate techniques are needed to create a robust empirical model. Therefore a literature study of nitrous oxide fluxes from organic soils has been carried out. This database contains flux data from boreal and temperate climate zones and covers the different land use categories: cropland, grassland, forest, natural and peat extraction sites. Especially managed crop- and grassland sites feature high emission potential. Generally nitrous oxide emissions increases significantly with deep drainage and intensive application of nitrogen fertilisation. Whereas natural peatland sites with a near surface groundwater table can act as nitrous oxide sink. An empirical fuzzy logic model has been applied to predict annual nitrous oxide emissions from organic soils. The calibration results in two separate models with best model performances for bogs and fens, respectively. The derived parameter combinations of these models contain mean groundwater table, nitrogen fertilisation, annual precipitation, air temperature, carbon content and pH value. Influences of the calibrated parameters on nitrous oxide fluxes are verified by several studies in literature. The extrapolation potential has been tested by an implemented cross validation. Furthermore the parameter ranges of the calibrated models are compared to occurring values on European scale. This avoid unknown systematic errors for the regionalisation purpose. Additionally a sensitivity analysis specify the model behaviour for each alternating parameter. The upscaling process for European peatland

  12. Modelling erosion and its interaction with soil organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyesiku-Blakemore, Joseph; Verrot, Lucile; Geris, Josie; Zhang, Ganlin; Peng, Xinhua; Hallett, Paul; Smith, Jo

    2017-04-01

    Water driven soil erosion removes and relocates a significant quantity of soil organic carbon. In China the quantity of carbon removed from the soil through water erosion has been reported to be 180+/-80 Mt y-1 (Yue et al., 2011). Being able to effectively model the movement of such a large quantity of carbon is important for the assessment of soil quality and carbon storage in the region and further afield. A large selection of erosion models are available and much work has been done on evaluating the performance of these in developed countries (Merritt et al., 2006). Fewer studies have evaluated the application of these models on soils in developing countries. Here we evaluate and compare the performance of two of these models, WEPP (Laflen et al., 1997) and RUSLE (Renard et al., 1991), for simulations of soil erosion and deposition at the slope scale on a Chinese Red Soil under cultivation using measurements taken at the site. We also describe work to dynamically couple the movement of carbon presented in WEPP to a model of soil organic matter and nutrient turnover, ECOSSE (Smith et al., 2010). This aims to improve simulations of both erosion and carbon cycling by using the simulated rates of erosion to alter the distribution of soil carbon, the depth of soil and the clay content across the slopes, changing the simulated rate of carbon turnover. This, in turn, affects the soil carbon available to be eroded in the next timestep, so improving estimates of carbon erosion. We compare the simulations of this coupled modelling approach with those of the unaltered ECOSSE and WEPP models to determine the importance of coupling erosion and turnover models on the simulation of carbon losses at catchment scale.

  13. Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry as a new tool for real time analysis of root-secreted volatile organic compounds in arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeghs, M.M.L.; Bais, H.P.; Gouw, J. de; Goldan, P.; Kuster, W.; Northway, M.; Fall, R.; Vivanco, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Plant roots release about 5% to 20% of all photosynthetically-fixed carbon, and as a result create a carbon-rich environment for numerous rhizosphere organisms, including plant pathogens and symbiotic microbes. Although some characterization of root exudates has been achieved, especially of

  14. A strong effect of growth medium and organ type on the identification of QTLs for phytate and mineral concentrations in three Arabidopsis thaliana RIL populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghandilyan, A.; Ilk, N.; Hanhart, C.J.; Mbengue, M.; Barboza, L.; Schat, H.; Koornneef, M.; El-Lithy, M.E.M.; Vreugdenhil, D.; Reymond, M.; Aarts, M.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of mineral accumulation in plants is genetically complex, with several genetic loci involved in the control of one mineral and loci affecting the accumulation of different minerals. To investigate the role of growth medium and organ type on the genetics of mineral accumulation, two ex

  15. A strong effect of growth medium and organ type on the identification of QTLs for phytate and mineral concentrations in three Arabidopsis thaliana RIL populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghandilyan, A.; Ilk, N.; Hanhart, C.J.; Mbengue, M.; Barboza, L.; Schat, H.; Koornneef, M.; El-Lithy, M.E.M.; Vreugdenhil, D.; Reymond, M.; Aarts, M.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of mineral accumulation in plants is genetically complex, with several genetic loci involved in the control of one mineral and loci affecting the accumulation of different minerals. To investigate the role of growth medium and organ type on the genetics of mineral accumulation, two

  16. FUM2, a Cytosolic Fumarase, Is Essential for Acclimation to Low Temperature in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Beth C; Miller, Matthew A E; Feil, Regina; Rattray, Nicholas; Bowsher, Caroline G; Goodacre, Royston; Lunn, John E; Johnson, Giles N

    2016-09-01

    Although cold acclimation is a key process in plants from temperate climates, the mechanisms sensing low temperature remain obscure. Here, we show that the accumulation of the organic acid fumaric acid, mediated by the cytosolic fumarase FUM2, is essential for cold acclimation of metabolism in the cold-tolerant model species Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). A nontargeted metabolomic approach, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, identifies fumarate as a key component of the cold response in this species. Plants of T-DNA insertion mutants, lacking FUM2, show marked differences in their response to cold, with contrasting responses both in terms of metabolite concentrations and gene expression. The fum2 plants accumulated higher concentrations of phosphorylated sugar intermediates and of starch and malate. Transcripts for proteins involved in photosynthesis were markedly down-regulated in fum2.2 but not in wild-type Columbia-0. Plants of fum2 show a complete loss of the ability to acclimate photosynthesis to low temperature. We conclude that fumarate accumulation plays an essential role in low temperature sensing in Arabidopsis, either indirectly modulating metabolic or redox signals or possibly being itself directly involved in cold sensing.

  17. Comparative genomics of Gossypium and Arabidopsis: Unraveling the consequences of both ancient and recent polyploidy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Junkang; Bowers, John E.; Schulze, Stefan R.; Waghmare, Vijay N.; Rogers, Carl J.; Pierce, Gary J.; Zhang, Hua; Estill, James C.; Paterson, Andrew H.

    2005-01-01

    Both ancient and recent polyploidy, together with post-polyploidization loss of many duplicated gene copies, complicates angiosperm comparative genomics. To explore an approach by which these challenges might be mitigated, genetic maps of extant diploid and tetraploid cottons (Gossypium spp.) were used to infer the approximate order of 3016 loci along the chromosomes of their hypothetical common ancestor. The inferred Gossypium gene order corresponded more closely than the original maps did to a similarly inferred ancestral gene order predating an independent paleopolyploidization (α) in Arabidopsis. At least 59% of the cotton map and 53% of the Arabidopsis transcriptome showed correspondence in multilocus gene arrangements based on one or both of two software packages (CrimeStatII, FISH). Genomic regions in which chromosome structural rearrangement has been rapid (obscuring gene order correspondence) have also been subject to greater divergence of individual gene sequences. About 26%-44% of corresponding regions involved multiple Arabidopsis or cotton chromosomes, in some cases consistent with known, more ancient, duplications. The genomic distributions of multiple-locus probes provided early insight into the consequences for chromosome structure of an ancient large-scale duplication in cotton. Inferences that mitigate the consequences of ancient duplications improve leveraging of genomic information for model organisms in the study of more complex genomes. PMID:16109973

  18. Spatiotemporal Organization of Spin-Coated Supported Model Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    All cells of living organisms are separated from their surroundings and organized internally by means of flexible lipid membranes. In fact, there is consensus that the minimal requirements for self-replicating life processes include the following three features: (1) information carriers (DNA, RNA), (2) a metabolic system, and (3) encapsulation in a container structure [1]. Therefore, encapsulation can be regarded as an essential part of life itself. In nature, membranes are highly diverse interfacial structures that compartmentalize cells [2]. While prokaryotic cells only have an outer plasma membrane and a less-well-developed internal membrane structure, eukaryotic cells have a number of internal membranes associated with the organelles and the nucleus. Many of these membrane structures, including the plasma membrane, are complex layered systems, but with the basic structure of a lipid bilayer. Biomembranes contain hundreds of different lipid species in addition to embedded or peripherally associated membrane proteins and connections to scaffolds such as the cytoskeleton. In vitro, lipid bilayers are spontaneously self-organized structures formed by a large group of amphiphilic lipid molecules in aqueous suspensions. Bilayer formation is driven by the entropic properties of the hydrogen bond network in water in combination with the amphiphilic nature of the lipids. The molecular shapes of the lipid constituents play a crucial role in bilayer formation, and only lipids with approximately cylindrical shapes are able to form extended bilayers. The bilayer structure of biomembranes was discovered by Gorter and Grendel in 1925 [3] using monolayer studies of lipid extracts from red blood cells. Later, a number of conceptual models were developed to rationalize the organization of lipids and proteins in biological membranes. One of the most celebrated is the fluid-mosaic model by Singer and Nicolson (1972) [4]. According to this model, the lipid bilayer component of

  19. Incorporating microbial ecology into the metabolic modelling of polyphosphate accumulating organisms and glycogen accumulating organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmen, A; Carvalho, G; Lopez-Vazquez, C M; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Reis, M A M

    2010-09-01

    In the enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process, the competition between polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAO) and glycogen accumulating organisms (GAO) has been studied intensively in recent years by both microbiologists and engineers, due to its important effects on phosphorus removal performance and efficiency. This study addresses the impact of microbial ecology on assessing the PAO-GAO competition through metabolic modelling, focussing on reviewing recent developments, discussion of how the results from molecular studies can impact the way we model the process, and offering perspectives for future research opportunities based on unanswered questions concerning PAO and GAO metabolism. Indeed, numerous findings that are seemingly contradictory could in fact be explained by the metabolic behaviour of different sub-groups of PAOs and/or GAOs exposed to different environmental and operational conditions. Some examples include the glycolysis pathway (i.e. Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) vs. Entner-Doudoroff (ED)), denitrification capacity, anaerobic tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity and PAOs' ability to adjust their metabolism to e.g. a GAO-like metabolism. Metabolic modelling may further yield far-reaching influences on practical applications as well, and serves as a bridge between molecular/biochemical research studies and the optimisation of wastewater treatment plant operation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Biophysical analysis of Arabidopsis protein-only RNase P alone and in complex with tRNA provides a refined model of tRNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinker, Franziska; Schelcher, Cédric; Fernandez-Millan, Pablo; Gobert, Anthony; Birck, Catherine; Thureau, Aurélien; Roblin, Pierre; Giegé, Philippe; Sauter, Claude

    2017-08-25

    RNase P is a universal enzyme that removes 5' leader sequences from tRNA precursors. The enzyme is therefore essential for maturation of functional tRNAs and mRNA translation. RNase P represents a unique example of an enzyme that can occur either as ribonucleoprotein or as protein alone. The latter form of the enzyme, called protein-only RNase P (PRORP), is widespread in eukaryotes in which it can provide organellar or nuclear RNase P activities. Here, we have focused on Arabidopsis nuclear PRORP2 and its interaction with tRNA substrates. Affinity measurements helped assess the respective importance of individual pentatricopeptide repeat motifs in PRORP2 for RNA binding. We characterized the PRORP2 structure by X-ray crystallography and by small-angle X-ray scattering in solution as well as that of its complex with a tRNA precursor by small-angle X-ray scattering. Of note, our study reports the first structural data of a PRORP-tRNA complex. Combined with complementary biochemical and biophysical analyses, our structural data suggest that PRORP2 undergoes conformational changes to accommodate its substrate. In particular, the catalytic domain and the RNA-binding domain can move around a central hinge. Altogether, this work provides a refined model of the PRORP-tRNA complex that illustrates how protein-only RNase P enzymes specifically bind tRNA and highlights the contribution of protein dynamics to achieve this specific interaction. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. A flower is born: an update on Arabidopsis floral meristem formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denay, Grégoire; Chahtane, Hicham; Tichtinsky, Gabrielle; Parcy, François

    2017-02-01

    In Arabidopsis, floral meristems appear on the flanks of the inflorescence meristem. Their stereotypic development, ultimately producing the four whorls of floral organs, is essentially controlled by a network coordinating growth and cell-fate determination. This network integrates hormonal signals, transcriptional regulators, and mechanical constraints. Mechanisms regulating floral meristem formation have been studied at many different scales, from protein structure to tissue modeling. In this paper, we review recent findings related to the emergence of the floral meristem and floral fate determination and examine how this field has been impacted by recent technological developments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. MIANN models in medicinal, physical and organic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Arrasate, Sonia; Sotomayor, Nuria; Lete, Esther; Munteanu, Cristian R; Pazos, Alejandro; Besada-Porto, Lina; Ruso, Juan M

    2013-01-01

    Reducing costs in terms of time, animal sacrifice, and material resources with computational methods has become a promising goal in Medicinal, Biological, Physical and Organic Chemistry. There are many computational techniques that can be used in this sense. In any case, almost all these methods focus on few fundamental aspects including: type (1) methods to quantify the molecular structure, type (2) methods to link the structure with the biological activity, and others. In particular, MARCH-INSIDE (MI), acronym for Markov Chain Invariants for Networks Simulation and Design, is a well-known method for QSAR analysis useful in step (1). In addition, the bio-inspired Artificial-Intelligence (AI) algorithms called Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) are among the most powerful type (2) methods. We can combine MI with ANNs in order to seek QSAR models, a strategy which is called herein MIANN (MI & ANN models). One of the first applications of the MIANN strategy was in the development of new QSAR models for drug discovery. MIANN strategy has been expanded to the QSAR study of proteins, protein-drug interactions, and protein-protein interaction networks. In this paper, we review for the first time many interesting aspects of the MIANN strategy including theoretical basis, implementation in web servers, and examples of applications in Medicinal and Biological chemistry. We also report new applications of the MIANN strategy in Medicinal chemistry and the first examples in Physical and Organic Chemistry, as well. In so doing, we developed new MIANN models for several self-assembly physicochemical properties of surfactants and large reaction networks in organic synthesis. In some of the new examples we also present experimental results which were not published up to date.

  3. Modeling uptake of hydrophobic organic contaminants into polyethylene passive samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jay M; Hsieh, Ching-Hong; Luthy, Richard G

    2015-02-17

    Single-phase passive samplers are gaining acceptance as a method to measure hydrophobic organic contaminant (HOC) concentration in water. Although the relationship between the HOC concentration in water and passive sampler is linear at equilibrium, mass transfer models are needed for nonequilibrium conditions. We report measurements of organochlorine pesticide diffusion and partition coefficients with respect to polyethylene (PE), and present a Fickian approach to modeling HOC uptake by PE in aqueous systems. The model is an analytic solution to Fick's second law applied through an aqueous diffusive boundary layer and a polyethylene layer. Comparisons of the model with existing methods indicate agreement at appropriate boundary conditions. Laboratory release experiments on the organochlorine pesticides DDT, DDE, DDD, and chlordane in well-mixed slurries support the model's applicability to aqueous systems. In general, the advantage of the model is its application in the cases of well-agitated systems, low values of polyethylene-water partioning coefficients, thick polyethylene relative to the boundary layer thickness, and/or short exposure times. Another significant advantage is the ability to estimate, or at least bound, the needed exposure time to reach a desired CPE without empirical model inputs. A further finding of this work is that polyethylene diffusivity does not vary by transport direction through the sampler thickness.

  4. OBJECT ORIENTED MODELLING, A MODELLING METHOD OF AN ECONOMIC ORGANIZATION ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TĂNĂSESCU ANA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Now, most economic organizations use different information systems types in order to facilitate their activity. There are different methodologies, methods and techniques that can be used to design information systems. In this paper, I propose to present the advantages of using the object oriented modelling at the information system design of an economic organization. Thus, I have modelled the activity of a photo studio, using Visual Paradigm for UML as a modelling tool. For this purpose, I have identified the use cases for the analyzed system and I have presented the use case diagram. I have, also, realized the system static and dynamic modelling, through the most known UML diagrams.

  5. Allele-specific interactions between CAST AWAY and NEVERSHED control abscission in Arabidopsis flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Groner

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An advantage of analyzing abscission in genetically tractable model plants is the ability to make use of classic genetic tools such as suppression analysis. We have investigated the regulation of organ abscission by carrying out suppression analysis in Arabidopsis flowers. Plants carrying mutations in the NEVERSHED (NEV gene, which encodes an ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein, retain their outer floral organs after fertilization. Mutant alleles of CAST AWAY (CST, which encodes a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, were found to restore organ abscission in nev flowers in an allele-specific manner. To further explore the basis of the interactions between CST and NEV, we tested whether the site of a nev mutation is predictive of its ability to be suppressed. Our results suggest instead that the strength of a nev allele influences whether organ abscission can be rescued by a specific allele of CST.

  6. Multiscale Modeling and Simulation of Organic Solar Cells

    CERN Document Server

    de Falco, Carlo; Sacco, Riccardo; Verri, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we continue our mathematical study of organic solar cells (OSCs) and propose a two-scale (micro- and macro-scale) model of heterojunction OSCs with interface geometries characterized by an arbitrarily complex morphology. The microscale model consists of a system of partial and ordinary differential equations in an heterogeneous domain, that provides a full description of excitation/transport phenomena occurring in the bulk regions and dissociation/recombination processes occurring in a thin material slab across the interface. The macroscale model is obtained by a micro-to-macro scale transition that consists of averaging the mass balance equations in the normal direction across the interface thickness, giving rise to nonlinear transmission conditions that are parametrized by the interfacial width. These conditions account in a lumped manner for the volumetric dissociation/recombination phenomena occurring in the thin slab and depend locally on the electric field magnitude and orientation. Usi...

  7. Controlling self-organized criticality in sandpile models

    CERN Document Server

    Cajueiro, Daniel O

    2013-01-01

    We introduce an external control to reduce the size of avalanches in some sandpile models exhibiting self organized criticality. This rather intuitive approach seems to be missing in the vast literature on such systems. The control action, which amounts to triggering avalanches in sites that are near to be come critical, reduces the probability of very large events, so that energy dissipation occurs most locally. The control is applied to a directed Abelian sandpile model driven by both uncorrelated and correlated deposition. The latter is essential to design an efficient and simple control heuristic, but has only small influence in the uncontrolled avalanche probability distribution. The proposed control seeks a tradeoff between control cost and large event risk. Preliminary results hint that the proposed control works also for an undirected sandpile model.

  8. Genome Editing and Its Applications in Model Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyuan Ma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances are important for innovative biological research. Development of molecular tools for DNA manipulation, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs, and the clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated (Cas, has revolutionized genome editing. These approaches can be used to develop potential therapeutic strategies to effectively treat heritable diseases. In the last few years, substantial progress has been made in CRISPR/Cas technology, including technical improvements and wide application in many model systems. This review describes recent advancements in genome editing with a particular focus on CRISPR/Cas, covering the underlying principles, technological optimization, and its application in zebrafish and other model organisms, disease modeling, and gene therapy used for personalized medicine.

  9. Intelligent Model for Measuring Organization Maturity in E-Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadra Ahmadi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available E-Business is one of the most fascinating areas of information Technology. Managers should seek out means for making decision towards optimizing resource development in this area in order to control their expense and capital allocations at a higher, strategic level. To do this, manager must first identify their level of e-business development and plan to improve the status quo by identifying factors contributing to the growth in this approach. The present paper aims to construct and develop intelligent models for determining the organization status quo and management decision-making towards improving the situation using fuzzy [logic] tools. Thus for modeling these factors and their impact, the contributing factors in development of e-business approaches were identified by literature survey. These were later categorized using Delphi Method. Furthermore the FCM model was used to graphically illustrate the causal relationships among factors, including the mode and means of their mutual impact.

  10. Self-organized criticality model for brain plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arcangelis, Lucilla; Perrone-Capano, Carla; Herrmann, Hans J

    2006-01-20

    Networks of living neurons exhibit an avalanche mode of activity, experimentally found in organotypic cultures. Here we present a model that is based on self-organized criticality and takes into account brain plasticity, which is able to reproduce the spectrum of electroencephalograms (EEG). The model consists of an electrical network with threshold firing and activity-dependent synapse strengths. The system exhibits an avalanche activity in a power-law distribution. The analysis of the power spectra of the electrical signal reproduces very robustly the power-law behavior with the exponent 0.8, experimentally measured in EEG spectra. The same value of the exponent is found on small-world lattices and for leaky neurons, indicating that universality holds for a wide class of brain models.

  11. Genome Editing and Its Applications in Model Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dongyuan; Liu, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Technological advances are important for innovative biological research. Development of molecular tools for DNA manipulation, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas), has revolutionized genome editing. These approaches can be used to develop potential therapeutic strategies to effectively treat heritable diseases. In the last few years, substantial progress has been made in CRISPR/Cas technology, including technical improvements and wide application in many model systems. This review describes recent advancements in genome editing with a particular focus on CRISPR/Cas, covering the underlying principles, technological optimization, and its application in zebrafish and other model organisms, disease modeling, and gene therapy used for personalized medicine.

  12. The scale of population structure in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Platt

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The population structure of an organism reflects its evolutionary history and influences its evolutionary trajectory. It constrains the combination of genetic diversity and reveals patterns of past gene flow. Understanding it is a prerequisite for detecting genomic regions under selection, predicting the effect of population disturbances, or modeling gene flow. This paper examines the detailed global population structure of Arabidopsis thaliana. Using a set of 5,707 plants collected from around the globe and genotyped at 149 SNPs, we show that while A. thaliana as a species self-fertilizes 97% of the time, there is considerable variation among local groups. This level of outcrossing greatly limits observed heterozygosity but is sufficient to generate considerable local haplotypic diversity. We also find that in its native Eurasian range A. thaliana exhibits continuous isolation by distance at every geographic scale without natural breaks corresponding to classical notions of populations. By contrast, in North America, where it exists as an exotic species, A. thaliana exhibits little or no population structure at a continental scale but local isolation by distance that extends hundreds of km. This suggests a pattern for the development of isolation by distance that can establish itself shortly after an organism fills a new habitat range. It also raises questions about the general applicability of many standard population genetics models. Any model based on discrete clusters of interchangeable individuals will be an uneasy fit to organisms like A. thaliana which exhibit continuous isolation by distance on many scales.

  13. Model for Triplet State Engineering in Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Prodhan, Suryoday; Ramasesha, S

    2014-01-01

    Engineering the position of the lowest triplet state (T1) relative to the first excited singlet state (S1) is of great importance in improving the efficiencies of organic light emitting diodes and organic photovoltaic cells. We have carried out model exact calculations of substituted polyene chains to understand the factors that affect the energy gap between S1 and T1. The factors studied are backbone dimerisation, different donor-acceptor substitutions and twisted geometry. The largest system studied is an eighteen carbon polyene which spans a Hilbert space of about 991 million. We show that for reverse intersystem crossing (RISC) process, the best system involves substituting all carbon sites on one half of the polyene with donors and the other half with acceptors.

  14. Metabolic Profiling of Intact Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves during Circadian Cycle Using 1H High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schadewijk, R.; de Groot, H. J. M.; Alia, A.

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is the most widely used model organism for research in plant biology. While significant advances in understanding plant growth and development have been made by focusing on the molecular genetics of Arabidopsis, extracting and understanding the functional framework of metabolism is challenging, both from a technical perspective due to losses and modification during extraction of metabolites from the leaves, and from the biological perspective, due to random variation obscuring how well the function is performed. The purpose of this work is to establish the in vivo metabolic profile directly from the Arabidopsis thaliana leaves without metabolite extraction, to reduce the complexity of the results by multivariate analysis, and to unravel the mitigation of cellular complexity by predominant functional periodicity. To achieve this, we use the circadian cycle that strongly influences metabolic and physiological processes and exerts control over the photosynthetic machinery. High resolution-magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) was applied to obtain the metabolic profile directly from intact Arabidopsis leaves. Combining one- and two-dimensional 1H HR-MAS NMR allowed the identification of several metabolites including sugars and amino acids in intact leaves. Multivariate analysis on HR-MAS NMR spectra of leaves throughout the circadian cycle revealed modules of primary metabolites with significant and consistent variations of their molecular components at different time points of the circadian cycle. Since robust photosynthetic performance in plants relies on the functional periodicity of the circadian rhythm, our results show that HR-MAS NMR promises to be an important non-invasive method that can be used for metabolomics of the Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with altered physiology and photosynthetic efficiency. PMID:27662620

  15. Metabolic Profiling of Intact Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves during Circadian Cycle Using 1H High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustijn, D; Roy, U; van Schadewijk, R; de Groot, H J M; Alia, A

    Arabidopsis thaliana is the most widely used model organism for research in plant biology. While significant advances in understanding plant growth and development have been made by focusing on the molecular genetics of Arabidopsis, extracting and understanding the functional framework of metabolism is challenging, both from a technical perspective due to losses and modification during extraction of metabolites from the leaves, and from the biological perspective, due to random variation obscuring how well the function is performed. The purpose of this work is to establish the in vivo metabolic profile directly from the Arabidopsis thaliana leaves without metabolite extraction, to reduce the complexity of the results by multivariate analysis, and to unravel the mitigation of cellular complexity by predominant functional periodicity. To achieve this, we use the circadian cycle that strongly influences metabolic and physiological processes and exerts control over the photosynthetic machinery. High resolution-magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) was applied to obtain the metabolic profile directly from intact Arabidopsis leaves. Combining one- and two-dimensional 1H HR-MAS NMR allowed the identification of several metabolites including sugars and amino acids in intact leaves. Multivariate analysis on HR-MAS NMR spectra of leaves throughout the circadian cycle revealed modules of primary metabolites with significant and consistent variations of their molecular components at different time points of the circadian cycle. Since robust photosynthetic performance in plants relies on the functional periodicity of the circadian rhythm, our results show that HR-MAS NMR promises to be an important non-invasive method that can be used for metabolomics of the Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with altered physiology and photosynthetic efficiency.

  16. Table of 3D organ model IDs and organ names (IS-A Tree) - BodyParts3D | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us BodyParts3D Table of 3D organ model IDs and organ names (IS-A Tree) Data detail Data name Table of 3D organ model...ontents List of downloadable 3D organ models in a tab-delimited text file format, describing the correspondence between 3D organ mode...| Contact Us Table of 3D organ model IDs and organ names (IS-A Tree) - BodyParts3D | LSDB Archive ...

  17. Developing an Enzyme Mediated Soil Organic Carbon Decomposition Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, M. A.; Post, W. M.; Wang, G.; Jagadamma, S.; Steinweg, J. M.; Schadt, C. W.

    2012-12-01

    We developed the Microbial-ENzyme-mediated Decomposition (MEND) model in order to mechanistically model the decomposition of soil organic carbon (C). This presentation is an overview of the concept and development of the model and of the design of complementary lab-scale experiments. The model divides soil C into five pools of particulate, mineral-associated, dissolved, microbial, and enzyme organic C (Wang et al. 2012). There are three input types - cellulose, lignin, and dissolved C. Decomposition is mediated via microbial extracellular enzymes using the Michaelis-Menten equation, resulting in the production of a common pool of dissolved organic C. Parameters for the Michaelis-Menten equation are obtained through a literature review (Wang and Post, 2012a). The dissolved C is taken up by microbial biomass and proportioned according to microbial maintenance and growth, which were recalculated according to Wang and Post (2012b). The model allows dissolved C to undergo adsorption and desorption reactions with the mineral-associated C, which was also parameterized based upon a literature review and complementary laboratory experiments. In the lab, four 14C-labeled substrates (cellulose, fatty acid, glucose, and lignin-like) were incubated with either the particulate C pool, the mineral-associated C pool, or to bulk soils. The rate of decomposition was measured via the production of 14CO2 over time, along with incorporation into microbial biomass, production of dissolved C, and estimation of sorbed C. We performed steady-state and dynamic simulations and sensitivity analyses under temperature increases of 1-5°C for a period of 100 y. Simulations indicated an initial decrease in soil organic C consisting of both cellulose and lignin pools. Over longer time intervals (> 6 y), however, a shrinking microbial population, a concomitant decrease in enzyme production, and a decrease in microbial carbon use efficiency together decreased CO2 production and resulted in greater

  18. Thermodynamic Modeling of Organic-Inorganic Aerosols with the Group-Contribution Model AIOMFAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Peter, T.

    2009-04-01

    Liquid aerosol particles are - from a physicochemical viewpoint - mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water and a large variety of organic compounds (Rogge et al., 1993; Zhang et al., 2007). Molecular interactions between these aerosol components lead to deviations from ideal thermodynamic behavior. Strong non-ideality between organics and dissolved ions may influence the aerosol phases at equilibrium by means of liquid-liquid phase separations into a mainly polar (aqueous) and a less polar (organic) phase. A number of activity models exists to successfully describe the thermodynamic equilibrium of aqueous electrolyte solutions. However, the large number of different, often multi-functional, organic compounds in mixed organic-inorganic particles is a challenging problem for the development of thermodynamic models. The group-contribution concept as introduced in the UNIFAC model by Fredenslund et al. (1975), is a practical method to handle this difficulty and to add a certain predictability for unknown organic substances. We present the group-contribution model AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients), which explicitly accounts for molecular interactions between solution constituents, both organic and inorganic, to calculate activities, chemical potentials and the total Gibbs energy of mixed systems (Zuend et al., 2008). This model enables the computation of vapor-liquid (VLE), liquid-liquid (LLE) and solid-liquid (SLE) equilibria within one framework. Focusing on atmospheric applications we considered eight different cations, five anions and a wide range of alcohols/polyols as organic compounds. With AIOMFAC, the activities of the components within an aqueous electrolyte solution are very well represented up to high ionic strength. We show that the semi-empirical middle-range parametrization of direct organic-inorganic interactions in alcohol-water-salt solutions enables accurate computations of vapor-liquid and liquid

  19. Contemporary model of language organization: an overview for neurosurgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Edward F; Raygor, Kunal P; Berger, Mitchel S

    2015-02-01

    Classic models of language organization posited that separate motor and sensory language foci existed in the inferior frontal gyrus (Broca's area) and superior temporal gyrus (Wernicke's area), respectively, and that connections between these sites (arcuate fasciculus) allowed for auditory-motor interaction. These theories have predominated for more than a century, but advances in neuroimaging and stimulation mapping have provided a more detailed description of the functional neuroanatomy of language. New insights have shaped modern network-based models of speech processing composed of parallel and interconnected streams involving both cortical and subcortical areas. Recent models emphasize processing in "dorsal" and "ventral" pathways, mediating phonological and semantic processing, respectively. Phonological processing occurs along a dorsal pathway, from the posterosuperior temporal to the inferior frontal cortices. On the other hand, semantic information is carried in a ventral pathway that runs from the temporal pole to the basal occipitotemporal cortex, with anterior connections. Functional MRI has poor positive predictive value in determining critical language sites and should only be used as an adjunct for preoperative planning. Cortical and subcortical mapping should be used to define functional resection boundaries in eloquent areas and remains the clinical gold standard. In tracing the historical advancements in our understanding of speech processing, the authors hope to not only provide practicing neurosurgeons with additional information that will aid in surgical planning and prevent postoperative morbidity, but also underscore the fact that neurosurgeons are in a unique position to further advance our understanding of the anatomy and functional organization of language.

  20. Performance Evaluation Based on EFQM Excellence Model in Sport Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasoul Faraji

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to evaluate the performance of physical education (P.E. general office of Tehran province through model of European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM. Questionnaire approach was used in this study. Therefore validity of the 50-item EFQM questionnaire verified by the experts and the reliability also calculated in a pilot study (α=0.928. 95 questionnaires distributed between subjects (N=n and 80 questionnaires returned and concluded in the statistical analysis. From nine EFQM criteria, the highest scores were gained in key performance results (37.62% and the lowest gained in people results (27.94%. Totally, this organization achieved 337.11 pointes out of a total of 1000. Additionally, there was a strong relationship (r=0.827, p=0.001 between enablers and results (P<0.05. Based on scores gained in the criteria, improving measures in all criteria is essential for this organization, especially in the people criterion from enablers and people results criterion from results domain. Furthermore, it is believed that the physical education area is one of the best fields for application of the excellence model towards the performance excellence and gaining better results and hence, it seems that the model has a high potential in responding to problems commonly seen in sport sector.

  1. Modeling of secondary organic aerosol yields from laboratory chamber data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Chan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A product-specific model for secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation and composition based on equilibrium gas-particle partitioning is evaluated. The model is applied to represent laboratory data on the ozonolysis of α-pinene under dry, dark, and low-NOx conditions in the presence of ammonium sulfate seed aerosol. Using five major identified products, the model is fit to the chamber data. From the optimal fitting, SOA oxygen-to-carbon (O/C and hydrogen-to-carbon (H/C ratios are modeled. The discrepancy between measured H/C ratios and those based on the oxidation products used in the model fitting suggests the potential importance of particle-phase reactions. Data fitting is also carried out using the volatility basis set, wherein oxidation products are parsed into volatility bins. The product-specific model is best used for an SOA precursor for which a substantial fraction of the aerosol-phase oxidation products has been identified.

  2. A novel high efficiency, low maintenance, hydroponic system for synchronous growth and flowering of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocquin, Pierre; Corbesier, Laurent; Havelange, Andrée; Pieltain, Alexandra; Kurtem, Emile; Bernier, Georges; Périlleux, Claire

    2003-01-01

    Background Arabidopsis thaliana is now the model organism for genetic and molecular plant studies, but growing conditions may still impair the significance and reproducibility of the experimental strategies developed. Besides the use of phytotronic cabinets, controlling plant nutrition may be critical and could be achieved in hydroponics. The availability of such a system would also greatly facilitate studies dealing with root development. However, because of its small size and rosette growth habit, Arabidopsis is hardly grown in standard hydroponic devices and the systems described in the last years are still difficult to transpose at a large scale. Our aim was to design and optimize an up-scalable device that would be adaptable to any experimental conditions. Results An hydroponic system was designed for Arabidopsis, which is based on two units: a seed-holder and a 1-L tank with its cover. The original agar-containing seed-holder allows the plants to grow from sowing to seed set, without transplanting step and with minimal waste. The optimum nitrate supply was determined for vegetative growth, and the flowering response to photoperiod and vernalization was characterized to show the feasibility and reproducibility of experiments extending over the whole life cycle. How this equipment allowed to overcome experimental problems is illustrated by the analysis of developmental effects of nitrate reductase deficiency in nia1nia2 mutants. Conclusion The hydroponic device described in this paper allows to drive small and large scale cultures of homogeneously growing Arabidopsis plants. Its major advantages are its flexibility, easy handling, fast maintenance and low cost. It should be suitable for many experimental purposes. PMID:12556248

  3. A Revised Iranian Model of Organ Donation as an Answer to the Current Organ Shortage Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidian Jahromi, Alireza; Fry-Revere, Sigrid; Bastani, Bahar

    2015-09-01

    Kidney transplantation has become the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage renal disease. Six decades of success in the field of transplantation have made it possible to save thousands of lives every year. Unfortunately, in recent years success has been overshadowed by an ever-growing shortage of organs. In the United States, there are currently more than 100 000 patients waiting for kidneys. However, the supply of kidneys (combined cadaveric and live donations) has stagnated around 17 000 per year. The ever-widening gap between demand and supply has resulted in an illegal black market and unethical transplant tourism of global proportions. While we believe there is much room to improve the Iranian model of regulated incentivized live kidney donation, with some significant revisions, the Iranian Model could serve as an example for how other countries could make significant strides to lessening their own organ shortage crises.

  4. Involvement of C2H2 zinc finger proteins in the regulation of epidermal cell fate determination in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An Yan; Minjie Wu; Yongqin Zhao; Aidong Zhang; Bohan Liu; John Schiefelbein; Yinbo Gan

    2014-01-01

    Cell fate determination is a basic developmental process during the growth of multicellular organisms. Trichomes and root hairs of Arabidopsis are both readily accessible structures originating from the epidermal cells of the aerial tissues and roots respectively, and they serve as excellent models for understanding the molecular mecha-nisms controlling cell fate determination and cell morphogen-esis. The regulation of trichome and root hair formation is a complex program that consists of the integration of hormonal signals with a large number of transcriptional factors, including MYB and bHLH transcriptional factors. Studies during recent years have uncovered an important role of C2H2 type zinc finger proteins in the regulation of epidermal cell fate determination. Here in this minireview we briefly summarize the involvement of C2H2 zinc finger proteins in the control of trichome and root hair formation in Arabidopsis.

  5. PS II model based analysis of transient fluorescence yield measured on whole leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana after excitation with light flashes of different energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaeva, N E; Schmitt, F-J; Paschenko, V Z; Riznichenko, G Yu; Rubin, A B; Renger, G

    2011-02-01

    Our recently presented PS II model (Belyaeva et al., 2008) was improved in order to permit a consistent simulation of Single Flash Induced Transient Fluorescence Yield (SFITFY) traces that were earlier measured by Steffen et al. (2005) on whole leaves of Arabidopsis (A.) thaliana at four different energies of the actinic flash. As the essential modification, the shape of the actinic flash was explicitly taken into account assuming that an exponentially decaying rate simulates the time dependent excitation of PS II by the 10 ns actinic flash. The maximum amplitude of this excitation exceeds that of the measuring light by 9 orders of magnitude. A very good fit of the SFITFY data was achieved in the time domain from 100 ns to 10s for all actinic flash energies (the maximum energy of 7.5 × 10¹⁶ photons/(cm²flash) is set to 100%, the relative energies of weaker actinic flashes were of ∼8%, 4%, ∼1%). Our model allows the calculation and visualization of the transient PS II redox state populations ranging from the dark adapted state, via excitation energy and electron transfer steps induced by pulse excitation, followed by final relaxation into the stationary state eventually attained under the measuring light. It turned out that the rate constants of electron transfer steps are invariant to intensity of the actinic laser flash. In marked contrast, an increase of the actinic flash energy by more than two orders of magnitude from 5.4×10¹⁴ photons/(cm²flash) to 7.5×10¹⁶ photons/(cm²flash), leads to an increase of the extent of fluorescence quenching due to carotenoid triplet (³Car) formation by a factor of 14 and of the recombination reaction between reduced primary pheophytin (Phe(-)) and P680(+) by a factor of 3 while the heat dissipation in the antenna complex remains virtually constant. The modified PS II model offers new opportunities to compare electron transfer and dissipative parameters for different species (e.g. for the green algae and the

  6. Modeling the role of microplastics in Bioaccumulation of organic chemicals to marine aquatic organisms. Critical Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that ingestion of microplastics may increase bioaccumulation of organic chemicals by aquatic organisms. This paper critically reviews the literature on the effects of plastic ingestion on the bioaccumulation of organic chemicals, emphasizing quantitative approaches and mechanistic

  7. Modeling the adsorption of weak organic acids on goethite: the ligand and charge distribution model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filius, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed study is presented in which the CD-MUSIC modeling approach is used in a new modeling approach that can describe the binding of large organic molecules by metal (hydr)oxides taking the full speciation of the adsorbed molecule into account. Batch equilibration experiments were performed usi

  8. Generic Modelling of Faecal Indicator Organism Concentrations in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl M. Stapleton

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available To meet European Water Framework Directive requirements, data are needed on faecal indicator organism (FIO concentrations in rivers to enable the more heavily polluted to be targeted for remedial action. Due to the paucity of FIO data for the UK, especially under high-flow hydrograph event conditions, there is an urgent need by the policy community for generic models that can accurately predict FIO concentrations, thus informing integrated catchment management programmes. This paper reports the development of regression models to predict base- and high-flow faecal coliform (FC and enterococci (EN concentrations for 153 monitoring points across 14 UK catchments, using land cover, population (human and livestock density and other variables that may affect FIO source strength, transport and die-off. Statistically significant models were developed for both FC and EN, with greater explained variance achieved in the high-flow models. Both land cover and, in particular, population variables are significant predictors of FIO concentrations, with r2 maxima for EN of 0.571 and 0.624, respectively. It is argued that the resulting models can be applied, with confidence, to other UK catchments, both to predict FIO concentrations in unmonitored watercourses and evaluate the likely impact of different land use/stocking level and human population change scenarios.

  9. Modeling financial markets by self-organized criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondo, Alessio Emanuele; Pluchino, Alessandro; Rapisarda, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    We present a financial market model, characterized by self-organized criticality, that is able to generate endogenously a realistic price dynamics and to reproduce well-known stylized facts. We consider a community of heterogeneous traders, composed by chartists and fundamentalists, and focus on the role of informative pressure on market participants, showing how the spreading of information, based on a realistic imitative behavior, drives contagion and causes market fragility. In this model imitation is not intended as a change in the agent's group of origin, but is referred only to the price formation process. We introduce in the community also a variable number of random traders in order to study their possible beneficial role in stabilizing the market, as found in other studies. Finally, we also suggest some counterintuitive policy strategies able to dampen fluctuations by means of a partial reduction of information.

  10. Modeling financial markets by self-organized criticality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondo, Alessio Emanuele; Pluchino, Alessandro; Rapisarda, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    We present a financial market model, characterized by self-organized criticality, that is able to generate endogenously a realistic price dynamics and to reproduce well-known stylized facts. We consider a community of heterogeneous traders, composed by chartists and fundamentalists, and focus on the role of informative pressure on market participants, showing how the spreading of information, based on a realistic imitative behavior, drives contagion and causes market fragility. In this model imitation is not intended as a change in the agent's group of origin, but is referred only to the price formation process. We introduce in the community also a variable number of random traders in order to study their possible beneficial role in stabilizing the market, as found in other studies. Finally, we also suggest some counterintuitive policy strategies able to dampen fluctuations by means of a partial reduction of information.

  11. Modelling Financial Markets by Self-Organized Criticality

    CERN Document Server

    Biondo, A E; Rapisarda, A

    2015-01-01

    We present a financial market model, characterized by self-organized criticality, that is able to generate endogenously a realistic price dynamics and to reproduce well-known stylized facts. We consider a community of heterogeneous traders, composed by chartists and fundamentalists, and focus on the role of informative pressure on market participants, showing how the spreading of information, based on a realistic imitative behavior, drives contagion and causes market fragility. In this model imitation is not intended as a change in the agent's group of origin, but is referred only to the price formation process. We introduce in the community also a variable number of random traders in order to study their possible beneficial role in stabilizing the market, as found in other studies. Finally we also suggest some counterintuitive policy strategies able to dampen fluctuations by means of a partial reduction of information.

  12. Partitioning of Nanoparticles into Organic Phases and Model Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posner, J.D.; Westerhoff, P.; Hou, W-C.

    2011-08-25

    There is a recognized need to understand and predict the fate, transport and bioavailability of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in aquatic and soil ecosystems. Recent research focuses on either collection of empirical data (e.g., removal of a specific NP through water or soil matrices under variable experimental conditions) or precise NP characterization (e.g. size, degree of aggregation, morphology, zeta potential, purity, surface chemistry, and stability). However, it is almost impossible to transition from these precise measurements to models suitable to assess the NP behavior in the environment with complex and heterogeneous matrices. For decades, the USEPA has developed and applies basic partitioning parameters (e.g., octanol-water partition coefficients) and models (e.g., EPI Suite, ECOSAR) to predict the environmental fate, bioavailability, and toxicity of organic pollutants (e.g., pesticides, hydrocarbons, etc.). In this project we have investigated the hypothesis that NP partition coefficients between water and organic phases (octanol or lipid bilayer) is highly dependent on their physiochemical properties, aggregation, and presence of natural constituents in aquatic environments (salts, natural organic matter), which may impact their partitioning into biological matrices (bioaccumulation) and human exposure (bioavailability) as well as the eventual usage in modeling the fate and bioavailability of ENPs. In this report, we use the terminology "partitioning" to operationally define the fraction of ENPs distributed among different phases. The mechanisms leading to this partitioning probably involve both chemical force interactions (hydrophobic association, hydrogen bonding, ligand exchange, etc.) and physical forces that bring the ENPs in close contact with the phase interfaces (diffusion, electrostatic interactions, mixing turbulence, etc.). Our work focuses on partitioning, but also provides insight into the relative behavior of ENPs as either "more like

  13. Partitioning of Nanoparticles into Organic Phases and Model Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posner, J.D.; Westerhoff, P.; Hou, W-C.

    2011-08-25

    There is a recognized need to understand and predict the fate, transport and bioavailability of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in aquatic and soil ecosystems. Recent research focuses on either collection of empirical data (e.g., removal of a specific NP through water or soil matrices under variable experimental conditions) or precise NP characterization (e.g. size, degree of aggregation, morphology, zeta potential, purity, surface chemistry, and stability). However, it is almost impossible to transition from these precise measurements to models suitable to assess the NP behavior in the environment with complex and heterogeneous matrices. For decades, the USEPA has developed and applies basic partitioning parameters (e.g., octanol-water partition coefficients) and models (e.g., EPI Suite, ECOSAR) to predict the environmental fate, bioavailability, and toxicity of organic pollutants (e.g., pesticides, hydrocarbons, etc.). In this project we have investigated the hypothesis that NP partition coefficients between water and organic phases (octanol or lipid bilayer) is highly dependent on their physiochemical properties, aggregation, and presence of natural constituents in aquatic environments (salts, natural organic matter), which may impact their partitioning into biological matrices (bioaccumulation) and human exposure (bioavailability) as well as the eventual usage in modeling the fate and bioavailability of ENPs. In this report, we use the terminology "partitioning" to operationally define the fraction of ENPs distributed among different phases. The mechanisms leading to this partitioning probably involve both chemical force interactions (hydrophobic association, hydrogen bonding, ligand exchange, etc.) and physical forces that bring the ENPs in close contact with the phase interfaces (diffusion, electrostatic interactions, mixing turbulence, etc.). Our work focuses on partitioning, but also provides insight into the relative behavior of ENPs as either "more like

  14. Correlated earthquakes in a self-organized model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Baiesi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the fact that empirical time series of earthquakes exhibit long-range correlations in space and time and the Gutenberg-Richter distribution of magnitudes, we propose a simple fault model that can account for these types of scale-invariance. It is an avalanching process that displays power-laws in the event sizes, in the epicenter distances as well as in the waiting-time distributions, and also aftershock rates obeying a generalized Omori law. We thus confirm that there is a relation between temporal and spatial clustering of the activity in this kind of models. The fluctuating boundaries of possible slipping areas show that the size of the largest possible earthquake is not always maximal, and the average correlation length is a fraction of the system size. This suggests that there is a concrete alternative to the extreme interpretation of self-organized criticality as a process in which every small event can cascade to an arbitrary large one: the new picture includes fluctuating domains of coherent stress field as part of the global self-organization. Moreover, this picture can be more easily compared with other scenarios discussing fluctuating correlations lengths in seismicity.

  15. Terrestrial and marine perspectives on modeling organic matter degradation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, Adrian B; Frey, Serita; Cabre, Anna; Ito, Takamitsu; Levine, Naomi M; Lønborg, Christian; Long, Matthew; Mauritz, Marguerite; Thomas, R Quinn; Stephens, Brandon M; Vanwalleghem, Tom; Zeng, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Organic matter (OM) plays a major role in both terrestrial and oceanic biogeochemical cycles. The amount of carbon stored in these systems is far greater than that of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) in the atmosphere, and annual fluxes of CO2 from these pools to the atmosphere exceed those from fossil fuel combustion. Understanding the processes that determine the fate of detrital material is important for predicting the effects that climate change will have on feedbacks to the global carbon cycle. However, Earth System Models (ESMs) typically utilize very simple formulations of processes affecting the mineralization and storage of detrital OM. Recent changes in our view of the nature of this material and the factors controlling its transformation have yet to find their way into models. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of the role and cycling of detrital OM in terrestrial and marine systems and examine how this pool of material is represented in ESMs. We include a discussion of the different mineralization pathways available as organic matter moves from soils, through inland waters to coastal systems and ultimately into open ocean environments. We argue that there is strong commonality between aspects of OM transformation in both terrestrial and marine systems and that our respective scientific communities would benefit from closer collaboration.

  16. Taxonomy and systematics are key to biological information: Arabidopsis, Eutrema (Thellungiella, Noccaea and Schrenkiella (Brassicaceae as examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus A. Koch

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomy and systematics provide the names and evolutionary framework for any biological study. Without these names there is no access to a biological context of the evolutionary processes which gave rise to a given taxon: close relatives and sister species (hybridisation, more distantly related taxa (ancestral states, for example. This is not only true for the single species a research project is focusing on, but also for its relatives, which might be selected for comparative approaches and future research. Nevertheless, taxonomical and systematic knowledge is rarely fully explored and considered across biological disciplines. One would expect the situation to be more developed with model organisms such as Noccaea, Arabidopsis, Schrenkiella and Eutrema (Thellungiella. However, we show the reverse. Using Arabidopsis halleri and Noccaea caerulescens, two model species among metal accumulating taxa, we summarize and reflect past taxonomy and systematics of Arabidopsis and Noccaea and provide a modern synthesis of taxonomic, systematic and evolutionary perspectives. The same is presented for several species of Eutrema s. l. and Schrenkiella recently appeared as models for studying stress tolerance in plants and widely known under the name Thellungiella.

  17. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  18. Modeling organic micro pollutant degradation kinetics during sewage sludge composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadef, Yumna; Poulsen, Tjalfe Gorm; Bester, Kai

    2014-11-01

    Degradation of 13 different organic micro-pollutants in sewage sludge during aerobic composting at 5 different temperatures over a 52 day period was investigated. Adequacy of two kinetic models: a single first order, and a dual first order expression (using an early (first 7 days) and a late-time (last 45 days) degradation coefficient), for describing micro-pollutant degradation, and kinetic constant dependency on composting temperature were evaluated. The results showed that both models provide relatively good descriptions of the degradation process, with the dual first order model being most accurate. The single first order degradation coefficient was 0.025 d(-1) on average across all compounds and temperatures. At early times, degradation was about three times faster than at later times. Average values of the early and late time degradation coefficients for the dual first order model were 0.066 d(-1) and 0.022 d(-1), respectively. On average 30% of the initial micro-pollutant mass present in the compost was degraded rapidly during the early stages of the composting process. Single first order and late time dual first order kinetic constants were strongly dependent on composting temperature with maximum values at temperatures of 35-65°C. In contrast the early time degradation coefficients were relatively independent of composting temperature.

  19. Mathematical modeling of wastewater-derived biodegradable dissolved organic nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Halis

    2016-11-01

    Wastewater-derived dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) typically constitutes the majority of total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) discharged to surface waters from advanced wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). When considering the stringent regulations on nitrogen discharge limits in sensitive receiving waters, DON becomes problematic and needs to be reduced. Biodegradable DON (BDON) is a portion of DON that is biologically degradable by bacteria when the optimum environmental conditions are met. BDON in a two-stage trickling filter WWTP was estimated using artificial intelligence techniques, such as adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems, multilayer perceptron, radial basis neural networks (RBNN), and generalized regression neural networks. Nitrite, nitrate, ammonium, TDN, and DON data were used as input neurons. Wastewater samples were collected from four different locations in the plant. Model performances were evaluated using root mean square error, mean absolute error, mean bias error, and coefficient of determination statistics. Modeling results showed that the R(2) values were higher than 0.85 in all four models for all wastewater samples, except only R(2) in the final effluent sample for RBNN modeling was low (0.52). Overall, it was found that all four computing techniques could be employed successfully to predict BDON.

  20. Priming and substrate quality interactions in soil organic matter models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wutzler

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between different qualities of soil organic matter (SOM affecting their turnover are rarely represented in models. In this study we propose three mathematical strategies at different levels of abstraction for representing those interactions. Implementing these strategies into the Introductory Carbon Balance Model (ICBM and applying them to several scenarios of litter input show that the different levels of abstraction are applicable on different time scales. We present a simple one-parameter equation of substrate limitation applicable at decadal time scale that is straightforward to implement into other models of SOM dynamics. We show how substrate quality interactions can explain priming effects, acceleration of turnover times in FACE experiments, and the slowdown of decomposition in long-term bare fallow experiments as an effect of energy limitation of microbial biomass. The mechanisms of those interactions need to be further scrutinized empirically for a more complete understanding. Overall, substrate quality interactions offer a valuable way of understanding and quantitatively modelling SOM dynamics.

  1. Modeling organic aerosols during MILAGRO: importance of biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hodzic

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The meso-scale chemistry-transport model CHIMERE is used to assess our understanding of major sources and formation processes leading to a fairly large amount of organic aerosols – OA, including primary OA (POA and secondary OA (SOA – observed in Mexico City during the MILAGRO field project (March 2006. Chemical analyses of submicron aerosols from aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS indicate that organic particles found in the Mexico City basin contain a large fraction of oxygenated organic species (OOA which have strong correspondence with SOA, and that their production actively continues downwind of the city. The SOA formation is modeled here by the one-step oxidation of anthropogenic (i.e. aromatics, alkanes, biogenic (i.e. monoterpenes and isoprene, and biomass-burning SOA precursors and their partitioning into both organic and aqueous phases. Conservative assumptions are made for uncertain parameters to maximize the amount of SOA produced by the model. The near-surface model evaluation shows that predicted OA correlates reasonably well with measurements during the campaign, however it remains a factor of 2 lower than the measured total OA. Fairly good agreement is found between predicted and observed POA within the city suggesting that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions are reasonably captured. Consistent with previous studies in Mexico City, large discrepancies are encountered for SOA, with a factor of 2–10 model underestimate. When only anthropogenic SOA precursors were considered, the model was able to reproduce within a factor of two the sharp increase in OOA concentrations during the late morning at both urban and near-urban locations but the discrepancy increases rapidly later in the day, consistent with previous results, and is especially obvious when the column-integrated SOA mass is considered instead of the surface concentration. The increase in the missing SOA mass in the afternoon coincides with the sharp drop in POA

  2. Weeding out the genes: the Arabidopsis genome project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martienssen, R A

    2000-05-01

    The Arabidopsis genome sequence is scheduled for completion at the end of this year (December 2000). It will be the first higher plant genome to be sequenced, and will allow a detailed comparison with bacterial, yeast and animal genomes. Already, two of the five chromosomes have been sequenced, and we have had our first glimpse of higher eukaryotic centromeres, and the structure of heterochromatin. The implications for understanding plant gene function, genome structure and genome organization are profound. In this review, the lessons learned for future genome projects are reviewed as well as a summary of the initial findings in Arabidopsis.

  3. Arabidopsis thaliana: uma pequena planta um grande papel Arabidopsis thaliana: a small plant a big role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Andréa Delatorre

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana é uma das espécies mais utilizadas na pesquisa científica atualmente. Apesar de não apresentar importância econômica direta, esta espécie é o foco de pesquisas na área da genética, bioquímica e fisiologia. O número de trabalhos publicados sobre a mesma aumentou significativamente após o seqüenciamento de seu genoma. Apesar do grande número de estudos existe ainda muita desinformação sobre qual o seu verdadeiro papel na pesquisa científica de espécies cultivadas e de que maneira o avanço no conhecimento adquirido com A. thaliana pode auxiliar o desenvolvimento de cultivares cada vez mais resistentes, adaptados e produtivos. Os objetivos deste trabalho são discutir as razões do uso da A. thaliana como espécie modelo e a aplicabilidade deste modelo no estudo de espécies cultivadas.Arabidopsis thaliana has been the species of choice for scientific research. Despite its lack of economic importance, it has been the focus of genetic, biochemical and physiological research worldwide. The number of published articles about arabidopsis has increased substantially after its genome was sequenced, and outgrew the number of articles related to economically important species. Despite the great number of studies involving arabidopsis, there is much disinformation about the actual role of this species in crop scientific research, as well as how the breakthroughs in arabidopsis research may help to develop more adapted and productive crops. This work aims to discuss reasons for using A. thaliana as a model species and the feasibility of this model for crop studies.

  4. Modeling biogenic and anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianlin; Wang, Peng; Ying, Qi; Zhang, Hongliang; Chen, Jianjun; Ge, Xinlei; Li, Xinghua; Jiang, Jingkun; Wang, Shuxiao; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Yingyi

    2017-01-01

    A revised Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model with updated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields and a more detailed description of SOA formation from isoprene oxidation was applied to study the spatial and temporal distribution of SOA in China in the entire year of 2013. Predicted organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon and volatile organic compounds agreed favorably with observations at several urban areas, although the high OC concentrations in wintertime in Beijing were under-predicted. Predicted summer SOA was generally higher (10-15 µg m-3) due to large contributions of isoprene (country average, 61 %), although the relative importance varies in different regions. Winter SOA was slightly lower and was mostly due to emissions of alkane and aromatic compounds (51 %). Contributions of monoterpene SOA was relatively constant (8-10 %). Overall, biogenic SOA accounted for approximately 75 % of total SOA in summer, 50-60 % in autumn and spring, and 24 % in winter. The Sichuan Basin had the highest predicted SOA concentrations in the country in all seasons, with hourly concentrations up to 50 µg m-3. Approximately half of the SOA in all seasons was due to the traditional equilibrium partitioning of semivolatile components followed by oligomerization, while the remaining SOA was mainly due to reactive surface uptake of isoprene epoxide (5-14 %), glyoxal (14-25 %) and methylglyoxal (23-28 %). Sensitivity analyses showed that formation of SOA from biogenic emissions was significantly enhanced due to anthropogenic emissions. Removing all anthropogenic emissions while keeping the biogenic emissions unchanged led to total SOA concentrations of less than 1 µg m-3, which suggests that manmade emissions facilitated biogenic SOA formation and controlling anthropogenic emissions would result in reduction of both anthropogenic and biogenic SOA.

  5. Nephrology around Europe: organization models and management strategies: Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Francisco, Angel L M; Piñera, Celestino

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this report is to present a picture of the current organization of nephrology in Spain. The Spanish health system offers almost universal coverage, a wide variety of services and a high-quality network of hospitals and primary care centers. Spain has a specialized health care training system that is highly developed, highly regulated, with the capacity to provide high-quality training in 54 different specialties. Nephrology is basically a hospital-based specialty. There are no private dialysis patients in Spain. Hemodialysis centers are 40% public, 15% private and 45% run by companies. The National Health System covers 95% of the population, and there is no cost to patients for treatment of renal disease (dialysis and transplant). We observed a clear decrease of nephrology in residents' election rankings, with position 29 out of 47 specialties in 2007. Some of the reasons for this are the complexity of the subject, no clear information at the university, reduction of professional posts and a very good public service with minimal private practice. In Spain, a model of organization for transplantation was adopted based on a decentralized transplant coordinating network. For cadaveric donors, it compares favorably with rates in other Western countries. Living donor transplantation is very low in Spain--just 10% of total renal transplantation activity. New programs due to financial constraints need to include reduced dialysis costs, greater cost-effectiveness of prescriptions, better handling of ethical issues related to the need for using a clinical score of chronic kidney disease patients to make decisions about conservative or renal replacement therapy and an action plan for improvement of organ donation and transplantation. Recovery of skills (acute kidney injury, biopsies, vascular access, etc.), research and advances in autonomous activities (imaging, surgical and medical vascular training, etc.) are some of the future educational paths needed in

  6. Arsenic uptake and speciation in Arabidopsis thaliana under hydroponic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Hee; Han, Young-Soo; Seong, Hye Jin; Ahn, Joo Sung; Nam, In-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Arsenic (As) uptake and species in Arabidopsis thaliana were evaluated under hydroponic conditions. Plant nutrient solutions were treated with arsenite [As(III)] or arsenate [As(V)], and aqueous As speciation was conducted using a solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. Arabidopsis reduced As(V) to As(III) in the nutrient solution, possibly due to root exudates such as organic acids or the efflux of As(III) from plant roots after in vivo reduction of As(V) to As(III). Arsenic uptake by Arabidopsis was associated with increased levels of Ca and Fe, and decreased levels of K in plant tissues. Arsenic in Arabidopsis mainly occurred as As(III), which was coordinated with oxygen and sulfur based on XANES and EXAFS results. The existence of As(III)O and As(III)S in EXAFS indicates partial biotransformation of As(III)O to a sulfur-coordinated form because of limited amount of glutathione in plants. Further understanding the mechanism of As biotransformation in Arabidopsis may help to develop measures that can mitigate As toxicity via genetic engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Modeling evolutionary dynamics of epigenetic mutations in hierarchically organized tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sottoriva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC concept is a highly debated topic in cancer research. While experimental evidence in favor of the cancer stem cell theory is apparently abundant, the results are often criticized as being difficult to interpret. An important reason for this is that most experimental data that support this model rely on transplantation studies. In this study we use a novel cellular Potts model to elucidate the dynamics of established malignancies that are driven by a small subset of CSCs. Our results demonstrate that epigenetic mutations that occur during mitosis display highly altered dynamics in CSC-driven malignancies compared to a classical, non-hierarchical model of growth. In particular, the heterogeneity observed in CSC-driven tumors is considerably higher. We speculate that this feature could be used in combination with epigenetic (methylation sequencing studies of human malignancies to prove or refute the CSC hypothesis in established tumors without the need for transplantation. Moreover our tumor growth simulations indicate that CSC-driven tumors display evolutionary features that can be considered beneficial during tumor progression. Besides an increased heterogeneity they also exhibit properties that allow the escape of clones from local fitness peaks. This leads to more aggressive phenotypes in the long run and makes the neoplasm more adaptable to stringent selective forces such as cancer treatment. Indeed when therapy is applied the clone landscape of the regrown tumor is more aggressive with respect to the primary tumor, whereas the classical model demonstrated similar patterns before and after therapy. Understanding these often counter-intuitive fundamental properties of (non-hierarchically organized malignancies is a crucial step in validating the CSC concept as well as providing insight into the therapeutical consequences of this model.

  8. Mathematical Models Light Up Plant Signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chew, Y.H.; Smith, R.W.; Jones, H.J.; Seaton, D.D.; Grima, R.; Halliday, K.J.

    2014-01-01

    Plants respond to changes in the environment by triggering a suite of regulatory networks that control and synchronize molecular signaling in different tissues, organs, and the whole plant. Molecular studies through genetic and environmental perturbations, particularly in the model plant Arabidopsis

  9. Mathematical Models Light Up Plant Signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chew, Y.H.; Smith, R.W.; Jones, H.J.; Seaton, D.D.; Grima, R.; Halliday, K.J.

    2014-01-01

    Plants respond to changes in the environment by triggering a suite of regulatory networks that control and synchronize molecular signaling in different tissues, organs, and the whole plant. Molecular studies through genetic and environmental perturbations, particularly in the model plant Arabidopsis

  10. Spectrophotometry and organic matter on Iapetus. 1: Composition models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Peter D.; Sagan, Carl

    1995-01-01

    Iapetus shows a greater hemispheric albedo asymmetry than any other body in the solar system. Hapke scattering theory and optical constants measured in the laboratory are used to identify possible compositions for the dark material on the leading hemisphere of Iapetus. The materials considered are poly-HCN, kerogen, Murchison organic residue, Titan tholin, ice tholin, and water ice. Three-component mixtures of these materials are modeled in intraparticle mixture of 25% poly-HCN, 10% Murchison residue, and 65% water ice is found to best fit the spectrum, albedo, and phase behavior of the dark material. The Murchison residue and/or water ice can be replaced by kerogen and ice tholin, respectively, and still produce very good fits. Areal and particle mixtures of poly-HCN, Titan tholin, and either ice tholin or Murchison residue are also possible models. Poly-HCN is a necessary component in almost all good models. The presence of poly-HCN can be further tested by high-resolution observations near 4.5 micrometers.

  11. In Vivo RNAi-Based Screens: Studies in Model Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Yamamoto-Hino

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a technique widely used for gene silencing in organisms and cultured cells, and depends on sequence homology between double-stranded RNA (dsRNA and target mRNA molecules. Numerous cell-based genome-wide screens have successfully identified novel genes involved in various biological processes, including signal transduction, cell viability/death, and cell morphology. However, cell-based screens cannot address cellular processes such as development, behavior, and immunity. Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans are two model organisms whose whole bodies and individual body parts have been subjected to RNAi-based genome-wide screening. Moreover, Drosophila RNAi allows the manipulation of gene function in a spatiotemporal manner when it is implemented using the Gal4/UAS system. Using this inducible RNAi technique, various large-scale screens have been performed in Drosophila, demonstrating that the method is straightforward and valuable. However, accumulated results reveal that the results of RNAi-based screens have relatively high levels of error, such as false positives and negatives. Here, we review in vivo RNAi screens in Drosophila and the methods that could be used to remove ambiguity from screening results.

  12. Multiscale modelling of charge transport in organic electronic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jenny

    2010-03-01

    Charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors is controlled by a complex combination of phenomena that span a range of length and time scales. As a result, it is difficult to rationalize charge transport properties in terms of material parameters. Until now, efforts to improve charge mobilities in molecular semiconductors have proceeded largely by trial and error rather than through systematic design. However, recent developments have enabled the first predictive simulation studies of charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors. In this presentation we will show how a set of computational methods, namely molecular modelling methods to simulate molecular packing, quantum chemical calculations of charge transfer rates, and Monte Carlo simulations of charge transport can be used to reproduce experimental charge mobilities with few or no fitting parameters. Using case studies, we will show how such simulations can explain the relative values of electron and hole mobility and the effects of grain size, side chains and polymer molecular weight on charge mobility. Although currently applied to material systems of relatively high symmetry or well defined structure, this approach can be developed to address more complex systems such as multicomponent solids and conjugated polymers.

  13. EcoCyc: fusing model organism databases with systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keseler, Ingrid M; Mackie, Amanda; Peralta-Gil, Martin; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Gama-Castro, Socorro; Bonavides-Martínez, César; Fulcher, Carol; Huerta, Araceli M; Kothari, Anamika; Krummenacker, Markus; Latendresse, Mario; Muñiz-Rascado, Luis; Ong, Quang; Paley, Suzanne; Schröder, Imke; Shearer, Alexander G; Subhraveti, Pallavi; Travers, Mike; Weerasinghe, Deepika; Weiss, Verena; Collado-Vides, Julio; Gunsalus, Robert P; Paulsen, Ian; Karp, Peter D

    2013-01-01

    EcoCyc (http://EcoCyc.org) is a model organism database built on the genome sequence of Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. Expert manual curation of the functions of individual E. coli gene products in EcoCyc has been based on information found in the experimental literature for E. coli K-12-derived strains. Updates to EcoCyc content continue to improve the comprehensive picture of E. coli biology. The utility of EcoCyc is enhanced by new tools available on the EcoCyc web site, and the development of EcoCyc as a teaching tool is increasing the impact of the knowledge collected in EcoCyc.

  14. A self-organized critical model for evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flyvbjerg, H.; Bak, P.; Jensen, M.H.; Sneppen, K.

    1996-01-01

    A simple mathematical model of biological macroevolution is presented. It describes an ecology of adapting, interacting species. Species evolve to maximize their individual fitness in their environment. The environment of any given species is affected by other evolving species; hence it is not constant in time. The ecology evolves to a ``self-organized critical`` state where periods of stasis alternate with avalanches of causally connected evolutionary changes. This characteristic intermittent behaviour of natural history, known as ``punctuated equilibrium,`` thus finds a theoretical explanation as a selforganized critical phenomenon. In particular, large bursts of apparently simultaneous evolutionary activity require no external cause. They occur as the less frequent result of the very same dynamics that governs the more frequent small-scale evolutionary activity. Our results are compared with data from the fossil record collected by J. Sepkoski, Jr., and others.

  15. Modeling nanostructure-enhanced light trapping in organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Jost

    A promising approach for improving the power conversion efficiencies of organic solar cells (OSCs) is by incorporating nanostructures in their thin film architecture to improve the light absorption in the device’s active polymer layers. Here, we present a modelling framework for the prediction...... of optical and plasmonic field enhancement by nanostructures in (or close to) the active layers and electrodes in OSCs. We incorporate finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations alongside semi- analytical approaches, as the rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) and mode-coupling theory. Our simulation......-compatible method for non-periodic electrode structuring by pores of controlled dimensions, formed through anodic oxidation of sputter-deposited high-purity aluminium films [3]. [1] Kluge, C., et al. Multi-periodic nanostructures for photon control. Optics Express, 22 (S5), A1363. (2014) [2] Skigin, D., et al...

  16. Corporate Social Responsibility And Islamic Business Organizations: A Proposed Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusnah Muhamad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of corporate social responsibility (CSR has been of growing concern among business communities in recent years. Various corporate leaders maintain that business is considered to contribute fully to the society if it is effi cient, profi table and socially responsible. Islam is considered as addin (a way of life, thus, providing comprehensive guidelines in every aspects of the believers’ life. It is the aim of this paper to propose an Islamic model of corporate social responsibility based on human relationships with the God (hablun min’Allah; with other fellow human being (hablun min’an-nas and with the environment.Keywords : Corporate Social Responsibility, Islamic Business Organization

  17. Azolla - A Model Organism for Plant Genomic Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-Long Qiu; Jun Yu

    2003-01-01

    The aquatic ferns of the genus Azolla are nitrogen-fixing plants that have great potentials in agricultural production and environmental conservation. Azolla in many aspects is qualified to serve as a model organism for genomic studies because of its importance in agriculture, its unique position in plant evolution, its symbiotic relationship with the N2-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena azollae, and its moderate-sized genome. The goals of this genome project are not only to understand the biology of the Azolla genome to promote its applications in biological research and agriculture practice but also to gain critical insights about evolution of plant genomes. Together with the strategic and technical improvement as well as cost reduction of DNA sequencing, the deciphering of their genetic code is imminent.

  18. Azolla—A Model Organism for Plant Genomic Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-LongQiu; JunYu

    2003-01-01

    The aquatic ferns of the genus Azolla are nitrogen-fixing plants that have great potentials in agricultural production and environmental conservation.Azolla in many aspects is qualified to serve as a model organism for genomic studies because of its importance in agriculture,its unique position in plant evolution,its symbiotic relationship with the N2-fixing cyanobacterium,Anabaena azollae,and its moderate-sized genome.The goals of this genome project are not only to understand the biology of the Azolla genome to promote its applications in biological research and agriculture practice but also to gain critical insights about evolution of plant genomes.Together with the strategic and technical improvement as well as cost reduction of DNA sequencing,the deciphering of their genetic code is imminent.

  19. Giant plasma membrane vesicles: models for understanding membrane organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levental, Kandice R; Levental, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    The organization of eukaryotic membranes into functional domains continues to fascinate and puzzle cell biologists and biophysicists. The lipid raft hypothesis proposes that collective lipid interactions compartmentalize the membrane into coexisting liquid domains that are central to membrane physiology. This hypothesis has proven controversial because such structures cannot be directly visualized in live cells by light microscopy. The recent observations of liquid-liquid phase separation in biological membranes are an important validation of the raft hypothesis and enable application of the experimental toolbox of membrane physics to a biologically complex phase-separated membrane. This review addresses the role of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) in refining the raft hypothesis and expands on the application of GPMVs as an experimental model to answer some of key outstanding problems in membrane biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Self-organized criticality in a computer network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan; Ren; Shan

    2000-02-01

    We study the collective behavior of computer network nodes by using a cellular automaton model. The results show that when the load of network is constant, the throughputs and buffer contents of nodes are power-law distributed in both space and time. Also the feature of 1/f noise appears in the power spectrum of the change of the number of nodes that bear a fixed part of the system load. It can be seen as yet another example of self-organized criticality. Power-law decay in the distribution of buffer contents implies that heavy network congestion occurs with small probability. The temporal power-law distribution for throughput might be a reasonable explanation for the observed self-similarity in computer network traffic.

  1. Comparing and modelling land use organization in cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenormand, Maxime; Picornell, Miguel; Cantú-Ros, Oliva G.; Louail, Thomas; Herranz, Ricardo; Barthelemy, Marc; Frías-Martínez, Enrique; San Miguel, Maxi; Ramasco, José J.

    2015-01-01

    The advent of geolocated information and communication technologies opens the possibility of exploring how people use space in cities, bringing an important new tool for urban scientists and planners, especially for regions where data are scarce or not available. Here we apply a functional network approach to determine land use patterns from mobile phone records. The versatility of the method allows us to run a systematic comparison between Spanish cities of various sizes. The method detects four major land use types that correspond to different temporal patterns. The proportion of these types, their spatial organization and scaling show a strong similarity between all cities that breaks down at a very local scale, where land use mixing is specific to each urban area. Finally, we introduce a model inspired by Schelling's segregation, able to explain and reproduce these results with simple interaction rules between different land uses. PMID:27019730

  2. Comparing and modeling land use organization in cities

    CERN Document Server

    Lenormand, Maxime; Cantú-Ros, Oliva G; Louail, Thomas; Herranz, Ricardo; Barthelemy, Marc; Frías-Martínez, Enrique; Miguel, Maxi San; Ramasco, José J

    2015-01-01

    The advent of geolocated ICT technologies opens the possibility of exploring how people use space in cities, bringing an important new tool for urban scientists and planners, especially for regions where data is scarce or not available. Here we apply a functional network approach to determine land use patterns from mobile phone records. The versatility of the method allows us to run a systematic comparison between Spanish cities of various sizes. The method detects four major land use types that correspond to different temporal patterns. The proportion of these types, their spatial organization and scaling show a strong similarity between all cities that breaks down at a very local scale, where land use mixing is specific to each urban area. Finally, we introduce a model inspired by Schelling's segregation, able to explain and reproduce these results with simple interaction rules between different land uses.

  3. Reference: 164 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available stel C et al. 2005 Mar. Development 132(5):897-911. The higher-plant shoot apical meristem is a dynamic structure...wo antagonistic processes: self-renewal of the stem cell population and initiation of the lateral organs. Th...is coordination is stringently controlled by gene networks that contain both positive and negative components. We have pre...viously defined the ULTRAPETALA1 (ULT1) gene as a key negative regu...lator of cell accumulation in Arabidopsis shoot and floral meristems, because mutations in ULT1 cause the enlargement of inflore

  4. CONCEPTUAL MODEL OF MARKETING STRATEGIC PLANNING SPECIFIC TO PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionescu Florin Tudor

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In public services, the political component of the marketing environment has a major importance, as all decisions adopted within central administration influence both the objectives and measures implemented by units of local government and other public service providers. Any discontinuity in the activity of such entities might result in neglecting the real needs of citizens and slowing the reform process in the public sector. Therefore, all initiatives of public organizations must have a unitary goal and integrate harmoniously within a single process. A tool from the management-marketing literature that both contributes to this purpose and leads to an increased customer satisfaction and organizational performance is strategic marketing planning. This paper presents, firstly, requirements and particularities of this process in the public sector, focusing on the need for bottom-up planning, meaning from the functional levels of public service organizations, to the corporate level, where strategic decisions are taken. To achieve this goal, there should be included in the planning process the clients and other audiences, which can provide useful information about the services they want, the quality or the accessibility thereof, and news about the services they need in the future. There are also mentioned the factors that can influence the quality of strategic marketing planning in public services domain: the importance of marketing within the organization, marketing knowledge of employees in marketing departments and/or of management personnel, the efficiency of activities within the organization, and the manager’s marketing vision. In the final part of the paper there are presented the stages of the conceptual model of strategic marketing planning in public services field: (1 accepting the idea of bottom-up planning, (2 avoid or eliminate discrepancies between measures taken at high levels and executions carried out at operational

  5. ORGANIZING SCENARIO VARIABLES BY APPLYING THE INTERPRETATIVE STRUCTURAL MODELING (ISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Estima de Carvalho

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The scenario building method is a thought mode - taken to effect in an optimized, strategic manner - based on trends and uncertain events, concerning a large variety of potential results that may impact the future of an organization.In this study, the objective is to contribute towards a possible improvement in Godet and Schoemaker´s scenario preparation methods, by employing the Interpretative Structural Modeling (ISM as a tool for the analysis of variables.Given this is an exploratory theme, bibliographical research with tool definition and analysis, examples extraction from literature and a comparison exercise of referred methods, were undertaken.It was verified that ISM may substitute or complement the original tools for the analysis of variables of scenarios per Godet and Schoemaker’s methods, given the fact that it enables an in-depth analysis of relations between variables in a shorter period of time, facilitating both structuring and construction of possible scenarios.Key-words: Strategy. Future studies. Interpretative Structural Modeling.

  6. Self-Organization of Aging in a Modified Penna Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gi Ok; Shim, Sugie

    The Penna model for biological aging is modified so that the fertility of each individual is determined by means of the number of activated mutations at that time. A new concept of "good" mutation, which makes an individual to mature enough to reproduce, is introduced. It is assumed that each individual can reproduce only during adulthood, which is determined by the number of activated mutations. The results of Monte Carlo calculations using the modified model show that the ranges of the reproductive age are broadened as time goes by, thus showing self-organization in the biological aging to the direction of the maximum self-conservation. In addition, the population, the survival rate, and the average life span were calculated and analyzed by changing the number of new mutations at birth. It is observed that the higher is the considered number of new mutations at birth, the shorter is the obtained average life span. The mortality functions are also calculated and they showed the exponential increase in adulthood, satisfying the Gompertz law.

  7. Development of an analytical model for organic-fluid fouling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panchal, C.B.; Watkinson, A.P.

    1994-10-01

    The research goal of this project is to determine ways to effectively mitigate fouling in organic fluids: hydrocarbons and derived fluids. The fouling research focuses on the development of methodology for determining threshold conditions for fouling. Initially, fluid containing chemicals known to produce foulant is analyzed; subsequently, fouling of industrial fluids is investigated. The fouling model developed for determining the effects of physical parameters is the subject of this report. The fouling model is developed on the premise that the chemical reaction for generation of precursor can take place in the bulk fluid, in the thermal-boundary layer, or at the fluid/wall interface, depending upon the interactive effects of fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer, and the controlling chemical reaction. In the analysis, the experimental data are examined for fouling deposition of polyperoxide produced by autoxidation of indene in kerosene. The effects of fluid and wall temperatures for two flow geometries are analyzed. The results show that the relative effects of physical parameters on the fouling rate differ for the three fouling mechanisms. Therefore, to apply the closed-flow-loop data to industrial conditions, the controlling mechanism must be identified.

  8. A Study of Some Leading Organ Transplant Models in Health Care Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasin Uzuntarla

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The most effective treatment method for patients with organ failure is an organ transplant. Although numerous patients are waiting to get organ transplants, the inadequacy in the supply of organs has become a chronic health problem around the whole world. Countries have made various regulations in their health systems that increase the supply of organs and, as a result, various organ transplantation models have been established. Organ transplantation models applied in Spain, the USA, the European Union, Iran, and Turkey have been examined in this study.

  9. KICS: A Model of Motivational Leadership in Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N. N. Ugoani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This pure research gave birth to a Model of Motivational Leadership – KICS: which embraces knowledge, intelligence, collaboration and synergy. It is a synergistic  proposition based on the theory of emotional intelligence as the index of competencies needed for effective leadership. It opened with a general discussion on traditional models of leadership, then the roles of knowledge, intelligence, collaboration and synergy as they relate to motivational leadership. Issues of emotional intelligence clusters and synthesis of the model’s elements were discussed, emphasizing how KICS-based motivational leadership skills can be developed and sustained. Motivational leadership entails exciting people’s imaginations and inspiring them to move in a desired direction. It takes more than simple power to motivate and lead in organizations. Realizing that unity and cohesiveness are built from personal bonds, the best leaders ensure to deepen their rapport with employees and colleagues which enhances organizational performance. This pure research argues that the synergy of related emotional intelligence competencies can lead to motivational leadership behaviour. Knowledge is critical to leadership because there are different types of leadership and different situations require different kinds of knowledge, and the person possessing the knowledge demanded by a certain situation in most cases, tends to become the best leader. A knowledgeable person is one who is trained to consider his actions to undertake them deliberately, in a disciplined manner. Added to this ability is the intelligence to endure in a chosen course in the face of distraction, confusion and difficulty, all combined in producing a motivational leader. Knowledge tends to be procedural in nature and to operate outside of focal awareness. It also reflects the structure of the situation more closely than it does in the structure of formal disciplinary knowledge. The survey research design

  10. An Arabidopsis callose synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Lars; Petersen, Morten; Mattsson, Ole

    2002-01-01

    unclear whether callose synthases can also produce cellulose and whether plant cellulose synthases may also produce beta-1,3-glucans. We describe here an Arabidopsis gene, AtGsl5, encoding a plasma membrane-localized protein homologous to yeast beta-1,3-glucan synthase whose expression partially......Beta-1,3-glucan polymers are major structural components of fungal cell walls, while cellulosic beta-1,4-glucan is the predominant polysaccharide in plant cell walls. Plant beta-1,3-glucan, called callose, is produced in pollen and in response to pathogen attack and wounding, but it has been...... in the Arabidopsis mpk4 mutant which exhibits systemic acquired resistance (SAR), elevated beta-1,3-glucan synthase activity, and increased callose levels. In addition, AtGsl5 is a likely target of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent SAR, since AtGsl5 mRNA accumulation is induced by SA in wild-type plants, while...

  11. Review of existing terrestrial bioaccumulation models and terrestrial bioaccumulation modeling needs for organic chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobas, Frank A P C; Burkhard, Lawrence P; Doucette, William J; Sappington, Keith G; Verbruggen, Eric M J; Hope, Bruce K; Bonnell, Mark A; Arnot, Jon A; Tarazona, Jose V

    2016-01-01

    Protocols for terrestrial bioaccumulation assessments are far less-developed than for aquatic systems. This article reviews modeling approaches that can be used to assess the terrestrial bioaccumulation potential of commercial organic chemicals. Models exist for plant, invertebrate, mammal, and avian species and for entire terrestrial food webs, including some that consider spatial factors. Limitations and gaps in terrestrial bioaccumulation modeling include the lack of QSARs for biotransformation and dietary assimilation efficiencies for terrestrial species; the lack of models and QSARs for important terrestrial species such as insects, amphibians and reptiles; the lack of standardized testing protocols for plants with limited development of plant models; and the limited chemical domain of existing bioaccumulation models and QSARs (e.g., primarily applicable to nonionic organic chemicals). There is an urgent need for high-quality field data sets for validating models and assessing their performance. There is a need to improve coordination among laboratory, field, and modeling efforts on bioaccumulative substances in order to improve the state of the science for challenging substances.

  12. The Arabidopsis COPT6 transport protein functions in copper distribution under copper-deficient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Molina, Antoni; Andrés-Colás, Nuria; Perea-García, Ana; Neumann, Ulla; Dodani, Sheel C; Huijser, Peter; Peñarrubia, Lola; Puig, Sergi

    2013-08-01

    Copper (Cu), an essential redox active cofactor, participates in fundamental biological processes, but it becomes highly cytotoxic when present in excess. Therefore, living organisms have established suitable mechanisms to balance cellular and systemic Cu levels. An important strategy to maintain Cu homeostasis consists of regulating uptake and mobilization via the conserved family of CTR/COPT Cu transport proteins. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, COPT1 protein mediates root Cu acquisition, whereas COPT5 protein functions in Cu mobilization from intracellular storage organelles. The function of these transporters becomes critical when environmental Cu bioavailability diminishes. However, little is know about the mechanisms that mediate plant Cu distribution. In this report, we present evidence supporting an important role for COPT6 in Arabidopsis Cu distribution. Similarly to COPT1 and COPT2, COPT6 fully complements yeast mutants defective in high-affinity Cu uptake and localizes to the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis cells. Whereas COPT2 mRNA is only up-regulated upon severe Cu deficiency, COPT6 transcript is expressed under Cu excess conditions and displays a more gradual increase in response to decreases in environmental Cu levels. Consistent with COPT6 expression in aerial vascular tissues and reproductive organs, copt6 mutant plants exhibit altered Cu distribution under Cu-deficient conditions, including increased Cu in rosette leaves but reduced Cu levels in seeds. This altered Cu distribution is fully rescued when the wild-type COPT6 gene is reintroduced into the copt6 mutant line. Taken together, these findings highlight the relevance of COPT6 in shoot Cu redistribution when environmental Cu is limited.

  13. 3D modeling of organic haze in Pluto's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Tanguy; Forget, François

    2017-05-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft, which flew by Pluto on July 14, 2015, revealed the presence of haze in Pluto's atmosphere that were formed by CH4/N2 photochemistry at high altitudes in Pluto's atmosphere, as on Titan and Triton. In order to help the analysis of the observations and further investigate the formation of organic haze and its evolution at global scales, we have implemented a simple parameterization of the formation of organic haze in our Pluto General Circulation Model. The production of haze in our model is based on the different steps of aerosol formation as understood on Titan and Triton: photolysis of CH4 in the upper atmosphere by Lyman-α UV radiation, production of various gaseous species, and conversion into solid particles through accumulation and aggregation processes. The simulations use properties of aerosols similar to those observed in the detached haze layer on Titan. We compared two reference simulations ran with a particle radius of 50 nm: with, and without South Pole N2 condensation. We discuss the impact of the particle radius and the lifetime of the precursors on the haze distribution. We simulate CH4 photolysis and the haze formation up to 600 km above the surface. Results show that CH4 photolysis in Pluto's atmosphere in 2015 occurred mostly in the sunlit summer hemisphere with a peak at an altitude of 250 km, though the interplanetary source of Lyman-α flux can induce some photolysis even in the Winter hemisphere. We obtained an extensive haze up to altitudes comparable with the observations, and with non-negligible densities up to 500 km altitude. In both reference simulations, the haze density is not strongly impacted by the meridional circulation. With No South Pole N2 condensation, the maximum nadir opacity and haze extent is obtained at the North Pole. With South Pole N2 condensation, the descending parcel of air above the South Pole leads to a latitudinally more homogeneous haze density with a slight density peak at the South

  14. Towards Increased Relevance: Context-Adapted Models of the Learning Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örtenblad, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this paper are to take a closer look at the relevance of the idea of the learning organization for organizations in different generalized organizational contexts; to open up for the existence of multiple, context-adapted models of the learning organization; and to suggest a number of such models.…

  15. Towards Increased Relevance: Context-Adapted Models of the Learning Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örtenblad, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this paper are to take a closer look at the relevance of the idea of the learning organization for organizations in different generalized organizational contexts; to open up for the existence of multiple, context-adapted models of the learning organization; and to suggest a number of such models.…

  16. Evaluation of approaches focused on modelling of organic carbon stocks using the RothC model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koco, Štefan; Skalský, Rastislav; Makovníková, Jarmila; Tarasovičová, Zuzana; Barančíková, Gabriela

    2014-05-01

    The aim of current efforts in the European area is the protection of soil organic matter, which is included in all relevant documents related to the protection of soil. The use of modelling of organic carbon stocks for anticipated climate change, respectively for land management can significantly help in short and long-term forecasting of the state of soil organic matter. RothC model can be applied in the time period of several years to centuries and has been tested in long-term experiments within a large range of soil types and climatic conditions in Europe. For the initialization of the RothC model, knowledge about the carbon pool sizes is essential. Pool size characterization can be obtained from equilibrium model runs, but this approach is time consuming and tedious, especially for larger scale simulations. Due to this complexity we search for new possibilities how to simplify and accelerate this process. The paper presents a comparison of two approaches for SOC stocks modelling in the same area. The modelling has been carried out on the basis of unique input of land use, management and soil data for each simulation unit separately. We modeled 1617 simulation units of 1x1 km grid on the territory of agroclimatic region Žitný ostrov in the southwest of Slovakia. The first approach represents the creation of groups of simulation units based on the evaluation of results for simulation unit with similar input values. The groups were created after the testing and validation of modelling results for individual simulation units with results of modelling the average values of inputs for the whole group. Tests of equilibrium model for interval in the range 5 t.ha-1 from initial SOC stock showed minimal differences in results comparing with result for average value of whole interval. Management inputs data from plant residues and farmyard manure for modelling of carbon turnover were also the same for more simulation units. Combining these groups (intervals of initial

  17. Development and evaluation of a new sorption model for organic cations in soil: contributions from organic matter and clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droge, Steven T J; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2013-12-17

    This study evaluates a newly proposed cation-exchange model that defines the sorption of organic cations to soil as a summed contribution of sorption to organic matter (OM) and sorption to phyllosilicate clay minerals. Sorption to OM is normalized to the fraction organic carbon (fOC), and sorption to clay is normalized to the estimated cation-exchange capacity attributed to clay minerals (CECCLAY). Sorption affinity is specified to a fixed medium composition, with correction factors for other electrolyte concentrations. The model applies measured sorption coefficients to one reference OM material and one clay mineral. If measured values are absent, then empirical relationships are available on the basis of molecular volume and amine type in combination with corrective increments for specific polar moieties. The model is tested using new sorption data generated at pH 6 for two Eurosoils, one enriched in clay and the other, OM, using 29 strong bases (pKa > 8). Using experimental data on reference materials for all tested compounds, model predictions for the two soils differed on average by only -0.1 ± 0.4 log units from measured sorption affinities. Within the chemical applicability domain, the model can also be applied successfully to various reported soil sorption data for organic cations. Particularly for clayish soils, the model shows that sorption of organic cations to clay minerals accounts for more than 90% of the overall affinity.

  18. Vienna Soil-Organic-Matter Modeler--Generating condensed-phase models of humic substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sündermann, Axel; Solc, Roland; Tunega, Daniel; Haberhauer, Georg; Gerzabek, Martin H; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Humic substances are ubiquitous in the environment and have manifold functions. While their composition is well known, information on the chemical structure and three-dimensional conformation is scarce. Here we describe the Vienna Soil-Organic-Matter Modeler, which is an online tool to generate condensed phase computer models of humic substances (http://somm.boku.ac.at). Many different models can be created that reflect the diversity in composition and conformations of the constituting molecules. To exemplify the modeler, 18 different models are generated based on two experimentally determined compositions, to explicitly study the effect of varying e.g. the amount of water molecules in the models or the pH. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on the models, which were subsequently analyzed in terms of structure, interactions and dynamics, linking macroscopic observables to the microscopic composition of the systems. We are convinced that this new tool opens the way for a wide range of in silico studies on soil organic matter.

  19. Modeling adsorption and reactions of organic molecules at metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Scheffler, Matthias

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: The understanding of adsorption and reactions of (large) organic molecules at metal surfaces plays an increasingly important role in modern surface science and technology. Such hybrid inorganic/organic systems (HIOS) are relevant for many applications in catalysis, light-emitting diodes, single-molecule junctions, molecular sensors and switches, and photovoltaics. Obviously, the predictive modeling and understanding of the structure and stability of such hybrid systems is an essential prerequisite for tuning their electronic properties and functions. At present, density-functional theory (DFT) is the most promising approach to study the structure, stability, and electronic properties of complex systems, because it can be applied to both molecules and solids comprising thousands of atoms. However, state-of-the-art approximations to DFT do not provide a consistent and reliable description for HIOS, which is largely due to two issues: (i) the self-interaction of the electrons with themselves arising from the Hartree term of the total energy that is not fully compensated in approximate exchange-correlation functionals, and (ii) the lack of long-range part of the ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The self-interaction errors sometimes lead to incorrect description of charge transfer and electronic level alignment in HIOS, although for molecules adsorbed on metals these effects will often cancel out in total energy differences. Regarding vdW interactions, several promising vdW-inclusive DFT-based methods have been recently demonstrated to yield remarkable accuracy for intermolecular interactions in the gas phase. However, the majority of these approaches neglect the nonlocal collective electron response in the vdW energy tail, an effect that is particularly strong in condensed phases and at interfaces between different materials. Here we show that the recently developed DFT+vdW(surf) method that accurately accounts for the collective electronic

  20. The prisoner as model organism: malaria research at Stateville Penitentiary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comfort, Nathaniel

    2009-01-01

    In a military-sponsored research project begun during the Second World War, inmates of the Stateville Penitentiary in Illinois were infected with malaria and treated with experimental drugs that sometimes had vicious side effects. They were made into reservoirs for the disease and they provided a food supply for the mosquito cultures. They acted as secretaries and technicians, recording data on one another, administering malarious mosquito bites and experimental drugs to one another, and helping decide who was admitted to the project and who became eligible for early parole as a result of his participation. Thus, the prisoners were not simply research subjects; they were deeply constitutive of the research project. Because a prisoner’s time on the project was counted as part of his sentence, and because serving on the project could shorten one’s sentence, the project must be seen as simultaneously serving the functions of research and punishment. Michel Foucault wrote about such ‘mixed mechanisms’ in his Discipline and punish. His shining example of such a ‘transparent’ and subtle style of punishment was the panopticon, Jeremy Bentham’s architectural invention of prison cellblocks arrayed around a central guard tower. Stateville prison was designed on Bentham’s model; Foucault featured it in his own discussion. This paper, then, explores the power relations in this highly idiosyncratic experimental system, in which the various roles of model organism, reagent, and technician are all occupied by sentient beings who move among them fluidly. This, I argue, created an environment in the Stateville hospital wing more panoptic than that in the cellblocks. Research and punishment were completely interpenetrating, and mutually reinforcing. PMID:19720327

  1. The prisoner as model organism: malaria research at Stateville Penitentiary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comfort, Nathaniel

    2009-09-01

    In a military-sponsored research project begun during the Second World War, inmates of the Stateville Penitentiary in Illinois were infected with malaria and treated with experimental drugs that sometimes had vicious side effects. They were made into reservoirs for the disease and they provided a food supply for the mosquito cultures. They acted as secretaries and technicians, recording data on one another, administering malarious mosquito bites and experimental drugs to one another, and helping decide who was admitted to the project and who became eligible for early parole as a result of his participation. Thus, the prisoners were not simply research subjects; they were deeply constitutive of the research project. Because a prisoner's time on the project was counted as part of his sentence, and because serving on the project could shorten one's sentence, the project must be seen as simultaneously serving the functions of research and punishment. Michel Foucault wrote about such 'mixed mechanisms' in his Discipline and punish. His shining example of such a 'transparent' and subtle style of punishment was the panopticon, Jeremy Bentham's architectural invention of prison cellblocks arrayed around a central guard tower. Stateville prison was designed on Bentham's model; Foucault featured it in his own discussion. This paper, then, explores the power relations in this highly idiosyncratic experimental system, in which the various roles of model organism, reagent, and technician are all occupied by sentient beings who move among them fluidly. This, I argue, created an environment in the Stateville hospital wing more panoptic than that in the cellblocks. Research and punishment were completely interpenetrating, and mutually reinforcing.

  2. System-level insights into the cellular interactome of a non-model organism: inferring, modelling and analysing functional gene network of soybean (Glycine max.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yungang Xu

    Full Text Available Cellular interactome, in which genes and/or their products interact on several levels, forming transcriptional regulatory-, protein interaction-, metabolic-, signal transduction networks, etc., has attracted decades of research focuses. However, such a specific type of network alone can hardly explain the various interactive activities among genes. These networks characterize different interaction relationships, implying their unique intrinsic properties and defects, and covering different slices of biological information. Functional gene network (FGN, a consolidated interaction network that models fuzzy and more generalized notion of gene-gene relations, have been proposed to combine heterogeneous networks with the goal of identifying functional modules supported by multiple interaction types. There are yet no successful precedents of FGNs on sparsely studied non-model organisms, such as soybean (Glycine max, due to the absence of sufficient heterogeneous interaction data. We present an alternative solution for inferring the FGNs of soybean (SoyFGNs, in a pioneering study on the soybean interactome, which is also applicable to other organisms. SoyFGNs exhibit the typical characteristics of biological networks: scale-free, small-world architecture and modularization. Verified by co-expression and KEGG pathways, SoyFGNs are more extensive and accurate than an orthology network derived from Arabidopsis. As a case study, network-guided disease-resistance gene discovery indicates that SoyFGNs can provide system-level studies on gene functions and interactions. This work suggests that inferring and modelling the interactome of a non-model plant are feasible. It will speed up the discovery and definition of the functions and interactions of other genes that control important functions, such as nitrogen fixation and protein or lipid synthesis. The efforts of the study are the basis of our further comprehensive studies on the soybean functional

  3. Modelling and Optimization of Organization of Workplaces in a Foundry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kukla S.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a practical example of improvement of foundry production systems in terms of post-finishing of nodular iron castings produced in the conditions of bulk production for automotive industry. The attention was paid to high labour-intensive efforts, which are difficult to be subjected to mechanization and automation. The times of actions related to grinding processing of castings in three grinding positions connected with a belt conveyor were estimated with the use of a time study method. A bottleneck as well as limiting factors were specified in a system. A number of improvements were proposed, aimed at improving work organization on the castings post-finishing line. An analysis of work ergonomics at the workplace was made in order to eliminate unnecessary and onerous for the employee actions. A model of production system using the Arena software, on which a simulation experiment was conducted, was drawn up in order to visualize the analysed phenomena. The effects of the project were shown on graphs comparing times, costs, work ergonomics and overall efficiency of production equipment indicator.

  4. [Epidemiological intelligence as a model of organization in health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Júnior, Antonio Luiz

    2012-03-01

    The concept of epidemiological intelligence, as a construction of information societies, goes beyond monitoring a list of diseases and the ability to elicit rapid responses. The concept should consider the complexity of the definition of epidemiology in the identification of this object of study without being limited to a set of actions in a single government sector. The activities of epidemiological intelligence include risk assessment, strategies for prevention and protection, subsystems of information, crisis management rooms, geographical analysis, etc. This concept contributes to the understanding of policies in health, in multisectorial and geopolitical dimensions, as regards the organization of services around public health emergencies, primary healthcare, as well as disasters. The activities of epidemiological intelligence should not be restricted to scientific research, but the researchers must beware of threats to public health. Lalonde's model enabled consideration of epidemiological intelligence as a way to restructure policies and share resources by creating communities of intelligence, whose purpose is primarily to deal with public health emergencies and disasters.

  5. Genome-wide analysis of basic leucine zipper transcription factor families in Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza saliva and Populus trichocarpa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Qian; ZHANG Liang-sheng; WANG Yi-fei; WANG Jian

    2009-01-01

    The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors form a large gene family that is important in pathogen defense, light and stress signaling, etc. The Completed whole genome sequences of model plants Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), rice (Oryza saliva) and poplar (Populus trichocarpa) constitute a valuable resource for genome-wide analysis and genomic comparative analysis, as they are representatives of the two major evolutionary lineages within the angiosperms: the monocotyledons and the dicotyledons. In this study, bioinformatics analysis identified 74, 89 and 88 bZIP genes respectively in Arabidopsis, rice and poplar. Moreover, a comprehensive overview of this gene family is presented, including the gene structure, phylogeny, chromosome distribution, conserved motifs. As a result, the plant bZIPs were organized into 10 subfamilies on basis of phylogenetic relationship. Gene duplication events during the family evolution history were also investigated. And it was further concluded that chromosomal/segmental duplication might have played a key role in gene expansion of bZIP gene family.

  6. FUM2, a Cytosolic Fumarase, Is Essential for Acclimation to Low Temperature in Arabidopsis thaliana1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Beth C.; Miller, Matthew A.E.; Feil, Regina; Rattray, Nicholas; Bowsher, Caroline G.

    2016-01-01

    Although cold acclimation is a key process in plants from temperate climates, the mechanisms sensing low temperature remain obscure. Here, we show that the accumulation of the organic acid fumaric acid, mediated by the cytosolic fumarase FUM2, is essential for cold acclimation of metabolism in the cold-tolerant model species Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). A nontargeted metabolomic approach, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, identifies fumarate as a key component of the cold response in this species. Plants of T-DNA insertion mutants, lacking FUM2, show marked differences in their response to cold, with contrasting responses both in terms of metabolite concentrations and gene expression. The fum2 plants accumulated higher concentrations of phosphorylated sugar intermediates and of starch and malate. Transcripts for proteins involved in photosynthesis were markedly down-regulated in fum2.2 but not in wild-type Columbia-0. Plants of fum2 show a complete loss of the ability to acclimate photosynthesis to low temperature. We conclude that fumarate accumulation plays an essential role in low temperature sensing in Arabidopsis, either indirectly modulating metabolic or redox signals or possibly being itself directly involved in cold sensing. PMID:27440755

  7. Modelling Competences for Partner Selection in Service-Oriented Virtual Organization Breeding Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Paszkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    In the context of globalization and dynamic markets, collaboration among organizations is a condition sine qua non for organizations, especially small and medium enterprises, to remain competitive. Virtual organizations have been proposed as an organizational structure adapted to collaboration among organizations. The concept of Virtual Organization Breeding Environment (VOBE) has been proposed as a means to support the creation and operation of virtual organizations. With the rise of the service-oriented architecture (SOA), the concept of service-oriented VOBE (SOVOBE) has been proposed as a VOBE systematically organized around the concept of services. In the context of SOVOBEs, novel competence models supporting both service orientation and collaboration among organizations have to be developed to support efficiently partner selection, a key aspect of VO creation. In this paper, such a competence model is presented. Our competence model consists of a competence description model, a competence verification m...

  8. In silico identification of known osmotic stress responsive genes from Arabidopsis in soybean and Medicago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina M. Soares-Cavalcanti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants experience various environmental stresses, but tolerance to these adverse conditions is a very complex phenomenon. The present research aimed to evaluate a set of genes involved in osmotic response, comparing soybean and medicago with the well-described Arabidopsis thaliana model plant. Based on 103 Arabidopsis proteins from 27 categories of osmotic stress response, comparative analyses against Genosoja and Medicago truncatula databases allowed the identification of 1,088 soybean and 1,210 Medicago sequences. The analysis showed a high number of sequences and high diversity, comprising genes from all categories in both organisms. Genes with unknown function were among the most representative, followed by transcription factors, ion transport proteins, water channel, plant defense, protein degradation, cellular structure, organization & biogenesis and senescence. An analysis of sequences with unknown function allowed the annotation of 174 soybean and 217 Medicago sequences, most of them concerning transcription factors. However, for about 30% of the sequences no function could be attributed using in silico procedures. The establishment of a gene set involved in osmotic stress responses in soybean and barrel medic will help to better understand the survival mechanisms for this type of stress condition in legumes.

  9. The AtNFS2 gene from Arabidopsis thaliana encodes a NifS-like plastidial cysteine desulphurase.

    OpenAIRE

    Léon, Sébastien; Touraine, Brigitte; Briat, Jean-François; Lobréaux, Stéphane

    2002-01-01

    NifS-like proteins are cysteine desulphurases required for the mobilization of sulphur from cysteine. They are present in all organisms, where they are involved in iron-sulphur (Fe-S) cluster biosynthesis. In eukaryotes, these enzymes are present in mitochondria, which are the major site for Fe-S cluster assembly. The genome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana contains two putative NifS-like proteins. A cDNA corresponding to one of them was cloned by reverse-transcription PCR, and named A...

  10. Dissecting Ubiquitin Folding Using the Self-Organized Polymer Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Govardhan; Thirumalai, D

    2015-08-27

    Folding of Ubiquitin (Ub), a functionally important protein found in eukaryotic organisms, is investigated at low and neutral pH at different temperatures using simulations of the coarse-grained self-organized-polymer model with side chains (SOP-SC). The melting temperatures (Tm's), identified with the peaks in the heat capacity curves, decrease as pH decreases, in qualitative agreement with experiments. The calculated radius of gyration, showing dramatic variations with pH, is in excellent agreement with scattering experiments. At Tm, Ub folds in a two-state manner at low and neutral pH. Clustering analysis of the conformations sampled in equilibrium folding trajectories at Tm, with multiple transitions between the folded and unfolded states, shows a network of metastable states connecting the native and unfolded states. At low and neutral pH, Ub folds with high probability through a preferred set of conformations resulting in a pH-dependent dominant folding pathway. Folding kinetics reveal that Ub assembly at low pH occurs by multiple pathways involving a combination of nucleation-collapse and diffusion collision mechanism. The mechanism by which Ub folds is dictated by the stability of the key secondary structural elements responsible for establishing long-range contacts and collapse of Ub. Nucleation collapse mechanism holds if the stability of these elements are marginal, as would be the case at elevated temperatures. If the lifetimes associated with these structured microdomains are on the order of hundreds of microseconds, then Ub folding follows the diffusion-collision mechanism with intermediates, many of which coincide with those found in equilibrium. Folding at neutral pH is a sequential process with a populated intermediate resembling that sampled at equilibrium. The transition state structures, obtained using a Pfold analysis, are homogeneous and globular with most of the secondary and tertiary structures being native-like. Many of our findings for

  11. Models,Characteristics and Upgrade of Rural Tourism Industrial Organizations in Beijing Suburbs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongli; GENG

    2013-01-01

    This paper firstly introduces theoretical basis of researches on industrial organizations of rural tourism.It sums up major models of industrial organizations of rural tourism in Beijing suburbs.Then,it presents benefits and major problems of different models,sums up characteristics of development of rural tourism industrial organizations in Beijing suburbs.Finally,it comes up with recommendations for upgrade and development of rural tourism industrial organizations in Beijing suburbs.

  12. Multi-element bioimaging of Arabidopsis thaliana roots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Daniel Olof; Chen, Anle; Aarts, Mark G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Better understanding of root function is central for the development of plants with more efficient nutrient uptake and translocation. We here present a method for multielement bioimaging at the cellular level in roots of the genetic model system Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using...... conventional protocols for microscopy, we observed that diffusible ions such as potassium and sodium were lost during sample dehydration. Thus, we developed a protocol that preserves ions in their native, cellular environment. Briefly, fresh roots are encapsulated in paraffin, cryo-sectioned, and freeze dried...... transport in roots. Being applicable to Arabidopsis, the molecular and genetic approaches available in this system can now be fully exploited in order to gain a better mechanistic understanding of these processes....

  13. Lateral root development in Arabidopsis: fifty shades of auxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavenus, Julien; Goh, Tatsuaki; Roberts, Ianto; Guyomarc'h, Soazig; Lucas, Mikaël; De Smet, Ive; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Beeckman, Tom; Bennett, Malcolm; Laplaze, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    The developmental plasticity of the root system represents a key adaptive trait enabling plants to cope with abiotic stresses such as drought and is therefore important in the current context of global changes. Root branching through lateral root formation is an important component of the adaptability of the root system to its environment. Our understanding of the mechanisms controlling lateral root development has progressed tremendously in recent years through research in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). These studies have revealed that the phytohormone auxin acts as a common integrator to many endogenous and environmental signals regulating lateral root formation. Here, we review what has been learnt about the myriad roles of auxin during lateral root formation in Arabidopsis.

  14. Using Arabidopsis to explore zinc tolerance and hyperaccumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosens, Nancy H C J; Willems, Glenda; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre

    2008-05-01

    Identifying the particular gene or genes underlying a specific adaptation is a major challenge in modern biology. Currently, the study of naturally occurring variation in Arabidopsis thaliana provides a bridge between functional genetics and evolutionary analyses. Nevertheless, the use of A. thaliana to study adaptation is limited to those traits that have undergone selection. Therefore, to understand fully the genetics of adaptation, the vast arsenal of genetic resources developed in A. thaliana must be extended to other species that display traits absent in this model species. Here, we discuss how A. thaliana resources can significantly enhance the study of heavy-metal tolerance and hyperaccumulation in the wild species Arabidopsis halleri.

  15. Meristem size contributes to the robustness of phyllotaxis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrein, Benoit; Refahi, Yassin; Besnard, Fabrice; Hervieux, Nathan; Mirabet, Vincent; Boudaoud, Arezki; Vernoux, Teva; Hamant, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    Using the plant model Arabidopsis, the relationship between day length, the size of the shoot apical meristem, and the robustness of phyllotactic patterns were analysed. First, it was found that reducing day length leads to an increased meristem size and an increased number of alterations in the final positions of organs along the stem. Most of the phyllotactic defects could be related to an altered tempo of organ emergence, while not affecting the spatial positions of organ initiations at the meristem. A correlation was also found between meristem size and the robustness of phyllotaxis in two accessions (Col-0 and WS-4) and a mutant (clasp-1), independent of growth conditions. A reduced meristem size in clasp-1 was even associated with an increased robustness of the phyllotactic pattern, beyond what is observed in the wild type. Interestingly it was also possible to modulate the robustness of phyllotaxis in these different genotypes by changing day length. To conclude, it is shown first that robustness of the phyllotactic pattern is not maximal in the wild type, suggesting that, beyond its apparent stereotypical order, the robustness of phyllotaxis is regulated. Secondly, a role for day length in the robustness of the phyllotaxis was also identified, thus providing a new example of a link between patterning and environment in plants. Thirdly, the experimental results validate previous model predictions suggesting a contribution of meristem size in the robustness of phyllotaxis via the coupling between the temporal sequence and spatial pattern of organ initiations. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  16. Modelling the subgenual organ of the honeybee, Apis mellifera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Jesper; Kilpinen, Ole

    1998-01-01

    In a recent study on the honeybee (Apis mellifera), the subgenual organ was observed moving inside the leg during sinusoidal vibrations of the leg (Kilpinen and Storm 1997). The subgenual organ of the honeybee is suspended in a haemolymph channel in the tibia of each leg. When the leg accelerates...

  17. Improving Organizations by Replacing the "Mechanical" Model with the "Organic" one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Organizations are currently viewed as artificial structures. However, in our opinion, organizations seem to match a biological structure much better. This paper explores this new approach with some interesting conclusions and results: organizations aim at perpetual exis-tence and continuous adaptation. We advance the ideas of organizational "instincts", organizational pathology and organizational optimization using genetic algorithms. In competitive markets, organizations are in a natural selection process, which actually is part of a natural genetic algorithm. This process may be simulated in an artificial multidisciplinary optimization environment, based on minimizing a Total Costs and Risks objective function. Unlike the gradient optimization methods, the genetic algorithms may be applied to such problems with thousands of degrees of freedom. This opens the way to the organizational structure optimization through genetic algorithms.

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK068856 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available eme oxygenase (HY1) [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4877362, heme oxygenase 1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4530591 GB:AF132475; annotation upd...ated per Seth J. Davis at University of Wisconsin-Madison 3e-90 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK104955 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available B:AF132475; annotation updated per Seth J. Davis at University of Wisconsin-Madison 3e-90 ... ...heme oxygenase (HY1) [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4877362, heme oxygenase 1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4530591 G

  20. Reference: 110 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on process. Our study shows that an Arabidopsis SNM protein, although structurally closer to the SNM1/PSO2 members, shares some prope...rties with ARTEMIS but also has novel characteristics. Arabidopsis plants defective