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Sample records for model oil-in-water emulsions

  1. Use of olive oil-in-water gelled emulsions in model turkey breast emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdaroğlu, M.; Öztürk, B.

    2017-09-01

    Today, gelled emulsion systems offer a novel possibility in lipid modification of meat products. In this study, we aimed to investigate the quality characteristics of model turkey emulsions that were prepared with olive oil-in-water gelled emulsion (GE) as partial or total beef fat replacer. The results indicated that while most of the GE treatments showed equivalent emulsion characteristics in terms of emulsion stability, water-holding capacity and cook yield, utilization of 100% GE as the lipid source could increase total expressible fluid of the model turkey emulsion and thus negatively affect the quality. Utilization of GE was effective in total fat reduction, as the model turkey emulsions formulated with more than 50% GE had significantly lower fat content compared to full-beef fat control model emulsion. However, beef fat replacement with GE produced considerable changes in colour parameters. Finally, it was concluded that utilization of GE as a partial beef fat replacer has good potential to enhance stability and reduce total fat in turkey meat emulsion products.

  2. The Influence of Chemically Modified Potato Maltodextrins on Stability and Rheological Properties of Model Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Pycia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the maltodextrins prepared from chemically modified starches (crosslinked, stabilized, crosslinked and stabilized on the stability and rheological properties of model oil-in-water (o/w emulsions. Based on the obtained results, it was concluded that emulsion stability depended on hydrolysates dextrose equivalent (DE value. Maltodextrin with the lowest degree of depolymerization effectively stabilized the dispersed system, and the effectiveness of this action depended on the maltodextrin type and concentration. Addition of distarch phosphate-based maltodextrin stabilized emulsion at the lowest applied concentration, and the least effective was maltodextrin prepared from acetylated starch. Emulsions stabilized by maltodextrins (DE 6 prepared from distarch phosphate and acetylated distarch adipate showed the predominance of the elastic properties over the viscous ones. Only emulsion stabilized by maltodextrin prepared from distarch phosphate (E1412 revealed the properties of strong gel. Additionally, the decrease in emulsions G′ and G″ moduli values, combined with an increase in the value of DE maltodextrins, was observed.

  3. Data on the physical characterization of oil in water emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldana L. Zalazar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article contains experimental data and images for the physical characterization of oil in water emulsions. Mentioned data are related to the research article “Effect of stabilizers, oil level and structure on the growth of Zygosaccharomyces bailii and on physical stability of model systems simulating acid sauces” (A.L. Zalazar, M.F. Gliemmo, C.A. Campos, 2016 [1]. Physical characterization of emulsions was performed through the evaluation of Span and Specific Surface Area (SSA determined by light scattering using a Mastersizer. Furthermore, microscopy images were recorded by confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM. The latter are presented to collaborate in the analysis of emulsion microstructure.

  4. Activity of flavonoids and β-carotene during the auto-oxidative deterioration of model food oil-in water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiokias, Sotirios; Varzakas, Theodoros

    2014-05-01

    The antioxidant effects of flavonoids and β-carotene during the thermal auto-oxidation of food relevant oil-in-water emulsions were spectrophotometrically assessed by measuring the formation of primary oxidation products (conjugated dienes and lipid hydroperoxides). An oxidatively "sensitive" model emulsion was selected as substrate of this study in terms of processing and compositional factors. At a concentration of 1.5mmolkgr(-1), only quercetin among the tested compounds significantly reduced the oxidative deterioration of cottonseed oil-in-water emulsions. Structural characteristics (positioning of hydroxyl group) or partitioning behaviour between the emulsion phases may modulate the flavonoid activity. The high oxygen pressure conditions of the experimental system may explain the lack of any antioxidant activity for β-carotene. The antioxidant potential of quercetin increased with its concentration until a specific level. On the contrary, the antioxidant concentration within the same tested range (0.75-3mmolkgr(-1)) did not impact the activity of catechin and β-carotene. Mixtures of β-carotene with flavonoids did not exert a tendency for increasing the activity of each individual compound. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Factors governing partial coalescence in oil-in-water emulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fredrick, E.; Walstra, P.; Dewettinck, K.

    2010-01-01

    The consequences of the instability mechanism partial coalescence in oil-in-water food emulsions show a discrepancy. On the one hand, it needs to be avoided in order to achieve an extended shelf life in food products like sauces, creams and several milk products. On the other hand, during the

  6. Transport and Retention of Concentrated Oil-in-Water Emulsions in Sandy Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, K.; Esahani, S. G.; Steven, C. C.; Ramsburg, A.

    2015-12-01

    Oil-in-water emulsions are widely employed to promote biotic reduction of contaminants; however, emulsions can also be used to encapsulate and deliver active ingredients required for long-term subsurface treatment. Our research focuses on encapsulating alkalinity-releasing particles in oil-in-water emulsions for sustained control of subsurface pH. Typical characteristics of these emulsions include kinetically stable for >20 hr; 20% soybean oil; 1 g/mL density; 8-10 cP viscosity; and 1.5 μm droplet d50, with emulsions developed for favorable subsurface delivery. The viscosity of the oil-in-water emulsions was found to be a function of oil content. Ultimately we aim to model both emulsion delivery and alkalinity release (from retained emulsion droplets) to provide a description of pH treatment. Emulsion transport and retention was investigated via a series of 1-d column experiments using varying particle size fractions of Ottawa sand. Emulsions were introduced for approximately two pore volumes followed by a flush of background solution (approx. ρ=1 g/mL; μ=1cP). Emulsion breakthrough curves exhibit an early fall on the backside of the breakthrough curve along with tailing. Deposition profiles are found to be hyper-exponential and unaffected by extended periods of background flow. Particle transport models established for dilute suspensions are unable to describe the transport of the concentrated emulsions considered here. Thus, we explore the relative importance of additional processes driving concentrated droplet transport and retention. Focus is placed on evaluating the role of attachment-detachment-straining processes, as well as the influence of mixing from both viscous instabilities and variable water saturation due to deposited mass.

  7. Efficiency and mechanism of demulsification of oil-in-water emulsions using ionic liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Schuur, Boelo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, 13 ionic liquids (ILs), including 9 halogenide ILs and 4 non-halogenide ILs, were evaluated as demulsifiers for a model oil-in-water emulsion prepared with heptane and water, where sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS) was used as a surfactant. The separating efficiency (the fraction

  8. Ultrasonic splitting of oil-in-water emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Jens; König, Ralf; Benes, Ewald

    1999-01-01

    Standing resonant ultrasonic wave fields can be utilized for liquid–liquid separation of the dispersed particles and the fluid caused by the acoustic radiation pressure and the induced particle agglomeration or coagulation/coalescence process. For the splitting of oil-in-water emulsions, the avai......Standing resonant ultrasonic wave fields can be utilized for liquid–liquid separation of the dispersed particles and the fluid caused by the acoustic radiation pressure and the induced particle agglomeration or coagulation/coalescence process. For the splitting of oil-in-water emulsions......, the available piezoelectric composite transducer technology was improved and a dedicated resonator with crossed plane wave sonication geometry has been developed. The resonator chamber is entirely made of aluminium or tempax glass and the PZT piezoceramic transducer delivers an acoustic energy flow density...... of up to 24 W/cm2 into the sonication volume. The chosen resonance frequency is kept stable by automatic frequency control utilizing the maximum true power criterion. Physically and chemically well-defined low and high density pure laboratory and also industrially used cooling-lubricating oil...

  9. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure and high dynamic pressure on stability and rheological properties of model oil-in-water emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigikocin, Erman; Mert, Behic; Alpas, Hami

    2011-09-01

    Both static and dynamic high pressure applications provide interesting modifications in food structures which lead to new product formulations. In this study, the effects of two different treatments, high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) and high dynamic pressure (HDP), on oil-in-water emulsions were identified and compared. Microfluidization was selected from among the HDP homogenization techniques. The performance of each process was analyzed in terms of rheological modifications and emulsion stability improvements compared with the coarse emulsions. The stability of the emulsions was determined comparatively by using an analytical photo-centrifuge device employing novel analysis technology. Whey protein isolate (WPI) in combination with a food polysaccharide (xanthan gum, guar gum or locust bean gum) were used as emulsifying and stabilizing ingredients. The effective disruption of oil droplets and the degradation of polysaccharides by the shear forces under high pressure in HDP microfluidization yielded finer emulsions with lower viscosities, leading to distinctive improvements in emulsion stability. On the other hand, improvements in stability obtained with HHP treatment were due to the thickening of the emulsions mainly induced by protein unfolding. The corresponding increases in viscosity were intensified in emulsion formulations containing higher oil content. Apart from these, HHP treatment was found to be relatively more contributive to the enhancements in viscoelastic properties.

  10. Factors governing partial coalescence in oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, Eveline; Walstra, Pieter; Dewettinck, Koen

    2010-01-15

    The consequences of the instability mechanism partial coalescence in oil-in-water food emulsions show a discrepancy. On the one hand, it needs to be avoided in order to achieve an extended shelf life in food products like sauces, creams and several milk products. On the other hand, during the manufacturing of products like ice cream, butter and whipped toppings partial coalescence is required to achieve the desired product properties. It contributes to the structure formation, the physicochemical properties (stability, firmness,...) and the sensory perception, like fattiness and creaminess of the final food products. This review critically summarises the findings of partial coalescence in oil-in-water emulsions in order to provide insight in how to enhance and retard it. Next to the pioneering work, a large set of experimental results of more recent work is discussed. First, the general mechanism of partial coalescence is considered and a distinction is made between partial and 'true' coalescence. The main differences are: the required solid particles in the dispersed oil phase, the formation of irregular clusters and the increased aggregation rate. Second, the kinetics of partial coalescence is discussed. In more detail, potential parameters affecting the rate of partial coalescence are considered by means of the encounter frequency and capture efficiency of the fat globules. The flow conditions, the fat volume fraction and the physicochemical properties of continuous aqueous phase affect both the encounter frequency and capture efficiency while the actual temperature, temperature history and the composition and formulation of the emulsion mainly affect the capture efficiency. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of Leaves of Caesalpinia decapetala on Oxidative Stability of Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Gabriela Gallego

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Caesalpinia decapetala (Roth Alston (Fabaceae (CD is used in folk medicine to prevent colds and treat bronchitis. This plant has antitumor and antioxidant activity. The antioxidant effects of an extract from Caesalpinia decapetala (Fabaceae were assessed by storage of model food oil-in-water emulsions with analysis of primary and secondary oxidation products. The antioxidant capacity of the plant extract was evaluated by the diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC, oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP assays and by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy. Lyophilized extracts of CD were added at concentrations of 0.002%, 0.02% and 0.2% into oil-in-water emulsions, which were stored for 30 days at 33 ± 1 °C, and then, oxidative stability was evaluated. The CD extract had high antioxidant activity (700 ± 70 µmol Trolox/g dry plant for the ORAC assay, mainly due to its phenolic components: gallic acid, quercetin, catechin, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and p-coumaric acid. At a concentration of 0.2%, the extract significantly reduced the oxidative deterioration of oil-in-water emulsions. The results of the present study show the possibility of utilizing CD as a promising source of natural antioxidants for retarding lipid oxidation in the food and cosmetic industries.

  12. Physical Stability of Oil in Water Emulsions in the Presence of Gamma Irradiated Gum Tragacanth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meybodi, Neda Mollakhalili; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Farhoodi, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Gum tragacanth (GT) exuded from an Iranian Astragalus species was γ-irradiated at 0, 0.75, 1.5, 3, 5, 7, 10 kGy and used to stabilize a model oil in water emulsion system. Stability and physicochemical properties of emulsion samples were investigated with respect to the effect of irradiation....... Emulsions were prepared by homogenizing 10% w/w sun flower oil with 90% w/w aqueous gum dispersions and stored quiescently at 25°C for 120 days. Results indicated that using 1.5 kGy irradiated GT was more effective in providing optimum values of apparent viscosity, number mean diameter, electrosteric...... repulsion and structure strength for getting maximum emulsion stability. GT significantly reduced the interfacial tension of the oil and water system, but no significant differences were observed among all irradiation treated and non-irradiated samples. This study revealed that, GT acts as a bifunctional...

  13. Characterizations of oil-in-water emulsion stabilized by different hydrophobic maize starches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fan; Miao, Ming; Jiang, Bo; Hamaker, Bruce R; Jin, Zhengyu; Zhang, Tao

    2017-06-15

    The molecular structure, rheological properties, microstructure and physical stability of oil-in-water emulsions using octenyl succinic-sugary maize soluble starch (OS-SMSS) were investigated and compared with two commercial OS-starches (HI-CAP 100 and Purity Gum 2000). The degree of substitution (DS), weight-average molecular weight (Mw) and z-root mean square radius of gyration (Rz) of OS-SMSS, HI-CAP 100 and Purity Gum 2000 were 0.0050, 223.4×10 5 g/mol and 38.8nm, 0.0037, 9.6×10 5 g/mol and 29.3nm, and 0.0031, 31.3×10 5 g/mol and 39.6nm, respectively. FT-IR spectra showed two new absorption bands at 1725 and 1570cm -1 from OS ester linkage in all tested samples. The emulsion with OS-SMSS exhibited a pseudoplastic behavior over the whole shear rate range, whereas other two emulsions showed a similar Newtonian fluid. All hydrophobic starch stabilized emulsions satisfied the Herschel-Bulkley model. All emulsions displayed storage modulus (G') was higher than loss modulus (G″), and only G' and G″ of OS-SMSS stabilized emulsion were independent of frequency. The volume-average droplet size (d 43 ) value of emulsions stabilized by three modified starches was 27.9, 15.2 and 24.4μm, respectively. During 4 weeks storage, lower change in d 43 of emulsion with OS-SMSS was observed. The above results with schematic models of emulsions suggested that an emulsion with high stability could be prepared using 3% of OS-SMSS due to the formation of high density and thick nanoparticle layer at the interface, indicating OS-SMSS was a Pickering emulsion stabilizer for good long-term stability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Osmosis-driven viscous fingering of oil-in-water emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Baskaran, Mrudhula; Stone, Howard

    2017-11-01

    Viscous fingering occurs when a low viscosity fluid invades a more viscous fluid. Fingering of two miscible fluids is more complicated than that of immiscible fluids in that there is no sharp fluid-fluid interface and diffusion occurs between the phases. We experimentally studied the fingering of two miscible fluids: an oil-in-water emulsion and a sodium chloride solution. When the concentration of sodium chloride in the water phase in the emulsion exceeds that in the sodium chloride solution, the consequent osmotic flow automatically facilitates the occurrence of the fingering. On the contrary, when the sodium chloride solution has higher concentration, the spreading of emulsion is more uniform than the case without the concentration difference. We provide a model to rationalize and quantify these observations.

  15. Method for resolution of oil-in-water emulsions containing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doft, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    A method of resolving oil-in-water emulsions resulting from the organic solvent extraction of uranium from aqueous acidic leach liquors which comprises treating said emulsions in accordance with the following steps: (a) adding to said emulsions a water-in-oil emulsion which contains from 2-50% by weight of a water-soluble acrylamide copolymer which contains from 5-50% by weight of a lower alkyl substituted tertiary aminoethyl methacrylate and quaternary ammonium slats therof in an amount to provide at least 20 parts per million of the acrylamide copolymer; (b) adjusting the pH of the emulsion being treated with ammonia to at least 9; (c) adding to the ammonia treated emulsion a water-soluble surfactant which is capable of inverting the water-in-oil emulsion which contains the polymer; and then (d) slowly mixing the treated oil-in-water emulsion for at least one-half hour to obtain good resolution therof

  16. Research on the Influence Factors of Emulsion Stability of Oil-in-water Drilling Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxu; Sun, Yuxue; Chen, Xiangming; Wang, Zengkui; Xu, Jianjun

    2018-01-01

    The evaluation standard of emulsion stability of oil-in-water drilling fluid is determined in this paper, based on which an evaluation analysis is conducted for the influence factors of emulsion stability, including the addition of emulsifier, addition of stabilizer, stirring speed, weighing agent, clay, etc. to gain the corresponding regularity understanding.

  17. The emulsifying and tribological properties of modified graphene oxide in oil-in-water emulsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Yinglei; Zeng, Xiangqiong; Ren, Tianhui; de Vries, Erik G.; van der Heide, Emile

    2017-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was asymmetric chemically modified with myristyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB) to get modified graphene oxide (MGO). This MGO was used as an emulsifier and additive in oil-in-water emulsion. The emulsifying tests showed MGO greatly improved the stability of base emulsion and

  18. Antioxidant Activity of Potato Peel Extracts in a Fish-RapeseedOil Mixture and in Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farvin, Sabeena; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of the present work were (a) to extract the phenolic fraction from the peels of two Danish varieties of potatoes, viz. Sava and Bintje, and examine their antioxidant capacity in in-vitro systems (b) to evaluate the effect of these extracts on the storage stability of a fish- rapeseed...... oil mixture and oil-in-water emulsions. Multiple antioxidant activity of the potato peel extracts was evident from in-vitro systems as they showed strong reducing power, radical scavenging ability, ferrous ion chelating activity and prevented oxidation in a liposome model system. The Sava variety......, which showed strong antioxidant activity in in-vitro systems, was tested in oil and oil-in- water emulsions. Ethanolic extracts of Sava (C1,600 mg/kg) prevented lipid oxidation in emulsions and in oil. Water extracts showed no antioxidant activity in oil whereas it showed pro-oxidant activity...

  19. Rheological properties of oil-in-water emulsions prepared with oil and protein isolates from sesame (Sesamum Indicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ramirez BREWER

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, food emulsions of oil in water from sesame (Sesamum indicum protein isolates and their oil were formulated and standardised. The effect of the concentrations of sesame (Sesamum indicum protein isolates and base oil and the speed of the emulsification process for the food emulsion stability was studied. The protein isolates were achieved from the defatted sesame flour (DSF, obtaining a percentage of 80% ± 0.05% of protein. Emulsions were formulated through a factorial design 23. The rheological behaviour of sesame (Sesamum indicum protein isolates-stabilised emulsions and microstructural composition were investigated. Stable emulsions with suitable rheological properties and microstructure were formulated at a concentration of 10% sesame oil and different concentrations of protein isolates, between 1.5% and 2.5%, with the best droplet distribution characteristics being shown for the 2.5% sesame protein isolates. The emulsions showed a non-Newtonian fluid behaviour, adjusting the Sisko model.

  20. Physical Stability of Whippable Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Merete Bøgelund

    Whippable emulsions based on vegetable fat are increasingly used as replacement for dairy whipping creams. One of the quality criteria of whippable emulsions is that it should be low-viscous prior to whipping, but sudden viscosity increase or even solidification during storage and transport...

  1. Physical Stability of Whippable Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Merete Bøgelund

    Whippable emulsions based on vegetable fat are increasingly used as replacement for dairy whipping creams. One of the quality criteria of whippable emulsions is that it should be low-viscous prior to whipping, but sudden viscosity increase or even solidification during storage and transport...... despite appliance of shear and temperature changes from 5 to 20 °C. Globule aggregation induced by LACTEM was impeded when used in combination with GMS. On the contrary, GMU induced very dense fat globule networks in emulsions which transformed emulsions into very firm solid-like pastes. This effect...... instability in emulsions, and conversely physical instability was not necessarily accompanied by protein displacement. GMS and LACTEM efficiently displaced caseinate from the fat globule interface into the serum phase, while caseinate molecules remained partly attached to the interfacial globule layer...

  2. Emulsification technique affects oxidative stability of fish oil-in-water emulsion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard

    .g. homogenization pressure can affect how proteins locate themselves at the interface of an emulsion. The hypothesis is therefore that emulsions produced with different emulsification equipments differ in their oxidative stability due to differences in the behaviour of the proteins at the interface. The aim...... of this study was therefore to compare lipid oxidation in 10% fish oil-in-water emulsions prepared by two different kinds of high pressure homogenizers i.e. a microfluidizer and a two valve high pressure homogenizer. Emulsions were made with equal droplet sizes, and with either 1% sodium caseinate or 1% whey...

  3. Emulsification technique affects oxidative stability of fish oil-in-water emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard

    .g. homogenization pressure can affect how proteins locate themselves at the interface of an emulsion. The hypothesis is therefore that emulsions produced with different emulsification equipments differ in their oxidative stability due to differences in the behaviour of the proteins at the interface. The aim...... of this study was to compare lipid oxidation in 10% fish oil-in-water emulsions prepared by two different kinds of high pressure homogenizers i.e. a microfluidizer and a two valve high pressure homogenizer. Emulsions were made with equal droplet sizes, and with either 1% sodium caseinate or 1% whey protein...

  4. Physical and Oxidative Stability of Fish Oil-In-Water Emulsions Stabilized with Fish Protein Hydrolysates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García Moreno, Pedro Jesús; Guadix, Antonio; Guadix, Emilia M.

    2016-01-01

    The emulsifying and antioxidant properties of fish protein hydrolysates (FPH) for the physical and oxidative stabilization of 5% (by weight) fish oil-in-water emulsions were investigated. Muscle proteins from sardine (Sardina pilchardus) and small-spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula) were...... hydrolyzed to degrees of hydrolysis (DH) of 3-4-5-6% with subtilisin. Sardine hydrolysates with low DH, 3% and 4%, presented the most effective peptides to physically stabilize emulsions with smaller droplet size. This implied more protein adsorbed at the interface to act as physical barrier against......% yielded a physically stable emulsion with low concentration of unsaturated aldehydes. These results show the potential of FPH as alternative protein emulsifiers for the production of oxidatively stable fish oil-in-water emulsions....

  5. Stability of bisphenol A (BPA) in oil-in water emulsions under riboflavin photosensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Eun Yeong; Park, Chan Uk; Kim, Mi-Ja; Lee, JaeHwan

    2012-08-01

    Effects of riboflavin photosensitization on the degradation of bisphenol A (BPA) were determined in oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or sodium azide, which are a metal chelator or a singlet oxygen quencher, respectively. Also, the distribution of BPA between the continuous and dispersed phases in O/W emulsions was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The concentration of BPA in O/W emulsions significantly decreased by 38.6% after 2 h under visible light irradiation and in the presence of riboflavin (P riboflavin photosensitization (P riboflavin photodegradation in O/W emulsions. Concentration of BPA, an endocrine disrupting chemical, was decreased significantly in oil-in-water emulsions under riboflavin and visible light irradiation. BPA in continuous aqueous phase was major target of riboflavin photosensitization. However, BPA was distributed more densely in lipid phase and more protected from riboflavin photosensitized O/W emulsions. This study can help to decrease the level of BPA in foods made of O/W emulsions containing riboflavin, which could be displayed under visible light irradiation. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Structures of nanoparticles prepared from oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöström, B; Kaplun, A; Talmon, Y; Cabane, B

    1995-01-01

    Hydrophobic substances were dissolved in an organic solvent and emulsified with an aqueous solution at very high shear. Droplets of very small sizes (50-100 nm) were obtained by using surfactants which were combinations of lecithins and bile salts. After emulsification, the organic solvent was removed by evaporation, yielding stable dispersions of solid particles. The sizes, shapes, and structures of the particles were examined through quasi-elastic light scattering, small-angle neutron scattering and cryotransmission electron microscopy. Cholesterol acetate particles stabilized by lecithin and bile salts were found to be platelets of 10-20 nm thickness and 80 nm diameter. Cholesteryl acetate particles stabilized with POE-(20)-sorbitan monolaurate were dense spherical globules of diameter 100 nm. Particles with a composition similar to the endogenously occurring, lipoprotein, LDL, were large spherical globules studded with small vesicles. The subsequent evolution of the cholesteryl acetate dispersion upon aging was examined. There was no transfer of cholesteryl acetate between particles nor to large crystals. However, some aggregation of the particles was observed when the volume fraction of the particles in the aqueous dispersion exceeded 0.05. Thus, the structure of the nanoparticles obtained through deswelling of emulsion droplets changes according to the nature of the emulsifiers and to the composition of the hydrophobic substances which they contain.

  7. Do oil-in-water (O/W) nano-emulsions have an effect on survival and growth of bacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Hani El; Devanthi, Putu Virgina Partha; Overton, Tim W; Gkatzionis, Konstantinos

    2017-11-01

    Nano-emulsions (typically droplet diameternano-emulsions even in reference to similar microbial species and formulations. Following up, this study aimed to investigate the effect of nano-emulsions on four bacterial species (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Bacillus cereus, Lactobacillus acidophilus and five Escherichia coli strains) possessing different surface charge and hydrophobicity. Model oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions with different size of oil droplets were prepared with sunflower oil stabilised by polysorbate 80 (Tween80) emulsifier (hydrophilic), using high shear mixing followed by ultrasonication. The viability of bacteria was monitored by culture, membrane integrity was assessed with flow cytometric analysis with propidium iodide (PI) staining and fluorescence microscopy monitored the spatial distribution of cells within the O/W emulsions. The stability of the nano-O/W emulsions in the presence of bacteria was assessed by monitoring the droplet size [D (4, 3)] and creaming height. In contrast to other reports the survival and growth of bacteria was not affected by the size of the oil droplets, no damage to the bacterial membrane was evident with flow cytometry and emulsion stability was not affected by the presence of bacteria during 7days of storage. Furthermore, the antimicrobial activity of caprylic acid (CA) was compared between O/W coarse and nano-emulsions while varying the concentration of the hydrophilic surfactant Tween80. The activity of CA was similar in nano-emulsion and coarse emulsion; however, it was higher than in bulk oil and was reduced with increasing Tween80 concentration, suggesting that its efficacy is dictated by formulation rather than oil droplet size. The results demonstrated no enhanced antimicrobial activity due to nano-sized oil droplets and that conclusions on nano-emulsions should be taken with caution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Purification of trona ores by conditioning with an oil-in-water emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. D.; Wang, Xuming; Li, Minhua

    2009-04-14

    The present invention is a trona concentrate and a process for floating gangue material from trona ore that comprises forming an emulsion, conditioning the trona ore at a high solids content in a saturated trona suspension, and then floating and removing the gangue material. The process for separating trona from gangue materials in trona ore can include emulsifying an oil in an aqueous solution to form an oil-in-water emulsion. A saturated trona suspension having a high solids content can also be formed having trona of a desired particle size. The undissolved trona in the saturated suspension can be conditioned by mixing the saturated suspension and the oil-in-water emulsion to form a conditioning solid suspension of trona and gangue material. A gas can be injected through the conditioning solid suspension to float the gangue material. Thus, the floated gangue material can be readily separated from the trona to form a purified trona concentrate without requirements of additional heat or other expensive processing steps.

  9. Demulsification of crude oil-in-water emulsions by means of fungal spores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Adriana Vallejo-Cardona

    Full Text Available The present feature describes for the first time the application of spores from Aspergillus sp. IMPMS7 to break out crude oil-in-water emulsions (O/W. The fungal spores were isolated from marine sediments polluted with petroleum hydrocarbons. The spores exhibited the ability to destabilize different O/W emulsions prepared with medium, heavy or extra-heavy Mexican crude oils with specific gravities between 10.1 and 21.2°API. The isolated fungal spores showed a high hydrophobic power of 89.3 ± 1.9% and with 2 g of spores per liter of emulsion, the half-life for emulsion destabilization was roughly 3.5 and 0.7 h for extra-heavy and medium crude oil, respectively. Then, the kinetics of water separation and the breaking of the O/W emulsion prepared with heavy oil through a spectrofluorometric technique were studied. A decrease in the fluorescence ratio at 339 and 326 nm (I339/I326 was observed in emulsions treated with spores, which is similar to previously reported results using chemical demulsifiers.

  10. Microfluidic preparation and self diffusion PFG-NMR analysis of monodisperse water-in-oil-in-water double emulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hughes, E.; Maan, A.A.; Acquistapace, S.; Burbidge, J.A.; Johns, M.L.; Gunes, D.Z.; Clausen, P.; Syrbe, A.; Hugo, J.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.

    2013-01-01

    Monodisperse water-in-oil-in-water (WOW) double emulsions have been prepared using microfluidic glass devices designed and built primarily from off the shelf components. The systems were easy to assemble and use. They were capable of producing double emulsions with an outer droplet size from 100 to

  11. Ultra structure of oil-in-water emulsions a comparison of different microscopy- and preparation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard; Loussert, C.; Humbel, B.M.

    We compare chemical fixation/ room temperature embedding in resin, cryofixation/ freeze substitution, and cryofixation/cryo imaging (freeze-fracture cryo-SEM) on several oil-in-water food emulsions. This is for visualization of the structure and thickness of the emulsifying layers consisting...... of this interface and even the protein in the water phase. We observed that freeze substituted material seems to correspond very well to images of freeze fractured frozen samples in cryo-SEM where protein aggregates seems to be visible in the water phase. With this work, we want to demonstrate the importance...

  12. Phenolic residues in spruce galactoglucomannans improve stabilization of oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, M; Merinen, M; Kilpeläinen, P O; Xu, C; Willför, S M; Mikkonen, K S

    2018-02-15

    Amphiphilic character of surfactants drives them at the interface of dispersed systems, such as emulsions. Hemicellulose-rich wood extracts contain assemblies (lignin-carbohydrate complexes, LCC) with natural amphiphilicity, which is expected to depend on their chemical composition resulting from the isolation method. Lignin-derived phenolic residues associated with hemicelluloses are hypothesized to contribute to emulsions' interfacial properties and stability. We investigated the role of phenolic residues in spruce hemicellulose extracts in the stabilization of oil-in-water emulsions by physical and chemical approach. Distribution and changes occurring in the phenolic residues at the droplet interface and in the continuous phase were studied during an accelerated storage test. Meanwhile, the physical stability and lipid oxidation in emulsions were monitored. Naturally associated lignin residues in GGM act as vehicles for anchoring these hemicelluloses into the oil droplet interface and further enable superior stabilization of emulsions. By adjusting the isolation method of GGM regarding their phenolic profile, their functionalities, especially interfacial behavior, can be altered. Retaining the native interactions of GGM and phenolic residues is suggested for efficient physical stabilization and extended protection against lipid oxidation. The results can be widely applied as guidelines in tailoring natural or synthetic amphiphilic compounds for interfacial stabilization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Antioxidant Activity of Seaweed Extracts: In Vitro Assays, Evaluation in 5 % Fish Oil-in-Water Emulsions and Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farvin Habebullah, Sabeena; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    In this study the antioxidant activity of absolute ethanol, 50 % ethanol and water extracts of two species of seaweeds, namely Fucus serratus and Polysiphonia fucoides, were evaluated both in in vitro assays and in 5 % fish oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions. The 50 % ethanolic extracts of P. fucoides...... showed higher antioxidant activity both in in vitro assays and in 5 % oil-in-water emulsion in the presence or absence of iron. In spite of the higher phenolic content and very good antioxidant activity in some of the in vitro assays, the absolute ethanol extracts of both the species showed a pro......-oxidative tendency in 5 % fish oil-in-water emulsion in the presence or absence of iron. In order to investigate the reason for the higher antioxidant activity of 50 % ethanolic extracts of P. fucoides, these extracts were further fractionated into polyphenol-rich, protein-rich, polysaccharide-rich and low...

  14. The prooxidant activity of salts on the lipid oxidation of lecithin-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Leqi; Fan, Jing; Sun, Yifei; Zhu, Zhenbao; Yi, Jianhua

    2018-06-30

    Salts reduction/substitution have gained a lot interest from food industry since the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a draft guidance for salt reduction. However how changes of salts in food formulation could influence lipid oxidation is still not fully understood. Using oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by a natural emulsifier - lecithin at pH 7.0 as a model system, this study evaluated how salts affect the physical parameters of the emulsion, the chelating activity of lecithin and thus the lipid oxidation of these emulsions. Results showed that salts increased the particle size, the negative charge of the oil droplets, and the amount of iron chelated by lecithin. Lipid oxidation lag phases were shortened by addition of salts, by 1 day and 2 days for lipid hydroperoxides and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances measurements respectively. These results provide some new insights on the mechanisms of how salts could affect the lipid oxidation of food emulsions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Formation of oil-in-water emulsions from natural emulsifiers using spontaneous emulsification: sunflower phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaiko, Jennifer; Sastrosubroto, Ashtri; McClements, David Julian

    2015-11-18

    This study examined the possibility of producing oil-in-water emulsions using a natural surfactant (sunflower phospholipids) and a low-energy method (spontaneous emulsification). Spontaneous emulsification was carried out by titrating an organic phase (oil and phospholipid) into an aqueous phase with continuous stirring. The influence of phospholipid composition, surfactant-to-oil ratio (SOR), initial phospholipids location, storage time, phospholipid type, and preparation method was tested. The initial droplet size depended on the nature of the phospholipid used, which was attributed to differences in phospholipid composition. Droplet size decreased with increasing SOR and was smallest when the phospholipid was fully dissolved in the organic phase rather than the aqueous phase. The droplets formed using spontaneous emulsification were relatively large (d > 10 μm), and so the emulsions were unstable to gravitational separation. At low SORs (0.1 and 0.5), emulsions produced with phospholipids had a smaller particle diameter than those produced with a synthetic surfactant (Tween 80), but at a higher SOR (1.0), this trend was reversed. High-energy methods (microfluidization and sonication) formed significantly smaller droplets (d < 10 μm) than spontaneous emulsification. The results from this study show that low-energy methods could be utilized with natural surfactants for applications for which fine droplets are not essential.

  16. Combination of sodium caseinate and succinylated alginate improved stability of high fat fish oil-in-water emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yesiltas, Betül; Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; García Moreno, Pedro Jesús

    2018-01-01

    Sodium caseinate (CAS) and commercial sodium alginate (CA), long chain modified alginate (LCMA) or short chain modified alginate (SCMA) were used in combination for emulsifying and stabilizing high fat (50–70%) fish oil-in-water emulsions. Physical (creaming, droplet size, viscosity and protein...

  17. Antioxidant Activity of Fish Protein Hydrolysates in in vitro Assays and in Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farvin, Sabeena; Andersen, Lisa Lystbæk; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    The aim of this study was to screen different protein hydrolysates with respect to their antioxidative properties in order to select the most promising extracts for further evaluation in oil-in-water emulsions. Three fractions of protein hydrolysates (Crude, >5kDa and 5kDa, 3-5kDa and...

  18. Food emulsion type oil in water prepared with high-protein from shrimp (Penaeus vannamei heads flour – SHF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Cano

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of flour from shrimp (Penaeus vannamei heads with a high content of protein (SHF to stabilize food emulsions type oil in water (o/w is an alternative to take advantage of the by-products of the shrimp industry. The aim of this work was to prepare food emulsion type oil in water (o/w using the SHF due to the high percentage in proteins; for this procedure a physicochemical and bromatological characterization of flour of shrimps (Penaeus vannamei heads has been done, in which a percentage of protein 51 %, moisture of 11,82 %, fat 8,52 % and 22,23 % of ash has been obtained. The base emulsions may be used in food products such as salad dressing, mayonnaise, spreads, dressings and other products. The different emulsions with adequate rheological and microstructural characteristics were prepared using different concentrations of palm oil (20, 30 and 40%w/w and different concentrate of SHF (0,5, 1 and 2 % w/w. Therefore, we have obtained a food emulsion stable type oil in water (O/W with 2 % w/w of SHF, which presented a behavior non-Newtonian fluid type shear-thinning and homogeneous distribution of droplets.

  19. Influence of Oil-in-Water Emulsions on Fluorescence Properties as Observed by Excitation-Emission Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baszanowska, E.; Zielinski, O.; Otremba, Z.; Toczek, H.

    2013-10-01

    Oil poses a major threat to marine ecosystems. This work describes a set of studies focused on introducing an efficient method for the identification of oil in the form of oil emulsions through fluorescence spectra analyses. Hence the concept of classification of oil pollution in seawater based on fluorescence spectroscopy using a high sensitive fluorimeter [1] suitable for laboratory and in situ measurements is introduced. We consider that this approach, in the future, will make it possible to collect specific fluorescence information allowing us to build a base of the oil standards. Here we examined excitation-emission fluorescence spectra (EEMs) of water containing oil-in-water emulsion prepared artificially under laboratory conditions. Water polluted with oil-in-water emulsion was studied with the objective to estimate differences in three-dimensional fluorescence spectra. Studies included various types of oils and oil concentrations. Essential differences in fluorescence spectra for various oils are indicated.

  20. Influence of maltodextrin dextrose equivalent value on rheological and dispersion properties of sunflower oil in water emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dokić Petar P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of dextrose equivalent (DE of maltodextrin present in continuous phase on flow along with dispersion properties of sunflower oil in water emulsions has been investigated. Both, rheological and disperse characteristics of the emulsions were greatly influenced by continuous phase viscosity and thus by the DE value of maltodextrin.. The smaller DE value the greater high shear viscosity and the smaller the droplet size. Irrespective of the amount and DE value of maltodextrin used was, all the emulsions showed a pseudoplastic behaviour.

  1. Oxidative Stability in Oil-in-Water Emulsions with Quercetin or Rutin Under Iron Catalysis or Riboflavin Photosensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, BoRa; Ka, HaeJung; Kwon, YongJun; Choi, HyungSeok; Kim, Sunghwa; Kim, Jisu; Kim, Mi-Ja; Lee, JaeHwan

    2017-04-01

    The effects of quercetin and rutin on the oxidative stability of oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions were tested under riboflavin (RF) photosensitization in the presence or absence of FeCl 2 . The degree of oxidation in O/W emulsions was determined by headspace oxygen content, conjugated dienes, and lipid hydroperoxides. Quercetin chelated more metal than did rutin in iron catalyzed O/W emulsions. Generally, 0.1 mM quercetin and rutin was oxidative while 0.5 and 1.0 mM quercetin and rutin was antioxidative in O/W emulsions under RF photosensitization. Depending on the analysis method, the antioxidants had different strengths. The antioxidative or oxidative properties of quercetin and rutin vary in O/W emulsions and depend the quercetin and rutin concentrations and oxidative forces like transition metals, RF photosensitization, or a combination thereof. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  2. Whey Peptide-Iron Complexes Increase the Oxidative Stability of Oil-in-Water Emulsions in Comparison to Iron Salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano-Silva, Maria Elisa; Barros Mariutti, Lilian Regina; Bragagnolo, Neura; Bertoldo-Pacheco, Maria Teresa; Netto, Flavia Maria

    2018-02-28

    Food fortification with iron may favor lipid oxidation in both food matrices and the human body. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of peptide-iron complexation on lipid oxidation catalyzed by iron, using oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions as a model system. The extent of lipid oxidation of emulsions containing iron salts (FeSO 4 or FeCl 2 ) or iron complexes (peptide-iron complexes or ferrous bisglycinate) was evaluated during 7 days, measured as primary (peroxide value) and secondary products (TBARS and volatile compounds). Both salts catalyzed lipid oxidation, leading to peroxide values 2.6- to 4.6-fold higher than the values found for the peptide-iron complexes. The addition of the peptide-iron complexes resulted in the formation of lower amounts of secondary volatiles of lipid oxidation (up to 78-fold) than those of iron salts, possibly due to the antioxidant activity of the peptides and their capacity to keep iron apart from the lipid phase, since the iron atom is coordinated and takes part in a stable structure. The peptide-iron complexes showed potential to reduce the undesirable sensory changes in food products and to decrease the side effects related to free iron and the lipid damage of cell membranes in the organism, due to the lower reactivity of iron in the complexed form.

  3. Production of monodispersed Oil-in Water Emulsion Using Crossflow-Type Silicon Microchannel Plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakatsu, Takahiro.; Komori, Hideaki.; Yonemoto, Toshikuni. [Tohoku University, Miyagi (Japan). Chemical Engineering Department; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi.; Kikuchi, Yuji. [National Food Research Institute, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    A novel method for continuous productin of monodispersed oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion is developed using acrossflow-type silicaon microchannel plate. On the single crystal silicon plate, a liquid flow path for continuous phase was made, and at each side of th wall of the path an array of regular-sized slits was precisely fabricated. A flat glass plate was tightly attached on the microchannel plate to cover the top of the slits to form the array of microchannels. Regular-sized oil (triolein) droplets were generated by squeezing the oil through the microchannels into the continuous-phase water (0.3 wt% sodium lauryl sulfate solutin) flowing in the liquid path. Oil droplet size is significantly dependent on the microchannel structure, which is identified with the microchannel width, height, and the length of the terrace (a flat area at the microchannel outlet). Three types of microchannel plates having different microchannel structures generate monodispersed emulsions of different average droplet sizes, 16,20, and 48 {mu}m at the watr flow rate of 1.4x10{sup -2}mL{center_dot}min{sup -1}. For the microchannel plate which generates large droplets of 48 {mu}m, increasing the flow rate causes decreasing droplet size. However, for the microchannel plate which generates small droplets of 16 or 20 {mu}m, the size is not affected by the flow rate within the range from 1.4x10{sup -2}to 2.4 mL{center_dot}min{sup -1}. In every case, the droplet size distribution is narrow, and the geometric standard deviation is 1.03 or less. (author)

  4. Nylon 6,6 Nonwoven Fabric Separates Oil Contaminates from Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Ryan A; Carter, Erin S; Ortega, Albert E

    2016-01-01

    Industrial oil spills into aquatic environments can have catastrophic environmental effects. First responders to oil spills along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico in the southern United States have used spunbond nylon fabric bags and fences to separate spilled oil and oil waste from contaminated water. Low area mass density spunbond nylon is capable of sorbing more than 16 times its mass in low viscosity crude oil and more than 26 times its mass in higher viscosity gear lube oil. Nylon bags separated more than 95% of gear lube oil contaminate from a 4.5% oil-in-water emulsion. Field testing of spunbond nylon fences by oil spill first responders has demonstrated the ability of this material to contain the oily contaminate while allowing water to flow through. We hypothesize that the effectiveness of nylon as an oil filter is due to the fact that it is both more oleophilic and more hydrophilic than other commonly used oil separation materials. The nylon traps oil droplets within the fabric or on the surface, while water droplets are free to flow through the fabric to the water on the opposite side of the fabric.

  5. Nylon 6,6 Nonwoven Fabric Separates Oil Contaminates from Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan A Ortega

    Full Text Available Industrial oil spills into aquatic environments can have catastrophic environmental effects. First responders to oil spills along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico in the southern United States have used spunbond nylon fabric bags and fences to separate spilled oil and oil waste from contaminated water. Low area mass density spunbond nylon is capable of sorbing more than 16 times its mass in low viscosity crude oil and more than 26 times its mass in higher viscosity gear lube oil. Nylon bags separated more than 95% of gear lube oil contaminate from a 4.5% oil-in-water emulsion. Field testing of spunbond nylon fences by oil spill first responders has demonstrated the ability of this material to contain the oily contaminate while allowing water to flow through. We hypothesize that the effectiveness of nylon as an oil filter is due to the fact that it is both more oleophilic and more hydrophilic than other commonly used oil separation materials. The nylon traps oil droplets within the fabric or on the surface, while water droplets are free to flow through the fabric to the water on the opposite side of the fabric.

  6. Microfluidic preparation and self diffusion PFG-NMR analysis of monodisperse water-in-oil-in-water double emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Eric; Maan, Abid Aslam; Acquistapace, Simone; Burbidge, Adam; Johns, Michael L; Gunes, Deniz Z; Clausen, Pascal; Syrbe, Axel; Hugo, Julien; Schroen, Karin; Miralles, Vincent; Atkins, Tim; Gray, Richard; Homewood, Philip; Zick, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Monodisperse water-in-oil-in-water (WOW) double emulsions have been prepared using microfluidic glass devices designed and built primarily from off the shelf components. The systems were easy to assemble and use. They were capable of producing double emulsions with an outer droplet size from 100 to 40 μm. Depending on how the devices were operated, double emulsions containing either single or multiple water droplets could be produced. Pulsed-field gradient self-diffusion NMR experiments have been performed on the monodisperse water-in-oil-in-water double emulsions to obtain information on the inner water droplet diameter and the distribution of the water in the different phases of the double emulsion. This has been achieved by applying regularization methods to the self-diffusion data. Using these methods the stability of the double emulsions to osmotic pressure imbalance has been followed by observing the change in the size of the inner water droplets over time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. PHYSICO-CHEMICAL AND BROMATOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF ARENCA AND RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF OIL-IN-WATER EMULSIONS CONTAINING ISOLATED PROTEIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaris Elena Quintana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The design, formulation and development of a new product or the improvement of a traditional product are dependent on the knowledge of the physicochemical, bromatological and rheological characteristics of that product. An important aspect of the study of food is complex dispersions such as emulsions. For preparation and formulation of emulsions, surfactants like protein are used to constitute a molecular barrier that helps emulsions to form and stabilizes dispersions. The aim of this work was to standardize an oil in water (O/W food emulsion with Arencas (Triportheus magdalenae isolated protein. For this procedure, a physicochemical and bromatological characterization of fish muscle has been done, in which a protein percentage of 17.85±0.12 has been achieved. This has allowed for the recovery of 72-90% of isolated protein to be used in food products such as salad dressing, mayonnaise, spreads, dressings and other products. Stable emulsions with adequate rheological and microstructural characteristics were prepared using 40% w/w palm oil and different concentrates of isolated protein from Arenca, between 2.5 and 3.5% w/w. Therefore, we have obtained an oil in water (O/W food emulsion with isolated proteins from Arenca that presented non-Newtonian fluid type pseudoplasticity and homogeneous distribution of droplets.

  8. Hydrodynamics and heat transfer characteristics of oil-in-water emulsion droplets impinging on hot stainless steel foil

    OpenAIRE

    Fujimoto, Hitoshi; Obana, Wataru; Ashida, Masayoshi; Hama, Takayuki; Takuda, Hirohiko

    2017-01-01

    The hydrodynamics and heat transfer characteristics of oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion droplets impinging on a hot stainless steel foil were investigated experimentally. A two-directional flash-photography technique was adopted to track the time evolution of the droplet shapes. The temperature history of the foil during the collision with the droplets was also measured using a high-speed infrared thermometer. The main objective was to investigate the effects of varying the solid temperature and o...

  9. Engineering interfacial properties by anionic surfactant-chitosan complexes to improve stability of oil-in-water emulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zinoviadou, K.; Scholten, E.; Moschakis, T.; Biliaderis, C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Oil-in-water emulsions (10% w/w n-tetradecane) were prepared at pH = 5.7 by using, as surface active agents, electrostatically formed complexes of sodium stearoyl lactylate (SSL) at a concentration of 0.4% (w/w) and chitosan (CH) in a concentration range between 0 and 0.48% w/w. The use of complexes

  10. Treatment of a waste oil-in-water emulsion from a copper-rolling process by ultrafiltration and vacuum evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Gemma; Lobo, Alberto; Benito, José M; Coca, José; Pazos, Carmen

    2011-01-30

    A process is proposed for the treatment of a waste oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion generated in an industrial copper-rolling operation. The use of demulsifier agents improves the subsequent treatment by techniques such as ultrafiltration (UF) or evaporation. The effluent COD is reduced up to 50% when the O/W emulsion is treated by UF using a flat 30 nm TiO(2) ceramic membrane (ΔP = 0.1 MPa) and up to 70% when it is treated by vacuum evaporation, after an emulsion destabilization pretreatment in both cases. Increases in the UF permeate flux and in the evaporation rate are observed when a chemical demulsifier is used in the pretreatment step. A combined process consisting of destabilization/settling, UF, and vacuum evaporation can yield a very high-quality aqueous effluent that could be used for process cooling or emulsion reformulation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Selective retardation of perfume oil evaporation from oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by either surfactant or nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Holt, Benjamin L; Beaussoubre, Pascal; Wong, Kenneth

    2010-12-07

    We have used dynamic headspace analysis to investigate the evaporation rates of perfume oils from stirred oil-in-water emulsions into a flowing gas stream. We compare the behavior of an oil of low water solubility (limonene) and one of high water solubility (benzyl acetate). It is shown how the evaporation of an oil of low water solubility is selectively retarded and how the retardation effect depends on the oil volume fraction in the emulsion. We compare how the evaporation retardation depends on the nature of the adsorbed film stabilizing the emulsion. Surfactant films are less effective than adsorbed films of nanoparticles, and the retardation can be further enhanced by compression of the adsorbed nanoparticle films by preshrinking the emulsion drops.

  12. Combination of sodium caseinate and succinylated alginate improved stability of high fat fish oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesiltas, Betül; Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; García-Moreno, Pedro J; Anankanbil, Sampson; Guo, Zheng; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2018-07-30

    Sodium caseinate (CAS) and commercial sodium alginate (CA), long chain modified alginate (LCMA) or short chain modified alginate (SCMA) were used in combination for emulsifying and stabilizing high fat (50-70%) fish oil-in-water emulsions. Physical (creaming, droplet size, viscosity and protein determination) and oxidative (primary and secondary oxidation products) stabilities of the emulsions were studied during 12 days of storage. Creaming stability was higher for emulsions produced with alginates and CAS compared to emulsions prepared with only CAS. Combined use of CAS + LCMA performed better in terms of physical stability compared to emulsions produced with only CAS. However, the oxidative stability of this emulsion was inferior probably due to the presence of an unsaturated carbon chain in LCMA structure. CAS + SCMA emulsions not only showed better physical stability such as smaller droplet size, lower creaming and higher viscosity, but also had an improved oxidative stability than emulsions produced with only CAS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of Whey Protein Oil-In-Water Emulsions with Different Oil Concentrations Stabilized by Ultra-High Pressure Homogenization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam Hebishy

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of ultra-high-pressure homogenization (UHPH: 100 or 200 MPa at 25 °C, in comparison to colloid mill (CM: 5000 rpm at 20 °C and conventional homogenization (CH: 15 MPa at 60 °C, on the stability of oil-in-water emulsions with different oil concentrations (10, 30 or 50 g/100 g emulsified by whey protein isolate (4 g/100 g was investigated. Emulsions were characterized for their microstructure, rheological properties, surface protein concentration (SPC, stability to creaming and oxidative stability under light (2000 lux/m2. UHPH produced emulsions containing lipid droplets in the sub-micron range (100–200 nm and with low protein concentrations on droplet surfaces. Droplet size (d3.2, µm was increased in CH and UHPH emulsions by increasing the oil concentration. CM emulsions exhibited Newtonian flow behaviour at all oil concentrations studied; however, the rheological behaviour of CH and UHPH emulsions varied from Newtonian flow (n ≈ 1 to shear-thinning (n ˂ 1 and thixotropic behaviour in emulsions containing 50% oil. This was confirmed by the non-significant differences in the d4.3 (µm value between the top and bottom of emulsions in tubes left at room temperature for nine days and also by a low migration velocity measured with a Turbiscan LAB instrument. UHPH emulsions showed significantly lower oxidation rates during 10 days storage in comparison to CM and CH emulsions as confirmed by hydroperoxides and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS. UHPH emulsions treated at 100 MPa were less oxidized than those treated at 200 MPa. The results from this study suggest that UHPH treatment generates emulsions that have a higher stability to creaming and lipid oxidation compared to colloid mill and conventional treatments.

  14. Impact of Environmental Stresses on Orange Oil-in-Water Emulsions Stabilized by Sucrose Monopalmitate and Lysolecithin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClements, David Julian; Decker, Eric Andrew; Choi, Seung Jun

    2014-04-09

    The food and beverage industry is trying to replace synthetic functional ingredients with more "label-friendly" ingredients in many commercial products. This study therefore examined the influence of environmental stresses on the stability of emulsions stabilized by a combination of lysolecithin and sucrose monopalmitate (SMP). Orange oil-in-water emulsions (5% (w/w) oil) stabilized by SMP (1%) and lysolecithin (0-0.5%) were prepared using high-pressure homogenization (pH 3). In the absence of lysolecithin, all emulsions were highly unstable to droplet aggregation, which was attributed to low droplet charge (weak electrostatic repulsion) and small SMP headgroup size (weak steric repulsion). Incorporation of 0.1-0.5% lysolecithin into the emulsions greatly improved their stability to droplet aggregation, which was mainly attributed to the increase in negative charge on the droplets (strong electrostatic repulsion). The addition of high levels of salt (NaCl) to the emulsions promoted droplet aggregation and creaming. Emulsions containing 0.5% lysolecithin were stable to heating (30-90 °C) in the absence of salt, but exhibited droplet aggregation and creaming when held at high (>50 °C) temperatures in the presence of 300 mM salt. This study has implications for the development of emulsion-based delivery systems for use in food and beverage products.

  15. Enhancement of the antimicrobial properties of bacteriophage-K via stabilization using oil-in-water nano-emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Patricia Perez; Alves, Diana R; Enright, Mark C; Bean, Jessica E; Gaudion, Alison; Jenkins, A T A; Young, Amber E R; Arnot, Tom C

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage therapy is a promising new treatment that may help overcome the threat posed by antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria, which are increasingly identified in hospitalized patients. The development of biocompatible and sustainable vehicles for incorporation of viable bacterial viruses into a wound dressing is a promising alternative. This article evaluates the antimicrobial efficacy of Bacteriophage K against Staphylococcus aureus over time, when stabilized and delivered via an oil-in-water nano-emulsion. Nano-emulsions were formulated via thermal phase inversion emulsification, and then bacterial growth was challenged with either native emulsion, or emulsion combined with Bacteriophage K. Bacteriophage infectivity, and the influence of storage time of the preparation, were assessed by turbidity measurements of bacterial samples. Newly prepared Bacteriophage K/nano-emulsion formulations have greater antimicrobial activity than freely suspended bacteriophage. The phage-loaded emulsions caused rapid and complete bacterial death of three different strains of S. aureus. The same effect was observed for preparations that were either stored at room temperature (18-20°C), or chilled at 4°C, for up to 10 days of storage. A response surface design of experiments was used to gain insight on the relative effects of the emulsion formulation on bacterial growth and phage lytic activity. More diluted emulsions had a less significant effect on bacterial growth, and diluted bacteriophage-emulsion preparations yielded greater antibacterial activity. The enhancement of bacteriophage activity when delivered via nano-emulsions is yet to be reported. This prompts further investigation into the use of these formulations for the development of novel anti-microbial wound management strategies. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  16. Prooxidative and antioxidative properties of β-carotene in chlorophyll and riboflavin photosensitized oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, JungWoo; Kim, Tae Soo; Kim, Mi-Ja; Lee, JaeHwan

    2013-09-01

    Effects of β-carotene on the oxidative stability of chlorophyll or riboflavin photosensitized oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions were determined by analysing the depleted headspace oxygen content, lipid hydroperoxides, fluorescence intensity, and headspace volatiles. As the concentration of β-carotene increased from 0 to 10, 100, and 1000 μM, the oxidative stability of samples containing chlorophylls decreased in a concentration-dependent manner under light, indicating that β-carotene acted as a prooxidant. However, in riboflavin photosensitized O/W emulsions, 100 and 1000 μM β-carotene inhibited lipid oxidation. Although β-carotene protected both photosensitisers in O/W emulsions, β-carotene displayed antioxidative or prooxidative properties, which depended on the polarity of the photosensitisers. The development of t-2-heptenal and 1-octen-3-ol increased greatly in chlorophyll sensitised O/W emulsions with an increase in β-carotene concentration, implying that more singlet oxygen oxidation occurred due to the higher levels of remaining chlorophylls. However, the content of t-2-heptenal and 1-octen-3-ol in the riboflavin sensitised O/W emulsions was not significantly correlated with the β-carotene concentration, which indicates that β-carotene in the lipid particles effectively quenched singlet oxygen. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fouling reduction by ozone-enhanced backwashing process in ultrafiltration of petroleum-based oil in water emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanti, Nita; Prihatiningtyas, Indah; Kusworo, Tutuk Djoko

    2017-06-01

    Ultrafiltration membrane has been successfully applied for oily waste water treatment. However, one significant drawback of membrane technology is fouling which is responsible for permeate flux decline as well as reducing membrane performance. One method commonly used to reduce fouling is a backwashing process. The backwashing is carried out by a push of reversed flow from permeate side to the feed side of a membrane to remove fouling on the membrane pore and release fouling release fouling layer on the external side. However, for adsorptive fouling, the backwashing process was not effective. On the other hand, Ozone demonstrated great performance for reducing organics fouling. Hence this research was focused on backwashing process with ozone for removing fouling due to ultrafiltration of petroleum based oil emulsion. Gasoline and diesel oil were selected as dispersed phase, while as continuous phase was water added with Tween 80 as a surfactant. This research found that the Ozone backwashing was effective to improve flux recovery. In ultrafiltration of gasoline emulsion, the flux recovery after Ozone backwashing was in the range of 42-74%. For ultrafiltration of diesel oil emulsion, the permeate flux recovery was about 35-84%. In addition, foulant deposition was proposed and predicting that foulant deposition for ultrafiltration of gasoline-in-water emulsion was surfactant as the top layer and the oil was underneath the surfactant. On the other hand, for ultrafiltration of diesel oil-in-water emulsion, the oil was predicted as a top layer above the surfactant foulant.

  18. Surface Film Adsorption and Lubricity of Soybean Oil In-Water Emulsion and Triblock Copolymer Aqueous Solution: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Taheri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the surface film adsorption and lubricity of two different types of potential environmentally friendly cold metal forming lubricants: soybean vegetable oil in water VO/W emulsions and triblock copolymer aqueous solutions. The lubricants have different visual appearance, surface film adsorption characteristic, lubricity and surface cleaning behaviour. The effects of concentration, temperature and emulsification ultrasonic energy (for VO/W emulsion are studied. The result shows that the soybean VO/W emulsions have stronger adsorption, superior lubricity and anti-wear property compared to the copolymer solutions. The effect of temperature is investigated at 30 °C and 65 °C which are below and above cloud point of the aqueous copolymer solutions. Both lubricants show improved friction and anti-wear property at 65 °C. However, tenacious residual film remained on the discs surface after surface cleaning indicates lower cleanability of the soybean VO/W emulsions compared to the copolymer solutions, postulating the need for extra post-processing cleaning operations after cold forming process with VO/W emulsion lubricant.

  19. Solid-in-Oil-in-Water Emulsions for Delivery of Lactase To Control in Vitro Hydrolysis of Lactose in Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Zhong, Qixin

    2017-11-01

    There is an established need to deliver lactase in milk to retain activity during storage and hydrolyze lactose after ingestion. In this work, spray-dried lactase powder was encapsulated in solid-in-oil-in-water (S/O/W) emulsions to fabricate delivery systems. The adoption of Span 80 in milk fat and lecithin in protein solution enabled the encapsulation of ∼76% lactase and lactose hydrolysis during a 14 day refrigeration (from ∼70 to lactose during the simulated gastric and intestinal digestions, and resulted in the hydrolysis of most lactose during the simulated digestions. Therefore, the studied S/O/W emulsions have the potential to deliver lactase in milk for lactose-intolerant consumers.

  20. Interactions between iron, phenolic compounds, emulsifiers, and pH in omega-3-enriched oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; Haahr, Anne-Mette; Becker, Eleonora Miquel; Skibsted, Leif H; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2008-03-12

    The behavior of antioxidants in emulsions is influenced by several factors such as pH and emulsifier type. This study aimed to evaluate the interaction between selected food emulsifiers, phenolic compounds, iron, and pH and their effect on the oxidative stability of n-3 polyunsaturated lipids in a 10% oil-in-water emulsion. The emulsifiers tested were Tween 80 and Citrem, and the phenolic compounds were naringenin, rutin, caffeic acid, and coumaric acid. Lipid oxidation was evaluated at all levels, that is, formation of radicals (ESR), hydroperoxides (PV), and secondary volatile oxidation products. When iron was present, the pH was crucial for the formation of lipid oxidation products. At pH 3 some phenolic compounds, especially caffeic acid, reduced Fe(3+) to Fe(2+), and Fe(2+) increased lipid oxidation at this pH compared to pH 6. Among the evaluated phenols, caffeic acid had the most significant effects, as caffeic acid was found to be prooxidative irrespective of pH, emulsifier type, and presence of iron, although the degrees of lipid oxidation were different at the different experimental conditions. The other evaluated phenols were prooxidative at pH 3 in Citrem-stabilized emulsions and had no significant effect at pH 6 in Citrem- or Tween-stabilized emulsions on the basis of the formation of volatiles. The results indicated that phenol-iron complexes/nanoparticles were formed at pH 6.

  1. Hippophae rhamnoides oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion improves barrier function in healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Barkat Ali; Akhtar, Naveed

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the changes in skin barrier function in human subjects, following long-term topical application of Hippophae rhamnoides oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion whereas effects were measred using non-invasive probes like tewameter and corneometer. For this purpose, two stable oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions were formulated one with 5% Hippophae rhamnoides extract and other without extracts. Thirteen healthy, male subjects with a mean age 27 ± 4.8 years were enrolled after their informed consents. The subjects were instructed to apply either the active formulation or the base formulation over 84 days while they were not known with the contents of either formulation. Biometrological measurements of skin hydration and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were performed on both sides of the face in each volunteer at baseline and on day 07, 14, 21, 28, 42, 56, 70 and 84. The statistical analysis revealed formulation with 5% plant extract was superior compared to placebo (base formulation) as formulation with extract have shown extremely significant improvements in skin hydration (p=0.0003) and TEWL (p=0.0087) throughout treatment course. Moreover, a significant (p<0.05) correlation between the active formulation and the improvement of the skin barrier functions was observed. The active formulation found to be superior to that of placebo. Results affirmed that future studies are necessary to clinically evaluate the active formulation hence it can be proposed that Hippophae rhamnoides emulsion could be an alternative pharmacological tool in treating barrier compromised conditions of skin.

  2. Janus Membranes with Charged Carbon Nanotube Coatings for Deemulsification and Separation of Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yun-Peng; Yang, Jing; Yang, Hao-Cheng; Wu, Ming-Bang; Xu, Zhi-Kang

    2018-03-21

    Oil/water separation, especially for those surfactant-stabilized oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions, is required to protect our ecological environment from destruction. Janus membranes with a function of deemulsification appear as a kind of efficient materials for the separation of O/W emulsions because of a precise adjustment of the surface nature for the hydrophilic and hydrophobic layers. However, existing strategies of membrane preparation suffer from complicated multisteps, leading to uncontrolled thickness of the hydrophilic deemulsification layer. Herein, we present a facile and tunable method to prepare a series of Janus membranes consisting of negatively or positively charged carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and hydrophobic microfiltration membranes by vacuum filtration. The thickness of the hydrophilic CNT coating is thus well-controlled by engineering the amount of CNTs deposited on the substrate membrane. The prepared Janus membranes are effective for the separation of both heavy oil and light oil from O/W emulsions through deemulsification owing to the charge-screening effect. It is very interesting that those membranes displaying a combination of water contact angle and underwater oil contact angle both above 90° have a unique oil delivery behavior and thus high separation performance of oil from O/W emulsions. Such Janus membranes can retrieve 89% of oil in 40 min from the 1,2-dichloroethane/water emulsions with the droplet size of 19 μm. This easy-to-prepare and easy-to-tune strategy provides feasibilities for practical applications of Janus membranes to the deemulsification and separation of O/W emulsions.

  3. Riboflavin-induced oxidation in fish oil-in-water emulsions: Impact of particle size and optical transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluata, Sibel; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2016-12-15

    The influence of particle size and optical properties on the stability of fish oil-in-water emulsions to riboflavin-induced oxidation by blending different combinations of small (d=44nm) and large (d=216nm) lipid droplets was examined. Emulsion turbidity increased with increasing mean droplet diameter due to greater light scattering by larger particles. The influence of droplet size on the stability of the emulsions to riboflavin-induced lipid oxidation during storage at 20 or 37°C was measured. At 37°C, the rate of lipid hydroperoxide formation increased with decreasing droplet diameter, but there were no significant differences in propanal concentrations. At 20°C, both peroxide and propanal values indicated that the rate of oxidation increased with decreasing droplet size. These data show that riboflavin was more effective at promoting oxidation in nanoemulsions containing small droplets because light was able to penetrate more easily and generate reactive oxygen species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Antioxidant Efficacies of Rutin and Rutin Esters in Bulk Oil and Oil-in-Water Emulsion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lue, Bena-Marie; Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    The use of flavonoids as antioxidants in food formulations is limited due to their solubility and thereby their localization in the food products. However, enzymatic alkylation of flavonoids with lipophilic moieties alters their lipophilicity and thereby partitioning within different phases...... concentrations (25 and 200 µM) was assessed in bulk oil and in an o/w emulsion system without and with iron addition. All evaluated compounds revealed antioxidant effects. However, rutin and BHT were the most efficient antioxidants in bulk oil followed by rutin palmitate, whereas rutin laurate acted as either...... in o/w emulsion. Interestingly, rutin had stronger antioxidative effect than BHT upon iron addition to the emulsion. Practical application: According to the antioxidant hypothesis the polar paradox more amphiphilic antioxidants should perform as better antioxidants in emulsions than more polar...

  5. Oil-in-water emulsions flow through constricted micro-capillarities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Oswaldo Robles; Carvalho, Marcio da Silveira [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2010-07-01

    The effect of the oil concentration and the drop size distribution on the characteristics of the flow of an emulsion through a constricted capillary was experimentally analyzed and quantified by the ratio of the pressure drop of the continuous phase flow to the pressure drop of the emulsion flow, at the same flow rate. The results confirm that the ratio between the capillary constriction diameter and the oil drop size is one of the most important parameters for this flow. For large oil drop size emulsions, the deformation of the drop as it flows through the constriction leads to a high extra pressure drop at low capillary numbers. For small oil drop size emulsions, the extra pressure drop is a function of the viscosity ratio and the disperse phase concentration. (author)

  6. Transitions in Structure in Oil-in-Water Emulsions As Studied by Diffusing Wave Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruis, H.G.M.; Gruijthuijsen, van K.; Venema, P.; Linden, van der E.

    2007-01-01

    Transitions in structure of sodium caseinate stabilized emulsions were studied using conventional rheometry as well as diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS). Structural differences were induced by different amounts of stabilizer, and transitions in structure were induced by acidification. Special

  7. Effect of Phytosterols on the Crystallization Behavior of Oil-in-Water Milk Fat Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zychowski, Lisa M; Logan, Amy; Augustin, Mary Ann; Kelly, Alan L; Zabara, Alexandru; O'Mahony, James A; Conn, Charlotte E; Auty, Mark A E

    2016-08-31

    Milk has been used commercially as a carrier for phytosterols, but there is limited knowledge on the effect of added plant sterols on the properties of the system. In this study, phytosterols dispersed in milk fat at a level of 0.3 or 0.6% were homogenized with an aqueous dispersion of whey protein isolate (WPI). The particle size, morphology, ζ-potential, and stability of the emulsions were investigated. Emulsion crystallization properties were examined through the use of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Synchrotron X-ray scattering at both small and wide angles. Phytosterol enrichment influenced the particle size and physical appearance of the emulsion droplets, but did not affect the stability or charge of the dispersed particles. DSC data demonstrated that, at the higher level of phytosterol addition, crystallization of milk fat was delayed, whereas, at the lower level, phytosterol enrichment induced nucleation and emulsion crystallization. These differences were attributed to the formation of separate phytosterol crystals within the emulsions at the high phytosterol concentration, as characterized by Synchrotron X-ray measurements. X-ray scattering patterns demonstrated the ability of the phytosterol to integrate within the milk fat triacylglycerol matrix, with a concomitant increase in longitudinal packing and system disorder. Understanding the consequences of adding phytosterols, on the physical and crystalline behavior of emulsions may enable the functional food industry to design more physically and chemically stable products.

  8. Influence of Casein-Phospholipid Combinations as Emulsifier on the Physical and Oxidative Stability of Fish Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García Moreno, Pedro Jesús; Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of casein (0.3% w/w) and phospholipid (0.5% w/w) emulsifier combinations on the physical and oxidative stability of 10% fish oil-in-water emulsions at pH 7. For that purpose, three phospholipids were evaluated, namely, lecithin (LC), ph...

  9. Physical and oxidative stability of high fat fish oil-in-water emulsions stabilized with combinations of sodium caseinate and sodium alginate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yesiltas, Betül; García Moreno, Pedro Jesús; Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke

    2017-01-01

    .2 ratio NaCas:NaAlg by Box-Behnken's design, the formulae 70%-1.4%-1.2 was decided due to high fish oil content's decreasing effect on droplet size and peroxide value. Practical applications: Physically and oxidatively stable high fat (50-70%) omega-3 delivery fish oil-in-water emulsions are of high...

  10. Assessment of partial coalescence in whippable oil-in-water food emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrut, Raul Flaviu; Danthine, Sabine; Blecker, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    Partial coalescence influences to a great extent the properties of final food products such as ice cream and whipped toppings. In return, the partial coalescence occurrence and development are conditioned, in such systems, by the emulsion's intrinsic properties (e.g. solid fat content, fat crystal shape and size), formulation (e.g. protein content, surfactants presence) and extrinsic factors (e.g. cooling rate, shearing). A set of methods is available for partial coalescence investigation and quantification. These methods are critically reviewed in this paper, balancing the weaknesses of the methods in terms of structure alteration (for turbidity, dye dilution, etc.) and assumptions made for mathematical models (for particle size determination) with their advantages (good repeatability, high sensitivity, etc.). With the methods proposed in literature, the partial coalescence investigations can be conducted quantitatively and/or qualitatively. Good correlation were observed between some of the quantitative methods such as dye dilution, calorimetry, fat particle size; while a poor correlation was found in the case of solvent extraction method with other quantitative methods. The most suitable way for partial coalescence quantification was implied to be the fat particle size method, which would give results with a high degree of confidence if used in combination with a microscopic technique for the confirmation of partial coalescence as the main destabilization mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Stabilization of oil-in-water emulsions by enzyme catalyzed oxidative gelation of sugar beet pectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz; Chronakis, Ioannis S.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    Enzyme catalyzed oxidative cross-linking of feruloyl groups can promote gelation of sugar beet pectin (SBP). It is uncertain how the enzyme kinetics of this cross-linking reaction are affected in emulsion systems and whether the gelation affects emulsion stability. In this study, SBP (2.5% w...... catalyzed oxidative gelation of SBP was evaluated by small angle oscillatory measurements for horseradish peroxidase (HRP) (EC 1.11.1.7) and laccase (EC 1.10.3.2) catalysis, respectively. HRP catalyzed gelation rates, determined from the slopes of the increase of elastic modulus (G0) with time, were higher...

  12. Influence of heating on oil-in-water emulsions prepared with soybean soluble polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Akihiro; Maeda, Hirokazu; Corredig, Milena

    2007-01-24

    The effect of heating on the physicochemical properties of emulsions prepared with soybean soluble polysaccharide (SSPS) was investigated. The emulsions were stable after heating at 90 degrees C for up to 30 min. Heating at different pH values or in the presence of CaCl2 (heating, while the protein impurities of the SSPS/LMF fraction formed aggregates by heating at pH 7. Analysis of the heat-induced aggregation of the two fractions of SSPS suggested that the changes in SSPS functionality with heating can be attributed to the protein impurities (LMF) present in the SSPS.

  13. Protein-Protein Multilayer Oil-in-Water Emulsions for the Microencapsulation of Flaxseed Oil: Effect of Whey and Fish Gelatin Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustier, Patrick; Achouri, Allaoua; Taherian, Ali R; Britten, Michel; Pelletier, Marylène; Sabik, Hassan; Villeneuve, Sébastien; Mondor, Martin

    2015-10-28

    The impact of whey protein isolate (WPI) and fish gelatin (FG) deposited sequentially at concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, and 0.75% on the surface of primary oil-in-water emulsions containing 5% flaxseed oil stabilized with either 0.5% fish gelatin or whey protein, respectively, was investigated. The results revealed that the adsorption of WPI/FG or FG/WPI complexes to the emulsion interface led to the formation of oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions with different stabilities and different protection degrees of the flaxseed oil. Deposition of FG on the WPI primary emulsion increased the particle size (from 0.53 to 1.58 μm) and viscosity and decreased electronegativity (from -23.91 to -11.15 mV) of the complexes. Different trends were noted with the deposition of WPI on the FG primary emulsion, resulting in decreasing particle size and increasing electronegativity and viscosity to a lower extent. Due to the superior tension-active property of WPI, the amount of protein load in the WPI primary emulsion as well as in WPI/FG complex was significantly higher than the FG counterparts. A multilayer emulsion made with 0.5% WPI/0.75% FG exhibited the lowest oxidation among all of the multilayered emulsions tested (0.32 ppm of hexanal) after 21 days, likely due to the charge effect of FG that may prevent pro-oxidant metals to interact with the flaxseed oil.

  14. Physical and Oxidative Stability of Flaxseed Oil-in-Water Emulsions Fabricated from Sunflower Lecithins: Impact of Blending Lecithins with Different Phospholipid Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Li; Chen, Fang; Wang, Xingguo; Jin, Qingzhe; Decker, Eric Andrew; McClements, David Julian

    2017-06-14

    There is great interest in the formulation of plant-based foods enriched with nutrients that promote health, such as polyunsaturated fatty acids. This study evaluated the impact of sunflower phospholipid type on the formation and stability of flaxseed oil-in-water emulsions. Two sunflower lecithins (Sunlipon 50 and 90) with different phosphatidylcholine (PC) levels (59 and 90%, respectively) were used in varying ratios to form emulsions. Emulsion droplet size, charge, appearance, microstructure, and oxidation were measured during storage at 55 °C in the dark. The physical and chemical stability increased as the PC content of the lecithin blends decreased. The oxidative stability of emulsions formulated using Sunlipon 50 was better than emulsions formulated using synthetic surfactants (SDS or Tween 20). The results are interpreted in terms of the impact of emulsifier type on the colloidal interactions between oil droplets and on the molecular interactions between pro-oxidants and oil droplet surfaces.

  15. Oil-in-water emulsion gels stabilized with chia (Salvia hispanica L.) and cold gelling agents: Technological and infrared spectroscopic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintado, T; Ruiz-Capillas, C; Jiménez-Colmenero, F; Carmona, P; Herrero, A M

    2015-10-15

    This paper reports on the development of olive oil-in-water emulsion gels containing chia (Salvia hispanica L.) (flour or seed) and cold gelling agents (transglutaminase, alginate or gelatin). The technological and structural characteristics of these emulsion gels were evaluated. Both structural and technological changes in emulsion gels resulting from chilled storage were also determined. The color and texture of emulsion gels depend on both the cold gelling agents used and chilled storage. Lipid oxidation increased (p oil lipid chain related to lipid interactions and droplet size in the emulsion gels could be decisive in determining their textural properties. The half-bandwidth of 2923 cm(-1) band and area of 3220 cm(-1) band did not show significant differences during chilled storage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Technology transfer of oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant manufacturing for pandemic influenza vaccine production in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christopher B; Huynh, Chuong; O'Hara, Michael K; Onu, Adrian

    2013-03-15

    Many developing countries lack or have inadequate pandemic influenza vaccine manufacturing capacity. In the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, this led to delayed and inadequate vaccine coverage in the developing world. Thus, bolstering developing country influenza vaccine manufacturing capacity is urgently needed. The Cantacuzino Institute in Bucharest, Romania has been producing seasonal influenza vaccine since the 1970s, and has the capacity to produce ∼5 million doses of monovalent vaccine in the event of an influenza pandemic. Inclusion of an adjuvant in the vaccine could enable antigen dose sparing, expanding vaccine coverage and potentially allowing universal vaccination of the Romanian population and possibly neighboring countries. However, adjuvant formulation and manufacturing know-how are difficult to access. This manuscript describes the successful transfer of oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant manufacturing and quality control technologies from the Infectious Disease Research Institute in Seattle, USA to the Cantacuzino Institute. By describing the challenges and accomplishments of the project, it is hoped that the knowledge and experience gained will benefit other institutes involved in similar technology transfer projects designed to facilitate increased vaccine manufacturing capacity in developing countries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Preparation of fluidized catalytic cracking slurry oil-in-water emulsion as anti-collapse agent for drilling fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengqiang Xiong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluidized catalytic cracking slurry oil-in-water emulsion (FCCSE was prepared by using interfacial complexes generation method that was simple and versatile. The critical factors influencing the sample preparation process were optimized, for instance, the optimum value of the mixed hydrophile-lipophile balance of compound emulsifier was 11.36, the content of compound emulsifier was 4 wt%, the emulsification temperature was 75 °C, the agitation speed was 200 rpm, and the emulsification time was 30–45 min. The performance as a drilling fluid additive was also investigated with respect to rheological properties, filtration loss and inhibition of FCCSE. Experimental results showed that FCCSE was favorable to inhibiting clay expansion and dispersion and reducing fluid loss. Furthermore, it had good compatibility with other additives and did not affect the rheological properties of drilling fluids. FCCSE exhibited better performance than the available emulsified asphalt. It has a promising application as anti-collapse agent in petroleum and natural gas drilling.

  18. Encapsulation of carotenoids extracted from halophilic Archaea in oil-in-water (O/W) micro- and nano-emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaari, Marwa; Theochari, Ioanna; Papadimitriou, Vassiliki; Xenakis, Aristotelis; Ammar, Emna

    2018-01-01

    Carotenoids extracted from halophilc Archaea have potential health benefits. Their poor water-solubility and low bioavailability is a challenge to their incorporation into foods. The aim of this work was the carotenoids encapsulation into two oil-in-water (O/W) dispersions, to increase their use as functional food applications. A nanoemulsion produced by high pressure homogenization and a spontaneously formed microemulsion were conceived. The limonene was the dispersed oil phase, and mixtures of Triton X-100/Tween-80 (3:1) as emulsifiers and of water/glycerol (2:1) as the continuous aqueous phase. The microemulsion monophasic area was determined through the pseudo-ternary phase diagram. Dynamic Light Scattering was used for the structural characterization of the nano- and micro-emulsions in the presence of the carotenoids. Moreover, the radical scavenging activity of the encapsulated carotenoids was examined by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy. The results confirmed the delivery systems design effectiveness to encapsulate and stabilize the carotenoids for food applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Amorphous nano-curcumin stabilized oil in water emulsion: Physico chemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aditya, N P; Hamilton, Ian E; Norton, Ian T

    2017-06-01

    Particle characteristics e.g. size and polymorphism are known to significantly affect the Pickering ability of the solid particles by influencing their interaction at the oil and water (O/W) interface. In this study, nano-sized amorphous curcumin particles were fabricated using nanonization technology to use them as Pickering particles. After nanonization, native crystalline curcumin particles were converted into amorphous, nanosized particles of ∼220nm. Amorphous nature of the particle was evident from the decreased melting point from 177±1°C (native curcumin) to 146±3°C (nanonized curcumin) and enthalpy from 27±2J/g to 3.5±1J/g. Interfacial tension (IFT) studies have shown a decrease in IFT at the O/W interface from ∼27mN/m to ∼15mN/m in the presence of amorphous curcumin particles in water phase compared to crystalline curcumin particles. Curcumin stabilized O/W emulsion has an initial droplet size of ∼1.2μm and they were stable for 30days at 4°C. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Highly efficient oil-in-water emulsion and oil layer/water mixture separation based on durably superhydrophobic sponge prepared via a facile route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jintao; Wang, Hongfei; Geng, Guihong

    2018-02-01

    The fabrication of the materials with special wettability being capable of removing oil layer on water surface and oil droplets in oil-in-water emulsion is an important issue for water pollution. So far, it still remains challenging to explore a simple, facile, environmentally friendly approach for achieving this goal. Herein, inspired by the adhesion of marine mussels, the polydopamine (PDA) coating with hierarchical structure was directly fabricated onto the surface of melamine (MF) sponge by facile self-polymerization in dopamine solution. Then, a superhydrophobic and superoleophilic sponge was successfully obtained after the modification by dodecanethiol (DDT) at ambient temperature. The as-prepared sponge can selectively separate a series of oil droplets in oil-in-water emulsion with high efficiency (transparency: 76.6-93.8%) and absorb various oils or organic solvents up to 45.2-98.6 times of its own weight. Moreover, in conjunction with a vacuum system, great amounts of oils up to 20 times its own weight can be effectively separated from water surface within 1s by the sponge. Due to low cost, simple process, and easy accessibility, the as-prepared sponge has potential applications in oil-in-water emulsion separation and oil spill cleanup. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Physical and oxidative stability of fish oil-in-water emulsions fortified with enzymatic hydrolysates from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) roe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghelichi, Sakhi; Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; García Moreno, Pedro Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Physical and oxidative stability of 5% (by weight) cod liver oil-in-water emulsions fortified with common carp (C. carpio) roe protein hydrolysate (CRPH) were examined. CRPH was obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of discarded roe by using Alcalase 2.4 L for 30, 60, 90, and 120 min to yield different...... degrees of hydrolysis (DH). All the hydrolysates showed in vitro antioxidant activity in terms of radical scavenging and chelating properties. CRPH-containing emulsions had significantly smaller droplets than control (p ...

  2. Oil-in-water emulsion impregnated electrospun poly(ethylene terephthalate) fiber mat as a novel tool for optical fiber cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlaminck, Dries J G; Rahman, Md Mahbubor; Dash, Mamoni; Samal, Sangram Keshari; Watté, Jan; Van Vlierberghe, Sandra; Dubruel, Peter

    2018-06-15

    The complete removal of remaining polymer debris after stripping of optical fiber cables is essential for high precision connection between two fibers. It can be anticipated that electrospun porous membranes as cleaning wipes are able to trap and retain polymer debris within their pores. Impregnation of an oil-in-water emulsion as cleaning agent lowers the interfacial tension between debris and the optical fiber thereby enabling the straightforward removal of polymer debris from the optical fiber. Electrospun membranes of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and cellulose acetate (CA) were obtained with fiber diameters of 0.430 μm and 2 μm respectively. The oil-in-water emulsion was formulated with 10 wt% medium chain triglyceride (MCT) and 10 wt% Tween 80 surfactant in an aqueous phosphate buffer solution. In a scoring range from 0 to 5 for which the score 0 indicated superior cleaning and the score 5 referred to the least efficient cleaning, the electrospun fiber mats (without emulsion) scored within the range of 2-4 while emulsion impregnated electrospun fiber mats revealed the best score of 0. A drastic improvement was thus clearly evident from the obtained results when the cleaning emulsion was applied. The materials developed herein thus represent a new class of soft cleaning agents for optical fibers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of fat and water crystallization on the stability of hydrogenated palm oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by a nonionic surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanasukarn, Parita; Pongsawatmanit, Rungnaphar; McClements, D Julian

    2006-05-17

    The influence of (0-40 wt %) sucrose and (0 and 150 mmol/kg) sodium chloride on the physical properties of 20 wt % hydrogenated palm oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by 2 wt % Tween 20 after crystallization of the oil phase only or both the oil and water phases has been examined. Emulsion stability was assessed by differential scanning calorimetry measurements of fat destabilization after cooling-heating cycles and by measurements of mean particle size, percent destabilized fat, and percent free oil obtained from gravitational separation after isothermal storage (at -40 to +37 degrees C). At storage temperatures where the oil phase was partially crystalline and the water was completely liquid, the emulsions were unstable to droplet coalescence and oiling off because of partial coalescence. Both NaCI and sucrose increased the extent of partial coalescence in the emulsions. At storage temperatures where both oil and water crystallized, the emulsions were completely destabilized. The stability of the emulsions to freezing and thawing could be improved somewhat by adding sucrose (>20 wt %). Emulsions stabilized by whey proteins were shown to have better freeze-thaw stability than those stabilized by Tween 20, especially in the presence of sucrose. These results may help formulate food emulsions with improved freeze-thaw stability.

  4. Electrocoagulation with polarity switch for fast oil removal from oil in water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbi, Lorena C A; Nascimento, Izabela L; Muniz, Eduardo P; Rocha, Sandra M S; Porto, Paulo S S

    2018-05-01

    An electrocoagulation technique using a 3.5 L reactor, with aluminum electrodes in a monopolar arrangement with polarity switch at each 10 s was used to separate oil from synthetic oily water similar in oil concentration to produced water from offshore platforms. Up to 98% of oil removal was achieved after 20 min of processing. Processing time dependence of the oil removal and pH was measured and successfully adjusted to exponential models, indicating a pseudo first order behavior. Statistical analysis was used to prove that electrical conductivity and total solids depend significantly on the concentration of electrolyte (NaCl) in the medium. Oil removal depends mostly on the distance between the electrodes but is proportional to electrolyte concentration when initial pH is 8. Electrocoagulation with polarity switch maximizes the lifetime of the electrodes. The process reduced oil concentration to a value below that stipulated by law, proving it can be an efficient technology to minimize the offshore drilling impact in the environment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of Antioxidant or Prooxidant Properties of Selected Amino Acids Using In Vitro Assays and in Oil-in-Water Emulsions Under Riboflavin Sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka, HyeJung; Yi, BoRa; Kim, Mi-Ja; Lee, JaeHwan

    2016-05-01

    The antioxidant properties of selected amino acids were tested using in vitro assays and oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions under riboflavin (RF) photosensitization. Headspace oxygen content, lipid hydroperoxides, and conjugated dienes were determined for the degree of oxidation. Riboflavin photosensitization was adapted as the oxidation driving force. In vitro assays showed that cysteine had the highest antioxidant properties followed by tryptophan and tyrosine. However, in O/W emulsions under RF photosensitization, tyrosine inhibited lipid oxidation whereas tryptophan acted as a prooxidant. Tryptophan accelerated the rates of oxidation in O/W emulsion without RF. The antioxidant properties of amino acids differed depending on the antioxidant determination methods, oxidation driving forces, and food matrices. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Multilayer Oil-in-Water Emulsions: Formation, Characteristics and Application as the Carriers for Lipophilic Bioactive Food Components – a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bortnowska Grażyna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review article demonstrates fundamentals regarding the manufacturing of multilayer oil-in-water (M-O/W emulsions and factors affecting stability of these systems. Moreover, characteristics of major bioactive lipophilic components and ingredients mostly applied to form multilayered membranes as well analytical methods used to examine properties of M-O/W emulsions are specified. It has been shown that production of M-O/W systems is based on the layer-by-layer (LbL electrostatic deposition technique which makes use of the electrostatic attraction of oppositely charged surfactants and biopolymers to form multicomposite protective layers around emulsion droplets. Finally, limitations regarding studies of M-O/W systems which should be developed are specified.

  7. Effect of Transition Metal Ions on the B Ring Oxidation of Sterols and their Kinetics in Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Baiyi Lu; Yinzhou Hu; Weisu Huang; Mengmeng Wang; Yuan Jiang; Tiantian Lou

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of metal ions on the oxidation of sterols and their kinetics in oil-in-water emulsions. Sterol substrates were added with different metal ions (Cu2+, Fe2+, Mn2+, Zn2+, Na+, and Mg2+) of five concentrations and investigated after 2?h of heating at 90??C. The substrates added with Fe2+ and Cu2+ were heated continuously to evaluate the kinetics of four sterols and their corresponding sterol oxidation products (SOPs). Sterol oxidation increased as the metal ion ...

  8. Elucidation of stabilizing oil-in-water Pickering emulsion with different modified maize starch-based nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fan; Miao, Ming; Jiang, Bo; Campanella, Osvaldo H; Jin, Zhengyu; Zhang, Tao

    2017-08-15

    The aim of present study was to study the medium-chain triacylglycerol-in-water (O/W) Pickering emulsion stabilized using different modified starch-based nanoparticles (octenylsuccinylation treated soluble starch nanoparticle, OSA-SSNP, and insoluble starch nanoparticle, ISNP). The major factors for affecting the system stability, rheological behaviour and microstructure of the emulsions were also investigated. The parameters of the O/W emulsions stabilized by OSA-SSNP or ISNP were selected as follows: 3.0% of starch nanoparticles concentration, 50% of MCT fraction and 7.0 of system pH. The rheological properties indicated that both emulsions displayed shear-thinning behaviour as a non-Newtonian fluid. For OSA-SSNP, the viscosities of the emulsion were higher than those of ISNP throughout shear rate range for the same condition. The plot of droplet size distribution for emulsion stabilized OSA-SSNP appeared as a single narrow peak, whereas a broader droplet size distribution with bimodal pattern was observed for emulsion stabilized ISNP. The microscopy results showed that both OSA-SSNP and ISNP were adsorbed at oil-water interface to form a barrier film and retard the phase separation. When emulsion was stored for 30d, no phase separation was detected for O/W emulsion, revealing high stability of emulsion stabilized by both OSA-SSNP and ISNP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Antioxidant activity of a proanthocyanidin-rich extract from grape seed in whey protein isolate stabilized algae oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Min; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2004-08-11

    Algae oil-in-water emulsions stabilized with 0.2% whey protein isolate (WPI) at pH 3.0 and 7.0 were chosen to evaluate antioxidant activity of a proanthocyanidin-rich extract from grape seed. In this emulsion system, (+)-catechin and ascorbic acid (620 microM) were found to be prooxidative at pH 3.0 and ineffective at pH 7.0. Grape seed extract was not able to effectively inhibit both lipid hydroperoxides and propanal formation when added to the emulsion at 124 microM. However, increasing the concentration of the grape seed extract to 620 microM resulted in inhibition of both lipid hydroperoxide and propanal formation at pH 3.0 and 7.0. None of the antioxidants tested had any effect on the physical stability of the WPI-stabilized emulsion. The superior antioxidant activity of the grape seed extract is likely due to the presence of oligomeric procyanidins which are better antioxidants compared to their monomeric counterparts.

  10. Impact of antioxidants on the formation of volatile secondary lipid oxidation products in oil-in-water emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food emulsions are particularly susceptible to lipid oxidation, which leads to the formation of off-flavors and odors, and ultimately, shorter product shelf lives. Here we examine antioxidants for use in emulsions from a variety of different sources, including natural product extracts as well as rat...

  11. Technology transfer of oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant manufacturing for pandemic influenza vaccine production in Romania: Preclinical evaluation of split virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine with adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavaru, Crina; Onu, Adrian; Lupulescu, Emilia; Tucureanu, Catalin; Rasid, Orhan; Vlase, Ene; Coman, Cristin; Caras, Iuliana; Ghiorghisor, Alina; Berbecila, Laurentiu; Tofan, Vlad; Bowen, Richard A; Marlenee, Nicole; Hartwig, Airn; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Baldwin, Susan L; Van Hoeven, Neal; Vedvick, Thomas S; Huynh, Chuong; O'Hara, Michael K; Noah, Diana L; Fox, Christopher B

    2016-04-02

    Millions of seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine doses containing oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant have been administered in order to enhance and broaden immune responses and to facilitate antigen sparing. Despite the enactment of a Global Action Plan for Influenza Vaccines and a multi-fold increase in production capabilities over the past 10 years, worldwide capacity for pandemic influenza vaccine production is still limited. In developing countries, where routine influenza vaccination is not fully established, additional measures are needed to ensure adequate supply of pandemic influenza vaccines without dependence on the shipment of aid from other, potentially impacted first-world countries. Adaptation of influenza vaccine and adjuvant technologies by developing country influenza vaccine manufacturers may enable antigen sparing and corresponding increases in global influenza vaccine coverage capacity. Following on previously described work involving the technology transfer of oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant manufacturing to a Romanian vaccine manufacturing institute, we herein describe the preclinical evaluation of inactivated split virion H5N1 influenza vaccine with emulsion adjuvant, including immunogenicity, protection from virus challenge, antigen sparing capacity, and safety. In parallel with the evaluation of the bioactivity of the tech-transferred adjuvant, we also describe the impact of concurrent antigen manufacturing optimization activities. Depending on the vaccine antigen source and manufacturing process, inclusion of adjuvant was shown to enhance and broaden functional antibody titers in mouse and rabbit models, promote protection from homologous virus challenge in ferrets, and facilitate antigen sparing. Besides scientific findings, the operational lessons learned are delineated in order to facilitate adaptation of adjuvant technologies by other developing country institutes to enhance global pandemic influenza preparedness.

  12. Emulsion stability and dilatational viscoelasticity of ovalbumin/chitosan complexes at the oil-in-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wenfei; Ren, Cong; Tian, Mo; Yang, Xuejun; Li, Jing; Li, Bin

    2018-06-30

    The contribution of the emulsion rheological properties and the viscoelastic of the interface adsorbed layer to the emulsification mechanism of ovalbumin (OVA)-chitosan (CS) mixtures were investigated. In comparison to the treatment with OVA alone and OVA/CS mixtures at pH 4.0, the addition of CS at pH 5.5 increased the size distribution of emulsion droplets with significant flocculation through polyelectrolyte bridging, remarkably enhancing the emulsions stability against gravity creaming after storage at 25 °C for 14 days. The dynamic rheological properties indicated that the formation of the complex at pH 5.5 increased the elastic modulus (G') and apparent viscosity (η ∗ ) of the emulsions, which is useful for inhibiting creaming. Moreover, the complexation of OVA and CS at pH 5.5 increased the dilatational modulus (E), especially the elastic modulus (E d ), of the oil/water interfacial absorbed layer, which could reduce the droplet coalescence and therefore inhibit the growth of emulsion droplets. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Oil-in-water Pickering emulsions stabilized by colloidal particles from the water-insoluble protein zein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Folter, J.W.J.; van Ruijven, M.W.M.; Velikov, K.

    2012-01-01

    Few fully natural and biocompatible materials are available for the effective particle-stabilization of emulsions since strict requirements, such as insolubility in both fluid phases and intermediate wettability, need to be met. In this paper, we demonstrate the first use of water-insoluble

  14. Impact of Endogenous Phenolics in Canola Oil on the Oxidative Stability of Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; Friel, James; Moser, Jill

    , the effect of these endogenous antioxidants on lipid oxidation in o/w emulsion is yet unknown. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the endogenous phenolics in Canola oil on lipid oxidation in o/w emulsion. For this purpose individual phenolics were extracted from defatted grinded...... Value (PV) and secondary volatile oxidation products by headspace GC supported by evaluation of the properties of the extracts and corresponding phenolic standards in 3 different in vitro antioxidant assays....... antioxidants will result in increased shelf life and thereby increased quality of the food products. Besides tocopherols, Canola oil contains different compounds with antioxidative properties. These compounds are Sinapic acid, Sinapine and Canolol; all belonging to the group of phenolic compounds. However...

  15. Interactions between iron, phenolic compounds, emulsifiers, and pH in omega-3-enriched oil-in-water emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; Haahr, Anne-Mette; Becker, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    The behavior of antioxidants in emulsions is influenced by several factors such as pH and emulsifier type. This study aimed to evaluate the interaction between selected food emulsifiers, phenolic compounds, iron, and pH and their effect on the oxidative stability of n-3 polyunsaturated lipids...... products. When iron was present, the pH was crucial for the formation of lipid oxidation products. At pH 3 some phenolic compounds, especially caffeic acid, reduced Fe3+ to Fe2+, and Fe2+ increased lipid oxidation at this pH compared to pH 6. Among the evaluated phenols, caffeic acid had the most...... significant effects, as caffeic acid was found to be prooxidative irrespective of pH, emulsifier type, and presence of iron, although the degrees of lipid oxidation were different at the different experimental conditions. The other evaluated phenols were prooxidative at pH 3 in Citrem-stabilized emulsions...

  16. Thermally induced gelling of oil-in-water emulsions comprising partially crystallized droplets: the impact of interfacial crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thivilliers, Florence; Laurichesse, Eric; Saadaoui, Hassan; Leal-Calderon, Fernando; Schmitt, Véronique

    2008-12-02

    We produced triglyceride-in-water emulsions comprising partially crystallized droplets, stabilized by a mixture of protein and low molecular weight surfactant. The emulsions were emulsified in the melted state of the oil phase and stored at low temperature (4 degrees C) right after fabrication to induce oil crystallization. The systems were then warmed to room temperature for a short period of time and cooled again to 4 degrees C. Owing to this treatment referred to as temperature cycling or "tempering", the initially fluid emulsions turned into hard gels. We followed the bulk rheological properties of the materials during and after tempering. The storage modulus, G', exhibited a dramatic increase when tempering was applied. We showed that the systems evolved following two distinct regimes that depend on the average droplet size and on the surfactant-to-protein molar ratio. Gelling may involve partial coalescence of the droplets, i.e., film rupturing with no further shape relaxation because of the solid nature of the droplets. Alternatively, gelling may occur without film rupturing, and is reminiscent of a jamming transition induced by surface roughness. We discussed the origin of these two mechanisms in terms of the properties (size and protuberance) of the interfacial oil crystals.

  17. Screening of Antioxidant Activity of Gentian Lutea Root and Its Application in Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Aini Mohd Azman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Gentiana Lutea root (G. Lutea is a medicinal herb, traditionally used as a bitter tonic in gastrointestinal ailments for improving the digestive system. The active principles of G. Lutea were found to be secoiridoid bitter compounds as well as many other active compounds causing the pharmacological effects. No study to date has yet determined the potential of G. Lutea antioxidant activity on lipid oxidation. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an extract of G. Lutea on lipid oxidation during storage of an emulsion. G. Lutea extracts showed excellent antioxidant activity measured by DPPH scavenging assay and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC assays. An amount of 0.5% w/w G. Lutea lyophilise was able to inhibit lipid oxidation throughout storage (p < 0.05. A mixture of G. Lutea with 0.1% (w/w BSA showed a good synergic effect and better antioxidant activity in the emulsion. Quantitative results of HPLC showed that G. Lutea contained secoiridoid-glycosides (gentiopiocroside and sweroside and post column analysis displayed radical scavenging activity of G. Lutea extract towards the ABTS radical. The results from this study highlight the potential of G. Lutea as a food ingredient in the design of healthier food commodities.

  18. Crossflow type silicon microchannel substrate monodispersion oil-in-water emulsion manufacture; Kurosufuro gata shirikon maikuro chaneru kiban wo mochiita tanbunsan suchuyu emarushon no sakusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakatsu, Takahiro [Tohoku University, Miyagi (Japan). Graduate School; Komori, Hideai; Najima, Mitsutashi; Kikuchi, Yuji; Yonemoto, Toshikuni

    1999-05-05

    The new technique, which continuously produced the monodispersion oil-in-water (0/W) emulsion using the crossflow type silicon microchannel substrate, was developed. On the silicon monocrystal substrate, the watercourse as the liquid of the continuous phase flowed was produced, and the column of the equal slit of the size in both walls of the watercourse was precisely processed. By closing the upper part in the slit by the clamp of the flat glass board in the microchannel substrate, the microchannel column was formed. Through the microchannel, the oil droplet in which the size was even was formed by sending out the oil (triolein) in the water (0.3wt% sodium lauryl sulfate aqueous solution) of continuous phase which is flowing in respect of the watercourse. The size of the oil droplet is greatly dependent on the structure of the microchannel regulated by microchannel width, microchannel height and terrace length (the even part of which the microchannel exit was equipped). Monodispersion emulsion of 16,20 and 48 {mu}m at the average droplet diameter was formed by using microchannel substrate of the three types of which the structure differs. Droplet diameter decreased, when the substrate which formed large droplet of 48 {mu}m in which the water current quantity is 1.4x10{sup -2}mLmin{sup -1} was used, when the flow rate increased. However, there was no a flow rate at droplet diameter, even if it was made to change from 1.4x10{sup -2} to 2.4mLmin{sup -1}, 16 {mu}m 20 {mu}m small change. In all cases, the droplet size distribution was narrow, and the geometry standard deviation was under 1.03. (translated by NEDO)

  19. Feasibility evaluation of neutron capture therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma using selective enhancement of boron accumulation in tumour with intra-arterial administration of boron-entrapped water-in-oil-in-water emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagie, Hironobu; Kumada, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Takemi; Higashi, Syushi; Ikushima, Ichiro; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Shinohara, Atsuko; Fijihara, Mitsuteru; Suzuki, Minoru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Sugiyama, Hirotaka; Kajiyama, Tetsuya; Nishimura, Ryohei; Ono, Koji; Nakajima, Jun; Ono, Minoru; Eriguchi, Masazumi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2011-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most difficult to cure with surgery, chemotherapy, or other combinational therapies. In the treatment of HCC, only 30% patients can be operated due to complication of liver cirrhosis or multiple intrahepatic tumours. Tumour cell destruction in boron neutron-capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction between (10)B atoms and thermal neutrons, so it is necessary to accumulate a sufficient quantity of (10)B atoms in tumour cells for effective tumour cell destruction by BNCT. Water-in-oil-in-water (WOW) emulsion has been used as the carrier of anti-cancer agents on intra-arterial injections in clinical. In this study, we prepared (10)BSH entrapped WOW emulsion by double emulsifying technique using iodized poppy-seed oil (IPSO), (10)BSH and surfactant, for selective intra-arterial infusion to HCC, and performed simulations of the irradiation in order to calculate the dose delivered to the patients. WOW emulsion was administrated with intra-arterial injections via proper hepatic artery on VX-2 rabbit hepatic tumour models. We simulated the irradiation of epithermal neutron and calculated the dose delivered to the tissues with JAEA computational dosimetry system (JCDS) at JRR4 reactor of Japan Atomic Research Institute, using the CT scans of a HCC patient. The (10)B concentrations in VX-2 tumour obtained by delivery with WOW emulsion were superior to those by conventional IPSO mix emulsion. According to the rabbit model, the boron concentrations (ppm) in tumour, normal liver tissue, and blood are 61.7, 4.3, and 0.1, respectively. The results of the simulations show that normal liver biologically weighted dose is restricted to 4.9 Gy-Eq (CBE; liver tumour: 2.5, normal liver: 0.94); the maximum, minimum, and mean tumour weighted dose are 43.1, 7.3, and 21.8 Gy-Eq, respectively, in 40 min irradiation. In this study, we show that (10)B entrapped WOW emulsion could be applied to novel intra-arterial boron delivery carrier

  20. Water-in-oil-in-water emulsion obtained by glass microfluidic device for protection and heat-triggered release of natural pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comunian, Talita A; Ravanfar, Raheleh; Alcaine, Samuel David; Abbaspourrad, Alireza

    2018-04-01

    Anthocyanins and norbixin are natural pigments used in food; however, they are unstable. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microencapsulation technique to protect these pigments. Elderberry extract (source of anthocyanins) and norbixin were encapsulated using a microfluidic device with palm oil as middle phase in a water-in-oil-in-water emulsion. The formulations were characterized for morphology, particle size, encapsulation efficiency, zeta potential, color release under heating, Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry, and color stability under different conditions. Spherical, mononucleated microcapsules, with particle size of 187-190 μm (elderberry) and 164-184 μm (norbixin), and with encapsulation efficiencies values of 47.80-54.87% (elderberry) and 49.18-74.73% (norbixin) were obtained. The formulations showed high color retention, with the encapsulated elderberry extract stored at pH 3.0 being the most stable. This study shows that the microencapsulation of these pigments using a microfluidic device provided protection, and represents a new method for anthocyanins and norbixin delivery in foods. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Clarification and filtration of the floculated partuicles suspension from a chemical treatment of waste oil-in-water emulsions from a non-ferrous metalworking plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević Vesna B.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the coagulation/floculation conditions on clarification and filtration of the floculated particle suspension obtained by the chemical treatment of the waste oil-in-water emulsion (OWE from a non-ferrous metalworking plant were studied. The treatment involved the addition of aluminum(III sulfate and lime to the OWE. The main goal was to define the optimum conditions for clarification and filtration of the floculated particle suspension. The factors involved were amounts lime (i.e. pH and filter aid added the OWE on clarification and filtration rates. At pH>10, the clarification rate was increased and the final volume of the concentrated suspension (sludge was reduced, while filter aid affected negatively the clarification rate. The filtration rate was also increased when the coagulation was carried out at pH>10. The floculated particle suspension should be concentrated before filtration in order to decrease the filtration duration. The most efficient filter aid was Celite standard super-cel, its optimum initial concentration being found to be 2 g/dm3.

  2. Scaling up the chemical treatment of spent oil-in-water emulsions from a non-ferrous metal-processing plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević Vesna B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of spent oil-in-water emulsion (SOWE from a non-ferrous metal-processing plant by using aluminum sulfate and hydrated lime was studied to determine the purification efficiency, to optimize the operating conditions and to scale up the treatment process. The purification efficiency was estimated by comparing the compositions of the SOWE and the processed wastewater. The treatment efficiency does not depend on the type of mineral oil and filter aid. The optimum doses of aluminum sulfate and hydrated lime must be experimentally determined for each batch of SOWEs, but the results obtained at laboratory level are applicable at pilot level. The processed wastewater and the filter cake from the process can be safely disposed into public sewage systems and at municipal waste landfills, respectively. The purification efficiency was higher than 98% with respect to total suspended solids, chemical oxygen demand and oil and grease, and was comparable to the known treatment processes based on coagulation/flocculation followed by sedimentation.

  3. Feasibility evaluation of neutron capture therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma using selective enhancement of boron accumulation in tumour with intra-arterial administration of boron-entrapped water-in-oil-in-water emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagie, Hironobu; Kumada, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Takemi; Higashi, Syushi; Ikushima, Ichiro; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Shinohara, Atsuko; Fijihara, Mitsuteru; Suzuki, Minoru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Sugiyama, Hirotaka; Kajiyama, Tetsuya; Nishimura, Ryohei; Ono, Koji; Nakajima, Jun; Ono, Minoru; Eriguchi, Masazumi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most difficult to cure with surgery, chemotherapy, or other combinational therapies. In the treatment of HCC, only 30% patients can be operated due to complication of liver cirrhosis or multiple intrahepatic tumours. Tumour cell destruction in boron neutron-capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction between 10 B atoms and thermal neutrons, so it is necessary to accumulate a sufficient quantity of 10 B atoms in tumour cells for effective tumour cell destruction by BNCT. Water-in-oil-in-water (WOW) emulsion has been used as the carrier of anti-cancer agents on intra-arterial injections in clinical. In this study, we prepared 10 BSH entrapped WOW emulsion by double emulsifying technique using iodized poppy-seed oil (IPSO), 10 BSH and surfactant, for selective intra-arterial infusion to HCC, and performed simulations of the irradiation in order to calculate the dose delivered to the patients. Materials and methods: WOW emulsion was administrated with intra-arterial injections via proper hepatic artery on VX-2 rabbit hepatic tumour models. We simulated the irradiation of epithermal neutron and calculated the dose delivered to the tissues with JAEA computational dosimetry system (JCDS) at JRR4 reactor of Japan Atomic Research Institute, using the CT scans of a HCC patient. Results and discussions: The 10 B concentrations in VX-2 tumour obtained by delivery with WOW emulsion were superior to those by conventional IPSO mix emulsion. According to the rabbit model, the boron concentrations (ppm) in tumour, normal liver tissue, and blood are 61.7, 4.3, and 0.1, respectively. The results of the simulations show that normal liver biologically weighted dose is restricted to 4.9 Gy-Eq (CBE; liver tumour: 2.5, normal liver: 0.94); the maximum, minimum, and mean tumour weighted dose are 43.1, 7.3, and 21.8 Gy-Eq, respectively, in 40 min irradiation. In this study, we show that 10 B entrapped WOW emulsion could be

  4. Feasibility evaluation of neutron capture therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma using selective enhancement of boron accumulation in tumour with intra-arterial administration of boron-entrapped water-in-oil-in-water emulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagie, Hironobu, E-mail: yanagie@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Dept of Nuclear Engineering and Management, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)] [Cooperative Unit of Medicine and Engineering, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kumada, Hiroaki [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Nakamura, Takemi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki (Japan); Higashi, Syushi [Dept of Surgery, Ebihara Memorial Hospital, Miyazaki (Japan)] [Kyushu Industrial Sources Foundation, Miyazaki (Japan); Ikushima, Ichiro [Dept of Radiology, Miyakonojyo Metropolitan Hospital, Miyazaki (Japan); Morishita, Yasuyuki [Dept of Human and Molecular Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Shinohara, Atsuko [Dept of Humanities, Graduate School of Seisen University, Tokyo (Japan); Fijihara, Mitsuteru [SPG Techno Ltd. Co., Miyazaki (Japan); Suzuki, Minoru; Sakurai, Yoshinori [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan); Sugiyama, Hirotaka [Cooperative Unit of Medicine and Engineering, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kajiyama, Tetsuya [Kyushu Industrial Sources Foundation, Miyazaki (Japan); Nishimura, Ryohei [Dept of Veternary Surgery, University of Tokyo Veternary Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Ono, Koji [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan); Nakajima, Jun; Ono, Minoru [Dept of Cardiothracic Surgery, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Eriguchi, Masazumi [Cooperative Unit of Medicine and Engineering, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Surgery, Shin-Yamanote Hospital, Saitama (Japan); Takahashi, Hiroyuki [Dept of Nuclear Engineering and Management, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)] [Cooperative Unit of Medicine and Engineering, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Introduction: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most difficult to cure with surgery, chemotherapy, or other combinational therapies. In the treatment of HCC, only 30% patients can be operated due to complication of liver cirrhosis or multiple intrahepatic tumours. Tumour cell destruction in boron neutron-capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction between {sup 10}B atoms and thermal neutrons, so it is necessary to accumulate a sufficient quantity of {sup 10}B atoms in tumour cells for effective tumour cell destruction by BNCT. Water-in-oil-in-water (WOW) emulsion has been used as the carrier of anti-cancer agents on intra-arterial injections in clinical. In this study, we prepared {sup 10}BSH entrapped WOW emulsion by double emulsifying technique using iodized poppy-seed oil (IPSO), {sup 10}BSH and surfactant, for selective intra-arterial infusion to HCC, and performed simulations of the irradiation in order to calculate the dose delivered to the patients. Materials and methods: WOW emulsion was administrated with intra-arterial injections via proper hepatic artery on VX-2 rabbit hepatic tumour models. We simulated the irradiation of epithermal neutron and calculated the dose delivered to the tissues with JAEA computational dosimetry system (JCDS) at JRR4 reactor of Japan Atomic Research Institute, using the CT scans of a HCC patient. Results and discussions: The {sup 10}B concentrations in VX-2 tumour obtained by delivery with WOW emulsion were superior to those by conventional IPSO mix emulsion. According to the rabbit model, the boron concentrations (ppm) in tumour, normal liver tissue, and blood are 61.7, 4.3, and 0.1, respectively. The results of the simulations show that normal liver biologically weighted dose is restricted to 4.9 Gy-Eq (CBE; liver tumour: 2.5, normal liver: 0.94); the maximum, minimum, and mean tumour weighted dose are 43.1, 7.3, and 21.8 Gy-Eq, respectively, in 40 min irradiation. In this study, we show that {sup 10}B

  5. Ultrasonic Phase Velocity and Attenuation in Emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesse, Oe.; Froeysa, K.E.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents measurements of ultrasonic phase velocity and attenuation in emulsions in the frequency range 250 kHz to 14 MHz for volume fractions of dispersed phase varying from 2% to 80%. The experimental data are compared to theoretical predictions based on multiple scattering models. Good agreement is found between experimental data and theory for an oil-in-water emulsion at volume fractions up to 50%. For volume fractions of the dispersed phase above 50%, important discrepancies are found between the multiple scattering theories and the experiments for oil-in-water emulsions and for water-in-oil emulsions. However, measurements on water-in-oil emulsions and attenuation in emulsions of aliphatic oils in water deviate considerably from the theories. Measurements of phase velocity and attenuation in emulsions may provide information about droplet size, volume fraction of the dispersed phase and determine whether the emulsion is oil or water continuous. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Impact of the release rate of magnesium ions in multiple emulsions (water-in-oil-in-water) containing BSA on the resulting physical properties and microstructure of soy protein gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qiaomei; Zhao, Ling; Zhang, Hui; Saito, Masayoshi; Yin, Lijun

    2017-04-01

    The objective of present study was to prepare multiple water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsions that exhibit different release rates of magnesium ions; and assess their utility as coagulants in improving tofu quality. W/O/W emulsions containing bovine serum albumin (BSA) and magnesium chloride (MgCl 2 ) were developed for controlled release applications. An increasing BSA concentration led to an increase in viscosity and droplet size of W/O/W double emulsions, as well as a decreased release rate of encapsulated Mg 2+ from emulsions. The gelation process of soy protein was simulated by conducting dynamic viscoelastic measurements. The rate constant (k) and saturated storage modulus (G' sat ) values of soy protein gel decreased as BSA concentration increased, suggesting that BSA could slow the release of magnesium ions from double emulsions. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) results showed that increased concentration of BSA created a more homogeneous microstructure of soy protein gels with smaller pores within the gel network structure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Extraction of Antioxidants from Borage (Borago officinalis L. Leaves—Optimization by Response Surface Method and Application in Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Segovia

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Borage (Borago officinalis L. is a typical Spanish plant. During processing, 60% are leaves. The aim of this work is to model and optimize the extraction of polyphenol from borage leaves using the response surface method (RSM and to use this extract for application in emulsions. The responses were: total polyphenol content (TPC, antioxidant capacity by ORAC, and rosmarinic acid by HPLC. The ranges of the variables temperature, ethanol content and time were 50–90 °C, 0%–30%–60% ethanol (v/v, and 10–15 min. For ethanolic extraction, optimal conditions were at 75.9 °C, 52% ethanol and 14.8 min, yielding activity of 27.05 mg GAE/g DW TPC; 115.96 mg TE/g DW in ORAC and 11.02 mg/L rosmarinic acid. For water extraction, optimal activity was achieved with extraction at 98.3 °C and 22 min, with responses of 22.3 mg GAE/g DW TPC; 81.6 mg TE/g DW in ORAC and 3.9 mg/L rosmarinic acid. The significant variables were ethanol concentration and temperature. For emulsions, the peroxide value was inhibited by 60% for 3% extract concentration; and 80% with 3% extract concentration and 0.2% of BSA. The p-anisidine value between the control and the emulsion with 3% extract was reduced to 73.6% and with BSA 86.3%, and others concentrations had similar behavior.

  8. Extraction of Antioxidants from Borage (Borago officinalis L.) Leaves—Optimization by Response Surface Method and Application in Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia, Francisco; Lupo, Bryshila; Peiró, Sara; Gordon, Michael H.; Almajano, María Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Borage (Borago officinalis L.) is a typical Spanish plant. During processing, 60% are leaves. The aim of this work is to model and optimize the extraction of polyphenol from borage leaves using the response surface method (RSM) and to use this extract for application in emulsions. The responses were: total polyphenol content (TPC), antioxidant capacity by ORAC, and rosmarinic acid by HPLC. The ranges of the variables temperature, ethanol content and time were 50–90 °C, 0%–30%–60% ethanol (v/v), and 10–15 min. For ethanolic extraction, optimal conditions were at 75.9 °C, 52% ethanol and 14.8 min, yielding activity of 27.05 mg GAE/g DW TPC; 115.96 mg TE/g DW in ORAC and 11.02 mg/L rosmarinic acid. For water extraction, optimal activity was achieved with extraction at 98.3 °C and 22 min, with responses of 22.3 mg GAE/g DW TPC; 81.6 mg TE/g DW in ORAC and 3.9 mg/L rosmarinic acid. The significant variables were ethanol concentration and temperature. For emulsions, the peroxide value was inhibited by 60% for 3% extract concentration; and 80% with 3% extract concentration and 0.2% of BSA. The p-anisidine value between the control and the emulsion with 3% extract was reduced to 73.6% and with BSA 86.3%, and others concentrations had similar behavior. PMID:26784875

  9. Effect of high-pressure homogenization preparation on mean globule size and large-diameter tail of oil-in-water injectable emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Jie Peng; Wu-jun Dong; Ling Li; Jia-ming Xu; Du-jia Jin; Xue-jun Xia; Yu-ling Liu

    2015-01-01

    The effect of different high pressure homogenization energy input parameters on mean diameter droplet size (MDS) and droplets with > 5 μm of lipid injectable emulsions were evaluated. All emulsions were prepared at different water bath temperatures or at different rotation speeds and rotor-stator system times, and using different homogenization pressures and numbers of high-pressure system recirculations. The MDS and polydispersity index (PI) value of the emulsions were determined using the d...

  10. Emulsifying properties of legume proteins compared to β-lactoglobulin and Tween 20 and the volatile release from oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, O; Silcock, P; Beauchamp, J; Buettner, A; Everett, D W

    2014-10-01

    The emulsifying properties of plant legume protein isolates (soy, pea, and lupin) were compared to a milk whey protein, β-lactoglobulin (β-lg), and a nonionic surfactant (Tween 20). The protein fractional composition was characterized using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis. The following emulsion properties were measured: particle diameter, shear surface ζ-potential, interfacial tension (IT), and creaming velocity. The effect of protein preheat treatment (90 °C for 10 min) on the emulsifying behavior and the release of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from emulsions under oral conditions was also investigated in real time using proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry. The legume proteins showed comparable results to β-lg and Tween 20, forming stable, negatively charged emulsions with particle diameter d3,2 emulsions was significantly correlated with the low protein surface hydrophobicity and IT of the emulsion. After heating the proteins, the droplet size of pea and lupin emulsions decreased. The VOC release profile was similar between the protein-stabilized emulsions, and greater retention was observed for Tween 20-stabilized emulsions. This study demonstrates the potential application of legume proteins as alternative emulsifiers to milk proteins in emulsion products. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. Impact of osmotic pressure and gelling in the generation of highly stable single core water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) nano multiple emulsions of aspirin assisted by two-stage ultrasonic cavitational emulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Siah Ying; Sivakumar, Manickam; Nashiru, Billa

    2013-02-01

    The present investigation focuses in investigating the effect of osmotic pressure, gelling on the mean droplet diameter, polydispersity index, droplet size stability of the developed novel Aspirin containing water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) nano multiple emulsion. The aspirin-loaded nano multiple emulsion formulation was successfully generated using two-stage ultrasonic cavitational emulsification which had been reported in author's previous study. The osmotic behavior of ultrasonically prepared nano multiple emulsions were also examined with different glucose concentrations both in the inner and outer aqueous phases. In addition, introducing gelatin into the formulation also observed to play an important role in preventing the interdroplet coalescence via the formation of interfacial rigid film. Detailed studies were also made on the possible mechanisms of water migration under osmotic gradient which primarily caused by the permeation of glucose. Besides, the experimental results have shown that the interfacial tension between the two immiscible phases decreases with varying the composition of organic phase. Although the W/O/W emulsion prepared with the inner/outer glucose weight ratio of 1-0.5% (w/w) showed an excellent droplet stability, the formulation containing 0.5% (w/w) glucose in the inner aqueous phase appeared to be the most stable with minimum change in the mean droplet size upon one-week storage period. Based on the optimization, nano multiple emulsion droplets with the mean droplet diameter of around 400 nm were produced using 1.25% (w/w) Span 80 and 0.5% Cremophore EL. Overall, our investigation makes a pathway in proving that the use of ultrasound cavitation is an efficient yet promising approach in the generation of stable and uniform nano multiple emulsions and could be used in the encapsulation of various active pharmaceutical ingredients in the near future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of lyophilized water extracts of Melissa officinalis on the stability of algae and linseed oil-in-water emulsion to be used as a functional ingredient in meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ciriano, Mikel García-Iñiguez; Rehecho, Sheyla; Calvo, Maria Isabel; Cavero, Rita Yolanda; Navarro, Iñigo; Astiasarán, Iciar; Ansorena, Diana

    2010-06-01

    Previous work pointed out the possibility to enhance the nutritional value of meat products using long chain omega-3 PUFA enriched emulsions. Oil-in-water emulsions elaborated with a mixture of algae and linseed oils (15:10) in order to be used as functional ingredient were stabilized with BHA (butylhydroxyanisol) or with a lyophilized water extract of Melissa officinalis L. (Lemon balm). The lipid profile of the oil mixture showed a high amount of DHA (31.7%), oleic (25.4%) and alpha-linolenic acid (12.7%) resulting in a very low omega-6/omega-3 ratio (0.12). The lyophilized extract of M. officinalis showed a high antioxidant activity (being 62ppm of the lyophilized water extract of Melissa equivalent to 200ppm of BHA, using the DPPH assay as reference), and high total phenolic content. Studying the oxidation process in the emulsions during 15days at room temperature, it could be concluded that this extract was as efficient as BHA in order to control the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. MF59 oil-in-water emulsion in combination with a synthetic TLR4 agonist (E6020) is a potent adjuvant for a combination Meningococcus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manmohan; Kazzaz, Jina; Ugozzoli, Mildred; Baudner, Barbara; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Giuliani, Marzia; Hawkins, Lynn D; Otten, Gillis; O'Hagan, Derek T

    2012-04-01

    The inclusion of a potent TLR4 immune potentiator to a recombinant antigen vaccine formulation enhances both the magnitude and the breadth of the engendered immune response. One such immune potentiator (TLR4 agonist E6020) was evaluated with recombinant Men B antigens delivered in MF59 sub-micron adjuvant emulsion. The ability of this formulation to enhance serum antibody and bactercidal titers was investigated. The co-delivery of E6020 within MF59 enhanced both the serum and bactericidal titers for Men B antigens and for Men B antigens combined with Men ACWY-CRM conjugate vaccine. The delivery of TLR4 agonist within MF59 emulsion oil droplets leads to a more potent response in comparison to the TLR4 when admixed with MF59 emulsion.

  14. Lipid oxidation in fish oil enriched oil-in-water emulsions and cream cheese with pre-emulsified fish oil is affected differently by the emulsifier used

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Andersen, Ulf

    acids to foods invariably increases the risk of lipid oxidation. A possible strategy to avoid lipid oxidation and the consecutive development of unpleasant off-flavours is to protect the oil in a delivery emulsion in which the oil droplets are shielded from its possible pro-oxidative surroundings......It is well-documented that a high intake of long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids has several health beneficial effects in humans. Consequently, the interest in food products enriched with marine oils has increased during recent years. However, addition of these highly unsaturated fatty...... by an emulsifier. The antioxidative properties of milk proteins make them an obvious choice as emulsifiers in delivery emulsions. Previous studies have furthermore shown that a combination of proteins and phospholipids may increase the thickness of the interfacial layer in an emulsion. This presentation...

  15. Monodisperse Water-in-Oil-in-Water (W/O/W Double Emulsion Droplets as Uniform Compartments for High-Throughput Analysis via Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the application of monodisperse double emulsion droplets, produced in a single step within partially hydrophilic/partially hydrophobic microfluidic devices, as defined containers for quantitative flow cytometric analysis. Samples with varying fluorophore concentrations were generated, and a clear correlation between dye concentration and fluorescence signals was observed.

  16. Application of neutron capture autoradiography to Boron Delivery seeking techniques for selective accumulation of boron compounds to tumor with intra-arterial administration of boron entrapped water-in-oil-in-water emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikado, S.; Yanagie, H.; Yasuda, N.; Higashi, S.; Ikushima, I.; Mizumachi, R.; Murata, Y.; Morishita, Y.; Nishimura, R.; Shinohara, A.; Ogura, K.; Sugiyama, H.; Iikura, H.; Ando, H.; Ishimoto, M.; Takamoto, S.; Eriguchi, M.; Takahashi, H.; Kimura, M.

    2009-06-01

    It is necessary to accumulate the 10B atoms selectively to the tumor cells for effective Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). In order to achieve an accurate measurement of 10B accumulations in the biological samples, we employed a technique of neutron capture autoradiography (NCAR) of sliced samples of tumor tissues using CR-39 plastic track detectors. The CR-39 track detectors attached with the biological samples were exposed to thermal neutrons in the thermal column of the JRR3 of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). We obtained quantitative NCAR images of the samples for VX-2 tumor in rabbit liver after injection of 10BSH entrapped water-in-oil-in-water (WOW) emulsion by intra-arterial injection via proper hepatic artery. The 10B accumulations and distributions in VX-2 tumor and normal liver of rabbit were investigated by means of alpha-track density measurements. In this study, we showed the selective accumulation of 10B atoms in the VX-2 tumor by intra-arterial injection of 10B entrapped WOW emulsion until 3 days after injection by using digitized NCAR images (i.e. alpha-track mapping).

  17. Application of neutron capture autoradiography to Boron Delivery seeking techniques for selective accumulation of boron compounds to tumor with intra-arterial administration of boron entrapped water-in-oil-in-water emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikado, S.; Yanagie, H.; Yasuda, N.; Higashi, S.; Ikushima, I.; Mizumachi, R.; Murata, Y.; Morishita, Y.; Nishimura, R.; Shinohara, A.; Ogura, K.; Sugiyama, H.; Iikura, H.; Ando, H.; Ishimoto, M.; Takamoto, S.; Eriguchi, M.; Takahashi, H.; Kimura, M.

    2009-01-01

    It is necessary to accumulate the 10 B atoms selectively to the tumor cells for effective Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). In order to achieve an accurate measurement of 10 B accumulations in the biological samples, we employed a technique of neutron capture autoradiography (NCAR) of sliced samples of tumor tissues using CR-39 plastic track detectors. The CR-39 track detectors attached with the biological samples were exposed to thermal neutrons in the thermal column of the JRR3 of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). We obtained quantitative NCAR images of the samples for VX-2 tumor in rabbit liver after injection of 10 BSH entrapped water-in-oil-in-water (WOW) emulsion by intra-arterial injection via proper hepatic artery. The 10 B accumulations and distributions in VX-2 tumor and normal liver of rabbit were investigated by means of alpha-track density measurements. In this study, we showed the selective accumulation of 10 B atoms in the VX-2 tumor by intra-arterial injection of 10 B entrapped WOW emulsion until 3 days after injection by using digitized NCAR images (i.e. alpha-track mapping).

  18. Application of neutron capture autoradiography to Boron Delivery seeking techniques for selective accumulation of boron compounds to tumor with intra-arterial administration of boron entrapped water-in-oil-in-water emulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikado, S. [Physical Science Laboratories, College of Industrial Technology, Nihon University, Chiba (Japan)], E-mail: mikado@cit.nihon-u.ac.jp; Yanagie, H. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Cooperative Unit of Medicine and Engineering, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Yasuda, N. [Fundamental Technology Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Higashi, S.; Ikushima, I. [Miyakonojyo Metropolitan Hospital, Miyazaki (Japan); Mizumachi, R.; Murata, Y. [Department of Pharmacology, Kumamoto Institute Branch, Mitsubishi Chemical Safety Institute Ltd., Kumamoto (Japan); Morishita, Y. [Department of Human and Molecular Pathology, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Nishimura, R. [Faculty of Agriculture, Laboratory of Veterinary Surgery, University of Tokyo (Japan); Shinohara, A. [Department of Humanities, The Graduate School of Seisen University, Tokyo (Japan); Ogura, K. [Physical Science Laboratories, College of Industrial Technology, Nihon University, Chiba (Japan); Sugiyama, H. [Cooperative Unit of Medicine and Engineering, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Iikura, H.; Ando, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Ishimoto, M. [Department of Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo (Japan); Takamoto, S. [Cooperative Unit of Medicine and Engineering, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Cardiac Surgery, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Eriguchi, M. [Cooperative Unit of Medicine and Engineering, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Microbiology, Syowa University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Cooperative Unit of Medicine and Engineering, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kimura, M. [Department of Physics, Toho University, Chiba (Japan)

    2009-06-21

    It is necessary to accumulate the {sup 10}B atoms selectively to the tumor cells for effective Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). In order to achieve an accurate measurement of {sup 10}B accumulations in the biological samples, we employed a technique of neutron capture autoradiography (NCAR) of sliced samples of tumor tissues using CR-39 plastic track detectors. The CR-39 track detectors attached with the biological samples were exposed to thermal neutrons in the thermal column of the JRR3 of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). We obtained quantitative NCAR images of the samples for VX-2 tumor in rabbit liver after injection of {sup 10}BSH entrapped water-in-oil-in-water (WOW) emulsion by intra-arterial injection via proper hepatic artery. The {sup 10}B accumulations and distributions in VX-2 tumor and normal liver of rabbit were investigated by means of alpha-track density measurements. In this study, we showed the selective accumulation of {sup 10}B atoms in the VX-2 tumor by intra-arterial injection of {sup 10}B entrapped WOW emulsion until 3 days after injection by using digitized NCAR images (i.e. alpha-track mapping)

  19. Effect of high-pressure homogenization preparation on mean globule size and large-diameter tail of oil-in-water injectable emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Peng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different high pressure homogenization energy input parameters on mean diameter droplet size (MDS and droplets with > 5 μm of lipid injectable emulsions were evaluated. All emulsions were prepared at different water bath temperatures or at different rotation speeds and rotor-stator system times, and using different homogenization pressures and numbers of high-pressure system recirculations. The MDS and polydispersity index (PI value of the emulsions were determined using the dynamic light scattering (DLS method, and large-diameter tail assessments were performed using the light-obscuration/single particle optical sensing (LO/SPOS method. Using 1000 bar homogenization pressure and seven recirculations, the energy input parameters related to the rotor-stator system will not have an effect on the final particle size results. When rotor-stator system energy input parameters are fixed, homogenization pressure and recirculation will affect mean particle size and large diameter droplet. Particle size will decrease with increasing homogenization pressure from 400 bar to 1300 bar when homogenization recirculation is fixed; when the homogenization pressure is fixed at 1000 bar, the particle size of both MDS and percent of fat droplets exceeding 5 μm (PFAT5 will decrease with increasing homogenization recirculations, MDS dropped to 173 nm after five cycles and maintained this level, volume-weighted PFAT5 will drop to 0.038% after three cycles, so the “plateau” of MDS will come up later than that of PFAT5, and the optimal particle size is produced when both of them remained at plateau. Excess homogenization recirculation such as nine times under the 1000 bar may lead to PFAT5 increase to 0.060% rather than a decrease; therefore, the high-pressure homogenization procedure is the key factor affecting the particle size distribution of emulsions. Varying storage conditions (4–25°C also influenced particle size, especially the PFAT

  20. Effect of high-pressure homogenization preparation on mean globule size and large-diameter tail of oil-in-water injectable emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jie; Dong, Wu-Jun; Li, Ling; Xu, Jia-Ming; Jin, Du-Jia; Xia, Xue-Jun; Liu, Yu-Ling

    2015-12-01

    The effect of different high pressure homogenization energy input parameters on mean diameter droplet size (MDS) and droplets with > 5 μm of lipid injectable emulsions were evaluated. All emulsions were prepared at different water bath temperatures or at different rotation speeds and rotor-stator system times, and using different homogenization pressures and numbers of high-pressure system recirculations. The MDS and polydispersity index (PI) value of the emulsions were determined using the dynamic light scattering (DLS) method, and large-diameter tail assessments were performed using the light-obscuration/single particle optical sensing (LO/SPOS) method. Using 1000 bar homogenization pressure and seven recirculations, the energy input parameters related to the rotor-stator system will not have an effect on the final particle size results. When rotor-stator system energy input parameters are fixed, homogenization pressure and recirculation will affect mean particle size and large diameter droplet. Particle size will decrease with increasing homogenization pressure from 400 bar to 1300 bar when homogenization recirculation is fixed; when the homogenization pressure is fixed at 1000 bar, the particle size of both MDS and percent of fat droplets exceeding 5 μm (PFAT 5 ) will decrease with increasing homogenization recirculations, MDS dropped to 173 nm after five cycles and maintained this level, volume-weighted PFAT 5 will drop to 0.038% after three cycles, so the "plateau" of MDS will come up later than that of PFAT 5 , and the optimal particle size is produced when both of them remained at plateau. Excess homogenization recirculation such as nine times under the 1000 bar may lead to PFAT 5 increase to 0.060% rather than a decrease; therefore, the high-pressure homogenization procedure is the key factor affecting the particle size distribution of emulsions. Varying storage conditions (4-25°C) also influenced particle size, especially the PFAT 5 . Copyright

  1. Aqueous extraction of oil bodies from maize germ (Zea mays) and characterization of the resulting natural oil-in-water emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforidis, Constantinos V; Kiosseoglou, Vassilios

    2009-06-24

    Oil bodies in the form of an adequately dispersed suspension were extracted from maize germ by applying aqueous extraction. The effect on the yield of oil body extraction of parameters, such as pH of aqueous medium, state of germ comminution, and number of successive extraction steps applied, was evaluated, indicating that an extraction yield as high as 95% could be reached when a finely comminuted germ material is extracted 3 times under alkaline conditions. The extracted oil body suspension was coagulated by pH manipulation, and the resulting cream, consisting of intact oil bodies, was studied with respect to protein composition, particle size distribution, and oil body zeta potential. Changes in particle mean diameter resulting during oil body cream storage as well as the creaming behavior of emulsions prepared by cream dilution with water were also investigated. The findings are discussed in terms of the presence at the oil body surface of an adsorbed mixed layer made up of phospholipids, oleosins, and extraneous germ proteins that determine the physical stability of oil droplets upon long-term storage.

  2. Water-in-oil-in-water double emulsion for the delivery of starter cultures in reduced-salt moromi fermentation of soy sauce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanthi, Putu Virgina Partha; Linforth, Robert; El Kadri, Hani; Gkatzionis, Konstantinos

    2018-08-15

    This study investigated the application of water-oil-water (W 1 /O/W 2 ) double emulsions (DE) for yeast encapsulation and sequential inoculation of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Tetragenococcus halophilus in moromi stage of soy sauce fermentation with reduced NaCl and/or substitution with KCl. Z. rouxii and T. halophilus were incorporated in the internal W 1 and external W 2 phase of DE, respectively. NaCl reduction and substitution promoted T. halophilus growth to 8.88 log CFU/mL, accompanied with faster sugar depletion and enhanced lactic acid production. Reducing NaCl without substitution increased the final pH (5.49) and decreased alcohols, acids, esters, furan and phenol content. However, the application of DE resulted in moromi with similar microbiological and physicochemical characteristics to that of high-salt. Principal component analysis of GC-MS data demonstrated that the reduced-salt moromi had identical aroma profile to that obtained in the standard one, indicating the feasibility of producing low-salt soy sauce without compromising its quality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A systematic review and meta-analysis of cross-reactivity of antibodies induced by oil-in-water emulsion adjuvanted influenza H5N1 virus monovalent vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chada, Kinnera E; Forshee, Richard; Golding, Hana; Anderson, Steven; Yang, Hong

    2017-05-31

    Cross-clade immunogenic stockpiled H5N1 vaccines may decrease the morbidity and transmission of infection during the initial phase of influenza pandemic. Meta-analysis of cross-reactive antibodies induced by oil-in-water emulsion adjuvanted (OWEA) influenza H5N1 virus monovalent vaccines with circulating heterologous H5N1 virus strains, isolated from human infections was performed. Literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Knowledge, The Cochrane Library, ClinicalTrials.gov, and International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number registry was conducted up through December 1, 2015. Methodologically qualified studies were included for (1) use of two doses of licensed OWEA (AS03 or MF59) egg-derived, inactivated influenza H5N1 virus monovalent vaccine, (2) participant age between 18 and 64years, and (3) evaluation of immunogenicity outcome for one or more subclade. Meta-analysis assessed the cross-reactivity of antibodies elicited by clade 1 adjuvanted vaccine strain against clade 2.1 virus strain (A/Vietnam/1194/2004 vs. A/Indonesia/05/2005); and separately against clade 2.2 virus strain (A/Vietnam/1194/2004 vs. A/turkey/Turkey/1/05); and clade 2.1 adjuvanted vaccine strain against clade 1 virus strain (A/Indonesia/05/2005 vs. A/Vietnam/1194/2004). Quantitative publication bias and influence analysis was conducted to evaluate potential impact of unpublished or new studies on the robustness of meta-analysis. Of 960 articles, 53 qualified for quality assessment and 15 studies met the inclusion criteria. All assessed clade pairs elicited cross-reactive antibodies (clade 1 against clade 2.1 and 2.2; clade 2.1 against clade 1, 2.2, and 2.3). Heterologous strains of same sub-clade are likely to elicit higher cross-reactive antibodies. OWEA influenza H5N1 virus monovalent vaccines exhibit broad cross-clade immunogenicity, a desired feature for vaccine stockpiling not yet demonstrated by unadjuvanted vaccines. In case of an impending H5N1 virus pandemic, stockpiled

  4. High pressure inactivation of Clostridium botulinum type E endospores in model emulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Juliane; Lenz, Christian A.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum type E is a cold-tolerant, neurotoxigenic, endospore-forming organism, primarily associated with aquatic environments. High pressure thermal (HPT) processing presents a promising tool to enhance food safety and stability. The effect of fat on HPT inactivation of C. botulinum type E spores was investigated using an emulsion model system. The distribution of spores in oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions and their HPT (300-750 MPa, 45-75 °C, 10 min) inactivation was determined as a function of emulsion fat content (30-70% (v/v) soybean oil in buffer). Approximately 26% and 74% of the spores were located at the oil-buffer interface and the continuous phase, respectively. Spore inactivation in emulsion systems decreased with increasing oil contents, which suggests that the fat content of food plays an important role in the protection of C. botulinum type E endospores against HPT treatments. These results can be helpful for future safety considerations. This paper was presented at the 8th International Conference on High Pressure Bioscience & Biotechnology (HPBB 2014), in Nantes (France), 15-18 July 2014.

  5. A new generation of models for water-in-oil emulsion formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.

    2009-01-01

    Water-in-oil emulsions form after oil or petroleum products are spilled, and can make the cleanup of oil spills difficult. This paper discussed new modelling schemes designed for the formation of water-in-oil emulsions. Density, viscosity, asphaltene and resin contents were used to compute a class index for unstable, entrained water-in-oil states, meso-stable, or stable emulsions. Prediction schemes were used to estimate the water content and viscosity of the water-in-oil states and the time to formation with wave height inputs. A numerical values was used for each type of water-in-oil type. The properties of the starting oil were correlated with the numerical scheme. New regressions were then performed using a Gaussian-style regression expansion technique. Data obtained from the models suggested that water-in-oil types are stabilized by both asphaltenes and resins. The optimized model was then compared with earlier models. The study showed that the new model has the capacity to accurately predict oil-in-water types approximately 90 per cent of the time using only resin, saturate, asphaltene, viscosity, and density data. 17 refs., 8 tabs., 8 figs

  6. Evidence for transfer of radicals between oil-in-water emulsion droplets as detected by the probe (E,E)-3,5-Bis(4-phenyl-1,3-butadienyl)-4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene, BODIPY665/676

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raudsepp, Piret; Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline; Andersen, Mogens Larsen

    2014-01-01

    /676), resulting in lower rates of probe oxidation. Confocal microscopy studies with BODIPY(665/676) as a radical-sensitive probe combined with oxygen consumption measurements of mixtures of oil-in-water emulsions showed that radicals could be transferred between oil droplets and thereby spread radical...... di-tert-butyl peroxide and 2,2'-azobis(2,4-dimethyl)valeronitrile (AMVN). In both cases the fluorescence of BODIPY(665/676) changed more in saturated medium-chain triglyceride oil than in linseed or sunflower oils, where the high degree of unsaturation is expected to give more pronounced radical......-derived lipid oxidation. It was suggested that BODIPY(665/676), as the only available oxidizable substance in the saturated oil, was directly attacked by radicals, resulting in high rates of probe oxidation, while in the unsaturated oils, radicals attacked either unsaturated fatty acids or BODIPY(665...

  7. Stabilization of Model Crude Oil Emulsion using Different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As part of an ongoing research into the stability of oil-field emulsions, model oil samples have been utilized to probe the effects of asphaltene interactions on crude oil/water emulsion stability. Asphaltenes were precipitated from treated Ondo State oil sand bitumen with n-hexane in a 40:1 solvent to bitumen ratio which was ...

  8. HEAVY-OIL PRODUCTION USING EMULSION FLOODING

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    liquid and ρ2 is the density of liquid. 3. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. 3.1 Centrifugation Analysis. The emulsion stability is analysed based on the less percentage of water separated. In other hand, the greater stability of emulsion shows the smaller percentage of water separated from the oil-in-water emulsions. The stability ...

  9. Selective boron delivery by intra-arterial injection of BSH-WOW emulsion in hepatic cancer model for neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagie, Hironobu; Dewi, Novriana; Higashi, Syushi; Ikushima, Ichiro; Seguchi, Koji; Mizumachi, Ryoji; Murata, Yuji; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Shinohara, Atsuko; Mikado, Shoji; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Fujihara, Mitsuteru; Sakurai, Yuriko; Mouri, Kikue; Yanagawa, Masashi; Iizuka, Tomoya; Suzuki, Minoru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Masunaga, Shin-Ichiro; Tanaka, Hiroki; Matsukawa, Takehisa; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Fujino, Takashi; Ogura, Koichi; Nonaka, Yasumasa; Sugiyama, Hirotaka; Kajiyama, Tetsuya; Yui, Sho; Nishimura, Ryohei; Ono, Koji; Takamoto, Sinichi; Nakajima, Jun; Ono, Minoru; Eriguchi, Masazumi; Hasumi, Kenichiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-01

    Boron neutron-capture therapy (BNCT) has been used to inhibit the growth of various types of cancers. In this study, we developed a 10 BSH-entrapped water-in-oil-in-water (WOW) emulsion, evaluated it as a selective boron carrier for the possible application of BNCT in hepatocellular carcinoma treatment. We prepared the 10 BSH-entrapped WOW emulsion using double emulsification technique and then evaluated the delivery efficacy by performing biodistribution experiment on VX-2 rabbit hepatic tumour model with comparison to iodized poppy-seed oil mix conventional emulsion. Neutron irradiation was carried out at Kyoto University Research Reactor with an average thermal neutron fluence of 5 × 10 12  n cm -2 . Morphological and pathological analyses were performed on Day 14 after neutron irradiation. Biodistribution results have revealed that 10 B atoms delivery with WOW emulsion was superior compared with those using iodized poppy-seed oil conventional emulsion. There was no dissemination in abdomen or lung metastasis observed after neutron irradiation in the groups treated with 10 BSH-entrapped WOW emulsion, whereas many tumour nodules were recognized in the liver, abdominal cavity, peritoneum and bilateral lobes of the lung in the non-injected group. Tumour growth suppression and cancer-cell-killing effect was observed from the morphological and pathological analyses of the 10 BSH-entrapped WOW emulsion-injected group, indicating its feasibility to be applied as a novel intra-arterial boron carrier for BNCT. Advances in knowledge: The results of the current study have shown that entrapped 10 BSH has the potential to increase the range of therapies available for hepatocellular carcinoma which is considered to be one of the most difficult tumours to cure.

  10. To Model Chemical Reactivity in Heterogeneous Emulsions, Think Homogeneous Microemulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Díaz, Carlos; Romsted, Laurence Stuart; Liu, Changyao; Losada-Barreiro, Sonia; Pastoriza-Gallego, Maria José; Gao, Xiang; Gu, Qing; Krishnan, Gunaseelan; Sánchez-Paz, Verónica; Zhang, Yongliang; Dar, Aijaz Ahmad

    2015-08-25

    Two important and unsolved problems in the food industry and also fundamental questions in colloid chemistry are how to measure molecular distributions, especially antioxidants (AOs), and how to model chemical reactivity, including AO efficiency in opaque emulsions. The key to understanding reactivity in organized surfactant media is that reaction mechanisms are consistent with a discrete structures-separate continuous regions duality. Aggregate structures in emulsions are determined by highly cooperative but weak organizing forces that allow reactants to diffuse at rates approaching their diffusion-controlled limit. Reactant distributions for slow thermal bimolecular reactions are in dynamic equilibrium, and their distributions are proportional to their relative solubilities in the oil, interfacial, and aqueous regions. Our chemical kinetic method is grounded in thermodynamics and combines a pseudophase model with methods for monitoring the reactions of AOs with a hydrophobic arenediazonium ion probe in opaque emulsions. We introduce (a) the logic and basic assumptions of the pseudophase model used to define the distributions of AOs among the oil, interfacial, and aqueous regions in microemulsions and emulsions and (b) the dye derivatization and linear sweep voltammetry methods for monitoring the rates of reaction in opaque emulsions. Our results show that this approach provides a unique, versatile, and robust method for obtaining quantitative estimates of AO partition coefficients or partition constants and distributions and interfacial rate constants in emulsions. The examples provided illustrate the effects of various emulsion properties on AO distributions such as oil hydrophobicity, emulsifier structure and HLB, temperature, droplet size, surfactant charge, and acidity on reactant distributions. Finally, we show that the chemical kinetic method provides a natural explanation for the cut-off effect, a maximum followed by a sharp reduction in AO efficiency with

  11. Mitigation of Oil in Water Column: Mitigation Prototype Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Mitigation of Oil in Water Column: Mitigation Prototype Tests Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release...of Oil in Water Column: Mitigation Prototype Tests ii UNCLAS\\\\Public | CG-926 RDC A. Balsley & Dr. M. Fitzpatrick | Public | June 2017 N...06320 Mitigation of Oil in Water Column: Mitigation Prototype Tests iii UNCLAS\\\\Public | CG-926 RDC A. Balsley & Dr. M. Fitzpatrick | Public

  12. A Computational Study of Internal Flows in a Heated Water-Oil Emulsion Droplet

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2015-01-05

    The vaporization characteristics of water-oil emulsion droplets are investigated by high fidelity computational simulations. One of the key objectives is to identify the physical mechanism for the experimentally observed behavior that the component in the dispersed micro-droplets always vaporizes first, for both oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsion droplets. The mechanism of this phenomenon has not been clearly understood. In this study, an Eulerian-Lagrangian method was implemented with a temperature-dependent surface tension model and a dynamic adaptive mesh refinement in order to effectively capture the thermo-capillary effect of a micro-droplet in an emulsion droplet efficiently. It is found that the temperature difference in an emulsion droplet creates a surface tension gradient along the micro-droplet surface, inducing surface movement. Subsequently, the outer shear flow and internal flow circulation inside the droplet, referred to as the Marangoni convection, are created. The present study confirms that the Marangoni effect can be sufficiently large to drive the micro-droplets to the emulsion droplet surface at higher temperature, for both water-in-oil and oil-and-water emulsion droplets. A further parametric study with different micro-droplet sizes and temperature gradients demonstrates that larger micro-droplets move faster with larger temperature gradient. The oil micro-droplet in oil-in-water emulsion droplets moves faster due to large temperature gradients by smaller thermal conductivity.

  13. Formulation and characterization of a multiple emulsion containing 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to prepare a stable multiple emulsion containing a skin anti-aging agent and using paraffin oil. Vitamin C, was incorporated into the inner aqueous phase of water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) multiple emulsion at a concentration of 1%. Multiple emulsion was prepared by two step method. Stability ...

  14. Food emulsions with amidated pectin from celery (Apium graveolens var. rapaceum D.C. tubers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iv. Petrova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Hydrocolloids, especially polysaccharides from traditional plant sources and their derivatives possessed significant emulsifying properties. Pectin was isolated from celery tubers by accelerated “green” method for extraction based on ultrasonic irradiation. Further chemical modification of celery pectin was performed with 4 mol/L NH The amidated celery pectin was obtained with the following characteristics: the degree of esterification (DE 31%, the degree of 3. amidation (DA 16%, degree of acetylation (DAc 2% and anhydrouronic acid content (AUAC 68%. This modified pectin was incorporated in preparation of model 30, 40 and 50% oil-in-water emulsions. The effect of amidation of celery pectin on the stability of emulsions was investigated. The results showed that amidation increased the emulsifying properties of pectic polysaccharides. It affected also the rheological characteristics of model emulsion. The current study demonstrated preparation of emulsion with low-caloric amidated pectin as proper alternative to the traditional emulsifiers.

  15. Emulsion-based encapsulation and delivery of nanoparticles for the controlled release of alkalinity within the subsurface environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsburg, C. A.; Muller, K.; Gill, J.

    2012-12-01

    Many current approaches to managing groundwater contamination rely on further advances in amendment delivery in order to initiate and sustain contaminant degradation or immobilization. In fact, limited or ineffective delivery is often cited when treatment objectives are not attained. Emulsions, specifically oil-in-water emulsions, have demonstrated potential to aid delivery of remediation amendments. Emulsions also afford opportunities to control the release of active ingredients encapsulated within the droplets. Our research is currently focused on the controlled release of nanoparticle-based buffering agents using oil-in-water emulsions. This interest is motivated by the fact that chemical and biological processes employed for the remediation and stewardship of contaminated sites often necessitate control of pH during treatment and, in some cases, long thereafter. Alkalinity-release nanoparticles (e.g., CaCO3, MgO) were suspended within soybean oil and subsequently encapsulated by through the creation of oil-in-water emulsions. These oil-in-water emulsions are designed to have physical properties which are favorable for subsurface delivery (nominal properties: 1 g/mL density; 10 cP viscosity; and 1.5 μm droplet diameter). Buffer capacity titrations suggest that MgO particles are moderately more accessible within the oil phase and nearly twice as effective (on a per mass basis) at releasing alkalinity (as compared to the CaCO3 particles). Results from experiments designed to assess the release kinetics suggest that a linear driving force model is capable of describing the release process and mass transfer coefficients are constant through the reactive life of the emulsion. The release kinetics in emulsions containing MgO particles were found to be three orders of magnitude faster than those quantified for emulsions containing CaCO3. The slower release kinetics of the emulsions containing CaCO3 particles may prove beneficial when considering pH control at sites

  16. Experiments and network model of flow of oil-water emulsion in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Mao Illich; Carvalho, Marcio S; Alvarado, Vladimir

    2011-10-01

    Transport of emulsions in porous media is relevant to several subsurface applications. Many enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes lead to emulsion formation and as a result conformance originating in the flow of a dispersed phase may arise. In some EOR processes, emulsion is injected directly as a mobility control agent. Modeling the flow of emulsion in porous media is extremely challenging due to the complex nature of the associated flows and numerous interfaces. The descriptions based on effective viscosity are not valid when the drop size is of the same order of magnitude as the pore-throat characteristic length scale. An accurate model of emulsion flow through porous media should describe this local change in mobility. The available filtration models do not take into account the variation of the straining and capturing rates with the local capillary number. In this work, we present experiments of emulsion flow through sandstone cores of different permeability and a first step on a capillary network model that uses experimentally determined pore-level constitutive relationships between flow rate and pressure drop in constricted capillaries to obtain representative macroscopic flow behavior emerging from microscopic emulsion flow at the pore level. A parametric analysis is conducted to study the effect of the permeability and dispersed phase droplet size on the flow response to emulsion flooding in porous media. The network model predictions qualitatively describe the oil-water emulsion flow behavior observed in the experiments.

  17. Modeling and simulation of milk emulsion drying in spray dryers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Birchal

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at modeling and simulating the drying of whole milk emulsion in spray dryers. Drops and particles make up the discrete phase and are distributed into temporal compartments following their residence time in the dryer. Air is the continuous and well-mixed phase. Mass and energy balances are developed for each phase, taking into account their interactions. Constitutive equations for describing the drop swelling and drying mechanisms as well as the heat and mass transfer between particles and hot air are proposed and analyzed. A set of algebraic-differential equations is obtained and solved by specific numerical codes. Results from experiments carried out in a pilot spray dryer are used to validate the model developed and the numerical algorithm. Comparing the simulated and experimental data, it is shown that the model predicts well the individual drop-particle history inside the dryer as well as the overall outlet air-particle temperature and humidity.

  18. Formation and stability of emulsions made with proteins and peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, P.E.A.

    2000-01-01

    The formation and stabilization of oil-in-water emulsions using well-defined and well-characterized proteins and peptides was studied in order to elucidate the relation between their molecular and functional properties. The emulsions were formed with a high-pressure homogenizer. To study

  19. Progression of radical reactions on microscopic scale in food emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raudsepp, Piret

    Understanding the progression of lipid oxidation in oil-in-water emulsions from the aspect of the food quality and safety, consumer satisfaction and cleaner food label is of importance, because most of the food emulsions are oil-in-water emulsions. There is an increasing tendency in the food...... industry to incorporate unsaturated oils into food products, but that results in shortened shelf-life. Therefore, studying the factors and consequences of the oxidative instability provides beneficial insight into prolonging the antioxidative stage and inhibiting undergoing oxidation processes to improve...

  20. The influence of emulsion structure on the Maillard reaction of ghee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Angela E; Fairbanks, Antony J; Golding, Matt; Andrewes, Paul; Gerrard, Juliet A

    2015-04-15

    Food systems, such as cream and butter, have an emulsion or emulsion-like structure. When these food emulsions are heated to high temperatures to make products such as ghee, the Maillard reaction forms a range of volatile flavour compounds. The objective of this paper was to unravel the specific influence of emulsion structure on the Maillard reaction pathways that occur during the cooking of ghee using model systems. Switching the dispersed phase from oil to water provided a means of altering the ratios of volatile compounds produced in the cooked samples. The oil-in-water emulsion generated a volatile compound profile similar to that of the fat containing two phase model matrix, whereas the water-in-oil emulsion produced a different ratio of these compounds. The ability to generate different volatile compound profiles through the use of inverted emulsion structures could point to a new avenue for control of the Maillard reaction in high temperature food systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Replacing Beef Fat with Chicken Skin on Some Properties of Model System Chicken Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslı Zungur

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Model system chicken emulsions were prepared by replacing 5, 10, 15 and 20 % beef fat with chicken skin. Moisture, protein, fat, ash and pH were determined in raw and heat processed emulsions. Emulsion samples were evaluated for cooking characteristics, TBA values and colour parameters (L*, a*, b*. Addition of chicken skin decreased fat content and increased moisture and protein content of emulsion samples. Chicken skin replacement significantly increased water holding capacity and cooking yield and decreased fluid release. Increasing chicken skin in formulation increased a* and b* values of emulsion samples. Therefore, adding of chicken skin instead of beef fat is useful in improving technological quality and producing low fat formulation.

  2. A magnetic nanoparticle stabilized gas containing emulsion for multimodal imaging and triggered drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Li, Diancheng; Zhu, Jia-an; Wei, Xiaohui; Men, Weiwei; Yin, Dazhi; Fan, Mingxia; Xu, Yuhong

    2014-06-01

    To develop a multimodal imaging guided and triggered drug delivery system based on a novel emulsion formulation composed of iron oxide nanoparticles, nanoscopic bubbles, and oil containing drugs. Iron oxide paramagnetic nanoparticles were synthesized and modified with surface conjugation of polyethylenimide (PEI) or Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA). Both particles were used to disperse and stabilize oil in water emulsions containing coumarin-6 as the model drug. Sulfur hexafluoride was introduced into the oil phase to form nanoscopic bubbles inside the emulsions. The resulted gas containing emulsions were evaluated for their magnetic resonance (MR) and ultrasound (US) imaging properties. The drug release profile triggered by ultrasound was also examined. We have successfully prepared the highly integrated multi-component emulsion system using the surface modified iron oxide nanoparticles to stabilize the interfaces. The resulted structure had distinctive MR and US imaging properties. Upon application of ultrasound waves, the gas containing emulsion would burst and encapsulated drug could be released. The integrated emulsion formulation was multifunctional with paramagnetic, sono-responsive and drug-carrying characteristics, which may have potential applications for disease diagnosis and imaging guided drug release.

  3. Transport and Retention of Emulsion Droplets in Sandy Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esahani, S. G.; Muller, K.; Chapra, S. C.; Ramsburg, A.

    2014-12-01

    Emulsions are commonly used as amendments during remediation; yet, the processes controlling the distribution of droplets within the subsurface are not well understood. Given that inadequate spatial and/or temporal delivery of amendments often leads to ineffective treatment, there is a need to better understand emulsion transport. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the transport and retention of emulsion droplets in columns containing Ottawa sands. Breakthrough curves and deposition profiles from these experiments were interrogated using a mathematical model capable of describing attachment, detachment, and straining to begin to elucidate the physical processes controlling delivery. Emulsions were constructed by stabilizing soybean oil droplets within a continuous aqueous phase. Physical properties of the resulting oil-in-water emulsions were favorable for subsurface delivery (nominal properties: 1 g/mL density; 10 cP viscosity; and 1.5 μm droplet d50). Emulsions were introduced to the columns for approximately two pore volumes and followed by an extended flush of background solution. Effluent droplet size distributions did not vary significantly over the course of the experiment and remained similar to those measured for the influent emulsion. Emulsion breakthrough curves exhibited tailing, and deposition profiles were found to be hyper-exponential and unaffected by extended periods of background flow. Depending on emulsion composition and flow characteristics, 10-30% of the injected emulsion was retained on the sand suggesting a non-negligible influence on accessible porosity over the course of the experiment. Experimental results were further interpreted using a droplet transport model that accounts for temporal and spatial variation in porosity due to the retention of the emulsion droplets. At present the model assumes a uniform size distribution of inelastic emulsion droplets which are transported by advection and dispersion, and exchanged with the solid

  4. Phenolics and Lipophilized Phenolics as Antioxidants in Fish Oil Enriched Emulsions,

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    Emulsions containing omega-3 LC PUFA are highly susceptible to oxidation. This causes formation of undesirable flavors and loss of health beneficial fatty acids. Many omega-3 enriched food products on the market are oil-in-water emulsions. According to the so called “polar paradox”, polar compounds...... factor determining their efficacy as antioxidants in simple model systems. Interactions between the antioxidants, emulsifier and pH also influence the antioxidant behavior. Moreover, studies with lipophilized phenolics in a food emulsion showed that there is no linear increase of antioxidant activity...... with increased lipophilicity. Instead a cut-off effect was observed in relation to the alkyl chain length lipophilized to the phenolic compound. Furthermore, the efficacy of lipophilic antioxidants is influenced by the type of food system. Thus, our results show that the antioxidant behavior may not be as simple...

  5. New method for fabrication of loaded micro- and nanocontainers: emulsion encapsulation by polyelectrolyte layer-by-layer deposition on the liquid core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, D O; Bukreeva, T; Möhwald, H; Shchukin, D G

    2008-02-05

    A novel approach to the emulsion encapsulation was developed by combining the advantages of direct encapsulation of a liquid colloidal core with the accuracy and multifunctionality of layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte deposition. Experimental data obtained for the model oil-in-water emulsion confirm unambiguously the alternating PE assembly in the capsule shell as well as the maintenance of the liquid colloidal core. Two different mechanisms of capsule destruction upon interaction with the solid substrate were observed and qualitatively explained. The proposed method can be easily generalized to the preparation of oil-filled capsules in various oil/water/polyelectrolyte systems important in the field of pharmacy, medicine, and food industry.

  6. Influence of a microemulsion vehicle on cutaneous bioequivalence of a lipophilic model drug assessed by microdialysis and pharmacodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreilgaard, Mads; Kemme, M J; Burggraaf, J

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the cutaneous bioequivalence of a lipophilic model drug (lidocaine) applied in a novel topical microemulsion vehicle, compared to a conventional oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion, assessed by a pharmacokinetics microdialysis model and a pharmacodynamic method....

  7. The stability of water-in-crude and model oil emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, A.P.; Zaki, N.N.; Kilpatrick, P.K. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Sjoblom, J. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Ugelstad Laboratory

    2007-12-15

    Emulsions are among the most persistent problems faced by petroleum producers. Water is added at refineries to generate a large oil-water interfacial area to facilitate the extraction of salts from the crude oil. The produced emulsions do not readily resolve into neat crude and water phases, and some volume of the emulsion remains. This paper described the surface-active components in petroleum as well as methods of measuring emulsion stability. The stabilities of a variety of water-in-model oil and petroleum emulsions were measured using the critical electric field (CEF) technique. In this study, CEF was used to measure the stability of water-in-heptane-toluene-asphaltene emulsions. Results for emulsions with 60 and 30 per cent water were presented. The effect of interfacial film thickness was discussed and a kinetic model for interfacial film formation was presented. The importance of solvation of asphaltenes to emulsion stability was confirmed along with the importance of the state of asphaltene aggregation. It was shown that emulsion stability increased with the concentration of soluble asphaltenes near the point of precipitation. In order to calculate interfacial area and film thickness, optical microscopy was used to measure droplet size. Film thickness increased with asphaltene concentration up to the solubility limit. Increased concentration above that limit had little effect. CEF increased with interfacial film thickness up to a monolayer coverage of asphaltene aggregates, but film thickness had a much smaller effect above the monolayer. These results were used to develop correlations of the stability of water-in-crude oil emulsions. A strong correlation was found for CEF with the product of asphaltene concentration and the difference in hydrogen to carbon atomic ratios of the asphaltenes and petroleum solvent. The effects of asphaltene chemistry, solvency, and resin concentration on the adsorption and consolidation of emulsion stabilizing interfacial

  8. Oxidative comparison of emulsion systems from fish oil-based structured lipid versus physically blended lipid with purple-fleshed sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Lu-Jing; Yang, Dan; Shin, Jung-Ah; Kim, Sun-Ju; Hong, Soon-Taek; Lee, Jeung Hee; Sung, Chang-Keun; Lee, Ki-Teak

    2012-01-11

    The effects of the purple-fleshed sweet potato extract (PFSPE) on oxidation stabilities of a model oil-in-water emulsion prepared with enzymatically synthesized fish oil-soybean oil structured lipid (SL) versus physically blended lipid (PBL) without modification were evaluated. The anthocyanins in PFSPE were analyzed and identified by HPLC-MS. The fatty acid composition of SL was similar to that of PBL, except palmitic acid (1.48 in PBL and 9.61% in SL) and linoleic acid (62.47 in PBL and 49.58% in SL). Peonidin 3-caffeoylsophoroside-5-glucoside, peonidin-3-(6',6'-caffeoylferuloylsophoroside)-5-glucoside, peonidin-dicaffeoylsophoroside-5-glucoside, peonidin 3-(6',6"-caffeoyl-p-hydroxybenzoylsophoroside)-5-glucoside were identified as the major anthocyanin compounds in PFSPE. Different levels (200, 500, 1000 ppm) of PFSPE were added into both SL- and PBL-based emulsions, with 200 ppm catechin as comparison. Oxidation was monitored by measuring the peroxide value and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. The antioxidant activity of PFSPE increased with an increased concentration, the concentration of 1000 ppm showed high antioxidant ability similar to that of catechin in both PBL- and SL-based oil-in-water emulsions. It is notable that the SL-based emulsion appeared to have better oxidative stability than the PBL-based emulsion.

  9. The Effect of Perilla frutescens Extract on the Oxidative Stability of Model Food Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Skowyra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The polyphenolic profile of leaves and stalks of Perilla frutescens, was assessed as a source of natural antioxidants. The amount of caffeic and rosmarinic acids, determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, were 0.51 mg/g dry weight (DW and 2.29 mg/g DW, respectively. The measurement of scavenging capacity against the 2,2′-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS radical cation, the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC, and the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP were 65.03 mg Trolox equivalents (TE/g DW, 179.60 mg TE/g DW and 44.46 mg TE/g DW, respectively. P. frutescens extracts also showed good antioxidant properties in 10% sunflower oil-in-water emulsions during storage at 32 °C. Perilla extract at 320 ppm was as effective as butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA at 20 ppm in slowing down the formation of hydroperoxides as measured by peroxide value, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and hexanal content. The results of this study indicate that extract of P. frutescens may be suitable for use in the food matrix to help achieve potential health benefits.

  10. Textural perception of liquid emulsions: Role of oil content, oil viscosity and emulsion viscosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aken, van G.A.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Wijk, de R.A.

    2011-01-01

    This work describes a study on the in-mouth textural perception of thickened liquid oil-in-water emulsions. The variables studied are oil content, oil viscosity, and the concentration of polysaccharide thickener. Gum arabic was chosen as the thickener because of the nearly Newtonian behavior of its

  11. Rheology of unstable mineral emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokolović Dunja S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the rheology of mineral oils and their unstable water emulsion were investigated. The oil samples were domestic crude oil UA, its fractions UA1, UA4 and blend semi-product UP1, while the concentration of oil in water emulsions was in the range from 1 up to 30%. The results were analyzed based on shear stress. The oil samples UA, UA1 and UP1 are Newtonian fluids, while UA4 is pseudoplastic fluid. The samples UA and UA4 show higher value of shear stress (83.75 Pa, 297 Pa, then other two samples UA1 and UP1 (18.41 Pa, 17.52 Pa. Rheology of investigated oils due to its complex chemical composition should be analyzed as a simultaneous effect of all their components. Therefore, structural composition of the oils was determined, namely content of paraffins, naphthenes, aromatics and asphaltenes. All samples contain paraffins, naphthenes and aromatics but only oils UA and UA4 contain asphaltenes as well. All investigated emulsions except 30% EUA4 are Newtonian fluids. The EUA4 30% emulsion shows pseudoplastic behaviour, and it is the only 30% emulsion among investigated ones that achieves lower shear stress then its oil. The characteristics of oil samples that could have an influence on their properties and their emulsion rheology, were determined. These characteristics are: neutralization number, interfacial tension, dielectric constant, and emulsivity. Oil samples UA and UA4 have significantly higher values of neutralization number, dielectric constants, and emulsivity. The sample UA has the lowest value of interface tension and the greatest emulsivity, indicating that this oil, among all investigated, has the highest preference for building emulsion. This could be the reason why 20% and 30% emulsions of the oil UA achieve the highest shear stress among all investigated emulsions.

  12. Pretreatment with intravenous lipid emulsion reduces mortality from cocaine toxicity in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreiro, Stephanie; Blum, Jared; Hack, Jason B

    2014-07-01

    We compare the effects of intravenous lipid emulsion and normal saline solution pretreatment on mortality and hemodynamic changes in a rat model of cocaine toxicity. We hypothesize that intravenous lipid emulsion will decrease mortality and hemodynamic changes caused by cocaine administration compared with saline solution. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were sedated and randomized to receive intravenous lipid emulsion or normal saline solution, followed by a 10 mg/kg bolus of intravenous cocaine. Continuous monitoring included intra-arterial blood pressure, pulse rate and ECG tracing. Endpoints included a sustained undetectable mean arterial pressure (MAP) or return to baseline MAP for 5 minutes. The log-rank test was used to compare mortality. A mixed-effect repeated-measures ANOVA was used to estimate the effects of group (intravenous lipid emulsion versus saline solution), time, and survival on change in MAP, pulse rate, or pulse pressure. In the normal saline solution group, 7 of 10 animals died compared with 2 of 10 in the intravenous lipid emulsion group. The survival rate of 80% (95% confidence interval 55% to 100%) for the intravenous lipid emulsion rats and 30% (95% confidence interval 0.2% to 58%) for the normal saline solution group was statistically significant (P=.045). Intravenous lipid emulsion pretreatment decreased cocaine-induced cardiovascular collapse and blunted hypotensive effects compared with normal saline solution in this rat model of acute lethal cocaine intoxication. Intravenous lipid emulsion should be investigated further as a potential adjunct in the treatment of severe cocaine toxicity. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Relations between interfacial properties and heavy crude oil emulsions stability; Relations entre les proprietes interfaciales et la stabilite des emulsions de brut lourd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoebler-Poteau, S.

    2006-02-15

    Oil in water emulsions are currently being investigated to facilitate the transport of viscous heavy oils. The behavior of these emulsions is largely controlled by oil / water interfaces. The surface-active components of crude oil such as asphaltenes and naphthenic acids compete among themselves at these interfaces and also with possibly added synthetic surfactant emulsifier.Here, we present a study of dynamic interfacial tension and rheology of interfaces between water and a model oil (toluene) in which asphaltenes and other surface active molecules from crude oil are dissolved. We show that different parameters such as aging of the interface, asphaltenes concentration, the pH and salinity of the aqueous phase have a strong influence on interfacial properties of asphaltenes at the oil/water interface. Several micro-pipette experiments, in which micrometric drops have been manipulated, are described as well as small angle neutron scattering measurements. The influence of lower molecular weight surface-active species, such as the natural naphthenic acids contained in maltenes (crude oil without asphaltenes) has been investigated, and an interaction between asphaltenes and maltenes which facilitates molecular arrangement at the interface was detected. The microscopic properties of the different interfaces and the stability of the corresponding emulsions are determined to be correlated.The results obtained on model emulsions and model oil/water interfaces were found to be helpful in order to explain and predict the behavior of heavy crude oil emulsions. (author)

  14. Target dependence of clan model parameter in Emulsion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    attention of physicists for a long time [7]. Scientists conveyed several important ... fully followed until they either interacted with nuclear emulsion detector (NED) nuclei or escaped from any surface of .... come from the diagonal terms of the full covariance matrix, the changes in the χ2/DOF values are insignificant when the ...

  15. Volatile release and structural stability of β-lactoglobulin primary and multilayer emulsions under simulated oral conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, O; Silcock, P; Beauchamp, J; Buettner, A; Everett, D W

    2013-09-01

    The relationship between emulsion structure and the release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was investigated using a model mouth system under oral conditions (tongue mastication, artificial saliva, pH and salt). The VOCs were monitored on-line by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Two types of emulsion system were compared: primary and multilayer oil-in-water (P-O/W, M-O/W) emulsions consisting of soy oil coated by β-lactoglobulin and pectin layers. The P-O/W emulsions showed intensive flocculation at pH 5 and above 200 mM NaCl where the electrostatic repulsive charge was at a minimum. Bridging and depletion flocculation were mostly observed for P-O/W emulsions containing artificial saliva with 1 wt% mucin. The VOC release was found to increase when the emulsion droplets flocculated, thus changing the oil volume phase distribution. The adsorbed pectin layer stabilised the emulsion structure under conditions of short-time oral processing, and hindered the release of hydrophobic VOCs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dynamic Oil-in-Water Concentration Acquisition on a Pilot-Scaled Offshore Water-Oil Separation Facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhndorf, Petar Durdevic; Raju, Chitra Sangaraju; Bram, Mads Valentin

    2017-01-01

    This article is a feasibility study on using fluorescence-based oil-in-water (OiW) monitors for on-line dynamic efficiency measurement of a deoiling hydrocyclone. Dynamic measurements are crucial in the design and validation of dynamic models of the hydrocyclones, and to our knowledge, no dynamic...

  17. Developing novel one-step processes for obtaining food-grade O/W emulsions from pressurized fluid extracts: processes description, state of the art and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Tresinari SANTOS

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn this work, a novel on-line process for production of food-grade emulsions containing oily extracts, i.e. oil-in-water (O/W emulsions, in only one step is presented. This process has been called ESFE, Emulsions from Supercritical Fluid Extraction. With this process, emulsions containing supercritical fluid extracts can be obtained directly from plant materials. The aim in the conception of this process is to propose a new rapid way to obtain emulsions from supercritical fluid extracts. Nowadays the conventional emulsion formulation method is a two-step procedure, i.e. first supercritical fluid extraction for obtaining an extract; secondly emulsion formulation using another device. Other variation of the process was tested and successfully validated originating a new acronymed process: EPFE (Emulsions from Pressurized Fluid Extractions. Both processes exploit the supercritical CO2-essential oils miscibility, in addition, EPFE process exploits the emulsification properties of saponin-rich pressurized aqueous plant extracts. The feasibility of this latter process was demonstrated using Pfaffia glomerata roots as source of saponin-rich extract, water as extracting solvent and clove essential oil, directly extracted using supercritical CO2, as a model dispersed phase. In addition, examples of pressurized fluid-based coupled processes applied for adding value to food bioactive compounds developed in the past five years are reviewed.

  18. Front-face fluorescence spectroscopy study of globular proteins in emulsions: influence of droplet flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampon, V; Genot, C; Riaublanc, A; Anton, M; Axelos, M A V; McClements, D J

    2003-04-23

    Measurement of the intensity (I(MAX)) and/or wavelength (lambda(MAX)) of the maximum in the tryptophan (TRP) emission spectrum using front-face fluorescence spectroscopy (FFFS) can be used to provide information about the molecular environment of proteins in nondiluted emulsions. Many protein-stabilized emulsions in the food industry are flocculated, and therefore, we examined the influence of droplet flocculation on FFFS. Stock oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by bovine serum albumin were prepared by high-pressure valve homogenization (30 wt % n-hexadecane, 0.35 wt % BSA, pH 7). These emulsions were used to create model systems with different degrees of droplet flocculation, either by changing the pH, adding surfactant, or adding xanthan. Emulsions (21 wt % n-hexadecane, 0.22 wt % BSA) with different pH (5 and 7) and molar ratios of Tween 20 to BSA (R = 0-131) were prepared by dilution of the stock emulsion. As the surfactant concentration was increased, the protein was displaced from the droplet surfaces, which caused an increase in both I(MAX) and lambda(MAX), because of the change in TRP environment. The dependence of I(MAX) and lambda(MAX) on surfactant concentration followed a similar pattern in emulsions that were initially flocculated (pH 5) and nonflocculated (pH 7). Relatively small changes in FFFS emission spectra were observed in emulsions (21 wt % n-hexadecane, 0.22 wt % BSA, pH 7) with different levels of depletion flocculation induced by adding xanthan. These results suggested that droplet flocculation did not have a major impact on FFFS. This study shows that FFFS is a powerful technique for nondestructively providing information about the molecular environment of proteins in concentrated and flocculated protein-stabilized emulsions. Nevertheless, in general the suitability of the technique may also depend on protein type and the nature of the physicochemical matrix surrounding the proteins.

  19. A Dewetting Model for Double-Emulsion Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanxiao Kang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of double-emulsion droplets is of great importance for the application of microdroplets and microparticles. We study the driving force of the dewetting process, the equilibrium configuration and the dewetting time of double-emulsion droplets. Through energy analysis, we find that the equilibrium configuration of a partial engulfed droplet depends on a dimensionless interfacial tension determined by the three relevant interfacial tensions, and the engulfing part of the inner phase becomes larger as the volume of the outer phase increases. By introducing a dewetting boundary, the dewetting time can be calculated by balancing the driving force, caused by interfacial tensions, and the viscous force. Without considering the momentum change of the continuous phase, the dewetting time is an increasing function against the viscosity of the outer phase and the volume ratio between the outer phase and inner phase.

  20. Interfacial rheology of model particles at liquid interfaces and its relation to (bicontinuous) Pickering emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, J. H. J.; Vermant, J.

    2018-01-01

    Interface-dominated materials are commonly encountered in both science and technology, and typical examples include foams and emulsions. Conventionally stabilised by surfactants, emulsions can also be stabilised by micron-sized particles. These so-called Pickering–Ramsden (PR) emulsions have received substantial interest, as they are model arrested systems, rather ubiquitous in industry and promising templates for advanced materials. The mechanical properties of the particle-laden liquid–liquid interface, probed via interfacial rheology, have been shown to play an important role in the formation and stability of PR emulsions. However, the morphological processes which control the formation of emulsions and foams in mixing devices, such as deformation, break-up, and coalescence, are complex and diverse, making it difficult to identify the precise role of the interfacial rheological properties. Interestingly, the role of interfacial rheology in the stability of bicontinuous PR emulsions (bijels) has been virtually unexplored, even though the phase separation process which leads to the formation of these systems is relatively simple and the interfacial deformation processes can be better conceptualised. Hence, the aims of this topical review are twofold. First, we review the existing literature on the interfacial rheology of particle-laden liquid interfaces in rheometrical flows, focussing mainly on model latex suspensions consisting of polystyrene particles carrying sulfate groups, which have been most extensively studied to date. The goal of this part of the review is to identify the generic features of the rheology of such systems. Secondly, we will discuss the relevance of these results to the formation and stability of PR emulsions and bijels.

  1. Homogenization Pressure and Temperature Affect Protein Partitioning and Oxidative Stability of Emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Barouh, Nathalie; Nielsen, Nina Skall

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative stability of 10 % fish oil-in-water emulsions was investigated for emulsions prepared under different homogenization conditions. Homogenization was conducted at two different pressures (5 or 22.5 MPa), and at two different temperatures (22 and 72 °C). Milk proteins were used as the ...

  2. Complex formation in mixtures of lysozyme-stabilized emulsions and human saliva

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silletti, E.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Norde, W.; Aken, van G.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the interaction between human unstimulated saliva and lysozyme-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions (10 wt/wt% oil phase, 10 mM NaCl, pH 6.7), to reveal the driving force for flocculation of these emulsions. Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) showed formation of

  3. Exceptional function of nanoporous metal organic framework particles in emulsion stabilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bo; Yuan, Qingchun; Williams, Richard A

    2013-09-25

    A new concept of nanoporous metal organic framework particles stabilising emulsions was investigated. The copper benzenetricarboxylate MOF particles adsorbed at the oil/water interface play an exceptional role in stabilising both oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsions.

  4. Orthokinetic flocculation of caseinate-stabilized emulsions : influence of calcium concentration, shear rate and protein content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schokker, E.P.; Dalgleish, D.G.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium-induced flocculation of caseinate-stabilized soybean oil-in- water emulsions in conditions of Couette flow was studied. A concentrated emulsion (20% oil, 0.5-2.0% sodium caseinate in 20 mM imidazole, pH 7) was diluted 20 times in buffer containing concentrations of CaCl2 between 9 and 17 mM

  5. Tweens demulsification effects on heavy crude oil/water emulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaran Hayati Roodbari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The demulsification role of Tweens (nonionic polymers was determined in the separation of water from heavy crude oil emulsion. According to the previous researches, these nonionic polymers, having hydrophilic and lipophilic groups, are appropriate for making oil in water emulsion. In this research their effects in certain concentrations on demulsifying of water in crude oil emulsion were proved. High molecular weight, alkenes’ chains and groups of ketone and ester in these polymers can improve their performance for the demulsification of water in crude oil emulsion. Their efficiencies are improved with electronegative groups such as oxygen. They leave no corrosion effect because they are neutral and do not leave counter ions.

  6. Assessing of the potential of extruded flour paste as fat replacer in O/W emulsion: A rheological and microstructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, Laura; Martínez, Mario M; Gómez, Manuel

    2015-08-01

    Extruded flour represents an economical and environmental friendly alternative as fat replacer. In this research, the potential use of an extruded flour-water paste as fat replacer in an oil-in-water emulsion was studied. The effect of flour-water ratio and level of oil replacement (30, 50 and 70%) on the microstructure, rheological properties and stability of mayonnaise-like emulsion was evaluated. Fat replacement by extruded flour gradually increased the number and reduced the size of oil droplets. All the emulsion samples showed a pseudoplastic behaviour. At low shear rates a Newtonian region characterised by Carreau model appeared (R 2 >0.99). In general, the limiting viscosity of the Newtonian region and the consistency index increased with the decreased water content of the paste and increased the level of oil substitution. A decrease in oil concentration led to a greater thixotropic behaviour. Oscillatory test revealed that predominance of the continuous or dispersed phase influenced viscoelastic behaviour. Reduction in oil content resulted in an increased freeze-thaw stability. Results suggested that if the flour-water ratio of the paste is controlled, extruded flour is appropriate for preparing reduced-fat oil-in-water emulsion with similar rheological properties to the full fat and greater freeze-thaw stability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Comparative Study of the Physicochemical Properties of a Virgin Coconut Oil Emulsion and Commercial Food Supplement Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yih Phing Khor

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Food manufacturers are interested in developing emulsion-based products into nutritional foods by using beneficial oils, such as fish oil and virgin coconut oil (VCO. In this study, the physicochemical properties of a VCO oil-in-water emulsion was investigated and compared to other commercial oil-in-water emulsion products (C1, C2, C3, and C4. C3 exhibited the smallest droplet size of 3.25 µm. The pH for the emulsion samples ranged from 2.52 to 4.38 and thus were categorised as acidic. In a texture analysis, C2 was described as the most firm, very adhesive and cohesive, as well as having high compressibility properties. From a rheological viewpoint, all the emulsion samples exhibited non-Newtonian behaviour, which manifested as a shear-thinning property. The G'G'' crossover illustrated by the VCO emulsion in the amplitude sweep graph but not the other commercial samples illustrated that the VCO emulsion had a better mouthfeel. In this context, the VCO emulsion yielded the highest zeta potential (64.86 mV, which was attributed to its strong repulsive forces, leading to a good dispersion system. C2 comprised the highest percentage of fat among all emulsion samples, followed by the VCO emulsion, with 18.44% and 6.59%, respectively.

  8. Phase inversion of ionomer-stabilized emulsions to form high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Xu, Zhiguang; Cai, Zengxiao; Guo, Qipeng

    2015-06-28

    Herein, we report the phase inversion of ionomer-stabilized emulsions to form high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) induced by salt concentration and pH changes. The ionomers are sulfonated polystyrenes (SPSs) with different sulfonation degrees. The emulsion types were determined by conductivity measurements, confocal microscopy and optical microscopy, and the formation of HIPE organogels was verified by the tube-inversion method and rheological measurements. SPSs with high sulfonation degrees (water-soluble) and low sulfonation degrees (water-insoluble) can stabilize oil-in-water emulsions; these emulsions were transformed into water-in-oil HIPEs by varying salt concentrations and/or changing the pH. SPS, with a sulfonation degree of 11.6%, is the most efficient, and as low as 0.2 (w/v)% of the organic phase is enough to stabilize the HIPEs. Phase inversion of the oil-in-water emulsions occurred to form water-in-oil HIPEs by increasing the salt concentration in the aqueous phase. Two phase inversion points from oil-in-water emulsions to water-in-oil HIPEs were observed at pH 1 and 13. Moreover, synergetic effects between the salt concentration and pH changes occurred upon the inversion of the emulsion type. The organic phase can be a variety of organic solvents, including toluene, xylene, chloroform, dichloroethane, dichloromethane and anisole, as well as monomers such as styrene, butyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. Poly(HIPEs) were successfully prepared by the polymerization of monomers as the continuous phase in the ionomer-stabilized HIPEs.

  9. Properties of emulsions stabilised by sodium caseinate–chitosan complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zinoviadou, K.; Scholten, E.; Moschakis, T.; Biliaderis, C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Oil-in-water emulsions (10%, w/w, oil) were prepared at pH 5.7 by using electrostatically formed complexes of 0.5% (w/w) sodium caseinate (Na-CAS) and 0–0.6% (w/w) chitosan. Emulsions stabilized by complexes with increased levels of chitosan (>0.2% w/w) had a smaller average droplet size and

  10. Rheology and microstructure of gluten and soya-based o/w emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengoechea, Carlos; Cordobes, Felipe; Guerrero, Antonio [Universidad de Sevilla, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Sevilla (Spain)

    2006-10-15

    Highly concentrated oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion stabilised by means of gluten and soya protein isolate (SPI) at low pH have been characterized by means of linear dynamic viscoelasticity and droplet size distribution analysis (DSD). The microstructure of these emulsions has been characterized at a colloidal level by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and light microscopy (LM). These emulsions always exhibited a behaviour characteristic of highly flocculated emulsions with a mechanical spectrum showing a well-developed plateau region. DSD results generally showed log normal bimodal profiles. Microstructure images revealed occurrence of a close packing of droplets with a broad distribution of sizes participating in the formation of a three dimensional flocculated network. The Mason model of elasticity of compressed emulsions has been used to correlate viscoelastic and microstructural parameters giving adequate fitting but underestimating the elastic properties obtained for the highest concentration of gluten. These deviations may be explained in terms of an enhancement of the elastic network formed in the aqueous phase in which the glutenin fraction must play an important role. (orig.)

  11. Yeasts and bacterial biosurfactants as demulsifiers for petroleum derivative in seawater emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha E Silva, Fernanda Cristina P; Roque, Bruno Augusto C; Rocha E Silva, Nathalia Maria P; Rufino, Raquel D; Luna, Juliana M; Santos, Valdemir A; Banat, Ibrahim M; Sarubbo, Leonie A

    2017-11-15

    Oil sludge or waste generated in transport, storage or refining forms highly stable mixtures due to the presence and additives with surfactant properties and water forming complex emulsions. Thus, demulsification is necessary to separate this residual oil from the aqueous phase for oil processing and water treatment/disposal. Most used chemical demulsifiers, although effective, are environmental contaminants and do not meet the desired levels of biodegradation. We investigated the application of microbial biosurfactants as potential natural demulsifiers of petroleum derivatives in water emulsions. Biosurfactants crude extracts, produced by yeasts (Candida guilliermondii, Candida lipolytica and Candida sphaerica) and bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas cepacia and Bacillus sp.) grown in industrial residues, were tested for demulsification capacity in their crude and pure forms. The best results obtained were for bacterial biosurfactants, which were able to recover about 65% of the seawater emulsified with motor oil compared to 35-40% only for yeasts products. Biosurfactants were also tested with oil-in-water (O/W) and water-in-oil (W/O) kerosene model emulsions. No relationship between interfacial tension, cell hydrophobicity and demulsification ratios was observed with all the biosurfactants tested. Microscopic illustrations of the emulsions in the presence of the biosurfactants showed the aspects of the emulsion and demulsification process. The results obtained demonstrate the potential of these agents as demulsifiers in marine environments.

  12. Ultra structure of oil-in-water emulsions a comparison of different microscopy- and preparation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard; Loussert, C.; Humbel, B.M.

    of food grade emulsifiers such as whey protein, sodium caseinate and milk phospholipids; layers that are expected to be in the range of only a few nm. Furthermore, the liquid nature and high water content of the samples further complicates the preparation process;especially since water is a major...

  13. NARCOSIS AND EMULSION REVERSAL BY INERT GASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Dewey F.; Fenn, Wallace O.

    1957-01-01

    Investigations of the effect of high pressures of Na (100 to 130 atmospheres) and of Ar (60 to 80 atmospheres) showed that these gases are effective in reversing the phases of an oil in water emulsion. Nitrous oxide did not cause reversal at pressures as high as 53 atmospheres nor did helium as high as 107 atmospheres. We found CO2 most effective in reversing the emulsions and attributed this to its chemical properties. It is suggested that these observations may help to explain the narcotic effects of inert gases. PMID:13416527

  14. MODEL SYSTEM EVALUATIONS OF MEAT EMULSIONS PREPARED WITH DIFFERENT EDIBLE BEEF BY PRODUCTS AND FATS AND OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa KARAKAYA

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Emulsion parameters of different meat by-products (beef head-meat, beef heart and liver and animal fats and oil (beef fat, mutton fat, sheep tail-fat and corn oil were studied in a model system. The results of the study showed that the highest emulsion capacity (EC was with the heart meat and beef fat emulsion while the lowest EC was measured in the beef head-meat and sheep tail-fat combination. Corn oil gave the best emulsification with beef head-meat and liver, and beef fat resulted the second best results. Beef head-meat gave the most stable emulsion with all fats, but the emulsions prepared with heart and liver were generally unstable.

  15. Preliminary results from the laboratory study of a flow-through fluorometer for measuring oil-in-water levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, P.; Fieldhouse, B.; Wang, Z.; Fingas, M.; Pearson, L.; Collazzi, E.

    2000-01-01

    An extensive bench-scale test program was conducted to evaluate the performance of the Turner Instruments flow-through model 10AU and model 10 fluorometers for measuring real-time concentrations of oil in water. The results were compared with alternative total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) methods. The 10AU model was equipped with a long wavelength optical kit, the other with the short wavelength optical kit for diesel fuels and light refined oil products. The oils tested were Alberta Sweet Mixed Blend crude oil, Prudhoe Bay crude oil, Bunker C fuel oil and diesel fuel. It was determined that the long wavelength optical kit has minimal capacity to detect and quantify diesel fuels compared to the short wavelength kit, although the latter exhibits a lower performance level. A calibration procedure was also established for oil-in-water to convert the real-time fluorometer data to oil concentrations. Initial comparisons of these tests with standard infrared and gas chromatography procedures were promising. It was determined that fluorometer data can differentiate between various oil-in-water concentrations, but regularly gives concentration values double those of the solvent extraction, infrared or gas chromatography methods. Future studies are being planned to relate the results of this study to the chemical composition of various oils. 16 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs

  16. Characterization of Emulsions of Fish Oil and Water by Cryo Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard; Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    Addition of fish oil to industrially prepared food products is attractive to the food industry because of the well-documented health effects of the omega 3 fatty acids in the fish oil [1]. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids including omega 3 fatty acids are highly susceptible to lipid oxidation due...... to the many double bonds. Emulsions of fish oil in water are potential candidates for a delivery system of fish oil to food products. It has been suggested that oxidation of oil-in-water emulsions is initiated at the interface between oil and water. It has also been proposed that oxidation is to some extent...... is to characterize fish oil in water emulsions with respect to oil droplet size, distribution, and ultimately to view the structure and thickness of the interface layer. A freeze-fractured surface viewed at low temperatures under the scanning electron microscope is a promising strategy to reveal variations...

  17. Surfactant-enhanced cellulose nanocrystal Pickering emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhen; Ballinger, Sarah; Pelton, Robert; Cranston, Emily D

    2015-02-01

    The effect of surfactants on the properties of Pickering emulsions stabilized by cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) was investigated. Electrophoretic mobility, interfacial tension, confocal microscopy and three-phase contact angle measurements were used to elucidate the interactions between anionic CNCs and cationic alkyl ammonium surfactants didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Both surfactants were found to adsorb onto CNCs with concentration-dependent morphology. At low concentrations, individual surfactant molecules adsorbed with alkyl tails pointing outward leading to hydrophobic CNCs. At higher concentrations, above the surfactant's apparent critical micelle concentration, surfactant aggregate morphologies on CNCs were inferred and the hydrophobicity of CNCs decreased. DMAB, which has two alkyl tails, rendered the CNCs more hydrophobic than CTAB which has only a single alkyl tail, at all surfactant concentrations. The change in CNC wettability from surfactant adsorption was directly linked to emulsion properties; adding surfactant increased the emulsion stability, decreased the droplet size, and controlled the internal phase of CNC Pickering emulsions. More specifically, a double transitional phase inversion, from oil-in-water to water-in-oil and back to oil-in-water, was observed for emulsions with CNCs and increasing amounts of DMAB (the more hydrophobic surfactant). With CNCs and CTAB, no phase inversion was induced. This work represents the first report of CNC Pickering emulsions with surfactants as well as the first CNC Pickering emulsions that can be phase inverted. The ability to surface modify CNCs in situ and tailor emulsions by adding surfactants may extend the potential of CNCs to new liquid formulations and extruded/spray-dried materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Physical and antimicrobial properties of thyme oil emulsions stabilized by ovalbumin and gum arabic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Fuge; Pan, Weichun; Su, Yujie; Yang, Yanjun

    2016-12-01

    Natural biopolymer stabilized oil-in-water emulsions were formulated using ovalbumin (OVA), gum arabic (GA) solutions and their complexes. The influence of interfacial structure of emulsion (OVA-GA bilayer and OVA/GA complexes emulsions) on the physical properties and antimicrobial activity of thyme oil (TO) emulsion against Escherichia coli (E. coli) was evaluated. The results revealed that the two types of emulsions with different oil phase compositions remained stable during a long storage period. The oil phase composition had an appreciable influence on the mean particle diameter and retention of the TO emulsions. The stable emulsion showed a higher minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and the TO emulsions showed an improved long-term antimicrobial activity compared to the pure thyme oil, especially complexes emulsion at pH 4.0. These results provided useful information for developing protection and delivery systems for essential oil using biopolymer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Formulation of a Novel Nano emulsion System for Enhanced Solubility of a Sparingly Water Soluble Antibiotic, Clarithromycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatsraj, S.; Pathak, H.; Chauhan, K.

    2014-01-01

    The sparingly water soluble property of majority of medicinally significant drugs acts as a potential barrier towards its utilization for therapeutic purpose. The present study was thus aimed at development of a novel oil-in-water (o/w) nano emulsion (NE) system having ability to function as carrier for poorly soluble drugs with clarithromycin as a model antibiotic. The therapeutically effective concentration of clarithromycin, 5 mg/mL, was achieved using polysorbate 80 combined with olive oil as lipophilic counterion. A three-level three-factorial central composite experimental design was utilized to conduct the experiments. The effects of selected variables, polysorbate 80 and olive oil content and concentration of polyvinyl alcohol, were investigated. The particle size of clarithromycin for the optimized formulation was observed to be 30 nm. The morphology of the nano emulsion was explored using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The emulsions prepared with the optimized formula demonstrated good physical stability during storage at room temperature. Antibacterial activity was conducted with the optimized nano emulsion NESH 01 and compared with free clarithromycin. Zone of inhibition was larger for NESH 01 as compared to that with free clarithromycin. This implies that the solubility and hence the bioavailability of clarithromycin has increased in the formulated nano emulsion system.

  20. Experimental characterization of a silicone oil-in-water droplet generator based on a micro T-junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, B.; Pulvirenti, B.; Puccetti, G.; Morini, G. L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper deals with the emulsion of two immiscible fluids in a micro T-junction. An opposed-flow micro T-junction obtained by means of square microchannels (with a side of 300 µm) fabricated in a pure fused glass chip has been used for the formation of silicone oil-in-water (O/W) droplets. The experimental results have been obtained by considering both pure deionized water and a mixture of deionized water and surfactant (Tween 20) as the continuous flow. The results shown in this paper highlight that the presence of surfactant, also in very small concentrations, is able to change drastically the flow patterns of the two-phase flow generated by the T-junction. Concentration in weight of Tween 20 between 1 and 2% in the continuous flow is able to promote highly monodispersed emulsions with low polydispersity, especially for low flow rate ratios between the dispersed and continuous phase flows. On the contrary, by avoiding the use of surfactant, a stratified flow is obtained. The experimental results obtained in this work have been used in order to link the depth ratio of the stratified flow and the non-dimensional length of the plugs in droplet-based flow to the flow rate ratio between the dispersed and continuous flows.

  1. On the macroscopic modeling of dilute emulsions under flow in the presence of particle inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwasame, Paul M.; Wagner, Norman J.; Beris, Antony N.

    2018-03-01

    Recently, Mwasame et al. ["On the macroscopic modeling of dilute emulsions under flow," J. Fluid Mech. 831, 433 (2017)] developed a macroscopic model for the dynamics and rheology of a dilute emulsion with droplet morphology in the limit of negligible particle inertia using the bracket formulation of non-equilibrium thermodynamics of Beris and Edwards [Thermodynamics of Flowing Systems: With Internal Microstructure (Oxford University Press on Demand, 1994)]. Here, we improve upon that work to also account for particle inertia effects. This advance is facilitated by using the bracket formalism in its inertial form that allows for the natural incorporation of particle inertia effects into macroscopic level constitutive equations, while preserving consistency to the previous inertialess approximation in the limit of zero inertia. The parameters in the resultant Particle Inertia Thermodynamically Consistent Ellipsoidal Emulsion (PITCEE) model are selected by utilizing literature-available mesoscopic theory for the rheology at small capillary and particle Reynolds numbers. At steady state, the lowest level particle inertia effects can be described by including an additional non-affine inertial term into the evolution equation for the conformation tensor, thereby generalizing the Gordon-Schowalter time derivative. This additional term couples the conformation and vorticity tensors and is a function of the Ohnesorge number. The rheological and microstructural predictions arising from the PITCEE model are compared against steady-shear simulation results from the literature. They show a change in the signs of the normal stress differences that is accompanied by a change in the orientation of the major axis of the emulsion droplet toward the velocity gradient direction with increasing Reynolds number, capturing the two main signatures of particle inertia reported in simulations.

  2. Physical stability assessment and sensory optimization of a dairy-free emulsion using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Daniel; de Castro, I Alves; Ellendersen, L Souza Neves; Masson, M Lucia

    2010-04-01

    Desserts made with soy cream, which are oil-in-water emulsions, are widely consumed by lactose-intolerant individuals in Brazil. In this regard, this study aimed at using response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize the sensory attributes of a soy-based emulsion over a range of pink guava juice (GJ: 22% to 32%) and soy protein (SP: 1% to 3%). WHC and backscattering were analyzed after 72 h of storage at 7 degrees C. Furthermore, a rating test was performed to determine the degree of liking of color, taste, creaminess, appearance, and overall acceptability. The data showed that the samples were stable against gravity and storage. The models developed by RSM adequately described the creaminess, taste, and appearance of the emulsions. The response surface of the desirability function was used successfully in the optimization of the sensory properties of dairy-free emulsions, suggesting that a product with 30.35% GJ and 3% SP was the best combination of these components. The optimized sample presented suitable sensory properties, in addition to being a source of dietary fiber, iron, copper, and ascorbic acid.

  3. Effect of Surfactant Concentration in the Emulsions on the Process of Oleophilic Porous Structures Imbibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shtyka Olga S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneous imbibition has been a subject of the scientific interest being a background process for numerous industrial technologies and occurring in the natural environment. In literature the experimental and theoretical results regarding this phenomenon describe a media imbibition with single-phase liquids and the relation between the process rate and media characteristics. The imbibition of oleophilic porous structures with two-phase liquids, only one phase of which was wetting, is an objective of the current publication. The main purpose is to estimate the influence of both surfactant fraction and the dispersed phase concentration on the mentioned process. The imbibition rate was investigated during model experiments with stabilized oil-in-water emulsions having the dispersed phase concentrations of 10 vol%, 30 vol% and 50 vol%. The prepared emulsions differed with fraction of the added surfactant, i.e. 1 vol%, 2 vol% and 5 vol%. The obtained results allowed to conclude that at the him≥0.02 m, the dispersed phase concentration and viscosity decreased versus height. However, the raise of the surfactant fraction caused the increase of mass and height of the imbibed emulsions in porous medium. Moreover, this provided increasing of viscosity and a change of emulsions behaviour as a liquid.

  4. Modeling of gadolinium recovery from nitrate medium with 8-hydroxyquinoline by emulsion liquid membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, M.A.; Aglan, R.F.; El-Reefy, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    The extraction equilibrium of Gd(III) from nitrate medium by 8-hydroxyquinoline (HOX) in toluene was studied. Liquid-liquid investigations were first carried out. Based on the equilibrium results, the extraction of Gd(III) from aqueous nitrate medium into an emulsion liquid membrane system (ELM) containing 8-hydroxyquinoline in toluene as extractant, HNO 3 as stripping solution, Span-80 as surfactant was studied. The stability of the prepared ELM was studied in terms of the degree of membrane breakage. The different parameters affecting the permeation of gadolinium (III) were also studied. A general permeation model for the recovery of Gd(III) by the selected membrane is presented. The internal mass transfer in the water in oil (W/O) emulsion drop, the external mass transfer around the drop, the rates of formation and decomposition of the complex at the external aqueous-organic interface were considered.

  5. Effect of High Pressure Homogenization on the Physicochemical Properties of Natural Plant-based Model Emulsion Applicable for Dairy Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Hee; Min, Sang-Gi; Jo, Yeon-Ji; Chun, Ji-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    In the dairy industry, natural plant-based powders are widely used to develop flavor and functionality. However, most of these ingredients are water-insoluble; therefore, emulsification is essential. In this study, the efficacy of high pressure homogenization (HPH) on natural plant (chocolate or vanilla)-based model emulsions was investigated. The particle size, electrical conductivity, Brix, pH, and color were analyzed after HPH. HPH significantly decreased the particle size of chocolate-based emulsions as a function of elevated pressures (20-100 MPa). HPH decreased the mean particle size of chocolate-based emulsions from 29.01 μm to 5.12 μm, and that of vanilla-based emulsions from 4.18 μm to 2.44 μm. Electrical conductivity increased as a function of the elevated pressures after HPH, for both chocolate- and vanilla-based model emulsions. HPH at 100 MPa increased the electrical conductivity of chocolate-based model emulsions from 0.570 S/m to 0.680 S/m, and that of vanilla-based model emulsions from 0.573 S/m to 0.601 S/m. Increased electrical conductivity would be attributed to colloidal phase modification and dispersion of oil globules. Brix of both chocolate- and vanilla-based model emulsions gradually increased as a function of the HPH pressure. Thus, HPH increased the solubility of plant-based powders by decreasing the particle size. This study demonstrated the potential use of HPH for enhancing the emulsification process and stability of the natural plant powders for applications with dairy products. PMID:26761891

  6. Selective enhancement of boron accumulation with boron-entrapped water-in-oil-water emulsion in VX-2 rabbit hepatic cancer model for BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagie, Hironobu; Higashi, Shushi; Ikushima, Ichiro

    2006-01-01

    Tumor cell destruction in boron neutron-capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction between 10 B and thermal neutrons. It is necessary for effective BNCT therapy to accumulate 10 B atoms in the tumor cells without affecting adjacent healthy cells. Water-in-oil-water (WOW) emulsion was used as the carrier of anti-cancer agents on arterial injections in clinical cancer treatment. In this study, we prepared 10 BSH entrapped WOW emulsion for selective arterial infusion for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. WOW emulsion was administrated by arterial injections via proper hepatic artery. The anti-tumor activity of the emulsion was compared with 10 BSH-Lipiodol mix emulsion or 10 BSH solutions on VX-2 rabbit hepatic tumor models. The 10 B concentrations in VX-2 tumor on delivery with WOW emulsion was superior to those by conventional lipiodol mix emulsion. Electro-microscopic figures of WOW emulsion delineated the accumulation of fat droplets of WOW emulsion in the tumor site, but there was no accumulation of fat droplets in lipiodol emulsion. These results indicate that 10 B entrapped WOW emulsion is most useful carrier for arterial delivery of boron agents on BNCT to cancer. (author)

  7. The density behaviour of heavy oils in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fingas, M.; Hollebone, B.; Fieldhouse, B. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science and Technology Division, Environmental Technology Centre, Science and Technology Branch

    2006-07-01

    The recent concern regarding the difficulty of cleaning up Low API gravity oils (LAPIO) spilled in water was discussed. Sinking and overwashing are 2 phenomena related to the behaviour of these heavy oils in water. Sinking refers to the complete submergence of the oil to the bottom of a waterbody, while over-washing refers to the overflowing of a layer of water over dense oil at sea when the oil is still close to the surface. The latter is important because even a micron-layer of water could render the oil undetectable, particularly at acute viewing angles, such as from a ship. This paper reviewed the properties of heavy oil, the prediction of density changes and the sinking/over-washing of heavy oil. In particular, it discussed a spill which occurred in August 2005 when 11 tank cars from train derailment spilled 800,000 litres of Bunker fuel mixed with high PAH-containing pole-treating oil into Lake Wabamun, Alberta. The behaviour of the oil included submergence, neutral buoyancy, resurfacing and formation of several types of aggregates of oil. This study summarized the behaviours and processes that transformed the particles of oil into small tar balls, larger logs, sheets, and large lumps into a slick. Sediment uptake or loss was found to be the major process that caused the changes in density. The behaviour of the oils was compared with respect to density and uptake of various types of sediment. The paper also reviewed the literature on dense oil behaviour. Weathering experiments performed on dense oils to determine if extensive weathering could render oils heavier than water showed that rarely is weathering the only factor in the bulk sinking of oil. Once an oil is submerged, little weathering occurs, either by dissolution or volatilization. The uptake of particulate matter is the most important process in increasing density. This study reviewed over-washing experiments to develop a mathematical solution of the conditions required for oil to be covered by a

  8. The density behaviour of heavy oils in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.; Hollebone, B.; Fieldhouse, B.

    2006-01-01

    The recent concern regarding the difficulty of cleaning up Low API gravity oils (LAPIO) spilled in water was discussed. Sinking and overwashing are 2 phenomena related to the behaviour of these heavy oils in water. Sinking refers to the complete submergence of the oil to the bottom of a waterbody, while over-washing refers to the overflowing of a layer of water over dense oil at sea when the oil is still close to the surface. The latter is important because even a micron-layer of water could render the oil undetectable, particularly at acute viewing angles, such as from a ship. This paper reviewed the properties of heavy oil, the prediction of density changes and the sinking/over-washing of heavy oil. In particular, it discussed a spill which occurred in August 2005 when 11 tank cars from train derailment spilled 800,000 litres of Bunker fuel mixed with high PAH-containing pole-treating oil into Lake Wabamun, Alberta. The behaviour of the oil included submergence, neutral buoyancy, resurfacing and formation of several types of aggregates of oil. This study summarized the behaviours and processes that transformed the particles of oil into small tar balls, larger logs, sheets, and large lumps into a slick. Sediment uptake or loss was found to be the major process that caused the changes in density. The behaviour of the oils was compared with respect to density and uptake of various types of sediment. The paper also reviewed the literature on dense oil behaviour. Weathering experiments performed on dense oils to determine if extensive weathering could render oils heavier than water showed that rarely is weathering the only factor in the bulk sinking of oil. Once an oil is submerged, little weathering occurs, either by dissolution or volatilization. The uptake of particulate matter is the most important process in increasing density. This study reviewed over-washing experiments to develop a mathematical solution of the conditions required for oil to be covered by a

  9. Emulsifier type, metal chelation and pH affect oxidative stability of n-3-enriched emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Anne-Mette; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    -enriched oil-in-water emulsion. The selected food emulsifiers were Tween 80, Citrem, sodium caseinate and lecithin. Lipid oxidation was evaluated by determination of peroxide values and secondary volatile oxidation products. Moreover, the zeta potential and the droplet sizes were determined. Twen resulted...... in the least oxidatively stable emulsions, followed by Citrem. When iron was present, caseinate-stabilized emulsions oxidized slower than lecithin emulsions at pH 3, whereas the opposite was the case at pH 7. Oxidation generally progressed faster at pH 3 than at pH 7, irrespective of the addition of iron. EDTA...

  10. BACTERIAL POPULATION DYNAMICS IN WASTE OILY EMULSIONS FROM THE METAL-PROCESSING INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Paweł Kaszycki; Paulina Supel; Przemysław Petryszak

    2014-01-01

    Oil-containing wastewaters are regarded as main industrial pollutants of soil and water environments. They can occur as free-floating oil, unstable or stable oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions, and in the case of extreme organic load, as water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions. In this study two types of oily effluents, a typical O/W emulsion marked as E1 and a W/O emulsion E2, both discharged by local metal processing plants were examined to test their toxicity to microbial communities and the ability to ser...

  11. ZETA POTENTIAL AND COLOR INVESTIGATIONS OF VEGETABLE OIL BASED EMULSIONS AS ECO-FRIENDLY LUBRICANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROMICĂ CREŢU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the past 10 years, the need for biodegradable lubricants has been more and more emphasized. The use of vegetable oils as lubricants offers several advantages. The vegetable oils are biodegradable; thus, the environmental pollution is minimal either during or after their use. The aim of this paper is to presents a preliminary study concerning the influence of some preparation conditions on the stability of vegetable oil-in-water (O/W emulsions as eco-friendly lubricants stabilized by nonionic surfactant. In this context, vegetable oil-in-water emulsions characteristics where assessed using microscopically observation and zeta potential. In addition, the color of these emulsions can be evaluated. It can be observed that the emulsions tend to stabilize in time.

  12. Emulsifying and emulsion-stabilizing properties of gluten hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joye, Iris J; McClements, David J

    2014-03-26

    Gluten is produced as a coproduct of the wheat starch isolation process. In this study, gluten was hydrolyzed to degrees of hydrolysis (DH) of 3-6-10 and 1-2-3 with alcalase and trypsin, respectively. These peptidases have a clearly distinct substrate specificity. Corn oil-in-water emulsions (10 wt % oil) were prepared by high-pressure homogenization at pH 7.5. Gluten peptides with DH 3 proved to be the most effective in producing peptides displaying emulsifying properties. Higher levels of alcalase hydrolysates (2.0 wt %) than of trypsin hydrolysates (1.0 wt %) were required to produce stable emulsions with small droplet sizes, which is attributed to differences in the nature of the peptides formed. The emulsions had small mean droplet diameters (d32 alcalase hydrolysates (destabilized after 2 days at 37 °C). The hydrolysate-containing emulsions, however, were quickly destabilized by salt addition (≤100 mM NaCl) and when the pH approached the isoelectric point of the coated droplets (pH ~5.5). Microscopic analysis revealed the formation of air-in-oil-in-water emulsions at lower hydrolysate concentrations, whereas at higher concentrations (≥3.0 wt %) extensive flocculation occurred. Both phenomena contributed to creaming of the emulsions. These results may be useful for the utilization of gluten hydrolysates in food and beverage products.

  13. Ultrasonic processing of butter oil (Ghee) into oil‐in‐water emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, Chandrashekhar Vishwanath

    2016-01-01

    Butter oil (ghee) derived from cow or buffalo milk is in semi-solid form at room temperature and contains >99% of lipids. Apparent high viscosity and water immiscibility – owing to the hydrophobic nature of lipid components hinder the applicability of butter oil for formulations. Here, we have employed ultrasonic processing technique to create oil-in-water emulsions of butter oil. We show that the butter oil is capable of self-stabilizing an emulsion at low concentration while higher concentr...

  14. Effects of heat on physicochemical properties of whey protein-stabilised emulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sliwinski, E.L.; Zoet, F.D.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Wouters, J.T.M.; Roubos-van den Hil, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of heating has been studied for whey protein-stabilised oil-in-water emulsions (25.0% (w/w) soybean oil, 3.0% (w/w) whey protein isolate, pH 7.0). These emulsions were heated between 55 and 95 degreesC as a function of time and the effect on particle size distribution, adsorbed protein

  15. Reverse micelle-loaded lipid nano-emulsions: new technology for nano-encapsulation of hydrophilic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Nicolas; Mojzisova, Halina; Porcher, Emilien; Benoit, Jean-Pierre; Saulnier, Patrick

    2010-10-15

    This study presents novel, recently patented technology for encapsulating hydrophilic species in lipid nano-emulsions. The method is based on the phase-inversion temperature method (the so-called PIT method), which follows a low-energy and solvent-free process. The nano-emulsions formed are stable for months, and exhibit droplet sizes ranging from 10 to 200 nm. Hydrophilic model molecules of fluorescein sodium salt are encapsulated in the oily core of these nano-emulsion droplets through their solubilisation in the reverse micellar system. As a result, original, multi-scaled nano-objects are generated with a 'hydrophilic molecule in a reverse-micelles-in-oil-in-water' structure. Once fluorescein has been encapsulated it remains stable, for thermodynamic reasons, and the encapsulation yields can reach 90%. The reason why such complex objects can be formed is due to the soft method used (PIT method) which allows the conservation of the structure of the reverse micelles throughout the formulation process, up to their entrapment in the nano-emulsion droplets. In this study, we focus the investigation on the process itself, revealing its potential and limits. Since the formulation of nanocarriers for the encapsulation of hydrophilic substances still remains a challenge, this study may constitute a significant advance in this field. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Factors affecting the oxidative stability of omega-3 emulsions prepared with milk proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    Omega-3 fatty acids are prone to lipid oxidation due to their unsaturated nature. In oil-in-water emulsions, lipid oxidation is expected to be initiated at the oil-water interface. The properties of the emulsifier used and the structure at the interface are therefore expected to be of great...

  17. An Evaluation of Emulsions in Wear-Metal-in-Oil Analyses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    torch, high noise levels and requires the use of organometallic standards.16 Organometallic compounds ... determination of lead in gasoline by AAS based on the formation of stable oil-in-water emulsions.22,23 AAS has ... The used oil was drained from a car engine during a routine service at a garage. 2.2.2. Standards.

  18. Emulsion preparation for novel micro-porous polymeric hemi-shells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, Kersch

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion process was developed to produce novel micro-porous hemi-spherical polycaprolactone (PCL) micro-particles called "hemi-shells". By addition of a porogen such as sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) into the PCL...

  19. PLGA microdevices for retinoids sustained release produced by supercritical emulsion extraction: continuous versus batch operation layouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Giovanna Della; Campardelli, Roberta; Falco, Nunzia; Reverchon, Ernesto

    2011-10-01

    Retinyl acetate (RA) was selected as a model compound to be entrapped in poly(lactic-co-glycolic)acid (PLGA) microspheres using supercritical emulsion extraction (SEE). Several oil-in-water emulsions prepared using acetone and aqueous glycerol (80% glycerol, 20% water) were processed using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2 ) to extract the oily phase and to induce microspheres formation. The characteristics of the microspheres obtained by conventional liquid emulsion extraction and SEE were also compared: SEE produced spherical and free flowing microspheres, whereas the conventional liquid-liquid extraction showed large intraparticles aggregation. Emulsion extraction by SC-CO2 technology was tested using two different operation layouts: batch (SEE-B) and continuous (SEE-C). SEE-C was performed using a packed tower to produce emulsion/SC-CO2 contact in countercurrent mode, allowing higher microsphere recovery and process efficiencies. Operating at 80 bar and 36°C, SEE-C produced PLGA/RA microspheres with mean sizes between 3.3 and 4.5 μm with an excellent encapsulation efficiency of 80%-90%. Almost all the drug was released in about 6 days when charged at 2.7% (w/w), whereas only 40% and 10% of RA were released in the same period of time when the charge was 5.2% and 8.8% (w/w), respectively. Release kinetics constants calculated from the experimental data, using a mathematical model, were also proposed and discussed. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Water-in-model oil emulsions studied by small-angle neutron scattering: interfacial film thickness and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verruto, Vincent J; Kilpatrick, Peter K

    2008-11-18

    The ever-increasing worldwide demand for energy has led to the upgrading of heavy crude oil and asphaltene-rich feedstocks becoming viable refining options for the petroleum industry. Traditional problems associated with these feedstocks, particularly stable water-in-petroleum emulsions, are drawing increasing attention. Despite considerable research on the interfacial assembly of asphaltenes, resins, and naphthenic acids, much about the resulting interfacial films is not well understood. Here, we describe the use of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to elucidate interfacial film properties from model emulsion systems. Modeling the SANS data with both a polydisperse core/shell form factor as well as a thin sheet approximation, we have deduced the film thickness and the asphaltenic composition within the stabilizing interfacial films of water-in-model oil emulsions prepared in toluene, decalin, and 1-methylnaphthalene. Film thicknesses were found to be 100-110 A with little deviation among the three solvents. By contrast, asphaltene composition in the film varied significantly, with decalin leading to the most asphaltene-rich films (30% by volume of the film), while emulsions made in toluene and methylnaphthalene resulted in lower asphaltenic contents (12-15%). Through centrifugation and dilatational rheology, we found that trends of decreasing water resolution (i.e., increasing emulsion stability) and increasing long-time dilatational elasticity corresponded with increasing asphaltene composition in the film. In addition to the asphaltenic composition of the films, here we also deduce the film solvent and water content. Our analyses indicate that 1:1 (O/W) emulsions prepared with 3% (w/w) asphaltenes in toluene and 1 wt % NaCl aqueous solutions at pH 7 and pH 10 resulted in 80-90 A thick films, interfacial areas around 2600-3100 cm (2)/mL, and films that were roughly 25% (v/v) asphaltenic, 60-70% toluene, and 8-12% water. The increased asphaltene and water film

  1. Intravenous lipid emulsion in the resuscitation of cocaine-induced cardiovascular arrest in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Peter R; Hack, Jason B

    2016-08-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) is a potential antidote for severe overdose of certain lipophilic drugs. Cocaine overdose is often fatal and has no antidote. The use of ILE after cocaine-induced cardiac arrest has been suggested but is not well characterized. The objective of the study is to determine if ILE would reverse cocaine-induced cardiac arrest in a rat model. Twelve Sprague-Dawley rats with intra-arterial and intravenous access were sedated with isoflurane and split into 2 cocaine dose groups, then given either ILE or normal saline (NS) intravenously (IV)-group A, 7 animals received cocaine (10 mg/kg IV) with 6 of 7 given ILE (15 mg/kg IV) and 1 of 7 given NS (equal volume); group B, 5 animals received cocaine (5 mg/kg IV) with 3 of 5 given ILE (15 mg/kg IV) and 2 of 5 given NS (equal volume). Closed chest compressions were initiated for asystole and continued for 15 minutes with rhythm checks every minute. All 12 rats experienced cardiac arrest after cocaine bolus. Resuscitation was successful in 1 of 7 rats in group A and 0 of 5 in group B. Intravenous lipid emulsion administration did not affect outcome of cocaine-induced cardiac arrest compared with control in this model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Insulin versus Lipid Emulsion in a Rabbit Model of Severe Propranolol Toxicity: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn Harvey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective. Beta-blocker overdose may result in intractable cardiovascular collapse despite conventional antidotal treatments. High dose insulin/glucose (ING, and more recently intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE, have been proposed as potentially beneficial therapies in beta blocker intoxication. We compare efficacy of the novel antidotes ING, with ILE, in a rabbit model of combined enteric/intravenous propranolol toxicity. Methods. Sedated, mechanically ventilated and invasively monitored New Zealand White rabbits underwent mini-laparotomy and enterostomy formation with 40 mg/kg propranolol instilled into the proximal small bowel. At 30 minutes propranolol infusion was commenced at 4 mg/kg/hr and continued to a target mean arterial pressure (MAP of 50% baseline MAP. Animals were resuscitated with insulin at 3 U/kg plus 0.5 g/kg glucose (ING group, or 10 mL/kg 20% Intralipid (ILE group. Results. Rate pressure product (RPP; RPP = heart rate × mean arterial pressure was greatest in the ING group at 60 minutes (P<.05. A trend toward greater heart rate was observed in the ING group (P=.06. No difference was observed in survival between groups (4/5 ING versus 2/5 ILE; P=.524. Conclusions. High dose insulin resulted in greater rate pressure product compared with lipid emulsion in this rabbit model of severe enteric/intravenous propranolol toxicity.

  3. Beneficial effects of isovolemic hemodilution using a perfluorocarbon emulsion in a stroke model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, R A; Negendank, W; McCoy, L; Berguer, R

    1991-08-01

    In a clinically applicable cat stroke model, 16 purpose-bred adult animals were used to evaluate the beneficial effects of two treatment regimens: isovolemic hemodilution with either a perfluorocarbon emulsion or dextran 40 (a glucose polymer). Animals that received these treatment regimens were then compared with a control group of untreated animals. Focal cerebral infarctions were produced by transorbital ligation of the left middle cerebral artery. The randomly allocated treatment arms of the study were instituted 3 hours after ligation of the middle cerebral artery, thereby simulating a human clinical situation. In vivo mitochondrial metabolic activity of the peri-infarct cerebral tissue was continually assessed by means of a multiwavelength near-infrared spectrophotometer. This allowed measurement of cellular oxygenation at the cytochrome aa3 level, the terminal member of the cytochrome chain. Sequential proton-based magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure intracerebral water in vivo. Cardiac output, oxygen consumption/delivery, chemical, histologic, and rheologic parameters were also assessed. The data collected were analyzed by group means and standard statistical analyses, which revealed that the group treated with the perfluorocarbon emulsion had both less brain edema in the early post-infarct period (p less than 0.05), as well as a higher level of oxidation of cytochrome aa3 (p less than or equal to 0.025). This evidence supports the premise that isovolemic hemodilution with an oxygen-carrying hemodiluent may be beneficial in the treatment of ischemic strokes.

  4. Numerical modelling and experimental validation of hydrodynamics of an emulsion in an extraction column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paisant, Jean-Francois

    2014-01-01

    Industrial reprocessing of spent fuel is based on chemical separation processes by liquid-liquid extraction into pulsed column. The current context of sustainable development and acceptance of nuclear energy drive the industry to improve the efficiency of this process. Pulsed column efficiency is bound to the amount of available exchange surface, which depends on the geometrical parameters of the column and the operating conditions. A better design would improve the efficiency. In this context, the work presented in this manuscript revolves around physical and numerical modelling of the hydrodynamics of the emulsion coupled with the evolution of the interfacial area, as well as an experimental characterization of the quantities which describe the emulsion. The emulsion is modelled based on the work of D. LHUILLIER. It is an Eulerian approach which describes each phase as a continuous medium as well as the interface which is thought as a third phase moving continuously in the flow field. This thesis contributes to describe of the hydrodynamics of dispersed and continuous phases, in order to determine the slip velocity needed for the design. The written transport equation for interfacial area is based on the thesis of T. RANDRIAMANANTENA. The simulation of this physical model was performed using the method of finite elements (FEM) and implementation was carried out under the software CAST3M. The numerical simulation have shown their abilities to correctly reproduce the expected physical behaviour, in particular, they allow to obtain the slip velocity which is essential to the scale up. In a first experimental approach, the single phase flow has been studied in a pulsed column using particle image velocimetry (PIV), for different amplitude and frequency parameters. A method of synchronization between the recording and the pulsation cycle was used in order to achieve this study. The average behavior, for different regimes of pulsation, has been studied by this way. In

  5. Ultrastructure of emulsions - a comparative electron microscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard

    . For this reason, electron microscopy was the method of choice. However, electron microscopy is inherently performed in vacuum and the emulsions presented a challenge by being liquid systems which are sensitiveto changes in water vapor and temperature. Furthermore, to achieve resolution and contrast of structural...... differences in specimens, electron microscopy relies on the scattering of electrons and the emulsions contain only light elements with low mass contrast. The objective of this thesis was two-fold. One was to identify and further develop sample preparation methods to enable observation of the emulsions...... is added. The Nanomega project, which is a cooperation between the National Food Institute, the Center for Electron Nanoscopy and the Department of Mechanical Engineering, all at the Technical University of Denmark, has dealt mainly with pure oil in water emulsions to describe the oxidation without...

  6. The choice of homogenisation equipment affects lipid oxidation in emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard

    2012-01-01

    Milk proteins are often used by the food industry because of their good emulsifying properties. In addition, they can also provide oxidative stability to foods. However, different milk proteins or protein components have been shown to differ in their antioxidative properties, and their localisation...... in emulsions has been shown to be affected by the emulsification conditions. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of homogenisation equipment (microfluidizer vs. two-stage valve homogeniser) on lipid oxidation in 10% fish oil-in-water emulsions prepared with two different milk proteins....... Emulsions were prepared at pH 7 with similar droplet sizes. Results showed that the oxidative stability of emulsions prepared with sodium caseinate was not influenced by the type of homogeniser used. In contrast, the type of homogenisation equipment significantly influenced lipid oxidation when whey protein...

  7. Physicochemical analysis in the evaluation of reconstituted dry emulsion tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niczinger, Noémi Anna; Kállai-Szabó, Barnabás; Lengyel, Miléna; Gordon, Péter; Klebovich, Imre; Antal, István

    2017-02-05

    The aim of this study was to characterize the formation of emulsions by droplet size analysis and turbidimetry during reconstitution from a solid dosage form, namely from dry emulsion systems, which carry an oil phase for poorly soluble active ingredients. For the dry emulsion systems tablets were prepared either from oil-in-water systems using a freeze-drying process or through direct compression containing the same oil and excipients. The ratios of oil to emulgents and oil to xanthan gum were equal in both methods. In the preparation methods applied, mannitol, erythritol and lactose were used as excipients and mannitol was found to be the most effective excipient based on droplet size reconstitution, turbidimetry and physical properties. Quality control involved testing the physical properties of tablets and characterizing the reconstituted emulsions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative Safety and Efficacy Profile of a Novel Oil in Water Vaccine Adjuvant Comprising Vitamins A and E and a Catechin in Protective Anti-Influenza Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sapna; Faraj, Yasser; Duso, Debra K; Reiley, William W; Karlsson, Erik A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Vajdy, Michael

    2017-05-21

    Non-replicating vaccines, such as those based on recombinant proteins, require adjuvants and delivery systems, which have thus far depended on mimicking pathogen danger signals and strong pro-inflammatory responses. In search of a safer and more efficacious alternative, we tested whether vaccinations with influenza recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) mixed with a novel vegetable oil in water emulsion adjuvant (Natural Immune-enhancing Delivery System, NIDS), based on the immune-enhancing synergy of vitamins A and E and a catechin, could protect against intra-nasal challenge with live influenza virus. Vaccinations of inbred Brag Albino strain c (BALB/c) mice, with HA mixed with NIDS compared to other adjuvants, i.e., a squalene oil in water emulsion (Sq. oil), and the Toll Like Receptor 3 (TLR3) agonist Poly (I:C), induced significantly lower select innate pro-inflammatory responses in serum, but induced significantly higher adaptive antibody and splenic T Helper 1 (TH1) or TH2, but not TH17, responses. Vaccinations with NIDS protected against infection, as measured by clinical scores, lung viral loads, and serum hemagglutination inhibition titers. The NIDS exhibited a strong dose sparing effect and the adjuvant action of NIDS was intact in the outbred CD1 mice. Importantly, vaccinations with the Sq. oil, but not NIDS, induced a significantly higher Serum Amyloid P component, an acute phase reactant secreted by hepatocytes, and total serum IgE. Thus, the NIDS may be used as a clinically safer and more efficacious vaccine adjuvant against influenza, and potentially other infectious diseases.

  9. Comparative Safety and Efficacy Profile of a Novel Oil in Water Vaccine Adjuvant Comprising Vitamins A and E and a Catechin in Protective Anti-Influenza Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna Patel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-replicating vaccines, such as those based on recombinant proteins, require adjuvants and delivery systems, which have thus far depended on mimicking pathogen danger signals and strong pro-inflammatory responses. In search of a safer and more efficacious alternative, we tested whether vaccinations with influenza recombinant hemagglutinin (HA mixed with a novel vegetable oil in water emulsion adjuvant (Natural Immune-enhancing Delivery System, NIDS, based on the immune-enhancing synergy of vitamins A and E and a catechin, could protect against intra-nasal challenge with live influenza virus. Vaccinations of inbred Brag Albino strain c (BALB/c mice, with HA mixed with NIDS compared to other adjuvants, i.e., a squalene oil in water emulsion (Sq. oil, and the Toll Like Receptor 3 (TLR3 agonist Poly (I:C, induced significantly lower select innate pro-inflammatory responses in serum, but induced significantly higher adaptive antibody and splenic T Helper 1 (TH1 or TH2, but not TH17, responses. Vaccinations with NIDS protected against infection, as measured by clinical scores, lung viral loads, and serum hemagglutination inhibition titers. The NIDS exhibited a strong dose sparing effect and the adjuvant action of NIDS was intact in the outbred CD1 mice. Importantly, vaccinations with the Sq. oil, but not NIDS, induced a significantly higher Serum Amyloid P component, an acute phase reactant secreted by hepatocytes, and total serum IgE. Thus, the NIDS may be used as a clinically safer and more efficacious vaccine adjuvant against influenza, and potentially other infectious diseases.

  10. Microencapsulation of a hydrophilic model molecule through vibration nozzle and emulsion phase inversion technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorati, Rossella; Genta, Ida; Modena, Tiziana; Conti, Bice

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the present work was to evaluate and discuss vibration nozzle microencapsulation (VNM) technology combined to lyophilization, for the microencapsulation of a hydrophilic model molecule into a hydrophilic polymer. Fluorescein-loaded alginate microparticles prepared by VNM and emulsion phase inversion microencapsulation (EPIM) were lyophilized. Morphology, particle size distribution, lyophilized microspheres stability upon rehydration, drug loading and in vitro release were evaluated. Well-formed microspheres were obtained by the VNM technique, with higher yields of production (93.3-100%) and smaller particle size (d50138.10-158.00) than the EPIM microspheres. Rehydration upon lyophilization occurred in 30 min maintaining microsphere physical integrity. Fluorescein release was always faster from the microspheres obtained by VNM (364 h) than from those obtained by EPIM (504 h). The results suggest that VNM is a simple, easy to be scaled-up process suitable for the microencapsulation hydrophilic drugs.

  11. Stability Emulsion and Sensory Characteristics Low Fat Mayonnaise Using Kefir as Emulsifier Replacer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herly Evanuarini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mayonnaise is a kind of semi solid oil in water (o/w emulsion which containing pasteurized egg yolk as an emulsifier. The consumers have demanded that the use of egg yolk be reduced. Kefir was used to develop a low fat mayonnaise as emulsifier replacer to egg yolk. The objective of this research was to observe the emulsion stability, sensory characteristics of low fat mayonnaise prepare during kefir as emulsifier replacer. The research method was using experimental design. The result showed that formulation of low fat mayonnaise by using Rice bran oil 40%, kefir 20% produces the optimal low fat mayonnaise in emulsion stability and accepted by the panelist.

  12. Efficiency Evaluation of Offshore Deoiling Applications utilizing Real-Time Oil-in-Water Monitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dennis Severin; Bram, Mads Valentin; Løhndorf, Petar Durdevic

    2017-01-01

    to measure hydrocyclone inlet's and underflow's Oil-in-Water (OiW) concentrations in real-time. Image-based microscopy was used to analyze the oil droplet size distribution at inlet and underflow to investigate the droplets' influence on hydrocyclone's efficiency. Performance experiments were carried out...

  13. Cost-effective ERT technique for oil-in-water measurement for offshore hydrocyclone installations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durdevic, Petar; Hansen, Leif; Mai, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to introduce and design a cost-effective Oil-in-Water (OiW) measuring instrument, which will be investigated for its value in increasing the efficiency of a deoiling hydrocyclone. The technique investigated is based on Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), which basic...

  14. A laboratory study of a flow-through fluorometer for measuring oil-in-water levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, P.; Fieldhouse, B.; Wang, Z.; Fingas, M.; Pearson, L.; Collazzi, E.

    2001-01-01

    An extensive bench-scale test program was conducted to evaluate the performance of the Turner Instruments flow-through model 10AU and model 10 fluorometers for measuring real-time concentrations of oil in water. The objective of the study was to evaluate the performance of the fluorometer resulting from different weathered states of a particular oil. The study, in turn, lead to a review of the influence of an oil's chemical composition on the instrument and detection technique. The results were compared with alternative total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) methods. It was determined that several factors in addition to an oil's chemical composition can effect the response of the fluorometer. The 10AU model was equipped with a long wavelength optical kit, the other with the short wavelength optical kit for diesel fuels and light refined oil products. A total of 8 oils were tested, including Alberta Sweet Mixed Blend crude oil, Prudhoe Bay crude oil, Bunker C fuel oil and diesel fuel. A study of the chemical composition of the selected oils found that the results of the fluorometer could not be directly linked to the concentration of any specific aromatic hydrocarbon such as napthalene or to the sum of the polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) compounds. The results showed that the fluorescence signal is generated by a combination of PAH compounds and that the relative contribution of each PAH compound is not equal. It was also determined that the response of the fluorometers may be influenced by the presence of volatile organic compounds such as BTEX and C3-benzenes in combination with PAH compounds. 14 refs., 7 tabs., 4 figs

  15. Stability studies of cosmetic emulsions prepared from natural products such as wine, grape seed oil and mastic resin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glampedaki, P.; Dutschk, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    An attempt was made in this study to use diluted wine as the aqueous phase and grapeseed oil as the oil phase for the preparation of oil-in-water cosmetic emulsions. Two monovarietal wines of Hellenic origin were used in this study; a red one from Sangiovese grapes and a white one from Muscat of

  16. Membrane permeation of testosterone from either solutions, particle dispersions, or particle-stabilized emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Johnson, Andrew J; Elliott, Russell P

    2012-02-07

    We derive a unified model that accounts for the variation in extent and rate of membrane permeation by a permeating species with the type of donor compartment formulation (aqueous and oil solutions, particle dispersions, and oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsions stabilized by particles) initially containing the permeant. The model is also applicable to either closed-loop or open-flow configurations of the receiver compartment of the permeation cell. Predictions of the model are compared with measured extents and rates of permeation of testosterone across an 80 μm thick polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane from donor compartments initially containing testosterone dissolved in either aqueous or isopropylmyristate (IPM) solutions, aqueous or IPM dispersions of silica nanoparticles or IPM-in-water or water-in-IPM emulsions stabilized by silica nanoparticles. Using a single set of input parameters, the model successfully accounts for the wide variations in permeation behavior observed for the different donor formulation types with either closed-loop or open flow configurations of the permeation cell receiver compartment.

  17. Design of an Emulsion-based Personal Detergent through a Model-based Chemical Product Design Methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattei, Michele; Hill, Michael; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    -by-one the different classes of chemicals, until a formulation is obtained, the stability of which as en emulsion is finally checked with appropriate models. Structured databases, appropriate pure component as well as mixture property models, rule-based selection criteria and CAMD techniques are employed together...... to obtain one or more candidate formulations. A conceptual casestudy representing a personal detergent is presented to highlight the methodology....

  18. Dynamic Oil-in-Water Concentration Acquisition on a Pilot-Scaled Offshore Water-Oil Separation Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar Durdevic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is a feasibility study on using fluorescence-based oil-in-water (OiW monitors for on-line dynamic efficiency measurement of a deoiling hydrocyclone. Dynamic measurements are crucial in the design and validation of dynamic models of the hydrocyclones, and to our knowledge, no dynamic OiW analysis of hydrocyclones has been carried out. Previous studies have extensively studied the steady state efficiency perspective of hydrocyclones, and have related them to different key parameters, such as the pressure drop ratio (PDR, inlet flow rate, and the flow-spilt. Through our study, we were able to measure the dynamics of the hydrocyclone’s efficiency ( ϵ response to step changes in the inlet flow rate with high accuracy. This is a breakthrough in the modelling, control, and monitoring of hydrocyclones.

  19. Oil components modulate physical characteristics and function of the natural oil emulsions as drug or gene delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, H; Kim, T W; Kwon, M; Kwon, I C; Jeong, S Y

    2001-04-28

    Oil-in-water (o/w) type lipid emulsions were formulated by using 18 different natural oils and egg phosphatidylcholine (egg PC) to investigate how emulsion particle size and stability change with different oils. Cottonseed, linseed and evening primrose oils formed emulsions with very large and unstable particles. Squalene, light mineral oil and jojoba bean oil formed stable emulsions with small particles. The remaining natural oils formed moderately stable emulsions. Emulsions with smaller initial particle size were more stable than those with larger particles. The correlation between emulsion size made with different oils and two physical properties of the oils was also investigated. The o/w interfacial tension and particle size of the emulsion were inversely proportional. The effect of viscosity was less pronounced. To study how the oil component in the emulsion modulates the in vitro release characteristics of lipophilic drugs, three different emulsions loaded with two different drugs were prepared. Squalene, soybean oil and linseed oil emulsions represented the most, medium and the least stable systems, respectively. For the lipophilic drugs, release was the slowest from the most stable squalene emulsion, followed by soybean oil and then by linseed oil emulsions. Cationic emulsions were also prepared with the above three different oils as gene carriers. In vitro transfection activity was the highest for the most stable squalene emulsion followed by soybean oil and then by linseed oil emulsions. Even though the in vitro transfection activity of emulsions were lower than the liposome in the absence of serum, the activity of squalene emulsion, for instance, was ca. 30 times higher than that of liposome in the presence of 80% (v/v) serum. In conclusion, the choice of oil component in o/w emulsion is important in formulating emulsion-based drug or gene delivery systems.

  20. An elasto-visco-plastic model for immortal foams or emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénito, S; Bruneau, C-H; Colin, T; Gay, C; Molino, F

    2008-03-01

    A variety of complex fluids consists in soft, round objects (foams, emulsions, assemblies of copolymer micelles or of multilamellar vesicles--also known as onions). Their dense packing induces a slight deviation from their preferred circular or spherical shape. As a frustrated assembly of interacting bodies, such a material evolves from one conformation to another through a succession of discrete, topological events driven by finite external forces. As a result, the material exhibits a finite yield threshold. The individual objects usually evolve spontaneously (colloidal diffusion, object coalescence, molecular diffusion), and the material properties under low or vanishing stress may alter with time, a phenomenon known as aging. We neglect such effects to address the simpler behaviour of (uncommon) immortal fluids: we construct a minimal, fully tensorial, rheological model, equivalent to the (scalar) Bingham model. Importantly, the model consistently describes the ability of such soft materials to deform substantially in the elastic regime (be it compressible or not) before they undergo (incompressible) plastic creep--or viscous flow under even higher stresses.

  1. 3D printing of concentrated emulsions into multiphase biocompatible soft materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Marianne R; Alison, Lauriane; Minas, Clara; Tervoort, Elena; Rühs, Patrick A; Studart, André R

    2017-03-01

    3D printing via direct ink writing (DIW) is a versatile additive manufacturing approach applicable to a variety of materials ranging from ceramics over composites to hydrogels. Due to the mild processing conditions compared to other additive manufacturing methods, DIW enables the incorporation of sensitive compounds such as proteins or drugs into the printed structure. Although emulsified oil-in-water systems are commonly used vehicles for such compounds in biomedical, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic applications, printing of such emulsions into architectured soft materials has not been fully exploited and would open new possibilities for the controlled delivery of sensitive compounds. Here, we 3D print concentrated emulsions into soft materials, whose multiphase architecture allows for site-specific incorporation of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds into the same structure. As a model ink, concentrated emulsions stabilized by chitosan-modified silica nanoparticles are studied, because they are sufficiently stable against coalescence during the centrifugation step needed to create a bridging network of droplets. The resulting ink is ideal for 3D printing as it displays high yield stress, storage modulus and elastic recovery, through the formation of networks of droplets as well as of gelled silica nanoparticles in the presence of chitosan. To demonstrate possible architectures, we print biocompatible soft materials with tunable hierarchical porosity containing an encapsulated hydrophobic compound positioned in specific locations of the structure. The proposed emulsion-based ink system offers great flexibility in terms of 3D shaping and local compositional control, and can potentially help address current challenges involving the delivery of incompatible compounds in biomedical applications.

  2. Effects of spray-drying on w/o/w multiple emulsions prepared from a stearic acid matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mlalila N

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nichrous Mlalila,1 Hulda Swai,2 Lonji Kalombo,2 Askwar Hilonga3 1School of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology, Arusha, Tanzania; 2Materials Science and Manufacturing, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria, South Africa; 3Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology, Arusha, Tanzania Abstract: The goal of this study was to explore the effects of spray-drying on w/o/w double emulsions of methyltestosterone (MT loaded in a stearic acid matrix. MT-loaded nanoparticles were formulated by a water-in-oil-in-water emulsion technique using 50, 75, and 100 mg of stearic acid, 2% and 3% w/v polyvinyl alcohol, 5% w/v lactose, and 0.2% w/v chitosan. The emulsions were immediately spray-dried based on an optimized model of inlet temperature and pump rate, and characterized for optimized responses with regard to particle size, polydispersity index, and zeta potential, for both emulsion and powder samples. Dynamic light scattering analysis shown that the nanoparticles increased in size with increasing concentrations of polyvinyl alcohol and stearic acid. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the MT-loaded nanoparticles were spherical in shape, had a smooth surface, and were in an amorphous state, which was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry. These MT-loaded nanoparticles are a promising candidate carrier for the delivery of MT; however, further studies are needed in order to establish the stability of the system and the cargo release profile under normal conditions of use. Keywords: double emulsions, nanoparticles, pump rate, spray-drying, testosterone

  3. Particle size, surface hydrophobicity and interaction with serum of parenteral fat emulsions and model drug carriers as parameters related to RES uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrstensen, H; Müller, R H; Müller, B W

    1992-10-01

    Fat emulsions for parenteral nutrition, stabilized by egg lecithin, were characterized in terms of parameters relevant to uptake by the reticuloendothelial system (RES), e.g. size distribution, surface hydrophobicity and adsorption of serum components as a measure of the degree of opsonization. Adsorption of serum components was quantified by zeta potential measurement. Fat emulsions for nutrition were compared with emulsions used for drug delivery and model drug carries for intravenous injection. The emulsions for drug delivery were stabilized by the blockcopolymers Poloxamer 188 and 407 (Pluronic F68 and F127) and Poloxamine 908. Model drug carriers were hydrophobic and hydrophilic polystyrene latex particles. Hydrophilic particles were prepared by adsorption of Poloxamine 908 (coating) onto the particle surface. The hydrophobicity and serum protein adsorption decreased from hydrophobic latex particles to egg lecithin emulsions and blockcopolymer emulsions and particles. The data correlated with that in the literature concerning liver uptake in vivo showing complete RES clearance of hydrophobic latex particles, reduced uptake of egg lecithin emulsions and avoidance of RES uptake by Poloxamine 908 coated particles.

  4. Design of an Emulsion-based Personal Detergent through a Model-based Chemical Product Design Methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattei, Michele; Hill, Michael; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    An extended systematic methodology for the design of emulsion-based Chemical products is presented. The methodology consists of a model-based framework involving seven sequential hierarchical steps: starting with the identification of the needs to be satisfied by the product and then adding one-b...... to obtain one or more candidate formulations. A conceptual casestudy representing a personal detergent is presented to highlight the methodology....

  5. Characterization of a novel oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant for swine influenza virus and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccines consisting of subunit or inactivated bacteria/virus and potent adjuvants are widely used to control and prevent infectious diseases. Because inactivated and subunit antigens are often less antigenic than live microbes, a growing need exists for the development of new and improved vaccine ad...

  6. Antioxidant Properties of Three Aromatic Herbs (Rosemary,Thyme and Lavender) in Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Gallego Iradi, María Gabriela; Gordon, Michael H.; Segovia Gómez, Francisco José; Skowyra, Monika; Almajano Pablos, María Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Lipid oxidation is the major form of deterio- ration in foods because it decreases food quality and nutritional value, and may have negative health implica- tions. Selected aromatic plant extracts from leaves, flowers and stems of rosemary, thyme and lavender were investi- gated for their antioxidant activity. The total polyphenol content was determined by the Folin–Ciocalteu assay and the antioxidant capacity was determined by the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacit...

  7. Controlled Generation of Ultrathin-Shell Double Emulsions and Studies on Their Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chun-Xia; Chen, Dong; Hui, Yue; Weitz, David A; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2017-05-19

    Double emulsions with a hierarchical core-shell structure have great potential in various applications, but their broad use is limited by their instability. To improve stability, water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsions with an ultrathin oil layer of several hundred nanometres were produced by using a microcapillary device. The effects of various parameters on the generation of ultrathin-shell double emulsions and their droplet size were investigated, including the proper combinations of inner, middle and outer phases, flow rates and surfactants. The surfactant in the middle oil phase was found to be critical for the formation of the ultrathin-shell double emulsions. Furthermore, the stability of these double emulsions can be notably improved by increasing the concentration of the surfactant, and they can be stable for months. This opens up new opportunities for their future applications in cosmetics, foods and pharmaceuticals. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Development of multicore hybrid particles for drug delivery through the precipitation of CO2 saturated emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, V S S; Rodríguez-Rojo, S; Matias, A A; Nunes, A V M; Nogueira, I D; Nunes, D; Fortunato, E; de Matos, A P Alves; Cocero, M J; Duarte, C M M

    2015-01-15

    Hybrid lipid-polymer particles are gaining increasing interest to be applied as drug delivery systems due to their greater stability in biological fluids and enhanced cellular uptake of drugs. However, a major drawback is the fact that these particles are usually produced through techniques that use organic solvents. This work studies the possibility of producing for the first time hybrid particles composed by lipid multicores enveloped in a polymeric layer through Particles from Gas Saturated Solutions (PGSS(®)), without using organic solvents. An oil-in-water emulsion, composed by Gelucire 43/01™ (GEL) as the discontinuous phase and by an aqueous polyethylene glycol 4000 (PEG) solution as the continuous phase, was successfully precipitated by PGSS(®). Operating conditions that ensured the stability of the CO2 saturated emulsion were previously evaluated. The resulting PEG-GEL particles present a spherical-like morphology constituted by several lipid cores encapsulated into a polymeric shell. The applicability of these structured particles to be used as drug delivery system (DDS) was studied by using ketoprofen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), as model drug. The particles provided an initial burst release of the drug due to the progressive dissolution of the external layer of PEG, followed by a controlled release of the NSAID from the GEL cores. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Crude Oil Model Emulsion Characterised by means of Near Infrared Spectroscopy and Multivariate Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallevik, H.; Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Sæther, Ø.

    2000-01-01

    Water-in-oil emulsions are investigated by means of multivariate analysis of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic profiles in the range 1100 - 2250 nm. The oil phase is a paraffin-diluted crude oil from the Norwegian Continental Shelf. The influence of water absorption and light scattering of the wa......Water-in-oil emulsions are investigated by means of multivariate analysis of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic profiles in the range 1100 - 2250 nm. The oil phase is a paraffin-diluted crude oil from the Norwegian Continental Shelf. The influence of water absorption and light scattering...

  10. Stabilization of heavy oil-water emulsions using a bio/chemical emulsifier mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahbakhsh, A.; Taghizadeh, M.; Movagharnejad, K. [Chemical Engineering Department, Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yakhchali, B. [National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    In this study, the viscosity reduction of heavy oil has been investigated through the formation of oil-water emulsion using a bio/chemical emulsifier mixture. Four bioemulsifiers from indigenous Rhodococcus ergthropolis and Bacillus licheniformis strains were used to stabilize a highly-viscous oil-in-water emulsion. The Taguchi method with an L{sub 9} orthogonal array design was used to investigate the effect of various control factors on the formation of the oil/water emulsions. An emulsion with lowest viscosity was formed using ACO4 strain. The substantial stability of the oil-in-water emulsion allows the heavy oil to be transported practically over long distances or remain stationary for a considerable period of time prior to utilization. As the result of Taguchi analysis, the temperature and concentration of the emulsifier had a significant influence on viscosity reduction of the emulsion. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. A metabolomic analysis of two intravenous lipid emulsions in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian T Kalish

    Full Text Available Parenteral nutrition (PN, including intravenous lipid administration, is a life-saving therapy but can be complicated by cholestasis and liver disease. The administration of intravenous soy bean oil (SO has been associated with the development of liver disease, while the administration of intravenous fish oil (FO has been associated with the resolution of liver disease. The biochemical mechanism of this differential effect is unclear. This study compares SO and FO lipid emulsions in a murine model of hepatic steatosis, one of the first hits in PN-associated liver disease.We established a murine model of hepatic steatosis in which liver injury is induced by orally feeding mice a PN solution. C57BL/6J mice were randomized to receive PN alone (a high carbohydrate diet (HCD, PN plus intravenous FO (Omegaven®; Fresenius Kabi AG, Bad Homburg VDH, Germany, PN plus intravenous SO (Intralipid®; Fresenius Kabi AG, Bad Homburg v.d.H., Germany, for Baxter Healthcare, Deerfield, IL, or a chow diet. After 19 days, liver tissue was harvested from all animals and subjected to metabolomic profiling.The administration of an oral HCD without lipid induced profound hepatic steatosis. SO was associated with macro- and microvesicular hepatic steatosis, while FO largely prevented the development of steatosis. 321 detectable compounds were identified in the metabolomic analysis. HCD induced de novo fatty acid synthesis and oxidative stress. Both FO and SO relieved some of the metabolic shift towards de novo lipogenesis, but FO offered additional advantages in terms of lipid peroxidation and the generation of inflammatory precursors.Improved lipid metabolism combined with reduced oxidative stress may explain the protective effect offered by intravenous FO in vivo.

  12. Pickering emulsions prepared by layered niobate K₄Nb₆O₁₇ intercalated with organic cations and photocatalytic dye decomposition in the emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakato, Teruyuki; Ueda, Hiroaki; Hashimoto, Sachika; Terao, Ryosuke; Kameyama, Miyuki; Mouri, Emiko

    2012-08-01

    We investigated emulsions stabilized with particles of layered hexaniobate, known as a semiconductor photocatalyst, and photocatalytic degradation of dyes in the emulsions. Hydrophobicity of the niobate particles was adjusted with the intercalation of alkylammonium ions into the interlayer spaces to enable emulsification in a toluene-water system. After the modification of interlayer space with hexylammonium ions, the niobate stabilized water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions in a broad composition range. Optical microscopy showed that the niobate particles covered the surfaces of emulsion droplets and played a role of emulsifying agents. The niobate particles also enabled the generation of oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions in a limited composition range. Modification with dodecylammonium ions, which turned the niobate particles more hydrophobic, only gave w/o emulsions, and the particles were located not only at the toluene-water interface but also inside the toluene continuous phase. On the other hand, interlayer modification with butylammonium ions led to the formation of o/w emulsions. When porphyrin dyes were added to the system, the cationic dye was adsorbed on niobate particles at the emulsion droplets whereas the lipophilic dye was dissolved in toluene. Upon UV irradiation, both of the dyes were degraded photocatalytically. When the cationic and lipophilic porphyrin molecules were simultaneously added to the emulsions, both of the dyes were photodecomposed nonselectively.

  13. Models of oil spill dispersion stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarized the theory of oil-in-water emulsion stability resulting in the resurfacing of oil spill dispersion. Since most emulsions are unstable, they will break down into their constituent parts because of the many forces and processes that act on them. These include gravitational forces; surfactant interchange with water and the subsequent surfactant loss to the water column; creaming; coalescence; flocculation; Ostwald ripening; and sedimentation. Gravitational separation is the most important force that contributes to the resurfacing of oil droplets from an oil-in-water emulsion. The paper presented a newly developed model that used 4 basic processes. Initial dispersion was an input, then the dispersion was distributed over the mixing depth, as predicted by the wave height. The droplets then rise to the surface according to Stokes' law. Oil on the surface from the rising oil and undispersed oil is redispersed. The droplets in the water column are subject to coalescence as governed by the Smoluchowski equation. The dispersion in the water column therefore decreases at an exponential rate with dispersion half-lives ranging from 120 to 250 minutes. Over 200 runs were performed using variations of the models. The study showed that the most important factor is the effectiveness of the initial dispersion and the the redispersion. Increased sea energy was found to increase the amount of coalescence that occurs, resulting in an increase in resurfacing. However, increased turbulence also caused redispersion, offsetting the effect of the recoalescence slightly. 17 refs., 5 tabs., 13 figs.

  14. Target dependence of clan model parameter in 84 Kr36–Emulsion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of target present in nuclear emulsion detector using 84Kr36 at ∼1 A GeV. The variation of scaled rapidity–gap (rap–gap) probability with single moment combination has been studied. We found that experimental points lie approximately on the negative binomial distribution (NBD) curve, indicating a scaling behaviour.

  15. Hydrophilic Surface Modification of PDMS Microchannel for O/W and W/O/W Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shazia Bashir

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A surface modification method for bonded polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS microchannels is presented herein. Polymerization of acrylic acid was performed on the surface of a microchannel using an inline atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier microplasma technique. The surface treatment changes the wettability of the microchannel from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. This is a challenging task due to the fast hydrophobic recovery of the PDMS surface after modification. This modification allows the formation of highly monodisperse oil-in-water (O/W droplets. The generation of water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W double emulsions was successfully achieved by connecting in series a hydrophobic microchip with a modified hydrophilic microchip. An original channel blocking technique to pattern the surface wettability of a specific section of a microchip using a viscous liquid comprising a mixture of honey and glycerol, is also presented for generating W/O/W emulsions on a single chip.

  16. A comparison of corn fiber gum, hydrophobically modified starch, gum arabic and soybean soluble polysaccharide: interfacial dynamics, viscoelastic response at oil/water interfaces and emulsion stabilization mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    The interfacial rheology of polysaccharide adsorption layers of corn fiber gum (CFG), octenyl succinate anhydride-modified starch (OSA-s), gum arabic (GA) and soybean soluble polysaccharides (SSPS) at the oil/water interface and their emulsifying properties in oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions were compa...

  17. Pickering emulsions stabilized by coloured organic pigment particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Bernard P; Olusanya, Samuel O

    2017-01-01

    The possibility of stabilizing emulsions of water and non-polar alkane with pure, coloured organic pigment particles is explored. Seven pigment types each possessing a primary colour of the rainbow were selected. Their solubility in water or heptane was determined using a spectrophotometric method and their surface energies were derived from the contact angles of probe liquids on compressed disks of the particles. As expected, most of the pigments are relatively hydrophobic but pigment orange is quite hydrophilic. At equal volumes of oil and water, preferred emulsions were water-in-oil (w/o) for six pigment types and oil-in-water (o/w) for pigment orange. The emulsion type is in line with calculated contact angles of the particles at the oil-water interface being either side of 90°. Their stability to coalescence increases with particle concentration. Emulsions are shown to undergo limited coalescence from which the coverage of drop interfaces by particles has been determined. In a few cases, close-packed primary particles are visible around emulsion droplets. At constant particle concentration, the influence of the volume fraction of water ( φ w ) on emulsions was also studied. For the most hydrophilic pigment orange, emulsions are o/w at all φ w , whereas they are w/o for the most hydrophobic pigments (red, yellow, green and blue). For pigments of intermediate hydrophobicity however (indigo and violet), catastrophic phase inversion becomes possible with emulsions inverting from w/o to o/w upon increasing φ w . For the first time, we link the pigment surface energy to the propensity of emulsions to phase invert transitionally or catastrophically.

  18. Rheological Properties of Nanoparticle Silica-Surfactant Stabilized Crude Oil Emulsions: Influence of Temperature, Nanoparticle Concentration and Water Volume Fraction"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, Erin; Pales, Ashley; Li, Chunyan; Mu, Linlin; Bai, Lingyun; Clifford, Heather; Darnault, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Oil in water emulsions occur during oil extraction due to the presence of water, naturally-occurring surface-active agents and mechanical mixing in pipelines or from oil spillage. Emulsions present difficulties for use of oil in fuel and their rheological properties are important to treat environmental impacts of spills. The objective of this study is to assess the rheological characteristics of oil in water emulsions stabilized by 5% NaCl brine, Tween 20 surfactant and silica nanoparticles to gain knowledge about the behavior of oil flow in pipelines and characterize them for environmental applications. Rheological behaviors such as shear rate, shear stress, and viscosity of Prudhoe Bay crude oil emulsions were analyzed with varying percent of water volume fractions (12.5, 25 and 50%), varying weight percent of silica nanoparticles (0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 weight %), with and without 2 CMC Tween 20 nonionic surfactant. Emulsions with varying water volume fractions were analyzed at 20, 40 and 60 degrees Celsius. Flow curve analysis of the emulsions was performed using an Anton-Paar rheometer. Preliminary findings indicate that increased temperature and increasing the concentration of nanoparticles both produced lower shear stress and that the addition of surfactant decreased the viscosity and shear stress of the emulsions.

  19. Recurrence network analysis of experimental signals from bubbly oil-in-water flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Zhang, Xin-Wang; Du, Meng; Jin, Ning-De

    2013-01-01

    Based on the signals from oil–water two-phase flow experiment, we construct and analyze recurrence networks to characterize the dynamic behavior of different flow patterns. We first take a chaotic time series as an example to demonstrate that the local property of recurrence network allows characterizing chaotic dynamics. Then we construct recurrence networks for different oil-in-water flow patterns and investigate the local property of each constructed network, respectively. The results indicate that the local topological statistic of recurrence network is very sensitive to the transitions of flow patterns and allows uncovering the dynamic flow behavior associated with chaotic unstable periodic orbits.

  20. Ultrathin cellulose nanosheet membranes for superfast separation of oil-in-water nanoemulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ke; Zhang, Qiu Gen; Li, Hong Mei; Guo, Nan Nan; Zhu, Ai Mei; Liu, Qing Lin

    2014-08-01

    Oily wastewater is generated in diverse industrial processes, and its treatment has become crucial due to increasing environmental concerns. Herein, novel ultrathin nanoporous membranes of cellulose nanosheets have been fabricated for separation of oil-in-water nanoemulsions. The fabrication approach is facile and environmentally friendly, in which cellulose nanosheets are prepared by freeze-extraction of a very dilute cellulose solution. The as-prepared membranes have a cellulose nanosheet layer with a cut-off of 10-12 nm and a controllable thickness of 80-220 nm. They allow ultrafast water permeation and exhibit excellent size-selective separation properties. A 112 nm-thick membrane has a water flux of 1620 l m-2 h-1 bar-1 and a ferritin rejection of 92.5%. These membranes have been applied to remove oil from its aqueous nanoemulsions successfully, and they show an ultrafast and effective separation of oil-in-water nanoemulsions. The newly developed ultrathin cellulose membranes have a wide application in oily wastewater treatment, separation and purification of nanomaterials.Oily wastewater is generated in diverse industrial processes, and its treatment has become crucial due to increasing environmental concerns. Herein, novel ultrathin nanoporous membranes of cellulose nanosheets have been fabricated for separation of oil-in-water nanoemulsions. The fabrication approach is facile and environmentally friendly, in which cellulose nanosheets are prepared by freeze-extraction of a very dilute cellulose solution. The as-prepared membranes have a cellulose nanosheet layer with a cut-off of 10-12 nm and a controllable thickness of 80-220 nm. They allow ultrafast water permeation and exhibit excellent size-selective separation properties. A 112 nm-thick membrane has a water flux of 1620 l m-2 h-1 bar-1 and a ferritin rejection of 92.5%. These membranes have been applied to remove oil from its aqueous nanoemulsions successfully, and they show an ultrafast and effective

  1. Efficiency Evaluation of Offshore Deoiling Applications utilizing Real-Time Oil-in-Water Monitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dennis Severin; Bram, Mads Valentin; Løhndorf, Petar Durdevic

    2017-01-01

    that these solutions could be further improved. In order to more precisely monitor the deoiling operations, this study investigated the real-time monitoring of the deoiling efficiency of the hydrocyclone facilities which are commonly used in offshore oil and gas production. Fluorescence based monitors were applied...... to measure hydrocyclone inlet's and underflow's Oil-in-Water (OiW) concentrations in real-time. Image-based microscopy was used to analyze the oil droplet size distribution at inlet and underflow to investigate the droplets' influence on hydrocyclone's efficiency. Performance experiments were carried out...

  2. The structure of omega3 food emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard; Loussert, C.; Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt

    Fish oil is rich in polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3 PUFAs) which are generally recognized as being beneficial to the health [1]. The addition of fish oil to food products is attractive to both the consumers and the food industry. Indeed, these components will improve nutritional value...... and add product value. Omega-3 PUFAs are rich in double bonds in their fatty acid chains and this attribute renders them highly susceptible to lipid oxidation. Omega-3 PUFAs can be added to food products as neat oil or as a delivery system such as oil-in-water emulsions. In this last configuration......, the oil is surrounded by an emulsifier e.g. proteins, phospholipids or hydro-colloids. This emulsifier layer is important and may protect the oil inside the droplets against prooxidants in the surrounding water phase; the emulsifier should act as a physical barrier between the omega-3 PUFAs...

  3. Formulation, Characterization and Properties of Hemp Seed Oil and Its Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulcová, Veronika; Kašpárková, Věra; Humpolíček, Petr; Buňková, Leona

    2017-04-27

    The formulation, characterization, and anticipated antibacterial properties of hemp seed oil and its emulsions were investigated. The oil obtained from the seeds of Cannabis sativa L. in refined and unrefined form was characterized using iodine, saponification, acid values, and gas chromatography, and was employed for the preparation of stable oil-in-water emulsions. The emulsions were prepared using pairs of non-ionic surfactants (Tween, Span). The effects of the emulsification method (spontaneous emulsification vs. high-intensity stirring), hydrophilic lipophilic balance (HLB), type and concentration of surfactant, and oil type on the size and distribution of the emulsion particles were investigated. It was found that the ability to form stable emulsions with small, initial particle sizes is primarily dependent on the given method of preparation and the HLB value. The most efficient method of emulsification that afforded the best emulsions with the smallest particles (151 ± 1 nm) comprised the high-energy method, and emulsions stable over the long-term were observed at HBL 9 with 10 wt % concentration of surfactants. Under high-intensity emulsification, refined and unrefined oils performed similarly. The oils as well as their emulsions were tested against the growth of selected bacteria using the disk diffusion and broth microdilution methods. The antibacterial effect of hemp seed oil was documented against Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus . The formulated emulsions did not exhibit the antibacterial activity that had been anticipated.

  4. Characterization of intrinsic material properties of a model lipoproteic emulsion gel by oscillatory and creep compliance rheometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kyle S; Kuo, Wan-Yuan; Lee, Youngsoo

    2018-02-01

    The effects of varying formulation and processing parameters on rheological properties in a model lipid/protein-based emulsion gel were studied. Heat-set model lipoproteic emulsion gels were prepared with varying levels of protein, lipid, and NaCl contents and high pressure homogenization treatments. Small deformation oscillatory rheometry, creep compliance, and pore size analysis experiments were used to characterize intrinsic structural properties, matrix interactions, and microstructure. Creep compliance behavior of the gel system was successfully modeled by a four-component Burgers model. Shear storage and loss moduli and Newtonian viscosity increased while instantaneous compliance, retarded compliance, and pore size decreased with increasing protein or fat content or homogenization pressure. The data obtained in this study provide information on factors affecting protein network structure and strength, properties may be useful for creating desirable attributes in lipid/protein-based foods with a further optimization process. This research evaluates the effects of formulation and processing factors on the properties of a protein/fat-based food system. These properties may be related to sodium mobility and salty taste perception. This research provides information on strategies that can be used to control factors influencing the physical properties of protein/fat-based food systems targeting sodium reduction. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Crude Oil Model Emulsion Characterised by means of Near Infrared Spectroscopy and Multivariate Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallevik, H.; Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Sæther, Ø.

    2000-01-01

    Water-in-oil emulsions are investigated by means of multivariate analysis of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic profiles in the range 1100 - 2250 nm. The oil phase is a paraffin-diluted crude oil from the Norwegian Continental Shelf. The influence of water absorption and light scattering...... of the water droplets are shown to be strong. Despite the strong influence of the water phase, the NIR technique is still capable of predicting the composition of the investigated oil phase....

  6. Formulation and physiochemical study of α-tocopherol based oil in water nanoemulsion stabilized with non toxic, biodegradable surfactant: Sodium stearoyl lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Khushwinder; Kaur, Jaspreet; Kumar, Raj; Mehta, S K

    2017-09-01

    The unique properties such as high optical clarity, stability and enhanced bioavailability of nanoemulsion make them useful for food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. In this work, sodium stearoyl lactate and Tween 80 surfactants were collectively used to fabricate alpha tocopherol based oil in water nanoemulsion using high energy ultrasonication method. The spherical nature of pure and drug loaded nanoemulsion has been confirmed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The influence of pH, dilution, surfactant concentration and ionic strength on average particle size of pure and nutraceutical (benzylisothiocyanate and curcumin) encapsulated emulsion was examined. The prepared emulsion exhibited good stability up to 90days in salt solution (50-200mM) and different pH conditions. The cumulative release % of benzylisothiocyanate and curcumin was found to be 50.29% in 36h and 89.15% in 150h respectively. The antioxidant activity of pure, benzylisothiocyanate, curcumin and cocktail (benzylisothiocyanate and curcumin) nanoemulsion was calculated with 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical. The IC 50 value of different antioxidant showed that benzylisothiocyanate nanoemulsion acted as better antioxidant as compared to pure and curcumin encapsulated nanoemulsion. Also the cell viability of pure nanoemulsion was found to be 24% on hep G2 cell. The effect of UV light irradiation on curcumin and benzylisothiocyanate stability was carried out in different solvent conditions (water/ethanol and nanoemulsion). The degradation of curcumin by the impact of UV light was successfully controlled by trapping in NEm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibition of β-carotene degradation in oil-in-water nanoemulsions: influence of oil-soluble and water-soluble antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Cheng; Decker, Eric Andrew; Xiao, Hang; McClements, David Julian

    2012-12-01

    The utilisation of carotenoids as functional ingredients (pigments and nutraceuticals) in many food and beverage products is currently limited because of their poor water-solubility, high melting point, chemical instability, and low bioavailability. This study examined the impact of antioxidants on the chemical degradation of β-carotene encapsulated within nanoemulsions suitable for oral ingestion. β-Carotene was incorporated into oil-in-water nanoemulsions stabilized by either a globular protein (β-lactoglobulin) or a non-ionic surfactant (Tween 20). Nanoemulsions were then stored at neutral pH and their physical and chemical stability were monitored under accelerated stress storage conditions (55°C). β-Carotene degradation was monitored non-destructively using colour reflectance measurements. The rate of β-carotene degradation decreased upon addition of water-soluble (EDTA and ascorbic acid) or oil-soluble (vitamin E acetate or Coenzyme Q10) antioxidants. EDTA was more effective than ascorbic acid, and Coenzyme Q10 was more effective than vitamin E acetate. The utilisation of water-soluble and oil-soluble antioxidants in combination (EDTA and vitamin E acetate) was less effective than using them individually. Emulsions stabilized by β-lactoglobulin were more stable to colour fading than those stabilized by Tween 20. These results provide useful information for designing effective nanoemulsion-based delivery systems that retard the chemical degradation of encapsulated carotenoids during long term storage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ocean sequestration of carbon dioxide: modeling the deep ocean release of a dense emulsion of liquid Co2-in-water stabilized by pulverized limestone particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golomb, D; Pennell, S; Ryan, D; Barry, E; Swett, P

    2007-07-01

    The release into the deep ocean of an emulsion of liquid carbon dioxide-in-seawater stabilized by fine particles of pulverized limestone (CaCO3) is modeled. The emulsion is denser than seawater, hence, it will sink deeper from the injection point, increasing the sequestration period. Also, the presence of CaCO3 will partially buffer the carbonic acid that results when the emulsion eventually disintegrates. The distance that the plume sinks depends on the density stratification of the ocean, the amount of the released emulsion, and the entrainment factor. When released into the open ocean, a plume containing the CO2 output of a 1000 MW(el) coal-fired power plant will typically sink hundreds of meters below the injection point. When released from a pipe into a valley on the continental shelf, the plume will sink about twice as far because of the limited entrainment of ambient seawater when the plume flows along the valley. A practical system is described involving a static mixer for the in situ creation of the CO2/seawater/pulverized limestone emulsion. The creation of the emulsion requires significant amounts of pulverized limestone, on the order of 0.5 tons per ton of liquid CO2. That increases the cost of ocean sequestration by about $13/ ton of CO2 sequestered. However, the additional cost may be compensated by the savings in transportation costs to greater depth, and because the release of an emulsion will not acidify the seawater around the release point.

  9. Effects of replacing beef fat with pre-emulsified pumpkin seed oil on some quality characteristics of model system chicken meat emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdaroğlu, M.; Nacak, B.; Karabıyıkoğlu, M.; Tepe, M.; Baykara, I.; Kökmen, Y.

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the effects of adding pumpkin seed oil (PSO) in water emulsion to model system chicken meat emulsions (MSME) on product quality and oxidative stability were investigated. MSME were produced by replacing 25% (P25) and 50% (P50) of beef fat with PSO-in-water emulsion (PSO/W) while control treatment was prepared with only beef fat. Addition of PSO/W to the formulation resulted in significant differences in chemical composition and pH values of both raw and cooked MSME treatments. The use of PSO/W produced significant improvements to emulsion stability, oxidative stability and cooking yield of MSME. It was determined that the use of PSO/W formulation results in decreased total expressible fluid values and increased cooking yields of the emulsions. It was observed that the highest cooking yield and the lowest total expressible fluid were found in the sample containing 50% PSO/W. It should be a feasible strategy to produce fat-reduced meat products with healthier lipid profiles by using PSO/W.

  10. Structural study of the continuous medium of spontaneous ternary emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desforge, Christine

    1993-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the study of the structure of a continuous medium of spontaneous ternary emulsions of oil-in-water type, composed of water and octane, and stabilised by means of a cationic surfactant (DDAB, didodecyldimethyl ammonium bromide). It shows that the kinetic stability is due to electrostatic repulsions between octane drops, and that these repulsions are due to the presence of positive charges on the DDAB mono-layer located at the interface between water and oil. Various aspects are highlighted by neutron and X ray scattering. In this study, the DDAB is replaced by a non-ionic surfactant. Its use results in very steady oil/water emulsions [fr

  11. Pretreatment with Fish Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion Modulates Muscle Leukocyte Chemotaxis in Murine Model of Sublethal Lower Limb Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Ming Shih

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of a fish oil- (FO- based lipid emulsion on muscle leukocyte chemotaxis and inflammatory responses in a murine model of limb ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury. Mice were assigned randomly to 1 sham (sham group, 2 ischemic groups, and 2 IR groups. The sham group did not undergo the ischemic procedure. The mice assigned to the ischemic or IR groups were pretreated intraperitoneally with either saline or FO-based lipid emulsion for 3 consecutive days. The IR procedure was induced by applying a 4.5 oz orthodontic rubber band to the left thigh above the greater trochanter for 120 min and then cutting the band to allow reperfusion. The ischemic groups were sacrificed immediately while the IR groups were sacrificed 24 h after reperfusion. Blood, IR-injured gastrocnemius, and lung tissues were collected for analysis. The results showed that FO pretreatment suppressed the local and systemic expression of several IR-induced proinflammatory mediators. Also, the FO-pretreated group had lower blood Ly6ChiCCR2hi monocyte percentage and muscle M1/M2 ratio than the saline group at 24 h after reperfusion. These findings suggest that FO pretreatment may have a protective role in limb IR injury by modulating the expression of proinflammatory mediators and regulating the polarization of macrophage.

  12. Preparation and Application of Water-in-Oil Emulsions Stabilized by Modified Graphene Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoma Fei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A series of alkyl chain modified graphene oxides (AmGO with different alkyl chain length and content was fabricated using a reducing reaction between graphene oxide (GO and alkyl amine. Then AmGO was used as a graphene-based particle emulsifier to stabilize Pickering emulsion. Compared with the emulsion stabilized by GO, which was oil-in-water type, all the emulsions stabilized by AmGO were water-in-oil type. The effects of alkyl chain length and alkyl chain content on the emulsion properties of AmGO were investigated. The emulsions stabilized by AmGO showed good stability within a wide range of pH (from pH = 1 to pH = 13 and salt concentrations (from 0.1 to 1000 mM. In addition, the application of water-in-oil emulsions stabilized by AmGO was investigated. AmGO/polyaniline nanocomposite (AmGO/PANi was prepared through an emulsion approach, and its supercapacitor performance was investigated. This research broadens the application of AmGO as a water-in-oil type emulsion stabilizer and in preparing graphene-based functional materials.

  13. Intravenous lipid emulsion does not reverse dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Jared; Carreiro, Stephanie; Hack, Jason B

    2013-10-01

    The anticoagulant dabigatran has no reversal agent and may cause life-threatening bleeding in patients with trauma or closed-space hemorrhage. Intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) is thought to create a lipid compartment in serum that sequesters lipophilic drugs. Dabigatran is lipophilic, and its anticoagulant effects are concentration dependent. The study objective was to determine if ILE therapy reverses dabigatran's anticoagulant effects. Twenty rats were selected at random, 10 in the ILE group and 10 in a normal saline (NS) control group. Animals had a baseline tail bleeding time (T0), followed by oral dabigatran administration (15 mg/kg). At 45 minutes (T45), a second tail bleed time measurement was performed, followed by a 7-minute infusion of 15 mL/kg ILE or NS. A final 60-minute (T60) bleed time measurement was obtained. An ILE-only group of five animals had bleeding times assessed prior to (T0) and 15 minutes after (T15) ILE therapy. A mixed-effect repeated-measures analysis of variance modeling the effect of time, group, and the interaction of group and time on bleed times was conducted. There was a significant within-subject change in bleeding time across the assessment points (F(2,36) = 33; p < 0.001), but there were no effect of group (F(1,18) = 1.42, p = 0.25) or an interaction between group and assessment point on mean bleeding time (F(2,36) = 0.59, p = 56). Between T0 and T45, average bleeding times increased from 109.5 seconds (95% confidence interval [CI] = 94 to 125 seconds) to 231.8 seconds (95% CI = 193 to 271 seconds; p < 0.0001) for both the ILE group and the NS control group. Between T45 and T60, bleeding times in the ILE group decreased by 31.5 seconds (95% CI = -77 to 14 seconds) and by 6 seconds (95% CI = -67 to 55 seconds) in the NS group (p = 0.46). In the five ILE-only animals, the average bleeding time at T0 was 114 seconds (95% CI = 62 to 166 seconds), which increased significantly at T15 to 237

  14. The role of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in stabilizing emulsions of hexadecane in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirelles, Aureliano Agostinho Dias; da Cunha, Rosiane Lopes; Gombert, Andreas Karoly

    2018-04-01

    During downstream operations involved in the purification of hydrophobic biofuels produced by microorganisms, undesired stable emulsions may be formed. Understanding the mechanisms behind this stability is a pre-requisite for designing cost-effective strategies to break these emulsions. In this work, we aimed at increasing our knowledge on the mechanisms responsible for stabilizing yeast-containing oil-in-water emulsions. For this purpose, emulsions containing hexadecane and different yeast-based aqueous phases were prepared and analyzed for phase separation, surface charge density, particle size, and rheology. First, we observed that compounds present in fresh tablet baker's yeast contribute to emulsion stability. In order to eliminate this effect, we generated stocks with this yeast in the laboratory, and compared its performance with an industrial fuel ethanol strain, namely Saccharomyces cerevisiae PE-2. We confirmed that the presence of yeast cells enhances emulsion stability. The cultivation medium (complex or defined) in which cells are grown, as well as the physiological state of the cells (pre- or post-diauxic), prior to emulsion preparation, influenced emulsion stability. The smaller cell size of tablet yeast probably also contributes to more stable emulsions, when compared to those prepared with yeast cells grown in the laboratory. Baker's and fuel ethanol yeast cells in post-diauxic phase promote the formation of more stable emulsions than those with cells in the pre-diauxic physiological state. Finally, we propose a mechanism to explain the enhanced emulsion stability due to the presence of yeast cells, with electrostatic repulsion between emulsion droplets having the prevailing effect.

  15. Efficacy of a new topical cationic emulsion of cyclosporine A on dry eye clinical signs in an experimental mouse model of dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daull, Philippe; Feraille, Laurence; Barabino, Stefano; Cimbolini, Nicolas; Antonelli, Sophie; Mauro, Virgine; Garrigue, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-12-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is a complex, multifactorial pathology characterized by corneal epithelium lesions and inflammation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a cationic emulsion of cyclosporine A (CsA) in a mouse model that mimics severe dry eye. Eight to 12-week-old female C57BL/6N mice with tail patches of scopolamine were housed in controlled environment chambers to induce dry eye. At day three, following dry eye confirmation by corneal fluorescein staining (CFS, score 0-15) and phenol red thread (PRT) lacrimation test, the mice (n = 10/gp) were either treated 3 times a day in both eyes with drug-free cationic emulsion, a 0.1% CsA cationic emulsion, or 1% methylprednisolone (positive control), or non-treated. Aqueous tear production and CFS scores were evaluated at baseline and throughout the treatment period. The lacrimation test confirmed the scopolamine-induced decrease in aqueous production by the lacrimal gland. A reduction of 59% in induced-CFS was observed following topical treatment with 0.1% CsA. The beneficial effect of the cationic emulsion vehicle itself on keratitis was also clearly evidenced by its better performance over 1% methylprednisolone, -36%, vs. -28% on the CFS scores, respectively. This study indicates that the cationic emulsion of CsA (0.1%) was a very effective formulation for the management of corneal epithelium lesions in a severe DED mouse model. In addition, it performed better than a potent glucocorticosteroid (1% methylprednisolone). This cationic emulsion of CsA (0.1%), combining CsA and a tear film oriented therapy (TFOT), i.e. with vehicle properties that mechanically stabilize the tear film, represents a promising new treatment strategy for the management of the signs of dry eye. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of Rate-All-That-Apply (RATA) and Descriptive sensory Analysis (DA) of model double emulsions with subtle perceptual differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppermann, A.K.L.; Graaf, de C.; Scholten, E.; Stieger, M.A.; Piqueras Fiszman, Phd Betina

    2017-01-01

    The Rate-All-That-Apply (RATA) method, an intensity-based Check-All-That-Apply (CATA) variant, has recently been developed for sensory characterization involving untrained panellists. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensory profiles of ten model (double) emulsions with subtle perceptual

  17. Phytosterol colloidal particles as Pickering stabilizers for emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fu; Tang, Chuan-He

    2014-06-04

    Water-insoluble phytosterols were developed into a kind of colloidal particle as Pickering stabilizers for emulsions by a classic anti-solvent method using 100% ethanol as the organic phase to solubilize the phytosterols and whey protein concentrate (WPC) as the emulsifier. The colloidal particles in the dispersion, with morphology of stacked platelet-like sheets, had a mean diameter of 44.7 and 24.7 μm for the volume- and surface-averaged sizes, respectively. The properties and stability of the emulsions stabilized by these colloidal particles were highly dependent upon the applied total solid concentration (c; in the dispersion) and oil fraction (ø). The results indicated that (1) at a low c value (emulsions were susceptible to phase separation, even at a low ø of 0.2, (2) at low ø values (e.g., 0.2 or 0.3) and a relatively high c value (1.0%, w/v, or above), a severe droplet flocculation occurred for the emulsions, and (3) when both c and ø were appropriately high, a kind of self-supporting gel-like emulsions could be formed. More interestingly, a phase inversion of the emulsions from the oil-in-water to water-in-oil type was observed, upon the ø increasing from 0.2 to 0.6 (especially at high c values, e.g., 3.0%, w/v). The elaborated Pickering emulsions stabilized by the phytosterol colloidal particles with a gel-like behavior would provide a candidate to act as a novel delivery system for active ingredients.

  18. Charm studies in emulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Kalinin, Sergey

    Neutrino-nucleon scattering is an effective way to investigate the inner structure of the nucleon, to extract the Standard Model parameters and to explore heavy quarks production dynamics. In the last decades, several experiments have been constructed to study weak interactions of neutrinos with nucleons. One of them was CERN-WA95 experiment operated by the CHORUS collaboration. It is based on a hybrid detector with nuclear emulsion as a target followed by electronic devices. Nuclear emulsion provides three dimensional spatial information with an outstanding resolution of the order of one micron. Therefore, it is ideal to detect short-lived particles. A special technique has been developed to reconstruct events in the emulsion which allows to perform a detailed investigation of events such as charmed hadrons production by neutrinos. As a result, the backround in the selected charm sample is up to six times lower compared to similar experiments. Such a method also permits to make direct measurements of some qu...

  19. Performance and Selectivity of Ceramic Membranes in the Ultrafiltration of Model Emulsion in Saline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćwirko, Konrad; Kalbarczyk-Jedynak, Agnieszka

    2017-06-01

    Oily wastewaters from different onshore and offshore installations and from maritime transport pose a serious threat to the environment so they must be treated by multistage separation also including membrane processes. The main advantages of such membranes are high performance and selectivity, high resistance for temperature and pressure, resistance for acids, bases and solvents, long service life and for application - significant reduction of industries and transport environmental impact. This work presents the results of the process of separation of oil from the emulsion with NaCl addition. Research was performed with a use of laboratory installation with ceramic 300 kDa membrane. The analysis concerned performance and selectivity of a membrane in the function of time and test results have been subsequently compared with the requirements of the IMO.

  20. A general computation model based on inverse analysis principle used for rheological analysis of W/O rapeseed and soybean oil emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vintila, Iuliana; Gavrus, Adinel

    2017-10-01

    The present research paper proposes the validation of a rigorous computation model used as a numerical tool to identify rheological behavior of complex emulsions W/O. Considering a three-dimensional description of a general viscoplastic flow it is detailed the thermo-mechanical equations used to identify fluid or soft material's rheological laws starting from global experimental measurements. Analyses are conducted for complex emulsions W/O having generally a Bingham behavior using the shear stress - strain rate dependency based on a power law and using an improved analytical model. Experimental results are investigated in case of rheological behavior for crude and refined rapeseed/soybean oils and four types of corresponding W/O emulsions using different physical-chemical composition. The rheological behavior model was correlated with the thermo-mechanical analysis of a plane-plane rheometer, oil content, chemical composition, particle size and emulsifier's concentration. The parameters of rheological laws describing the industrial oils and the W/O concentrated emulsions behavior were computed from estimated shear stresses using a non-linear regression technique and from experimental torques using the inverse analysis tool designed by A. Gavrus (1992-2000).

  1. Response of nuclear emulsions to ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, R.; Pinkerton, F.E.

    1975-01-01

    Heavy ion tracks in Ilford K-2 emulsion are simulated with a computer program which makes use of the delta-ray theory of track structure, and the special assumption that the response of this emulsion to gamma-rays is 8-or-more hit. The Ilford K-series of nuclear emulsions is produced from a parent stock called K.0 emulsion, sensitized to become K.1 to K.5, and desensitized to become K-1 to K-3. Our simulations demonstrate that the emulsions K.5 through K.0 to K-1 are 1-or-more hit detectors, while K-2 is an 8-or-more hit detector. We have no data for K-3 emulsion. It would appear that emulsions of intermediate hittedness might be produced by an intermediate desensitization, to mimic or match the RBE-LET variations of biological cells, perhaps to produce a ''rem-dosimeter''. In the K-2 emulsion no developable gains are produced by stopping H, He, and Li ions. The emulsion has ''threshold-like'' properties, resembling etchable track detectors. It should prove useful in the measurement of high LET dose in a strong low LET background, as for pions or neutrons. Since it can be expected to accumulate and repair ''sub-lethal damage'', to display the ion-kill and gamma-kill inactivation modes, the grain-count and track width regimes, it may serve to model biological effects. (auth)

  2. Directed weighted network structure analysis of complex impedance measurements for characterizing oil-in-water bubbly flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Dang, Wei-Dong; Xue, Le; Zhang, Shan-Shan

    2017-03-01

    Characterizing the flow structure underlying the evolution of oil-in-water bubbly flow remains a contemporary challenge of great interests and complexity. In particular, the oil droplets dispersing in a water continuum with diverse size make the study of oil-in-water bubbly flow really difficult. To study this issue, we first design a novel complex impedance sensor and systematically conduct vertical oil-water flow experiments. Based on the multivariate complex impedance measurements, we define modalities associated with the spatial transient flow structures and construct modality transition-based network for each flow condition to study the evolution of flow structures. In order to reveal the unique flow structures underlying the oil-in-water bubbly flow, we filter the inferred modality transition-based network by removing the edges with small weight and resulting isolated nodes. Then, the weighted clustering coefficient entropy and weighted average path length are employed for quantitatively assessing the original network and filtered network. The differences in network measures enable to efficiently characterize the evolution of the oil-in-water bubbly flow structures.

  3. Emulsion design for the delivery of β-carotene in complex food systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Like; Wang, Di; Liu, Fuguo; Gao, Yanxiang

    2018-03-24

    β-Carotene has been widely investigated both in the industry and academia, due to its unique bioactive attributes as an antioxidant and pro-vitamin A. Many attempts were made to design delivery systems for β-carotene to improve its dispersant state and chemical stability, and finally to enhance the functionality. Different types of oil-in-water emulsions were proved to be effective delivery systems for lipophilic bioactive ingredients, and intensive studies were performed on β-carotene emulsions in the last decade. Emulsions are thermodynamically unstable, and emulsions with intact structures are preferable in delivering β-carotene during processing and storage. β-Carotene in emulsions with smaller particle size has poor stability, and protein-type emulsifiers and additional antioxidants are effective in protecting β-carotene from degradation. Recent development in the design of protein-polyphenol conjugates has provided a novel approach to improve the stability of β-carotene emulsions. When β-carotene is consumed, its bioaccessibility is highly influenced by the digestion of lipids, and β-carotene in smaller oil droplets containing long-chain fatty acids has a higher bioaccessibility. In order to better deliver β-carotene in complex food products, some novel emulsions with tailor-made structures have been developed, e.g., multilayer emulsions, solid lipid particles, Pickering emulsions. This review summarizes the updated understanding of emulsion-based delivery systems for β-carotene, and how emulsions can be better designed to fulfill the benefits of β-carotene in functional foods.

  4. Effect of Grape Seed Proanthocyanidin-Gelatin Colloidal Complexes on Stability and in Vitro Digestion of Fish Oil Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yi-Chin; Hsu, Chun-Hua; Chao, An-Chong; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Tsai, Min-Lang; Mi, Fwu-Long

    2015-11-25

    The colloidal complexes composed of grape seed proanthocyanidin (GSP) and gelatin (GLT), as natural antioxidants to improve stability and inhibit lipid oxidation in menhaden fish oil emulsions, were evaluated. The interactions between GSP and GLT, and the chemical structures of GSP/GLT self-assembled colloidal complexes, were characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), circular dichroism (CD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) studies. Fish oil was emulsified with GLT to obtain an oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion. After formation of the emulsion, GLT was fixed by GSP to obtain the GSP/GLT colloidal complexes stabilized fish oil emulsion. Menhaden oil emulsified by GSP/GLT(0.4 wt %) colloidal complexes yielded an emulsion with smaller particles and higher emulsion stability as compared to its GLT emulsified counterpart. The GSP/GLT colloidal complexes inhibited the lipid oxidation in fish oil emulsions more effectively than free GLT because the emulsified fish oil was surrounded by the antioxidant GSP/GLT colloidal complexes. The digestion rate of the fish oil emulsified with the GSP/GLT colloidal complexes was reduced as compared to that emulsified with free GLT. The extent of free fatty acids released from the GSP/GLT complexes stabilized fish oil emulsions was 63.3% under simulated digestion condition, indicating that the fish oil emulsion was considerably hydrolyzed with lipase.

  5. An Underwater Superoleophobic Sepiolite Fibrous Membrane (SFM) for Oil­‐in­‐water Emulsion Separation

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Pinjiang

    2014-12-01

    Separating oil/water emulsions is significant for the ecosystem and the petroleum and processing industry. To this end, we prepared an underwater superoleophobic membrane inspired by unique wettability of the fish scales. This membrane was fabricated by a facile vacuum filtration process of sepiolite nanofibers and chitosan, and after the cross-linking via glutaraldehyde, a self-standing membrane was obtained. The as-prepared membrane exhibited excellent capability of separating both the surfactant-free and surfactant-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions with high efficiency. This sepiolite fibrous membrane offers a convenient, reliable and efficient way for the large-scale de-emulsification process.

  6. The separation of stable water-in-oil emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velicogna, D.; Koundakjiian, A.; Beausejour, I.

    1993-01-01

    Stable oil-in-water emulsions are a major problem in the recovery of spilled oils. Such emulsions can contain as little as 10% oil and can have properties very different from the original oils, making their storage and disposal difficult. These problems have led to experiments testing the feasibility of a process for separating these stable emulsions into dischargeable water and reusable oil. The technique investigated involves use of a recyclable solvent to remove the oil and subsequent distillation and/or membrane treatment to recover the oil and recycle the solvent. Results of preliminary tests show that stable water-in-oil emulsions can be separated quite readily with a regenerated solvent system. The only products of these systems are oil, which can be sent to a refinery, and dischargeable water. The recycled solvent can be used many times without any significant decrease in separation efficiency. In order to enhance the throughput of the system, a solvent vapor stripping method was invented. This stripping method also improves the quality of the products and the recycled solvent. Membrane methods can be used as a post-treatment for the produced water in order to achieve more adequate compliance with discharge limits. 4 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Study on the Stability of DeoxyArbutin in an Anhydrous Emulsion Systemy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu-Wen Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The skin-whitening agent, deoxyArbutin, is a potent tyrosinase inhibitor that is safer than hydroquinone and arbutin. However, it is thermolabile in aqueous solutions, where it decomposes to hydroquinone. Pharmaceutical and cosmetic emulsions are normally oil-in-water (o/w or water-in-oil (w/o systems; however, emulsions can be formulated with no aqueous phase to produce an anhydrous emulsion system. An anhydrous emulsion system could offer a stable vehicle for compounds that are sensitive to hydrolysis or oxidation. Therefore, to enhance the stability of deoxyArbutin in formulations, we chose the polyol-in-silicone, anhydrous emulsion system as the basic formulation for investigation. The quantity of deoxyArbutin and the accumulation of hydroquinone in both hydrous and anhydrous emulsions at various temperatures were analyzed through an established high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC method. The results indicated that water increased the decomposition of deoxyArbutin in the formulations and that the polyol-in-silicone, oil-based, anhydrous emulsion system provided a relatively stable surrounding for the deoxyArbutin that delayed its degradation at 25 °C and 45 °C. Moreover, the composition of the inner hydrophilic phase, containing different amounts of glycerin and propylene glycol, affected the stability of deoxyArbutin. Thus, these results will be beneficial when using deoxyArbutin in cosmetics and medicines in the future.

  8. Helix aspersa gelatin as an emulsifier and emulsion stabilizer: functional properties and effects on pancreatic lipolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarai, Zied; Balti, Rafik; Sila, Assaâd; Ben Ali, Yassine; Gargouri, Youssef

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are widely used in food and pharmaceutical applications for the encapsulation, solubilization, entrapment, and controlled delivery of active ingredients. In order to fulfill the increasing demand for clean label excipients, natural polymers could be used to replace the potentially irritative synthetic surfactants used in emulsion formulation. In the present study, we have studied the properties of oil-in-water emulsions prepared with land snail gelatin (LSG) as the sole emulsifying agent, extracted and described for the first time. LSG was evaluated in terms of proximate composition, oil and water holding capacity, emulsifying and foaming properties, color and amino acid composition. Emulsions of trioctanoylglycerol (TC8) and olive oil were made at different gelatin/oil ratios and changes in droplet-size distribution were determined. The superior emulsifying properties of LSG, the susceptibility of gelatin protein emulsions increasing flocculation on storage, and the coalescence of gelatin emulsions following centrifugation were demonstrated. Furthermore, the effect of LSG on the activity of turkey pancreatic lipase (TPL) was evaluated through the pH-stat methodology with TC8 and olive oil emulsions. The LSG affected the TPL activity in a concentration-dependent way. Our results showed that LSG, comparably to gum arabic, increases the pancreatic lipase activity and improves its stability at the oil-water interface.

  9. Study on the Stability of DeoxyArbutin in an Anhydrous Emulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Chien; Yang, Chao-Hsun; Chang, Nai-Fang; Wu, Pey-Shiuan; Chen, Yi-Shyan; Lee, Shu-Mei; Chen, Chiu-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The skin-whitening agent, deoxyArbutin, is a potent tyrosinase inhibitor that is safer than hydroquinone and arbutin. However, it is thermolabile in aqueous solutions, where it decomposes to hydroquinone. Pharmaceutical and cosmetic emulsions are normally oil-in-water (o/w) or water-in-oil (w/o) systems; however, emulsions can be formulated with no aqueous phase to produce an anhydrous emulsion system. An anhydrous emulsion system could offer a stable vehicle for compounds that are sensitive to hydrolysis or oxidation. Therefore, to enhance the stability of deoxyArbutin in formulations, we chose the polyol-in-silicone, anhydrous emulsion system as the basic formulation for investigation. The quantity of deoxyArbutin and the accumulation of hydroquinone in both hydrous and anhydrous emulsions at various temperatures were analyzed through an established high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method. The results indicated that water increased the decomposition of deoxyArbutin in the formulations and that the polyol-in-silicone, oil-based, anhydrous emulsion system provided a relatively stable surrounding for the deoxyArbutin that delayed its degradation at 25 °C and 45 °C. Moreover, the composition of the inner hydrophilic phase, containing different amounts of glycerin and propylene glycol, affected the stability of deoxyArbutin. Thus, these results will be beneficial when using deoxyArbutin in cosmetics and medicines in the future. PMID:22016637

  10. Impact of Protein Gel Porosity on the Digestion of Lipid Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Anwesha; Juan, Jean-Marc; Kolodziejczyk, Eric; Acquistapace, Simone; Donato-Capel, Laurence; Wooster, Tim J

    2015-10-14

    The present study sought to understand how the microstructure of protein gels impacts lipolysis of gelled emulsions. The selected system consisted of an oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion embedded within gelatin gels. The gelatin-gelled emulsions consisted of a discontinuous network of aggregated emulsion droplets (mesoscale), dispersed within a continuous network of gelatin (microscale). The viscoelastic properties of the gelled emulsions were dominated by the rheological behavior of the gelatin, suggesting a gelatin continuous microstructure rather than a bicontinuous gel. A direct relationship between the speed of fat digestion and gel average mesh size was found, indicating that the digestion of fat within gelatin-gelled emulsions is controlled by the ability of the gel's microstructure to slow lipase diffusion to the interface of fat droplets. Digestion of fat was facilitated by gradual breakdown of the gelatin network, which mainly occurred via surface erosion catalyzed by proteases. Overall, this work has demonstrated that the lipolysis kinetics of gelled emulsions is driven by the microstructure of protein gels; this knowledge is key for the future development of microstructures to control fat digestion and/or the delivery of nutrients to different parts of the gastrointestinal tract.

  11. Study of Water-Oil Emulsion Breaking by Stabilized Solution Consisting of Anionic Surface Acting Agent - Soda Ash - Polymer (ASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulichkov, S. V.; Avtomonov, E. G.; Andreeva, L. V.; Solomennik, S. F.; Nikitina, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    The paper provides a laboratory research of breaking natural water-oil emulsions: - by non-stabilized ASP; by stabilized ASP; by mixture of stabilized and non-stabilized ASP in different proportions and production of refinery water of the required quality with the use of IronGuard 2495 as flocculant. Oil-in-water emulsion is stable. Classic methods are not suitable for residual water treatment: sediment gravity flow; filtration; centrifuge test. Microemulsion formed after ASP application has low boundary tension and high pH. It contributes to transfer of oil phase into a water one, forming oil-in-water emulsion. Alkaline condition has adverse effect on demulsifying ability of agents, flocculation and boundary tension. For breaking of water-oil emulsion at EBU before the interchanger water or water-oil emulsion from the wells that were not APS-treated in ratio of 1:9 shall be delivered. Residual water after EBU must be prepared in water tanks by dilution in great volume.

  12. Upstream Operations in the Oil Industry: Rigorous Modeling of an Electrostatic Coalescer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Rossi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a first-principle mathematical model that describes the electrostatic coalescer units devoted to the separation of water from oil in water-in-oil emulsions, which are typical of the upstream operations in oil fields. The main phenomena governing the behavior of the electrostatic coalescer are described, starting from fundamental laws. In addition, the gradual coalescence of the emulsion droplets is considered in the mathematical modeling in a dynamic fashion, as the phenomenon is identified as a key step in the overall yield of the unit operation. The resulting differential system with boundary conditions is then integrated via performing numerical libraries, and the simulation results confirm the available literature and the industrial data. A sensitivity analysis is provided with respect to the main parameters. The mathematical model results in a flexible tool that is useful for the purposes of design, unit behavior prediction, performance monitoring, and optimization.

  13. Immunotherapeutic Potential of Eugenol Emulsion in Experimental Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Islamuddin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The therapy of visceral leishmaniasis (VL is limited by resistance, toxicity and decreased bioavailability of the existing drugs coupled with dramatic increase in HIV-co-infection, non-availability of vaccines and down regulation of cell-mediated immunity (CMI. Thus, we envisaged combating the problem with plant-derived antileishmanial drug that could concomitantly mitigate the immune suppression of the infected hosts. Several plant-derived compounds have been found to exert leishmanicidal activity via immunomodulation. In this direction, we investigated the antileishmanial activity of eugenol emulsion (EE, complemented with its immunomodulatory and therapeutic efficacy in murine model of VL.Oil-in-water emulsion of eugenol (EE was prepared and size measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS. EE exhibited significant leishmanicidal activity with 50% inhibitory concentration of 8.43±0.96 μg ml-1 and 5.05±1.72 μg ml─1, respectively against the promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes of Leishmania donovani. For in vivo effectiveness, EE was administered intraperitoneally (25, 50 and 75 mg/kg b.w./day for 10 days to 8 week-infected BALB/c mice. The cytotoxicity of EE was assessed in RAW 264.7 macrophages as well as in naive mice. EE induced a significant drop in hepatic and splenic parasite burdens as well as diminution in spleen and liver weights 10 days post-treatment, with augmentation of 24h-delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH response and high IgG2a:IgG1, mirroring induction of CMI. Enhanced IFN-γ and IL-2 levels, with fall in disease-associated Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10 detected by flow cytometric bead-based array, substantiated the Th1 immune signature. Lymphoproliferation and nitric oxide release were significantly elevated upon antigen revoke in vitro. The immune-stimulatory activity of EE was further corroborated by expansion of IFN-γ producing CD4+ and CD8+ splenic T lymphocytes and up-regulation of CD80 and CD86 on

  14. Preparation of a multiple emulsion based on pectin-whey protein complex for encapsulation of saffron extract nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faridi Esfanjani, Afshin; Jafari, Seid Mahdi; Assadpour, Elham

    2017-04-15

    The present study illustrates a simple and practical way to produce an adequate delivery system of bioactive compounds of saffron by protein-polysaccharide complex. Frist, crocin, safranal, and picrocrocin were loaded in nanodroplets (WPC)-maltodextrin or WPC-pectin-maltodextrin through water in oil in water (W/O/W) multiple emulsions. The stability and release of loaded crocin, safranal, and picrocrocin in multiple emulsions were investigated during 22days storage. The produced multiple emulsion by WPC-pectin-maltodextrin along with 5% inner aqueous phase showed a high stability and low release of encapsulated compounds over time. This emulsion also provided a high protection of crocin, safranal, and picrocrocin in the gastric condition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Lycopene in Beverage Emulsions: Optimizing Formulation Design and Processing Effects for Enhanced Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Meroni

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Lycopene is a desired ingredient in food formulations, yet its beneficial effects on human health remain largely underexploited due to its poor chemical stability and bioavailability. Oil-in-water emulsions may offer multiple advantages for the incorporation and delivery of this carotenoid species. Engineering and processing aspects for the development of emulsion-based delivery systems are of paramount importance for maintaining the structural integrity of lycopene. The selection of emulsifiers, pH, temperature, oil phase, particle size, homogenization conditions and presence of other antioxidants are major determinants for enhancing lycopene stability and delivery from a food emulsion. Process and formulation optimization of the delivery system is product-specific and should be tailored accordingly. Further research is required to better understand the underlying mechanisms of lycopene absorption by the human digestive system.

  16. Determination of the aqueous solubility of crude oil in water-soluble fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollebone, B.P.; Wang, Z.; Fingas, M.; Landriault, M.

    2003-01-01

    Crude oil often mixes with water when it is accidentally spilled from a vessel or pipeline. The authors studied the total solubility of twelve oils in distilled, de-ionized water and reported their findings. Oil solubilities varied from 0.5 to 4 milligram of oil per litre of water. For each oil, water-soluble fractions (WSF) were prepared and the total hydrocarbon concentration in aqueous fraction was quantified using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC/FID). Very light and very heavy crudes were selected, including some very high wax oils. The preparation method for the water-soluble fraction was described in detail along with the effects of the oil-to-water loading ratio, equilibration time, and mixing energy. In light of the findings, the formation of oil-in-water dispersions was discussed. Two other topics of interest were examined: (1) modifications to the preparation of the water-soluble fraction to minimize dispersion formation, and (2) chromatographic techniques to remove their contributions to the total solubility. 21 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs

  17. Data on iron oxide core oil-in-water nanoemulsions for atherosclerosis imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Prévot

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the publication entitled “Iron oxide core oil-in-water nanoemulsion as tracer for atherosclerosis MPI and MRI imaging” (Prévot et al., 2017 [1]. Herein we describe the synthesis and the characteristics of the Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPION loaded inside nanoemulsions (NEs. Focus was set on obtaining SPION with narrow size distribution and close to superparamagnetic limit (20 nm in order to reach a reasonable magnetic signal. Nanoparticles (NPs of three different sizes were obtained (7, 11 and 18 nm and characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. SPION were coated with oleic acid (OA in order to load them inside the oily core of NEs droplets. SPION loaded NEs were magnetically sorted using MACS® MS Column (Miltenyi Biotec and iron quantification was performed by UV-spectrometry measurements.

  18. Intravenous lipid emulsion alters the hemodynamic response to epinephrine in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreiro, Stephanie; Blum, Jared; Jay, Gregory; Hack, Jason B

    2013-09-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) is an adjunctive antidote used in selected critically ill poisoned patients. These patients may also require administration of advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) drugs. Limited data is available to describe interactions of ILE with standard ACLS drugs, specifically epinephrine. Twenty rats with intra-arterial and intravenous access were sedated with isoflurane and split into ILE or normal saline (NS) pretreatment groups. All received epinephrine 15 μm/kg intravenously (IV). Continuous mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were monitored until both indices returned to baseline. Standardized t tests were used to compare peak MAP, time to peak MAP, maximum change in HR, time to maximum change in HR, and time to return to baseline MAP/HR. There was a significant difference (p = 0.023) in time to peak MAP in the ILE group (54 s, 95 % CI 44-64) versus the NS group (40 s, 95 % CI 32-48) and a significant difference (p = 0.004) in time to return to baseline MAP in ILE group (171 s, 95 % CI 148-194) versus NS group (130 s, 95 % CI 113-147). There were no significant differences in the peak change in MAP, peak change in HR, time to minimum HR, or time to return to baseline HR between groups. ILE-pretreated rats had a significant difference in MAP response to epinephrine; ILE delayed the peak effect and prolonged the duration of effect of epinephrine on MAP, but did not alter the peak increase in MAP or the HR response.

  19. Ann Modeling for Grey Particles Produced from Interactions of Different Projectiles with Emulsion Nuclei at 4.5 AGEV/C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Bakry, M.N.Y.; Basha, A.M.; Rashed, N.; Mahmoud, M.A.; Radi, A.

    2008-01-01

    Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is one of the important tools in high energy physics. In this paper, we are using ANN for modeling the multiplicity distributions of grey particles produced from interactions of P, 3 He, 4 He, 6 Li, 12 C, 24 Mg, and 32 S with emulsion nuclei, light nuclei (CNO), and heavy nuclei (Ag Br). The equations of these distributions were obtained

  20. Tunable stability of monodisperse secondary O/W nano-emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchione, R.; Ciotola, U.; Sagliano, A.; Bianchini, P.; Diaspro, A.; Netti, P. A.

    2014-07-01

    Stable and biodegradable oil in water (O/W) nano-emulsions can have a huge impact on a wide range of bio-applications, from food to cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. Emulsions, however, are immiscible systems unstable over time; polymer coatings are known to be helpful, but an effective procedure to stabilize monodisperse and biodegradable O/W nano-emulsions is yet to be designed. Here, we coat biodegradable O/W nano-emulsions with a molecular layer of biodegradable polyelectrolytes such as polysaccharides - like chitosan - and polypeptides - like polylysine - and effectively re-disperse and densify the polymer coating at high pressure, thus obtaining monodisperse and stable systems. In particular, focusing on chitosan, our tests show that it is possible to obtain unprecedented ultra-stable O/W secondary nano-emulsions (diameter sizes tunable from ~80 to 160 nm and polydispersion indices below 0.1) by combining this process with high concentrations of polymers. Depending on the polymer concentration, it is possible to control the level of coating that results in a tunable stability ranging from a few weeks to several months. The above range of concentrations has been investigated using a fluorescence-based approach with new insights into the coating evolution.Stable and biodegradable oil in water (O/W) nano-emulsions can have a huge impact on a wide range of bio-applications, from food to cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. Emulsions, however, are immiscible systems unstable over time; polymer coatings are known to be helpful, but an effective procedure to stabilize monodisperse and biodegradable O/W nano-emulsions is yet to be designed. Here, we coat biodegradable O/W nano-emulsions with a molecular layer of biodegradable polyelectrolytes such as polysaccharides - like chitosan - and polypeptides - like polylysine - and effectively re-disperse and densify the polymer coating at high pressure, thus obtaining monodisperse and stable systems. In particular, focusing on

  1. Encapsulation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in PLA microspheres using supercritical emulsion extraction to produce bactericidal nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campardelli, R., E-mail: rcampardelli@unisa.it; Della Porta, G. [University of Salerno, Department of Industrial Engineering (Italy); Gomez, V.; Irusta, S. [University of Zaragoza, Aragon Institute of Nanoscience (INA) (Spain); Reverchon, E., E-mail: ereverchon@unisa.it [University of Salerno, Department of Industrial Engineering (Italy); Santamaria, J., E-mail: jesus.santamaria@unizar.es [University of Zaragoza, Aragon Institute of Nanoscience (INA) (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    In this work, PLA microparticles containing TiO{sub 2} (anatase) nanoparticles have been produced using the Continuous Supercritical Emulsion Extraction technique (SEE-C). A stabilized anatase colloidal suspension (15 {+-} 5 nm) in ethanol aqueous solution was obtained by precipitation from solutions of titanium alkoxides and directly used as the water internal phase of a water-in-oil in water double emulsion or suspended as a powder in the organic phase of a solid-in-oil in water emulsion. Micro- (0.9 {+-} 0.5 {mu}m) and submicro-particles (203 {+-} 40 nm) have been produced, with TiO{sub 2} nominal loadings of 1.2, 2.4, and 3.6 wt%. High TiO{sub 2} encapsulation efficiencies up to about 90 % have been obtained. PLA/TiO{sub 2} particles have been characterized by TEM and XPS to investigate the dispersion of the metal oxide in the polymeric matrix. The photo-assisted bactericidal activity of TiO{sub 2}-containing microparticles against a biofilm-forming strain of Staphylococcus aureus was investigated in specific assays under UV light. Pure TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and PLA/TiO{sub 2} particles showed the same bactericidal activity.

  2. Flexible PVDF membranes with exceptional robust superwetting surface for continuous separation of oil/water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhu; Lin, Haibo; Liu, Fu; Xiao, Peng; Wu, Ziyang; Li, Tiantian; Li, Dehong

    2017-10-26

    Instability of superwetting surface is the stumbling block of flexible polymeric membranes for continuous separation of water-in-oil or oil-in-water emulsions. Manipulation of rigid superwetting nano-TiO 2 on hierarchical poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membrane by mimicking the plant roots holding soil behaviour enabled the generation of robust superwetting surface withstanding the harshly physical and chemical torture. The unique interface combination, which fabricated by a compacted nano-layer with the thickness of ~20 μm, was disclosed by systematic structure characterization. As demonstrated by SEM, LSCM and nano-CT, the pristine PVDF membrane with large quantities of cilia-like micro/nano-fibrils can function as the plant roots to capture, cage and confine the nanoparticles to form a robustly rigid nano-coating. The as-prepared membranes showed excellent durable separation performance both in varieties of stabilized water-in-oil and oil-in-water emulsion separation for a long term with few nanoparticles loss in a continuous crossflow mode. The strategy of assembling rigid inorganic nano-particles on flexible surface offers a window of opportunity for preparation of robust organic-inorganic hybrid membranes not only for continuous oil/water emulsion separation, but also for other functional application, such as electric conduction, heat conduction, ion exchange, and in membrane catalytic reactors etc.

  3. Encapsulation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in PLA microspheres using supercritical emulsion extraction to produce bactericidal nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campardelli, R.; Della Porta, G.; Gomez, V.; Irusta, S.; Reverchon, E.; Santamaria, J.

    2013-10-01

    In this work, PLA microparticles containing TiO2 (anatase) nanoparticles have been produced using the Continuous Supercritical Emulsion Extraction technique (SEE-C). A stabilized anatase colloidal suspension (15 ± 5 nm) in ethanol aqueous solution was obtained by precipitation from solutions of titanium alkoxides and directly used as the water internal phase of a water-in-oil in water double emulsion or suspended as a powder in the organic phase of a solid-in-oil in water emulsion. Micro- (0.9 ± 0.5 μm) and submicro-particles (203 ± 40 nm) have been produced, with TiO2 nominal loadings of 1.2, 2.4, and 3.6 wt%. High TiO2 encapsulation efficiencies up to about 90 % have been obtained. PLA/TiO2 particles have been characterized by TEM and XPS to investigate the dispersion of the metal oxide in the polymeric matrix. The photo-assisted bactericidal activity of TiO2-containing microparticles against a biofilm-forming strain of Staphylococcus aureus was investigated in specific assays under UV light. Pure TiO2 nanoparticles and PLA/TiO2 particles showed the same bactericidal activity.

  4. Sustained delivery of salbutamol and beclometasone from spray-dried double emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learoyd, Tristan P; Burrows, Jane L; French, Eddie; Seville, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    The sustained delivery of multiple agents to the lung offers potential benefits to patients. This study explores the preparation of highly respirable dual-loaded spray-dried double emulsions. Spray-dried powders were produced from water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) double emulsions, containing salbutamol sulphate and/or beclometasone dipropionate in varying phases. The double emulsions contained the drug release modifier polylactide co-glycolide (PLGA 50 : 50) in the intermediate organic phase of the original micro-emulsion and low molecular weight chitosan (Mwemulsion stabilizer) and leucine (aerosolization enhancer) in the tertiary aqueous phase. Following spray-drying resultant powders were physically characterized: with in vitro aerosolization performance and drug release investigated using a Multi-Stage Liquid Impinger and modified USP II dissolution apparatus, respectively. Powders generated were of a respirable size exhibiting emitted doses of over 95% and fine particle fractions of up to 60% of the total loaded dose. Sustained drug release profiles were observed during dissolution for powders containing agents in the primary aqueous and secondary organic phases of the original micro-emulsion; the burst release of agents was witnessed from the tertiary aqueous phase. The novel spray-dried emulsions from this study would be expected to deposit and display sustained release character in the lung.

  5. Design of an experimental model to study the behavior of unsaturated fats in the preparation of meat emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier F. Rey

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The essence of a good experimental position consists on projecting an experiment so that him it is able to in fact give therefore the type of information that is looked for, by means of the development of the present work it is looked for to determine which the quality of the meat products will be elaborated with unsaturated vegetable fats, which its yield will be and for ende its cost regarding the traditional products, in and of itself the present investigation outlines an experimental design by means of the control of such variables as type of fat, use temperature and time of cutteado, keeping in mind the physiochemical and biochemical phenomena that happen beginning the control from the composition of the meat and fat during the trial, as raw materials dedicated to this end, for he/she thought about it the experimental design using a statistical model of complete factorial planning with 3 variables and 2 levels for a number of 15 rehearsals with a replica. Identified the variables to control as type of fat, temperature of use of the fats and the time of cutteado, the outlined experimental design is applied and you ends up obtaining the equation that gives solution to the identified problem that facilitates to use the unsaturated fats inside a process of elaboration of meat emulsions.

  6. Theory of RBE. Third triennial report, 1 January 1967--31 December 1975. [Model based on tracks of heavy ions in nuclear emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, R.

    1975-09-01

    From a single set of themes, the theory of RBE has developed a picture of the response of many biological, physical, and chemical systems to radiations of different quality, that depends on a model of the structure of the tracks of nuclear projectiles in condensed matter. Its characterizations arise from the tracks of heavy ions in nuclear emulsions, as extended to accommodate biological cells. Most recently emulsions have been identified whose radiosensitivity changes with radiation quality parallel those of biological cells. From experimentally determined radiosensitivity parameters, the theory predicts response to a range of radiations, and includes synergistic effects of mixed radiation fields, making it possible to calculate the RBE of a mixed field of neutrons and gamma-rays, and to specify the dosimetric measurements required to make these predictions. (auth)

  7. Latest nuclear emulsion technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokujo, Hiroki; Kawahara, Hiroaki; Komatani, Ryosuke; Morishita, Misaki; Nakano, Toshiyuki; Otsuka, Naoto; Yoshimoto, Masahiro

    2017-06-01

    Nuclear emulsion is a extremely high-resolution 3D tracking detector. Since the discovery of the pion by C.F. Powell et al. in 1946, experiments with nuclear emulsions have contributed to the development of particle physics. (e.g. the OPERA collaboration reported the discovery of νμ * ντ oscillations in appearance mode in 2015) The technology of nuclear emulsion still keeps making progress. Since 2010, we have introduced a system of nuclear emulsion gel production to our laboratory in Nagoya University, and have started self-development of the new gel, instead of from the photographic film companies. Moreover, a faster automated emulsion scanning system is developed. Its scanning speed reaches 4000 cm2/h, and the load for analyzing becomes more and more lighter. In this presentation, we report the status of nuclear emulsion technologies for cosmic ray experiments.

  8. Latest nuclear emulsion technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokujo Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear emulsion is a extremely high-resolution 3D tracking detector. Since the discovery of the pion by C.F. Powell et al. in 1946, experiments with nuclear emulsions have contributed to the development of particle physics. (e.g. the OPERA collaboration reported the discovery of νμ * ντ oscillations in appearance mode in 2015 The technology of nuclear emulsion still keeps making progress. Since 2010, we have introduced a system of nuclear emulsion gel production to our laboratory in Nagoya University, and have started self-development of the new gel, instead of from the photographic film companies. Moreover, a faster automated emulsion scanning system is developed. Its scanning speed reaches 4000 cm2/h, and the load for analyzing becomes more and more lighter. In this presentation, we report the status of nuclear emulsion technologies for cosmic ray experiments.

  9. Mechanism of aerobic biological destabilisation of wool scour effluent emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Andrew J; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf; William Jones, F

    2005-07-01

    Wool scouring effluent is a highly polluted industrial wastewater in which the main pollutant, wool wax, is held in a stable oil-in-water emulsion by non-ionic detergent. The use of microbial action to cause emulsion destabilisation has been proposed as a new treatment strategy for this effluent stream. This strategy aims at improving aerobic treatment performance by physically removing the high-COD, slowly bio-degradable wool wax from the system without bio-degradation. The mechanism by which an aerobic-mixed culture destabilises the wool scouring effluent emulsion was investigated. Our results show that destabilisation is due to partial bio-degradation of both the scouring detergent and the wool wax. Cleavage of the wool wax esters was the first stage in wax degradation, when 40-50% of wax was de-emulsified. Over the same period, detergent degradation was low, at 7-21%. With further incubation, detergent degradation increased, aiding further breakdown of the emulsion. The degradation of the detergent, a nonylphenol ethoxylate, resulted in both a reduction in molar concentration (of up to 82%) and a shortening of the ethoxylate chain length. The latter reduced the hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB) from 12 to approximately 7, thereby reducing the ability of the residual detergent to stabilise the emulsion. Analysis of the emulsified and de-emulsified wax fractions could not identify a group of compounds that were preferentially de-emulsified based on molecular weight or polarity. These findings will assist in using a de-emulsification strategy in both existing and new treatment systems in order to save on aeration costs and treatment times for biological treatment of this highly polluted wastewater.

  10. Emulsion Hydrogel Soft Motor Actuated by Thermal Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Liang, Yuling; Gao, Wei; Dong, Renfeng; Wang, Chaoyang

    2017-12-13

    An emulsion hydrogel motor (E-H motor), constituted by low-boiling-point oil fuel and a hydrogel matrix, is prepared through a simple yet versatile oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion template method. The E-H motor can be efficiently propelled by the bubbles generated under a thermal stimulus. As thermally induced explosion occurs inside the E-H motor (diameter ∼4.0 mm and length ∼6.0 mm), the gas bubbles resulting from thermotropic phase transition are violently ejected from one side, leading to a fast speed of 14.78 ± 4.82 mm s -1 in a 60 °C aqueous solution. Additionally, multiple water-insoluble organic solvents can serve as the fuel for self-propulsion, which demonstrates the favorable universality of the E-H motor. The magnetic navigation and near-infrared propulsion can be realized through incorporating hydrophilic iron oxide (Fe 3 O 4 ) nanoparticles and graphene oxide (GO) into the aqueous phase. Moreover, the synchronous integration of GO and enrofloxacin bactericide can enable intelligent targeted cargo transportation and delivery. The attractive self-propulsion performance, precise locomotion control, and formidable integration ability of the emulsion hydrogel-based miniaturized soft motor hold great promise for numerous practical applications.

  11. Ptychographic X-ray computed tomography of extended colloidal networks in food emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou Nielsen, Mikkel; Bøgelund Munk, Merete; Diaz, Ana

    2016-01-01

    of suitable non-destructive 3D imaging techniques with submicron resolution. We present results of quantitative ptychographic X-ray computed tomography applied to a palm kernel oil based oil-in-water emulsion. The measurements were carried out at ambient pressure and temperature. The 3D structure...... of the extended colloidal network of fat globules was obtained with a resolution of around 300 nm. Through image analysis of the network structure, the fat globule size distribution was computed and compared to previous findings. In further support, the reconstructed electron density values were within 4...

  12. Oil-in-water biocompatible microemulsion as a carrier for the antitumor drug compound methyl dihydrojasmonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva GB

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gisela Bevilacqua Rolfsen Ferreira da Silva,1 Maria Virginia Scarpa,1 Iracilda Zepone Carlos,2 Marcela Bassi Quilles,2 Raphael Carlos Comeli Lia,3 Eryvaldo Socrates Tabosa do Egito,4 Anselmo Gomes de Oliveira1 1Departamento de Fármacos e Medicamentos, 2Departamento de Análises Clínicas, UNESP–Universidade Estadual Paulista, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, PPG em Nanotecnologia Farmacêutica, Rodovia Araraquara-Jaú Km 01, Araraquara, SP, Brazil; 3Instituto de Patologia Cirúrgica e Citopatologia (IPC, Araraquara, SP, Brazil; 4UFRN–Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Programa de Pós-graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Natal, RN, Brazil Abstract: Methyl dihydrojasmonate (MJ has been studied because of its application as an antitumor drug compound. However, as MJ is a poorly water-soluble compound, a suitable oil-in-water microemulsion (ME has been studied in order to provide its solubilization in an aqueous media and to allow its administration by the parenteral route. The ME used in this work was characterized on the pseudo-ternary phase diagram by dynamic light scattering and rheological measurements. Regardless of the drug presence, the droplet size was directly dependent on the oil/surfactant (O/S ratio. Furthermore, the drug incorporation into the ME significantly increased the ME diameter, mainly at low O/S ratios. The rheological evaluation of the systems showed that in the absence of drug a Newtonian behavior was observed. On the other hand, in the presence of MJ the ME systems revealed pseudoplastic behavior, independently of the O/S ratio. The in vivo studies demonstrated that not only was the effect on the tumor inhibition inversely dependent on the MJ-loaded ME administered dose, but also it was slightly higher than the doxorubicin alone, which was used as the positive control. Additionally, a small antiangiogenic effect for MJ-loaded ME was found at doses in which it possesses antitumor activity. MJ revealed to

  13. Transitional phase inversion of crude oil emulsions by solid particles; Inversao transicional de emulsoes de petroleo com particulas solidas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Troner A. de; Scheer, Agnes P.; Soares, Cristyan R.; Luz Junior, Luiz Fernando de Lima [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Oliveira, Marcia Cristina K. de [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2008-07-01

    In petroleum production water-in-oil emulsions (W/O) can be found, due to simultaneous flowing of the oil and formation water. This emulsions provide an increase in the viscosity; that can be reduced for the phase inversion in oil-in-water emulsions (O/W), resulting in pressure drop and consequently cost production reduction. The petroleum emulsions W/O were prepared at 60 deg C, with 50% v/v of saline water containing 50 g.L{sup -1} of NaCl. The hydrophilic solids content was varied between 0,5% and 8%, mass fraction, related to the water. The quantity of solids needed to phase inversion of the emulsion was measured by conductivimetry. The stability of the emulsions was verified, at 60 deg C, for the time determination in order to have two phases in four hours, checking the viability for production; and during 24 hours, checking the viability for transportation. Under dynamics conditions, was also noted the stability at 20 deg C, for reproduce the flowing condition. Two of the hydrophilic particles tested in the transitional phase inversion of petroleum emulsions presented better results in quantity and stability. Preliminaries rheological properties measurements were carried out adjusting the temperature of the sample in the range of 30 deg C to 12 deg C a shear rate from 20s{sup -1} to 250s {sup -1}, viscosity decrease was observed until two orders of magnitude. (author)

  14. Singly and Doubly Charged Projectile Fragments in Nucleus-Emulsion Collisions at Dubna Energy in the Framework of the Multi-Source Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Er-Qin, Wang; Fu-Hu, Liu; Jian-Xin, Sun; Rahim, Magda A.; Fakhraddin, S.

    2011-01-01

    The multiplicity distributions of projectile fragments emitted in interactions of different nuclei with emulsion are studied by using a multi-source model. Our calculated results show that the projectile fragments can be described by the model and each source contributes an exponential distribution. As the weighted sum of the folding result of many exponential distributions, a multi-component Erlang distribution is used to describe the experimental data. The relationship between the height (or width) of the distribution and the mass of the incident projectile, as well as the dependence of projectile fragments on target groups, are investigated too. (nuclear physics)

  15. Encapsulation of Nicardipine Hydrochloride and Release from Biodegradable Poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid Microparticles by Double Emulsion Process: Effect of Emulsion Stability and Different Parameters on Drug Entrapment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nopparuj Soomherun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA is an important material used in drug delivery when controlled release is required. The purpose of this research is to design and characterize PLGA microparticles (PLGA MPs implants for the controlled release of nicardipine hydrochloride (NCH in vitro. This study used the water-in-oil-in-water (w1/o/w2 double emulsion and solvent diffusion/evaporation approach to prepare PLGA MPs. Optimal processing conditions were found, such as polymer content, surfactant type, stabilizer concentration, inner and outer aqueous phase volumes, and stirring speed. The PLGA MPs for use as nicardipine hydrochloride (NCH loading and release had spherical morphology, and the average diameter was smaller than 5.20±0.25 μm. The release kinetics were modeled to elucidate the possible mechanism of drug release. In vitro release studies indicated that the NCH release rate is slow and continuous. PLGA MPs are an interesting alternative drug delivery system, especially for use with NCH for biomedical applications.

  16. The effect of some processing conditions on the characteristics of biodegradable microspheres obtained by an emulsion solvent evaporation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Maia

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Unloaded microspheres were prepared from polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB and polyhydroxybutyrate-co-valerate (PHB-HV polymers using an oil-in-water emulsion solvent evaporation method. The study was conducted to evaluate how the polymer and some process parameters affect properties of the final microspheres such as particle size, superficial area, zeta potential, surface morphology and microsphere degradation. The variables included surfactant concentration in the emulsion water phase and solvent composition. From the results, it was found that the parameters affecting microsphere size the most were surfactant concentration in the emulsion water phase and solvent composition. Properties such as zeta potential, surface area and surface morphology remained pratically unchanged over the range of the processing conditions studied here.

  17. Emulsion Science Basic Principles

    CERN Document Server

    Leal-Calderon, Fernando; Schmitt, Véronique

    2007-01-01

    Emulsions are generally made out of two immiscible fluids like oil and water, one being dispersed in the second in the presence of surface-active compounds.They are used as intermediate or end products in a huge range of areas including the food, chemical, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, paint, and coating industries. Besides the broad domain of technological interest, emulsions are raising a variety of fundamental questions at the frontier between physics and chemistry. This book aims to give an overview of the most recent advances in emulsion science. The basic principles, covering aspects of emulsions from their preparation to their destruction, are presented in close relation to both the fundamental physics and the applications of these materials. The book is intended to help scientists and engineers in formulating new materials by giving them the basics of emulsion science.

  18. Sugar Beet Extract (Beta vulgaris L.) as a New Natural Emulsifier: Emulsion Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralla, Theo; Salminen, Hanna; Edelmann, Matthias; Dawid, Corinna; Hofmann, Thomas; Weiss, Jochen

    2017-05-24

    The interfacial and emulsion-forming properties of sugar beet extract (Beta vulgaris L.) were examined and compared to a Quillaja extract that is widely used within the food industry. We investigated the influence of extract concentration on surface activity at oil-water and air-water interfaces and on the formation of oil-in-water emulsions (10% w/w, pH 7). Sugar beet extract reduced the interfacial tension up to 38% at the oil-water interface, and the surface tension up to 33% at the air-water surface. The generated emulsions were negatively charged (ζ ≈ -46 mV) and had the smallest particle sizes (d 43 ) of ∼1.3 μm at a low emulsifier-to-oil ratio of 0.75:10. Applying lower or higher extract concentrations increased the mean particle sizes. The smallest emulsions were formed at an optimum homogenization pressure of 69 MPa. Higher homogenization pressures led to increased particle sizes. Overall, sugar beet extract showed high surface activity. Furthermore, the formation of small emulsion droplets was successful; however, the droplets were bigger compared to those from the Quillaja extract. These results indicate sugar beet as an effective natural emulsifier that may be utilized for a variety of food and beverage applications.

  19. Structured emulsions as butter substitutes: effects on physicochemical and sensory attributes of shortbread cookies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curti, Elena; Federici, Enrico; Diantom, Agoura; Carini, Eleonora; Pizzigalli, Emanuele; Wu Symon, Veronica; Pellegrini, Nicoletta; Vittadini, Elena

    2018-01-24

    Reformulation of foods products to reduce total and saturated fats while maintaining acceptable structure, texture and mouthfeel poses an important challenge to the food industry. In this work, the use of structured emulsions (fibre-induced oil-in-water biphasic systems with reduced total and saturated fats) is proposed to replace butter in shortbread cookies. Use of structured emulsions resulted in softer dough that was still workable using a traditional process. Shortbread cookies containing structured emulsions were harder and paler than the butter control but had a significantly reduced saturated fat content. They also received promising scores in the sensory analysis in terms of texture and overall acceptability, despite the butter product still being the preferred sample. The results of this study indicated that structured emulsions represent a good solution to produce nutritionally improved shortbreads. Optimization of the structured emulsion formulation can provide further improvement of the nutritional, sensory and physicochemical properties of shortbread cookies. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Formulation and characterization of a multiple emulsion containing 1% L-ascorbic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Akhtar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to prepare a stable multiple emulsion containing a skin anti-aging agent and using paraffin oil. Vitamin C, was incorporated into the inner aqueous phase of water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w multiple emulsion at a concentration of 1%. Multiple emulsion was prepared by two step method. Stability studies were performed at different accelerated conditions, i.e. 8 oC (in refrigerator, 25 oC (in oven, 40 oC (in oven, and 40 oC at 75% RH (in stability cabin for 28 days to predict the stability of formulations. Different parameters, namely pH, globule size, electrical conductivity and effect of centrifugation (simulating gravity were determined during stability studies. Data obtained was evaluated statistically using ANOVA two way analyses and LSD tests. Multiple emulsion formulated was found to be stable at lower temperatures (i.e. 8 and 25 oC for 28 days. No phase separation was observed in the samples during stability testing. It was found that there was no significant change (p > 0.05 in globule sizes in most of the samples kept at various conditions. Insignificant changes (p > 0.05 in both pH and conductivity values were determined for the samples kept at 8, 40, and 40 oC at 75% RH, throughout the study period. Further studies are needed to formulate more stable emulsions with other emulsifying agents.

  1. A programmable microenvironment for cellular studies via microfluidics-generated double emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Ho, Yi-Ping; Chiu, Ya-Ling; Chan, Hon Fai; Chlebina, Ben; Schuhmann, Tom; You, Lingchong; Leong, Kam W

    2013-06-01

    High throughput cellular studies require small sample volume to reduce costs and enhance sensitivity. Microfluidics-generated water-in-oil (W/O) single emulsion droplet systems, in particular, provide uniform, well defined and discrete microenvironment for cell culture, screening, and sorting. However, these single emulsion droplets are incapable of continuous supply of nutrient molecule and are not compatible with aqueous phase-based analysis. A solution is to entrap W/O droplets in another aqueous phase, forming water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) double emulsions. The external aqueous phase efficiently prevents desiccation and reduces the amount of organic component, and yet retaining the advantages of compartmentalization. The internal environment can also be programmed dynamically without the need of rupturing the droplets. In this study, we explore the potential application of W/O/W double emulsion droplets for cell cultivation, genetic activation and study of more complicated biological events such as bacteria quorum-sensing as an example. This study demonstrates the advantages and potential application of double emulsion for the study of complex biological processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Emulsions stabilized by precipitates of zirconium and tributyl phosphate degradation products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugai, H.; Munakata, K.; Miyachi, S.; Yasu, S.

    1992-01-01

    In the Purex process, a solvent extraction method of nuclear fuel reprocessing, a stable emulsion called crud forms at the interface between the oil and water phases. This paper reports that crud is an emulsion stabilized by finely dispersed solids. Insoluble residues and precipitates of zirconium and radiation-degraded products of tributyl phosphate (TBP) are key materials in crud formation. Cruds formed by precipitates of zirconium and TBP degradation products, such as di-n-butyl phosphate (HDBP), mono-n-butyl phosphate (H 2 MBP), and phosphoric acid (H 3 PO 4 ) are studied. Experimental results show that the precipitate of zirconium and HDBP is not effective in stabilizing emulsions. However, the refractory complex of zirconium and H 3 PO 4 is an important material for stabilizing an oil-in-water emulsion in a solution with or without uranium. Moreover, it is shown that the complex of zirconium and H 2 MBP has a significant role in stabilizing a water-in-oil emulsion, especially when uranium is also present

  3. Factors Influencing the Effect of Milkbased Emulsifiers on Lipid Oxidation in Omega-3 Emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt

    . An interest in omega-3 enriched foods has therefore developed. The challenge when the polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids are added to foods is their sensitivity towards heating, metal ions and oxygen, as these factors can lead to lipid oxidation. To avoid this, a possible approach is to incorporate...... factors related to the choice of emulsifier, homogenization equipment and emulsification conditions that could influence lipid oxidation in simple fish oil-in-water emulsion systems. The main focus was on the use of milk proteins alone or in combination with phospholipids as emulsifiers. In addition...... in the delivery emulsions was shown to result in the least oxidatively stable fish oil enriched cream cheese. Overall, this PhD work showed that factors related to both the choice of emulsifier, homogenization equipment and emulsification conditions influence the oxidative stability of simple fish oil...

  4. Incorporation of iodine in polymeric microparticles and emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolontaeva, Olga A.; Khokhlova, Anastasia R.; Markina, Natalia E.; Markin, Alexey V.; Burmistrova, Natalia A.

    2016-04-01

    Application of different methods for formation of microcontainers containing iodine is proposed in this paper. Two types of microcontainers: microemulsions and microparticles have been investigated, conditions and methods for obtaining microcontainers were optimized. Microparticles were formed by layer-by-layer method with cores of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) as templates. Incorporation of complexes of iodine with polymers (chitosan, starch, polyvinyl alcohol) into core, shell and hollow capsules was investigated and loadings of microparticles with iodine were estimated. It was found that the complex of iodine with chitosan adsorbed at CaCO3 core is the most stable under physiological conditions and its value of loading can be 450 μg of I2 per 1 g of CaCO3. Moreover, chitosan was chosen as a ligand because of its biocompatibility and biodegradability as well as very low toxicity while its complex with iodine is very stable. A small amount of microparticles containing a iodine-chitosan complex can be used for prolonged release of iodine in the human body since iodine daily intake for adults is around 100 μg. "Oil-in-water" emulsions were prepared by ultrasonication of iodinated oils (sunflower and linseed) with sodium laurilsulfate (SLS) as surfactant solution. At optimal conditions, the homogenous emulsions remained stable for weeks, with total content of iodine in such emulsion being up to 1% (w/w). The oil:SLS ratio was equal to 1:10 (w/w), optimal duration and power of ultrasound exposure were 1.5 min and 7 W, correspondingly. Favorable application of iodized linseed oil for emulsion preparation with suitable oil microdroplets size was proved.

  5. A new nano-engineered hierarchical membrane for concurrent removal of surfactant and oil from oil-in-water nanoemulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Detao; Liu, Zhaoyang; Bai, Hongwei; Sun, Darren Delai; Song, Xiaoxiao

    2016-01-01

    Surfactant stabilized oil-in-water nanoemulsions pose a severe threat to both the environment and human health. Recent development of membrane filtration technology has enabled efficient oil removal from oil/water nanoemulsion, however, the concurrent removal of surfactant and oil remains unsolved because the existing filtration membranes still suffer from low surfactant removal rate and serious surfactant-induced fouling issue. In this study, to realize the concurrent removal of surfactant and oil from nanoemulsion, a novel hierarchically-structured membrane is designed with a nanostructured selective layer on top of a microstructured support layer. The physical and chemical properties of the overall membrane, including wettability, surface roughness, electric charge, thickness and structures, are delicately tailored through a nano-engineered fabrication process, that is, graphene oxide (GO) nanosheet assisted phase inversion coupled with surface functionalization. Compared with the membrane fabricated by conventional phase inversion, this novel membrane has four times higher water flux, significantly higher rejections of both oil (~99.9%) and surfactant (as high as 93.5%), and two thirds lower fouling ratio when treating surfactant stabilized oil-in-water nanoemulsion. Due to its excellent performances and facile fabrication process, this nano-engineered membrane is expected to have wide practical applications in the oil/water separation fields of environmental protection and water purification. PMID:27087362

  6. O/W emulsions stabilised by both low molecular weight surfactants and colloidal particles: The effect of surfactant type and concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichot, R; Spyropoulos, F; Norton, I T

    2010-12-01

    The stability against coalescence of O/W emulsions in the presence of both surfactants and colloidal particles was investigated. In particular the effect of the surfactant type and concentration in these emulsifier mixtures on the O/W emulsions' stability was studied. Two types of surfactants were selected; those that have the ability to stabilise O/W emulsions on their own (O/W surfactants) and those that cannot (W/O surfactants). Tween 60 and Sodium Caseinate were selected as the O/W surfactants and lecithin as the W/O surfactant. Oil-in-water emulsions prepared with both particles and any of the three surfactants were stable against coalescence but, depending on the type of surfactant, the behaviour of the systems was found to depend on surfactant concentration. The droplet sizes of emulsions stabilised by mixed emulsifier systems containing low concentrations of O/W surfactants (Tween 60 or Sodium Caseinate) were smaller than those solely stabilised by either the surfactant or particles alone. At intermediate O/W surfactants concentrations, the droplet sizes of the emulsions increased. Further increases in the O/W surfactants' concentration, resulted in the complete removal of particles from the interface with the system now behaving as a surfactant-only stabilised emulsion. The behaviour of emulsions stabilised by emulsifier mixtures containing W/O surfactants was not dependent on the concentration of surfactant: no removal of particles was observed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Lipolysis of emulsion models of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins is altered in male patients with abdominal aorta aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.J. Hosni

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of the lipid metabolism may play a role in the genesis of abdominal aorta aneurysm. The present study examined the intravascular catabolism of chylomicrons, the lipoproteins that carry the dietary lipids absorbed by the intestine in the circulation in patients with abdominal aorta aneurysm. Thirteen male patients (72 ± 5 years with abdominal aorta aneurysm with normal plasma lipid profile and 13 healthy male control subjects (73 ± 5 years participated in the study. The method of chylomicron-like emulsions was used to evaluate this metabolism. The emulsion labeled with 14C-cholesteryl oleate and ³H-triolein was injected intravenously in both groups. Blood samples were taken at regular intervals over 60 min to determine the decay curves. The fractional clearance rate (FCR of the radioactive labels was calculated by compartmental analysis. The FCR of the emulsion with ³H-triolein was smaller in the aortic aneurysm patients than in controls (0.025 ± 0.017 vs 0.039 ± 0.019 min-1; P < 0.05, but the FCR of14C-cholesteryl oleate of both groups did not differ. In conclusion, as indicated by the triglyceride FCR, chylomicron lipolysis is diminished in male patients with aortic aneurysm, whereas the remnant removal which is traced by the cholesteryl oleate FCR is not altered. The results suggest that defects in the chylomicron metabolism may represent a risk factor for development of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  8. Effects of NOx-inhibitor agent on fuel properties of three-phase biodiesel emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Cherng-Yuan; Lin, Hsiu-An

    2008-01-01

    Biodiesel is one of the more promising alternative clean fuels to fossil fuel, which can reduce the emissions of fossil fuel burning, and possibly resolve the energy crisis caused by the exhaustion of petroleum resources in the near future. The burning of biodiesel emits much less gaseous emissions and particulate matter primarily because of its dominant combustion efficiency. However, the high oxygen content in biodiesel not only promotes the burning process but also enhances NO x formation when biodiesel is used as fuel. Biodiesel emulsion and the additive of NO x -inhibitor agent are considered to reduce levels of NO x emissions in this experimental study. The biodiesel was produced by transesterification reaction accompanied with peroxidation process. A three-phase biodiesel emulsion of oil-in water drops-in oil (O/W/O) and an O/W/O biodiesel emulsion containing aqueous ammonia were prepared afterwards. The effect of the existence of NO x -inhibitor agent on the fuel properties and the emulsion characteristics of the O/W/O biodiesel emulsions were investigated. The experimental results show that the burning of the O/W/O biodiesel emulsion and the O/W/O biodiesel emulsion containing aqueous ammonia had larger fraction of fuel burnt and thus larger heat release than the neat biodiesel if water content is not considered for the calculation of heating value. The addition of aqueous ammonia within the dispersed phase of the O/W/O biodiesel emulsion appeared to deteriorate the emulsification characteristics. A smaller quantity of emulsion and greater kinematic viscosity were formed while a larger carbon residue and actual reaction-heat release also appeared for this O/W/O biodiesel emulsion. Aqueous ammonia in the O/W/O biodiesel emulsion produces a higher pH value as well. In addition, the number as well as the volumetric fraction of the dispersed water droplets is reduced for the O/W/O biodiesel emulsion that contains aqueous ammonia. (author)

  9. Oxidative stability of fish and algae oils containing long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in bulk and in oil-in-water emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, E.N.; Satue-Gracia, T.; Meyer, Anne Boye Strunge

    2002-01-01

    The oxidative stability of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-containing fish and algae oils varies widely according to their fatty acid composition, the physical and colloidal states of the lipids, the contents of tocopherols and other antioxidants, and t...... high iron:EDTA ratios. Therefore, to be effective as a metal chelator, EDTA must be added at molar concentrations higher than that of iron to inhibit oxidation of foods containing long-chain PUFA from either fish or algae and fortified with iron.......The oxidative stability of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-containing fish and algae oils varies widely according to their fatty acid composition, the physical and colloidal states of the lipids, the contents of tocopherols and other antioxidants......-chain PUFA-containing fish oils and DHA-containing algal oils. The relatively high oxidative stability of an algal oil containing 42% DHA was completely lost after chromatographic purification to remove tocopherols and other antioxidants. Therefore, this evidence does not support the claim that DHA-rich oils...

  10. Experimenting with a new emulsifying agent (tahini) in mineral oil emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Achi, A; Greenwood, R; Akin-Isijola, A

    2000-01-01

    The use of tahini, a sesame paste, as an emulsifying agent was the subject of this investigation. Mineral oil emulsion, USP was used as an emulsion model. Tahini partially or completely replaced acacia in the oficial emulsion. The rate of creaming (expressed as percent) and the viscosity of the resulting emulsions were measured. Also, emulsions were prepared containing tahini only. The results show that tahini-prepared emulsions had lower creaming rates and viscosity after one month of storage at room temperature. Thus, a better physical stability was achieved when tahini was used as and emulsifying agent.

  11. Electrochemically driven emulsion inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johans, Christoffer; Kontturi, Kyoesti

    2007-01-01

    It is shown that emulsions stabilized by ionic surfactants can be inverted by controlling the electrical potential across the oil-water interface. The potential dependent partitioning of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was studied by cyclic voltammetry at the 1,2-dichlorobenzene|water interface. In the emulsion the potential control was achieved by using a potential-determining salt. The inversion of a 1,2-dichlorobenzene-in-water (O/W) emulsion stabilized by SDS was followed by conductometry as a function of added tetrapropylammonium chloride. A sudden drop in conductivity was observed, indicating the change of the continuous phase from water to 1,2-dichlorobenzene, i.e. a water-in-1,2-dichlorobenzene emulsion was formed. The inversion potential is well in accordance with that predicted by the hydrophilic-lipophilic deviation if the interfacial potential is appropriately accounted for

  12. Emulsions inside Gargamelle

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    A feasibility test was made with a 2.5 litre emulsion stack installed within the chamber. The stack was contained in a thermally insulated aluminium alloy pressure vessel (photo). See Annual Report 1978 p. 79 Fig. 5.

  13. Structural study of micro-emulsions in an inversion domain. Highlighting a bi-continuous cubic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyer d'Orth, Arnaud de

    1987-01-01

    This research thesis report the study of the structure of micro-emulsions in an inversion domain (domain of Winsor equilibriums) by using small angle neutron scattering. In this domain, the micro-emulsion keeps on passing from water-rich state (Winsor I domain) to an oil-rich state (Winsor II domain). In the intermediate domain (Winsor III domain), the micro-emulsion presents the peculiarity to be able to solubilise equal volumes of water and oil. The small angle neutron scattering technique allows highlighting the continuous passage from of an 'oil in water' droplet dispersion (Winsor I) to a 'water in oil' droplet dispersion (Winsor II) with an intermediate bi-continuous structure (Winsor III). The author shows that the micro-emulsion structure in the inversion domain is not random, but corresponds to a cubic structure. He also shows that the interface film of the Winsor III micro-emulsion forms a minimum surface. The author highlights the structure continuity between the Winsor III micro-emulsion and a cubic liquid crystal phase [fr

  14. Oxidative enzymatic gelation of sugar beet pectin for emulsion stabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz; Meyer, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    Pectin from sugar beet is derived from the sugar beet pulp residue which results when sugar beets are processed for sucrose extraction. The sugar beet pectin has poor gelationability by the classic divalentcation molecular mechanism because of a relatively high acetylation degree and short...... emulsions has recently been investigated in model food emulsions. This paper reviews the pectin chemistry, enzymatic oxidative gelation mechanisms, interaction mechanisms of the sugar beet pectin with the emulsion droplets and explores how the gelation affects the rheology and stability of emulsion systems...

  15. Properties of the Langmuir films made by petroleum asphaltenes. Model systems of crude oil-water emulsions; Proprietes des films de Langmuir formes par des asphaltenes du petrole. Systemes modeles des emulsions eau - petrole brut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deghais, S.; Solimando, R. [Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Industries Chimiques, Lab. de Thermodynamique des Separations, 54 - Nancy (France); Zywocinski, A.; Rogalska, E. [Universite Henri Poincare, Lab. de Physco-Chimie des Colloides, UMR CNRS 7565, 54 - Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Rogalski, M.; Rogalska, E. [Metz Univ., Lab. de Thermodynamique et d' Analyse Chimique, 57 (France)

    2001-07-01

    This work deals with the analysis of the properties of the water-petroleum fluid interfaces using the Langmuir films technique. The stability of the water-petroleum emulsions is ensured by complex interactions which exist at the interface between paraffins and heavy petroleum compounds like asphaltenes and resins. The experiments performed have shown that the stabilizing properties of the asphaltene films depend on the dielectric constant of the fluid, on the presence or not of resins, and on the presence of possible paraffinic depositions. (J.S.)

  16. Evaluation of the stability of concentrated emulsions for lemon beverages using sequential experimental designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Teresa Cristina Abreu; Larentis, Ariane Leites; Ferraz, Helen Conceição

    2015-01-01

    The study of the stability of concentrated oil-in-water emulsions is imperative to provide a scientific approach for an important problem in the beverage industry, contributing to abolish the empiricism still present nowadays. The use of these emulsions would directly imply a reduction of transportation costs between production and the sales points, where dilution takes place. The goal of this research was to evaluate the influence of the main components of a lemon emulsion on its stability, aiming to maximize the concentration of oil in the beverage and to correlate its physicochemical characteristics to product stability, allowing an increase of shelf life of the final product. For this purpose, analyses of surface and interface tension, electrokinetic potential, particle size and rheological properties of the emulsions were conducted. A 2(4-1) fractional factorial design was performed with the following variables: lemon oil/water ratio (30% to 50%), starch and Arabic gum concentrations (0% to 30%) and dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (0 mg/L to 100 mg/L), including an evaluation of the responses at the central conditions of each variable. Sequentially, a full design was prepared to evaluate the two most influential variables obtained in the first plan, in which concentration of starch and gum ranged from 0% to 20%, while concentration of lemon oil/water ratio was fixed at 50%, without dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate. Concentrated emulsions with stability superior to 15 days were obtained with either starch or Arabic gum and 50% lemon oil. The most stable formulations presented viscosity over 100 cP and ratio between the surface tension of the emulsion and the mucilage of over 1. These two answers were selected, since they better represent the behavior of emulsions in terms of stability and could be used as tools for an initial selection of the most promising formulations.

  17. Drop sizes and particle coverage in emulsions stabilised solely by silica nanoparticles of irregular shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Holt, Benjamin L; Parker, James; Beaussoubre, Pascal; Wong, Kenneth

    2010-10-14

    We have investigated emulsions stabilised solely by partially-hydrophobised fumed silica particles which consist of a mixture of primary particles and irregularly-shaped fused aggregates and larger agglomerates. The particle wettability is controlled by varying the extent of hydrophobisation of their surfaces. This, in turn, controls the contact angle between the oil-water interface and the particle surface (θ(ow)) which affects the particle adsorption energy and the type of emulsion formed (oil-in-water, o/w or water-in-oil, w/o). Progressive particle hydrophobisation causes transitional phase inversion of the emulsions from o/w to w/o which occurs when θ(ow) = 90° and the energy of particle adsorption to the oil-water interface is maximally favourable. The key problem addressed here is to understand why the emulsion drop size passes through a minimum at the point of emulsion phase inversion. In principle, this effect could be the result of particle desorption, changes in the extent of close-packing of the adsorbed particle film (at constant particle orientation), particle re-orientation or a combination of these processes. Using measurements of emulsion drop size and the extent of particle desorption, we have derived adsorbed particle surface concentrations as a function of the energy of desorption of the particles from the oil-water interface for a range of particle concentrations and different oil-water systems. The main conclusion is that the minimum in emulsion drop size through phase inversion is mainly caused by re-orientation of the particles from a high surface area orientation when the energy of desorption is high to a low surface area orientation when the energy of desorption is low. Some particle desorption occurs but this is a secondary effect.

  18. Evaluation of the stability of concentrated emulsions for lemon beverages using sequential experimental designs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Cristina Abreu Almeida

    Full Text Available The study of the stability of concentrated oil-in-water emulsions is imperative to provide a scientific approach for an important problem in the beverage industry, contributing to abolish the empiricism still present nowadays. The use of these emulsions would directly imply a reduction of transportation costs between production and the sales points, where dilution takes place. The goal of this research was to evaluate the influence of the main components of a lemon emulsion on its stability, aiming to maximize the concentration of oil in the beverage and to correlate its physicochemical characteristics to product stability, allowing an increase of shelf life of the final product. For this purpose, analyses of surface and interface tension, electrokinetic potential, particle size and rheological properties of the emulsions were conducted. A 2(4-1 fractional factorial design was performed with the following variables: lemon oil/water ratio (30% to 50%, starch and Arabic gum concentrations (0% to 30% and dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (0 mg/L to 100 mg/L, including an evaluation of the responses at the central conditions of each variable. Sequentially, a full design was prepared to evaluate the two most influential variables obtained in the first plan, in which concentration of starch and gum ranged from 0% to 20%, while concentration of lemon oil/water ratio was fixed at 50%, without dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate. Concentrated emulsions with stability superior to 15 days were obtained with either starch or Arabic gum and 50% lemon oil. The most stable formulations presented viscosity over 100 cP and ratio between the surface tension of the emulsion and the mucilage of over 1. These two answers were selected, since they better represent the behavior of emulsions in terms of stability and could be used as tools for an initial selection of the most promising formulations.

  19. Bioaccessibility and Cellular Uptake of β-Carotene Encapsulated in Model O/W Emulsions: Influence of Initial Droplet Size and Emulsifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Lu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the initial emulsion structure (droplet size and emulsifier on the properties of β-carotene-loaded emulsions and the bioavailability of β-carotene after passing through simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT digestion were investigated. Exposure to GIT significantly changed the droplet size, surface charge and composition of all emulsions, and these changes were dependent on their initial droplet size and the emulsifiers used. Whey protein isolate (WPI-stabilized emulsion showed the highest β-carotene bioaccessibility, while sodium caseinate (SCN-stabilized emulsion showed the highest cellular uptake of β-carotene. The bioavailability of emulsion-encapsulated β-carotene based on the results of bioaccessibility and cellular uptake showed the same order with the results of cellular uptake being SCN > TW80 > WPI. An inconsistency between the results of bioaccessibility and bioavailability was observed, indicating that the cellular uptake assay is necessary for a reliable evaluation of the bioavailability of emulsion-encapsulated compounds. The findings in this study contribute to a better understanding of the correlation between emulsion structure and the digestive fate of emulsion-encapsulated nutrients, which make it possible to achieve controlled or potential targeted delivery of nutrients by designing the structure of emulsion-based carriers.

  20. Interconnected Porous Material Prepared Via High Internal Phase Emulsion Stabilized by Mixture of Fe3O4 and Tween85

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Huaqing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available PolyHIPE monoliths with open-cell structure were prepared using an oil-in-water Pickering high internal phase emulsion (HIPEs template. Fe3O4 nanoparticles and Tween 85 were used to stabilize the HIPE. The effects of surfactant concentration, nanoparticle amount and internal phase fraction on the average void and interconnecting pore diameter and interconnectivity degree were investigated. Efficiency of these PolyHIPEs as catalyst for Fenton reaction to decompose methyl orange was tested. The results showed that the PolyHIPE was an excellent and reusable supporter for Fenton reaction.

  1. Stabilization Improves Theranostic Properties of Lipiodol®-Based Emulsion During Liver Trans-arterial Chemo-embolization in a VX2 Rabbit Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deschamps, F.; Farouil, G.; Gonzalez, W.; Robic, C.; Paci, A.; Mir, L. M.; Tselikas, L.; Baère, T. de

    2017-01-01

    PurposeTo demonstrate that stability is a crucial parameter for theranostic properties of Lipiodol ® -based emulsions during liver trans-arterial chemo-embolization.Materials and MethodsWe compared the theranostic properties of two emulsions made of Lipiodol ® and doxorubicin in two successive animal experiments (One VX2 tumour implanted in the left liver lobe of 30 rabbits). Emulsion-1 reproduced one of the most common way of preparation (ratio of oil/water: 1/1), and emulsion-2 was designed to obtain a water-in-oil emulsion with enhanced stability (ratio of oil/water: 3/1, plus an emulsifier). The first animal experiment compared the tumour selectivity of the two emulsions: seven rabbits received left hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) of emulsion-1 and eight received HAI of emulsion-2. 3D-CBCT acquisitions were acquired after HAI of every 0.1 mL to measure the densities’ ratios between the tumours and the left liver lobes. The second animal experiment compared the plasmatic and tumour doxorubicin concentrations after HAI of 1.5 mg of doxorubicin administered either alone (n = 3) or in emulsion-1 (n = 6) or in emulsion-2 (n = 6).ResultsEmulsion-2 resulted in densities’ ratios between the tumours and the left liver lobes that were significantly higher compared to emulsion-1 (up to 0.4 mL infused). Plasmatic doxorubicin concentrations (at 5 min) were significantly lower after HAI of emulsion-2 (19.0 μg/L) than emulsion-1 (275.3 μg/L, p < 0.01) and doxorubicin alone (412.0 μg/L, p < 0.001), and tumour doxorubicin concentration (day-1) was significantly higher after HAI of emulsion-2 (20,957 ng/g) than in emulsion-1 (8093 ng/g, p < 0.05) and doxorubicin alone (2221 ng/g, p < 0.01).ConclusionStabilization of doxorubicin in a water-in-oil Lipiodol ® -based emulsion results in better theranostic properties.

  2. Stabilization Improves Theranostic Properties of Lipiodol{sup ®}-Based Emulsion During Liver Trans-arterial Chemo-embolization in a VX2 Rabbit Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschamps, F., E-mail: frederic.deschamps@gustaveroussy.fr; Farouil, G. [Université Paris-Saclay, Département de radiologie Interventionnelle, Gustave Roussy (France); Gonzalez, W.; Robic, C. [Guerbet France, Guerbet (France); Paci, A.; Mir, L. M. [Université Paris-Saclay, UMR 8203 (France); Tselikas, L.; Baère, T. de [Université Paris-Saclay, Département de radiologie Interventionnelle, Gustave Roussy (France)

    2017-06-15

    PurposeTo demonstrate that stability is a crucial parameter for theranostic properties of Lipiodol{sup ®}-based emulsions during liver trans-arterial chemo-embolization.Materials and MethodsWe compared the theranostic properties of two emulsions made of Lipiodol{sup ®} and doxorubicin in two successive animal experiments (One VX2 tumour implanted in the left liver lobe of 30 rabbits). Emulsion-1 reproduced one of the most common way of preparation (ratio of oil/water: 1/1), and emulsion-2 was designed to obtain a water-in-oil emulsion with enhanced stability (ratio of oil/water: 3/1, plus an emulsifier). The first animal experiment compared the tumour selectivity of the two emulsions: seven rabbits received left hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) of emulsion-1 and eight received HAI of emulsion-2. 3D-CBCT acquisitions were acquired after HAI of every 0.1 mL to measure the densities’ ratios between the tumours and the left liver lobes. The second animal experiment compared the plasmatic and tumour doxorubicin concentrations after HAI of 1.5 mg of doxorubicin administered either alone (n = 3) or in emulsion-1 (n = 6) or in emulsion-2 (n = 6).ResultsEmulsion-2 resulted in densities’ ratios between the tumours and the left liver lobes that were significantly higher compared to emulsion-1 (up to 0.4 mL infused). Plasmatic doxorubicin concentrations (at 5 min) were significantly lower after HAI of emulsion-2 (19.0 μg/L) than emulsion-1 (275.3 μg/L, p < 0.01) and doxorubicin alone (412.0 μg/L, p < 0.001), and tumour doxorubicin concentration (day-1) was significantly higher after HAI of emulsion-2 (20,957 ng/g) than in emulsion-1 (8093 ng/g, p < 0.05) and doxorubicin alone (2221 ng/g, p < 0.01).ConclusionStabilization of doxorubicin in a water-in-oil Lipiodol{sup ®}-based emulsion results in better theranostic properties.

  3. Fabrication of magnetic and fluorescent chitin and dibutyrylchitin sub-micron particles by oil-in-water emulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Fernandez, Barbara; Chakravarty, Shatadru; Nkansah, Michael K; Shapiro, Erik M

    2016-11-01

    Chitin is a carbohydrate polymer with unique pharmacological and immunological properties, however, because of its unwieldy chemistry, the synthesis of discreet sized sub-micron particles has not been well reported. This work describes a facile and flexible method to fabricate biocompatible chitin and dibutyrylchitin sub-micron particles. This technique is based on an oil-in-water emulsification/evaporation method and involves the hydrophobization of chitin by the addition of labile butyryl groups onto chitin, disrupting intermolecular hydrogen bonds and enabling solubility in the organic solvent used as the oil phase during fabrication. The subsequent removal of butyryl groups post-fabrication through alkaline saponification regenerates native chitin while keeping particles morphology intact. Examples of encapsulation of hydrophobic dyes and nanocrystals are demonstrated, specifically using iron oxide nanocrystals and coumarin 6. The prepared particles had diameters between 300-400nm for dibutyrylchitin and 500-600nm for chitin and were highly cytocompatible. Moreover, they were able to encapsulate high amounts of iron oxide nanocrystals and were able to label mammalian cells. We describe a technique to prepare sub-micron particles of highly acetylated chitin (>90%) and dibutyrylchitin and demonstrate their utility as carriers for imaging. Chitin is a polysaccharide capable of stimulating the immune system, a property that depends on the acetamide groups, but its insolubility limits its use. No method for sub-micron particle preparation with highly acetylated chitins have been published. The only approach for the preparation of sub-micron particles uses low acetylation chitins. Dibutyrylchitin, a soluble chitin derivative, was used to prepare particles by oil in water emulsification. Butyryl groups were then removed, forming chitin particles. These particles could be suitable for encapsulation of hydrophobic payloads for drug delivery and cell imaging, as well as

  4. Electrospraying of water in oil emulsions for thin film coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, M.K.I.; Maan, A.A.; Schutyser, M.A.I.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Electrospraying of water-in-oil emulsions was investigated to produce thin edible barriers. A reproducible model surface was used, namely cellulose membranes of which permeability is well-established. PGPR-based emulsions were stable during electrospraying and produced a fine stable jet spray;

  5. Production of a New Emulsifier Material for the Formation Heavy Hydrocarbon/Water Emulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Farahbakhsh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Emulsifiers are a unique class of compounds that have proved to have a variety of potential applications in formation of hydrocarbon in water emulsion, in enhancement of oil recovery and in the reduction of heavy oil viscosity. In this paper, a bio emulsifier was synthesized by a strain of Bacillus licheniformis and was separated by an autoclave and centrifugal process; the purification of bio emulsifier and the increase quality of product was done by adding sulfuric acid (H2SO4 (98% to the solution and centrifuging this compound again. This bio emulsifier has the property of emulsification to a wide range of heavy hydrocarbon to form a stable hydrocarbon-water emulsion. This bio emulsifier could reduce Iranian Nuroze high viscosity oil of about 10000 cP down to 250 cP. This means about 97% decreases in the viscosity. The emulsion stable this condition for 48 hr and the viscosity slowly increases to 4000cp until 192 hr. The stability of the oil in water emulsion during 48hr allows the heavy oil to be transported practically over lengthy distances or remain stable for long periods of time prior to utilization.

  6. Influence of propylene glycol on aqueous silica dispersions and particle-stabilized emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Thompson, Michael A; Elliott, Russell P

    2013-05-14

    We have studied the influence of adding propylene glycol to both aqueous dispersions of fumed silica nanoparticles and emulsions of paraffin liquid and water stabilized by the same particles. In the absence of oil, aerating mixtures of aqueous propylene glycol and particles yields either stable dispersions, aqueous foams, climbing particle films, or liquid marbles depending on the glycol content and particle hydrophobicity. The presence of glycol in water promotes particles to behave as if they are more hydrophilic. Calculations of their contact angle at the air-aqueous propylene glycol surface are in agreement with these findings. In the presence of oil, particle-stabilized emulsions invert from water-in-oil to oil-in-water upon increasing either the inherent hydrophilicity of the particles or the glycol content in the aqueous phase. Stable multiple emulsions occur around phase inversion in systems of low glycol content, and completely stable, waterless oil-in-propylene glycol emulsions can also be prepared. Accounting for the surface energies at the respective interfaces allows estimation of the contact angle at the oil-polar phase interface; reasonable agreement between measured and calculated phase inversion conditions is found assuming no glycol adsorption on particle surfaces.

  7. Influence of emulsion nature on radiation response of β-carotene in an aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhushan, B.; Tobback, P.; Snauwaert, F.; Maes, E.

    1978-01-01

    The radiation response of β-carotene was followed in lipid solvents and in aqueous preparations. The nature of the solvent was found to have a marked influence on the response of β-carotene to γ-radiation. In aqueous emulsions radiation destruction of β-carotene was far less than that observed in solutions. Oil in water (O/W) emulsions of petroleum ether offered maximum protection to β-carotene against radiation damage. This observation was attributed to the multiphase nature of the emulsion since a transparent aqueous preparation was observed to offer no protection upon irradiation. Solubility of crystalline β-carotene in water was found to increase with the emulsifier concentration. Irradiation revealed that the extent of β-carotene destruction was dose dependent and increased with the solubility of β-carotene in water. In the presence of a free radical scavenger DPPH β-carotene exhibited varied radiation response depending upon the nature of solvents used. Thus, in transparent aqueous preparations the protection afforded by added DPPH to β-carotene was almost complete, while its influence was insignificant in O/W emulsions. The significance of these observations in radiation processing of foods is discussed. (author)

  8. Macroporous polymer from core-shell particle-stabilized Pickering emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zifu; Ngai, To

    2010-04-06

    Poly(styrene-co-N-isopropylacrylamide) (PS-co-PNIPAM) core-shell particles were synthesized and used as particulate emulsifiers in the preparation of particle-stabilized (Pickering) emulsions. Highly concentrated oil-in-water emulsions with an internal phase up to 80 vol % can be produced using PS-co-PNIPAM core-shell particles along as the emulsifiers in emulsions. The core-shell particles are adsorbed at the liquid interface, acting as a barrier against oil droplet coalescence. In addition, it is likely that excess particles simultaneously form a gel in the continuous phase to trap oil droplets in the gel matrix, in turn inhibiting creaming and phase inversion. Evaporation in air of such a core-shell particle-stabilized emulsion directly leads to porous membranes in the absence of chemical reactions. The pore walls of the final structures are densely packed with layers of the core-shell particles. This provides great flexibility to prepare functionalized porous materials for opening up new applications.

  9. Investigation on the influence of the TBP diluents on the primary emulsion stability in model extraction systems: TBP-diluents-water solutions of HNO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogoz, F.

    1983-01-01

    In the extraction systems containing little quantities of TBP in carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) and kerosene the stable emulsions are created; for higher concentrations of TBP the emulsion stability decreases and increases again for the highest concentrations of TBP. In the TBP solutions in N-octane and benzene the great influence on the primary emulsion stability is observed only for the high concentrations of TBP. The addition of MBP has considerably less influence on the primary emulsion stability than the addition of DBP has, for all used diluents. (author)

  10. Oil encapsulation in core-shell alginate capsules by inverse gelation II: comparison between dripping techniques using W/O or O/W emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Evandro; Poncelet, Denis; Rodrigues, Ramila Cristiane; Renard, Denis

    2017-09-01

    In the first part of this article, it was described an innovative method of oil encapsulation from dripping-inverse gelation using water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions. It was noticed that the method of oil encapsulation was quite different depending on the emulsion type (W/O or oil-in-water (O/W)) used and that the emulsion structure (W/O or O/W) had a high impact on the dripping technique and the capsules characteristics. The objective of this article was to elucidate the differences between the dripping techniques using both emulsions and compare the capsule properties (mechanical resistance and release of actives). The oil encapsulation using O/W emulsions was easier to perform and did not require the use of emulsion destabilisers. However, capsules produced from W/O emulsions were more resistant to compression and showed the slower release of actives over time. The findings detailed here widened the knowledge of the inverse gelation and gave opportunities to develop new techniques of oil encapsulation.

  11. Emulsions for interfacial filtration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grillet, Anne Mary; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Souza, Caroline Ann; Welk, Margaret Ellen; Hartenberger, Joel David; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated a novel emulsion interfacial filter that is applicable for a wide range of materials, from nano-particles to cells and bacteria. This technology uses the interface between the two immiscible phases as the active surface area for adsorption of targeted materials. We showed that emulsion interfaces can effectively collect and trap materials from aqueous solution. We tested two aqueous systems, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and coal bed methane produced water (CBMPW). Using a pendant drop technique to monitor the interfacial tension, we demonstrated that materials in both samples were adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface, and did not readily desorb. A prototype system was built to test the emulsion interfacial filter concept. For the BSA system, a protein assay showed a progressive decrease in the residual BSA concentration as the sample was processed. Based on the initial prototype operation, we propose an improved system design.

  12. Evolution of equilibrium Pickering emulsions--a matter of time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Daniela J; Luigjes, Bob; de Folter, Julius W J; Philipse, Albert P; Kegel, Willem K

    2010-09-30

    A new class of equilibrium solid-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions harbors a competition of two processes on disparate time scales that affect the equilibrium droplet size in opposing ways. The aim of this work is to elucidate the molecular origins of these two time scales and demonstrate their effects on the evolution of the emulsion droplet size. First, spontaneous emulsification into particle-covered droplets occurs through in situ generation of surface-active molecules by hydrolysis of molecules of the oil phase. We show that surface tensions of the oil-water interfaces in the absence of stabilizing colloidal particles are connected to the concentration of these surface-active molecules, and hence also to the equilibrium droplet size in the presence of colloids. As a consequence, the hydrolysis process sets the time scale of formation of these solid-stabilized emulsions. A second time scale is governing the ultimate fate of the solid-stabilized equilibrium emulsions: by condensation of the in situ generated amphiphilic molecules onto the colloidal particles, their wetting properties change, leading to a gradual transfer from the aqueous to the oil phase via growth of the emulsion droplets. This migration is observed macroscopically by a color change of the water and oil phases, as well as by electron microscopy after polymerization of the oil phase in a phase separated sample. Surprisingly, the relative oil volume sets the time scale of particle transfer. Phase separation into an aqueous phase and an oil phase containing colloidal particles is influenced by sedimentation of the emulsion droplets. The two processes of formation of surface-active molecules through hydrolysis and condensation thereof on the colloidal surface have an opposite influence on the droplet size. By their interplay, a dynamic equilibrium is created where the droplet size always adjusts to the thermodynamically stable state.

  13. Preparation of Pickering emulsions through interfacial adsorption by soft cyclodextrin nanogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintaro Kawano

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emulsions stabilized by colloidal particles are known as Pickering emulsions. To date, soft microgel particles as well as inorganic and organic particles have been utilized as Pickering emulsifiers. Although cyclodextrin (CD works as an attractive emulsion stabilizer through the formation of a CD–oil complex at the oil–water interface, a high concentration of CD is normally required. Our research focuses on an effective Pickering emulsifier based on a soft colloidal CD polymer (CD nanogel with a unique surface-active property.Results: CD nanogels were prepared by crosslinking heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl-β-cyclodextrin with phenyl diisocyanate and subsequent immersion of the resulting polymer in water. A dynamic light scattering study shows that primary CD nanogels with 30–50 nm diameter assemble into larger CD nanogels with 120 nm diameter by an increase in the concentration of CD nanogel from 0.01 to 0.1 wt %. The CD nanogel has a surface-active property at the air–water interface, which reduces the surface tension of water. The CD nanogel works as an effective Pickering emulsion stabilizer even at a low concentration (0.1 wt %, forming stable oil-in-water emulsions through interfacial adsorption by the CD nanogels.Conclusion: Soft CD nanogel particles adsorb at the oil–water interface with an effective coverage by forming a strong interconnected network and form a stable Pickering emulsion. The adsorption property of CD nanogels on the droplet surface has great potential to become new microcapsule building blocks with porous surfaces. These microcapsules may act as stimuli-responsive nanocarriers and nanocontainers.

  14. Development of High Sensitivity Nuclear Emulsion and Fine Grained Emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, H.; Asada, T.; Naka, T.; Naganawa, N.; Kuwabara, K.; Nakamura, M.

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear emulsion is a particle detector having high spacial resolution and angular resolution. It became useful for large statistics experiment thanks to the development of automatic scanning system. In 2010, a facility for emulsion production was introduced and R&D of nuclear emulsion began at Nagoya university. In this paper, we present results of development of the high sensitivity emulsion and fine grained emulsion for dark matter search experiment. Improvement of sensitivity is achieved by raising density of silver halide crystals and doping well-adjusted amount of chemicals. Production of fine grained emulsion was difficult because of unexpected crystal condensation. By mixing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to gelatin as a binder, we succeeded in making a stable fine grained emulsion.

  15. Development of High Sensitivity Nuclear Emulsion and Fine Grained Emulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawahara, H.; Asada, T. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Naka, T. [Institute of Advanced Research, Nagoya University (Japan); Naganawa, N.; Kuwabara, K.; Nakamura, M. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Nuclear emulsion is a particle detector having high spacial resolution and angular resolution. It became useful for large statistics experiment thanks to the development of automatic scanning system. In 2010, a facility for emulsion production was introduced and R and D of nuclear emulsion began at Nagoya university. In this paper, we present results of development of the high sensitivity emulsion and fine grained emulsion for dark matter search experiment. Improvement of sensitivity is achieved by raising density of silver halide crystals and doping well-adjusted amount of chemicals. Production of fine grained emulsion was difficult because of unexpected crystal condensation. By mixing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to gelatin as a binder, we succeeded in making a stable fine grained emulsion.

  16. Fuzzy Clustering-Based Modeling of Surface Interactions and Emulsions of Selected Whey Protein Concentrate Combined to i-Carrageenan and Gum Arabic Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gums and proteins are valuable ingredients with a wide spectrum of applications. Surface properties (surface tension, interfacial tension, emulsion activity index “EAI” and emulsion stability index “ESI”) of 4% whey protein concentrate (WPC) in a combination with '- carrageenan (0.05%, 0.1%, and 0.5...

  17. Intravenous Treatment with a Long-Chain Omega-3 Lipid Emulsion Provides Neuroprotection in a Murine Model of Ischemic Stroke - A Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Berressem

    Full Text Available Single long-chain omega-3 fatty acids (e.g. docosahexaenoic acid (DHA or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA are known for their neuroprotective properties associated with ischemic stroke. This pilot study aimed to test the effectiveness of an acute treatment with a long-chain omega-3 lipid emulsion (Omegaven 10%®, OGV that contains fish oil (DHA 18 mg/ml; EPA 21 mg/ml and α-tocopherol (0.2 mg/ml in a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO model of ischemic stroke in mice. For this purpose, female CD-1 mice were anesthetized and subjected to 90 minutes of MCAO. To reflect a clinically relevant situation for an acute treatment, either after induction of stroke or after reperfusion, a single dose of OGV was injected intravenously into the tail vein (5 ml/kg b.w.. A neurological severity score was used to assess motor function and neurological outcome. Stroke-related parameters were determined 24 hours after MCAO. Microdialysis was used to collect samples from extracellular space of the striatum. Mitochondrial function was determined in isolated mitochondria or dissociated brain cells. Inflammation markers were measured in brain homogenate. According to control experiments, neuroprotective effects could be attributed to the long-chain omega-3 content of the emulsion. Intravenous injection of OGV reduced size and severity of stroke, restored mitochondrial function, and prevented excitotoxic glutamate release. Increases of pro-inflammatory markers (COX-2 and IL-6 were attenuated. Neurological severity scoring and neurochemical data demonstrated that acute OGV treatment shortly after induction of stroke was most efficient and able to improve short-term neurological outcome, reflecting the importance of an acute treatment to improve the outcome. Summarising, acute treatment of stroke with a single intravenous dose of OGV provided strong neuroprotective effects and was most effective when given immediately after onset of ischemia. As OGV is an

  18. A microfluidic approach to fabricate monodisperse hollow or porous poly(HEMA-MMA) microspheres using single emulsions as templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Xie, Rui; Cheng, Chang-Jing; Ren, Ping-Wei; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2009-08-01

    We have successfully developed a novel and simple method to controllably prepare monodisperse poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-methyl methacrylate) (poly(HEMA-MMA)) microspheres with two distinct structures using single emulsions as templates. By employing a microfluidic emulsification approach to fabricate monomer-contained oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions as templates, and introducing proper initiators and different types of porogens, poly(HEMA-MMA) microspheres with hollow or porous structure are prepared in a controllable way. The shell thickness of hollow microspheres or the porosity of porous microspheres is controllably achieved by simply adjusting the porogen concentration. The prepared poly(HEMA-MMA) microspheres with controllable hollow or porous structures are favored for various potential applications. Furthermore, by using the simple preparation methodology proposed in this study, fabrication of monodisperse porous microspheres or hollow microcapsules with other materials can also be easily achieved.

  19. Pickering emulsions for food applications: background, trends, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton-Carabin, Claire C; Schroën, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Particle-stabilized emulsions, also referred to as Pickering emulsions, have garnered exponentially increasing interest in recent years. This has also led to the first food applications, although the number of related publications is still rather low. The involved stabilization mechanisms are fundamentally different as compared to conventional emulsifiers, which can be an asset in terms of emulsion stability. Even though most of the research on Pickering emulsions has been conducted on model systems, with inorganic solid particles, recent progress has been made on the utilization of food-grade or food-compatible organic particles for this purpose. This review reports the latest advances in that respect, including technical challenges, and discusses the potential benefits and drawbacks of using Pickering emulsions for food applications, as an alternative to conventional emulsifier-based systems.

  20. Oil-in-water nanocontainers as low environmental impact cleaning tools for works of art: two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretti, Emiliano; Giorgi, Rodorico; Berti, Debora; Baglioni, Piero

    2007-05-22

    A novel class of p-xylene-in-water microemulsions mainly based on nonionic surfactants and their application as low impact cleaning tool in cultural heritage conservation is presented. Alkyl polyglycosides (APG) and Triton X-100 surfactants allow obtaining very effective low impact oil-in-water (o/w) microemulsions as alternatives to pure organic solvents for the removal of polymers (particularly Paraloid B72 and Primal AC33) applied during previous conservation treatments. The ternary APG/p-xylene/water microemulsions have been characterized by quasi elastic light scattering to obtain the hydrodynamic radius and the polydispersity of the microemulsion droplets. Laplace inversion of the correlation function CONTIN analysis provided evidence of acrylic copolymers solubilization into the oil nanodroplets. Contact angle, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) data confirmed that microemulsions were effective in removing polymer coatings. The phase diagram of APG microemulsions showed that a reduction >90% (compared to the conventional cleaning methods) of the organic solvent can be achieved by using o/w microemulsions. The microemulsions were successfully tested in two real cases: (1) the APG based microemulsion was used in a Renaissance painting by Vecchietta in Santa Maria della Scala, Siena, Italy, degraded by the presence of a polyacrylate coating applied during a previous restoration and (2) a Triton X-100 oil-in-water microemulsion containing (NH4)2CO3 in the water continuous phase. The association of ammoniun carbonate to the microemusion led to the swelling of an organic deposit (mainly asphaltenes deposited on the fresco in the Oratorio di San Nicola al Ceppo in Florence, still contamined by the water of the Arno river during the 1966 flood) and a very efficient removal of highly insoluble inorganic deposits (mainly gypsum) strongly associated to asphaltenes. These innovative systems are

  1. Front-face fluorescence spectroscopy study of globular proteins in emulsions: displacement of BSA by a nonionic surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampon, V; Genot, C; Riaublanc, A; Anton, M; Axelos, M A V; McClements, D J

    2003-04-23

    The displacement of a globular protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA) from the surface of oil droplets in concentrated oil-in-water emulsions by a nonionic surfactant (polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolauarate, Tween 20) was studied using front-face fluorescence spectroscopy (FFFS). This method relies on measurement of the change in intensity (I(MAX)) and wavelength (lambda(MAX)) of the maximum in the tryptophan emission spectrum. A series of oil-in-water emulsions (21 wt % n-hexadecane, 0.22 wt % BSA, pH 7.0) containing different molar ratios of Tween 20 to BSA (R = 0-131) were prepared. As the surfactant concentration was increased, the protein was progressively displaced from the droplet surfaces. At R > or = 66, the protein was completely displaced from the droplet surfaces. There was an increase in both I(MAX) and lambda(MAX) with increasing Tween 20 concentration up to R = 66, which correlated with the increase in the ratio of nonadsorbed to adsorbed protein. In contrast, there was a decrease in I(MAX) and lambda(MAX) with Tween 20 concentration in protein solutions and for R > or = 66 in the emulsions, which was attributed to binding of the surfactant to the protein. This study shows that FFFS is a powerful technique for nondestructively providing information about the interfacial composition of droplets in concentrated protein-stabilized emulsions in situ. Nevertheless, in general the suitability of the technique may also depend on protein type and the nature of the physicochemical matrix surrounding the proteins.

  2. Thermal Degradation and Isomerization of β-Carotene in Oil-in-Water Nanoemulsions Supplemented with Natural Antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jiang; Fan, Yuting; Yokoyama, Wallace; Zhang, Yuzhu; Zhao, Liqing

    2016-03-09

    The goal of this study was to see the impact on the retention and isomerization of encapsulated β-carotene (BC) in nanoemulsions fortified with natural antioxidants (α-tocopherol (AT) and l-ascorbic acid (AA)). The physical stability of nanoemulsion, oxidative stability, and isomerization of all-trans-β-carotene (BC) in oil-in-water (O/W) nanoemulsions were determined in the presence or absence of natural antioxidants at 25 and 50 °C at certain intervals of time by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Sodium caseinate was used as the emulsifier, and corn oil (CO) was more protective than medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) and used for isomerization studies. Mean diameters of control (without antioxidants) and AA- and AT-fortified particles were similar. Mean particle diameter of nanoemulsions increased from 10 to 25 nm at 25 °C and from 40 to 50 nm at 50 °C during 30 days of storage. The isomerization from all-trans-BC to cis-BC isomers was inhibited by antioxidants. The isomerization rates were in the following order: 13-cis-BC > 15-cis-BC > 9-cis-BC. AT had better antioxidant activities than AA in inhibiting BC degradation in O/W nanoemulsions. The results indicated that BC encapsulated in nanoemulsions supplemented with antioxidants could significantly improve BC's chemical stability.

  3. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT K2 HPO4, NaCl LEVELS AND TWO DIFFERENT TEMPARATURES ON SOME EMULSION PROPERTIES OF GOAT MEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa KARAKAYA

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Different levels of K2 HPO4 (0.00 %, 0.25 % and 0.50 % and NaCl (2.5 % and 3.0 % were added into goat meat, at the two different temperatures (11o C and 18o C in order to investigate the emulsion properties in the model emulsion system. Emulsion capacity (EK, emulsion viscocity (EV, emulsion stability ratio (ES, the ratio of separated water (ESO and oil (EYO ratio from the emulsion, and the emulsion pH were determined. K2 HPO4 and NaCl levels and the oil temperatures have significant effect (p

  4. Use of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as surfactant for the determination of copper and chromium in gasoline emulsions by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Denilson S.S. dos; Teixeira, Alete P.; Barbosa, Jose T.P.; Ferreira, Sergio L.C.; Korn, Maria das Gracas A; Teixeira, Leonardo S.G.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, the use of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as surfactant for the preparation of oil-in-water emulsions for the determination of Cu and Cr in gasoline by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS) was evaluated. The surfactant amount was tested in the range of 25 to 300 mg, added to 2 ml of gasoline, and completed to 10 mL with 0.1% (v/v) nitric acid solution. 150 mg of surfactant was found optimum, and a sonication time of 10 min sufficient to form an oil-in-water emulsion that was stable for several hours. The ET AAS temperature program was established based on pyrolysis and atomization curves. The pyrolysis temperatures were set at 700 and 1300 deg. C for Cu and Cr, respectively and the selected atomization temperatures were 2400 and 2500 deg. C. The time and temperature of the drying stage and the atomization time were experimentally tested to provide optimum conditions. The limits of detection were found to be 5 μg L -1 and 1.5 μg L -1 for Cu and Cr, respectively in the original gasoline samples. The relative standard deviation (RSD) ranged from 4 to 9% in oil-in-water emulsions spiked with 5 μg L -1 and 15 μg L -1 of each metal, respectively. Recoveries varied from 90 to 98%. The accuracy of the proposed method was tested by an alternate procedure using complete evaporation of the gasoline sample. The method was adequate for the determination of Cu and Cr in gasoline samples collected from different gas stations in Salvador, BA, Brazil

  5. α-Tocopherol/chitosan-based nanoparticles: characterization and preliminary investigations for emulsion systems application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aresta, Antonella; Calvano, Cosima Damiana; Trapani, Adriana; Zambonin, Carlo Giorgio; De Giglio, Elvira

    2014-02-01

    The processes of lipids oxidation represent a great concern for the consumer health because they are one of the major causes of quality deterioration in fat-containing products. One of the most effective methods of delaying lipid oxidation consists in incorporating antioxidants. The present investigation describes the formulation of chitosan and novel glycol chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with α-Tocopherol (αToc-NPs). The obtained NPs were characterized by various techniques, such as particle size (showing mean diameters in the range 335-503 nm) and zeta potential measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The NPs were, then, added in the preparation of oil-in-water simple emulsion both to make the lipophilic αToc available in an aqueous medium and to prevent emulsion oxidation. For this purpose, a new highly sensitive, simple and solvent-free method based on a solid phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography mass spectrometry was developed for the determination of αToc in aqueous medium. All the parameters influencing SPME, including fiber coating, time and temperature extraction, pH, ionic strength and desorption conditions, have been carefully screened. The method was successfully applied to the determination of vitamin in the αToc-NPs and its release from NPs-enriched simple emulsion formulations. SPME provided high recovery yields and the limits of detection and of quantification in emulsion were 0.1 and 0.5 μg/mg, respectively. The precision of the method has been also estimated. The delay of the lipid oxidation by the proposed formulations has been evaluated exploiting the Kreis test on αToc-NPs-enriched emulsions.

  6. Double emulsion generation in the mass production of inertial confinement fusion targets using T-junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Matthew J.

    This work demonstrates a new device for the continuous controlled production of double emulsions for the manufacturing of inertial confinement fusion targets. This device can be integrated into a microfluidic approach to produce targets which should increase the yield and quality of the targets and at a lower cost. The device is a double T-Junction, which has been scaled, optimized and built to produce oil-in-water-in-oil double emulsions from diameters of roughly 4 mm or less. A T-Junction is an intersection of two channels at a right angle where fluid emerges and is broken off to form droplets. A systematic study presented here has shown that a single T-Junction has four modes of operation: squeezing, dripping, transition and streaming. The droplet size may be controlled by controlling the fluid flow rate through the channels; the droplet increases with increasing dispersed flow and decreasing continuous flow. The device was utilized to produce hundreds of ˜ 2.5 mm diameter resorcinol formaldehyde double emulsions with better than 2 percent reproducibility in diameter. The device was used to produce 2.0 mm shells with an average wall thickness of 510 microns.

  7. Functionalized Cellulose Networks for Efficient Oil Removal from Oil–Water Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttam C. Paul

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The separation of oil from water in emulsions is a great environmental challenge, since oily wastewater is industrially produced. Here, we demonstrate a highly efficient method to separate oil from water in non-stabilized emulsions, using functionalized cellulose fiber networks. This is achieved by the modification of the wetting properties of the fibers, transforming them from oil- and water-absorbing to water-absorbing and oil-proof. In particular, two diverse layers of polymeric coatings, paraffin wax and poly(dimethylsiloxane-b-poly(ethylene oxide (PDMS-b-PEO diblock copolymer, are applied on the surface of each individual fiber by a two-step dip adsorption process. The resulting cellulose networks exhibit superhydrophilicity and underwater superoleophobicity and they are mechanically reinforced. Therefore, the described treatment makes cellulose fiber networks excellent candidates for the filtration and subsequent removal of oil from oil-in-water non-stabilized emulsions with oil separation efficiency up to 99%. The good selectivity, reproducibility, and cost effectiveness of the preparation process leads to the production of low cost filters that can be used in oil–water separation applications.

  8. Sensory assessment of fat content: effect of emulsion and subject characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mela, D J; Langley, K R; Martin, A

    1994-02-01

    This work examines some of the fundamental stimulus properties contributing to the perception and discrimination of fat content in foods. In an initial experiment, oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions were prepared with 0, 5, 10, ..., 40, 45, and 50% sunflower oil (SUN) and homogenized at pressures of 100 and 300 bar. These were rated for "fat content" and "smoothness" on 9-point category scales. There were significant effects of fat concentration and processing pressure. Higher pressures, associated with a decreased fat particle size/number ratio, generated a slightly enhanced perception of fat content. In a second experiment, O/W emulsions were prepared with 0, 12, 24, 36, and 48% fat at 100 and 300 bar, from two oils differing in fat saturation: SUN and Hycoa 5 (HY5, a highly saturated commercial cocoa butter substitute). The results indicate significant main and interactive effects of fat type and concentration, but no significant effect of processing pressure were seen in this experiment. HY5 emulsions had a substantially greater measured viscosity and were judged higher in fat content than those prepared from SUN, particularly at higher fat levels. Analyses indicate a significant independent contribution of fat concentration to perceived fat content, beyond increased viscosity. There were no consistent main or interactive effects of subject age or body composition on judgments of fat content.

  9. Effect of synthetic surfactants, salinity and alkalinity on the properties of asphalt emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prat, F.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the effect of salinity, alkalinity and amount of ionic and non-ionic synthetic surfactants in the aqueous emulsifier used to prepare oil-in-water or asphaltic emulsions on the performance of such substances as waterproofing on buildings. The emulsion systems studied here were prepared with Venezuelan extra heavy oil. The findings showed that the four variables modified viscosity, surface tension and mean particle size, physical properties that are instrumental to asphalt emulsion stability.Este trabajo estudia la influencia de las variables salinidad, alcalinidad y cantidad de surfactantes sintéticos, tanto iónicos como no iónicos, existentes en el emulsivo acuoso empleado para formular emulsiones asfálticas, con vistas a la aplicación de las mismas como recubrimientos impermeabilizantes en edificaciones. Para la preparación de los sistemas emulsionados objeto de estudio, se utilizó como producto bituminoso un crudo extrapesado procedente de Venezuela. En tal sentido, los resultados obtenidos muestran cómo las cuatro variables de formulación anteriormente mencionadas modifican una serie de propiedades físicas (viscosidad, tensión superficial y diámetro promedio de partícula muy determinantes para la estabilidad de las referidas emulsiones asfálticas.

  10. Pilot clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent hepatic cancer involving the intra-arterial injection of a (10)BSH-containing WOW emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagie, Hironobu; Higashi, Syushi; Seguchi, Koji; Ikushima, Ichiro; Fujihara, Mituteru; Nonaka, Yasumasa; Oyama, Kazuyuki; Maruyama, Syoji; Hatae, Ryo; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Kinashi, Tomoko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Kajiyama, Tetsuya; Maruhashi, Akira; Ono, Koji; Nakajima, Jun; Ono, Minoru; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Eriguchi, Masazumi

    2014-06-01

    A 63-year-old man with multiple HCC in his left liver lobe was enrolled as the first patient in a pilot study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) involving the selective intra-arterial infusion of a (10)BSH-containing water-in-oil-in-water emulsion ((10)BSH-WOW). The size of the tumorous region remained stable during the 3 months after the BNCT. No adverse effects of the BNCT were observed. The present results show that (10)BSH-WOW can be used as novel intra-arterial boron carriers during BNCT for HCC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Three Types of Oil Dispersants on Biodegradation of Dispersed Crude Oil in Water Surrounding Two Persian Gulf Provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Zolfaghari-Baghbaderani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the most effective and biodegradable dispersant of spilled oil in water surrounding two Persian Gulf provinces. Methods. This study compared the effects of three dispersants, Pars 1, Pars 2, and Gamlen OD4000 on removal of oil in two Persian Gulf provinces' water. Overall, 16 stations were selected. Using the Well method, the growth rate of isolated bacteria and fungi was identified. To specify the growth rate of microorganisms and their usage of oil in the presence of the above-mentioned dispersants, as exclusive sources of carbon, the bacteria were grown in culture medium for 28 days at 120 rpm, 30∘C, and their optical density was measured by spectrophotometry. Then, we tested biological oxygen demand (BOD and chemical oxygen demand (COD in microorganisms. Results. The highest growth rate was documented for the growth of microorganisms on either Pars 1 or Pars 2 dispersants or their mixtures with oil. However, the culture having microorganisms grown on Pars 1 had higher BOD and COD than the other two dispersants (9200 and 16800 versus 500 and 960, P<0.05. Mixture of oil and Pars 2 as well as oil and Pars 1 dispersants showed the highest BODs and CODs, respectively. In the Bahregan province, microorganisms grown on Pars 2 had maximum amount of BOD and COD in comparison with Pars 1 and Gamlen dispersants (7100 and 15200 versus 6000 and 10560, P<0.05. Conclusion. Pars 1 and Pars 2 were the most effective dispersants with highest degradability comparing Gamlen. In each region, the most suitable compound for removing oil spill from offshores with least secondary contamination should be investigated.

  12. Formulation of Oil-in-Water Cream from Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L. Pericarp Extract Preserved by Gamma Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Isabella

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to formulate mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L. pericarp extract into oil-in-water (O/W cream which stable and durable. In order to improve the shelf life durability of the formula, the irradiation of formula using gamma rays from cobalt-60 was done. The concentrations of extract were varied to 1, 2 and 3% and were irradiated by gamma rays with doses of 5, 7.5 and 10 kGy. Physicochemical and microbiological properties of these formulas were carried out for 90 days stored at 30 ± 2°C and 40 ± 2°C. It was found that both of physicochemical and microbiological properties of the formulas were changed by extract concentrations and after irradiation. The irradiated formulas with dose up to 7.5 kGy, which were stored at 30 ± 2°C and 40 ± 2°C, presented acceptable physicochemical and microbiological stability for at least 90 days. Analysis by TLC (Thin Layer Chromatography-densitometry to study decomposition of G. mangostana pericarp extract cream formulas was carried out 24 h after preparation and 90 day after storage. The result of TLC-densitometry analysis showed that G. mangostana pericarp extract in the cream formulas did not develope significant decomposition after 90 days of storage. Decontamination dose for all formulas was found to be about 7.5 kGy. At this condition, the bacteria and mold-yeast have been killed, without reducing the antioxidant activity

  13. Synthesis of Mixed Cu/Ce Oxide Nanoparticles by the Oil-in-Water Microemulsion Reaction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Pemartin-Biernath

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerium oxide and mixed Cu/Ce oxide nanoparticles were prepared by the oil-in-water (O/W microemulsion reaction method in mild conditions. The Cu/Ce molar ratio was varied between 0/100 and 50/50. According to X-ray diffraction (XRD, below 30/70 Cu/Ce molar ratio, the materials presented a single phase consistent with cubic fluorite CeO2. However, above Cu/Ce molar ratio 30/70, an excess monoclinic CuO phase in coexistence with the predominant Cu/Ce mixed oxide was detected by XRD and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM. Raman spectroscopy showed that oxygen vacancies increased significantly as the Cu content was increased. Band gap (Eg was investigated as a function of the Cu/Ce molar ratio, resulting in values from 2.91 eV for CeO2 to 2.32 eV for the mixed oxide with 30/70 Cu/Ce molar ratio. These results indicate that below 30/70 Cu/Ce molar ratio, Cu2+ is at least partially incorporated into the ceria lattice and very well dispersed in general. In addition, the photodegradation of Indigo Carmine dye under visible light irradiation was explored for selected samples; it was shown that these materials can remove such contaminants, either by adsorption and/or photodegradation. The results obtained will encourage investigation into the optical and photocatalytic properties of these mixed oxides, for widening their potential applications.

  14. Aligned Porous Beads Prepared by Frozen Polymerization of Emulsion-Templates Involving Tiny Emulsifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High internal phase emulsion (HIPE templated porous materials are attracting increasing interests due to its high porosity and tunable structure. However, large amounts (5-50 vol% of suitable non-ionic surfactants are commonly required to stabilize conventional HIPE due to the high internal volume fraction of HIPE. In this work, applying frozen polymerization in HIPE, aligned porous beads were prepared with tiny surfactant (~0.1 wt%. These interconnected aligned porous beads were prepared through directional freezing, and frozen ultraviolet (UV initiation of an oil-in-water (o/w HIPE. The HIPEs are extruded by needle, and then directionally frozen in liquid nitrogen to form beads. The frozen beads were exposed under UV irradiation in a -20 °C ethanol bath to initiate the monomers in the aqueous phase. Moreover, the morphology of the resulting porous beads were tailored by vary the ratio of oil/water and the amount of emulsifier.

  15. Natural gum modified emulsion gel as single carrier for the oral delivery of probiotic-drug combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, S; Senthilguru, K; Uvanesh, K; Sagiri, S S; Behera, B; Babu, N; Bhattacharyya, M K; Pal, K; Banerjee, I

    2016-11-01

    Single formulation based delivery of probiotic-drug combination is envisioned as a superior therapeutic delivery modality for the diseases like Crohn's diseases, ulceritive colitis and Recurrent Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhoea (RCDAD). Keeping this perspective in mind, here we have developed natural gum [using a combination of aqueous solution of xantham gum (X) and guar gum (G)] modified sunflower oil based emulsion gels for the delivery of probiotics-drugs combination. FT-IR analysis and fluorescence microscopy together confirmed the formation of oil-in-water type emulsion gel by physical gelation in presence of the physical gelator sorbitan monopalmitate (SM). Other studies (XRD, DSC, mechanical properties and disintegration study) revealed that the variation in relative proportion of the two gums has a sporadic but significant effect on the physico-chemical properties of the gel. Post storage viability of commercially used probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum 299v (Lp 299v) at different storage conditions (4°C, -20°C, -196°C) was found higher in the emulsion gels with respect to the control. Moreover, the gels were found suitable for sustained delivery of metronidazole (the lipophilic drug often used with Lp 299v). In conclusion, the natural gum modified emulsion gel may be used as a delivery system for the probiotic-drug combination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessing Interactions between Lipophilic and Hydrophilic Antioxidants in Food Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Erwann; Zhao, Yu; Coupland, John N; Elias, Ryan J

    2015-12-16

    Dietary lipids containing high concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids are considered to be beneficial to human health, yet their incorporation within formulated foods is complicated by their susceptibility to oxidation. Lipid oxidation in foods is inhibited through the incorporation of antioxidants, yet the list of antioxidants approved for food use is small, and consumers frequently demand foods without synthetic additives. As a consequence, food processors are now tasked with improving the efficacy of approved, "natural" (i.e., nonsynthetic) antioxidants; a rational strategy for doing so involves localizing the antioxidants at the interface where oxidation usually occurs and regenerating the consumed antioxidants after the oxidation event has occurred. The present study describes a procedure to evaluate antioxidant interactions in oil-in-water food emulsions, which is based on controlled oxidation reactions induced in the dispersed oil phase by the lipophilic radical generator, 2,2'-azobis(2,4-dimethylvaleronitrile). The extent of lipid oxidation is measured spectroscopically by following the loss of an oxidatively labile, lipophilic probe (methyl eleostearate), the synthesis of which is described here. Using this procedure, the ability of various aqueous phase solvated antioxidants (ascorbic acid, gallic acid, (-)-epicatechin, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate) to regenerate lipid phase solvated α-tocopherol was evaluated. In all cases, the test compounds were able to inhibit oxidation reactions; however, these effects were not profoundly synergistic, and the maximum synergistic interaction observed was only ∼ 3% using ascorbic acid.

  17. Effect of primary emulsions on microsphere size and protein-loading in the double emulsion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maa, Y F; Hsu, C C

    1997-01-01

    Incorporation of a protein drug in microspheres made of a hydrophobic polymer is commonly achieved via double liquid-liquid emulsification (w/o/w) or by dispersing a powdered protein in a polymer solution followed by liquid-liquid emulsification (s/o/w). This study focused on the effect of the first operating step in both processes on the size and protein-loading of the microspheres. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as the model protein and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was used as the model polymer. The w/o emulsion was characterized based on the degree of emulsion fineness which was controlled using rotor/stator homogenization. The s/o emulsion was characterized based on protein powder size and shape. Protein powders of different sizes and shapes were produced using different powder preparation methods. In both emulsification processes, the second operating step which produced the microspheres was conducted in either a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) or a static mixer. The size of the microspheres thus prepared was found to increase with increasing size of the protein powder in the s/o/w system but increase with decreasing size of the liquid emulsion droplets in the w/o/w system. Empirical correlations can accurately predict the size of the microspheres if the size of w/o emulsion droplets and protein powder is 10 x less than the microsphere size. Protein loading in the microspheres decreased with respect to increases in w/o emulsion droplet size or in protein powder size. We propose that these phenomena are attributed to two mechanisms, fragmentation along the weak routes in the w/o/w system and particle redistribution as the result of terminal velocity in the s/o/w system. The role of protein powder shape was not significant until the protein powder size exceeded 5 microns. Irregular-shaped protein powders resulted in lower encapsulation efficiency than spherical-shaped protein powders.

  18. UV-vis degradation of α-tocopherol in a model system and in a cosmetic emulsion-Structural elucidation of photoproducts and toxicological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vaugelade, Ségolène; Nicol, Edith; Vujovic, Svetlana; Bourcier, Sophie; Pirnay, Stéphane; Bouchonnet, Stéphane

    2017-09-29

    The UV-vis photodegradation of α-tocopherol was investigated in a model system and in a cosmetic emulsion. Both gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) and high performance liquid chromatography coupled with ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC-UHR-MS) were used for photoproducts structural identification. Nine photoproduct families were detected and identified based on their mass spectra and additional experiments with α-tocopherol-d 9 ; phototransformation mechanisms were postulated to rationalize their formation under irradiation. In silico QSAR (Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship) toxicity predictions were conducted with the Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (T.E.S.T.). Low oral rat LD50 values of 466.78mgkg -1 and 467.9mgkg -1 were predicted for some photoproducts, indicating a potential toxicity more than 10 times greater that of α-tocopherol (5742.54mgkg -1 ). In vitro assays on Vibrio fischeri bacteria showed that the global ecotoxicity of the α-tocopherol solution significantly increases with irradiation time. One identified product should contribute to this ecotoxicity enhancement since in silico estimations for D. magna provide a LC50 value 4 times lower than that of the parent molecule. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Oxidative enzymatic gelation of sugar beet pectin for emulsion stabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz; Meyer, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    Pectin from sugar beet is derived from the sugar beet pulp residue which results when sugar beets are processed for sucrose extraction. The sugar beet pectin has poor gelationability by the classic divalentcation molecular mechanism because of a relatively high acetylation degree and short...... polygalacturonate backbone chain length. However, due to the feruloyl-substitutions on the side chains, the sugar beet pectic polysaccharides can be cross-linked via enzyme catalyzed oxidation. The enzyme kinetics and functionality of such oxidativelycross-linked sugar beet pectin, in relation to stabilizing...... emulsions has recently been investigated in model food emulsions. This paper reviews the pectin chemistry, enzymatic oxidative gelation mechanisms, interaction mechanisms of the sugar beet pectin with the emulsion droplets and explores how the gelation affects the rheology and stability of emulsion systems...

  20. Fabrication of porous polymer microparticles with tunable pore size and density through the combination of phase separation and emulsion-solvent evaporation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shanqin; Cai, Mingle; Deng, Renhua; Wang, Jianying; Liang, Ruijing; Zhu, Jintao

    2014-02-01

    A facile and versatile route to prepare porous polymer microparticles with tunable pore size and density through the combination of phase separation and emulsion-solvent evaporation method is demonstrated. When volatile organic solvent ( e.g., chloroform) diffuses through the aqueous phase containing poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and evaporates, n-hexadecane (HD) and polystyrene (PS) in oil-in-water emulsion droplets occur to phase separate due to the incompatibility between PS and HD, ultimately yielding microparticles with porous structures. Interestingly, density of the pores (pore number) on the shell of microparticles can be tailored from one to hundreds by simply varying the HD concentration and/ or the rate of solvent evaporation. Moreover, this versatile approach for preparing porous microparticles with tunable pore size and density can be applied to other types of hydrophobic polymers, organic solvents, and alkanes, which will find potential applications in the fields of pharmaceutical, catalyst carrier, separation, and diagnostics.

  1. Attachment of Alcanivorax borkumensis to Hexadecane-in-Artificial Sea Water Emulsion Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Akram; Bothun, Geoffrey D; Bose, Arijit

    2018-04-16

    Alcanivorax borkumensis (AB) is a marine bacterium that dominates bacterial communities around many oil spills because it enzymatically degrades the oil while using it as a nutrient source. Several dispersants have been used to produce oil-in-water emulsions following a spill. Compared to surface slicks, the additional oil-water surface area produced by emulsification provides greater access to the oil, and accelerates its degradation. We deliberately cultured AB cells using hexadecane as the only nutrient source. We then examined the first critical step of the biodegradation process, the attachment of these AB cells to hexadecane-water interfaces, using fluorescence microscopy and cryogenic scanning electron microscopy. The hexadecane-in-artificial sea water (ASW) emulsions were produced by gentle shaking, and were stabilized either by AB alone, by Corexit 9500, by Tween 20, or by carbon black particles. When no dispersants were used, AB stabilizes the emulsion, and bacterial cells attach to the hexadecane droplets within the first 3 days. When Corexit 9500 was used as the dispersant, AB did not attach to the hexadecane droplets over 3 days, and many AB cells in the aqueous phase appeared dead. Only limited attachment was observed after 7 days. No AB attachment was observed over 3 days when Tween 20 was used as the dispersant. However, the bacteria used Tween 20 in the ASW as a nutrient. Large amounts of AB attached to carbon black stabilized hexadecane droplets within 3 days. An analysis that accounts for van der Waals and electrostatic interactions is unable to predict all of these observations, indicating that the attachment of AB to the hexadecane is a complex phenomenon that goes beyond simple physiochemical effects. While these experiments do not mimic conditions in the open ocean where the large amount of water dilutes any emulsion stabilizer, they provide important insights on bacteria adhesion to oil, a critical step in the oil degradation process

  2. Emulsion oil droplet size significantly affects satiety: A pre-ingestive approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lett, Aaron M; Norton, Jennifer E; Yeomans, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that the manipulation of oil droplet size within oil-in-water emulsions significantly affects sensory characteristics, hedonics and expectations of food intake, independently of energy content. Smaller oil droplets enhanced perceived creaminess, increased Liking and generated greater expectations of satiation and satiety, indicating that creaminess is a satiety-relevant sensory cue within these systems. This paper extends these findings by investigating the effect of oil droplet size (d4,3: 2 and 50 μm) on food intake and appetite. Male participants (n = 34 aged 18-37; BMI of 22.7 ± 1.6 kg/m(2); DEBQ restricted eating score of 1.8 ± 0.1.) completed two test days, where they visited the laboratory to consume a fixed-portion breakfast, returning 3 h later for a "drink", which was the emulsion preload containing either 2 or 50 μm oil droplets. This was followed 20 min later with an ad libitum pasta lunch. Participants consumed significantly less at the ad libitum lunch after the preload containing 2 μm oil droplets than after the 50 μm preload, with an average reduction of 12% (62.4 kcal). Despite the significant differences in intake, no significant differences in sensory characteristics were noted. The findings show that the impact that an emulsion has on satiety can be enhanced without producing significantly perceivable differences in sensory properties. Therefore, by introducing a processing step which results in a smaller droplets, emulsion based liquid food products can be produced that enhance satiety, allowing covert functional redesign. Future work should consider the mechanism responsible for this effect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of soy lecithin based novel self-assembled emulsion hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vinay K; Pandey, Preeti M; Agarwal, Tarun; Kumar, Dilip; Banerjee, Indranil; Anis, Arfat; Pal, Kunal

    2015-03-01

    The current study reports the development and characterization of soy lecithin based novel self-assembled emulsion hydrogels. Sesame oil was used as the representative oil phase. Emulsion gels were formed when the concentration of soy lecithin was >40% w/w. Metronidazole was used as the model drug for the drug release and the antimicrobial tests. Microscopic study showed the apolar dispersed phase in an aqueous continuum phase, suggesting the formation of emulsion hydrogels. FTIR study indicated the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, whereas, the XRD study indicated predominantly amorphous nature of the emulsion gels. Composition dependent mechanical and drug release properties of the emulsion gels were observed. In-depth analyses of the mechanical studies were done using Ostwald-de Waele power-law, Kohlrausch and Weichert models, whereas, the drug release profiles were modeled using Korsmeyer-Peppas and Peppas-Sahlin models. The mechanical analyses indicated viscoelastic nature of the emulsion gels. The release of the drug from the emulsion gels was diffusion mediated. The drug loaded emulsion gels showed good antimicrobial activity. The biocompatibility test using HaCaT cells (human keratinocytes) suggested biocompatibility of the emulsion gels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Emulsion stability: determination from turbidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, S.R.; Fogler, H.S.

    1981-01-01

    The relationship between particle size and concentration and turbidity has been developed for a polydispersed system. The stability of acoustically prepared emulsions of C36H74 in water were determined from turbidimetry and found to be in agreement with the stability determined by the freezing method. The turbidimetry method can be used for determining the stability of various emulsions easily and inexpensively. 11 references.

  5. Automatic scanning of emulsion films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ambrosio, N.; Mandrioli, G.; Sirrib, G.

    2003-01-01

    The use of nuclear emulsions in recent large neutrino experiments is mostly due to the significant results in the developments of this detection technique. In the emulsion films, trajectories of through-going particles are permanently recorded: thus, the emulsion target can be considered not only as a tracking but also as a storing device. If the data readout is performed by automatic scanning systems interfaced to an acquisition computer equipped with a fast frame grabber, nuclear emulsions can be used as very large target detector and quickly analyzed in particle physics experiments. Techniques for automatic scanning of nuclear emulsions have been developed in the early past. The effort was initiated by Niwa at Nagoya (Japan) in the late 70s. The first large-scale application was the CHORUS experiment; then emulsions have been used to search for T neutrinos in a high track density environment like DONUT. In order to measure with high accuracy and high speed, very strict constraints must be satisfied in terms of mechanical precisions, camera speed, image processing power. Recent improvements in this technique are briefly reported

  6. Pickering emulsions stabilized by coloured organic pigment particles† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc03085h Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olusanya, Samuel O.

    2017-01-01

    The possibility of stabilizing emulsions of water and non-polar alkane with pure, coloured organic pigment particles is explored. Seven pigment types each possessing a primary colour of the rainbow were selected. Their solubility in water or heptane was determined using a spectrophotometric method and their surface energies were derived from the contact angles of probe liquids on compressed disks of the particles. As expected, most of the pigments are relatively hydrophobic but pigment orange is quite hydrophilic. At equal volumes of oil and water, preferred emulsions were water-in-oil (w/o) for six pigment types and oil-in-water (o/w) for pigment orange. The emulsion type is in line with calculated contact angles of the particles at the oil–water interface being either side of 90°. Their stability to coalescence increases with particle concentration. Emulsions are shown to undergo limited coalescence from which the coverage of drop interfaces by particles has been determined. In a few cases, close-packed primary particles are visible around emulsion droplets. At constant particle concentration, the influence of the volume fraction of water (φ w) on emulsions was also studied. For the most hydrophilic pigment orange, emulsions are o/w at all φ w, whereas they are w/o for the most hydrophobic pigments (red, yellow, green and blue). For pigments of intermediate hydrophobicity however (indigo and violet), catastrophic phase inversion becomes possible with emulsions inverting from w/o to o/w upon increasing φ w. For the first time, we link the pigment surface energy to the propensity of emulsions to phase invert transitionally or catastrophically. PMID:28626551

  7. Production of Concentrated Pickering Emulsions with Narrow Size Distributions Using Stirred Cell Membrane Emulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Mohamed S; York, David W

    2017-09-12

    Stirred cell membrane emulsification (SCME) has been employed to prepare concentrated Pickering oil in water emulsions solely stabilized by fumed silica nanoparticles. The optimal conditions under which highly stable and low-polydispersity concentrated emulsions using the SCME approach are highlighted. Optimization of the oil flux rates and the paddle stirrer speeds are critical to achieving control over the droplet size and size distribution. Investigating the influence of oil volume fraction highlights the criticality of the initial particle loading in the continuous phase on the final droplet size and polydispersity. At a particle loading of 4 wt %, both the droplet size and polydispersity increase with increasing of the oil volume fraction above 50%. As more interfacial area is produced, the number of particles available in the continuous phase diminishes, and coincidently a reduction in the kinetics of particle adsorption to the interface resulting in larger polydisperse droplets occurs. Increasing the particle loading to 10 wt % leads to significant improvements in both size and polydispersity with oil volume fractions as high as 70% produced with coefficient of variation values as low as ∼30% compared to ∼75% using conventional homogenization techniques.

  8. Blood gas sample spiking with total parenteral nutrition, lipid emulsion, and concentrated dextrose solutions as a model for predicting sample contamination based on glucose result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Aguirre, Jose C; Smeets, Steven W; Wockenfus, Amy M; Karon, Brad S

    2018-03-16

    Evaluate the effects of blood gas sample contamination with total parenteral nutrition (TPN)/lipid emulsion and dextrose 50% (D50) solutions on blood gas and electrolyte measurement; and determine whether glucose concentration can predict blood gas sample contamination with TPN/lipid emulsion or D50. Residual lithium heparin arterial blood gas samples were spiked with TPN/lipid emulsion (0 to 15%) and D50 solutions (0 to 2.5%). Blood gas (pH, pCO2, pO2), electrolytes (Na+, K+ ionized calcium) and hemoglobin were measured with a Radiometer ABL90. Glucose concentration was measured in separated plasma by Roche Cobas c501. Chart review of neonatal blood gas results with glucose >300 mg/dL (>16.65 mmol/L) over a seven month period was performed to determine whether repeat (within 4 h) blood gas results suggested pre-analytical errors in blood gas results. Results were used to determine whether a glucose threshold could predict contamination resulting in blood gas and electrolyte results with greater than laboratory-defined allowable error. Samples spiked with 5% or more TPN/lipid emulsion solution or 1% D50 showed glucose concentration >500 mg/dL (>27.75 mmol/L) and produced blood gas (pH, pO 2 , pCO 2 ) results with greater than laboratory-defined allowable error. TPN/lipid emulsion, but not D50, produced greater than allowable error in electrolyte (Na + ,K + ,Ca ++ ,Hb) results at these concentrations. Based on chart review of 144 neonatal blood gas results with glucose >250 mg/dL received over seven months, four of ten neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients with glucose results >500 mg/dL and repeat blood gas results within 4 h had results highly suggestive of pre-analytical error. Only 3 of 36 NICU patients with glucose results 300-500 mg/dL and repeat blood gas results within 4 h had clear pre-analytical errors in blood gas results. Glucose concentration can be used as an indicator of significant blood sample contamination with either TPN

  9. BACTERIAL POPULATION DYNAMICS IN WASTE OILY EMULSIONS FROM THE METAL-PROCESSING INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Kaszycki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oil-containing wastewaters are regarded as main industrial pollutants of soil and water environments. They can occur as free-floating oil, unstable or stable oil-in-water (O/W emulsions, and in the case of extreme organic load, as water-in-oil (W/O emulsions. In this study two types of oily effluents, a typical O/W emulsion marked as E1 and a W/O emulsion E2, both discharged by local metal processing plants were examined to test their toxicity to microbial communities and the ability to serve as nutrient sources for bacterial growth. The organic contaminant load of the samples was evaluated on the basis of chemical oxygen demand (COD parameter values and was equal to 48 200 mg O2·dm-3 and >300 000 mg O2·dm-3 for E1 and E2, respectively.Both emulsions proved to be non toxic to bacterial communities and were shown to contain biodiverse autochthonous microflora consisting of several bacterial strains adapted to the presence of xenobiotics (the total of 1.36 · 106 CFU·cm-3 and 1.72 · 105 CFU·cm-3 was determined for E1 and E2, respectively. These indigenous bacteria as well as exogenously inoculated specialized allochthonous microorganisms were biostimulated so as to proliferate within the wastewater environment whose organic content served as the only source of carbon. The most favorable cultivation conditions were determined as fully aerobic growth at the temperature of 25 ºC. In 9 to 18 day-tests, autochthonous as well as bioaugmented allochthonous bacterial population dynamics were monitored. For both emulsions tested there was a dramatic increase (up to three orders of magnitude in bacterial frequency, as compared to the respective initial values. The resultant high biomass densities suggest that the effluents are susceptible to bioremediation. A preliminary xenobiotic biodegradation test confirmed that mixed auto- and allochthonous bacterial consortia obtained upon inoculation of the samples with microbiocenoses preselected for efficient

  10. Experimental study of viscosity properties of emulsion system with SiO2 nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZEIGMAN Yury Veniaminovich,

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available When oil production is increasing due to intensive oilfield development methods supporting seam pressure by water injection oil producers face the problem of displacement agent break in more permeable intervals of petroleum reservoir. That leads to dramatic increase of product inundation for well stock and decrease of economic efficiency for well performance. Nowadays the petroleum engineers have proposed more than 100 technologies designed to restrict water inflows and flooding agent to bottom-hole zone of the production wells. The water inflows restriction technologies are distinguished by the type of applied chemical compositions and the way how the chemical compositions are delivered to bottom-hole zone. The analysis of the currently applied chemical compositions has allowed authors to reveal the common feature. The common feature is that the currently applied chemical compositions are non-selective and they produce isolating or blocking effect onto water-saturated and oil-saturated zones of the petroleum reservoir. The application of the nonselective high-stability chemical compositions leads to uncontrolled colmatation of all treated intervals and makes it difficult to involve them into filtration process in future. This work presents the technology for the selective reservoir stimulation based on emulsion systems with SiO2 nanoparticles content and gelling acid composition. The technology was developed for complex impact on formation system, that achieved by blocking water-saturated intervals of reservoir and stimulation of less permeable oil-saturated intervals of reservoir. The paper shows the results of complex laboratory experiments to study viscosity parameters of emulsion systems with SiO2 nanoparticles content. The results of the experiments revealed the ability of the SiO2 nanoparticles to rise dynamic viscosity of the different type of emulsion systems: oil in water and water in oil. Test for thermostability of the modified

  11. A quality by design approach to optimization of emulsions for electrospinning using factorial and D-optimal designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Mariam A; El-Khordagui, Labiba K

    2014-07-16

    Emulsion electrospinning is a multifactorial process used to generate nanofibers loaded with hydrophilic drugs or macromolecules for diverse biomedical applications. Emulsion electrospinnability is greatly impacted by the emulsion pharmaceutical attributes. The aim of this study was to apply a quality by design (QbD) approach based on design of experiments as a risk-based proactive approach to achieve predictable critical quality attributes (CQAs) in w/o emulsions for electrospinning. Polycaprolactone (PCL)-thickened w/o emulsions containing doxycycline HCl were formulated using a Span 60/sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) emulsifier blend. The identified emulsion CQAs (stability, viscosity and conductivity) were linked with electrospinnability using a 3(3) factorial design to optimize emulsion composition for phase stability and a D-optimal design to optimize stable emulsions for viscosity and conductivity after shifting the design space. The three independent variables, emulsifier blend composition, organic:aqueous phase ratio and polymer concentration, had a significant effect (pemulsion CQAs, the emulsifier blend composition exerting prominent main and interaction effects. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of emulsion-electrospun NFs and desirability functions allowed modeling of emulsion CQAs to predict electrospinnable formulations. A QbD approach successfully built quality in electrospinnable emulsions, allowing development of hydrophilic drug-loaded nanofibers with desired morphological characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Isotachophoresis with emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goet, G.; Baier, T.; Hardt, S.; Sen, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study on isotachophoresis (ITP) in which an emulsion is used as leading electrolyte (LE) is reported. The study aims at giving an overview about the transport and flow phenomena occurring in that context. Generally, it is observed that the oil droplets initially dispersed in the LE are collected at the ITP transition zone and advected along with it. The detailed behavior at the transition zone depends on whether or not surfactants (polyvinylpyrrolidon, PVP) are added to the electrolytes. In a system without surfactants, coalescence is observed between the droplets collected at the ITP transition zone. After having achieved a certain size, the droplets merge with the channel walls, leaving an oil film behind. In systems with PVP, coalescence is largely suppressed and no merging of droplets with the channel walls is observed. Instead, at the ITP transition zone, a droplet agglomerate of increasing size is formed. In the initial stages of the ITP experiments, two counter rotating vortices are formed inside the terminating electrolyte. The vortex formation is qualitatively explained based on a hydrodynamic instability triggered by fluctuations of the number density of oil droplets. PMID:24404037

  13. Intravenous Lipid Emulsion Therapy Does Not Improve Hypotension Compared to Sodium Bicarbonate for Tricyclic Antidepressant Toxicity: A Randomized, Controlled Pilot Study in a Swine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    this possibility. In addition, there may be a difference in the way humans and swine metabolize the lipid drop- lets, although this has not been...acidotic state than in the sodium bicarbonate group. Acidosis increases the fraction of ionized ami- triptyline, which may theoretically slow diffusion...therapy. Pediatrics 2012;130:e432–8. 15. Al-Duaij N, George M, O’Donnell K, Burns EM. Lipid emulsion in massive imipramine overdose. Clin Toxicol

  14. Determination of Cu, Mn, Ni and Sn in gasoline by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and emulsion sample introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint'Pierre, Tatiana D.; Dias, Lucia Felicidade; Pozebon, Dirce; Aucelio, Ricardo Q.; Curtius, Adilson J.; Welz, Bernhard

    2002-01-01

    Trace metals in fuels, except in the case of additives, are usually undesirable and normally they occur in very low concentrations in gasoline, requiring sensitive techniques for their determination. Coupling of electrothermal vaporization with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry minimizes the problems related to the introduction of organic solvents into the plasma. Furthermore, sample preparation as oil-in-water emulsions reduces problems related to gasoline analysis. In this work, a method for determination of Cu, Mn, Ni and Sn in gasoline is proposed. Samples were prepared by forming a 10-fold diluted emulsion with a surfactant (Triton X-100), after treatment with concentrated HNO 3 . The sample emulsion was pre-concentrated in the graphite tube by repeated pipetting and drying. External calibration was used with aqueous standards in a purified gasoline emulsion. Six samples from different gas stations were analyzed, and the analyte concentrations were found to be in the μg l -1 range or below. The limits of detection were 0.22, 0.02, 0.38 and 0.03 μg l -1 for Cu, Mn, Ni and Sn, respectively. The accuracy of the method was estimated using a recovery test

  15. Stimuli-triggered Formation of Polymersomes from W/O/W Multiple Double Emulsion Droplets Containing Poly(styrene)-block-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-spironaphthoxazine methacryloyl).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Ri; Cheong, In Woo

    2016-09-13

    We report stimuli-triggered fabrication of polymersomes from water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) multiple double emulsion droplets and the dual-stimuli (temperature and UV) responsive behavior of corresponding polymersomes. The polymersome comprises Tween20, cholesterol, and poly(styrene)-block-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-spironaphthoxazine methacryloyl), i.e., PS-b-P(NIPAAm-co-SPO), synthesized by stepwise reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Amphiphilic PS-b-P(NIPAAm-co-SPO) copolymer forms micelles in water above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 0.7 g/L at 23 °C. The micelles show a temperature-driven aggregation among the micelles above 30.6 °C, confirmed by a decrease in UV-vis transmittance. The micelles also show a color change without colloidal instability under 365 nm UV at room temperature. PS-b-P(NIPAAm-co-SPO) plays not only a role of the polymeric surfactant in the preparation of W/O/W multiple double emulsions but also an important role in the stimuli-triggered transformation from multi- to single-core double emulsion droplets under heat and UV light irradiation. It was found that the morphological transformation of W/O/W multiple double emulsions by UV irradiation was much faster than temperature change. Dual-responsive polymersomes were simply prepared after solvent removal and they exhibit stable and reversible size and color variations under temperature and UV-visible changes, respectively.

  16. Double emulsions for the compatibilization of hydrophilic nanocellulose with non-polar polymers and validation in the synthesis of composite fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Carlos A; Nypelö, Tiina; Rojas, Orlando J

    2016-03-14

    A route for the compatibilization of aqueous dispersions of cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) with a non-polar polymer matrix is proposed to overcome a major challenge in CNF-based material synthesis. Non-ionic surfactants were used in CNF aqueous dispersions equilibrated with an organic phase (for demonstration, a polystyrene solution, PS, was used). Stable water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) double emulsions were produced as a result of the compromise between composition and formulation variables. Most remarkably, the proposed route for CNF integration with hydrophobic polymers removed the need for drying or solvent-exchange of the CNF aqueous dispersion prior to processing. The rheological behavior of the double emulsions showed strong shear thinning behavior and facilitated CNF-PS co-mixing in solid nanofibers upon electrospinning. The morphology and thermal properties of the resultant nanofibers revealed that CNFs were efficiently integrated in the hydrophobic matrix which was consistent with the high interfacial area of the precursor double emulsion. In addition, the morphology and quality of the composite nanofibers can be controlled by the conductivity (ionic strength) of the CNF dispersion. Overall, double emulsion systems are proposed as a novel, efficient and scalable platform for CNF co-processing with non-polar systems and they open up the possibility for the redispersion of CNFs after removal of the organic phase.

  17. Modelagem da polimerização simultânea de estireno em suspensão e emulsão Modeling styrene simultaneous suspension and emulsion polymerization systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo K. Lenzi

    2004-06-01

    polymerizations, while emulsion polymerization constituents are added during the batch. The influence of the moment when emulsion feed is started on the course of the polymerization and the effects on the polymer properties are analyzed. A mathematical model is developed to describe the behavior of the system. Simulation data obtained with the proposed model are in good agreement with experimental conversion, average molecular weight and molecular weight distribution data. It was observed that the polymer particle morphology and the average molecular weight change very significantly with the emulsion feed time and that such changes can lead to bimodal molecular weight distributions. Core-shell polymer particles were obtained, with the core being formed by polymer particles from the suspension polymerization process and the shell formed by polymer particles from the emulsion one.

  18. Development of Nutraceutical Emulsions as Risperidone Delivery Systems: Characterization and Toxicological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igartúa, Daniela Edith; Calienni, María Natalia; Feas, Daniela Agustina; Chiaramoni, Nadia Silvia; Del Valle Alonso, Silvia; Prieto, María Jimena

    2015-12-01

    Emulsions are gaining increasing interest to be applied as drug delivery systems. The main goal of this work was the formulation of an oil/water nutraceutical emulsion (NE) for oral administration, enriched in omega 3 (ω3) and omega 6 (ω6), and able to encapsulate risperidone (RISP), an antipsychotic drug widely used in the treatment of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). RISP has low solubility in aqueous medium and poor bioavailability because of its metabolism and high protein binding. Coadministration of ω3, ω3, and vitamin E complexed with RISP might increase its bioavailability and induce a synergistic effect on the treatment of ASD. Here, we developed an easy and quick method to obtain NEs and then optimized them. The best formulation was chosen after characterization by particle size, defects of the oil-in-water interface, zeta potential (ZP), and in vitro drug release. The formulation selected was stable over time, with a particle size of around 3 μm, a ZP lower than -20 mV and controlled drug release. To better understand the biochemical properties of the formulation obtained, we studied in vitro toxicity in the Caco-2 cell line. After 4 h of treatment, an increase in cellular metabolism was observed for all RISP concentrations, but emulsions did not change their metabolic rate, except at the highest concentration without drug (25 μg/mL), which showed a significant reduction in metabolism respect to the control. Additionally, locomotor activity and heart rate in zebrafish were measured as parameters of in vivo toxicity. Only the highest concentration (0.625 μg/mL) showed a cardiotoxic effect, which corresponds to the decrease in spontaneous movement observed previously. As all the materials contained in the formulations were US FDA approved, the NE selected would be good candidate for clinical trials. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  19. Emulsions and rectal formulations containing myrrh essential oil for better patient compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etman, M; Amin, M; Nada, A H; Shams-Eldin, M; Salama, O

    2011-06-01

    Myrrh has long been used for its circulatory, disinfectant, analgesic, antirheumatic, antidiabetic, and schistosomicidal properties. Myrrh essential oil (MEO) was extracted from the oleo-gum resin of Commiphora molmol and formulated into emulsions and suppositories to mask/avoid its bitter taste. Three oil-in-water emulsions (E1-E3) were formulated and taste was evaluated by 10 volunteers. Particle size distribution was measured and correlated with excipients and the method of preparation. Physical and chemical stability testing was carried out for the optimum formulation (E2). Seven suppository formulations were investigated (F1-F7). Suppocire AML (F1) and Suppocire CM (F2) were chosen as fatty bases, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) 1500 (F3), PEG 4000 (F4), and a PEG blend (50% PEG 6000 + 30% PEG 1500 + 20% PEG 400) (F5) were chosen as water-soluble bases. A blend of PEG 1500 and Suppocire CM was also used (F7). Camphor (5%) was added to PEG 1500 (F6). Disintegration time, release rate, DSC, fracture points, and weight uniformity were evaluated. The overall average bitterness for formulations E1, E2, and E3 was 6.44, 4.15, and 3.45, respectively. Suppositories containing Suppocire AML had the fastest disintegration time (1.5 min) with dissolution efficiency (DE) of 56.8%. F3 containing PEG 1500 had a fast disintegration time of 2.5 min and maximum DE of 93.5%. The PEG blend had satisfactory release: (DE = 90.9%). A mixed fatty and water-soluble base (F7) had a disintegration time of 5 min and low DE (33.4%). A stable MEO emulsion with acceptable taste was formulated to improve patient acceptance and compliance. F3 suppositories yielded satisfactory results, while formulations containing fatsoluble bases exhibited poor release.

  20. A Novel Cassia fistula (L.-Based Emulsion Elicits Skin Anti-Aging Benefits in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barkat Ali Khan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cassia fistula, a flowering plant in the family of Caesalpinaceae (Fabaceae, is used in traditional medicine for several indications. Nevertheless, too little is known about its effects on skin conditions and skin aging. Therefore, in this pioneering study, the extracts of oil-in-water macro-emulsions containing 5% C. fistula (L. crude pods (i.e., phyto-active formulation were optimally developed and compared to the placebo (i.e., emulsions without the crude extract for assessment of their effects on human skin aging. Healthy adult male volunteers (n = 13 with a mean age of 31 ± 5.5 years (range: 24–47 years were enrolled after informed written consent. For 12 consecutive weeks, the subjects were directed to use a patch containing the active emulsion on one of their forearms as well as a patch containing the placebo on their other forearm. Biometrological measurements of skin hydration (SH and transepidermal water loss (TEWL were performed on both sides of their respective cheeks at time 0 (baseline values, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12th weeks. Surface evaluation of living skin (SELS was taken at time 0 (baseline values or after 1, 2 and 3 months. Topical application of C. fistula extracts showed a significant (p < 0.05 increase in stratum corneum hydration level, a significant enhancement in its water-holding function as well as in its barrier function. Further, significant (p < 0.005 ameliorations of skin aspects were observed (i.e., less roughness, less dryness, less wrinkles. Taken together, our results strongly suggest therapeutic and esthetic potential of C. fistula pod’s extracts to prevent or delay human skin aging.

  1. Emulsion properties of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Perez, S.; Koningsveld, van G.A.; Vereijken, J.M.; Merck, K.B.; Gruppen, H.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Emulsions were made with sunflower protein isolate (SI), helianthinin, and sunflower albumins (SFAs). Emulsion formation and stabilization were studied as a function of pH and ionic strength and after heat treatment of the proteins. The emulsions were characterized with respect to average droplet

  2. Dielectric Properties of Flocculated Water-in-Oil Emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skodvin, T.

    1995-12-31

    When an offshore oil field is near completion, water occupies a large fraction of the available pore volume. Thus, in collecting the oil and gas reserves, one has to deal with a high co-production of either formation- or injected water. This doctoral thesis focuses on the effect of water-in-oil emulsions on the dielectric properties, in particular the effect of flocculation. Various dielectric models are applied to obtain methods for qualitative and quantitative characterization of the flocculated state. Permittivity and measurement of dielectric properties are discussed as a basis for the interpretation of the dielectric properties of the emulsions. Various flocculation models are presented. It is concluded that the dielectric properties of water-in-oil emulsions are strongly influenced by continuously ongoing processes in the system. Because of flocculation and sedimentation the traditional dielectric mixture models cannot satisfactorily predict the dielectric behaviour. The experimentally obtained permittivities for the emulsions can be reproduced by including flocculation in the models and treating the floc aggregates as spheroids or subsystems with dielectric properties given by the degree of flocculation. The models discussed have difficulties reproducing the complete frequency behaviour found experimentally. This is probably because the dielectric relaxation may be influenced by processes not included in the models, such as the effects of dipolar or multipolar interactions between the droplets. For further research it is recommended that rheological and dielectric measurements be combined. 227 refs., 61 figs., 16 tabs.

  3. Light scattering in Baltic crude oil - seawater emulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Stelmaszewski

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the scattering of radiation by a Baltic crude oil - seawater emulsion. The scattering spectrum calculated using the Mie solution in the spectral range from 380 nm to 730 nm is compared with the measured spectrum of light scattered through a right angle. Spectra in the wavelength range from 210 nm to 730 nm were measured using a spectrofluorimeter for fresh and stored samples of the Baltic crude oil emulsion. Scattering increases with wavelength in the UV range and then decreases slightly with the wavelength of visible light. The result of the calculation is similar to the measured spectra. Both the calculated and measured spectra display numerous relative extremes throughout the spectral area. Light scattering in the emulsion decreases during storage as the oil concentration in the medium diminishes. The results also demonstrate that the single scattering model describes the phenomenon correctly.

  4. Emulsion Droplet Combustion in Microgravity: Water/Heptane Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avedisian, C. Thomas

    1997-01-01

    This presentation reviews a series of experiments to further examine parametric effects on sooting processes of droplet flames in microgravity. The particular focus is on a fuel droplet emulsified with water, specifically emulsions of n-heptane as the fuel-phase and water as the dispersed phase. Water was selected as the additive because of its anticipated effect on soot formation, and the heptane fuel phase was chosen to theoretically reduce the likelihood of microexplosions because its boiling point is nearly the same as that of water: 100 C for water and 98 C for heptane. The water content was varied while the initial droplet diameter was kept within a small range. The experiments were carried out in microgravity to reduce the effects of buoyancy and to promote spherical symmetry in the burning process. Spherically symmetric droplet burning is a convenient starting point for analysis, but experimental data are difficult to obtain for this situation as evidenced by the fact that no quantitative data have been reported on unsupported emulsion droplet combustion in a convection-free environment. The present study improves upon past work carried out on emulsion droplet combustion in microgravity which employed emulsion droplets suspended from a fiber. The fiber can be instrusive to the emulsion droplet burning process as it can promote coalescence of the dispersed water phase and heterogeneous nucleation on the fiber. Prior work has shown that the presence of water in liquid hydrocarbons can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on the combustion process. Water is known to reduce soot formation and radiation heat transfer to combustor walls Gollahalli (1979) reduce flame temperatures and thereby NOx emissions, and encourage secondary droplet atomization or microexplosion. Water also tends to retard ignition and and promote early extinction. The former effect restricted the range of water volume fractions as discussed below.

  5. Radiation processing of polymer emulsion, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makuuchi, Keizo; Katakai, Akio; Ito, Hiroshi; Araki, Kunio; Takagi, Toru.

    1980-01-01

    The crosslinking characteristics of hydroxylated acrylic emulsions irradiated with Co-60 γ rays were investigated by measuring the gel fractions of the films baked with melamine resin. Cure response of the irradiated emulsions increased with increasing dose, owing to the crosslinking of the polymers in the emulsion particles by radiation. The irradiated emulsions were crosslinked with melamine resin at lower temperature than the unirradiated emulsion. Crosslinking in the particles by radiation and crosslinking between particles with melamine resin at the elevated temperatures were dependent on the distribution of hydroxyl groups in the particles. Localization of hydroxyl groups near the particle surface did not facilitated both kinds of crosslinking. (author)

  6. Exploiting the pliability and lateral mobility of Pickering emulsion for enhanced vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yufei; Wu, Jie; Wei, Wei; Du, Yiqun; Wan, Tao; Ma, Xiaowei; An, Wenqi; Guo, Aiying; Miao, Chunyu; Yue, Hua; Li, Shuoguo; Cao, Xuetao; Su, Zhiguo; Ma, Guanghui

    2018-02-01

    A major challenge in vaccine formulations is the stimulation of both the humoral and cellular immune response for well-defined antigens with high efficacy and safety. Adjuvant research has focused on developing particulate carriers to model the sizes, shapes and compositions of microbes or diseased cells, but not antigen fluidity and pliability. Here, we develop Pickering emulsions--that is, particle-stabilized emulsions that retain the force-dependent deformability and lateral mobility of presented antigens while displaying high biosafety and antigen-loading capabilities. Compared with solid particles and conventional surfactant-stabilized emulsions, the optimized Pickering emulsions enhance the recruitment, antigen uptake and activation of antigen-presenting cells, potently stimulating both humoral and cellular adaptive responses, and thus increasing the survival of mice upon lethal challenge. The pliability and lateral mobility of antigen-loaded Pickering emulsions may provide a facile, effective, safe and broadly applicable strategy to enhance adaptive immunity against infections and diseases.

  7. Multiple emulsions containing amazon oil: açaí oil (Euterpe oleracea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Ferrari

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to formulate O/W/O multiple emulsions containing açaí oil as a model system and to evaluate their physical stability and in vivo Sun Protection Factor (SPF. Multiple emulsions are complex dispersion systems, known also as, "emulsions of emulsions". These emulsion systems, have significant potential in the cosmetic industry. Euterpe oleracea Mart., Arecaceae, popularly known in Brazil as "açaí", is an economically important plant. Açaí oil has been used as antioxidant and as anti-inflammatory activities. The multiple emulsions were prepared using a two-step procedure. The investigated formulations were characterized and their stability over time was evaluated by preliminary and accelerated stability. O/W/O multiple emulsions containing the same concentration of sunscreens with and without açaí oil were evaluated by the International Sun Protection Factor Test Method. The samples containing 70% (w/w of primary emulsion, 5% (w/w PEG-30-dipolyhydroxystearate, 10% (w/w of açaí oil and 5% (w/w of sucrose polybehenate have been found to be stable. The rheological measurements revealed that the samples exhibited non-Newtonian pseudoplastic flow behavior and thixotropy. To conclude, no statistical difference could be observed on the in vivo SPF to both multiple systems with or without açaí oil.

  8. Controlling molecular transport in minimal emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruner, Philipp; Riechers, Birte; Semin, Benoît; Lim, Jiseok; Johnston, Abigail; Short, Kathleen; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions in which molecular transport is a major mechanism driving the system towards its state of minimal energy. Determining the underlying mechanisms of molecular transport between droplets is challenging due to the complexity of a typical emulsion system. Here we introduce the concept of `minimal emulsions', which are controlled emulsions produced using microfluidic tools, simplifying an emulsion down to its minimal set of relevant parameters. We use these minimal emulsions to unravel the fundamentals of transport of small organic molecules in water-in-fluorinated-oil emulsions, a system of great interest for biotechnological applications. Our results are of practical relevance to guarantee a sustainable compartmentalization of compounds in droplet microreactors and to design new strategies for the dynamic control of droplet compositions.

  9. Radiation processing of polymer emulsion, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makuuchi, Keizo; Araki, Kunio; Takagi, Toru.

    1978-01-01

    Feasibility of radiation processing was investigated to prepare the emulsion which forms a good water resistant film. Polyethylacrylate emulsion was prepared by γ-ray and conventional catalytic (ammonium persulfate) emulsion polymerization at various concentrations of emulsifier. Polymerization stability of γ-ray method was higher than that of catalytic method at low concentration of emulsifier. However, attempts of emulsifier-free polymerization by γ-ray were unsuccessful. Water resistance of the γ-ray emulsion film, measured by water absorption, was very good because of less electrolyte in the emulsion. Irradiation of the emulsion produced by catalytic method improved the water resistance of the film. This was attributed to crosslinking of polyethylacrylate in polymer particles by irradiation of the emulsion. (auth.)

  10. Biodistribution of 10B in a rat liver tumor model following intra-arterial administration of sodium borocaptate (BSH)/degradable starch microspheres (DSM) emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Minoru; Nagata, Kenji; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Maruhashi, Akira; Ono, Koji

    2004-01-01

    We reported that intra-arterial administration of borocaptate sodium (BSH)/lipiodol emulsion provided selectively high 10 B concentrations (approximately 200 ppm 6 h after administration) in experimental liver tumors. In the present study, we investigated the pharmacokinetics of BSH following intra-arterial administration of BSH with other embolizing agent, degradable starch microspheres (DSM). The 10 B concentration in the tumor at 1 h after administration of BSH with DSM was 231 ppm. At 6 h, the 10 B concentration in the tumor in BSH with DSM group was 81.5 ppm. The 10 B concentration in the liver at 1 h after administration of BSH with DSM was 184 ppm. At 6 h, the 10 B concentration in the liver in BSH with DSM group was 78 ppm. The tumor/liver 10 B concentration ratios (T/L ratio) in the 'BSH+DSM' group were significantly smaller than those in the 'BSH+lipiodol' group at 1 h (1.4 vs. 3.6) and 6 h (1.1 vs. 14.9). BSH/DSM-boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was not suitable for treatment of multiple liver tumors due to the low T/L 10 B concentration ratio. However, the high 10 B accumulation in the liver tumors following intra-arterial administration of BSH/DSM emulsion suggests that BSH/DSM-BNCT has the potential for application to malignant tumors in other sites

  11. Preformulation studies on Freund's incomplete adjuvant emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R O; Mahaguna, V

    1998-02-01

    Freund's Incomplete Adjuvant (FIA), which is used in vaccine therapy, is a water-in-oil emulsion delivery system consisting of an aqueous internal phase containing an antigenic protein dispersed in an external phase containing a mixture of mannide monooleate and light mineral oil. Preformulation studies are reported in this investigation for FIA emulsion. The preformulation studies included the determination of the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the formulations investigated, the surface activity of mannide monooleate at the interface between the oil phase and the aqueous phase containing ovalbumin as the model antigenic protein, and the effect of ovalbumin on the surface activity at the interface. The influence of the concentration of mannide monooleate and/or ovalbumin on the interfacial tension between light mineral oil and either purified water or 0.9% w/v normal saline solution was measured by the DuNouy Ring Method at 25 degrees C. The CMC was determined experimentally from the relationship between the concentration of the surface active agent in each formulation and the interfacial tension. The number of moles of the surface active agent per unit area at the interface (surface excess concentration) was calculated from the Gibbs' Adsorption equation. The results indicated that mannide monooleate was an effective surface active agent since the formulation containing only mannide monooleate provided the lowest magnitude of CMC. The presence of the surface active agent, mannide monooleate and/or ovalbumin, in the formulations studied reduced the interfacial tension between the two phases. The surface activity was influenced by the presence of an electrolyte (sodium chloride), a protein (ovalbumin), or mannide monooleate in the formulation. The presence of antigenic proteins in the aqueous phase of a waterin-oil emulsion influenced the effectiveness of a surface active agent in the formulation.

  12. Evaporation of Particle-Stabilized Emulsion Sunscreen Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Johnson, Andrew J; Marinopoulos, Ioannis; Crowther, Jonathan M; Thompson, Michael A

    2016-08-24

    We recently showed (Binks et al., ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 2016, DOI: 10.1021/acsami.6b02696) how evaporation of sunscreen films consisting of solutions of molecular UV filters leads to loss of UV light absorption and derived sun protection factor (SPF). In the present work, we investigate evaporation-induced effects for sunscreen films consisting of particle-stabilized emulsions containing a dissolved UV filter. The emulsions contained either droplets of propylene glycol (PG) in squalane (SQ), droplets of SQ in PG or droplets of decane in PG. In these different emulsion types, the SQ is involatile and shows no evaporation, the PG is volatile and evaporates relatively slowly, whereas the decane is relatively very volatile and evaporates quickly. We have measured the film mass and area, optical micrographs of the film structure, and the UV absorbance spectra during evaporation. For emulsion films containing the involatile SQ, evaporation of the PG causes collapse of the emulsion structure with some loss of specular UV absorbance due to light scattering. However, for these emulsions with droplets much larger than the wavelength of light, the light is scattered only at small forward angles so does not contribute to the diffuse absorbance and the film SPF. The UV filter remains soluble throughout the evaporation and thus the UV absorption by the filter and the SPF remain approximately constant. Both PG-in-SQ and SQ-in-PG films behave similarly and do not show area shrinkage by dewetting. In contrast, the decane-in-PG film shows rapid evaporative loss of the decane, followed by slower loss of the PG resulting in precipitation of the UV filter and film area shrinkage by dewetting which cause the UV absorbance and derived SPF to decrease. Measured UV spectra during evaporation are in reasonable agreement with spectra calculated using models discussed here.

  13. Effect of the Composition and Structure of Excipient Emulsion on the Bioaccessibility of Pesticide Residue in Agricultural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruojie; Wu, Wenhao; Zhang, Zipei; Park, Yeonhwa; He, Lili; Xing, Baoshan; McClements, David Julian

    2017-10-18

    The influence of co-ingestion of food emulsions with tomatoes on the bioaccessibility of a model pesticide (chlorpyrifos) was studied. Emulsions were fabricated with different oil contents (0-8%), lipid compositions (medium chain triglyceride (MCT) and corn oil), and particle diameters (d 32 = 0.17 and 10 μm). The emulsions were then mixed with chlorpyrifos-contaminated tomato puree, and the mixtures were subjected to a simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT) consisting of mouth, stomach, and small intestine. The particle size, surface charge, and microstructure of the emulsions was measured as they passed through the GIT, and chlorpyrifos bioaccessibility was determined after digestion. The composition and structure of the emulsions had a significant impact on chlorpyrifos bioaccessibility. Bioaccessibility increased with increasing oil content and was higher for corn oil than MCT, but did not strongly depend on oil droplet size. These results suggest that co-ingestion of emulsions with fruits or vegetables could increase pesticide bioaccessibility.

  14. Steroidal Compounds in Commercial Parenteral Lipid Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafat A. Siddiqui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn® II, Liposyn® III, Lipofundin® MCT, Lipofundin® N, Structolipid®, Intralipid®, Ivelip® and ClinOleic®. Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction.

  15. Steroidal Compounds in Commercial Parenteral Lipid Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A.; Pavlina, Thomas; Dutot, Guy; Hise, Mary; Zaloga, Gary P.; Siddiqui, Rafat A.

    2012-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn® II, Liposyn® III, Lipofundin® MCT, Lipofundin® N, Structolipid®, Intralipid®, Ivelip® and ClinOleic®. Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction. PMID:23016123

  16. Smart candle soot coated membranes for on-demand immiscible oil/water mixture and emulsion switchable separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Zhao, Zhihong; Li, Dianming; Tian, Haifeng; Zha, Fei; Feng, Hua; Guo, Lin

    2017-09-21

    Oil/water separation is of great importance for the treatment of oily wastewater, including immiscible light/heavy oil-water mixtures, oil-in-water or water-in-oil emulsions. Smart surfaces with responsive wettability have received extensive attention especially for controllable oil/water separation. However, traditional smart membranes with a switchable wettability between superhydrophobicity and superhydrophilicity are limited to certain responsive materials and continuous external stimuli, such as pH, electrical field or light irradiation. Herein, a candle soot coated mesh (CSM) with a larger pore size and a candle soot coated PVDF membrane (CSP) with a smaller pore size with underwater superoleophobicity and underoil superhydrophobicity were successfully fabricated, which can be used for on-demand immiscible oil/water mixtures and surfactants-stabilized oil/water emulsion separation, respectively. Without any continuous external stimulus, the wettability of our membranes could be reversibly switched between underwater superoleophobicity and underoil superhydrophobicity simply by drying and washing alternately, thus achieving effective and switchable oil/water separation with excellent separation efficiency. We believe that such smart materials will be promising candidates for use in the removal of oil pollutants in the future.

  17. Sequential Coalescence Enabled Two-Step Microreactions in Triple-Core Double-Emulsion Droplets Triggered by an Electric Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yankai; Ren, Yukun; Hou, Likai; Liu, Weiyu; Deng, Xiaokang; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2017-12-01

    Advances in microfluidic emulsification have enabled the generation of exquisite multiple-core droplets, which are promising structures to accommodate microreactions. An essential requirement for conducting reactions is the sequential coalescence of the multiple cores encapsulated within these droplets, therefore, mixing the reagents together in a controlled sequence. Here, a microfluidic approach is reported for the conduction of two-step microreactions by electrically fusing three cores inside double-emulsion droplets. Using a microcapillary glass device, monodisperse water-in-oil-in-water droplets are fabricated with three compartmented reagents encapsulated inside. An AC electric field is then applied through a polydimethylsiloxane chip to trigger the sequential mixing of the reagents, where the precise sequence is guaranteed by the discrepancy of the volume or conductivity of the inner cores. A two-step reaction in each droplet is ensured by two times of core coalescence, which totally takes 20-40 s depending on varying conditions. The optimal parameters of the AC signal for the sequential fusion of the inner droplets are identified. Moreover, the capability of this technique is demonstrated by conducting an enzyme-catalyzed reaction used for glucose detection with the double-emulsion droplets. This technique should benefit a wide range of applications that require multistep reactions in micrometer scale. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Hierarchical high internal phase emulsions and transparent oleogels stabilized by quillaja saponin-coated nanodroplets for color performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Wei; Wang, Jin-Mei; Guo, Jian; Wan, Zhi-Li; Yin, Shou-Wei; Yang, Xiao-Quan

    2017-02-22

    Herein, we report novel high internal phase emulsions and transparent oleogels that exhibit a hierarchical configuration by manipulating the spatial assembly of a natural small molecular-weight quillaja saponin for color performance. Quillaja saponin (QS) is a natural triterpenoid bidesmosidic from the soapbark tree (Quillaja saponaria Molina). Fairly monodispersed QS-coated nanodroplets (∼154 nm) were prepared using the ultrasonic emulsification strategy, and then used as block stabilizers for the fabrication of stable oil-in-water high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs, ϕ = 0.75). The resulting HIPEs can be easily converted into transparent oleogels with a very high oil loading (99.7%) through oven drying (70 °C). The jelly-like oleogels exhibit weak elastic, shear thinning behavior, good thixotropic recovery, and thermostabilization properties, which might be provided by the percolating 3D network of QS fibrils in the oil phase. We spatially tuned the color performance of the HIPEs and subsequent oleogels by locating the compositions of food colorants in different sections of their hierarchal architecture. The design and construction of hierarchical HIPEs and oleogels provide a promising new route for multitask functional delivery applications in various fields including food, cosmetics, and medical applications.

  19. Pickering emulsions for skin decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Alicia; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Rolland, Pauline; Chevalier, Yves; Josse, Denis; Briançon, Stéphanie

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed at developing innovative systems for skin decontamination. Pickering emulsions, i.e. solid-stabilized emulsions, containing silica (S-PE) or Fuller's earth (FE-PE) were formulated. Their efficiency for skin decontamination was evaluated, in vitro, 45min after an exposure to VX, one of the most highly toxic chemical warfare agents. Pickering emulsions were compared to FE (FE-W) and silica (S-W) aqueous suspensions. PE containing an oil with a similar hydrophobicity to VX should promote its extraction. All the formulations reduced significantly the amount of VX quantified on and into the skin compared to the control. Wiping the skin surface with a pad already allowed removing more than half of VX. FE-W was the less efficient (85% of VX removed). The other formulations (FE-PE, S-PE and S-W) resulted in more than 90% of the quantity of VX removed. The charge of particles was the most influential factor. The low pH of formulations containing silica favored electrostatic interactions of VX with particles explaining the better elimination from the skin surface. Formulations containing FE had basic pH, and weak interactions with VX did not improve the skin decontamination. However, these low interactions between VX and FE promote the transfer of VX into the oil droplets in the FE-PE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of non-migratory metal-chelating active packaging film on food quality: impact on physical and chemical stability of emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fang; Decker, Eric A; McClements, D Julian; Goddard, Julie M

    2014-05-15

    Previously, we developed a novel metal-chelating packaging film (PP-g-PAA) by grafting acrylic acid (AA) monomer from polypropylene (PP) film surface, and demonstrated its potential in controlling iron-promoted lipid oxidation. Herein, we further established the industrial practicality of this active film. Specifically, the influence of film surface area-to-product volume ratio (SA/V) and product pH on the application of the film was investigated using an oil-in-water emulsion system. The films equally inhibited lipid oxidation throughout the range of SA/V ratios tested (2-8 cm(2)/ml). PP-g-PAA films were most effective at pH 7.0, and the activity decreased with decreasing pH. The particle size examination of emulsions indicated no adverse influence from the active film on the stability of this emulsion system. FTIR analysis suggested a non-migratory nature of PP-g-PAA films. These results provide fundamental knowledge that will facilitate the application of this effective and economical active packaging film in the food industry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Radiation induced emulsion polymerization of vinylidene chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panajkar, M.S.; Rao, K.N.

    1979-01-01

    Gamma ray induced emulsion polymerization of vinylidene chloride has been carried out and the percent conversion of monomer to polymer and molecular weights of emulsion polymer were measured as a function of time and emulsifier concentration. Rp was found to be dependent on 0.3 power of emulsifier concentration whereas molecular weights increased with conversion and emulsifier concentration. The number of particles N also increased with conversion contrary to Smith Ewart's theory of emulsion polymerization. The results are discussed in the light of existing theories of emulsion polymerization. (author)

  2. Probing structural changes of proteins incorporated into water-in-oil emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Lene; van de Weert, Marco; Vermehren, Charlotte

    2004-01-01

    (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) as model proteins. FTIR shows that the overall secondary structure of the proteins changes to some extent, 12% for BSA and 9% for HSA, when these are incorporated into the emulsion. There was no evidence of changes in the distribution of secondary structural elements...... indicated that the domains in the proteins change because the shape of the transition peaks changes, when the proteins were incorporated into the emulsions. The total enthalpy decreases for BSA and HSA when these are incorporated into the emulsion, and some changes to the transition temperatures...

  3. Study on target interactions in emulsion chamber - Brasil-Japan emulsion chamber collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, M.; Santos, C.; Bellandi Filho, J.; Chinellato, J. A.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Lattes, C. M. G.; Marques, A.; Menon, M. J.; Navia, C. E.; Sawayanagi, K.

    Experimental results are presented from observations of 80 target nuclear interactions where the total gamma-ray energy is greater than or equal to 20 TeV. Evidence is presented for the existence of two types of interactions; the interpretation is given on the basis of a fire-ball model. Two-story emulsion chambers exposed at Mount Chacaltaya, in Bolivia (5,220 m above sea level), are used. Gamma rays from nuclear interactions in the target layer of petroleum pitch (1/3 of the nuclear mean free path in thickness) are detected through observations of the electron showers generated by them in the lower chamber

  4. The dynamic influence of cells on the formation of stable emulsions in organic-aqueous biotransformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jonathan; Grund, Marcel; Brandenbusch, Christoph; Sadowski, Gabriele; Schmid, Andreas; Bühler, Bruno

    2015-07-01

    Emulsion stability plays a crucial role for mass transfer and downstream processing in organic-aqueous bioprocesses based on whole microbial cells. In this study, emulsion stability dynamics and the factors determining them during two-liquid phase biotransformation were investigated for stereoselective styrene epoxidation catalyzed by recombinant Escherichia coli. Upon organic phase addition, emulsion stability rapidly increased correlating with a loss of solubilized protein from the aqueous cultivation broth and the emergence of a hydrophobic cell fraction associated with the organic-aqueous interface. A novel phase inversion-based method was developed to isolate and analyze cellular material from the interface. In cell-free experiments, a similar loss of aqueous protein did not correlate with high emulsion stability, indicating that the observed particle-based emulsions arise from a convergence of factors related to cell density, protein adsorption, and bioreactor conditions. During styrene epoxidation, emulsion destabilization occurred correlating with product-induced cell toxification. For biphasic whole-cell biotransformations, this study indicates that control of aqueous protein concentrations and selective toxification of cells enables emulsion destabilization and emphasizes that biological factors and related dynamics must be considered in the design and modeling of respective upstream and especially downstream processes.

  5. Gelatin Particle-Stabilized High-Internal Phase Emulsions for Use in Oral Delivery Systems: Protection Effect and in Vitro Digestion Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Huan; Zhao, Lifeng; Tian, Sisi; Wen, Hui; Gou, Xiaojun; Ngai, To

    2017-02-01

    The potential application of Pickering high-internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) in the food and pharmaceutical industries has yet to be fully developed. Herein, we synthesized fairly monodisperse, nontoxic, autofluorescent gelatin particles for use as sole stabilizers for fabricating oil-in-water (O/W) HIPEs in an effort to improve the protection and bioaccessibility of entrapped β-carotene. Our results showed that the concentration of gelatin particles determined the formation, microstructure, droplet size distribution, and digestion profile of the HIPEs. For storage stability, the retention of β-carotene in HIPEs was significantly higher than in dispersion in bulk oil, even after storage for 27 days. In addition, in vitro digestion experiments indicated that the bioaccessibility of β-carotene was improved 5-fold in HIPEs. This study will help establish a correlation between the physicochemical properties of gelatin particle-stabilized HIPEs with their applications in the oral delivery of bioactive nutraceuticals.

  6. Dynamics of Encapsulation and Controlled Release Systems Based on Water-in-Water Emulsions: Negligible Surface Rheology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagis, L.M.C.

    2008-01-01

    A nonequilibrium thermodynamic model based on the interfacial transport phenomena (ITP) formalism was used to study deformation¿relaxation behavior of water-in-water emulsions. The ITP formalism allows us to describe all water-in-water emulsions with one single theory. Phase-separated biopolymer

  7. Universal emulsion stabilization from the arrested adsorption of rough particles at liquid-liquid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanini, Michele; Marschelke, Claudia; Anachkov, Svetoslav E; Marini, Emanuele; Synytska, Alla; Isa, Lucio

    2017-06-07

    Surface heterogeneities, including roughness, significantly affect the adsorption, motion and interactions of particles at fluid interfaces. However, a systematic experimental study, linking surface roughness to particle wettability at a microscopic level, is currently missing. Here we synthesize a library of all-silica microparticles with uniform surface chemistry, but tuneable surface roughness and study their spontaneous adsorption at oil-water interfaces. We demonstrate that surface roughness strongly pins the particles' contact lines and arrests their adsorption in long-lived metastable positions, and we directly measure the roughness-induced interface deformations around isolated particles. Pinning imparts tremendous contact angle hysteresis, which can practically invert the particle wettability for sufficient roughness, irrespective of their chemical nature. As a unique consequence, the same rough particles stabilize both water-in-oil and oil-in-water emulsions depending on the phase they are initially dispersed in. These results both shed light on fundamental phenomena concerning particle adsorption at fluid interfaces and indicate future design rules for particle-based emulsifiers.

  8. Air-filled polymeric microcapsules from emulsions containing different organic phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerknes, K; Braenden, J U; Braenden, J E; Skurtveit, R; Smistad, G; Agerkvist, I

    2001-01-01

    Air-filled polymeric microcapsules for use as a contrast agent in ultrasonography have been prepared by the freeze-drying of different oil-in-water emulsions. The water phases consisted of a block copolymer in water. The organic phases consisted of a biodegradable polyester dissolved in (-)-camphene, cyclooctane, cyclohexane or tricyclene, which were relatively poor solvents for the polyester. A polymeric wall was, therefore, precipitated at the droplet surface early in the process, i.e. during freezing. Removing the solvent during freeze-drying, resulted in air-filled microcapsules. The microcapsules were suspended in saline after freeze-drying. All the suspensions contained echogenic microcapsules with a volume mean diameter of approximately 5-7 microm. Microscopic investigations showed that the microcapsules were spherical and hollow. Tricyclene and, to some degree, (-)-camphene were found unsuitable for industrial production due to melting points above 30 degrees C. Cyclooctane and cyclohexane were investigated as replacements for the initially chosen (-)-camphene, since they are liquids over a wider temperature range. These solvents gave improved yields, measured both as particle volume concentration per amount of polymer in suspension and acoustic attenuation at 3.5 MHz per amount of polymer in suspension, although the freeze-drying cycle was not optimized for these systems.

  9. New Oils for Cosmetic O/W Emulsions: In Vitro/In Vivo Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Damasceno Sousa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to design new cosmetic formulations containing oils from catolé, licuri and spent coffee grounds, and to evaluate their immediate and long-term effects on skin barrier function and skin hydration. Nonionic oil-in-water (o/w emulsions were prepared and physicochemically characterized. The effects of the formulations were assessed by volunteers and by measuring the water content of the epidermis (WCE and transepidermal water loss (TEWL both two hours and 20 days after daily application. The irritation potential was evaluated using three different methods: the Hen’s egg chorioallantoic membrane test (HET-CAM; the observation of undesirable effects after skin formulation application, and by using the L*a*b* system to verify changes in skin coloring. The results obtained showed that the formulations containing 10% of these oils presented promising characteristics in the improvement of hydration and skin barrier function when compared to the baseline values and with the placebo cream. According to the sensory evaluation performed, all creams were found to have great acceptability.

  10. An Inactivated Rabies Virus-Based Ebola Vaccine, FILORAB1, Adjuvanted With Glucopyranosyl Lipid A in Stable Emulsion Confers Complete Protection in Nonhuman Primate Challenge Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Reed F; Kurup, Drishya; Hagen, Katie R; Fisher, Christine; Keshwara, Rohan; Papaneri, Amy; Perry, Donna L; Cooper, Kurt; Jahrling, Peter B; Wang, Jonathan T; Ter Meulen, Jan; Wirblich, Christoph; Schnell, Matthias J

    2016-10-15

    The 2013-2016 West African Ebola virus (EBOV) disease outbreak was the largest filovirus outbreak to date. Over 28 000 suspected, probable, or confirmed cases have been reported, with a 53% case-fatality rate. The magnitude and international impact of this EBOV outbreak has highlighted the urgent need for a safe and efficient EBOV vaccine. To this end, we demonstrate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of FILORAB1, a recombinant, bivalent, inactivated rabies virus-based EBOV vaccine, in rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys. Our results demonstrate that the use of the synthetic Toll-like receptor 4 agonist glucopyranosyl lipid A in stable emulsion (GLA-SE) as an adjuvant increased the efficacy of FILORAB1 to 100% protection against lethal EBOV challenge, with no to mild clinical signs of disease. Furthermore, all vaccinated subjects developed protective anti-rabies virus antibody titers. Taken together, these results support further development of FILORAB1/GLA-SE as an effective preexposure EBOV vaccine. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. Nuclear emulsion and high-energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Hancheng; Zhang Donghai

    2008-01-01

    The history of the development of nuclear emulsion and its applications in high-energy physics, from the discovery of pion to the discovery of tau neutrino, are briefly reviewed in this paper. A new stage of development of nuclear-emulsion technique is discussed

  12. Nuclear emulsions in the OPERA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Di Ferdinando, Donato

    2009-01-01

    The use of emulsions as particles detector has a long and successful life. The recent development of fast automatized analysis systems has allowed the use of huge amount of emulsions films with no precedence in the history of particle physics. The OPERA experiment, running in the underground Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS), for the confirmation of the neutrino oscillation in the $\

  13. Polymerization in emulsion microdroplet reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Nick J.

    The goal of this research project is to utilize emulsion droplets as chemical reactors for execution of complex polymerization chemistries to develop unique and functional particle materials. Emulsions are dispersions of immiscible fluids where one fluid usually exists in the form of drops. Not surprisingly, if a liquid-to-solid chemical reaction proceeds to completion within these drops, the resultant solid particles will possess the shape and relative size distribution of the drops. The two immiscible liquid phases required for emulsion polymerization provide unique and complex chemical and physical environments suitable for the engineering of novel materials. The development of novel non-ionic fluorosurfactants allows fluorocarbon oils to be used as the continuous phase in a water-free emulsion. Such emulsions enable the encapsulation of almost any hydrocarbon compound in droplets that may be used as separate compartments for water-sensitive syntheses. Here, we exemplify the promise of this approach by suspension polymerization of polyurethanes (PU), in which the liquid precursor is emulsified into droplets that are then converted 1:1 into polymer particles. The stability of the droplets against coalescence upon removal of the continuous phase by evaporation confirms the formation of solid PU particles. These results prove that the water-free environment of fluorocarbon based emulsions enables high conversion. We produce monodisperse, cross-linked, and fluorescently labeled PU-latexes with controllable mesh size through microfluidic emulsification in a simple one-step process. A novel method for the fabrication of monodisperse mesoporous silica particles is presented. It is based on the formation of well-defined equally sized emulsion droplets using a microfluidic approach. The droplets contain the silica precursor/surfactant solution and are suspended in hexadecane as the continuous oil phase. The solvent is then expelled from the droplets, leading to

  14. Emulsion based cast booster - a priming system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.N.; Mishra, A.K. [National Institute of Rock Mechanics, KGF (India)

    2005-07-01

    This paper explores the potential of emulsion based cast booster to be used as primer to initiate bulk delivered emulsion explosives used in mines. An attempt has been made for comparative study between conventional cast booster and emulsion based cast booster in terms of the initiation process developed and their capability to develop and maintain the stable detonation process in the column explosives. The study has been conducted using a continuous velocity of detonation (VOD) measuring instrument. During this study three blasts have been monitored. In each blast two holes have been selected for study, the first hole being initiated with conventional cast booster while the other one with emulsion based cast booster. The findings of the study advocates that emulsion based cast booster is capable of efficient priming of bulk delivered column explosive with stable detonation process in the column. Further, the booster had advantages over the conventional PETN/TNT based cast booster. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab., 1 photo.

  15. Radiation processing of polymer emulsion, 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makuuchi, Keizo; Takagi, Toru; Nakayama, Hiroyuki.

    1983-01-01

    The film properties of thermosettable emulsions prepared by radiation method and persulfate method with same monomer composition were compared to make clear the features of the radiation-induced emulsion polymerization. The radiation method was superior to the persulfate method in the physical and chemical properties of the cured films. However, the surface gloss of the pigmented films from the radiation method were inferior to those from the persulfate method. The reason for the low surface gloss was investigated. The reaction products of glass which was used as reaction vessel with monomers were found to decrease the gloss. With ESCA (Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis) of the pigmented film it was found that there were much amount of isolated melamine resins in the radiation emulsion film than in the persufate emulsion film. The isolated melamine resins on the film surface caused by poor mutual solubility of the emulsion was found to decrease the surface gloss. (author)

  16. An oil-in-water self-assembly synthesis, characterization and photocatalytic properties of nano Ag@AgCl surface-sensitized K2Ti4O9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Yinghua; Lin, Shuanglong; Liu, Li; Hu, Jinshan; Cui, Wenquan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The plasmatic Ag@AgCl surface-sensitized K 2 Ti 4 O 9 composite photocatalysts. • Ag@AgCl greatly increased visible light absorption for K 2 Ti 4 O 9 . • The photocatalysts exhibited enhanced photocatalytic dye degradation. - Abstract: Nano-sized plasmonic Ag@AgCl surface-sensitized K 2 Ti 4 O 9 composite photocatalysts (hereafter designated as Ag@AgCl/K 2 Ti 4 O 9 ) was synthesized via a facile oil-in-water self-assembly method. The photocatalytic activity of the prepared materials for RhB (Rhodamine B) degradation was examined under visible light irradiation. The results reveal that the size of Ag@AgCl, which evenly dispersed on the surface of K 2 Ti 4 O 9 , distributes about 20–50 nm. The UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra indicate that Ag@AgCl/K 2 Ti 4 O 9 samples have a significantly enhanced optical absorption in 380–700 nm. The photocatalytic activities of the Ag@AgCl/K 2 Ti 4 O 9 samples increase first and then decrease with increasing amount of loading Ag@AgCl and the Ag@AgCl(20 wt.%)/K 2 Ti 4 O 9 sample exhibits the best photocatalytic activity and 94.47% RhB was degraded after irradiation for 2 h. Additionally, studies performed using radical scavengers indicated that O 2 · − and Cl 0 acted as the main reactive species. The electronic interaction was systematically studied and confirmed by the photo-electrochemical measurements

  17. Enhanced biodegradation of lindane using oil-in-water bio-microemulsion stabilized by biosurfactant produced by a new yeast strain, Pseudozyma VITJzN01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Salam, Jaseetha; Das, Nilanjana

    2013-11-28

    Organochlorine pesticide residues continue to remain as a major environmental threat worldwide. Lindane is an organochlorine pesticide widely used as an acaricide in medicine and agriculture. In the present study, a new lindane-degrading yeast strain, Pseudozyma VITJzN01, was identified as a copious producer of glycolipid biosurfactant. The glycolipid structure and type were elucidated by FTIR, NMR spectroscopy, and GC-MS analysis. The surface activity and stability of the glycolipid was analyzed. The glycolipids, characterized as mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), exhibited excellent surface active properties and the surface tension of water was reduced to 29 mN/m. The glycolipid was stable over a wide range of pH, temperature, and salinity, showing a very low CMC of 25 mg/l. Bio-microemulsion of olive oil-in-water (O/W) was prepared using the purified biosurfactant without addition of any synthetic cosurfactants, for lindane solubilization and enhanced degradation assay in liquid and soil slurry. The O/W bio-microemulsions enhanced the solubility of lindane up to 40-folds. Degradation of lindane (700 mg/l) by VITJzN01 in liquid medium amended with bio-microemulsions was found to be enhanced by 36% in 2 days, compared with degradation in 12 days in the absence of bio-microemulsions. Lindane-spiked soil slurry incubated with bio-microemulsions also showed 20-40% enhanced degradation compared with the treatment with glycolipids or yeast alone. This is the first report on lindane degradation by Pseudozyma sp., and application of bio-microemulsions for enhanced lindane degradation. MEL-stabilized bio-microemulsions can serve as a potential tool for enhanced remediation of diverse lindanecontaminated environments.

  18. CoFe2O4-TiO2 Hybrid Nanomaterials: Synthesis Approaches Based on the Oil-in-Water Microemulsion Reaction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Adrián Rodríguez-Rodríguez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available CoFe2O4 nanoparticles decorated and wrapped with TiO2 nanoparticles have been prepared by mixing well-dispersed CoFe2O4 with amorphous TiO2 (impregnation approach and growing amorphous TiO2 over the magnetic core (seed approach, respectively, followed by thermal treatment to achieve TiO2 crystallinity. Synthesis strategies were based on the oil-in-water microemulsion reaction method. Thermally treated nanomaterials were characterized in terms of structure, morphology, and composition, to confirm hybrid nanoparticles formation and relate with the synthesis approaches; textural, optical, and magnetic properties were evaluated. X-ray diffraction revealed coexistence of cubic spinel-type CoFe2O4 and tetragonal anatase TiO2. Electron microscopy images depicted crystalline nanoparticles (sizes below 25 nm, with homogeneous Ti distribution for the hybrid nanoparticles synthesized by seed approach. EDX microanalysis and ICP-AES corroborated established chemical composition. XPS evidenced chemical states, as well as TiO2 predominance over CoFe2O4 surface. According to BET measurements, the hybrid nanoparticles were mesoporous. UV-Vis spectroscopy showed optical response along the UV-visible light region. Magnetic properties suggested the breaking order of magnetic domains due to modification with TiO2, especially for mediated seed approach sample. The properties of the obtained hybrid nanoparticles were different in comparison with its individual components. The results highlight the usefulness of designed microemulsion approaches for the straightforward synthesis of CoFe2O4-TiO2 nanostructured hybrids.

  19. Oil-in-water microemulsion droplets of TDMAO/decane interconnected by the telechelic C18-EO150-C18: clustering and network formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malo de Molina, Paula; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Gradzielski, Michael

    2014-07-28

    The effect of a doubly hydrophobically end-capped water soluble polymer (C18-PEO150-C18) on the properties of an oil-in-water (O/W) droplet microemulsion (R ∼ 2.85 nm) has been studied as a function of the amount of added telechelic polymer. Macroscopically one observes a substantial increase of viscosity once a concentration of ∼5 hydrophobic stickers per droplet is surpassed and effective cross-linking of the droplets takes place. SANS measurements show that the size of the individual droplets is not affected by the polymer addition but it induces attractive interactions at low concentration and repulsive ones at high polymer content. Measurements of the diffusion coefficient by DLS and FCS show increasing sizes at low polymer addition that can be attributed to the formation of clusters of microemulsion droplets interconnected by the polymer. At higher polymer content the network formation leads to an additional slow relaxation mode in DLS that can be related to the rheological behaviour, while the self-diffusion observed in FCS attains a lower plateau value, i.e., the microemulsion droplets remain effectively fixed within the network. The combination of SANS, DLS, and FCS allows us to derive a self-consistent picture of the evolution of structure and dynamics of the mixed system microemulsion/telechelic polymer as a function of the polymer content, which is not only relevant for controlling the macroscopic rheological properties but also with respect to the internal dynamics as it is, for instance, relevant for the release and transport of active agents.

  20. Supercritical fluid-mediated liposomes containing cyclosporin A for the treatment of dry eye syndrome in a rabbit model: comparative study with the conventional cyclosporin A emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karn, Pankaj Ranjan; Kim, Hyun Do; Kang, Han; Sun, Bo Kyung; Jin, Su-Eon; Hwang, Sung-Joo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of cyclosporin (CsA)-encapsulated liposomes with the commercially available CsA emulsion (Restasis) for the treatment of dry eye syndrome in rabbits. Liposomes containing CsA were prepared by the supercritical fluid (SCF) method consisted of phosphatidylcholine from soybean (SCF-S100) and egg lecithins (SCF-EPCS). An in vitro permeation study was carried out using artificial cellulose membrane in Franz diffusion cells. Dry eye syndrome was induced in male albino rabbits and further subdivided into untreated, Restasis-treated, EPCS, and S100-treated groups. Tear formation in the dry-eye-induced rabbits was evaluated using the Schirmer tear test. All formulations were also evaluated by ocular irritation tests using the Draize eye and winking methods with the determination of CsA concentration in rabbit tears. After the treatment, the Schirmer tear test value significantly improved in EPCS-treated (P=0.005) and S100-treated (P=0.018) groups compared to the Restasis-treated group. The AUC₀₋₂₄ h for rabbit's tear film after the administration of SCF-S100 was 32.75±9.21 μg·h/mg which was significantly higher than that of 24.59±8.69 μg·h/mg reported with Restasis. Liposomal CsA formulations used in this study showed lower irritation in rabbit eyes compared with Restasis. These results demonstrate that the novel SCF-mediated liposomal CsA promises a significant improvement in overcoming the challenges associated with the treatment of dry eyes.

  1. Perfluorocarbon emulsions radiosensitise brain tumors in carbogen breathing mice with orthotopic GL261 gliomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Feldman

    Full Text Available Tumour hypoxia limits the effectiveness of radiation therapy. Delivering normobaric or hyperbaric oxygen therapy elevates pO2 in both tumour and normal brain tissue. However, pO2 levels return to baseline within 15 minutes of stopping therapy.To investigate the effect of perfluorocarbon (PFC emulsions on hypoxia in subcutaneous and intracranial mouse gliomas and their radiosensitising effect in orthotopic gliomas in mice breathing carbogen (95%O2 and 5%CO2.PFC emulsions completely abrogated hypoxia in both subcutaneous and intracranial GL261 models and conferred a significant survival advantage orthotopically (Mantel Cox: p = 0.048 in carbogen breathing mice injected intravenously (IV with PFC emulsions before radiation versus mice receiving radiation alone. Carbogen alone decreased hypoxia levels substantially and conferred a smaller but not statistically significant survival advantage over and above radiation alone.IV injections of PFC emulsions followed by 1h carbogen breathing, radiosensitises GL261 intracranial tumors.

  2. On the transport of emulsions in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortis, Andrea; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.

    2007-06-27

    Emulsions appear in many subsurface applications includingbioremediation, surfactant-enhanced remediation, and enhancedoil-recovery. Modeling emulsion transport in porous media is particularlychallenging because the rheological and physical properties of emulsionsare different from averages of the components. Current modelingapproaches are based on filtration theories, which are not suited toadequately address the pore-scale permeability fluctuations and reductionof absolute permeability that are often encountered during emulsiontransport. In this communication, we introduce a continuous time randomwalk based alternative approach that captures these unique features ofemulsion transport. Calculations based on the proposed approach resultedin excellent match with experimental observations of emulsionbreakthrough from the literature. Specifically, the new approach explainsthe slow late-time tailing behavior that could not be fitted using thestandard approach. The theory presented in this paper also provides animportant stepping stone toward a generalizedself-consistent modeling ofmultiphase flow.

  3. Utilisation of water-in-oil-water (W1/O/W2) double emulsion in a set-type yogurt model for the delivery of probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kadri, Hani; Lalou, Sofia; Mantzouridou, FaniTh; Gkatzionis, Konstantinos

    2018-05-01

    W 1 /O/W 2 emulsion in set-type yogurt has the potential to segregate probiotics in order to avoid interference with the starter culture as well as protection against harsh processing and digestion conditions. Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei DC 412 probiotic cells in milk-based W 1 /O/W 2 emulsions were incorporated in yogurt, in addition to starter cultures Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus, and the effect on the fermentation, bacterial growth kinetics, physicochemical properties, and structural characteristics was investigated. Stability of W 1 /O/W 2 was monitored with optical microscopy and cryo-SEM and localisation of encapsulated L. paracasei in yogurt was monitored using fluorescent microscopy. During fermentation, starter culture was not affected by introduction of L. paracasei and/or W 1 /O/W 2 emulsion. The viability of L. paracasei encapsulated in W 1 /O/W 2 emulsion was enhanced during storage and after exposure to simulated gastrointestinal conditions. L. paracasei remained within the inner W 1 phase till the end of the storage period (28 days at 4 °C). Moreover, W 1 /O/W 2 emulsion altered physicochemical and textural properties; however, these were within acceptable range. These results demonstrate the capability of W 1 /O/W 2 emulsion to be utilised for probiotic fortification of yogurt to increase functionality without interfering with starter culture and fermentation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Microfluidic emulsion separation-simultaneous separation and sensing by multilayer nanofilm structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, P; Varnik, F; Truman, P; Zikos, G; Moulin, J-F; Müller-Buschbaum, P; Stamm, M

    2011-05-11

    Emulsion separation is of high relevance for filtration applications, liquid-liquid-partitioning of biomolecules like proteins and recovery of products from droplet microreactors. Selective interaction of various components of an emulsion with substrates is used to design microfluidic flow chambers for efficient separation of emulsions into their individual components. Our lab-on-a-chip device consists of an emulsion separation cell with an integrated silicon sensor chip, the latter allowing the detection of liquid motion via the field-effect signal. Thus, within our lab-on-a-chip device, emulsions can be separated while the separation process is monitored simultaneously. For emulsion separation a surface energy step gradient, namely a sharp interface between the hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts of the separation chamber, is used. The key component of the lab-on-a-chip system is a multilayer and multifunctional nanofilm structure which not only provides the surface energy step gradient for emulsion separation but also constitutes the functional parts of the field-effect transistors. The proof-of-principle was performed using a model emulsion consisting of immiscible aqueous and organic solvent components. Droplet coalescence was identified as a key aspect influencing the separation process, with quite different effects during separation on open surfaces as compared to slit geometry. For a detailed description of this observation, an analytical model was derived and lattice Boltzmann computer simulations were performed. By use of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) interfacial nanostructures during gold nanoparticle deposition in a flow field were probed to demonstrate the potential of GISAXS for in situ investigations during flow.

  5. Experimental study on the influence of chemical sensitizer on pressure resistance in deep water of emulsion explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; zhang, Zhihua; Wang, Ya; Qin, hao

    2018-03-01

    The study on the pressure resistance performance of emulsion explosives in deep water can provide theoretical basis for underwater blasting, deep-hole blasting and emulsion explosives development. The sensitizer is an important component of emulsion explosives. By using reusable experimental devices to simulate the charge environment in deep water, the influence of the content of chemical sensitizer on the deep-water pressure resistance performance of emulsion explosives was studied. The experimental results show that with the increasing of the content of chemical sensitizer, the deep-water pressure resistance performance of emulsion explosives gradually improves, and when the pressure is fairly large, the effect is particularly pronounced; in a certain range, with the increase of the content of chemical sensitizer, that emulsion explosives’ explosion performance also gradually improve, but when the content reaches a certain value, the explosion properties declined instead; under the same emulsion matrix condition, when the content of NANO2 is 0.2%, that the emulsion explosives has good resistance to water pressure and good explosion properties. The correctness of the results above was testified in model blasting.

  6. Latest Developments in Nuclear Emulsion Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Kunihiro

    Nuclear emulsion is high sensitive photographic film used for detection of three-dimensional trajectory of charged particles. These trajectories are recorded as tracks consist of a lot of silver grains. The size of silver grain is about 1 μm, so that nuclear emulsion has submicron three-dimensional spatial resolution, which gives us a few mrad three-dimensional angular resolution. The important technical progress was speed-up of the read-out technique of nuclear emulsions built with optical microscope system. We succeeded in developing a high-speed three-dimensional read-out system named Super Ultra Track Selector (S-UTS) with the operating read-out speed of approximately 50 cm2/h. Nowadays we are developing the nuclear emulsion gel independently in Nagoya University by introducing emulsion gel production machine. Moreover, we are developing nuclear emulsion production technologies (gel production, poring and mass production). In this paper, development of nuclear emulsion technologies for the OPERA experiment, applications by the technologies and current development are described.

  7. Regeneration of liquid membrane without breaking emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dines, M.B.

    1982-01-01

    A process for removing a species from a fluid which comprises (A) contacting said fluid with an emulsion, said emulsion having an external phase and an internal phase, said external phase being immiscible with said fluid and said species being permeable to said external phase; (B) permeating said species through said external phase into said internal phase; (C) converting said permeated species in said internal phase, into a species which is impermeable to said external phase; (D) separating said emulsion from said fluid; (E) converting the impermeable species of step (C) into a species which is permeable to said external phase by means of an oxidation-reduction reaction; and (F) permeating the permeable species of step (E) through said external phase. The instant process may be carried out in the reverse manner, i.e. the fluid including the species to be removed can be the internal phase of an emulsion or foam and thus permeate through the external phase. Preferably the fluid is an aqueous solution and the emulsion is a water-in-oil emulsion. The impermeable species of step (C) may be converted into a species which is permeable to said external phase by irradiating with light (uv or visible), by heating or by isolating said impermeable species from light. Preferably the permeable species in the internal phase is U + 6 e.g. As UO 2+ 2 , which is trapped in the internal phase of the emulsion by reduction to U + 4 an impermeable species, in the presence of a hydroquinone and light. Simultaneously hydroquinone is converted to quinone. After separation of the emulsion containing uranium in the +4 nonpermeable state from the aqueous solution, the emulsion is subjected to agitation in the presence of a fresh aqueous solution and in the absence of light whereby the quinone oxidizes the U + 4 to U + 6 e.g. UO 2+ 2 which then permeates through said external phase into said fresh aqueous solution

  8. Long-term characteristics of nuclear emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, N; Kuwabara, K

    2010-01-01

    Long-term characteristics of the nuclear emulsion so called 'OPERA film' used in the neutrino oscillation experiment, OPERA, has been studied for 8 years since its production or refreshing after it. In the results, it turned out to be excellent in sensitivity, amount of random noise, and refreshing characteristics. The retention capacity of latent image of tracks was also studied. The result will open the way to the recycling of 7,000,000 emulsion films which will remain not developed after 5 years of OPERA's run, and other long-term experiments with emulsion.

  9. Fast automated scanning of OPERA emulsion films

    CERN Document Server

    Sirri, G.

    2007-01-01

    The use of nuclear emulsions to record tracks of charged particles with an accuracy of better than 1 micron is possible in large physics experiments thanks to the recent improvements in the industrial production of emulsions and to the development of fast automated microscopes. The European Scanning System (ESS) is a fast automatic system developed for the mass scanning of the emulsions of the OPERA experiment, which requires microscopes with scanning speeds of about 20 cm$^2$/h. Recent improvements in the technique and measurements with ESS are reported.

  10. Emulsions from a Culinary Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgesdotter, Guro

    , because of its emulsion, foam and suspension properties. This thesis explores the structure and parameters influencing product diversity in hollandaise sauce and similar products from a culinary point of view. It can therefore be regarded as an investigation in the field of molecular gastronomy. When...... consulting the culinary literature and culinary professionals, it became evident that large variations existed both in the preparation techniques and regarding the ingredients used in hollandaise sauce. It was unlikely that all these variations could lead to sauces having the same sensory properties...... influenced the research aims and topics, and hollandaise sauce was chosen as the research subject in this PhD to gain knowledge about how the culinary variation regarding hollandaise sauce production influences the product. This knowledge may benefit chefs in their daily work and may stimulate culinary...

  11. Emulsion type dry cleaning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohanawa, Osamu; Matsumoto, Hiroyo.

    1988-01-01

    Protective clothing against radioactive contamination used in the radiation controlled areas of nuclear plants has been washed by the same wet washing as used for underwear washing, but recently dry cleaning is getting used in place of wet washing, which generates a large quantity of laundry drain. However, it was required to use wet washing once every five to ten dry cleanings for washing protective clothing, because conventional dry cleaning is less effective in removing water-soluble soils. Therefore, in order to eliminate wet washing, and to decrease the quantity of laundry drains, the emulsion type dry cleaning system capable of removing both oil-soluble and water-soluble soils at a time has been developed. The results of developmental experiments and actual application are presented in this paper. (author)

  12. Critical frequency for coalescence of emulsions in an AC electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhou; Ali, Faizi Hammad; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2017-11-01

    Applying an electric field to trigger the coalescence of emulsions has been applied in various applications which include crude oil recovery, emulsion stability characterization as well as pico-injection and droplet-based chemical reaction in microfluidics. In this work, we systematically investigated the responses of surfactant-stabilized emulsions to a controlled AC electric field using a customer-built chip. At a given amplitude of the AC voltage, we found a critical frequency beyond which the emulsions remain stable. When the frequency is decreased to below the critical value, emulsions coalesce immediately. Such critical frequency is found to be dependent of amplitude of the AC voltage, viscosity of the fluids, concentration and type of the surfactant as well as the electric conductivity of the droplet phase. Using a model based on the drainage of thin film, we have explored the mechanism behind and interpret this phenomenon systematically. Our work extends the understanding of the electro-coalescence of emulsions and can be beneficial for any applications involve the coalescence of droplets in an AC electric field.

  13. Size determinations of colloidal fat emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Klaus, Katrin; Steiniger, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Size and size distributions of colloidal dispersions are of crucial importance for their performance and safety. In the present study, commercially available fat emulsions (Lipofundin N, Lipofundin MCT and Lipidem) were analyzed by photon correlation spectroscopy, laser diffraction with adequate ...

  14. Special photographic emulsions for high LET dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, R.

    1978-12-01

    The purpose of these investigations into photographic emulsion dosimetry is to attempt to use the photographic emulsion to mimic the response of human tissues to high LET radiations. The program therefore requires that a systematic understanding of the response of mammalian cells to ionizing radiations be achieved. We have been concerned with differences in RBE and in radiation response to both high and LET radiations, and in the interrelationship between observations with these different radiations

  15. Conditions for equilibrium solid-stabilized emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Daniela J; de Folter, Julius W J; Luigjes, Bob; Castillo, Sonja I R; Sacanna, Stefano; Philipse, Albert P; Kegel, Willem K

    2010-08-19

    Particular types of solid-stabilized emulsions can be thermodynamically stable as evidenced by their spontaneous formation and monodisperse droplet size, which only depends on system parameters. Here, we investigate the generality of these equilibrium solid-stabilized emulsions with respect to the basic constituents: aqueous phase with ions, oil, and stabilizing particles. From systematic variations of these constituents, we identify general conditions for the spontaneous formation of monodisperse solid-stabilized emulsions droplets. We conclude that emulsion stability is achieved by a combination of solid particles as well as amphiphilic ions adsorbed at the droplet surface, and low interfacial tensions of the bare oil-water interface of order 10 mN/m or below. Furthermore, preferential wetting of the colloidal particles by the oil phase is necessary for thermodynamic stability. We demonstrate the sufficiency of these basic requirements by extending the observed thermodynamic stability to emulsions of different compositions. Our findings point to a new class of colloid-stabilized meso-emulsions with a potentially high impact on industrial emulsification processes due to the associated large energy savings.

  16. Physics of puffing and microexplosion of emulsion fuel droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinjo, J.; Xia, J.; Ganippa, L. C.; Megaritis, A.

    2014-10-01

    The physics of water-in-oil emulsion droplet microexplosion/puffing has been investigated using high-fidelity interface-capturing simulation. Varying the dispersed-phase (water) sub-droplet size/location and the initiation location of explosive boiling (bubble formation), the droplet breakup processes have been well revealed. The bubble growth leads to local and partial breakup of the parent oil droplet, i.e., puffing. The water sub-droplet size and location determine the after-puffing dynamics. The boiling surface of the water sub-droplet is unstable and evolves further. Finally, the sub-droplet is wrapped by boiled water vapor and detaches itself from the parent oil droplet. When the water sub-droplet is small, the detachment is quick, and the oil droplet breakup is limited. When it is large and initially located toward the parent droplet center, the droplet breakup is more extensive. For microexplosion triggered by the simultaneous growth of multiple separate bubbles, each explosion is local and independent initially, but their mutual interactions occur at a later stage. The degree of breakup can be larger due to interactions among multiple explosions. These findings suggest that controlling microexplosion/puffing is possible in a fuel spray, if the emulsion-fuel blend and the ambient flow conditions such as heating are properly designed. The current study also gives us an insight into modeling the puffing and microexplosion of emulsion droplets and sprays.

  17. Olive Oil Based Emulsions in Frozen Puff Pastry Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriele, D.; Migliori, M.; Lupi, F. R.; de Cindio, B.

    2008-07-01

    Puff pastry is an interesting food product having different industrial applications. It is obtained by laminating layers of dough and fats, mainly shortenings or margarine, having specific properties which provides required spreading characteristic and able to retain moisture into dough. To obtain these characteristics, pastry shortenings are usually saturated fats, however the current trend in food industry is mainly oriented towards unsatured fats such as olive oil, which are thought to be safer for human health. In the present work, a new product, based on olive oil, was studied as shortening replacer in puff pastry production. To ensure the desired consistency, for the rheological matching between fat and dough, a water-in-oil emulsion was produced based on olive oil, emulsifier and a hydrophilic thickener agent able to increase material structure. Obtained materials were characterized by rheological dynamic tests in linear viscoelastic conditions, aiming to setup process and material consistency, and rheological data were analyzed by using the weak gel model. Results obtained for tested emulsions were compared to theological properties of a commercial margarine, adopted as reference value for texture and stability. Obtained emulsions are characterized by interesting rheological properties strongly dependent on emulsifier characteristics and water phase composition. However a change in process temperature during fat extrusion and dough lamination seems to be necessary to match properly typical dough rheological properties.

  18. Antioxidant activities of annatto and palm tocotrienol-rich fractions in fish oil and structured lipid-based infant formula emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Long; Akoh, Casimir C

    2015-02-01

    The abilities of annatto and palm tocotrienol-rich fractions (TRFs), as natural antioxidants, to inhibit lipid oxidation in menhaden fish oil and structured lipid-based infant formula emulsion, were evaluated and compared. The peroxide and anisidine values of the bulk oil and oil-in-water emulsion samples stored at 37°C were measured over a 28-day period. The results showed that annatto TRF was a more effective antioxidant than palm TRF and α-tocopherol in both food systems at 0.02% and 0.05%. Factors, including structural differences in chromanol head and isoprenoid tail, polarity, concentration, oxidation time, and the method used to monitor lipid oxidation, were responsible for the different behaviours of tocopherols and tocotrienols. In contrast to the reported findings in vivo, addition of α-tocopherol (0-75%) did not interfere with the antioxidant activity of tocopherol-free annatto TRF in foods. Our findings may lead to the development of new natural antioxidant products for food applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pilot clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent hepatic cancer involving the intra-arterial injection of a 10BSH-containing WOW emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagie, Hironobu; Higashi, Syushi; Seguchi, Koji; Ikushima, Ichiro; Fujihara, Mituteru; Nonaka, Yasumasa; Oyama, Kazuyuki; Maruyama, Syoji; Hatae, Ryo; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Kinashi, Tomoko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Kajiyama, Tetsuya; Maruhashi, Akira; Ono, Koji; Nakajima, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A 63-year-old man with multiple HCC in his left liver lobe was enrolled as the first patient in a pilot study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) involving the selective intra-arterial infusion of a 10 BSH-containing water-in-oil-in-water emulsion ( 10 BSH-WOW). The size of the tumorous region remained stable during the 3 months after the BNCT. No adverse effects of the BNCT were observed. The present results show that 10 BSH-WOW can be used as novel intra-arterial boron carriers during BNCT for HCC. - Highlights: • We started the pilot clinical study of BNCT to recurrence hepatic cancer. • The tumor size was remained stable during 3 months after BNCT(SD). • No adverse effect as a result of BNCT was observed during follow-up period. • 10 B-containing WOW emulsion can be applied as a novel intra-arterial boron carrier for BNCT for HCC

  20. Interconnectivity of macroporous molecularly imprinted polymers fabricated by hydroxyapatite-stabilized Pickering high internal phase emulsions-hydrogels for the selective recognition of protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanhua; Li, Yuqing; Xu, Jiangfeng; Huang, Ling; Qiu, Tianyun; Zhong, Shian

    2017-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite hybridized molecularly imprinted polydopamine polymers with selective recognition of bovine hemoglobin (BHb) were successfully prepared via Pickering oil-in-water high internal phase emulsions-hydrogels and molecularly imprinting technique. The emulsions were stabilized by hydroxyapatite of which the wettability was modified by 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane. The materials were characterized by SEM, IR and TGA. The results showed that the BHb imprinted polymers based on Pickering hydrogels (Hydro-MIPs) possess macropores ranging from 20μm to 50μm, and their large numbers of amino groups and hydroxyl groups result in a favorable adsorption capacity for BHb. The maximum adsorption capacity of Hydro-MIPs for BHb was 438mg/g, 3.27 times more than that of the non-imprinted polymers (Hydro-NIPs). The results indicated that Hydro-MIPs possessing well-defined hierarchical porous structures exhibited outstanding recognition behavior towards the target protein molecules. This work provided a promising alternative method for the fabrication of polymer materials with tunable and interconnected pores structures for the separation and purification of protein in vitro. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. A first-generation physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of alpha-tocopherol in human influenza vaccine adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegenge, Million A; Mitkus, Robert J

    2015-04-01

    Alpha (α)-tocopherol is a component of a new generation of squalene-containing oil-in-water (SQ/W) emulsion adjuvants that have been licensed for use in certain influenza vaccines. Since regulatory pharmacokinetic studies are not routinely required for influenza vaccines, the in vivo fate of this vaccine constituent is largely unknown. In this study, we constructed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for emulsified α-tocopherol in human adults and infants. An independent sheep PBPK model was also developed to inform the local preferential lymphatic transfer and for the purpose of model evaluation. The PBPK model predicts that α-tocopherol will be removed from the injection site within 24h and rapidly transfer predominantly into draining lymph nodes. A much lower concentration of α-tocopherol was estimated to peak in plasma within 8h. Any systemically absorbed α-tocopherol was predicted to accumulate slowly in adipose tissue, but not in other tissues. Model evaluation and uncertainty analyses indicated acceptable fit, with the fraction of dose taken up into the lymphatics as most influential on plasma concentration. In summary, this study estimates the in vivo fate of α-tocopherol in adjuvanted influenza vaccine, may be relevant in explaining its immunodynamics in humans, and informs current regulatory risk-benefit analyses. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. The influence of asphaltenes of the petroleum on the rheology of O/W (Oil/Water) emulsions; Influencia de asfaltenos do petroleo sobre a reologia de emulsoes O/A (Oleo/Agua)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Ronaldo Goncalves dos; Mohamed, Rahoma Sadeg; Loh, Watson; Bannwart, Antonio Carlos [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    Heavy oils represent a large fraction of the Brazilian petroleum reserves and display a great potential for application as substitute to the conventional oils, provided a suitable technology for their transportation is available. The high viscosity of these heavy oils leads to high flow resistance and increase in the recovery and transportation costs. Methodologies employed to reduce these problems involve application of heat of addition of diluents or lighter oils, but are associated with high costs. Formation of low viscosity oil-in-water emulsions has been proposed as an alternative for the transportation of heavy oils, as investigated in this work. Preliminary results indicate significant viscosity decreases upon emulsification of heavy oils (viscosities greater than 1,000 cP) forming o/w emulsions with high oil content (between 50-65 vol. %), which display viscosities within 4-25 cP. Additionally, the effect of different surfactants, methodology of preparation and oil asphaltene content on the emulsion stability was also evaluated. These results confirm the potential of emulsification as a viable methodology for heavy oil transportation. (author)

  3. Palm oil anionic surfactants based emulsion breaker (Case study of emulsions breaker at Semanggi Field production wells)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhpidah; Hambali, E.; Suryani, A.; Kartika, I. A.

    2017-05-01

    The presence of emulsion in oil production process is undesirable. The emulsion will increase the production costs, transportation and costs related to emulsion separation process between water and oil. The development of palm oil-based surfactant as an emulsion breaker needs to be conducted given the availability of abundant raw materials in Indonesia and as an alternative to petroleum-based surfactant. The purpose of this study is to produce palm oil-based emulsion breaker, assessing the effect of additive application to the emulsion breaker and analyze the performance of the emulsion breaker. This research was conducted by formulating palm oil anionic surfactant in water formation with the addition of co-surfactant additive and co-solvent. Palm oil anionic surfactant-based emulsion breaker with 0.5% concentration in water can reduce 50% of emulsions with the interfacial tension (IFT) of 2.33x10-2 dyne/cm. The addition of co-solvent (toluene: xylene) is able to remove the emulsion formed with a lower IFT namely 10-3 dyne / cm. The resulting emulsion breaker is capable to remove the emulsion between water and oil. The performance test of emulsion breaker show that the emulsion is able to maintain its performance at reservoir temperature with no indicate of plugging and the value generated incremental oil recovery values is 13%.

  4. Availability of perfluoroctylbromide (PFOB) emulsion used as agent in the liver tumor imaging of computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Takachika

    1986-01-01

    We carried out a fundamental study on the availability of perfluoroctylbromide (PFOB) emulsion used as an agent in the liver tumor imaging of computed tomography (CT). For this study, we used emulsified yolk phospolipid as a surfactant for PFOB emulsion because it is generally considered to have higher safety relative to the administration to the humans. In the rabbits' liver tumor model in which VX 2 tumor cell was implanted into their livers, we observed increases in the CT values of the livers when 5 to 10 ml/kg of PFOB emulsion (20 % w/v) was administered into the vein, and also ringlike enhancement and increases in the CT values on the tumor rim when 20 ml/kg of PFOB emulsion was administered. In addition, in the chemical analysis of a gas chromatography, we also observed significant increases in the PFOB concentration on the tumor rim, compared with those of normal liver parenchyma, when 20 ml/kg of PFOB emulsion was given. In the finding of CT values in the human liver tumor by means of organ perfusion system, we recognized increases in the CT values (induced by the accumulation of PFOB emulsion) on the rim of the metastatic tumor of colon cancer. These results suggest that PFOB emulsion has certain availability as an agent for the liver tumor imaging of computed tomography (CT). (author)

  5. A Systematic Methodology for Design of Emulsion Based Chemical Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattei, Michele; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Gani, Rafiqul

    2012-01-01

    a hierarchical approach starting with the identification of the needs to be satisfied by the emulsified product and then building up the formulation by adding one-by-one the different classes of chemicals. A structured database together with dedicated property prediction models and evaluation criteria......A systematic methodology for emulsion based chemical product design is presented. The methodology employs a model-based product synthesis/design stage and a modelexperiment based further refinement and/or validation stage. In this paper only the first stage is presented. The methodology employs...

  6. Physical properties of emulsion-based hydroxypropyl methylcellulose/whey protein isolate (HPMC/WPI) edible films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubilar, Javiera F; Zúñiga, Rommy N; Osorio, Fernando; Pedreschi, Franco

    2015-06-05

    The objective of this research was to study the effect of the film microstructure of oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose/whey protein isolate (HPMC/WPI) with or without sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) over physical properties of HPMC/WPI emulsion-based films. The films were prepared with different HPMC/WPI-oil-SDS combinations (%w/w for 100g of dispersion): HPMC; WPI; HPMC/1WPI-0.5-SDS; HPMC/1WPI-1; HPMC/2WPI-0.5; HPMC/2WPI-1-SDS. Physical properties of films were evaluated. The results showed no statistical differences (p>0.05) between the thicknesses of EFs (0.156 ± 0.004 mm). The effect of oil content and incorporation of SDS showed the inverse trend for WI and ΔE, the increasing order of change, for WI and ΔE, among the formulation evaluated was: HPMC/1WPI-1>HPMC/2WPI-0.5>HPMC/2WPI-1.0-SDS≈HPMC/1WPI-0.5-SDS≈WPI>HPMC for WI and HPMC/1WPI-0.5-SDS>HPMC/2WPI-1.0-SDS>HPMC/2WPI-0.5>HPMC/1WPI-1 for ΔE, respectively. The addition of oil and SDS decreased the TS and EB, because oil addition into EF induces the development of structural discontinuities, producing an EF with less chain mobility, and consequently, with less flexibility and resistance to fracture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The influence of thermal processing on emulsion properties of defatted hazelnut flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Deniz; Altay, Filiz; Capanoğlu Güven, Esra

    2015-01-15

    In this study, the influences of roasting and the amount of hazelnut flour on the formation and stabilization of emulsions containing different amounts of oil were investigated. After hazelnuts were roasted in an oven at 140°C for 40 min, the oil content was removed. The emulsions with defatted hazelnut flour containing corn oil at 3%, 10% and 50% were prepared. Roasting process significantly decreased the interfacial tension values of samples down to 1.9 mN/m due to protein denaturation. There was no significant difference between the particle sizes of oil droplets in emulsions with roasted and raw hazelnut flour at the same concentration. However, diffusion coefficients of oil droplets increased for emulsions containing roasted defatted flour samples. The zeta (ζ) potential values of all emulsions increased when roasted hazelnut flour was used, indicating the stabilization of suspensions and the solution resistance against aggregation. Storage modulus (G'), loss modulus (G″) and complex viscosity (η(∗)) of emulsions were measured. G' value was found to be greater than the G″ value, which fits into weak gel model. The roasting process resulted with lower transition temperatures but with increased transition enthalpies of the flour samples based on differential scanning (DSC) measurements. Lower transition temperatures may be attributed to the partial gelatinization of starch in the flour and partial denaturation of proteins. These results may help to tailor the properties of defatted hazelnut flour when it is used in food products containing emulsions such as sauces, dressings and creams for stabilizing purposes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of ethanol as bore fluid component on the morphological structure and performance of PES hollow fiber membrane for oil in water separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otitoju, Tunmise Ayode; Ahmad, Abdul Latif; Ooi, Boon Seng

    2017-01-01

    The relationships among varying bore fluid compositions containing ethanol/water were studied. The ethanol composition was varied in the ratio of 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%. The membrane dope solutions were prepared from 17.25 wt% polyethersulfone (PES), 0.75 wt% polyethylene glycol (PEG), 3 wt% silicon dioxide sol and 78.25 wt% of 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) via dry-jet spinning process. The membranes’ morphology as a result of varying ethanol ratio in the bore fluid composition was characterized and their effects on crude oil/water emulsion separation were evaluated. Results show that the membrane pore size and porosity decreased with increasing ethanol content in the bore fluid mixture, whereas the inner wall thickness of fibers increased. Furthermore, an increase in ethanol concentration also resulted in a slight increase in water contact angle. The use of 100/0 of ethanol/water resulted in UF membranes with the lowest performance. On the other hand, bore fluid mixture containing 25/75 ethanol/water produced membrane with the best performance for crude oil/water separation. Overall, the use of bore fluid mixture containing 25/75 ethanol/water mixture was found to be a powerful way to tune the morphological properties and performance of HF membrane.

  9. Influence of ethanol as bore fluid component on the morphological structure and performance of PES hollow fiber membrane for oil in water separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otitoju, Tunmise Ayode; Ahmad, Abdul Latif; Ooi, Boon Seng [Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang (Malaysia)

    2017-10-15

    The relationships among varying bore fluid compositions containing ethanol/water were studied. The ethanol composition was varied in the ratio of 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%. The membrane dope solutions were prepared from 17.25 wt% polyethersulfone (PES), 0.75 wt% polyethylene glycol (PEG), 3 wt% silicon dioxide sol and 78.25 wt% of 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) via dry-jet spinning process. The membranes’ morphology as a result of varying ethanol ratio in the bore fluid composition was characterized and their effects on crude oil/water emulsion separation were evaluated. Results show that the membrane pore size and porosity decreased with increasing ethanol content in the bore fluid mixture, whereas the inner wall thickness of fibers increased. Furthermore, an increase in ethanol concentration also resulted in a slight increase in water contact angle. The use of 100/0 of ethanol/water resulted in UF membranes with the lowest performance. On the other hand, bore fluid mixture containing 25/75 ethanol/water produced membrane with the best performance for crude oil/water separation. Overall, the use of bore fluid mixture containing 25/75 ethanol/water mixture was found to be a powerful way to tune the morphological properties and performance of HF membrane.

  10. Vegetable oil based emulsions in milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Mikulcová

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Milk and dairy products represent an important part of functional food in the market. Based on their positive health and nutritional benefits, they have gained popularity and their consumption as well as production is on the rise in the last few decades. As a result of this trend, milk-based products are being used for the delivery of bioactive food ingredients. This study is devoted to the formulation of stable emulsions containing grape seed oil dispersed with several emulsifiers (Tween 80, monocaprylin, and lecithin in milk. Photon correlation spectroscopy was used to evaluate the characteristics of the emulsions in terms of mean droplet size, droplet size distribution and polydispersity index. Emulsions were prepared using 2% and 5% w/w grape seed oil, and 3%, 5%, or 8% w/w emulsifier, and these were homogenized at two different rates of 1050 and 13400 rpm. Parameters influencing emulsion particle size and particle size distribution were identified, which included emulsifier type, its HLB value, oil type (virgin, refined, homogenization rate and the fat content in the milk. Homogenization at 13400 rpm for 10 min. produced fine emulsions with small mean particle sizes and monomodal distribution of droplets. Regarding emulsifier type, the smallest droplet sizes were obtained with formulations containing Tween 80 (250-315 nm, whereas lecithin primarily accounted for the monomodal particle size distributions.

  11. Application of superheated emulsions in neutron spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Mala; Abe, Masashi; Sawamura, Teruko; Roy, S.C; Chatterjee, B.K.; Roy, B.

    2003-01-01

    'Superheated emulsions' are known to detect energetic radiations. The use of superheated emulsion as neutron spectrometry needs monoenergetic neutrons for the calibration. Because of the limitation of the availability of monoenergetic neutrons, the present work deals with the alternative method to find out the temperature-threshold neutron energy relationship for superheated emulsions. R-114 (C2C12F4, b.p.3.77degC) is used as the superheated liquid to unfold the neutron energy spectrum generated at Pb target by 45 MeV electron LINAC. The normalized response of the emulsion with temperature is obtained as an integrated spectrum, the derivative of which generates neutron energy spectrum. It is noted that R114 detector is insensitive to gamma rays at low temperature and it is only at 70degC to low energy. The present study gives an approach to the application of superheated emulsions in neutron spectrometry in a complex radiation field of both gamma rays and neutrons of different energy. (T. Tanaka)

  12. Effect of bitumen emulsion on setting, strength, soundness and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Addition of bitumen emulsion to the matrix has been found to improve strength and soundness of the product while decreasing the initial setting periods. Thus, bitumen emulsion as an admixture in magnesia cement is a moisture proofing and strengthening material.

  13. Preparation and characterization of quercetin-loaded silica microspheres stabilized by combined multiple emulsion and sol-gel processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Young Ho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite exhibiting a wide spectrum of cosmeceutical properties, flavonoids and related compounds have some limitations related to their stability and solubility in distilledwater. In this project, we prepared silica microspheres using a novel method that uses polyol-in-oil-in-water (P/O/W emulsion and sol-gel methods as techniques for stabilizing quercetin. A stable microsphere suspension was successfully preparedusing a mixed solvent system comprising a polyol-phase medium for performing the sol-gel processing of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS as an inorganic precursor with outer water phase. The morphology of the microsphere was evaluated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM, which showed a characteristic spherical particle shape with a smooth surface. Furthermore, SEM/EDSanalysis of a representative microsphere demonstrated that the inner structure of the silica microspheres was filled with quercetin. The mean diameter of the microsphere was in the range 20.6-35.0 μm, and the encapsulation efficiency ranged from 17.8% to 27.5%. The free and encapsulated quercetin samples were incubated in separateaqueous solutions at 25 and 42°C for 28 days. The residualcontent of the quercetin encapsulated by silica microspheres was 82% at 42°C. In contrast, that of the free quercetin stored at 42°C decreased to ~24%.

  14. Sardine Fish Oil By Sentrifugation and Adsorbent for Emulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Kristina Haryati; Sugeng Heri Suseno; Nurjanah Nurjanah

    2017-01-01

    Sardine fish meal by-product contain eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) and it can be made as emulsion. The purpose of this study were to determine the best fish oil emulsion by mixingthe oil phase (lecithin 3% and oil) and water phase (carboxymethyl cellulose/CMC 2% and fruit juice) and then stored until creaming, and the emulsion is analyzed their viscosity, pH, percent of stability and longseparation. Sardine oil is separated from the emulsion and tested oxidation parame...

  15. Highly concentrated emulsions. Physicochemical principles of the preparation and stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babak, V G

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies on highly concentrated emulsions are critically analysed. The views on the relationship between the stability of surfactant-stabilised emulsions and the properties of microemulsion phases formed in surfactant-water-oil ternary systems are considered. The empirical criteria and rules that can be used to predict the type and stability of emulsions are presented. The physicochemical factors determining the rupture stability of emulsion films are discussed.

  16. Supralinearity and particle discrimination in nuclear emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, R.; Larsson, L.; Pinkerton, F.E.; Benton, E.V.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear emulsions may be desensitized in manufacture and/or may be so processed as to discriminate against small latent image sites; to yield supralinear sensitometric response after x-irradiation; and to discriminate against lightly ionizing radiations in favor of heavily ionizing particles. In a circumstance where one electron passing through an emulsion grain is unlikely to generate a latent image sufficiently large to yield a visible grain after development, some larger number of electrons is required, resulting in 'many-hit' statistics, supralinearity, and particle discrimination: for lightly ionizing particles are not likely to generate more than one delta-ray (secondary electron) in their passage through or near a grain. Since these properties are analogous to the response of many biological cells to ionizing radiations, such emulsion-developer combinations have the potential to mimic the response of biological systems to particulate radiations of different charge and speed. (author)

  17. Controllable microfluidic production of multicomponent multiple emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xie, Rui; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Luo, Tao; Liu, Li; Weitz, David A; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2011-05-07

    A hierarchical and scalable microfluidic device constructed from a combination of three building blocks enables highly controlled generation of multicomponent multiple emulsions. The number, ratio and size of droplets, each with distinct contents being independently co-encapsulated in the same level, can be precisely controlled. The building blocks are a drop maker, a connector and a liquid extractor; combinations of these enable the scale-up of the device to create higher-order multicomponent multiple emulsions with exceptionally diverse structures. These multicomponent multiple emulsions offer a versatile and promising platform for precise encapsulation of incompatible actives or chemicals, for synergistic delivery and biochemical and chemical reactions, and for engineering multicompartment materials with controlled internal phases. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  18. Emulsion analysis in the OPERA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, N

    2010-01-01

    OPERA is a unique experiment aimed at the first detection of ν τ appearance in a flux of ν μ due to the neutrino oscillation from ν μ to ν τ . The CERN CNGS beam is the source of ν μ . The detector is hybrid; it is composed of nuclear emulsion films and electronic detectors. It is located in the LNGS underground laboratory. The target consists of 150,000 Emulsion Cloud Chambers (ECC) bricks, which are stacks of interleaved emulsion films and lead plates. The ν τ charged current interactions will be detected by identifying the decay topology of the τ in the ECC bricks. The first run started in 2008. The experiment is currently in the phase of data taking and analysis. The experimental methods, the status and the summary of the results from the 2008 run are presented in this paper.

  19. Emulsion chamber experiments for the Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, R. J.

    Emulsion chambers offer several unique features for the study of ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray interactions and spectra aboard a permanent manned Space Station. Emulsion-chamber experiments provide the highest acceptance/weight ratio of any current experimental technique, are invulnerable to mechanical shocks and temperature excursions associated with space flight, do not employ volatile or explosive components or materials, and are not dependent upon data communications or recording systems. Space-Station personnel would be employed to replace track-sensitive materials as required by background accumulation. Several emulsion-chamber designs are proposed, including both conventional passive calorimetric detectors and a hybrid superconducting-magnetic-spectrometer system. Results of preliminary simulation studies are presented. Operational logistics are discussed.

  20. Radiation processing of polymer emulsion, 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makuuchi, Keizo; Katakai, Akio; Hagiwara, Miyuki

    1983-01-01

    Radiation induced emulsion copolymerization of strong acid monomer was investigated to reduce the curing temperature of core shell particle emulsion having N-(n-butoxymethyl) acrylamide (NBM) moities in shell part. The strong acid monomers used were 3-chloro-2-acidphosphoxypropyl methacrylate, acid-phosphoxyethyl methacrylate, 2-acrylamide-2-methyl-propane sulfonic acid, and sodium p-styrenesulfonate. Curing was remarkably promoted by the presence of copolymerized strong acid monomer in shell part. Tensile strength of the film cured at 120 0 C was identical with that of conventional NBM core-shell emulsion film cured at 160 0 C. However, the water absorbing capacity of the film cured at 120 0 C was extremely high. The water resistance was found to increase with decreasing the amount of adsorbed polyelectrolyte on the particle surface. (author)

  1. Perfluorooctyl bromide emulsion contrast agent for tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, Yoshio; Ueda, Yasuo; Tanaka, Mikio; Yamanouchi, Kouichi; Yokoyama, Kazumasa

    1985-01-01

    Perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB), a biologically inert radiodense compound, was evaluated as a potential contrast agent for tumors. When 25 w/v% PFOB emulsion was administered intravenously in rats with AH 130 tumor, the tumor became radiopaque using conventional X-rays. Rabbits were implanted into liver with VX 2 carcinoma and were given 10 ml/kg PFOB emulsion intravenously. Computed tomographic scanning of the rabbits showed the dense enhancement of the rim of the tumor. The PFOB contents in the tumor, the tumor-rim and the normal liver tissues were determined by gas chromatography. The differences of PFOB contents in three different locations showed the density of the tumor rim was due to the accumulation of PFOB in the periphery of the tumor. Optical and electron microscopy revealed lots of vaculoes of PFOB particles in macrophages around the tumor. Thus, PFOB emulsion may be useful in detection of tumors. (author)

  2. Particle tracks in supralinear nuclear research emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, L.; Pinkerton, F.E.; Katz, R.; Benton, E.V.

    1976-01-01

    The tracks of isolated particles in the grain-count regime in emulsion are described by a theory extended from l-hit detectors to c-or-more hit detectors, for study of the tracks of 12 C, 16 O, and 20 Ne ions in a series of desensitized Ilford K-minus emulsions, as processed in a wet hot-stage (Bristol formula) developer. These emulsions represent a class of many-hit nuclear track detectors able to discriminate against low LET radiations, with a threshold that can be varied by processing, and which are able to mimic some of the aspects of the response of biological cells to radiations of different quality

  3. Facile fabrication of poly(L-lactic acid) microsphere-incorporated calcium alginate/hydroxyapatite porous scaffolds based on Pickering emulsion templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Ma, Shanshan; Yang, Zhuohong; Zhou, Wuyi; Du, Zhengshan; Huang, Jian; Yi, Huan; Wang, Chaoyang

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we develop a facile one-pot approach to the fabrication of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) microsphere-incorporated calcium alginate (ALG-Ca)/hydroxyapatite (HAp) porous scaffolds based on HAp nanoparticle-stabilized oil-in-water Pickering emulsion templates, which contain alginate in the aqueous phase and PLLA in the oil phase. The emulsion aqueous phase is solidified by in situ gelation of alginate with Ca(2+) released from HAp by decreasing pH with slow hydrolysis of D-gluconic acid δ-lactone (GDL) to produce emulsion droplet-incorporated gels, followed by freeze-drying to form porous scaffolds containing microspheres. The pore structure of porous scaffolds can be adjusted by varying the HAp or GDL concentration. The compressive tests show that the increase of HAp or GDL concentration is beneficial to improve the compressive property of porous scaffolds, while the excessive HAp can lead to the decrease in compressive property. Moreover, the swelling behavior studies display that the swelling ratios of porous scaffolds reduce with increasing HAp or GDL concentration. Furthermore, hydrophobic drug ibuprofen (IBU) and hydrophilic drug bovine serum albumin (BSA) are loaded into the microspheres and scaffold matrix, respectively. In vitro drug release results indicate that BSA has a rapid release while IBU has a sustained release in the dual drug-loaded scaffolds. In vitro cell culture experiments verify that mouse bone mesenchymal stem cells can proliferate on the porous scaffolds well, indicating the good biocompatibility of porous scaffolds. All these results demonstrate that the PLLA microsphere-incorporated ALG-Ca/HAp porous scaffolds have a promising potential for tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Food emulsions as delivery systems for flavor compounds: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Like; Roos, Yrjö H; Biliaderis, Costas G; Miao, Song

    2017-10-13

    Food flavor is an important attribute of quality food, and it largely determines consumer food preference. Many food products exist as emulsions or experience emulsification during processing, and therefore, a good understanding of flavor release from emulsions is essential to design food with desirable flavor characteristics. Emulsions are biphasic systems, where flavor compounds are partitioning into different phases, and the releases can be modulated through different ways. Emulsion ingredients, such as oils, emulsifiers, thickening agents, can interact with flavor compounds, thus modifying the thermodynamic behavior of flavor compounds. Emulsion structures, including droplet size and size distribution, viscosity, interface thickness, etc., can influence flavor component partition and their diffusion in the emulsions, resulting in different release kinetics. When emulsions are consumed in the mouth, both emulsion ingredients and structures undergo significant changes, resulting in different flavor perception. Special design of emulsion structures in the water phase, oil phase, and interface provides emulsions with great potential as delivery systems to control flavor release in wider applications. This review provides an overview of the current understanding of flavor release from emulsions, and how emulsions can behave as delivery systems for flavor compounds to better design novel food products with enhanced sensorial and nutritional attributes.

  5. The role of electrostatics in saliva-induced emulsion flocculation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silletti, Erika; Vingerhoeds, Monique H.; Norde, Willem; Van Aken, George A.

    Upon consumption food emulsions undergo different processes, including mixing with saliva. It has been shown that whole saliva induces emulsion flocculation [van Aken, G. A., Vingerhoeds, M. H., & de Hoog, E. H. A. (2005). Colloidal behaviour of food emulsions under oral conditions. In E. Dickinson

  6. Performance evaluation of organic emulsion liquid membrane on phenol removal

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Yee Sern; Jayakumar, N.S.; Hashim, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    The percentage removal of phenol from aqueous solution by emulsion liquid membrane and emulsion leakage was investigated experimentally for various parameters such as membrane:internal phase ratio, membrane:external phase ratio, emulsification speed, emulsification time, carrier concentration, surfactant concentration and internal agent concentration. These parameters strongly influence the percentage removal of phenol and emulsion leakage. Under optimum membrane properties, the percentage re...

  7. The role of electrostatistics in saliva-induced emulsion flocculation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silletti, E.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Norde, W.; Aken, van G.A.

    2007-01-01

    Upon consumption food emulsions undergo different processes, including mixing with saliva. It has been shown that whole saliva induces emulsion flocculation [van Aken, G. A., Vingerhoeds, M. H., & de Hoog, E. H. A. (2005). Colloidal behaviour of food emulsions under oral conditions. In E.

  8. On the production of shower particles from light (Cno) and heavy (Ag Br) emulsion nuclei at Dubna energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EI-Nagdy, M.S.; Abdel-Waged, Kh; Abdel-Halim, S.M.; Khalil, E.I.

    2000-01-01

    The reaction cross sections for p, d, He, C, Mg and S beams with different chemical components of emulsion nuclei at 4.5 A GeV/c have been studied with high statistics, and were compared with the calculations according to Glauber model. The multiplicity distributions of shower produced particles from these interactions with light and heavy emulsion nuclei are analyzed in terms of the negative binomial and Poisson distribution laws

  9. Dual asymmetric centrifugation as an alternative preparation method for parenteral fat emulsions in preformulation development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenambergen, Frederike; Maruiama, Cintia H; Mäder, Karsten

    2013-04-15

    Nanoscaled fat emulsions are well established as a drug delivery system for lipophilic drugs and for the use in parenteral nutrition. Typically, the production of nanoscaled fat emulsions requires several formulation steps, including high pressure homogenization and filtration. The applicability of dual asymmetric centrifugation as an alternative technique to produce submicron fat emulsions in a short and easy way was investigated. The emulsions could be prepared without substance loss in a closed system within 30 min. Formulations with 10% soybean oil and up to 5% emulsifier-mixture were produced. The droplet size distribution was determined by static light scattering. Stability over six months was shown by regular static light scattering measurements and determination of the zeta potential. Furthermore, hemolytic activity of the samples was investigated. With the dual asymmetric centrifugation physiological tolerable emulsions with droplets in the lower micron and submicron range could be prepared. This method could be used as a model for screening active pharmaceutical ingredients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Catalytic Emulsion Based on Janus Nanosheets for Ultra-Deep Desulfurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lixin; Zhang, Hairan; Wei, Zhichao; Jiang, Yi; Zhang, Ling; Zhao, Jie; Zhang, Junhui; Dong, Li; Li, Erni; Ruhlmann, Laurent; Zhang, Qian

    2017-02-03

    Catalytic Janus nanosheets were synthesized by using an anion-exchange reaction between heteropolyacids (HPAs) and the modified ionic-liquid (IL) moieties of Janus nanosheets. Their morphology and surface properties were characterized by using SEM, energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), FTIR spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies. Because of their inherent Janus structure, the nanosheets exhibited good amphipathic character with ILs and oil to form a stable ILs-in-oil emulsion. Therefore, these Janus nanosheets can be used as both emulsifiers and catalysts to perform emulsive desulfurization. During this process, sulfur-containing compounds at the interface could be easily oxidized and efficiently removed from a model oil. Application of this Janus emulsion brings an efficient, useful, and green procedure to the desulfurization process. Compared with the desulfurization catalyzed by using HPAs in a conventional two-phase system, the sulfur removal of dibenzothiophene (DBT) achieved in a Janus emulsion system was improved from 68 to 97 % within 1.5 h. Moreover, this emulsion system could be demulsified easily by simple centrifugation to recover both the nanosheets and the ILs. Owing to the good structural stability of the Janus nanosheets, the sulfur removal efficiency of DBT could still reach 99.9 % after the catalytic nanosheets had been recycled at least six times. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Pickering emulsions stabilized by biodegradable block copolymer micelles for controlled topical drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laredj-Bourezg, Faiza; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Pelletier, Jocelyne; Chevalier, Yves

    2017-10-05

    Surfactant-free biocompatible and biodegradable Pickering emulsions were investigated as vehicles for skin delivery of hydrophobic drugs. O/w emulsions of medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) oil droplets loaded with all-trans retinol as a model hydrophobic drug were stabilized by block copolymer nanoparticles: either poly(lactide)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-b-PEG) or poly(caprolactone)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PCL-b-PEG). Those innovative emulsions were prepared using two different processes allowing drug loading either inside oil droplets or inside both oil droplets and non-adsorbed block copolymer nanoparticles. Skin absorption of retinol was investigated in vitro on pig skin biopsies using the Franz cell method. Supplementary experiments by confocal fluorescence microscopy allowed the visualization of skin absorption of the Nile Red dye on histological sections. Retinol and Nile Red absorption experiments showed the large accumulation of hydrophobic drugs in the stratum corneum for the Pickering emulsions compared to the surfactant-based emulsion and an oil solution. Loading drug inside both oil droplets and block copolymer nanoparticles enhanced again skin absorption of drugs, which was ascribed to the supplementary contribution of free block copolymer nanoparticles loaded with drug. Such effect allowed tuning drug delivery to skin over a wide range by means of a suitable selection of either the formulation or the drug loading process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Food enrichment with marine phospholipid emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Henna Fung Sieng; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Baron, Caroline P.

    of marine PL emulsions, iii) evaluation of non-enzymatic browning reactions in marine PL emulsions, iv) evaluation of sensory properties and oxidative stability of yoghurt enriched with marine PL. The obtained results showed that marine PL have good emulsifying properties and it was feasible to prepare...... to the interaction between lipid oxidation products with amine group either from phosphatidylethanolamine or residues of amino acids/proteins in marine PL. The study on enrichment of yoghurt with marine PL showed that the oxidative stability and sensory acceptability was highly dependent on the quality...

  13. Characteristics of emulsion chamber family events produced at low heights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, G.; Jing, C.; Zhu, Q.; Ding, L.

    1985-01-01

    The uncertainty of primary cosmic ray composition at 10 to the 14th power -10 to the 16th power eV is well known making the study of nuclear interaction mechanisms more difficult. Experimentally if one can identify effectively the family events produced at low heights, then an induced by primary protons might be separated. In this paper an attempt is made to simulate a family of events under the conditions of a mountain emulsion chamber experiments using a reasonable model. The aim is to search for the dependence of some experimentally observable quantities on the interaction height

  14. Performance of automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güler, A. Murat; Altınok, Özgür

    2015-12-01

    The impressive improvements in scanning technology and methods let nuclear emulsion to be used as a target in recent large experiments. We report the performance of an automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments. After successful calibration and alignment of the system, we have reached 99% tracking efficiency for the minimum ionizing tracks that penetrating through the emulsions films. The automatic scanning system is successfully used for the scanning of emulsion films in the OPERA experiment and plan to use for the next generation of nuclear emulsion experiments.

  15. The use of fluorocarbon emulsions in cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guichard, M.

    1991-01-01

    The chemical and physical properties of perfluorochemical emulsions which highlight their advantages and disadvantages for use in cancer radiotherapy are summarized. The radiobiological properties of two emulsions are reviewed: the authors have chosen the Fluosol-DA 20% and the PFOB emulsion 100 v/w% which is one of the most promising second generation fluorocarbon emulsions. The radiosensitization obtained in a human tumor xenograft with PFOB emulsion is compared to that obtained with other modalities used to overcome the radioresistance of tumor cells linked to hypoxia. (author). 27 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  16. Nanocellulose-stabilized Pickering emulsions and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Shuji; Togawa, Eiji; Kuroda, Katsushi

    2017-01-01

    Pickering emulsion, which is an emulsion stabilized by solid particles, offers a wide range of potential applications because it generally provides a more stable system than surfactant-stabilized emulsion. Among various solid stabilizers, nanocellulose may open up new opportunities for future Pickering emulsions owing to its unique nanosizes, amphiphilicity, and other favorable properties (e.g. chemical stability, biodegradability, biocompatibility, and renewability). In this review, the preparation and properties of nanocellulose-stabilized Pickering emulsions are summarized. We also provide future perspectives on their applications, such as drug delivery, food, and composite materials.

  17. Starch stabilized Pickering emulsions : Colloidal starch particles and their effects on emulsion properties

    OpenAIRE

    Saari, Hisfazilah

    2017-01-01

    Particles can be used to stabilize multi-phase systems known as Pickering emulsions. The aim of this thesis was to investigate how starch particles affect emulsion properties. Starch granules were used individually as well as in binary mixtures. To obtain a wide variety of starch properties granules were selected based on botanic variation (quinoa, oat, waxy barley, waxy maize and potato). The properties of the starch particles were furthermore changed by size fractionation by sedimentation, ...

  18. In vitro release of dibucaine hydrochloride from chitosan semisolid vehicles: emulsion and hydrophilic gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilia de la Paz

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: Chitosan has received attention as a functional, sustainably renewable, nontoxic and biodegradable biopolymer for pharmaceutical applications. Aims: To evaluate the release of dibucaine hydrochloride from semisolid vehicles of oil/aqueous type emulsion and aqueous gels, stabilized by using chitosan (CH or chitosan acetate (CHAc. Methods: Emulsions were developed by varying the emulsifying agent: polysorbate 80, CH or CHAc and by combining CH with polysorbate 80 or CHAc with polysorbate 80. The hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose F4M was added as a stabilizing agent in gel formulations. The release rates of model drug from semisolid vehicles were measured by using a dialysis sac. Drug release was also quantified by using a validated UV-VIS spectrophotometric method. Results: The pH values showed minimal changes for emulsion and gel formulations. The drug is a cationic salt, and it is not able to bind polymer cations by electrostatic repulsion. The rheological property of the vehicle type emulsion was adjusted to plastic and pseudo-plastic fluid to the gels. The drug release was independent of the viscosity of vehicles. Dibucaine release from both types of formulation was found to follow a square-root-of-time kinetic model, but a higher rate of release was obtained from gel formulations. Conclusions: It was shown that chitosan was adsorbed to the surface of polysorbate 80-coated droplets, and that the electrostatic attraction between the non-ionic surfactant and the drug retarded its release from a semisolid system. The multilayer emulsions showed more influence of the release of drug than CH or CHAc single layer emulsion.

  19. CMS emulsion pictures during LS1

    CERN Multimedia

    Di Ferdinando, Donato

    2013-01-01

    These images were taken at the CMS experimental cavern during Long Shutdown 1, installing pinhole cameras at different points of the cavern and exposing them for days. The development of the film was done by Donato di Ferdinando from INFN Bologna. A pinhole camera is a light-tight box where a small hole is made (diameter of the order of microns); a light-sensitive material is set in the back of the hole. As sensitive material a nuclear emulsion film from the OPERA experiment was used. It is a special photographic emulsion optimized (silver grains enriched) for the detection of charged particles. A very large amount of nuclear emulsions where used in Opera experiment, at the Gran Sasso Underground Labs; nuclear emulsions must detect the charged tau-leptons emerging from the interaction between the "oscillated" tau-neutrino coming from the pure muon-neutrino beam produced at CERN (the CNGS beam). The oscillations theory of neutrino expects that muon neutrinos oscillate to tau-neutrinos and due to this behavior ...

  20. Rheological and textural properties of cosmetic emulsions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Morávková, Tereza; Štern, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 3 (2011), č. článku 35200. ISSN 1430-6395 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : cosmetic emulsions * rheology * texture * sensory analysis * psychorheology Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2011

  1. Perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions as potential drug carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuhas, J.M.; Goodman, R.L.; Moore, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    PFC emulsions have excellent oxygen transporting properties and have been reported to enhance the response of murine tumors to both radiation and BCNU. While the presently available emulsions are far too toxic to the immune system to be used in cancer therapy, they can be used to investigate the overall potential of this approach. As an example, the authors have found that these emulsions can alter drug availability. The lipophilicity of both the PFC and the drug in question determine the partitioning of the drug between the organic and aqueous phases of an emulsion. In vitro, this can reduce drug effectiveness by reducing the amount of drug available to the cells. In vivo, however, this partitioning may produce sustained drug exposure, which could be of benefit in cancer therapy and other applications. In brief, as the drug is absorbed from the circulating aqueous phase, additional drug would leach from the PFC, thereby providing a sustained drug exposure similar to that obtained with liposomes. While a great deal more work will be required to evaluate the practicality of this approach, the existence of this phenomenon must be taken into account in both the design and interpretation of efficacy studies in which anesthetics, chemotherapeutics, etc are employed

  2. Breaking of double emulsions based on electrohydrodynamics principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasic, Aleksandar M; Jovanovic, Jovan M; Manojlovic, Vaso; Jovanovic, Mica

    2016-10-01

    This research focuses on the modeling of the liquid-liquid dispersed system, including particular insight on the electrocoalescence (EC) process that occurs during the breaking of double emulsions. The representative system, used in this work, was taken from the pilot plant for solvent extraction of uranium from wet phosphoric acid. The chosen framework required for elucidation of the EC process is based on the electrohydrodynamic (EHD) principles. During the model development it was necessary to consider several theoretical concepts for easier understanding and description of the related events. The first is the concept of entities, and corresponding classification of finely dispersed systems. The second concept is an introduction of almost forgotten basic electrodynamics element the memdiode or memristor as a current controlled device, and corresponding memristive systems. Hence, the conclusions that may be withdrawn from the presented results and findings could enable easier designing of the solutions for a breaking of double emulsions problems, that is, the entrainment problems that may arise in some pilot or industrial plants. Finally, the perspectives and the remaining challenges, considering the here discussed concepts and model based on the EHD principles, are mentioned. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Beneficial effects of curcumin nano-emulsion on spermatogenesis and reproductive performance in male rats under protein deficient diet model: enhancement of sperm motility, conservancy of testicular tissue integrity, cell energy and seminal plasma amino acids content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed-Farid, Omar A H; Nasr, Maha; Ahmed, Rania F; Bakeer, Rofanda M

    2017-09-02

    Malnutrition resulting from protein and calorie deficiency continues to be a major concern worldwide especially in developing countries. Specific deficiencies in the protein intake can adversely influence reproductive performance. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of curcumin and curcumin nano-emulsion on protein deficient diet (PDD)-induced testicular atrophy, troubled spermatogenesis and decreased reproductive performance in male rats. Juvenile rats were fed the protein deficient diet (PDD) for 75 days. Starting from day 60 the rats were divided into 4 groups and given the corresponding treatments for the last 15 days orally and daily as follows: 1st group; curcumin group (C) received 50 mg/kg curcumin p.o. 2 nd group; curcumin nano-form low dose group (NCL) received 2.5 mg/kg nano-curcumin. 3rd group; curcumin nano-form high dose group (NCH) received 5 mg/kg nano-curcumin. 4th group served as malnutrition group (PDD group) receiving the protein deficient diet daily for 75 days and received distilled water ingestions (5 ml/kg p.o) daily for the last 15 days of the experiment. A normal control group was kept under the same conditions for the whole experiment and received normal diet according to nutrition requirement center daily for 75 days and received distilled water ingestions (5 ml/kg p.o) daily for the last 15 days of the experiment. PDD induced significant (P nano-emulsion (2.5 and 5 mg/kg) showed significant (Pnano-emulsion (5 mg/kg) were comparable to curcumin (50 mg/kg). The present study suggests that administration of curcumin nano-emulsion as a daily supplement would be beneficial in malnutrition- induced troubled male reproductive performance and spermatogenesis cases.

  4. Synthetic Polymers at Interfaces: Monodisperse Emulsions Multiple Emulsions and Liquid Marbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guanqing

    The adsorption of polymeric materials at interfaces is an energetically favorable process which is investigated in much diversified fields, such as emulsions, bubbles, foams, liquid marbles. Pickering emulsion, which is emulsion stabilized by solid particles has been investigated for over one century and preparation of Pickering emulsion with narrow size distribution is crucial for both the theoretical study of the stabilization mechanism and practical application, such as templated fabrication of colloidosomes. The precise control over the size and functionality of polymer latices allows the preparation of monodisperse Pickering emulsions with desired sizes through SPG membrane emulsification at rather rapid rate compared to microfludic production. Double or multiple emulsions have long been investigated but its rapid destabilization has always been a major obstacle in applying them into practical applications. The modern living polymerization techniques allow us to prepare polymers with designed structure of block copolymers which makes it possible to prepare ultra-stable multiple emulsions. The precise tuning of the ratio of hydrophobic part over the hydrophilic can unveil the stabilization mechanism. Liquid marble is a new type of materials of which liquid droplets are coated by dry particles. The coating of an outer layer of dry particles renders the liquid droplets non-sticky at solid surface which is useful in transportation of small amount of liquid without leakage at extreme low friction force. The property of liquid marbles relies largely on the stabilizers and the drying condition of polymeric latices is shown to have great influence on the property of liquid marbles. Firstly, an introduction to the interfacial and colloidal science with special attention to topics on emulsions, multiple emulsion and liquid marbles is given in Chapter 1. The unique features of an interface and a discussion on the definition of colloids are introduced prior to the

  5. Detection of crude oil emulsions in the Bering Sea by the analysis of seawater color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyuk, Pavel A.; Stepochkin, Igor E.; Sokolova, Ekaterina B.; Kachur, Vasiliy A.; Prokuda, Natalya A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents the analysis of uncertainties between observed remote sensed reflectance spectra of seawater, with crude oil emulsions and oil dissolved fractions, and modeled remote sensed reflectance spectra of seawater without oil calculated from the fluorometric measurements of chlorophyll-a and dissolved organic matter concentrations carried out in the layer under oil pollution.

  6. Experimental and numerical studies of emulsion formation in a microfluidic T-junction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mbanjwa, MB

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available . The interfacial tension of the system was controlled to ~ 0.003 N/m using oil-soluble surface active agent (surfactant). A 2-dimensional (2D) CFD model was setup for simulation of the generation of w/o emulsion in a 200µm wide T-junction microchannel. COMSOL...

  7. Ceramic membrane fouling during ultrafiltration of oil/water emulsions: roles played by stabilization surfactants of oil droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dongwei; Zhang, Tao; Ma, Jun

    2015-04-07

    Oil/water (O/W) emulsion stabilized by surfactants is the part of oily wastewater that is most difficult to handle. Ceramic membrane ultrafiltration presently is an ideal process to treat O/W emulsions. However, little is known about the fouling mechanism of the ceramic membrane during O/W emulsion treatment. This paper investigated how stabilization surfactants of O/W emulsions influence the irreversible fouling of ceramic membranes during ultrafiltration. An unexpected phenomenon observed was that irreversible fouling was much less when the charge of the stabilization surfactant of O/W emulsions is opposite to the membrane. The less ceramic membrane fouling in this case was proposed to be due to a synergetic steric effect and demulsification effect which prevented the penetration of oil droplets into membrane pores and led to less pore blockage. This proposed mechanism was supported by cross section images of fouled and virgin ceramic membranes taken with scanning electron microscopy, regression results of classical fouling models, and analysis of organic components rejected by the membrane. Furthermore, this mechanism was also verified by the existence of a steric effect and demulsification effect. Our finding suggests that ceramic membrane oppositely charged to the stabilization surfactant should be applied in ultrafiltration of O/W emulsions to alleviate irreversible membrane fouling. It could be a useful rule for ceramic membrane ultrafiltration of oily wastewater.

  8. Ceramic membrane fouling during ultrafiltration of oil/water emulsions: Roles played by stabilization surfactants of oil droplets

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Dongwei

    2015-04-07

    Oil/water (O/W) emulsion stabilized by surfactants is the part of oily wastewater that is most difficult to handle. Ceramic membrane ultrafiltration presently is an ideal process to treat O/W emulsions. However, little is known about the fouling mechanism of the ceramic membrane during O/W emulsion treatment. This paper investigated how stabilization surfactants of O/W emulsions influence the irreversible fouling of ceramic membranes during ultrafiltration. An unexpected phenomenon observed was that irreversible fouling was much less when the charge of the stabilization surfactant of O/W emulsions is opposite to the membrane. The less ceramic membrane fouling in this case was proposed to be due to a synergetic steric effect and demulsification effect which prevented the penetration of oil droplets into membrane pores and led to less pore blockage. This proposed mechanism was supported by cross section images of fouled and virgin ceramic membranes taken with scanning electron microscopy, regression results of classical fouling models, and analysis of organic components rejected by the membrane. Furthermore, this mechanism was also verified by the existence of a steric effect and demulsification effect. Our finding suggests that ceramic membrane oppositely charged to the stabilization surfactant should be applied in ultrafiltration of O/W emulsions to alleviate irreversible membrane fouling. It could be a useful rule for ceramic membrane ultrafiltration of oily wastewater. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  9. Uranium extraction process in a sulfuric medium by means of liquid emulsified membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteillet, A.

    1985-02-01

    Uranium ore processing, after leaching by sulfuric acid, by liquid-liquid extraction is a rather heavy process, not suitable for small deposits. Extraction by emulsions was suggested. In this process the leachate is contacted with an oil in water type emulsion, a liquid organic membrane is formed by the continuous phase. Uranium complexes diffuse through the liquid membrane towards the dispersed aqueous phase of the emulsion (stripping solution). Uranium is recovered by breaking the emulsion. Are successively studied: development of stable emulsions, influence of emulsion composition on uranium transfer kinetics, transfer mechanisms through the membrane and modelling of kinetics data obtained in the experimental study [fr

  10. Budesonide loaded nanoparticles with pH-sensitive coating for improved mucosal targeting in mouse models of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, H; Weigmann, B; Neurath, M F; Collnot, E M; Windbergs, M; Lehr, C-M

    2014-06-10

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of budesonide loaded nanocarriers for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). First, budesonide was encapsulated in poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles by an oil in water (O/W) emulsion technique. A second batch of the same nanoparticles was additionally coated with a pH-sensitive methyl-methacrylate-copolymer. The particle sizes of the plain and the coated PLGA were 200±10.1nm and ~240±14.7nm, respectively. As could be shown in vitro, the pH-sensitive coating prevented premature drug release at acidic pH and only releases the drug at neutral to slightly alkaline pH. The efficacy of both coated and plain nanoparticle formulations was assessed in different acute and chronic colitis mouse models, also in comparison to an aqueous solution of the drug. The dose was always the same (0.168mg/kg). It was found that delivery by coated PLGA nanoparticles alleviated the induced colitis significantly better than by plain PLGA particles, which was already more effective than treatment with the same dose of the free drug. These data further corroborate the potential of polymeric nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery to the inflamed intestinal mucosa, and that this concept can still be further improved regarding the oral route of administration by implementing pH-dependent drug release characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. ROS-responsive microspheres for on demand antioxidant therapy in a model of diabetic peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Kristin M; Nelson, Christopher E; Joshi, Rucha V; Martin, John R; Gupta, Mukesh K; Haws, Skylar C; Kavanaugh, Taylor E; Skala, Melissa C; Duvall, Craig L

    2015-02-01

    A new microparticle-based delivery system was synthesized from reactive oxygen species (ROS)-responsive poly(propylene sulfide) (PPS) and tested for "on demand" antioxidant therapy. PPS is hydrophobic but undergoes a phase change to become hydrophilic upon oxidation and thus provides a useful platform for ROS-demanded drug release. This platform was tested for delivery of the promising anti-inflammatory and antioxidant therapeutic molecule curcumin, which is currently limited in use in its free form due to poor pharmacokinetic properties. PPS microspheres efficiently encapsulated curcumin through oil-in-water emulsion and provided sustained, on demand release that was modulated in vitro by hydrogen peroxide concentration. The cytocompatible, curcumin-loaded microspheres preferentially targeted and scavenged intracellular ROS in activated macrophages, reduced in vitro cell death in the presence of cytotoxic levels of ROS, and decreased tissue-level ROS in vivo in the diabetic mouse hind limb ischemia model of peripheral arterial disease. Interestingly, due to the ROS scavenging behavior of PPS, the blank microparticles also showed inherent therapeutic properties that were synergistic with the effects of curcumin in these assays. Functionally, local delivery of curcumin-PPS microspheres accelerated recovery from hind limb ischemia in diabetic mice, as demonstrated using non-invasive imaging techniques. This work demonstrates the potential for PPS microspheres as a generalizable vehicle for ROS-demanded drug release and establishes the utility of this platform for improving local curcumin bioavailability for treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Modeling for influenza vaccines and adjuvants profile for safety prediction system using gene expression profiling and statistical tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Eita; Momose, Haruka; Hiradate, Yuki; Furuhata, Keiko; Takai, Mamiko; Asanuma, Hideki; Ishii, Ken J.

    2018-01-01

    Historically, vaccine safety assessments have been conducted by animal testing (e.g., quality control tests and adjuvant development). However, classical evaluation methods do not provide sufficient information to make treatment decisions. We previously identified biomarker genes as novel safety markers. Here, we developed a practical safety assessment system used to evaluate the intramuscular, intraperitoneal, and nasal inoculation routes to provide robust and comprehensive safety data. Influenza vaccines were used as model vaccines. A toxicity reference vaccine (RE) and poly I:C-adjuvanted hemagglutinin split vaccine were used as toxicity controls, while a non-adjuvanted hemagglutinin split vaccine and AddaVax (squalene-based oil-in-water nano-emulsion with a formulation similar to MF59)-adjuvanted hemagglutinin split vaccine were used as safety controls. Body weight changes, number of white blood cells, and lung biomarker gene expression profiles were determined in mice. In addition, vaccines were inoculated into mice by three different administration routes. Logistic regression analyses were carried out to determine the expression changes of each biomarker. The results showed that the regression equations clearly classified each vaccine according to its toxic potential and inoculation amount by biomarker expression levels. Interestingly, lung biomarker expression was nearly equivalent for the various inoculation routes. The results of the present safety evaluation were confirmed by the approximation rate for the toxicity control. This method may contribute to toxicity evaluation such as quality control tests and adjuvant development. PMID:29408882

  13. Thermodynamically stable emulsions using Janus dumbbells as colloid surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Fuquan; Park, Bum Jun; Lee, Daeyeon

    2013-10-15

    One of the most important properties of emulsions is their stability. Most emulsions stabilized with molecular surfactants tend to lose their stability over time via different mechanisms. Although the stability of emulsions stabilized with homogeneous particles have been shown to be superior to that of surfactant-stabilized emulsions, these Pickering emulsions nevertheless are only kinetically stable and thus can undergo destabilization. Janus particles that have two opposite wetting surfaces have shown promise in imparting emulsions with long-term stability because of their strong attachment to the oil-water interface. In this theoretical study, we consider thermodynamics of emulsion stabilization using amphiphilic Janus dumbbells, which are nonspherical particles made of two partially fused spherical particles of opposite wettability. These amphiphilic dumbbells are attractive candidates as colloid surfactants for emulsion stabilization because highly uniform Janus dumbbells can be synthesized in large quantities; thus, their application in emulsion stabilization can become practical. Our theoretical calculation demonstrates that Janus dumbbells can indeed generate thermodynamically stable Pickering emulsions. In addition, we also find that there exists a total oil-water interfacial area that results in the lowest energy state in the system, which occurs when Janus dumbbells available in the system are completely consumed to fully cover the droplet interfaces. We show that the geometry of dumbbells as well as the composition of the emulsion mixtures has significant influences on the average size of dumbbell-stabilized emulsions. We also investigate the effect of asymmetry of Janus dumbbells on the average droplet radius. Our results clearly show that amphiphilic Janus dumbbells provide unique opportunities in stabilizing emulsions for various applications.

  14. Prophylactic Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2) Vaccines Adjuvanted with Stable Emulsion and Toll-Like Receptor 9 Agonist Induce a Robust HSV-2-Specific Cell-Mediated Immune Response, Protect against Symptomatic Disease, and Reduce the Latent Viral Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Michael T; Marshall, Jason D; Dorwart, Michael R; Heeke, Darren S; Rao, Eileen; Tummala, Padmaja; Yu, Li; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Sloan, Derek D

    2017-05-01

    Several prophylactic vaccines targeting herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) have failed in the clinic to demonstrate sustained depression of viral shedding or protection from recurrences. Although these vaccines have generated high titers of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), their induction of robust CD8 T cells has largely been unreported, even though evidence for the importance of HSV-2 antigen-specific CD8 T cells is mounting in animal models and in translational studies involving subjects with active HSV-2-specific immune responses. We developed a subunit vaccine composed of the NAb targets gD and gB and the novel T cell antigen and tegument protein UL40, and we compared this vaccine to a whole-inactivated-virus vaccine (formaldehyde-inactivated HSV-2 [FI-HSV-2]). We evaluated different formulations in combination with several Th1-inducing Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in vivo In mice, the TLR9 agonist cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotide formulated in a squalene-based oil-in-water emulsion promoted most robust, functional HSV-2 antigen-specific CD8 T cell responses and high titers of neutralizing antibodies, demonstrating its superiority to vaccines adjuvanted by monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL)-alum. We further established that FI-HSV-2 alone or in combination with adjuvants as well as adjuvanted subunit vaccines were successful in the induction of NAbs and T cell responses in guinea pigs. These immunological responses were coincident with a suppression of vaginal HSV-2 shedding, low lesion scores, and a reduction in latent HSV-2 DNA in dorsal root ganglia to undetectable levels. These data support the further preclinical and clinical development of prophylactic HSV-2 vaccines that contain appropriate antigen and adjuvant components responsible for programming elevated CD8 T cell responses. IMPORTANCE Millions of people worldwide are infected with herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), and to date, an efficacious prophylactic vaccine has not met the rigors

  15. Crocin loaded nano-emulsions: Factors affecting emulsion properties in spontaneous emulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrnia, Mohammad-Amin; Jafari, Seid-Mahdi; Makhmal-Zadeh, Behzad S; Maghsoudlou, Yahya

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous emulsification may be used for encapsulating bioactive compounds in food and pharmaceutical industry. It has several advantages over high energy and other low energy methods including, protecting sensitive compounds against severe conditions of high energy method and its ability to minimize surfactant, removal of cosurfactant and thermal stability compared with other low energy methods. In this study, we examined possibility of encapsulating highly soluble crocin in W/O micro-emulsions using spontaneous method which further could be used for making double emulsions. Nonionic surfactants of Span 80 and polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) were used for making micro-emulsions that showed the high potential of PGPR for spontaneous method. Surfactant to water ratio (SWR%) was evaluated to find the highest amount of aqueous phase which can be dispersed in organic phase. Droplet size decreased by increasing SWR toward the SWR=100% which had the smallest droplet size and then increased at higher levels of surfactant. By increasing SWR, shear viscosity increased which showed the high effect of PGPR on rheological properties. This study shows in addition to W/O micro-emulsions, spontaneous method could be used for preparing stable O/W micro-emulsions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Emulsion characteristics, chemical and textural properties of meat systems produced with double emulsions as beef fat replacers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdaroğlu, Meltem; Öztürk, Burcu; Urgu, Müge

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, double emulsions are stated to have a promising potential in low-fat food production, however, there are very few studies on their possible applications in meat matrices. We aimed to investigate the quality of beef emulsion systems in which beef fat was totally replaced by double emulsions (W1/O/W2) prepared with olive oil and sodium caseinate (SC) by two-step emulsification procedure. Incorporation of W1/O/W2 emulsion resulted in reduced lipid, increased protein content, and modified fatty acid composition. W1/O/W2 emulsion treatments had lower jelly and fat separation, higher water-holding capacity and higher emulsion stability than control samples with beef fat. Increased concentrations of W1/O/W2 emulsions resulted in significant changes in texture parameters. TBA values were lower in W1/O/W2 emulsion treatments than control treatment after 60days of storage. In conclusion, our study confirms that double emulsions had promising impacts on modifying fatty acid composition and developing both technologically and oxidatively stable beef emulsion systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Storage stability of marine phospholipids emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Henna Fung Sieng; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Baron, Caroline Pascale

    Marine phospholipids (MPL) are believed to provide more advantages than fish oil from the same source. They are considered to have a better bioavailability, a better resistance towards oxidation and a higher content of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic...... of secondary volatile compounds by Solid Phase Microextraction at several time intervals at 2°C storage. Preliminary results showed that marine phospholipids emulsion has a good oxidative stability........ In addition, preliminary investigation of the oxidative and hydrolytic stability was carried out through determination of Peroxide Value and Free Fatty Acids Value after 32 days storage at room temperature and 2ºC, respectively. Oxidative stability of MPL emulsions were also investigated through measurement...

  18. Rheology essentials of cosmetic and food emulsions

    CERN Document Server

    Brummer, Rüdiger

    2006-01-01

    Cosmetic emulsions exist today in many forms for a wide variety of applications, including face and hand creams for normal, dry or oily skin, body milks and lotions, as well as sun-block products. Keeping track of them and their properties is not always easy despite informative product names or partial names (e.g. hand or face cream) that clearly indicate their use and properties. This practical manual provides a detailed overview that describes the key properties and explains how to measure them using modern techniques. Written by an expert in flows and flow properties, it focuses on the application of rheological (flow) measurements to cosmetic and food emulsions and the correlation of these results with findings from other tests. Beginning with a brief history of rheology and some fundamental principles, the manual describes in detail the use of modern viscometers and rheometers, including concise explanations of the different available instruments. But the focus remains on practical everyday lab procedure...

  19. A Comprehensive Framework for Surfactant Selection and Design for Emulsion Based Chemical Product Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattei, Michele; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Gani, Rafiqul

    2014-01-01

    The manufacture of emulsified products is of increasing interest in the consumer oriented chemical indus-try. Several cosmetic, house-hold and pharmaceutical products are in the emulsified form when soldand/or they are expected to form an emulsion when used. Therefore, there is a need for the dev......The manufacture of emulsified products is of increasing interest in the consumer oriented chemical indus-try. Several cosmetic, house-hold and pharmaceutical products are in the emulsified form when soldand/or they are expected to form an emulsion when used. Therefore, there is a need...... ingredientsis consequently necessary to tackle this problem with computer-aided methods and tools. A compre-hensive framework for the selection and design of surfactants, the main responsible for the formationand the stability of emulsions, is presented here together with the modeling of the cloud point, a key......-property of nonionic surfactants, with a group-contribution model. The mathematical formulation of astandard product design problem is presented, together with the list of both the pure component prop-erties (related to nonionic surfactants) and the mixture properties (relevant to the overall products asan emulsion...

  20. Hydrodynamic behavior of water: tri-n-butylphosphate emulsions during ultrafiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modolo, R.; Vittori, O.; Rumeau, M.

    1984-01-01

    The behavior of tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP)-water emulsion is studied during ultrafiltration through two membranes with pore diameters of 1.2 and 1.5 nm, respectively. The emulsion is stabilized with two surfactants: Montane 80 and Montanox 80, which are lipophilic and hydrophilic, respectively. Their percentages never exceeded 10% of the organic part. The organic/water ratio decreases more (i.e., from 1/3 to 1/7) the higher the permeate when the pressure above the membrane is constant. The more the organic/water (O/W) ratio increases, and the more the flow rate of the emulsion above the membrane decreases, a so-called polarization layer appears at the membrane surface and a reverse emulsion (water in TBP) is noticed along with a sudden change in the behavior of the ultrafiltration process. This is due to a change from a capillary transfer model to a diffusional model. The best operating conditions seem to be for a lower O/W ratio and a large retentate flow rate because the formation of the polarization layer is more difficult with a turbulent flow above the membrane surface