WorldWideScience

Sample records for model observables light

  1. Observed light yield of scintillation pixels: Extending the two-ray model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantorski, Igor; Jurkowski, Jacek; Drozdowski, Winicjusz

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we propose an extended, two dimensional model describing the propagation of scintillation photons inside a cuboid crystal until they reach a PMT window. In the simplest approach the model considers two main reasons for light losses: standard absorption obeying the classical Lambert-Beer law and non-ideal reflectivity of the "mummy" covering formed by several layers of Teflon tape wrapping the sample. Results of the model calculations are juxtaposed with experimental data as well as with predictions of an earlier, one dimensional model.

  2. Bayesian evidences for dark energy models in light of current observational data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonappan, Anto. I.; Kumar, Sumit; Ruchika; Dinda, Bikash R.; Sen, Anjan A.

    2018-02-01

    We do a comprehensive study of the Bayesian evidences for a large number of dark energy models using a combination of latest cosmological data from SNIa, CMB, BAO, strong lensing time delay, growth measurements, measurements of Hubble parameter at different redshifts and measurements of angular diameter distance by Megamaser Cosmology Project. We consider a variety of scalar field models with different potentials as well as different parametrizations for the dark energy equation of state. Among 21 models that we consider in our study, we do not find strong evidences in favor of any evolving dark energy model compared to Λ CDM . For the evolving dark energy models, we show that purely nonphantom models have much better evidences compared to those models that allow both phantom and nonphantom behaviors. Canonical scalar field with exponential and tachyon field with square potential have highest evidences among all the models considered in this work. We also show that a combination of low redshift measurements decisively favors an accelerating Λ CDM model compared to a nonaccelerating power law model.

  3. Modeling and verification of the diffraction-limited visible light telescope aboard the solar observing satellite HINODE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsukawa, Y.; Suematsu, Y.; Tsuneta, S.; Ichimoto, K.; Shimizu, T.

    2011-09-01

    HINODE, Japanese for "sunrise", is a spacecraft dedicated for observations of the Sun, and was launched in 2006 to study the Sun's magnetic fields and how their explosive energies propagate through the different atmospheric layers. The spacecraft carries the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), which has a 50 cm diameter clear aperture and provides a continuous series of diffraction-limited visible light images from space. The telescope was developed through international collaboration between Japan and US. In order to achieve the diffraction-limited performance, thermal and structural modeling of the telescope was extensively used in its development phase to predict how the optical performance changes dependent on the thermal condition in orbit. Not only the modeling, we devoted many efforts to verify the optical performance in ground tests before the launch. The verification in the ground tests helped us to find many issues, such as temperature dependent focus shifts, which were not identified only through the thermal-structural modeling. Another critical issue was micro-vibrations induced by internal disturbances of mechanical gyroscopes and momentum wheels for attitude control of the spacecraft. Because the structural modeling was not accurate enough to predict how much the image quality was degraded by the micro-vibrations, we measured their transmission in a spacecraft-level test.

  4. Modeling gamma-ray burst observations by Fermi and MAGIC including attenuation due to diffuse background light

    OpenAIRE

    Gilmore, Rudy C.; Prada, Francisco; Primack, Joel R.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma rays from extragalactic sources are attenuated by pair-production interactions with diffuse photons of the extragalactic background light (EBL). Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are a source of high-redshift photons above 10 GeV, and could be therefore useful as a probe of the evolving UV background radiation. In this paper, we develop a simple phenomenological model for the number and redshift distribution of gamma-ray bursts that can be seen at GeV energies with the Fermi satellite and MAGIC a...

  5. Neural differentiation of transplanted neural stem cells in a rat model of striatal lacunar infarction: light and electron microscopic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñetón-Gómez, Vilma C.; Doncel-Pérez, Ernesto; Fernandez, Ana P.; Serrano, Julia; Pozo-Rodrigálvarez, Andrea; Vellosillo-Huerta, Lara; Taylor, Julian S.; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria P.; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The increased risk and prevalence of lacunar stroke and Parkinson's disease (PD) makes the search for better experimental models an important requirement for translational research. In this study we assess ischemic damage of the nigrostriatal pathway in a model of lacunar stroke evoked by damaging the perforating arteries in the territory of the substantia nigra (SN) of the rat after stereotaxic administration of endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstrictor peptide. We hypothesized that transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) with the capacity of differentiating into diverse cell types such as neurons and glia, but with limited proliferation potential, would constitute an alternative and/or adjuvant therapy for lacunar stroke. These cells showed neuritogenic activity in vitro and a high potential for neural differentiation. Light and electron microscopy immunocytochemistry was used to characterize GFP-positive neurons derived from the transplants. 48 h after ET-1 injection, we characterized an area of selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons within the nigrostriatal pathway characterized with tissue necrosis and glial scar formation, with subsequent behavioral signs of Parkinsonism. Light microscopy showed that grafted cells within the striatal infarction zone differentiated with a high yield into mature glial cells (GFAP-positive) and neuron types present in the normal striatum. Electron microscopy revealed that NSCs-derived neurons integrated into the host circuitry establishing synaptic contacts, mostly of the asymmetric type. Astrocytes were closely associated with normal small-sized blood vessels in the area of infarct, suggesting a possible role in the regulation of the blood brain barrier and angiogenesis. Our results encourage the use of NSCs as a cell-replacement therapy for the treatment of human vascular Parkinsonism. PMID:22876219

  6. Observations and models of emissions of volatile terpenoid compounds from needles of ponderosa pine trees growing in situ: control by light, temperature and stomatal conductance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harley, Peter; Eller, Allyson; Guenther, Alex; Monson, Russell K.

    2014-07-12

    Terpenoid emissions from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa subsp. scopulorum) were measured in Colorado, USA over two growing seasons to evaluate the role of incident light, needle temperature and stomatal conductance in controlling emissions of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) and several monoterpenes. MBO was the dominant daylight terpenoid emission, comprising on average 87% of the total flux, and diurnal variations were largely determined by light and temperature. During daytime, oxygenated monoterpenes (especially linalool) comprised up to 75% of the total monoterpenoid flux from needles. A significant fraction of monoterpenoid emissions was light dependent and 13CO2 labeling studies confirmed de novo production. Thus, modeling of monoterpenoid emissions required a hybrid model in which a significant fraction of emissions was dependent on both light and temperature, while the remainder was dependent on temperature alone. Experiments in which stomata were forced to close using abscisic acid demonstrated that MBO and a large fraction of the monoterpene flux, presumably linalool, could be limited at the scale of seconds to minutes by stomatal conductance. Using a previously published model of terpenoid emissions which explicitly accounts for the physico-chemical properties of emitted compounds, we are able to simulate these observed stomatal effects, whether induced through experimentation or arising under naturally fluctuation conditions of temperature and light. This study shows unequivocally that, under naturally occurring field conditions, de novo light dependent monoterpenes can comprise a large fraction of emissions. Differences between the monoterpene composition of ambient air and needle emissions imply a significant non-needle emission source enriched in Δ-3-carene.

  7. Simultaneous Observations of p-mode Light Walls and Magnetic Reconnection Ejections above Sunspot Light Bridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Yijun; Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Yang, Shuhong; Li, Xiaohong, E-mail: yijunhou@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2017-10-10

    Recent high-resolution observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph reveal bright wall-shaped structures in active regions (ARs), especially above sunspot light bridges. Their most prominent feature is the bright oscillating front in the 1400/1330 Å channel. These structures are named light walls and are often interpreted to be driven by p-mode waves. Above the light bridge of AR 12222 on 2014 December 06, we observed intermittent ejections superimposed on an oscillating light wall in the 1400 Å passband. At the base location of each ejection, the emission enhancement was detected in the Solar Dynamics Observatory 1600 Å channel. Thus, we suggest that in wall bases (light bridges), in addition to the leaked p-mode waves consistently driving the oscillating light wall, magnetic reconnection could happen intermittently at some locations and eject the heated plasma upward. Similarly, in the second event occurring in AR 12371 on 2015 June 16, a jet was simultaneously detected in addition to the light wall with a wave-shaped bright front above the light bridge. At the footpoint of this jet, lasting brightening was observed, implying magnetic reconnection at the base. We propose that in these events, two mechanisms, p-mode waves and magnetic reconnection, simultaneously play roles in the light bridge, and lead to the distinct kinetic features of the light walls and the ejection-like activities, respectively. To illustrate the two mechanisms and their resulting activities above light bridges, in this study we present a cartoon model.

  8. Orbital Signatures from Observed Light Curves of Blazars A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Possible extents of this inner region and a break frequency as an orbital sig- nature are presented in Section 2. We briefly review existing models in Section 3 and present our preliminary results from disk-jet models. Time series analysis of observed light curves (LCs) can detect Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (QPOs), provide.

  9. Thermal-based modeling of coupled carbon, water, and energy fluxes using nominal light use efficiencies constrained by leaf chlorophyll observations

    KAUST Repository

    Schull, M. A.

    2015-03-11

    Recent studies have shown that estimates of leaf chlorophyll content (Chl), defined as the combined mass of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b per unit leaf area, can be useful for constraining estimates of canopy light use efficiency (LUE). Canopy LUE describes the amount of carbon assimilated by a vegetative canopy for a given amount of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (APAR) and is a key parameter for modeling land-surface carbon fluxes. A carbon-enabled version of the remote-sensing-based two-source energy balance (TSEB) model simulates coupled canopy transpiration and carbon assimilation using an analytical sub-model of canopy resistance constrained by inputs of nominal LUE (βn), which is modulated within the model in response to varying conditions in light, humidity, ambient CO2 concentration, and temperature. Soil moisture constraints on water and carbon exchange are conveyed to the TSEB-LUE indirectly through thermal infrared measurements of land-surface temperature. We investigate the capability of using Chl estimates for capturing seasonal trends in the canopy βn from in situ measurements of Chl acquired in irrigated and rain-fed fields of soybean and maize near Mead, Nebraska. The results show that field-measured Chl is nonlinearly related to βn, with variability primarily related to phenological changes during early growth and senescence. Utilizing seasonally varying βn inputs based on an empirical relationship with in situ measured Chl resulted in improvements in carbon flux estimates from the TSEB model, while adjusting the partitioning of total water loss between plant transpiration and soil evaporation. The observed Chl-βn relationship provides a functional mechanism for integrating remotely sensed Chl into the TSEB model, with the potential for improved mapping of coupled carbon, water, and energy fluxes across vegetated landscapes.

  10. IRTS observation of zodiacal light and emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T.; Murakami, H.; Onaka, T.; Ootsubo, T.; Roellig, T. L.; Chan, K. -W.; Noda, M.

    1998-01-01

    We present the infrared spectrum of the zodiacal light and emission obtained by the Near-Infrared Spectrometer (NIRS) and Mid-Infrared Spectrometer (MIRS) onboard the Infrared Telescope in Space (IRTS). The wavelength coverages and spectral resolutions are 1.4-4.0 microns and 0.12 microns for the NIRS, and 4.5-11.7 microns and 0.23-0.36 microns for the MIRS respectively. Both instruments have the same beam size of 8 arcminutes square. The IRTS observations were made for 1995 March 29 - April 26. Here we present the data of two days, April 19 and April 20.

  11. Models of light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, M.; Khanna, F.C.

    1975-01-01

    The general problem of what constitutes a physical model and what is known about the free nucleon-nucleon interaction are considered. A time independent formulation of the basic equations is chosen. Construction of the average field in which particles move in a general independent particle model is developed, concentrating on problems of defining the average spherical single particle field for any given nucleus, and methods for construction of effective residual interactions and other physical operators. Deformed shell models and both spherical and deformed harmonic oscillator models are discussed in detail, and connections between spherical and deformed shell models are analyzed. A section on cluster models is included. 11 tables, 21 figures

  12. Geomagnetic Observations and Models

    CERN Document Server

    Mandea, Mioara

    2011-01-01

    This volume provides comprehensive and authoritative coverage of all the main areas linked to geomagnetic field observation, from instrumentation to methodology, on ground or near-Earth. Efforts are also focused on a 21st century e-Science approach to open access to all geomagnetic data, but also to the data preservation, data discovery, data rescue, and capacity building. Finally, modeling magnetic fields with different internal origins, with their variation in space and time, is an attempt to draw together into one place the traditional work in producing models as IGRF or describing the magn

  13. Some curious phenomena when observing strobe-lights.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Visual perception is suppressed during saccadic eye movements. Intense light flashes may still be observed but are difficult to localize. Two possible causes are suggested on the basis of observations made with police patrol- car strobe lights. See also B 24963 T.

  14. The model of a flat (Euclidean) expansive homogeneous and isotropic relativistic universe in the light of the general relativity, quantum mechanics, and observations

    OpenAIRE

    Skalsky, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Assuming that the relativistic universe is homogeneous and isotropic, we can unambiguously determine its model and physical properties, which correspond with the Einstein general theory of relativity (and with its two special partial solutions: Einstein special theory of relativity and Newton gravitation theory), quantum mechanics, and observations, too.

  15. MulensModel: Microlensing light curves modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleski, Radoslaw; Yee, Jennifer

    2018-03-01

    MulensModel calculates light curves of microlensing events. Both single and binary lens events are modeled and various higher-order effects can be included: extended source (with limb-darkening), annual microlensing parallax, and satellite microlensing parallax. The code is object-oriented and written in Python3, and requires AstroPy (ascl:1304.002).

  16. Interpretation of photometric observations of R Coronae Borealis. Light curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugach, A.F.

    1990-01-01

    The calculations confirm the 'reptive hypothesis' of light variations of R CrB. The central point of the hypothesis is an assertion of infinite expansion of an elementary dust cloud. The calculations for different masses of the dust cloud provide a set of elementary light curves. Superposition of the curves yields a complex light curve. The comparison with the observed minima of 1972 has been performed

  17. Global Night-Time Lights for Observing Human Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipskind, Stephen R.; Elvidge, Chris; Gurney, K.; Imhoff, Mark; Bounoua, Lahouari; Sheffner, Edwin; Nemani, Ramakrishna R.; Pettit, Donald R.; Fischer, Marc

    2011-01-01

    We present a concept for a small satellite mission to make systematic, global observations of night-time lights with spatial resolution suitable for discerning the extent, type and density of human settlements. The observations will also allow better understanding of fine scale fossil fuel CO2 emission distribution. The NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey recommends more focus on direct observations of human influence on the Earth system. The most dramatic and compelling observations of human presence on the Earth are the night light observations taken by the Defence Meteorological System Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS). Beyond delineating the footprint of human presence, night light data, when assembled and evaluated with complementary data sets, can determine the fine scale spatial distribution of global fossil fuel CO2 emissions. Understanding fossil fuel carbon emissions is critical to understanding the entire carbon cycle, and especially the carbon exchange between terrestrial and oceanic systems.

  18. Supersymmetric models with light higgsinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruemmer, F.

    2012-05-01

    In the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, the higgsinos can have masses around the electroweak scale, while the other supersymmetric particles have TeV-scale masses. This happens in models of gauge-mediated SUSY breaking with a high messenger scale, which are motivated from string theory. For particular choices of the messenger eld content, multi-TeV squark and gluino masses naturally lead to a much lower electroweak scale, somewhat similar to focus point supersymmetry. They also induce Higgs masses of 124-126 GeV, while making the discovery of supersymmetry at the LHC unlikely. The light higgsinos will be di cult to see at the LHC but may eventually be discovered at a linear collider.

  19. RADIAL VELOCITY OBSERVATIONS AND LIGHT CURVE NOISE MODELING CONFIRM THAT KEPLER-91b IS A GIANT PLANET ORBITING A GIANT STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barclay, Thomas; Huber, Daniel; Rowe, Jason F.; Quintana, Elisa V. [NASA Ames Research Center, M/S 244-30, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J. [McDonald Observatory, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Foreman-Mackey, Daniel [New York University, Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2015-02-10

    Kepler-91b is a rare example of a transiting hot Jupiter around a red giant star, providing the possibility to study the formation and composition of hot Jupiters under different conditions compared to main-sequence stars. However, the planetary nature of Kepler-91b, which was confirmed using phase-curve variations by Lillo-Box et al., was recently called into question based on a re-analysis of Kepler data. We have obtained ground-based radial velocity observations from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and unambiguously confirm the planetary nature of Kepler-91b by simultaneously modeling the Kepler and radial velocity data. The star exhibits temporally correlated noise due to stellar granulation which we model as a Gaussian Process. We hypothesize that it is this noise component that led previous studies to suspect Kepler-91b to be a false positive. Our work confirms the conclusions presented by Lillo-Box et al. that Kepler-91b is a 0.73 ± 0.13 M {sub Jup} planet orbiting a red giant star.

  20. Contrasting trends in light pollution across Europe based on satellite observed night time lights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennie, Jonathan; Davies, Thomas W; Duffy, James P; Inger, Richard; Gaston, Kevin J

    2014-01-21

    Since the 1970s nighttime satellite images of the Earth from space have provided a striking illustration of the extent of artificial light. Meanwhile, growing awareness of adverse impacts of artificial light at night on scientific astronomy, human health, ecological processes and aesthetic enjoyment of the night sky has led to recognition of light pollution as a significant global environmental issue. Links between economic activity, population growth and artificial light are well documented in rapidly developing regions. Applying a novel method to analysis of satellite images of European nighttime lights over 15 years, we show that while the continental trend is towards increasing brightness, some economically developed regions show more complex patterns with large areas decreasing in observed brightness over this period. This highlights that opportunities exist to constrain and even reduce the environmental impact of artificial light pollution while delivering cost and energy-saving benefits.

  1. The GO Cygni system: photoelectric observations and light curves analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovithis, P.; Rovithis-Livaniou, H.; Niarchos, P.G.

    1990-01-01

    Photoelectric observations, in B and V, of the system GO Cygni obtained during 1985 at the Kryonerion Astronomical Station of the National Observatory of Greece are given. The corresponding light curves (typical β Lyrae) are analysed using Frequency Domain techniques. New photoelectric and absolute elements for the system are given, and its period was found to continue its increasing

  2. Photometric Observation and Light Curve Analysis of Binary System ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Photometric observations of the over-contact binary ER ORI were performed during November 2007 and February to April 2008 with the 51cm telescope of Biruni Observatory of Shiraz University in U, B and V filters (Johnson system) and an RCA 4509 photomultiplier. We used these data to obtain the light curves ...

  3. Orbital Signatures from Observed Light Curves of Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Variability in active galactic nuclei is observed in UV to X-ray emission based light curves. This could be attributed to orbital signatures of the plasma that constitutes the accretion flow on the putative disk or in the developing jet close to the inner region of the central black hole. We discuss some theoretical ...

  4. Can an observer really catch up with light?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Guihua; Zheng, Zhao

    2003-01-01

    Given a null geodesic γ 0 (λ) with a point r in (p, q) conjugate to p along γ 0 (λ), up to the second variation, there will be a variation of γ 0 (λ) which will give a timelike curve from p to q. This is the well-known theory proved in the famous book (Hawking S W and Ellis G F R 1973 The Large Scale Structure of Space-Time (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)). In this paper, we prove that the timelike curves coming from the above-mentioned second variation have a proper acceleration approaching infinity as the timelike curves approach the null geodesic. This means no observer infinitesimally near the light can begin at the same point with it and finally catch up with it. Only when separated from the light path finitely, can the observer begin at the same point with it and really catch up with it

  5. Observations involving broadband impedance modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, J.S.

    1995-08-01

    Results for single- and multi-bunch instabilities can be significantly affected by the precise model that is used for the broadband impendance. This paper discusses three aspects of broadband impendance modeling. The first is an observation of the effect that a seemingly minor change in an impedance model has on the single-bunch mode coupling threshold. The second is a successful attempt to construct a model for the high-frequency tails of an r.f cavity. The last is a discussion of requirements for the mathematical form of an impendance which follow from the general properties of impendances

  6. Observations involving broadband impedance modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, J.S. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Results for single- and multi-bunch instabilities can be significantly affected by the precise model that is used for the broadband impedance. This paper discusses three aspects of broadband impedance modelling. The first is an observation of the effect that a seemingly minor change in an impedance model has on the single-bunch mode coupling threshold. The second is a successful attempt to construct a model for the high-frequency tails of an r.f. cavity. The last is a discussion of requirements for the mathematical form of an impedance which follow from the general properties of impedances. (author)

  7. White-light and radio sounding observations of coronal transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, M. K.; Volland, H.; Howard, R. A.; Koomen, M. J.; Michels, D. J.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Amstrong, J. W.; Seidel, B. L.; Stelzried, C. T.; Woo, R.

    1985-01-01

    A concerted search for coronal transients was conducted with the 'Solwind' coronagraph during the solar occultations of the two Helios spacecraft in October/November 1979. The polarization angle and bandwidth of the linearly polarized S-band downlink signal were monitored at the three 64-m tracking stations of the NASA Deep Space Network to determine coronal Faraday rotation and spectral broadening. A one-to-one correspondence could be established between abrupt disturbances in the two signal parameters and the passage of a white-light transient through the signal ray path from spacecraft to earth. The white-light morphology and the additional information provided by the radio sounding coverage are presented for each of the five distinct events recorded. Although no specific example could be observed in sufficient detail in both white light and Faraday rotation to derive the small-scale magnetic structure, some qualitative descriptions of the orientation and rough estimates of the magnitude of the transient magnetic field could be made.

  8. Study of galactic light, extragalactic light, and galactic structure using pioneer 10 observations of background starlight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toller, G.N.

    1981-01-01

    An observational and theoretical study of the diffuse astronomical background sky brightness (background starlight) is carried out. The brightness is determined over 95% of the sky using Pioneer 10 photometric measurements in sky regions where the zodiacal light is negligible (heliocentric distances approx. greater than or equal to 3. A.U.). Brightness levels are presented at blue (3950 to 4850 A) and red (5900 to 6800 A) wavelengths. The B-R color index distribution is established over the celestial sphere. Pioneer 10 results are compared with previous star count and ground based photometric studies to separate background starlight into its constituent parts: integrated starlight, diffuse galactic light (DGL), and cosmic light. Significant errors are found in published star count results at low galactic latitudes. The galactic latitude (b'') and longitude (1'') dependences of integrated starlight and the variation of DGL with b'' are determined. An upper limit of 3.9 S 10 (V)/sub G2V/ at the 90% confidence level is deduced for the cosmic light brightness at blue wavelengths near the galactic poles. The integrated light from discrete galaxies adequately explains this component of the background starlight

  9. Observational modeling of topological spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molaei, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a model for a multi-dimensional observer by using of the fuzzy theory is presented. Relative form of Tychonoff theorem is proved. The notion of topological entropy is extended. The persistence of relative topological entropy under relative conjugate relation is proved.

  10. Modeling of light scattering by icy bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolokolova, L.; Mackowski, D.; Pitman, K.; Verbiscer, A.; Buratti, B.; Momary, T.

    2014-07-01

    As a result of ground-based, space-based, and in-situ spacecraft mission observations, a great amount of photometric, polarimetric, and spectroscopic data of icy bodies (satellites of giant planets, Kuiper Belt objects, comet nuclei, and icy particles in cometary comae and rings) has been accumulated. These data have revealed fascinating light-scattering phenomena, such as the opposition surge resulting from coherent backscattering and shadow hiding and the negative polarization associated with them. Near-infrared (NIR) spectra of these bodies are especially informative as the depth, width, and shape of the absorption bands of ice are sensitive not only to the ice abundance but also to the size of icy grains. Numerous NIR spectra obtained by Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) have been used to map the microcharacteristics of the icy satellites [1] and rings of Saturn [2]. VIMS data have also permitted a study of the opposition surge for icy satellites of Saturn [3], showing that coherent backscattering affects not only brightness and polarization of icy bodies but also their spectra [4]. To study all of the light-scattering phenomena that affect the photopolarimetric and spectroscopic characteristics of icy bodies, including coherent backscattering, requires computer modeling that rigorously considers light scattering by a large number of densely packed small particles that form either layers (in the case of regolith) or big clusters (ring and comet particles) . Such opportunity has appeared recently with a development of a new version MSTM4 of the Multi-Sphere T-Matrix code [5]. Simulations of reflectance and absorbance spectra of a ''target'' (particle layer or cluster) require that the dimensions of the target be significantly larger than the wavelength, sphere radius, and layer thickness. For wavelength-sized spheres and packing fractions typical of regolith, targets can contain dozens of thousands of spheres that, with the original MSTM

  11. Planetary systems in polarized light: Debris disk observations and instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell A.

    Understanding planet formation is one of the major challenges of modern astronomy. Polarimetry is a powerful tool with which we can confront this challenge. In particular, polarimetric observations can be useful for imaging debris disks and characterizing exoplanet atmospheres. With that in mind, this thesis has been constructed with two main aspects: i) observational studies of two debris disk systems, beta Pic and HD 157587, using the Gemini Planet Imager and ii) the characterization and testing of a new type of diffraction grating, called a polarization grating, that we plan to use for future observations of exoplanet atmospheres. The Gemini Planet Imager is a high-contrast imager that includes a polarimetry mode designed to image circumstellar disks. Here we detail the development of new data analysis techniques that reduce systematics and noise in processed GPI data. We apply these techniques to observations of the beta Pic and HD 157587 debris disks and then fit each disk image to a geometric disk model. The beta Pic disk model's morphology cannot be explained by interactions with the planet beta Pic b, and the presence of a second planet could be invoked to explain the discrepancy. In the case of HD 157587, the disk model's geometric centre is offset from the location of the star, which could be explained by a perturbing planet. Characterization of the planets' interactions with their debris disks is a critical method to gain more information about these two systems. The second component of this thesis focuses on polarization gratings, thin film optical devices that can simultaneously act as polarizing beam splitters and as spectral dispersive elements. Moreover, they can be designed for high diffraction efficiency across a broad wavelength range. These features make polarization gratings useful for many types of astronomical observations. We have carried out laboratory and on-sky test observations using a polarization grating optimized for visible

  12. Studying aerosol light scattering based on aspect ratio distribution observed by fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Zheng, Xu; Li, Zhengqiang; Li, Zhanhua; Dubovik, Oleg; Chen, Xingfeng; Wendisch, Manfred

    2017-08-07

    Particle shape is crucial to the properties of light scattered by atmospheric aerosol particles. A method of fluorescence microscopy direct observation was introduced to determine the aspect ratio distribution of aerosol particles. The result is comparable with that of the electron microscopic analysis. The measured aspect ratio distribution has been successfully applied in modeling light scattering and further in simulation of polarization measurements of the sun/sky radiometer. These efforts are expected to improve shape retrieval from skylight polarization by using directly measured aspect ratio distribution.

  13. Observation of spatial quantum correlations induced by multiple scattering of nonclassical light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolka, Stephan; Huck, Alexander; Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2009-01-01

    and negative spatial quantum correlations are observed when varying the quantum state incident to the multiple scattering medium, and the strength of the correlations is controlled by the number of photons. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with recent theoretical proposals by implementing......We present the experimental realization of spatial quantum correlations of photons that are induced by multiple scattering of squeezed light. The quantum correlation relates photons propagating along two different light paths through the random medium and is infinite in range. Both positive...... the full quantum model of multiple scattering....

  14. Observation and modelling of urban dew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Katrina

    Despite its relevance to many aspects of urban climate and to several practical questions, urban dew has largely been ignored. Here, simple observations an out-of-doors scale model, and numerical simulation are used to investigate patterns of dewfall and surface moisture (dew + guttation) in urban environments. Observations and modelling were undertaken in Vancouver, B.C., primarily during the summers of 1993 and 1996. Surveys at several scales (0.02-25 km) show that the main controls on dew are weather, location and site configuration (geometry and surface materials). Weather effects are discussed using an empirical factor, FW . Maximum dew accumulation (up to ~ 0.2 mm per night) is seen on nights with moist air and high FW , i.e., cloudless conditions with light winds. Favoured sites are those with high Ysky and surfaces which cool rapidly after sunset, e.g., grass and well insulated roofs. A 1/8-scale model is designed, constructed, and run at an out-of-doors site to study dew patterns in an urban residential landscape which consists of house lots, a street and an open grassed park. The Internal Thermal Mass (ITM) approach is used to scale the thermal inertia of buildings. The model is validated using data from full-scale sites in Vancouver. Patterns in the model agree with those seen at the full-scale, i.e., dew distribution is governed by weather, site geometry and substrate conditions. Correlation is shown between Ysky and surface moisture accumulation. The feasibility of using a numerical model to simulate urban dew is investigated using a modified version of a rural dew model. Results for simple isolated surfaces-a deciduous tree leaf and an asphalt shingle roof-show promise, especially for built surfaces.

  15. SHOCK BREAKOUT AND EARLY LIGHT CURVES OF TYPE II-P SUPERNOVAE OBSERVED WITH KEPLER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnavich, P. M.; Tucker, B. E.; Rest, A.; Shaya, E. J.; Olling, R. P.; Kasen, D; Villar, A.

    2016-01-01

    We discovered two transient events in the Kepler field with light curves that strongly suggest they are type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P). Using the fast cadence of the Kepler observations we precisely estimate the rise time to maximum for KSN2011a and KSN2011d as 10.5 ± 0.4 and 13.3 ± 0.4 rest-frame days, respectively. Based on fits to idealized analytic models, we find the progenitor radius of KSN2011a (280 ± 20 R ⊙ ) to be significantly smaller than that for KSN2011d (490 ± 20 R ⊙ ), but both have similar explosion energies of 2.0 ± 0.3 × 10 51 erg. The rising light curve of KSN2011d is an excellent match to that predicted by simple models of exploding red supergiants (RSG). However, the early rise of KSN2011a is faster than the models predict, possibly due to the supernova shock wave moving into pre-existing wind or mass-loss from the RSG. A mass-loss rate of 10 −4 M ⊙ yr −1 from the RSG can explain the fast rise without impacting the optical flux at maximum light or the shape of the post-maximum light curve. No shock breakout emission is seen in KSN2011a, but this is likely due to the circumstellar interaction suspected in the fast rising light curve. The early light curve of KSN2011d does show excess emission consistent with model predictions of a shock breakout. This is the first optical detection of a shock breakout from a SNe II-P

  16. Photometric Observation and Light Curve Analysis of Binary System ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Using the Wilson's computer code with the help of an auxiliary computer program to improve the optimizations, the light curve analyses were carried out to find out the ... This means that each accepted article is being published immediately online with DOI and article citation ID with starting page number 1.

  17. Colour dependence of zodiacal light models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, R. H.; Hanner, M. S.; Leinert, C.

    1973-01-01

    Colour models of the zodiacal light in the ecliptic have been calculated for both dielectric and metallic particles in the sub-micron and micron size range. Two colour ratios were computed, a blue ratio and a red ratio. The models with a size distribution proportional to s to the -2.5 power ds (where s is the particle radius) generally show a colour close to the solar colour and almost independent of elongation. Especially in the blue colour ratio there is generally no significant dependence on the lower cutoff size (0.1-1 micron). The main feature of absorbing particles is a reddening at small elongations. The models for size distributions proportional to s to the -4 power ds show larger departures from solar colour and more variation with model parameters. Colour measurements, including red and near infra-red, therefore are useful to distinguish between flat and steep size spectra and to verify the presence of slightly absorbing particles.

  18. Afterglow Observations Shed New Light on the Nature of X-ray Flashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granot, J

    2005-02-17

    X-ray flashes (XRFs) and X-ray rich gamma-ray bursts (XRGRBs) share many observational characteristics with long duration ({approx}> 2 s) GRBs, but the reason for which the spectral energy distribution of their prompt emission peaks at lower photon energies, E{sub p}, is still a subject of debate. Although many different models have been invoked in order to explain the lower values of E{sub p}, their implications for the afterglow emission were not considered in most cases, mainly because observations of XRF afterglows have become available only recently. Here we examine the predictions of the various XRF models for the afterglow emission, and test them against the observations of XRF 030723 and XRGRB 041006, the events with the best monitored afterglow light curves in their respective class. We show that most existing XRF models are hard to reconcile with the observed afterglow light curves, which are very flat at early times. Such light curves are, however, naturally produced by a roughly uniform jet with relatively sharp edges that is viewed off-axis (i.e. from outside of the jet aperture). This type of model self consistently accommodates both the observed prompt emission and the afterglow light curves of XRGRB 041006 and XRF 030723, implying viewing angles {theta}{sub obs} from the jet axis of ({theta}{sub obs}-{theta}{sub 0}) {approx} 0.15 {theta}{sub 0} and ({theta}{sub obs}-{theta}{sub 0}) {approx} {theta}{sub 0}, respectively, where {theta}{sub 0} {approx} 3{sup o} is the half-opening angle of the jet. This suggests that GRBs, XRGRBs and XRFs are intrinsically similar relativistic jets viewed from different angles. It is then natural to identify GRBs with {gamma}({theta}{sub obs} - {theta}{sub 0}) {approx}< 1, XRGRBs with 1 {approx}< ({theta}{sub obs} - {theta}{sub 0}) {approx}< a few, and XRFs with {gamma}({theta}{sub obs} - {theta}{sub 0}) {approx}> a few, where {gamma} is the Lorentz factor of the outflow near the edge of the jet from which most of the

  19. 30 parameter version of the MSSM in light of the Bs→μ+μ- observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbdusSalam, S. S.; Velasco-Sevilla, L.

    2018-03-01

    The R-parity conserving minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) in light of the decay Bs→μ+μ- with near-standard model branching ratio is an interesting platform for studying the complementarity between direct and indirect searches for beyond the standard model physics. Based on this, we have analysed the possible impact of the Bs→μ+μ- observation on the posterior sample from the global fit of a 30-parameter MSSM (MSSM-30), and the related Wilson coefficients. The MSSM-30 is a systematically constructed, symmetry-guided, MSSM parameterisation, as opposed to the traditional frames (e.g., pMSSM) with crude treatment of flavor violation parameters. This paper illustrates why phenomenological frames like the MSSM-30 should be preferred to study flavor physics. For the current and future B-physics experimental precision, such a consideration is crucial for suitably assessing supersymmetric contributions to flavor observables.

  20. First light and beyond making a success of astronomical observing

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, D A

    2015-01-01

    Amateur astronomers who have been disappointed by the results of an observing session can still gain useful experience in a seemingly “failed” night at the telescope. In a world with imperfect seeing conditions, incredible observing sessions are often mixed with less inspiring ones, discouraging the amateur observer. This book is designed to help novice observers take something worthwhile away each and every time they go out under the night sky, regardless of what was originally planned. Almost every observer remembers his first sight of Ringed Saturn, hanging majestically in the blackness of space. Practitioners agree that visual observing is special. Real-time observations at the eyepiece can provide fleeting yet intense feelings that connect us with the universe. But when expectations aren’t met at the eyepiece, there are other ways to profit from the practice of astronomy. These rewards, though less showy, are well worth cultivating. This book will help you see what constitutes a “successful” vi...

  1. Observations of collective effects at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, J.M.; Barry, W.; Corlett, J.N.; Fox, J.; Teytelman, D.

    1995-10-01

    We present a summary of measurements of single beam collective effects in the Advanced Light Source (ALS). We describe measurements of coupled-bunch instabilities, including some recent results using the newly commissioned feedback systems and the results of an initial search for the fast ion instability. Single bunch effects include bunch lengthening, energy spread increase, HOM loss measurements, head-tail damping rates, current dependent tune shifts, and transverse mode coupling instability threshold. The longitudinal measurements are consistent with a broadband impedance |Ζ parallel /η| eff = 0.22±0.07 Ω and transverse measurements indicate broadband impedances of Ζ y,eff = 155 kΩ/m and Z x,eff = 58 kΩ/m

  2. Age determinations and Earth-based multispectral observations of lunar light plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, U.; Jaumann, R.; Neukum, G.

    1993-01-01

    The history of light plains still remains doubtful, but there are good arguments - mainly obtained by age determinations and supported by multispectral observations - for an endogenic (magmatic) instead of an (exclusively) impact related origin. Light plains are characterized by smooth areas with an albedo lower than the surrounding highlands (12 - 13 percent), but significantly higher than maria (5 - 6 percent). Before Apollo 16 a volcanic source has been supposed, but analysis of returned samples (highly brecciated and metamorphosed rocks) favored an impact ejecta related origin. Among the currently discussed models are formation by ejecta sedimentation from multi-ringed basins, formation by secondary and tertiary cratering action of ballistically ejected material during the formation of multi-ringed basins, in situ formation by impact melt of large events, and premare (crypto-) volcanism basalts covered by a thin ejecta cover; younger impacts penetrated the ejecta surface to create the dark haloed craters. To find arguments in favor or against these ideas the chronology of light plains is of major importance. Obviously a genetic relationship between the evolution of light plains and the basin forming impacts can be possible only if the events of emplacement features happened simultaneously.

  3. Educational complex of light-colored modeling of urban environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpenko Vladimir E.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms, methodological tools and structure of a training complex of light-colored modeling of the urban environment are developed in this paper. The following results of the practical work of students are presented: light composition and installation, media facades, lighting of building facades, city streets and embankment. As a result of modeling, the structure of the light form is determined. Light-transmitting materials and causing characteristic optical illusions, light-visual and light-dynamic effects (video-dynamics and photostatics, basic compositional techniques of light form are revealed. The main elements of the light installation are studied, including a light projection, an electronic device, interactivity and relationality of the installation, and the mechanical device which becomes a part of the installation composition. The meaning of modern media facade technology is the transformation of external building structures and their facades into a changing information cover, into a media content translator using LED technology. Light tectonics and the light rhythm of the plastics of the architectural object are built up through point and local illumination, modeling of the urban ensemble assumes the structural interaction of several light building models with special light-composition techniques. When modeling the social and pedestrian environment, the lighting parameters depend on the scale of the chosen space and are adapted taking into account the visual perception of the pedestrian, and the atmospheric effects of comfort and safety of the environment are achieved with the help of special light compositional techniques. With the aim of realizing the tasks of light modeling, a methodology has been created, including the mechanisms of models, variability and complementarity. The perspectives of light modeling in the context of structural elements of the city, neuropsychology, wireless and bioluminescence technologies are proposed

  4. Light microscope observations on the epididymis of paca (Agouti paca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimming, Bruno Cesar; Machado, Márcia Rita Fernandes; Simões, Karina; da Cruz, Claudinei; Domeniconi, Raquel Fantin

    2013-01-01

    The features of paca epididymis, based on its appearance in light microscope, is described in this paper. The cellular population of the epithelial lining comprises principal cells, basal cells, apical cells, narrows cells, and hallo cells. The epididymis is divided in five distinct and continuous regions, Zone I, or initial segment, and zone II, are both localized into the head. Zone III comprises the distal head and all the body. Zones IV and V are restricted to the tail, in the proximal and distal cauda epididymis respectively. Each zone can be readily distinguished on the basis of morphological characteristics. The height of epididymal epithelium is greater in zone I. There is a progressive increase in the diameter of the tubular lumen through the different areas, with the maximum in the zone V. The presence of a high epithelium, and the virtual absence of sperm in zone I suggest fast transit of spermatozoa in this region. Zone V comprises the distal tail, has smaller epithelial lining, greater luminal diameter, shorter stereocilia than the other zones, and contains spermatozoa packed inside the lumen, that characterizes this zone as a place of sperm storage. The findings are compared with other reports in rodents and other domestic animals, to contribute to the understanding of epididymal morphophysiology.

  5. Orbital Signatures from Observed Light Curves of Blazars A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Sarjapur Road, 2nd Block, Koramangala,. Bangalore 560 034, India. ∗ .... sonable match to observations: a high frequency power-law region, a low frequency flattening possibly due to ..... The search strategy is applied to a XMM Newton X-ray LC from S5 0716 +714. (Obs. id. 0502271401) of ...

  6. Light microscope observation of circulating human lymphocytes cultured in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naila Francis Paulo de Oliveira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to study the isolation and a light microscopy technique for cultured lymphocytes. Blood samples were obtained by venipuncture with an anticoagulant added and centrifuged in a Percoll density gradient to separate the leukocytes. Lymphocytes were placed in 25 cm ³ tissue culture flasks at 37ºC. After culturing, they were fixed and stained with the methods used for blood smears. Results showed that not all fixing solutions and stains were an equally good choice for cultured lymphocytes.Os linfócitos são células importantes do sistema imune e têm sido largamente utilizados em estudos morfológicos. Entretanto, a literatura sobre técnicas de preparação dessas células é escassa e antiga, especialmente para linfócitos cultivados in vitro. Portanto, o objetivo desse estudo foi relatar com detalhes as técnicas de isolamento e microscopia de luz de linfócitos mantidos em cultura. Amostras de sangue foram obtidas por punção venosa e centrifugadas em gradiente de densidade de Percoll, para separar os leucócitos. Os linfócitos foram mantidos em frascos de cultura de 25 cm³ a 37ºC. Após a cultura, as células foram fixadas e coradas de acordo com a metodologia utilizada para esfregaços sanguíneos. Nossos resultados mostraram que nem todos os fixadores e corantes utilizados para esfregaços sanguíneos são uma boa escolha para linfócitos cultivados in vitro.

  7. Early light curves for Type Ia supernova explosion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noebauer, U. M.; Kromer, M.; Taubenberger, S.; Baklanov, P.; Blinnikov, S.; Sorokina, E.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2017-12-01

    Upcoming high-cadence transient survey programmes will produce a wealth of observational data for Type Ia supernovae. These data sets will contain numerous events detected very early in their evolution, shortly after explosion. Here, we present synthetic light curves, calculated with the radiation hydrodynamical approach STELLA for a number of different explosion models, specifically focusing on these first few days after explosion. We show that overall the early light curve evolution is similar for most of the investigated models. Characteristic imprints are induced by radioactive material located close to the surface. However, these are very similar to the signatures expected from ejecta-CSM or ejecta-companion interaction. Apart from the pure deflagration explosion models, none of our synthetic light curves exhibit the commonly assumed power-law rise. We demonstrate that this can lead to substantial errors in the determination of the time of explosion. In summary, we illustrate with our calculations that even with very early data an identification of specific explosion scenarios is challenging, if only photometric observations are available.

  8. Galactic light isotopes: significance of the present observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.-P.

    1975-01-01

    All the existing observations which did resolve low energy deuterons and He 3 's appear to form a self-consistent set with a hysteresis type of variation over the solar cycle of the ratio PHI(d)/PHI(He 4 *), where PHI(He 4 *) is the He 4 flux corrected for the ''anomalous'' low energy component. This hysteresis can be understood if one accepts an interplanetary deceleration which is weak during the rising phase, and strong during the recovery phase of the solar cycle, and a continued increase of the escape length from the galaxy below a few GeV/n [fr

  9. Automated and observer based light field indicator edge evaluation in diagnostic X-ray equipment

    OpenAIRE

    Bottaro, Márcio; Nagy, Balázs Vince; Soares, Fernanda Cristina Salvador; Rosendo, Danilo Cabral

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction To analyze edge detection and optical contrast calculation of light field-indicators used in X-ray via automated- and observer-based methods, and comparison with current standard approaches, which do not give exact definition for light field edge determination. Methods Automated light sensor array was used to measure the penumbra zone of the edge in the standard X-ray equipment, while trained and naïve human observers were asked to mark the light field edge according t...

  10. EXTRASOLAR STORMS: PRESSURE-DEPENDENT CHANGES IN LIGHT-CURVE PHASE IN BROWN DWARFS FROM SIMULTANEOUS HST AND SPITZER OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hao; Apai, Dániel; Karalidi, Theodora [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Marley, Mark S. [NASA Ames Research Center, Naval Air Station, Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA 94035 (United States); Flateau, Davin [Department of Planetary Sciences, 1629 E. University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Showman, Adam P. [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, 1629 University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Metchev, Stanimir [The University of Western Ontario, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Centre for Planetary Science and Exploration, 1151 Richmond St., London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Buenzli, Esther [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zürich Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 27, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Radigan, Jacqueline [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Artigau, Étienne [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Lowrance, Patrick J. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Burgasser, Adam J., E-mail: haoyang@email.arizona.edu, E-mail: apai@arizona.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2016-07-20

    We present Spitzer /Infrared Array Camera Ch1 and Ch2 monitoring of six brown dwarfs during eight different epochs over the course of 20 months. For four brown dwarfs, we also obtained simulataneous Hubble Space Telescope ( HST )/WFC3 G141 grism spectra during two epochs and derived light curves in five narrowband filters. Probing different pressure levels in the atmospheres, the multiwavelength light curves of our six targets all exhibit variations, and the shape of the light curves evolves over the timescale of a rotation period, ranging from 1.4 to 13 hr. We compare the shapes of the light curves and estimate the phase shifts between the light curves observed at different wavelengths by comparing the phase of the primary Fourier components. We use state-of-the-art atmosphere models to determine the flux contribution of different pressure layers to the observed flux in each filter. We find that the light curves that probe higher pressures are similar and in phase, but are offset and often different from the light curves that probe lower pressures. The phase differences between the two groups of light curves suggest that the modulations seen at lower and higher pressures may be introduced by different cloud layers.

  11. General Model for Light Curves of Chromospherically Active Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetsu, L.; Henry, G. W.; Lehtinen, J.

    2017-04-01

    The starspots on the surface of many chromospherically active binary stars concentrate on long-lived active longitudes separated by 180°. Shifts in activity between these two longitudes, the “flip-flop” events, have been observed in single stars like FK Comae and binary stars like σ Geminorum. Recently, interferometry has revealed that ellipticity may at least partly explain the flip-flop events in σ Geminorum. This idea was supported by the double-peaked shape of the long-term mean light curve of this star. Here we show that the long-term mean light curves of 14 chromospherically active binaries follow a general model that explains the connection between orbital motion, changes in starspot distribution, ellipticity, and flip-flop events. Surface differential rotation is probably weak in these stars, because the interference of two constant period waves may explain the observed light curve changes. These two constant periods are the active longitude period ({P}{act}) and the orbital period ({P}{orb}). We also show how to apply the same model to single stars, where only the value of P act is known. Finally, we present a tentative interference hypothesis about the origin of magnetic fields in all spectral types of stars. The CPS results are available electronically at the Vizier database.

  12. Light Curve Observations of Upper Stages in the Low Earth Orbit Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, J.-C.; Lederer, S.; Cowardin, H.; Mulrooney, M.; Read, J.; Chun, F.; Dearborn, M.; Tippets, R.

    2012-01-01

    Active debris removal (ADR) is a potential means to remediate the orbital debris environment in low Earth orbit (LEO). Massive intact objects, including spent upper stages and retired payloads, with high collision probabilities have been suggested as potential targets for ADR. The challenges to remove such objects on a routine basis are truly monumental. A key piece of information needed for any ADR operations is the tumble motion of the targets. Rapid tumble motion (in excess of one degree per second) of a multiple-ton intact object could be a major problem for proximity and docking operations. Therefore, there is a need to characterize the general tumble motion of the potential ADR targets for future ADR planning. The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has initiated an effort to identify the global tumble behavior of potential ADR targets in LEO. The activities include optical light curve observations, imaging radar data collection, and laboratory light curve simulations and modeling. This paper provides a preliminary summary of light curve data of more than 100 upper stages collected by two telescope facilities in Colorado and New Mexico between 2011 and 2012. Analyses of the data and implications for the tumble motions of the objects are also discussed in the paper.

  13. Investigating surface and subsurface physical properties of small bodies from light scattering observations and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Hadamcik, E.; Lasue, J.; Renard, J. B.

    Investigating surface and subsurface physical properties of small bodies from light scattering observations and simulations A.C. Levasseur-Regourd (1), E. Hadamcik (1), J. Lasue (1), J.B. Renard (2) (1) Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris6, UMR 7620, Aéronomie, BP-3, Verrières, 91371 France, (2) LPCE-CNRS, 3A av. Recherche Scientifique, Orléans, F-45071 France Investigating surface and subsurface physical properties of asteroids and comet nuclei is of major interest to i) assess future space missions and ii) constrain formation and evolution models. Our purpose is to infer such properties from the properties of solar light scattered by such media. We will first summarize recent remote polarimetric observations of small bodies, which confirm the main characteristics of the variation of the linear polarization of solar scattered light in the visible domain with the scattering geometry and the wavelength (1). To interpret such characteristics in terms of physical properties of the regoliths (e.g. albedo, size distribution, complex refractive index, porosity), experimental and numerical simulations on various types of particles and aggregates are mandatory, together with some comparisons between experimental and numerical simulations (2,3). We will thus present recent results of such simulations (for dust around bright comets, for core-mantle particles, for loose deposited transparent and dark materials), and point out the trends already suggested by this approach. Finally, we will mention future key observations and elaborate simulations, which could solve open questions about surface and subsurface properties of small bodies. References 1. Levasseur-Regourd et al., ASR 37, 161, 2006. 2. Hadamcik et al., JQSRT 100, 143, 2006. 3. Lasue et al., JQSRT 100, 220, 2006.

  14. Two-singlet model for light cold dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abada, Abdessamad; Ghaffor, Djamal; Nasri, Salah

    2011-01-01

    We extend the standard model by adding two gauge-singlet Z 2 -symmetric scalar fields that interact with visible matter only through the Higgs particle. One is a stable dark matter WIMP, and the other one undergoes a spontaneous breaking of the symmetry that opens new channels for the dark matter annihilation, hence lowering the mass of the WIMP. We study the effects of the observed dark matter relic abundance on the WIMP annihilation cross section and find that in most regions of the parameters' space, light dark matter is viable. We also compare the elastic-scattering cross section of our dark matter candidate off a nucleus with existing (CDMSII and XENON100) and projected (SuperCDMS and XENON1T) experimental exclusion bounds. We find that most of the allowed mass range for light dark matter will be probed by the projected sensitivity of the XENON1T experiment.

  15. Caenorhabditis elegans as a model to study the impact of exposure to light emitting diode (LED) domestic lighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Fawzia; Okeremgbo, Bethel; Alhamadah, Fatimah; Jamadar, Sakha; Anthony, Kevin; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2017-04-16

    This study aimed to investigate the biological impact of exposure on domestic light emitting diodes (LED) lighting using the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model. Nematodes were separately exposed to white LED light covering the range of 380-750 nm, blue light at 450 nm and black light at 380-420 nm for one life cycle (egg to adult) with dark exposure as the control. Each light range induced stress to the nematode C. elegans such as reducing the number of the hatched eggs and/or delayed the maturation of the hatched eggs to the adult stage. In addition, it lowered or prevented the ability of adults to lay eggs and impaired the locomotion in the exposed worms. The observed type of biological stress was also associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as compared to nematodes grown in the dark. It is concluded that the blue light component of white LED light may cause health problems, and further investigation is required to test commercial brands of white LEDs that emit different amounts of blue light.

  16. Coupled dark matter-dark energy in light of near universe observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honorez, Laura Lopez; Reid, Beth A.; Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul; Mena, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Cosmological analysis based on currently available observations are unable to rule out a sizeable coupling among the dark energy and dark matter fluids. We explore a variety of coupled dark matter-dark energy models, which satisfy cosmic microwave background constraints, in light of low redshift and near universe observations. We illustrate the phenomenology of different classes of dark coupling models, paying particular attention in distinguishing between effects that appear only on the expansion history and those that appear in the growth of structure. We find that while a broad class of dark coupling models are effectively models where general relativity (GR) is modified — and thus can be probed by a combination of tests for the expansion history and the growth of structure —, there is a class of dark coupling models where gravity is still GR, but the growth of perturbations is, in principle modified. While this effect is small in the specific models we have considered, one should bear in mind that an inconsistency between reconstructed expansion history and growth may not uniquely indicate deviations from GR. Our low redshift constraints arise from cosmic velocities, redshift space distortions and dark matter abundance in galaxy voids. We find that current data constrain the dimensionless coupling to be |ξ| < 0.2, but prospects from forthcoming data are for a significant improvement. Future, precise measurements of the Hubble constant, combined with high-precision constraints on the growth of structure, could provide the key to rule out dark coupling models which survive other tests. We shall exploit as well weak equivalence principle violation arguments, which have the potential to highly disfavour a broad family of coupled models

  17. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Why is left right and right left in the mirror? Baffled by the basics of reflection and refraction? Wondering just how the eye works? If you have trouble teaching concepts about light that you don t fully grasp yourself, get help from a book that s both scientifically accurate and entertaining with Light. By combining clear explanations, clever drawings, and activities that use easy-to-find materials, this book covers what science teachers and parents need to know to teach about light with confidence. It uses ray, wave, and particle models of light to explain the basics of reflection and refraction, optical instruments, polarization of light, and interference and diffraction. There s also an entire chapter on how the eye works. Each chapter ends with a Summary and Applications section that reinforces concepts with everyday examples. Whether you need a deeper understanding of how light bends or a good explanation of why the sky is blue, you ll find Light more illuminating and accessible than a college textbook...

  18. Observation Platform for Dynamic Biomedical and Biotechnology Experiments using the ISS Light Microscopy Module, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the research is the completion of an observation platform for the ISS Light Microscopy Module (LMM) as it currently resides on the US Fluids...

  19. Tunable Light-Guide Image Processing Snapshot Spectrometer (TuLIPSS) for Earth and Moon Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkaczyk, T. S.; Alexander, D.; Luvall, J. C.; Wang, Y.; Dwight, J. G.; Pawlowsk, M. E.; Howell, B.; Tatum, P. F.; Stoian, R.-I.; Cheng, S.; Daou, A.

    2018-02-01

    A tunable light-guide image processing snapshot spectrometer (TuLIPSS) for Earth science research and observation is being developed through a NASA instrument incubator project with Rice University and Marshall Space Flight Center.

  20. Observation Platform for Dynamic Biomedical and Biotechnology Experiments using the ISS Light Microscopy Module, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed "Observation platform for dynamic biomedical and biotechnology experiments using the ISS Light Microscopy Module" consists of a platen sized to fit the...

  1. Observation Platform for Dynamic Biomedical and Biotechnology Experiments using the ISS Light Microscopy Module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed "Observation platform for dynamic biomedical and biotechnology experiments using the ISS Light Microscopy Module" consists of a platen sized to fit the...

  2. Modeling the Frequency of Cyclists’ Red-Light Running Behavior Using Bayesian PG Model and PLN Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Red-light running behaviors of bicycles at signalized intersection lead to a large number of traffic conflicts and high collision potentials. The primary objective of this study is to model the cyclists’ red-light running frequency within the framework of Bayesian statistics. Data was collected at twenty-five approaches at seventeen signalized intersections. The Poisson-gamma (PG and Poisson-lognormal (PLN model were developed and compared. The models were validated using Bayesian p values based on posterior predictive checking indicators. It was found that the two models have a good fit of the observed cyclists’ red-light running frequency. Furthermore, the PLN model outperformed the PG model. The model estimated results showed that the amount of cyclists’ red-light running is significantly influenced by bicycle flow, conflict traffic flow, pedestrian signal type, vehicle speed, and e-bike rate. The validation result demonstrated the reliability of the PLN model. The research results can help transportation professionals to predict the expected amount of the cyclists’ red-light running and develop effective guidelines or policies to reduce red-light running frequency of bicycles at signalized intersections.

  3. Spectra of heavy-light mesons in a relativistic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Bin; Lü, Cai-Dian

    2017-05-01

    The spectra and wave functions of heavy-light mesons are calculated within a relativistic quark model which is based on a heavy-quark expansion of the instantaneous Bethe-Salpeter equation by applying the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation. The kernel we choose is the standard combination of linear scalar and Coulombic vector. The effective Hamiltonian for heavy-light quark-antiquark system is calculated up to order 1/m_Q^2. Our results are in good agreement with available experimental data except for the anomalous D_{s0}^*(2317) and D_{s1}(2460) states. The newly observed heavy-light meson states can be accommodated successfully in the relativistic quark model with their assignments presented. The D_{sJ}^*(2860) can be interpreted as the |1^{3/2}D_1\\rangle and |1^{5/2}D_3\\rangle states being members of the 1D family with J^P=1^- and 3^-.

  4. Spectra of heavy-light mesons in a relativistic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jing-Bin; Lue, Cai-Dian [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-05-15

    The spectra and wave functions of heavy-light mesons are calculated within a relativistic quark model which is based on a heavy-quark expansion of the instantaneous Bethe-Salpeter equation by applying the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation. The kernel we choose is the standard combination of linear scalar and Coulombic vector. The effective Hamiltonian for heavy-light quark-antiquark system is calculated up to order 1/m{sub Q}{sup 2}. Our results are in good agreement with available experimental data except for the anomalous D{sub s0}{sup *}(2317) and D{sub s1}(2460) states. The newly observed heavy-light meson states can be accommodated successfully in the relativistic quark model with their assignments presented. The D{sub sJ}{sup *}(2860) can be interpreted as the vertical stroke 1{sup 3/2}D{sub 1} right angle and vertical stroke 1{sup 5/2}D{sub 3} right angle states being members of the 1D family with J{sup P} = 1{sup -} and 3{sup -}. (orig.)

  5. Observations and Modeling of Atmospheric Radiance Structure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wintersteiner, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The overall purpose of the work that we have undertaken is to provide new capabilities for observing and modeling structured radiance in the atmosphere, particularly the non-LTE regions of the atmosphere...

  6. Model for behavior observation training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berghausen, P.E. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Continued behavior observation is mandated by ANSI/ANS 3.3. This paper presents a model for behavior observation training that is in accordance with this standard and the recommendations contained in US NRC publications. The model includes seventeen major topics or activities. Ten of these are discussed: Pretesting of supervisor's knowledge of behavior observation requirements, explanation of the goals of behavior observation programs, why behavior observation training programs are needed (legal and psychological issues), early indicators of emotional instability, use of videotaped interviews to demonstrate significant psychopathology, practice recording behaviors, what to do when unusual behaviors are observed, supervisor rationalizations for noncompliance, when to be especially vigilant, and prevention of emotional instability

  7. Automated and observer based light field indicator edge evaluation in diagnostic X-ray equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottaro, Marcio; Nagy, Balazs Vince; Soares, Fernanda Cristina Salvador; Rosendo, Danilo Cabral, E-mail: marcio@iee.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil); Optics and Engineering Informatics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest (Hungary)

    2017-04-15

    Introduction: To analyze edge detection and optical contrast calculation of light field-indicators used in X-ray via automated- and observer-based methods, and comparison with current standard approaches, which do not give exact definition for light field edge determination. Methods: Automated light sensor array was used to measure the penumbra zone of the edge in the standard X-ray equipment, while trained and naive human observers were asked to mark the light field edge according to their own determination. Different interpretations of the contrast were then calculated and compared. Results: In contrast to automated measurements of edge definition and detection, measurements by human observers showed large inter-observer variation independent of their training with X-ray equipment. Different contrast calculations considering the different edge definitions gave very different contrast values. Conclusion: As the main conclusion, we propose a more exact edge definition of the X-ray light field, corresponding well to the average human observer's edge determination. The new edge definition method with automated systems would reduce human variability in edge determination. Such errors could potentially affect the approval of X-ray equipment, and also increase the radiation dose. The automated measurement based on human observers’ edge definition and the corresponding contrast calculation may lead to a more precise light field calibration, which enables reduced irradiation doses on radiology patients. (author)

  8. Automated and observer based light field indicator edge evaluation in diagnostic X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottaro, Marcio; Nagy, Balazs Vince; Soares, Fernanda Cristina Salvador; Rosendo, Danilo Cabral

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: To analyze edge detection and optical contrast calculation of light field-indicators used in X-ray via automated- and observer-based methods, and comparison with current standard approaches, which do not give exact definition for light field edge determination. Methods: Automated light sensor array was used to measure the penumbra zone of the edge in the standard X-ray equipment, while trained and naive human observers were asked to mark the light field edge according to their own determination. Different interpretations of the contrast were then calculated and compared. Results: In contrast to automated measurements of edge definition and detection, measurements by human observers showed large inter-observer variation independent of their training with X-ray equipment. Different contrast calculations considering the different edge definitions gave very different contrast values. Conclusion: As the main conclusion, we propose a more exact edge definition of the X-ray light field, corresponding well to the average human observer's edge determination. The new edge definition method with automated systems would reduce human variability in edge determination. Such errors could potentially affect the approval of X-ray equipment, and also increase the radiation dose. The automated measurement based on human observers’ edge definition and the corresponding contrast calculation may lead to a more precise light field calibration, which enables reduced irradiation doses on radiology patients. (author)

  9. Modeling of an Adjustable Beam Solid State Light

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is for the development of a computational model of a prototype variable beam light source using optical modeling software, Zemax OpticStudio ®. The...

  10. IRTF/SPEX OBSERVATIONS OF THE UNUSUAL KEPLER LIGHT CURVE SYSTEM KIC 8462852

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisse, C. M. [JHU-APL, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Sitko, M. L. [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0011 (United States); Marengo, M., E-mail: carey.lisse@jhuapl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, 12 Physics Hall, Ames, IA 50010 (United States)

    2015-12-20

    We have utilized the NASA/IRTF 3 m SpeX instrument’s high-resolution spectral mode to observe and characterize the near-infrared flux emanating from the unusual Kepler light curve system KIC 8462852. By comparing the resulting 0.8–4.2 μm spectrum to a mesh of model photospheric spectra, the 6 emission line analyses of the Rayner et al. catalog, and the 25 system collections of debris disks we have observed to date using SpeX under the Near InfraRed Debris disk Survey, we have been able to additionally characterize the system. Within the errors of our measurements, this star looks like a normal solar abundance main-sequence F1V to F3V dwarf star without any obvious traces of significant circumstellar dust or gas. Using Connelley and Greene’s emission measures, we also see no evidence of significant ongoing accretion onto the star nor any stellar outflow away from it. Our results are inconsistent with large amounts of static close-in obscuring material or the unusual behavior of a YSO system, but are consistent with the favored episodic giant comet models of a Gyr old stellar system favored by Boyajian et al. We speculate that KIC 8462852, like the ∼1.4 Gyr old F2V system η Corvi, is undergoing a late heavy bombardment, but is only in its very early stages.

  11. Automated and observer based light field indicator edge evaluation in diagnostic X-ray equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Bottaro

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction To analyze edge detection and optical contrast calculation of light field-indicators used in X-ray via automated- and observer-based methods, and comparison with current standard approaches, which do not give exact definition for light field edge determination. Methods Automated light sensor array was used to measure the penumbra zone of the edge in the standard X-ray equipment, while trained and naïve human observers were asked to mark the light field edge according to their own determination. Different interpretations of the contrast were then calculated and compared. Results In contrast to automated measurements of edge definition and detection, measurements by human observers showed large inter-observer variation independent of their training with X-ray equipment. Different contrast calculations considering the different edge definitions gave very different contrast values. Conclusion As the main conclusion, we propose a more exact edge definition of the X-ray light field, corresponding well to the average human observer’s edge determination. The new edge definition method with automated systems would reduce human variability in edge determination. Such errors could potentially affect the approval of X-ray equipment, and also increase the radiation dose. The automated measurement based on human observers’ edge definition and the corresponding contrast calculation may lead to a more precise light field calibration, which enables reduced irradiation doses on radiology patients.

  12. Computational Modeling to Limit the Impact Displays and Indicator Lights Have on Habitable Volume Operational Lighting Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, T. A.; Brainard, G.; Salazar, G.; Johnston, S.; Schwing, B.; Litaker, H.; Kolomenski, A.; Venus, D.; Tran, K.; Hanifin, J.; hide

    2017-01-01

    NASA has demonstrated an interest in improving astronaut health and performance through the installment of a new lighting countermeasure on the International Space Station. The Solid State Lighting Assembly (SSLA) system is designed to positively influence astronaut health by providing a daily change to light spectrum to improve circadian entrainment. Unfortunately, existing NASA standards and requirements define ambient light level requirements for crew sleep and other tasks, yet the number of light-emitting diode (LED) indicators and displays within a habitable volume is currently uncontrolled. Because each of these light sources has its own unique spectral properties, the additive lighting environment ends up becoming something different from what was planned or researched. Restricting the use of displays and indicators is not a solution because these systems provide beneficial feedback to the crew. The research team for this grant used computer-based computational modeling and real-world lighting mockups to document the impact that light sources other than the ambient lighting system contribute to the ambient spectral lighting environment. In particular, the team was focused on understanding the impacts of long-term tasks located in front of avionics or computer displays. The team also wanted to understand options for mitigating the changes to the ambient light spectrum in the interest of maintaining the performance of a lighting countermeasure. The project utilized a variety of physical and computer-based simulations to determine direct relationships between system implementation and light spectrum. Using real-world data, computer models were built in the commercially available optics analysis software Zemax Optics Studio(c). The team also built a mockup test facility that had the same volume and configuration as one of the Zemax models. The team collected over 1200 spectral irradiance measurements, each representing a different configuration of the mockup

  13. Phenomenological study of extended seesaw model for light sterile neutrino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nath, Newton [Physical Research Laboratory,Navarangpura, Ahmedabad 380 009 (India); Indian Institute of Technology,Gandhinagar, Ahmedabad-382424 (India); Ghosh, Monojit [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University,Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Goswami, Srubabati [Physical Research Laboratory,Navarangpura, Ahmedabad 380 009 (India); Gupta, Shivani [Center of Excellence for Particle Physics (CoEPP), University of Adelaide,Adelaide SA 5005 (Australia)

    2017-03-14

    We study the zero textures of the Yukawa matrices in the minimal extended type-I seesaw (MES) model which can give rise to ∼ eV scale sterile neutrinos. In this model, three right handed neutrinos and one extra singlet S are added to generate a light sterile neutrino. The light neutrino mass matrix for the active neutrinos, m{sub ν}, depends on the Dirac neutrino mass matrix (M{sub D}), Majorana neutrino mass matrix (M{sub R}) and the mass matrix (M{sub S}) coupling the right handed neutrinos and the singlet. The model predicts one of the light neutrino masses to vanish. We systematically investigate the zero textures in M{sub D} and observe that maximum five zeros in M{sub D} can lead to viable zero textures in m{sub ν}. For this study we consider four different forms for M{sub R} (one diagonal and three off diagonal) and two different forms of (M{sub S}) containing one zero. Remarkably we obtain only two allowed forms of m{sub ν} (m{sub eτ}=0 and m{sub ττ}=0) having inverted hierarchical mass spectrum. We re-analyze the phenomenological implications of these two allowed textures of m{sub ν} in the light of recent neutrino oscillation data. In the context of the MES model, we also express the low energy mass matrix, the mass of the sterile neutrino and the active-sterile mixing in terms of the parameters of the allowed Yukawa matrices. The MES model leads to some extra correlations which disallow some of the Yukawa textures obtained earlier, even though they give allowed one-zero forms of m{sub ν}. We show that the allowed textures in our study can be realized in a simple way in a model based on MES mechanism with a discrete Abelian flavor symmetry group Z{sub 8}×Z{sub 2}.

  14. Urban light pollution - The effect of atmospheric aerosols on astronomical observations at night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Joachim H.; Mekler, Yuri; Kaufman, Yoram J.

    1991-01-01

    The transfer of diffuse city light from a localized source through a dust-laden atmosphere with optical depth less than 0.5 has been analyzed in the source-observer plane on the basis of an approximate treatment. The effect on several types of astronomical observation at night has been studied, considering different size distributions and amounts as well as particle shapes of the aerosols. The analysis is made in terms of the signal-to-noise ratios for a given amount of aerosol. The model is applied to conditions at the Wise Astronomical Observatory in the Negev desert, and limiting backgrounds for spectroscopy, photometry, and photography of stars and extended objects have been calculated for a variety of signal-to-noise ratios. Applications to observations with different equipment at various distances from an urban area of any size are possible. Due to the use of signal-to-noise ratios, the conclusions are different for the different experimental techniques used in astronomy.

  15. Supersymmetry and light quark masses in a realistic superstring model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halyo, Edi.

    1993-10-01

    We examine the light quark masses in a standard-like superstring model in the four dimensional free fermionic formulation. We find that the supersymmetry constraints in the observable and hidden sectors eliminate all large contributions to m u and m d and force them to be much smaller than the other quark masses. The requirement for an acceptable Higgs doublet spectrum results in m u d . In these models a realistic m d can always be obtained whereas m u is at most 10 -5 MeV. For particular choices on flat direction or vacua m u can be as small as 10 -7 MeV but cannot vanish. (author) 15 refs, 2 tabs

  16. An Exploration into Integrating Daylight and Artificial Light via an Observational Instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin

    2015-01-01

    abstract and blurred phenomena, these diffused luminous reflections rouse us into interactions with the world. In this book we are interested in identifying the qualitative parameters involved in the integration of dynamic artificial lighting and daylight; the latter being already highly dynamic by nature......An Exploration into Integrating Daylight and Artificial Light via an Observational Instrument Daylight is dynamic and dependent upon weather conditions; unfolding with both subtle and dramatic variations in qualities of light. Through a building’s apertures, daylight creates a connection between...... that examine how the dynamic artificial lighting in the observational instrument unfolds during the changing of the daylight situations that are generated by the weather outside. This research employs the concept of coupling between interior and exterior, in order to identify a spectrum of design parameters...

  17. Results from the Prototype GLOBE at Night Worldwide Light Pollution Observation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.; Pompea, S. M.; Isbell, D.; Orellana, D.; Blurton, C.; Henderson, S.

    2006-06-01

    Students, families, and educators worldwide participated in GLOBE at Night - an international event designed to observe and record the visible stars as a means of measuring light pollution in a given location. Participation was open to anyone - anywhere in the world - who could get outside and look skyward during the week of March 22-29, 2006. Our goal was 5000 observations from around the world in this prototype program.The hands-on learning activities associated with the program were designed to extend the traditional classroom and school day with a week of nighttime observations involving teachers, students and their families. By locating specific constellations in the sky, students from around the world learned how the lights in their community contribute to light pollution. Students explored the different light sources in their community learning the relationship between science, technology and society, and they reported their observations online through a central database allowing for authentic worldwide research and analysis. The observations made during GLOBE at Night helped students and scientists together assess how the quality of the night sky varies around the world as well as the level of energy wastage associated with poorly-shielded lights.For more information, visit http://www.globe.gov/globeatnight.GLOBE at Night is a collaboration between The GLOBE Program, the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), Centro de Apoyo a la Didactica de la Astronomia (CADIAS) in Chile , Windows to the Universe, and Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI).

  18. A Community Data Model for Hydrologic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarboton, D. G.; Horsburgh, J. S.; Zaslavsky, I.; Maidment, D. R.; Valentine, D.; Jennings, B.

    2006-12-01

    The CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System project is developing information technology infrastructure to support hydrologic science. Hydrologic information science involves the description of hydrologic environments in a consistent way, using data models for information integration. This includes a hydrologic observations data model for the storage and retrieval of hydrologic observations in a relational database designed to facilitate data retrieval for integrated analysis of information collected by multiple investigators. It is intended to provide a standard format to facilitate the effective sharing of information between investigators and to facilitate analysis of information within a single study area or hydrologic observatory, or across hydrologic observatories and regions. The observations data model is designed to store hydrologic observations and sufficient ancillary information (metadata) about the observations to allow them to be unambiguously interpreted and used and provide traceable heritage from raw measurements to usable information. The design is based on the premise that a relational database at the single observation level is most effective for providing querying capability and cross dimension data retrieval and analysis. This premise is being tested through the implementation of a prototype hydrologic observations database, and the development of web services for the retrieval of data from and ingestion of data into the database. These web services hosted by the San Diego Supercomputer center make data in the database accessible both through a Hydrologic Data Access System portal and directly from applications software such as Excel, Matlab and ArcGIS that have Standard Object Access Protocol (SOAP) capability. This paper will (1) describe the data model; (2) demonstrate the capability for representing diverse data in the same database; (3) demonstrate the use of the database from applications software for the performance of hydrologic analysis

  19. Diffusion model for ultrasound-modulated light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmann, Joseph L; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei; DiMarzio, Charles A

    2014-03-01

    Researchers use ultrasound (US) to modulate diffusive light in a highly scattering medium like tissue. This paper analyzes the US-optical interaction in the scattering medium and derives an expression for the US-modulated optical radiance. The diffusion approximation to the radiative transport equation is employed to develop a Green's function for US-modulated light. The predicted modulated fluence and flux are verified using finite-difference time-domain simulations. The Green's function is then utilized to illustrate the modulated reflectance as the US-optical interaction increases in depth. The intent of this paper is to focus on high US frequencies necessary for high-resolution imaging because they are of interest for applications such as phase conjugation.

  20. Environmental SEM and dye penetration observation on resin-tooth interface using different light curing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Takako; Morigami, Makoto; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was the effects of different light curing methods on marginal sealing and resin composite adaptation to the cavity wall using the dye penetration test and environmental scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations. Cylindrical cavities were prepared on cervical regions. The teeth were restored with Clearfil Liner Bond 2 V adhesive and filled with Clearfil Photo Bright or Palfique Estelite resin composites. These resins were cured with a conventional light-curing method or a slow-start curing method. After thermal cycling, the specimens were subjected to the dye penetration test to evaluate marginal sealing and adaptation of the resin composites to the cavity walls. These resin-tooth interfaces were then observed using environmental SEM. The light-cured resin composite, which exhibited increased contrast ratios during polymerization, suggests high compensation for polymerization stress using the slow-start curing method. There was a high correlation between dye penetration test and environmental SEM observation.

  1. Stratospheric dryness: model simulations and satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lelieveld

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms responsible for the extreme dryness of the stratosphere have been debated for decades. A key difficulty has been the lack of comprehensive models which are able to reproduce the observations. Here we examine results from the coupled lower-middle atmosphere chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1 together with satellite observations. Our model results match observed temperatures in the tropical lower stratosphere and realistically represent the seasonal and inter-annual variability of water vapor. The model reproduces the very low water vapor mixing ratios (below 2 ppmv periodically observed at the tropical tropopause near 100 hPa, as well as the characteristic tape recorder signal up to about 10 hPa, providing evidence that the dehydration mechanism is well-captured. Our results confirm that the entry of tropospheric air into the tropical stratosphere is forced by large-scale wave dynamics, whereas radiative cooling regionally decelerates upwelling and can even cause downwelling. Thin cirrus forms in the cold air above cumulonimbus clouds, and the associated sedimentation of ice particles between 100 and 200 hPa reduces water mass fluxes by nearly two orders of magnitude compared to air mass fluxes. Transport into the stratosphere is supported by regional net radiative heating, to a large extent in the outer tropics. During summer very deep monsoon convection over Southeast Asia, centered over Tibet, moistens the stratosphere.

  2. Current-voltage model of LED light sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beczkowski, Szymon; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2012-01-01

    Amplitude modulation is rarely used for dimming light-emitting diodes in polychromatic luminaires due to big color shifts caused by varying magnitude of LED driving current and nonlinear relationship between intensity of a diode and driving current. Current-voltage empirical model of light...

  3. Increased light-use efficiency in northern terrestrial ecosystems indicated by CO 2 and greening observations: INCREASE IN NH LIGHT USE EFFICIENCY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Rebecca T. [Science and Solutions for a Changing Planet DTP, Imperial College London, London UK; AXA Chair Programme in Biosphere and Climate Impacts, Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, London UK; Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London UK; Prentice, Iain Colin [AXA Chair Programme in Biosphere and Climate Impacts, Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, London UK; Grantham Institute: Climate Change and the Environment, Imperial College London, London UK; Graven, Heather [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London UK; Grantham Institute: Climate Change and the Environment, Imperial College London, London UK; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Saint-Aubin France; Fisher, Joshua B. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California USA; Hayes, Daniel J. [School of Forest Resources, University of Maine, Orono Maine USA; Huang, Maoyi [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Huntzinger, Deborah N. [School of Earth Sciences and Environmental Sustainability, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff Arizona USA; Ito, Akihiko [Center for Global Environmental Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba Japan; Jain, Atul [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana Illinois USA; Mao, Jiafu [Climate Change Science Institute and Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Tennessee USA; Michalak, Anna M. [Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford California USA; Peng, Shushi [Sino-French Institute for Earth System Science, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing China; Poulter, Benjamin [Department of Ecology, Montana State University, Bozeman Montana USA; Ricciuto, Daniel M. [Climate Change Science Institute and Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Tennessee USA; Shi, Xiaoying [Climate Change Science Institute and Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Tennessee USA; Schwalm, Christopher [Woods Hole Research Center, Falmouth Massachusetts USA; Tian, Hanqin [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research, School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn Alabama USA; Zeng, Ning [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland, College Park Maryland USA

    2016-11-04

    Observations show an increasing amplitude in the seasonal cycle of CO2 (ASC) north of 45°N of 56 ± 9.8% over the last 50 years and an increase in vegetation greenness of 7.5–15% in high northern latitudes since the 1980s. However, the causes of these changes remain uncertain. Historical simulations from terrestrial biosphere models in the Multiscale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project are compared to the ASC and greenness observations, using the TM3 atmospheric transport model to translate surface fluxes into CO2 concentrations. We find that the modeled change in ASC is too small but the mean greening trend is generally captured. Modeled increases in greenness are primarily driven by warming, whereas ASC changes are primarily driven by increasing CO2. We suggest that increases in ecosystem-scale light use efficiency (LUE) have contributed to the observed ASC increase but are underestimated by current models. We highlight potential mechanisms that could increase modeled LUE.

  4. Spectrophotometric Modeling of MAHLI Goniometer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, W.; Johnson, J. R.; Hayes, A.; Lemmon, M. T.; Bell, J. F., III; Grundy, W. M.; Deen, R. G.

    2017-12-01

    The Mars Hand Lends Imager (MAHLI) on the Curiosity rover's robotic arm was used as a goniometer to acquire a multiple-viewpoint data set on sol 544 [1]. Images were acquired at 20 arm positions, all centered at the same location and from a near-constant distance of 1.0 m from the surface. Although this sequence was acquired at only one time of day ( 13:30 LTST), it provided phase angle coverage from 0-110°. Images were converted to radiance from calibrated PDS files (DRXX) using radiance scaling factors and MAHLI focus position counts in an algorithm that rescaled the data to match the Mastcam M-34 calibration via comparison of sky images acquired during the mission. Converted MAHLI radiance values from an image of the Mastcam calibration target compared favorably in the red, green, and blue Bayer filters to M-34 radiance values from an image of the same target taken minutes afterwards. The 20 MAHLI images allowed construction of a digital terrain model (DTM), although images with shadows cast by the rover arm were more challenging to include. Their current absence restricts the lowest phase angles available to about 17°. The DTM enables calculation of surface normals that can be used with sky models to correct for diffuse reflectance on surface facets prior to Hapke modeling [cf. 2-6]. Regions of interest (ROIs) were extracted using one of the low emission-angle images as a template. ROI unit types included soils, light-toned surfaces (5 cm felsic rock "Nita"), dark-toned rocks with variable textures and dust cover, and larger areas representative of the average surface (see attached figure). These ROIs were translated from the template image to the other images through a matching of DTM three-dimensional coordinates. Preliminary phase curves (prior to atmospheric correction) show that soil-dominated surfaces are most backscattering, whereas rocks are least backscattering, and light-toned surfaces exhibit wavelength-dependent scattering. Future work will

  5. Flow observation by rod lens and low-light video (videotape script: January 4, 1977)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lord, D.E.; Carter, G.W.; Petrini, R.R.

    1977-01-01

    The script of a demonstration videotape made to show the possibilities of coupling rod lenses to low-light video systems to observe internal flow conditions is presented. The illustrations accompanying the text were photographed directly from the video screen. Some up-dated comments appear as footnotes to the original script and a description of the multiscan low-light television system developed to measure velocity is included in the epilogue. The combination of rod lens and low-light video system makes it possible to observe dynamic events in hitherto inaccessible volumes. The pressure and temperature capabilities of the rod lens make it applicable to many engineering uses. This system, in conjunction with electronic image enhancement systems, provides a new dimension in engineering analysis

  6. Flow observation by rod lens and low-light video (videotape script: January 4, 1977)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lord, D.E.; Carter, G.W.; Petrini, R.R.

    1977-08-10

    The script of a demonstration videotape made to show the possibilities of coupling rod lenses to low-light video systems to observe internal flow conditions is presented. The illustrations accompanying the text were photographed directly from the video screen. Some up-dated comments appear as footnotes to the original script and a description of the multiscan low-light television system developed to measure velocity is included in the epilogue. The combination of rod lens and low-light video system makes it possible to observe dynamic events in hitherto inaccessible volumes. The pressure and temperature capabilities of the rod lens make it applicable to many engineering uses. This system, in conjunction with electronic image enhancement systems, provides a new dimension in engineering analysis.

  7. An Exploration into Integrating Daylight and Artificial Light via an Observational Instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Karin; Petersen, Kjell Yngve

    2015-01-01

    An Exploration into Integrating Daylight and Artificial Light via an Observational Instrument Daylight is dynamic and dependent upon weather conditions; unfolding with both subtle and dramatic variations in qualities of light. Through a building’s apertures, daylight creates a connection between...... the space inside and the world outside. The aperture or window itself constitutes the frame that simultaneously separates, and connects, us to our surroundings. One can say that the world outside projects itself into the interior space, essentially as diffused illuminating reflections. As figuratively...... that examine how the dynamic artificial lighting in the observational instrument unfolds during the changing of the daylight situations that are generated by the weather outside. This research employs the concept of coupling between interior and exterior, in order to identify a spectrum of design parameters...

  8. Light in Tropical Forest Models: What Detail Matters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkin, A.; Bentley, L. P.; Asner, G. P.; Malhi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Representations of light in models of tropical forests are typically unconstrained by field data and rife with assumptions, and for good reason: forest light environments are highly variable, difficult and onerous to predict, and the value of improved prediction is unclear. Still, the question remains: how detailed must our models be to be accurate enough, yet simple enough to be able to scale them from plots to landscapes? Here we use field data to constrain 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D light models and integrate them with simple forest models to predict net primary production (NPP) across an Andes-to-Amazon elevation transect in Peru. Field data consist of novel vertical light profile measurements coupled with airborne LiDAR (light detection and ranging) data from the Carnegie Airborne Observatory. Preliminary results indicate that while 1-D models may be "good-enough" and highly-scalable where forest structure is relatively homogenous, more complex models become important as forest structure becomes more heterogeneous. We discuss the implications our results hold for prediction of NPP under a changing climate, and suggest paths forward for useful proxies of light availability in forests to improve and scale up forest models.

  9. First Light Observations from the International Study of Astronomy Reasoning (ISTAR) Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatge, Coty B.; Slater, Stephanie; Slater, Timothy F.; Bretones, Paulo S.; McKinnon, David; Schleigh, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    During the period between Fall 2014 and Summer 2015, the International Astronomical Union reorganized its structure to include the IAU Working Group on Theory and Methods in Astronomy Education. The initial goals of that working group are 1) promoting Astronomy Education Research (AER) by adopting the international collaboration model used by astronomy researchers, 2) fostering international astronomy education and AER capacity through the development of networks, training and shared resources, and 3) improving astronomy education by describing research based approaches to the teaching and learning of astronomy. In support of those efforts, the working group began a collaboration with the Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research to develop the International Study of Astronomy Reasoning (ISTAR) Database, an online, searchable research tool, intended to catalog, characterize, and provide access to all known astronomy education research production, world-wide. Beginning in the Summer of 2015, a test of ISTAR's functionality began with a survey of a previously uncatalogued set of test objects: U.S.-based doctoral dissertations and masters. This target population was selected for its familiarity to the ISTAR developers, and for its small expected sample size (50-75 objects). First light observations indicated that the sample exceeded 300 dissertation objects. These objects were characterized across multiple variables, including: year of production, document source, type of resource, empirical methodology, context, informal setting type, research construct, type of research subject, scientific content, language, and nation of production. These initial observations provide motivation to extend this project to observe masters levels thesis, which are anticipated to be ten times more numerous as doctoral dissertations, other peer-reviewed contributions, contributions from the larger international community.

  10. Modeling Water Clarity and Light Quality in Oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Abdelrhman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton is a primary producer of organic compounds, and it forms the base of the food chain in ocean waters. The concentration of phytoplankton in the water column controls water clarity and the amount and quality of light that penetrates through it. The availability of adequate light intensity is a major factor in the health of algae and phytoplankton. There is a strong negative coupling between light intensity and phytoplankton concentration (e.g., through self-shading by the cells, which reduces available light and in return affects the growth rate of the cells. Proper modeling of this coupling is essential to understand primary productivity in the oceans. This paper provides the methodology to model light intensity in the water column, which can be included in relevant water quality models. The methodology implements relationships from bio-optical models, which use phytoplankton chlorophyll a (chl-a concentration as a surrogate for light attenuation, including absorption and scattering by other attenuators. The presented mathematical methodology estimates the reduction in light intensity due to absorption by pure seawater, chl-a pigment, non-algae particles (NAPs and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM, as well as backscattering by pure seawater, phytoplankton particles and NAPs. The methods presented facilitate the prediction of the effects of various environmental and management scenarios (e.g., global warming, altered precipitation patterns, greenhouse gases on the wellbeing of phytoplankton communities in the oceans as temperature-driven chl-a changes take place.

  11. Confronting Cepheids Models with Interferometric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardetto, N.

    In the last years, some issues concerning Cepheids have been resolved, based on observations and modeling. However, as usual, new difficulties arise. The link between the dynamical structure of Cepheid atmosphere and the distance scale calibration in the universe is now clearly established. To support observations, we currently need fully consistent hydrodynamical models, including pulsating and evolutionary theories, convective energy transport, adaptive numerical meshes, and a refined calculation of the radiative transfer within the pulsating atmosphere, and also in the expected circumstellar envelope (hereafter CSE). Confronting such models with observations (spectral line profiles, spatial- and spectral- visibility curves), will permit to resolve and/or strengthen subtle questions concerning (1) the limb-darkening, (2) the dynamical structure of Cepheids' atmosphere, (3) the expected interaction between the atmosphere and the CSE, and (4) it will bring new insights in determining the fundamental parameters of Cepheids. All these physical quantities are supposed furthermore to be linked to the pulsation period of Cepheids. From these studies, it will be possible to paint a glowing picture of all Cepheids within the instability strip, allowing an unprecedent calibration of the period-luminosity relation (hereafter PL relation), leading to new insights in the fields of extragalactic distance scales and cosmology.

  12. Modeling Heliospheric Interface: Observational and Theoretical Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelov, N.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Borovikov, S.; Zank, G.

    2008-12-01

    Observational data provided by Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 spacecraft ahead of the heliospheric termination shock (TS) and in the heliosheath require considerate reassessment of theoretical models of the solar wind (SW) interaction with the magnetized interstellar medium (LISM). Contemporary models, although sophisticated enough to take into account kinetic processes accompanying charge exchange between ions and atoms and address the coupling of the interstellar and interplanetary magnetic fields (ISMF and IMF) at the heliospheric interface, are still unable to analyze the effect of non-thermal pick-up ions (PUI's) in the heliosheath. The presence of PUI's undermines the assumption of a Maxwellian distribution of the SW ions. We discuss the ways to improve physical models in this respect. The TS asymmetry observed by Voyagers can be attributed to the combination of 3D, time- dependent behavior of the SW and by the action of the ISMF. It is clear, however, that the ISMF alone can account for the TS asymmetry of about 10 AU only if it is unexpectedly strong (greater than 4 microgauss). We analyze the consequences of such magnetic fields for the neutral hydrogen deflection in the inner heliosphere from its original direction in the unperturbed LISM. We also discuss the conditions for the 2-3 kHz radio emission, which is believed to be generated in the outer heliosheath beyond the heliopause, and analyze possible location of radio emission sources under the assumption of strong magnetic field. The quality of the physical model becomes crucial when we need to address modern observational and theoretical challenges. We compare the plasma, neutral particle, and magnetic field distributions obtained with our MHD-kinetic and 5-fluid models. The transport of neutral particles is treated kinetically in the former and by a multiple neutral-fluid approach in the latter. We also investigate the distribution of magnetic field in the inner heliosheath for large angles between the Sun

  13. Light hadrons in the bag model with broken chiral symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efrosinin, V.P.; Zaikin, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    A version of the bag model with broken chiral symmetry is proposed. A satisfactory description of the experimental data on light hadrons including the pion is obtained. The estimate of the pion-nucleon σ term is given in the framework of this model. The pion and kaon decay constants are calculated. The centre-of-mass motion problem in bag models is discussed

  14. Dark energy observational evidence and theoretical models

    CERN Document Server

    Novosyadlyj, B; Shtanov, Yu; Zhuk, A

    2013-01-01

    The book elucidates the current state of the dark energy problem and presents the results of the authors, who work in this area. It describes the observational evidence for the existence of dark energy, the methods and results of constraining of its parameters, modeling of dark energy by scalar fields, the space-times with extra spatial dimensions, especially Kaluza---Klein models, the braneworld models with a single extra dimension as well as the problems of positive definition of gravitational energy in General Relativity, energy conditions and consequences of their violation in the presence of dark energy. This monograph is intended for science professionals, educators and graduate students, specializing in general relativity, cosmology, field theory and particle physics.

  15. INTERVAL OBSERVER FOR A BIOLOGICAL REACTOR MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Kharkovskaia

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The method of an interval observer design for nonlinear systems with parametric uncertainties is considered. The interval observer synthesis problem for systems with varying parameters consists in the following. If there is the uncertainty restraint for the state values of the system, limiting the initial conditions of the system and the set of admissible values for the vector of unknown parameters and inputs, the interval existence condition for the estimations of the system state variables, containing the actual state at a given time, needs to be held valid over the whole considered time segment as well. Conditions of the interval observers design for the considered class of systems are shown. They are: limitation of the input and state, the existence of a majorizing function defining the uncertainty vector for the system, Lipschitz continuity or finiteness of this function, the existence of an observer gain with the suitable Lyapunov matrix. The main condition for design of such a device is cooperativity of the interval estimation error dynamics. An individual observer gain matrix selection problem is considered. In order to ensure the property of cooperativity for interval estimation error dynamics, a static transformation of coordinates is proposed. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated by computer modeling of the biological reactor. Possible applications of these interval estimation systems are the spheres of robust control, where the presence of various types of uncertainties in the system dynamics is assumed, biotechnology and environmental systems and processes, mechatronics and robotics, etc.

  16. Transcranial red and near infrared light transmission in a cadaveric model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared R Jagdeo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Low level light therapy has garnered significant interest within the past decade. The exact molecular mechanisms of how red and near infrared light result in physiologic modulation are not fully understood. Heme moieties and copper within cells are red and near infrared light photoreceptors that induce the mitochondrial respiratory chain component cytochrome C oxidase, resulting in a cascade linked to cytoprotection and cellular metabolism. The copper centers in cytochrome C oxidase have a broad absorption range that peaks around 830 nm. Several in vitro and in vivo animal and human models exist that have demonstrated the benefits of red light and near infrared light for various conditions. Clinical applications for low level light therapy are varied. One study in particular demonstrated improved durable functional outcomes status post-stroke in patients treated with near infrared low level light therapy compared to sham treatment [1]. Despite previous data suggesting the beneficial effect in treating multiple conditions, including stroke, with low level light therapy, limited data exists that measures transmission in a human model. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: To investigate this idea, we measured the transmission of near infrared light energy, using red light for purposes of comparison, through intact cadaver soft tissue, skull bones, and brain using a commercially available LED device at 830 nm and 633 nm. RESULTS: Our results demonstrate that near infrared measurably penetrates soft tissue, bone and brain parenchyma in the formalin preserved cadaveric model, in comparison to negligible red light transmission in the same conditions. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that near infrared light can penetrate formalin fixed soft tissue, bone and brain and implicate that benefits observed in clinical studies are potentially related to direct action of near infrared light on neural tissue.

  17. A switchable light-input, light-output system modelled and constructed in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozma-Bognar Laszlo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in synthetic biology will require spatio-temporal regulation of biological processes in heterologous host cells. We develop a light-switchable, two-hybrid interaction in yeast, based upon the Arabidopsis proteins PHYTOCHROME A and FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 1-LIKE. Light input to this regulatory module allows dynamic control of a light-emitting LUCIFERASE reporter gene, which we detect by real-time imaging of yeast colonies on solid media. Results The reversible activation of the phytochrome by red light, and its inactivation by far-red light, is retained. We use this quantitative readout to construct a mathematical model that matches the system's behaviour and predicts the molecular targets for future manipulation. Conclusion Our model, methods and materials together constitute a novel system for a eukaryotic host with the potential to convert a dynamic pattern of light input into a predictable gene expression response. This system could be applied for the regulation of genetic networks - both known and synthetic.

  18. Trends of light particle spectra observed in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awes, T.C.; Poggi, G.; Saini, S.; Gelbke, C.K.; Legrain, R.; Westfall, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    The emission of energetic light particles (p,d,t) has been studied for 16 O induced reactions on Al, Zr and Au targets at the incident energies of 140, 215 and 310 MeV. The light-particle energy spectra have been analyzed in terms of a moving thermal source. The apparent temperatures exhibit a systematic variation as a function of the incident energy per nucleon above the Coulomb barrier. The observed trend can be extrapolated in a smooth fashion to temperatures obtained in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. (orig.)

  19. Observations of zodiacal light of the isolated Herbig BF Ori Ae star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinin, V.P.; Kiselev, N.N.; Minikulov, N.Kh.; AN Tadzhikskoj SSR, Dushanbe

    1989-01-01

    The isolated Herbig BF Ori Ae-star belongs to the subclass of young irreguLar variables with non-periodic Algol-type brightness variations. In the course of polarization and photometrical patrol observations carried out in 1987-88 in the Crimea and Sanglock, high linear polarization has been observed in deep minima. The analysis of the observations show, that the most probably a source of polarization is the scattered light from the circumstellar dust disklike envelope that is the analogue of the solar zodiacal light. It is concluded that the bimodal distribution oF positional angles of linear polarization in L 1641 reflects a complex structure of the magnetic field in this giant cloud

  20. Affordable and personalized lighting using inverse modeling and virtual sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Chandrayee; Chen, Benjamin; Richards, Jacob; Dhinakaran, Aparna; Agogino, Alice; Martin, Rodney

    2014-03-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSN) have great potential to enable personalized intelligent lighting systems while reducing building energy use by 50%-70%. As a result WSN systems are being increasingly integrated in state-ofart intelligent lighting systems. In the future these systems will enable participation of lighting loads as ancillary services. However, such systems can be expensive to install and lack the plug-and-play quality necessary for user-friendly commissioning. In this paper we present an integrated system of wireless sensor platforms and modeling software to enable affordable and user-friendly intelligent lighting. It requires ⇠ 60% fewer sensor deployments compared to current commercial systems. Reduction in sensor deployments has been achieved by optimally replacing the actual photo-sensors with real-time discrete predictive inverse models. Spatially sparse and clustered sub-hourly photo-sensor data captured by the WSN platforms are used to develop and validate a piece-wise linear regression of indoor light distribution. This deterministic data-driven model accounts for sky conditions and solar position. The optimal placement of photo-sensors is performed iteratively to achieve the best predictability of the light field desired for indoor lighting control. Using two weeks of daylight and artificial light training data acquired at the Sustainability Base at NASA Ames, the model was able to predict the light level at seven monitored workstations with 80%-95% accuracy. We estimate that 10% adoption of this intelligent wireless sensor system in commercial buildings could save 0.2-0.25 quads BTU of energy nationwide.

  1. Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Lighting Systems Test Facilities aid research that improves the energy efficiency of lighting systems. • Gonio-Photometer: Measures illuminance from each portion of...

  2. Updated observational constraints on quintessence dark energy models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrive, Jean-Baptiste; Ooba, Junpei; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2018-02-01

    The recent GW170817 measurement favors the simplest dark energy models, such as a single scalar field. Quintessence models can be classified in two classes, freezing and thawing, depending on whether the equation of state decreases towards -1 or departs from it. In this paper, we put observational constraints on the parameters governing the equations of state of tracking freezing, scaling freezing, and thawing models using updated data, from the Planck 2015 release, joint light-curve analysis, and baryonic acoustic oscillations. Because of the current tensions on the value of the Hubble parameter H0, unlike previous authors, we let this parameter vary, which modifies significantly the results. Finally, we also derive constraints on neutrino masses in each of these scenarios.

  3. Fluorescence enhancement and reflection of the excitation light observed with a multilayered substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Takuo; Yasuda, Mitsuru

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence enhancement from a multilayered substrate fabricated with Ag and Al(2)O(3) was investigated using fluorescein, rhodamine B, Cy3, and Cy5 as fluorophores. The change in the fluorescence enhancement with Al(2)O(3) had two peaks and one valley in the range from 0 to 300 nm of Al(2)O(3) thickness, and such peaks and valley were found to appear periodically. Moreover, the reflection of the excitation light from the multilayered substrate was investigated. The reflection of the excitation light periodically changed depending on the Al(2)O(3) thickness as well, and the maximum reflection was observed near the Al(2)O(3) thickness of the peak fluorescence enhancement. It was found that the periodic changes of the fluorescence enhancement and the reflection of the excitation light could be explained, for the most part, with the integral multiples of the lambda/4 derived by a simple interference theory.

  4. Ellipso-Microscopic Observation of Titanium Surface under UV-Light Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fushimi, K.; Kurauchi, K.; Nakanishi, T.; Hasegawa, Y.; Ueda, M.; Ohtsuka, T.

    2016-01-01

    The ellipso-microscopic observation of a titanium surface undergoing anodization in 0.05 mol dm -3 of H 2 SO 4 was conducted. During irradiation by ultra-violet (UV) light with a wavelength of 325 nm, the titanium surface allowed for the flow of a photo-induced current and showed up as a bright, patch-like image on an ellipso-microscopic view. The brightness and patch-pattern in the image changed with flowing photo-induced current. The changes in the brightness and the image corresponded to the formation and/or degradation of titanium oxide due to the photo-electrochemical reaction of the oxide. An in situ monitoring using the ellipso-microscope revealed that the film change was dependent on the irradiation light power, by UV-light increases the anodic current and results in the initiation of pitting at lower potentials as compared with the non-irradiated condition.

  5. Phase microscopy using light-field reconstruction method for cell observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Kuang, Cuifang; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2015-08-01

    The refractive index (RI) distribution can serve as a natural label for undyed cell imaging. However, the majority of images obtained through quantitative phase microscopy is integrated along the illumination angle and cannot reflect additional information about the refractive map on a certain plane. Herein, a light-field reconstruction method to image the RI map within a depth of 0.2 μm is proposed. It records quantitative phase-delay images using a four-step phase shifting method in different directions and then reconstructs a similar scattered light field for the refractive sample on the focus plane. It can image the RI of samples, transparent cell samples in particular, in a manner similar to the observation of scattering characteristics. The light-field reconstruction method is therefore a powerful tool for use in cytobiology studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Inner Disk Structure of Dwarf Novae in the Light of X-Ray Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Balman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Diversity of the X-ray observations of dwarf nova are still not fully understood. I review the X-ray spectral characteristics of dwarf novae during the quiescence in general explained by cooling flow models and the outburst spectra that show hard X-ray emission dominantly with few sources that reveal soft X-ray/EUV blackbody emission. The nature of aperiodic time variability of brightness of dwarf novae shows band limited noise, which can be adequately described in the framework of the model of propagating fluctuations. The frequency of the break (1-6 mHz indicates inner disk truncation of the optically thick disk with a range of radii (3.0-10.0×109 cm. The RXTE and optical (RTT150 data of SS Cyg in outburst and quiescence reveal that the inner disk radius moves towards the white dwarf and receeds as the outburst declines to quiescence. A preliminary analysis of SU UMa indicates a similar behaviour. In addition, I find that the outburst spectra of WZ Sge shows two component spectrum of only hard X-ray emission, one of which may be fitted with a power law suggesting thermal Comptonization occuring in the system. Cross-correlations between the simultaneous UV and X-ray light curves (XMM −Newton of five DNe in quiescence show time lags in the X-rays of 96-181 sec consistent with travel time of matter from a truncated inner disk to the white dwarf surface. All this suggests that dwarf novae and other plausible nonmagnetic systems have truncated accretion disks indicating that the disks may be partially evaporated and the accretion may occur through hot (coronal flows in the disk.

  7. Finite difference time domain modeling of light matter interaction in light-propelled microtools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Aabo, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Direct laser writing and other recent fabrication techniques offer a wide variety in the design of microdevices. Hence, modeling such devices requires analysis methods capable of handling arbitrary geometries. Recently, we have demonstrated the potential of microtools, optically actuated microstr......Direct laser writing and other recent fabrication techniques offer a wide variety in the design of microdevices. Hence, modeling such devices requires analysis methods capable of handling arbitrary geometries. Recently, we have demonstrated the potential of microtools, optically actuated...... microstructures with functionalities geared towards biophotonics applications. Compared to dynamic beam shaping alone, microtools allow more complex interactions between the shaped light and the biological samples at the receiving end. For example, strongly focused light coming from a tapered tip of a microtool...... demonstrate novel methods of optical micromanipulation which primarily result from the particle's geometry as opposed to the directly moving the light distributions as in conventional trapping....

  8. Improved spring model-based collaborative indoor visible light positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhijie; Zhang, WeiNan; Zhou, GuoFu

    2016-06-01

    Gaining accuracy with indoor positioning of individuals is important as many location-based services rely on the user's current position to provide them with useful services. Many researchers have studied indoor positioning techniques based on WiFi and Bluetooth. However, they have disadvantages such as low accuracy or high cost. In this paper, we propose an indoor positioning system in which visible light radiated from light-emitting diodes is used to locate the position of receivers. Compared with existing methods using light-emitting diode light, we present a high-precision and simple implementation collaborative indoor visible light positioning system based on an improved spring model. We first estimate coordinate position information using the visible light positioning system, and then use the spring model to correct positioning errors. The system can be employed easily because it does not require additional sensors and the occlusion problem of visible light would be alleviated. We also describe simulation experiments, which confirm the feasibility of our proposed method.

  9. Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, N.B.; Kristensen, Helle Halkjær; Wathes, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality......This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality...

  10. Light Scatter in Optical Materials: Advanced Haze Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-31

    backside light from the bulb back toward the bowl. The center of the bowl has a clear aperture cut through it, allowing the eye an unobstructed...AFRL-RH-FS-TR-2017-0022 Light Scatter in Optical Materials: Advanced Haze Modeling Michael A. Guevara William R. Brockmeier Thomas K. Kuyk...other person or corporation; or convey any rights or permission to manufacture, use, or sell any patented invention that may relate to them. Qualified

  11. Modeling nanostructure-enhanced light trapping in organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Jost

    A promising approach for improving the power conversion efficiencies of organic solar cells (OSCs) is by incorporating nanostructures in their thin film architecture to improve the light absorption in the device’s active polymer layers. Here, we present a modelling framework for the prediction....... Diffraction by fractal metallic supergratings. Optics Express, 15(24), 15628–15636 (2007) [3] Goszczak, A. J. et al. Nanoscale Aluminum dimples for light trapping in organic thin films (submitted)...

  12. Investigation of light baryons in a three-body quark model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanzadeh, M.; Rajabi, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    We present a three-body quark model based on hypercentral approach for investigating the internal structure of light baryons. The analytically obtained energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the three-body problem have been used in the calculations of the mass spectrum of light baryons and electromagnetic elastic form factors of nucleon. The magnetic moments and charge radii of nucleon have also been calculated. We have compared the evaluated observables with experimental data and it has been shown that the present model provides a good description of the observed resonances.

  13. Lagrangian Observations and Modeling of Marine Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Claire B.; Irisson, Jean-Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Just within the past two decades, studies on the early-life history stages of marine organisms have led to new paradigms in population dynamics. Unlike passive plant seeds that are transported by the wind or by animals, marine larvae have motor and sensory capabilities. As a result, marine larvae have a tremendous capacity to actively influence their dispersal. This is continuously revealed as we develop new techniques to observe larvae in their natural environment and begin to understand their ability to detect cues throughout ontogeny, process the information, and use it to ride ocean currents and navigate their way back home, or to a place like home. We present innovative in situ and numerical modeling approaches developed to understand the underlying mechanisms of larval transport in the ocean. We describe a novel concept of a Lagrangian platform, the Drifting In Situ Chamber (DISC), designed to observe and quantify complex larval behaviors and their interactions with the pelagic environment. We give a brief history of larval ecology research with the DISC, showing that swimming is directional in most species, guided by cues as diverse as the position of the sun or the underwater soundscape, and even that (unlike humans!) larvae orient better and swim faster when moving as a group. The observed Lagrangian behavior of individual larvae are directly implemented in the Connectivity Modeling System (CMS), an open source Lagrangian tracking application. Simulations help demonstrate the impact that larval behavior has compared to passive Lagrangian trajectories. These methodologies are already the base of exciting findings and are promising tools for documenting and simulating the behavior of other small pelagic organisms, forecasting their migration in a changing ocean.

  14. Penumbral models in the light of Hinode spectroplarimetric observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurčák, Jan; Bellot Rubio, L.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 481, č. 1 (2008), L17-L20 ISSN 0004-6361 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : sunspots * photosphere * polarimetric techniques Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.153, year: 2008

  15. Observation of sperm-head vacuoles and sperm morphology under light microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Seog; Park, Sol; Ko, Duck Sung; Park, Dong Wook; Seo, Ju Tae; Yang, Kwang Moon

    2014-09-01

    The presence of sperm-head vacuoles has been suspected to be deleterious to the outcomes of assisted reproductive technology (ART). It is difficult to accurately distinguish morphologically abnormal sperm with vacuoles under a light microscope. This study was performed to analyze the result of the observation of sperm-head vacuoles using Papanicolaou staining under a light microscope and whether the male partner's age affects these vacuoles. Sperm morphology with vacuoles was evaluated using Papanicolaou staining and observed under a light microscope (400×) in 980 men. The normal morphology was divided into three categories (group A, 14% of normal morphology). The criteria for the sperm-head vacuoles were those given in the World Health Organization manual. For the analysis of the age factor, the participants were divided into the following groups: 26-30 years, 31-35 years, 36-40 years, 41-45 years, and 46-50 years. The percentage of sperm-head vacuoles increased with normal sperm morphology (group A vs. groups B, C) (p<0.05). In the case of the age factor, a statistically significant difference was not observed across any of the age groups. A majority of the sperm-head vacuoles showed a statistically significant difference among normal morphology groups. Therefore, we should consider the probability of the percentage of sperm-head vacuoles not increasing with age but with abnormal sperm morphology. A further study is required to clarify the effect of the sperm-head vacuoles on ART outcomes.

  16. Physical properties of cometary dust, as derived from light scattering observations and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Hadamcik, E.; Lasue, J.; Renard, J. B.

    Physical properties of cometary dust, as derived from light scattering observations and simulations A.C. Levasseur-Regourd (1), E. Hadamcik (1), J. Lasue (1), J.B. Renard (2) (1) Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris6, UMR 7620, Aéronomie, BP-3, Verrières, 91371 France, (2) LPCE-CNRS, 3A av. Recherche Scientifique, Orléans, F-45071 France Physical properties of dust released from comets nuclei can be inferred from observations of solar light scattered by cometary comae. We will first summarize the main trends noticed in the polarimetric properties of dust comae, with emphasis on recent observations of 9P/Tempel 1 and 73P/Schwassmann 3. We will then compare them to the polarimetric properties of tentatively realistic cometary particles analogues, as deduced from experimental simulations on levitating particles. We will finally present results from light scattering numerical simulations (with core- mantle spheroids and fractal aggregates, with appropriate size distributions), and infer some key physical parameters (e.g. size distribution, albedo) retrieved for comet Hale-Bopp and for other active comets. The significance of these parameters will be discussed in terms of origin and evolution of cometary dust.

  17. New Cosmological Model and Its Implications on Observational Data Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlahovic Branislav

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The paradigm of ΛCDM cosmology works impressively well and with the concept of inflation it explains the universe after the time of decoupling. However there are still a few concerns; after much effort there is no detection of dark matter and there are significant problems in the theoretical description of dark energy. We will consider a variant of the cosmological spherical shell model, within FRW formalism and will compare it with the standard ΛCDM model. We will show that our new topological model satisfies cosmological principles and is consistent with all observable data, but that it may require new interpretation for some data. Considered will be constraints imposed on the model, as for instance the range for the size and allowed thickness of the shell, by the supernovae luminosity distance and CMB data. In this model propagation of the light is confined along the shell, which has as a consequence that observed CMB originated from one point or a limited space region. It allows to interpret the uniformity of the CMB without inflation scenario. In addition this removes any constraints on the uniformity of the universe at the early stage and opens a possibility that the universe was not uniform and that creation of galaxies and large structures is due to the inhomogeneities that originated in the Big Bang.

  18. Observation of squeezed light and quantum description of the macroscopical body movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykov, V.P.

    1992-01-01

    The possibility of a nondemolition measurement (observation) of macroscopical objects in widely distributed quantum mechanical states arises from the fact of the squezzed light observation. Macroscopical bodies -bodies of classical mechanics - are usually in states with narrow wave packets. It is shown that the absence of macroscopical bodies in widely distributed states is due to the focusing influence of the body's gravity field on its wave packet. An evidence that the gravity is essential in the classic limit of quantum mechanics is given. (author). 14 refs, 7 figs

  19. Modeling the dynamic modulation of light energy in photosynthetic algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Ioannis A; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos; Lika, Konstadia

    2012-05-07

    An integrated cell-based dynamic mathematical model that take into account the role of the photon absorbing process, the partition of excitation energy, and the photoinactivation and repair of photosynthetic units, under variable light and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) availability is proposed. The modeling of the photon energy absorption and the energy dissipation is based on the photoadaptive changes of the underlying mechanisms. The partition of the excitation energy is based on the relative availability of light and DIC to the cell. The modeling of the photoinactivation process is based on the common aspect that it occurs under any light intensity and the modeling of the repair process is based on the evidence that it is controlled by chloroplast and nuclear-encoded enzymes. The present model links the absorption of photons and the partitioning of excitation energy to the linear electron flow and other quenchers with chlorophyll fluorescence emission parameters, and the number of the functional photosynthetic units with the photosynthetic oxygen production rate. The energy allocation to the LEF increases as DIC availability increases and/or light intensity decreases. The rate of rejected energy increases with light intensity and with DIC availability. The resulting rate coefficient of photoinactivation increases as light intensity and/or as DIC concentration increases. We test the model against chlorophyll fluorescence induction and photosynthetic oxygen production rate measurements, obtained from cultures of the unicellular green alga Scenedesmus obliquus, and find a very close quantitative and qualitative correspondence between predictions and data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Balamuthia mandrillaris: Further morphological observations of trophozoites by light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Robles, Arturo; Lares-Villa, Fernando; Lares-Jiménez, Luis Fernando; Omaña-Molina, Maritza; Salazar-Villatoro, Lizbeth; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2015-10-01

    Additional morphological features of Balamuthia mandrillaris observed by light and electron microscopy are reported. Trophozoites were extremely pleomorphic: their cell shapes ranged from rounded to elongated and sometimes they appeared exceptionally stretched out and branched. By transmission electron microscopy it was possible to observe two different cytoplasmic areas, the ectoplasm and the endoplasm and often sections of rough endoplasmic reticulum were found in the transition zone. The cytoplasm was very fibrogranular and most of the organelles typically found in eukaryotic cells were observed. A particular finding was the presence of numerous mitochondria with a different structure from those of other free-living amoebae. The observations reported here may reinforce the morphological knowledge of this amoeba and provide a background for further analyses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Brief History of Ultra-light Scalar Dark Matter Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jae-Weon

    2018-01-01

    dark matter, BEC dark matter, wave dark matter, or ultra-light axion. In this model ultra-light scalar dark matter particles with mass m = O(10-22eV condense in a single Bose-Einstein condensate state and behave collectively like a classical wave. Galactic dark matter halos can be described as a self-gravitating coherent scalar field configuration called boson stars. At the scale larger than galaxies the dark matter acts like cold dark matter, while below the scale quantum pressure from the uncertainty principle suppresses the smaller structure formation so that it can resolve the small scale crisis of the conventional cold dark matter model.

  2. Light and the outcome of the critically ill: an observational cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Light before and during acute illness has been associated with both benefit and harm in animal models and small human studies. Our objective was to determine the associations of light duration (photoperiod) and intensity (insolation) before and during critical illness with hospital mortality in ICU patients. Based on the 'winter immunoenhancement' theory, we tested the hypothesis that a shorter photoperiod before critical illness is associated with improved survival. Methods We analyzed data from 11,439 patients admitted to 8 ICUs at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center between June 30, 1999 and July 31, 2004. Daily photoperiod and insolation prior to and after ICU admission were estimated for each patient by using data provided by the United States Naval Observatory and National Aeronautics and Space Administration and direct measurement of light gradient from outside to bedside for each ICU room. Our primary outcome was hospital mortality. The association between light and risk of death was analyzed using multivariate analyses, adjusting for potential confounders, including severity of illness, case mix, and ICU type. Results The cohort had an average APACHE III of 52.9 and a hospital mortality of 10.7%. In total, 128 ICU beds were analyzed; 108 (84%) had windows. Pre-illness photoperiod ranged from 259 to 421 hours in the prior month. A shorter photoperiod was associated with a reduced risk of death: for each 1-hour decrease, the adjusted OR was 0.997 (0.994 to 0.999, p = 0.03). In the ICU, there was near complete (99.6%) degradation of natural light from outside to the ICU bed. Thus, light exposure once in the ICU approached zero; the 24-hour insolation was 0.005 ± 0.003 kWh/m2 with little diurnal variation. There was no association between ICU photoperiod or insolation and mortality. Conclusions Consistent with the winter immunoenhancement theory, a shorter photoperiod in the month before critical illness is associated with a reduced risk

  3. Light and the outcome of the critically ill: an observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Ricardo A; Angus, Derek C; Hong, Seo Yeon; Lee, Chingwen; Weissfeld, Lisa A; Clermont, Gilles; Rosengart, Matthew R

    2012-07-24

    Light before and during acute illness has been associated with both benefit and harm in animal models and small human studies. Our objective was to determine the associations of light duration (photoperiod) and intensity (insolation) before and during critical illness with hospital mortality in ICU patients. Based on the 'winter immunoenhancement' theory, we tested the hypothesis that a shorter photoperiod before critical illness is associated with improved survival. We analyzed data from 11,439 patients admitted to 8 ICUs at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center between June 30, 1999 and July 31, 2004. Daily photoperiod and insolation prior to and after ICU admission were estimated for each patient by using data provided by the United States Naval Observatory and National Aeronautics and Space Administration and direct measurement of light gradient from outside to bedside for each ICU room. Our primary outcome was hospital mortality. The association between light and risk of death was analyzed using multivariate analyses, adjusting for potential confounders, including severity of illness, case mix, and ICU type. The cohort had an average APACHE III of 52.9 and a hospital mortality of 10.7%. In total, 128 ICU beds were analyzed; 108 (84%) had windows. Pre-illness photoperiod ranged from 259 to 421 hours in the prior month. A shorter photoperiod was associated with a reduced risk of death: for each 1-hour decrease, the adjusted OR was 0.997 (0.994 to 0.999, p = 0.03). In the ICU, there was near complete (99.6%) degradation of natural light from outside to the ICU bed. Thus, light exposure once in the ICU approached zero; the 24-hour insolation was 0.005 ± 0.003 kWh/m² with little diurnal variation. There was no association between ICU photoperiod or insolation and mortality. Consistent with the winter immunoenhancement theory, a shorter photoperiod in the month before critical illness is associated with a reduced risk of death. Once in the ICU, patients are

  4. Observations of the Zodiacal Light during the cruising phase of PLANET-C/VCO Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Munetaka

    We present an observing project in the cruising phase of PLANET-C/VCO (Venus Climate Orbiter) mission. PLANET-C mission will give us a unique opportunity to observe the zodiacal light from various viewing points in the solar system without any contaminations of sky brightness, and will map the spatial distribution of the zodiacal dust cloud along the heliocentric distance, the resonance structures, the local emissivity, and small clumps in the cloud complex. "IR2" camera onboard PLANET-C, whose main target is to monitor the Venusian atmosphere at near infrared wavelength, is designed to extend its sensitivities to faint zodiacal light, and to realize very stable response for accurate measurement. A PtSi infrared sensor is developed for the dedicated use of IR2 camera, which has a large dynamical range covering bright Venusian surface down to the faint flux of the zodiacal light. The current status of the detector development is also presented in this talk. Very significant problem on the zodiacal dust cloud is the origin itself, since the lifetime of the interplanetary dust under the Poynting-Robertson drag is much shorter than the age of the solar system. PLANET-C capabilities such as good sensitivities for extended target, unique viewing points, fine spatial resolutions will open a new horizon for these studies.

  5. Experimental observation of stochastic, periodic, and localized light structures in a brillouin cavity system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yingchun; Feng, Qi; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Zhongxuan; Tang, Xin; Lin, Chengyou; Chen, Zhaoyang

    2017-06-01

    It has been an important research subject to find new nonlinear optical phenomena. In this paper, we report the experimental observation of stochastic, periodic, and localized light structures in a super long single-mode standard fiber with external optical feedback provided by the fiber end. The end facet reflection provides an analogous Fabry-Perot stimulated Brillouin resonator cavity. By increasing the pump power to exceed stimulated Brillouin scattering threshold, we observed light structures exhibiting extremely rich temporal-pulse characteristics that had never been reported in literature before, including supercontinuum background generation, the localization of periodic optical structure formation, fission, and compression. These optical structures are of period-doubling distribution and have different recurrence rates. What is more interesting is that we have observed sets of low frequency bipolar cycle-pulse trains that is often seen in the electrical field and hardly seen in pure optical system. Real-time specification of dynamical temporal regimes of laser operation may bring new insight into rich underlying nonlinear physics of practical fiber cavity systems. Therefore, some new nonlinear optical phenomena have been observed.

  6. The Impact of Light Pollution on Islamic New Moon (hilal Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Nafhatun Md Shariff

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Muslims has differentiated between new moon and Islamic new moon (hilal. The determination of first day of months based on visibility of Islamic new moon (hilal i.e. sightings of the first sliver of the waxing moon marking the start of each month. One major issue that has affected hilal visibility for many years is misdirected, excessive and obtrusive artificial light. The objective of this research is to study the impact of light pollution on the visibility of hilal. The data were taken using Sky Quality Meter (SQM which records the visual magnitudes per square arcsecond (mpsas to measure sky limiting magnitude. Result showed that reading between 16-22 mpsas, the chances to witness hilal is high. Any lower than 16mpsas, the hilal is not visible. The main result of this research is to find out a vital parameter of hilal observations which leads to propose a new criterion i.e. sky limiting magnitude.

  7. Light nuclides observed in the fission and fragmentation of 238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricciardi, M.V.; Schmidt, K.H.; Benlliure, J.

    2001-05-01

    Light nuclides produced in collisions of 1 A.GeV 238 U with protons and titanium have been fully identified with a high-resolution forward magnetic spectrometer, the fragment separator (FRS), at GSI, and for each nuclide an extremely precise determination of the velocity has been performed. The so-obtained information on the velocity shows that the very asymmetric fission of uranium, in the 238 U + p reaction, produces neutron-rich isotopes of elements down to around charge 10. New important features of the fragmentation of 238 U, concerning the velocity and the N/Z-ratio of these light fragments, and a peculiar even-odd structure in N=Z nuclei, have also been observed. (orig.)

  8. Comparison of the light flash phenomena observed in space and in laboratory experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNulty, P.J.; Pease, V.P.; Bond, V.P.

    1976-01-01

    Astronauts on Apollo and Skylab missions have reported observing a variety of visual phenomena when their eyes were closed and adapted to darkness. These observations were studied under controlled conditions during a number of sessions on board Apollo and Skylab spacecraft and the data available to date on these so-called light flashes is in the form of descriptions of the phenomena and frequency of occurrence. Similar visual phenomena have been demonstrated in a number of laboratories by exposing the eyes of human subjects to beams of neutrons, alphas, pions, and protons. More than one physical mechanism is involved in the laboratory and space phenomena. No direct comparison of the laboratory and space observations has been made by observers who have experienced both. However, the range of visual phenomena observed in the laboratory is consistent with the Apollo and Skylab observations. Measured detection efficiencies can be used to estimate the frequencies with which various phenomena would be observed if the subject was exposed to cosmic rays in space

  9. Properties of light flavour baryons in hypercentral quark model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The light flavour baryons are studied within the quark model using the hypercentral description of the three-body system. ... Department of Physics, Sardar Patel University, Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120, India; Department of Physics, S.V. National Institute of Technology, Surat 395 007, India; Department of Physical Sciences, ...

  10. Investigating Students' Mental Models about the Quantization of Light, Energy, and Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didis, Nilüfer; Eryilmaz, Ali; Erkoç, Sakir

    2014-01-01

    This paper is the first part of a multiphase study examining students' mental models about the quantization of physical observables--light, energy, and angular momentum. Thirty-one second-year physics and physics education college students who were taking a modern physics course participated in the study. The qualitative analysis of data revealed…

  11. Modelling 1-minute directional observations of the global irradiance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thejll, Peter; Pagh Nielsen, Kristian; Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Direct and diffuse irradiances from the sky has been collected at 1-minute intervals for about a year from the experimental station at the Technical University of Denmark for the IEA project "Solar Resource Assessment and Forecasting". These data were gathered by pyrheliometers tracking the Sun, as well as with apertured pyranometers gathering 1/8th and 1/16th of the light from the sky in 45 degree azimuthal ranges pointed around the compass. The data are gathered in order to develop detailed models of the potentially available solar energy and its variations at high temporal resolution in order to gain a more detailed understanding of the solar resource. This is important for a better understanding of the sub-grid scale cloud variation that cannot be resolved with climate and weather models. It is also important for optimizing the operation of active solar energy systems such as photovoltaic plants and thermal solar collector arrays, and for passive solar energy and lighting to buildings. We present regression-based modelling of the observed data, and focus, here, on the statistical properties of the model fits. Using models based on the one hand on what is found in the literature and on physical expectations, and on the other hand on purely statistical models, we find solutions that can explain up to 90% of the variance in global radiation. The models leaning on physical insights include terms for the direct solar radiation, a term for the circum-solar radiation, a diffuse term and a term for the horizon brightening/darkening. The purely statistical model is found using data- and formula-validation approaches picking model expressions from a general catalogue of possible formulae. The method allows nesting of expressions, and the results found are dependent on and heavily constrained by the cross-validation carried out on statistically independent testing and training data-sets. Slightly better fits -- in terms of variance explained -- is found using the purely

  12. Light-limited growth and competition for light in well-mixed aquatic environments : An elementary model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Jef; Weissing, F.J.

    Light is never distributed homogeneously since it forms a gradient over biomass. As a consequence, the common theories on nutrient competition are not applicable to competition for light. In this paper, we investigate a model for light-limited growth and competition among phytoplankton species in a

  13. Modeling of photoluminescence in laser-based lighting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzizyrli, Elisavet; Tinne, Nadine; Lachmayer, Roland; Neumann, Jörg; Kracht, Dietmar

    2017-12-01

    The development of laser-based lighting systems has been the latest step towards a revolution in illumination technology brought about by solid-state lighting. Laser-activated remote phosphor systems produce white light sources with significantly higher luminance than LEDs. The weak point of such systems is often considered to be the conversion element. The high-intensity exciting laser beam in combination with the limited thermal conductivity of ceramic phosphor materials leads to thermal quenching, the phenomenon in which the emission efficiency decreases as temperature rises. For this reason, the aim of the presented study is the modeling of remote phosphor systems in order to investigate their thermal limitations and to calculate the parameters for optimizing the efficiency of such systems. The common approach to simulate remote phosphor systems utilizes a combination of different tools such as ray tracing algorithms and wave optics tools for describing the incident and converted light, whereas the modeling of the conversion process itself, i.e. photoluminescence, in most cases is circumvented by using the absorption and emission spectra of the phosphor material. In this study, we describe the processes involved in luminescence quantum-mechanically using the single-configurational-coordinate diagram as well as the Franck-Condon principle and propose a simulation model that incorporates the temperature dependence of these processes. Following an increasing awareness of climate change and environmental issues, the development of ecologically friendly lighting systems featuring low power consumption and high luminous efficiency is imperative more than ever. The better understanding of laser-based lighting systems is an important step towards that aim as they may improve on LEDs in the near future.

  14. Postirradiation changes in rat brain. Observations in light- and scanning microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiczka-Wojczuk, J.; Sosnierz, M.; Bialas, B.; Wazna-Bogunska, C.

    1977-01-01

    Irradiation changes in central nervous system of the rat were evaluated. Fifty rats irradiated by a single dose of 1000 R were used. A special attention was paid to changes in ventricular ependyma. The changes observed in scanning microscope consisted of loss of cilia, swelling of ependymal cells and changes in their nuclear profiles. The changes presented in light microscope were typical for postirradiation damage of the brain. The authors express the opinion that scanning microscope offers a valuable, complementary tool for routine neuropathological investigations. (author)

  15. Model independent control of lightly damped noise/vibration systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing

    2008-07-01

    Feedforward control is a popular strategy of active noise/vibration control. In well-damped noise/vibration systems, path transfer functions from actuators to sensors can be modeled by finite impulse response (FIR) filters with negligible errors. It is possible to implement noninvasive model independent feedforward control by a recently proposed method called orthogonal adaptation. In lightly damped noise/vibration systems, however, path transfer functions have infinite impulse responses (IIRs) that cause difficulties in design and implementation of broadband feedforward controllers. A major source of difficulties is model error if IIR path transfer functions are approximated by FIR filters. In general, active control performance deteriorates as model error increases. In this study, a new method is proposed to design and implement model independent feedforward controllers for broadband in lightly damped noise/vibration systems. It is shown analytically that the proposed method is able to drive the convergence of a noninvasive model independent feedforward controller to improve broadband control in lightly damped noise/vibration systems. The controller is optimized in the minimum H2 norm sense. Experiment results are presented to verify the analytical results.

  16. Models Constraints from Observations of Active Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffel, R.; Pastoriza, M. G.; Rodríguez-Ardila, A.; Dametto, N. Z.; Ruschel-Dutra, D.; Riffel, R. A.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Martins, L. P.; Mason, R.; Ho, L. C.; Palomar XD Team

    2015-08-01

    Studying the unresolved stellar content of galaxies generally involves disentangling the various components contributing to the spectral energy distribution (SED), and fitting a combination of simple stellar populations (SSPs) to derive information about age, metallicity, and star formation history. In the near-infrared (NIR, 0.85-2.5 μm), the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase - the last stage of the evolution of intermediate-mass (M ≲ 6 M⊙) stars - is a particularly important component of the SSP models. These stars can dominate the emission of stellar populations with ages ˜ 0.2-2 Gyr, being responsible for roughly half of the luminosity in the K band. In addition, when trying to describe the continuum observed in active galactic nuclei, the signatures of the central engine and from the dusty torus cannot be ignored. Over the past several years we have developed a method to disentangle these three components. Our synthesis shows significant differences between Seyfert 1 (Sy 1) and Seyfert 2 (Sy 2) galaxies. The central few hundred parsecs of our galaxy sample contain a substantial fraction of intermediate-age populations with a mean metallicity near solar. Two-dimensional mapping of the near-infrared stellar population of the nuclear region of active galaxies suggests that there is a spatial correlation between the intermediate-age stellar population and a partial ring of low stellar velocity dispersion (σ*). Such an age is consistent with a scenario in which the origin of the low-σ* rings is a past event which triggered an inflow of gas and formed stars which still keep the colder kinematics of the gas from which they have formed. We also discuss the fingerprints of features attributed to TP-AGB stars in the spectra of the nuclear regions of nearby galaxies.

  17. The ciliary corona: physical model and simulation of the fine needles radiating from point light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Thomas J T P; Hagenouw, Michiel P J; Coppens, Joris E

    2005-07-01

    Most people see, around bright lights against dark backgrounds, a radiating pattern of numerous fine, slightly colored needles of light-the so called ciliary corona. The purpose of this study was to try to explain this phenomenon. Recently, it has been shown that light-scattering in the eye, measured psychophysically and on human donor lenses, can be explained assuming the presence of specific distributions of small particles in the eye. Light entering the eye is diffracted by these particles. Each such particle causes a circular diffraction pattern on the retina of tens of degrees, much like the well-known Airy pattern. The optics of combining many such diffraction patterns was modeled and the resultant pattern simulated graphically. The simulations were compared with observations on the ciliary corona, as seen by the natural eye. The diffraction discs originating from all the particles coherently superimposed on the retina. Because of phase differences this resulted in breaking the Airy-like discs into a fine spotted pattern when monochromatic light was used. For white (polychromatic) light, the spots line up to form the very fine-line pattern seen in the ciliary corona. Details such as the width and color of the needles follow from the theoretical treatment and were demonstrated by simulations. The details of the ciliary corona can be understood on the basis of polychromatic light-scattering by the particles predicted to be present in human eye lenses on the basis of light-scattering studies of donor lenses.

  18. Characterization, Modeling, and Optimization of Light-Emitting Diode Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorseth, Anders

    This thesis explores, characterization, modeling, and optimization of light-emitting diodes (LED) for general illumination. An automated setup has been developed for spectral radiometric characterization of LED components with precise control of the settings of forward current and operating...... temperature. The automated setup has been used to characterize commercial LED components with respect to multiple settings. It is shown that the droop in quantum efficiency can be approximated by a simple parabolic function. The investigated models of the spectral power distributions (SPD) from LEDs...... comparing the chromaticity of the measured SPD with tted models, the deviation is found to be larger than the lower limit of human color perception. A method has been developed to optimize multicolored cluster LED systems with respect to light quality, using multi objective optimization. The results...

  19. Should we trust models or observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellsaesser, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    Scientists and laymen alike already trust observational data more than theories-this is made explicit in all formalizations of the scientific method. It was demonstrated again during the Supersonic Transport (SST) controversy by the continued efforts to reconcile the computed effect of the 1961-62 nuclear test series on the ozone layer with the observational record. Scientists, caught in the focus of the political limelight, sometimes, demonstrated their faith in the primacy of observations by studiously ignoring or dismissing as erroneous data at variance with the prevailing theoretical consensus-thereby stalling the theoretical modifications required to accommodate the observations. (author)

  20. Role of light satellites in the high-resolution Earth observation domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Moshe

    1999-12-01

    Current 'classic' applications using and exploring space based earth imagery are exclusive, narrow niche tailored, expensive and hardly accessible. On the other side new, inexpensive and widely used 'consumable' applications will be only developed concurrently to the availability of appropriate imagery allowing that process. A part of these applications can be imagined today, like WWW based 'virtual tourism' or news media, but the history of technological, cultural and entertainment evolution teaches us that most of future applications are unpredictable -- they emerge together with the platforms enabling their appearance. The only thing, which can be ultimately stated, is that the definitive condition for such applications is the availability of the proper imagery platform providing low cost, high resolution, large area, quick response, simple accessibility and quick dissemination of the raw picture. This platform is a constellation of Earth Observation satellites. Up to 1995 the Space Based High Resolution Earth Observation Domain was dominated by heavy, super-expensive and very inflexible birds. The launch of Israeli OFEQ-3 Satellite by MBT Division of Israel Aircraft Industries (IAI) marked the entrance to new era of light, smart and cheap Low Earth Orbited Imaging satellites. The Earth Resource Observation System (EROS) initiated by West Indian Space, is based on OFEQ class Satellites design and it is capable to gather visual data of Earth Surface both at high resolution and large image capacity. The main attributes, derived from its compact design, low weight and sophisticated logic and which convert the EROS Satellite to valuable and productive system, are discussed. The major advantages of Light Satellites in High Resolution Earth Observation Domain are presented and WIS guidelines featuring the next generation of LEO Imaging Systems are included.

  1. Modelling light and photosynthesis in the marine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Woźniak

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The overriding and far-reaching aim of our work has been to achieve a good understanding of the processes of light interaction with phytoplankton in the sea and to develop an innovative physical model of photosynthesis in the marine environment, suitable for the remote sensin gof marine primary production. Unlike previous models, the present one takesgreater account of the complexity of the physiological processes in phytoplankton. We have focused in particular on photophysiological processes, which are governed directly or indirectly by light energy, or in which light, besides the nutrient content in and the temperature of seawater, is one of the principal limiting factors.    To achieve this aim we have carried out comprehensive statistical analyses of the natural variability of the main photophysiological properties of phytoplankton and their links with the principal abiotic factors in the sea. These analyses have made use of extensive empirical data gathered in a wide diversity of seas and oceans by Polish and Russian teams as well as by joint Polish-Russian expeditions. Data sets available on the Internet have also been applied. As a result, a set of more or less complex, semi-empirical models of light-stimulated processes occurring in marine phytoplankton cells has been developed. The trophic type of sea, photo-acclimation and the production of photoprotecting carotenoids, chromatic acclimation and the production of various forms of chlorophyll-antennas and photosynthetic carotenoids, cell adaptation by the package effect, light absorption, photosynthesis, photoinhibition, the fluorescence effect, and the activation of PS2 centres are all considered in the models. These take into account not only the influence of light, but also, indirectly, that of the vertical mixing of water; in the case of photosynthesis, the quantum yield has been also formulated as being dependent on the nutrient concentrations and the temperature of seawater

  2. Plant canopy light absorption model with application to wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, J. E.; Lemaster, E. W.

    1978-01-01

    A light absorption model (LAM) for vegetative plant canopies has been derived from the Suits reflectance model. From the LAM the absorption of light in the photosynthetically active region of the spectrum (400-700 nm) has been calculated for a Penjamo wheat crop for several situations including (a) the percent absorption of the incident radiation by a canopy of LAI 3.1 having a four-layer structure, (b) the percent absorption of light by the individual layers within a four-layer canopy and by the underlying soil, (c) the percent absorption of light by each vegetative canopy layer for variable sun angle, and (d) the cumulative solar energy absorbed by the developing wheat canopy as it progresses from a single layer through its growth stages to a three-layer canopy. This calculation is also presented as a function of the leaf area index and is shown to be in agreement with experimental data reported by Kanemasu on Plainsman V wheat.

  3. Sperm head vacuoles--light microscopic and ultrastructural observations: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shucheng; Wang, Ning; He, Bin; Cheng, Jie; Xi, Shui; Wang, Shang-ming; Gao, Yu; Wang, Jiedong

    2012-05-01

    Sperm head vacuoles are easily detectable in human spermatozoa under the electron microscope. A sperm head vacuole is considered abnormal when it exceeds 20% of the head's cross-sectional area. The authors report a rare case of primary spermatozoa deformity with 100% vacuolated head and evaluate the correlation between presence of head vacuoles/nucleus vacuoles and abnormal transformation of nucleoprotamine types, defects of nucleoprotamine, and gene disorders of chromatin/chromosome/spermatogenesis. A 43-year-old male patient with infertility came to the Reproduction Health Center, Hebei, China. Semen was examined in accordance with the WHO criteria, and the spermatozoa were counted. Two hundred spermatozoa were observed both under light microscope and the electronic microscope. About 50% of the spermatozoa had head deformities. In the intact spermatozoa, the heads were 100% vacuolated. Under ultrastructural observation, abnormalities were observed and two major types of spermatozoa were detected. In the head of those incompletely mature spermatozoa, four kinds of the nucleus vacuoles were observed. Abnormal spermatozoa with head vacuoles account for the patient infertility.

  4. Observational constraints on successful model of quintessential Inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang [Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing, 400065 (China); Lee, Chung-Chi [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Sami, M. [Centre for Theoretical Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Saridakis, Emmanuel N. [Physics Division, National Technical University of Athens, 15780 Zografou Campus, Athens (Greece); Starobinsky, Alexei A., E-mail: geng@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: lee.chungchi16@gmail.com, E-mail: sami@iucaa.ernet.in, E-mail: Emmanuel_Saridakis@baylor.edu, E-mail: alstar@landau.ac.ru [L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, Moscow 119334 (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-01

    We study quintessential inflation using a generalized exponential potential V (φ)∝ exp(−λ φ {sup n} / M {sub Pl} {sup n} ), n >1, the model admits slow-roll inflation at early times and leads to close-to-scaling behaviour in the post inflationary era with an exit to dark energy at late times. We present detailed investigations of the inflationary stage in the light of the Planck 2015 results, study post-inflationary dynamics and analytically confirm the existence of an approximately scaling solution. Additionally, assuming that standard massive neutrinos are non-minimally coupled, makes the field φ dominant once again at late times giving rise to present accelerated expansion of the Universe. We derive observational constraints on the field and time-dependent neutrino masses. In particular, for n =6 (8), the parameter λ is constrained to be, log λ > −7.29 (−11.7); the model produces the spectral index of the power spectrum of primordial scalar (matter density) perturbations as n {sub s} = 0.959 ± 0.001 (0.961 ± 0.001) and tiny tensor-to-scalar ratio, r <1.72 × 10{sup −2} (2.32 × 10{sup −2}) respectively. Consequently, the upper bound on possible values of the sum of neutrino masses Σ m {sub ν} ∼< 2.5 eV significantly enhances compared to that in the standard ΛCDM model.

  5. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Light is all around us. Learn how it is used in art, technology, and engineering. Five easy-to-read chapters explain the science behind light, as well as its real-world applications. Vibrant, full-color photos, bolded glossary words, and a key stats section let readers zoom in even deeper. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Abdo Zoom is a division of ABDO.

  6. U.S. Army anthropometric standards for rotary-wing aviators in the light observation helicopter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, W D; Buescher, T M

    1989-07-01

    U.S. Army anthropometric standards for rotary-wing aviators were examined to determine if the standards allowed an adequate fit of the aviator to the cockpit of the OH-58A "Kiowa" light observation helicopter, which now comprises the overwhelming majority of light helicopters in the active army and reserve forces. Thirty rated aviators with heights less than or equal to 70 in. were examined, and standard anthropometric measurements were made. Army regulations require these measurements on all initial-entry aviation students with heights less than or equal to 68 in. The aviators were then placed in a representative OH-58A cockpit to determine their ability to reach all control surfaces and panel switches. Several aviators greater than 68 in. tall and, therefore, not subject to anthropometric testing upon entry into army aviation, could not perform all cockpit tasks without cockpit changes beyond the limited adjustments in the OH-58A. Several had developed aid devices, especially pads to support forearm-to-thigh "spot welds" to ensure right arm stability on the cyclic control. The same problem was seen with some aviators less than 68 in. in height, who had been anthropometrically evaluated. The present standards do not adequately address functional ability in the OH-58A cockpit, which is the least adjustable cockpit in the combat inventory. Design modifications to accommodate these factors exist and should be used to retrofit existing aircraft and to design future aircrafts.

  7. Bicycle Rider Control: Observations, Modeling & Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Kooijman, J.D.G.

    2012-01-01

    Bicycle designers traditionally develop bicycles based on experience and trial and error. Adopting modern engineering tools to model bicycle and rider dynamics and control is another method for developing bicycles. This method has the potential to evaluate the complete design space, and thereby develop well handling bicycles for specific user groups in a much shorter time span. The recent benchmarking of the Whipple bicycle model for the balance and steer of a bicycle is an opening enabling t...

  8. Observations and light curve solutions of four ultrashort-period binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjurkchieva D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents light curve solutions of our observations of four new ultrashort-period eclipsing binaries with MS components. Two of them have periods almost at the upper limit (0.22 days of the ultrashort-period binaries, while the periods of around 0.18 days of CSS J171508.5+350658 and CSS J214633.8+120016 are amongst the shortest known orbital periods. CSS J171410.0+ 445850, CSS J214633.8+120016 and CSS J224326.0+154532 are over contact binaries with fill out factors around 0.25 while CSS J171508.5+350658 is a semidetached system. The two targets with shortest periods consist of M dwarfs.

  9. White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) at domestic lighting levels and retinal injury in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yu-Man; Wang, Gen-Shuh; Sliney, David; Yang, Chang-Hao; Lee, Li-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) deliver higher levels of blue light to the retina than do conventional domestic light sources. Chronic exposure to high-intensity light (2,000-10,000 lux) has previously been found to result in light-induced retinal injury, but chronic exposure to relatively low-intensity (750 lux) light has not been previously assessed with LEDs in a rodent model. We examined LED-induced retinal neuronal cell damage in the Sprague-Dawley rat using functional, histological, and biochemical measurements. We used blue LEDs (460 nm) and full-spectrum white LEDs, coupled with matching compact fluorescent lights, for exposures. Pathological examinations included electroretinogram, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We also measured free radical production in the retina to determine the oxidative stress level. H&E staining and TEM revealed apoptosis and necrosis of photoreceptors, which indicated blue-light induced photochemical injury of the retina. Free radical production in the retina was increased in LED-exposed groups. IHC staining demonstrated that oxidative stress was associated with retinal injury. Although we found serious retinal light injury in LED groups, the compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) groups showed moderate to mild injury. Our results raise questions about adverse effects on the retina from chronic exposure to LED light compared with other light sources that have less blue light. Thus, we suggest a precautionary approach with regard to the use of blue-rich "white" LEDs for general lighting. Shang YM, Wang GS, Sliney D, Yang CH, Lee LL. 2014. White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) at domestic lighting levels and retinal injury in a rat model. Environ Health Perspect 122:269-276; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307294.

  10. Ultraviolet Light Curves of Gaia16apd in Superluminous Supernova Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolstov, Alexey; Zhiglo, Andrey; Nomoto, Ken’ichi; Blinnikov, Sergei [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Sorokina, Elena [Sternberg Astronomical Institute, M.V.Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119234 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kozyreva, Alexandra, E-mail: alexey.tolstov@ipmu.jp [The Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2017-08-10

    Observations of Gaia16apd revealed extremely luminous ultraviolet emission among superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). Using radiation hydrodynamics simulations, we perform a comparison of UV light curves, color temperatures, and photospheric velocities between the most popular SLSN models: pair-instability supernova, magnetar, and interaction with circumstellar medium. We find that the interaction model is the most promising to explain the extreme UV luminosity of Gaia16apd. The differences in late-time UV emission and in color evolution found between the models can be used to link an observed SLSN event to the most appropriate model. Observations at UV wavelengths can be used to clarify the nature of SLSNe and more attention should be paid to them in future follow-up observations.

  11. EDGE EFFECT MODELING AND STUDY FOR THREE-CHIP RGB LIGHT-EMITTING DIODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Podosinnikov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Subject of study. The paper deals with light quality improvement of multi–chip RGB light-emitting diodes (LEDs and luminaries on their basis. In particular, we have studied the issues of the edge effect reducing, which is non–uniformity of color when observing the source of light under different angles as well as non-uniformity of color distribution on the illuminated surface. Methods. Experimental study of the edge effect has been performed, namely, the analysis of the halo at the periphery of the illuminated area and the non–uniformity of area at the surface of the screen illuminated with RGB LEDs with and without light concentrators. Modeling of illumination distribution at various distances from the source for the system containing four RGB LEDs with reflectors by ZEMAX software has been carried out. Assessment of the uniformity for light distribution via calculating the chromaticity coordinates has been performed. Main results. The possibility of modeling application at the stage of a luminary design is shown on the example of RGB LEDs for assessing the efficiency of light flux usage and colorimetric parameters. Suggested method simplifies significantly the design of luminaries and reduces associated costs. Practical relevance. The findings can be used in the design of luminaries based on RGB LEDs, including the ones with secondary optics elements.

  12. Modelling of particular phenomena observed in PANDA with Gothic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandurski, Th.; Putz, F.; Andreani, M.; Analytis, M.

    2000-01-01

    PANDA is a large scale facility for investigating the long-term decay heat removal from the containment of a next generation 'passive' Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR). The first test series was aimed at the investigation of the long-term LOCA response of the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) for the General Electric (GE) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). Recently, the facility is used in the framework of two European projects for investigating the performance of four passive cooling systems, i.e. the Building Condenser (BC) designed by Siemens for the SWR-1000 long-term containment cooling, the Passive Containment Cooling System for the European Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR), the Containment Plate Condenser (CPC) and the Isolation Condenser (IC) for cooling of a BWR core. The PANDA tests have the dual objectives of improving confidence in the performance of the passive heat removal mechanisms underlying the design of the tested safety systems and extending the data base available for containment analysis code qualification. Among others, the containment analysis code Gothic was chosen for the analysis of particular phenomena observed during the PANDA tests. Ibis paper presents selected safety relevant phenomena observed in the PANDA tests and identified for the analyses and possible approaches for their modeling with Gothic. (author)

  13. Fitting a 3-D analytic model of the coronal mass ejection to observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, S. E.; Biesecker, D.; Fisher, R.; Howard, R. A.; Thompson, B. J.

    1997-01-01

    The application of an analytic magnetohydrodynamic model is presented to observations of the time-dependent explusion of 3D coronal mass ejections (CMEs) out of the solar corona. This model relates the white-light appearance of the CME to its internal magnetic field, which takes the form of a closed bubble, filled with a partly anchored, twisted magnetic flux rope and embedded in an otherwise open background field. The density distribution frozen into the expanding CME expanding field is fully 3D, and can be integrated along the line of sight to reproduce observations of scattered white light. The model is able to reproduce the three conspicuous features often associated with CMEs as observed with white-light coronagraphs: a surrounding high-density region, an internal low-density cavity, and a high-density core. The model also describes the self-similar radial expansion of these structures. By varying the model parameters, the model can be fitted directly to observations of CMEs. It is shown how the model can quantitatively match the polarized brightness contrast of a dark cavity emerging through the lower corona as observed by the HAO Mauna Loa K-coronameter to within the noise level of the data.

  14. Television Advertising and Children's Observational Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Charles K.

    This paper assesses advertising effects on children and adolescents from a social learning theory perspective, emphasizing imitative performance of vicariously reinforced consumption stimuli. The basic elements of social psychologist Albert Bandura's modeling theory are outlined. Then specific derivations from the theory are applied to the problem…

  15. Bicycle Rider Control : Observations, Modeling & Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, J.D.G.

    2012-01-01

    Bicycle designers traditionally develop bicycles based on experience and trial and error. Adopting modern engineering tools to model bicycle and rider dynamics and control is another method for developing bicycles. This method has the potential to evaluate the complete design space, and thereby

  16. Observational consequences of a dark interaction model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, M. de, E-mail: campos@if.uff.b [Roraima Federal University (UFRR), Paricarana, Boa Vista, RO (Brazil). Physics Dept.

    2010-12-15

    We study a model with decay of dark energy and creation of the dark matter particles. We integrate the field equations and find the transition redshift where the evolution process of the universe change the accelerated expansion, and discuss the luminosity distance, acoustic oscillations and the state finder parameters. (author)

  17. Validation of ultraviolet, infrared, and narrow band light alternate light sources for detection of bruises in a pigskin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, Kelly; Byard, Roger W; Winskog, Calle; Langlois, Neil E I

    2016-12-01

    Alternate light sources such as ultraviolet, narrow band, and infrared have been used in an attempt to reveal the presence of bruising that is not otherwise apparent (inapparent). The following study evaluates the ability of alternate light sources to enhance visibility of bruises by employing an objective assessment of digital photography images in conjunction with histology. A pigskin model was employed with bruises created by injection of blood to be not visible or barely visible (inapparent) under white light. The pigskin was photographed using alternate light source illumination. Images were assessed using the program Fiji ® to measure enhancement in terms of bruise length (cm). Photography results were compared with histology to confirm the presence of bruising. Violet and blue light sources produced the greatest enhancement, both with a p light sources in this study, indicating that light sources are not specific, and that their use to enhance the visibility of bruising should be undertaken with caution.

  18. Scaling properties in single collision model of light ion reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukanic, J.; Simovic, R.

    2004-01-01

    Light ion reflection from solids in the keV energy region has been studied within the single collision model. Particle and energy reflection coefficients as functions of the scaled transport cross section have been calculated numerically by utilizing the exact scattering function for the Kr-C potential and analytically with an effective power approximation for the same potential. The obtained analytical formulae approximate very accurately to the numerical results. Comparison of the calculated reflection coefficients with the experimental data and computer simulations for different light ion-heavy target combinations shows that the scaled transport cross section remains a convenient scaling parameter in the single collision domain, as adopted previously in multiple collision theory

  19. Nucleon parton distributions in a light-front quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutsche, Thomas [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany); Lyubovitskij, Valery E. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany); Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Laboratory of Particle Physics, Mathematical Physics Department, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Departamento de Fisica y Centro Cientifico Tecnologico de Valparaiso (CCTVal), Valparaiso (Chile); Schmidt, Ivan [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Departamento de Fisica y Centro Cientifico Tecnologico de Valparaiso (CCTVal), Valparaiso (Chile)

    2017-02-15

    Continuing our analysis of parton distributions in the nucleon, we extend our light-front quark model in order to obtain both the helicity-independent and the helicity-dependent parton distributions, analytically matching the results of global fits at the initial scale μ∝ 1 GeV; they also contain the correct Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution. We also calculate the transverse parton, Wigner and Husimi distributions from a unified point of view, using our light-front wave functions and expressing them in terms of the parton distributions q{sub v}(x) and δq{sub v}(x). Our results are very relevant for the current and future program of the COMPASS experiment at SPS (CERN). (orig.)

  20. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Ditchburn, R W

    1963-01-01

    This classic study, available for the first time in paperback, clearly demonstrates how quantum theory is a natural development of wave theory, and how these two theories, once thought to be irreconcilable, together comprise a single valid theory of light. Aimed at students with an intermediate-level knowledge of physics, the book first offers a historical introduction to the subject, then covers topics such as wave theory, interference, diffraction, Huygens' Principle, Fermat's Principle, and the accuracy of optical measurements. Additional topics include the velocity of light, relativistic o

  1. ADOPT: A Historically Validated Light Duty Vehicle Consumer Choice Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooker, A.; Gonder, J.; Lopp, S.; Ward, J.

    2015-05-04

    The Automotive Deployment Option Projection Tool (ADOPT) is a light-duty vehicle consumer choice and stock model supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office. It estimates technology improvement impacts on U.S. light-duty vehicles sales, petroleum use, and greenhouse gas emissions. ADOPT uses techniques from the multinomial logit method and the mixed logit method estimate sales. Specifically, it estimates sales based on the weighted value of key attributes including vehicle price, fuel cost, acceleration, range and usable volume. The average importance of several attributes changes nonlinearly across its range and changes with income. For several attributes, a distribution of importance around the average value is used to represent consumer heterogeneity. The majority of existing vehicle makes, models, and trims are included to fully represent the market. The Corporate Average Fuel Economy regulations are enforced. The sales feed into the ADOPT stock model. It captures key aspects for summing petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions This includes capturing the change in vehicle miles traveled by vehicle age, the creation of new model options based on the success of existing vehicles, new vehicle option introduction rate limits, and survival rates by vehicle age. ADOPT has been extensively validated with historical sales data. It matches in key dimensions including sales by fuel economy, acceleration, price, vehicle size class, and powertrain across multiple years. A graphical user interface provides easy and efficient use. It manages the inputs, simulation, and results.

  2. Modeling of lighting behaviour of a hybrid lighting system in inner spaces of Building of Electrical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado, L.; Osma, G.; Villamizar, R.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the modelling of lighting behaviour of a hybrid lighting system - HLS in inner spaces for tropical climate. HLS aims to mitigate the problem of high electricity consumption used by artificial lighting in buildings. These systems integrate intelligently the daylight and artificial light through control strategies. However, selection of these strategies usually depends on expertise of designer and of available budget. In order to improve the selection process of the control strategies, this paper analyses the Electrical Engineering Building (EEB) case, initially modelling of lighting behaviour is established for the HLS of a classroom and an office. This allows estimating the illuminance level of the mixed lighting in the space, and energy consumption by artificial light according to different lighting control techniques, a control strategy based on occupancy and a combination of them. The model considers the concept of Daylight Factor (DF) for the estimating of daylight illuminance on the work plane for tropical climatic conditions. The validation of the model was carried out by comparing the measured and model-estimated indoor illuminances.

  3. Modeling and predicting the growth boundary of Listeria monocytogenes in lightly preserved seafood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejlholm, Ole; Dalgaard, Paw

    2007-01-01

    in lightly preserved seafood. The developed growth boundary model accurately predicted growth and no-growth responses in 68 of 71 examined experiments from the present study as well as from literature data. Growth was predicted for three batches of naturally contaminated cold-smoked salmon when a no......-growth response was actually observed, indicating that the model is fail-safe. The developed model predicts both the growth boundary and growth rate of L. monocytogenes and seems useful for the risk management of lightly preserved seafood. Particularly, the model facilitates the identification of product...... characteristics required to prevent the growth of L. monocytogenes, thereby making it possible to identify critical control points, and is useful for compliance with the new European Union regulation on ready-to-eat foods (EC 2073/2005)....

  4. A Search for Beyond Standard Model Light Bosons Decaying into Muon Pairs

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A dataset corresponding to $2.8~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ of proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 13~\\mathrm{TeV}$ was recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC. These data are used to search for new light bosons with a mass in the range $0.25-8.5~\\mathrm{GeV}/c^2$ decaying into muon pairs. No excess is observed in the data, and a model-independent upper limit on the product of the cross section, branching fraction and acceptance is derived. The results are interpreted in the context of two benchmark models, namely, the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model, and dark SUSY models including those predicting a non-negligible light boson lifetime.

  5. Search on e+ - e- Pair and Observation of a New Light Neutral Boson

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nagdy, M. S.; Abdelsalam, A.; Badawy, B. M.

    2011-06-01

    We present a unified description of e+ e- dilepton production in heavy ion collisions at relativistic (3.7A GeV) and ultrarelativistic (200A GeV) energies. From the interactions of [12C and 22Ne] at 3.7A GeV and 32S at 200A GeV with nuclear emulsion, 134 e+ e- pairs are observed. The differential distribution of the energy asymmetry of pairs is compared to a background observation at Bristol. The events are consistent in a way that, they scale well in a single curve of exponential decay. This ensures correct asymptotics and provides a unified description of mesonic decay. The existence of light neutral boson of mass (1.55±0.14 MeV/c2) is questionable, because the candidate peak is seen in the invariant mass spectrum of its decay into e+ e- pairs. The data seem to suggest the production and subsequent decay of short lived neutral boson with lifetime of the order of 10-16 S.

  6. Interacting Dark Energy Models and Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, Hamed; Urioste, Jazmin

    2017-01-01

    Dark energy is one of the mysteries of the twenty first century. Although there are candidates resembling some features of dark energy, there is no single model describing all the properties of dark energy. Dark energy is believed to be the most dominant component of the cosmic inventory, but a lot of models do not consider any interaction between dark energy and other constituents of the cosmic inventory. Introducing an interaction will change the equation governing the behavior of dark energy and matter and creates new ways to explain cosmic coincidence problem. In this work we studied how the Hubble parameter and density parameters evolve with time in the presence of certain types of interaction. The interaction serves as a way to convert dark energy into matter to avoid a dark energy-dominated universe by creating new equilibrium points for the differential equations. Then we will use numerical analysis to predict the values of distance moduli at different redshifts and compare them to the values for the distance moduli obtained by WMAP (Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe). Undergraduate Student

  7. Modeling light use efficiency in a subtropical mangrove forest equipped with CO2 eddy covariance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Barr

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of mangrove ecosystems in the global carbon budget, the relationships between environmental drivers and carbon dynamics in these forests remain poorly understood. This limited understanding is partly a result of the challenges associated with in situ flux studies. Tower-based CO2 eddy covariance (EC systems are installed in only a few mangrove forests worldwide, and the longest EC record from the Florida Everglades contains less than 9 years of observations. A primary goal of the present study was to develop a methodology to estimate canopy-scale photosynthetic light use efficiency in this forest. These tower-based observations represent a basis for associating CO2 fluxes with canopy light use properties, and thus provide the means for utilizing satellite-based reflectance data for larger scale investigations. We present a model for mangrove canopy light use efficiency utilizing the enhanced green vegetation index (EVI derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS that is capable of predicting changes in mangrove forest CO2 fluxes caused by a hurricane disturbance and changes in regional environmental conditions, including temperature and salinity. Model parameters are solved for in a Bayesian framework. The model structure requires estimates of ecosystem respiration (RE, and we present the first ever tower-based estimates of mangrove forest RE derived from nighttime CO2 fluxes. Our investigation is also the first to show the effects of salinity on mangrove forest CO2 uptake, which declines 5% per each 10 parts per thousand (ppt increase in salinity. Light use efficiency in this forest declines with increasing daily photosynthetic active radiation, which is an important departure from the assumption of constant light use efficiency typically applied in satellite-driven models. The model developed here provides a framework for estimating CO2 uptake by these forests from reflectance data and

  8. Modeling light use efficiency in a subtropical mangrove forest equipped with CO2 eddy covariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, J.G.; Engel, V.; Fuentes, J.D.; Fuller, D.O.; Kwon, H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of mangrove ecosystems in the global carbon budget, the relationships between environmental drivers and carbon dynamics in these forests remain poorly understood. This limited understanding is partly a result of the challenges associated with in situ flux studies. Tower-based CO2 eddy covariance (EC) systems are installed in only a few mangrove forests worldwide, and the longest EC record from the Florida Everglades contains less than 9 years of observations. A primary goal of the present study was to develop a methodology to estimate canopy-scale photosynthetic light use efficiency in this forest. These tower-based observations represent a basis for associating CO2 fluxes with canopy light use properties, and thus provide the means for utilizing satellite-based reflectance data for larger scale investigations. We present a model for mangrove canopy light use efficiency utilizing the enhanced green vegetation index (EVI) derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) that is capable of predicting changes in mangrove forest CO2 fluxes caused by a hurricane disturbance and changes in regional environmental conditions, including temperature and salinity. Model parameters are solved for in a Bayesian framework. The model structure requires estimates of ecosystem respiration (RE), and we present the first ever tower-based estimates of mangrove forest RE derived from nighttime CO2 fluxes. Our investigation is also the first to show the effects of salinity on mangrove forest CO2 uptake, which declines 5% per each 10 parts per thousand (ppt) increase in salinity. Light use efficiency in this forest declines with increasing daily photosynthetic active radiation, which is an important departure from the assumption of constant light use efficiency typically applied in satellite-driven models. The model developed here provides a framework for estimating CO2 uptake by these forests from reflectance data and information about

  9. Comparison of observed and modeled longwave radiances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Kenneth; Coakley, J. A., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Calculated LW radiances based on NMC profiles of temperature and humidities for the month of July 1985 are obtained using standard procedures for performing radiative transfer calculations, and are within 3 percent (against a standard deviation of 4 percent) for global daytime land comparsions and within 1 percent (against a standard deviation of 1.5 percent) for a case study located over North America. The calculated values over the global data set show a slight trend with the surface temperature, and since there is no obvious trend with the column amount of water vapor, it is argued that the trend with temperature is evidence that absorption by other components (i.e., CO2O3 and other trace gases not included in these calculations) in the model could be improved.

  10. Light aircraft sound transmission studies - Noise reduction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwal, Mahabir S.; Heitman, Karen E.; Crocker, Malcolm J.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental tests conducted on the fuselage of a single-engine Piper Cherokee light aircraft suggest that the cabin interior noise can be reduced by increasing the transmission loss of the dominant sound transmission paths and/or by increasing the cabin interior sound absorption. The validity of using a simple room equation model to predict the cabin interior sound-pressure level for different fuselage and exterior sound field conditions is also presented. The room equation model is based on the sound power flow balance for the cabin space and utilizes the measured transmitted sound intensity data. The room equation model predictions were considered good enough to be used for preliminary acoustical design studies.

  11. Design and modeling of a light powered biomimicry micropump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Tsun-kay Jackie; Liu, Jin; Dutta, Prashanta

    2015-06-01

    The design of compact micropumps to provide steady flow has been an on-going challenge in the field of microfluidics. In this work, a novel micropump concept is introduced utilizing bacteriorhodopsin and sugar transporter proteins. The micropump utilizes light energy to activate the transporter proteins, which create an osmotic pressure gradient and drive the fluid flow. The capability of the bio inspired micropump is demonstrated using a quasi 1D numerical model, where the contributions of bacteriorhodopsin and sugar transporter proteins are taken care of by appropriate flux boundary conditions in the flow channel. Proton flux created by the bacteriorhodopsin proteins is compared with experimental results to obtain the appropriate working conditions of the proteins. To identify the pumping capability, we also investigate the influences of several key parameters, such as the membrane fraction of transporter proteins, membrane proton permeability and the presence of light. Our results show that there is a wide bacteriorhodopsin membrane fraction range (from 0.2 to 10%) at which fluid flow stays nearly at its maximum value. Numerical results also indicate that lipid membranes with low proton permeability can effectively control the light source as a method to turn on/off fluid flow. This capability allows the micropump to be activated and shut off remotely without bulky support equipment. In comparison with existing micropumps, this pump generates higher pressures than mechanical pumps. It can produce peak fluid flow and shutoff head comparable to other non-mechanical pumps.

  12. Very light Higgs bosons in extended models at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, Alexander; Guedes, Renato; Santos, Rui; Moretti, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    The Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider experiments have constrained the mass of the standard model (SM) Higgs boson to be above 114.4 GeV. This bound applies to all extensions of the SM where the coupling of a Higgs boson to the Z boson and also the Higgs decay profile do not differ much from the SM one. However, in scenarios with extended Higgs sectors, this coupling can be made very small by a suitable choice of the parameters of the model. In such cases, the lightest CP-even Higgs boson mass can in turn be made very small. Such a very light Higgs state, with a mass of the order of the Z boson one or even smaller, could have escaped detection at LEP. In this work we perform a detailed parton level study on the feasibility of the detection of such a very light Higgs particle at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the production process pp→hj→τ + τ - j, where j is a resolved jet. We conclude that there are several models where such a Higgs state could be detected at the LHC with early data.

  13. An analytical model of nonproportional scintillator light yield in terms of recombination rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizarri, G.; Moses, W. W.; Singh, J.; Vasil'ev, A. N.; Williams, R. T.

    2009-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the local light yield as a function of the local deposited energy (-dE/dx) and total scintillation yield integrated over the track of an electron of initial energy E are derived from radiative and/or nonradiative rates of first through third order in density of electronic excitations. The model is formulated in terms of rate constants, some of which can be determined independently from time-resolved spectroscopy and others estimated from measured light yield efficiency as a constraint assumed to apply in each kinetic order. The rates and parameters are used in the theory to calculate scintillation yield versus primary electron energy for comparison to published experimental results on four scintillators. Influence of the track radius on the yield is also discussed. Results are found to be qualitatively consistent with the observed scintillation light yield. The theory can be applied to any scintillator if the rates of the radiative and nonradiative processes are known

  14. Does Light from Steady Sources Bear Any Observable Imprint of the Dispersive Intergalactic Medium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieu, Richard; Duan, Lingze

    2018-02-01

    There has recently been some interest in the prospect of detecting ionized intergalactic baryons by examining the properties of incoherent light from background cosmological sources, namely quasars. Although the paper by Lieu et al. proposed a way forward, it was refuted by the later theoretical work of Hirata & McQuinn and the observational study of Hales et al. In this paper we investigate in detail the manner in which incoherent radiation passes through a dispersive medium both from the frameworks of classical and quantum electrodynamics, leading us to conclude that the premise of Lieu et al. would only work if the pulses involved are genuinely classical ones containing many photons per pulse; unfortunately, each photon must not be treated as a pulse that is susceptible to dispersive broadening. We are nevertheless able to change the tone of the paper at this juncture by pointing out that because current technology allows one to measure the phase of individual modes of radio waves from a distant source, the most reliable way of obtaining irrefutable evidence of dispersion, namely via the detection of its unique signature of a quadratic spectral phase, may well be already accessible. We demonstrate how this technique is only applied to measure the column density of the ionized intergalactic medium.

  15. Light and electron microscope observations on Nephroselmis gaoae sp. nov. (Prasinophyceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, C. K.; Jiao-Fen, Chen; Zhe-Fu, Zhang; Hui-Qi, Zhang

    1994-09-01

    Nephroselmis gaoae sp. nov. is described on the basis of light and electron microscope observations of cultured material originally collected and isolated from seawater of Jiaozhou Bay, Qingdao, China. The periplasts on the cell body and flagella are covered by five types of scales, two types on the flagella and three on the body. Among these, the morphology and the number of spines of large stellate body scales differ remarkably from those of previously described species of Nephroselmis. Apart from these, the unusual fine structure of the eyespot (stigma) is very characteristic. As in the other species of Nephroselmis, the eyespot lies immediately under the two-membraned chloroplast envelope; unlike the others, however, it is not composed of a number of osmiophilic globules, but consists of about 14 curved rod-shaped osmiophilic bodies arranged loosely and randomly. This feature distinguishes the present new species not only from the other species of Nephroselmis but also from the other motile algal species, the eyespots structure of which had been previously described.

  16. The red-light running behavior of electric bike riders and cyclists at urban intersections in China: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changxu; Yao, Lin; Zhang, Kan

    2012-11-01

    Electric bikes and regular bicycles play an important role in the urban transportation system of China. Red-light running is a type of highly dangerous behavior of two-wheeled riders. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the rate, associated factors, and behavior characteristics of two-wheelers' red-light running in China. A field observational study was conducted using two synchronized video cameras at three signalized intersections in Beijing. A total of 451 two-wheelers facing a red light (222 e-bike riders and 229 cyclists) were observed and analyzed. The results showed that 56% of the two-wheelers crossed the intersection against a red light. Age was found to be a significant variable for predicting red-light runners, with the young and middle-aged riders being more likely than the old ones to run against a red light. The logistic regression analysis also indicated that the probability of a rider running a red light was higher when she or he was alone, when there were fewer riders waiting, and when there were riders already crossing on red. Further analysis of crossing behavior revealed that the majority of red-light running occurred in the early and late stages of a red-light cycle. Two-wheelers' crossing behavior was categorized into three distinct types: law-obeying (44%), risk-taking (31%) and opportunistic (25%). Males were more likely to act in a risk-taking manner than females, and so were the young and middle-aged riders than the old ones. These findings provide valuable insights in understanding two-wheelers' red-light running behaviors, and their implications in improving road safety were discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A local model of light interaction with transparent crystalline media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debelov, Victor A; Kozlov, Dmitry S

    2013-08-01

    The paper is devoted to the derivation of a bidirectional distribution function for crystals, which specifies all outgoing rays for a ray coming to the boundary of two transparent crystalline media with different optical properties, i.e., a particular mineral, directions of optical axes if they exist, and other features. A local model of interaction based on the notion of polarized light ray is introduced, which is specified by a geometric ray, its polarization state, light intensity, and so on. The computational algorithm that is suggested allows computing the directions and other properties of all (up to four) outgoing rays. In this paper, isotropic, uniaxial, and biaxial crystals are processed in a similar manner. The correctness of the model is validated by comparison of photos of real uniaxial crystals with corresponding computed images. The case of biaxial crystals is validated by testing the effect of conical refraction. Specifications of a series of tests devoted to rendering of optically different objects is presented also.

  18. Light absorption and morphological properties of soot-containing aerosols observed at an East Asian outflow site, Noto Peninsula, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    S. Ueda; S. Ueda; T. Nakayama; T. Nakayama; F. Taketani; K. Adachi; A. Matsuki; Y. Iwamoto; Y. Iwamoto; Y. Sadanaga; Y. Matsumi; Y. Matsumi

    2016-01-01

    The coating of black carbon (BC) with inorganic salts and organic compounds can enhance the magnitude of light absorption by BC. To elucidate the enhancement of light absorption of aged BC particles and its relation to the mixing state and morphology of individual particles, we conducted observations of particles at an Asian outflow site in Noto Peninsula, Japan, in the spring of 2013. Absorption and scattering coefficients at 405, 532, and 781 nm and mass concentrations/mix...

  19. Light absorption and morphological properties of soot-containing aerosols observed at an East Asian outflow site, Noto Peninsula, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    S. Ueda; T. Nakayama; F. Taketani; K. Adachi; A. Matsuki; Y. Iwamoto; Y. Sadanaga; Y. Matsumi

    2015-01-01

    The coating of black carbon (BC) with inorganic salts and organic compounds can enhance the magnitude of light absorption by BC. To elucidate the enhancement of light absorption of aged BC particles and its relation to the mixing state and morphology of individual particles, we conducted observations of particles at an Asian outflow site in Noto Peninsula, Japan, in the spring of 2013. Absorption and scattering coefficients at 405, 532, and 781 nm and mass concentrations/mix...

  20. Re-evaluation of model-based light-scattering spectroscopy for tissue spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Condon; Šćepanović, Obrad; Mirkovic, Jelena; McGee, Sasha; Yu, Chung-Chieh; Fulghum, Stephen; Wallace, Michael; Tunnell, James; Bechtel, Kate; Feld, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Model-based light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) seemed a promising technique for in-vivo diagnosis of dysplasia in multiple organs. In the studies, the residual spectrum, the difference between the observed and modeled diffuse reflectance spectra, was attributed to single elastic light scattering from epithelial nuclei, and diagnostic information due to nuclear changes was extracted from it. We show that this picture is incorrect. The actual single scattering signal arising from epithelial nuclei is much smaller than the previously computed residual spectrum, and does not have the wavelength dependence characteristic of Mie scattering. Rather, the residual spectrum largely arises from assuming a uniform hemoglobin distribution. In fact, hemoglobin is packaged in blood vessels, which alters the reflectance. When we include vessel packaging, which accounts for an inhomogeneous hemoglobin distribution, in the diffuse reflectance model, the reflectance is modeled more accurately, greatly reducing the amplitude of the residual spectrum. These findings are verified via numerical estimates based on light propagation and Mie theory, tissue phantom experiments, and analysis of published data measured from Barrett’s esophagus. In future studies, vessel packaging should be included in the model of diffuse reflectance and use of model-based LSS should be discontinued. PMID:19405760

  1. Light and Color Curve Properties of Type Ia Supernovae: Theory Versus Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeflich, P.; Hsiao, E. Y. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Ashall, C. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moore University, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Burns, C. R. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St., Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Diamond, T. R. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Phillips, M. M. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 601 La Serena (Chile); Sand, D. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Texas Tech University, Box 41051, Lubbock, TX 79409-1051 (United States); Stritzinger, M. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000, Aarhus (Denmark); Suntzeff, N.; Krisciunas, K.; Wang, L. [The G.P. and C. Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Contreras, C.; Morrell, N., E-mail: phoeflich77@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa Maria, Ava España 1680, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2017-09-01

    We study the optical light curve (LC) relations of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) for their use in cosmology using high-quality photometry published by the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I). We revisit the classical luminosity decline rate (Δ m {sub 15}) relation and the Lira relation, as well as investigate the time evolution of the ( B − V ) color and B ( B − V ), which serves as the basis of the color–stretch relation and Color–MAgnitude Intercept Calibrations (CMAGIC). Our analysis is based on explosion and radiation transport simulations for spherically symmetric delayed-detonation models (DDT) producing normal-bright and subluminous SNe Ia. Empirical LC relations can be understood as having the same physical underpinnings, i.e., opacities, ionization balances in the photosphere, and radioactive energy deposition changing with time from below to above the photosphere. Some three to four weeks past maximum, the photosphere recedes to {sup 56}Ni-rich layers of similar density structure, leading to a similar color evolution. An important secondary parameter is the central density ρ {sub c} of the WD because at higher densities, more electron-capture elements are produced at the expense of {sup 56}Ni production. This results in a Δ m {sub 15} spread of 0.1 mag in normal-bright and 0.7 mag in subluminous SNe Ia and ≈0.2 mag in the Lira relation. We show why color–magnitude diagrams emphasize the transition between physical regimes and enable the construction of templates that depend mostly on Δ m {sub 15} with little dispersion in both the CSP-I sample and our DDT models. This allows intrinsic SN Ia variations to be separated from the interstellar reddening characterized by E ( B − V ) and R {sub B}. Invoking different scenarios causes a wide spread in empirical relations, which may suggest one dominant scenario.

  2. Light and Color Curve Properties of Type Ia Supernovae: Theory Versus Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeflich, P.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Ashall, C.; Burns, C. R.; Diamond, T. R.; Phillips, M. M.; Sand, D.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Suntzeff, N.; Contreras, C.; Krisciunas, K.; Morrell, N.; Wang, L.

    2017-09-01

    We study the optical light curve (LC) relations of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) for their use in cosmology using high-quality photometry published by the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I). We revisit the classical luminosity decline rate (Δm 15) relation and the Lira relation, as well as investigate the time evolution of the (B - V) color and B(B - V), which serves as the basis of the color-stretch relation and Color-MAgnitude Intercept Calibrations (CMAGIC). Our analysis is based on explosion and radiation transport simulations for spherically symmetric delayed-detonation models (DDT) producing normal-bright and subluminous SNe Ia. Empirical LC relations can be understood as having the same physical underpinnings, I.e., opacities, ionization balances in the photosphere, and radioactive energy deposition changing with time from below to above the photosphere. Some three to four weeks past maximum, the photosphere recedes to 56Ni-rich layers of similar density structure, leading to a similar color evolution. An important secondary parameter is the central density ρ c of the WD because at higher densities, more electron-capture elements are produced at the expense of 56Ni production. This results in a Δm 15 spread of 0.1 mag in normal-bright and 0.7 mag in subluminous SNe Ia and ≈0.2 mag in the Lira relation. We show why color-magnitude diagrams emphasize the transition between physical regimes and enable the construction of templates that depend mostly on Δm 15 with little dispersion in both the CSP-I sample and our DDT models. This allows intrinsic SN Ia variations to be separated from the interstellar reddening characterized by E(B - V) and R B . Invoking different scenarios causes a wide spread in empirical relations, which may suggest one dominant scenario.

  3. Improving NIR snow pit stratigraphy observations by introducing a controlled NIR light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, J.; Marshall, H.; Rutter, N.; Karlson, A.

    2013-12-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) photography in a prepared snow pit measures mm-/grain-scale variations in snow structure, as reflectivity is strongly dependent on microstructure and grain size at the NIR wavelengths. We explore using a controlled NIR light source to maximize signal to noise ratio and provide uniform incident, diffuse light on the snow pit wall. NIR light fired from the flash is diffused across and reflected by an umbrella onto the snow pit; the lens filter transmits NIR light onto the spectrum-modified sensor of the DSLR camera. Lenses are designed to refract visible light properly, not NIR light, so there must be a correction applied for the subsequent NIR bright spot. To avoid interpolation and debayering algorithms automatically performed by programs like Adobe's Photoshop on the images, the raw data are analyzed directly in MATLAB. NIR image data show a doubling of the amount of light collected in the same time for flash over ambient lighting. Transitions across layer boundaries in the flash-lit image are detailed by higher camera intensity values than ambient-lit images. Curves plotted using median intensity at each depth, normalized to the average profile intensity, show a separation between flash- and ambient-lit images in the upper 10-15 cm; the ambient-lit image curve asymptotically approaches the level of the flash-lit image curve below 15cm. We hypothesize that the difference is caused by additional ambient light penetrating the upper 10-15 cm of the snowpack from above and transmitting through the wall of the snow pit. This indicates that combining NIR ambient and flash photography could be a powerful technique for studying penetration depth of radiation as a function of microstructure and grain size. The NIR flash images do not increase the relative contrast at layer boundaries; however, the flash more than doubles the amount of recorded light and controls layer noise as well as layer boundary transition noise.

  4. Correlation between human observer performance and model observer performance in differential phase contrast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ke; Garrett, John; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: With the recently expanding interest and developments in x-ray differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT), the evaluation of its task-specific detection performance and comparison with the corresponding absorption CT under a given radiation dose constraint become increasingly important. Mathematical model observers are often used to quantify the performance of imaging systems, but their correlations with actual human observers need to be confirmed for each new imaging method. This work is an investigation of the effects of stochastic DPC-CT noise on the correlation of detection performance between model and human observers with signal-known-exactly (SKE) detection tasks.Methods: The detectabilities of different objects (five disks with different diameters and two breast lesion masses) embedded in an experimental DPC-CT noise background were assessed using both model and human observers. The detectability of the disk and lesion signals was then measured using five types of model observers including the prewhitening ideal observer, the nonprewhitening (NPW) observer, the nonprewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (NPWEi), the prewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (PWEi), and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). The same objects were also evaluated by four human observers using the two-alternative forced choice method. The results from the model observer experiment were quantitatively compared to the human observer results to assess the correlation between the two techniques.Results: The contrast-to-detail (CD) curve generated by the human observers for the disk-detection experiments shows that the required contrast to detect a disk is inversely proportional to the square root of the disk size. Based on the CD curves, the ideal and NPW observers tend to systematically overestimate the performance of the human observers. The NPWEi and PWEi observers did not predict human performance well either, as the slopes of their CD

  5. Using Cross Entropy Optimization to Model Active Galactic Nuclei Light Curves from VLBA MOJAVE Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitoriano, R. P.; Botti, L. C. L.

    2018-02-01

    We present in this article a new method to derive the observed properties of outbursts in relativistic jets. We use the VLBI MOJAVE maps to obtain the light curves, based on the principle that the variability of extragalactic sources, in this case 3C 279 and 4C +29.45, should appear in high resolution observations since 1996 until 2016. The use of the cross entropy method (CE) can accurately determine the ranges of parameters for a sequence of outbursts based on the shock-wave model, where the decay/rise timescale ratio has a small spread and the use of a unique index 1.3 generates a good fit modeled by functions of outbursts and by the model of the three stages. By the CE method, one can automatically get the start epochs as well as the occurrence of rise and decline times of the outbursts in the light curves. The values found are in agreement with the power-law distribution of energy, which shows that the cooling of electrons is a predominant process during the initial phase of the shock model evolution. The results of the decomposition show that the outbursts match the VLBI components observed in jets in addition to showing strong evidence of the peaks in the frequencies of 15.3 GHz. With this, we can model the shock waves with reference to the distance at the core of AGN to obtain the Doppler factor and the Lorentz factor.

  6. Modeling Global Urbanization Supported by Nighttime Light Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Urbanization, a major driver of global change, profoundly impacts our physical and social world, for example, altering carbon cycling and climate. Understanding these consequences for better scientific insights and effective decision-making unarguably requires accurate information on urban extent and its spatial distributions. In this study, we developed a cluster-based method to estimate the optimal thresholds and map urban extents from the nighttime light remote sensing data, extended this method to the global domain by developing a computational method (parameterization) to estimate the key parameters in the cluster-based method, and built a consistent 20-year global urban map series to evaluate the time-reactive nature of global urbanization (e.g. 2000 in Fig. 1). Supported by urban maps derived from nightlights remote sensing data and socio-economic drivers, we developed an integrated modeling framework to project future urban expansion by integrating a top-down macro-scale statistical model with a bottom-up urban growth model. With the models calibrated and validated using historical data, we explored urban growth at the grid level (1-km) over the next two decades under a number of socio-economic scenarios. The derived spatiotemporal information of historical and potential future urbanization will be of great value with practical implications for developing adaptation and risk management measures for urban infrastructure, transportation, energy, and water systems when considered together with other factors such as climate variability and change, and high impact weather events.

  7. Observation-Based Modeling for Model-Based Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanstrén, T.; Piel, E.; Gross, H.G.

    2009-01-01

    One of the single most important reasons that modeling and modelbased testing are not yet common practice in industry is the perceived difficulty of making the models up to the level of detail and quality required for their automated processing. Models unleash their full potential only through

  8. Direct observation of surface mode excitation and slow light coupling in photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volkov, V.S.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2007-01-01

    A scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) is used to systematically study the properties of guided modes in linear and slow-light regimes of silicon-on-insulator (SOI)-based photonic crystal waveguides (PhCWs) with different terminations of the photonic lattice. High quality SNOM images...... are obtained for light at telecom wavelengths propagating in the PhCW, demonstrating directly, for the first time to our knowledge, drastic widening of the PhCW guided mode in the slow-light regime and excitation of surface waves at the PhCW interface along with their feeding into the guided mode...

  9. Modeling the drain current and its equation parameters for lightly doped symmetrical double-gate MOSFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhartia, Mini; Chatterjee, Arun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A 2D model for the potential distribution in silicon film is derived for a symmetrical double gate MOSFET in weak inversion. This 2D potential distribution model is used to analytically derive an expression for the subthreshold slope and threshold voltage. A drain current model for lightly doped symmetrical DG MOSFETs is then presented by considering weak and strong inversion regions including short channel effects, series source to drain resistance and channel length modulation parameters. These derived models are compared with the simulation results of the SILVACO (Atlas) tool for different channel lengths and silicon film thicknesses. Lastly, the effect of the fixed oxide charge on the drain current model has been studied through simulation. It is observed that the obtained analytical models of symmetrical double gate MOSFETs are in good agreement with the simulated results for a channel length to silicon film thickness ratio greater than or equal to 2. (paper)

  10. Modeling the drain current and its equation parameters for lightly doped symmetrical double-gate MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhartia, Mini; Chatterjee, Arun Kumar

    2015-04-01

    A 2D model for the potential distribution in silicon film is derived for a symmetrical double gate MOSFET in weak inversion. This 2D potential distribution model is used to analytically derive an expression for the subthreshold slope and threshold voltage. A drain current model for lightly doped symmetrical DG MOSFETs is then presented by considering weak and strong inversion regions including short channel effects, series source to drain resistance and channel length modulation parameters. These derived models are compared with the simulation results of the SILVACO (Atlas) tool for different channel lengths and silicon film thicknesses. Lastly, the effect of the fixed oxide charge on the drain current model has been studied through simulation. It is observed that the obtained analytical models of symmetrical double gate MOSFETs are in good agreement with the simulated results for a channel length to silicon film thickness ratio greater than or equal to 2.

  11. Dependence of reconstructed image characteristics on the observation condition in light-in-flight recording by holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Aya; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Toshihiro

    2005-08-01

    We analyze the dependence of the reconstructed image characteristic on the observation condition in the light-in-flight recording by holography both theoretically and experimentally. This holography makes it possible to record a propagating light pulse. We have found that the shape of the reconstructed image is changed when the observation position is vertically moved along the hologram plane. The reconstructed image is numerically simulated on the basis of the theory and is experimentally obtained by using a 373 fs pulsed laser. The numerical results agree with the experimental result, and the validity of the theory is verified. Also, experimental results are analyzed and the restoration of the reconstructed image is discussed.

  12. Observation platform for colloid science experiments using the ISS Light Microscopy Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurk, Michael Andy; Todd, Paul; Vellinger, John C.

    2012-07-01

    The role of gravity in colloid self-assembly is a long-standing subject of inquiry. The International Space Station Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is a potentially powerful tool for implementing the observation of colloids in a high-quality low-gravity environment. The main requirements for making observations of colloid self-assembly include a small-volume, thermally stabilized environment, the addition and removal of small volumes of fluids (colloidal suspensions or reagents), and on-demand access to electrokinetic and/or magnetophoretic body forces. A modular device has been designed in which a custom electronics module is designed to mate with the existing LMM cold plate and LMM controlling power. All control features, electrical power, microscope illuminator, fluid pumps and valves are components of this module. This module lies under, mates with and serves an experiment module which houses the fluid containers that fit under the LMM objective lenses and fluid transfer tubing. Four versions of the experiment module have been designed: a hollow-slide stopped flow cell, a multiwell quiescent module, a magnetization module and an electrokinetic module. Interfaces can be established in the viewing field using the stopped-flow cell, which is also applicable to living systems such as microbial cultures, suspended blood cells, nematodes, etc. Multi-well modules can be equipped with in-line static mixers that allow the investigator to combine pairs of fluids or to re-homogenize settled samples. The maximum dimension of all modules is 16 cm, so the modules can be transported in large numbers on cargo or manned spacecraft to the ISS. A doubly-contained transfer tool can be used to transfer fluids in and out of the experiment module, which is equipped with a fluid coupling that mates to the transfer tool. Experiment-specific versions of these modules can be prepared for approved experimenters within a 1-year period. The research for these devices is supported by NASA

  13. Models of light singlet fermion and neutrino phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, E.J.; Joshipura, A.S.; Smirnov, A.Yu.

    1995-05-01

    We suggest that a single fermion S exists beyond the standard see-saw structure. It mixes with light neutrinos via interactions with the right-handed neutrino components, so that ν e → S conversion solves the solar neutrino problem. Supersymmetry endowed with R-symmetry is shown to give a natural framework for existence, mass scale (∼ 3 · 10 -3 eV) and mixing (sin 2 2θ es ∼ (0.1 - 1.5) · 10 -2 ) of such a fermion. Models with an approximate horizontal symmetry are constructed, which embed the fermion S and explain simultaneously solar, atmospheric, hot dark matter problems as well as may predict the oscillation ν-bar μ → ν-bar e in the region of sensitivity of KARMEN and LSND experiments. (author). 24 refs

  14. Modeling the light-travel-time effect on the far-infrared size of IRC +10216

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Edward L.; Baganoff, Frederick K.

    1995-01-01

    Models of the far-infrared emission from the large circumstellar dust envelope surrounding the carbon star IRC +10216 are used to assess the importance of the light-travel-time effect (LTTE) on the observed size of the source. The central star is a long-period variable with an average period of 644 +/- 17 days and a peak-to-peak amplitude of two magnituds, so a large light-travel-time effect is seen at 1 min radius. An attempt is made to use the LTTE to reconcile the discrepancy between the observations of Fazio et al. and Lester et al. regarding the far-infrared source size. This discrepancy is reviewed in light of recent, high-spatial-resolution observations at 11 microns by Danchi et al. We conclude that IRC +10216 has been resolved on the arcminute scale by Fazio et al. Convolution of the model intensity profile at 61 microns with the 60 sec x 90 sec Gaussian beam of Fazio et al. yields an observed source size full width at half maximum (FWHM) that ranges from approximately 67 sec to 75 sec depending on the phase of the star and the assumed distance to the source. Using a simple r(exp -2) dust distribution and the 106 deg phase of the Fazio et al. observations, the LTTE model reaches a peak size of 74.3 sec at a distance of 300 pc. This agrees favorably with the 78 sec x 6 sec size measured by Fazio et al. Finally, a method is outlined for using the LTTE as a distance indicator to IRC +10216 and other stars with extended mass outflows.

  15. The light and shadow in high altitude observations: the observation with Subaru telescope and the acute mountain sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, M.

    The Subaru-telescope observatory is located at an elevation of 4200 m high. The acute mountain sickness (AMS) is one impediment of observations at high altitude. Among symptoms of AMS, high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is the most dangerous one. The author mentions the symptoms of HAPE and other AMS related problems.

  16. A construction of observables for AKSZ sigma models

    OpenAIRE

    Mnev, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    A construction of gauge-invariant observables is suggested for a class of topological field theories, the AKSZ sigma-models. The observables are associated to extensions of the target Q-manifold of the sigma model to a Q-bundle over it with additional Hamiltonian structure in fibers.

  17. Is the island universe model consistent with observations?

    OpenAIRE

    Piao, Yun-Song

    2005-01-01

    We study the island universe model, in which initially the universe is in a cosmological constant sea, then the local quantum fluctuations violating the null energy condition create the islands of matter, some of which might corresponds to our observable universe. We examine the possibility that the island universe model is regarded as an alternative scenario of the origin of observable universe.

  18. modeling, observation and control, a multi-model approach

    OpenAIRE

    Elkhalil, Mansoura

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the control of systems which dynamics can be suitably described by a multimodel approach from an investigation study of a model reference adaptative control performance enhancement. Four multimodel control approaches have been proposed. The first approach is based on an output reference model control design. A successful experimental validation involving a chemical reactor has been carried out. The second approach is based on a suitable partial state model reference ...

  19. Retinal endoilluminator toxicity of xenon and light-emitting diode (LED) light source: rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Bahri; Dinç, Erdem; Yilmaz, S Necat; Altiparmak, U Emrah; Yülek, Fatma; Ertekin, Sevda; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Yakın, Mehmet

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluates retinal toxicity due to endoillumination with the light-emitting diode (LED) light source in comparison to endoillumination with xenon light source. Twenty-five eyes of 14 New Zealand pigmented rabbits were used in the study. The LED light (Omesis Medical Systems, Turkey) group was composed of 7 right eyes, while the other 7 right eyes constituted the xenon group (420 nm filter, 357mW/cm(2)) (Bright Star; DORC, Zuidland, Netherlands). Eleven untreated left eyes composed the control group. Twenty gauge pars plana incision 1.5 mm behind the limbus was performed in the right eyes. Twenty gauge bullet type fiberoptic endoilluminator was inserted into the eye from the incision without any pars plana vitrectomy. Fiberoptic endoilluminator was placed in such a way that it was directed toward visual streak of the rabbit retina with a 5 mm distance to retinal surface. Endoillumination was then applied for 20 min with a maximum light intensity for LED and xenon light. In left control eyes, no surgical procedure and no endoillumination were performed. One week after the endoillumination procedure, both eyes of the rabbits were enucleated following electroretinography. Sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin to evaluate morphologic changes. Retina tissues were assessed by active caspase-3 staining. There was no difference in the shape of the waveforms recorded in the eyes endoilluminated with LED light and xenon light sources compared to control eyes both before and after endoillumination application (p > 0.05). Microscopic evaluation of the retinas with hematoxylin and eosin staining demonstrated that all study groups have normal histologic properties similar to control group. No apoptosis positive cells were found within all sections in all groups. When the LED light source is used with maximum power and limited duration for endoillumination in rabbit eyes it does not produce phototoxic effects that may be detectable by electrophysiology

  20. Characterization, Modeling, and Optimization of Light-Emitting Diode System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorseth, Anders

    limit of human color perception. A method has been developed to optimize multicolored cluster LED systems with respect to light quality, using multi objective optimization. The results are simulated SPDs similar to traditional light sources, and with high light quality. As part of this work...

  1. Double parton correlations in Light-Front constituent quark models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldi Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Double parton distribution functions (dPDF represent a tool to explore the 3D proton structure. They can be measured in high energy proton-proton and proton nucleus collisions and encode information on how partons inside a proton are correlated among each other. dPFDs are studied here in the valence quark region, by means of a constituent quark model, where two particle correlations are present without any additional prescription. This framework allows to understand the dynamical origin of the correlations and to clarify which, among the features of the results, are model independent. Use will be made of a relativistic light-front scheme, able to overcome some drawbacks of the previous calculation. Transverse momentum correlations, due to the exact treatment of the boosts, are predicted and analyzed. The role of spin correlations is also shown. Due to the covariance of the approach, some symmetries of the dPDFs are seen unambigously. For the valence sector, also the study of the QCD evolution of the model results, which can be performed safely thanks to the property of good support, has been also completed.

  2. Initiation and early evolution of a Coronal Mass Ejection on May 13, 2009 from EUV and white-light observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, Anton; Kuzin, Sergey; Bogachev, Sergey; Ulyanov, Artyom

    In this talk we present results of the observations of a CME, which occurred on May 13, 2009. The most important feature of these observations is that the CME was observed from the very beginning stage (the solar surface) up to the distance of 15 solar radii (R_⊙). Below 2 R_⊙ we used the data from the TESIS EUV telescopes obtained in the Fe 171 Å and He 304 Å lines, and above 2 R_⊙ we used the observations of the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs. Using data of these three instruments, we have studied the evolution of the CME in details. The CME had a curved trajectory -- its helio-latitude decreased with time. The mass ejection originated at a latitudes of about 50(°) and reached the ecliptic plane at a distance of 2.5 R_⊙ from the Sun’s center. The CME velocity and acceleration increased as the CME went away from the Sun. At the distance of 15 R_⊙ from the Sun’s center the CME had a velocity of 250 km/s and an acceleration of 5 m/s(2) . The CME was not associated with a flare, and didn’t have an impulsive acceleration phase. The mass ejection had U-shaped structure which was observed both in the 171 Å images and in white-light. The CME was formed at a distance of about 0.2 -- 0.5 R_⊙ from the Sun’s surface. Observations in the line 304 Å showed that the CME was associated with the erupting prominence, which was located in the lowest part of the U-shaped structure close to the X-point of the magnetic reconnection. The prominence disappeared at the height of 0.4 R_⊙ above the solar limb. Some aspects of these observations can’t be explained in the standard CME model, which predicts that the prominence should be located inside the U-shaped structure, and the CME should be associated with a flare and have an impulsive acceleration phase.

  3. A 3D model of illumination, light distribution and crop photosynthesis to simulate lighting strategies in greenhouses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, de P.H.B.; Buck-Sorlin, G.H.; Heijden, van der G.W.A.M.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2012-01-01

    A functional-structural model for a tomato crop, situated in a greenhouse, was developed to calculate the most efficient lamp (HPS, LED) positions and crop structure, with the objective to reduce energy consumption and improve light use efficiency. The model was built within the GroIMP platform and

  4. Nucleon-generalized parton distributions in the light-front quark model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-12

    generalized parton distributions in the light-front quark model ... We calculate the generalized parton distributions (GPDs) for the up- and downquarks in nucleon using the effective light-front wavefunction. The results obtained for ...

  5. Fuzzy model-based observers for fault detection in CSTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros-Moncada, Hazael; Herrera-López, Enrique J; Anzurez-Marín, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Under the vast variety of fuzzy model-based observers reported in the literature, what would be the properone to be used for fault detection in a class of chemical reactor? In this study four fuzzy model-based observers for sensor fault detection of a Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor were designed and compared. The designs include (i) a Luenberger fuzzy observer, (ii) a Luenberger fuzzy observer with sliding modes, (iii) a Walcott-Zak fuzzy observer, and (iv) an Utkin fuzzy observer. A negative, an oscillating fault signal, and a bounded random noise signal with a maximum value of ±0.4 were used to evaluate and compare the performance of the fuzzy observers. The Utkin fuzzy observer showed the best performance under the tested conditions. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. WDAC Task Team on Observations for Model Evaluation: Facilitating the use of observations for CMIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waliser, D. E.; Gleckler, P. J.; Ferraro, R.; Eyring, V.; Bosilovich, M. G.; Schulz, J.; Thepaut, J. N.; Taylor, K. E.; Chepfer, H.; Bony, S.; Lee, T. J.; Joseph, R.; Mathieu, P. P.; Saunders, R.

    2015-12-01

    Observations are essential for the development and evaluation of climate models. Satellite and in-situ measurements as well as reanalysis products provide crucial resources for these purposes. Over the last two decades, the climate modeling community has become adept at developing model intercomparison projects (MIPs) that provide the basis for more systematic comparisons of climate models under common experimental conditions. A prominent example among these is the coupled MIP (CMIP). Due to its growing importance in providing input to the IPCC, the framework for CMIP, now planning CMIP6, has expanded to include a very comprehensive and precise set of experimental protocols, with an advanced data archive and dissemination system. While the number, types and sophistication of observations over the same time period have kept pace, their systematic application to the evaluation of climate models has yet to be fully exploited due to a lack of coordinated protocols for identifying, archiving, documenting and applying observational resources. This presentation will discuss activities and plans of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) Data Advisory Council's (WDAC) Task Team on Observations for Model Evaluation for facilitating the use of observations for model evaluation. The presentation will include an update on the status of the obs4MIPs and ana4MIPs projects, whose purpose is to provide a limited collection of well-established and documented observation and reanalysis datasets for comparison with Earth system models, targeting CMIP in particular. The presentation will also describe the role these activities and datasets play in the development of a set of community standard observation-based climate model performance metrics by the Working Group on Numerical Experimentation (WGNE)'s Performance Metrics Panel, as well as which CMIP6 experiments these activities are targeting, and where additional community input and contributions to these activities are needed.

  7. Characterizing Cold Giant Planets in Reflected Light: Lessons from 50 Years of Outer Solar System Exploration and Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Mark Scott; Hammel, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    A space based coronagraph, whether as part of the WFIRST/AFTA mission or on a dedicated space telescope such as Exo-C or -S, will be able to obtain photometry and spectra of multiple gas giant planets around nearby stars, including many known from radial velocity detections. Such observations will constrain the masses, atmospheric compositions, clouds, and photochemistry of these worlds. Giant planet albedo models, such as those of Cahoy et al. (2010) and Lewis et al. (this meeting), will be crucial for mission planning and interpreting the data. However it is equally important that insights gleaned from decades of solar system imaging and spectroscopy of giant planets be leveraged to optimize both instrument design and data interpretation. To illustrate these points we will draw on examples from solar system observations, by both HST and ground based telescopes, as well as by Voyager, Galileo, and Cassini, to demonstrate the importance clouds, photochemical hazes, and various molecular absorbers play in sculpting the light scattered by solar system giant planets. We will demonstrate how measurements of the relative depths of multiple methane absorption bands of varying strengths have been key to disentangling the competing effects of gas column abundances, variations in cloud height and opacity, and scattering by high altitude photochemical hazes. We will highlight both the successes, such as the accurate remote determination of the atmospheric methane abundance of Jupiter, and a few failures from these types of observations. These lessons provide insights into technical issues facing spacecraft designers, from the selection of the most valuable camera filters to carry to the required capabilities of the flight spectrometer, as well as mission design questions such as choosing the most favorable phase angles for atmospheric characterization.

  8. A Unimodal Model for Double Observer Distance Sampling Surveys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Earl F Becker

    Full Text Available Distance sampling is a widely used method to estimate animal population size. Most distance sampling models utilize a monotonically decreasing detection function such as a half-normal. Recent advances in distance sampling modeling allow for the incorporation of covariates into the distance model, and the elimination of the assumption of perfect detection at some fixed distance (usually the transect line with the use of double-observer models. The assumption of full observer independence in the double-observer model is problematic, but can be addressed by using the point independence assumption which assumes there is one distance, the apex of the detection function, where the 2 observers are assumed independent. Aerially collected distance sampling data can have a unimodal shape and have been successfully modeled with a gamma detection function. Covariates in gamma detection models cause the apex of detection to shift depending upon covariate levels, making this model incompatible with the point independence assumption when using double-observer data. This paper reports a unimodal detection model based on a two-piece normal distribution that allows covariates, has only one apex, and is consistent with the point independence assumption when double-observer data are utilized. An aerial line-transect survey of black bears in Alaska illustrate how this method can be applied.

  9. Monte Carlo model of light transport in scintillating fibers and large scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakarova, R.

    1995-01-01

    A Monte Carlo model is developed which simulates the light transport in a scintillator surrounded by a transparent layer with different surface properties. The model is applied to analyse the light collection properties of scintillating fibers and a large scintillator wrapped in aluminium foil. The influence of the fiber interface characteristics on the light yield is investigated in detail. Light output results as well as time distributions are obtained for the large scintillator case. 15 refs, 16 figs

  10. Ultra light inspection robotic arm, design and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voisembert, S.

    2012-01-01

    One of the major challenges in robotics is the improvement of inspections operations in confined and hazardous area using unmanned remote handling systems. Articulated arm are used in this case to carry some diagnostic tools for the inspection tasks. These long reach multi-link carriers should be characterized by a large workspace and reduced mass. Today, with about ten degrees of freedom and ten meters long they have reached their performance limit. Indeed, for long reach, the arm should have enough torque to carry its own weight plus the payload in cantilever mode and enough stiffness to minimize the deflection caused by the gravity. Despite the use of best materials and components, this kind of robot has reach its performance limit. Overcoming this limit needs a change in paradigm. Therefore a problem-solving, analysis and forecasting tool TRIZ (theory of inventive problem solving) is used. It leads naturally to identify the origin of the dilemma: the proper weight of the arm and so its mass under gravity. In particular, it proposes to postulate that a no-mass robot exists. An analysis of the properties of such a robot leads to the patented concept of an ultra light inflatable robot with unique and constant volume and constant diameter joints. This new object would benefit from advantages such as easy implementation, harmlessness toward its environment and so the ability to lean on it without damage. Therefore it could easily increase its range and its foreseen low-cost building would open a wide field of new applications. This thesis work, elaborates appropriate technical concepts and dimensioning methods for ultra light inflatable robots. The payload and length performances of an inflatable robot are analytically validated. Experimentations and a finite-element modeling are used for a pre-dimensioning of the joints and different modes of construction are prototyped in partnership with, specialized company in thigh-tech textile. The joints are also modeled with

  11. Colour photographic photometry of the inner zodiacal light observed from the orbital station Salyut-7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchmi, S.; Nikol'skij, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    The results of the photographic photometry of the best colour picture of the inner zodiacal light, obtained during the joint Soviet-French mission aboard the Salyut-7 orbital laboratory are presented. Isophote-map indicates that the plane of maximum zodiacal light brightness is very near the orbital plane of the planet Venus. Intensity in the plane of maximum brightness can be matched using the law Bsub(ZL) approximately epsilonsup(-2.04) at the elongations 23 deg <= epsilon <= 35 deg, the colorimetric index being bound to be nearly solar

  12. Assimilating uncertain, dynamic and intermittent streamflow observations in hydrological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, Maurizio; Alfonso, Leonardo; Chacon-Hurtado, Juan; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2015-09-01

    Catastrophic floods cause significant socio-economical losses. Non-structural measures, such as real-time flood forecasting, can potentially reduce flood risk. To this end, data assimilation methods have been used to improve flood forecasts by integrating static ground observations, and in some cases also remote sensing observations, within water models. Current hydrologic and hydraulic research works consider assimilation of observations coming from traditional, static sensors. At the same time, low-cost, mobile sensors and mobile communication devices are becoming also increasingly available. The main goal and innovation of this study is to demonstrate the usefulness of assimilating uncertain streamflow observations that are dynamic in space and intermittent in time in the context of two different semi-distributed hydrological model structures. The developed method is applied to the Brue basin, where the dynamic observations are imitated by the synthetic observations of discharge. The results of this study show how model structures and sensors locations affect in different ways the assimilation of streamflow observations. In addition, it proves how assimilation of such uncertain observations from dynamic sensors can provide model improvements similar to those of streamflow observations coming from a non-optimal network of static physical sensors. This can be a potential application of recent efforts to build citizen observatories of water, which can make the citizens an active part in information capturing, evaluation and communication, helping simultaneously to improvement of model-based flood forecasting.

  13. Predicted light scattering from particles observed in human age-related nuclear cataracts using mie scattering theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, M Joseph; Johnsen, Sönke; Gilliland, Kurt O; Freel, Christopher D; Fowler, W Craig

    2007-01-01

    To employ Mie scattering theory to predict the light-scattering from micrometer-sized particles surrounded by lipid shells, called multilamellar bodies (MLBs), reported in human age-related nuclear cataracts. Mie scattering theory is applicable to randomly distributed spherical and globular particles separated by distances much greater than the wavelength of incident light. With an assumed refractive index of 1.40 for nuclear cytoplasm, particle refractive indices from 1.33 to 1.58 were used to calculate scattering efficiencies for particle radii 0.05 to 3 microm and incident light with wavelengths (in vacuo) of 400, 550, and 700 nm. Surface plots of scattering efficiency versus particle radius and refractive index were calculated for coated spherical particles. Pronounced peaks and valleys identified combinations of particle parameters that produce high and low scattering efficiencies. Small particles (scattering efficiency over a wide range of particle refractive indices. Particles with radii 0.6 to 3 microm and refractive indices 0.08 to 0.10 greater (or less) than the surrounding cytoplasm had very high scattering efficiencies. This size range corresponds well to MLBs in cataractous nuclei (average MLB radius, 1.4 microm) and, at an estimated 4000 particles/mm(3) of tissue, up to 18% of the incident light was scattered primarily within a 20 degrees forward cone. The calculated size of spherical particles that scatter efficiently was close to the observed dimensions of MLBs in cataractous nuclei. Particle refractive indices only 0.02 units different from the surrounding cytoplasm scatter a significant amount of light. These results suggest that the MLBs observed in human age-related nuclear cataracts may be major sources of forward light scattering that reduces contrast of fine details, particularly under dim light.

  14. Predicting the future completing models of observed complex systems

    CERN Document Server

    Abarbanel, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the Future: Completing Models of Observed Complex Systems provides a general framework for the discussion of model building and validation across a broad spectrum of disciplines. This is accomplished through the development of an exact path integral for use in transferring information from observations to a model of the observed system. Through many illustrative examples drawn from models in neuroscience, fluid dynamics, geosciences, and nonlinear electrical circuits, the concepts are exemplified in detail. Practical numerical methods for approximate evaluations of the path integral are explored, and their use in designing experiments and determining a model's consistency with observations is investigated. Using highly instructive examples, the problems of data assimilation and the means to treat them are clearly illustrated. This book will be useful for students and practitioners of physics, neuroscience, regulatory networks, meteorology and climate science, network dynamics, fluid dynamics, and o...

  15. Evaluation of internal noise methods for Hotelling observer models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yani; Pham, Binh T.; Eckstein, Miguel P.

    2007-01-01

    The inclusion of internal noise in model observers is a common method to allow for quantitative comparisons between human and model observer performance in visual detection tasks. In this article, we studied two different strategies for inserting internal noise into Hotelling model observers. In the first strategy, internal noise was added to the output of individual channels: (a) Independent nonuniform channel noise, (b) independent uniform channel noise. In the second strategy, internal noise was added to the decision variable arising from the combination of channel responses. The standard deviation of the zero mean internal noise was either constant or proportional to: (a) the decision variable's standard deviation due to the external noise, (b) the decision variable's variance caused by the external noise, (c) the decision variable magnitude on a trial to trial basis. We tested three model observers: square window Hotelling observer (HO), channelized Hotelling observer (CHO), and Laguerre-Gauss Hotelling observer (LGHO) using a four alternative forced choice (4AFC) signal known exactly but variable task with a simulated signal embedded in real x-ray coronary angiogram backgrounds. The results showed that the internal noise method that led to the best prediction of human performance differed across the studied model observers. The CHO model best predicted human observer performance with the channel internal noise. The HO and LGHO best predicted human observer performance with the decision variable internal noise. The present results might guide researchers with the choice of methods to include internal noise into Hotelling model observers when evaluating and optimizing medical image quality

  16. Light pollution: measuring and modelling skyglow. An application in two Portuguese reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Raul Cerveira Pinto Sousa

    Outdoors human-made lighting at night causes sky glow, one of the effects of light pollution. Sky glow is rising with the growth of world population. Urban inhabitants are increasingly deprived from a starry sky. However, since light propagates to regions far from where it is produced, light pollution spreads to places where few or none artificial light at night existed, disturbing the quality of the night sky. In this work we assess for the first time the sky brightness of two regions in Portugal, the Peneda-Geres National Park, and the recently created Starlight Reserve Dark Sky® Alqueva. We used a portable unit, a Unihedron Sky Quality Meter-L (SQM-L), to measure the luminance of the night sky. We also tested the SQM-L in a laboratory to a more thorough analysis of the device, and to check the effect of polarization on the unit, suggested by our observations and other users. Our results suggest that the SQM-L is not affected by any measurable effect of polarization, but some guidelines to use the SQM-L in the field are provided based on our work. The data from the field measurement was used to compare to one light pollution propagation model (Kocifaj, 2007), using VIIRS DNB satellite upwards radiance as input to the model. The results obtained from the model are favourably compared to the field measurements. We proceeded to a set of tests with the model to find the best fit. Our best results were achieved by analysing the data by night rather than the global set of data. Our first results were used to apply to the classification of the region of Alqueva to a Starlight Tourism Destination. That classification was attained during the course of this work (December 2011). A guideline on the Peneda-Geres National Park was also implemented after our first results were provided. We believe we have achieved a set of results in a set of parallel issues all related to light pollution that we hope may contribute to the current knowledge on this area of research.

  17. Polarimetry of Solar System Objects: Observations vs. Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2014-04-01

    The overarching goals for the remote sensing and robotic exploration of planetary systems are: (1) understanding the formation of planetary systems and their diversity; and (2) search for habitability. Since all objects have unique polarimetric signatures inclusion of spectrophotopolarimetry as a complementary approach to standard techniques of imaging and spectroscopy, provides insight into the scattering properties of the planetary media. Specifically, linear and circular polarimetric signatures of the object arise from different physical processes and their study proves essential to the characterization of the object. Linear polarization of reflected light by various solar system objects provides insight into the scattering characteristics of atmospheric aerosols and hazes? and surficial properties of atmosphereless bodies. Many optically active materials are anisotropic and so their scattering properties differ with the object's principal axes (such as dichroic or birefringent materials) and are crystalline in structure instead of amorphous, (eg., the presence of olivines and silicates in cometary dust and circumstellar disks? Titan, etc.). Ices (water and other species) are abundant in the system indicated in their near - infrared spectra. Gas giants form outside the frost line (where ices condense), and their satellites and ring systems exhibit signature of water ice? clathrates, nonices (Si, C, Fe) in their NIR spectra and spectral dependence of linear polarization. Additionally, spectral dependence of polarization is important to separate the macroscopic (bulk) properties of the scattering medium from the microscopic (particulate) properties of the scattering medium. Circular polarization, on the other hand, is indicative of magnetic fields and biologically active molecules, necessary for habitability. These applications suffer from lack of detailed observations, instrumentation, dedicated missions and numericalretrieval methods. With recent discoveries and

  18. Direct Observation of a Dark State in the Photocycle of a Light-Driven Molecular Motor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amirjalayer, Saeed; Cnossen, Arjen; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Buma, Wybren J.; Woutersen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the excited-state properties of light driven molecular machines is crucial to achieving high efficiency and directed functionality. A key challenge in achieving control lies in unravelling the complex photodynamics and especially in identifying the role played by dark states. Here we use

  19. Modeling light scattering in the shadow region behind thin cylinders for diameter analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blohm, Werner

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the scattered light intensities resulting in the shadow region at an observation plane behind monochromatically illuminated circular cylinders are modeled by sinusoidal sequences having a squared dependence on spatial position in the observation plane. Whereas two sinusoidal components appear to be sufficient for modeling the light distribution behind intransparent cylinders, at least three sinusoidal components are necessary for transparent cylinders. Based on this model, a novel evaluation algorithm for a very fast retrieval of the diameter of thin cylindrical products like metallic wires and transparent fibers is presented. This algorithm was tested in a cylinder diameter range typical for these products (d ≈ 70 … 150 μm; n ≈ 1.5). Numerical examples are given to illustrate its application by using both synthetic and experimental scattering data. Diameter accuracies below 0.05 μm could be achieved for intransparent cylinders in the tested diameter range. However, scattering effects due to morphological-dependent resonances (MDRs) are problematical in the diameter analysis of transparent products. In order to incorporate these effects into the model, further investigations are needed.

  20. Detecting influential observations in nonlinear regression modeling of groundwater flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Richard M.

    1998-01-01

    Nonlinear regression is used to estimate optimal parameter values in models of groundwater flow to ensure that differences between predicted and observed heads and flows do not result from nonoptimal parameter values. Parameter estimates can be affected, however, by observations that disproportionately influence the regression, such as outliers that exert undue leverage on the objective function. Certain statistics developed for linear regression can be used to detect influential observations in nonlinear regression if the models are approximately linear. This paper discusses the application of Cook's D, which measures the effect of omitting a single observation on a set of estimated parameter values, and the statistical parameter DFBETAS, which quantifies the influence of an observation on each parameter. The influence statistics were used to (1) identify the influential observations in the calibration of a three-dimensional, groundwater flow model of a fractured-rock aquifer through nonlinear regression, and (2) quantify the effect of omitting influential observations on the set of estimated parameter values. Comparison of the spatial distribution of Cook's D with plots of model sensitivity shows that influential observations correspond to areas where the model heads are most sensitive to certain parameters, and where predicted groundwater flow rates are largest. Five of the six discharge observations were identified as influential, indicating that reliable measurements of groundwater flow rates are valuable data in model calibration. DFBETAS are computed and examined for an alternative model of the aquifer system to identify a parameterization error in the model design that resulted in overestimation of the effect of anisotropy on horizontal hydraulic conductivity.

  1. Modelling the light absorption coefficients of oceanic waters: Implications for underwater optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Sai Shri; Sahu, Sanjay Kumar; Dev, Pravin Jeba; Shanmugam, Palanisamy

    2018-05-01

    Spectral absorption coefficients of particulate (algal and non-algal components) and dissolved substances are modelled and combined with the pure seawater component to determine the total light absorption coefficients of seawater in the Bay of Bengal. Two parameters namely chlorophyll-a (Chl) concentration and turbidity were measured using commercially available instruments with high sampling rates. For modelling the light absorption coefficients of oceanic waters, the measured data are classified into two broad groups - algal dominant and non-algal particle (NAP) dominant. With these criteria the individual absorption coefficients of phytoplankton and NAP were established based on their concentrations using an iterative method. To account for the spectral dependence of absorption by phytoplankton, the wavelength-dependent coefficients were introduced into the model. The CDOM absorption was determined by subtracting the individual absorption coefficients of phytoplankton and NAP from the measured total absorption data and then related to the Chl concentration. Validity of the model is assessed based on independent in-situ data from certain discrete locations in the Bay of Bengal. The total absorption coefficients estimated using the new model by considering the contributions of algal, non-algal and CDOM have good agreement with the measured total absorption data with the error range of 6.9 to 28.3%. Results obtained by the present model are important for predicting the propagation of the radiant energy within the ocean and interpreting remote sensing observation data.

  2. Bounds on an Energy-Dependent and Observer-Independent Speed of Light from Violations of Locality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossenfelder, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    We show that models with deformations of special relativity that have an energy-dependent speed of light have nonlocal effects. The requirement that the arising nonlocality is not in conflict with known particle physics allows us to derive strong bounds on deformations of special relativity and rule out a modification to first order in energy over the Planck mass.

  3. COCOA code for creating mock observations of star cluster models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askar, Abbas; Giersz, Mirek; Pych, Wojciech; Dalessandro, Emanuele

    2018-04-01

    We introduce and present results from the COCOA (Cluster simulatiOn Comparison with ObservAtions) code that has been developed to create idealized mock photometric observations using results from numerical simulations of star cluster evolution. COCOA is able to present the output of realistic numerical simulations of star clusters carried out using Monte Carlo or N-body codes in a way that is useful for direct comparison with photometric observations. In this paper, we describe the COCOA code and demonstrate its different applications by utilizing globular cluster (GC) models simulated with the MOCCA (MOnte Carlo Cluster simulAtor) code. COCOA is used to synthetically observe these different GC models with optical telescopes, perform point spread function photometry, and subsequently produce observed colour-magnitude diagrams. We also use COCOA to compare the results from synthetic observations of a cluster model that has the same age and metallicity as the Galactic GC NGC 2808 with observations of the same cluster carried out with a 2.2 m optical telescope. We find that COCOA can effectively simulate realistic observations and recover photometric data. COCOA has numerous scientific applications that maybe be helpful for both theoreticians and observers that work on star clusters. Plans for further improving and developing the code are also discussed in this paper.

  4. Southeast Atmosphere Studies: learning from model-observation syntheses

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Observed and modeled data shown in figure 2b-c. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Mao, J., A. Carlton, R. Cohen, W. Brune, S. Brown, G....

  5. Blue-light filtering alters angiogenic signaling in human retinal pigmented epithelial cells culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Natalia; Siblini, Aya; Esposito, Evangelina; Bravo-Filho, Vasco; Zoroquiain, Pablo; Aldrees, Sultan; Logan, Patrick; Arias, Lluis; Burnier, Miguel N

    2017-11-02

    Light exposure and more specifically the spectrum of blue light contribute to the oxidative stress in Age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The purpose of the study was to establish whether blue light filtering could modify proangiogenic signaling produced by retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells under different conditions simulating risk factors for AMD. Three experiments were carried out in order to expose ARPE-19 cells to white light for 48 h with and without blue light-blocking filters (BLF) in different conditions. In each experiment one group was exposed to light with no BLF protection, a second group was exposed to light with BLF protection, and a control group was not exposed to light. The ARPE-19 cells used in each experiment prior to light exposure were cultured for 24 h as follows: Experiment 1) Normoxia, Experiment 2) Hypoxia, and Experiment 3) Lutein supplemented media in normoxia. The media of all groups was harvested after light exposure for sandwich ELISA-based assays to quantify 10 pro-angiogenic cytokines. A significant decrease in angiogenin secretion levels and a significant increase in bFGF were observed following light exposure, compared to dark conditions, in both normoxia and hypoxia conditions. With the addition of a blue light-blocking filter in normoxia, a significant increase in angiogenin levels was observed. Although statistical significance was not achieved, blue light filters reduce light-induced secretion of bFGF and VEGF to near normal levels. This trend is also observed when ARPE-19 cells are grown under hypoxic conditions and when pre-treated with lutein prior to exposure to experimental conditions. Following light exposure, there is a decrease in angiogenin secretion by ARPE-19 cells, which was abrogated with a blue light - blocking filter. Our findings support the position that blue light filtering affects the secretion of angiogenic factors by retinal pigmented epithelial cells under normoxic, hypoxic, and lutein

  6. Temporal Evolution of the Gamma-ray Burst Afterglow Spectrum for an Observer: GeV–TeV Synchrotron Self-Compton Light Curve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukushima, Takuma; Fujita, Yutaka [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Osaka, 560-0043 (Japan); To, Sho; Asano, Katsuaki, E-mail: fukushima@vega.ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: fujita@vega.ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: tosho@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: asanok@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2017-08-01

    We numerically simulate the gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow emission with a one-zone time-dependent code. The temporal evolutions of the decelerating shocked shell and energy distributions of electrons and photons are consistently calculated. The photon spectrum and light curves for an observer are obtained taking into account the relativistic propagation of the shocked shell and the curvature of the emission surface. We find that the onset time of the afterglow is significantly earlier than the previous analytical estimate. The analytical formulae of the shock propagation and light curve for the radiative case are also different from our results. Our results show that even if the emission mechanism is switching from synchrotron to synchrotron self-Compton, the gamma-ray light curves can be a smooth power law, which agrees with the observed light curve and the late detection of a 32 GeV photon in GRB 130427A. The uncertainty of the model parameters obtained with the analytical formula is discussed, especially in connection with the closure relation between spectral index and decay index.

  7. Light exposure at night, sleep duration, melatonin, and breast cancer: a dose-response analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wan-Shui; Deng, Qin; Fan, Wen-Yan; Wang, Wei-Ye; Wang, Xin

    2014-07-01

    Evidence from observational studies on light at night (LAN) exposure, sleep duration, endogenous melatonin levels, and risk for breast cancer in women is conflicting. This led us to conduct a dose-response analysis of published observational data. Pertinent studies were identified by searching Medline, Web of Science, and EMBASE through April 2013. The dose-response relationship between sleep duration, urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin levels, and breast cancer was assessed using the restricted cubic spline model and by multivariate random-effects metaregression. A separate meta-analysis was also carried out to calculate the relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for breast cancer for the comparable categories or highest levels of exposure versus the lowest levels. Twelve case-control and four cohort studies were included in the analysis. High artificial LAN exposure is associated with an increased risk for breast cancer (RR=1.17, 95% CI: 1.11-1.23), but not ambient LAN exposure (RR=0.91, 95% CI: 0.78-1.07). The summary RR for breast cancer is 1.00 (95% CI: 0.995-1.01) for an increment of 1 h of sleep per night. No significant dose-response relationship between sleep duration and breast cancer was found either for the linearity test (Ptrend=0.725) or for the nonlinearity (Ptrend=0.091) test. An increasein of 15 ng/mg creatinine in urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin is associated with a 14% reduced risk for breast cancer (RR=0.86, 95% CI: 0.78-0.95), with a linear dose-response trend (Ptrend=0.003). There was no evidence of substantial heterogeneity or publication bias in the analysis. Our study adds to the evidence of LAN breast cancer theory. Further research in this area is warranted.

  8. Device model investigation of bilayer organic light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crone, B. K.; Davids, P. S.; Campbell, I. H.; Smith, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    Organic materials that have desirable luminescence properties, such as a favorable emission spectrum and high luminescence efficiency, are not necessarily suitable for single layer organic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) because the material may have unequal carrier mobilities or contact limited injection properties. As a result, single layer LEDs made from such organic materials are inefficient. In this article, we present device model calculations of single layer and bilayer organic LED characteristics that demonstrate the improvements in device performance that can occur in bilayer devices. We first consider an organic material where the mobilities of the electrons and holes are significantly different. The role of the bilayer structure in this case is to move the recombination away from the electrode that injects the low mobility carrier. We then consider an organic material with equal electron and hole mobilities but where it is not possible to make a good contact for one carrier type, say electrons. The role of a bilayer structure in this case is to prevent the holes from traversing the device without recombining. In both cases, single layer device limitations can be overcome by employing a two organic layer structure. The results are discussed using the calculated spatial variation of the carrier densities, electric field, and recombination rate density in the structures. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  9. Meridional Flow Observations: Implications for the current Flux Transport Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Hernandez, Irene; Komm, Rudolf; Kholikov, Shukur; Howe, Rachel; Hill, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Meridional circulation has become a key element in the solar dynamo flux transport models. Available helioseismic observations from several instruments, Taiwan Oscillation Network (TON), Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) and Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI), have made possible a continuous monitoring of the solar meridional flow in the subphotospheric layers for the last solar cycle, including the recent extended minimum. Here we review some of the meridional circulation observations using local helioseismology techniques and relate them to magnetic flux transport models.

  10. Electric and magnetic behaviors observed in NiO-based thin films under light-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yi-Dong; Song, Kenan; Shun, Li; Gao, Junqi; Xu, Ben, E-mail: xuben@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: linyh@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Lin, Yuan-Hua, E-mail: xuben@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: linyh@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Nan, Ce-Wen; Liu, Wei [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-09-07

    We report the room-temperature ferromagnetic properties that can be tuned by light irradiation in the Li and Mn co-doped NiO films (LMNO) grown by the spinning coating. The optical tunable magnetic behavior is enhanced by the increase of the Li doping concentration. First-principle calculations reveal that the Li doping plays key roles in the optical tuned magnetic behavior, which brings a 3d-like impurity state to enhance a significant hybridization between the Mn{sup 3+} 3d state and the impurity band, thus strengthening the ferromagnetic coupling effects. Additionally, it can tune the band gap of the LMNO films and produce more holes under the light irradiation, enhancing the optical tuned magnetic behavior.

  11. Characterisation of Rosa Mosqueta seeds : cell wall polysaccharide composition and light microscopy observations

    OpenAIRE

    Dourado, Fernando; Vasco, Pedro; Gama, F. M.; Coimbra, Manuel A.; Mota, M.

    2000-01-01

    The utilisation of enzymes for the extraction of vegetable oils from seeds has been a topic of growing interest in recent years. Knowledge of the cell wall polysaccharide composition is important to select the enzyme(s) necessary for the most effective degradation of the cell walls. The purpose of the present work is to characterise the seeds of Rosa Mosqueta (Rosa aff rubiginosa) by light microscopy (where several differential staining methods were applied to analyse the seed structure...

  12. Runoff modeling of the Mara River using satellite observed soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The model is developed based on the relationships found between satellite observed soil moisture and rainfall and the measured runoff. It uses the satellite observed rainfall as the prime forcing, and the soil moisture to separate the fast surface runoff and slow base flow contributions. The soil moisture and rainfall products ...

  13. ExPo: A Sensitive Imaging Polarimeter for Observations of Scattered Light from Circumstellar Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenhuis, M.

    2011-01-01

    In astronomy, high-contrast imaging is a rapidly developing field focussing on the observation of faint targets in close proximity to very bright ones. This can be applied to the direct observation of exoplanets, but also for observations of disks or dust shells surrounding stars. The brightness of

  14. Observational Data-Driven Modeling and Optimization of Manufacturing Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Sadati, Najibesadat; Chinnam, Ratna Babu; Nezhad, Milad Zafar

    2017-01-01

    The dramatic increase of observational data across industries provides unparalleled opportunities for data-driven decision making and management, including the manufacturing industry. In the context of production, data-driven approaches can exploit observational data to model, control and improve the process performance. When supplied by observational data with adequate coverage to inform the true process performance dynamics, they can overcome the cost associated with intrusive controlled de...

  15. Time-symmetric universe model and its observational implication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Futamase, T.; Matsuda, T.

    1987-08-01

    A time-symmetric closed-universe model is discussed in terms of the radiation arrow of time. The time symmetry requires the occurrence of advanced waves in the recontracting phase of the Universe. We consider the observational consequences of such advanced waves, and it is shown that a test observer in the expanding phase can observe a time-reversed image of a source of radiation in the future recontracting phase.

  16. A time-symmetric Universe model and its observational implication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futamase, T.; Matsuda, T.

    1987-01-01

    A time-symmetric closed-universe model is discussed in terms of the radiation arrow of time. The time symmetry requires the occurrence of advanced waves in the recontracting phase of the Universe. The observational consequences of such advanced waves are considered, and it is shown that a test observer in the expanding phase can observe a time-reversed image of a source of radiation in the future recontracting phase

  17. A NEW MODEL OF AUTONOMOUS MOBILE ROBOTS WITH LIGHTS AND ITS COMPUTATIONAL POWER

    OpenAIRE

    寺井, 智史

    2016-01-01

    We study gathering problem for robots that move on a two dimensional plane. Robots are autonomous, anonymous, and have light that represents robot’s state. Gathering algorithm for n=2 robots is proposed in previous research. We propose a new model of robots with lights and athering algorithm. Key Words :distributed , mobile robots , light

  18. Cosmological observables in the quasi-spherical Szekeres model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Robert G.

    2014-10-01

    The standard model of cosmology presents a homogeneous universe, and we interpret cosmological data through this framework. However, structure growth creates nonlinear inhomogeneities that may affect observations, and even larger structures may be hidden by our limited vantage point and small number of independent observations. As we determine the universe's parameters with increasing precision, the accuracy is contingent on our understanding of the effects of such structures. For instance, giant void models can explain some observations without dark energy. Because perturbation theory cannot adequately describe nonlinear inhomogeneities, exact solutions to the equations of general relativity are important for these questions. The most general known solution capable of describing inhomogeneous matter distributions is the Szekeres class of models. In this work, we study the quasi-spherical subclass of these models, using numerical simulations to calculate the inhomogeneities' effects on observations. We calculate the large-angle CMB in giant void models and compare with simpler, symmetric void models that have previously been found inadequate to matchobservations. We extend this by considering models with early-time inhomogeneities as well. Then, we study distance observations, including selection effects, in models which are homogeneous on scales around 100 Mpc---consistent with standard cosmology---but inhomogeneous on smaller scales. Finally, we consider photon polarizations, and show that they are not directly affected by inhomogeneities. Overall, we find that while Szekeres models have some advantages over simpler models, they are still seriously limited in their ability to alter our parameter estimation while remaining within the bounds of current observations.

  19. Observing how others lift light or heavy objects: time-dependent encoding of grip force in the primary motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaerts, Kaat; de Beukelaar, Toon T; Swinnen, Stephan P; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2012-07-01

    During movement observation, corticomotor excitability of the observer's primary motor cortex (M1) is modulated according to the force requirements of the observed action. Here, we explored the time course of observation-induced force encoding. Force-related changes in M1-excitability were assessed by delivering transcranial magnetic stimulations at distinct temporal phases of an observed reach-grasp-lift action. Temporal changes in force-related electromyographic activity were also assessed during active movement execution. In observation conditions in which a heavy object was lifted, M1-excitability was higher compared to conditions in which a light object was lifted. Both during observation and execution, differential force encoding tended to gradually increase from the grasping phase until the late lift phase. Surprisingly, however, during observation, force encoding was already present at the early reach phase: a time point at which no visual cues on the object's weight were available to the observer. As the observer was aware that the same weight condition was presented repeatedly, this finding may indicate that prior predictions concerning the upcoming weight condition are reflected by M1 excitability. Overall, findings may provide indications that the observer's motor system represents motor predictions as well as muscular requirements to infer the observed movement goal.

  20. Radiative Decays of Scalar Mesons in Light-Front Quark Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitt, Martin; Choi, Ho-Meoyng; Ji, Chueng-Ryong

    2003-04-01

    It is currently thought that the difficulty in experimentally identifying the light scalar glueball results from the fact that it tends to mix with nearby conventional scalar mesons. Therefore, the glueball's presence can only be inferred from the behavior of the experimentally observed (mixed) scalar states. Here, we present relativistic light-front quark model calculations of absolute widths for the radiative decay processes Scalar[0^++] → γγ, Scalar[0^++]→γ Vector[1^-], and Vector[1^-]→γ Scalar[0^++] which incorporate the effects of glueball-q barq mixing. The mixed physical states are assumed to be the f_0(1370), the f_0(1500), and the f_0(1710). The n barn, s bars, and gg content of each of the physical states is taken from the mass mixing matrix calculations of other works. These flavor/glue wavefunctions are then used in conjunction with light-front spin-space wavefunctions to compute transition form factors for the decay processes mentioned above. In the q^2→ 0 limit the form factors are used to determine the corresponding decay widths. Our results are compared with available experimental data as well as the results of a recent non-relativistic model calculation of the process Scalar[0^++]→γ Vector[1^-].

  1. Light Kaluza Klein States in Randall-Sundrum Models with Custodial SU(2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carena, Marcela; /Fermilab; Ponton, Eduardo; /Columbia U.; Santiago, Jose; /Fermilab; Wagner, Carlos E.M.; /Argonne /Chicago U., EFI /KICP, Chicago

    2006-07-01

    We consider Randall-Sundrum scenarios based on SU(2){sub L} x SU(2){sub R} and a discrete parity exchanging L with R. The custodial and parity symmetries can be used to make the tree level contribution to the T parameter and the anomalous couplings of the bottom quark to the Z very small. We show that the resulting quantum numbers typically induce a negative T parameter at one loop that, together with the positive value of the S parameter, restrict considerably these models. There are nevertheless regions of parameter space that successfully reproduce the fit to electroweak precision observables with light Kaluza-Klein excitations accessible at colliders. We consider models of gauge-Higgs unification that implement the custodial and parity symmetries and find that the electroweak data singles out a very well defined region in parameter space. In this region one typically finds light gauge boson Kaluza-Klein excitations as well as light SU(2){sub L} singlet, and sometimes also doublet, fermionic states, that mix with the top quark, and that may yield interesting signatures at future colliders.

  2. Characterization, Modeling, and Optimization of Light-Emitting Diode System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorseth, Anders

    An automated setup has been developed for spectral radiometric characterization of LED components with precise control of the settings of forward current and operating temperature. The automated setup has been used to characterize commercial LED components with respect to multiple settings...... limit of human color perception. A method has been developed to optimize multicolored cluster LED systems with respect to light quality, using multi objective optimization. The results are simulated SPDs similar to traditional light sources, and with high light quality. As part of this work...

  3. Asymptotic behavior of observables in the asymmetric quantum Rabi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, J.; Kollar, M.

    2018-01-01

    The asymmetric quantum Rabi model with broken parity invariance shows spectral degeneracies in the integer case, that is when the asymmetry parameter equals an integer multiple of half the oscillator frequency, thus hinting at a hidden symmetry and accompanying integrability of the model. We study the expectation values of spin observables for each eigenstate and observe characteristic differences between the integer and noninteger cases for the asymptotics in the deep strong coupling regime, which can be understood from a perturbative expansion in the qubit splitting. We also construct a parent Hamiltonian whose exact eigenstates possess the same symmetries as the perturbative eigenstates of the asymmetric quantum Rabi model in the integer case.

  4. Tests of Financial Models in the Presence of Overlapping Observations.

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Matthew; Smith, Tom

    1991-01-01

    A general approach to testing serial dependence restrictions implied from financial models is developed. In particular, we discuss joint serial dependence restrictions imposed by random walk, market microstructure, and rational expectations models recently examined in the literature. This approach incorporates more information from the data by explicitly modeling dependencies induced by the use of overlapping observations. Because the estimation problem is sufficiently simple in this framewor...

  5. Experimental constraints on light scalar field models in cosmology and particle physics (SNLS and CMS experiments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neveu, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    The nature of dark energy and dark matter is still unknown today. Light scalar field models have been proposed to explain the late-time accelerated expansion of the Universe and the apparent abundance of non-baryonic matter. In the first part of this thesis, the Galileon theory, a well-posed modified gravity theory preserving the local gravitation thanks to the Vainshtein screening effect, is accurately tested against recent cosmological data. Observational constraints are derived on the model parameters using cosmological distance and growth rate of structure measurements. A good agreement is observed between data and theory predictions. The Galileon theory appears therefore as a promising alternative to the cosmological constant scenario. In the second part, the dark matter question is explored through an extra-dimension theory containing massive and stable scalar fields called Branons. Branon production is searched for in the proton-proton collisions that were collected by the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment in 2012 at the Large Hadron Collider. Events with a single photon and transverse missing energy are selected in this data set and compared to the Standard Model and instrumental background estimates. No signature of new physics is observed, so experimental limits on the Branon model parameters are derived. This thesis concludes with some ideas to reach an unified description of both models in the frame of extra-dimension theories. (author) [fr

  6. Microbunch Instability Observations from a THz Detector at Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, W.; Bartolini, R.; Boorman, G.; Karataev, P.; Lyapin, A.; Puntree, J.; Rehm, G.

    2012-05-01

    Diamond Light source is a third generation synchrotron facility dedicated to producing radiation of outstanding brightness, ranging from infra-red to x-rays. The short electron bunches that are accelerated around the storage ring are susceptible to the phenomenon of microbunching instabilities when the bunch charge exceeds a threshold. The primary feature of the microbunch instabilities is the onset of bursts of radiation in the THz range. The high frequencies involved in the emissions make detection and analysis challenging. A 60-90 GHz Schottky Barrier Diode detector was installed to investigate turn by turn evolution of the instabilities.

  7. Microbunch Instability Observations from a THz Detector at Diamond Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, W; Boorman, G; Karataev, P; Lyapin, A; Bartolini, R; Rehm, G; Puntree, J

    2012-01-01

    Diamond Light source is a third generation synchrotron facility dedicated to producing radiation of outstanding brightness, ranging from infra-red to x-rays. The short electron bunches that are accelerated around the storage ring are susceptible to the phenomenon of microbunching instabilities when the bunch charge exceeds a threshold. The primary feature of the microbunch instabilities is the onset of bursts of radiation in the THz range. The high frequencies involved in the emissions make detection and analysis challenging. A 60-90 GHz Schottky Barrier Diode detector was installed to investigate turn by turn evolution of the instabilities.

  8. An update on single field models of inflation in light of WMAP7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alabidi, Laila; Huston, Ian

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we summarise the status of single field models of inflation in light of the WMAP 7 data release. We find little has changed since the 5 year release, and results are consistent with previous findings. The increase in the upper bound on the running of the spectral index impacts on the status of the production of Primordial Black Holes from single field models. The lower bound on f equi NL is reduced and thus the bounds on the theoretical parameters of (UV) DBI single brane models are weakened. In the case of multiple coincident branes the bounds are also weakened and the two, three or four brane cases will produce a tensor-signal that could possibly be observed in the future

  9. Household light source for potent photo-dynamic antimicrobial effect and wound healing in an infective animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Azeem; Zhang, Yuxiang; Iqbal, Zafar; Zhang, Yaxin; Wang, Dong; Chen, Jincan; Hu, Ping; Chen, Zhuo; Huang, Mingdong

    2018-03-01

    Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) is considered a promising alternative to conventional antibiotic approach. We have previously developed a novel PS containing five lysine amino acids, pentalysine-β-carbonylphthalocyanine Zinc (ZnPc(Lys) 5 ), which in the presence of light, is highly toxic against a range of bacterial strains, including hospital isolated, drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Here, we study the effect of light fluence of the two light sources on the PACT potency of ZnPc(Lys) 5 . We observed that an exposure of E.coli to a red LED light for only 2 seconds (light fluence of 0.15 J/cm 2 ) in the presence of ZnPc(Lys) 5 significantly eradicated 80% of the E.coli . We further demonstrated that a light fluence of 4.5 J/cm 2 from a household light source induced a noticeable photodynamic effect in vitro and in vivo animal model. This study points to a new research direction of reducing light illumination time by increasing potency of PS.

  10. Measuring and Modeling Twilight’s Purple Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-20

    since the Krakatoa volcano’s explosion in Au- gust 1883, major volcanic eruptions have been fol- lowed by reports worldwide of extraordinarily vivid...purple light. Naturally, volcanic purple lights occurred long before the Krakatoa eruption, and scattered ac- counts of these date from at least the...early 16th century.1 After the Krakatoa event, 19th-century scientists quite reasonably speculated that the eruption in- jected dust into the upper

  11. Charon's Light Curves, as Observed by New Horizons' Ralph Color Camera (MVIC) on Approach to the Pluto System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howett, C. J. A.; Ennico, K.; Olkin, C. B.; Buie, M. W.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Zangari, A. M.; Parker, A. H.; Reuter, D. C.; Grundy, W. M.; Weaver, H. A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Light curves produced from color observations taken during New Horizons approach to the Pluto-system by its Multi-spectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC, part of the Ralph instrument) are analyzed. Fifty seven observations were analyzed, they were obtained between 9th April and 3rd July 2015, at a phase angle of 14.5 degrees to 15.1 degrees, sub-observer latitude of 51.2 degrees North to 51.5 degrees North, and a sub-solar latitude of 41.2 degrees North. MVIC has four color channels; all are discussed for completeness but only two were found to produce reliable light curves: Blue (400-550 nm) and Red (540-700 nm). The other two channels, Near Infrared (780-975 nm) and Methane-Band (860-910 nm), were found to be potentially erroneous and too noisy respectively. The Blue and Red light curves show that Charon's surface is neutral in color, but slightly brighter on its Pluto-facing hemisphere. This is consistent with previous studies made with the Johnson B and V bands, which are at shorter wavelengths than that of the MVIC Blue and Red channel respectively.

  12. Modeling investigation of light-absorbing aerosols in the Amazon Basin during the wet season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We use a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem to interpret observed light-absorbing aerosols in Amazonia during the wet season. Observed aerosol properties, including black carbon (BC concentration and light absorption, at the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO site in the central Amazon have relatively low background levels but frequently show high peaks during the study period of January–April 2014. With daily temporal resolution for open fire emissions and modified aerosol optical properties, our model successfully captures the observed variation in fine/coarse aerosol and BC concentrations as well as aerosol light absorption and its wavelength dependence over the Amazon Basin. The source attribution in the model indicates the important influence of open fire on the observed variances of aerosol concentrations and absorption, mainly from regional sources (northern South America and from northern Africa. The contribution of open fires from these two regions is comparable, with the latter becoming more important in the late wet season. The analysis of correlation and enhancement ratios of BC versus CO suggests transport times of < 3 days for regional fires and  ∼  11 days for African plumes arriving at ATTO during the wet season. The model performance of long-range transport of African plumes is also evaluated with observations from AERONET, MODIS, and CALIOP. Simulated absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD averaged over the wet season is lower than 0.0015 over the central Amazon, including the ATTO site. We find that more than 50 % of total absorption at 550 nm is from BC, except for the northeastern Amazon and the Guianas, where the influence of dust becomes significant (up to 35 %. The brown carbon contribution is generally between 20 and 30 %. The distribution of absorption Ångström exponents (AAE suggests more influence from fossil fuel combustion in the southern part of the basin (AAE  ∼  1 but more

  13. Gamma-ray pulsar physics: gap-model populations and light-curve analyses in the Fermi era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierbattista, M.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis research focusses on the study of the young and energetic isolated ordinary pulsar population detected by the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope. We compared the model expectations of four emission models and the LAT data. We found that all the models fail to reproduce the LAT detections, in particular the large number of high E objects observed. This inconsistency is not model dependent. A discrepancy between the radio-loud/radio-quiet objects ratio was also found between the observed and predicted samples. The L γ α E 0.5 relation is robustly confirmed by all the assumed models with particular agreement in the slot gap (SG) case. On luminosity bases, the intermediate altitude emission of the two pole caustic SG model is favoured. The beaming factor f Ω shows an E dependency that is slightly visible in the SG case. Estimates of the pulsar orientations have been obtained to explain the simultaneous gamma and radio light-curves. By analysing the solutions we found a relation between the observed energy cutoff and the width of the emission slot gap. This relation has been theoretically predicted. A possible magnetic obliquity α alignment with time is rejected -for all the models- on timescale of the order of 10 6 years. The light-curve morphology study shows that the outer magnetosphere gap emission (OGs) are favoured to explain the observed radio-gamma lag. The light curve moment studies (symmetry and sharpness) on the contrary favour a two pole caustic SG emission. All the model predictions suggest a different magnetic field layout with an hybrid two pole caustic and intermediate altitude emission to explain both the pulsar luminosity and light curve morphology. The low magnetosphere emission mechanism of the polar cap model, is systematically rejected by all the tests done. (author) [fr

  14. Observations that polar climate modelers use and want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, J. E.; de Boer, G.; Hunke, E. C.; Bailey, D. A.; Schneider, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Observations are essential for motivating and establishing improvement in the representation of polar processes within climate models. We believe that explicitly documenting the current methods used to develop and evaluate climate models with observations will help inform and improve collaborations between the observational and climate modeling communities. As such, we will present the current strategy of the Polar Climate Working Group (PCWG) to evaluate polar processes within Community Earth System Model (CESM) using observations. Our presentation will focus primarily on PCWG evaluation of atmospheric, sea ice, and surface oceanic processes. In the future, we hope to expand to include land surface, deep ocean, and biogeochemical observations. We hope our presentation, and a related working document developed by the PCWG (https://docs.google.com/document/d/1zt0xParsFeMYhlihfxVJhS3D5nEcKb8A41JH0G1Ic-E/edit) inspires new and useful interactions that lead to improved climate model representation of polar processes relevant to polar climate.

  15. Confronting Lemaitre–Tolman–Bondi models with observational cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Haugbølle, Troels

    2008-01-01

    The possibility that we live in a special place in the universe, close to the centre of a large void, seems an appealing alternative to the prevailing interpretation of the acceleration of the universe in terms of a ΛCDM model with a dominant dark energy component. In this paper we confront the asymptotically flat Lemaitre–Tolman–Bondi (LTB) models with a series of observations, from type Ia supernovae to cosmic microwave background and baryon acoustic oscillations data. We propose two concrete LTB models describing a local void in which the only arbitrary functions are the radial dependence of the matter density Ω M and the Hubble expansion rate H. We find that all observations can be accommodated within 1 sigma, for our models with four or five independent parameters. The best fit models have a χ 2 very close to that of the ΛCDM model. A general Fortran program for comparing LTB models with cosmological observations, that has been used to make the parameter scan in this paper, has been made public, and can be downloaded at http://www.phys.au.dk/~haugboel/software.shtml together with IDL routines for creating the likelihood plots. We perform a simple Bayesian analysis and show that one cannot exclude the hypothesis that we live within a large local void of an otherwise Einstein–de Sitter model

  16. Light-induced spin crossover observed for a Fe(II) complex embedded in a Nafion membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, H.; Rusanov, V.; McGarvey, J. J.; Toftlund, H.; Trautwein, A. X.; Wolny, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    Light-induced spin crossover has been observed for the first time by means of Moessbauer spectroscopy for a Fe(II) complex embedded in a Nafion membrane. The results obtained confirm other independent observations we have made, which point to the possibility of generating a long-lived HS state by means of laser irradiation of the same system (C. Brady, PhD thesis Queens University, Belfast 2002; J.A. Wolny, H. Toftlund, J.J. McGarvey, C. Brady, manuscript in preparation).

  17. Swelling in light water reactor internal components: Insights from computational modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, Roger E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Barashev, Alexander V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Golubov, Stanislav I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    A modern cluster dynamics model has been used to investigate the materials and irradiation parameters that control microstructural evolution under the relatively low-temperature exposure conditions that are representative of the operating environment for in-core light water reactor components. The focus is on components fabricated from austenitic stainless steel. The model accounts for the synergistic interaction between radiation-produced vacancies and the helium that is produced by nuclear transmutation reactions. Cavity nucleation rates are shown to be relatively high in this temperature regime (275 to 325°C), but are sensitive to assumptions about the fine scale microstructure produced under low-temperature irradiation. The cavity nucleation rates observed run counter to the expectation that void swelling would not occur under these conditions. This expectation was based on previous research on void swelling in austenitic steels in fast reactors. This misleading impression arose primarily from an absence of relevant data. The results of the computational modeling are generally consistent with recent data obtained by examining ex-service components. However, it has been shown that the sensitivity of the model s predictions of low-temperature swelling behavior to assumptions about the primary damage source term and specification of the mean-field sink strengths is somewhat greater that that observed at higher temperatures. Further assessment of the mathematical model is underway to meet the long-term objective of this research, which is to provide a predictive model of void swelling at relevant lifetime exposures to support extended reactor operations.

  18. Observation of the two-photon decay of a light penetrating particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faissner, H.; Frenzel, E.; Heinrigs, W.; Preussger, A.; Samm, D.; Samm, U.

    1981-07-01

    Coincident two-photon events, emerging from a 2 m long decay region, and pointing back to the SIN 590 MeV proton beam dump were detected in a thin-foil optical spark chamber. There was a significant excess of photons at small angles ( Eγ1 Eγ2 front of the decay region, but vanished with the wall put at its end. Presumably a light boson χ 0 comes from the beam dump, penetrates the shielding, and decays: χ0 → 2 γ The measured rate of (14.5 ± 5.0) events in 129 Coulomb fixes a combination of production cross section and life-time. If the new boson χ 0 was the axion, one can solve for the Higgs parameter X = 3.0 ± 0.3, and infer τa ≈ 7 ms, and ma = (250 ± 25) keV.

  19. Light absorption and morphological properties of soot-containing aerosols observed at an East Asian outflow site, Noto Peninsula, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ueda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The coating of black carbon (BC with inorganic salts and organic compounds can enhance the magnitude of light absorption by BC. To elucidate the enhancement of light absorption of aged BC particles and its relation to the mixing state and morphology of individual particles, we conducted observations of particles at an Asian outflow site in Noto Peninsula, Japan, in the spring of 2013. Absorption and scattering coefficients at 405, 532, and 781 nm and mass concentrations/mixing states of refractory BC in PM2.5 were measured using a three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer and a single-particle soot photometer (SP2, respectively, after passage through a thermodenuder (TD maintained at 300 or 400 °C or a bypass line maintained at room temperature (25 °C. The average enhancement factor of BC light absorption due to coating was estimated by comparing absorption coefficients at 781 nm for particles that with and without passing through the TD at 300 °C and was found to be 1.22. The largest enhancements (> 1.30 were observed under high absorption coefficient periods when the air mass was long-range transported from urban areas in China. Aerosol samples were also analyzed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer. The morphological features and mixing states of soot-containing particles of four samples collected during the high absorption events were analyzed by comparing microphotographs before and after the evaporation of beam-sensitive materials by irradiation with a high-density electron beam. The majority of the soot in all samples was found as mixed particles with sulfate-containing spherules or as clusters of such spherules. For samples showing high enhancement (> 1.30 of BC light absorption, the TEM showed that the internally mixed soot-containing particles tended to have a more spherical shape and to be thickly coated. The SP2 measurements also suggested that the

  20. Light absorption and morphological properties of soot-containing aerosols observed at an East Asian outflow site, Noto Peninsula, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Sayako; Nakayama, Tomoki; Taketani, Fumikazu; Adachi, Kouji; Matsuki, Atsushi; Iwamoto, Yoko; Sadanaga, Yasuhiro; Matsumi, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    The coating of black carbon (BC) with inorganic salts and organic compounds can enhance the magnitude of light absorption by BC. To elucidate the enhancement of light absorption of aged BC particles and its relation to the mixing state and morphology of individual particles, we conducted observations of particles at an Asian outflow site in Noto Peninsula, Japan, in the spring of 2013. Absorption and scattering coefficients at 405, 532, and 781 nm and mass concentrations/mixing states of refractory BC in PM2.5 were measured using a three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer and a single-particle soot photometer (SP2), respectively, after passage through a thermodenuder (TD) maintained at 300 or 400 °C or a bypass line maintained at room temperature (25 °C). The average enhancement factor of BC light absorption due to coating was estimated by comparing absorption coefficients at 781 nm for particles that with and without passing through the TD at 300 °C and was found to be 1.22. The largest enhancements (> 1.30) were observed under high absorption coefficient periods when the air mass was long-range transported from urban areas in China. Aerosol samples were also analyzed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer. The morphological features and mixing states of soot-containing particles of four samples collected during the high absorption events were analyzed by comparing microphotographs before and after the evaporation of beam-sensitive materials by irradiation with a high-density electron beam. The majority of the soot in all samples was found as mixed particles with sulfate-containing spherules or as clusters of such spherules. For samples showing high enhancement (> 1.30) of BC light absorption, the TEM showed that the internally mixed soot-containing particles tended to have a more spherical shape and to be thickly coated. The SP2 measurements also suggested that the proportion of thickly coated

  1. A NANOFLARE-BASED CELLULAR AUTOMATON MODEL AND THE OBSERVED PROPERTIES OF THE CORONAL PLASMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, Marcelo López [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio, CONICET-UBA, CC. 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Klimchuk, James A., E-mail: lopezf@iafe.uba.ar [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-09-10

    We use the cellular automaton model described in López Fuentes and Klimchuk to study the evolution of coronal loop plasmas. The model, based on the idea of a critical misalignment angle in tangled magnetic fields, produces nanoflares of varying frequency with respect to the plasma cooling time. We compare the results of the model with active region (AR) observations obtained with the Hinode /XRT and SDO /AIA instruments. The comparison is based on the statistical properties of synthetic and observed loop light curves. Our results show that the model reproduces the main observational characteristics of the evolution of the plasma in AR coronal loops. The typical intensity fluctuations have amplitudes of 10%–15% both for the model and the observations. The sign of the skewness of the intensity distributions indicates the presence of cooling plasma in the loops. We also study the emission measure (EM) distribution predicted by the model and obtain slopes in log(EM) versus log(T) between 2.7 and 4.3, in agreement with published observational values.

  2. A Nanoflare-Based Cellular Automaton Model and the Observed Properties of the Coronal Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Fuentes, Marcelo; Klimchuk, James Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We use the cellular automaton model described in Lopez Fuentes and Klimchuk to study the evolution of coronal loop plasmas. The model, based on the idea of a critical misalignment angle in tangled magnetic fields, produces nanoflares of varying frequency with respect to the plasma cooling time. We compare the results of the model with active region (AR) observations obtained with the Hinode/XRT and SDOAIA instruments. The comparison is based on the statistical properties of synthetic and observed loop light curves. Our results show that the model reproduces the main observational characteristics of the evolution of the plasma in AR coronal loops. The typical intensity fluctuations have amplitudes of 10 percent - 15 percent both for the model and the observations. The sign of the skewness of the intensity distributions indicates the presence of cooling plasma in the loops. We also study the emission measure (EM) distribution predicted by the model and obtain slopes in log(EM) versus log(T) between 2.7 and 4.3, in agreement with published observational values.

  3. A Global Model of The Light Curves and Expansion Velocities of Type II-plateau Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Prieto, Jose L.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new self-consistent and versatile method that derives photospheric radius and temperature variations of Type II-Plateau supernovae based on their expansion velocities and photometric measurements. We apply the method to a sample of 26 well-observed, nearby supernovae with published light curves and velocities. We simultaneously fit ~230 velocity and ~6800 mag measurements distributed over 21 photometric passbands spanning wavelengths from 0.19 to 2.2 μm. The light-curve differences among the Type II-Plateau supernovae are well modeled by assuming different rates of photospheric radius expansion, which we explain as different density profiles of the ejecta, and we argue that steeper density profiles result in flatter plateaus, if everything else remains unchanged. The steep luminosity decline of Type II-Linear supernovae is due to fast evolution of the photospheric temperature, which we verify with a successful fit of SN 1980K. Eliminating the need for theoretical supernova atmosphere models, we obtain self-consistent relative distances, reddenings, and nickel masses fully accounting for all internal model uncertainties and covariances. We use our global fit to estimate the time evolution of any missing band tailored specifically for each supernova, and we construct spectral energy distributions and bolometric light curves. We produce bolometric corrections for all filter combinations in our sample. We compare our model to the theoretical dilution factors and find good agreement for the B and V filters. Our results differ from the theory when the I, J, H, or K bands are included. We investigate the reddening law toward our supernovae and find reasonable agreement with standard \\mathscr{R}_V˜ 3.1 reddening law in UBVRI bands. Results for other bands are inconclusive. We make our fitting code publicly available.

  4. A GLOBAL MODEL OF THE LIGHT CURVES AND EXPANSION VELOCITIES OF TYPE II-PLATEAU SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejcha, Ondřej [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Prieto, Jose L., E-mail: pejcha@astro.princeton.edu [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército 441 Santiago (Chile)

    2015-02-01

    We present a new self-consistent and versatile method that derives photospheric radius and temperature variations of Type II-Plateau supernovae based on their expansion velocities and photometric measurements. We apply the method to a sample of 26 well-observed, nearby supernovae with published light curves and velocities. We simultaneously fit ∼230 velocity and ∼6800 mag measurements distributed over 21 photometric passbands spanning wavelengths from 0.19 to 2.2 μm. The light-curve differences among the Type II-Plateau supernovae are well modeled by assuming different rates of photospheric radius expansion, which we explain as different density profiles of the ejecta, and we argue that steeper density profiles result in flatter plateaus, if everything else remains unchanged. The steep luminosity decline of Type II-Linear supernovae is due to fast evolution of the photospheric temperature, which we verify with a successful fit of SN 1980K. Eliminating the need for theoretical supernova atmosphere models, we obtain self-consistent relative distances, reddenings, and nickel masses fully accounting for all internal model uncertainties and covariances. We use our global fit to estimate the time evolution of any missing band tailored specifically for each supernova, and we construct spectral energy distributions and bolometric light curves. We produce bolometric corrections for all filter combinations in our sample. We compare our model to the theoretical dilution factors and find good agreement for the B and V filters. Our results differ from the theory when the I, J, H, or K bands are included. We investigate the reddening law toward our supernovae and find reasonable agreement with standard R{sub V}∼3.1 reddening law in UBVRI bands. Results for other bands are inconclusive. We make our fitting code publicly available.

  5. Observational constraints on models for giant planet formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, D.; Owen, T.; Arizona Univ., Tucson)

    1985-01-01

    Current information about element abundances and isotope ratios in the atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune is reviewed. The observed enhancement of C/H compared with the solar value favors models for the origin of these bodies that invoke the accretion and degassing of an ice-rock core followed by the accumulation of a solar composition envelope. Titan may represent an example of a core-forming planetesimal. Observations of D/H and other isotope ratios must be accommodated by these models in ways that are not yet completely clear. Some additional tests are suggested

  6. In situ observation of modulated light emission of fiber fuse synchronized with void train over hetero-core splice point.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichi Todoroki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fiber fuse is a process of optical fiber destruction under the action of laser radiation, found 20 years ago. Once initiated, opical discharge runs along the fiber core region to the light source and leaves periodic voids whose shape looks like a bullet pointing the direction of laser beam. The relation between damage pattern and propagation mode of optical discharge is still unclear even after the first in situ observation three years ago. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fiber fuse propagation over hetero-core splice point (Corning SMF-28e and HI 1060 was observed in situ. Sequential photographs obtained at intervals of 2.78 micros recorded a periodic emission at the tail of an optical discharge pumped by 1070 nm and 9 W light. The signal stopped when the discharge ran over the splice point. The corresponding damage pattern left in the fiber core region included a segment free of periodicity. CONCLUSIONS: The spatial modulation pattern of the light emission agreed with the void train formed over the hetero-core splice point. Some segments included a bullet-shaped void pointing in the opposite direction to the laser beam propagation although the sequential photographs did not reveal any directional change in the optical discharge propagation.

  7. Living Cells and Dynamic Molecules Observed with the Polarized Light Microscope: the Legacy of Shinya Inoué.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Tomomi; Shribak, Michael; Oldenbourg, Rudolf

    2016-08-01

    In 1948, Shinya Inoué arrived in the United States for graduate studies at Princeton. A year later he came to Woods Hole, starting a long tradition of summer research at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), which quickly became Inoué's scientific home. Primed by his Japanese mentor, Katsuma Dan, Inoué followed Dan's mantra to work with healthy, living cells, on a fundamental problem (mitosis), with a unique tool set that he refined for precise and quantitative observations (polarized light microscopy), and a fresh and brilliant mind that was unafraid of challenging current dogma. Building on this potent combination, Inoué contributed landmark observations and concepts in cell biology, including the notion that there are dynamic, fine structures inside living cells, in which molecular assemblies such as mitotic spindle fibers exist in delicate equilibrium with their molecular building blocks suspended in the cytoplasm. In the late 1970s and 1980s, Inoué and others at the MBL were instrumental in conceiving video microscopy, a groundbreaking technique which married light microscopy and electronic imaging, ushering in a revolution in how we know and what we know about living cells and the molecular mechanisms of life. Here, we recount some of Inoué's accomplishments and describe how his legacy has shaped current activities in polarized light imaging at the MBL. © 2016 Marine Biological Laboratory.

  8. Evaluating Climate Models: Should We Use Weather or Climate Observations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oglesby, R. J.; Rowe, C. M.; Maasch, K. A.; Erickson, D. J.; Hays, C.

    2009-12-01

    Calling the numerical models that we use for simulations of climate change 'climate models' is a bit of a misnomer. These 'general circulation models' (GCMs, AKA global climate models) and their cousins the 'regional climate models' (RCMs) are actually physically-based weather simulators. That is, these models simulate, either globally or locally, daily weather patterns in response to some change in forcing or boundary condition. These simulated weather patterns are then aggregated into climate statistics, very much as we aggregate observations into 'real climate statistics'. Traditionally, the output of GCMs has been evaluated using climate statistics, as opposed to their ability to simulate realistic daily weather observations. At the coarse global scale this may be a reasonable approach, however, as RCM's downscale to increasingly higher resolutions, the conjunction between weather and climate becomes more problematic. We present results from a series of present-day climate simulations using the WRF ARW for domains that cover North America, much of Latin America, and South Asia. The basic domains are at a 12 km resolution, but several inner domains at 4 km have also been simulated. These include regions of complex topography in Mexico, Colombia, Peru, and Sri Lanka, as well as a region of low topography and fairly homogeneous land surface type (the U.S. Great Plains). Model evaluations are performed using standard climate analyses (e.g., reanalyses; NCDC data) but also using time series of daily station observations. Preliminary results suggest little difference in the assessment of long-term mean quantities, but the variability on seasonal and interannual timescales is better described. Furthermore, the value-added by using daily weather observations as an evaluation tool increases with the model resolution.

  9. The diverse broad-band light-curves of Swift GRBs reproduced with the cannonball model

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo; De Rújula, A

    2009-01-01

    Two radiation mechanisms, inverse Compton scattering (ICS) and synchrotron radiation (SR), suffice within the cannonball (CB) model of long gamma ray bursts (LGRBs) and X-ray flashes (XRFs) to provide a very simple and accurate description of their observed prompt emission and afterglows. Simple as they are, the two mechanisms and the burst environment generate the rich structure of the light curves at all frequencies and times. This is demonstrated for 33 selected Swift LGRBs and XRFs, which are well sampled from early time until late time and well represent the entire diversity of the broad band light curves of Swift LGRBs and XRFs. Their prompt gamma-ray and X-ray emission is dominated by ICS of glory light. During their fast decline phase, ICS is taken over by SR which dominates their broad band afterglow. The pulse shape and spectral evolution of the gamma-ray peaks and the early-time X-ray flares, and even the delayed optical `humps' in XRFs, are correctly predicted. The canonical and non-canonical X-ra...

  10. On prognostic models, artificial intelligence and censored observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, S S; Hamilton, P W; Hughes, J G; Bell, D A

    2001-03-01

    The development of prognostic models for assisting medical practitioners with decision making is not a trivial task. Models need to possess a number of desirable characteristics and few, if any, current modelling approaches based on statistical or artificial intelligence can produce models that display all these characteristics. The inability of modelling techniques to provide truly useful models has led to interest in these models being purely academic in nature. This in turn has resulted in only a very small percentage of models that have been developed being deployed in practice. On the other hand, new modelling paradigms are being proposed continuously within the machine learning and statistical community and claims, often based on inadequate evaluation, being made on their superiority over traditional modelling methods. We believe that for new modelling approaches to deliver true net benefits over traditional techniques, an evaluation centric approach to their development is essential. In this paper we present such an evaluation centric approach to developing extensions to the basic k-nearest neighbour (k-NN) paradigm. We use standard statistical techniques to enhance the distance metric used and a framework based on evidence theory to obtain a prediction for the target example from the outcome of the retrieved exemplars. We refer to this new k-NN algorithm as Censored k-NN (Ck-NN). This reflects the enhancements made to k-NN that are aimed at providing a means for handling censored observations within k-NN.

  11. Light element abundances in a matter-antimatter model of the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the problem of light element synthesis in a baryon symmetric Big-Bang cosmology, in which the universe is constituted at the end of the leptonic era by a nucleon-antinucleon emulsion. If the initial typical size of the matter or antimatter regions is sufficiently high to avoid significant neutron annihilation, nucleosynthesis can proceed in this kind of model in the same way as in the conventional Big-Bang. But the abundances of the created light elements can be modified at a later time by interaction of the nuclei with the high energy particles and photons resulting from annihilation. In this article, we consider two specific mechanisms able to change the abundances: a 4 He 'nucleodisruption' process (proposed by Combes et al., 1975), which leads to deuterium production, and 4 He photodisintegration by annihilation γ-rays, which leads to an increase of the 3 He and D production. General relations are established which allow one to compute the abundances of the so created elements when the size l of the matter or antimatter regions and the annihilation rate are given as function of time. These relations are applied to the Omnes model, in which the size l grows by a coalescence mechanism. It is shown that in this model the D and 3 He abundances are much greater than the limits on primordial abundances deduced from the present observations. (orig.) [de

  12. Ultra Light Axionic Dark Matter: Galactic Halos and Implications for Observations with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan de Martino

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The cold dark matter (CDM paradigm successfully explains the cosmic structure over an enormous span of redshifts. However, it fails when probing the innermost regions of dark matter halos and the properties of the Milky Way’s dwarf galaxy satellites. Moreover, the lack of experimental detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP favors alternative candidates such as light axionic dark matter that naturally arise in string theory. Cosmological N-body simulations have shown that axionic dark matter forms a solitonic core of size of ≃150 pc in the innermost region of the galactic halos. The oscillating scalar field associated to the axionic dark matter halo produces an oscillating gravitational potential that induces a time dilation of the pulse arrival time of ≃400 ns/(m B /10 − 22 eV for pulsar within such a solitonic core. Over the whole galaxy, the averaged predicted signal may be detectable with current and forthcoming pulsar timing array telescopes.

  13. Observation of Electronic Excitation Transfer Through Light Harvesting Complex II Using Two-Dimensional Electronic-Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, NHC; Gruenke, NL; Oliver, TAA; Ballottari, M; Bassi, R; Fleming, GR

    2016-10-05

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) serves a central role in light harvesting for oxygenic photosynthesis and is arguably the most important photosynthetic antenna complex. In this article, we present two-dimensional electronic–vibrational (2DEV) spectra of LHCII isolated from spinach, demonstrating the possibility of using this technique to track the transfer of electronic excitation energy between specific pigments within the complex. We assign the spectral bands via comparison with the 2DEV spectra of the isolated chromophores, chlorophyll a and b, and present evidence that excitation energy between the pigments of the complex are observed in these spectra. Lastly, we analyze the essential components of the 2DEV spectra using singular value decomposition, which makes it possible to reveal the relaxation pathways within this complex.

  14. Observational artifacts of Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array: Ghost rays and stray light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristin K.; Christensen, Finn Erland; Craig, William W.

    2017-01-01

    photons that do not undergo the focused double reflections in the optics, and we term these ghost rays. We present detailed analysis and characterization of these two components and discuss how they impact observations. Finally, we discuss how they could have been prevented and should be in future...

  15. External Influences on Modeled and Observed Cloud Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvel, Kate; Zelinka, Mark; Klein, Stephen A.; Bonfils, Celine; Caldwell, Peter; Doutriaux, Charles; Santer, Benjamin D.; Taylor, Karl E.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the cloud response to external forcing is a major challenge for climate science. This crucial goal is complicated by intermodel differences in simulating present and future cloud cover and by observational uncertainty. This is the first formal detection and attribution study of cloud changes over the satellite era. Presented herein are CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project - Phase 5) model-derived fingerprints of externally forced changes to three cloud properties: the latitudes at which the zonally averaged total cloud fraction (CLT) is maximized or minimized, the zonal average CLT at these latitudes, and the height of high clouds at these latitudes. By considering simultaneous changes in all three properties, the authors define a coherent multivariate fingerprint of cloud response to external forcing and use models from phase 5 of CMIP (CMIP5) to calculate the average time to detect these changes. It is found that given perfect satellite cloud observations beginning in 1983, the models indicate that a detectable multivariate signal should have already emerged. A search is then made for signals of external forcing in two observational datasets: ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) and PATMOS-x (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Pathfinder Atmospheres - Extended). The datasets are both found to show a poleward migration of the zonal CLT pattern that is incompatible with forced CMIP5 models. Nevertheless, a detectable multivariate signal is predicted by models over the PATMOS-x time period and is indeed present in the dataset. Despite persistent observational uncertainties, these results present a strong case for continued efforts to improve these existing satellite observations, in addition to planning for new missions.

  16. Fenton Process Coupled to Ultrasound and UV Light Irradiation for the Oxidation of a Model Pollutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E. Barrera-Salgado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fenton process coupled to photosonolysis (UV light and Us, using Fe2O3 catalyst supported on Al2O3, was used to oxidize a model pollutant like acid green 50 textile dye (AG50. Dye degradation was followed by AG50 concentration decay analyses. It was observed that parameters like iron content on a fixed amount of catalyst supporting material, catalyst annealing temperature, initial dye concentration, and the solution pH influence the overall treatment efficiency. High removal efficiencies of the model pollutant are achieved. The stability and reusability tests of the Fe2O3 catalyst show that the catalyst can be used up to three cycles achieving high discoloration. Thus, this catalyst is highly efficient for the degradation of AG50 in the Fenton process.

  17. The Involvement of the Oxidative Stress in Murine Blue LED Light-Induced Retinal Damage Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Maho; Kuse, Yoshiki; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    The aim of study was to establish a mouse model of blue light emitting diode (LED) light-induced retinal damage and to evaluate the effects of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Mice were exposed to 400 or 800 lx blue LED light for 2 h, and were evaluated for retinal damage 5 d later by electroretinogram amplitude and outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness. Additionally, we investigated the effect of blue LED light exposure on shorts-wave-sensitive opsin (S-opsin), and rhodopsin expression by immunohistochemistry. Blue LED light induced light intensity dependent retinal damage and led to collapse of S-opsin and altered rhodopsin localization from inner and outer segments to ONL. Conversely, NAC administered at 100 or 250 mg/kg intraperitoneally twice a day, before dark adaptation and before light exposure. NAC protected the blue LED light-induced retinal damage in a dose-dependent manner. Further, blue LED light-induced decreasing of S-opsin levels and altered rhodopsin localization, which were suppressed by NAC. We established a mouse model of blue LED light-induced retinal damage and these findings indicated that oxidative stress was partially involved in blue LED light-induced retinal damage.

  18. THE CENTRAL REGION IN M100 - OBSERVATIONS AND MODELING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KNAPEN, JH; BECKMAN, JE; HELLER, CH; SHLOSMAN, [No Value; DEJONG, RS

    1995-01-01

    We present new high-resolution observations of the central region in the late-type spiral galaxy M100 (NGC 4321) supplemented by three-dimensional numerical modeling of stellar and gas dynamics, including star formation (SF). Near-infrared imaging has revealed a small bulge of 4'' effective

  19. Obtaining the time evolution for spherically symmetric Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi models given data on our past light cone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, M. E.; Stoeger, W. R.

    2009-01-01

    A rigorous demonstration that given appropriate data on our past light cone leads to the determination of the metric functions and all their time derivatives on our past light cone is presented, thus showing how to evolve the solution we obtain from data on the light cone off it in a well-defined and straightforward way. It also automatically gives a procedure for constructing the solution for all spherically symmetric, inhomogeneous cosmological Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi models in observational coordinates as a Taylor series in time of however many terms we need. Our procedure takes into account the essential data giving the maximum of the observer area (angular-diameter) distance, and the redshift z max at which that occurs. This enables the determination of the vacuum-energy density μ Λ , which would otherwise remain undetermined.

  20. Made-to-measure modelling of observed galaxy dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovy, Jo; Kawata, Daisuke; Hunt, Jason A. S.

    2018-01-01

    Amongst dynamical modelling techniques, the made-to-measure (M2M) method for modelling steady-state systems is amongst the most flexible, allowing non-parametric distribution functions in complex gravitational potentials to be modelled efficiently using N-body particles. Here, we propose and test various improvements to the standard M2M method for modelling observed data, illustrated using the simple set-up of a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator. We demonstrate that nuisance parameters describing the modelled system's orientation with respect to the observer - e.g. an external galaxy's inclination or the Sun's position in the Milky Way - as well as the parameters of an external gravitational field can be optimized simultaneously with the particle weights. We develop a method for sampling from the high-dimensional uncertainty distribution of the particle weights. We combine this in a Gibbs sampler with samplers for the nuisance and potential parameters to explore the uncertainty distribution of the full set of parameters. We illustrate our M2M improvements by modelling the vertical density and kinematics of F-type stars in Gaia DR1. The novel M2M method proposed here allows full probabilistic modelling of steady-state dynamical systems, allowing uncertainties on the non-parametric distribution function and on nuisance parameters to be taken into account when constraining the dark and baryonic masses of stellar systems.

  1. Photokinetic Drug Delivery: Light-Enhanced Permeation in an In Vitro Eye Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godley, Bernard F; Kraft, Edward R; Giannos, Steven A; Zhao, Zhen-Yang; Haag, Anthony M; Wen, Julie W

    2015-12-01

    To investigate light-enhanced molecular movement as a potential technology for drug delivery. To do this, we developed an in vitro eye model while representing similar concentration gradient conditions and compositions found in the eye. The eye model unit was fabricated by inserting a cross-linked type I collagen membrane in a spectrophotometer cuvette with 1% hyaluronic acid as the drug recipient medium. Photokinetic delivery was studied by illuminating 1 mg/mL methotrexate (MTX) placed in the drug donor compartment on top of the membrane, with noncoherent 450 nm light at 8.2 mW from an LED source pulsed at 25 cycles per second, placed in contact with the solution. A modified UV-visual spectrophotometer was employed to rapidly determine the concentration of MTX, at progressive 1 mm distances away from the membrane, within the viscous recipient medium of the model eye after 1 h. A defined, progressive concentration gradient was observed within the nonagitated drug recipient media, diminishing with greater distances from the membrane. Transport of MTX through the membrane was significantly enhanced (ranging from 2 to 3 times, P < 0.05 to P ≤ 0.001) by photokinetic methods compared with control conditions by determining drug concentrations at 4 defined distances from the membrane. According to scanning electron microscopy images, no structural damage or shunts were created on the surface of the cross-linked gelatin membrane. The application of pulsed noncoherent visible light significantly enhances the permeation of MTX through a cross-linked collagen membrane and hyaluronic acid recipient medium without causing structural damage to the membrane.

  2. Freud's views on early female sexuality in the light of direct child observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeman, J A

    1976-01-01

    Freud's writings on early female sexuality are reviewed in order to demonstrate which of his central assumptions are supported and which have been corrected by the direct observation of young children. The study of the emergence of core gender identity in little girls is a key to the modification of Freud's statements on the onset of and crucial factors in the development of femininity. Cognitive functions, learning experiences, and language are believed to be more important than Freud stressed, and penis envy and feelings of inferiority are relegated to a less universal and less necessary place in the onset of femininity. The role of the father is given different emphasis. Direct observation clarifies many aspects of masturbation or early genital self-stimulation in the young female: its onset; its feminine rather than masculine character; its early vicissitudes; its importance relative to other behavior; the impact of the discovery of anatomical difference; one special way it is affected by parental attitude; and how it contrasts with comparable behavior in the young male. Observation refutes Freud's often quoted statement that masturbation is further removed from the nature of women than of men.

  3. Travelers ability to observe changes in traffic intensities and traffic light settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, Jacob Dirk; Do, Michael; Middag, Wilco; Martens, Marieke Hendrikje; van Berkum, Eric C.; van Arem, Bart; ITSC,

    2011-01-01

    Travel choice behavior is an important determinant in traffic and subject to human imperfection and bounded rationality. In decision-making processes travelers seldom act perfectly rational. Traffic models and traffic network management measure could become more realistic and effective, if

  4. Differences in rain rate intensities between TRMM observations and community atmosphere model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi; Bowman, Kenneth P.; Jackson, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Precipitation related latent heating is important in driving the atmospheric general circulation and in generating intraseasonal to decadal atmospheric variability. Our ability to project future climate change, especially trends in costly precipitation extremes, hinges upon whether coupled GCMs capture processes that affect precipitation characteristics. Our study compares the tropical-subtropical precipitation characteristics of simulations by the NCAR CAM3.1 atmospheric GCM and observations derived from the NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. Despite a fairly good simulation of the annual mean rain rate, CAM rains about 10-50% more often than the real world and fails to capture heavy rainfall associated with deep convective systems over subtropical South America and U.S. Southern Plains. When it rains, there is a likelihood of 0.96-1.0 that it rains lightly in the model, compared to values of 0.84-1.0 in TRMM data. On the other hand, the likelihood of the occurrence of moderate to heavy rainfall is an order of magnitude higher in observations (0.12-0.2) than that in the model (model compensates for the lack of heavy precipitation through raining more frequently within the light rain category, which leads to an annual rainfall amount close to what is observed. CAM captures the qualitative change of rain rate PDF from a "dry" oceanic to a "wet" oceanic region, but it fails to simulate the change of precipitation characteristics from an oceanic region to a land region where thunderstorm rainfall dominates.

  5. Photometric observations and numerical modeling of AW Sge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, M. M.; Voloshina, I.; Goel, Amit

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present R-band photometric light curves of Cataclysmic Variable AW Sge, an SU Uma type, near superoutburst maximum. The positive superhump shape changes over three days, from single peaked on October 11, 2013 to one maximum near phase ϕ ˜ 0.3 followed by minor peaks near phases ϕ ˜ 0.6 and ϕ ˜ 0.9, respectively, on October 13, 2013. Using the maxima from October 11-13, 2013 (JD 2456577-2356579), the observed positive superhump period is 0.074293 ± 0.000025 days. In addition to the observations, we also provide a three dimensional Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic simulation near superoutburst maximum, for comparison, assuming a secondary-to-primary mass ratio q =M2 /M1 = 0.6 M⊙/0.132 M⊙ = 0.22. The simulation produces positive superhump shapes that are similar to the observations. The simulated positive superhump has a period of 0.076923 days, which is approximately 6% longer than the orbital period, assuming an orbital period Porb = 0.0724 days. The 3.5% difference from the observed positive superhump period is likely due to the assumptions used in generating the simulations, as the orbital period and masses are not well known. From an analysis of the simulated positive superhump shape near superoutburst maximum, the maximum occurs near ϕ ˜ 0.3, when the disk is highly elliptical and eccentric and at least one of the two density waves is compressing with the disk rim. Based on the simulation, we find that the disk may be tilted and precessing in the retrograde direction at a time that is just before the next outburst and/or superoutburst.

  6. Model for variable light sensitivity in imbibed dark-dormant seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, S O; Egley, G H; Reger, B J

    1977-02-01

    The level of light-induced germination of the seed of common purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.) and curly dock (Rumex crispus L.) changes with dark incubation time prior to brief, low energy, red light treatment. The rate at which phytochrome-far red-absorbing form (Pfr) acts in the light-induced population of seeds was measured by quantitating per cent reversals of the red light effect with saturating far red light exposures at successive times after the red light exposure. A linear positive correlation was found between this rate and the final germination level. These results are compatible with a model involving changing levels, during dark incubation, of a component with which Pfr interacts. In this model, germination is initiated after attainment of a certain level of interaction between Pfr and this component. These findings also support the view that the Pfr to Pr decay rate constant and total phytochrome level are stable during dark incubation.

  7. Obs4MIPS: Satellite Observations for Model Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, R.; Waliser, D. E.; Gleckler, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    This poster will review the current status of the obs4MIPs project, whose purpose is to provide a limited collection of well-established and documented datasets for comparison with Earth system models (https://www.earthsystemcog.org/projects/obs4mips/). These datasets have been reformatted to correspond with the CMIP5 model output requirements, and include technical documentation specifically targeted for their use in model output evaluation. The project holdings now exceed 120 datasets with observations that directly correspond to CMIP5 model output variables, with new additions in response to the CMIP6 experiments. With the growth in climate model output data volume, it is increasing more difficult to bring the model output and the observations together to do evaluations. The positioning of the obs4MIPs datasets within the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) allows for the use of currently available and planned online tools within the ESGF to perform analysis using model output and observational datasets without necessarily downloading everything to a local workstation. This past year, obs4MIPs has updated its submission guidelines to closely align with changes in the CMIP6 experiments, and is implementing additional indicators and ancillary data to allow users to more easily determine the efficacy of an obs4MIPs dataset for specific evaluation purposes. This poster will present the new guidelines and indicators, and update the list of current obs4MIPs holdings and their connection to the ESGF evaluation and analysis tools currently available, and being developed for the CMIP6 experiments.

  8. An observer model for quantifying panning artifacts in digital pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanaki, Ali R. N.; Espig, Kathryn S.; Xthona, Albert; Lanciault, Christian; Kimpe, Tom R. L.

    2017-03-01

    Typically, pathologists pan from one region of a slide to another, choosing areas of interest for closer inspection. Due to finite frame rate and imperfect zero-order hold reconstruction (i.e., the non-zero time to reach the target brightness after a change in pixel drive), panning in whole slide images (WSI) cause visual artifacts. It is important to study the impact of such artifacts since research suggests that 49% of navigation is conducted in low-power/overview with digital pathology (Molin et al., Histopathology 2015). In this paper, we explain what types of medical information may be harmed by panning artifacts, propose a method to simulate panning artifacts, and design an observer model to predict the impact of panning artifacts on typical human observers' performance in basic diagnostically relevant visual tasks. The proposed observer model is based on derivation of perceived object border maps from luminance and chrominance information and may be tuned to account for visual acuity of the human observer to be modeled. Our results suggest that increasing the contrast (e.g., using a wide gamut display) with a slow response panel may not mitigate the panning artifacts which mostly affect visual tasks involving spatial discrimination of objects (e.g., normal vs abnormal structure, cell type and spatial relationships between them, and low-power nuclear morphology), and that the panning artifacts worsen with increasing panning speed. The proposed methods may be used as building blocks in an automatic WSI quality assessment framework.

  9. Laguerre-Gauss basis functions in observer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Arthur E.

    2003-05-01

    Observer models based on linear classifiers with basis functions (channels) are useful for evaluation of detection performance with medical images. They allow spatial domain calculations with a covariance matrix of tractable size. The term "channelized Fisher-Hotelling observer" will be used here. It is also called the "channelized Hotelling observer" model. There are an infinite number of basis function (channel ) sets that could be employed. Examples of channel sets that have been used include: difference of Gaussian (DOG) filters, difference of Mesa (DOM) filters and Laguerre-Gauss (LG) basis functions. Another option, sums of LG functions (LGS), will also be presented here. This set has the advantage of having no DC response. The effect of the number of images used to estimate model observer performance will be described, for both filtered 1/f3 noise and GE digital mammogram backgrounds. Finite sample image sets introduce both bias and variance to the estimate. The results presented here agree with previous work on linear classifiers. The LGS basis set gives a small but statistically significant reduction in bias. However, this may not be of much practical benefit. Finally, the effect of varying the number of basis functions included in the set will be addressed. It was found that four LG bases or three LGS bases are adequate.

  10. Multiparameter breast cancer cell image analysis for objective estimation of nuclear grade: comparison with light microscopic observational data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzins, Juris; Sneiders, Uldis; Plegere, Daina; Freivalds, Talivaldis; Grigalinovica, Romalda

    2000-04-01

    We performed a multi parameter image analysis assessment of breast cancer cell population nuclear grade (NG), which is regarded as one of the main prognostic factors for treatment efficacy and survival of the patients and compared it with light microscopic estimation of NG. Cytological imprint slides from 20 ductal carcinomas were stained according to Leischmann-AzureII-eosine method, and NG was estimated by light microscopic observation according to Black in Fisher's modification. Simultaneously, using specially elaborated software, in each patient 100 cancer cells were analyzed for nuclear perimeter, diameter, area, nucleolar area, and average intensity of staining. The chromatin structure was assessed using mean diameter of chromatin grains and relatively chromatic are within the nucleus. Light microscopic estimation revealed 4/15 grade 2 and 7/15 grade 3 tumors out of 15 filtrating ductal carcinomas, with 4/15 classified as intermediate between grade 2-3. Multifactoral linear correlation coefficient r equals 0.39, p < 0.001 for ductal cancer, higher NG comes with increasing nucleolar area, nuclear roundness factor, nuclear are, and chromatin area within the cell nucleus. Image analysis may yield precise information on NG as a prognostic factor in breast cancer patients.

  11. Southeast Atmosphere Studies: learning from model-observation syntheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jingqiu; Carlton, Annmarie; Cohen, Ronald C.; Brune, William H.; Brown, Steven S.; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Pye, Havala O. T.; Ng, Nga Lee; Xu, Lu; McNeill, V. Faye; Tsigaridis, Kostas; McDonald, Brian C.; Warneke, Carsten; Guenther, Alex; Alvarado, Matthew J.; de Gouw, Joost; Mickley, Loretta J.; Leibensperger, Eric M.; Mathur, Rohit; Nolte, Christopher G.; Portmann, Robert W.; Unger, Nadine; Tosca, Mika; Horowitz, Larry W.

    2018-02-01

    Concentrations of atmospheric trace species in the United States have changed dramatically over the past several decades in response to pollution control strategies, shifts in domestic energy policy and economics, and economic development (and resulting emission changes) elsewhere in the world. Reliable projections of the future atmosphere require models to not only accurately describe current atmospheric concentrations, but to do so by representing chemical, physical and biological processes with conceptual and quantitative fidelity. Only through incorporation of the processes controlling emissions and chemical mechanisms that represent the key transformations among reactive molecules can models reliably project the impacts of future policy, energy and climate scenarios. Efforts to properly identify and implement the fundamental and controlling mechanisms in atmospheric models benefit from intensive observation periods, during which collocated measurements of diverse, speciated chemicals in both the gas and condensed phases are obtained. The Southeast Atmosphere Studies (SAS, including SENEX, SOAS, NOMADSS and SEAC4RS) conducted during the summer of 2013 provided an unprecedented opportunity for the atmospheric modeling community to come together to evaluate, diagnose and improve the representation of fundamental climate and air quality processes in models of varying temporal and spatial scales.This paper is aimed at discussing progress in evaluating, diagnosing and improving air quality and climate modeling using comparisons to SAS observations as a guide to thinking about improvements to mechanisms and parameterizations in models. The effort focused primarily on model representation of fundamental atmospheric processes that are essential to the formation of ozone, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and other trace species in the troposphere, with the ultimate goal of understanding the radiative impacts of these species in the southeast and elsewhere. Here we

  12. Southeast Atmosphere Studies: learning from model-observation syntheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations of atmospheric trace species in the United States have changed dramatically over the past several decades in response to pollution control strategies, shifts in domestic energy policy and economics, and economic development (and resulting emission changes elsewhere in the world. Reliable projections of the future atmosphere require models to not only accurately describe current atmospheric concentrations, but to do so by representing chemical, physical and biological processes with conceptual and quantitative fidelity. Only through incorporation of the processes controlling emissions and chemical mechanisms that represent the key transformations among reactive molecules can models reliably project the impacts of future policy, energy and climate scenarios. Efforts to properly identify and implement the fundamental and controlling mechanisms in atmospheric models benefit from intensive observation periods, during which collocated measurements of diverse, speciated chemicals in both the gas and condensed phases are obtained. The Southeast Atmosphere Studies (SAS, including SENEX, SOAS, NOMADSS and SEAC4RS conducted during the summer of 2013 provided an unprecedented opportunity for the atmospheric modeling community to come together to evaluate, diagnose and improve the representation of fundamental climate and air quality processes in models of varying temporal and spatial scales.This paper is aimed at discussing progress in evaluating, diagnosing and improving air quality and climate modeling using comparisons to SAS observations as a guide to thinking about improvements to mechanisms and parameterizations in models. The effort focused primarily on model representation of fundamental atmospheric processes that are essential to the formation of ozone, secondary organic aerosol (SOA and other trace species in the troposphere, with the ultimate goal of understanding the radiative impacts of these species in the southeast and

  13. Modelling and observing urban climate in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hove, B.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Heusinkveld, B.; Holtslag, B.; Jacobs, C.; Ter Maat, H.; Elbers, J.; Moors, E.

    2011-06-01

    The main aims of the present study are: (1) to evaluate the performance of two well-known mesoscale NWP (numerical weather prediction) models coupled to a UCM (Urban Canopy Models), and (2) to develop a proper measurement strategy for obtaining meteorological data that can be used in model evaluation studies. We choose the mesoscale models WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting Model) and RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System), respectively, because the partners in the present project have a large expertise with respect to these models. In addition WRF and RAMS have been successfully used in the meteorology and climate research communities for various purposes, including weather prediction and land-atmosphere interaction research. Recently, state-of-the-art UCM's were embedded within the land surface scheme of the respective models, in order to better represent the exchange of heat, momentum, and water vapour in the urban environment. Key questions addressed here are: What is the general model performance with respect to the urban environment?; How can useful and observational data be obtained that allow sensible validation and further parameterization of the models?; and Can the models be easily modified to simulate the urban climate under Dutch climatic conditions, urban configuration and morphology? Chapter 2 reviews the available Urban Canopy Models; we discuss their theoretical basis, the different representations of the urban environment, the required input and the output. Much of the information was obtained from the Urban Surface Energy Balance: Land Surface Scheme Comparison project (PILPS URBAN, PILPS stands for Project for Inter-comparison of Land-Surface Parameterization Schemes). This project started in March 2008 and was coordinated by the Department of Geography, King's College London. In order to test the performance of our models we participated in this project. Chapter 3 discusses the main results of the first phase of PILPS URBAN. A first

  14. Light Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegel, Kurt W.

    1973-01-01

    Outdoor lighting is light pollution which handicaps certain astronomical programs. Protective measures must be adopted by the government to aid observational astronomy without sacrificing legitimate outdoor lighting needs. (PS)

  15. Phototherapy with blue and green mixed-light is as effective against unconjugated jaundice as blue light and reduces oxidative stress in the Gunn rat model.

    OpenAIRE

    Uchida, Yumiko; Morimoto, Yukihiro; Uchiike, Takao; Kamamoto, Tomoyuki :4/0000339; Hayashi, Tamaki; Arai, Ikuyo; Nishikubo, Toshiya; Takahashi, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:Phototherapy using blue light-emitting diodes (LED) is effective against neonatal jaundice. However, green light phototherapy also reduces unconjugated jaundice. We aimed to determine whether mixed blue and green light can relieve jaundice with minimal oxidative stress as effectively as either blue or green light alone in a rat model.METHODS:Gunn rats were exposed to phototherapy with blue (420-520 nm), filtered blue (FB; 440-520 nm without

  16. Light-Toned, Layered Outcrops of Northern Terra Meridiani Mars: Viking, Phobos 2, and Mars Global Surveyor Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.

    2002-01-01

    Locating outcrops of sedimentary rock on Mars is an important step toward deciphering the planet's geologic and climatologic record. Sedimentary rock representing the earliest martian environments, are of particular interest in this context. This is a report about a vast exposure of material proposed to be martian sedimentary rock. The outcrops cover an area (approximately sq 300,000 km) roughly the size of the Colorado Plateau in North America (approximately 260,000 sq km). The materials occur in northern Terra Meridiani, near of one of the four sites being considered for a 2004 NASA Mars Exploration Rover (MER) landing. The landing ellipse, centered at deg S, deg W, lies in a region exhibiting smooth and rough (at meter scale) dark-toned surfaces, with scattered light-toned patches. Stratigraphically, the dark-toned materials at the MER site lie unconformably on top of a previously-eroded, light-toned surface; the light-toned patches in the landing ellipse are geologic windows down to this lower stratigraphic unit. North of the landing ellipse, the light-toned materials are well-exposed because the darker materials have been removed, stranding outlier remnants in a few locations. The light-toned materials are layered, vertically heterogeneous, and exhibit lateral continuity over hundreds of kilometers. Eroded layers produce cliffs; some outcrops are expressed as mesas, buttes, and spires; and impact craters ranging in diameter from a few meters to tens of kilometers are interbedded with the layers. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of greater than 6 years of photogeologic investigation into the nature of the light-toned outcrops of northern Terra Meridiani. The work is a 'snapshot' of progress made toward eventual geologic mapping and establishment of the stratigraphic sequence for the materials through 30 September 2002, a day prior to the first release of Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) data to the NASA Planetary Data

  17. CrowdWater - Can people observe what models need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meerveld, I. H. J.; Seibert, J.; Vis, M.; Etter, S.; Strobl, B.

    2017-12-01

    CrowdWater (www.crowdwater.ch) is a citizen science project that explores the usefulness of crowd-sourced data for hydrological model calibration and prediction. Hydrological models are usually calibrated based on observed streamflow data but it is likely easier for people to estimate relative stream water levels, such as the water level above or below a rock, than streamflow. Relative stream water levels may, therefore, be a more suitable variable for citizen science projects than streamflow. In order to test this assumption, we held surveys near seven different sized rivers in Switzerland and asked more than 450 volunteers to estimate the water level class based on a picture with a virtual staff gauge. The results show that people can generally estimate the relative water level well, although there were also a few outliers. We also asked the volunteers to estimate streamflow based on the stick method. The median estimated streamflow was close to the observed streamflow but the spread in the streamflow estimates was large and there were very large outliers, suggesting that crowd-based streamflow data is highly uncertain. In order to determine the potential value of water level class data for model calibration, we converted streamflow time series for 100 catchments in the US to stream level class time series and used these to calibrate the HBV model. The model was then validated using the streamflow data. The results of this modeling exercise show that stream level class data are useful for constraining a simple runoff model. Time series of only two stream level classes, e.g. above or below a rock in the stream, were already informative, especially when the class boundary was chosen towards the highest stream levels. There was hardly any improvement in model performance when more than five water level classes were used. This suggests that if crowd-sourced stream level observations are available for otherwise ungauged catchments, these data can be used to constrain

  18. Observations and Models of Highly Intermittent Phytoplankton Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Sandip; Locke, Christopher; Tanaka, Mamoru; Yamazaki, Hidekatsu

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of phytoplankton distributions in ocean ecosystems provides the basis for elucidating the influences of physical processes on plankton dynamics. Technological advances allow for measurement of phytoplankton data to greater resolution, displaying high spatial variability. In conventional mathematical models, the mean value of the measured variable is approximated to compare with the model output, which may misinterpret the reality of planktonic ecosystems, especially at the microscale level. To consider intermittency of variables, in this work, a new modelling approach to the planktonic ecosystem is applied, called the closure approach. Using this approach for a simple nutrient-phytoplankton model, we have shown how consideration of the fluctuating parts of model variables can affect system dynamics. Also, we have found a critical value of variance of overall fluctuating terms below which the conventional non-closure model and the mean value from the closure model exhibit the same result. This analysis gives an idea about the importance of the fluctuating parts of model variables and about when to use the closure approach. Comparisons of plot of mean versus standard deviation of phytoplankton at different depths, obtained using this new approach with real observations, give this approach good conformity. PMID:24787740

  19. Solar spectral irradiance variability in cycle 24: observations and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenko, Sergey V.; DeLand, Matthew T.; Lean, Judith L.

    2016-12-01

    Utilizing the excellent stability of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), we characterize both short-term (solar rotation) and long-term (solar cycle) changes of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) between 265 and 500 nm during the ongoing cycle 24. We supplement the OMI data with concurrent observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) and Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments and find fair-to-excellent, depending on wavelength, agreement among the observations, and predictions of the Naval Research Laboratory Solar Spectral Irradiance (NRLSSI2) and Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S) models.

  20. Solar spectral irradiance variability in cycle 24: observations and models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchenko Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing the excellent stability of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI, we characterize both short-term (solar rotation and long-term (solar cycle changes of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI between 265 and 500 nm during the ongoing cycle 24. We supplement the OMI data with concurrent observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2 and Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE instruments and find fair-to-excellent, depending on wavelength, agreement among the observations, and predictions of the Naval Research Laboratory Solar Spectral Irradiance (NRLSSI2 and Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S models.

  1. Observational constraints from models of close binary evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greve, J.P. de; Packet, W.

    1984-01-01

    The evolution of a system of 9 solar masses + 5.4 solar masses is computed from Zero Age Main Sequence through an early case B of mass exchange, up to the second phase of mass transfer after core helium burning. Both components are calculated simultaneously. The evolution is divided into several physically different phases. The characteristics of the models in each of these phases are transformed into corresponding 'observable' quantities. The outlook of the system for photometric observations is discussed, for an idealized case. The influence of the mass of the loser and the initial mass ratio is considered. (Auth.)

  2. Multi-observation integrated model of troposphere - current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilgan, Karina; Rohm, Witold; Bosy, Jarosław; Sierny, Jan; Kapłon, Jan; Hadaś, Tomasz; Hordyniec, Paweł

    2014-05-01

    The Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and meteorological observation systems in the past decades were developed to address separate challenges and were used by different communities. Currently, the inter-dependence between meteorology and GNSS processing is growing up, providing both communities incentives, data and research challenges. The GNSS community uses meteorological observations as well as Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models to reduce the troposphere impact on the signal propagation (i.e. eliminate tropospheric delay). On the other hand, meteorology community is assimilating the GNSS observations into weather forecasting, nowcasting or climate studies. To seamlessly use observations from both sides of the GNSS and meteorology spectra, the data have to be interoperable. In this study we present a current status of establishing an integrated model of troposphere. We investigated and compared a number of meteorological and GNSS data sources that are going to be integrated into the troposphere model with high temporal and spatial resolution. The integrated model will provide values of meteorological and GNSS parameters at any point and any time with known accuracy. First step in building this model is to inter-compare all available data sources and to establish the accuracy of parameters. Three main data sources were compared: ground-based GNSS products on ASG-EUPOS stations, NWP model COAMPS (Coupled Ocean/ Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System) and meteorological parameters from three kinds of stations - EUREF Permanent Network (EPN) stations, meteorological sensors at airports and synoptic Institute of Meteorology and Water Management. Data was provided with different temporal and spatial resolution, so it had to be interpolated prior to inter-comparison. Afterwards, the quality of the data was established. The results show that NWP model data quality is: 4hPa in terms of air pressure, 2hPa in terms of water vapor partial pressure, and 6K in

  3. Modelling of salad plants growth and physiological status in vitamin space greenhouse during lighting regime optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalova, Irina; Berkovich, Yuliy A.; Smolyanina, Svetlana; Erokhin, Alexei; Yakovleva, Olga; Lapach, Sergij; Radchenko, Stanislav; Znamenskii, Artem; Tarakanov, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    The efficiency of the photoautotrophic element as part of bio-engineering life-support systems is determined substantially by lighting regime. The artificial light regime optimization complexity results from the wide range of plant physiological functions controlled by light: trophic, informative, biosynthetical, etc. An average photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), light spectral composition and pulsed light effects on the crop growth and plant physiological status were studied in the multivariate experiment, including 16 independent experiments in 3 replicates. Chinese cabbage plants (Brassica chinensis L.), cultivar Vesnianka, were grown during 24 days in a climatic chamber under white and red light-emitting diodes (LEDs): photoperiod 24 h, PPFD from 260 to 500 µM/(m ^{2}*s), red light share in the spectrum varying from 33% to 73%, pulsed (pulse period from 30 to 501 µs) and non-pulsed lighting. The regressions of plant photosynthetic and biochemical indexes as well as the crop specific productivity in response to the selected parameters of lighting regime were calculated. Developed models of crop net photosynthesis and dark respiration revealed the most intense gas exchange area corresponding to PPFD level 450 - 500 µM/(m ^{2}*s) with red light share in the spectrum about 60% and the pulse length 30 µs with a pulse period from 300 to 400 µs. Shoot dry weight increased monotonically in response to the increasing PPFD and changed depending on the pulse period under stabilized PPFD level. An increase in ascorbic acid content in the shoot biomass was revealed when increasing red light share in spectrum from 33% to 73%. The lighting regime optimization criterion (Q) was designed for the vitamin space greenhouse as the maximum of a crop yield square on its ascorbic acid concentration, divided by the light energy consumption. The regression model of optimization criterion was constructed based on the experimental data. The analysis of the model made it

  4. Observations of radiation bursts from winter thunderclouds and lighting over the Japan sea coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, D.; Tsuchiya, H.; Enoto, T.; Yamada, S.; Yuasa, T.; Kawaharada, M.; Kitaguchi, T.; Nakazawa, K.; Kokubun, M.; Iwata, K.; Kato, H.; Okano, M.; Tamagawa, T.; Makishima, K.

    2013-12-01

    Radiation bursts associated with lightning and thunderstorms are reported by an increasing number of experiments, either ground-based or space-borne. These bursts are thought to be produced via Bremsstrahlung by energetic electrons, which are accelerated in the electrical fields within thunderclouds. GROWTH (Gamma-Ray Observation of Winther THunderclouds) experiment has been operating over 7 seasons since 2006, in Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant located in Niigata prefecture, Japan, facing the Japan sea (Tsuchiya et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 165002, 2007). It aims to detect radiation from winter thunderclouds in this region, which are known to have very low cloud-base altitudes and to involve huge lightning energies. With GROWTH, we have so far detected 20 radiation bursts, which can be classified distinctly into 12 long-duration events (Tsuchiya et al., JGR 116, D09113, 2011) and 8 short-lived ones. The former ones have durations up to several minutes without correlation with lightning, and are likely to be associated with thunderclouds themselves. The latter ones are coincident with lightning discharges, and last for less than 1 second. In both types of events, gamma-ray energy spectra extend typically up 10 MeV. As described below, the present study covers both types of events. In a long burst which occurred on 2010 December 30, the gamma-ray intensity gradually increased and the spectrum continuously hardened over a few minutes, and then the emission abruptly ceased (Tsuchiya et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 015001, 2013). This sudden termination preceded (by 800 ms or less) a lightning flash that occurred 5 km away form the GROWTH site. We are also analyzing two short bursts detected on 2012 January 13, and another on 2012 December 9, all of which lasted no longer than 300 ms. In the spectrum of one of them, we found evidence of excess emission around 511 keV. The line emission increased in coincidence with the continuum radiation, but lasted for more than

  5. Modelling the cosmic spectral energy distribution and extragalactic background light over all time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, S. K.; Driver, S. P.; Davies, L. J. M.; Lagos, C. d. P.; Robotham, A. S. G.

    2018-02-01

    We present a phenomological model of the cosmic spectral energy distribution (CSED) and the integrated galactic light (IGL) over all cosmic time. This model, based on an earlier model by Driver et al., attributes the cosmic star formation history (CSFH) to two processes - first, chaotic clump accretion and major mergers, resulting in the early-time formation of bulges and secondly, cold gas accretion, resulting in late-time disc formation. Under the assumption of a Universal Chabrier initial mass function, we combine the Bruzual & Charlot stellar libraries, the Charlot & Fall dust attenuation prescription and template spectra for emission by dust and active galactic nuclei to predict the CSED - pre- and post-dust attenuation - and the IGL throughout cosmic time. The phenomological model, as constructed, adopts a number of basic axioms and empirical results and has minimal free parameters. We compare the model output, as well as predictions from the semi-analytic model GALFORM to recent estimates of the CSED out to z = 1. By construction, our empirical model reproduces the full energy output of the Universe from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared extremely well. We use the model to derive predictions of the stellar and dust mass densities, again finding good agreement. We find that GALFORM predicts the CSED for z < 0.3 in good agreement with the observations. This agreement becomes increasingly poor towards z = 1, when the model CSED is ˜50 per cent fainter. The latter is consistent with the model underpredicting the CSFH. As a consequence, GALFORM predicts a ˜30 per cent fainter IGL.

  6. A sliding mode observer for hemodynamic characterization under modeling uncertainties

    KAUST Repository

    Zayane, Chadia

    2014-06-01

    This paper addresses the case of physiological states reconstruction in a small region of the brain under modeling uncertainties. The misunderstood coupling between the cerebral blood volume and the oxygen extraction fraction has lead to a partial knowledge of the so-called balloon model describing the hemodynamic behavior of the brain. To overcome this difficulty, a High Order Sliding Mode observer is applied to the balloon system, where the unknown coupling is considered as an internal perturbation. The effectiveness of the proposed method is illustrated through a set of synthetic data that mimic fMRI experiments.

  7. Modelling shear wave splitting observations from Wellington, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marson-Pidgeon, Katrina; Savage, Martha K.

    2004-05-01

    Frequency-dependent anisotropy was previously observed at the permanent broad-band station SNZO, South Karori, Wellington, New Zealand. This has important implications for the interpretation of measurements in other subduction zones and hence for our understanding of mantle flow. This motivated us to make further splitting measurements using events recorded since the previous study and to develop a new modelling technique. Thus, in this study we have made 67 high-quality shear wave splitting measurements using events recorded at the SNZO station spanning a 10-yr period. This station is the only one operating in New Zealand for longer than 2 yr. Using a combination of teleseismic SKS and S phases and regional ScS phases provides good azimuthal coverage, allowing us to undertake detailed modelling. The splitting measurements indicate that in addition to the frequency dependence observed previously at this station, there are also variations with propagation and initial polarization directions. The fast polarization directions range between 2° and 103°, and the delay times range between 0.75 s and 3.05 s. These ranges are much larger than observed previously at SNZO or elsewhere in New Zealand. Because of the observed frequency dependence we measure the dominant frequency of the phase used to make the splitting measurement, and take this into account in the modelling. We fit the fast polarization directions fairly well with a two-layer anisotropic model with horizontal axes of symmetry. However, such a model does not fit the delay times or explain the frequency dependence. We have developed a new inversion method which allows for an inclined axis of symmetry in each of the two layers. However, applying this method to SNZO does not significantly improve the fit over a two-layer model with horizontal symmetry axes. We are therefore unable to explain the frequency dependence or large variation in delay time values with multiple horizontal layers of anisotropy, even

  8. Observational constraints on tachyonic chameleon dark energy model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banijamali, A.; Bellucci, S.; Fazlpour, B.; Solbi, M.

    2018-03-01

    It has been recently shown that tachyonic chameleon model of dark energy in which tachyon scalar field non-minimally coupled to the matter admits stable scaling attractor solution that could give rise to the late-time accelerated expansion of the universe and hence alleviate the coincidence problem. In the present work, we use data from Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) and Baryon Acoustic oscillations to place constraints on the model parameters. In our analysis we consider in general exponential and non-exponential forms for the non-minimal coupling function and tachyonic potential and show that the scenario is compatible with observations.

  9. The GINGERino ring laser gyroscope, seismological observations at one year from the first light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonelli, Andreino; Belfi, Jacopo; Beverini, Nicolò; Di Virgilio, Angela; Carelli, Giorgio; Maccioni, Enrico; De Luca, Gaetano; Saccorotti, Gilberto

    2016-04-01

    The GINGERino ring laser gyroscope (RLG) is a new large observatory-class RLG located in Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS), one national laboratory of the INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The GINGERino apparatus funded by INFN in the context of a larger project of fundamental physics is intended as a pathfinder instrument to reach the high sensitivity needed to observe general relativity effects; more details are found at the URL (https://web2.infn.it/GINGER/index.php/it/). The sensitivity reached by our instrument in the first year after the set up permitted us to acquire important seismological data of ground rotations during the transit of seismic waves generated by seisms at different epicentral distances. RLGs are in fact the best sensors for capturing the rotational motions associated with the transit of seismic waves, thanks to the optical measurement principle, these instruments are in fact insensitive to translations. Ground translations are recorded by two seismometers: a Nanometrics Trillium 240 s and Guralp CMG 3T 360 s, the first instrument is part of the national earthquake monitoring program of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) and provides the ground translation data to be compared to the RLG rotational data. We report the waveforms and the seismological analysis of some seismic events recorded during our first year of activity inside the LNGS laboratory.

  10. Byurakan Cosmogony Concept in the Light of Modern Observational Data: Why We Need to Recall it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harutyunian, H. A.

    2017-07-01

    Some physically possible consequences of interaction between baryonic matter and dark energy are considered. We are arguing that the modern cosmogony and cosmology based on the hypothesis of Kant and Laplace and its further modifications are not adequate to the nowadays growing base of observational data. A thought experiment is conducted in the framework of generally accepted physical concepts and laws to study the most prominent consequences of interactions between various types of substances with the dark energy carrier. Such experiments allow one to arrive at a conclusion that owing to continuous exchanges of energy between the atomic nuclei and the bearer of dark energy, the binding energy of nuclei should reduce and their mass had increase over time. This process can be considered as the Universe total mass growth at the expense of dark energy. Then one would be able to explain the long standing paradox: why the Universe did not collapse immediately after the mass formation event at the very beginning of the Universe formation. On the other hand, this way of thinking leads to a physical picture of the Universe where huge amounts of embryonic baryons possessing of negligible masses can exist in the interiors of large cosmic objects to transform into the ordinary baryonic matter of vast masses in the future. As a result, clumps of matter of huge masses can be ejected from the cores of such objects.

  11. Model dependence of isospin sensitive observables at high densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Wen-Mei; Yong, Gao-Chan; Wang, Yongjia; Li, Qingfeng; Zhang, Hongfei; Zuo, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Within two different frameworks of isospin-dependent transport model, i.e., Boltzmann–Uehling–Uhlenbeck (IBUU04) and Ultrarelativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) transport models, sensitive probes of nuclear symmetry energy are simulated and compared. It is shown that neutron to proton ratio of free nucleons, π − /π + ratio as well as isospin-sensitive transverse and elliptic flows given by the two transport models with their “best settings”, all have obvious differences. Discrepancy of numerical value of isospin-sensitive n/p ratio of free nucleon from the two models mainly originates from different symmetry potentials used and discrepancies of numerical value of charged π − /π + ratio and isospin-sensitive flows mainly originate from different isospin-dependent nucleon–nucleon cross sections. These demonstrations call for more detailed studies on the model inputs (i.e., the density- and momentum-dependent symmetry potential and the isospin-dependent nucleon–nucleon cross section in medium) of isospin-dependent transport model used. The studies of model dependence of isospin sensitive observables can help nuclear physicists to pin down the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy through comparison between experiments and theoretical simulations scientifically

  12. Observations in particle physics: from two neutrinos to standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederman, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments, which have made their contribution to creation of the standard model, are discussed. Results of observations on the following concepts: long-lived neutral V-particles, violation of preservation of parity and charge invariance in meson decays, reaction with high-energy neutrino and existence of neutrino of two types, partons and dynamic quarks, dimuon resonance at 9.5 GeV in 400 GeV-proton-nucleus collisions, are considered

  13. Cold light dark matter in extended seesaw models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulebnane, Sami; Heeck, Julian; Nguyen, Anne; Teresi, Daniele

    2018-04-01

    We present a thorough discussion of light dark matter produced via freeze-in in two-body decays A→ B DM . If A and B are quasi-degenerate, the dark matter particle has a cold spectrum even for keV masses. We show this explicitly by calculating the transfer function that encodes the impact on structure formation. As examples for this setup we study extended seesaw mechanisms with a spontaneously broken global U(1) symmetry, such as the inverse seesaw. The keV-scale pseudo-Goldstone dark matter particle is then naturally produced cold by the decays of the quasi-degenerate right-handed neutrinos.

  14. Light-scattering models applied to circumstellar dust properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, Melanie; Mann, Ingrid

    2004-01-01

    Radiation pressure force, Poynting-Robertson effect, and collisions are important to determine the size distribution of dust in circumstellar debris disks with the two former parameters depending on the light-scattering properties of grains. We here present Mie and discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) calculations to describe the optical properties of dust particles around β Pictoris, Vega, and Fomalhaut in order to study the influence of the radiation pressure force. We find that the differences between Mie and DDA calculations are lower than 30% for all porosities. Therefore, Mie calculations can be used to determine the cut-off limits which contribute to the size distribution for the different systems

  15. Design, characterization and modelling of high efficient solar powered lighting systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Frederik; Nymann, Peter; Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the major challenges in the development of L2L (Light-2-Light) products. It’s the lack of efficient converter electronics, modelling tools for dimensioning and furthermore, characterization facilities to support the successful development of the products. We report th...

  16. Towards a 3D structural tomato model for calculating light interception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarlikioti, V.; Marcelis, L.F.M.; Visser, de P.H.B.

    2011-01-01

    A number of physiological tomato models have been proposed the last decades, their main challenge being the correct simulation of fruit yield. For this, an accurate simulation of light interception, and thus photosynthesis, is of primary importance. Light interception is highly dependent of the

  17. Standard Model in multiscale theories and observational constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcagni, Gianluca; Nardelli, Giuseppe; Rodríguez-Fernández, David

    2016-08-01

    We construct and analyze the Standard Model of electroweak and strong interactions in multiscale spacetimes with (i) weighted derivatives and (ii) q -derivatives. Both theories can be formulated in two different frames, called fractional and integer picture. By definition, the fractional picture is where physical predictions should be made. (i) In the theory with weighted derivatives, it is shown that gauge invariance and the requirement of having constant masses in all reference frames make the Standard Model in the integer picture indistinguishable from the ordinary one. Experiments involving only weak and strong forces are insensitive to a change of spacetime dimensionality also in the fractional picture, and only the electromagnetic and gravitational sectors can break the degeneracy. For the simplest multiscale measures with only one characteristic time, length and energy scale t*, ℓ* and E*, we compute the Lamb shift in the hydrogen atom and constrain the multiscale correction to the ordinary result, getting the absolute upper bound t*28 TeV . Stronger bounds are obtained from the measurement of the fine-structure constant. (ii) In the theory with q -derivatives, considering the muon decay rate and the Lamb shift in light atoms, we obtain the independent absolute upper bounds t*35 MeV . For α0=1 /2 , the Lamb shift alone yields t*450 GeV .

  18. Studying Aerosol Properties with Astronomical Observations Using a Scattered Moonlight Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Amy; Noll, Stefan; Kausch, Wolfgang; Szyszka, Cezary; Kimeswenger, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    We are developing a new technique for monitoring the atmosphere with astronomical observations and our scattered moonlight model. This could be used to determine the size distributions and amounts of various aerosol particles. By taking the Moon as an illuminating source in sky observations, it is possible to iteratively find aerosol properties for a given time and location. There is a wealth of astronomical data over the last decade taken at Cerro Paranal in Chile where this technique can be applied. Our advanced scattered moonlight model is part of a sky radiance and transmission model developed for the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory. The moon model can calculate the amount of scattered moonlight present in a given astronomical observation based on the positions of the Moon and target, lunar phase, and atmospheric properties. This model is more physical than previous works in astronomy, which were almost completely empirical. For the original astronomical purpose, the model uses typical size distributions of remote continental tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols and the measured extinction curve from standard star observations to calculate the scattering and absorption of the moonlight to determine the amount of light that would eventually arrive to the telescope. Because the model incorporates the properties of the aerosols, in principle we can use this model with sky background observations to find the aerosol composition. The sky observations would first need to be analysed with our full sky model to calculate the other sky background components, and a derived extinction curve from standard star observations. Then with our moon model we could iteratively find the best aerosol composition for the data. This would require optical and near infrared spectra for an unique, optimized solution. This technique for studying aerosol properties would provide data from a new perspective. The investigated aerosols would be nocturnal, from a

  19. The link between laboratory/field observations and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, C.R.; Foley, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The various linkages in system performance assessments that integrate disposal program elements must be understood. The linkage between model development and field/laboratory observations is described as the iterative program of site and system characterization for development of an observational-confirmatory data base. This data base is designed to develop, improve, and support conceptual models for site and system behavior. The program consists of data gathering and experiments to demonstrate understanding at various spatial and time scales and degrees of complexity. Understanding and accounting for the decreasing characterization certainty that arises with increasing space and time scales is an important aspect of the link between models and observations. The performance allocation process for setting performance goals and confidence levels, coupled with a performance assessment approach that provides these performance and confidence estimates, will determine when sufficient characterization has been achieved. At each iteration, performance allocation goals are reviewed and revised as necessary. The updated data base and appropriate performance assessment tools and approaches are utilized to identify and design additional tests and data needs necessary to meet current performance allocation goals

  20. Light propagation in disordered media: From Maxwell equations to a spherical p-spin model and light condensation effects

    KAUST Repository

    Toth, Laszlo Daniel

    2013-05-01

    The well-known phenomenon of the formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), a striking consequence of the Bose-Einstein statistics, has been traditionally linked to an ensemble of ultra-cold gas molecules. However, classical systems can also exhibit condensation effects; in the field of photonics, for example, signatures of this condensation in the mode dynamics (\\'light condensation\\', LC) have been theoretically investigated and experimentally observed in various types of multimode lasers [1,2 and ref. therein]. © 2013 IEEE.

  1. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA DISTANCE MODULUS BIAS AND DISPERSION FROM K-CORRECTION ERRORS: A DIRECT MEASUREMENT USING LIGHT CURVE FITS TO OBSERVED SPECTRAL TIME SERIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, C.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Childress, M.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Kim, A. G. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Guy, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucléaire et des Hautes Énergies, Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Université Paris Diderot Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Baltay, C. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06250-8121 (United States); Buton, C.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Feindt, U.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Bonn, Nußallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); and others

    2015-02-10

    We estimate systematic errors due to K-corrections in standard photometric analyses of high-redshift Type Ia supernovae. Errors due to K-correction occur when the spectral template model underlying the light curve fitter poorly represents the actual supernova spectral energy distribution, meaning that the distance modulus cannot be recovered accurately. In order to quantify this effect, synthetic photometry is performed on artificially redshifted spectrophotometric data from 119 low-redshift supernovae from the Nearby Supernova Factory, and the resulting light curves are fit with a conventional light curve fitter. We measure the variation in the standardized magnitude that would be fit for a given supernova if located at a range of redshifts and observed with various filter sets corresponding to current and future supernova surveys. We find significant variation in the measurements of the same supernovae placed at different redshifts regardless of filters used, which causes dispersion greater than ∼0.05 mag for measurements of photometry using the Sloan-like filters and a bias that corresponds to a 0.03 shift in w when applied to an outside data set. To test the result of a shift in supernova population or environment at higher redshifts, we repeat our calculations with the addition of a reweighting of the supernovae as a function of redshift and find that this strongly affects the results and would have repercussions for cosmology. We discuss possible methods to reduce the contribution of the K-correction bias and uncertainty.

  2. Technical and economic analysis of a Smart Public Lighting model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moretti F.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on public lighting (PL and is based on data collected through the Lumière project (www.progettolumiere.enea.it (ENEA. We identified three intervention strategies that have been piloted in the town of Castelnuovo: 1 Line control 2 Remote point-to-point control 3 Smart (or Adaptive Lighting. The three solutions were compared according to their net present value (NPV and payback time (PBT and considering the energy saving and the security level. Overall, the third solution was found to be the best. The study was extended, given certain assumptions, to the municipalities in the Lumière Network and to Italy, and some very interesting results emerged. In conclusion, an adaptive control system would substantially increase Italy’s energy efficiency and would also significantly reduce municipalities’ expenditure. It would also represent a significant development in the field of PL as well as in transport, building management, security and the quality of services offered to citizens and tourists in general.

  3. Constraints on mirror models of dark matter from observable neutron-mirror neutron oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Rabindra N.; Nussinov, Shmuel

    2018-01-01

    The process of neutron-mirror neutron oscillation, motivated by symmetric mirror dark matter models, is governed by two parameters: n -n‧ mixing parameter δ and n -n‧ mass splitting Δ. For neutron mirror neutron oscillation to be observable, the splitting between their masses Δ must be small and current experiments lead to δ ≤ 2 ×10-27 GeV and Δ ≤10-24 GeV. We show that in mirror universe models where this process is observable, this small mass splitting constrains the way that one must implement asymmetric inflation to satisfy the limits of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis on the number of effective light degrees of freedom. In particular we find that if asymmetric inflation is implemented by inflaton decay to color or electroweak charged particles, the oscillation is unobservable. Also if one uses SM singlet fields for this purpose, they must be weakly coupled to the SM fields.

  4. Staying in the Light: Evaluating Sustainability Models for Brokering Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, L. A.; Benedict, K. K.; Best, M.; Fyfe, S.; Jacobs, C. A.; Michener, W. K.; Pearlman, J.; Turner, A.; Nativi, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Business Models Team of the Research Data Alliance Brokering Governance Working Group examined several support models proposed to promote the long-term sustainability of brokering middleware. The business model analysis includes examination of funding source, implementation frameworks and obstacles, and policy and legal considerations. The issue of sustainability is not unique to brokering software and these models may be relevant to many applications. Results of this comprehensive analysis highlight advantages and disadvantages of the various models in respect to the specific requirements for brokering services. We offer recommendations based on the outcomes of this analysis while recognizing that all software is part of an evolutionary process and has a lifespan.

  5. Modeling and Maximum Likelihood Fitting of Gamma-Ray and Radio Light Curves of Millisecond Pulsars Detected with Fermi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T. J.; Harding, A. K.; Venter, C.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed gamma rays have been detected with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) from more than 20 millisecond pulsars (MSPs), some of which were discovered in radio observations of bright, unassociated LAT sources. We have fit the radio and gamma-ray light curves of 19 LAT-detected MSPs in the context of geometric, outermagnetospheric emission models assuming the retarded vacuum dipole magnetic field using a Markov chain Monte Carlo maximum likelihood technique. We find that, in many cases, the models are able to reproduce the observed light curves well and provide constraints on the viewing geometries that are in agreement with those from radio polarization measurements. Additionally, for some MSPs we constrain the altitudes of both the gamma-ray and radio emission regions. The best-fit magnetic inclination angles are found to cover a broader range than those of non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars.

  6. Tree Size Inequality Reduces Forest Productivity: An Analysis Combining Inventory Data for Ten European Species and a Light Competition Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdier, Thomas; Cordonnier, Thomas; Kunstler, Georges; Piedallu, Christian; Lagarrigues, Guillaume; Courbaud, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Plant structural diversity is usually considered as beneficial for ecosystem functioning. For instance, numerous studies have reported positive species diversity-productivity relationships in plant communities. However, other aspects of structural diversity such as individual size inequality have been far less investigated. In forests, tree size inequality impacts directly tree growth and asymmetric competition, but consequences on forest productivity are still indeterminate. In addition, the effect of tree size inequality on productivity is likely to vary with species shade-tolerance, a key ecological characteristic controlling asymmetric competition and light resource acquisition. Using plot data from the French National Geographic Agency, we studied the response of stand productivity to size inequality for ten forest species differing in shade tolerance. We fitted a basal area stand production model that included abiotic factors, stand density, stand development stage and a tree size inequality index. Then, using a forest dynamics model we explored whether mechanisms of light interception and light use efficiency could explain the tree size inequality effect observed for three of the ten species studied. Size inequality negatively affected basal area increment for seven out of the ten species investigated. However, this effect was not related to the shade tolerance of these species. According to the model simulations, the negative tree size inequality effect could result both from reduced total stand light interception and reduced light use efficiency. Our results demonstrate that negative relationships between size inequality and productivity may be the rule in tree populations. The lack of effect of shade tolerance indicates compensatory mechanisms between effect on light availability and response to light availability. Such a pattern deserves further investigations for mixed forests where complementarity effects between species are involved. When studying the

  7. Observer analysis and its impact on task performance modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Eddie L.; Brown, Jeremy B.

    2014-05-01

    Fire fighters use relatively low cost thermal imaging cameras to locate hot spots and fire hazards in buildings. This research describes the analyses performed to study the impact of thermal image quality on fire fighter fire hazard detection task performance. Using human perception data collected by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for fire fighters detecting hazards in a thermal image, an observer analysis was performed to quantify the sensitivity and bias of each observer. Using this analysis, the subjects were divided into three groups representing three different levels of performance. The top-performing group was used for the remainder of the modeling. Models were developed which related image quality factors such as contrast, brightness, spatial resolution, and noise to task performance probabilities. The models were fitted to the human perception data using logistic regression, as well as probit regression. Probit regression was found to yield superior fits and showed that models with not only 2nd order parameter interactions, but also 3rd order parameter interactions performed the best.

  8. General Description of Fission Observables - JEFF Report 24. GEF Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Karl-Heinz; Jurado, Beatriz; Amouroux, Charlotte

    2014-06-01

    The Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion (JEFF) Project is a collaborative effort among the member countries of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank to develop a reference nuclear data library. The JEFF library contains sets of evaluated nuclear data, mainly for fission and fusion applications; it contains a number of different data types, including neutron and proton interaction data, radioactive decay data, fission yield data and thermal scattering law data. The General fission (GEF) model is based on novel theoretical concepts and ideas developed to model low energy nuclear fission. The GEF code calculates fission-fragment yields and associated quantities (e.g. prompt neutron and gamma) for a large range of nuclei and excitation energy. This opens up the possibility of a qualitative step forward to improve further the JEFF fission yields sub-library. This report describes the GEF model which explains the complex appearance of fission observables by universal principles of theoretical models and considerations on the basis of fundamental laws of physics and mathematics. The approach reveals a high degree of regularity and provides a considerable insight into the physics of the fission process. Fission observables can be calculated with a precision that comply with the needs for applications in nuclear technology. The relevance of the approach for examining the consistency of experimental results and for evaluating nuclear data is demonstrated. (authors)

  9. Photochemistry of an Urban Region using Observations and Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, C. A.; Mauldin, L.; Mukherjee, A. D.; Flocke, F. M.; Pfister, G.; Apel, E. C.; Bahreini, R.; Blake, D. R.; Blake, N. J.; Campos, T. L.; Cohen, R. C.; Farmer, D.; Fried, A.; Guenther, A. B.; Hall, S. R.; Heikes, B.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Huey, L. G.; Karl, T.; Kaser, L.; Nowak, J. B.; Ortega, J. V.; O'Sullivan, D. W.; Richter, D.; Smith, J. N.; Tanner, D.; Townsend-Small, A.; Ullmann, K.; Walega, J.; Weibring, P.; Weinheimer, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The chemistry of HOx radicals in the troposphere can lead to the production of secondary products such as ozone and aerosols, while volatile organic compounds are degraded. The production rates and identities of secondary products depend on the abundance of NOx and other parameters. The amounts of VOCs and NOx can also affect the concentrations of OH, HO2 and RO2. Comparison of observations and model-derived values of HOx species can provide one way to assess the completeness and accuracy of model mechanisms. The functional dependence of measure-model agreement on various controlling parameters can also reveal details of current understanding of photochemistry in urban regions. During the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE), conducted during the summer of 2014, observations from ground-based and airborne platforms were performed to study the evolution of atmospheric composition over the Denver metropolitan area. Of particular interest in FRAPPE was the assessment of the roles of mixing of emissions from oil and gas exploration and extraction, and those from confined animal production operations, with urban emissions (e.g. from transportation, energy production, and industrial processes) on air quality in the metropolitan and surrounding region. Our group made measurements of OH, HO2, and HO2 + RO2 from the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft platform using selected ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The C-130 was equipped with instrumentation for the observation of a wide variety of photochemical-related species and parameters. These data are used to assess the photochemical regimes encountered during the period of the study, and to quantitatively describe the chemical processes involved in formation of secondary products. One of the tools used is a steady state model for short-lived species such as those that we observed. This presentation summarizes the behavior of species that were measured during FRAPPE and what the observations reveal

  10. Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer Modeling of Lightning Observed in Galileo Images of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyudine, U. A.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2002-01-01

    We study lightning on Jupiter and the clouds illuminated by the lightning using images taken by the Galileo orbiter. The Galileo images have a resolution of 25 km/pixel and axe able to resolve the shape of the single lightning spots in the images, which have full widths at half the maximum intensity in the range of 90-160 km. We compare the measured lightning flash images with simulated images produced by our ED Monte Carlo light-scattering model. The model calculates Monte Carlo scattering of photons in a ED opacity distribution. During each scattering event, light is partially absorbed. The new direction of the photon after scattering is chosen according to a Henyey-Greenstein phase function. An image from each direction is produced by accumulating photons emerging from the cloud in a small range (bins) of emission angles. Lightning bolts are modeled either as points or vertical lines. Our results suggest that some of the observed scattering patterns axe produced in a 3-D cloud rather than in a plane-parallel cloud layer. Lightning is estimated to occur at least as deep as the bottom of the expected water cloud. For the six cases studied, we find that the clouds above the lightning are optically thick (tau > 5). Jovian flashes are more regular and circular than the largest terrestrial flashes observed from space. On Jupiter there is nothing equivalent to the 30-40-km horizontal flashes which axe seen on Earth.

  11. Realistic modelling of observed seismic motion in complex sedimentary basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faeh, D.; Panza, G.F.

    1994-03-01

    Three applications of a numerical technique are illustrated to model realistically the seismic ground motion for complex two-dimensional structures. First we consider a sedimentary basin in the Friuli region, and we model strong motion records from an aftershock of the 1976 earthquake. Then we simulate the ground motion caused in Rome by the 1915, Fucino (Italy) earthquake, and we compare our modelling with the damage distribution observed in the town. Finally we deal with the interpretation of ground motion recorded in Mexico City, as a consequence of earthquakes in the Mexican subduction zone. The synthetic signals explain the major characteristics (relative amplitudes, spectral amplification, frequency content) of the considered seismograms, and the space distribution of the available macroseismic data. For the sedimentary basin in the Friuli area, parametric studies demonstrate the relevant sensitivity of the computed ground motion to small changes in the subsurface topography of the sedimentary basin, and in the velocity and quality factor of the sediments. The total energy of ground motion, determined from our numerical simulation in Rome, is in very good agreement with the distribution of damage observed during the Fucino earthquake. For epicentral distances in the range 50km-100km, the source location and not only the local soil conditions control the local effects. For Mexico City, the observed ground motion can be explained as resonance effects and as excitation of local surface waves, and the theoretical and the observed maximum spectral amplifications are very similar. In general, our numerical simulations permit the estimate of the maximum and average spectral amplification for specific sites, i.e. are a very powerful tool for accurate micro-zonation. (author). 38 refs, 19 figs, 1 tab

  12. A Data Quality Information Model for Earth Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.; Blower, J.; Cornford, D.; Maso, J.; Zabala, A.; Bastin, L.; Lush, V.; Diaz, P.

    2012-04-01

    The question of data quality is a prominent topic of current research in Earth observation. However, different users have different views and visions on data quality. There exists a set of standards and specifications in relation to data quality for Earth observation (e.g. ISO standards, W3C standards, QA4EO), and how to choose appropriate one for quality information representation also present a challenge. In order to address the need, we carried out interviews with environmental scientists to elicit their views on matters such as how they choose data for their studies, and what encourages them to trust the accuracy and validity of the data. Interviews were structured around a carefully-designed questionnaire. Face-to-face and telephone interviews were performed in order to gain maximum value from the consultation process. An array of views and visions on Earth observation data have been gathered, which will provide valuable input to the community and other data providers. Informed by the interview findings, we critically review the existing standards and specifications and propose a new, integrated quality information model for Earth observation. This builds upon existing models, notably the ISO standards suite, filling gaps that we have identified in order to encompass other important aspects of data quality. This work has been performed in the context of the EU FP7 GeoViQua project, which aims to augment the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) with information about the quality of data holdings, and to provide visualization capabilities for users to view data together with associated quality information.

  13. Modelling Elastic Scattering and Light Transport in 3D Collagen Gel Constructs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bixio, L

    2001-01-01

    A model of elastic scattering and light propagation is presented, which can be used to obtain the scattering coefficient, the index of refraction and the distribution of the collagen fibrils in a gel...

  14. Three-dimensional Kinetic Pulsar Magnetosphere Models: Connecting to Gamma-Ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Brambilla, Gabriele; Timokhin, Andrey; Harding, Alice K.; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2018-04-01

    We present three-dimensional (3D) global kinetic pulsar magnetosphere models, where the charged particle trajectories and the corresponding electromagnetic fields are treated self-consistently. For our study, we have developed a Cartesian 3D relativistic particle-in-cell code that incorporates radiation reaction forces. We describe our code and discuss the related technical issues, treatments, and assumptions. Injecting particles up to large distances in the magnetosphere, we apply arbitrarily low to high particle injection rates, and obtain an entire spectrum of solutions from close to the vacuum-retarded dipole to close to the force-free (FF) solution, respectively. For high particle injection rates (close to FF solutions), significant accelerating electric field components are confined only near the equatorial current sheet outside the light cylinder. A judicious interpretation of our models allows the particle emission to be calculated, and consequently, the corresponding realistic high-energy sky maps and spectra to be derived. Using model parameters that cover the entire range of spin-down powers of Fermi young and millisecond pulsars, we compare the corresponding model γ-ray light curves, cutoff energies, and total γ-ray luminosities with those observed by Fermi to discover a dependence of the particle injection rate, { \\mathcal F }, on the spin-down power, \\dot{{ \\mathcal E }}, indicating an increase of { \\mathcal F } with \\dot{{ \\mathcal E }}. Our models, guided by Fermi observations, provide field structures and particle distributions that are not only consistent with each other but also able to reproduce a broad range of the observed γ-ray phenomenologies of both young and millisecond pulsars.

  15. Observations and models of centrifugally supported magnetospheres in massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksala, Mary Elizabeth

    Magnetic massive stars, via their strong magnetic fields and radiation-driven winds, strongly influence the dynamical and chemical evolution of their surroundings. The interaction between these two intrinsic stellar properties can produce dynamic circumstellar structures, and, in the case of rapidly rotating stars, centrifugally supported magnetospheres. This thesis uses new observations to confront current magnetosphere models, testing their predictive power using photometry and spectropolarimetry of the prototypical magnetic B2Vp star sigma Ori E. In addition, we present the discovery of a magnetic field in a second rapidly rotating massive star. At the time of its discovery, this star was the most rapidly rotating non-degenerate magnetic star. We begin with an overview of magnetism in massive stars and wind-field interactions (Chapter 2) and the observational techniques involved in their study (Chapter 3), and summarize historical studies of sigma Ori E (Chapter 4). Chapter 5 describes the detection of rotational braking in sigma Ori E. We find a 77 ms yr-1 lengthening of the rotational period, corresponding to a spindown time of 1.34+0.10 -0.09 Myr. This observed period change agrees well with theoretical predictions for angular momentum loss in a magnetically channeled, line-driven wind. Next we present new spectropolarimetric observations of sigma Ori E (Chapter 6). The observed Halpha variability matches the predictions from a rigidly rotating magnetosphere (RRM) model with an offset dipole magnetic field configuration. However, our new, precise longitudinal magnetic field measurements reveal significant discrepancies with respect to the RRM model, challenging the current form as applied to sigma Ori E and suggesting that the field configuration of this star is more complex than a simple dipole. Chapter 7 describes the first detection of a magnetic field in the B2Vn star HR 7355. From analyzing photometric data, we find a 0.5214404(6) d rotational period

  16. A Numerical Method for Calculating Stellar Occultation Light Curves from an Arbitrary Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, D. M.; Elliot, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    We present a method for speeding up numerical calculations of a light curve for a stellar occultation by a planetary atmosphere with an arbitrary atmospheric model that has spherical symmetry. This improved speed makes least-squares fitting for model parameters practical. Our method takes as input several sets of values for the first two radial derivatives of the refractivity at different values of model parameters, and interpolates to obtain the light curve at intermediate values of one or more model parameters. It was developed for small occulting bodies such as Pluto and Triton, but is applicable to planets of all sizes. We also present the results of a series of tests showing that our method calculates light curves that are correct to an accuracy of 10(exp -4) of the unocculted stellar flux. The test benchmarks are (i) an atmosphere with a l/r dependence of temperature, which yields an analytic solution for the light curve, (ii) an atmosphere that produces an exponential refraction angle, and (iii) a small-planet isothermal model. With our method, least-squares fits to noiseless data also converge to values of parameters with fractional errors of no more than 10(exp -4), with the largest errors occurring in small planets. These errors are well below the precision of the best stellar occultation data available. Fits to noisy data had formal errors consistent with the level of synthetic noise added to the light curve. We conclude: (i) one should interpolate refractivity derivatives and then form light curves from the interpolated values, rather than interpolating the light curves themselves; (ii) for the most accuracy, one must specify the atmospheric model for radii many scale heights above half light; and (iii) for atmospheres with smoothly varying refractivity with altitude, light curves can be sampled as coarsely as two points per scale height.

  17. A Ball Lightning Model as a Possible Explanation of Recently Reported Cavity Lights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryberger, David; /SLAC

    2009-08-04

    The salient features of cavity lights, in particular, mobile luminous objects (MLO's), as have been experimentally observed in superconducting accelerator cavities, are summarized. A model based upon standard electromagnetic interactions between a small particle and the 1.5 GHz cavity excitation field is described. This model can explain some features of these data, in particular, the existence of particle orbits without wall contact. While this result is an important success for the model, it is detailed why the model as it stands is incomplete. It is argued that no avenues for a suitable extension of the model through established physics appear evident, which motivates an investigation of a model based upon a more exotic object, ball lightning. As discussed, further motivation derives from the fact that there are significant similarities in many of the qualitative features of ball lightning and MLO's, even though they appear in quite different circumstances and differ in scale by orders of magnitude. The ball lightning model, which incorporates electromagnetic charges and currents, is based on a symmetrized set of Maxwell's equations in which the electromagnetic sources and fields are characterized by a process called dyality rotation. It is shown that a consistent mathematical description of dyality rotation as a physical process can be achieved by adding suitable (phenomenological) current terms to supplement the usual current terms in the symmetrized Maxwell's equations. These currents, which enable the conservation of electric and magnetic charge, are called vacuum currents. It is shown that the proposed ball lightning model offers a good qualitative explanation of the perplexing aspects of the MLO data. Avenues for further study are indicated.

  18. Short-channel drain current model for asymmetric heavily / lightly ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRADIPTA DUTTA

    2017-07-29

    Jul 29, 2017 ... Abstract. The paper presents a drain current model for double gate metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (DG MOSFETs) based on a new velocity saturation model that accounts for short-channel velocity saturation effect independently in the front and the back gate controlled channels under ...

  19. A cortical edge-integration model of object-based lightness computation that explains effects of spatial context and individual differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that perceived surface reflectance (lightness) can be modeled in simple contexts in a quantitatively exact way by assuming that the visual system first extracts information about local, directed steps in log luminance, then spatially integrates these steps along paths through the image to compute lightness (Rudd and Zemach, 2004, 2005, 2007). This method of computing lightness is called edge integration. Recent evidence (Rudd, 2013) suggests that human vision employs a default strategy to integrate luminance steps only along paths from a common background region to the targets whose lightness is computed. This implies a role for gestalt grouping in edge-based lightness computation. Rudd (2010) further showed the perceptual weights applied to edges in lightness computation can be influenced by the observer's interpretation of luminance steps as resulting from either spatial variation in surface reflectance or illumination. This implies a role for top-down factors in any edge-based model of lightness (Rudd and Zemach, 2005). Here, I show how the separate influences of grouping and attention on lightness can be modeled in tandem by a cortical mechanism that first employs top-down signals to spatially select regions of interest for lightness computation. An object-based network computation, involving neurons that code for border-ownership, then automatically sets the neural gains applied to edge signals surviving the earlier spatial selection stage. Only the borders that survive both processing stages are spatially integrated to compute lightness. The model assumptions are consistent with those of the cortical lightness model presented earlier by Rudd (2010, 2013), and with neurophysiological data indicating extraction of local edge information in V1, network computations to establish figure-ground relations and border ownership in V2, and edge integration to encode lightness and darkness signals in V4.

  20. A cortical edge-integration model of object-based lightness computation that explains effects of spatial context and individual differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that perceived surface reflectance (lightness) can be modeled in simple contexts in a quantitatively exact way by assuming that the visual system first extracts information about local, directed steps in log luminance, then spatially integrates these steps along paths through the image to compute lightness (Rudd and Zemach, 2004, 2005, 2007). This method of computing lightness is called edge integration. Recent evidence (Rudd, 2013) suggests that human vision employs a default strategy to integrate luminance steps only along paths from a common background region to the targets whose lightness is computed. This implies a role for gestalt grouping in edge-based lightness computation. Rudd (2010) further showed the perceptual weights applied to edges in lightness computation can be influenced by the observer's interpretation of luminance steps as resulting from either spatial variation in surface reflectance or illumination. This implies a role for top-down factors in any edge-based model of lightness (Rudd and Zemach, 2005). Here, I show how the separate influences of grouping and attention on lightness can be modeled in tandem by a cortical mechanism that first employs top-down signals to spatially select regions of interest for lightness computation. An object-based network computation, involving neurons that code for border-ownership, then automatically sets the neural gains applied to edge signals surviving the earlier spatial selection stage. Only the borders that survive both processing stages are spatially integrated to compute lightness. The model assumptions are consistent with those of the cortical lightness model presented earlier by Rudd (2010, 2013), and with neurophysiological data indicating extraction of local edge information in V1, network computations to establish figure-ground relations and border ownership in V2, and edge integration to encode lightness and darkness signals in V4. PMID:25202253

  1. Modeling of light absorbing particles in atmosphere, snow and ice in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, N.; Kulkarni, S.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Long-range transport of atmospheric particles from mid-latitude sources to the Arctic is the main contributor to the Arctic aerosol loadings and deposition. Black Carbon (BC), Brown Carbon (BrC) and dust are considered of great climatic importance and are the main absorbers of sunlight in the atmosphere. Furthermore, wet and dry deposition of light absorbing particles (LAPs) on snow and ice cause reduction of snow and ice albedo. LAPs have significant radiative forcing and effect on snow albedo. There are high uncertainties in estimating radiative forcing of LAPs. We studied the potential effect of LAPs from different emission source regions and sectors on snow albedo in the Arctic. The transport pathway of LAPs to the Arctic is studies for different high pollution episodes. In this study a modeling framework including Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) and the University of Iowa's Sulfur Transport and dEpostion model(STEM) is used to predict the transport of LAPs from different geographical sources and sectors (i.e. transportation, residential, industry, biomass burning and power) to the Arctic. For assessing the effect of LAP deposition on snow single-layer simulator of the SNow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR-Online) model was used to derive snow albedo values for snow albedo reduction causes by BC deposition. To evaluate the simulated values we compared the BC concentration in snow with observed values from previous studies including Doherty et al. 2010.

  2. Modelling the potential distribution of Bemisia tabaci in Europe in light of the climate change scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilioli, Gianni; Pasquali, Sara; Parisi, Simone; Winter, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    Bemisia tabaci is a serious pest of agricultural and horticultural crops in greenhouses and fields around the world. This paper deals with the distribution of the pest under field conditions. In Europe, the insect is currently found in coastal regions of Mediterranean countries where it is subject to quarantine regulations. To assess the risk presented by B. tabaci to Europe, the area of potential establishment of this insect, in light of the climate change scenario, was assessed by a temperature-dependent physiologically based demographic model (PBDM). The simulated potential distribution under current climate conditions has been successfully validated with the available field records of B. tabaci in Europe. Considering climate change scenarios of +1 and +2 °C, range expansion by B. tabaci is predicted, particularly in Spain, France, Italy, Greece and along the Adriatic coast of the Balkans. Nonetheless, even under the scenario of +2 °C, northern European countries are not likely to be at risk of B. tabaci establishment because of climatic limitations. Model validation with field observations and evaluation of uncertainties associated with model parameter variability support the reliability of model results. The PBDM developed here can be applied to other organisms and offers significant advantages for assessing the potential distribution of invasive species. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Land Surface Microwave Emissivity Dynamics: Observations, Analysis and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yudong; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Kenneth W.; Kumar, Sujay; Ringerud, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Land surface microwave emissivity affects remote sensing of both the atmosphere and the land surface. The dynamical behavior of microwave emissivity over a very diverse sample of land surface types is studied. With seven years of satellite measurements from AMSR-E, we identified various dynamical regimes of the land surface emission. In addition, we used two radiative transfer models (RTMs), the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) and the Community Microwave Emission Modeling Platform (CMEM), to simulate land surface emissivity dynamics. With both CRTM and CMEM coupled to NASA's Land Information System, global-scale land surface microwave emissivities were simulated for five years, and evaluated against AMSR-E observations. It is found that both models have successes and failures over various types of land surfaces. Among them, the desert shows the most consistent underestimates (by approx. 70-80%), due to limitations of the physical models used, and requires a revision in both systems. Other snow-free surface types exhibit various degrees of success and it is expected that parameter tuning can improve their performances.

  4. Arctic Pacific water dynamics from model intercomparison and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, Yevgeny; Karcher, Michael; Proshutinsky, Andrey; Gerdes, Ruediger; Bacon, Sheldon; Nurser, George; Coward, Andrew; Golubeva, Elena; Kauker, Frank; Nguyen, An; Platov, Gennady; Wadley, Martin; Watanabe, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    Pacific Water imports heat and fresh water from the northern Pacific in the Arctic Ocean, impacting upper ocean mixing and dynamics, as well as Arctic sea ice. Pathways and the circulation of PW in the central Arctic Ocean are not well known due to the lack of observations. This study uses an ensemble of the sea ice-ocean models integrated with passive tracer released in the Bering Strait to simulate Pacific water spread. We investigate different branches and modes of Pacific water and analyse changes in the water mass distribution through the Arctic Ocean due to changes in the wind and ocean potential vorticity. We focus on seasonal cycle and inter-decadal variations. The first results have been published recently (Aksenov et al., 2015) as a part of Forum for Arctic Ocean Modeling and Observational Synthesis (FAMOS) project. In the present study we extend the examination further and discuss the role of the Pacific water variability in the recent changes in the Arctic heat and fresh water storage. We present insights in the projected future changes to Pacific water dynamics. Reference Aksenov, Y., et al. (2015), Arctic pathways of Pacific Water: Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison experiments, J. Geophys. Res. Oceans, 120, doi:10.1002/2015JC011299.

  5. Model and observed seismicity represented in a two dimensional space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Caputo

    1976-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years theoretical seismology lias introduced
    some formulae relating the magnitude and the seismic moment of earthquakes
    to the size of the fault and the stress drop which generated the
    earthquake.
    In the present paper we introduce a model for the statistics of the
    earthquakes based on these formulae. The model gives formulae which
    show internal consistency and are also confirmed by observations.
    For intermediate magnitudes the formulae reproduce also the trend
    of linearity of the statistics of magnitude and moment observed in all the
    seismic regions of the world. This linear trend changes into a curve with
    increasing slope for large magnitudes and moment.
    When a catalogue of the magnitudes and/or the seismic moment of
    the earthquakes of a seismic region is available, the model allows to estimate
    the maximum magnitude possible in the region.

  6. Observational Tests of Magnetospheric Accretion Models in Young Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johns–Krull Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetically controlled accretion of disk material onto the surface of Classical T Tauri stars is the dominant paradigm in our understanding of how these young stars interact with their surrounding disks. These stars provide a powerful test of magnetically controlled accretion models since all of the relevant parameters, including the magnetic field strength and geometry, are in principle measureable. Both the strength and the field geometry are key for understanding how these stars interact with their disks. This talk will focus on recent advances in magnetic field measurements on a large number of T Tauri stars, as well as very recent studies of the accretion rates onto a sample of young stars in NGC 2264 with known rotation periods. We discuss how these observations provide critical tests of magnetospheric accretion models which predict a rotational equilibrium is reached. We find good support for the model predictions once the complex geometry of the stellar magnetic field is taken into account. We will also explore how the observations of the accretion properties of the 2264 cluster stars can be used to test emerging ideas on how magnetic fields on young stars are generated and organized as a function of their internal structure (i.e. the presence of a radiative core. We do not find support for the hypothesis that large changes in the magentic field geometry occur when a radiative core appears in these young stars.

  7. Solar lighting system delivery models for rural areas in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koirala, Binod Prasad; Ortiz, Brisa [Freiburg Univ. (DE). Center for Renewable Energy (ZEE); Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Solare Energiesysteme (ISE), Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Modi, Anish [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Mathur, Jyotirmay [Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur (India); Kafle, Nashib [Alternative Energy Promotion Center (AEPC), Kathmandu (Nepal)

    2011-07-01

    Many rural areas in developing countries will not have electricity access from the central grid for several years to come. Autonomous Solar Lighting Systems (SLS) are attractive and enviromentally friendly options for replacing kerosene lamps and providing basic lighting services to such areas. In order to highlight the benefits of these technologies, analysis of reduction in indoor air pollution due to replacement of kerosene lamp by SLS has been carried out. Use of SLS in place of kerosene lamps saves an equivalent of 1341 kg CO{sub 2} emissions per annum from each household. If a suitable mechanism is created, this amount of GHG emissions saving could alone be sufficient to finance solar lighting system for rural households. However, these technologies have not reached most of the poor population. In order to guarantee the access of solar lighting to the people at the Base of the Pyramid (BOP), strengths of different organizations working in the rural areas should be combined together to form successful business models. This paper will discuss business models to disseminate such services to needy people. A comparative study of SLS delivery models based on cash, credit, leasing, subsidy and service is performed. In addition, SWOT analysis for each model is employed. Further, Case studies of few projects to elaborate different models are also presented. If suitable business models for its delivery to rural people are considered, solar lighting systems are viable for providing basic lighting needs of rural areas in developing countries. (orig.)

  8. Collision and Break-off : Numerical models and surface observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottrill, Andrew; van Hunen, Jeroen; Allen, Mark

    2013-04-01

    The process of continental collision and slab break-off has been explored by many authors using a number of different numerical models and approaches (Andrews and Billen, 2009; Gerya et al., 2004; van Hunen and Allen, 2011). One of the challenges of using numerical models to explore collision and break-off is relating model predictions to real observables from current collision zones. Part of the reason for this is that collision zones by their nature destroy a lot of potentially useful surface evidence of deep dynamics. One observable that offers the possibility for recording mantle dynamics at collision zones is topography. Here we present topography predictions from numerical models and show how these can be related to actual topography changes recoded in the sedimentary record. Both 2D and 3D numerical simulation of the closure of a small oceanic basin are presented (Bottrill et al., 2012; van Hunen and Allen, 2011). Topography is calculated from the normal stress at the surface applied to an elastic beam, to give a more realist prediction of topography by accounting for the expected elasticity of the lithosphere. Predicted model topography showed a number of interesting features on the overriding plate. The first is the formation of a basin post collision at around 300km from the suture. Our models also showed uplift postdating collision between the suture and this basin, caused by subduction of buoyant material. Once break-off has occurred we found that this uplift moved further into the overriding plate due to redistribution of stresses from the subducted plate. With our 3D numerical models we simulate a collision that propagates laterally along a subduction system. These models show that a basin forms, similar to that found in our 2D models, which propagates along the system at the same rate as collision. The apparent link between collision and basin formation leads to the investigation into the stress state in the overriding lithosphere. Preliminary

  9. Initializing a Mesoscale Boundary-Layer Model with Radiosonde Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berri, Guillermo J.; Bertossa, Germán

    2018-01-01

    A mesoscale boundary-layer model is used to simulate low-level regional wind fields over the La Plata River of South America, a region characterized by a strong daily cycle of land-river surface-temperature contrast and low-level circulations of sea-land breeze type. The initial and boundary conditions are defined from a limited number of local observations and the upper boundary condition is taken from the only radiosonde observations available in the region. The study considers 14 different upper boundary conditions defined from the radiosonde data at standard levels, significant levels, level of the inversion base and interpolated levels at fixed heights, all of them within the first 1500 m. The period of analysis is 1994-2008 during which eight daily observations from 13 weather stations of the region are used to validate the 24-h surface-wind forecast. The model errors are defined as the root-mean-square of relative error in wind-direction frequency distribution and mean wind speed per wind sector. Wind-direction errors are greater than wind-speed errors and show significant dispersion among the different upper boundary conditions, not present in wind speed, revealing a sensitivity to the initialization method. The wind-direction errors show a well-defined daily cycle, not evident in wind speed, with the minimum at noon and the maximum at dusk, but no systematic deterioration with time. The errors grow with the height of the upper boundary condition level, in particular wind direction, and double the errors obtained when the upper boundary condition is defined from the lower levels. The conclusion is that defining the model upper boundary condition from radiosonde data closer to the ground minimizes the low-level wind-field errors throughout the region.

  10. Analysis and modeling of tropical convection observed by CYGNSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, T. J.; Li, X.; Roberts, J. B.; Mecikalski, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    The Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) is a multi-satellite constellation that utilizes Global Positioning System (GPS) reflectometry to retrieve near-surface wind speeds over the ocean. While CYGNSS is primarily aimed at measuring wind speeds in tropical cyclones, our research has established that the mission may also provide valuable insight into the relationships between wind-driven surface fluxes and general tropical oceanic convection. Currently, we are examining organized tropical convection using a mixture of CYGNSS level 1 through level 3 data, IMERG (Integrated Multi-satellite Retrievals for Global Precipitation Measurement), and other ancillary datasets (including buoys, GPM level 1 and 2 data, as well as ground-based radar). In addition, observing system experiments (OSEs) are being performed using hybrid three-dimensional variational assimilation to ingest CYGNSS observations into a limited-domain, convection-resolving model. Our focus for now is on case studies of convective evolution, but we will also report on progress toward statistical analysis of convection sampled by CYGNSS. Our working hypothesis is that the typical mature phase of organized tropical convection is marked by the development of a sharp gust-front boundary from an originally spatially broader but weaker wind speed change associated with precipitation. This increase in the wind gradient, which we demonstrate is observable by CYGNSS, likely helps to focus enhanced turbulent fluxes of convection-sustaining heat and moisture near the leading edge of the convective system where they are more easily ingested by the updraft. Progress on the testing and refinement of this hypothesis, using a mixture of observations and modeling, will be reported.

  11. LEIR impedance model and coherent beam instability observations

    CERN Document Server

    Biancacci, N; Migliorati, M; Rijoff, T L

    2017-01-01

    The LEIR machine is the first synchrotron in the ion ac-celeration chain at CERN and it is responsible to deliverhigh intensity ion beams to the LHC. Following the recentprogress in the understanding of the intensity limitations,detailed studies of the machine impedance started. In thiswork we describe the present LEIR impedance model, detail-ing the contribution to the total longitudinal and transverseimpedance of several machine elements. We then comparethe machine tune shift versus intensity predictions againstmeasurements at injection energy and summarize the co-herent instability observations in the absence of transversefeedback.

  12. Observational and Modeling Studies of Clouds and the Hydrological Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Richard C. J.

    1997-01-01

    Our approach involved validating parameterizations directly against measurements from field programs, and using this validation to tune existing parameterizations and to guide the development of new ones. We have used a single-column model (SCM) to make the link between observations and parameterizations of clouds, including explicit cloud microphysics (e.g., prognostic cloud liquid water used to determine cloud radiative properties). Surface and satellite radiation measurements were used to provide an initial evaluation of the performance of the different parameterizations. The results of this evaluation will then used to develop improved cloud and cloud-radiation schemes, which were tested in GCM experiments.

  13. S-AMP for non-linear observation models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cakmak, Burak; Winther, Ole; Fleury, Bernard H.

    2015-01-01

    matrix has zero-mean iid Gaussian entries. Our derivation is based upon 1) deriving expectation-propagation-(EP)-like equations from the stationary-points equations of the Gibbs free energy under first- and second-moment constraints and 2) applying additive free convolution in free probability theory......Recently we presented the S-AMP approach, an extension of approximate message passing (AMP), to be able to handle general invariant matrix ensembles. In this contribution we extend S-AMP to non-linear observation models. We obtain generalized AMP (GAMP) as the special case when the measurement...

  14. Dispersion Relations for Electroweak Observables in Composite Higgs Models

    CERN Document Server

    Contino, Roberto

    2015-12-14

    We derive dispersion relations for the electroweak oblique observables measured at LEP in the context of $SO(5)/SO(4)$ composite Higgs models. It is shown how these relations can be used and must be modified when modeling the spectral functions through a low-energy effective description of the strong dynamics. The dispersion relation for the parameter $\\epsilon_3$ is then used to estimate the contribution from spin-1 resonances at the 1-loop level. Finally, it is shown that the sign of the contribution to the $\\hat S$ parameter from the lowest-lying spin-1 states is not necessarily positive definite, but depends on the energy scale at which the asymptotic behavior of current correlators is attained.

  15. Polar cap patches observed during the magnetic storm of November 2003: observations and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Valladares

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present multi-instrumented measurements and multi-technique analysis of polar cap patches observed early during the recovery phase of the major magnetic storm of 20 November 2003 to investigate the origin of the polar cap patches. During this event, the Qaanaaq imager observed elongated polar cap patches, some of which containing variable brightness; the Qaanaaq digisonde detected abrupt NmF2 fluctuations; the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar (ISR measured patches placed close to but poleward of the auroral oval–polar cap boundary; and the DMSP-F13 satellite intersected topside density enhancements, corroborating the presence of the patches seen by the imager, the digisonde, and the Sondrestrom ISR. A 2-D cross-correlation analysis was applied to series of two consecutive red-line images, indicating that the magnitude and direction of the patch velocities were in good agreement with the SuperDARN convection patterns. We applied a back-tracing analysis to the patch locations and found that most of the patches seen between 20:41 and 21:29 UT were likely transiting the throat region near 19:41 UT. Inspection of the SuperDARN velocities at this time indicates spatial and temporal collocation of a gap region between patches and large (1.7 km s−1 line-of-sight velocities. The variable airglow brightness of the patches observed between 20:33 and 20:43 UT was investigated using the numerical Global Theoretical Ionospheric Model (GTIM driven by the SuperDARN convection patterns and a variable upward/downward neutral wind. Our numerical results indicate that variations in the airglow intensity up to 265 R can be produced by a constant 70 m s−1 downward vertical wind.

  16. Precision spectroscopy at COMPASS: Observation of a new (exotic) light axial vector meson and a deeper look into decay dynamics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    High statistical accuracy has triggered the development of innovative analysis schemes not possible in previous experiments and lead to the discovery of new hadronic states. Among these is the observation of a new light (possibly exotic) axial vector meson, the interpretation of which is still open. In addition we have analyzed the pi-pi S-wave content in exclusive 3pi-events. As a result of our analysis also the interpretation of resonance structures can now be clarified using the variation of production rates with the four momentum transfer, allowing to identify resonant and non-resonant components in the spectra. In addition to the 3pi final states we will also give an overview on results obtained with other particles forming the final state and present an outlook on forthcoming results.

  17. Observation and modelling of fog at Cold Lake, Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Boudala, Faisal; Weng, Wensong; Taylor, Peter A.; Gultepe, Ismail; Isaac, George A.

    2017-04-01

    observational data indicates that the surface-based in situ measurements agree well with aviation weather observation METAR reports and are comparable with model simulations. Both the HRDPS model and microwave radiometry data indicate low level fog and cloud formation but the depths and intensities differ considerably depending on environmental conditions. Causes for this are under investigation with the high resolution 1-D boundary-layer model.

  18. Modelling of light pollution in suburban areas using remotely sensed imagery and GIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkias, C; Petrakis, M; Psiloglou, B; Lianou, M

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes a methodology for modelling light pollution using geographical information systems (GIS) and remote sensing (RS) technology. The proposed approach attempts to address the issue of environmental assessment in sensitive suburban areas. The modern way of life in developing countries is conductive to environmental degradation in urban and suburban areas. One specific parameter for this degradation is light pollution due to intense artificial night lighting. This paper aims to assess this parameter for the Athens metropolitan area, using modern analytical and data capturing technologies. For this purpose, night-time satellite images and analogue maps have been used in order to create the spatial database of the GIS for the study area. Using GIS advanced analytical functionality, visibility analysis was implemented. The outputs for this analysis are a series of maps reflecting direct and indirect light pollution around the city of Athens. Direct light pollution corresponds to optical contact with artificial night light sources, while indirect light pollution corresponds to optical contact with the sky glow above the city. Additionally, the assessment of light pollution in different periods allows for dynamic evaluation of the phenomenon. The case study demonstrates high levels of light pollution in Athens suburban areas and its increase over the last decade.

  19. Using observations to evaluate biosphere-atmosphere interactions in models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Julia; Konings, Alexandra G.; Alemohammad, Seyed H.; Gentine, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Biosphere-atmosphere interactions influence the hydrologic cycle by altering climate and weather patterns (Charney, 1975; Koster et al., 2006; Seneviratne et al., 2006), contributing up to 30% of precipitation and radiation variability in certain regions (Green et al., 2017). They have been shown to contribute to the persistence of drought in Europe (Seneviratne et al., 2006), as well as to increase rainfall in the Amazon (Spracklen et al., 2012). Thus, a true representation of these feedbacks in Earth System Models (ESMs) is crucial for accurate forecasting and planning. However, it has been difficult to validate the performance of ESMs since often-times surface and atmospheric flux data are scarce and/or difficult to observe. In this study, we use the results of a new global observational study (using remotely sensed solar-induced fluorescence to represent the biosphere flux) (Green et al., 2017) to determine how well a suite of 13 ESMs capture biosphere-atmosphere feedbacks. We perform a Conditional Multivariate Granger Causality analysis in the frequency domain with radiation, precipitation and temperature as atmospheric inputs and GPP as the biospheric input. Performing the analysis in the frequency domain allows for separation of feedbacks at different time-scales (subseasonal, seasonal or interannual). Our findings can be used to determine whether there is agreement between models, as well as, to pinpoint regions or time-scales of model bias or inaccuracy, which will provide insight on potential improvement. We demonstrate that in addition to the well-known problem of convective parameterization over land in models, the main issue in representing feedbacks between the land and the atmosphere is due to the misrepresentation of water stress. These results provide a direct quantitative assessment of feedbacks in models and how to improve them. References: Charney, J.G. Dynamics of deserts and drought in the Sahel. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological

  20. General Description of Fission Observables: GEF Model Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, K.-H.; Jurado, B.; Amouroux, C.; Schmitt, C.

    2016-01-01

    The GEF ("GEneral description of Fission observables") model code is documented. It describes the observables for spontaneous fission, neutron-induced fission and, more generally, for fission of a compound nucleus from any other entrance channel, with given excitation energy and angular momentum. The GEF model is applicable for a wide range of isotopes from Z = 80 to Z = 112 and beyond, up to excitation energies of about 100 MeV. The results of the GEF model are compared with fission barriers, fission probabilities, fission-fragment mass- and nuclide distributions, isomeric ratios, total kinetic energies, and prompt-neutron and prompt-gamma yields and energy spectra from neutron-induced and spontaneous fission. Derived properties of delayed neutrons and decay heat are also considered. The GEF model is based on a general approach to nuclear fission that explains a great part of the complex appearance of fission observables on the basis of fundamental laws of physics and general properties of microscopic systems and mathematical objects. The topographic theorem is used to estimate the fission-barrier heights from theoretical macroscopic saddle-point and ground-state masses and experimental ground-state masses. Motivated by the theoretically predicted early localisation of nucleonic wave functions in a necked-in shape, the properties of the relevant fragment shells are extracted. These are used to determine the depths and the widths of the fission valleys corresponding to the different fission channels and to describe the fission-fragment distributions and deformations at scission by a statistical approach. A modified composite nuclear-level-density formula is proposed. It respects some features in the superfluid regime that are in accordance with new experimental findings and with theoretical expectations. These are a constant-temperature behaviour that is consistent with a considerably increased heat capacity and an increased pairing condensation energy that is

  1. Parental modelling of eating behaviours: observational validation of the Parental Modelling of Eating Behaviours scale (PARM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palfreyman, Zoe; Haycraft, Emma; Meyer, Caroline

    2015-03-01

    Parents are important role models for their children's eating behaviours. This study aimed to further validate the recently developed Parental Modelling of Eating Behaviours Scale (PARM) by examining the relationships between maternal self-reports on the PARM with the modelling practices exhibited by these mothers during three family mealtime observations. Relationships between observed maternal modelling and maternal reports of children's eating behaviours were also explored. Seventeen mothers with children aged between 2 and 6 years were video recorded at home on three separate occasions whilst eating a meal with their child. Mothers also completed the PARM, the Children's Eating Behaviour Questionnaire and provided demographic information about themselves and their child. Findings provided validation for all three PARM subscales, which were positively associated with their observed counterparts on the observational coding scheme (PARM-O). The results also indicate that habituation to observations did not change the feeding behaviours displayed by mothers. In addition, observed maternal modelling was significantly related to children's food responsiveness (i.e., their interest in and desire for foods), enjoyment of food, and food fussiness. This study makes three important contributions to the literature. It provides construct validation for the PARM measure and provides further observational support for maternal modelling being related to lower levels of food fussiness and higher levels of food enjoyment in their children. These findings also suggest that maternal feeding behaviours remain consistent across repeated observations of family mealtimes, providing validation for previous research which has used single observations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Observation and modeling of deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in low-density HMX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tringe, Joseph W.; Vandersall, Kevin S.; Reaugh, John E.; Levie, Harold W.; Henson, Bryan F.; Smilowitz, Laura B.; Parker, Gary R.

    2017-01-01

    We employ simultaneous flash x-ray radiography and streak imaging, together with a multi-phase finite element model, to understand deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) phenomena in low-density (˜1.2 gm/cm3) powder of the explosive cyclotetramethylene-tetranitramine (HMX). HMX powder was lightly hand-tamped in a 12.7 mm diameter column, relatively lightly-confined in an optically-transparent polycarbonate cylinder with wall thickness 25.4 mm. We observe apparent compaction of the powder in advance of the detonation transition by the motion of small steel spheres pre-emplaced throughout the length of explosive. High-speed imaging along the explosive cylinder length provides a more temporally continuous record of the transition that is correlated with the high-resolution x-ray image record. Preliminary simulation of these experiments with the HERMES model implemented in the ALE3D code enables improved understanding of the explosive particle burning, compaction and detonation phenomena which are implied by the observed reaction rate and transition location within the cylinder.

  3. A New Light Trap Model as an Alternative for Controlling Pests in Eucalyptus Plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafia, R G; Loureiro, E B; Silva, J B; Simões, J A C; Zarpelon, T G; Bezerra Junior, N S; Damacena, M B

    2017-07-18

    Eucalyptus plantations can be affected by species of defoliating caterpillars. The integrated management of this group primarily involves a monitoring system, natural enemies, and biological products. Alternative control methods, including the use of conventional light traps, have not been adopted, mostly because of their low efficiency. Therefore, a more efficient light trap model was developed. The new model allowed the capture of 3.6 times as many insects as the conventional model, with a 261% gain in control efficiency. The use of this new model represents another integrated management alternative for lepidopteran pests of eucalyptus plantations and other cultured plants.

  4. The FU Orionis outburst as a thermal accretion event: Observational constraints for protostellar disk models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, K. R.; Lin, D. N. C.; Hartmann, L. W.; Kenyon, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    The results of the time-dependent disk models developed in Bell & Lin are compared with observed properties of FU Orionis variables. Specific models are fit to the light curves of Fu Ori, V1515 Cyg, and V1057 Cyg. The slow risetime of V1515 Cyg can be matched by a self-regulated outburst model. The rapid risetimes of FU Ori and V1057 Cyg can be fitted with the application of modest perturbations to the disk surface density. Model disks display spectral features characteristic of observed objects. The color evolution of V1057 Cyg is naturally explained if mass flux drops in the inner disk (r less than 1/4 AU) while remaining steady in the outer disk. The decrease in optical line width (rotational velocity) observed during the decay of V1057 Cyg may be accounted for by an outward-propagating ionization front. We predict that before final decay to the quiescent phase, short-wavelength line widths (lambda less than 1.5 microns) will again increase. It is suggested that FU Orionis outbursts primarily occur to systems during the embedded phase with ages less than several times 10(exp 5) yr.

  5. Land-Surface-Atmosphere Coupling in Observations and Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan K Betts

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal cycle and the daily mean at the land-surface result from the coupling of many physical processes. The framework of this review is largely conceptual; looking for relationships and information in the coupling of processes in models and observations. Starting from the surface energy balance, the role of the surface and cloud albedos in the shortwave and longwave fluxes is discussed. A long-wave radiative scaling of the diurnal temperature range and the night-time boundary layer is summarized. Several aspects of the local surface energy partition are presented: the role of soilwater availability and clouds; vector methods for understanding mixed layer evolution, and the coupling between surface and boundary layer that determines the lifting condensation level. Moving to larger scales, evaporation-precipitation feedback in models is discussed; and the coupling of column water vapor, clouds and precipitation to vertical motion and moisture convergence over the Amazon. The final topic is a comparison of the ratio of surface shortwave cloud forcing to the diabatic precipitation forcing of the atmosphere in ERA-40 with observations.

  6. CORAL: model for no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Pizzo, Fabiola; Lombardo, Anna; Gadaleta, Domenico; Benfenati, Emilio

    2015-08-01

    The in vivo repeated dose toxicity (RDT) test is intended to provide information on the possible risk caused by repeated exposure to a substance over a limited period of time. The measure of the RDT is the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) that is the dose at which no effects are observed, i.e., this endpoint indicates the safety level for a substance. The need to replace in vivo tests, as required by some European Regulations (registration, evaluation authorization and restriction of chemicals) is leading to the searching for reliable alternative methods such as quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR). Considering the complexity of the RDT endpoint, for which data quality is limited and depends anyway on the study design, the development of QSAR for this endpoint is an attractive task. Starting from a dataset of 140 organic compounds with NOAEL values related to oral short term toxicity in rats, we developed a QSAR model based on optimal descriptors calculated with simplified molecular input-line entry systems and the graph of atomic orbitals by the Monte Carlo method, using CORAL software. Three different splits into the training, calibration, and validation sets are studied. The mechanistic interpretation of these models in terms of molecular fragment with positive or negative contributions to the endpoint is discussed. The probabilistic definition for the domain of applicability is suggested.

  7. Initiation and Early Evolution of the Coronal Mass Ejection on 2009 May 13 from Extreme-ultraviolet and White-light Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, A. A.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Bogachev, S. A.; Kuzin, S. V.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of the observations of a coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2009 May 13. The most important feature of these observations is that the CME was observed from the very early stage (the solar surface) up to a distance of 15 solar radii (R ⊙). Below 2 R ⊙, we used the data from the TESIS extreme-ultraviolet telescopes obtained in the Fe 171 Å and He 304 Å lines, and above 2 R ⊙, we used the observations of the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs. The CME was formed at a distance of 0.2-0.5R ⊙ from the Sun's surface as a U-shaped structure, which was observed both in the 171 Å images and in the white light. Observations in the He 304 Å line showed that the CME was associated with an erupting prominence, which was not located above—as the standard model predicts—but rather in the lowest part of the U-shaped structure close to the magnetic X point. The prominence location can be explained with the CME breakout model. Estimates showed that CME mass increased with time. The CME trajectory was curved—its heliolatitude decreased with time. The CME started at a latitude of 50° and reached the ecliptic plane at distances of 2.5 R ⊙. The CME kinematics can be divided into three phases: initial acceleration, main acceleration, and propagation with constant velocity. After the CME, onset GOES registered a sub-A-class flare.

  8. Initiation and early evolution of the coronal mass ejection on 2009 May 13 from extreme-ultraviolet and white-light observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reva, A. A.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Bogachev, S. A.; Kuzin, S. V., E-mail: reva.antoine@gmail.com [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 53 Leninskij Prospekt, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of the observations of a coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2009 May 13. The most important feature of these observations is that the CME was observed from the very early stage (the solar surface) up to a distance of 15 solar radii (R {sub ☉}). Below 2 R {sub ☉}, we used the data from the TESIS extreme-ultraviolet telescopes obtained in the Fe 171 Å and He 304 Å lines, and above 2 R {sub ☉}, we used the observations of the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs. The CME was formed at a distance of 0.2-0.5R {sub ☉} from the Sun's surface as a U-shaped structure, which was observed both in the 171 Å images and in the white light. Observations in the He 304 Å line showed that the CME was associated with an erupting prominence, which was not located above—as the standard model predicts—but rather in the lowest part of the U-shaped structure close to the magnetic X point. The prominence location can be explained with the CME breakout model. Estimates showed that CME mass increased with time. The CME trajectory was curved—its heliolatitude decreased with time. The CME started at a latitude of 50° and reached the ecliptic plane at distances of 2.5 R {sub ☉}. The CME kinematics can be divided into three phases: initial acceleration, main acceleration, and propagation with constant velocity. After the CME, onset GOES registered a sub-A-class flare.

  9. Initiation and early evolution of the coronal mass ejection on 2009 May 13 from extreme-ultraviolet and white-light observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reva, A. A.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Bogachev, S. A.; Kuzin, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of the observations of a coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2009 May 13. The most important feature of these observations is that the CME was observed from the very early stage (the solar surface) up to a distance of 15 solar radii (R ☉ ). Below 2 R ☉ , we used the data from the TESIS extreme-ultraviolet telescopes obtained in the Fe 171 Å and He 304 Å lines, and above 2 R ☉ , we used the observations of the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs. The CME was formed at a distance of 0.2-0.5R ☉ from the Sun's surface as a U-shaped structure, which was observed both in the 171 Å images and in the white light. Observations in the He 304 Å line showed that the CME was associated with an erupting prominence, which was not located above—as the standard model predicts—but rather in the lowest part of the U-shaped structure close to the magnetic X point. The prominence location can be explained with the CME breakout model. Estimates showed that CME mass increased with time. The CME trajectory was curved—its heliolatitude decreased with time. The CME started at a latitude of 50° and reached the ecliptic plane at distances of 2.5 R ☉ . The CME kinematics can be divided into three phases: initial acceleration, main acceleration, and propagation with constant velocity. After the CME, onset GOES registered a sub-A-class flare.

  10. Short-channel drain current model for asymmetric heavily / lightly ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRADIPTA DUTTA

    2017-07-29

    Jul 29, 2017 ... drive current [1–6]. It also improves the performance of logic [7–9] as well as analog applications [10–12]. Previously, various types of drain current models of DG. MOSFETs have been demonstrated but they are ..... obtained from the electric field at the front and back gates. The smooth variation of the drain ...

  11. Independent-particle models for light negative atomic ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganas, P. S.; Talman, J. D.; Green, A. E. S.

    1980-01-01

    For the purposes of astrophysical, aeronomical, and laboratory application, a precise independent-particle model for electrons in negative atomic ions of the second and third period is discussed. The optimum-potential model (OPM) of Talman et al. (1979) is first used to generate numerical potentials for eight of these ions. Results for total energies and electron affinities are found to be very close to Hartree-Fock solutions. However, the OPM and HF electron affinities both depart significantly from experimental affinities. For this reason, two analytic potentials are developed whose inner energy levels are very close to the OPM and HF levels but whose last electron eigenvalues are adjusted precisely with the magnitudes of experimental affinities. These models are: (1) a four-parameter analytic characterization of the OPM potential and (2) a two-parameter potential model of the Green, Sellin, Zachor type. The system O(-) or e-O, which is important in upper atmospheric physics is examined in some detail.

  12. submitter Phase transition observations and discrimination of small cloud particles by light polarization in expansion chamber experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Nichman, Leonid; Järvinen, Emma; Ignatius, Karoliina; Höppel, Niko Florian; Dias, Antonio; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Tröstl, Jasmin; Wagner, Andrea Christine; Wagner, Robert; Williamson, Christina; Yan, Chao; Connolly, Paul James; Dorsey, James Robert; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Hoyle, Christopher Robert; Kristensen, Thomas Bjerring; Steiner, Gerhard; McPherson Donahue, Neil; Flagan, Richard; Gallagher, Martin William; Kirkby, Jasper; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, António

    2016-01-01

    Cloud microphysical processes involving the ice phase in tropospheric clouds are among the major uncertainties in cloud formation, weather, and general circulation models. The detection of aerosol particles, liquid droplets, and ice crystals, especially in the small cloud particle-size range below 50 μm, remains challenging in mixed phase, often unstable environments. The Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer with Polarization (CASPOL) is an airborne instrument that has the ability to detect such small cloud particles and measure the variability in polarization state of their backscattered light. Here we operate the versatile Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) chamber facility at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) to produce controlled mixed phase and other clouds by adiabatic expansions in an ultraclean environment, and use the CASPOL to discriminate between different aerosols, water, and ice particles. In this paper, optical property measurements of mixed-phase clouds and viscous secondary ...

  13. Strength of the Solar Coronal Magnetic Field - A Comparison of Independent Estimates Using Contemporaneous Radio and White-Light Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Anshu; Ramesh, R.; Kathiravan, C.; Wang, T. J.

    2017-11-01

    We estimated the coronal magnetic field strength (B) during the 23 July 2016 coronal mass ejection (CME) event using i) the flux rope structure of the CME in the white-light coronagraph images and ii) the band-splitting in the associated type II burst. No models were assumed for the coronal electron density (N(r)) we used in the estimation. The results obtained with these two independent methods correspond to different heliocentric distances (r) in the range {≈} 2.5 - 4.5 R_{⊙}, but they show excellent consistency and could be fit with a single power-law distribution of the type B(r)=5.7r^{-2.6} G, which is applicable in that distance range. The power-law index ( i.e. -2.6) is in good agreement with the results obtained in previous studies by different methods.

  14. Glider observations and modeling of sediment transport in Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Travis; Seroka, Greg; Kohut, Josh; Schofield, Oscar; Glenn, Scott

    2015-03-01

    Regional sediment resuspension and transport are examined as Hurricane Sandy made landfall on the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB) in October 2012. A Teledyne-Webb Slocum glider, equipped with a Nortek Aquadopp current profiler, was deployed on the continental shelf ahead of the storm, and is used to validate sediment transport routines coupled to the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). The glider was deployed on 25 October, 5 days before Sandy made landfall in southern New Jersey (NJ) and flew along the 40 m isobath south of the Hudson Shelf Valley. We used optical and acoustic backscatter to compare with two modeled size classes along the glider track, 0.1 and 0.4 mm sand, respectively. Observations and modeling revealed full water column resuspension for both size classes for over 24 h during peak waves and currents, with transport oriented along-shelf toward the southwest. Regional model predictions showed over 3 cm of sediment eroded on the northern portion of the NJ shelf where waves and currents were the highest. As the storm passed and winds reversed from onshore to offshore on the southern portion of the domain waves and subsequently orbital velocities necessary for resuspension were reduced leading to over 3 cm of deposition across the entire shelf, just north of Delaware Bay. This study highlights the utility of gliders as a new asset in support of the development and verification of regional sediment resuspension and transport models, particularly during large tropical and extratropical cyclones when in situ data sets are not readily available.

  15. Exploring the Vertical Distribution of Structural Parameters and Light Radiation in Rice Canopies by the Coupling Model and Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjiu Guo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Canopy structural parameters and light radiation are important for evaluating the light use efficiency and grain yield of crops. Their spatial variation within canopies and temporal variation over growth stages could be simulated using dynamic models with strong application and predictability. Based on an optimized canopy structure vertical distribution model and the Beer-Lambert law combined with hyperspectral remote sensing (RS technology, we established a new dynamic model for simulating leaf area index (LAI, leaf angle (LA distribution and light radiation at different vertical heights and growth stages. The model was validated by measuring LAI, LA and light radiation in different leaf layers at different growth stages of two different types of rice (Oryza sativa L., i.e., japonica (Wuxiangjing14 and indica (Shanyou63. The results show that the simulated values were in good agreement with the observed values, with an average RRMSE (relative root mean squared error between simulated and observed LAI and LA values of 14.75% and 21.78%, respectively. The RRMSE values for simulated photosynthetic active radiation (PAR transmittance and interception rates were 14.25% and 9.22% for Wuxiangjing14 and 15.71% and 4.40% for Shanyou63, respectively. In addition, the corresponding RRMSE values for red (R, green (G and blue (B radiation transmittance and interception rates were 16.34%, 15.96% and 15.36% for Wuxiangjing14 and 5.75%, 8.23% and 5.03% for Shanyou63, respectively. The results indicate that the model performed well for different rice cultivars and under different cultivation conditions.

  16. Fracture initiation associated with chemical degradation: observation and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byoungho Choi; Zhenwen Zhou; Chudnovsky, Alexander [Illinois Univ., Dept. of Civil and Materials Engineering (M/C 246), Chicago, IL (United States); Stivala, Salvatore S. [Stevens Inst. of Technology, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Hoboken, NJ (United States); Sehanobish, Kalyan; Bosnyak, Clive P. [Dow Chemical Co., Freeport, TX (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The fracture initiation in engineering thermoplastics resulting from chemical degradation is usually observed in the form of a microcrack network within a surface layer of degraded polymer exposed to a combined action of mechanical stresses and chemically aggressive environment. Degradation of polymers is usually manifested in a reduction of molecular weight, increase of crystallinity in semi crystalline polymers, increase of material density, a subtle increase in yield strength, and a dramatic reduction in toughness. An increase in material density, i.e., shrinkage of the degraded layer is constrained by adjacent unchanged material results in a buildup of tensile stress within the degraded layer and compressive stress in the adjacent unchanged material due to increasing incompatibility between the two. These stresses are an addition to preexisting manufacturing and service stresses. At a certain level of degradation, a combination of toughness reduction and increase of tensile stress result in fracture initiation. A quantitative model of the described above processes is presented in these work. For specificity, the internally pressurized plastic pipes that transport a fluid containing a chemically aggressive (oxidizing) agent is used as the model of fracture initiation. Experimental observations of material density and toughness dependence on degradation reported elsewhere are employed in the model. An equation for determination of a critical level of degradation corresponding to the offset of fracture is constructed. The critical level of degradation for fracture initiation depends on the rates of toughness deterioration and build-up of the degradation related stresses as well as on the manufacturing and service stresses. A method for evaluation of the time interval prior to fracture initiation is also formulated. (Author)

  17. Europlanet/IDIS: Combining Diverse Planetary Observations and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Walter; Capria, Maria Teresa; Chanteur, Gerard

    2013-04-01

    Planetary research involves a diversity of research fields from astrophysics and plasma physics to atmospheric physics, climatology, spectroscopy and surface imaging. Data from all these disciplines are collected from various space-borne platforms or telescopes, supported by modelling teams and laboratory work. In order to interpret one set of data often supporting data from different disciplines and other missions are needed while the scientist does not always have the detailed expertise to access and utilize these observations. The Integrated and Distributed Information System (IDIS) [1], developed in the framework of the Europlanet-RI project, implements a Virtual Observatory approach ([2] and [3]), where different data sets, stored in archives around the world and in different formats, are accessed, re-formatted and combined to meet the user's requirements without the need of familiarizing oneself with the different technical details. While observational astrophysical data from different observatories could already earlier be accessed via Virtual Observatories, this concept is now extended to diverse planetary data and related model data sets, spectral data bases etc. A dedicated XML-based Europlanet Data Model (EPN-DM) [4] was developed based on data models from the planetary science community and the Virtual Observatory approach. A dedicated editor simplifies the registration of new resources. As the EPN-DM is a super-set of existing data models existing archives as well as new spectroscopic or chemical data bases for the interpretation of atmospheric or surface observations, or even modeling facilities at research institutes in Europe or Russia can be easily integrated and accessed via a Table Access Protocol (EPN-TAP) [5] adapted from the corresponding protocol of the International Virtual Observatory Alliance [6] (IVOA-TAP). EPN-TAP allows to search catalogues, retrieve data and make them available through standard IVOA tools if the access to the archive

  18. Variation of plasmapause location during magnetic storms: observations and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W.

    2017-12-01

    This paper investigates the dynamic evolutions of the plasmapause during magnetic storms based on in situ observations and empirical modeling results. Superposed epoch analysis is performed on the plasmapause location identified from THEMIS in situ measurements during the 61 magnetic storms from 2009 to 2013. The evolution of the plasmapause is generally consistent with the theory of erosion/refilling of the plasmapause. From multi-spacecraft in situ measurements, we are able to directly calculate the plasmapause radial velocity, Vpp. It is found that the radial velocity is on average earthward during main phase and turns outward during recovery phase. The empirical plasmapause model by Liu et al. [2015] is further utilized to reproduce the plasmapause location during these 61 storms to reveal the details of the evolution, such as the local time dependence. It is shown that the expansion of the plasmapause starts firstly on the midnight sector at t0+1hr, and subsequently on the dawnside at t0+4hr, dayside at t0+8hr and duskside at t0+11hr, where t0 corresponds to the time of Dst minimum. The averaged Vpp is quantified based on modeling results as up to 0.17 RE/hr earthward in the main phase and 0.08 RE/hr outward in the recovery phase. The knowledge of the dynamic evolution of plasmapause provided in this paper is valuable to understand the dynamics of the inner magnetosphere during magnetic storms.

  19. SIMPLIFIED BUILDING MODELS EXTRACTION FROM ULTRA-LIGHT UAV IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Küng

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Generating detailed simplified building models such as the ones present on Google Earth is often a difficult and lengthy manual task, requiring advanced CAD software and a combination of ground imagery, LIDAR data and blueprints. Nowadays, UAVs such as the AscTec Falcon 8 have reached the maturity to offer an affordable, fast and easy way to capture large amounts of oblique images covering all parts of a building. In this paper we present a state-of-the-art photogrammetry and visual reconstruction pipeline provided by Pix4D applied to medium resolution imagery acquired by such UAVs. The key element of simplified building models extraction is the seamless integration of the outputs of such a pipeline for a final manual refinement step in order to minimize the amount of manual work.

  20. A light neutralino in hybrid models of supersymmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Dudas, Emilian; Parmentier, Jeanne; 10.1016

    2008-01-01

    We show that in gauge mediation models where heavy messenger masses are provided by the adjoint Higgs field of an underlying SU(5) theory, a generalized gauge mediation spectrum arises with the characteristic feature of having a neutralino much lighter than in the standard gauge or gravity mediation schemes. This naturally fits in a hybrid scenario where gravity mediation, while subdominant with respect to gauge mediation, provides mu and B mu parameters in the TeV range.

  1. Evaluating the Uncertainties in the Electron Temperature and Radial Speed Measurements Using White Light Corona Eclipse Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginald, Nelson L.; Davilla, Joseph M.; St. Cyr, O. C.; Rastaetter, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    We examine the uncertainties in two plasma parameters from their true values in a simulated asymmetric corona. We use the Corona Heliosphere (CORHEL) and Magnetohydrodynamics Around the Sphere (MAS) models in the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) to investigate the differences between an assumed symmetric corona and a more realistic, asymmetric one. We were able to predict the electron temperatures and electron bulk flow speeds to within +/-0.5 MK and +/-100 km s(exp-1), respectively, over coronal heights up to 5.0 R from Sun center.We believe that this technique could be incorporated in next-generation white-light coronagraphs to determine these electron plasma parameters in the low solar corona. We have conducted experiments in the past during total solar eclipses to measure the thermal electron temperature and the electron bulk flow speed in the radial direction in the low solar corona. These measurements were made at different altitudes and latitudes in the low solar corona by measuring the shape of the K-coronal spectra between 350 nm and 450 nm and two brightness ratios through filters centered at 385.0 nm/410.0 nm and 398.7 nm/423.3 nm with a bandwidth of is approximately equal to 4 nm. Based on symmetric coronal models used for these measurements, the two measured plasma parameters were expected to represent those values at the points where the lines of sight intersected the plane of the solar limb.

  2. Generalized Beer-Lambert model for near-infrared light propagation in thick biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Manish; Ayyalasomayajula, Kalyan R.; Yalavarthy, Phaneendra K.

    2016-07-01

    The attenuation of near-infrared (NIR) light intensity as it propagates in a turbid medium like biological tissue is described by modified the Beer-Lambert law (MBLL). The MBLL is generally used to quantify the changes in tissue chromophore concentrations for NIR spectroscopic data analysis. Even though MBLL is effective in terms of providing qualitative comparison, it suffers from its applicability across tissue types and tissue dimensions. In this work, we introduce Lambert-W function-based modeling for light propagation in biological tissues, which is a generalized version of the Beer-Lambert model. The proposed modeling provides parametrization of tissue properties, which includes two attenuation coefficients μ0 and η. We validated our model against the Monte Carlo simulation, which is the gold standard for modeling NIR light propagation in biological tissue. We included numerous human and animal tissues to validate the proposed empirical model, including an inhomogeneous adult human head model. The proposed model, which has a closed form (analytical), is first of its kind in providing accurate modeling of NIR light propagation in biological tissues.

  3. Observation of Point-Light-Walker Locomotion Induces Motor Resonance When Explicitly Represented; An EEG Source Analysis Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Inuggi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding human motion, to infer the goal of others' actions, is thought to involve the observer's motor repertoire. One prominent class of actions, the human locomotion, has been object of several studies, all focused on manipulating the shape of degraded human figures like point-light walker (PLW stimuli, represented as walking on the spot. Nevertheless, since the main goal of the locomotor function is to displace the whole body from one position to the other, these stimuli might not fully represent a goal-directed action and thus might not be able to induce the same motor resonance mechanism expected when observing a natural locomotion. To explore this hypothesis, we recorded the event-related potentials (ERP of canonical/scrambled and translating/centered PLWs decoding. We individuated a novel ERP component (N2c over central electrodes, around 435 ms after stimulus onset, for translating compared to centered PLW, only when the canonical shape was preserved. Consistently with our hypothesis, sources analysis associated this component to the activation of trunk and lower legs primary sensory-motor and supplementary motor areas. These results confirm the role of own motor repertoire in processing human action and suggest that ERP can detect the associated motor resonance only when the human figure is explicitly involved in performing a meaningful action.

  4. Establishment of a blue light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, G; Cai, S J; Gong, X; Wang, L L; Li, H H; Wang, L M

    2016-06-24

    To establish a blue-light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Fourth-generation human RPE cells were randomly divided into two groups. In group A, cells were exposed to blue light (2000 ± 500 lux) for 0 (control), 3, 6, 9, and 12 h, and cell culture was stopped after 12 h. In group B, cells were exposed to blue light at the same intensity and time periods, but cell culture was stopped after 24 h. TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay was performed to determine the most suitable illuminating time with apoptotic index. Flow cytometry was used to determine apoptotic ratio of RPEs. In group A, the apoptotic index of cells that received 6, 9 and 12 h of blue light was higher than that of control. The apoptotic index of cells receiving 9 and 12 h was higher than that of 6 h (P = 0.000). In group B, the apoptotic index and RPE cell apoptosis ratio of cells exposed to 6, 9 and 12 h of blue light were higher than that of 3 h (P = 0.000); and cells receiving 9 and 12 h had higher values than that of 6 h. This study demonstrated that the best conditions to establish a blue light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro are 2000 ± 500 lux light intensity for 6 h, with 24 h of cell culture post-exposure.

  5. The Greenland ice sheet during LGM – a model based on field observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Svend Visby; Kjeldsen, Kristian Kjellerup; Kjær, Kurt H.

    combine this new evidence with the older observations. This model is conservative because it is, as far as possible, based on tangible evidence minimising the amount of speculation. The LGM ice sheet in this model covered c. 2.7 mio km2, 65% more than the present. Two thirds of this excess relative......In the light of recent years¿ intense discussion on the role of Greenland Ice Sheet in global warming its reaction to past climatic change can contribute valuable information. We have updated the evidence for LGM (c. 23-20 kaBP) icesheet coverage. previous reviews An important part of the main...... The issue is complicated by the circumstance that during LGM (Last glacial maximum) the ice sheet margins around the whole perimeter stood on the shelf and “classical” evidence, such as large moraine belts, extensive sandurs and major drainage diversions do not apply. The first estimates were therefore...

  6. Implications of a Light Higgs in Composite Models

    CERN Document Server

    Redi, Michele

    2012-01-01

    We study the Higgs mass in composite Higgs models with partial compositeness, extending the results of Ref. [1] to different representations of the composite sector for SO(5)/SO(4) and to the coset SO(6)/SO(5). For a given tuning we find in general a strong correlation between the mass of the top partners and the Higgs mass, akin to the one in supersymmetry. If the theory is natural a Higgs mass of 125 GeV typically requires fermionic partners below TeV which might be within the reach of the present run of LHC. A discussion of CP properties of both cosets is also presented.

  7. The alfalfa “almost darks” campaign: Pilot VLA HI observations of five high mass-to-light ratio systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, John M.; Martinkus, Charlotte P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Leisman, Lukas; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Hallenbeck, Gregory; Jones, Michael, E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu, E-mail: cmartink@macalester.edu, E-mail: leisman@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: riccardo@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: hallenbg@union.edu, E-mail: jonesmg@astro.cornell.edu [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); and others

    2015-02-01

    We present new Very Large Array (VLA) H i spectral line imaging of five sources discovered by the ALFALFA extragalactic survey. These targets are drawn from a larger sample of systems that were not uniquely identified with optical counterparts during ALFALFA processing, and as such have unusually high H i mass to light ratios. The candidate “Almost Dark” objects fall into four broad categories: (1) objects with nearby H i neighbors that are likely of tidal origin; (2) objects that appear to be part of a system of multiple H i sources, but which may not be tidal in origin; (3) objects isolated from nearby ALFALFA H i detections, but located near a gas-poor early type galaxy; (4) apparently isolated sources, with no object of coincident redshift within ∼400 kpc. Roughly 75% of the 200 objects without identified counterparts in the α.40 database (Haynes et al. 2011) fall into category 1 (likely tidal), and were not considered for synthesis follow-up observations. The pilot sample presented here (AGC193953, AGC208602, AGC208399, AGC226178, and AGC233638) contains the first five sources observed as part of a larger effort to characterize H i sources with no readily identifiable optical counterpart at single dish resolution (3.′5). These objects span a range of H i mass [7.41 < log(M{sub Hi}) < 9.51] and H i mass to B-band luminosity ratios (3 < M{sub Hi}/L{sub B} < 9). We compare the H i total intensity and velocity fields to optical imaging drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and to ultraviolet imaging drawn from archival GALEX observations. Four of the sources with uncertain or no optical counterpart in the ALFALFA data are identified with low surface brightness optical counterparts in Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging when compared with VLA H i intensity maps, and appear to be galaxies with clear signs of ordered rotation in the H i velocity fields. Three of these are detected in far-ultraviolet GALEX images, a likely indication of star formation within

  8. The alfalfa “almost darks” campaign: Pilot VLA HI observations of five high mass-to-light ratio systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, John M.; Martinkus, Charlotte P.; Leisman, Lukas; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Hallenbeck, Gregory; Jones, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present new Very Large Array (VLA) H i spectral line imaging of five sources discovered by the ALFALFA extragalactic survey. These targets are drawn from a larger sample of systems that were not uniquely identified with optical counterparts during ALFALFA processing, and as such have unusually high H i mass to light ratios. The candidate “Almost Dark” objects fall into four broad categories: (1) objects with nearby H i neighbors that are likely of tidal origin; (2) objects that appear to be part of a system of multiple H i sources, but which may not be tidal in origin; (3) objects isolated from nearby ALFALFA H i detections, but located near a gas-poor early type galaxy; (4) apparently isolated sources, with no object of coincident redshift within ∼400 kpc. Roughly 75% of the 200 objects without identified counterparts in the α.40 database (Haynes et al. 2011) fall into category 1 (likely tidal), and were not considered for synthesis follow-up observations. The pilot sample presented here (AGC193953, AGC208602, AGC208399, AGC226178, and AGC233638) contains the first five sources observed as part of a larger effort to characterize H i sources with no readily identifiable optical counterpart at single dish resolution (3.′5). These objects span a range of H i mass [7.41 < log(M Hi ) < 9.51] and H i mass to B-band luminosity ratios (3 < M Hi /L B < 9). We compare the H i total intensity and velocity fields to optical imaging drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and to ultraviolet imaging drawn from archival GALEX observations. Four of the sources with uncertain or no optical counterpart in the ALFALFA data are identified with low surface brightness optical counterparts in Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging when compared with VLA H i intensity maps, and appear to be galaxies with clear signs of ordered rotation in the H i velocity fields. Three of these are detected in far-ultraviolet GALEX images, a likely indication of star formation within the last few

  9. Capacitance Online Estimation Based on Adaptive Model Observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cen Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As a basic component in electrical and electronic devices, capacitors are very popular in electrical circuits. Conventional capacitors such as electrotype capacitors are easy to degradation, aging and fatigue due to long‐time running and outer damages such as mechanical and electrical stresses. In this paper, a novel online capacitance measurement/estimation approach is proposed. Firstly, an Adaptive Model Observer (AMO is designed based on the capacitor's circuit equations. Secondly, the AMO’s stability and convergence are analysed and discussed. Finally, Capacitors with different capacitance and different initial voltages in a buck converter topology are tested and validated. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority of our proposed approach.

  10. Venus Aerosol Properties from Modelling and Akatsuki IR2 Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGouldrick, K.

    2017-09-01

    I am creating computer simulations of the clouds of Venus. In these simulations, I make changes to the properties of the aerosols that affect their ability to form, grow, evaporate, or combine with other particles. I then use the results of these models to predict how bright or dark Venus might appear when viewed at infrared wavelengths. By comparing this calculated brightness with the infrared observations made by the IR2 infrared camera on the Akatsuki spacecraft (currently orbiting Venus since its arrival in December 2015, built by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)), I hope to explain the causes for the changes that are seen to occur in the clouds via these and other images.

  11. Light radiation pressure upon a wrinkled membrane – parametrization of an optically orthotropic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerovny, N. A.; Zimin, V. N.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the problem of representing the light pressure force upon the surface of a thin wrinkled film is discussed. The common source of wrinkles is the shear deformation of the membrane sample. The optical model of such a membrane is assumed to be optically orthotropic and an analytic equation for infinitesimal light pressure force is written. A linear regression model in the case of wrinkle geometry, where a surface element can have different optical parameters, is constructed and the Bayesian approach is used to calculate the parameters of this model.

  12. (Non)supersymmetric SU(5) grand unified models with light coloured octets and electroweak triplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnikov, N.V.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that split 24 multiplets of SU(5) can cure the problems of (non)supersymmetric SU(5) grand unified models with light coloured octets and electroweak triplets, and predict the correct value of sin 2 (Θ ω ) and don't have the problems with the proton decay. The phenomenology of light coloured scalars is discussed briefly. (author) 17 refs.; 3 figs

  13. The regulatory network adjusting light-harvesting in the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, control of light-harvesting is a key component of acclimation mechanisms that optimize photon conversion efficiencies. In this thesis, the interrelation of short- and long-term regulation of light-harvesting at photosystem II (PSII) was analyzed in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This model organism is able to gain carbon and energy through photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation as well as heterotrophic feeding. A lowered inorganic or increased organic c...

  14. Confronting the outflow-regulated cluster formation model with observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Fumitaka [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Li, Zhi-Yun, E-mail: fumitaka.nakamura@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: zl4h@virginia.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    Protostellar outflows have been shown theoretically to be capable of maintaining supersonic turbulence in cluster-forming clumps and keeping the star formation rate per free-fall time as low as a few percent. We aim to test two basic predictions of this outflow-regulated cluster formation model, namely, (1) the clump should be close to virial equilibrium and (2) the turbulence dissipation rate should be balanced by the outflow momentum injection rate, using recent outflow surveys toward eight nearby cluster-forming clumps (B59, L1551, L1641N, Serpens Main Cloud, Serpens South, ρ Oph, IC 348, and NGC 1333). We find, for almost all sources, that the clumps are close to virial equilibrium and the outflow momentum injection rate exceeds the turbulence momentum dissipation rate. In addition, the outflow kinetic energy is significantly smaller than the clump gravitational energy for intermediate and massive clumps with M {sub cl} ≳ a few × 10{sup 2} M {sub ☉}, suggesting that the outflow feedback is not enough to disperse the clump as a whole. The number of observed protostars also indicates that the star formation rate per free-fall time is as small as a few percent for all clumps. These observationally based results strengthen the case for outflow-regulated cluster formation.

  15. Rigorous modelling of light's intensity angular-profile in Abbe refractometers with absorbing homogeneous fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Valenzuela, A; Contreras-Tello, H; Márquez-Islas, R; Sánchez-Pérez, C

    2013-01-01

    We derive an optical model for the light intensity distribution around the critical angle in a standard Abbe refractometer when used on absorbing homogenous fluids. The model is developed using rigorous electromagnetic optics. The obtained formula is very simple and can be used suitably in the analysis and design of optical sensors relying on Abbe type refractometry.

  16. Models based on multichannel R-matrix theory for evaluating light element reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodder, D.C.; Hale, G.M.; Nisley, R.A.; Witte, K.; Young, P.G.

    1975-01-01

    Multichannel R-matrix theory has been used as a basis for models for analysis and evaluation of light nuclear systems. These models have the characteristic that data predictions can be made utilizing information derived from other reactions related to the one of primary interest. Several examples are given where such an approach is valid and appropriate. (auth.)

  17. Nucleon-generalized parton distributions in the light-front quark model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-12

    Jan 12, 2016 ... The results obtained for GPDs in momentum and impact parameter space are comparable with phenomenological parametrization ... Recently, a phenomenological light-front quark model (LFQM) has been proposed by matching the soft-wall model of ... representation are defined as. F q. 1 (t) = ∫ dx d2k⊥.

  18. Unraveling models of CP violation through electric dipole moments of light nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekens, W.; Vries, J. de; Bsaisou, J.; Bernreuther, W.; Hanhart, C.; Meißner, Ulf-G; Nogga, A.; Wirzba, A.

    2014-01-01

    We show that the proposed measurements of the electric dipole moments of light nuclei in storage rings would put strong constraints on models of flavor-diagonal CP violation. Our analysis is exemplified by a comparison of the Standard Model including the QCD theta term, the minimal left-right

  19. Modeling future scenarios of light attenuation and potential seagrass success in a eutrophic estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Barrio, Pilar; Ganju, Neil K.; Aretxabaleta, Alfredo L.; Hayn, Melanie; García, Andrés; Howarth, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Estuarine eutrophication has led to numerous ecological changes, including loss of seagrass beds. One potential cause of these losses is a reduction in light availability due to increased attenuation by phytoplankton. Future sea level rise will also tend to reduce light penetration and modify seagrass habitat. In the present study, we integrate a spectral irradiance model into a biogeochemical model coupled to the Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS). It is linked to a bio-optical seagrass model to assess potential seagrass habitat in a eutrophic estuary under future nitrate loading and sea-level rise scenarios. The model was applied to West Falmouth Harbor, a shallow estuary located on Cape Cod (Massachusetts) where nitrate from groundwater has led to eutrophication and seagrass loss in landward portions of the estuary. Measurements of chlorophyll, turbidity, light attenuation, and seagrass coverage were used to assess the model accuracy. Mean chlorophyll based on uncalibrated in-situ fluorometry varied from 28 μg L−1 at the landward-most site to 6.5 μg L−1 at the seaward site, while light attenuation ranged from 0.86 to 0.45 m-1. The model reproduced the spatial variability in chlorophyll and light attenuation with RMS errors of 3.72 μg L−1 and 0.07 m-1 respectively. Scenarios of future nitrate reduction and sea-level rise suggest an improvement in light climate in the landward basin with a 75% reduction in nitrate loading. This coupled model may be useful to assess habitat availability changes due to eutrophication and sediment resuspension and fully considers spatial variability on the tidal timescale.

  20. Light moduli in almost no-scale models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmueller, Wilfried; Moeller, Jan; Schmidt, Jonas

    2009-09-01

    We discuss the stabilization of the compact dimension for a class of five-dimensional orbifold supergravity models. Supersymmetry is broken by the superpotential on a boundary. Classically, the size L of the fifth dimension is undetermined, with or without supersymmetry breaking, and the effective potential is of no-scale type. The size L is fixed by quantum corrections to the Kaehler potential, the Casimir energy and Fayet-Iliopoulos (FI) terms localized at the boundaries. For an FI scale of order M GUT , as in heterotic string compactifications with anomalous U(1) symmetries, one obtains L∝1/M GUT . A small mass is predicted for the scalar fluctuation associated with the fifth dimension, m ρ 3/2 /(L M). (orig.)

  1. Phototherapy with blue and green mixed-light is as effective against unconjugated jaundice as blue light and reduces oxidative stress in the Gunn rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Yumiko; Morimoto, Yukihiro; Uchiike, Takao; Kamamoto, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Tamaki; Arai, Ikuyo; Nishikubo, Toshiya; Takahashi, Yukihiro

    2015-07-01

    Phototherapy using blue light-emitting diodes (LED) is effective against neonatal jaundice. However, green light phototherapy also reduces unconjugated jaundice. We aimed to determine whether mixed blue and green light can relieve jaundice with minimal oxidative stress as effectively as either blue or green light alone in a rat model. Gunn rats were exposed to phototherapy with blue (420-520 nm), filtered blue (FB; 440-520 nm without 1.00), respectively. Blue plus green phototherapy is as effective as blue phototherapy and it attenuates irradiation-induced oxidative stress. Combined blue and green spectra might be effective against neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Modeling the Ionosphere with GPS and Rotation Measure Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malins, J. B.; Taylor, G. B.; White, S. M.; Dowell, J.

    2017-12-01

    Advances in digital processing have created new tools for looking at and examining the ionosphere. We have combined data from dual frequency GPSs, digital ionosondes and observations from The Long Wavelength Array (LWA), a 256 dipole low frequency radio telescope situated in central New Mexico in order to examine ionospheric profiles. By studying polarized pulsars, the LWA is able to very accurately determine the Faraday rotation caused by the ionosphere. By combining this data with the international geomagnetic reference field, the LWA can evaluate ionospheric profiles and how well they predict the actual Faraday rotation. Dual frequency GPS measurements of total electron content, as well as measurements from digisonde data were used to model the ionosphere, and to predict the Faraday rotation to with in 0.1 rad/m2. Additionally, it was discovered that the predicted topside profile of the digisonde data did not accurate predict faraday rotation measurements, suggesting a need to reexamine the methods for creating the topside predicted profile. I will discuss the methods used to measure rotation measure and ionosphere profiles as well as discuss possible corrections to the topside model.

  3. Impacts of Diffuse Radiation on Light Use Efficiency across Terrestrial Ecosystems Based on Eddy Covariance Observation in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kun; Wang, Shaoqiang; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Huimin; Zhang, Junhui; Yan, Junhua; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Yanfen; Shi, Peili

    2014-01-01

    Ecosystem light use efficiency (LUE) is a key factor of production models for gross primary production (GPP) predictions. Previous studies revealed that ecosystem LUE could be significantly enhanced by an increase on diffuse radiation. Under large spatial heterogeneity and increasing annual diffuse radiation in China, eddy covariance flux data at 6 sites across different ecosystems from 2003 to 2007 were used to investigate the impacts of diffuse radiation indicated by the cloudiness index (CI) on ecosystem LUE in grassland and forest ecosystems. Our results showed that the ecosystem LUE at the six sites was significantly correlated with the cloudiness variation (0.24≤R2≤0.85), especially at the Changbaishan temperate forest ecosystem (R2 = 0.85). Meanwhile, the CI values appeared more frequently between 0.8 and 1.0 in two subtropical forest ecosystems (Qianyanzhou and Dinghushan) and were much larger than those in temperate ecosystems. Besides, cloudiness thresholds which were favorable for enhancing ecosystem carbon sequestration existed at the three forest sites, respectively. Our research confirmed that the ecosystem LUE at the six sites in China was positively responsive to the diffuse radiation, and the cloudiness index could be used as an environmental regulator for LUE modeling in regional GPP prediction. PMID:25393629

  4. The Alfalfa “Almost Darks” Campaign: Pilot VLA HI Observations of Five High Mass-To-Light Ratio Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, John M.; Martinkus, Charlotte P.; Leisman, Lukas; Haynes, Martha P.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Hallenbeck, Gregory; Janowiecki, Steven; Jones, Michael; Józsa, Gyula I. G.; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Nichols, Nathan; Papastergis, Emmanouil; Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J.; Troischt, Parker

    2015-02-01

    We present new Very Large Array (VLA) H i spectral line imaging of five sources discovered by the ALFALFA extragalactic survey. These targets are drawn from a larger sample of systems that were not uniquely identified with optical counterparts during ALFALFA processing, and as such have unusually high H i mass to light ratios. The candidate “Almost Dark” objects fall into four broad categories: (1) objects with nearby H i neighbors that are likely of tidal origin; (2) objects that appear to be part of a system of multiple H i sources, but which may not be tidal in origin; (3) objects isolated from nearby ALFALFA H i detections, but located near a gas-poor early type galaxy; (4) apparently isolated sources, with no object of coincident redshift within ˜400 kpc. Roughly 75% of the 200 objects without identified counterparts in the α.40 database (Haynes et al. 2011) fall into category 1 (likely tidal), and were not considered for synthesis follow-up observations. The pilot sample presented here (AGC193953, AGC208602, AGC208399, AGC226178, and AGC233638) contains the first five sources observed as part of a larger effort to characterize H i sources with no readily identifiable optical counterpart at single dish resolution (3.‧5). These objects span a range of H i mass [7.41 ALFALFA data are identified with low surface brightness optical counterparts in Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging when compared with VLA H i intensity maps, and appear to be galaxies with clear signs of ordered rotation in the H i velocity fields. Three of these are detected in far-ultraviolet GALEX images, a likely indication of star formation within the last few hundred Myrs. One source (AGC208602) is likely tidal in nature, associated with the NGC 3370 group. Consistent with previous efforts, we find no “dark galaxies” in this limited sample. However, the present observations do reveal complex sources with suppressed star formation, highlighting both the observational difficulties and

  5. Advanced network planning for bus rapid transit : the "Quickway" model as a modal alternative to "Light Rail Lite"

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    Transit planning in the United States has tended toward viewing BRT as an analogue to light rail transit, with similar operating patterns. This model, referred to as Light Rail Lite, is compared to international best practices, which have often...

  6. Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossiter, John R.; Percy, Larry

    2013-01-01

    product or service or to achieve a higher price that consumers are willing to pay than would obtain in the absence of advertising. What has changed in recent years is the notable worsening of the academic-practitioner divide, which has seen academic advertising researchers pursuing increasingly...... as requiring a new model of how advertising communicates and persuades, which, as the authors' textbooks explain, is sheer nonsense and contrary to the goal of integrated marketing. We provide in this article a translation of practitioners' jargon into more scientifically acceptable terminology as well...

  7. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Advanced Seismic Soil Structure Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolisetti, Chandrakanth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Coleman, Justin Leigh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    of interest. The specific nonlinear soil behavior included in the NLSSI calculation presented in this report is gapping and sliding. Other NLSSI effects are not included in the calculation. The results presented in this report document initial model runs in the linear and nonlinear analysis process. Final comparisons between traditional and advanced SPRA will be presented in the September 30th deliverable.

  8. Biomechanical model produced from light-activated dental composite resins: a holographic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelić, Dejan; Vasiljević, Darko; Blažić, Larisa; Savić-Šević, Svetlana; Murić, Branka; Nikolić, Marko

    2013-11-01

    Light-activated dental composites, commonly applied in dentistry, can be used as excellent material for producing biomechanical models. They can be cast in almost any shape in an appropriate silicone mold and quickly solidified by irradiation with light in the blue part of the spectrum. In that way, it is possible to obtain any number of nearly identical casts. The models can be used to study the behavior of arbitrary structure under mechanical loads. To test the technique, a simple mechanical model of the tooth with a mesio-occluso-distal cavity was manufactured. Composite resin restoration was placed inside the cavity and light cured. Real-time holographic interferometry was used to analyze the contraction of the composite resin and its effect on the surrounding material. The results obtained in the holographic experiment were in good agreement with those obtained using the finite element method.

  9. Observation of intermediate bands in Eu3+ doped YPO4 host: Li+ ion effect and blue to pink light emitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Kareem Parchur

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the tuning of blue to pink colour generation from Li+ ion co-doped YPO4:5Eu nanoparticles prepared by polyol method at ∼100-120 °C with ethylene glycol (EG as a capping agent. Interaction of EG molecules capped on the surface of the nanoparticles and/or created oxygen vacancies induces formation of intermediate/mid gap bands in the host structure, which is supported by UV-Visible absorption data. Strong blue and pink colors can be observed in the cases of as-prepared and 500 °C annealed samples, respectively. Co-doping of Li+ enhances the emission intensities of intermediate band as well as Eu3+. On annealing as-prepared sample to 500 °C, the intermediate band emission intensity decreases, whereas Eu3+ emission intensity increases suggesting increase of extent of energy transfer from the intermediate band to Eu3+ on annealing. Emission intensity ratio of electric to magnetic dipole transitions of Eu3+ can be varied by changing excitation wavelength. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS study of as-prepared samples confirms the presence of oxygen vacancies and Eu3+ but absence of Eu2+. Dispersed particles in ethanol and polymer film show the strong blue color, suggesting that these materials will be useful as probes in life science and also in light emitting device applications.

  10. Towards a functional-structural plant model of cut-rose: simulation of light environment, light absorption, photosynthesis and interference with the plant structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck-Sorlin, Gerhard; de Visser, Pieter H B; Henke, Michael; Sarlikioti, Vaia; van der Heijden, Gerie W A M; Marcelis, Leo F M; Vos, Jan

    2011-10-01

    The production system of cut-rose (Rosa × hybrida) involves a complex combination of plant material, management practice and environment. Plant structure is determined by bud break and shoot development while having an effect on local light climate. The aim of the present study is to cover selected aspects of the cut-rose system using functional-structural plant modelling (FSPM), in order to better understand processes contributing to produce quality and quantity. The model describes the production system in three dimensions, including a virtual greenhouse environment with the crop, light sources (diffuse and direct sun light and lamps) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) sensors. The crop model is designed as a multiscaled FSPM with plant organs (axillary buds, leaves, internodes, flowers) as basic units, and local light interception and photosynthesis within each leaf. A Monte-Carlo light model was used to compute the local light climate for leaf photosynthesis, the latter described using a biochemical rate model. The model was able to reproduce PAR measurements taken at different canopy positions, different times of the day and different light regimes. Simulated incident and absorbed PAR as well as net assimilation rate in upright and bent shoots showed characteristic spatial and diurnal dynamics for different common cultivation scenarios. The model of cut-rose presented allowed the creation of a range of initial structures thanks to interactive rules for pruning, cutting and bending. These static structures can be regarded as departure points for the dynamic simulation of production of flower canes. Furthermore, the model was able to predict local (per leaf) light absorption and photosynthesis. It can be used to investigate the physiology of ornamental plants, and provide support for the decisions of growers and consultants.

  11. Towards a functional–structural plant model of cut-rose: simulation of light environment, light absorption, photosynthesis and interference with the plant structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck-Sorlin, Gerhard; de Visser, Pieter H. B.; Henke, Michael; Sarlikioti, Vaia; van der Heijden, Gerie W. A. M.; Marcelis, Leo F. M.; Vos, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The production system of cut-rose (Rosa × hybrida) involves a complex combination of plant material, management practice and environment. Plant structure is determined by bud break and shoot development while having an effect on local light climate. The aim of the present study is to cover selected aspects of the cut-rose system using functional–structural plant modelling (FSPM), in order to better understand processes contributing to produce quality and quantity. Methods The model describes the production system in three dimensions, including a virtual greenhouse environment with the crop, light sources (diffuse and direct sun light and lamps) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) sensors. The crop model is designed as a multiscaled FSPM with plant organs (axillary buds, leaves, internodes, flowers) as basic units, and local light interception and photosynthesis within each leaf. A Monte-Carlo light model was used to compute the local light climate for leaf photosynthesis, the latter described using a biochemical rate model. Key Results The model was able to reproduce PAR measurements taken at different canopy positions, different times of the day and different light regimes. Simulated incident and absorbed PAR as well as net assimilation rate in upright and bent shoots showed characteristic spatial and diurnal dynamics for different common cultivation scenarios. Conclusions The model of cut-rose presented allowed the creation of a range of initial structures thanks to interactive rules for pruning, cutting and bending. These static structures can be regarded as departure points for the dynamic simulation of production of flower canes. Furthermore, the model was able to predict local (per leaf) light absorption and photosynthesis. It can be used to investigate the physiology of ornamental plants, and provide support for the decisions of growers and consultants. PMID:21856634

  12. A mechanistic model for the light response of photosynthetic electron transport rate based on light harvesting properties of photosynthetic pigment molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zi-Piao; Robakowski, Piotr; Suggett, David J

    2013-03-01

    Models describing the light response of photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR) are routinely used to determine how light absorption influences energy, reducing power and yields of primary productivity; however, no single model is currently able to provide insight into the fundamental processes that implicitly govern the variability of light absorption. Here we present development and application of a new mechanistic model of ETR for photosystem II based on the light harvesting (absorption and transfer to the core 'reaction centres') characteristics of photosynthetic pigment molecules. Within this model a series of equations are used to describe novel biophysical and biochemical characteristics of photosynthetic pigment molecules and in turn light harvesting; specifically, the eigen-absorption cross-section and the minimum average lifetime of photosynthetic pigment molecules in the excited state, which describe the ability of light absorption of photosynthetic pigment molecules and retention time of excitons in the excited state but are difficult to be measured directly. We applied this model to a series of previously collected fluorescence data and demonstrated that our model described well the light response curves of ETR, regardless of whether dynamic down-regulation of PSII occurs, for a range of photosynthetic organisms (Abies alba, Picea abies, Pinus mugo and Emiliania huxleyi). Inherent estimated parameters (e.g. maximum ETR and the saturation irradiance) by our model are in very close agreement with the measured data. Overall, our mechanistic model potentially provides novel insights into the regulation of ETR by light harvesting properties as well as dynamical down-regulation of PSII.

  13. Odessa Tsunami of 27 June 2014: Observations and Numerical Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šepić, Jadranka; Rabinovich, Alexander B.; Sytov, Victor N.

    2017-11-01

    On 27 June, a 1-2-m high wave struck the beaches of Odessa, the third largest Ukrainian city, and the neighbouring port-town Illichevsk (northwestern Black Sea). Throughout the day, prominent seiche oscillations were observed in several other ports of the Black Sea. Tsunamigenic synoptic conditions were found over the Black Sea, stretching from Romania in the west to the Crimean Peninsula in the east. Intense air pressure disturbances and convective thunderstorm clouds were associated with these conditions; right at the time of the event, a 1.5-hPa air pressure jump was recorded at Odessa and a few hours earlier in Romania. We have utilized a barotropic ocean numerical model to test two hypotheses: (1) a tsunami-like wave was generated by an air pressure disturbance propagating directly over Odessa ("Experiment 1"); (2) a tsunami-like wave was generated by an air pressure disturbance propagating offshore, approximately 200 km to the south of Odessa, and along the shelf break ("Experiment 2"). Both experiments decisively confirm the meteorological origin of the tsunami-like waves on the coast of Odessa and imply that intensified long ocean waves in this region were generated via the Proudman resonance mechanism while propagating over the northwestern Black Sea shelf. The "Odessa tsunami" of 27 June 2014 was identified as a "beach meteotsunami", similar to events regularly observed on the beaches of Florida, USA, but different from the "harbour meteotsunamis", which occurred 1-3 days earlier in Ciutadella (Baleares, Spain), Mazara del Vallo (Sicily, Italy) and Vela Luka (Croatia) in the Mediterranean Sea, despite that they were associated with the same atmospheric system moving over the Mediterranean/Black Sea region on 23-27 June 2014.

  14. A TWO-RIBBON WHITE-LIGHT FLARE ASSOCIATED WITH A FAILED SOLAR ERUPTION OBSERVED BY ONSET, SDO, AND IRIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, X.; Hao, Q.; Ding, M. D.; Chen, P. F.; Fang, C.; Liu, K.; Liu, Y. D.

    2015-01-01

    Two-ribbon brightenings are one of the most remarkable characteristics of an eruptive solar flare and are often used to predict the occurrence of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Nevertheless, it was recently called into question whether all two-ribbon flares are eruptive. In this paper, we investigate a two-ribbon-like white-light (WL) flare that is associated with a failed magnetic flux rope (MFR) eruption on 2015 January 13, which has no accompanying CME in the WL coronagraph. Observations by the Optical and Near-infrared Solar Eruption Tracer and the Solar Dynamics Observatory reveal that with the increase of the flare emission and the acceleration of the unsuccessfully erupting MFR, two isolated kernels appear at the WL 3600 Å passband and quickly develop into two elongated ribbon-like structures. The evolution of the WL continuum enhancement is completely coincident in time with the variation of Fermi hard X-ray 26–50 keV flux. An increase of continuum emission is also clearly visible at the whole FUV and NUV passbands observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. Moreover, in one WL kernel, the Si iv, C ii, and Mg ii h/k lines display significant enhancement and non-thermal broadening. However, their Doppler velocity pattern is location-dependent. At the strongly bright pixels, these lines exhibit a blueshift, while at moderately bright ones, the lines are generally redshifted. These results show that the failed MFR eruption is also able to produce a two-ribbon flare and high-energy electrons that heat the lower atmosphere, causing the enhancement of the WL and FUV/NUV continuum emissions and chromospheric evaporation

  15. A Dynamic Model for Prediction of Psoriasis Management by Blue Light Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix Garza, Zandra C; Liebmann, Joerg; Born, Matthias; Hilbers, Peter A J; van Riel, Natal A W

    2017-01-01

    Clinical investigations prove that blue light irradiation reduces the severity of psoriasis vulgaris. Nevertheless, the mechanisms involved in the management of this condition remain poorly defined. Despite the encouraging results of the clinical studies, no clear guidelines are specified in the literature for the irradiation scheme regime of blue light-based therapy for psoriasis. We investigated the underlying mechanism of blue light irradiation of psoriatic skin, and tested the hypothesis that regulation of proliferation is a key process. We implemented a mechanistic model of cellular epidermal dynamics to analyze whether a temporary decrease of keratinocytes hyper-proliferation can explain the outcome of phototherapy with blue light. Our results suggest that the main effect of blue light on keratinocytes impacts the proliferative cells. They show that the decrease in the keratinocytes proliferative capacity is sufficient to induce a transient decrease in the severity of psoriasis. To study the impact of the therapeutic regime on the efficacy of psoriasis treatment, we performed simulations for different combinations of the treatment parameters, i.e., length of treatment, fluence (also referred to as dose), and intensity. These simulations indicate that high efficacy is achieved by regimes with long duration and high fluence levels, regardless of the chosen intensity. Our modeling approach constitutes a framework for testing diverse hypotheses on the underlying mechanism of blue light-based phototherapy, and for designing effective strategies for the treatment of psoriasis.

  16. Interaction of hematoporphyrin derivative, light, and ionizing radiation in a rat glioma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostron, H.; Swartz, M.R.; Miller, D.C.; Martuza, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of hematoporphyrin derivative, light, and cobalt 60 ( 60 Co) irradiation were studied in a rat glioma model using an in vivo and an in vitro clonogenic assay. There was no effect on tumor growth by visible light or by a single dose of 60 Co irradiation at 4 Gy or 8 Gy, whereas 16 Gy inhibited tumor growth to 40% versus the control. Hematoporphyrin derivative alone slightly stimulated growth (P less than 0.1). Light in the presence of 10 mg hematoporphyrin derivative/kg inhibited tumor growth to 32%. 60 Co irradiation in the presence of hematoporphyrin derivative produced a significant tumor growth inhibition (P less than 0.02). This growth inhibition was directly related to the concentration of hematoporphyrin derivative. The addition of 60 Co to light in the presence of hematoporphyrin derivative produced a greater growth inhibition than light or 60 Co irradiation alone. This effect was most pronounced when light was applied 30 minutes before 60 Co irradiation. Our experiments in a subcutaneous rat glioma model suggest a radiosensitizing effect of hematoporphyrin derivative. Furthermore, the photodynamic inactivation is enhanced by the addition of 60 Co irradiation. These findings may be of importance in planning new treatment modalities in malignant brain tumors

  17. Ionosphere TEC disturbances before strong earthquakes: observations, physics, modeling (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namgaladze, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    The phenomenon of the pre-earthquake ionospheric disturbances is discussed. A number of typical TEC (Total Electron Content) relative disturbances is presented for several recent strong earthquakes occurred in different ionospheric conditions. Stable typical TEC deviations from quiet background state are observed few days before the strong seismic events in the vicinity of the earthquake epicenter and treated as ionospheric earthquake precursors. They don't move away from the source in contrast to the disturbances related with geomagnetic activity. Sunlit ionosphere approach leads to reduction of the disturbances up to their full disappearance, and effects regenerate at night. The TEC disturbances often observed in the magnetically conjugated areas as well. At low latitudes they accompany with equatorial anomaly modifications. The hypothesis about the electromagnetic channel of the pre-earthquake ionospheric disturbances' creation is discussed. The lithosphere and ionosphere are coupled by the vertical external electric currents as a result of ionization of the near-Earth air layer and vertical transport of the charged particles through the atmosphere over the fault. The external electric current densities exceeding the regular fair-weather electric currents by several orders are required to produce stable long-living seismogenic electric fields such as observed by onboard measurements of the 'Intercosmos-Bulgaria 1300' satellite over the seismic active zones. The numerical calculation results using the Upper Atmosphere Model demonstrate the ability of the external electric currents with the densities of 10-8-10-9 A/m2 to produce such electric fields. The sumulations reproduce the basic features of typical pre-earthquake TEC relative disturbances. It is shown that the plasma ExB drift under the action of the seismogenic electric field leads to the changes of the F2 region electron number density and TEC. The upward drift velocity component enhances NmF2 and TEC and

  18. Interacting spiral waves in the Oregonator model of the light-sensitive Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schebesch, I.; Engel, H.

    1999-12-01

    We study the interaction of meandering spiral waves within the framework of a modified Oregonator model for the light-sensitive Belousov-Zhabotinskii medium. In this medium the local excitation threshold can be controlled by varying the intensity of incident light. At low as well as sufficiently high light intensity we find stable axis-symmetric bound states consisting of two counterrotating spirals. At intensity values in between, spiral pairs undergo a symmetry-breaking instability, leading to one spiral suppressing and expelling the other. To avoid the instability, we consider a spiral wave interacting with its mirror image close to a plane boundary impermeable to diffusion. The drift velocity and the drift direction of those pseudobound states parallel to the boundary are strongly influenced by the light intensity.

  19. Modeling of the cloud and radiation processes observed during SHEBA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ping; Girard, Eric; Bertram, Allan K.; Shupe, Matthew D.

    2011-09-01

    Six microphysics schemes implemented in the climate version of the Environment Canada's Global Multiscale Environmental (GEM) model are used to simulate the cloud and radiation processes observed during Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) field experiment. The simplest microphysics scheme (SUN) has one prognostic variable: the total cloud water content. The second microphysics scheme (MLO) has 12 prognostic variables. The four other microphysics schemes are modified versions of MLO. A new parameterization for heterogeneous ice nucleation based on laboratory experiments is included in these versions of MLO. One is for uncoated ice nuclei (ML-NAC) and another is for sulfuric acid coated ice nuclei (ML-AC). ML-AC and ML-NAC have been developed to distinguish non-polluted and polluted air masses, the latter being common over the Arctic during winter and spring. A sensitivity study, in which the dust concentration is reduced by a factor 5, is also performed to assess the sensitivity of the results to the dust concentration in ML-AC-test and ML-NAC-test. Results show that SUN, ML-AC and ML-AC-test reproduce quite well the downward longwave radiation and cloud radiative forcing during the cold season. The good results obtained with SUN are due to compensating errors. It overestimates cloud fraction and underestimates cloud liquid water path during winter. ML-AC and ML-AC-test reproduces quite well all these variables and their relationships. MLO, ML-NAC and ML-NAC-test underestimate the cloud liquid water path and cloud fraction during the cold season, which leads to an underestimation of the downward longwave radiation at surface. During summer, all versions of the model underestimate the downward shortwave radiation at surface. ML-AC and ML-NAC overestimate the total cloud water during the warm season, however, they reproduce relatively well the relationships between cloud radiative forcing and cloud microstructure, which is not the case for the most simple

  20. The efficient model to define a single light source position by use of high dynamic range image of 3D scene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu-yang; Zhdanov, Dmitry D.; Potemin, Igor S.; Wang, Ying; Cheng, Han

    2016-10-01

    One of the challenges of augmented reality is a seamless combination of objects of the real and virtual worlds, for example light sources. We suggest a measurement and computation models for reconstruction of light source position. The model is based on the dependence of luminance of the small size diffuse surface directly illuminated by point like source placed at a short distance from the observer or camera. The advantage of the computational model is the ability to eliminate the effects of indirect illumination. The paper presents a number of examples to illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method.

  1. Adaptation to shift work: physiologically based modeling of the effects of lighting and shifts' start time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Postnova

    Full Text Available Shift work has become an integral part of our life with almost 20% of the population being involved in different shift schedules in developed countries. However, the atypical work times, especially the night shifts, are associated with reduced quality and quantity of sleep that leads to increase of sleepiness often culminating in accidents. It has been demonstrated that shift workers' sleepiness can be improved by a proper scheduling of light exposure and optimizing shifts timing. Here, an integrated physiologically-based model of sleep-wake cycles is used to predict adaptation to shift work in different light conditions and for different shift start times for a schedule of four consecutive days of work. The integrated model combines a model of the ascending arousal system in the brain that controls the sleep-wake switch and a human circadian pacemaker model. To validate the application of the integrated model and demonstrate its utility, its dynamics are adjusted to achieve a fit to published experimental results showing adaptation of night shift workers (n = 8 in conditions of either bright or regular lighting. Further, the model is used to predict the shift workers' adaptation to the same shift schedule, but for conditions not considered in the experiment. The model demonstrates that the intensity of shift light can be reduced fourfold from that used in the experiment and still produce good adaptation to night work. The model predicts that sleepiness of the workers during night shifts on a protocol with either bright or regular lighting can be significantly improved by starting the shift earlier in the night, e.g.; at 21:00 instead of 00:00. Finally, the study predicts that people of the same chronotype, i.e. with identical sleep times in normal conditions, can have drastically different responses to shift work depending on their intrinsic circadian and homeostatic parameters.

  2. Electroweak Precision Observables in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Heinemeyer, S; Weiglein, Georg

    2006-01-01

    The current status of electroweak precision observables in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) is reviewed. We focus in particular on the $W$ boson mass, M_W, the effective leptonic weak mixing angle, sin^2 theta_eff, the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, (g-2)_\\mu, and the lightest CP-even MSSM Higgs boson mass, m_h. We summarize the current experimental situation and the status of the theoretical evaluations. An estimate of the current theoretical uncertainties from unknown higher-order corrections and from the experimental errors of the input parameters is given. We discuss future prospects for both the experimental accuracies and the precision of the theoretical predictions. Confronting the precision data with the theory predictions within the unconstrained MSSM and within specific SUSY-breaking scenarios, we analyse how well the data are described by the theory. The mSUGRA scenario with cosmological constraints yields a very good fit to the data, showing a clear preference for a relativ...

  3. Light activation of one rhodopsin molecule causes the phosphorylation of hundreds of others. A reaction observed in electropermeabilized frog rod outer segments exposed to dim illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, B.M.; Biernbaum, M.S.; Bownds, M.D.

    1990-01-01

    A rhodopsin phosphorylation reaction that occurs with high-gain is observed if measurements are made in electropermeabilized frog rod outer segments (ROS) stimulated by a dim flash of light in the operating range of the photoreceptor. Flashes of light exciting 1000 or fewer of the 3 x 10(9) rhodopsins present/ROS results in the incorporation of 1400 phosphates from ATP into the rhodopsin pool for each excited rhodopsin (Rho*). This amplification decreases with increasing light intensity, falling most sharply after each disk has absorbed one photon. The high-gain reaction is lost if the ROS are broken into vesicles by shearing, leaving a low-gain rhodopsin phosphorylation characterized in previous studies using brighter illumination. The high-gain but not the low-gain phosphorylation appears to be regulated by G-protein and by calcium levels in the range over which intracellular calcium changes when rod photoreceptors are illuminated. Kinetic measurements made on the phosphorylation observed at higher light intensities shows that it initially occurs rapidly enough for a role in terminating the photoresponse. The high-gain phosphorylation observed at lower light intensities may play a global role in regulating light-adaptation of the rod photoreceptor, and its existence suggests that a search for a similar high-gain modification in systems using the homologous beta-adrenergic or muscarinic acetylcholine receptors might be rewarding

  4. Combining model and satellite data to investigate the effect of light absorbing impurities on snow melt and discharge generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, F.; Burkhart, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    Light absorbing impurities in snow and ice (LAISI) originating from atmospheric deposition enhance snow melt by increasing the absorption of solar radiation. The consequences are a shortening of the snow cover duration due to increased snow melt and, with respect to hydrologic processes, a temporal shift in the discharge generation. However, the effects as simulated in numerical models have large uncertainties. These uncertainties originate mainly from uncertainties in the wet and dry deposition of light absorbing aerosols, limitations in the model representation of the snowpack, and the lack of observable variables required to estimate model parameters. This leads to high uncertainties in the additional energy absorbed by the snow due to the presence of LAISI (the so called radiative forcing of LAISI), a key variable in understanding snowpack energy-balance dynamics. In this study, we present an approach combining distributed model simulations on the catchment scale and remotely sensed radiative forcing from LAISI in order to evaluate and improve model predictions. In a case study, we assess the effect of LAISI on snow melt and discharge generation in a high mountain catchment located in the western Himalaya using the distributed hydrologic model, Shyft. The snow albedo is hereby calculated from a radiative transfer model for snow, taking the increased absorption of solar radiation by LAISI into account. LAISI mixing ratios in snow are determined from atmospheric aerosol deposition rates. To asses the quality of our simulations, we model the instantaneous clear sky radiative forcing at MODIS overpass times, and compare it to the MODIS Dust Radiative Forcing in Snow (MODDRFS) satellite product. By scaling the deposition input to the model, we can optimize the simulated radiative forcing towards the satellite observations.

  5. Comparison of low cost 3D structured light scanners for face modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakirman, Tolga; Gumusay, Mustafa Umit; Reis, Hatice Catal; Selbesoglu, Mahmut Oguz; Yosmaoglu, Serra; Yaras, Mehmet Cem; Seker, Dursun Zafer; Bayram, Bulent

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to compare three different structured light scanner systems to generate accurate 3D human face models. Among these systems, the most dense and expensive one was denoted as the reference and the other two that were low cost and low resolution were compared according to the reference system. One female face and one male face were scanned with three light scanner systems. Point-cloud filtering, mesh generation, and hole-filling steps were carried out using a trial version of commercial software; moreover, the data evaluation process was realized using CloudCompare open-source software. Various filtering and mesh smoothing levels were applied on reference data to compare with other low-cost systems. Thus, the optimum reduction level of reference data was evaluated to continue further processes. The outcome of the presented study shows that low-cost structured light scanners have a great potential for 3D object modeling, including the human face. A considerable cheap structured light system has been used due to its capacity to obtain spatial and morphological information in the case study of 3D human face modeling. This study also discusses the benefits and accuracy of low-cost structured light systems.

  6. Hybrid diffusion and two-flux approximation for multilayered tissue light propagation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Durkin, Anthony J

    2011-07-20

    Accurate and rapid estimation of fluence, reflectance, and absorbance in multilayered biological media has been essential in many biophotonics applications that aim to diagnose, cure, or model in vivo tissue. The radiative transfer equation (RTE) rigorously models light transfer in absorbing and scattering media. However, analytical solutions to the RTE are limited even in simple homogeneous or plane media. Monte Carlo simulation has been used extensively to solve the RTE. However, Monte Carlo simulation is computationally intensive and may not be practical for applications that demand real-time results. Instead, the diffusion approximation has been shown to provide accurate estimates of light transport in strongly scattering tissue. The diffusion approximation is a greatly simplified model and produces analytical solutions for the reflectance and absorbance in tissue. However, the diffusion approximation breaks down if tissue is strongly absorbing, which is common in the visible part of the spectrum or in applications that involve darkly pigmented skin and/or high local volumes of blood such as port-wine stain therapy or reconstructive flap monitoring. In these cases, a model of light transfer that can accommodate both strongly and weakly absorbing regimes is required. Here we present a model of light transfer through layered biological media that represents skin with two strongly scattering and one strongly absorbing layer. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  7. Model-observer similarity, error modeling and social learning in rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Monfardini

    Full Text Available Monkeys readily learn to discriminate between rewarded and unrewarded items or actions by observing their conspecifics. However, they do not systematically learn from humans. Understanding what makes human-to-monkey transmission of knowledge work or fail could help identify mediators and moderators of social learning that operate regardless of language or culture, and transcend inter-species differences. Do monkeys fail to learn when human models show a behavior too dissimilar from the animals' own, or when they show a faultless performance devoid of error? To address this question, six rhesus macaques trained to find which object within a pair concealed a food reward were successively tested with three models: a familiar conspecific, a 'stimulus-enhancing' human actively drawing the animal's attention to one object of the pair without actually performing the task, and a 'monkey-like' human performing the task in the same way as the monkey model did. Reward was manipulated to ensure that all models showed equal proportions of errors and successes. The 'monkey-like' human model improved the animals' subsequent object discrimination learning as much as a conspecific did, whereas the 'stimulus-enhancing' human model tended on the contrary to retard learning. Modeling errors rather than successes optimized learning from the monkey and 'monkey-like' models, while exacerbating the adverse effect of the 'stimulus-enhancing' model. These findings identify error modeling as a moderator of social learning in monkeys that amplifies the models' influence, whether beneficial or detrimental. By contrast, model-observer similarity in behavior emerged as a mediator of social learning, that is, a prerequisite for a model to work in the first place. The latter finding suggests that, as preverbal infants, macaques need to perceive the model as 'like-me' and that, once this condition is fulfilled, any agent can become an effective model.

  8. Using regression models to enhance signals in a dispersive radiative field: Reducing stray light corruption in the limb profiles of the Ozone Mapper Profiler Suite (OMPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, J. W.; Flynn, L. E.; Hornstein, J. S.; Lumpe, J. D.

    2006-12-01

    As the technology of remote sensing using radiometric observations advances and we are confronted with weaker and weaker signals, stray light corruption will become an increasingly important challenge. Stray light is particularly important for instruments that sample a large dynamic range such as the OMPS limb profiler. In that case, even a very small fraction of photons straying from the high-intensity region of spectral/viewing angle space can dominate measurements in the low intensity region. For the OMPS limb profiler, stray light represents a small linear perturbation to the overall observed energy, even though it dominates observations for some wavelengths and viewing angles. By exploiting those characteristics, we have found that both iterative techniques based on a Taylor expansion of the inverse stray light operator and linear regression models can effectively reduce stray light corruption from the OMPS measurements provided there is sufficient sampling of the measured radiant energy. Regression models are extremely efficient in operational application because their cost is incurred during offline training. However, they can perform no better than the data used to train them and only work well for systems whose dynamical operators are largely linear. Regression models can be problematic in an operational application if the instrument undergoes changes (e.g., pixel failure in the detector); with the instrument in orbit, retraining can be difficult. Thus, it is important to both characterize stray light with instrument tests before it is launched and to find stray light removal techniques that are flexible and can be altered to accommodate instrument changes. We examine three variations of an ozone retrieval algorithm that utilizes regression models to characterize photon dispersion and other instrument effects. These three methods are compared in terms of their sensitivity to model error, their sensitivity to errors in the assumed background atmospheric

  9. Phenomenological approach to the modelling of elliptical galaxies: The problem of the mass-to-light ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samurović S.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the problem of the phenomenological modelling of elliptical galaxies using various available observational data is presented. Recently, Tortora, Cardona and Piedipalumbo (2007 suggested a double power law expression for the global cumulative mass-to-light ratio of elliptical galaxies. We tested their expression on a sample of ellipticals for which we have the estimates of the mass-to-light ratio beyond ~ 3 effective radii, a region where dark matter is expected to play an important dynamical role. We found that, for all the galaxies in our sample, we have α + β > 0, but that this does not necessarily mean a high dark matter content. The galaxies with higher mass (and higher dark matter content also have higher value of α+β. It was also shown that there is an indication that the galaxies with higher value of the effective radius also have higher dark matter content. .

  10. Beam-based model of broad-band impedance of the Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaluk, Victor; Martin, Ian; Fielder, Richard; Bartolini, Riccardo

    2015-06-01

    In an electron storage ring, the interaction between a single-bunch beam and a vacuum chamber impedance affects the beam parameters, which can be measured rather precisely. So we can develop beam-based numerical models of longitudinal and transverse impedances. At the Diamond Light Source (DLS) to get the model parameters, a set of measured data has been used including current-dependent shift of betatron tunes and synchronous phase, chromatic damping rates, and bunch lengthening. A matlab code for multiparticle tracking has been developed. The tracking results and analytical estimations are quite consistent with the measured data. Since Diamond has the shortest natural bunch length among all light sources in standard operation, the studies of collective effects with short bunches are relevant to many facilities including next generation of light sources.

  11. Beam-based model of broad-band impedance of the Diamond Light Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Smaluk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In an electron storage ring, the interaction between a single-bunch beam and a vacuum chamber impedance affects the beam parameters, which can be measured rather precisely. So we can develop beam-based numerical models of longitudinal and transverse impedances. At the Diamond Light Source (DLS to get the model parameters, a set of measured data has been used including current-dependent shift of betatron tunes and synchronous phase, chromatic damping rates, and bunch lengthening. A matlab code for multiparticle tracking has been developed. The tracking results and analytical estimations are quite consistent with the measured data. Since Diamond has the shortest natural bunch length among all light sources in standard operation, the studies of collective effects with short bunches are relevant to many facilities including next generation of light sources.

  12. Theoretical model of a polarization diffractive elements for the light beams conversion holographic formation in PDLCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharangovich, Sergey N.; Semkin, Artem O.

    2017-12-01

    In this work a theoretical model of the holographic formation of the polarization diffractive optical elements for the transformation of Gaussian light beams into Bessel-like ones in polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (PDLC) is developed. The model is based on solving the equations of photo-induced Fredericks transition processes for polarization diffractive elements formation by orthogonally polarized light beams with inhomogeneous amplitude and phase profiles. The results of numerical simulation of the material's dielectric tensor changing due to the structure's formation process are presented for various recording beams' polarization states. Based on the results of numerical simulation, the ability to form the diffractive optical elements for light beams transformation by the polarization holography methods is shown.

  13. Sweet Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) Canopy Photosynthesis Modeling Using 3D Plant Architecture and Light Ray-Tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jee Hoon; Lee, Joon Woo; Ahn, Tae In; Shin, Jong Hwa; Park, Kyung Sub; Son, Jung Eek

    2016-01-01

    Canopy photosynthesis has typically been estimated using mathematical models that have the following assumptions: the light interception inside the canopy exponentially declines with the canopy depth, and the photosynthetic capacity is affected by light interception as a result of acclimation. However, in actual situations, light interception in the canopy is quite heterogenous depending on environmental factors such as the location, microclimate, leaf area index, and canopy architecture. It is important to apply these factors in an analysis. The objective of the current study is to estimate the canopy photosynthesis of paprika (Capsicum annuum L.) with an analysis of by simulating the intercepted irradiation of the canopy using a 3D ray-tracing and photosynthetic capacity in each layer. By inputting the structural data of an actual plant, the 3D architecture of paprika was reconstructed using graphic software (Houdini FX, FX, Canada). The light curves and A/C i curve of each layer were measured to parameterize the Farquhar, von Caemmerer, and Berry (FvCB) model. The difference in photosynthetic capacity within the canopy was observed. With the intercepted irradiation data and photosynthetic parameters of each layer, the values of an entire plant's photosynthesis rate were estimated by integrating the calculated photosynthesis rate at each layer. The estimated photosynthesis rate of an entire plant showed good agreement with the measured plant using a closed chamber for validation. From the results, this method was considered as a reliable tool to predict canopy photosynthesis using light interception, and can be extended to analyze the canopy photosynthesis in actual greenhouse conditions.

  14. A Multi-model Study on Warm Precipitation Biases in Global Models Compared to Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, X.; Suzuki, K.; Guo, H.; Goto, D.; Ogura, T.; Koshiro, T.; Mulmenstadt, J.

    2017-12-01

    The cloud-to-precipitation transition process in warm clouds simulated by state-of-the-art global climate models (GCMs), including both traditional climate models and a global cloud-resolving model, is evaluated against A-Train satellites observations. The models and satellite observations are compared in the form of the statistics obtained from combined analysis of multiple satellite observables that probe signatures of the cloud-to-precipitation transition process. One common problem identified among these models is the too frequent occurrence of warm precipitation. The precipitation is found to form when the cloud particle size and the liquid water path (LWP) are both much smaller than those in observations. The too efficient formation of precipitation is found to be compensated for by errors of cloud microphysical properties, such as underestimated cloud particle size and LWP, to an extent that varies among the models. However, this does not completely cancel the precipitation formation bias. Robust errors are also found in the evolution of cloud microphysical properties in precipitation process in some GCMs, implying unrealistic interaction between precipitation and cloud water. Nevertheless, auspicious information is found for future improvement of warm precipitation representations: the adoption of more realistic autoconversion scheme or subgrid variability scheme is shown to improve the triggering of precipitation and evolution of cloud microphysical properties.

  15. Deriving a light use efficiency model from eddy covariance flux data for predicting daily gross primary production across biomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, W.; Liu, S.; Zhou, G.; Tieszen, L.L.; Baldocchi, D.; Bernhofer, C.; Gholz, H.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Goulden, M.L.; Hollinger, D.Y.; Hu, Y.; Law, B.E.; Stoy, Paul C.; Vesala, T.; Wofsy, S.C.

    2007-01-01

    The quantitative simulation of gross primary production (GPP) at various spatial and temporal scales has been a major challenge in quantifying the global carbon cycle. We developed a light use efficiency (LUE) daily GPP model from eddy covariance (EC) measurements. The model, called EC-LUE, is driven by only four variables: normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), air temperature, and the Bowen ratio of sensible to latent heat flux (used to calculate moisture stress). The EC-LUE model relies on two assumptions: First, that the fraction of absorbed PAR (fPAR) is a linear function of NDVI; Second, that the realized light use efficiency, calculated from a biome-independent invariant potential LUE, is controlled by air temperature or soil moisture, whichever is most limiting. The EC-LUE model was calibrated and validated using 24,349 daily GPP estimates derived from 28 eddy covariance flux towers from the AmeriFlux and EuroFlux networks, covering a variety of forests, grasslands and savannas. The model explained 85% and 77% of the observed variations of daily GPP for all the calibration and validation sites, respectively. A comparison with GPP calculated from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) indicated that the EC-LUE model predicted GPP that better matched tower data across these sites. The realized LUE was predominantly controlled by moisture conditions throughout the growing season, and controlled by temperature only at the beginning and end of the growing season. The EC-LUE model is an alternative approach that makes it possible to map daily GPP over large areas because (1) the potential LUE is invariant across various land cover types and (2) all driving forces of the model can be derived from remote sensing data or existing climate observation networks.

  16. Design of a Stand-Alone Photovoltaic (PV Models for Home Lightings and Clean Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Anayochukwu Ani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a well-documented health risks of fuel-based lighting (kerosene lamps and fuel-powered generators and proposed a design of a stand-alone solar PV system for sustainable home lightings in rural Nigerian area. The design was done in three different patterns of electricity consumptions with energy efficient lightings (EELs using two different battery types (Rolls Surrette 6CS25PS and hoppecke 10 OpzS 1000 on; i judicious power consumption, ii normal power consumption, iii excess power consumption; and compared them with the incandescent light bulb consumption. The stand-alone photovoltaic energy systems were designed to match the rural Nigerian sunlight and weather conditions to meet the required lightings of the household. The objective function and constraints for the design models were formulated and optimization procedure were used to demonstrate the best solution (reliability at the lowest lifecycle cost. Initial capital costs as well as annualized costs over 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 years were quantified and documented. The design identified the most cost-effective and reliable solar and battery array among the patterns of electricity consumption with energy efficient lighting options (judicious power consumption, normal power consumption, and excess power consumption.

  17. THE INFORMATION CONTENT IN ANALYTIC SPOT MODELS OF BROADBAND PRECISION LIGHT CURVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walkowicz, Lucianne M. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08534 (United States); Basri, Gibor [Astronomy Department, University of California at Berkeley, Hearst Field Annex, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Valenti, Jeff A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    We present the results of numerical experiments to assess degeneracies in light curve models of starspots. Using synthetic light curves generated with the Cheetah starspot modeling code, we explore the extent to which photometric light curves constrain spot model parameters, including spot latitudes and stellar inclination. We also investigate the effects of spot parameters and differential rotation on one's ability to correctly recover rotation periods and differential rotation in the Kepler light curves. We confirm that in the absence of additional constraints on the stellar inclination, such as spectroscopic measurements of vsin i or occultations of starspots by planetary transits, the spot latitude and stellar inclination are difficult to determine uniquely from the photometry alone. We find that for models with no differential rotation, spots that appear on opposite hemispheres of the star may cause one to interpret the rotation period to be half of the true period. When differential rotation is included, the changing longitude separation between spots breaks the symmetry of the hemispheres and the correct rotation period is more likely to be found. The dominant period found via periodogram analysis is typically that of the largest spot. Even when multiple spots with periods representative of the star's differential rotation exist, if one spot dominates the light curve the signal of differential rotation may not be detectable from the periodogram alone. Starspot modeling is applicable to stars with a wider range of rotation rates than other surface imaging techniques (such as Doppler imaging), allows subtle signatures of differential rotation to be measured, and may provide valuable information on the distribution of stellar spots. However, given the inherent degeneracies and uncertainty present in starspot models, caution should be exercised in their interpretation.

  18. THE INFORMATION CONTENT IN ANALYTIC SPOT MODELS OF BROADBAND PRECISION LIGHT CURVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Basri, Gibor; Valenti, Jeff A.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of numerical experiments to assess degeneracies in light curve models of starspots. Using synthetic light curves generated with the Cheetah starspot modeling code, we explore the extent to which photometric light curves constrain spot model parameters, including spot latitudes and stellar inclination. We also investigate the effects of spot parameters and differential rotation on one's ability to correctly recover rotation periods and differential rotation in the Kepler light curves. We confirm that in the absence of additional constraints on the stellar inclination, such as spectroscopic measurements of vsin i or occultations of starspots by planetary transits, the spot latitude and stellar inclination are difficult to determine uniquely from the photometry alone. We find that for models with no differential rotation, spots that appear on opposite hemispheres of the star may cause one to interpret the rotation period to be half of the true period. When differential rotation is included, the changing longitude separation between spots breaks the symmetry of the hemispheres and the correct rotation period is more likely to be found. The dominant period found via periodogram analysis is typically that of the largest spot. Even when multiple spots with periods representative of the star's differential rotation exist, if one spot dominates the light curve the signal of differential rotation may not be detectable from the periodogram alone. Starspot modeling is applicable to stars with a wider range of rotation rates than other surface imaging techniques (such as Doppler imaging), allows subtle signatures of differential rotation to be measured, and may provide valuable information on the distribution of stellar spots. However, given the inherent degeneracies and uncertainty present in starspot models, caution should be exercised in their interpretation.

  19. Real-Time Measurements and Modelling on Dynamic Behaviour of SonoVue Bubbles Based on Light Scattering Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Juan; Guan F., J.; Matula J., T.; Crum A., L.; Wei, Rongjue

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic behaviour of SonoVue microbubbles, a new generation ultrasound contrast agent, is investigated in real time with light scattering method. Highly diluted SonoVue microbubbles are injected into a diluted gel made of xanthan gum and water. The responses of individual SonoVue bubbles to driven ultrasound pulses are measured. Both linear and nonlinear bubble oscillations are observed and the results suggest that SonoVue microbubbles can generate strong nonlinear responses. By fitting the experimental data of individual bubble responses with Sarkar's model, the shell coating parameter of the bubbles and dilatational viscosity is estimated to be 7.0 nm.s.Pa.

  20. White Light–Emitting Diodes (LEDs) at Domestic Lighting Levels and Retinal Injury in a Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Shang, Yu-Man; Wang, Gen-Shuh; Sliney, David; Yang, Chang-Hao; Lee, Li-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Background: Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) deliver higher levels of blue light to the retina than do conventional domestic light sources. Chronic exposure to high-intensity light (2,000–10,000 lux) has previously been found to result in light-induced retinal injury, but chronic exposure to relatively low-intensity (750 lux) light has not been previously assessed with LEDs in a rodent model. Objective: We examined LED-induced retinal neuronal cell damage in the Sprague-Dawley rat using functiona...

  1. A reprocessing model for the ultraviolet and optical light from 4U 1820-30

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arons, Jonathan; King, Ivan R.

    1993-01-01

    We show that the recently discovered optical and ultraviolet light from the X-ray burst source 4U 1820-30 in the globular cluster NGC 6624 is due to reprocessing of the X-rays in the outer regions of an optically thick, geometrically thin accretion disk. We suggest that observation of orbital modulation of the reprocessed light, due to the variable contribution made as the heated face of the companion turns toward and away from the observer, would provide constraints on the inclination of the binary orbit, and we suggest that detection in the reprocessed flux of the 'red noise' already observed in the X-rays would provide useful constraints on the geometry and physics of the accretion disk.

  2. Thermodynamic Modelling of Fe-Cr-Ni-Spinel Formation at the Light-Water Reactor Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurepin, V. A.; Kulik, D. A.; Hitpold, A.; Nicolet, M.

    2002-03-01

    In the light water reactors (LWR), the neutron activation and transport of corrosion products is of concern in the context of minimizing the radiation doses received by the personnel during maintenance works. A practically useful model for transport and deposition of the stainless steel corrosion products in LWR can only be based on an improved understanding of chemical processes, in particular, on the attainment of equilibrium in this hydrothermal system, which can be described by means of a thermodynamic solid-solution -aqueous-solution (SSAS) model. In this contribution, a new thermodynamic model for a Fe-Cr-Ni multi-component spinel solid solutions was developed that considers thermodynamic consequences of cation interactions in both spinel sub-Iattices. The obtained standard thermodynamic properties of two ferrite and two chromite end-members and their mixing parameters at 90 bar pressure and 290 *c temperature predict a large miscibility gap between (Fe,Ni) chromite and (Fe,Ni) ferrite phases. Together with the SUPCRT92-98 thermo- dynamic database for aqueous species, the 'spinel' thermodynamic dataset was applied to modeling oxidation of austenitic stainless steel in hydrothermal water at 290*C and 90 bar using the Gibbs energy minimization (GEM) algorithm, implemented in the GEMS-PSI code. Firstly, the equilibrium compositions of steel oxidation products were modelIed as function of oxygen fugacity .fO 2 by incremental additions of O 2 in H 2 O-free system Cr-Fe- Ni-O. Secondly, oxidation of corrosion products in the Fe-Cr-Ni-O-H aquatic system was modelIed at different initial solid/water ratios. It is demonstrated that in the transition region from hydrogen regime to oxygen regime, the most significant changes in composition of two spinel-oxide phases (chromite and ferrite) and hematite must take place. Under more reduced conditions, the Fe-rich ferrite (magnetite) and Ni-poor chromite phases co-exist at equilibrium with a metal Ni phase, maintaining

  3. Statistical simulation of hadron-nucleus and light nucleus-nucleus interaction. Intranuclear cascade model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobov, G.A.; Stepanov, N.V.; Sibirtsev, A.A.; Trebukhovskij, Yu.V.

    1983-01-01

    A new version of the program of statistical simulation of hadron-nucleus and light nucleus-nucleus interaction is elaborated. The cascade part of the program is described. The comparison of model predictions with the proton-nucleus interaction experiments is performed. A satisfactory calculations-experiment agreement is obtained

  4. Description of light charged particle multiplicities in the framework of dinuclear system model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonenko N.V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of dinuclear system (DNS model we calculate the light charged particle (LCP multiplicities produced in fusion and quasifission reactions and their kinetic energy spectra. Calculations indicate that with increasing bombarding energy the ratio of LCP multiplicity from fragments MFF to corresponding LCP multiplicity from compound nucleus (CN MCN strongly increases.

  5. On the dynamic buckling of a lightly damped elastic cubic model ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... technique to determine the dynamic buckling load of a lightly and viscously damped elastic cubic model structure modulated by a sinusoidally slowly varying dynamic load. The imperfect elastic cubic (nonlinear) structure is itself a generalization of most elastic physical structures that have been investigated over the years.

  6. A simple model for 2D image upconversion of incoherent light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Pedersen, Christian; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple theoretical model for 2 dimensional (2-D) image up-conversion of incoherent light. While image upconversion has been known for more than 40 years, the technology has been hindered by very low conversion quantum efficiency (~10-7). We show that our implementation compared...

  7. Regional impacts of iron-light colimitation in a global biogeochemical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Galbraith

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory and field studies have revealed that iron has multiple roles in phytoplankton physiology, with particular importance for light-harvesting cellular machinery. However, although iron-limitation is explicitly included in numerous biogeochemical/ecosystem models, its implementation varies, and its effect on the efficiency of light harvesting is often ignored. Given the complexity of the ocean environment, it is difficult to predict the consequences of applying different iron limitation schemes. Here we explore the interaction of iron and nutrient cycles in an ocean general circulation model using a new, streamlined model of ocean biogeochemistry. Building on previously published parameterizations of photoadaptation and export production, the Biogeochemistry with Light Iron Nutrients and Gasses (BLING model is constructed with only four explicit tracers but including macronutrient and micronutrient limitation, light limitation, and an implicit treatment of community structure. The structural simplicity of this computationally-inexpensive model allows us to clearly isolate the global effect that iron availability has on maximum light-saturated photosynthesis rates vs. the effect iron has on photosynthetic efficiency. We find that the effect on light-saturated photosynthesis rates is dominant, negating the importance of photosynthetic efficiency in most regions, especially the cold waters of the Southern Ocean. The primary exceptions to this occur in iron-rich regions of the Northern Hemisphere, where high light-saturated photosynthesis rates allow photosynthetic efficiency to play a more important role. In other words, the ability to efficiently harvest photons has little effect in regions where light-saturated growth rates are low. Additionally, we speculate that the phytoplankton cells dominating iron-limited regions tend to have relatively high photosynthetic efficiency, due to reduced packaging effects. If this speculation is correct

  8. Model Predictive Vibration Control Efficient Constrained MPC Vibration Control for Lightly Damped Mechanical Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Takács, Gergely

    2012-01-01

    Real-time model predictive controller (MPC) implementation in active vibration control (AVC) is often rendered difficult by fast sampling speeds and extensive actuator-deformation asymmetry. If the control of lightly damped mechanical structures is assumed, the region of attraction containing the set of allowable initial conditions requires a large prediction horizon, making the already computationally demanding on-line process even more complex. Model Predictive Vibration Control provides insight into the predictive control of lightly damped vibrating structures by exploring computationally efficient algorithms which are capable of low frequency vibration control with guaranteed stability and constraint feasibility. In addition to a theoretical primer on active vibration damping and model predictive control, Model Predictive Vibration Control provides a guide through the necessary steps in understanding the founding ideas of predictive control applied in AVC such as: ·         the implementation of ...

  9. [Models for quantification of fluid saturation in two-phase flow system by light transmission method and its application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Hong; Ye, Shu-Jun; Wu, Ji-Chun

    2014-06-01

    Based on light transmission method in quantification of liquid saturation and its application in two-phase flow system, two groups of sandbox experiments were set up to study the migration of gas or Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) in water saturated porous media. The migration of gas or DNAPL was monitored in the study. Two modified Light Intensity-Saturation (LIS) models for water/gas two-phase system were applied and verified by the experiment data. Moreover two new LIS models for NAPL/water system were developed and applied to simulate the DNAPL infiltration experiment data. The gas injection experiment showed that gas moved upward to the top of the sandbox in the form of 'fingering' and finally formed continuous distribution. The results of DNAPL infiltration experiment showed that TCE mainly moved downward as the result of its gravity, eventually formed irregular plume and accumulated at the bottom of the sandbox. The outcomes of two LIS models for water/gas system (WG-A and WG-B) were consistent to the measured data. The results of two LIS models for NAPL/water system (NW-A and NW-B) fit well with the observations, and Model NW-A based on assumption of individual drainage gave better results. It could be a useful reference for quantification of NAPL/water saturation in porous media system.

  10. Comparison of model-observer and human-observer performance for breast tomosynthesis: effect of reconstruction and acquisition parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mini; Gifford, Howard C.

    2011-03-01

    The problem of optimizing the acquisition and reconstruction parameters for breast-cancer detection with digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is becoming increasingly important due to the potential of DBT for clinical screening. Ideally, one wants a set of parameters suitable for both microcalcification (MC) and mass detection that specifies the lowest possible radiation dose to the patient. Attacking this multiparametric optimization problem using human-observer studies (which are the gold standard) would be very expensive. On the other hand, there are numerous limitations to having existing mathematical model observers as replacements. Our aim is to develop a model observer that can reliably mimic human observers at clinically realistic DBT detection tasks. In this paper, we present a novel visual-search (VS) model observer for MC detection and localization. Validation of this observer against human data was carried out in a study with simulated DBT test images. Radiation dose was a study parameter, with tested acquisition levels of 0.7, 1.0 and 1.5 mGy. All test images were reconstructed with a penalized-maximum-likelihood reconstruction method. Good agreement at all three dose levels was obtained between the VS and human observers. We believe that this new model observer has the potential to take the field of image-quality research in a new direction with a number of practical clinical ramifications.

  11. In-medium pion valence distributions in a light-front model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, J.P.B.C. de; Tsushima, K.; Ahmed, I.

    2017-01-01

    Pion valence distributions in nuclear medium and vacuum are studied in a light-front constituent quark model. The in-medium input for studying the pion properties is calculated by the quark-meson coupling model. We find that the in-medium pion valence distribution, as well as the in-medium pion valence wave function, are substantially modified at normal nuclear matter density, due to the reduction in the pion decay constant.

  12. New model for counter-current flow during reflood in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbajo, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    Counter-current flow (CCF) of steam and water may occur at the upper core plate of a light water reactor (LWR) under reflood conditions. This paper describes a new model for CCF and flooding at the upper core plate of a LWR. The model assumes separate paths for the water draining through some open area of the upper core plate and the steam rising up through the remaining open area. Condensation of steam is not considered

  13. Turn up the lights: Deep-sea in situ application of a high-speed, high-resolution sCMOS camera to observe marine bioluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, B. T.; Gruber, D. F.; Sparks, J. S.; Vasan, G.; Roman, C.; Pieribone, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    Observing and measuring marine bioluminescence presents unique challenges in situ. Technology is the greatest limiting factor in this endeavor, with sensitivity, speed and resolution constraining the imaging tools available to researchers. State-of-the-art microscopy cameras offer to bridge this gap. An ultra-low-light, scientific complimentary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (sCMOS) camera was outfitted for in-situ imaging of marine bioluminescence. This system was deployed on multiple deep-sea platforms (manned submersible, remotely operated vehicle, and towed body) in three oceanic regions (Western Tropical Pacific, Eastern Equatorial Pacific, and Northwestern Atlantic) to depths up to 2500m. Using light stimulation, bioluminescent responses were recorded at high frame rates and in high resolution, offering unprecedented low-light imagery of deep-sea bioluminescence in situ. The kinematics and physiology of light production in several zooplankton groups is presented, and luminescent responses at different depths are quantified as intensity vs. time.

  14. Tidal Movement of Nioghalvfjerdsfjorden Glacier, Northeast Greenland: Observations and Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Niels; Mayer, C.; Olesen, O. B.

    2000-01-01

    , 1997 and 1998. As part of this work, tidal-movement observations were carried out by simultaneous differential global positioning system (GPS) measurements at several locations distributed on the glacier surface. The GPS observations were performed continuously over several tidal cycles. At the same...

  15. Constraints on mirror models of dark matter from observable neutron-mirror neutron oscillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabindra N. Mohapatra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of neutron-mirror neutron oscillation, motivated by symmetric mirror dark matter models, is governed by two parameters: n−n′ mixing parameter δ and n−n′ mass splitting Δ. For neutron mirror neutron oscillation to be observable, the splitting between their masses Δ must be small and current experiments lead to δ≤2×10−27 GeV and Δ≤10−24 GeV. We show that in mirror universe models where this process is observable, this small mass splitting constrains the way that one must implement asymmetric inflation to satisfy the limits of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis on the number of effective light degrees of freedom. In particular we find that if asymmetric inflation is implemented by inflaton decay to color or electroweak charged particles, the oscillation is unobservable. Also if one uses SM singlet fields for this purpose, they must be weakly coupled to the SM fields.

  16. Spatial extrapolation of light use efficiency model parameters to predict gross primary production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Schulz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available To capture the spatial and temporal variability of the gross primary production as a key component of the global carbon cycle, the light use efficiency modeling approach in combination with remote sensing data has shown to be well suited. Typically, the model parameters, such as the maximum light use efficiency, are either set to a universal constant or to land class dependent values stored in look-up tables. In this study, we employ the machine learning technique support vector regression to explicitly relate the model parameters of a light use efficiency model calibrated at several FLUXNET sites to site-specific characteristics obtained by meteorological measurements, ecological estimations and remote sensing data. A feature selection algorithm extracts the relevant site characteristics in a cross-validation, and leads to an individual set of characteristic attributes for each parameter. With this set of attributes, the model parameters can be estimated at sites where a parameter calibration is not possible due to the absence of eddy covariance flux measurement data. This will finally allow a spatially continuous model application. The performance of the spatial extrapolation scheme is evaluated with a cross-validation approach, which shows the methodology to be well suited to recapture the variability of gross primary production across the study sites.

  17. {theta}-vacua in the light-front quantized Schwinger model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Prem P. [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica]|[Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1996-09-01

    The light-front quantization of the bosonized Schwinger model is discussed in the continuum formulation. The proposal, successfully used earlier for describing the spontaneous symmetry breaking on the light-front, of separating first the scalar field into the dynamical condensate and the fluctuation fields before employing the standard Dirac method works here as well. Some topics on the front form theory are summarized in the Appendices and attention is drawn to the fact that the theory quantized, at x{sup +} seems already to carry information on equal x{sup -} commutators as well. (author). 21 refs.

  18. Analytical design and performance studies of nuclear furnace tests of small nuclear light bulb models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, T. S.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical studies were continued to identify the design and performance characteristics of a small-scale model of a nuclear light bulb unit cell suitable for testing in a nuclear furnace reactor. Emphasis was placed on calculating performance characteristics based on detailed radiant heat transfer analyses, on designing the test assembly for ease of insertion, connection, and withdrawal at the reactor test cell, and on determining instrumentation and test effluent handling requirements. In addition, a review of candidate test reactors for future nuclear light bulb in-reactor tests was conducted.

  19. Mathematical modelling of light-induced electric reaction of Cucurbita pepo L. leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Stolarek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The bioelectRIc reactions of 14-16 day old plants of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L. and internodal cells of Nitellopsis obtusa to the action of visible and ultraviolet light (UV-C were studied. The possibility of analyzing the bioelectric reaction of pumpkin plants induced by visible light by means of mathematical modelling using a linear differential equation of the second order was considered. The solution of this equation (positive and negative functions can, in a sufficient way, reflect the participation of H+ and CI- ions in the generation of the photoelectric response in green plant cells.

  20. Analysis of LEP Constraints on Supersymmetric Models with a Light Gravitino

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John R.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.

    1997-01-01

    We propose an analysis of LEP constraints on radiative neutralino decays into a light gravitino, based on the plane of the Higgs mixing parameter mu and the SU(2) gaugino mass M_2. The preliminary LEP 2W constraints in the (mu, M_2) plane are considerably stronger than for supersymmetric models in which the lightest neutralino is stable. A significant portion of the parameter space in which chargino or selectron decay into a final state containing a light gravitino could provide an interpretation of the CDF ee gamma gamma + E_T,miss event can now excluded by the preliminary LEP 2W data.

  1. θ-vacua in the light-front quantized Schwinger model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Prem P.

    1996-09-01

    The light-front quantization of the bosonized Schwinger model is discussed in the continuum formulation. The proposal, successfully used earlier for describing the spontaneous symmetry breaking on the light-front, of separating first the scalar field into the dynamical condensate and the fluctuation fields before employing the standard Dirac method works here as well. Some topics on the front form theory are summarized in the Appendices and attention is drawn to the fact that the theory quantized, at x + seems already to carry information on equal x - commutators as well. (author). 21 refs

  2. Interstitial photodynamic therapy and glioblastoma: Light fractionation in a preclinical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Henri-Arthur; Vermandel, Maximilien; Vignion-Dewalle, Anne-Sophie; Leroux, Bertrand; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Duhamel, Alain; Mordon, Serge; Reyns, Nicolas

    2017-07-01

    Glioblastoma is a high-grade cerebral tumor with local recurrence and poor outcome. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a localized treatment based on the light activation of a photosensitizer (PS) in the presence of oxygen, which results in the formation of cytotoxic species. The delivery of fractionated light may enhance treatment efficacy by reoxygenating tissues. To evaluate the efficiency of two light-fractionation schemes using immunohistological data. Human U87 cells were grafted into the right putamen of 39 nude rats. After PS precursor intake (5-ALA), an optic fiber was introduced into the tumor. The rats were randomly divided into three groups: without light, with light split into 2 fractions and with light split into 5 fractions. Treatment effects were assessed using brain immunohistology. Fractionated treatments induced intratumoral necrosis (P < 0.001) and peritumoral edema (P = 0.009) associated with a macrophagic infiltration (P = 0.006). The ratio of apoptotic cells was higher in the 5-fraction group than in either the sham (P = 0.024) or 2-fraction group (P = 0.01). Peripheral vascularization increased after treatment (P = 0.017), and these likely new vessels were more frequently observed in the 5-fraction group (P = 0.028). Interstitial PDT with fractionated light resulted in specific tumoral lesions. The 5-fraction scheme induced more apoptosis but led to greater peripheral neovascularization. Lasers Surg. Med. 49:506-515, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Clinical observation of 25-gauge vitrectomy in the treatment of traumatized eyes with non-light perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei He

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore the clinical value of 25-gauge vitrectomy in the treatment of traumatized eyes with non-light perception. METHODS: Forty-six patients(46 eyeswho diagnosed as traumatized eyes with non-light perception treated with 25-gauge vitrectomy, which collected in our hospital from July 1, 2013 to June 1, 2017. Their sex, age, residence area, traumatic nature, causes of injury, duration from the injury to intervention, location and size of the wound, visual acuity and prognosis was retrospectively studied and analyzed statistically in this study. RESULTS: In the 46 patients, 38 were males, 8 were females(M:F=4.75:1. The age of the patients was between 7 and 77 years(mean 37.96±18.99 years. Among them, there were 26 case(57%in the young group(60 years. The cause of injury included blunt trauma(18 cases, 39%, sharp instrument injury(8 cases, 17%, plant injury(6 cases, 13%, explosion injury(6 cases, 13%, impact injury(4 cases, 9%, limb impact injury(2 cases, 4%, traffic accident injury(2 cases, 4%. There were 33 cases(72%with ocular rupture, 12 cases(26%with perforating injury of eyeball and 1 case(2%with ocular contusion. There were 44 cases(96%with vitreous hemorrhage, 30 cases(65%with retinal detachment, 18 cases(39%with intraocular foreign body(IOFB, 22 cases(48%with cilio-choroidal detachment, 18 cases(39%with endophthalmitis and 12 cases(26%with retinal hemorrhage. The postoperative best-corrected visual acuity improved to light perception or better than light perception in 30 cases(65%, and 16 cases(35%still had no light perception. CONCLUSION: The patients who had no light perception after ocular trauma were almost young and middle-aged people in rural areas. The factors that affected the visual acuity of the postoperative included the type of injury, the location and size of the wound, the retinal detachment, the cilio-choroidal detachment, the duration from the injury to intervention, the endophthalmitis and whether the merger of

  4. Solar lanterns for domestic lighting in India: Viability of central charging station model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaurey, A.; Kandpal, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    About 68 million households in India rely on kerosene as a fuel for domestic lighting. Kerosene-based lighting devices, not only for poor quality of light, but also for the risks of indoor air pollution and fire hazards, etc. are not a desired option for domestic lighting purposes. Solar lantern is a better alternative in terms of its quality of illumination, durability and versatility of use. The dissemination model for solar lantern in India has so far been based on cash sales with or without the incentive of capital subsidy. This paper analyses several dissemination models including rental and fee-for-service based on centralized solar charging station concept for CFL- and LED-based designs of solar lanterns available in India. The basis of comparison is the acceptable daily costs or rental to the user as well as to the owner of the charging station. Further, the paper studies the impact of likely escalation in kerosene price on the acceptable daily rental and estimates the amount of subsidy required to make the charging station model viable for disseminating solar lanterns among rural households.

  5. Modeling light entangled in polarization and frequency: case study in quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, John M.

    2005-08-01

    With the recognition of a logical gap between experiments and equations of quantum mechanics comes: (1) a chance to clarify such purely mathematical entities as probabilities, density operators, and partial traces-separated out from the choices and judgments necessary to apply them to describing experiments with devices, and (2) an added freedom to invent equations by which to model devices, stemming from the corresponding freedom in interpreting how these equations connect to experiments. Here I apply a few of these clarifications and freedoms to model polarization-entangled light pulses called for in quantum key distribution (QKD). Available light pulses are entangled not only in polarization but also in frequency. Although absent from the simplified models that initiated QKD, the degree of frequency entanglement of polarization-entangled light pulses is shown to affect the amount of key that can be distilled from raw light signals, in one case by a factor of 4/3. Open questions remain, because QKD brings concepts of quantum decision theory, such as measures of distinguishability, mostly worked out in the context of finite-dimensional vector spaces, into contact with infinite-dimensional Hilbert spaces needed to give expression to optical frequency spectra.

  6. Two electric field Monte Carlo models of coherent backscattering of polarized light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronin, Alexander; Radosevich, Andrew J; Backman, Vadim; Meglinski, Igor

    2014-11-01

    Modeling of coherent polarized light propagation in turbid scattering medium by the Monte Carlo method provides an ultimate understanding of coherent effects of multiple scattering, such as enhancement of coherent backscattering and peculiarities of laser speckle formation in dynamic light scattering (DLS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) diagnostic modalities. In this report, we consider two major ways of modeling the coherent polarized light propagation in scattering tissue-like turbid media. The first approach is based on tracking transformations of the electric field along the ray propagation. The second one is developed in analogy to the iterative procedure of the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. To achieve a higher accuracy in the results and to speed up the modeling, both codes utilize the implementation of parallel computing on NVIDIA Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) with Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). We compare these two approaches through simulations of the enhancement of coherent backscattering of polarized light and evaluate the accuracy of each technique with the results of a known analytical solution. The advantages and disadvantages of each computational approach and their further developments are discussed. Both codes are available online and are ready for immediate use or download.

  7. Modelling dust polarization observations of molecular clouds through MHD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Patrick K.; Fissel, Laura M.; Chen, Che-Yu; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2018-03-01

    The BLASTPol observations of Vela C have provided the most detailed characterization of the polarization fraction p and dispersion in polarization angles S for a molecular cloud. We compare the observed distributions of p and S with those obtained in synthetic observations of simulations of molecular clouds, assuming homogeneous grain alignment. We find that the orientation of the mean magnetic field relative to the observer has a significant effect on the p and S distributions. These distributions for Vela C are most consistent with synthetic observations where the mean magnetic field is close to the line of sight. Our results point to apparent magnetic disorder in the Vela C molecular cloud, although it can be due to either an inclination effect (i.e. observing close to the mean field direction) or significant field tangling from strong turbulence/low magnetization. The joint correlations of p with column density and of S with column density for the synthetic observations generally agree poorly with the Vela C joint correlations, suggesting that understanding these correlations requires a more sophisticated treatment of grain alignment physics.

  8. CME Flux Rope and Shock Identifications and Locations: Comparison of White Light Data, Graduated Cylindrical Shell Model, and MHD Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Cairns, Iver H.; Xie, Hong; St. Cyr, O. C.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are major transient phenomena in the solar corona that are observed with ground-based and spacecraft-based coronagraphs in white light or with in situ measurements by spacecraft. CMEs transport mass and momentum and often drive shocks. In order to derive the CME and shock trajectories with high precision, we apply the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model to fit a flux rope to the CME directed toward STEREO A after about 19:00 UT on 29 November 2013 and check the quality of the heliocentric distance-time evaluations by carrying out a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the same CME with the Block Adaptive Tree Solar-Wind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code. Heliocentric distances of the CME and shock leading edges are determined from the simulated white light images and magnetic field strength data. We find very good agreement between the predicted and observed heliocentric distances, showing that the GCS model and the BATS-R-US simulation approach work very well and are consistent. In order to assess the validity of CME and shock identification criteria in coronagraph images, we also compute synthetic white light images of the CME and shock. We find that the outer edge of a cloud-like illuminated area in the observed and predicted images in fact coincides with the leading edge of the CME flux rope and that the outer edge of a faint illuminated band in front of the CME leading edge coincides with the CME-driven shock front.

  9. A hydrodynamical model for the Fermi-LAT γ-ray light curve of blazar PKS 1510-089

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabrera J.I.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A physical description of the formation and propagation of working surfaces inside the relativistic jet of the blazar PKS 1510-089 are used to model its γ -ray variability light curve using Fermi-LAT data from 2008 to 2012. The physical model is based on conservation laws of mass and momentum at the working surface as explained by Mendoza et al. (2009. The hydrodynamical description of a working surface is parametrized by the initial velocity and mass injection rate at the base of the jet. We show that periodic variations on the injected velocity profiles are able to account for the observed luminosity, fixing model parameters such as mass ejection rates of the central engine injected at the base of the jet, oscillation frequencies of the flow and maximum Lorentz factors of the bulk flow during a particular burst.

  10. Observations and theoretical evaluations of color changes of traveling light beams caused by optical rotation phenomena in sugared water and their applications for educational purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokumitsu, Seika; Hasegawa, Makoto

    2017-08-01

    Investigations were conducted for the purposes of understanding coloring phenomena to be caused by optical rotation of polarized light beams in sugared water and realizing their applications as educational tools. By allowing polarized laser beams in red, blue or green to travel in sugared water of certain concentrations, changes in their intensities were measured while changing a distance between a pair of polarizing plates in the sugared water. An equation was established for a theoretical value for the angle of rotation for light of any colors (wavelengths) travelling in sugared water of any concentrations. The predicted results exhibited satisfactory matching with the measured values. In addition, the intensities of transmitted laser beams, as well as colors to be observable when a white-color LED torch was employed as a light source, were also become predictable, and the predicted results were well-matched with the observation results.

  11. Interstitial photodynamic therapy and glioblastoma: light fractionation study on a preclinical model: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Henri-Arthur; Vermandel, Maximilien; Tétard, Marie-Charlotte; Lejeune, Jean-Paul; Mordon, Serge; Reyns, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    Background Glioblastoma is a high-grade cerebral tumor with local recurrence and poor outcome. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a local treatment based on the light activation of a photosensitizer (PS) in the presence of oxygen to form cytotoxic species. Fractionation of light delivery may enhance treatment efficiency by restoring tissue oxygenation. Objectives To evaluate the efficiency of light fractionation using MRI imaging, including diffusion and perfusion, compared to histological data. Materials and Methods Thirty-nine "Nude" rats were grafted with human U87 cells into the right putamen. After PS precursor intake (5-ALA), an optic fiber was introduced into the tumor. The rats were randomized in three groups: without illumination, with monofractionated illumination and the third one with multifractionated light. Treatment effects were assessed with early MRI including diffusion and perfusion sequences. The animals were eventually sacrificed to perform brain histology. Results On MRI, we observed elevated diffusion values in the center of the tumor among treated animals, especially in multifractionated group. Perfusion decreased around the treatment site, all the more in the multifractionated group. Histology confirmed our MRI findings, with a more extensive necrosis and associated with a rarified angiogenic network in the treatment area, after multifractionated PDT. However, we observed more surrounding edema and neovascularization in the peripheral ring after multifractionated PDT. Conclusion Fractionated interstitial PDT induced specific tumoral lesions. The multifractionated scheme was more efficient, inducing increased tumoral necrosis, but it also caused significant peripheral edema and neovascularization. Diffusion and perfusion MRI imaging were able to predict the histological lesions.

  12. Light-induced depigmentation in planarians models the pathophysiology of acute porphyrias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubenhaus, Bradford M; Dustin, John P; Neverett, Emily R; Beaudry, Megan S; Nadeau, Leanna E; Burk-McCoy, Ethan; He, Xinwen; Pearson, Bret J; Pellettieri, Jason

    2016-05-31

    Porphyrias are disorders of heme metabolism frequently characterized by extreme photosensitivity. This symptom results from accumulation of porphyrins, tetrapyrrole intermediates in heme biosynthesis that generate reactive oxygen species when exposed to light, in the skin of affected individuals. Here we report that in addition to producing an ommochrome body pigment, the planarian flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea generates porphyrins in its subepithelial pigment cells under physiological conditions, and that this leads to pigment cell loss when animals are exposed to intense visible light. Remarkably, porphyrin biosynthesis and light-induced depigmentation are enhanced by starvation, recapitulating a common feature of some porphyrias - decreased nutrient intake precipitates an acute manifestation of the disease. Our results establish planarians as an experimentally tractable animal model for research into the pathophysiology of acute porphyrias, and potentially for the identification of novel pharmacological interventions capable of alleviating porphyrin-mediated photosensitivity or decoupling dieting and fasting from disease pathogenesis.

  13. Research on the Collinear Equation Model of Visual Positioning Based on Visible Light Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yuqi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A positioning method based on visible light communication is proposed, which receiving visible light information by low-resolution photodiode array and receiving visual information by the front camera of mobile phone. The terminal position is determined by matching spot information provided by photodiode array with visual information and position information provided by visible light communication. A collinear equation model is derived which based on mobile phone front camera. A hardware-in-loop simulation has been conducted to verify the collinear equation. The three-dimensional positioning error is on the level of decimeter. Moreover, the main factors which affect the positioning accuracy are analyzed in order to further improve the positioning accuracy.

  14. Reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus infection by ultraviolet light: a human model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perna, J.J.; Mannix, M.L.; Rooney, J.F.; Notkins, A.L.; Straus, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    Infection with herpes simplex virus often results in a latent infection of local sensory ganglia and a disease characterized by periodic viral reactivation and mucocutaneous lesions. The factors that trigger reactivation in humans are still poorly defined. In our study, five patients with documented histories of recurrent herpes simplex virus infection on the buttocks or sacrum were exposed to three times their minimal erythema dose of ultraviolet light. Site-specific cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection occurred at 4.4 +/- 0.4 days after exposure to ultraviolet light in 8 of 13 attempts at reactivation. We conclude that ultraviolet light can reactivate herpes simplex virus under experimentally defined conditions. This model in humans should prove useful in evaluating the pathophysiology and prevention of viral reactivation

  15. Sustainable Street Lighting Design Supported by Hypergraph-Based Computational Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Sȩdziwy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Street lighting systems are significant energy consumers in urban environments. The important step toward the reduction of this energy consumption and, thus, finding a balance between functional requirements and savings-related demands, was introducing LED-based light sources. There still exists, however, a margin for further savings, which is associated with well-tailored designs of road lighting installations. The critical impediment that has to be overcame beforehand is the computational complexity related to preparing such a well-suited design. To make this approach feasible, we propose using the formal graph-based model, enabling efficient heuristic computations. In this article, we demonstrate several real-life cases showing a coarse estimation of potential savings in terms of reduced CO2 emission. The presented results are expressed in kWh of saved energy, metric tones of CO2 , but also as a volume of combusted fuels, to make the assessment more tangible.

  16. Quasi-Monte Carlo methods: applications to modeling of light transport in tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Steven A.

    1996-05-01

    Monte Carlo modeling of light propagation can accurately predict the distribution of light in scattering materials. A drawback of Monte Carlo methods is that they converge inversely with the square root of the number of iterations. Theoretical considerations suggest that convergence which scales inversely with the first power of the number of iterations is possible. We have previously shown that one can obtain at least a portion of that improvement by using van der Corput sequences in place of a conventional pseudo-random number generator. Here, we present our further analysis, and show that quasi-Monte Carlo methods do have limited applicability to light scattering problems. We also discuss potential improvements which may increase the applicability.

  17. LED Lighting System Reliability Modeling and Inference via Random Effects Gamma Process and Copula Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huibing Hao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Light emitting diode (LED lamp has attracted increasing interest in the field of lighting systems due to its low energy and long lifetime. For different functions (i.e., illumination and color, it may have two or more performance characteristics. When the multiple performance characteristics are dependent, it creates a challenging problem to accurately analyze the system reliability. In this paper, we assume that the system has two performance characteristics, and each performance characteristic is governed by a random effects Gamma process where the random effects can capture the unit to unit differences. The dependency of performance characteristics is described by a Frank copula function. Via the copula function, the reliability assessment model is proposed. Considering the model is so complicated and analytically intractable, the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method is used to estimate the unknown parameters. A numerical example about actual LED lamps data is given to demonstrate the usefulness and validity of the proposed model and method.

  18. Radicals excess in the retina: A model for light flashes in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narici, L.; De Martino, A.; Brunetti, V.; Rinaldi, A.; Sannita, W.G.; Paci, M.

    2009-01-01

    The risk due to cosmic radiation is a major issue in planning future missions to the Moon or Mars and would be critical if inadequately addressed. Functional risks must also be considered. The perception of light flashes reported by astronauts in space, and ascribed mostly to the action of ionizing radiation in the eye (retina), is an evidence for radiation functional interaction. No detailed model of the ion/retina interaction is yet available. Here we present the first model for a generation mechanism compatible with light flashes in space, and the results of in vitro tests supporting it. The model can be a common end point for the interactions between ionizing radiation and visual system in space. It would also support the assessment of functional radiation risks in space.

  19. Observations and modeling of deterministic properties of human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We show that the properties of both models are different from those obtained for Type-I intermittency in the presence of additive noise. The two models help to explain some of the features seen in the intermittency in human heart rate variability. Keywords. Heart rate variability; intermittency; non-stationary dynamical systems.

  20. Observation-based correction of dynamical models using thermostats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Myerscough, Keith W.; Frank, Jason; Leimkuhler, Benedict

    2017-01-01

    Models used in simulation may give accurate shortterm trajectories but distort long-Term (statistical) properties. In this work, we augment a given approximate model with a control law (a 'thermostat') that gently perturbs the dynamical system to target a thermodynamic state consistent with a set of

  1. Observations and modeling of deterministic properties of human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of two classes of models of Type-I intermittency: (a) the control parameter of the logistic map is changed dichotomously from a value within the intermittency range to just below the bifurcation point and back; (b) the control parameter is changed randomly within the same parameter range as in the model class (a). We show ...

  2. Antimicrobial blue light therapy for multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection in a mouse burn model: implications for prophylaxis and treatment of combat-related wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunsong; Zhu, Yingbo; Gupta, Asheesh; Huang, Yingying; Murray, Clinton K; Vrahas, Mark S; Sherwood, Margaret E; Baer, David G; Hamblin, Michael R; Dai, Tianhong

    2014-06-15

    In this study, we investigated the utility of antimicrobial blue light therapy for multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection in a mouse burn model. A bioluminescent clinical isolate of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii was obtained. The susceptibility of A. baumannii to blue light (415 nm)-inactivation was compared in vitro to that of human keratinocytes. Repeated cycles of sublethal inactivation of bacterial by blue light were performed to investigate the potential resistance development of A. baumannii to blue light. A mouse model of third degree burn infected with A. baumannii was developed. A single exposure of blue light was initiated 30 minutes after bacterial inoculation to inactivate A. baumannii in mouse burns. It was found that the multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strain was significantly more susceptible than keratinocytes to blue light inactivation. Transmission electron microscopy revealed blue light-induced ultrastructural damage in A. baumannii cells. Fluorescence spectroscopy suggested that endogenous porphyrins exist in A. baumannii cells. Blue light at an exposure of 55.8 J/cm(2) significantly reduced the bacterial burden in mouse burns. No resistance development to blue light inactivation was observed in A. baumannii after 10 cycles of sublethal inactivation of bacteria. No significant DNA damage was detected in mouse skin by means of a skin TUNEL assay after a blue light exposure of 195 J/cm(2). © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Design of a Stand-Alone Photovoltaic Model for Home Lightings and Clean Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ani, Vincent Anayochukwu

    2016-01-01

    This paper gives a well-documented health risk of fuel-based lighting (kerosene lamps and fuel-powered generators) and proposed a design of a stand-alone solar PV system for sustainable home lightings in rural Nigerian area. The design was done in three different patterns of electricity consumptions with energy efficient lightings (EELs) using two different battery types (Rolls Surrette 6CS25PS and Hoppecke 10 OpzS 1000) on; (i) judicious power consumption, (ii) normal power consumption, and (iii) excess power consumption; and compared them with the incandescent light bulb consumption. The stand-alone photovoltaic energy systems were designed to match the rural Nigerian sunlight and weather conditions to meet the required lightings of the household. The objective function and constraints for the design models were formulated and optimization procedures were used to demonstrate the best solution (reliability at the lowest lifecycle cost). Initial capital costs as well as annualized costs over 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 years were quantified and documented. The design identified the most cost-effective and reliable solar and battery array among the patterns of electricity consumption with EEL options (judicious power consumption, normal power consumption, and excess power consumption).

  4. Interacting scalar tensor cosmology in light of SNeIa, CMB, BAO and OHD observational data sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiei, Sayed Wrya; Saaidi, Khaled [Faculty of Science University of Kurdistan, Department of Physics, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sheikhahmadi, Haidar [Faculty of Science University of Kurdistan, Department of Physics, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Advance Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS) Gava Zang, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aghamohammadi, Ali [Sanandaj Branch Islamic Azad University, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    In this work, an interacting chameleon-like scalar field scenario, by considering SNeIa, CMB, BAO, and OHD data sets, is investigated. In fact, the investigation is realized by introducing an ansatz for the effective dark energy equation of state, which mimics the behavior of chameleon-like models. Based on this assumption, some cosmological parameters, including the Hubble, deceleration, and coincidence parameters, in such a mechanism are analyzed. It is realized that, to estimate the free parameters of a theoretical model, by regarding the systematic errors it is better that the whole of the above observational data sets would be considered. In fact, if one considers SNeIa, CMB, and BAO, but disregards OHD, it maybe leads to different results. Also, to get a better overlap between the contours with the constraint χ{sub m}{sup 2} ≤ 1, the χ{sub T}{sup 2} function could be re-weighted. The relative probability functions are plotted for marginalized likelihood L(Ω{sub m0}, ω{sub 1}, β) according to the two dimensional confidence levels 68.3, 90, and 95.4%. Meanwhile, the value of the free parameters which maximize the marginalized likelihoods using the above confidence levels are obtained. In addition, based on these calculations the minimum value of χ{sup 2} based on the free parameters of the ansatz for the effective dark energy equation of state is achieved. (orig.)

  5. Observation of vector and tensor light shifts in 87Rb using near-resonant, stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qing-Qing; Freier, Christian; Sun, Yuan; Leykauf, Bastian; Schkolnik, Vladimir; Yang, Jun; Krutzik, Markus; Peters, Achim

    2018-01-01

    We present the derivation of the frequency-dependent scalar, vector, and tensor dynamical polarizabilities for the two hyperfine levels of the 87Rb atom 5 s ground state. Based on the characterization of the dynamical polarizabilities, we analyze and measure the differential vector and tensor light shift between the 5 s ground-state sublevels with near-resonant, stimulated Raman transitions. These results clarify that the tensor polarizabilities for the ground states of alkali atoms are absent when the light field is far detuned from the atomic resonance and the total electronic angular momentum J is a good quantum number. In the near-resonant case, the light shifts are nontrivial and the determination of the frequency-dependent vector and tensor dynamic polarizabilities will help to achieve higher fidelities for applications of neutral atoms in quantum information and precision measurements.

  6. Ionospheric detection of tsunami earthquakes: observation, modeling and ideas for future early warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occhipinti, G.; Manta, F.; Rolland, L.; Watada, S.; Makela, J. J.; Hill, E.; Astafieva, E.; Lognonne, P. H.

    2017-12-01

    .8 Benyak event (2010). In this talk we present all this new tsunami observations in the ionosphere and we discuss, under the light of modelling, the potential role of ionospheric sounding by GNSS-TEC and airglow cameras in oceanic monitoring and future tsunami warning system. All ref. here @ www.ipgp.fr/ ninto

  7. Understanding Transient Forcing with Plasma Instability Model, Ionospheric Propagation Model and GNSS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, K.; Zettergren, M. D.; Datta-Barua, S.

    2017-12-01

    Fluctuations in the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals observed as amplitude and phase scintillations are produced by plasma density structures in the ionosphere. Phase scintillation events in particular occur due to structures at Fresnel scales, typically about 250 meters at ionospheric heights and GNSS frequency. Likely processes contributing to small-scale density structuring in auroral and polar regions include ionospheric gradient-drift instability (GDI) and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI), which result, generally, from magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions (e.g. reconnection) associated with cusp and auroral zone regions. Scintillation signals, ostensibly from either GDI or KHI, are frequently observed in the high latitude ionosphere and are potentially useful diagnostics of how energy from the transient forcing in the cusp or polar cap region cascades, via instabilities, to small scales. However, extracting quantitative details of instabilities leading to scintillation using GNSS data drastically benefits from both a model of the irregularities and a model of GNSS signal propagation through irregular media. This work uses a physics-based model of the generation of plasma density irregularities (GEMINI - Geospace Environment Model of Ion-Neutral Interactions) coupled to an ionospheric radio wave propagation model (SIGMA - Satellite-beacon Ionospheric-scintillation Global Model of the upper Atmosphere) to explore the cascade of density structures from medium to small (sub-kilometer) scales. Specifically, GEMINI-SIGMA is used to simulate expected scintillation from different instabilities during various stages of evolution to determine features of the scintillation that may be useful to studying ionospheric density structures. Furthermore we relate the instabilities producing GNSS scintillations to the transient space and time-dependent magnetospheric phenomena and further predict characteristics of scintillation in different geophysical

  8. Observations and models of the decimetric radio emission from Jupiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pater, I. de.

    1980-01-01

    The high energy electron distribution as a function of energy, pitch angle and spatial coordinates in Jupiter's inner magnetosphere was derived from a comparison of radio data and model calculations of Jupiter's synchrotron radiation. (Auth.)

  9. Dispersion of light and heavy pollutants in urban scale models: CO(2) laser photoacoustic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelinger, Z; Strizík, M; Kubát, P; Civis, S; Grigorová, E; Janecková, R; Zavila, O; Nevrlý, V; Herecová, L; Bailleux, S; Horká, V; Ferus, M; Skrínský, J; Kozubková, M; Drábková, S; Janour, Z

    2009-04-01

    The distribution of pollutants in two urban scale models (point emission source and street canyon with extensive transport) was investigated by means of CO(2) laser photoacoustic spectroscopy in the region of the atmospheric window (9-10 mum). The experimental results of physical modeling are in a good agreement with the numerical calculations performed in the frame of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling. Methanol, ethanol, and ozone (examples of light pollutants), as well as sulfur hexafluoride and 1,2 dichlorethane (examples of heavy pollutants), were selected on the basis of their high resolution spectra acquired by Fourier transform and laser diode spectroscopy.

  10. NACP Regional: Gridded 1-deg Observation Data and Biosphere and Inverse Model Outputs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains standardized gridded observation data, terrestrial biosphere model output data, and inverse model simulations of carbon flux...

  11. NACP Regional: Gridded 1-deg Observation Data and Biosphere and Inverse Model Outputs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains standardized gridded observation data, terrestrial biosphere model output data, and inverse model simulations of carbon flux parameters that...

  12. NACP Regional: Original Observation Data and Biosphere and Inverse Model Outputs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains the originally-submitted observation measurement data, terrestrial biosphere model output data, and inverse model simulations that various...

  13. NACP Regional: Original Observation Data and Biosphere and Inverse Model Outputs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains the originally-submitted observation measurement data, terrestrial biosphere model output data, and inverse model simulations that...

  14. Electromagnetic properties of light and heavy baryons in the relativistic quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicmorus Marinescu, Diana

    2007-06-14

    One of the main challenges of nowadays low-energy physics remains the description of the internal structure of hadrons, strongly connected to the electromagnetic properties of matter. In this vein, the success of the relativistic quark model in the analysis of the hadron structure constitutes a solid motivation for the study carried out throughout this work. The relativistic quark model is extended to the investigation of static electromagnetic properties of both heavy and light baryons. The bare contributions to the magnetic moments of the single-, double- and triple-heavy baryons are calculated. Moreover, the relativistic quark model allows the study of the electromagnetic properties of the light baryon octet incorporating meson cloud contributions in a perturbative manner. The long disputed values of the multipole ratios E2/M1 and C2/M1 and the electromagnetic form factors of the N{yields}{delta}{gamma} transition are successfully reproduced. The relativistic quark model can be viewed as a quantum field theory approach based on a phenomenological Lagrangian coupling light and heavy baryons to their constituent quarks. In our approach the baryon is a composite object of three constituent quarks, at least in leading order. The effective interaction Lagrangian is written in terms of baryon and constituent quark fields. The effective action preserves Lorentz covariance and gauge invariance. The main ingredients of the model are already introduced at the level of the interaction Lagrangian: the three-quark baryon currents, the Gaussian distribution of the constituent quarks inside the baryon and the compositeness condition which sets an upper limit for the baryon-quark vertex. The S-matrix elements are expressed by a set of Feynman quark-diagrams. The model contains only few parameters, namely, the cut-off parameter of the Gaussian quark distribution and the free quark propagator, which are unambiguously determined from the best fit to the data. The heavy quark limit

  15. Electromagnetic properties of light and heavy baryons in the relativistic quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicmorus Marinescu, Diana

    2007-01-01

    One of the main challenges of nowadays low-energy physics remains the description of the internal structure of hadrons, strongly connected to the electromagnetic properties of matter. In this vein, the success of the relativistic quark model in the analysis of the hadron structure constitutes a solid motivation for the study carried out throughout this work. The relativistic quark model is extended to the investigation of static electromagnetic properties of both heavy and light baryons. The bare contributions to the magnetic moments of the single-, double- and triple-heavy baryons are calculated. Moreover, the relativistic quark model allows the study of the electromagnetic properties of the light baryon octet incorporating meson cloud contributions in a perturbative manner. The long disputed values of the multipole ratios E2/M1 and C2/M1 and the electromagnetic form factors of the N→Δγ transition are successfully reproduced. The relativistic quark model can be viewed as a quantum field theory approach based on a phenomenological Lagrangian coupling light and heavy baryons to their constituent quarks. In our approach the baryon is a composite object of three constituent quarks, at least in leading order. The effective interaction Lagrangian is written in terms of baryon and constituent quark fields. The effective action preserves Lorentz covariance and gauge invariance. The main ingredients of the model are already introduced at the level of the interaction Lagrangian: the three-quark baryon currents, the Gaussian distribution of the constituent quarks inside the baryon and the compositeness condition which sets an upper limit for the baryon-quark vertex. The S-matrix elements are expressed by a set of Feynman quark-diagrams. The model contains only few parameters, namely, the cut-off parameter of the Gaussian quark distribution and the free quark propagator, which are unambiguously determined from the best fit to the data. The heavy quark limit within this

  16. Observations and Numerical Modeling of the Jovian Ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, R. G.; Simon, A.; Morales-Juberias, R.; Sayanagi, K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple wavelength observations made by the Hubble Space Telescope in early 2007 show the presence of a wavy, high-contrast feature in Jupiter's atmosphere near 30 degrees North. The "Jovian Ribbon," best seen at 410 nanometers, irregularly undulates in latitude and is time-variable in appearance. A meridional intensity gradient algorithm was applied to the observations to track the Ribbon's contour. Spectral analysis of the contour revealed that the Ribbon's structure is a combination of several wavenumbers ranging from k equals 8-40. The Ribbon is a dynamic structure that has been observed to have spectral power for dominant wavenumbers which vary over a time period of one month. The presence of the Ribbon correlates with periods when the velocity of the westward jet at the same location is highest. We conducted numerical simulations to investigate the stability of westward jets of varying speed, vertical shear, and background static stability to different perturbations. A Ribbon-like morphology was best reproduced with a 35 per millisecond westward jet that decreases in amplitude for pressures greater than 700 hectopascals and a background static stability of N equals 0.005 per second perturbed by heat pulses constrained to latitudes south of 30 degrees North. Additionally, the simulated feature had wavenumbers that qualitatively matched observations and evolved throughout the simulation reproducing the Jovian Ribbon's dynamic structure.

  17. Asteroseismic observations and modelling of 70 Ophiuchi AB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggenberger, P; Miglio, A [Institut d' Astrophysique et de Geophysique de l' Universite de Liege, 17 Allee du 6 Aout, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Carrier, F [Institute of Astronomy, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200 D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Fernandes, J [Observatorio Astronomico da Universidade de Coimbra e Departamento de Matematica, FCTUC (Portugal); Santos, N C [Centro de AstrofIsica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, P-4150-762 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: eggenberger@astro.ulg.ac.be

    2008-10-15

    The analysis of solar-like oscillations for stars belonging to a binary system provides an opportunity to probe the internal stellar structure and to test our knowledge of stellar physics. We present asteroseismic observations of 70 Oph A performed with the HARPS spectrograph together with a comprehensive theoretical calibration of the 70 Ophiuchi system.

  18. Intelligent Cognitive Radio Models for Enhancing Future Radio Astronomy Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodele Abiola Periola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio astronomy organisations desire to optimise the terrestrial radio astronomy observations by mitigating against interference and enhancing angular resolution. Ground telescopes (GTs experience interference from intersatellite links (ISLs. Astronomy source radio signals received by GTs are analysed at the high performance computing (HPC infrastructure. Furthermore, observation limitation conditions prevent GTs from conducting radio astronomy observations all the time, thereby causing low HPC utilisation. This paper proposes mechanisms that protect GTs from ISL interference without permanent prevention of ISL data transmission and enhance angular resolution. The ISL transmits data by taking advantage of similarities in the sequence of observed astronomy sources to increase ISL connection duration. In addition, the paper proposes a mechanism that enhances angular resolution by using reconfigurable earth stations. Furthermore, the paper presents the opportunistic computing scheme (OCS to enhance HPC utilisation. OCS enables the underutilised HPC to be used to train learning algorithms of a cognitive base station. The performances of the three mechanisms are evaluated. Simulations show that the proposed mechanisms protect GTs from ISL interference, enhance angular resolution, and improve HPC utilisation.

  19. 76 FR 76932 - Public Hearings for 2017 and Later Model Year Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-09

    .../otaq/climate/regulations.htm or by searching the public dockets (NHTSA-2010-0131 (for the proposed rule... emissions from and improve fuel economy for light-duty vehicles for model years 2017-2025. The proposal... Program to reduce greenhouse gas emissions of light-duty vehicles for model years 2017-2025. The proposal...

  20. Citizen observations contributing to flood modelling: opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assumpção, Thaine H.; Popescu, Ioana; Jonoski, Andreja; Solomatine, Dimitri P.

    2018-02-01

    Citizen contributions to science have been successfully implemented in many fields, and water resources is one of them. Through citizens, it is possible to collect data and obtain a more integrated decision-making process. Specifically, data scarcity has always been an issue in flood modelling, which has been addressed in the last decades by remote sensing and is already being discussed in the citizen science context. With this in mind, this article aims to review the literature on the topic and analyse the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead. The literature on monitoring, mapping and modelling, was evaluated according to the flood-related variable citizens contributed to. Pros and cons of the collection/analysis methods were summarised. Then, pertinent publications were mapped into the flood modelling cycle, considering how citizen data properties (spatial and temporal coverage, uncertainty and volume) are related to its integration into modelling. It was clear that the number of studies in the area is rising. There are positive experiences reported in collection and analysis methods, for instance with velocity and land cover, and also when modelling is concerned, for example by using social media mining. However, matching the data properties necessary for each part of the modelling cycle with citizen-generated data is still challenging. Nevertheless, the concept that citizen contributions can be used for simulation and forecasting is proved and further work lies in continuing to develop and improv