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Sample records for model nuclear reactor

  1. Mathematical Modeling for Simulation of Nuclear Reactor Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Salah Ud-Din Khan; Shahab Ud-Din Khan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we have developed a mathematical model for the nuclear reactor analysis to be implemented in the nuclear reactor code. THEATRe is nuclear reactor analysis code which can only work for the cylindrical type fuel reactor and cannot applicable for the plate type fuel nuclear reactor. Therefore, the current studies encompasses on the modification of THEATRe code for the plate type fuel element. This mathematical model is applicable to the thermal analysis of the reactor which is ver...

  2. Nuclear reactor core modelling in multifunctional simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puska, E.K. [VTT Energy, Nuclear Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-06-01

    The thesis concentrates on the development of nuclear reactor core models for the APROS multifunctional simulation environment and the use of the core models in various kinds of applications. The work was started in 1986 as a part of the development of the entire APROS simulation system. The aim was to create core models that would serve in a reliable manner in an interactive, modular and multifunctional simulator/plant analyser environment. One-dimensional and three-dimensional core neutronics models have been developed. Both models have two energy groups and six delayed neutron groups. The three-dimensional finite difference type core model is able to describe both BWR- and PWR-type cores with quadratic fuel assemblies and VVER-type cores with hexagonal fuel assemblies. The one- and three-dimensional core neutronics models can be connected with the homogeneous, the five-equation or the six-equation thermal hydraulic models of APROS. The key feature of APROS is that the same physical models can be used in various applications. The nuclear reactor core models of APROS have been built in such a manner that the same models can be used in simulator and plant analyser applications, as well as in safety analysis. In the APROS environment the user can select the number of flow channels in the three-dimensional reactor core and either the homogeneous, the five- or the six-equation thermal hydraulic model for these channels. The thermal hydraulic model and the number of flow channels have a decisive effect on the calculation time of the three-dimensional core model and thus, at present, these particular selections make the major difference between a safety analysis core model and a training simulator core model. The emphasis on this thesis is on the three-dimensional core model and its capability to analyse symmetric and asymmetric events in the core. The factors affecting the calculation times of various three-dimensional BWR, PWR and WWER-type APROS core models have been

  3. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  4. Basic Model of a Control Assembly Drop in Nuclear Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek BULÍN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on the modelling and dynamic analysis of a nonlinear system representing a control assembly of the VVER 440/V213 nuclear reactor. A simple rigid body model intended for basic dynamic analyses is introduced. It contains the influences of the pressurized water and mainly the eects of possible control assembly contacts with guiding tubes inside the reactor. Another approach based on a complex multibody model is further described and the suitability of both modelling approaches is discussed.

  5. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  6. Modeling of Flow in Nuclear Reactor Fuel Cell Outlet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František URBAN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Safe and effective load of nuclear reactor fuel cells demands qualitative and quantitative analysis of relations between coolant temperature in fuel cell outlet temperature measured by thermocouple and middle temperature of coolant in thermocouple plane position. In laboratory at Insitute of thermal power engineering of the Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava was installed an experimental physical fuel cell model of VVER 440 nuclear power plant with V 213 nuclear reactors. Objective of measurements on physical model was temperature and velocity profiles analysis in the fuel cell outlet. In this paper the measured temperature and velocity profiles are compared with the results of CFD simulation of fuel cell physical model coolant flow.

  7. Towards an efficient multiphysics model for nuclear reactor dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obaidurrahman K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Availability of fast computer resources nowadays has facilitated more in-depth modeling of complex engineering systems which involve strong multiphysics interactions. This multiphysics modeling is an important necessity in nuclear reactor safety studies where efforts are being made worldwide to combine the knowledge from all associated disciplines at one place to accomplish the most realistic simulation of involved phenomenon. On these lines coupled modeling of nuclear reactor neutron kinetics, fuel heat transfer and coolant transport is a regular practice nowadays for transient analysis of reactor core. However optimization between modeling accuracy and computational economy has always been a challenging task to ensure the adequate degree of reliability in such extensive numerical exercises. Complex reactor core modeling involves estimation of evolving 3-D core thermal state, which in turn demands an expensive multichannel based detailed core thermal hydraulics model. A novel approach of power weighted coupling between core neutronics and thermal hydraulics presented in this work aims to reduce the bulk of core thermal calculations in core dynamics modeling to a significant extent without compromising accuracy of computation. Coupled core model has been validated against a series of international benchmarks. Accuracy and computational efficiency of the proposed multiphysics model has been demonstrated by analyzing a reactivity initiated transient.

  8. Thermohydraulic and nuclear modeling of natural fission reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viggato, Jason Charles

    Experimental verification of proposed nuclear waste storage schemes in geologic repositories is not possible, however, a natural analog exists in the form of ancient natural reactors that existed in uranium-rich ores. Two billion years ago, the enrichment of natural uranium was high enough to allow a sustained chain reaction in the presence of water as a moderator. Several natural reactors occurred in Gabon, Africa and were discovered in the early 1970's. These reactors operated at low power levels for hundreds of thousands of years. Heated water generated from the reactors also leached uranium from the surrounding rock strata and deposited it in the reactor cores. This increased the concentration of uranium in the core over time and served to "refuel" the reactor. This has strong implications in the design of modern geologic repositories for spent nuclear fuel. The possibility of accidental fission events in man-made repositories exists and the geologic evidence from Oklo suggests how those events may progress and enhance local concentrations of uranium. Based on a review of the literature, a comprehensive code was developed to model the thermohydraulic behavior and criticality conditions that may have existed in the Oklo reactor core. A two-dimensional numerical model that incorporates modeling of fluid flow, temperatures, and nuclear fission and subsequent heat generation was developed for the Oklo natural reactors. The operating temperatures ranged from about 456 K to about 721 K. Critical reactions were observed for a wide range of concentrations and porosity values (9 to 30 percent UO2 and 10 to 20 percent porosity). Periodic operation occurred in the computer model prediction with UO2 concentrations of 30 percent in the core and 5 percent in the surrounding material. For saturated conditions and 30 percent porosity, the model predicted temperature transients with a period of about 5 hours. Kuroda predicted 3 to 4 hour durations for temperature transients

  9. Development of an automated core model for nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosteller, R.D.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to develop an automated package of computer codes that can model the steady-state behavior of nuclear-reactor cores of various designs. As an added benefit, data produced for steady-state analysis also can be used as input to the TRAC transient-analysis code for subsequent safety analysis of the reactor at any point in its operating lifetime. The basic capability to perform steady-state reactor-core analysis already existed in the combination of the HELIOS lattice-physics code and the NESTLE advanced nodal code. In this project, the automated package was completed by (1) obtaining cross-section libraries for HELIOS, (2) validating HELIOS by comparing its predictions to results from critical experiments and from the MCNP Monte Carlo code, (3) validating NESTLE by comparing its predictions to results from numerical benchmarks and to measured data from operating reactors, and (4) developing a linkage code to transform HELIOS output into NESTLE input.

  10. Heterogeneous Nuclear Reactor Models for Optimal Xenon Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondal, Ishtiaq Ahmad

    Nuclear reactors are generally modeled as homogeneous mixtures of fuel, control, and other materials while in reality they are heterogeneous-homogeneous configurations comprised of fuel and control rods along with other materials. Similarly, for space-time studies of a nuclear reactor, homogeneous, usually one-group diffusion theory, models are used, and the system equations are solved by either nodal or modal expansion approximations. Study of xenon-induced problems has also been carried out using similar models and with the help of dynamic programming or classical calculus of variations or the minimum principle. In this study a thermal nuclear reactor is modeled as a two-dimensional lattice of fuel and control rods placed in an infinite-moderator in plane geometry. The two-group diffusion theory approximation is used for neutron transport. Space -time neutron balance equations are written for two groups and reduced to one space-time algebraic equation by using the two-dimensional Fourier transform. This equation is written at all fuel and control rod locations. Iodine -xenon and promethium-samarium dynamic equations are also written at fuel rod locations only. These equations are then linearized about an equilibrium point which is determined from the steady-state form of the original nonlinear system equations. After studying poisonless criticality, with and without control, and the stability of the open-loop system and after checking its controllability, a performance criterion is defined for the xenon-induced spatial flux oscillation problem in the form of a functional to be minimized. Linear -quadratic optimal control theory is then applied to solve the problem. To perform a variety of different additional useful studies, this formulation has potential for various extensions and variations; for example, different geometry of the problem, with possible extension to three dimensions, heterogeneous -homogeneous formulation to include, for example, homogeneously

  11. Multiphysics modeling of porous CRUD deposits in nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, M. P.; Hussey, D.; Kendrick, B. K.; Besmann, T. M.; Stanek, C. R.; Yip, S.

    2013-11-01

    The formation of porous CRUD deposits on nuclear reactor fuel rods, a longstanding problem in the operation of pressurized water reactors (PWRs), is a significant challenge to science-based multiscale modeling and simulation. While existing, published studies have focused on individual or loosely coupled processes, such as heat transfer, fluid flow, and compound dissolution/precipitation, none have addressed their coupled effects sufficiently to enable a comprehensive, scientific understanding of CRUD. Here we present the formulation and results of a model, MAMBA-BDM, which begins to incorporate mechanistic details in describing CRUD in PWRs. CRUD is treated as a chemical deposition process in an environment of variable concentration, an arbitrary level of heating, and a complex fractal-based flow geometry. We present results on spatial distributions of temperature, pressure, velocity, and concentration that give insight into the interplay between these physical properties and geometrical parameters. We show the role of heat convection which has not been discussed previously. Furthermore, we suggest that the assumption of liquid saturation in the CRUD deserves scrutiny, as a result of our attempt to determine an effective CRUD thermal conductivity.

  12. Nuclear reactor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering. Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide, and new power reactors with improved fuel cycles are being developed. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. The second edition of this successful comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics has been completely updated, revised and enlarged to include the latest developme

  13. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  14. Discussion about modeling the effects of neutron flux exposure for nuclear reactor core analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondy, D.R.

    1986-04-01

    Methods used to calculate the effects of exposure to a neutron flux are described. The modeling of the nuclear-reactor core history presents an analysis challenge. The nuclide chain equations must be solved, and some of the methods in use for this are described. Techniques for treating reactor-core histories are discussed and evaluated.

  15. Modeling and Control of a Large Nuclear Reactor A Three-Time-Scale Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Shimjith, S R; Bandyopadhyay, B

    2013-01-01

    Control analysis and design of large nuclear reactors requires a suitable mathematical model representing the steady state and dynamic behavior of the reactor with reasonable accuracy. This task is, however, quite challenging because of several complex dynamic phenomena existing in a reactor. Quite often, the models developed would be of prohibitively large order, non-linear and of complex structure not readily amenable for control studies. Moreover, the existence of simultaneously occurring dynamic variations at different speeds makes the mathematical model susceptible to numerical ill-conditioning, inhibiting direct application of standard control techniques. This monograph introduces a technique for mathematical modeling of large nuclear reactors in the framework of multi-point kinetics, to obtain a comparatively smaller order model in standard state space form thus overcoming these difficulties. It further brings in innovative methods for controller design for systems exhibiting multi-time-scale property,...

  16. A simple dynamic model and transient simulation of the nuclear power reactor on microcomputers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yang Gee; Park, Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    A simple dynamic model is developed for the transient simulation of the nuclear power reactor. The dynamic model includes the normalized neutron kinetics model with reactivity feedback effects and the core thermal-hydraulics model. The main objective of this paper demonstrates the capability of the developed dynamic model to simulate various important variables of interest for a nuclear power reactor transient. Some representative results of transient simulations show the expected trends in all cases, even though no available data for comparison. In this work transient simulations are performed on a microcomputer using the DESIRE/N96T continuous system simulation language which is applicable to nuclear power reactor transient analysis. 3 refs., 9 figs. (Author)

  17. Linear stability analysis of a nuclear reactor using the lumped model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kale Vivek A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The stability analysis of a nuclear reactor is an important aspect in the design and operation of the reactor. A stable neutronic response to perturbations is essential from the safety point of view. In this paper, a general methodology has been developed for the linear stability analysis of nuclear reactors using the lumped reactor model. The reactor kinetics has been modelled using the point kinetics equations and the reactivity feedbacks from fuel, coolant and xenon have been modelled through the appropriate time dependent equations. These governing equations are linearized considering small perturbations in the reactor state around a steady operating point. The characteristic equation of the system is used to establish the stability zone of the reactor considering the reactivity coefficients as parameters. This methodology has been used to identify the stability region of a typical pressurized heavy water reactor. It is shown that the positive reactivity feedback from xenon narrows down the stability region. Further, it is observed that the neutron kinetics parameters (such as the number of delayed neutron precursor groups considered, the neutron generation time, the delayed neutron fractions, etc. do not have a significant influence on the location of the stability boundary. The stability boundary is largely influenced by the parameters governing the evolution of the fuel and coolant temperature and xenon concentration.

  18. Space Nuclear Reactor Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    We needed to find a space reactor concept that could be attractive to NASA for flight and proven with a rapid turnaround, low-cost nuclear test. Heat-pipe-cooled reactors coupled to Stirling engines long identified as the easiest path to near-term, low-cost concept.

  19. Random processes in nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, M M R

    1974-01-01

    Random Processes in Nuclear Reactors describes the problems that a nuclear engineer may meet which involve random fluctuations and sets out in detail how they may be interpreted in terms of various models of the reactor system. Chapters set out to discuss topics on the origins of random processes and sources; the general technique to zero-power problems and bring out the basic effect of fission, and fluctuations in the lifetime of neutrons, on the measured response; the interpretation of power reactor noise; and associated problems connected with mechanical, hydraulic and thermal noise sources

  20. Modeling of operating history of the research nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naymushin, A.; Chertkov, Yu; Shchurovskaya, M.; Anikin, M.; Lebedev, I.

    2016-06-01

    The results of simulation of the IRT-T reactor operation history from 2012 to 2014 are presented. Calculations are performed using continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCU-PTR. Comparison is made between calculation and experimental data for the critical reactor.

  1. 3D CAD model of the subcritical nuclear reactor of IPN; Modelo CAD 3D del reactor nuclear subcritico del IPN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahuamba V, F. de J.; Delfin L, A.; Gomez T, A. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ibarra R, G.; Del Valle G, E.; Sanchez R, A., E-mail: narehc@hotmail.com [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. IPN, Edif. 9, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    The three-dimensional (3D) CAD model of the subcritical reactor Chicago model 9000 of Instituto Politecnico Nacional (IPN) allows obtaining a 3D view with the dimensions of each of its components, such as: natural uranium cylindrical rods, fuel elements, hexagonal reactor core arrangement, cylindrical stainless steel tank containing the core, fuel element support grids and reactor water cleaning system. As a starting point for the development of the model, the Chicago model 9000 subcritical reactor manual provided by the manufacturer was used, the measurement and verification of the components to adapt the geometric, physical and mechanical characteristics was carried out and materials standards were used to obtain a design that allows to elaborate a new manual according to the specifications. In addition, the 3D models of the building of the Advanced Physics Laboratory, neutron generator, cobalt source and the corridors connecting to the subcritical reactor facility were developed, allowing an animated ride, developed by computer-aided design software. The manual provided by the company Nuclear Chicago, dates from the year 1959 and presents diverse deviations in the design and dimensions of the reactor components. The model developed; in addition to supporting the development of the new manual represents a learning tool to visualize the reactor components. (Author)

  2. Steam separator modeling for various nuclear reactor transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paik, C Y; Mullen, G; Knoess, C; Griffith, P

    1987-06-01

    In a pressurized water reactor steam generator, a moisture separator is used to separate steam and liquid and to insure that essentially dry steam is supplied to the turbine. During a steam line break or combined steam line break plus tube rupture, a number of phenomena can occur in the separator which have no counterparts during steady-state operation. How the separator will perform under these circumstances is important for two reasons, it affects the carry-over of radioactive iodine and the water inventory in the secondary side. This study has as its goal the development of a simple separator model which can be applied to a variety of steam generator for off-design conditions. Experiments were performed using air and water on three different types of centrifugal separators: a cyclone as a generic separator, a Combustion Engineering type stationary swirl vane separator, and a Westinghouse type separator. The cyclone separator system has three stages of separation: first the cyclone, then a gravity separator, and finally a chevron plate separator. The other systems have only a centrifugal separator to isolate the effect of the primary separator. Experiments were also done in MIT blowdown rig, with and without a separator, using steam and water. The separators appear to perform well at flow rates well above the design values as long as the downcomer water level is not high. High downcomer water level rather than high flow rates appear to be the primary cause of degraded performance. Appreciable carry-over from the separator section of a steam generator occurs when the drain lines from three stages of separation are unable to carry off the liquid flow. Failure scenarios of the separator for extreme range of conditions from the quasi-steady state transient to the fast transients are presented. A general model structure and simple separator models are provided.

  3. Nuclear reactor design

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on core design and methods for design and analysis. It is based on advances made in nuclear power utilization and computational methods over the past 40 years, covering core design of boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors, as well as fast reactors and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The objectives of this book are to help graduate and advanced undergraduate students to understand core design and analysis, and to serve as a background reference for engineers actively working in light water reactors. Methodologies for core design and analysis, together with physical descriptions, are emphasized. The book also covers coupled thermal hydraulic core calculations, plant dynamics, and safety analysis, allowing readers to understand core design in relation to plant control and safety.

  4. Seismic analysis of the APR1400 nuclear reactor system using a verified beam element model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong-beom [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of); Park, No-Cheol, E-mail: pnch@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Jeong; Park, Young-Pil [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Youngin [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 62 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34142 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • A simplified beam element model is constructed based on the real dynamic characteristics of the APR1400. • Time history analysis is performed to calculate the seismic responses of the structures. • Large deformations can be observed at the in-phase mode of reactor vessel and core support barrel. - Abstract: Structural integrity is the first priority in the design of nuclear reactor internal structures. In particular, nuclear reactor internals should be designed to endure external forces, such as those due to earthquakes. Many researchers have performed finite element analyses to meet these design requirements. Generally, a seismic analysis model should reflect the dynamic characteristics of the target system. However, seismic analysis based on the finite element method requires long computation times as well as huge storage space. In this research, a beam element model was developed and confirmed based on the real dynamic characteristics of an advanced pressurized water nuclear reactor 1400 (APR1400) system. That verification process enhances the accuracy of the finite element analysis using the beam elements, remarkably. Also, the beam element model reduces seismic analysis costs. Therefore, the beam element model was used to perform the seismic analysis. Then, the safety of the APR1400 was assessed based on a seismic analysis of the time history responses of its structures. Thus, efficient, accurate seismic analysis was demonstrated using the proposed beam element model.

  5. Nuclear Reactor/Hydrogen Process Interface Including the HyPEP Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven R. Sherman

    2007-05-01

    The Nuclear Reactor/Hydrogen Plant interface is the intermediate heat transport loop that will connect a very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (VHTR) to a thermochemical, high-temperature electrolysis, or hybrid hydrogen production plant. A prototype plant called the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is planned for construction and operation at the Idaho National Laboratory in the 2018-2021 timeframe, and will involve a VHTR, a high-temperature interface, and a hydrogen production plant. The interface is responsible for transporting high-temperature thermal energy from the nuclear reactor to the hydrogen production plant while protecting the nuclear plant from operational disturbances at the hydrogen plant. Development of the interface is occurring under the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) and involves the study, design, and development of high-temperature heat exchangers, heat transport systems, materials, safety, and integrated system models. Research and development work on the system interface began in 2004 and is expected to continue at least until the start of construction of an engineering-scale demonstration plant.

  6. Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  7. Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER ) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  8. Radioactive target needs for nuclear reactor physics and nuclear astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Jurado, B.; Barreau, G.; Bacri, C. O.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A - In press.; Nuclear reaction cross sections of short-lived nuclei are key inputs for new generation nuclear reactor simulations and for models describing the nucleosynthesis of elements. After discussing various topics of nuclear astrophysics and reactor physics where the demand of nuclear data on unstable nuclei is strong, we describe the general characteristics of the targets needed to measure the requested data. In some cases t...

  9. Reflected kinetics model for nuclear space reactor kinetics and control scoping calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, K.E.

    1986-05-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a model that offers an alternative to the point kinetics (PK) modelling approach in the analysis of space reactor kinetics and control studies. Modelling effort will focus on the explicit treatment of control drums as reactivity input devices so that the transition to automatic control can be smoothly done. The proposed model is developed for the specific integration of automatic control and the solution of the servo mechanism problem. The integration of the kinetics model with an automatic controller will provide a useful tool for performing space reactor scoping studies for different designs and configurations. Such a tool should prove to be invaluable in the design phase of a space nuclear system from the point of view of kinetics and control limitations.

  10. Nuclear research reactors in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cota, Anna Paula Leite; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias, E-mail: aplc@cdtn.b, E-mail: amir@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The rising concerns about global warming and energy security have spurred a revival of interest in nuclear energy, giving birth to a 'nuclear power renaissance' in several countries in the world. Particularly in Brazil, in the recent years, the nuclear power renaissance can be seen in the actions that comprise its nuclear program, summarily the increase of the investments in nuclear research institutes and the government target to design and build the Brazilian Multipurpose research Reactor (BMR). In the last 50 years, Brazilian research reactors have been used for training, for producing radioisotopes to meet demands in industry and nuclear medicine, for miscellaneous irradiation services and for academic research. Moreover, the research reactors are used as laboratories to develop technologies in power reactors, which are evaluated today at around 450 worldwide. In this application, those reactors become more viable in relation to power reactors by the lowest cost, by the operation at low temperatures and, furthermore, by lower demand for nuclear fuel. In Brazil, four research reactors were installed: the IEA-R1 and the MB-01 reactors, both at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares (IPEN, Sao Paulo); the Argonauta, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN, Rio de Janeiro) and the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor, at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN, Belo Horizonte). The present paper intends to enumerate the characteristics of these reactors, their utilization and current academic research. Therefore, through this paper, we intend to collaborate on the BMR project. (author)

  11. Nuclear research reactors in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cota, Anna Paula Leite; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias, E-mail: aplc@cdtn.b, E-mail: amir@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The rising concerns about global warming and energy security have spurred a revival of interest in nuclear energy, giving birth to a 'nuclear power renaissance' in several countries in the world. Particularly in Brazil, in the recent years, the nuclear power renaissance can be seen in the actions that comprise its nuclear program, summarily the increase of the investments in nuclear research institutes and the government target to design and build the Brazilian Multipurpose research Reactor (BMR). In the last 50 years, Brazilian research reactors have been used for training, for producing radioisotopes to meet demands in industry and nuclear medicine, for miscellaneous irradiation services and for academic research. Moreover, the research reactors are used as laboratories to develop technologies in power reactors, which are evaluated today at around 450 worldwide. In this application, those reactors become more viable in relation to power reactors by the lowest cost, by the operation at low temperatures and, furthermore, by lower demand for nuclear fuel. In Brazil, four research reactors were installed: the IEA-R1 and the MB-01 reactors, both at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares (IPEN, Sao Paulo); the Argonauta, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN, Rio de Janeiro) and the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor, at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN, Belo Horizonte). The present paper intends to enumerate the characteristics of these reactors, their utilization and current academic research. Therefore, through this paper, we intend to collaborate on the BMR project. (author)

  12. Numerical Solution of Fractional Neutron Point Kinetics Model in Nuclear Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowak Tomasz Karol

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results concerning solutions of the fractional neutron point kinetics model for a nuclear reactor. Proposed model consists of a bilinear system of fractional and ordinary differential equations. Three methods to solve the model are presented and compared. The first one entails application of discrete Grünwald-Letnikov definition of the fractional derivative in the model. Second involves building an analog scheme in the FOMCON Toolbox in MATLAB environment. Third is the method proposed by Edwards. The impact of selected parameters on the model’s response was examined. The results for typical input were discussed and compared.

  13. Modeling and Testing of Non-Nuclear, Highpower Simulated Nuclear Thermal Rocket Reactor Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Daniel R.

    2005-01-01

    When the President offered his new vision for space exploration in January of 2004, he said, "Our third goal is to return to the moon by 2020, as the launching point for missions beyond," and, "With the experience and knowledge gained on the moon, we will then be ready to take the next steps of space exploration: human missions to Mars and to worlds beyond." A human mission to Mars implies the need to move large payloads as rapidly as possible, in an efficient and cost-effective manner. Furthermore, with the scientific advancements possible with Project Prometheus and its Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO), (these use electric propulsion), there is a renewed interest in deep space exploration propulsion systems. According to many mission analyses, nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP), with its relatively high thrust and high specific impulse, is a serious candidate for such missions. Nuclear rockets utilize fission energy to heat a reactor core to very high temperatures. Hydrogen gas flowing through the core then becomes superheated and exits the engine at very high exhaust velocities. The combination of temperature and low molecular weight results in an engine with specific impulses above 900 seconds. This is almost twice the performance of the LOX/LH2 space shuttle engines, and the impact of this performance would be to reduce the trip time of a manned Mars mission from the 2.5 years, possible with chemical engines, to about 12-14 months.

  14. Development and analysis of some versions of the fractional-order point reactor kinetics model for a nuclear reactor with slab geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyawahare, Vishwesh A.; Nataraj, P. S. V.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we report the development and analysis of some novel versions and approximations of the fractional-order (FO) point reactor kinetics model for a nuclear reactor with slab geometry. A systematic development of the FO Inhour equation, Inverse FO point reactor kinetics model, and fractional-order versions of the constant delayed neutron rate approximation model and prompt jump approximation model is presented for the first time (for both one delayed group and six delayed groups). These models evolve from the FO point reactor kinetics model, which has been derived from the FO Neutron Telegraph Equation for the neutron transport considering the subdiffusive neutron transport. Various observations and the analysis results are reported and the corresponding justifications are addressed using the subdiffusive framework for the neutron transport. The FO Inhour equation is found out to be a pseudo-polynomial with its degree depending on the order of the fractional derivative in the FO model. The inverse FO point reactor kinetics model is derived and used to find the reactivity variation required to achieve exponential and sinusoidal power variation in the core. The situation of sudden insertion of negative reactivity is analyzed using the FO constant delayed neutron rate approximation. Use of FO model for representing the prompt jump in reactor power is advocated on the basis of subdiffusion. Comparison with the respective integer-order models is carried out for the practical data. Also, it has been shown analytically that integer-order models are a special case of FO models when the order of time-derivative is one. Development of these FO models plays a crucial role in reactor theory and operation as it is the first step towards achieving the FO control-oriented model for a nuclear reactor. The results presented here form an important step in the efforts to establish a step-by-step and systematic theory for the FO modeling of a nuclear reactor.

  15. Health effects models for off-site radiological consequence analysis on nuclear reactor accidents (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homma, Toshimitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Takahashi, Tomoyuki [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst; Yonehara, Hidenori [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [eds.

    2000-12-01

    This report is a revision of JAERI-M 91-005, 'Health Effects Models for Off-Site Radiological Consequence Analysis of Nuclear Reactor Accidents'. This revision provides a review of two revisions of NUREG/CR-4214 reports by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission which is the basis of the JAERI health effects models and other several recent reports that may impact the health effects models by international organizations. The major changes to the first version of the JAERI health effects models and the recommended parameters in this report are for late somatic effects. These changes reflect recent changes in cancer risk factors that have come from longer followup and revised dosimetry in major studies on the Japanese A-bomb survivors. This report also provides suggestions about future revisions of computational aspects on health effects models. (author)

  16. Cost-based optimization of a nuclear reactor core design: a preliminary model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacco, Wagner F.; Alves Filho, Hermes [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Inst. Politecnico. Dept. de Modelagem Computacional]. E-mails: wfsacco@iprj.uerj.br; halves@iprj.uerj.br; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Reatores]. E-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    A new formulation of a nuclear core design optimization problem is introduced in this article. Originally, the optimization problem consisted in adjusting several reactor cell parameters, such as dimensions, enrichment and materials, in order to minimize the radial power peaking factor in a three-enrichment zone reactor, considering restrictions on the average thermal flux, criticality and sub-moderation. Here, we address the same problem using the minimization of the fuel and cladding materials costs as the objective function, and the radial power peaking factor as an operational constraint. This cost-based optimization problem is attacked by two metaheuristics, the standard genetic algorithm (SGA), and a recently introduced Metropolis algorithm called the Particle Collision Algorithm (PCA). The two algorithms are submitted to the same computational effort and their results are compared. As the formulation presented is preliminary, more elaborate models are also discussed (author)

  17. Synthesis of Model Based Robust Stabilizing Reactor Power Controller for Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Habib Malik

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a nominal SISO (Single Input Single Output model of PHWR (Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor type nuclear power plant is developed based on normal moderator pump-up rate capturing the moderator level dynamics using system identification technique. As the plant model is not exact, therefore additive and multiplicative uncertainty modeling is required. A robust perturbed plant model is derived based on worst case model capturing slowest moderator pump-up rate dynamics and moderator control valve opening delay. Both nominal and worst case models of PHWR-type nuclear power plant have ARX (An Autoregressive Exogenous structures and the parameters of both models are estimated using recursive LMS (Least Mean Square optimization algorithm. Nominal and worst case discrete plant models are transformed into frequency domain for robust controller design purpose. The closed loop system is configured into two port model form and H? robust controller is synthesized. The H?controller is designed based on singular value loop shaping and desired magnitude of control input. The selection of desired disturbance attenuation factor and size of the largest anticipated multiplicative plant perturbation for loop shaping of H? robust controller form a constrained multi-objective optimization problem. The performance and robustness of the proposed controller is tested under transient condition of a nuclear power plant in Pakistan and found satisfactory.

  18. Teaching About Nature's Nuclear Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J M

    2005-01-01

    Naturally occurring nuclear reactors existed in uranium deposits on Earth long before Enrico Fermi built the first man-made nuclear reactor beneath Staggs Field in 1942. In the story of their discovery, there are important lessons to be learned about scientific inquiry and scientific discovery. Now, there is evidence to suggest that the Earth's magnetic field and Jupiter's atmospheric turbulence are driven by planetary-scale nuclear reactors. The subject of planetocentric nuclear fission reactors can be a jumping off point for stimulating classroom discussions about the nature and implications of planetary energy sources and about the geomagnetic field. But more importantly, the subject can help to bring into focus the importance of discussing, debating, and challenging current thinking in a variety of areas.

  19. Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlos Chavez-Mercado; Jaime B. Morales-Sandoval; Benjamin E. Zayas-Perez

    1998-12-31

    The Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory (NREAL) is a sophisticated computer system with state-of-the-art analytical tools and technology for analysis of light water reactors. Multiple application software tools can be activated to carry out different analyses and studies such as nuclear fuel reload evaluation, safety operation margin measurement, transient and severe accident analysis, nuclear reactor instability, operator training, normal and emergency procedures optimization, and human factors engineering studies. An advanced graphic interface, driven through touch-sensitive screens, provides the means to interact with specialized software and nuclear codes. The interface allows the visualization and control of all observable variables in a nuclear power plant (NPP), as well as a selected set of nonobservable or not directly controllable variables from conventional control panels.

  20. Nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Center (CCN) of IPEN produces nuclear fuel for the continuous operation of the IEA-R1 research reactor of IPEN. The serial production started in 1988, when the first nuclear fuel element was delivered for IEA-R1. In 2011, CCN proudly presents the 100{sup th} nuclear fuel element produced. Besides routine production, development of new technologies is also a permanent concern at CCN. In 2005, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} were replaced by U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-based fuels, and the research of U Mo is currently under investigation. Additionally, the Brazilian Multipurpose Research Reactor (RMB), whose project will rely on the CCN for supplying fuel and uranium targets. Evolving from an annual production from 10 to 70 nuclear fuel elements, plus a thousand uranium targets, is a huge and challenging task. To accomplish it, a new and modern Nuclear Fuel Factory is being concluded, and it will provide not only structure for scaling up, but also a safer and greener production. The Nuclear Engineering Center has shown, along several years, expertise in the field of nuclear, energy systems and correlated areas. Due to the experience obtained during decades in research and technological development at Brazilian Nuclear Program, personnel has been trained and started to actively participate in design of the main system that will compose the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) which will make Brazil self-sufficient in production of radiopharmaceuticals. The institution has participated in the monitoring and technical support concerning the safety, licensing and modernization of the research reactors IPEN/MB-01 and IEA-R1. Along the last two decades, numerous specialized services of engineering for the Brazilian nuclear power plants Angra 1 and Angra 2 have been carried out. The contribution in service, research, training, and teaching in addition to the development of many related technologies applied to nuclear engineering and correlated areas enable the institution to

  1. Heat Transfer Salts for Nuclear Reactor Systems - Chemistry Control, Corrosion Mitigation, and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Mark [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Peterson, Per [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Calderoni, Pattrick [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Scheele, Randall [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Casekka, Andrew [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); McNamara, Bruce [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-01-22

    The concept of a molten salt reactor has existed for nearly sixty years. Previously all work was done during a large collaborative effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, culminating in a research reactor which operated for 15,000 hours without major error. This technical success has garnished interest in modern, high temperature, reactor schemes. Research using molten fluoride salts for nuclear applications requires a steady supply of high grade molten salts. There is no bulk supplier of research grade fluoride salts in the world, so a facility which could provide all the salt needed for testing at the University of Wisconsin had to be produced. Two salt purification devices were made for this purpose, a large scale purifier, and a small scale purifier, each designed to clean the salts from impurities and reduce their corrosion potential. As of now, the small scale has performed with flibe salt, hydrogen, and hydrogen fluoride, yielding clean salt. This salt is currently being used in corrosion testing facilities at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Wisconsin. Working with the beryllium based salts requires extensive safety measures and health monitoring to prevent the development of acute or chronic beryllium disease, two pulmonary diseases created by an allergic reaction to beryllium in the lungs. Extensive health monitoring, engineering controls, and environment monitoring had to be set up with the University of Wisconsin department of Environment, Health and Safety. The hydrogen fluoride required for purification was also an extreme health hazard requiring thoughtful planning and execution. These dangers have made research a slow and tedious process. Simple processes, such as chemical handling and clean-up, can take large amounts of ingenuity and time. Other work has complemented the experimental research at Wisconsin to advance high temperature reactor goals. Modeling work has been performed in house to re

  2. Fundamentals of Nuclear Reactor Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, E E

    2008-01-01

    This new streamlined text offers a one-semester treatment of the essentials of how the fission nuclear reactor works, the various approaches to the design of reactors, and their safe and efficient operation. The book includes numerous worked-out examples and end-of-chapter questions to help reinforce the knowledge presented. This textbook offers an engineering-oriented introduction to nuclear physics, with a particular focus on how those physics are put to work in the service of generating nuclear-based power, particularly the importance of neutron reactions and neutron behavior. Engin

  3. A simplified model for calculating atmospheric radionuclide transport and early health effects from nuclear reactor accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madni, I.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Cazzoli, E.G.; Khatib-Rahbar, M. [Energy Research, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

    1995-11-01

    During certain hypothetical severe accidents in a nuclear power plant, radionuclides could be released to the environment as a plume. Prediction of the atmospheric dispersion and transport of these radionuclides is important for assessment of the risk to the public from such accidents. A simplified PC-based model was developed that predicts time-integrated air concentration of each radionuclide at any location from release as a function of time integrated source strength using the Gaussian plume model. The solution procedure involves direct analytic integration of air concentration equations over time and position, using simplified meteorology. The formulation allows for dry and wet deposition, radioactive decay and daughter buildup, reactor building wake effects, the inversion lid effect, plume rise due to buoyancy or momentum, release duration, and grass height. Based on air and ground concentrations of the radionuclides, the early dose to an individual is calculated via cloudshine, groundshine, and inhalation. The model also calculates early health effects based on the doses. This paper presents aspects of the model that would be of interest to the prediction of environmental flows and their public consequences.

  4. Thermal-Hydraulic Experiments and Modelling for Advanced Nuclear Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, C. H.; Chung, M. K.; Park, C. K. and others

    2005-04-15

    The objectives of the project are to study thermal hydraulic characteristics of reactor primary system for the verification of the reactor safety and to evaluate new safety concepts of new safety design features. To meet the research goal, several thermal hydraulic experiments were performed and related thermal hydraulic models were developed with the experimental data which were produced through the thermal hydraulic experiments. Followings are main research topics; - Multi-dimensional Phenomena in a Reactor Vessel Downcomer - Condensation Load and Thermal Mixing in the IRWST - Development of Thermal-Hydraulic Models for Two-Phase Flow - Development of Measurement Techniques for Two-Phase Flow - Supercritical Reactor T/H Characteristics Analysis From the above experimental and analytical studies, new safety design features of the advanced power reactors were verified and lots of the safety issues were also resolved.

  5. Reactor antineutrinos and nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balantekin, A. B.

    2016-11-01

    Short-baseline reactor neutrino experiments successfully measured the neutrino parameters they set out to measure, but they also identified a shape distortion in the 5-7 MeV range as well as a reduction from the predicted value of the flux. Nuclear physics input into the calculations of reactor antineutrino spectra needs to be better refined if this anomaly is to be interpreted as due to sterile neutrino states.

  6. CHANGE IN DEFORMATION PROPERTIES MODELING OF CONCRETE IN PROTECTIVE STRUCTURES OF NUCLEAR REACTOR BY IONIZING RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K. Agakhanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The necessity of studying the effect impact of elementary particles impact on the strength and deformation materials properties used in protective constructions nuclear reactors and reactor technology has been stipulated. A nuclear reactor pressure vessel from prestressed concrete, combining the functions of biological protection is to be considered. The neutron flux problem distribution in the pressure vessel of a nuclear reactor has been solved. The solution is made in axisymmetric with the finite element method using a flat triangular finite element. Computing has been conducted in Matlab package. The comparison with the results has been obtained using the finite difference method, as well as the graphs of changes under the influence of radiation exposure and the elastic modulus of concrete radiation deformations have been constructed. The proposed method allows to simulate changes in the deformation properties of concrete under the influence of neutron irradiation. Results of the study can be used in the calculation of stress-strain state of structures, taking into account indirect heterogeneity caused by the physical fields influence.

  7. Nuclear reactor downcomer flow deflector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, Charles B. (Greensburg, PA); Altman, David A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Singleton, Norman R. (Murrysville, PA)

    2011-02-15

    A nuclear reactor having a coolant flow deflector secured to a reactor core barrel in line with a coolant inlet nozzle. The flow deflector redirects incoming coolant down an annulus between the core barrel and the reactor vessel. The deflector has a main body with a front side facing the fluid inlet nozzle and a rear side facing the core barrel. The rear side of the main body has at least one protrusion secured to the core barrel so that a gap exists between the rear side of the main body adjacent the protrusion and the core barrel. Preferably, the protrusion is a relief that circumscribes the rear side of the main body.

  8. Fuel Fabrication and Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    The uranium from the enrichment plant is still in the form of UF6. UF6 is not suitable for use in a reactor due to its highly corrosive chemistry as well as its phase diagram. UF6 is converted into UO2 fuel pellets, which are in turn placed in fuel rods and assemblies. Reactor designs are variable in moderators, coolants, fuel, performance etc.The dream of energy ‘too-cheap to meter’ is no more, and now the nuclear power industry is pushing ahead with advanced reactor designs.

  9. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jong E.

    2005-11-01

    Earlier experiments determined that the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR) core is cooled, not by an axial flow, but rather by a strong cross flow due to the thermal expansion of the coolant. To further complicate the flow field, a nitrogen-16 (N-16) pump was installed above the PSBR core to mix the exiting core buoyant thermal plume in order to delay the rapid release of radioactive N-16 to the PSBR pool surface. Thus, the interaction between the N-16 jet flow and the buoyancy driven flow complicates the analysis of the flow distribution in the PSBR pool. The main objectives of this study is to model the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the PSBR core and pool. During this study four major things were performed including the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model for the PSBR pool, the stand-alone fuel rod model for a PSBR fuel rod, the velocity measurements in and around the PSBR core, and the temperature measurements in the PSBR pool. Once the flow field was predicted by the CFD model, the measurement devices were manufactured and calibrated based on the CFD results. The major contribution of this study is to understand and to explain the flow behavior in the PSBR subchannels and pool using the FLOW3D model. The stand-alone dynamic fuel rod model was developed to determine the temperature distribution inside a PSBR fuel rod. The stand-alone fuel rod model was coupled to the FLOW3D model and used to predict the temperature behavior during steady-state and pulsing. The heat transfer models in the stand-alone fuel rod code are used in order to overcome the disadvantage of the CFD code, which does not calculate the mechanical stress, the gap conductance, and the two phase heat transfer. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  10. Nuclear reactor PBMR and cogeneration; Reactor nuclear PBMR y cogeneracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G., E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In recent years the nuclear reactor designs for the electricity generation have increased their costs, so that at the moment costs are managed of around the 5000 US D for installed kw, reason for which a big nuclear plant requires of investments of the order of billions of dollars, the designed reactors as modular of low power seek to lighten the initial investment of a big reactor dividing the power in parts and dividing in modules the components to lower the production costs, this way it can begin to build a module and finished this to build other, differing the long term investment, getting less risk therefore in the investment. On the other hand the reactors of low power can be very useful in regions where is difficult to have access to the electric net being able to take advantage of the thermal energy of the reactor to feed other processes like the water desalination or the vapor generation for the processes industry like the petrochemical, or even more the possible hydrogen production to be used as fuel. In this work the possibility to generate vapor of high quality for the petrochemical industry is described using a spheres bed reactor of high temperature. (Author)

  11. Oklo reactors and implications for nuclear science

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, E D; Sharapov, E I

    2014-01-01

    We summarize the nuclear physics interests in the Oklo natural nuclear reactors, focusing particularly on developments over the past two decades. Modeling of the reactors has become increasingly sophisticated, employing Monte Carlo simulations with realistic geometries and materials that can generate both the thermal and epithermal fractions. The water content and the temperatures of the reactors have been uncertain parameters. We discuss recent work pointing to lower temperatures than earlier assumed. Nuclear cross sections are input to all Oklo modeling and we discuss a parameter, the $^{175}$Lu ground state cross section for thermal neutron capture leading to the isomer $^{176\\mathrm{m}}$ Lu, that warrants further investigation. Studies of the time dependence of dimensionless fundamental constants have been a driver for much of the recent work on Oklo. We critically review neutron resonance energy shifts and their dependence on the fine structure constant $\\alpha$ and the ratio $X_q=m_q/\\Lambda$ (where $m_...

  12. Modeling of Complex Wear Behavior Associated with Grid-to-Rod Fretting in Light Water Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, P. J.; Qu, J.; Lu, R.

    2016-09-01

    Fretting wear damage to fuel cladding from flow-induced vibrations can be a significant concern in the operation of light water nuclear reactors. For years, research on the grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) phenomena has been underway in countries where nuclear power production is a significant industry. Under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, an effort has been underway to develop and test an engineering wear model for zirconium alloy fuel rod cladding against a supporting grid. The multi-stage model accounts for oxide layers and wear rate transitions. This paper describes the basis for a GTRF engineering wear model, the physical significance of the wear factor it contains, and recent progress toward model validation based on a fretting wear testing apparatus that accounts for coolant temperature, pressure, and the presence of periodic impacts (gaps) in grid/rod contact.

  13. Modeling of Complex Wear Behavior Associated with Grid-to-Rod Fretting in Light Water Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, P. J.; Qu, J.; Lu, R.

    2016-11-01

    Fretting wear damage to fuel cladding from flow-induced vibrations can be a significant concern in the operation of light water nuclear reactors. For years, research on the grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) phenomena has been underway in countries where nuclear power production is a significant industry. Under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, an effort has been underway to develop and test an engineering wear model for zirconium alloy fuel rod cladding against a supporting grid. The multi-stage model accounts for oxide layers and wear rate transitions. This paper describes the basis for a GTRF engineering wear model, the physical significance of the wear factor it contains, and recent progress toward model validation based on a fretting wear testing apparatus that accounts for coolant temperature, pressure, and the presence of periodic impacts (gaps) in grid/rod contact.

  14. Progress in the Development of Compressible, Multiphase Flow Modeling Capability for Nuclear Reactor Flow Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. A. Berry; R. Saurel; F. Petitpas; E. Daniel; O. Le Metayer; S. Gavrilyuk; N. Dovetta

    2008-10-01

    In nuclear reactor safety and optimization there are key issues that rely on in-depth understanding of basic two-phase flow phenomena with heat and mass transfer. Within the context of multiphase flows, two bubble-dynamic phenomena – boiling (heterogeneous) and flashing or cavitation (homogeneous boiling), with bubble collapse, are technologically very important to nuclear reactor systems. The main difference between boiling and flashing is that bubble growth (and collapse) in boiling is inhibited by limitations on the heat transfer at the interface, whereas bubble growth (and collapse) in flashing is limited primarily by inertial effects in the surrounding liquid. The flashing process tends to be far more explosive (and implosive), and is more violent and damaging (at least in the near term) than the bubble dynamics of boiling. However, other problematic phenomena, such as crud deposition, appear to be intimately connecting with the boiling process. In reality, these two processes share many details.

  15. Gaseous fuel nuclear reactor research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenk, F. C.; Thom, K.

    1975-01-01

    Gaseous-fuel nuclear reactors are described; their distinguishing feature is the use of fissile fuels in a gaseous or plasma state, thereby breaking the barrier of temperature imposed by solid-fuel elements. This property creates a reactor heat source that may be able to heat the propellant of a rocket engine to 10,000 or 20,000 K. At this temperature level, gas-core reactors would provide the breakthrough in propulsion needed to open the entire solar system to manned and unmanned spacecraft. The possibility of fuel recycling makes possible efficiencies of up to 65% and nuclear safety at reduced cost, as well as high-thrust propulsion capabilities with specific impulse up to 5000 sec.

  16. Nuclear Reactors and Technology; (USA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on EDB and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to EDB, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user's needs.

  17. Simulation of a channel blockage transient in the Angra 2 Nuclear Reactor using a RELAP5-3D model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Mantecon, Javier; Costa, Antonella L.; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.; Pereira, Claubia; Reis, Patricia A.L.; Scari, Maria E., E-mail: mantecon1987@gmail.com, E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: dora@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: patricialire@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: melizabethscari@yahoo.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The Angra 2 Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) type with electrical output of about 1350 MW. The RELAP5-3D code was used to develop a detailed thermal hydraulic model of such reactor using reference data from the Angra 2 Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). In this work, a blockage transient has been investigated at full power operation. The transient herein considered is related to total obstruction of a core cooling channel of one fuel assembly. The calculations were performed using a point kinetic model. The reactor behavior after this transient was analyzed and the time evolution of cladding and coolant temperatures mass flow and void fraction are presented. (author)

  18. Nuclear reactor effluent monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minns, J.L.; Essig, T.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Radiological environmental monitoring and effluent monitoring at nuclear power plants is important both for normal operations, as well as in the event of an accident. During normal operations, environmental monitoring verifies the effectiveness of in-plant measures for controlling the release of radioactive materials in the plant. Following an accident, it would be an additional mechanism for estimating doses to members of the general public. This paper identifies the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory basis for requiring radiological environmental and effluent monitoring, licensee conditions for effluent and environmental monitoring, NRC independent oversight activities, and NRC`s program results.

  19. Multi-objective optimization of a compact pressurized water nuclear reactor computational model for biological shielding design using innovative materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunes, M.A., E-mail: matheus.tunes@usp.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 – CEP 05508 – 030 São Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira, C.R.E. de, E-mail: cassiano@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, The University of New Mexico, Farris Engineering Center, 221, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1070 (United States); Schön, C.G., E-mail: schoen@usp.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 – CEP 05508 – 030 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Use of two n-γ transport codes leads to optimized model of compact nuclear reactor. • It was possible to safely reduce both weight and volume of the biological shielding. • Best configuration obtained by using new composites for both γ and n attenuation. - Abstract: The aim of the present work is to develop a computational model of a compact pressurized water nuclear reactor (PWR) to investigate the use of innovative materials to enhance the biological shielding effectiveness. Two radiation transport codes were used: the first one – MCNP – for the PWR design and the GEM/EVENT to simulate (in a 1D slab) the behavior of several materials and shielding thickness on gamma and neutron radiation. Additionally MATLAB Optimization Toolbox was used to provide new geometric configurations of the slab aiming at reducing the volume and weight of the walls by means of a cost/objective function. It is demonstrated in the reactor model that the dose rate outside biological shielding has been reduced by one order of magnitude for the optimized model compared with the initial configuration. Volume and weight of the shielding walls were also reduced. The results indicated that one-dimensional deterministic code to reach an optimized geometry and test materials, combined with a three-dimensional model of a compact nuclear reactor in a stochastic code, is a fast and efficient procedure to test shielding performance and optimization before the experimental assessment. A major outcome of this research is that composite materials (ECOMASS 2150TU96) may replace (with advantages) traditional shielding materials without jeopardizing the nuclear power plant safety assurance.

  20. Nuclear Data and the Oklo Natural Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, C. R.; Sharapov, E. I.; Sonzogni, A. A.

    2014-04-01

    Data from the Oklo natural nuclear reactors have enabled some of the most sensitive terrestrial tests of time variation of dimensionless fundamental constants. The constraints on variation of αEM, the fine structure constant are particular good, but depend on the reliability of the nuclear data, and on the reliability of the modeling of the reactor environment. We briefly review the history of these tests and discuss our recent work in 1) attempting to better bound the temperatures at which the reactors operated, 2) investigating whether the γ-ray fluxes in the reactors could have contributed to changing lutetium isotopic abundances and 3) determining whether lanthanum isotopic data could provide an alternate estimate of the neutron fluence.

  1. A model of reactor kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, A.S.; Thompson, B.R.

    1988-09-01

    The analytical model of nuclear reactor transients, incorporating both mechanical and nuclear effects, simulates reactor kinetics. Linear analysis shows the stability borderline for small power perturbations. In a stable system, initial power disturbances die out with time. With an unstable combination of nuclear and mechanical characteristics, initial disturbances persist and may increase with time. With large instability, oscillations of great magnitude occur. Stability requirements set limits on the power density at which particular reactors can operate. The limiting power density depends largely on the product of two terms: the fraction of delayed neutrons and the frictional damping of vibratory motion in reactor core components. As the fraction of delayed neutrons is essentially fixed, mechanical damping largely determines the maximum power density. A computer program, based on the analytical model, calculates and plots reactor power as a nonlinear function of time in response to assigned values of mechanical and nuclear characteristics.

  2. Reactors for nuclear electric propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Propulsion is the key to space exploitation and power is the key to propulsion. This paper examines the role of nuclear fission reactors as the primary power source for high specific impulse electric propulsion systems for space missions of the 1980s and 1990s. Particular mission applications include transfer to and a reusable orbital transfer vehicle from low-Earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit, outer planet exploration and reconnaissance missions, and as a versatile space tug supporting lunar resource development. Nuclear electric propulsion is examined as an indispensable component in space activities of the next two decades.

  3. THATCH: A computer code for modelling thermal networks of high- temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroeger, P.G.; Kennett, R.J.; Colman, J.; Ginsberg, T. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1991-10-01

    This report documents the THATCH code, which can be used to model general thermal and flow networks of solids and coolant channels in two-dimensional r-z geometries. The main application of THATCH is to model reactor thermo-hydraulic transients in High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs). The available modules simulate pressurized or depressurized core heatup transients, heat transfer to general exterior sinks or to specific passive Reactor Cavity Cooling Systems, which can be air or water-cooled. Graphite oxidation during air or water ingress can be modelled, including the effects of added combustion products to the gas flow and the additional chemical energy release. A point kinetics model is available for analyzing reactivity excursions; for instance due to water ingress, and also for hypothetical no-scram scenarios. For most HTGR transients, which generally range over hours, a user-selected nodalization of the core in r-z geometry is used. However, a separate model of heat transfer in the symmetry element of each fuel element is also available for very rapid transients. This model can be applied coupled to the traditional coarser r-z nodalization. This report described the mathematical models used in the code and the method of solution. It describes the code and its various sub-elements. Details of the input data and file usage, with file formats, is given for the code, as well as for several preprocessing and postprocessing options. The THATCH model of the currently applicable 350 MW{sub th} reactor is described. Input data for four sample cases are given with output available in fiche form. Installation requirements and code limitations, as well as the most common error indications are listed. 31 refs., 23 figs., 32 tabs.

  4. The SAM software system for modeling severe accidents at nuclear power plants equipped with VVER reactors on full-scale and analytic training simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchaya, D. Yu.; Fuks, R. L.

    2014-04-01

    The architecture of the SAM software package intended for modeling beyond-design-basis accidents at nuclear power plants equipped with VVER reactors evolving into a severe stage with core melting and failure of the reactor pressure vessel is presented. By using the SAM software package it is possible to perform comprehensive modeling of the entire emergency process from the failure initiating event to the stage of severe accident involving meltdown of nuclear fuel, failure of the reactor pressure vessel, and escape of corium onto the concrete basement or into the corium catcher with retention of molten products in it.

  5. Heat for industry from nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikoin, I.K.; Novikov, V.M.

    Two factors which incline nations toward the use of heat from nuclear reactors for industrial use are: 1) exhaustion of cheap fossil fuel resources, and 2) ecological problems associated both with extraction of fossil fuel from the earth and with its combustion. In addition to the usual problems that beset nuclear reactors, special problems associated with using heat from nuclear reactors in various industries are explored.

  6. Nonlinear Fractional Sliding Mode Controller Based on Reduced Order FNPK Model for Output Power Control of Nuclear Research Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davijani, Nafiseh Zare; Jahanfarnia, Gholamreza; Abharian, Amir Esmaeili

    2017-01-01

    One of the most important issues with respect to nuclear reactors is power control. In this study, we designed a fractional-order sliding mode controller based on a nonlinear fractional-order model of the reactor system in order to track the reference power trajectory and overcome uncertainties and external disturbances. Since not all of the variables in an operating reactor are measurable or specified in the control law, we propose a reduced-order fractional neutron point kinetic (ROFNPK) model based on measurable variables. In the design, we assume the differences between the approximated model and the real system is limited. We use the obtained model in the controller design process and use the Lyapunov method to perform a stability analysis of the closed-loop system. We simulate the proposed reduced-order fractional-order sliding mode controller (ROFOSMC) using Matlab/Simulink, and its performance is compared with that of a reduced order integer-order sliding mode controller (ROIOSMC). Our simulation results indicate an acceptable performance of the proposed approach in tracking the reference power trajectory with respect to ROIOSMC because of faster response of control effort signal and the smaller tracking error. Moreover, the results illustrate the capability of the controller in rejection of the disturbance and the noise signals and the robustness of controller against uncertainty.

  7. Autonomous Control of Space Nuclear Reactors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nuclear reactors to support future robotic and manned missions impose new and innovative technological requirements for their control and protection instrumentation....

  8. Environmental impact assessment of the nuclear reactor at Vinca, based on the data on emission of radioactivity from the literature: A modeling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gršić Z.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Research activities of Vinca Institite have been based on two heavy water research reactors: 10 MW one, RA and zero power RB. Reactor RA was operational from 1962 to 1982. In 2010, spent fuel have been sent to the country of origin, and reactor now is in decommissioning. During operational phase of the reactor there were no recorded accidental releases into the environment just operational ones. Results of the environmental impact assessment, of the assumed emission of radionuclides, from the ventilation of nuclear reactor "RA" in Vinca, to the atmospheric boundary layer are presented in this paper. Evaluation was done by using the Gaussian straight-line diffusion model and taking into account characteristics of the reactor ventilation system, the assumed emission release of radioactivity (from the literature, site-specific meteorological data for six-year period and local topography around nuclear reactor, and corresponding dose factors for inventory of radionuclides. Based on the described approach, and assuming that the range of appropriate meteorological data for six year period for the application of described mathematical model is enough for this kind of analysis, it can be concluded that the nuclear reactor "RA", in the course of its work from 1962 to 1982, had no influence on the surrounding environment through the air above regulatory limits. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45003

  9. Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors, establishes reactor safety requirements to assure that reactors are sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that adequately protects health and safety and is in accordance with uniform standards, guides, and codes which are consistent with those applied to comparable licensed reactors. This document identifies nuclear safety criteria applied to NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) licensed reactors. The titles of the chapters and sections of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.70, Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Rev. 3, are used as the format for compiling the NRC criteria applied to the various areas of nuclear safety addressed in a safety analysis report for a nuclear reactor. In each section the criteria are compiled in four groups: (1) Code of Federal Regulations, (2) US NRC Regulatory Guides, SRP Branch Technical Positions and Appendices, (3) Codes and Standards, and (4) Supplemental Information. The degree of application of these criteria to a DOE-owned reactor, consistent with their application to comparable licensed reactors, must be determined by the DOE and DOE contractor.

  10. Oklo reactors and implications for nuclear science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, E. D.; Gould, C. R.; Sharapov, E. I.

    2014-04-01

    We summarize the nuclear physics interests in the Oklo natural nuclear reactors, focusing particularly on developments over the past two decades. Modeling of the reactors has become increasingly sophisticated, employing Monte Carlo simulations with realistic geometries and materials that can generate both the thermal and epithermal fractions. The water content and the temperatures of the reactors have been uncertain parameters. We discuss recent work pointing to lower temperatures than earlier assumed. Nuclear cross-sections are input to all Oklo modeling and we discuss a parameter, the 175Lu ground state cross-section for thermal neutron capture leading to the isomer 176mLu, that warrants further investigation. Studies of the time dependence of dimensionless fundamental constants have been a driver for much of the recent work on Oklo. We critically review neutron resonance energy shifts and their dependence on the fine structure constant α and the ratio Xq = mq/Λ (where mq is the average of the u and d current quark masses and Λ is the mass scale of quantum chromodynamics (QCD)). We suggest a formula for the combined sensitivity to α and Xq that exhibits the dependence on proton number Z and mass number A, potentially allowing quantum electrodynamic (QED) and QCD effects to be disentangled if a broader range of isotopic abundance data becomes available.

  11. Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    This document is a compilation and source list of nuclear safety criteria that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) applies to licensed reactors; it can be used by DOE and DOE contractors to identify NRC criteria to be evaluated for application to the DOE reactors under their cognizance. The criteria listed are those that are applied to the areas of nuclear safety addressed in the safety analysis report of a licensed reactor. They are derived from federal regulations, USNRC regulatory guides, Standard Review Plan (SRP) branch technical positions and appendices, and industry codes and standards.

  12. The Design of a Nuclear Reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this largely pedagogical article is toemploy pre-college physics to arrive at an understanding of a system as complex as a nuclear reactor. We focus on three key issues: the fuelpin, the moderator, and lastly the dimensions ofthe nuclear reactor.

  13. Nuclear reactor composite fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, Donn M. (Richland, WA); Marr, Duane R. (West Richland, WA); Cappiello, Michael W. (Richland, WA); Omberg, Ronald P. (Richland, WA)

    1980-01-01

    A core and composite fuel assembly for a liquid-cooled breeder nuclear reactor including a plurality of elongated coextending driver and breeder fuel elements arranged to form a generally polygonal bundle within a thin-walled duct. The breeder elements are larger in cross section than the driver elements, and each breeder element is laterally bounded by a number of the driver elements. Each driver element further includes structure for spacing the driver elements from adjacent fuel elements and, where adjacent, the thin-walled duct. A core made up of the fuel elements can advantageously include fissile fuel of only one enrichment, while varying the effective enrichment of any given assembly or core region, merely by varying the relative number and size of the driver and breeder elements.

  14. Design of an Organic Simplified Nuclear Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Koroush Shirvan; Eric Forrest

    2016-01-01

    Numerous advanced reactor concepts have been proposed to replace light water reactors ever since their establishment as the dominant technology for nuclear energy production. While most designs seek to improve cost competitiveness and safety, the implausibility of doing so with affordable materials or existing nuclear fuel infrastructure reduces the possibility of near-term deployment, especially in developing countries. The organic nuclear concept, first explored in the 1950s, offers an attr...

  15. Proliferation Resistant Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, L W; Moody, K J; Bradley, K S; Lorenzana, H E

    2011-02-18

    Global appetite for fission power is projected to grow dramatically this century, and for good reason. Despite considerable research to identify new sources of energy, fission remains the most plentiful and practical alternative to fossil fuels. The environmental challenges of fossil fuel have made the fission power option increasingly attractive, particularly as we are forced to rely on reserves in ecologically fragile or politically unstable corners of the globe. Caught between a globally eroding fossil fuel reserve as well as the uncertainty and considerable costs in the development of fusion power, most of the world will most likely come to rely on fission power for at least the remainder of the 21st century. Despite inevitable growth, fission power faces enduring challenges in sustainability and security. One of fission power's greatest hurdles to universal acceptance is the risk of potential misuse for nefarious purposes of fissionable byproducts in spent fuel, such as plutonium. With this issue in mind, we have discussed intrinsic concepts in this report that are motivated by the premise that the utility, desirability, and applicability of nuclear materials can be reduced. In a general sense, the intrinsic solutions aim to reduce or eliminate the quantity of existing weapons usable material; avoid production of new weapons-usable material through enrichment, breeding, extraction; or employ engineering solutions to make the fuel cycle less useful or more difficult for producing weapons-usable material. By their nature, these schemes require modifications to existing fuel cycles. As such, the concomitants of these modifications require engagement from the nuclear reactor and fuel-design community to fully assess their effects. Unfortunately, active pursuit of any scheme that could further complicate the spread of domestic nuclear power will probably be understandably unpopular. Nevertheless, the nonproliferation and counterterrorism issues are paramount

  16. Nuclear reactor kinetics and plant control

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2013-01-01

    Understanding time-dependent behaviors of nuclear reactors and the methods of their control is essential to the operation and safety of nuclear power plants. This book provides graduate students, researchers, and engineers in nuclear engineering comprehensive information on both the fundamental theory of nuclear reactor kinetics and control and the state-of-the-art practice in actual plants, as well as the idea of how to bridge the two. The first part focuses on understanding fundamental nuclear kinetics. It introduces delayed neutrons, fission chain reactions, point kinetics theory, reactivit

  17. Axisymmetric whole pin life modelling of advanced gas-cooled reactor nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mella, R.; Wenman, M. R.

    2013-06-01

    Thermo-mechanical contributions to pellet-clad interaction (PCI) in advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGRs) are modelled in the ABAQUS finite element (FE) code. User supplied sub-routines permit the modelling of the non-linear behaviour of AGR fuel through life. Through utilisation of ABAQUS's well-developed pre- and post-processing ability, the behaviour of the axially constrained steel clad fuel was modelled. The 2D axisymmetric model includes thermo-mechanical behaviour of the fuel with time and condition dependent material properties. Pellet cladding gap dynamics and thermal behaviour are also modelled. The model treats heat up as a fully coupled temperature-displacement study. Dwell time and direct power cycling was applied to model the impact of online refuelling, a key feature of the AGR. The model includes the visco-plastic behaviour of the fuel under the stress and irradiation conditions within an AGR core and a non-linear heat transfer model. A multiscale fission gas release model is applied to compute pin pressure; this model is coupled to the PCI gap model through an explicit fission gas inventory code. Whole pin, whole life, models are able to show the impact of the fuel on all segments of cladding including weld end caps and cladding pellet locking mechanisms (unique to AGR fuel). The development of this model in a commercial FE package shows that the development of a potentially verified and future-proof fuel performance code can be created and used. The usability of a FE based fuel performance code would be an enhancement over past codes. Pre- and post-processors have lowered the entry barrier for the development of a fuel performance model to permit the ability to model complicated systems. Typical runtimes for a 5 year axisymmetric model takes less than one hour on a single core workstation. The current model has implemented: Non-linear fuel thermal behaviour, including a complex description of heat flow in the fuel. Coupled with a variety of

  18. Models and numerical methods for the simulation of loss-of-coolant accidents in nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    In view of the simulation of the water flows in pressurized water reactors (PWR), many models are available in the literature and their complexity deeply depends on the required accuracy, see for instance [1]. The loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) may appear when a pipe is broken through. The coolant is composed by light water in its liquid form at very high temperature and pressure (around 300 °C and 155 bar), it then flashes and becomes instantaneously vapor in case of LOCA. A front of liquid/vapor phase transition appears in the pipes and may propagate towards the critical parts of the PWR. It is crucial to propose accurate models for the whole phenomenon, but also sufficiently robust to obtain relevant numerical results. Due to the application we have in mind, a complete description of the two-phase flow (with all the bubbles, droplets, interfaces…) is out of reach and irrelevant. We investigate averaged models, based on the use of void fractions for each phase, which represent the probability of presence of a phase at a given position and at a given time. The most accurate averaged model, based on the so-called Baer-Nunziato model, describes separately each phase by its own density, velocity and pressure. The two phases are coupled by non-conservative terms due to gradients of the void fractions and by source terms for mechanical relaxation, drag force and mass transfer. With appropriate closure laws, it has been proved [2] that this model complies with all the expected physical requirements: positivity of densities and temperatures, maximum principle for the void fraction, conservation of the mixture quantities, decrease of the global entropy… On the basis of this model, it is possible to derive simpler models, which can be used where the flow is still, see [3]. From the numerical point of view, we develop new Finite Volume schemes in [4], which also satisfy the requirements mentioned above. Since they are based on a partial linearization of the physical

  19. The Development of Nufreq-N AN Analytical Model for the Stability Analysis of Nuclear Coupled Density-Wave Oscillations in Boiling Water Nuclear Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Goon Cherl

    A state-of-the-art one-dimensional thermal-hydraulic model has been developed to be used for the linear analysis of nuclear-coupled density-wave oscillations in a boiling water nuclear reactor (BWR). The model accounts for phasic slip, distributed spacers, subcooled boiling, space/time -dependent power distributions and distributed heated wall dynamics. In addition to a parallel channel stability analysis, a detailed model was derived for the BWR loop analysis of both the natural and forced circulation modes of operation. In its final form, this model constitutes a multi -input, multi-output(MIMO) linear system, which features a general nodal neutron kinetics model. Kinetics parameters for use in the kinetics model have been obtained by utilizing self-consistent nodal data and power distributions. The stability characteristics of a typical BWR/4 has been investigated with the Nyquist criterion. The computer implementation of this model, NUFREQ -N, was used for the parametric study of a typical BWR/4 and comparisons were made with existing in-core and out -of-core data. Also, NUFREQ-N was used to analyze the expected stability characteristics of a typical BWR/4. The parametric results revealed important factors influencing BWR stability margin. It was found that NUFREQ -N generally agreed well with out-of-core data. This was especially true for the predicted power-to-flow transfer function, which is the most important transfer function in thermal-hydraulic stability analysis. In the stability analysis of a typical BWR/4 it was found that it is very important to use accurate models of thermal-hydraulic and neutron kinetic phenomena. Moreover, the accuracy of the nuclear input data is extremely important.

  20. Electrochemistry of Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, Dgiby; Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna; Pitt, Jonathan

    2006-08-08

    This project developed a comprehensive mathematical and simulation model for calculating thermal hydraulic, electrochemical, and corrosion parameters, viz. temperature, fluid flow velocity, pH, corrosion potential, hydrogen injection, oxygen contamination, stress corrosion cracking, crack growth rate, and other important quantities in the coolant circuits of water-cooled nuclear power plants, including both Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The model is being used to assess the three major operational problems in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), which include mass transport, activity transport, and the axial offset anomaly, and provide a powerful tool for predicting the accumulation of SCC damage in BWR primary coolant circuits as a function of operating history. Another achievement of the project is the development of a simulation tool to serve both as a training tool for plant operators and as an engineering test-bed to evaluate new equipment and operating strategies (normal operation, cold shut down and others). The development and implementation of the model allows us to estimate the activity transport or "radiation fields" around the primary loop and the vessel, as a function of the operating parameters and the water chemistry.

  1. Hysteresis phenomenon in nuclear reactor dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirayesh, Behnam; Pazirandeh, Ali [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Science and Research Branch; Akbari, Monireh [Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Mathematics

    2017-05-15

    This paper applies a nonlinear analysis method to show that hysteresis phenomenon, due to the Saddle-node bifurcation, may occur in the nuclear reactor. This phenomenon may have significant effects on nuclear reactor dynamics and can even be the beginning of a nuclear reactor accident. A system of four dimensional nonlinear ordinary differential equations was considered to study the hysteresis phenomenon in a typical nuclear reactor. It should be noted that the reactivity was considered as a nonlinear function of state variables. The condition for emerging hysteresis was investigated using Routh-Hurwitz criterion and Sotomayor's theorem for saddle node bifurcation. A numerical analysis is also provided to illustrate the analytical results.

  2. Autonomous Control of Space Nuclear Reactors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nuclear reactors to support future lunar and Mars robotic and manned missions impose new and innovative technological requirements for their control and protection...

  3. Radiation Damage in Nuclear Fuel for Advanced Burner Reactors: Modeling and Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Niels Gronbech; Asta, Mark; Ozolins, Nigel Browning' Vidvuds; de Walle, Axel van; Wolverton, Christopher

    2011-12-29

    The consortium has completed its existence and we are here highlighting work and accomplishments. As outlined in the proposal, the objective of the work was to advance the theoretical understanding of advanced nuclear fuel materials (oxides) toward a comprehensive modeling strategy that incorporates the different relevant scales involved in radiation damage in oxide fuels. Approaching this we set out to investigate and develop a set of directions: 1) Fission fragment and ion trajectory studies through advanced molecular dynamics methods that allow for statistical multi-scale simulations. This work also includes an investigation of appropriate interatomic force fields useful for the energetic multi-scale phenomena of high energy collisions; 2) Studies of defect and gas bubble formation through electronic structure and Monte Carlo simulations; and 3) an experimental component for the characterization of materials such that comparisons can be obtained between theory and experiment.

  4. Radiation Damage in Nuclear Fuel for Advanced Burner Reactors: Modeling and Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Niels Gronbech; Asta, Mark; Ozolins, Nigel Browning' Vidvuds; de Walle, Axel van; Wolverton, Christopher

    2011-12-29

    The consortium has completed its existence and we are here highlighting work and accomplishments. As outlined in the proposal, the objective of the work was to advance the theoretical understanding of advanced nuclear fuel materials (oxides) toward a comprehensive modeling strategy that incorporates the different relevant scales involved in radiation damage in oxide fuels. Approaching this we set out to investigate and develop a set of directions: 1) Fission fragment and ion trajectory studies through advanced molecular dynamics methods that allow for statistical multi-scale simulations. This work also includes an investigation of appropriate interatomic force fields useful for the energetic multi-scale phenomena of high energy collisions; 2) Studies of defect and gas bubble formation through electronic structure and Monte Carlo simulations; and 3) an experimental component for the characterization of materials such that comparisons can be obtained between theory and experiment.

  5. Design of an organic simplified nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirvan, Koroush [Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States); Forrest, Eric [Primary Standards Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Numerous advanced reactor concepts have been proposed to replace light water reactors ever since their establishment as the dominant technology for nuclear energy production. While most designs seek to improve cost competitiveness and safety, the implausibility of doing so with affordable materials or existing nuclear fuel infrastructure reduces the possibility of near-term deployment, especially in developing countries. The organic nuclear concept, first explored in the 1950s, offers an attractive alternative to advanced reactor designs being considered. The advent of high temperature fluids, along with advances in hydrocracking and reforming technologies driven by the oil and gas industries, make the organic concept even more viable today. We present a simple, cost-effective, and safe small modular nuclear reactor for offshore underwater deployment. The core is moderated by graphite, zirconium hydride, and organic fluid while cooled by the organic fluid. The organic coolant enables operation near atmospheric pressure and use of plain carbon steel for the reactor tank and primary coolant piping system. The core is designed to mitigate the coolant degradation seen in early organic reactors. Overall, the design provides a power density of 40 kW/L, while reducing the reactor hull size by 40% compared with a pressurized water reactor while significantly reducing capital plant costs.

  6. MODERATOR ELEMENTS FOR UNIFORM POWER NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balent, R.

    1963-03-12

    This patent describes a method of obtaining a flatter flux and more uniform power generation across the core of a nuclear reactor. The method comprises using moderator elements having differing moderating strength. The elements have an increasing amount of the better moderating material as a function of radial and/or axial distance from the reactor core center. (AEC)

  7. Nuclear data requirements for fusion reactor nucleonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, M.R.; Abdou, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear data requirements for fusion reactor nucleonics are reviewed and the present status of data are assessed. The discussion is divided into broad categories dealing with data for Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT), D-T Fusion Reactors, Alternate Fuel Cycles and the Evaluated Data Files that are available or would be available in the near future.

  8. Design of an Organic Simplified Nuclear Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koroush Shirvan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous advanced reactor concepts have been proposed to replace light water reactors ever since their establishment as the dominant technology for nuclear energy production. While most designs seek to improve cost competitiveness and safety, the implausibility of doing so with affordable materials or existing nuclear fuel infrastructure reduces the possibility of near-term deployment, especially in developing countries. The organic nuclear concept, first explored in the 1950s, offers an attractive alternative to advanced reactor designs being considered. The advent of high temperature fluids, along with advances in hydrocracking and reforming technologies driven by the oil and gas industries, make the organic concept even more viable today. We present a simple, cost-effective, and safe small modular nuclear reactor for offshore underwater deployment. The core is moderated by graphite, zirconium hydride, and organic fluid while cooled by the organic fluid. The organic coolant enables operation near atmospheric pressure and use of plain carbon steel for the reactor tank and primary coolant piping system. The core is designed to mitigate the coolant degradation seen in early organic reactors. Overall, the design provides a power density of 40 kW/L, while reducing the reactor hull size by 40% compared with a pressurized water reactor while significantly reducing capital plant costs.

  9. Numerical simulation of a Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident in a small-scale model of a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbe, M.F. E-mail: robbe@aquilon.cea.frmfrobbe@cea.fr; Lepareux, M.; Treille, E.; Cariou, Y

    2003-08-01

    In the case of a Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident (HCDA) in a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor, it is assumed that the core of the nuclear reactor has melted partially and that the chemical interaction between molten fuel and liquid sodium has created a high-pressure gas bubble in the core. The violent expansion of this bubble loads and deforms the reactor vessel and the internal structures, thus endangering the safety of the nuclear plant. The MARA 10 experimental test simulates a HCDA in a 1/30-scale mock-up schematising a reactor block. In the mock-up, the liquid sodium cooling the reactor core is replaced by water and the argon blanket laying below the reactor roof is simulated by an air blanket. The explosion is triggered by an explosive charge. This paper presents a numerical simulation of the test with the EUROPLEXUS code and an analysis of the computed results. In particular, the evolution of the fluid flows and the deformations of the internal and external structures are analysed in detail. Finally, the current computed results are compared with the experimental ones and with previous numerical results computed with the SIRIUS and CASTEM-PLEXUS codes.

  10. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Zohuri, Bahman

    2015-01-01

    This text covers the fundamentals of thermodynamics required to understand electrical power generation systems and the application of these principles to nuclear reactor power plant systems. It is not a traditional general thermodynamics text, per se, but a practical thermodynamics volume intended to explain the fundamentals and apply them to the challenges facing actual nuclear power plants systems, where thermal hydraulics comes to play.  Written in a lucid, straight-forward style while retaining scientific rigor, the content is accessible to upper division undergraduate students and aimed at practicing engineers in nuclear power facilities and engineering scientists and technicians in industry, academic research groups, and national laboratories. The book is also a valuable resource for students and faculty in various engineering programs concerned with nuclear reactors. This book also: Provides extensive coverage of thermal hydraulics with thermodynamics in nuclear reactors, beginning with fundamental ...

  11. Finite element modelling of the effect of temperature and neutron dose on the fracture behaviour of nuclear reactor graphite bricks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadsworth, M.; Kyaw, S.T., E-mail: si.kyaw@nottingham.ac.uk; Sun, W.

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Effects of irradiation on fracture behaviours of graphite bricks are analysed. • Two irradiation conditions chosen are irradiation temperature and neutron dose. • The crack initiates around the keyway fillet of the brick for every study. • Higher temperature and higher neutron dose accelerate crack initiation time. • Turnaround point of hoop strain indicates the crack initiation time. - Abstract: Graphite moderator bricks used within many UK gas-cooled nuclear reactors undergo harsh temperature and radiation gradients. They cause changes in material properties of graphite over extended periods of time. Consequently, models have been developed in order to understand and predict the complex stresses formed within the brick by these processes. In this paper the effect of irradiation temperature and neutron dose on the fracture characteristics, crack initiation and crack growth are investigated. A finite element (FE) mechanical constitutive model is implemented in combination with the damage model to simulate crack growth within the graphite brick. The damage model is based on a linear traction–separation cohesive model in conjunction with the extended finite element method for arbitrary crack initiation and propagation. Results obtained have showed that cracks initiate in the vicinity of the keyway fillet of the graphite brick and initiation time accelerates with higher temperatures and doses.

  12. Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor. [LMFBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, L.R.

    1982-03-17

    This invention, which resulted from a contact with the United States Department of Energy, relates to a control mechanism for a nuclear reactor and, more particularly, to an assembly for selectively shifting different numbers of reactivity modifying rods into and out of the core of a nuclear reactor. It has been proposed heretofore to control the reactivity of a breeder reactor by varying the depth of insertion of control rods (e.g., rods containing a fertile material such as ThO/sub 2/) in the core of the reactor, thereby varying the amount of neutron-thermalizing coolant and the amount of neutron-capturing material in the core. This invention relates to a mechanism which can advantageously be used in this type of reactor control system.

  13. A model for the release, dispersion and environmental impact of a postulated reactor accident from a submerged commercial nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertch, Timothy Creston

    1998-12-01

    Nuclear power plants are inherently suitable for submerged applications and could provide power to the shore power grid or support future underwater applications. The technology exists today and the construction of a submerged commercial nuclear power plant may become desirable. A submerged reactor is safer to humans because the infinite supply of water for heat removal, particulate retention in the water column, sedimentation to the ocean floor and inherent shielding of the aquatic environment would significantly mitigate the effects of a reactor accident. A better understanding of reactor operation in this new environment is required to quantify the radioecological impact and to determine the suitability of this concept. The impact of release to the environment from a severe reactor accident is a new aspect of the field of marine radioecology. Current efforts have been centered on radioecological impacts of nuclear waste disposal, nuclear weapons testing fallout and shore nuclear plant discharges. This dissertation examines the environmental impact of a severe reactor accident in a submerged commercial nuclear power plant, modeling a postulated site on the Atlantic continental shelf adjacent to the United States. This effort models the effects of geography, decay, particle transport/dispersion, bioaccumulation and elimination with associated dose commitment. The use of a source term equivalent to the release from Chernobyl allows comparison between the impacts of that accident and the postulated submerged commercial reactor plant accident. All input parameters are evaluated using sensitivity analysis. The effect of the release on marine biota is determined. Study of the pathways to humans from gaseous radionuclides, consumption of contaminated marine biota and direct exposure as contaminated water reaches the shoreline is conducted. The model developed by this effort predicts a significant mitigation of the radioecological impact of the reactor accident release

  14. Nuclear Power from Fission Reactors. An Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Technical Information Center.

    The purpose of this booklet is to provide a basic understanding of nuclear fission energy and different fission reaction concepts. Topics discussed are: energy use and production, current uses of fuels, oil and gas consumption, alternative energy sources, fossil fuel plants, nuclear plants, boiling water and pressurized water reactors, the light…

  15. U.S. Nuclear Power Reactor Plant Status

    Data.gov (United States)

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission — Demographic data on U.S. commercial nuclear power reactors, including: plant name/unit number, docket number, location, licensee, reactor/containment type, nuclear...

  16. Reactor neutrons in nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifarth, René; Glorius, Jan; Göbel, Kathrin; Heftrich, Tanja; Jentschel, Michael; Jurado, Beatriz; Käppeler, Franz; Köster, Ulli; Langer, Christoph; Litvinov, Yuri A.; Weigand, Mario

    2017-09-01

    The huge neutron fluxes offer the possibility to use research reactors to produce isotopes of interest, which can be investigated afterwards. An example is the half-lives of long-lived isotopes like 129I. A direct usage of reactor neutrons in the astrophysical energy regime is only possible, if the corresponding ions are not at rest in the laboratory frame. The combination of an ion storage ring with a reactor and a neutron guide could open the path to direct measurements of neutron-induced cross sections on short-lived radioactive isotopes in the astrophysically interesting energy regime.

  17. Thermionic reactors for space nuclear power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griaznov, Georgii M.; Zhabotinskii, Evgenii E.; Serbin, Victor I.; Zrodnikov, Anatolii V.; Pupko, Victor Ia.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, Nikolai N.; Usov, V. A.; Nikolaev, Iu. V.

    Compact thermionic nuclear reactor systems with satisfactory mass performance are competitive with space nuclear power systems based on the organic Rankine and closed Brayton cycles. The mass characteristics of the thermionic space nuclear power system are better than that of the solar power system for power levels beyond about 10 kWe. Longlife thermionic fuel element requirements, including their optimal dimensions, and common requirements for the in-core thermionic reactor design are formulated. Thermal and fast in-core thermionic reactors are considered and the ranges of their sensible use are discussed. Some design features of the fast in-core thermionic reactors cores (power range to 1 MWe) including a choice of coolants are discussed. Mass and dimensional performance for thermionic nuclear power reactor system are assessed. It is concluded that thermionic space nuclear power systems are promising power supplies for spacecrafts and that a single basic type of thermionic fuel element may be used for power requirements ranging to several hundred kWe.

  18. Modeling Forced Flow Chemical Vapor Infiltration Fabrication of SiC-SiC Composites for Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian P. Deck

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide fiber/silicon carbide matrix (SiC-SiC composites exhibit remarkable material properties, including high temperature strength and stability under irradiation. These qualities have made SiC-SiC composites extremely desirable for use in advanced nuclear reactor concepts, where higher operating temperatures and longer lives require performance improvements over conventional metal alloys. However, fabrication efficiency advances need to be achieved. SiC composites are typically produced using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI, where gas phase precursors flow into the fiber preform and react to form a solid SiC matrix. Forced flow CVI utilizes a pressure gradient to more effectively transport reactants into the composite, reducing fabrication time. The fabrication parameters must be well understood to ensure that the resulting composite has a high density and good performance. To help optimize this process, a computer model was developed. This model simulates the transport of the SiC precursors, the deposition of SiC matrix on the fiber surfaces, and the effects of byproducts on the process. Critical process parameters, such as the temperature and reactant concentration, were simulated to identify infiltration conditions which maximize composite density while minimizing the fabrication time.

  19. Optimally moderated nuclear fission reactor and fuel source therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Terry, William K.; Gougar, Hans D.

    2008-07-22

    An improved nuclear fission reactor of the continuous fueling type involves determining an asymptotic equilibrium state for the nuclear fission reactor and providing the reactor with a moderator-to-fuel ratio that is optimally moderated for the asymptotic equilibrium state of the nuclear fission reactor; the fuel-to-moderator ratio allowing the nuclear fission reactor to be substantially continuously operated in an optimally moderated state.

  20. Introduction to the neutron kinetics of nuclear power reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Tyror, J G; Grant, P J

    2013-01-01

    An Introduction to the Neutron Kinetics of Nuclear Power Reactors introduces the reader to the neutron kinetics of nuclear power reactors. Topics covered include the neutron physics of reactor kinetics, feedback effects, water-moderated reactors, fast reactors, and methods of plant control. The reactor transients following faults are also discussed, along with the use of computers in the study of power reactor kinetics. This book is comprised of eight chapters and begins with an overview of the reactor physics characteristics of a nuclear power reactor and their influence on system design and

  1. Modeling of radiation-induced sink evolution in 6061 aluminum alloy in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sang Il; Kim, Ji Hyun [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gyeong-Geun; Kwon, Junhyun [Division of Nuclear Materials Research, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    The objective of this study is a detailed analysis of the radiation effects on sink generation and growth in order to understand the phenomenon of irradiation hardening of 6061 aluminum alloy in research reactor conditions. In order to have a fundamental understanding, various sink behavior characteristics such as size and number density of dislocation loop, void, and precipitation were calculated and examined. Thereafter, theoretical assessment of various sink effects on irradiation hardening was conducted based on the mean field rate theory (MFRT). Dislocation loop, void, and precipitation were examined by defect flux. For the quantitative analysis of radiation-induced degradation, change in sink size was calculated using number density. 6061 Alloy showed great dependence on precipitation generation and growth. However, dislocation loop and void did not have any significant effect on irradiation hardening. Finally, the behavior of sinks was compared with the experimental results for validation. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignatiev, V. [ed.; Feinberg, O.; Morozov, A. [Russian Research Centre `Kurchatov Institute`, Moscow (Russian Federation); Devell, L. [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1995-07-01

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary.

  3. Hybrid reactors: Nuclear breeding or energy production?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piera, Mireia [UNED, ETSII-Dp Ingenieria Energetica, c/Juan del Rosal 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Lafuente, Antonio; Abanades, Alberto; Martinez-Val, J.M. [ETSII-UPM, c/Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    After reviewing the long-standing tradition on hybrid research, an assessment model is presented in order to characterize the hybrid performance under different objectives. In hybrids, neutron multiplication in the subcritical blanket plays a major role, not only for energy production and nuclear breeding, but also for tritium breeding, which is fundamental requirement in fusion-fission hybrids. All three objectives are better achieved with high values of the neutron multiplication factor (k-eff) with the obvious and fundamental limitation that it cannot reach criticality under any event, particularly, in the case of a loss of coolant accident. This limitation will be very important in the selection of the coolant. Some general considerations will be proposed, as guidelines for assessing the hybrid potential in a given scenario. Those guidelines point out that hybrids can be of great interest for the future of nuclear energy in a framework of Sustainable Development, because they can contribute to the efficient exploitation of nuclear fuels, with very high safety features. Additionally, a proposal is presented on a blanket specially suited for fusion-fission hybrids, although this reactor concept is still under review, and new work is needed for identifying the most suitable blanket composition, which can vary depending on the main objective of the hybrid. (author)

  4. Dynamic Modeling and Control of Nuclear Reactors Coupled to Closed-Loop Brayton Cycle Systems using SIMULINK™

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Steven A.; Sanchez, Travis

    2005-02-01

    The operation of space reactors for both in-space and planetary operations will require unprecedented levels of autonomy and control. Development of these autonomous control systems will require dynamic system models, effective control methodologies, and autonomous control logic. This paper briefly describes the results of reactor, power-conversion, and control models that are implemented in SIMULINK™ (Simulink, 2004). SIMULINK™ is a development environment packaged with MatLab™ (MatLab, 2004) that allows the creation of dynamic state flow models. Simulation modules for liquid metal, gas cooled reactors, and electrically heated systems have been developed, as have modules for dynamic power-conversion components such as, ducting, heat exchangers, turbines, compressors, permanent magnet alternators, and load resistors. Various control modules for the reactor and the power-conversion shaft speed have also been developed and simulated. The modules are compiled into libraries and can be easily connected in different ways to explore the operational space of a number of potential reactor, power-conversion system configurations, and control approaches. The modularity and variability of these SIMULINK™ models provides a way to simulate a variety of complete power generation systems. To date, both Liquid Metal Reactors (LMR), Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR), and electric heaters that are coupled to gas-dynamics systems and thermoelectric systems have been simulated and are used to understand the behavior of these systems. Current efforts are focused on improving the fidelity of the existing SIMULINK™ modules, extending them to include isotopic heaters, heat pipes, Stirling engines, and on developing state flow logic to provide intelligent autonomy. The simulation code is called RPC-SIM (Reactor Power and Control-Simulator).

  5. Neutrino Mixing Discriminates Geo-reactor Models

    CERN Document Server

    Dye, S T

    2009-01-01

    Geo-reactor models suggest the existence of natural nuclear reactors at different deep-earth locations with loosely defined output power. Reactor fission products undergo beta decay with the emission of electron antineutrinos, which routinely escape the earth. Neutrino mixing distorts the energy spectrum of the electron antineutrinos. Characteristics of the distorted spectrum observed at the earth's surface could specify the location of a geo-reactor, discriminating the models and facilitating more precise power measurement. The existence of a geo-reactor with known position could enable a precision measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameter delta-mass-squared.

  6. ANALISIS TRANSIEN PADA FIXED BED NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rizaal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Desain teras Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR yang modular memungkinkan pengendalian daya dapat dilakukan dengan mengatur ketinggian suspended core dan laju aliran massa pendingin. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mempelajari perubahan daya termal teras sebagai akibat perubahan laju aliran massa pendingin yang masuk ke teras reaktor dan perubahan ketinggian suspended core serta mempelajari karakteristik keselamatan melekat yang dimiliki FBNR saat terjadi kegagalan pelepasan kalor (loss of heat sink. Keadaan neutronik teras dimodelkan pada kondisi tunak dengan menggunakan paket program Standard Reactor Analysis Code (SRAC untuk memperoleh data fluks neutron, konstanta grup, fraksi neutron kasip, konstanta peluruhan prekursor neutron kasip, dan beberapa parameter teras penting lainnya. Selanjutnya data tersebut digunakan pada perhitungan transien sebagai syarat awal. Analisis transien dilakukan pada tiga kondisi, yaitu saat terjadi penurunan laju aliran massa pendingin, saat terjadi penurunan ketinggian suspended core, dan saat terjadi kegagalan sistem pelepasan kalor. Hasil yang diperoleh dari penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa penurunan laju aliran massa pendingin sebesar 50%, dari kondisi normal, menyebabkan daya termal teras turun 28% dibanding daya sebelumnya. Penurunan ketinggian suspended core sebesar 30% dari ketinggian normal menyebabkan daya termal teras turun 17% dibanding daya sebelumnya. Sementara untuk kondisi kegagalan sistem pelepasan kalor, daya termal teras mengalami penurunan sebesar 76%. Dengan demikian, pengendalian daya pada FBNR dapat dilakukan dengan mengatur laju aliran massa pendingin dan ketinggian suspended core, serta keselamatan melekat yang handal pada kondisi kegagalan sistem pelepasan kalor. Kata kunci: FBNR, transien, daya, laju aliran massa, suspended core Modular in design enables Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR power controlled by the adjustment of suspended core and coolant flow rate. The main purposes of this paper

  7. Nuclear reactor materials at the atomic scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle A. Marquis

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available With the renewed interest in nuclear energy, developing new materials able to respond to the stringent requirements of the next-generation fission and future fusion reactors has become a priority. An efficient search for such materials requires detailed knowledge of material behaviour under irradiation, high temperatures and corrosive environments. Minimizing the rates of materials degradation will be possible only if the mechanisms by which it occurs are understood. Atomic-scale experimental probing as well as modelling can provide some answers and help predict in-service behaviour. This article illustrates how this approach has already improved our understanding of precipitation under irradiation, corrosion behaviour, and stress corrosion cracking. It is also now beginning to provide guidance for the development of new alloys.

  8. Fractional calculus with applications for nuclear reactor dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, Santanu Saha

    2015-01-01

    Introduces Novel Applications for Solving Neutron Transport EquationsWhile deemed nonessential in the past, fractional calculus is now gaining momentum in the science and engineering community. Various disciplines have discovered that realistic models of physical phenomenon can be achieved with fractional calculus and are using them in numerous ways. Since fractional calculus represents a reactor more closely than classical integer order calculus, Fractional Calculus with Applications for Nuclear Reactor Dynamics focuses on the application of fractional calculus to describe the physical behavi

  9. Meteodiffusive Characterization of Algiers' Nuclear Research Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourad Messaci

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the environmental impact studies of the nuclear research reactor of Algiers, we will present the work related to the atmospheric dispersion of releases due to the installation in normal operation, which dealt with the assessment of spatial distribution of yearly average values of atmospheric dilution factor. The aim of this work is a characterization of the site in terms of diffusivity, which is basic for the radiological impact evaluation of the reactor. The meteorological statistics result from the National Office of Meteorology and concern 15 years of hourly records. According to the nature and features of these data, a Gaussian-type model with wind direction sectors was used. Values of wind speed at release height were estimated from measurement values at 10 m from ground. For the assessment of vertical dispersion coefficient, we used Briggs' formulas related to a sampling time of one hour. Areas of maximum impact were delimited and points of highest concentration within these zones were identified.

  10. Nuclear reactor alignment plate configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altman, David A; Forsyth, David R; Smith, Richard E; Singleton, Norman R

    2014-01-28

    An alignment plate that is attached to a core barrel of a pressurized water reactor and fits within slots within a top plate of a lower core shroud and upper core plate to maintain lateral alignment of the reactor internals. The alignment plate is connected to the core barrel through two vertically-spaced dowel pins that extend from the outside surface of the core barrel through a reinforcement pad and into corresponding holes in the alignment plate. Additionally, threaded fasteners are inserted around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad and into the alignment plate to further secure the alignment plate to the core barrel. A fillet weld also is deposited around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad. To accomodate thermal growth between the alignment plate and the core barrel, a gap is left above, below and at both sides of one of the dowel pins in the alignment plate holes through with the dowel pins pass.

  11. Actinide transmutation in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bultman, J.H.

    1995-01-17

    An optimization method is developed to maximize the burning capability of the ALMR while complying with all constraints imposed on the design for reliability and safety. This method leads to a maximal transuranics enrichment, which is being limited by constraints on reactivity. The enrichment can be raised by using the neutrons less efficiently by increasing leakage from the fuel. With the developed optimization method, a metallic and an oxide fueled ALMR were optimized. Both reactors perform equally well considering the burning of transuranics. However, metallic fuel has a much higher heat conductivity coefficient, which in general leads to better safety characteristics. In search of a more effective waste transmuter, a modified Molten Salt Reactor was designed. A MSR operates on a liquid fuel salt which makes continuous refueling possible, eliminating the issue of the burnup reactivity loss. Also, a prompt negative reactivity feedback is possible for an overmoderated reactor design, even when the Doppler coefficient is positive, due to the fuel expansion with fuel temperature increase. Furthermore, the molten salt fuel can be reprocessed based on a reduction process which is not sensitive to the short-lived spontaneously fissioning actinides. (orig./HP).

  12. Technological Transfer from Research Nuclear Reactors to New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulescu, Laura; Pavelescu, Margarit

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is the analysis of the technological transfer role in the nuclear field, with particular emphasis on nuclear reactors domain. The presentation is sustained by historical arguments. In this frame, it is very important to start with the achievements of the first nuclear systems, for instant those with natural uranium as fuel and heavy water as moderator, following in time through the history until the New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors. Starting with 1940, the accelerated development of the industry has implied the increase of the global demand for energy. In this respect, the nuclear energy could play an important role, being essentially an unlimited source of energy. However, the nuclear option faces the challenges of increasingly demanding safety requirements, economic competitiveness and public acceptance. Worldwide, a significant amount of experience has been accumulated during development, licensing, construction, and operation of nuclear power reactors. The experience gained is a strong basis for further improvements. Actually, the nuclear programs of many countries are addressing the development of advanced reactors, which are intended to have better economics, higher reliability, improved safety, and proliferation-resistant characteristics in order to overcome the current concerns about nuclear power. Advanced reactors, now under development, may help to meet the demand for energy power of both developed and developing countries as well as for district heating, desalination and for process heat. The paper gives historical examples that illustrate the steps pursued from first research nuclear reactors to present advanced power reactors. Emphasis was laid upon the fact that the progress is due to the great discoveries of the nuclear scientists using the technological transfer.

  13. A Model for Molten Fuel-Coolant Interaction during Melt Slumping in a Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohal, Manohar Singh; Siefken, Larry James

    1999-10-01

    This paper describes a simple fuel melt slumping model to replace the current parametric model in SCDAP/RELAP5. Specifically, a fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) model is developed to analyze the slumping molten fuel, molten fuel breakup, heat transfer to coolant, relocation of the molten droplets, size of a partially solidified particles that settle to the bottom of the lower plenum, and melt-plenum interaction, if any. Considering our objectives, the molten fuel jet breakup model, and fuel droplets Lagrangian model as included in a code TEXAS-V with Eulerian thermal hydraulics for water and steam from SCDAP/RELAP5 were used. The model was assessed with experimental data from MAGICO-2000 tests performed at University of California at Santa Barbara, and FARO Test L-08 performed at Joint Research Center, Ispra, Italy. The comparison was found satisfactory.

  14. Modeling the effect in of criticality from changes in key parameters for small High Temperature Nuclear Reactor (U-BatteryTM) using MCNP4C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzi, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    The neutron transport code, Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) which was wellkown as the gold standard in predicting nuclear reaction was used to model the small nuclear reactor core called "U-batteryTM", which was develop by the University of Manchester and Delft Institute of Technology. The paper introduces on the concept of modeling the small reactor core, a high temperature reactor (HTR) type with small coated TRISO fuel particle in graphite matrix using the MCNPv4C software. The criticality of the core were calculated using the software and analysed by changing key parameters such coolant type, fuel type and enrichment levels, cladding materials, and control rod type. The criticality results from the simulation were validated using the SCALE 5.1 software by [1] M Ding and J L Kloosterman, 2010. The data produced from these analyses would be used as part of the process of proposing initial core layout and a provisional list of materials for newly design reactor core. In the future, the criticality study would be continued with different core configurations and geometries.

  15. Current Abstracts Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bales, J.D.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1993-01-01

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  16. Handbook of nuclear engineering: vol 1: nuclear engineering fundamentals; vol 2: reactor design; vol 3: reactor analysis; vol 4: reactors of waste disposal and safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The Handbook of Nuclear Engineering is an authoritative compilation of information regarding methods and data used in all phases of nuclear engineering. Addressing nuclear engineers and scientists at all academic levels, this five volume set provides the latest findings in nuclear data and experimental techniques, reactor physics, kinetics, dynamics and control. Readers will also find a detailed description of data assimilation, model validation and calibration, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, fuel management and cycles, nuclear reactor types and radiation shielding. A discussion of radioactive waste disposal, safeguards and non-proliferation, and fuel processing with partitioning and transmutation is also included. As nuclear technology becomes an important resource of non-polluting sustainable energy in the future, The Handbook of Nuclear Engineering is an excellent reference for practicing engineers, researchers and professionals.

  17. Development of an educational nuclear research reactor simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arafa, Amany Abdel Aziz; Saleh, Hassan Ibrahim [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Radiation Engineering Dept.; Ashoub, Nagieb [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Reactor Physics Dept.

    2014-12-15

    This paper introduces the development of a research reactor educational simulator based on LabVIEW that allows the training of operators and studying different accident scenarios and the effects of operational parameters on the reactor behavior. Using this simulator, the trainee can test the interaction between the input parameters and the reactor activities. The LabVIEW acts as an engine implements the reactor mathematical models. In addition, it is used as a tool for implementing the animated graphical user interface. This simulator provides the training requirements for both of the reactor staff and the nuclear engineering students. Therefore, it uses dynamic animation to enhance learning and interest for a trainee on real system problems and provides better visual effects, improved communications, and higher interest levels. The benefits of conducting such projects are to develop the expertise in this field and save costs of both operators training and simulation courses.

  18. Uso de detectores de neutrinos para el monitoreo de reactores nucleares Uso de detectores de neutrinos para el monitoreo de reactores nucleares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Moreno

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Se estudia la factibilidad del uso de los detectores de antineutrinos para el monitoreo de reactores nucleares. Usando un modelo sencillo de cascada de fisión a dos componentes, se ilustra la dependencia del número de antineutrinos detectados a una distancia L del reactor según la composición nuclear del combustible. Se explica el principio de detección de neutrinos de reactores en base al decaimiento beta inverso y se describe como los detectores de neutrinos pueden emplearse para el monitoreo de la producción de materiales fisibles en el reactor. Se comenta como generalizar este análisis al caso real de un reactor nuclear in situ y uno de los principales experimentos internacionales dedicados a este propósito. We study the feasibility to use antineutrinos detectors for monitoring of nuclear reactors. Using a simple model of fission shower with two components, we illustrate how the numbers of antineutrinos detected at a distance L from the reactor depend on the composition of the nuclear combustible. We explain the principles of reactor neutrino detection using inverse beta decays and we describe how neutrinos detectors can be used for monitoring the production of fissile materials within the reactors. We comment how to generalize this analysis to the realistic case of a nuclear reactor in situ and one of the main international experiments dedicated to study the use of neutrinos detectors as nuclear safeguards.

  19. Inconsistency in the average hydraulic models used in nuclear reactor design and safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jee Won; Roh, Gyu Hong; Choi, Hang Bok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    One of important inconsistencies in the six-equation model predictions has been found to be the force experienced by a single bubble placed in a convergent stream of liquid. Various sets of governing equations yield different amount of forces to hold the bubble stationary in a convergent nozzle. By using the first order potential flow theory, it is found that the six-equation model can not be used to estimate the force experienced by a deformed bubble. The theoretical value of the particle stress of a bubble in a convergent nozzle flow has been found to be a function of the Weber number when bubble distortion is allowed. This force has been calculated by using different sets of governing equations and compared with the theoretical value. It is suggested in this study that the bubble size distribution function can be used to remove the presented inconsistency by relating the interfacial variables with different moments of the bubble size distribution function. This study also shows that the inconsistencies in the thermal-hydraulic governing equation can be removed by mechanistic modeling of the phasic interface. 11 refs., 3 figs. (Author)

  20. Classification of Transient Events of Nuclear Reactor Using Hidden Markov Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bečvář

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a part of on-line system for a residual life of a pressure vessel shell. In this system there appears a need for determining of a real history of a pressure vessel described as a sequence of so called transient events. Each event (there are 23 events now is given by its template. It is theoretically necessary to compare data measured in a real history with all possible sequences of transient events. This solution in intractable and that is why a more sophisticated solution had to be used. Because this task is very similar to task of an automatic speech recognition, models and algorithms used to solve speech recognition tasks can be efficiently used to solve our task. Of course there are some different circumstances caused by the fact that the transient events take much longer than words and their number is much smaller than the number of words in speech recognition system's vocabulary. But the inspiration from speech recognition was very useful and the known algorithms rapidly decreased the design time.

  1. FUEL COMPOSITION FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, J.C.

    1963-08-01

    A process for making refractory nuclear fuel elements involves heating uranium and silicon powders in an inert atmosphere to 1600 to 1800 deg C to form USi/sub 3/; adding silicon carbide, carbon, 15% by weight of nickel and aluminum, and possibly also molybdenum and silicon powders; shaping the mixture; and heating to 1700 to 2050 deg C again in an inert atmosphere. Information on obtaining specific compositions is included. (AEC)

  2. Cold nuclear fusion reactor and nuclear fusion rocket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Zhenqiang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available "Nuclear restraint inertial guidance directly hit the cold nuclear fusion reactor and ion speed dc transformer" [1], referred to as "cold fusion reactor" invention patents, Chinese Patent Application No. CN: 200910129632.7 [2]. The invention is characterized in that: at room temperature under vacuum conditions, specific combinations of the installation space of the electromagnetic field, based on light nuclei intrinsic magnetic moment and the electric field, the first two strings of the nuclei to be bound fusion on the same line (track of. Re-use nuclear spin angular momentum vector inherent nearly the speed of light to form a super strong spin rotation gyro inertial guidance features, to overcome the Coulomb repulsion strong bias barrier to achieve fusion directly hit. Similar constraints apply nuclear inertial guidance mode for different speeds and energy ion beam mixing speed, the design of ion speed dc transformer is cold fusion reactors, nuclear fusion engines and such nuclear power plants and power delivery systems start important supporting equipment, so apply for a patent merger

  3. Foundational development of an advanced nuclear reactor integrated safety code.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarno, Kevin (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Lorber, Alfred Abraham; Pryor, Richard J.; Spotz, William F.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Belcourt, Kenneth (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Hooper, Russell Warren; Humphries, Larry LaRon

    2010-02-01

    This report describes the activities and results of a Sandia LDRD project whose objective was to develop and demonstrate foundational aspects of a next-generation nuclear reactor safety code that leverages advanced computational technology. The project scope was directed towards the systems-level modeling and simulation of an advanced, sodium cooled fast reactor, but the approach developed has a more general applicability. The major accomplishments of the LDRD are centered around the following two activities. (1) The development and testing of LIME, a Lightweight Integrating Multi-physics Environment for coupling codes that is designed to enable both 'legacy' and 'new' physics codes to be combined and strongly coupled using advanced nonlinear solution methods. (2) The development and initial demonstration of BRISC, a prototype next-generation nuclear reactor integrated safety code. BRISC leverages LIME to tightly couple the physics models in several different codes (written in a variety of languages) into one integrated package for simulating accident scenarios in a liquid sodium cooled 'burner' nuclear reactor. Other activities and accomplishments of the LDRD include (a) further development, application and demonstration of the 'non-linear elimination' strategy to enable physics codes that do not provide residuals to be incorporated into LIME, (b) significant extensions of the RIO CFD code capabilities, (c) complex 3D solid modeling and meshing of major fast reactor components and regions, and (d) an approach for multi-physics coupling across non-conformal mesh interfaces.

  4. Medical Radioisotopes Production Without A Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Keur, H.

    2010-05-15

    This report is answering the key question: Is it possible to ban the use of research reactors for the production of medical radioisotopes? Chapter 2 offers a summarized overview on the history of nuclear medicine. Chapter 3 gives an overview of the basic principles and understandings of nuclear medicine. The production of radioisotopes and its use in radiopharmaceuticals as a tracer for imaging particular parts of the inside of the human body (diagnosis) or as an agent in radiotherapy. Chapter 4 lists the use of popular medical radioisotopes used in nuclear imaging techniques and radiotherapy. Chapter 5 analyses reactor-based radioisotopes that can be produced by particle accelerators on commercial scale, other alternatives and the advantages of the cyclotron. Chapter 6 gives an overview of recent developments and prospects in worldwide radioisotopes production. Chapter 7 presents discussion, conclusions and recommendations, and is answering the abovementioned key question of this report: Is it possible to ban the use of a nuclear reactor for the production of radiopharmaceuticals? Is a safe and secure production of radioisotopes possible?.

  5. Application of a Russian nuclear reactor simulator VVER-1000; Aplicacion de un simulador de reactor nuclear ruso VVER-1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Peniche S, A. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Circuito Interior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04360 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Salazar S, E., E-mail: alpsordo@hotmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, 62250 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The objective of the present work is to give to know the most important characteristics in the Russian nuclear reactor of pressurized light water VVER-1000, doing emphasis in the differences that has with the western equivalent the reactor PWR in the design and the safety systems. Therefore, a description of the computerized simulation of the reactor VVER-1000 developed by the company Eniko TSO that the International Atomic of Energy Agency distributes to the states members with academic purposes will take place. The simulator includes mathematical models that represent to the essential systems in the real nuclear power plant, for what is possible to reproduce common faults and transitory characteristic of the nuclear industry with a behavior sufficiently attached to the reality. In this work is analyzed the response of the system before a turbine shot. After the accident in the nuclear power plant of Three Mile Island (US) they have been carried out improvements in the design of the reactor PWR and their safety systems. To know the reach and the limitations of the program, the events that gave place to this accident will be reproduced in the simulator VVER-1000. With base to the results of the simulation we will conclude that so reliable is the response of the safety system of this reactor. (Author)

  6. Wire core reactor for nuclear thermal propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harty, Richard B.; Brengle, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    Studies have been performed of a compact high-performance nuclear rocket reactor that incorporates a tungsten alloy wire fuel element. This reactor, termed the wire core reactor, can deliver a specific impulse of 1,000 s using an expander cycle and a nozzle expansion ratio of 500 to 1. The core is constructed of layers of 0.8-mm-dia fueled tungsten wires wound over alternate layers of spacer wires, which forms a rugged annular lattice. Hydrogen flow in the core is annular, flowing from inside to outside. In addition to the concepts compact size and good heat transfer, the core has excellent power-flow matching features and can resist vibration and thermal stresses during star-up and shutdown.

  7. Parallelization and automatic data distribution for nuclear reactor simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebrock, L.M. [Liebrock-Hicks Research, Calumet, MI (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Detailed attempts at realistic nuclear reactor simulations currently take many times real time to execute on high performance workstations. Even the fastest sequential machine can not run these simulations fast enough to ensure that the best corrective measure is used during a nuclear accident to prevent a minor malfunction from becoming a major catastrophe. Since sequential computers have nearly reached the speed of light barrier, these simulations will have to be run in parallel to make significant improvements in speed. In physical reactor plants, parallelism abounds. Fluids flow, controls change, and reactions occur in parallel with only adjacent components directly affecting each other. These do not occur in the sequentialized manner, with global instantaneous effects, that is often used in simulators. Development of parallel algorithms that more closely approximate the real-world operation of a reactor may, in addition to speeding up the simulations, actually improve the accuracy and reliability of the predictions generated. Three types of parallel architecture (shared memory machines, distributed memory multicomputers, and distributed networks) are briefly reviewed as targets for parallelization of nuclear reactor simulation. Various parallelization models (loop-based model, shared memory model, functional model, data parallel model, and a combined functional and data parallel model) are discussed along with their advantages and disadvantages for nuclear reactor simulation. A variety of tools are introduced for each of the models. Emphasis is placed on the data parallel model as the primary focus for two-phase flow simulation. Tools to support data parallel programming for multiple component applications and special parallelization considerations are also discussed.

  8. An overview of future sustainable nuclear power reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Poullikkas

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an overview of the current and future nuclear power reactor technologies is carried out. In particular, the nuclear technology is described and the classification of the current and future nuclear reactors according to their generation is provided. The analysis has shown that generation II reactors currently in operation all around the world lack significantly in safety precautions and are prone to loss of coolant accident (LOCA). In contrast, generation III reactors, which are ...

  9. Muon trackers for imaging a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, N.; Miyadera, H.; Morris, C. L.; Bacon, J.; Borozdin, K. N.; Durham, J. M.; Fuzita, K.; Guardincerri, E.; Izumi, M.; Nakayama, K.; Saltus, M.; Sugita, T.; Takakura, K.; Yoshioka, K.

    2016-09-01

    A detector system for assessing damage to the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors by using cosmic-ray muon tomography was developed. The system consists of a pair of drift-tube tracking detectors of 7.2× 7.2-m2 area. Each muon tracker consists of 6 x-layer and 6 y-layer drift-tube detectors. Each tracker is capable of measuring muon tracks with 12 mrad angular resolutions, and is capable of operating under 50-μ Sv/h radiation environment by removing gamma induced background with a novel time-coincidence logic. An estimated resolution to observe nuclear fuel debris at Fukushima Daiichi is 0.3 m when the core is imaged from outside the reactor building.

  10. Global risk of radioactive fallout after major nuclear reactor accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelieveld, J.; Kunkel, D.; Lawrence, M. G.

    2012-05-01

    Major reactor accidents of nuclear power plants are rare, yet the consequences are catastrophic. But what is meant by "rare"? And what can be learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents? Here we assess the cumulative, global risk of exposure to radioactivity due to atmospheric dispersion of gases and particles following severe nuclear accidents (the most severe ones on the International Nuclear Event Scale, INES 7), using particulate 137Cs and gaseous 131I as proxies for the fallout. Our results indicate that previously the occurrence of INES 7 major accidents and the risks of radioactive contamination have been underestimated. Using a global model of the atmosphere we compute that on average, in the event of a major reactor accident of any nuclear power plant worldwide, more than 90% of emitted 137Cs would be transported beyond 50 km and about 50% beyond 1000 km distance before being deposited. This corroborates that such accidents have large-scale and trans-boundary impacts. Although the emission strengths and atmospheric removal processes of 137Cs and 131I are quite different, the radioactive contamination patterns over land and the human exposure due to deposition are computed to be similar. High human exposure risks occur around reactors in densely populated regions, notably in West Europe and South Asia, where a major reactor accident can subject around 30 million people to radioactive contamination. The recent decision by Germany to phase out its nuclear reactors will reduce the national risk, though a large risk will still remain from the reactors in neighbouring countries.

  11. Global risk of radioactive fallout after major nuclear reactor accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lelieveld

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Major reactor accidents of nuclear power plants are rare, yet the consequences are catastrophic. But what is meant by "rare"? And what can be learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents? Here we assess the cumulative, global risk of exposure to radioactivity due to atmospheric dispersion of gases and particles following severe nuclear accidents (the most severe ones on the International Nuclear Event Scale, INES 7, using particulate 137Cs and gaseous 131I as proxies for the fallout. Our results indicate that previously the occurrence of INES 7 major accidents and the risks of radioactive contamination have been underestimated. Using a global model of the atmosphere we compute that on average, in the event of a major reactor accident of any nuclear power plant worldwide, more than 90% of emitted 137Cs would be transported beyond 50 km and about 50% beyond 1000 km distance before being deposited. This corroborates that such accidents have large-scale and trans-boundary impacts. Although the emission strengths and atmospheric removal processes of 137Cs and 131I are quite different, the radioactive contamination patterns over land and the human exposure due to deposition are computed to be similar. High human exposure risks occur around reactors in densely populated regions, notably in West Europe and South Asia, where a major reactor accident can subject around 30 million people to radioactive contamination. The recent decision by Germany to phase out its nuclear reactors will reduce the national risk, though a large risk will still remain from the reactors in neighbouring countries.

  12. Reference Neutron Radiographs of Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    Reference neutron radiographs of nuclear reactor fuel were produced by the Euraton Neutron Radiography Working Group and published in 1984 by the Reidel Publishing Company. In this collection a classification is given of the various neutron radiographic findings, that can occur in different parts...... of pelletized, annular and vibro-conpacted nuclear fuel pins. Those parts of the pins are shown where changes of appearance differ from those for the parts as fabricated. Also radiographs of those as fabricated parts are included. The collection contains 158 neutron radiographs, reproduced on photographic paper...

  13. Multivariable Feedback Control of Nuclear Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Moen

    1982-07-01

    Full Text Available Multivariable feedback control has been adapted for optimal control of the spatial power distribution in nuclear reactor cores. Two design techniques, based on the theory of automatic control, were developed: the State Variable Feedback (SVF is an application of the linear optimal control theory, and the Multivariable Frequency Response (MFR is based on a generalization of the traditional frequency response approach to control system design.

  14. Some views on nuclear reactor safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanguy, P.Y. [Electricite de France, Paris (France)

    1995-04-01

    This document is the text of a speech given by Pierre Y. Tanguy (Electricite de France) at the 22nd Water Reactor Safety Meeting held in Bethesda, MD in 1994. He describes the EDF nuclear program in broad terms and proceeds to discuss operational safety results with EDF plants. The speaker also outlines actions to enhance safety planned for the future, and he briefly mentions French cooperation with the Chinese on the Daya Bay project.

  15. Nuclear vapor thermal reactor propulsion technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, Isaac; Diaz, Nils J.; Dugan, Edward T.; Watanabe, Yoichi; McClanahan, James A.; Wen-Hsiung Tu, Carman, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    The conceptual design of a nuclear rocket based on the vapor core reactor is presented. The Nuclear Vapor Thermal Rocket (NVTR) offers the potential for a specific impulse of 1000 to 1200 s at thrust-to-weight ratios of 1 to 2. The design is based on NERVA geometry and systems with the solid fuel replaced by uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) vapor. The closed-loop core does not rely on hydrodynamic confinement of the fuel. The hydrogen propellant is separated from the UF4 fuel gas by graphite structure. The hydrogen is maintained at high pressure (˜100 atm), and exits the core at 3,100 K to 3,500 K. Zirconium carbide and hafnium carbide coatings are used to protect the hot graphite from the hydrogen. The core is surrounded by beryllium oxide reflector. The nuclear reactor core has been integrated into a 75 klb engine design using an expander cycle and dual turbopumps. The NVTR offers the potential for an incremental technology development pathway to high performance gas core reactors. Since the fuel is readily available, it also offers advantages in the initial cost of development, as it will not require major expenditures for fuel development.

  16. Neutron Capture and the Antineutrino Yield from Nuclear Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Patrick; Jaffke, Patrick

    2016-03-25

    We identify a new, flux-dependent correction to the antineutrino spectrum as produced in nuclear reactors. The abundance of certain nuclides, whose decay chains produce antineutrinos above the threshold for inverse beta decay, has a nonlinear dependence on the neutron flux, unlike the vast majority of antineutrino producing nuclides, whose decay rate is directly related to the fission rate. We have identified four of these so-called nonlinear nuclides and determined that they result in an antineutrino excess at low energies below 3.2 MeV, dependent on the reactor thermal neutron flux. We develop an analytic model for the size of the correction and compare it to the results of detailed reactor simulations for various real existing reactors, spanning 3 orders of magnitude in neutron flux. In a typical pressurized water reactor the resulting correction can reach ∼0.9% of the low energy flux which is comparable in size to other, known low-energy corrections from spent nuclear fuel and the nonequilibrium correction. For naval reactors the nonlinear correction may reach the 5% level by the end of cycle.

  17. Neutron Capture and the Antineutrino Yield from Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Patrick; Jaffke, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    We identify a new, flux-dependent correction to the antineutrino spectrum as produced in nuclear reactors. The abundance of certain nuclides, whose decay chains produce antineutrinos above the threshold for inverse beta decay, has a nonlinear dependence on the neutron flux, unlike the vast majority of antineutrino producing nuclides, whose decay rate is directly related to the fission rate. We have identified four of these so-called nonlinear nuclides and determined that they result in an antineutrino excess at low energies below 3.2 MeV, dependent on the reactor thermal neutron flux. We develop an analytic model for the size of the correction and compare it to the results of detailed reactor simulations for various real existing reactors, spanning 3 orders of magnitude in neutron flux. In a typical pressurized water reactor the resulting correction can reach ˜0.9 % of the low energy flux which is comparable in size to other, known low-energy corrections from spent nuclear fuel and the nonequilibrium correction. For naval reactors the nonlinear correction may reach the 5% level by the end of cycle.

  18. Global risk of radioactive fallout after nuclear reactor accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, D.; Lelieveld, J.; Lawrence, M. G.

    2012-04-01

    Reactor core meltdowns of nuclear power plants are rare, yet the consequences are catastrophic. But what is meant by "rare"? And what can be learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents? Here we assess the risk of exposure to radioactivity due to atmospheric dispersion of gases and particles following severe nuclear accidents, using particulate 137Cs and gaseous 131I as proxies for the fallout. It appears that previously the occurrence of major accidents and the risks of radioactive contamination have been underestimated. Using a global model of the atmosphere we compute that on average, in the event of a core melt of any nuclear power plant worldwide, more than 90 % of emitted 137Cs would be transported beyond 50 km and about 50 % beyond 1000 km distance. This corroborates that such accidents have large-scale and trans-boundary impacts. Although the emission strengths and atmospheric removal processes of 137Cs and 131I are quite different, the radioactive contamination patterns over land and the human deposition exposure are computed to be similar. High human exposure risks occur around reactors in densely populated regions, notably in southern Asia where a core melt can subject 55 million people to radioactive contamination. The recent decision by Germany to phase out its nuclear reactors will reduce the national risk, though a large risk will still remain from the reactors in neighbouring countries.

  19. Modeling and numerical simulation of oscillatory two-phase flows, with application to boiling water nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, M.P. [Instituto de Estudos Avancados - CTA, Sao Paolo (Brazil); Podowski, M.Z. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the analysis of dynamics and stability of boiling channels and systems. The specific objectives are two-fold. One of them is to present the results of a study aimed at analyzing the effects of various modeling concepts and numerical approaches on the transient response and stability of parallel boiling channels. The other objective is to investigate the effect of closed-loop feedback on stability of a boiling water reactor (BWR). Various modeling and computational issues for parallel boiling channels are discussed, such as: the impact of the numerical discretization scheme for the node containing the moving boiling boundary on the convergence and accuracy of computations, and the effects of subcooled boiling and other two-phase flow phenomena on the predictions of marginal stability conditions. Furthermore, the effects are analyzed of local loss coefficients around the recirculation loop of a boiling water reactor on stability of the reactor system. An apparent paradox is explained concerning the impact of changing single-phase losses on loop stability. The calculations have been performed using the DYNOBOSS computer code. The results of DYNOBOSS validation against other computer codes and experimental data are shown.

  20. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Djurcic, Z.(Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, 60439, U.S.A.); Detwiler, J. A.; Piepke, A.; Foster Jr., V. R.; Miller, L.; Gratta, G.

    2008-01-01

    Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these quantities for commercial power plants and their impact on the calculated interaction rates in electron anti-neutrino detectors is examined. We discuss reactor-to-reactor correlations between the leading uncertainties and their relevance to reactor anti-neutrino experiments.

  1. Three-dimensional all-speed CFD code for safety analysis of nuclear reactor containment: Status of GASFLOW parallelization, model development, validation and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Jianjun, E-mail: jianjun.xiao@kit.edu [Institute of Nuclear and Energy Technologies, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Travis, John R., E-mail: jack_travis@comcast.com [Engineering and Scientific Software Inc., 3010 Old Pecos Trail, Santa Fe, NM 87505 (United States); Royl, Peter, E-mail: peter.royl@partner.kit.edu [Institute of Nuclear and Energy Technologies, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Necker, Gottfried, E-mail: gottfried.necker@partner.kit.edu [Institute of Nuclear and Energy Technologies, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Svishchev, Anatoly, E-mail: anatoly.svishchev@kit.edu [Institute of Nuclear and Energy Technologies, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Jordan, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.jordan@kit.edu [Institute of Nuclear and Energy Technologies, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • 3-D scalable semi-implicit pressure-based CFD code for containment safety analysis. • Robust solution algorithm valid for all-speed flows. • Well validated and widely used CFD code for hydrogen safety analysis. • Code applied in various types of nuclear reactor containments. • Parallelization enables high-fidelity models in large scale containment simulations. - Abstract: GASFLOW is a three dimensional semi-implicit all-speed CFD code which can be used to predict fluid dynamics, chemical kinetics, heat and mass transfer, aerosol transportation and other related phenomena involved in postulated accidents in nuclear reactor containments. The main purpose of the paper is to give a brief review on recent GASFLOW code development, validations and applications in the field of nuclear safety. GASFLOW code has been well validated by international experimental benchmarks, and has been widely applied to hydrogen safety analysis in various types of nuclear power plants in European and Asian countries, which have been summarized in this paper. Furthermore, four benchmark tests of a lid-driven cavity flow, low Mach number jet flow, 1-D shock tube and supersonic flow over a forward-facing step are presented in order to demonstrate the accuracy and wide-ranging capability of ICE’d ALE solution algorithm for all-speed flows. GASFLOW has been successfully parallelized using the paradigms of Message Passing Interface (MPI) and domain decomposition. The parallel version, GASFLOW-MPI, adds great value to large scale containment simulations by enabling high-fidelity models, including more geometric details and more complex physics. It will be helpful for the nuclear safety engineers to better understand the hydrogen safety related physical phenomena during the severe accident, to optimize the design of the hydrogen risk mitigation systems and to fulfill the licensing requirements by the nuclear regulatory authorities. GASFLOW-MPI is targeting a high

  2. Nuclear Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossión, Rubén

    2010-09-01

    The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction). Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

  3. Designing a mini subcritical nuclear reactor; Diseno de un mini reactor nuclear subcritico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobedo G, C. R.; Vega C, H. R.; Davila H, V. M., E-mail: rafelaescobedo@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Jardin Juarez 147, Col. Centro, 98000 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    In this work the design of a mini subcritical nuclear reactor formed by means of light water moderator, uranium as fuel, and isotopic neutron source of {sup 239}PuBe was carried out. The design was done by Monte Carlo methods with the code MCNP5 in which uranium was modeled in an array of concentric holes cylinders of 8.5, 14.5, 20.5, 26.5, 32.5 cm of internal radius and 3 cm of thickness, 36 cm of height. Different models were made from a single fuel cylinder (natural uranium) to five. The neutron source of {sup 239}PuBe was situated in the center of the mini reactor; in each arrangement was used water as moderator. Cross sections libraries Endf/Vi were used and the number of stories was large enough to ensure less uncertainty than 3%. For each case the effective multiplication factor k{sub e}-f{sub f}, the amplification factor and the power was calculated. Outside the mini reactor the ambient dose equivalent H (10) was calculated for different cases. The value of k{sub eff}, the amplification factor and power are directly related to the number of cylinders of uranium as fuel. Although the average energy of the neutrons {sup 239}PuBe is between 4.5 and 5 MeV in the case of the mini reactor for a cylinder, in the neutron spectrum the presence of thermal neutrons does not exist, so that produced fissions are generated with fast neutrons, and in designs of two and three rings the neutron spectra shows the presence of thermal neutrons, however the fissions are being generated with fast neutrons. Finally in the four and five cases the amount of moderator is enough to thermalized the neutrons and thereby produce the fission. The maximum value for k{sub eff} was 0.82; this value is very close to the assembly of Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas generating a k{sub eff} of 0.86. According to the safety and radiation protection standards for the design of mini reactor of one, two and three cylinders they comply with the established safety, while designs of four and five

  4. Exploring new coolants for nuclear breeder reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafuente, A., E-mail: anlafuente@etsii.upm.e [ETSII-UPM, c/Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Piera, M. [ETSII:UNED, c/Juan del Rosal, 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-06-15

    Breeder reactors are considered a unique tool for fully exploiting natural nuclear resources. In current Light Water Reactors (LWR), only 0.5% of the primary energy contained in the nuclei removed from a mine is converted into useful heat. The rest remains in the depleted uranium or spent fuel. The need to improve resource-efficiency has stimulated interest in Fast-Reactor-based fuel cycles, which can exploit a much higher fraction of the energy content of mined uranium by burning U-238, mainly after conversion into Pu-239. Thorium fuel cycles also offer several potential advantages over a uranium fuel cycle. The coolant initially selected for most of the FBR programs launched in the 1960s was sodium, which is still considered the best candidate for these reactors. However, Na-cooled FBRs have a positive void reactivity coefficient. Among other factors, this fundamental drawback has resulted in the canceled deployment of these reactors. Therefore, it seems reasonable to explore new options for breeder coolants. In this paper, a proposal is presented for a new molten salt (F{sub 2}Be) coolant that could overcome the safety issues related to the positive void reactivity coefficient of molten metal coolants. Although it is a very innovative proposal that would require an extensive R and D program, this paper presents the very appealing properties of this salt when using a specific type of fuel that is similar to that of pebble bed reactors. The F{sub 2}Be concept was studied over a typical MOX composition and extended to a thorium-based cycle. The general analysis took into account the requirements for criticality (opening the option of hybrid subcritical systems); the requirements for breeding; and the safety requirement of having a negative coolant void reactivity coefficient. A design window was found in the definition of a F{sub 2}Be cooled reactor where the safety requirement was met, unlike for molten metal-cooled reactors, which always have positive void

  5. Designed porosity materials in nuclear reactor components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacout, A. M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Stan, Marius

    2016-09-06

    A nuclear fuel pellet with a porous substrate, such as a carbon or tungsten aerogel, on which at least one layer of a fuel containing material is deposited via atomic layer deposition, and wherein the layer deposition is controlled to prevent agglomeration of defects. Further, a method of fabricating a nuclear fuel pellet, wherein the method features the steps of selecting a porous substrate, depositing at least one layer of a fuel containing material, and terminating the deposition when the desired porosity is achieved. Also provided is a nuclear reactor fuel cladding made of a porous substrate, such as silicon carbide aerogel or silicon carbide cloth, upon which layers of silicon carbide are deposited.

  6. Designed porosity materials in nuclear reactor components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yacout, A. M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Stan, Marius

    2016-09-06

    A nuclear fuel pellet with a porous substrate, such as a carbon or tungsten aerogel, on which at least one layer of a fuel containing material is deposited via atomic layer deposition, and wherein the layer deposition is controlled to prevent agglomeration of defects. Further, a method of fabricating a nuclear fuel pellet, wherein the method features the steps of selecting a porous substrate, depositing at least one layer of a fuel containing material, and terminating the deposition when the desired porosity is achieved. Also provided is a nuclear reactor fuel cladding made of a porous substrate, such as silicon carbide aerogel or silicon carbide cloth, upon which layers of silicon carbide are deposited.

  7. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, B.

    1991-07-25

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions.

  8. Experimental investigations on turbulent mixing of hot upward flow and cold downward flow inside a chimney model of a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Samiran, E-mail: samiran_sengupta@yahoo.co.in [Research Reactor Design & Projects Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ghosh, Aniruddha [Research Reactor Design & Projects Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sengupta, C. [Research Reactor Maintenance Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Vijayan, P.K. [Reactor Design & Development Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Bhattacharya, S. [Research Reactor Design & Projects Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sharma, R.C. [Reactor Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Simulated mixing of hot upward and cold downward flows in a chimney of a reactor. • Experiments in chimney model (2:9 scale) at Reynolds number (Re)—1.5 to 4.5 × 10{sup 5}. • Hot upward flow comes out of the chimney when bypass flow ratio (R) is zero. • Increase in ratio (R) reduces jet height, vortex spread height and temperature front height. • Effects of Re, chimney height and temperature differential are not significant. - Abstract: Experiments were conducted to study the turbulent mixing of hot upward flow and cold downward flow inside a scaled down model of chimney structure of a pool type nuclear research reactor. Open pool type nuclear reactors often use this type of chimney structures to prevent mixing of radioactive core outlet water directly into the reactor pool so that radiation field at the reactor pool top can be kept to a lower limit. The chimney structure is designed to facilitate guiding of the radioactive water towards the two outlet nozzles of the chimney and simultaneously allows drawing water from the reactor pool through the chimney top opening. The present work aims at studying flow mixing behaviour of hot and cold water inside a 2/9th scaled down model of the chimney structure experimentally. The ratio between the cold downward flow and the hot upward flow is varied between 0 and 0.15 to predict the extent of suppression of the hot upward flow within the chimney region for various bypass flow ratios. The Reynolds number of the hot upward flow considered in the experiment is about 1.5 × 10{sup 5} which corresponds to a flow rate of about 500 l min{sup −1}. The upward jet height and the temperature distribution were predicted from the experiment. It was observed that increase in bypass flow ratio reduces the upward jet height of hot water. Experiments were also carried out by increasing the flow rate to 1000 and 1500 l min{sup −1} corresponding to Reynolds numbers of 3 × 10{sup 5} and 4.5 × 10{sup 5

  9. FRAUD/SABOTAGE Killing Nuclear-Reactors Need Modeling!!!: ``Super'' alloys GENERIC ENDEMIC Wigner's-Disease/.../IN-stability: Ethics? SHMETHICS!!!

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Joseph; Bument, Arlden; Siegel, Edward

    2011-03-01

    Carbides solid-state chemistry domination of old/new nuclear-reactors/spent-fuel-casks/refineries/jet/missile/rocket-engines is austenitic/FCC Ni/Fe-based (so miscalled)"super"alloys(182/82;Hastelloy-X,600,304/304L-SSs,...690!!!) GENERIC ENDEMIC EXTANT detrimental(synonyms): Wigner's-disease(WD) [J.Appl.Phys.17,857 (46)]/Ostwald-ripening/spinodal-decomposition/overageing-embrittlement/thermal-leading-to-mechanical(TLTM)-INstability: Mayo[Google: fLeaksCouldKill > ; - Siegel [ J . Mag . Mag . Mtls . 7 , 312 (78) = atflickr . comsearchonGiant - Magnotoresistance [Fert" [PRL(1988)]-"Gruenberg"[PRL(1989)] 2007-Nobel]necessitating NRC inspections on 40+25=65 Westin"KL"ouse PWRs(12/2006)]-Lai [Met.Trans.AIME, 9A,827(78)]-Sabol-Stickler[Phys.Stat.Sol.(70)]-Ashpahani[ Intl.Conf. Hydrogen in Metals, Paris(1977]-Russell [Prog.Mtls.Sci.(1983)]-Pollard [last UCS rept.(9/1995)]-Lofaro [BNL/DOE/NRC Repts.]-Pringle [ Nuclear-Power:From Physics to Politics(1979)]-Hoffman [animatedsoftware.com], what DOE/NRC MISlabels as "butt-welds" "stress-corrosion cracking" endpoint's ROOT-CAUSE ULTIMATE-ORIGIN is WD overageing-embrittlement caused brittle-fracture cracking from early/ongoing AEC/DOE-n"u"tional-la"v"atories sabotage!!!

  10. Advanced Nuclear Reactor Concepts for China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoche, D.; Sassen, F.; Tietsch, W. [Westinghouse Electric Germany, Postfach 10 05 63, 68140 Mannheim (Germany); Yujie, Dong; Li, Cao [INET, Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing (China)

    2008-07-01

    China is one of the fastest growing economies in the world. With 1.3 billion people China also has the largest population worldwide. The growing economy, the migration of people from rural areas to cities and the augmentation in living standard will drive the energy demand of China in the coming decades. At present the installed electrical power is about 500 GW. In the years 2004 and 2005 the added electrical capacity was around 60 GW per year. Chinas primary energy demand is covered mainly by the use of coal. Coal also will remain the main energy source in the coming decades in China. Nevertheless taking into account more and more environmental aspects and the goal to reduce dependencies on energy imports a better energy mix strategy is planed to change including at an increasing level the renewable and nuclear option. Present the nuclear park is characterised by a large variety of different types of reactors. With the AP-1000, EPR and the gas-cooled High Temperature Reactor (HTR) the spectrum of different reactor types will be further enlarged. (authors)

  11. Exploring new coolants for nuclear breeder reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafuente, A. [ETSI Industriales-Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, C/Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2. 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    Breeder reactors are considered the unique tool for fully exploiting the natural nuclear resources. In current LWR, only a 0.5% of the primary energy contained in the nuclei removed from the mine is converted into useful heat, with the rest remaining in the depleted uranium or in the spent fuel. The objective of resource-efficiency stimulated the interest in Fast- Reactor-based fuel cycles which can exploit a much higher fraction of the energy content of the mined uranium by burning U-238, mainly after conversion into Pu-239. Thorium fuel cycles would also offers several potential advantages over a uranium fuel cycle. The coolant initially chosen for most of the FBR programs launched in the 60's was sodium, which still is considered the best candidate for these reactors. However, Na-cooled FBR have a positive void reactivity coefficient, which has been among others, a fundamental drawback that has cancelled the deployment of these reactors. Therefore, it seems reasonable to explore totally new options on coolants for breeders. In this paper, a proposal is presented on a new molten salt (F{sub 2}Be) coolant that could overcome the safety issues related to the positive void reactivity coefficient of molten metal coolants. Although it is a very innovative proposal that would need an extensive R and D programme, this paper presents the very appealing properties of this salt, in the case of using a specific type of fuel, similar to that of pebble bed reactors. The concept will be studied over a typical MOX composition and extended to a Thorium-based cycle. The general analysis takes into account requirements for criticality (opening the option of hybrid subcritical systems); requirements for breeding; and the safety requirement of having a negative coolant void reactivity coefficient. A design window is found in the definition of a F{sub 2}Be cooled reactor where the safety requirement is met, unlike for molten metal cooled reactors which always have positive void

  12. Thermophotovoltaic Energy Conversion in Space Nuclear Reactor Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    contrasted with nuclear thermal rockets which use the heat from a nuclear fission reactor to heat propellant to provide rocket thrust and radioisotope...K. Note that the highest temperature (2550 K by the Pewee reactor) was for a nuclear thermal rocket application and has the shortest duration (40 min

  13. Dielectric Heaters for Testing Spacecraft Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, William Herbert; Bitteker, Leo; Godfroy, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A document proposes the development of radio-frequency-(RF)-driven dielectric heaters for non-nuclear thermal testing of the cores of nuclear-fission reactors for spacecraft. Like the electrical-resistance heaters used heretofore for such testing, the dielectric heaters would be inserted in the reactors in place of nuclear fuel rods. A typical heater according to the proposal would consist of a rod of lossy dielectric material sized and shaped like a fuel rod and containing an electrically conductive rod along its center line. Exploiting the dielectric loss mechanism that is usually considered a nuisance in other applications, an RF signal, typically at a frequency .50 MHz and an amplitude between 2 and 5 kV, would be applied to the central conductor to heat the dielectric material. The main advantage of the proposal is that the wiring needed for the RF dielectric heating would be simpler and easier to fabricate than is the wiring needed for resistance heating. In some applications, it might be possible to eliminate all heater wiring and, instead, beam the RF heating power into the dielectric rods from external antennas.

  14. State space modeling of reactor core in a pressurized water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashaari, A.; Ahmad, T.; Shamsuddin, Mustaffa; M, Wan Munirah W.; Abdullah, M. Adib

    2014-07-01

    The power control system of a nuclear reactor is the key system that ensures a safe operation for a nuclear power plant. However, a mathematical model of a nuclear power plant is in the form of nonlinear process and time dependent that give very hard to be described. One of the important components of a Pressurized Water Reactor is the Reactor core. The aim of this study is to analyze the performance of power produced from a reactor core using temperature of the moderator as an input. Mathematical representation of the state space model of the reactor core control system is presented and analyzed in this paper. The data and parameters are taken from a real time VVER-type Pressurized Water Reactor and will be verified using Matlab and Simulink. Based on the simulation conducted, the results show that the temperature of the moderator plays an important role in determining the power of reactor core.

  15. State space modeling of reactor core in a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashaari, A.; Ahmad, T.; M, Wan Munirah W. [Department of Mathematical Science, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Shamsuddin, Mustaffa [Institute of Ibnu Sina, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Abdullah, M. Adib [Swinburne University of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Computing and Science, Jalan Simpang Tiga, 93350 Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10

    The power control system of a nuclear reactor is the key system that ensures a safe operation for a nuclear power plant. However, a mathematical model of a nuclear power plant is in the form of nonlinear process and time dependent that give very hard to be described. One of the important components of a Pressurized Water Reactor is the Reactor core. The aim of this study is to analyze the performance of power produced from a reactor core using temperature of the moderator as an input. Mathematical representation of the state space model of the reactor core control system is presented and analyzed in this paper. The data and parameters are taken from a real time VVER-type Pressurized Water Reactor and will be verified using Matlab and Simulink. Based on the simulation conducted, the results show that the temperature of the moderator plays an important role in determining the power of reactor core.

  16. Modeling nuclear processes by Simulink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Nahrul Khair Alang Md, E-mail: nahrul@iium.edu.my [Faculty of Engineering, International Islamic University Malaysia, Jalan Gombak, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Modelling and simulation are essential parts in the study of dynamic systems behaviours. In nuclear engineering, modelling and simulation are important to assess the expected results of an experiment before the actual experiment is conducted or in the design of nuclear facilities. In education, modelling can give insight into the dynamic of systems and processes. Most nuclear processes can be described by ordinary or partial differential equations. Efforts expended to solve the equations using analytical or numerical solutions consume time and distract attention from the objectives of modelling itself. This paper presents the use of Simulink, a MATLAB toolbox software that is widely used in control engineering, as a modelling platform for the study of nuclear processes including nuclear reactor behaviours. Starting from the describing equations, Simulink models for heat transfer, radionuclide decay process, delayed neutrons effect, reactor point kinetic equations with delayed neutron groups, and the effect of temperature feedback are used as examples.

  17. Modeling nuclear processes by Simulink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Nahrul Khair Alang Md

    2015-04-01

    Modelling and simulation are essential parts in the study of dynamic systems behaviours. In nuclear engineering, modelling and simulation are important to assess the expected results of an experiment before the actual experiment is conducted or in the design of nuclear facilities. In education, modelling can give insight into the dynamic of systems and processes. Most nuclear processes can be described by ordinary or partial differential equations. Efforts expended to solve the equations using analytical or numerical solutions consume time and distract attention from the objectives of modelling itself. This paper presents the use of Simulink, a MATLAB toolbox software that is widely used in control engineering, as a modelling platform for the study of nuclear processes including nuclear reactor behaviours. Starting from the describing equations, Simulink models for heat transfer, radionuclide decay process, delayed neutrons effect, reactor point kinetic equations with delayed neutron groups, and the effect of temperature feedback are used as examples.

  18. Neutron capture and the antineutrino yield from nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We identify a new, flux-dependent correction to the antineutrino spectrum as produced in nuclear reactors. The abundance of certain nuclides, whose decay chains produce antineutrinos above the threshold for inverse beta decay, has a nonlinear dependence on the neutron flux, unlike the vast majority of antineutrino producing nuclides, whose decay rate is directly related to the fission rate. We have identified four of these so-called nonlinear nuclides and determined that they result in an antineutrino excess at low-energies below 3.2MeV, dependent on the reactor thermal neutron flux. We develop an analytic model for the size of the correction and compare it to the results of detailed reactor simulations for various real existing reactors, spanning 3 orders of magnitude in neutron flux. In a typical pressurized water reactor the resulting correction can reach 0.9% of the low energy flux which is comparable in size to other, known low-energy corrections from spent nuclear fuel and the non-equilibrium correction...

  19. A particle assembly/constrained expansion (PACE) model for the formation and structure of porous metal oxide deposits on nuclear fuel rods in pressurized light water reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Donald W.; Lu, Shijing; O'Brien, Christopher J.; Bucholz, Eric W.; Rak, Zsolt

    2015-02-01

    A new model is proposed for the structure and properties of porous metal oxide scales (aka Chalk River Unidentified Deposits (CRUD)) observed on the nuclear fuel rod cladding in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The model is based on the thermodynamically-driven expansion of agglomerated octahedral nickel ferrite particles in response to pH and temperature changes in the CRUD. The model predicts that porous nickel ferrite with internal {1 1 1} surfaces is a thermodynamically stable structure under PWR conditions even when the free energy of formation of bulk nickel ferrite is positive. This explains the pervasive presence of nickel ferrite in CRUD, observed CRUD microstructures, why CRUD maintains its porosity, and variations in porosity within the CRUD observed experimentally. This model is a stark departure from decades of conventional wisdom and detailed theoretical analysis of CRUD chemistry, and defines new research directions for model validation, and for understanding and ultimately controlling CRUD formation.

  20. Solution of heat removal from nuclear reactors by natural convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zitek Pavel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the basis for the solution of heat removal by natural convection from both conventional nuclear reactors and reactors with fuel flowing coolant (such as reactors with molten fluoride salts MSR.The possibility of intensification of heat removal through gas lift is focused on. It might be used in an MSR (Molten Salt Reactor for cleaning the salt mixture of degassed fission products and therefore eliminating problems with iodine pitting. Heat removal by natural convection and its intensification increases significantly the safety of nuclear reactors. Simultaneously the heat removal also solves problems with lifetime of pumps in the primary circuit of high-temperature reactors.

  1. Development of an artificial neural network model for on-line thermal margin estimation of a nuclear reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Koon

    1992-02-15

    One of the key safety parameters related to thermal margin in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core, is Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR), which is to be assessed and continuously monitored during operation via either an analog or a digital monitoring system. The digital monitoring system, in general, allows more thermal margin than the analog system through the on-line computation of DNBR using the measured parameters as inputs to a simplified, fast running computer code. The purpose of this thesis is to develop an advanced method for on-line DNBR estimation by introducing an artifactual neural network model for best-estimation of DNBR at the given reactor operating conditions. the neural network model, consisting of three layers with five operating parameters in the input layer, provides real-time prediction accuracy of DNBR by training the network against the detailed simulation results for various operating conditions. The overall training procedure is developed to learn the characteristics of DNBR behaviour in the reactor core. First, a set of random combination of input variables is generated by Latin Hypercube Sampling technique performed on a wide range of input parameters. Second, the target values of DNBR to be referenced for training are calculated using a detailed simulation code, COBRA-IV. Third, the optimized training input data are selected. Then, training is performed using an Error Back Propagation algorithm. After completion of training, the network is tested on the examining data set in order to investigate the generalization capability of the network responses for the steady state operating condition as well as for the transient situations where DNB is of a primary concern. The test results show that the values of DNBR predicted by the neural network are maintained at a high level of accuracy for the steady state condition, and are in good agreements with the transient situation, although slightly conservative as compared to those

  2. Collective control of a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rognin, L.

    1995-06-01

    Nowadays, mainly related to the increasing complexity of working environments, working activities become more and collective. The present research on the paradoxical nature of working teams, considered from a reliability point of view. This document is composed of four Sections. The first Section introduces the context of the research, its objectives and the underlying assumptions. In the second Section, we describe a working situation, which is the control of a nuclear reactor. Relations between cooperative work and reliability are discussed in the third Section. Finally, in the fourth Section, a synthesis of the research and some perspectives are proposed. (authors). 7 refs.

  3. Temperature measuring analysis of the nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    F., Urban; Ľ., Kučák; Bereznai, J.; Závodný, Z.; Muškát, P.

    2014-08-01

    Study was based on rapid changes of measured temperature values from the thermocouple in the VVER 440 nuclear reactor fuel assembly. Task was to determine origin of fluctuations of the temperature values by experiments on physical model of the fuel assembly. During an experiment, heated water was circulating in the system and cold water inlet through central tube to record sensitivity of the temperature sensor. Two positions of the sensor was used. First, just above the central tube in the physical model fuel assembly axis and second at the position of the thermocouple in the VVER 440 nuclear reactor fuel assembly. Dependency of the temperature values on time are presented in the diagram form in the paper.

  4. Request for Naval Reactors Comment on Proposed Prometheus Space Flight Nuclear Reactor High Tier Reactor Safety Requirements and for Naval Reactors Approval to Transmit These Requirements to JPL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Kokkinos

    2005-04-28

    The purpose of this letter is to request Naval Reactors comments on the nuclear reactor high tier requirements for the PROMETHEUS space flight reactor design, pre-launch operations, launch, ascent, operation, and disposal, and to request Naval Reactors approval to transmit these requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory to ensure consistency between the reactor safety requirements and the spacecraft safety requirements. The proposed PROMETHEUS nuclear reactor high tier safety requirements are consistent with the long standing safety culture of the Naval Reactors Program and its commitment to protecting the health and safety of the public and the environment. In addition, the philosophy on which these requirements are based is consistent with the Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group recommendations on space nuclear propulsion safety (Reference 1), DOE Nuclear Safety Criteria and Specifications for Space Nuclear Reactors (Reference 2), the Nuclear Space Power Safety and Facility Guidelines Study of the Applied Physics Laboratory.

  5. Transient behavior of a nuclear reactor coupled to an accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadineni, Suresh Babu

    Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) present one of the most viable solutions for transmutation and effective utilization of nuclear fuel. Spent fuel from reactors will be partitioned to separate plutonium and other minor actinides to be transmuted in the ADS. Without the ADS, minor actinides must be stored at a geologic repository for long periods of time. One problem with ADS is understanding the control issues that arise when coupling an accelerator to a reactor. "ADSTRANS" was developed to predict the transient behavior of a nuclear reactor coupled to an accelerator. It was based on MCNPX, a radiation transport code developed at the LANL, and upon a numerical model of the neutron transport equation. MCNPX was used to generate the neutron "source" term that occurs when the accelerator is fired. ADSTRANS coupled MCNPX to a separate finite difference code that solved the transient neutron transport equation. A cylindrical axisymmetric reactor with steel shielding was considered for this analysis. Multiple neutron energy groups, neutron precursor groups and neutron poisons were considered. ENDF/B cross-section data obtained through MCNPX was also employed. The reactor was assumed to be isothermal and near zero power level. Unique features of this code are: (1) it predicts the neutron behavior of an ADS for different reactor geometry, material concentration, both electron and proton particle accelerators, and target material, (2) it develops input files for MCNPX to simulate neutron production, runs MCNPX, and retrieves information from the MCNPX output files. Neutron production predicted by MCNPX for a 20 MeV electron accelerator and lead target was compared with experimental data from the Idaho Accelerator Center and found to be in good agreement. The spatial neutron flux distribution and transient neutron flux in the reactor as predicted by the code were compared with analytical solutions and found to be in good agreement. Fuel burnup and poison buildup were also as

  6. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Measurements in Nuclear Reactor Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Brian T.

    Several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs, such as the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD), Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC), Light Water Reactor Sustainability, and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants (NGNP), are investigating new fuels, materials, and inspection paradigms for advanced and existing reactors. A key objective of such programs is to understand the performance of these fuels and materials during irradiation. In DOE-NE's FCRD program, ultrasonic based technology was identified as a key approach that should be pursued to obtain the high-fidelity, high-accuracy data required to characterize the behavior and performance of new candidate fuels and structural materials during irradiation testing. The radiation, high temperatures, and pressure can limit the available tools and characterization methods. In this thesis, two ultrasonic characterization techniques will be explored. The first, finite amplitude wave propagation has been demonstrated to be sensitive to microstructural material property changes. It is a strong candidate to determine fuel evolution; however, it has not been demonstrated for in-situ reactor applications. In this thesis, finite amplitude wave propagation will be used to measure the microstructural evolution in Al-6061. This is the first demonstration of finite amplitude wave propagation at temperatures in excess of 200 °C and during an irradiation test. Second, a method based on contact nonlinear acoustic theory will be developed to identify compressed cracks. Compressed cracks are typically transparent to ultrasonic wave propagation; however, by measuring harmonic content developed during finite amplitude wave propagation, it is shown that even compressed cracks can be characterized. Lastly, piezoelectric transducers capable of making these measurements are developed. Specifically, three piezoelectric sensors (Bismuth Titanate, Aluminum Nitride, and Zinc Oxide) are tested in the Massachusetts

  7. Conceptual Design of a Nuclear Reactor Dedicated for Desalination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yong Hun; Moon, Jang Sik; Jeong, Yong Hoon [Korea Adavanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The many advantages of nuclear desalination, the nuclear safety issues still remain a perennial problem today. To respond to such needs, the development of a desalination-dedicated nuclear reactor with maximized safety features was proposed. From the feasibility study, the desalination-dedicated reactor was found to be a good solution for meeting future water demand during the winter season in some countries like UAE by decoupling water and electricity supply. The economic analysis results indicated that under certain conditions, the desalination-dedicated reactor can produce freshwater at lower cost than the target nuclear cogeneration reactor using steam extraction technologies. A conceptual design of the desalination-dedicated nuclear reactor is in progress. The design features of the desalination-dedicated nuclear reactor could significantly enhance safety, reliability, and simplicity, and facilitate the extensive use of innovative passive safety systems. These maximized safety features of desalination-dedicated reactor could provide advanced capabilities for passive reactor shutdown and residual heat removal, and eventually prevent radioactivity release into the environment. The conceptual design achieved will provide a foothold for the future commercialization of the desalination-dedicated nuclear reactor and eventually help to address both a serious water crisis and nuclear safety issues.

  8. Nuclear Data and Nuclear Model Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Developing nuclear data needs towards to sustainable development on fission reactor design and many nuclear applications out the field of fission reactor technology that are growing economicsignificance and that have substantial data requirements are introduced. International standard codes used in nuclear data evaluations and calculations are introduced and compared each other. Generally

  9. Determination of the fission coefficients in thermal nuclear reactors for antineutrino detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Lenilson M. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Cabral, Ronaldo G., E-mail: rgcabral@ime.eb.b [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Anjos, Joao C.C. dos, E-mail: janjos@cbpf.b [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. GLN - G

    2011-07-01

    The nuclear reactors in operation periodically need to change their fuel. It is during this process that these reactors are more vulnerable to occurring of several situations of fuel diversion, thus the monitoring of the nuclear installations is indispensable to avoid events of this nature. Considering this fact, the most promissory technique to be used for the nuclear safeguard for the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons, it is based on the detection and spectroscopy of antineutrino from fissions that occur in the nuclear reactors. The detection and spectroscopy of antineutrino, they both depend on the single contribution for the total number of fission of each actinide in the core reactor, these contributions receive the name of fission coefficients. The goal of this research is to show the computational and mathematical modeling used to determinate these coefficients for PWR reactors. (author)

  10. Models of signal validation using artificial intelligence techniques applied to a nuclear reactor; Modelos de validacao de sinal utilizando tecnicas de inteligencia artificial aplicados a um reator nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Mauro V. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Schirru, Roberto [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia

    2000-07-01

    This work presents two models of signal validation in which the analytical redundancy of the monitored signals from a nuclear plant is made by neural networks. In one model the analytical redundancy is made by only one neural network while in the other it is done by several neural networks, each one working in a specific part of the entire operation region of the plant. Four cluster techniques were tested to separate the entire operation region in several specific regions. An additional information of systems' reliability is supplied by a fuzzy inference system. The models were implemented in C language and tested with signals acquired from Angra I nuclear power plant, from its start to 100% of power. (author)

  11. A fast and flexible reactor physics model for simulating neutron spectra and depletion in fast reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recktenwald, Geoff; Deinert, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Determining the time dependent concentration of isotopes within a nuclear reactor core is central to the analysis of nuclear fuel cycles. We present a fast, flexible tool for determining the time dependent neutron spectrum within fast reactors. The code (VBUDS: visualization, burnup, depletion and spectra) uses a two region, multigroup collision probability model to simulate the energy dependent neutron flux and tracks the buildup and burnout of 24 actinides, as well as fission products. While originally developed for LWR simulations, the model is shown to produce fast reactor spectra that show high degree of fidelity to available fast reactor benchmarks.

  12. Modelling of heterogenous neutron leakages in a nuclear reactor; Modelisation des fuites heterogenes de neutrons dans un reacteur nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohleber, X

    1997-11-17

    The TIBERE Model is a neutron leakage method based on B{sub 1} heterogeneous transport equation resolution. In this work, we have studied the influence of the reflection mode at the boundary of the assembly. In particular the White boundary condition has been implemented in the APOLLO2 neutron transport code. We have compared the two TIBERE kinds of boundary conditions (specular and white) with the classical B{sub 1} homogeneous leakage method in the modelling of some reactors. We have remarked the better capability of the TIBERE Model to compute voided assemblies. The white boundary condition is also able to compute a completely voided assembly and, besides, wins a factor 10 in CPU time in comparison with the specular boundary condition. These two heterogenous leakage formalisms have been tested on a partially voided experiment and have shown that the TIBERE Model can compute this kind of situation with a greater precision than the classical B{sub 1} homogeneous leakage method, and with a shorter computational time. (author)

  13. Modelling of heterogenous neutron leakages in a nuclear reactor; Modelisation des fuites heterogenes de neutrons dans un reacteur nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohleber, X

    1997-11-17

    The TIBERE Model is a neutron leakage method based on B{sub 1} heterogeneous transport equation resolution. In this work, we have studied the influence of the reflection mode at the boundary of the assembly. In particular the White boundary condition has been implemented in the APOLLO2 neutron transport code. We have compared the two TIBERE kinds of boundary conditions (specular and white) with the classical B{sub 1} homogeneous leakage method in the modelling of some reactors. We have remarked the better capability of the TIBERE Model to compute voided assemblies. The white boundary condition is also able to compute a completely voided assembly and, besides, wins a factor 10 in CPU time in comparison with the specular boundary condition. These two heterogenous leakage formalisms have been tested on a partially voided experiment and have shown that the TIBERE Model can compute this kind of situation with a greater precision than the classical B{sub 1} homogeneous leakage method, and with a shorter computational time. (author)

  14. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1993. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: civilian, production, military, export, and critical assembly.

  15. Nuclear waste disposal utilizing a gaseous core reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternoster, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of a gaseous core nuclear reactor designed to produce power to also reduce the national inventories of long-lived reactor waste products through nuclear transmutation was examined. Neutron-induced transmutation of radioactive wastes is shown to be an effective means of shortening the apparent half life.

  16. Modular Lead-Bismuth Fast Reactors in Nuclear Power

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Petrochenko; Georgy Toshinsky

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of the unique experience of operating reactors with heavy liquid metal coolant–eutectic lead-bismuth alloy in nuclear submarines, the concept of modular small fast reactors SVBR-100 for civilian nuclear power has been developed and validated. The features of this innovative technology are as follows: a monoblock (integral) design of the reactor with fast neutron spectrum, which can operate using different types of fuel in various fuel cycles including MOX fuel in a self-providing...

  17. Spent nuclear fuel discharges from U.S. reactors 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    Spent Nuclear Fuel Discharges from US Reactors 1994 provides current statistical data on fuel assemblies irradiated at commercial nuclear reactors operating in the US. This year`s report provides data on the current inventories and storage capacities at these reactors. Detailed statistics on the data are presented in four chapters that highlight 1994 spent fuel discharges, storage capacities and inventories, canister and nonfuel component data, and assembly characteristics. Five appendices, a glossary, and bibliography are also included. 10 figs., 34 tabs.

  18. Inherently safe reactors and a second nuclear era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, A M; Spiewak, I

    1984-06-29

    The Swedish PIUS reactor and the German-American small modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor are inherently safe-that is, their safety relies not upon intervention of humans or of electromechanical devices but on immutable principles of physics and chemistry. A second nuclear era may require commercialization and deployment of such inherently safe reactors, even though existing light-water reactors appear to be as safe as other well-accepted sources of central electricity, particularly hydroelectric dams.

  19. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djurcic, Zelimir; Detwiler, Jason A.; Piepke, Andreas; Foster Jr., Vince R.; Miller, Lester; Gratta, Giorgio

    2008-08-06

    Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these quantities for commercial power plants and their impact on the calculated interaction rates in {bar {nu}}{sub e} detectors is examined. We discuss reactor-to-reactor correlations between the leading uncertainties, and their relevance to reactor {bar {nu}}{sub e} experiments.

  20. SIMODIS - a software package for simulating nuclear reactor components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Lamartine; Borges, Eduardo M. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA-IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Estudos Avancados. E-mail: guimarae@ieav.cta.br; Oliveira Junior, Nilton S.; Santos, Glauco S.; Bueno, Mariana F. [Universidade Bras Cubas, Mogi das Cruzes, SP (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    In this paper it is presented the initial development effort in building a nuclear reactor component simulation package. This package was developed to be used in the MATLAB simulation environment. It uses the graphical capabilities from MATLAB and the advantages of compiled languages, as for instance FORTRAN and C{sup ++}. From the MATLAB it takes the facilities for better displaying the calculated results. From the compiled languages it takes processing speed. So far models from reactor core, UTSG and OTSG have been developed. Also, a series a user-friendly graphical interfaces have been developed for the above models. As a by product a set of water and sodium thermal and physical properties have been developed and may be used directly as a function from MATLAB, or by being called from a model, as part of its calculation process. The whole set was named SIMODIS, which stands for SIstema MODular Integrado de Simulacao. (author)

  1. Qualitative diagnosis for transients analysis on nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorre, J.P.; Dorlet, E.; Evrard, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    One of the major aims of an intelligent monitoring system, is the supervision task which assist the operator in understanding what occurs on a process. Failures hypotheses must be located and the inferring process must be explained. This paper demonstrate a second generation expert system (SEXTANT) decided to the transients analysis on PWR nuclear reactors. This system detects failures by simulating the process with a numerical model. A diagnosis module uses an even graph built from a causal graph model of the plant to generate hypotheses, and a numerical model to validate these hypotheses. Hypotheses are stored into scenarios which are concurrent possible interpretations of the process evolution. The approach is illustrated by an application for the analysis of the house load operation on a pressurized water reactor. (authors). 9 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Nuclear reactor composite fuel assembly. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, D.M.; Cappiello, M.W.; Marr, D.R.; Omberg, R.P.

    1980-11-25

    A core and composite fuel assembly are described for a liquid-cooled breeder nuclear reactor including a plurality of elongated coextending driver and breeder fuel elements arranged to form a generally polygonal bundle within a thin-walled duct. The breeder elements are larger in cross section than the driver elements, and each breeder element is laterally bounded by a number of the driver elements. Each driver element further includes structure for spacing the driver elements from adjacent fuel elements and, where adjacent, the thin-walled duct. A core made up of the fuel elements can advantageously include fissile fuel of only one enrichment, while varying the effective enrichment of any given assembly or core region, merely by varying the relative number and size of the driver and breeder elements.

  3. Neutron measurements at nuclear power reactors [55

    CERN Document Server

    Scherpelz, R I

    2002-01-01

    Staff from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (operated by Battelle Memorial Institute), have performed neutron measurements at a number of commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. Neutron radiation fields at light water reactor (LWR) power plants are typically characterized by low-energy distributions due to the presence of large amounts of scattering material such as water and concrete. These low-energy distributions make it difficult to accurately monitor personnel exposures, since most survey meters and dosimeters are calibrated to higher-energy fields such as those produced by bare or D sub 2 O-moderated sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf sources. Commercial plants typically use thermoluminescent dosimeters in an albedo configuration for personnel dosimetry and survey meters based on a thermal-neutron detector inside a cylindrical or spherical moderator for dose rate assessment, so their methods of routine monitoring are highly dependent on the energy of the neutron fields. Battelle has participate...

  4. Role of research reactors for nuclear power program in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soentono, S.; Arbie, B. [National Atomic Energy Agency, Batan (Indonesia)

    1994-12-31

    The main objectives of nuclear development program in Indonesia are to master nuclear science and technology, as well as to utilise peaceful uses of nuclear know-how, aiming at stepwisely socioeconomic development. A Triga Mark II, previously of 250 kW, reactor in Bandung has been in operation since 1965 and its design power has been increased to 1000 kW in 1972. Using core grid of the Triga 250 kW, BATAN designed and constructed the Kartini Reactor in Yogyakarta which started its operation in 1979. Both of these Triga reactors have served a wide spectrum of utilisation, such as training of manpower in nuclear engineering as well as radiochemistry, isotope production and beam research activities in solid state physics. In order to support the nuclear power development program in general and to suffice the reactor experiments further, simultaneously meeting the ever increasing demand for radioisotope, the third reactor, a multipurpose reactor of 30 MW called GA. Siwabessy (RSG-GAS) has been in operation since 1987 at Serpong near Jakarta. Each of these reactors has strong cooperation with Universities, namely the Bandung Institute of Technology at Bandung, the Gadjah Mada University at Yogyakarta, and the Indonesia University at Jakarta and has facilitated the man power development required. The role of these reactors, especially the multipurpose GA. Siwabessy reactor, as essential tools in nuclear power program are described including the experience gained during preproject, construction and commissioning, as well as through their operation, maintenance and utilisation.

  5. Structural integrity of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, John F.

    2013-09-01

    The paper starts from concerns expressed by Sir Alan Cottrell, in the early 1970s, related to the safety of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) proposed at that time for the next phase of electrical power generation. It proceeds to describe the design and operation of nuclear generation plant and gives details of the manufacture of PWR reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Attention is paid to stress-relief cracking and under-clad cracking, experienced with early RPVs, explaining the mechanisms for these forms of cracking and the means taken to avoid them. Particular note is made of the contribution of non-destructive inspection to structural integrity. Factors affecting brittle fracture in RPV steels are described: in particular, effects of neutron irradiation. The use of fracture mechanics to assess defect tolerance is explained, together with the failure assessment diagram embodied in the R6 procedure. There is discussion of the Master Curve and how it incorporates effects of irradiation on fracture toughness. Dangers associated with extrapolation of data to low probabilities are illustrated. The treatment of fatigue-crack growth is described, in the context of transients that may be experienced in the operation of PWR plant. Detailed attention is paid to the thermal shock associated with a large loss-of-coolant accident. The final section reviews the arguments advanced to justify 'Incredibility of Failure' and how these are incorporated in assessments of the integrity of existing plant and proposed 'new build' PWR pressure vessels.

  6. Computer simulation of two-phase flow in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulff, W.

    1992-09-01

    Two-phase flow models dominate the economic resource requirements for development and use of computer codes for analyzing thermohydraulic transients in nuclear power plants. Six principles are presented on mathematical modeling and selection of numerical methods, along with suggestions on programming and machine selection, all aimed at reducing the cost of analysis. Computer simulation is contrasted with traditional computer calculation. The advantages of run-time interactive access operation in a simulation environment are demonstrated. It is explained that the drift-flux model is better suited for two-phase flow analysis in nuclear reactors than the two-fluid model, because of the latter`s closure problem. The advantage of analytical over numerical integration is demonstrated. Modeling and programming techniques are presented which minimize the number of needed arithmetical and logical operations and thereby increase the simulation speed, while decreasing the cost.

  7. Computer simulation of two-phase flow in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulff, W.

    1992-01-01

    Two-phase flow models dominate the economic resource requirements for development and use of computer codes for analyzing thermohydraulic transients in nuclear power plants. Six principles are presented on mathematical modeling and selection of numerical methods, along with suggestions on programming and machine selection, all aimed at reducing the cost of analysis. Computer simulation is contrasted with traditional computer calculation. The advantages of run-time interactive access operation in a simulation environment are demonstrated. It is explained that the drift-flux model is better suited for two-phase flow analysis in nuclear reactors than the two-fluid model, because of the latter's closure problem. The advantage of analytical over numerical integration is demonstrated. Modeling and programming techniques are presented which minimize the number of needed arithmetical and logical operations and thereby increase the simulation speed, while decreasing the cost.

  8. Nuclear safety in light water reactors severe accident phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Sehgal, Bal Raj

    2011-01-01

    This vital reference is the only one-stop resource on how to assess, prevent, and manage severe nuclear accidents in the light water reactors (LWRs) that pose the most risk to the public. LWRs are the predominant nuclear reactor in use around the world today, and they will continue to be the most frequently utilized in the near future. Therefore, accurate determination of the safety issues associated with such reactors is central to a consideration of the risks and benefits of nuclear power. This book emphasizes the prevention and management of severe accidents to teach nuclear professionals

  9. Modeling of Reactor Kinetics and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew Johnson; Scott Lucas; Pavel Tsvetkov

    2010-09-01

    In order to model a full fuel cycle in a nuclear reactor, it is necessary to simulate the short time-scale kinetic behavior of the reactor as well as the long time-scale dynamics that occur with fuel burnup. The former is modeled using the point kinetics equations, while the latter is modeled by coupling fuel burnup equations with the kinetics equations. When the equations are solved simultaneously with a nonlinear equation solver, the end result is a code with the unique capability of modeling transients at any time during a fuel cycle.

  10. Sustainable and safe nuclear fission energy technology and safety of fast and thermal nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Kessler, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Unlike existing books of nuclear reactor physics, nuclear engineering and nuclear chemical engineering this book covers a complete description and evaluation of nuclear fission power generation. It covers the whole nuclear fuel cycle, from the extraction of natural uranium from ore mines, uranium conversion and enrichment up to the fabrication of fuel elements for the cores of various types of fission reactors. This is followed by the description of the different fuel cycle options and the final storage in nuclear waste repositories. In addition the release of radioactivity under normal and possible accidental conditions is given for all parts of the nuclear fuel cycle and especially for the different fission reactor types.

  11. Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials: News for the Reactor Materials Crosscut, May 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science in Radiation and Dynamics Extremes

    2016-09-26

    In this newsletter for Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials, pages 1-3 cover highlights from the DOE-NE (Nuclear Energy) programs, pages 4-6 cover determining the stress-strain response of ion-irradiated metallic materials via spherical nanoindentation, and pages 7-8 cover theoretical approaches to understanding long-term materials behavior in light water reactors.

  12. Nuclear research reactors activities in INVAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez, Juan Pablo [INVAP, Bariloche (Argentina)

    2013-07-01

    This presentation describes the different activities in the research reactor field that are being carried out by INVAP. INVAP is presently involved in the design of three new research reactors in three different countries. The RA-10 is a multipurpose reactor, in Argentina, planned as a replacement for the RA-3 reactor. INVAP was contracted by CNEA for carrying out the preliminary engineering for this reactor, and has recently been contracted by CNEA for the detailed engineering. CNEA groups are strongly involved in the design of this reactor. The RMB is a multipurpose reactor, planned by CNEN from Brazil. CNEN, through REDETEC, has contracted INVAP to carry out the preliminary engineering for this reactor. As the user requirements for RA-10 and RMB are very similar, an agreement was signed between Argentina and Brasil governments to cooperate in these two projects. The agreement included that both reactors would use the OPAL reactor in Australia, design and built by INVAP, as a reference reactor. INVAP has also designed the LPRR reactor for KACST in Saudi Arabia. The LPRR is a 30 kw reactor for educational purposes. KACST initially contracted INVAP for the engineering for this reactor and has recently signed the contract with INVAP for building the reactor. General details of these three reactors will be presented.

  13. A brief history of design studies on innovative nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    In a short period after the success of CP1, many types of nuclear reactors were proposed and investigated. However, soon only a small number of reactors were selected for practical use. Around 1970, only LWRs with small number of CANDUs were operated in the western world, and FBRs were under development. It was about the time when Apollo moon landing was accomplished. However, at the same time, the future of human being was widely considered pessimistic and Limits to Growth was published. In the end of 1970's the TMI accident occurred and many nuclear reactor contracts were cancelled in USA and any more contracts had not been concluded until recent years. From the reflection of this accident, many Inherent Safe Reactors (ISRs) were proposed, though none of them were constructed. A common idea of ISRs is smallness of their size. Tokyo Institute of Technology (TokyoTech) held a symposium on small reactors, SR/TIT, in 1991, where many types of small ISRs were presented. Recently small reactors attract interest again. The most ideas employed in these reactors were the same discussed in SR/TIT. In 1980's the radioactive wastes from fuel cycle became a severe problem around the world. In TokyoTech, this issue was discussed mainly from the viewpoint of nuclear transmutations. The neutron economy became inevitable for these innovative nuclear reactors especially small long-life reactors and transmutation reactors.

  14. A brief history of design studies on innovative nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi, E-mail: hsekimot@gmail.com [Emeritus Professor, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

    2014-09-30

    In a short period after the success of CP1, many types of nuclear reactors were proposed and investigated. However, soon only a small number of reactors were selected for practical use. Around 1970, only LWRs with small number of CANDUs were operated in the western world, and FBRs were under development. It was about the time when Apollo moon landing was accomplished. However, at the same time, the future of human being was widely considered pessimistic and Limits to Growth was published. In the end of 1970’s the TMI accident occurred and many nuclear reactor contracts were cancelled in USA and any more contracts had not been concluded until recent years. From the reflection of this accident, many Inherent Safe Reactors (ISRs) were proposed, though none of them were constructed. A common idea of ISRs is smallness of their size. Tokyo Institute of Technology (TokyoTech) held a symposium on small reactors, SR/TIT, in 1991, where many types of small ISRs were presented. Recently small reactors attract interest again. The most ideas employed in these reactors were the same discussed in SR/TIT. In 1980’s the radioactive wastes from fuel cycle became a severe problem around the world. In TokyoTech, this issue was discussed mainly from the viewpoint of nuclear transmutations. The neutron economy became inevitable for these innovative nuclear reactors especially small long-life reactors and transmutation reactors.

  15. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, B.

    1992-07-01

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1991. The book is divided into three major sections: Section 1 consists of a reactor locator map and reactor tables; Section 2 includes nuclear reactors that are operating, being built, or planned; and Section 3 includes reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. Sections 2 and 3 contain the following classification of reactors: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is an American company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4, in each section). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

  16. Investigation of Thermal Hydraulics of a Nuclear Reactor Moderator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarchami, Araz

    A three-dimensional numerical modeling of the thermo hydraulics of Canadian Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) nuclear reactor is conducted. The moderator tank is a Pressurized heavy water reactor which uses heavy water as moderator in a cylindrical tank. The main use of the tank is to bring the fast neutrons to the thermal neutron energy levels. The moderator tank compromises of several bundled tubes containing nuclear rods immersed inside the heavy water. It is important to keep the water temperature in the moderator at sub-cooled conditions, to prevent potential failure due to overheating of the tubes. Because of difficulties in measuring flow characteristics and temperature conditions inside a real reactor moderator, tests are conducted using a scaled moderator in moderator test facility (MTF) by Chalk River Laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (CRL, AECL). MTF tests are conducted using heating elements to heat tube surfaces. This is different than the real reactor where nuclear radiation is the source of heating which results in a volumetric heating of the heavy water. The data recorded inside the MTF tank have shown levels of fluctuations in the moderator temperatures and requires in depth investigation of causes and effects. The purpose of the current investigation is to determine the causes for, and the nature of the moderator temperature fluctuations using three-dimensional simulation of MTF with both (surface heating and volumetric heating) modes. In addition, three dimensional simulation of full scale actual moderator tank with volumetric heating is conducted to investigate the effects of scaling on the temperature distribution. The numerical simulations are performed on a 24-processor cluster using parallel version of the FLUENT 12. During the transient simulation, 55 points of interest inside the tank are monitored for their temperature and velocity fluctuations with time.

  17. Theory of neutron slowing down in nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Ferziger, Joel H; Dunworth, J V

    2013-01-01

    The Theory of Neutron Slowing Down in Nuclear Reactors focuses on one facet of nuclear reactor design: the slowing down (or moderation) of neutrons from the high energies with which they are born in fission to the energies at which they are ultimately absorbed. In conjunction with the study of neutron moderation, calculations of reactor criticality are presented. A mathematical description of the slowing-down process is given, with particular emphasis on the problems encountered in the design of thermal reactors. This volume is comprised of four chapters and begins by considering the problems

  18. The current status of nuclear research reactor in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sittichai, C.; Kanyukt, R.; Pongpat, P. [Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Bangkok (Thailand)

    1998-10-01

    Since 1962, the Thai Research Reactor has been serving for various kinds of activities i.e. the production of radioisotopes for medical uses and research and development on nuclear science and technology, for more than three decades. The existing reactor site should be abandoned and relocated to the new suitable site, according to Thai cabinet`s resolution on the 27 December 1989. The decommissioning project for the present reactor as well as the establishment of new nuclear research center were planned. This paper discussed the OAEP concept for the decommissioning programme and the general description of the new research reactor and some related information were also reported. (author)

  19. A study on future nuclear reactor technology and development strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Sohn, D. S.; Suk, S. D.; Zee, S. K.; Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. J.; Park, W. S

    2000-12-01

    Development of nuclear reactor and fuel cycle technology for future is essential to meet the current issues such as enhancement of nuclear power reactor safety, economically competitive with gas turbine power generation, less production of radioactive waste, proliferation resistant fuel cycle, and public acceptance in consideration of lack of energy resources in the nuclear countries worldwide as well as in Korea. This report deals with as follows, 1) Review the world energy demand and supply perspective and analyse nature of energy and sustainable development to set-up nuclear policy in Korea 2) Recaptitulate the current long term nuclear R and D activities 3) Review nuclear R and D activities and programs of USA, Japan, France, Russia, international organizations such as IAEA, OECD/NEA 4) Recommend development directions of nuclear reactors and fuels.

  20. The necessity of nuclear reactors for targeted radionuclide therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krijger, Gerard C; Ponsard, Bernard; Harfensteller, Mark; Wolterbeek, Hubert T; Nijsen, Johannes W F

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear medicine has been contributing towards personalized therapies. Nuclear reactors are required for the working horses of both diagnosis and treatment, i.e., Tc-99m and I-131. In fact, reactors will remain necessary to fulfill the demand for a variety of radionuclides and are essential in the expanding field of targeted radionuclide therapies for cancer. However, the main reactors involved in the global supply are ageing and expected to shut down before 2025. Therefore, the fields of (nuclear) medicine, nuclear industry and politics share a global responsibility, faced with the task to secure future access to suitable nuclear reactors. At the same time, alternative production routes should be industrialized. For this, a coordinating entity should be put into place.

  1. Vital area identification for U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission nuclear power reactor licensees and new reactor applicants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, Donnie Wayne; Varnado, G. Bruce

    2008-09-01

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission nuclear power plant licensees and new reactor applicants are required to provide protection of their plants against radiological sabotage, including the placement of vital equipment in vital areas. This document describes a systematic process for the identification of the minimum set of areas that must be designated as vital areas in order to ensure that all radiological sabotage scenarios are prevented. Vital area identification involves the use of logic models to systematically identify all of the malicious acts or combinations of malicious acts that could lead to radiological sabotage. The models available in the plant probabilistic risk assessment and other safety analyses provide a great deal of the information and basic model structure needed for the sabotage logic model. Once the sabotage logic model is developed, the events (or malicious acts) in the model are replaced with the areas in which the events can be accomplished. This sabotage area logic model is then analyzed to identify the target sets (combinations of areas the adversary must visit to cause radiological sabotage) and the candidate vital area sets (combinations of areas that must be protected against adversary access to prevent radiological sabotage). Any one of the candidate vital area sets can be selected for protection. Appropriate selection criteria will allow the licensee or new reactor applicant to minimize the impacts of vital area protection measures on plant safety, cost, operations, or other factors of concern.

  2. The scheme for evaluation of isotopic composition of fast reactor core in closed nuclear fuel cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldikov, I. S.; Ternovykh, M. Yu; Fomichenko, P. A.; Gerasimov, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    The PRORYV (i.e. «Breakthrough» in Russian) project is currently under development. Within the framework of this project, fast reactors BN-1200 and BREST-OD-300 should be built to, inter alia, demonstrate possibility of the closed nuclear fuel cycle technologies with plutonium as a main source of power. Russia has a large inventory of plutonium which was accumulated in the result of reprocessing of spent fuel of thermal power reactors and conversion of nuclear weapons. This kind of plutonium will be used for development of initial fuel assemblies for fast reactors. To solve the closed nuclear fuel modeling tasks REPRORYV code was developed. It simulates the mass flow for nuclides in the closed fuel cycle. This paper presents the results of modeling of a closed nuclear fuel cycle, nuclide flows considering the influence of the uncertainty on the outcome of neutron-physical characteristics of the reactor.

  3. RTC-control of power transients in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratemi, Wajdi Mohamed [Alfateh University, PO Box 13040, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, the new Reactivity Trace Curve (RTC) method (Ratemi 1993,1994), which is based on the dynamic period studies (Bernard et al.,1984), has been studied for maneuvering of the nuclear reactor power without power shooting. The reactor is modeled with one group of delayed neutrons with temperature feedback effect, as well as, Xenon feedback effect. A precursors concentration model is used to provide for the effective dynamic decay constant (in one group case, it is a static one). The RTC-identifier which is given by a differential equation is then solved at each sampling time (for one group, it has an analytical solution). Its solution is what is called the Reactivity Trace Curve which keeps the power steady at the desired power. An inverse kinetic model which uses the on-line power data for reactivity calculation is used to provide initial condition (initial reactivity) for the RTC- power controller. Also feedback model are needed to evaluate both the temperature and Xenon reactivities which when subtracted from the RTC-value, one then can determine the reactivity required to keep the reactor power steady without power shooting. (authors)

  4. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    This publication contains unclassified information about facilities, built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1996. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S. Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters, and field offices of DOE; from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the U. S. reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from U.S. and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled.

  5. Neutron spectrometer for fast nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Osipenko, M; Ricco, G; Caiffi, B; Pompili, F; Pillon, M; Angelone, M; Verona-Rinati, G; Cardarelli, R; Mila, G; Argiro, S

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe the development and first tests of a neutron spectrometer designed for high flux environments, such as the ones found in fast nuclear reactors. The spectrometer is based on the conversion of neutrons impinging on $^6$Li into $\\alpha$ and $t$ whose total energy comprises the initial neutron energy and the reaction $Q$-value. The $^6$LiF layer is sandwiched between two CVD diamond detectors, which measure the two reaction products in coincidence. The spectrometer was calibrated at two neutron energies in well known thermal and 3 MeV neutron fluxes. The measured neutron detection efficiency varies from 4.2$\\times 10^{-4}$ to 3.5$\\times 10^{-8}$ for thermal and 3 MeV neutrons, respectively. These values are in agreement with Geant4 simulations and close to simple estimates based on the knowledge of the $^6$Li(n,$\\alpha$)$t$ cross section. The energy resolution of the spectrometer was found to be better than 100 keV when using 5 m cables between the detector and the preamplifiers.

  6. Experimental determination of nuclear parameters for RP-0 reactor core; Determinacion experimental de los parametros nucleares para el nucleo tipo MTR del reactor nuclear RP-0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cajacuri, Rafael A. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2000-07-01

    In the nuclear reactor for investigations RP-0 which is in Lima, Peru, that is a open pool class reactor with 1 to 10 watts of power and as a nuclear fuel uranium 238 enriched to 20% constituted by elements of Material Testing Reactor fuel class. This has reflectors of graphite and moderator of water demineralized. In 1996/1997 was measured in this reactor the following parameters: position of the control bar that make critic the reactor, critic height of moderator, excess of reactivity of the nucleus, parameter of reactivity for vacuum, parameter of reactivity for temperature, reactivity of its control bar, levels of doses in the reactor. (author)

  7. Plutonium Discharge Rates and Spent Nuclear Fuel Inventory Estimates for Nuclear Reactors Worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian K. Castle; Shauna A. Hoiland; Richard A. Rankin; James W. Sterbentz

    2012-09-01

    This report presents a preliminary survey and analysis of the five primary types of commercial nuclear power reactors currently in use around the world. Plutonium mass discharge rates from the reactors’ spent fuel at reload are estimated based on a simple methodology that is able to use limited reactor burnup and operational characteristics collected from a variety of public domain sources. Selected commercial reactor operating and nuclear core characteristics are also given for each reactor type. In addition to the worldwide commercial reactors survey, a materials test reactor survey was conducted to identify reactors of this type with a significant core power rating. Over 100 material or research reactors with a core power rating >1 MW fall into this category. Fuel characteristics and spent fuel inventories for these material test reactors are also provided herein.

  8. Closed Brayton cycle power conversion systems for nuclear reactors :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lipinski, Ronald J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vernon, Milton E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sanchez, Travis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2006-04-01

    This report describes the results of a Sandia National Laboratories internally funded research program to study the coupling of nuclear reactors to gas dynamic Brayton power conversion systems. The research focused on developing integrated dynamic system models, fabricating a 10-30 kWe closed loop Brayton cycle, and validating these models by operating the Brayton test-loop. The work tasks were performed in three major areas. First, the system equations and dynamic models for reactors and Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems were developed and implemented in SIMULINKTM. Within this effort, both steady state and dynamic system models for all the components (turbines, compressors, reactors, ducting, alternators, heat exchangers, and space based radiators) were developed and assembled into complete systems for gas cooled reactors, liquid metal reactors, and electrically heated simulators. Various control modules that use proportional-integral-differential (PID) feedback loops for the reactor and the power-conversion shaft speed were also developed and implemented. The simulation code is called RPCSIM (Reactor Power and Control Simulator). In the second task an open cycle commercially available Capstone C30 micro-turbine power generator was modified to provide a small inexpensive closed Brayton cycle test loop called the Sandia Brayton test-Loop (SBL-30). The Capstone gas-turbine unit housing was modified to permit the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller to form a closed loop. The Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator were used without modification. The Capstone systems nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system also were reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled by adjusting the alternator load by using the electrical grid as the load bank. The SBL-30 test loop was operated at

  9. Solid0Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2008-09-30

    This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP).

  10. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1994. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is a US company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

  11. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned: 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This report contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the US for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1995. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is a US company--working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

  12. Fractional neutron point kinetics equations for nuclear reactor dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto, E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx [Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Polo-Labarrios, Marco-A. [Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Espinosa-Martinez, Erick-G. [Retorno Quebec 6, Col. Burgos de Cuernavaca 62580, Temixco, Mor. (Mexico); Valle-Gallegos, Edmundo del [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, Mexico, D.F. 07738 (Mexico)

    2011-02-15

    The fractional point-neutron kinetics model for the dynamic behavior in a nuclear reactor is derived and analyzed in this paper. The fractional model retains the main dynamic characteristics of the neutron motion in which the relaxation time associated with a rapid variation in the neutron flux contains a fractional order, acting as exponent of the relaxation time, to obtain the best representation of a nuclear reactor dynamics. The physical interpretation of the fractional order is related with non-Fickian effects from the neutron diffusion equation point of view. The numerical approximation to the solution of the fractional neutron point kinetics model, which can be represented as a multi-term high-order linear fractional differential equation, is calculated by reducing the problem to a system of ordinary and fractional differential equations. The numerical stability of the fractional scheme is investigated in this work. Results for neutron dynamic behavior for both positive and negative reactivity and for different values of fractional order are shown and compared with the classic neutron point kinetic equations. Additionally, a related review with the neutron point kinetics equations is presented, which encompasses papers written in English about this research topic (as well as some books and technical reports) published since 1940 up to 2010.

  13. Modeling minor actinide multiple recycling in a lead-cooled fast reactor to demonstrate a fuel cycle without long-lived nuclear waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisz Przemysław

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The concept of closed nuclear fuel cycle seems to be the most promising options for the efficient usage of the nuclear energy resources. However, it can be implemented only in fast breeder reactors of the IVth generation, which are characterized by the fast neutron spectrum. The lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR was defined and studied on the level of technical design in order to demonstrate its performance and reliability within the European collaboration on ELSY (European Lead-cooled System and LEADER (Lead-cooled European Advanced Demonstration Reactor projects. It has been demonstrated that LFR meets the requirements of the closed nuclear fuel cycle, where plutonium and minor actinides (MA are recycled for reuse, thereby producing no MA waste. In this study, the most promising option was realized when entire Pu + MA material is fully recycled to produce a new batch of fuel without partitioning. This is the concept of a fuel cycle which asymptotically tends to the adiabatic equilibrium, where the concentrations of plutonium and MA at the beginning of the cycle are restored in the subsequent cycle in the combined process of fuel transmutation and cooling, removal of fission products (FPs, and admixture of depleted uranium. In this way, generation of nuclear waste containing radioactive plutonium and MA can be eliminated. The paper shows methodology applied to the LFR equilibrium fuel cycle assessment, which was developed for the Monte Carlo continuous energy burnup (MCB code, equipped with enhanced modules for material processing and fuel handling. The numerical analysis of the reactor core concerns multiple recycling and recovery of long-lived nuclides and their influence on safety parameters. The paper also presents a general concept of the novel IVth generation breeder reactor with equilibrium fuel and its future role in the management of MA.

  14. Modeling the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; A. M. Yacout; G. E. Matthern; S. J. Piet; A. Moisseytsev

    2005-07-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative is developing a system dynamics model as part of their broad systems analysis of future nuclear energy in the United States. The model will be used to analyze and compare various proposed technology deployment scenarios. The model will also give a better understanding of the linkages between the various components of the nuclear fuel cycle that includes uranium resources, reactor number and mix, nuclear fuel type and waste management. Each of these components is tightly connected to the nuclear fuel cycle but usually analyzed in isolation of the other parts. This model will attempt to bridge these components into a single model for analysis. This work is part of a multi-national laboratory effort between Argonne National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory and United States Department of Energy. This paper summarizes the basics of the system dynamics model and looks at some results from the model.

  15. An overview of future sustainable nuclear power reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Poullikkas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an overview of the current and future nuclear power reactor technologies is carried out. In particular, the nuclear technology is described and the classification of the current and future nuclear reactors according to their generation is provided. The analysis has shown that generation II reactors currently in operation all around the world lack significantly in safety precautions and are prone to loss of coolant accident (LOCA. In contrast, generation III reactors, which are an evolution of generation II reactors, incorporate passive or inherent safety features that require no active controls or operational intervention to avoid accidents in the event of malfunction, and may rely on gravity, natural convection or resistance to high temperatures. Today, partly due to the high capital cost of large power reactors generating electricity and partly due to the consideration of public perception, there is a shift towards the development of smaller units. These may be built independently or as modules in a larger complex, with capacity added incrementally as required. Small reactors most importantly benefit from reduced capital costs, simpler units and the ability to produce power away from main grid systems. These factors combined with the ability of a nuclear power plant to use process heat for co-generation, make the small reactors an attractive option. Generally, modern small reactors for power generation are expected to have greater simplicity of design, economy of mass production and reduced installation costs. Many are also designed for a high level of passive or inherent safety in the event of malfunction. Generation III+ designs are generally extensions of the generation III concept, which include advanced passive safety features. These designs can maintain the safe state without the use of any active control components. Generation IV reactors, which are future designs that are currently under research and development, will

  16. Issues and future direction of thermal-hydraulics research and development in nuclear power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, P., E-mail: pradip.saha@ge.com [GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Aksan, N. [GRNSPG Group, University of Pisa (Italy); Andersen, J. [GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Yan, J. [Westinghouse Electric Co., Columbia, SC (United States); Simoneau, J.P. [AREVA, Lyon (France); Leung, L. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Bertrand, F. [CEA, DEN, DER, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Aoto, K.; Kamide, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    The paper archives the proceedings of an expert panel discussion on the issues and future direction of thermal-hydraulic research and development in nuclear power reactors held at the NURETH-14 conference in Toronto, Canada, in September 2011. Thermal-hydraulic issues related to both operating and advanced reactors are presented. Advances in thermal-hydraulics have significantly improved the performance of operating reactors. Further thermal-hydraulics research and development is continuing in both experimental and computational areas for operating reactors, reactors under construction or ready for near-term deployment, and advanced Generation-IV reactors. As the computing power increases, the fine-scale multi-physics computational models, coupled with the systems analysis code, are expected to provide answers to many challenging problems in both operating and advanced reactor designs.

  17. A combined gas cooled nuclear reactor and fuel cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, David J.

    Rising oil costs, global warming, national security concerns, economic concerns and escalating energy demands are forcing the engineering communities to explore methods to address these concerns. It is the intention of this thesis to offer a proposal for a novel design of a combined cycle, an advanced nuclear helium reactor/solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) plant that will help to mitigate some of the above concerns. Moreover, the adoption of this proposal may help to reinvigorate the Nuclear Power industry while providing a practical method to foster the development of a hydrogen economy. Specifically, this thesis concentrates on the importance of the U.S. Nuclear Navy adopting this novel design for its nuclear electric vessels of the future with discussion on efficiency and thermodynamic performance characteristics related to the combined cycle. Thus, the goals and objectives are to develop an innovative combined cycle that provides a solution to the stated concerns and show that it provides superior performance. In order to show performance, it is necessary to develop a rigorous thermodynamic model and computer program to analyze the SOFC in relation with the overall cycle. A large increase in efficiency over the conventional pressurized water reactor cycle is realized. Both sides of the cycle achieve higher efficiencies at partial loads which is extremely important as most naval vessels operate at partial loads as well as the fact that traditional gas turbines operating alone have poor performance at reduced speeds. Furthermore, each side of the cycle provides important benefits to the other side. The high temperature exhaust from the overall exothermic reaction of the fuel cell provides heat for the reheater allowing for an overall increase in power on the nuclear side of the cycle. Likewise, the high temperature helium exiting the nuclear reactor provides a controllable method to stabilize the fuel cell at an optimal temperature band even during transients helping

  18. Fundamental aspects of nuclear reactor fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olander, D.R.

    1976-01-01

    The book presented is designed to function both as a text for first-year graduate courses in nuclear materials and as a reference for workers involved in the materials design and performance aspects of nuclear power plants. The contents are arranged under the following chapter headings: statistical thermodynamics, thermal properties of solids, crystal structures, cohesive energy of solids, chemical equilibrium, point defects in solids, diffusion in solids, dislocations and grain boundaries, equation of state of UO/sub 2/, fuel element thermal performance, fuel chemistry, behavior of solid fission products in oxide fuel elements, swelling due to fission gases, pore migration and fuel restructuring kinetics, fission gas release, mechanical properties of UO/sub 2/, radiation damage, radiation effects in metals, interaction of sodium and stainless steel, modeling of the structural behavior of fuel elements and assemblies. (DG)

  19. Moderator configuration options for a low-enriched uranium fueled Kilowatt-class Space Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Jeffrey C., E-mail: kingjc@mines.edu [Nuclear Science and Engineering Program, Colorado School of Mines (CSM), Golden, CO (United States); Mencarini, Leonardo de Holanda; Guimaraes, Lamartine N. F., E-mail: guimaraes@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: mencarini@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAV), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Energia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The Brazilian Air Force, through its Institute for Advanced Studies (Instituto de Estudos Avancados, IEAv/DCTA), and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) are studying the feasibility of a space nuclear reactor with a power of 1-5 kW{sub e} and fueled with Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU). This type of nuclear reactor would be attractive to signatory countries of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) or commercial interests. A LEU-fueled space reactor would avoid the security concerns inherent with Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. As an initial step, the HEU-fueled Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling Technology (KRUSTY) designed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory serves as a basis for a similar reactor fueled with LEU fuel. Using the computational code MCNP6 to predict the reactor neutronics performance, the size of the resulting reactor fueled with 19.75 wt% enriched uranium-10 wt% molybdenum alloy fuel is adjusted to match the excess reactivity of KRUSTY. Then, zirconium hydride moderator is added to the core to reduce the size of the reactor. This work presents the preliminary results of the computational modeling, with special emphasis on the comparison between homogeneous and heterogeneous moderator systems, in terms of the core diameter required to meet a specific multiplication factor (k{sub eff} = 1.035). This comparison illustrates the impact of moderator configuration on the size and performance of a LEU-fueled kilowatt-class space nuclear reactor. (author)

  20. An introduction to the engineering of fast nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Judd, Anthony M

    2014-01-01

    An invaluable resource for both graduate-level engineering students and practising nuclear engineers who want to expand their knowledge of fast nuclear reactors, the reactors of the future! This book is a concise yet comprehensive introduction to all aspects of fast reactor engineering. It covers topics including neutron physics; neutron flux spectra; flux distribution; Doppler and coolant temperature coefficients; the performance of ceramic and metal fuels under irradiation, structural changes, and fission-product migration; the effects of irradiation and corrosion on structural materials, irradiation swelling; heat transfer in the reactor core and its effect on core design; coolants including sodium and lead-bismuth alloy; coolant circuits; pumps; heat exchangers and steam generators; and plant control. The book includes new discussions on lead-alloy and gas coolants, metal fuel, the use of reactors to consume radioactive waste, and accelerator-driven subcritical systems.

  1. Physics of nuclear reactors; La physique des reacteurs nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marguet, S. [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Risques Industriels de Bourges, 18 (France); Institut de Transfert de Technologie d' EDF, 92 - Clamart (France)

    2011-07-01

    This manual covers all the aspects of the science of neutron transport in nuclear reactors and can be used with great advantage by students, engineers or even reactor experts. It is composed of 18 chapters: 1) basis of nuclear physics, 2) the interactions of neutrons with matter, 3) the interactions of electromagnetic radiations and charged-particles with matter, 4) neutron slowing-down, 5) resonant absorption, 6) Doppler effect, 7) neutron thermalization, 8) Boltzmann equation, 9) calculation methods in neutron transport theory, 10) neutron scattering, 11) reactor reactivity, 12) theory of the critical homogenous pile, 13) the neutron reflector, 14) the heterogeneous reactor, 15) the equations of the fuel cycle, 16) neutron counter-reactions, 17) reactor kinetics, and 18) calculation methods in neutron scattering

  2. Experimental investigations of heat transfer and temperature fields in models simulating fuel assemblies used in the core of a nuclear reactor with a liquid heavy-metal coolant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, I. A.; Genin, L. G.; Krylov, S. G.; Novikov, A. O.; Razuvanov, N. G.; Sviridov, V. G.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this experimental investigation is to obtain information on the temperature fields and heat transfer coefficients during flow of liquid-metal coolant in models simulating an elementary cell in the core of a liquid heavy metal cooled fast-neutron reactor. Two design versions for spacing fuel rods in the reactor core were considered. In the first version, the fuel rods were spaced apart from one another using helical wire wound on the fuel rod external surface, and in the second version spacer grids were used for the same purpose. The experiments were carried out on the mercury loop available at the Moscow Power Engineering Institute National Research University's Chair of Engineering Thermal Physics. Two experimental sections simulating an elementary cell for each of the fuel rod spacing versions were fabricated. The temperature fields were investigated using a dedicated hinged probe that allows temperature to be measured at any point of the studied channel cross section. The heat-transfer coefficients were determined using the wall temperature values obtained at the moment when the probe thermocouple tail end touched the channel wall. Such method of determining the wall temperature makes it possible to alleviate errors that are unavoidable in case of measuring the wall temperature using thermocouples placed in slots milled in the wall. In carrying out the experiments, an automated system of scientific research was applied, which allows a large body of data to be obtained within a short period of time. The experimental investigations in the first test section were carried out at Re = 8700, and in the second one, at five values of Reynolds number. Information about temperature fields was obtained by statistically processing the array of sampled probe thermocouple indications at 300 points in the experimental channel cross section. Reach material has been obtained for verifying the codes used for calculating velocity and temperature fields in channels with

  3. Nuclear data and reactor physics activities in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liem, P.H. [National Atomic Energy Agency, Tangerang (Indonesia). Center for Multipurpose Reactor

    1998-03-01

    The nuclear data and reactor physics activities in Indonesia, especially, in the National Atomic Energy Agency are presented. In the nuclear data field, the Agency is now taking the position of a user of the main nuclear data libraries such as JENDL and ENDF/B. These nuclear data libraries become the main sources for producing problem dependent cross section sets that are needed by cell calculation codes or transport codes for design, analysis and safety evaluation of research reactors. In the reactor physics field, besides utilising the existing core analysis codes obtained from bilateral and international co-operation, the Agency is putting much effort to self-develop Batan`s codes for reactor physics calculations, in particular, for research reactor and high temperature reactor design, analysis and fuel management. Under the collaboration with JAERI, Monte Carlo criticality calculations on the first criticality of RSG GAS (MPR-30) first core were done using JAERI continuous energy, vectorized Monte Carlo code, MVP, with JENDL-3.1 and JENDL-3.2 nuclear data libraries. The results were then compared with the experiment data collected during the commissioning phase. Monte Carlo calculations with both JENDL-3.1 and -3.2 libraries produced k{sub eff} values with excellent agreement with experiment data, however, systematically, JENDL-3.2 library showed slightly higher k{sub eff} values than JENDL-3.1 library. (author)

  4. Application of CFD Codes in Nuclear Reactor Safety Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Höhne

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD is increasingly being used in nuclear reactor safety (NRS analyses as a tool that enables safety relevant phenomena occurring in the reactor coolant system to be described in more detail. Numerical investigations on single phase coolant mixing in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR have been performed at the FZD for almost a decade. The work is aimed at describing the mixing phenomena relevant for both safety analysis, particularly in steam line break and boron dilution scenarios, and mixing phenomena of interest for economical operation and the structural integrity. For the experimental investigation of horizontal two phase flows, different non pressurized channels and the TOPFLOW Hot Leg model in a pressure chamber was build and simulated with ANSYS CFX. In a common project between the University of Applied Sciences Zittau/Görlitz and FZD the behaviour of insulation material released by a LOCA released into the containment and might compromise the long term emergency cooling systems is investigated. Moreover, the actual capability of CFD is shown to contribute to fuel rod bundle design with a good CHF performance.

  5. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 8: Reactor Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutians in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  6. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 12: Reactor Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  7. Monitoring Akkuyu Nuclear Reactor Using Anti-Neutrino Flux Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Ozturk, Sertac; Ozcan, V Erkcan; Unel, Gokhan

    2016-01-01

    We present a simulation based study for monitoring Akkuyu Nuclear Power Plant's activity using anti-neutrino flux originating from the reactor core. A water Cherenkov detector has been designed and optimization studies have been performed using Geant4 simulation toolkit. A first study for the design of a monitoring detector facility for Akkuyu Nuclear Power Plant has been discussed in this paper.

  8. Economics and utilization of thorium in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-05-01

    Information on thorium utilization in power reactors is presented concerning the potential demand for nuclear power, the potential supply for nuclear power, economic performance of thorium under different recycle policies, ease of commercialization of the economically preferred cases, policy options to overcome institutional barriers, and policy options to overcome technological and regulatory barriers.

  9. Fuel element concept for long life high power nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, G. E.; Rom, F. E.

    1969-01-01

    Nuclear reactor fuel elements have burnups that are an order of magnitude higher than can currently be achieved by conventional design practice. Elements have greater time integrated power producing capacity per unit volume. Element design concept capitalizes on known design principles and observed behavior of nuclear fuel.

  10. 77 FR 3009 - Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors..., ``Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors.''...

  11. 76 FR 14437 - Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Standard Design: GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Issuance of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Standard Design: GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Issuance of... GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy (GEH) for the economic simplified boiling water reactor (ESBWR) standard...

  12. Nuclear fission reactors from thousand of million years; Reactores de fision nuclear de hace miles de millones de anos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulbulian G, S.; Ordonez R, E.; Fernandez V, S.M. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    This book is about nuclear reactors, not only of the industrial ones that work to provide electric power, neither of those experimental ones as the first one that worked in Chicago in the first half of the XX Century but, mainly, of those that worked in the Earth thousands of millions of years ago. The book examines what happened in last geologic times, when the natural uranium had a different constitution to the current one. We will give you information on the nuclear fission reactors that worked in Gabon, Africa. A discussion of the radioactive isotopes formed during the operation of those reactors and its behavior until our days is presented. (Author)

  13. New reactor technology: safety improvements in nuclear power systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, M L

    2007-11-01

    Almost 450 nuclear power plants are currently operating throughout the world and supplying about 17% of the world's electricity. These plants perform safely, reliably, and have no free-release of byproducts to the environment. Given the current rate of growth in electricity demand and the ever growing concerns for the environment, nuclear power can only satisfy the need for electricity and other energy-intensive products if it can demonstrate (1) enhanced safety and system reliability, (2) minimal environmental impact via sustainable system designs, and (3) competitive economics. The U.S. Department of Energy with the international community has begun research on the next generation of nuclear energy systems that can be made available to the market by 2030 or earlier, and that can offer significant advances toward these challenging goals; in particular, six candidate reactor system designs have been identified. These future nuclear power systems will require advances in materials, reactor physics, as well as thermal-hydraulics to realize their full potential. However, all of these designs must demonstrate enhanced safety above and beyond current light water reactor systems if the next generation of nuclear power plants is to grow in number far beyond the current population. This paper reviews the advanced Generation-IV reactor systems and the key safety phenomena that must be considered to guarantee that enhanced safety can be assured in future nuclear reactor systems.

  14. SCW Pressure-Channel Nuclear Reactor Some Design Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioro, Igor L.; Khan, Mosin; Hopps, Victory; Jacobs, Chris; Patkunam, Ruban; Gopaul, Sandeep; Bakan, Kurtulus

    Concepts of nuclear reactors cooled with water at supercritical pressures were studied as early as the 1950s and 1960s in the USA and Russia. After a 30-year break, the idea of developing nuclear reactors cooled with SuperCritical Water (SCW) became attractive again as the ultimate development path for water cooling. The main objectives of using SCW in nuclear reactors are: 1) to increase the thermal efficiency of modern Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) from 30-35% to about 45-48%, and 2) to decrease capital and operational costs and hence decrease electrical energy costs (˜1000 US/kW or even less). SCW NPPs will have much higher operating parameters compared to modern NPPs (pressure about 25 MPa and outlet temperature up to 625°C), and a simplified flow circuit, in which steam generators, steam dryers, steam separators, etc., can be eliminated. Also, higher SCW temperatures allow direct thermo-chemical production of hydrogen at low cost, due to increased reaction rates. Pressure-tube or pressure-channel SCW nuclear reactor concepts are being developed in Canada and Russia for some time. Some design features of the Canadian concept related to fuel channels are discussed in this paper. The main conclusion is that the development of SCW pressure-tube nuclear reactors is feasible and significant benefits can be expected over other thermal-energy systems.

  15. Spent nuclear fuel discharges from US reactors 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-05

    This report provides current statistical data on every fuel assembly irradiated in commercial nuclear reactors operating in the United States. It also provides data on the current inventories and storage capacities of those reactors to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the nuclear and electric industries and the general public. It uses data from the mandatory, ``Nuclear Fuel Data`` survey, Form RW-859 for 1992 and historical data collected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on previous Form RW-859 surveys. The report was prepared by the EIA under a Memorandum of Understanding with the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management.

  16. The role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor in the future of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollaway, W.R.; Lidsky, L.M.; Miller, M.M.

    1990-12-01

    A preliminary assessment is made of the potential role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) in the future of nuclear power. The development of a usable actinide burning strategy could be an important factor in the acceptance and implementation of a next generation of nuclear power. First, the need for nuclear generating capacity is established through the analysis of energy and electricity demand forecasting models which cover the spectrum of bias from anti-nuclear to pro-nuclear. The analyses take into account the issues of global warming and the potential for technological advances in energy efficiency. We conclude, as do many others, that there will almost certainly be a need for substantial nuclear power capacity in the 2000--2030 time frame. We point out also that any reprocessing scheme will open up proliferation-related questions which can only be assessed in very specific contexts. The focus of this report is on the fuel cycle impacts of actinide burning. Scenarios are developed for the deployment of future nuclear generating capacity which exploit the advantages of actinide partitioning and actinide burning. Three alternative reactor designs are utilized in these future scenarios: The Light Water Reactor (LWR); the Modular Gas-Cooled Reactor (MGR); and the Integral Fast Reactor (FR). Each of these alternative reactor designs is described in some detail, with specific emphasis on their spent fuel streams and the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Four separation and partitioning processes are utilized in building the future nuclear power scenarios: Thermal reactor spent fuel preprocessing to reduce the ceramic oxide spent fuel to metallic form, the conventional PUREX process, the TRUEX process, and pyrometallurgical reprocessing.

  17. Computational modeling of nuclear thermal rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peery, Steven D.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: rocket engine transient simulation (ROCETS) system; ROCETS performance simulations composed of integrated component models; ROCETS system architecture significant features; ROCETS engineering nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) modules; ROCETS system easily adapts Fortran engineering modules; ROCETS NTR reactor module; ROCETS NTR turbomachinery module; detailed reactor analysis; predicted reactor power profiles; turbine bypass impact on system; and ROCETS NTR engine simulation summary.

  18. Development of Improved Models and Designs for Coated-Particle Gas Reactor Fuels -- Final Report under the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab. (INEEL); Martin, Philippe [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA-Saclay), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Phelip, Mayeul [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA-Saclay), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ballinger, Ronald [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2004-12-01

    The objective of this INERI project was to develop improved fuel behavior models for gas reactor coated-particle fuels and to explore improved coated-particle fuel designs that could be used reliably at very high burnups and potentially in gas-cooled fast reactors. Project participants included the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEEL), Centre Étude Atomique (CEA), and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). To accomplish the project objectives, work was organized into five tasks.

  19. Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning Nuclear Reactors At Multiple-Reactor Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittenbrock, N. G.

    1982-01-01

    Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of large (1175-MWe) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and large (1155-MWe) boiling water reactors {BWRs) at multiple-reactor stations. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). Safety and costs of decommissioning are estimated by determining the impact of probable features of multiple-reactor-station operation that are considered to be unavailable at a single-reactor station, and applying these estimated impacts to the decommissioning costs and radiation doses estimated in previous PWR and BWR decommissioning studies. The multiple-reactor-station features analyzed are: the use of interim onsite nuclear waste storage with later removal to an offsite nuclear waste disposal facility, the use of permanent onsite nuclear waste disposal, the dedication of the site to nuclear power generation, and the provision of centralized services. Five scenarios for decommissioning reactors at a multiple-reactor station are investigated. The number of reactors on a site is assumed to be either four or ten; nuclear waste disposal is varied between immediate offsite disposal, interim onsite storage, and immediate onsite disposal. It is assumed that the decommissioned reactors are not replaced in one scenario but are replaced in the other scenarios. Centralized service facilities are provided in two scenarios but are not provided in the other three. Decommissioning of a PWR or a BWR at a multiple-reactor station probably will be less costly and result in lower radiation doses than decommissioning an identical reactor at a single-reactor station. Regardless of whether the light water reactor being decommissioned is at a single- or multiple-reactor station: • the estimated occupational radiation dose for decommissioning an LWR is lowest for SAFSTOR and highest for DECON • the estimated

  20. Spent nuclear fuel discharges from US reactors 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Nuclear Fuel Data Survey, Form RW-859. This form is used to collect data on fuel assemblies irradiated at commercial nuclear reactors operating in the United States, and the current inventories and storage capacities of those reactors. These data are important to the design and operation of the equipment and facilities that DOE will use for the future acceptance, transportation, and disposal of spent fuels. The data collected and presented identifies trends in burnup, enrichment, and spent nuclear fuel discharged form commercial light-water reactor as of December 31, 1993. The document covers not only spent nuclear fuel discharges; but also site capacities and inventories; canisters and nonfuel components; and assembly type characteristics.

  1. SNIF: A Futuristic Neutrino Probe for Undeclared Nuclear Fission Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Lasserre, Thierry; Mention, Guillaume; Reboulleau, Romain; Cribier, Michel; Letourneau, Alain; Lhuillier, David

    2010-01-01

    Today reactor neutrino experiments are at the cutting edge of fundamental research in particle physics. Understanding the neutrino is far from complete, but thanks to the impressive progress in this field over the last 15 years, a few research groups are seriously considering that neutrinos could be useful for society. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) works with its Member States to promote safe, secure and peaceful nuclear technologies. In a context of international tension and nuclear renaissance, neutrino detectors could help IAEA to enforce the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). In this article we discuss a futuristic neutrino application to detect and localize an undeclared nuclear reactor from across borders. The SNIF (Secret Neutrino Interactions Finder) concept proposes to use a few hundred thousand tons neutrino detectors to unveil clandestine fission reactors. Beyond previous studies we provide estimates of all known background sources as a function of the detecto...

  2. Multiscale Methods for Nuclear Reactor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Benjamin S.

    The ability to accurately predict local pin powers in nuclear reactors is necessary to understand the mechanisms that cause fuel pin failure during steady state and transient operation. In the research presented here, methods are developed to improve the local solution using high order methods with boundary conditions from a low order global solution. Several different core configurations were tested to determine the improvement in the local pin powers compared to the standard techniques, that use diffusion theory and pin power reconstruction (PPR). Two different multiscale methods were developed and analyzed; the post-refinement multiscale method and the embedded multiscale method. The post-refinement multiscale methods use the global solution to determine boundary conditions for the local solution. The local solution is solved using either a fixed boundary source or an albedo boundary condition; this solution is "post-refinement" and thus has no impact on the global solution. The embedded multiscale method allows the local solver to change the global solution to provide an improved global and local solution. The post-refinement multiscale method is assessed using three core designs. When the local solution has more energy groups, the fixed source method has some difficulties near the interface: however the albedo method works well for all cases. In order to remedy the issue with boundary condition errors for the fixed source method, a buffer region is used to act as a filter, which decreases the sensitivity of the solution to the boundary condition. Both the albedo and fixed source methods benefit from the use of a buffer region. Unlike the post-refinement method, the embedded multiscale method alters the global solution. The ability to change the global solution allows for refinement in areas where the errors in the few group nodal diffusion are typically large. The embedded method is shown to improve the global solution when it is applied to a MOX/LEU assembly

  3. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) translational studies in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer at the new "B2" configuration of the RA-6 nuclear reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti Hughes, Andrea; Longhino, Juan; Boggio, Esteban; Medina, Vanina A; Martinel Lamas, Diego J; Garabalino, Marcela A; Heber, Elisa M; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Itoiz, María E; Aromando, Romina F; Nigg, David W; Trivillin, Verónica A; Schwint, Amanda E

    2017-09-04

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on selective accumulation of B-10 carriers in tumor followed by neutron irradiation. We demonstrated, in 2001, the therapeutic effect of BNCT mediated by BPA (boronophenylalanine) in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer, at the RA-6 nuclear reactor. Between 2007 and 2011, the RA-6 was upgraded, leading to an improvement in the performance of the BNCT beam (B2 configuration). Our aim was to evaluate BPA-BNCT radiotoxicity and tumor control in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer at the new "B2" configuration. We also evaluated, for the first time in the oral cancer model, the radioprotective effect of histamine against mucositis in precancerous tissue as the dose-limiting tissue. Cancerized pouches were exposed to: BPA-BNCT; BPA-BNCT + histamine; BO: Beam only; BO + histamine; CONTROL: cancerized, no-treatment. BNCT induced severe mucositis, with an incidence that was slightly higher than in "B1" experiments (86 vs 67%, respectively). BO induced low/moderate mucositis. Histamine slightly reduced the incidence of severe mucositis induced by BPA-BNCT (75 vs 86%) and prevented mucositis altogether in BO animals. Tumor overall response was significantly higher in BNCT (94-96%) than in control (16%) and BO groups (9-38%), and did not differ significantly from the "B1" results (91%). Histamine did not compromise BNCT therapeutic efficacy. BNCT radiotoxicity and therapeutic effect at the B1 and B2 configurations of RA-6 were consistent. Histamine slightly reduced mucositis in precancerous tissue even in this overly aggressive oral cancer model, without compromising tumor control.

  4. Analysis and application of a simulator of a nuclear reactor AP-600; Analisis y aplicacion de un simulador de un reactor nuclear AP-600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina S, V. S. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Circuito Interior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Salazar S, E., E-mail: medina_victor@comunidad.unam.mx [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Division de Ingenieria Electrica, Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, 62250 Jiutepec, Morelos (MX)

    2011-11-15

    In front of the resurgence of interest in the nuclear power production, several national organizations have considered convenient to have highly specialized human resources in the technologies of nuclear reactors of III + and IV generation. For this task, the intensive and extensive applications of the computation should been considered, as the virtual instrumentation. The present work analyzes the possible applications of a nuclear simulator provided by the IAEA with base in the design of the reactor AP-600, using a focusing of modular model developed in FORTRAN. One part of the work that was made with the simulator includes the evaluation of 21 transitory events of operation, including the recreation of the accident happened in the nuclear power plant of Three Mile Island in 1979, comparing the actions flow and the answer of the systems under the intrinsic security of a III + generation reactor. The impact that had the mentioned accident was analyzed in the growing of the nuclear energy sector and in the public image with regard to the nuclear power plants. An application for this simulator was proposed, its use as tool for the instruction in the nuclear engineering courses using it to observe the operation of the different security systems and its interrelation inside the power plant as well as a theoretical/practical approach for the student. (Author)

  5. Primary loop simulation of the SP-100 space nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Eduardo M.; Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F., E-mail: eduardo@ieav.cta.b, E-mail: fbraz@ieav.cta.b, E-mail: guimarae@ieav.cta.b [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/DCTA) Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Between 1983 and 1992 the SP-100 space nuclear reactor development project for electric power generation in a range of 100 to 1000 kWh was conducted in the USA. Several configurations were studied to satisfy different mission objectives and power systems. In this reactor the heat is generated in a compact core and refrigerated by liquid lithium, the primary loops flow are controlled by thermoelectric electromagnetic pumps (EMTE), and thermoelectric converters produce direct current energy. To define the system operation point for an operating nominal power, it is necessary the simulation of the thermal-hydraulic components of the space nuclear reactor. In this paper the BEMTE-3 computer code is used to EMTE pump design performance evaluation to a thermalhydraulic primary loop configuration, and comparison of the system operation points of SP-100 reactor to two thermal powers, with satisfactory results. (author)

  6. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Results of work performed from January 1, 1977 through March 31, 1977 on the Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program are presented. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Process Heat and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (impure Helium), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes progress to date on alloy selection for VHTR Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) applications and for DCHT applications. The present status on the simulated reactor helium loop design and on designs for the testing and analysis facilities and equipment is discussed.

  7. The role of nuclear reactors in space exploration and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipinski, R.J.

    2000-07-01

    The United States has launched more than 20 radioisotopic thermoelectric generators (RTGs) into space over the past 30 yr but has launched only one nuclear reactor, and that was in 1965. Russia has launched more than 30 reactors. The RTGs use the heat of alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu for power and typically generate <1 kW of electricity. Apollo, Pioneer, Voyager, Viking, Galileo, Ulysses, and Cassini all used RTGs. Space reactors use the fission energy of {sup 235}U; typical designs are for 100 to 1000 kW of electricity. The only US space reactor launch (SNAP-10A) was a demonstration mission. One reason for the lack of space reactor use by the United States was the lack of space missions that required high power. But, another was the assumed negative publicity that would accompany a reactor launch. The net result is that all space reactor programs after 1970 were terminated before an operating space reactor could be developed, and they are now many years from recovering the ability to build them. Two major near-term needs for space reactors are the human exploration of Mars and advanced missions to and beyond the orbit of Jupiter. To help obtain public acceptance of space reactors, one must correct some of the misconceptions concerning space reactors and convey the following facts to the public and to decision makers: Space reactors are 1000 times smaller in power and size than a commercial power reactor. A space reactor at launch is only as radioactive as a pile of dirt 60 m (200 ft) across. A space reactor contains no plutonium at launch. It does not become significantly radioactive until it is turned on, and it will be engineered so that no launch accident can turn it on, even if that means fueling it after launch. The reactor will not be turned on until it is in a high stable orbit or even on an earth-escape trajectory for some missions. The benefits of space reactors are that they give humanity a stairway to the planets and perhaps the stars. They open a new

  8. Evaluation of isotopic composition of fast reactor core in closed nuclear fuel cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirov, Georgy; Ternovykh, Mikhail; Saldikov, Ivan; Fomichenko, Peter; Gerasimov, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    The strategy of the development of nuclear power in Russia provides for use of fast power reactors in closed nuclear fuel cycle. The PRORYV (i.e. «Breakthrough» in Russian) project is currently under development. Within the framework of this project, fast reactors BN-1200 and BREST-OD-300 should be built to, inter alia, demonstrate possibility of the closed nuclear fuel cycle technologies with plutonium as a main source of energy. Russia has a large inventory of plutonium which was accumulated in the result of reprocessing of spent fuel of thermal power reactors and conversion of nuclear weapons. This kind of plutonium will be used for development of initial fuel assemblies for fast reactors. The closed nuclear fuel cycle concept of the PRORYV assumes self-supplied mode of operation with fuel regeneration by neutron capture reaction in non-enriched uranium, which is used as a raw material. Operating modes of reactors and its characteristics should be chosen so as to provide the self-sufficient mode by using of fissile isotopes while refueling by depleted uranium and to support this state during the entire period of reactor operation. Thus, the actual issue is modeling fuel handling processes. To solve these problems, the code REPRORYV (Recycle for PRORYV) has been developed. It simulates nuclide streams in non-reactor stages of the closed fuel cycle. At the same time various verified codes can be used to evaluate in-core characteristics of a reactor. By using this approach various options for nuclide streams and assess the impact of different plutonium content in the fuel, fuel processing conditions, losses during fuel processing, as well as the impact of initial uncertainties on neutron-physical characteristics of reactor are considered in this study.

  9. Development of a research nuclear reactor simulator using LABVIEW®

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lage, Aldo Marcio Fonseca; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias; Pinto, Antonio Juscelino; Souza, Luiz Claudio Andrade [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency recommends the use of safety and friendly interfaces for monitoring and controlling the operational parameters of the nuclear reactors. The most important variable in the nuclear reactors control is the power released by fission of the fuel in the core which is directly proportional to neutron flux. It was developed a digital system to simulate the neutron evolution flux and monitoring their interaction on the other operational parameters. The control objective is to bring the reactor power from its source level (mW) to a few W. It is intended for education of basic reactor neutronic principles such as the multiplication factor, criticality, reactivity, period, delayed neutron and control by rods. The 250 kW IPR-R1 TRIGA research reactor at Nuclear Technology Development Center - CDTN (Belo Horizonte/Brazil) was used as reference. TRIGA reactors, developed by General Atomics (GA), are the most widely used research reactor in the world. They are cooled by light water under natural convection and are characterized by being inherently safety. The simulation system was developed using the LabVIEW® (Laboratory Virtual Instruments Engineering Workbench) software, considering the modern concept of virtual instruments (VI's). The main purpose of the system is to provide to analyze the behavior, and the tendency of some processes that occur in the reactor using a user-friendly operator interface. The TRIGA simulator system will allow the study of parameters, which affect the reactor operation, without the necessity of using the facility.(author)

  10. Target-fueled nuclear reactor for medical isotope production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Richard L.; Parma, Edward J.

    2017-06-27

    A small, low-enriched, passively safe, low-power nuclear reactor comprises a core of target and fuel pins that can be processed to produce the medical isotope .sup.99Mo and other fission product isotopes. The fuel for the reactor and the targets for the .sup.99Mo production are the same. The fuel can be low enriched uranium oxide, enriched to less than 20% .sup.235U. The reactor power level can be 1 to 2 MW. The reactor is passively safe and maintains negative reactivity coefficients. The total radionuclide inventory in the reactor core is minimized since the fuel/target pins are removed and processed after 7 to 21 days.

  11. Spectral structure of electron antineutrinos from nuclear reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, D A; Langford, T J

    2015-01-01

    Recent measurements of the positron energy spectrum obtained from inverse beta decay interactions of reactor electron antineutrinos show an excess in the 4 to 6 MeV region relative to current predictions. First-principles calculations of fission and beta decay processes within a typical pressurized water reactor core identify prominent fission daughter isotopes as a possible origin for this excess. These calculations also predict percent-level substructures in the antineutrino spectrum due to Coulomb effects in beta decay. Precise measurement of these substructures can elucidate the nuclear processes occurring within reactors. These substructures can be a systematic issue for measurements utilizing the detailed spectral shape.

  12. Spectral Structure of Electron Antineutrinos from Nuclear Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Dwyer, D A

    2014-01-01

    Recent measurements of the positron energy spectrum obtained from inverse beta decay interactions of reactor electron antineutrinos show an excess in the 4 to 6 MeV region relative to current predictions. First-principle calculations of fission and beta decay processes within a typical pressurized water reactor core identify prominent fission daughter isotopes as a possible origin for this excess. These calculations also predict percent-level substructure in the antineutrino spectrum due to Coulomb effects in beta decay. Precise measurement of this substructure can constrain nuclear reactor physics. The substructure can be a systematic uncertainty for measurements utilizing the detailed spectral shape.

  13. Technological status of reactor coolant pumps in generation III+ pressurized nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brecht, Bernhard; Bross, Stephan [KSB Aktiengesellschaft, Frankenthal (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    KSB has been developing and producing pumps for thermal power plants for nearly 90 years. Consequently, KSB also started to develop and manufacture pumps for all kinds of nuclear power plants from the very beginning of the civil use of nuclear energy. This is especially true for reactor coolant pumps for pressurized water reactors. For the generation of advanced evolutionary reactors (Generation III+ reactors), KSB developed an advanced shaft seal system which is also able to fulfill the requirements of station blackout conditions. The tests in the KSB test rigs, which were successfully completed in December 2015, proved the full functionality of the new design. For generation III+ passive plant reactors KSB developed a new reactor coolant pump type called RUV, which is based on the experience of classic reactor coolant pumps and reactor internal pumps. It is a very compact, hermetically sealed vertical pump-motor unit with a wet winding motor. A full scale prototype successfully passed the 1st stage qualification test program in October 2015.

  14. Nuclear Safeguards Considerations For The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillip Casey Durst; David Beddingfield; Brian Boyer; Robert Bean; Michael Collins; Michael Ehinger; David Hanks; David L. Moses; Lee Refalo

    2009-10-01

    High temperature reactors (HTRs) have been considered since the 1940s, and have been constructed and demonstrated in the United Kingdom (Dragon), United States (Peach Bottom and Fort Saint Vrain), Japan (HTTR), Germany (AVR and THTR-300), and have been the subject of conceptual studies in Russia (VGM). The attraction to these reactors is that they can use a variety of reactor fuels, including abundant thorium, which upon reprocessing of the spent fuel can produce fissile U-233. Hence, they could extend the stocks of available uranium, provided the fuel is reprocessed. Another attractive attribute is that HTRs typically operate at a much higher temperature than conventional light water reactors (LWRs), because of the use of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coated (TRISO) fuel particles embedded in ceramic graphite. Rather than simply discharge most of the unused heat from the working fluid in the power plant to the environment, engineers have been designing reactors for 40 years to recover this heat and make it available for district heating or chemical conversion plants. Demonstrating high-temperature nuclear energy conversion was the purpose behind Fort Saint Vrain in the United States, THTR-300 in Germany, HTTR in Japan, and HTR-10 and HTR-PM, being built in China. This resulted in nuclear reactors at least 30% or more thermodynamically efficient than conventional LWRs, especially if the waste heat can be effectively utilized in chemical processing plants. A modern variant of high temperature reactors is the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Originally developed in the United States and Germany, it is now being redesigned and marketed by the Republic of South Africa and China. The team examined historical high temperature and high temperature gas reactors (HTR and HTGR) and reviewed safeguards considerations for this reactor. The following is a preliminary report on this topic prepared under the ASA-100 Advanced Safeguards Project in support of the NNSA Next

  15. The role of integral experiments and nuclear cross section evaluations in space nuclear reactor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, David L.; McKnight, Richard D.

    The importance of the nuclear and neutronic properties of candidate space reactor materials to the design process has been acknowledged as has been the use of benchmark reactor physics experiments to verify and qualify analytical tools used in design, safety, and performance evaluation. Since June 1966, the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) has acted as an interagency forum for the assessment and evaluation of nuclear reaction data used in the nuclear design process. CSEWG data testing has involved the specification and calculation of benchmark experiments which are used widely for commercial reactor design and safety analysis. These benchmark experiments preceded the issuance of the industry standards for acceptance, but the benchmarks exceed the minimum acceptance criteria for such data. Thus, a starting place has been provided in assuring the accuracy and uncertainty of nuclear data important to space reactor applications.

  16. University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Meyer

    2007-04-01

    The objectives of this meeting were to capture the observations, insights, issues, concerns, and ideas of those involved in the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center (TAMU NSC) TRIGA Reactor Conversion so that future efforts can be conducted with greater effectiveness, efficiency, and with fewer challenges. This workshop was held in conjunction with a similar workshop for the University of Florida Reactor Conversion. Some of the generic lessons from that workshop are included in this report for completeness.

  17. Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schenter, R.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-11-01

    The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted.

  18. Localization of Vibrating Noise Sources in Nuclear Reactor Cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hultqvist, Pontus

    2004-09-01

    In this thesis the possibility of locating vibrating noise sources in a nuclear reactor core from the neutron noise has been investigated using different localization methods. The influence of the vibrating noise source has been considered to be a small perturbation of the neutron flux inside the reactor. Linear perturbation theory has been used to construct the theoretical framework upon which the localization methods are based. Two different cases have been considered: one where a one-dimensional one-group model has been used and another where a two-dimensional two-energy group noise simulator has been used. In the first case only one localization method is able to determine the position with good accuracy. This localization method is based on finding roots of an equation and is sensitive to other perturbations of the neutron flux. It will therefore work better with the assistance of approximative methods that reconstruct the noise source to determine if the results are reliable or not. In the two-dimensional case the results are more promising. There are several different localization techniques that reproduce both the vibrating noise source position and the direction of vibration with enough precision. The approximate methods that reconstruct the noise source are substantially better and are able to support the root finding method in a more constructive way. By combining the methods, the results will be more reliable.

  19. SAFETY ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY FOR AGED CANDU® 6 NUCLEAR REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WOLFGANG HARTMANN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the Safety Analysis for CANDU® 6 nuclear reactors as affected by main Heat Transport System (HTS aging. Operational and aging related changes of the HTS throughout its lifetime may lead to restrictions in certain safety system settings and hence some restriction in performance under certain conditions. A step in confirming safe reactor operation is the tracking of relevant data and their corresponding interpretation by the use of appropriate thermalhydraulic analytic models. Safety analyses ranging from the assessment of safety limits associated with the prevention of intermittent fuel sheath dryout for a slow Loss of Regulation (LOR analysis and fission gas release after a fuel failure are summarized. Specifically for fission gas release, the thermalhydraulic analysis for a fresh core and an 11 Effective Full Power Years (EFPY aged core was summarized, leading to the most severe stagnation break sizes for the inlet feeder break and the channel failure time. Associated coolant conditions provide the input data for fuel analyses. Based on the thermalhydraulic data, the fission product inventory under normal operating conditions may be calculated for both fresh and aged cores, and the fission gas release may be evaluated during the transient. This analysis plays a major role in determining possible radiation doses to the public after postulated accidents have occurred.

  20. Study of fuel assemblies for the nuclear reactor GFR; Estudio de ensambles de combustible para el reactor nuclear GFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes R, R.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Francois L, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Morelos 62550 (Mexico)]. e-mail: ricarera@yahoo.com.mx

    2008-07-01

    In the present work the criticality calculations for two models of fuel assembly were realized to study the nuclear reactor cooled by gas (Gas Fast Reactor) of IV Generation. Model 1 is an assembly with hexagonal adjustment of fuel rods with reflector in the axial ends higher and lower, the coolant flows between the rods. Model 2 is an hexagonal assembly type block with spheres dispersion and cylindrical channels for where the coolant with reflector in the axial ends also flows. The materials selected for each component of the assemblies, should be resistant to the radiation of fast neutrons and high operation temperatures, for what in both models the following materials were chosen: a mixture of uranium carbide more plutonium for the fuel; a mixture of silicon carbide in different theoretical density percentages for structures and shieldings; helium gas like coolant and a zirconium carbide mixture like reflector, which fulfill the restrictions of being resistant to the high operation temperatures and means of irradiation. General considerations were taken, which are common parameters to both types of assemblies, like size and materials used in the different parts of each model of assembly. The criticality calculations were obtained with the help of the MCNPx code, based on the Monte Carlo method. It was realized a validation of the atomic density data of each component of the assemblies, to have the certainty of the proportionate values that they were introduced of correct way in the code. The results show that model 1 makes better use of the fissile material in a assembly that has the same dimensions externally. That is to say, that from the only considered viewpoint, the neutron one, model 1 is better than model 2. (Author)

  1. Investigations on boron carbide oxidation for nuclear reactors safety-General modelling for ICARE/CATHARE code applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, N. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Cadarache, BP 3, 13 115 Saint Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)], E-mail: nathalie.seiler@irsn.fr; Bertrand, F.; Marchand, O.; Repetto, G. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Cadarache, BP 3, 13 115 Saint Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Ederli, S. [ENEA, Ente per le Nuove Tecnologie l' Energia et l' Ambiente (Italy)

    2008-04-15

    The present paper deals with the problem of boron carbide pellet oxidation which might occur during a severe accident. A basic correlation, involving global variables, has been developed for the simulation of boron carbide oxidation with the ICARE/CATHARE code. This modelling has been based on available experimental data, including the VERDI separate effects experiments performed by IRSN at low pressures and high temperatures. According to the agreement between the measured and the calculated bundle temperatures as well as hydrogen release and oxidized B{sub 4}C, the ICARE/CATHARE code simulates rather well QUENCH experiments involving B{sub 4}C control rod degradation, Zircaloy oxidation under starvation and cooling with steam. Based on simulations results, it has been noticed that the B{sub 4}C degradation has a slight direct effect on global bundle degradation but a non-negligible influence on Zircaloy oxidation through power release, material melting and flowing down.

  2. On the Optimization of the Fuel Distribution in a Nuclear Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thevenot, Laurent

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we give an optimality condition for the optimization problem of the distribution of fuel assemblies in a nuclear reactor by using the homogenization method. This study deals with purely fissile fuels and is based on the neutron transport equation modeling for continuous models...

  3. Nuclear reactor (1960); Reacteurs nucleaires (1960)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maillard, M.L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Leo, M.B. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    1960-07-01

    The first French plutonium-making reactors G1, G2 and G3 built at Marcoule research center are linked to a power plant. The G1 electrical output does not offset the energy needed for operating this reactor. On the contrary, reactors G2 and G3 will each generate a net power of 25 to 30 MW, which will go into the EDF grid. This power is relatively small, but the information obtained from operation is great and will be helpful for starting up the power reactor EDF1, EDF2 and EDF3. The paper describes how, previous to any starting-up operation, the tests performed, especially those concerned with the power plant and the pressure vessel, have helped to bring the commissioning date closer. (author) [French] Les premiers reacteurs industriels plutonigenes francais G1 - G2 - G3 du Centre de Marcoule comportent une installation de recuperation d'energie. La production d'electricite de G1 ne compense pas l'energie depensee par ailleurs pour le fonctionnement de l'ensemble, par contre, G2 et G3 doivent fournir chacun une puissance de 25 a 30 MW au reseau national d'Electricite de France. Cette puissance est modeste, mais l'experience acquise grace a ces reacteurs est tres grande et c'est grace a elle qu'il nous sera possible de mettre en exploitation les reacteurs energetiques EDF1 - EDF2 - EDF3. Le memoire decrit comment, avant tout demarrage du reacteur, les essais effectues, en particulier ceux concernant l'installation de recuperation d'energie et le caisson, ont permis d'abreger la phase de montee en puissance. (auteur)

  4. Nonlinear Control of Hydraulic Manipulator for Decommissioning Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myoung-Ho; Lee, Sung-Uk; Kim, Chang-Hoi; Choi, Byung-Seon; Moon, Jei-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Robot technique is need to decommission nuclear reactor because of high radiation environment. Especially, Manipulator systems are useful for dismantling complex structure in a nuclear facility. In addition, Hydraulic system is applied to handle heavy duty object. Since hydraulic system can demonstrate high power. The manipulator with hydraulic power is already developed. To solve this problem, various nonlinear control method includes acceleration control. But, it is difficult because acceleration value is highly noisy. In this paper, the nonlinear control algorithm without acceleration control is studied. To verify, the hydraulic manipulator model had been developed. Furthermore, the numerical simulation is carried out. The nonlinear control without acceleration parameter method is developed for hydraulic manipulator. To verify control algorithm, the manipulator is modeled by MBD and the hydraulic servo system is also derived. In addition, the numerical simulation is also carried out. Especially, PID gain is determined though TDC algorithm. In the result of numerical simulation, tracking performance is good without acceleration control. Thus, the PID though TDC with SMC is good for hydraulic manipulator control.

  5. Assessment of the TiO2/water nanofluid effects on heat transfer characteristics in VVER-1000 nuclear reactor using CFD modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Mousavizadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The most important advantage of nanoparticles is the increased thermal conductivity coefficient and convection heat transfer coefficient so that, as a result of using a 1.5% volume concentration of nanoparticles, the thermal conductivity coefficient would increase by about twice. In this paper, the effects of a nanofluid (TiO2/water on heat transfer characteristics such as the thermal conductivity coefficient, heat transfer coefficient, fuel clad, and fuel center temperatures in a VVER-1000 nuclear reactor are investigated. To this end, the cell equivalent of a fuel rod and its surrounding coolant fluid were obtained in the hexagonal fuel assembly of a VVER-1000 reactor. Then, a fuel rod was simulated in the hot channel using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulation codes and thermohydraulic calculations (maximum fuel temperature, fluid outlet, Minimum Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (MDNBR, etc. were performed and compared with a VVER-1000 reactor without nanoparticles. One of the most important results of the analysis was that heat transfer and the thermal conductivity coefficient increased, and usage of the nanofluid reduced MDNBR.

  6. Assessment of the TiO{sub 2}/water nanofluid effects on heat transfer characteristics in VVER-1000 nuclear reactor using CFD modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavizadeh, Seyed Mohammad; Ansarifar, Gholam Reza; Talebi, Mansour [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Advanced Sciences and Technology, University of Isfahan, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The most important advantage of nanoparticles is the increased thermal conductivity coefficient and convection heat transfer coefficient so that, as a result of using a 1.5% volume concentration of nanoparticles, the thermal conductivity coefficient would increase by about twice. In this paper, the effects of a nanofluid (TiO2/water) on heat transfer characteristics such as the thermal conductivity coefficient, heat transfer coefficient, fuel clad, and fuel center temperatures in a VVER-1000 nuclear reactor are investigated. To this end, the cell equivalent of a fuel rod and its surrounding coolant fluid were obtained in the hexagonal fuel assembly of a VVER-1000 reactor. Then, a fuel rod was simulated in the hot channel using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation codes and thermohydraulic calculations (maximum fuel temperature, fluid outlet, Minimum Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (MDNBR), etc.) were performed and compared with a VVER-1000 reactor without nanoparticles. One of the most important results of the analysis was that heat transfer and the thermal conductivity coefficient increased, and usage of the nanofluid reduced MDNBR.

  7. Synergistic Smart Fuel For In-pile Nuclear Reactor Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Randall A. Ali; Steven L . Garrett

    2013-10-01

    In March 2011, an earthquake of magnitude 9.0 on the Richter scale struck Japan with its epicenter on the northeast coast, near the Tohoku region. In addition to the immense physical destruction and casualties across the country, several nuclear power plants (NPP) were affected. It was the Fukushima Daiichi NPP that experienced the most severe and irreversible damage. The earthquake brought the reactors at Fukushima to an automatic shutdown and because the power transmission lines were damaged, emergency diesel generators (EDGs) were activated to ensure that there was continued cooling of the reactors and spent fuel pools. The situation was being successfully managed until the tsunami hit about forty-five minutes later with a maximum wave height of approximately 15 m. The influx of water submerged the EDGs, the electrical switchgear, and dc batteries, resulting in the total loss of power to the reactors.2 At this point, the situation became critical. There was a loss of the sensors and instrumentation within the reactor that could have provided valuable information to guide the operators to make informed decisions and avoid the unfortunate events that followed. In the light of these events, we have developed and tested a potential self-powered thermoacoustic system, which will have the ability to serve as a temperature sensor and can transmit data independently of electronic networks. Such a device is synergistic with the harsh environment of the nuclear reactor as it utilizes the heat from the nuclear fuel to provide the input power.

  8. Modular Lead-Bismuth Fast Reactors in Nuclear Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Petrochenko

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the unique experience of operating reactors with heavy liquid metal coolant–eutectic lead-bismuth alloy in nuclear submarines, the concept of modular small fast reactors SVBR-100 for civilian nuclear power has been developed and validated. The features of this innovative technology are as follows: a monoblock (integral design of the reactor with fast neutron spectrum, which can operate using different types of fuel in various fuel cycles including MOX fuel in a self-providing mode. The reactor is distinct in that it has a high level of self-protection and passive safety, it is factory manufactured and the assembled reactor can be transported by railway. Multipurpose application of the reactor is presumed, primarily, it can be used for regional power to produce electricity, heat and for water desalination. The Project is being realized within the framework of state-private partnership with joint venture OJSC “AKME-Engineering” established on a parity basis by the State Atomic Energy Corporation “Rosatom” and the Limited Liability Company “EuroSibEnergo”.

  9. Modeling and Simulation of the Sulfur-Iodine Process Coupled to a Very High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Youngjoon; Lee, Taehoon; Lee, Kiyoung; Kim, Minhwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Hydrogen produced from water using nuclear energy will avoid both the use of fossil fuel and CO{sub 2} emission presumed to be the dominant reason for global warming. A thermo-chemical sulfur-iodine (SI) process coupled to a Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor(VHTR) is one of the most prospective hydrogen production methods that split water using nuclear energy because the SI process is suitable for large-scale hydrogen production without CO{sub 2} emission. The dynamic simulation code to evaluate the start-up behavior of the chemical reactors placed on the secondary helium loop of the SI process has been developed and partially verified using the steady state values obtained from the Aspen Plus{sup TM} Code simulation. As the start-up dynamic simulation results of the SI process coupled to the IHX, which is one of components in the VHTR system, it is expected that the integrated secondary helium loop of the SI process can be successfully and safely approach the steady state condition.

  10. Piezoelectric material for use in a nuclear reactor core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, D. A.; Reinhardt, Brian; Tittmann, B. R.

    2012-05-01

    In radiation environments ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation has great potential for improving reactor safety and furthering the understanding of radiation effects and materials. In both nuclear power plants and materials test reactors, elevated temperatures and high levels of radiation present challenges to ultrasonic NDE methodologies. The challenges are primarily due to the degradation of the ultrasonic sensors utilized. We present results from the operation of a ultrasonic piezoelectric transducer, composed of bulk single crystal AlN, in a nuclear reactor core for over 120 MWHrs. The transducer was coupled to an aluminum cylinder and operated in pulse echo mode throughout the irradiation. In addition to the pulse echo testing impedance data were obtained. Further, the piezoelectric coefficient d33 was measured prior to irradiation and found to be 5.5 pC/N which is unchanged from as-grown samples, and in fact higher than the measured d33 for many as-grown samples.

  11. Alloying of steel and graphite by hydrogen in nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasikov, E.

    2017-02-01

    In traditional power engineering hydrogen may be one of the first primary source of equipment damage. This problem has high actuality for both nuclear and thermonuclear power engineering. Study of radiation-hydrogen embrittlement of the steel raises the question concerning the unknown source of hydrogen in reactors. Later unexpectedly high hydrogen concentrations were detected in irradiated graphite. It is necessary to look for this source of hydrogen especially because hydrogen flakes were detected in reactor vessels of Belgian NPPs. As a possible initial hypothesis about the enigmatical source of hydrogen one can propose protons generation during beta-decay of free neutrons поскольку inasmuch as protons detected by researches at nuclear reactors as witness of beta-decay of free neutrons.

  12. Optimizing Nuclear Reactor Operation Using Soft Computing Techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Entzinger, J.O.; Ruan, D.; Kahraman, Cengiz

    2006-01-01

    The strict safety regulations for nuclear reactor control make it di±cult to implement new control techniques such as fuzzy logic control (FLC). FLC however, can provide very desirable advantages over classical control, like robustness, adaptation and the capability to include human experience into

  13. Method of controlling crystallite size in nuclear-reactor fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, M.H.; Collins, J.L.; Shell, S.E.

    Improved spherules for making enhanced forms of nuclear-reactor fuels are prepared by internal gelation procedures within a sol-gel operation and are accomplished by first boiling the concentrated HMTA-urea feed solution before engaging in the spherule-forming operation thereby effectively controlling crystallite size in the product spherules.

  14. Simplified dynamic simulation of a traveling wave nuclear reactor; Simulacion dinamica simplificada de un reactor nuclear de onda viajera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez M, H.; Espinosa P, G. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Francois, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec 62550, Morelos (Mexico); Lopez S, R., E-mail: heribertosanchez7@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    In this work the nuclear fuel burn wave in a fast traveling wave reactor (TWR) is presented, using the reduced model of the neutron diffusion equation, considering only the axial component, and the equations of the transuranic dynamics of U-Pu and a radionuclide of Pu. Two critical zones of the reactor are considered, one enriched with U-Pu called ignition zone and the other impoverished zone or of U-238, named breeding zone. Occupying Na as refrigerant within TWR, and Fe as structural material; both are present in the ignition and breeding zones. Considering as a fissile material the Pu, since by neutron capture the U is transformed into Pu, thus increasing the quantity of Pu more than that of U; in this way the fuel burn stability with the wave dynamics is understood. The calculation of the results was approached numerically to determine the temporal space evolution of the neutron flux in this system and of the main isotopes involved in the burning process. (Author)

  15. Use of hafnium in control bars of nuclear reactors; Uso de hafnio en barras de control de reactores nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J.R.; Alonso V, G. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: jrrs@nuclear.inin-mx

    2003-07-01

    Recently the use of hafnium as neutron absorber material in nuclear reactors has been reason of investigation by virtue of that this material has nuclear properties as to the neutrons absorption and structural that can prolong the useful life of the control mechanisms of the nuclear reactors. In this work some of those more significant hafnium properties are presented like nuclear material. Also there are presented calculations carried out with the HELIOS code for fuel cells of uranium oxide and of uranium and plutonium mixed oxides under controlled conditions with conventional bars of boron carbide and also with similar bars to which are substituted the absorbent material by metallic hafnium, the results are presented in this work. (Author)

  16. Technical support to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the boiling water reactor blowdown heat transfer program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, R.E.

    1976-09-01

    Results are presented of studies conducted by Aerojet Nuclear Company (ANC) in FY 1975 to support the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the boiling water reactor blowdown heat transfer (BWR-BDHT) program. The support provided by ANC is that of an independent assessor of the program to ensure that the data obtained are adequate for verification of analytical models used for predicting reactor response to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident. The support included reviews of program plans, objectives, measurements, and actual data. Additional activity included analysis of experimental system performance and evaluation of the RELAP4 computer code as applied to the experiments.

  17. Reactor Fuel Isotopics and Code Validation for Nuclear Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, Matthew W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Weber, Charles F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pigni, Marco T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gauld, Ian C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Experimentally measured isotopic concentrations of well characterized spent nuclear fuel (SNF) samples have been collected and analyzed by previous researchers. These sets of experimental data have been used extensively to validate the accuracy of depletion code predictions for given sets of burnups, initial enrichments, and varying power histories for different reactor types. The purpose of this report is to present the diversity of data in a concise manner and summarize the current accuracy of depletion modeling. All calculations performed for this report were done using the Oak Ridge Isotope GENeration (ORIGEN) code, an internationally used irradiation and decay code solver within the SCALE comprehensive modeling and simulation code. The diversity of data given in this report includes key actinides, stable fission products, and radioactive fission products. In general, when using the current ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data libraries in SCALE, the major actinides are predicted to within 5% of the measured values. Large improvements were seen for several of the curium isotopes when using improved cross section data found in evaluated nuclear data file ENDF/B-VII.0 as compared to ENDF/B-V-based results. The impact of the flux spectrum on the plutonium isotope concentrations as a function of burnup was also shown. The general accuracy noted for the actinide samples for reactor types with burnups greater than 5,000 MWd/MTU was not observed for the low-burnup Hanford B samples. More work is needed in understanding these large discrepancies. The stable neodymium and samarium isotopes were predicted to within a few percent of the measured values. Large improvements were seen in prediction for a few of the samarium isotopes when using the ENDF/B-VII.0 libraries compared to results obtained with ENDF/B-V libraries. Very accurate predictions were obtained for 133Cs and 153Eu. However, the predicted values for the stable ruthenium and rhodium isotopes varied

  18. Performance tests for integral reactor nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Dong-Seong; Yim, Jeong-Sik; Lee, Chong-Tak; Kim, Han-Soo; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ho; Cheon, Jin-Sik; Oh, Je-Yong

    2006-02-15

    An integral type reactor SMART plans to utilize metallic Zr-U fuel which is Zr-based alloy with 34{approx}38 wt% U. In order to verify the technologies for the design and manufacturing of the fuel and get a license, performance tests were carried out. Experimental Fuel Assembly (EFA) manufactured in KAERI is being successfully irradiated in the MIR reactor of RIAR from September 4 2004, and it has achieved burnup of 0.21 g/cc as of January 25 2006. Thermal properties of irradiated Zr-U fuel were measured. Up to the phase transformation temperature, thermal diffusivity increased linearly in proportion to temperature. However its dependence on the burnup was not significant. RIA tests with 4 unirradiated Zr-U fuel rods were performed in Kurchatov Institute to establish a safety criterion. In the case of the un-irradiated Zr-U fuel, the energy deposition during the control rod ejection accident should be less than 172 cal/g to prevent the failure accompanying fuel fragmentation and dispersal. Finally the irradiation tests of fuel rods have been performed at HANARO. The HITE-2 test was successfully completed up to a burnup of 0.31 g/cc. The HITE-3 test began in February 2004 and will be continued up to a target burnup of 0.6 g/cc.

  19. 77 FR 39521 - Application for a License To Export Nuclear Reactor Major Components and Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Application for a License To Export Nuclear Reactor Major Components and Equipment Pursuant to 10... Reactor internals, Components and For use in Braka nuclear power Company LLC reactor coolant equipment...

  20. Evaluation of prestress losses in nuclear reactor containments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundqvist, Peter, E-mail: peter.lundqvist@kstr.lth.s [Div. of Structural Engineering, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Nilsson, Lars-Olof [Div. of Building Materials, Lund University, Lund (Sweden)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: Prestress losses in reactor containments were estimated using prediction models. The predicted prestress losses were compared to long-term measurements. The accuracy of the models was improved by considering actual drying conditions. Predictions by CEB/FIP MC 1999 and ACI 209 were closest to the measured losses. - Abstract: The most critical safety barrier in a nuclear power plant, the concrete containment, is prestressed by hundreds of tendons, both horizontally and vertically. The main purpose of the containment is to prevent radioactive discharge to the environment in the case of a serious internal accident. Due to creep and shrinkage of concrete and relaxation of the prestressing steel, tendon forces decrease with time. These forces are thus measured in Swedish containments with unbonded tendons at regular in-service inspections. In this paper, the prestress losses obtained from these in-service inspections are compared to losses estimated using several prediction models for creep, shrinkage and relaxation. In an attempt to increase the accuracy of these models, existing expressions for the development of shrinkage were modified using previous findings on the humidity and temperature inside two Swedish containments. The models which were used and modified for predicting creep and shrinkage were CEB-FIP Model Codes 1990 and 1999, ACI 209, Model B3 and GL2000. Eurocode 2 was used for the prediction of relaxation. The results show that the most accurate of the models were CEB/FIP MC 99 and ACI 209. Depending on the model, the accuracy of the prediction models was increased by 0.5-1.2 percentage points of prestress losses when using the modified development of shrinkage. Furthermore, it was found that the differences between the different models depend mainly on the prediction of creep. Possible explanations for the deviation between the calculated and measured models can be the influence of reinforcement on creep and shrinkage of concrete and

  1. Advanced methods for nuclear reactor gas laser coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miley, G.H.; Verdeyen, J.T.

    1978-06-01

    Research is described that led to the discovery of three nuclear-pumped lasers (NPLs) using mixtures of Ne--N/sub 2/, He--Hg, and He or Ne with CO or CO/sub 2/. The Ne--N/sub 2/ NPL was the first laser obtained with modest neutron fluxes from a TRIGA reactor (vs fast burst reactors used elsewhere in such work), the He--Hg NPL was the first visible nuclear-pumped laser, while the Ne--CO and He--CO/sub 2/ lasers are the first to provide energy storage on a millisecond time scale. Important potential applications of NPLs include coupling and power transmission from remote power stations such as nuclear plants in satellites and neutron-feedback operation of inertial confinement fusion plants.

  2. A reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Baldoncini, Marica; Fiorentini, Giovanni; Mantovani, Fabio; Ricci, Barbara; Strati, Virginia; Xhixha, Gerti

    2014-01-01

    Antineutrinos produced at nuclear reactors constitute a severe source of background for the detection of geoneutrinos, which bring to the Earth's surface information about natural radioactivity in the whole planet. In this framework we provide a reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors, in view of reactors operational records yearly published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). We evaluate the expected signal from commercial reactors for ongoing (KamLAND and Borexino), planned (SNO+) and proposed (Juno, RENO-50, LENA and Hanohano) experimental sites. Uncertainties related to reactor antineutrino production, propagation and detection processes are estimated using a Monte Carlo based approach, which provides an overall site dependent uncertainty on the signal in the geoneutrino energy window on the order of 3%. We also implement the off-equilibrium correction to the reference reactor spectra associated with the long-lived isotopes and we estimate a 2.4% increase of the unoscillate...

  3. Methodology for the integral comparison of nuclear reactors: selecting a reactor for Mexico; Metodologia para la comparacion integral de reactores nucleares: seleccion de un reactor para Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes R, R.; Martin del Campo M, C. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: ricarera@yahoo.com.mx

    2006-07-01

    In this work it was built a methodology to compare nuclear reactors of third generation that can be contemplated for future electric planning in Mexico. This methodology understands the selection of the reactors to evaluate eliminating the reactors that still are not sufficiently mature at this time of the study. A general description of each reactor together with their main ones characteristic is made. It was carried out a study for to select the group of parameters that can serve as evaluation indicators, which are the characteristics of the reactors with specific values for each considered technology, and it was elaborated an evaluation matrix indicators including the reactors in the columns and those indicators in the lines. Since that none reactor is the best in all the indicators were necessary to use a methodology for multi criteria taking decisions that we are presented. It was used the 'Fuzzy Logic' technique, the which is based in those denominated diffuse groups and in a system of diffuse inference based on heuristic rules in the way 'If Then consequence> ', where the linguistic values of the condition and of the consequence is defined by diffuse groups, it is as well as the rules always they transform a diffuse group into another. Later on they combine all the diffuse outputs to create a single output and an inverse transformation is made that it transfers the output from the diffuse domain to the real one. They were carried out two studies one with the entirety of the indicators and another in which the indicators were classified in three approaches: the first one refers to indicators related with the planning of the plants inside the context of the general electric sector, the second approach includes indicators related with the characteristics of the fuel and the third it considers indicators related with the acting of the plant in safety and environmental impact. This second study allowed us to know the qualities of

  4. Accelerated development of Zr-containing new generation ferritic steels for advanced nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yang, Ying [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sridharan, K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys that can be fabricated using conventional steelmaking methods. The new alloys are expected to have superior high-temperature creep performance and excellent radiation resistance as compared to Grade 91. The designed alloys were fabricated using arc-melting and drop-casting, followed by hot rolling and conventional heat treatments. Comprehensive experimental studies have been conducted on the developed alloys to evaluate their hardness, tensile properties, creep resistance, Charpy impact toughness, and aging resistance, as well as resistance to proton and heavy ion (Fe2+) irradiation.

  5. Modelling and simulation the radioactive source-term of fission products in PWR type reactors; Modelagem e simulacao do termo-fonte radioativo de produtos de fissao em reatores nucleares do tipo PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porfirio, Rogilson Nazare da Silva

    1996-07-01

    The source-term was defined with the purpose the quantify all radioactive nuclides released the nuclear reactor in the case of accidents. Nowadays the source-term is limited to the coolant of the primary circuit of reactors and may be measured or modelled with computer coders such as the TFP developed in this work. The calculational process is based on the linear chain techniques used in the CINDER-2 code. The TFP code considers forms of fission products release from the fuel pellet: Recoil, Knockout and Migration. The release from the gap to the coolant fluid is determined from the ratio between activity measured in the coolant and calculated activity in the gap. Considered the operational data of SURRY-1 reactor, the TFP code was run to obtain the source=term of this reactor. From the measured activities it was verified the reliability level of the model and the employed computational logic. The accuracy of the calculated quantities were compared to the measured data was considered satisfactory. (author)

  6. Jules Horowitz Reactor, a new irradiation facility: Improving dosimetry for the future of nuclear experimentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregoire, G.; Beretz, D.; Destouches, C. [CEA, DEN, DER/SPEX, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is an experimental reactor under construction at the French Nuclear Energy and Alternative Energies Commission (CEA) facility at Cadarache. It will achieve its first criticality by the end of 2014. Experiments that will be conducted at JHR will deal with fuel, cladding, and material behavior. The JHR will also produce medical radio-isotopes and doped silicon for the electronic industry. As a new irradiation facility, its instrumentation will benefit from recent improvements. Nuclear instrumentation will include reactor dosimetry, as it is a reference technique to determine neutron fluence in experimental devices or characterize irradiation locations. Reactor dosimetry has been improved with the progress of simulation tools and nuclear data, but at the same time the customer needs have increased: Experimental results must have reduced and assessed uncertainties. This is now a necessary condition to perform an experimental irradiation in a test reactor. Items improved, in the framework of a general upgrading of the dosimetry process based on uncertainty minimization, will include dosimeter, nuclear data, and modelling scheme. (authors)

  7. Nuclear reactor melt arrest and coolability device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofanous, Theo G.; Dinh, Nam Truc; Wachowiak, Richard M.

    2016-06-14

    Example embodiments provide a Basemat-Internal Melt Arrest and Coolability device (BiMAC) that offers improved spatial and mechanical characteristics for use in damage prevention and risk mitigation in accident scenarios. Example embodiments may include a BiMAC having an inclination of less than 10-degrees from the basemat floor and/or coolant channels of less than 4 inches in diameter, while maintaining minimum safety margins required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  8. Installation of a new type of nuclear reactor in Mexico: advantages and disadvantages; Instalacion de un nuevo tipo de reactor nuclear en Mexico: ventajas y desventajas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurado P, M.; Martin del Campo M, C. [FI-UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: mjp_green@hotmail.com

    2005-07-01

    In this work the main advantages and disadvantages of the installation of a new type of nuclear reactor different to the BWR type reactor in Mexico are presented. A revision of the advanced reactors is made that are at the moment in operation and of the advanced reactors that are in construction or one has already planned its construction in the short term. Specifically the A BWR and EPR reactors are analyzed. (Author)

  9. Monte Carlo modelling of TRIGA research reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bakkari, B.; Nacir, B.; El Bardouni, T.; El Younoussi, C.; Merroun, O.; Htet, A.; Boulaich, Y.; Zoubair, M.; Boukhal, H.; Chakir, M.

    2010-10-01

    The Moroccan 2 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at Centre des Etudes Nucléaires de la Maâmora (CENM) achieved initial criticality on May 2, 2007. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes for their use in agriculture, industry, and medicine. This study deals with the neutronic analysis of the 2-MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at CENM and validation of the results by comparisons with the experimental, operational, and available final safety analysis report (FSAR) values. The study was prepared in collaboration between the Laboratory of Radiation and Nuclear Systems (ERSN-LMR) from Faculty of Sciences of Tetuan (Morocco) and CENM. The 3-D continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP (version 5) was used to develop a versatile and accurate full model of the TRIGA core. The model represents in detailed all components of the core with literally no physical approximation. Continuous energy cross-section data from the more recent nuclear data evaluations (ENDF/B-VI.8, ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, and JENDL-3.3) as well as S( α, β) thermal neutron scattering functions distributed with the MCNP code were used. The cross-section libraries were generated by using the NJOY99 system updated to its more recent patch file "up259". The consistency and accuracy of both the Monte Carlo simulation and neutron transport physics were established by benchmarking the TRIGA experiments. Core excess reactivity, total and integral control rods worth as well as power peaking factors were used in the validation process. Results of calculations are analysed and discussed.

  10. iDREAM: an industrial detector for nuclear reactor monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribov, I. V.; Gromov, M. B.; Lukjanchenko, G. A.; Novikova, G. J.; Obinyakov, B. A.; Oralbaev, A. Y.; Skorokhvatov, M. D.; Sukhotin, S. V.; Chepurnov, A. S.; Etenko, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    Prototype of industrial reactor antineutrino detector iDREAM is dedicated for an experiment to demonstrate the possibility of remote monitoring of PWR reactor operational modes by neutrino method in real-time in order to avoid undeclared exposure modes for nuclear fuel and unauthorized removal of isotopes. The prototype detector was started up in 2014. To test the detector elements and components of electronics distilled water has been used as a target, which enables the use of Cerenkov radiation from cosmic muons as a physical signal. Also parallel measuring of the long-term stability has been doing for samples of liquid organic scintillator doped with gadolinium and synthesized by different methods

  11. Nuclear reactor for breeding U.sup.233

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohanan, Charles S.; Jones, David H.; Raab, Jr., Harry F.; Radkowsky, Alvin

    1976-01-01

    A light-water-cooled nuclear reactor capable of breeding U.sup.233 for use in a light-water breeder reactor includes physically separated regions containing U.sup.235 fissile material and U.sup.238 fertile material and Th.sup.232 fertile material and Pu.sup.239 fissile material, if available. Preferably the U.sup.235 fissile material and U.sup.238 fertile material are contained in longitudinally movable seed regions and the Pu.sup.239 fissile material and Th.sup.232 fertile material are contained in blanket regions surrounding the seed regions.

  12. Modeling Chemical Reactors I: Quiescent Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Michoski, C E; Schmitz, P G

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a fully generalized quiescent chemical reactor system in arbitrary space $\\vdim =1,2$ or 3, with $n\\in\\mathbb{N}$ chemical constituents $\\alpha_{i}$, where the character of the numerical solution is strongly determined by the relative scaling between the local reactivity of species $\\alpha_{i}$ and the local functional diffusivity $\\mathscr{D}_{ij}(\\alpha)$ of the reaction mixture. We develop an operator time-splitting predictor multi-corrector RK--LDG scheme, and utilize $hp$-adaptivity relying only on the entropy $\\mathscr{S}_{\\mathfrak{R}}$ of the reactive system $\\mathfrak{R}$. This condition preserves these bounded nonlinear entropy functionals as a necessarily enforced stability condition on the coupled system. We apply this scheme to a number of application problems in chemical kinetics; including a difficult classical problem arising in nonequilibrium thermodynamics known as the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction where we utilize a concentration-dependent diffusivity tensor $\\mathscr{D}_{ij}(...

  13. Requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemicalseparation plants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmiotti, G.; Cahalan, J.; Pfeiffer, P.; Sofu, T.; Taiwo, T.; Wei,T.; Yacout, A.; Yang, W.; Siegel, A.; Insepov, Z.; Anitescu, M.; Hovland,P.; Pereira, C.; Regalbuto, M.; Copple, J.; Willamson, M.

    2006-12-11

    This report presents requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants that are of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. Justification for advanced simulation and some examples of grand challenges that will benefit from it are provided. An integrated software tool that has its main components, whenever possible based on first principles, is proposed as possible future approach for dealing with the complex problems linked to the simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants. The main benefits that are associated with a better integrated simulation have been identified as: a reduction of design margins, a decrease of the number of experiments in support of the design process, a shortening of the developmental design cycle, and a better understanding of the physical phenomena and the related underlying fundamental processes. For each component of the proposed integrated software tool, background information, functional requirements, current tools and approach, and proposed future approaches have been provided. Whenever possible, current uncertainties have been quoted and existing limitations have been presented. Desired target accuracies with associated benefits to the different aspects of the nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants were also given. In many cases the possible gains associated with a better simulation have been identified, quantified, and translated into economical benefits.

  14. Synergistic smart fuel for in-pile nuclear reactor measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.A.; Kotter, D.K. [Idaho National Laboratories, Idaho Falls (United States); Ali, R.A.; Garrett, S.L. [Penn State University, University Park, State College, PA 16801 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The thermo-acoustic fuel rod sensor developed in this research has demonstrated a novel technique for monitoring the temperature within the core of a nuclear reactor or the temperature of the surrounding heat-transfer fluid. It uses the heat from the nuclear fuel to generate sustained acoustic oscillations whose frequency will be indicative of the temperature. Converting a nuclear fuel rod into this type of thermo-acoustic sensor simply requires the insertion of a porous material (stack). This sensor has demonstrated a synergy with the elevated temperatures that exist within the nuclear reactor using materials that have only minimal susceptibility to high-energy particle fluxes. When the sensor is in operation, the sound waves radiated from the fuel rod resonator will propagate through the surrounding cooling fluid. The frequency of these oscillations is directly correlated with an effective temperature within the fuel rod resonator. This device is self-powered and is operational even in case of total loss of power of the reactor.

  15. Activities in the field of small nuclear power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranaev, Yu.D.; Dolgov, V.V.; Sergeev, Yu.A. [Physics and Power Eng. Inst., Obninsk (Russian Federation). State Res. Centre

    1997-10-01

    Considerable efforts have been undertaken for development, design, construction and operation of small nuclear power plants (SNPP) in Russia. Systematic work in this area was started in the mid-1950s. The driving force for this activity was the awareness that the use of nuclear fuel would practically solve the problem of fuel transportation. As far as the remote northern regions are concerned, this provides the key advantage of nuclear over conventional energy sources. The activity in the field of SNPP has included pre-design analytical feasibility studies and experimental research including large-scale experiments on critical assemblies, thermal and hydraulic test facilities, research and development work, construction and operation of pilot and demonstration SNPPs, and finally, construction and more than 20 years of operation of the commercial SNPP, namely Bilibino nuclear co-generation plant (NCGP) located in Chukotka autonomous district, which is one of the most remote regions in the far north-east of Russia. In recent years, studies have been carried out on the development of several new SNPP designs using advanced reactors of the new generation. Among these are the second stage of Bilibino NCGP, floating NCGP VOLNOLOM-3, designated for siting in the Arctic sea coast area, and a nuclear district heating plant for the town of Apatity, in the Murmansk region. In this paper, the background and current status of the SNPPs are given, and the problems as well as prospects of small nuclear reactors development and implementation are considered. (orig.) 20 refs.

  16. Optimization Algorithms for Nuclear Reactor Power Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeong Min; Oh, Won Jong; Oh, Seung Jin; Chun, Won Gee; Lee, Yoon Joon [Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    One of the control techniques that could replace the present conventional PID controllers in nuclear plants is the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) method. The most attractive feature of the LQR method is that it can provide the systematic environments for the control design. However, the LQR approach heavily depends on the selection of cost function and the determination of the suitable weighting matrices of cost function is not an easy task, particularly when the system order is high. The purpose of this paper is to develop an efficient and reliable algorithm that could optimize the weighting matrices of the LQR system

  17. Interactive Virtual Reactor and Control Room for Education and Training at Universities and Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Yoshinori; Li, Ye; Zhu, Xuefeng; Rizwan, Uddin [University of Illinois, Urbana (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Efficient and effective education and training of nuclear engineering students and nuclear workers are critical for the safe operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. With an eye toward this need, we have focused on the development of 3D models of virtual labs for education, training as well as to conduct virtual experiments. These virtual labs, that are expected to supplement currently available resources, and have the potential to reduce the cost of education and training, are most easily developed on game-engine platforms. We report some recent extensions to the virtual model of the University of Illinois TRIGA reactor.

  18. Application of probabilistic risk assessment in nuclear and environmental licensing processes of nuclear reactors in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mata, Jonatas F.C. da; Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: jonatasfmata@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: vasconv@cdtn.br, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi, occurred in Japan in 2011, brought reflections, worldwide, on the management of nuclear and environmental licensing processes of existing nuclear reactors. One of the key lessons learned in this matter, is that the studies of Probabilistic Safety Assessment and Severe Accidents are becoming essential, even in the early stage of a nuclear development project. In Brazil, Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission, CNEN, conducts the nuclear licensing. The organism responsible for the environmental licensing is Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources, IBAMA. In the scope of the licensing processes of these two institutions, the safety analysis is essentially deterministic, complemented by probabilistic studies. The Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is the study performed to evaluate the behavior of the nuclear reactor in a sequence of events that may lead to the melting of its core. It includes both probability and consequence estimation of these events, which are called Severe Accidents, allowing to obtain the risk assessment of the plant. Thus, the possible shortcomings in the design of systems are identified, providing basis for safety assessment and improving safety. During the environmental licensing, a Quantitative Risk Analysis (QRA), including probabilistic evaluations, is required in order to support the development of the Risk Analysis Study, the Risk Management Program and the Emergency Plan. This article aims to provide an overview of probabilistic risk assessment methodologies and their applications in nuclear and environmental licensing processes of nuclear reactors in Brazil. (author)

  19. Exploring Stochastic Sampling in Nuclear Data Uncertainties Assessment for Reactor Physics Applications and Validation Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Vasiliev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The quantification of uncertainties of various calculation results, caused by the uncertainties associated with the input nuclear data, is a common task in nuclear reactor physics applications. Modern computation resources and improved knowledge on nuclear data allow nowadays to significantly advance the capabilities for practical investigations. Stochastic sampling is the method which has received recently a high momentum for its use and exploration in the domain of reactor design and safety analysis. An application of a stochastic sampling based tool towards nuclear reactor dosimetry studies is considered in the given paper with certain exemplary test evaluations. The stochastic sampling not only allows the input nuclear data uncertainties propagation through the calculations, but also an associated correlation analysis performance with no additional computation costs and for any parameters of interest can be done. Thus, an example of assessment of the Pearson correlation coefficients for several models, used in practical validation studies, is shown here. As a next step, the analysis of the obtained information is proposed for discussion, with focus on the systems similarities assessment. The benefits of the employed method and tools with respect to practical reactor dosimetry studies are consequently outlined.

  20. Study on the selection of nuclear fuel type for a hybrid power extraction reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Dong Han; Park, Won Suk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-11-01

    The development of a subcritical transmutation reactor concept is emerging for reducing the amounts of actinides and long-lived nuclides in the spent fuel from nuclear power plants. This technology may make contribution to reduce the human risks associated with constructing radio-waste disposal facilities. One of the important issues for the design of the reactor is the selection of a suitable nuclear fuel type. Choosing the best nuclear fuel type for the reactor may not be easy since there exist several criteria associated with neutronic aspects, thermal performance, safety problem, cost problem, radiation damage in the reactor, etc. The best option should be chosen based on the maximization of our needs in this situation. This study presents a logical decision model for this issue using an analytic hierarchy process (AHP). Hierarchy is a representation of a system to study the functional relations of its components and its impact on the entire system. The study shows first how to construct hierarchy representing their relations and then measure the individual element's impact to the entire system for a quantitative decision making. Current four fuel types; metal, oxide, molten salt, and nitride, were selected and analyzed based on several characteristics with respect to overall comparison. Based on the decision model developed, the study concludes that the metal fuel type is the best choice for the transmutation reactor. The proposed approach is intended to help people be rational and logical in making decisions such complex task. 13 refs., 16 figs., 16 tabs. (Author)

  1. Sub-Critical Nuclear Reactor Based on FFAG-Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Seok; Kang, Hung Sik; Lee, Tae Yeon [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    After the East-Japan earthquake and the subsequent nuclear disaster, the anti-nuclear mood has been wide spread. It is very unfortunate both for nuclear science community and for the future of mankind, which is threatened by two serious challenges, the global warming caused by the greenhouse effect and the shortage of energy cause by the petroleum exhaustion. While the nuclear energy seemed to be the only solution to these problems, it is clear that it has its own problems, one of which broke out so strikingly in Japan. There are also other problems such as the radiotoxic nuclear wastes that survive up to even tens of thousands years and the limited reserves of Uranium. To solve these problems of nuclear fission energy, accelerator-based sub-critical nuclear reactor was once proposed. (Its details will be explained below.) First of all, it is safe in a disaster such as an earthquake, because the deriving accelerator stops immediately by the earthquake. It also minimizes the nuclear waste problem by reducing the amount of the toxic waste and shortening their half lifetime to only a few hundred years. Finally, it solves the Uranium reserve problem because it can use Thorium as its fuel. The Thorium reserve is much larger than that of Uranium. Although the idea of the accelerator-driven nuclear reactor was proposed long time ago, it has not been utilized yet first by technical difficulty and economical reasons. The accelerator-based system needs 1 GeV, 10 MW power proton accelerator. A conventional linear accelerator would need several hundred m length, which is highly costly particularly in Korea because of the high land cost. However, recent technologies make it possible to realize that scale accelerator by a reasonable size. That is the fixed-field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator that is described in this article

  2. Passive heat-transfer means for nuclear reactors. [LMFBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burelbach, J.P.

    1982-06-10

    An improved passive cooling arrangement is disclosed for maintaining adjacent or related components of a nuclear reactor within specified temperature differences. Specifically, heat pipes are operatively interposed between the components, with the vaporizing section of the heat pipe proximate the hot component operable to cool it and the primary condensing section of the heat pipe proximate the other and cooler component operable to heat it. Each heat pipe further has a secondary condensing section that is located outwardly beyond the reactor confinement and in a secondary heat sink, such as air ambient the containment, that is cooler than the other reactor component. By having many such heat pipes, an emergency passive cooling system is defined that is operative without electrical power.

  3. Software reliability and safety in nuclear reactor protection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Planning the development, use and regulation of computer systems in nuclear reactor protection systems in such a way as to enhance reliability and safety is a complex issue. This report is one of a series of reports from the Computer Safety and Reliability Group, Lawrence Livermore that investigates different aspects of computer software in reactor National Laboratory, that investigates different aspects of computer software in reactor protection systems. There are two central themes in the report, First, software considerations cannot be fully understood in isolation from computer hardware and application considerations. Second, the process of engineering reliability and safety into a computer system requires activities to be carried out throughout the software life cycle. The report discusses the many activities that can be carried out during the software life cycle to improve the safety and reliability of the resulting product. The viewpoint is primarily that of the assessor, or auditor.

  4. A probabilistic safety analysis of incidents in nuclear research reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Valdir Maciel; Agostinho Angelo Sordi, Gian Maria; Moralles, Mauricio; Filho, Tufic Madi

    2012-06-01

    This work aims to evaluate the potential risks of incidents in nuclear research reactors. For its development, two databases of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) were used: the Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) and the Incident Report System for Research Reactor (IRSRR). For this study, the probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) was used. To obtain the result of the probability calculations for PSA, the theory and equations in the paper IAEA TECDOC-636 were used. A specific program to analyse the probabilities was developed within the main program, Scilab 5.1.1. for two distributions, Fischer and chi-square, both with the confidence level of 90 %. Using Sordi equations, the maximum admissible doses to compare with the risk limits established by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) were obtained. All results achieved with this probability analysis led to the conclusion that the incidents which occurred had radiation doses within the stochastic effects reference interval established by the ICRP-64.

  5. Neutron analysis of the fuel of high temperature nuclear reactors; Analisis neutronico del combustible de reactores nucleares de alta temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastida O, G. E.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: gbo729@yahoo.com.mx [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this work a neutron analysis of the fuel of some high temperature nuclear reactors is presented, studying its main features, besides some alternatives of compound fuel by uranium and plutonium, and of coolant: sodium and helium. For this study was necessary the use of a code able to carry out a reliable calculation of the main parameters of the fuel. The use of the Monte Carlo method was convenient to simulate the neutrons transport in the reactor core, which is the base of the Serpent code, with which the calculations will be made for the analysis. (Author)

  6. Reactor Physics Analysis Models for a CANDU Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok

    2007-10-15

    Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor physics analysis is typically performed in three steps. At first, macroscopic cross-sections of the reference lattice is produced by modeling the reference fuel channel. Secondly macroscopic cross-sections of reactivity devices in the reactor are generated. The macroscopic cross-sections of a reactivity device are calculated as incremental cross-sections by subtracting macroscopic cross-sections of a three-dimensional lattice without reactivity device from those of a three-dimensional lattice with a reactivity device. Using the macroscopic cross-sections of the reference lattice and incremental cross-sections of the reactivity devices, reactor physics calculations are performed. This report summarizes input data of typical CANDU reactor physics codes, which can be utilized for the future CANDU reactor physics analysis.

  7. Reactor Physics Analysis Models for a CANDU Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok

    2007-10-15

    Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor physics analysis is typically performed in three steps. At first, macroscopic cross-sections of the reference lattice is produced by modeling the reference fuel channel. Secondly macroscopic cross-sections of reactivity devices in the reactor are generated. The macroscopic cross-sections of a reactivity device are calculated as incremental cross-sections by subtracting macroscopic cross-sections of a three-dimensional lattice without reactivity device from those of a three-dimensional lattice with a reactivity device. Using the macroscopic cross-sections of the reference lattice and incremental cross-sections of the reactivity devices, reactor physics calculations are performed. This report summarizes input data of typical CANDU reactor physics codes, which can be utilized for the future CANDU reactor physics analysis.

  8. Nuclear reactor pulse tracing using a CdZnTe electro-optic radiation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Kyle A., E-mail: nuclearengg@gmail.com [S.M.A.R.T. Laboratory, Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan KS 66506 (United States); Geuther, Jeffrey A. [TRIGA Mark II Nuclear Reactor, Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan KS 66506 (United States); Neihart, James L.; Riedel, Todd A. [S.M.A.R.T. Laboratory, Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan KS 66506 (United States); Rojeski, Ronald A. [Nanometrics, Inc., 1550 Buckeye Drive, Milpitas CA 95035 (United States); Ugorowski, Philip B.; McGregor, Douglas S. [S.M.A.R.T. Laboratory, Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan KS 66506 (United States)

    2012-07-11

    CdZnTe has previously been shown to operate as an electro-optic radiation detector by utilizing the Pockels effect to measure steady-state nuclear reactor power levels. In the present work, the detector response to reactor power excursion experiments was investigated. Peak power levels during an excursion were predicted to be between 965 MW and 1009 MW using the Fuchs-Nordheim and Fuchs-Hansen models and confirmed with experimental data from the Kansas State University TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor. The experimental arrangement of the Pockels cell detector includes collimated laser light passing through a transparent birefringent crystal, located between crossed polarizers, and focused upon a photodiode. The birefringent crystal, CdZnTe in this case, is placed in a neutron beam emanating from a nuclear reactor beam port. After obtaining the voltage-dependent Pockels characteristic response curve with a photodiode, neutron measurements were conducted from reactor pulses with the Pockels cell set at the 1/4 and 3/4 wave bias voltages. The detector responses to nuclear reactor pulses were recorded in real-time using data logging electronics, each showing a sharp increase in photodiode current for the 1/4 wave bias, and a sharp decrease in photodiode current for the 3/4 wave bias. The polarizers were readjusted to equal angles in which the maximum light transmission occurred at 0 V bias, thereby, inverting the detector response to reactor pulses. A high sample rate oscilloscope was also used to more accurately measure the FWHM of the pulse from the electro-optic detector, 64 ms, and is compared to the experimentally obtained FWHM of 16.0 ms obtained with the {sup 10}B-lined counter.

  9. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Nuclear Reactor Equipment Under NRC Export Licensing Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... designed for inserting or removing fuel in an operating nuclear reactor. (3) Complete reactor control rod... contain fuel elements and the primary coolant in a nuclear reactor at an operating pressure in excess of... diffuser plates especially designed or prepared for use in a nuclear reactor. (8) Reactor control......

  10. Design and implementation progress of multi-purpose simulator for nuclear research reactor using LabVIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arafa, Amany Abdel Aziz; Saleh, Hassan Ibrahim [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Radiation Engineering Dept.; Ashoub, Nagieb [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Nuclear Research Center

    2015-11-15

    This paper illustrates the neutronic and thermal hydraulic models that were implemented in the nuclear research reactor simulator based on LabVIEW. It also describes the system and transient analysis of the simulator that takes into consideration the temperature effects and poisoning. This simulator is designed to be a multi-purpose in which the operator could understand the effects of the input parameters on the reactor. A designer can study different solutions for virtual reactor accident scenarios. The main features of the simulator are the flexibility to design and maintain the interface and the ability to redesign and remodel the reactor core engine. The developed reactor simulator permits to acquire hands-on the experience of the physics and technology of nuclear reactors including reactivity control, thermodynamics, technology design and safety system design. This simulator can be easily customizable and upgradable and new opportunities for collaboration between academic groups could be conducted.

  11. Fission-Produced (99)Mo Without a Nuclear Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youker, Amanda J; Chemerisov, Sergey D; Tkac, Peter; Kalensky, Michael; Heltemes, Thad A; Rotsch, David A; Vandegrift, George F; Krebs, John F; Makarashvili, Vakho; Stepinski, Dominique C

    2017-03-01

    (99)Mo, the parent of the widely used medical isotope (99m)Tc, is currently produced by irradiation of enriched uranium in nuclear reactors. The supply of this isotope is encumbered by the aging of these reactors and concerns about international transportation and nuclear proliferation. Methods: We report results for the production of (99)Mo from the accelerator-driven subcritical fission of an aqueous solution containing low enriched uranium. The predominately fast neutrons generated by impinging high-energy electrons onto a tantalum convertor are moderated to thermal energies to increase fission processes. The separation, recovery, and purification of (99)Mo were demonstrated using a recycled uranyl sulfate solution. Conclusion: The (99)Mo yield and purity were found to be unaffected by reuse of the previously irradiated and processed uranyl sulfate solution. Results from a 51.8-GBq (99)Mo production run are presented.

  12. Advanced Space Nuclear Reactors from Fiction to Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa-Simil, L.

    The advanced nuclear power sources are used in a large variety of science fiction movies and novels, but their practical development is, still, in its early conceptual stages, some of the ideas being confirmed by collateral experiments. The novel reactor concept uses the direct conversion of nuclear energy into electricity, has electronic control of reactivity, being surrounded by a transmutation blanket and very thin shielding being small and light that at its very limit may be suitable to power an autonomously flying car. It also provides an improved fuel cycle producing minimal negative impact to environment. The key elements started to lose the fiction attributes, becoming viable actual concepts and goals for the developments to come, and on the possibility to achieve these objectives started to become more real because the theory shows that using the novel nano-technologies this novel reactor might be achievable in less than a century.

  13. Inception and evolution of Oklo natural nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentridi, Salah-Eddine; Gall, Benoît; Gauthier-Lafaye, François; Seghour, Abdeslam; Medjadi, Djamel-Eddine

    2011-11-01

    The occurrence of more than 15 natural nuclear Reactor Zones (RZ) in a geological environment remains a mystery even 40 years after their discovery. The present work gives for the first time an explanation of the chemical and physical processes that caused the start-up of the fission reactions with two opposite processes, uranium enrichments and progressive impoverishment in 235U. Based on Monte-Carlo neutronics simulations, a solution space was defined taking into account realistic combinations of relevant parameters acting on geological conditions and neutron transport physics. This study explains criticality occurrence, operation, expansion and end of life conditions of Oklo natural nuclear reactors, from the smallest to the biggest ones.

  14. Systems and methods for dismantling a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heim, Robert R; Adams, Scott Ryan; Cole, Matthew Denver; Kirby, William E; Linnebur, Paul Damon

    2014-10-28

    Systems and methods for dismantling a nuclear reactor are described. In one aspect the system includes a remotely controlled heavy manipulator ("manipulator") operatively coupled to a support structure, and a control station in a non-contaminated portion of a workspace. The support structure provides the manipulator with top down access into a bioshield of a nuclear reactor. At least one computing device in the control station provides remote control to perform operations including: (a) dismantling, using the manipulator, a graphite moderator, concrete walls, and a ceiling of the bioshield, the manipulator being provided with automated access to all internal portions of the bioshield; (b) loading, using the manipulator, contaminated graphite blocks from the graphite core and other components from the bioshield into one or more waste containers; and (c) dispersing, using the manipulator, dust suppression and contamination fixing spray to contaminated matter.

  15. ZEEP: Canada's first nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, R.E.; Okazaki, A. [retired, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    In 1905 Albert Einstein published his historic paper on special relativity, which contained the equation E=mc 2. The significance of this mass-energy relationship became evident with the discovery of nuclear fission in 1939, when it was realized that large amounts of energy would be released in a fission chain reaction. Canadian scientists were involved in this field from the beginning and their efforts resulted in the startup in September 1945 of the ZEEP reactor at Chalk River, the first reactor to go critical outside the USA. In this paper we recall some of the events that led to the construction of ZEEP, and describe the role it played in the development of the Canadian nuclear energy program. (author)

  16. FRAUD/SABOTAGE Killing Nuclear-Reactors Need Modeling!!!: "Super"alloys GENERIC ENDEMIC Wigner's-Disease/.../IN-stability: Ethics? SHMETHICS!!!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asphahani, Aziz; Siegel, Sidney; Siegel, Edward

    2010-03-01

    Carbides solid-state chemistry domination of old/new nuclear- reactors/spent-fuel-casks/refineries/jet/missile/rocket-engines in austenitic/FCC Ni/Fe-based(so miscalled)``super"alloys(182/82; Hastelloy-X,600,304/304L-SSs,...,690!!!) GENERIC ENDEMIC EXTANT detrimental(synonyms): Wigner's-diseas(WD)[J.Appl.Phys.17,857 (1946)]/Ostwald-ripening/spinodal-decomposition/overageing- embrittlement/thermal-leading-to-mechanical(TLTM)-INstability: Mayo[Google:``If Leaks Could Kill"; at flickr.com search on ``Giant-Magnotoresistance"; find: Siegel[J.Mag.Mag.Mtls.7,312 (1978)]<<<``Fert"-"Gruenberg"(1988/89)2007-physics Nobel/Wolf/ Japan-prizes]necessitating NRC-inspections of 40+25 = 65 Westin- ``KLouse PWRs(12/2006)]-Lai[Met.Trans.AIME,9A,827(1978)]-Sabol- Stickler[Phys.Stat.Sol.(1970)]-Ashpahani[Intl.Conf. H in Metals, Paris(1977]-Russell[Prog.Mtls.Sci.(1983)]-Pollard[last UCS rept. (9/1995)]-Lofaro[BNL/DOE/NRC Repts.]-Pringle[Nuclear-Power:From Physics to Politics(1979)]-Hoffman[animatedsoftware.com], what DOE/NRC MISlabels as ``butt-welds" ``stress-corrosion cracking" endpoint's ROOT-CAUSE ULTIMATE-ORIGIN is WD overageing-embritt- lement caused brittle-fracture cracking from early/ongoing AEC/ DOE-n"u"tional-la"v"atories sabotage!!!

  17. Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor nuclear steam supply system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memmott, M. J.; Harkness, A. W.; Van Wyk, J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 600 Cranberry Woods Drive, Cranberry Twp. PA 16066 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR), in which all of the components typically associated with the nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) of a nuclear power plant are incorporated within a single reactor pressure vessel. This paper is the first in a series of four papers which describe the design and functionality of the Westinghouse SMR. Also described in this series are the key drivers influencing the design of the Westinghouse SMR and the unique passive safety features of the Westinghouse SMR. Several critical motivators contributed to the development and integration of the Westinghouse SMR design. These design driving motivators dictated the final configuration of the Westinghouse SMR to varying degrees, depending on the specific features under consideration. These design drivers include safety, economics, AP1000{sup R} reactor expertise and experience, research and development requirements, functionality of systems and components, size of the systems and vessels, simplicity of design, and licensing requirements. The Westinghouse SMR NSSS consists of an integral reactor vessel within a compact containment vessel. The core is located in the bottom of the reactor vessel and is composed of 89 modified Westinghouse 17x17 Robust Fuel Assemblies (RFA). These modified fuel assemblies have an active core length of only 2.4 m (8 ft) long, and the entirety of the core is encompassed by a radial reflector. The Westinghouse SMR core operates on a 24 month fuel cycle. The reactor vessel is approximately 24.4 m (80 ft) long and 3.7 m (12 ft) in diameter in order to facilitate standard rail shipping to the site. The reactor vessel houses hot and cold leg channels to facilitate coolant flow, control rod drive mechanisms (CRDM), instrumentation and cabling, an intermediate flange to separate flow and instrumentation and facilitate simpler refueling, a pressurizer, a straight tube, recirculating steam

  18. Specific schedule conditions for the formation of personnel of A or B category working in nuclear facilities. Option nuclear reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Int. At. Energy Agency, Wien

    2002-01-01

    This document describes the specific dispositions relative to the nuclear reactor domain, for the formation to the conventional and radiation risks prevention of personnel of A or B category working in nuclear facilities. The application domain, the applicable documents, the liability, the specificity of the nuclear reactor and of the retraining, the Passerelle formation, are presented. (A.L.B.)

  19. Nuclear data uncertainty propagation for a lead-cooled fast reactor: Combining TMC with criticality benchmarks for improved accuracy

    OpenAIRE

    Alhassan, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    For the successful deployment of advanced nuclear systems and for optimization of current reactor designs, high quality and accurate nuclear data are required. Before nuclear data can be used in applications, they are first evaluated, benchmarked against integral experiments and then converted into formats usable for applications. The evaluation process in the past was usually done by using differential experimental data which was then complimented with nuclear model calculations. This trend ...

  20. Nuclear data uncertainty quantification and data assimilation for a lead-cooled fast reactor : Using integral experiments for improved accuracy

    OpenAIRE

    Alhassan, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    For the successful deployment of advanced nuclear systems and optimization of current reactor designs, high quality nuclear data are required. Before nuclear data can be used in applications they must first be evaluated, tested and validated against a set of integral experiments, and then converted into formats usable for applications. The evaluation process in the past was usually done by using differential experimental data which was then complemented with nuclear model calculations. This t...

  1. Testing piezoelectric sensors in a nuclear reactor environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Brian T.; Suprock, Andy; Tittmann, Bernhard

    2017-02-01

    Several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs, such as the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD), Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC), Light Water Reactor Sustainability, and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants (NGNP), are investigating new fuels, materials, and inspection paradigms for advanced and existing reactors. A key objective of such programs is to understand the performance of these fuels and materials during irradiation. In DOE-NE's FCRD program, ultrasonic based technology was identified as a key approach that should be pursued to obtain the high-fidelity, high-accuracy data required to characterize the behavior and performance of new candidate fuels and structural materials during irradiation testing. The radiation, high temperatures, and pressure can limit the available tools and characterization methods. In this work piezoelectric transducers capable of making these measurements are developed. Specifically, three piezoelectric sensors (Bismuth Titanate, Aluminum Nitride, and Zinc Oxide) are tested in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research reactor to a fast neutron fluence of 8.65×1020 nf/cm2. It is demonstrated that Bismuth Titanate is capable of transduction up to 5 × 1020 nf/cm2, Zinc Oxide is capable of transduction up to at least 6.27 × 1020 nf/cm2, and Aluminum Nitride is capable of transduction up to at least 8.65 × 1020 nf/cm2.

  2. Design of an analytical aggregation of rules of a diffuse controller and its application in the model of a nuclear research reactor; Diseno de una agregacion analitica de reglas de un controlador difuso y su aplicacion en el modelo de un reactor nuclear de investigacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najera H, M.C

    2003-07-01

    As they have gone being managed complex systems that fulfill tasks inside industrial or nuclear processes, it becomes necessary the development of technical novel of control, in which can incorporate heuristic knowledge of operation without to necessarily use the theories of classic control based mainly in mathematical models. One of the control techniques that allows to carry out this is the control based on diffuse logic. For the case of a model of the nuclear research reactor Triga Mark III of the National Institute of Nuclear Research have been developed diverse algorithms of diffuse control that have as objective the regulation of the neutron power in the nucleus. The aggregation stages and desdifussification in these algorithms discretize the universe of values of the control variable, being required a high number of operations for their execution. With the purpose of reducing this number of operations and to obtain results more exact in the generation of the aggregated group in each cycle of control and in the determination of the center of gravity of this added group, it is presented the development of an analytical method for these calculations. The main objectives outlined in this entitled thesis {sup D}esign of an analytical aggregate of a diffuse controller rules and their application in the pattern of a nuclear research reactor{sup ,} they are: to improve the behavior of control systems in closed knot based on diffuse logic by means of the development of an analytical method that determines an aggregated group resultant of the activation of rules in the diffuse controller and the obtaining of the exit variable using an exact solution of the technique of the center of gravity; and to compare the operation of these methods with those traditionally used ones that consider the discretization of the universe of the exit variable so much for the aggregation like for the desdiffusification. The chapters 1 and 2 present an introduction at two fundamental

  3. A Nuclear Reactor Transient Methodology Based on Discrete Ordinates Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of nuclear power industry, simulating and analyzing the reactor transient are of great significance for the nuclear safety. The traditional diffusion theory is not suitable for small volume or strong absorption problem. In this paper, we have studied the application of discrete ordinates method in the numerical solution of space-time kinetics equation. The fully implicit time integration was applied and the precursor equations were solved by analytical method. In order to improve efficiency of the transport theory, we also adopted some advanced acceleration methods. Numerical results of the TWIGL benchmark problem presented demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of this methodology.

  4. Neutron physics for nuclear reactors unpublished writings by Enrico Fermi

    CERN Document Server

    Fermi, Enrico; Pisanti, O

    2010-01-01

    This unique volume gives an accurate and very detailed description of the functioning and operation of basic nuclear reactors, as emerging from yet unpublished papers by Nobel Laureate Enrico Fermi. In the first part, the entire course of lectures on Neutron Physics delivered by Fermi at Los Alamos is reported, according to the version made by Anthony P French. Here, the fundamental physical phenomena are described very clearly and comprehensively, giving the appropriate physics grounds for the functioning of nuclear piles. In the second part, all the patents issued by Fermi (and coworkers) on

  5. Determination of 36Cl in nuclear waste from reactor decommissioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Frøsig, Lars; Nielsen, Sven Poul

    2007-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of Cl-36 in nuclear waste such as graphite, heavy concrete, steel, aluminum, and lead was developed. Several methods were investigated for decomposing the samples. AgCl precipitation was used to separate Cl-36 from the matrix elements, followed by ion...... of this analytical method for Cl-36 is 14 mBq. The method has been used to determine Cl-36 in heavy concrete, aluminum, and graphite from the Danish DR-2 research reactor....

  6. Expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, K.C.; Singer, R.M.; Humenik, K.E.

    1992-12-31

    This report describes an expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps. This system provides a means for early detection of pump or sensor degradation. Degradation is determined through the use of a statistical analysis technique, sequential probability ratio test, applied to information from several sensors which are responsive to differing physical parameters. The results of sequential testing of the data provide the operator with an early warning of possible sensor or pump failure.

  7. Circuit for power variation rate measurements in a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moisin, L.H.

    1980-01-01

    An asychronous digital circuit for the power variation rate of a nuclear reactor is proposed. The circuit is based on the fact that the variation rate can be obtained by a simple division between the difference of two time normalized adjacent measurements of the neutron flux and the total value of the first measurement. The circuit maintains a constant precision of the counting rate due to the effect of an automatic time constant switch. 4 references.

  8. La política nuclear espanyola: el caos del reactor nuclear Argos

    OpenAIRE

    Barca i Salom, Francesc Xavier

    2000-01-01

    L’11 de juny de 1962 s’inaugurava a l’Escola Tècnica Superior d’Enginyeria Industrial de Barcelona un reactor nuclear experimental, que era batejat amb el nom mític d’Argos. Tota la premsa barcelonina se’n feu ressò i el presentava com el primer reactor construït íntegrament a Espanya per la Junta d’Energia Nuclear. La idea de dotar l’Escola d’un reactor nuclear havia nascut, però, set anys abans, precisament en el mateix moment de la creació de la Càtedra Ferran Tallada d’enginyeria...

  9. Neutron dose estimation in a zero power nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triviño, S.; Vedelago, J.; Cantargi, F.; Keil, W.; Figueroa, R.; Mattea, F.; Chautemps, A.; Santibañez, M.; Valente, M.

    2016-10-01

    This work presents the characterization and contribution of neutron and gamma components to the absorbed dose in a zero power nuclear reactor. A dosimetric method based on Fricke gel was implemented to evaluate the separation between dose components in the mixed field. The validation of this proposed method was performed by means of direct measurements of neutron flux in different positions using Au and Mg-Ni activation foils. Monte Carlo simulations were conversely performed using the MCNP main code with a dedicated subroutine to incorporate the exact complete geometry of the nuclear reactor facility. Once nuclear fuel elements were defined, the simulations computed the different contributions to the absorbed dose in specific positions inside the core. Thermal/epithermal contributions of absorbed dose were assessed by means of Fricke gel dosimetry using different isotopic compositions aimed at modifying the sensitivity of the dosimeter for specific dose components. Clear distinctions between gamma and neutron capture dose were obtained. Both Monte Carlo simulations and experimental results provided reliable estimations about neutron flux rate as well as dose rate during the reactor operation. Simulations and experimental results are in good agreement in every positions measured and simulated in the core.

  10. Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Van Brutzel, Laurent; Chartier, Alan; Gueneau, Christine; Mattsson, Ann E.; Tikare, Veena; Bartel, Timothy; Besmann, T. M.; Stan, Marius; Van Uffelen, Paul

    2010-10-01

    We review the state of modeling and simulation of nuclear fuels with emphasis on the most widely used nuclear fuel, UO2. The hierarchical scheme presented represents a science-based approach to modeling nuclear fuels by progressively passing information in several stages from ab initio to continuum levels. Such an approach is essential to overcome the challenges posed by radioactive materials handling, experimental limitations in modeling extreme conditions and accident scenarios, and the small time and distance scales of fundamental defect processes. When used in conjunction with experimental validation, this multiscale modeling scheme can provide valuable guidance to development of fuel for advanced reactors to meet rising global energy demand.

  11. Modeling and simulation of coupled nuclear heat energy deposition and transfer in the fuel assembly of the Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ameyaw, Felix, E-mail: fafeknoc@yahoo.co.uk [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Material Sciences, School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences (SNAS), University of Ghana, P.O. Box AE 1, Atomic Energy, Accra (Ghana); Ayensu, Akwasi; Akaho, E.H.K. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Material Sciences, School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences (SNAS), University of Ghana, P.O. Box AE 1, Atomic Energy, Accra (Ghana)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model heat energy distribution without exceeding thermal limits Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We ascertain the hottest fuel rod is within design limits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Axial fuel rod heat energy increases until maximum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radial energy profile suggest the hottest region in the core. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model convective heat transfer processes of the core. - Abstract: Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code coupled with PLTEMP/ANL code were used to model and simulate the heat transfer problems in the fuel elements assembly of the Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) by solving Boltzmann transport approximation to the heat conduction equation. Coupled neutron radiation-thermal codes were used to determine the spatial variations of thermal energy in the fuel channels, the heat energy distribution in the radial and axial segments of the fuel assembly and the convective heat transfer processes in the entire core of the reactor. The thermal energy at maximum reactivity load of 4 mk, reactor power of 30 kW and inlet system pressure of 101.3 kPa were found to be 8.896 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} J for a single fuel pin, and 1.104 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} J and 7.376 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} J, for the radial and axial sectioning of the core respectively. Using the PLTEMP/ANL V4.0 code and given that the inlet coolant temperature was 30 Degree-Sign C, the maximum outlet coolant temperature was 51 Degree-Sign C. The energy values were obtained using the following thermodynamic parameters as maximum pressure drop of 0.7 MPa and mass flow rate of 0.4 kg/s. Neutronics point kinetics model and Safety Analysis Report used to validate the results confirmed that the heat distribution in the core did not exceed 100 Degree-Sign C. The heat energy profiles based on the data suggested no nucleate boiling at the simulated energies, and since the melting point of U-Al alloy fuel

  12. Experimental reactor regulation: the nuclear safety authority's approach; Le controle des reacteurs experimentaux: la demarche de l'Autorite de surete nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieu, J.; Conte, D.; Chevalier, A. [Autorite de Surete Nucleaire, 75 - Paris (France)

    2007-07-15

    French research reactors can be classified into 6 categories: 1) critical scale models (Eole, Minerve and Masurca) whose purpose is the study of the neutron production through the fission reaction; 2) reactors that produce neutron beams (Orphee, and the high flux reactor in Grenoble); 3) reactors devoted to safety studies (Cabri, Phebus) whose purpose is to reproduce accidental configurations of power reactors in reduced scale; 4) experimental reactors (Osiris, Phenix) whose purpose is the carrying-out of irradiation experiments concerning nuclear fuels or structure materials; 5) teaching reactors (Ulysse, Isis); and 6) reactors involved in defense programs (Caliban, Prospero, Apareillage-B). We have to note that 3 research reactors are currently being dismantled: Strasbourg University's reactor, Siloe and Siloette. Research reactors in France are of different types and present different hazards. Even if methods of control become more and more similar to those of power reactors, the French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) works to allow the necessary flexibility in the ever changing research reactor field while ensuring a high level of safety. Adopting the internal authorizations for operations of minor safety significance, under certain conditions, is one example of this approach. Another challenge in the coming years for ASN is to monitor the ageing of the French research reactors. This includes periodic safety reviews for each facility every ten years. But ASN has also to regulate the new research reactor projects such as Jules Horowitz Reactor, International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, which are about to be built.

  13. The Dynamic Monte Carlo Method for Transient Analysis of Nuclear Reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjenitzer, B.L.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis a new method for the analysis of power transients in a nuclear reactor is developed, which is more accurate than the present state-of-the-art methods. Transient analysis is important tool when designing nuclear reactors, since they predict the behaviour of a reactor during changing co

  14. Thermal Hydraulic Characteristics of Fuel Defects in Plate Type Nuclear Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodey, Isaac T [ORNL

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent flow coupled with heat transfer is investigated for a High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel plate. The Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Models are used for fluid dynamics and the transfer of heat from a thermal nuclear fuel plate using the Multi-physics code COMSOL. Simulation outcomes are compared with experimental data from the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor Thermal Hydraulic Test Loop. The computational results for the High Flux Isotope Reactor core system provide a more physically accurate simulation of this system by modeling the turbulent flow field in conjunction with the diffusion of thermal energy within the solid and fluid phases of the model domain. Recommendations are made regarding Nusselt number correlations and material properties for future thermal hydraulic modeling efforts

  15. Optical shutdown control of nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Ash, Milton

    1966-01-01

    In this book, we study theoretical and practical aspects of computing methods for mathematical modelling of nonlinear systems. A number of computing techniques are considered, such as methods of operator approximation with any given accuracy; operator interpolation techniques including a non-Lagrange interpolation; methods of system representation subject to constraints associated with concepts of causality, memory and stationarity; methods of system representation with an accuracy that is the best within a given class of models; methods of covariance matrix estimation;methods for low-rank mat

  16. Nuclear Reactor Component Code CUPID-I: Numerical Scheme and Preliminary Assessment Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyoung Kyu; Jeong, Jae Jun; Park, Ik Kyu; Kim, Jong Tae; Yoon, Han Young

    2007-12-15

    A component scale thermal hydraulic analysis code, CUPID (Component Unstructured Program for Interfacial Dynamics), is being developed for the analysis of components of a nuclear reactor, such as reactor vessel, steam generator, containment, etc. It adopted three-dimensional, transient, two phase and three-field model. In order to develop the numerical schemes for the three-field model, various numerical schemes have been examined including the SMAC, semi-implicit ICE, SIMPLE, Row Scheme and so on. Among them, the ICE scheme for the three-field model was presented in the present report. The CUPID code is utilizing unstructured mesh for the simulation of complicated geometries of the nuclear reactor components. The conventional ICE scheme that was applied to RELAP5 and COBRA-TF, therefore, were modified for the application to the unstructured mesh. Preliminary calculations for the unstructured semi-implicit ICE scheme have been conducted for a verification of the numerical method from a qualitative point of view. The preliminary calculation results showed that the present numerical scheme is robust and efficient for the prediction of phase changes and flow transitions due to a boiling and a flashing. These calculation results also showed the strong coupling between the pressure and void fraction changes. Thus, it is believed that the semi-implicit ICE scheme can be utilized for transient two-phase flows in a component of a nuclear reactor.

  17. Pellet bed reactor concept for nuclear electric propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Morley, Nicholas J.; Juhasz, Albert

    1993-01-01

    For Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) applications, gas cooled nuclear reactors with dynamic energy conversion systems offer high specific power and low total mass. This paper describes the Pellet Bed Reactor (PeBR) concept for potential NEP missions to Mars. The helium cooled, 75-80 MWt PeBR, consists of a single annular fuel region filled with a randomly packed bed of spherical fuel pellets, is designed for multiple starts, and offers unique safety and operation features. Each fuel pellet, about 8-10 mm in diameter, is composed of hundreds of TRISO type fuel microspheres embedded in a graphite matrix for a full retention of fission products. To eliminate the likelihood of a single-point failure, the annular core of the PeBR is divided into three 120° sectors. Each sector is self contained and separate and capable of operating and being cooled on its own and in cooperation with either one or two other sectors. Each sector is coupled to a separate, 5 MWe Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) energy conversion unit and is subcritical for safe handling and launching. In the event of a failure of the cooling system of a core sector, the reactor power level may be reduced, allowing adjacent sectors to convect the heat away using their own cooling system, thus maintaining reactor operation. Also, due to the absence of an internal core structure in the PeBR core, fueling of the reactor can easily be performed either at the launch facility or in orbit, and refueling can be accomplished in orbit as needed to extend the power system lifetime

  18. Design and axial optimization of nuclear fuel for BWR reactors; Diseno y optimizacion axial de combustible nuclear para reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia V, M.A

    2006-07-01

    In the present thesis, the modifications made to the axial optimization system based on Tabu Search (BT) for the axial design of BWR fuel type are presented, developed previously in the Nuclear Engineering Group of the UNAM Engineering Faculty. With the modifications what is mainly looked is to consider the particular characteristics of the mechanical design of the GE12 fuel type, used at the moment in the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central (CNLV) and that it considers the fuel bars of partial longitude. The information obtained in this thesis will allow to plan nuclear fuel reloads with the best conditions to operate in a certain cycle guaranteeing a better yield and use in the fuel burnt, additionally people in charge in the reload planning will be favored with the changes carried out to the system for the design and axial optimization of nuclear fuel, which facilitate their handling and it reduces their execution time. This thesis this developed in five chapters that are understood in the following way in general: Chapter 1: It approaches the basic concepts of the nuclear energy, it describes the physical and chemical composition of the atoms as well as that of the uranium isotopes, the handling of the uranium isotope by means of the nuclear fission until arriving to the operation of the nuclear reactors. Chapter 2: The nuclear fuel cycle is described, the methods for its extraction, its conversion and its enrichment to arrive to the stages of the nuclear fuel management used in the reactors are described. Beginning by the radial design, the axial design and the core design of the nuclear reactor related with the fuel assemblies design. Chapter 3: the optimization methods of nuclear fuel previously used are exposed among those that are: the genetic algorithms method, the search methods based on heuristic rules and the application of the tabu search method, which was used for the development of this thesis. Chapter 4: In this part the used methodology to the

  19. The MAUS nuclear space reactor with ion propulsion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainardi, Enrico [DINCE - Dipartimento di Ingegneria Nucleare e Conversioni Energetiche, University of Rome ' La Sapienza' , C.so V. Emanuele II, 244, 00186 Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: mainardi@frascati.enea.it

    2006-06-01

    MAUS (Moltiplicatore Avanzato Ultracompatto Spaziale) is a nuclear reactor concept design capable to ensure a reliable, long-lasting, low-mass, compact energy supply needed for advanced, future space missions. The exploration of the solar system and the space beyond requires the development of nuclear energy generators for supplying electricity to space-bases, spacecrafts, probes or satellites, as well as for propelling ships in long space missions. For propulsion, the MAUS nuclear reactor could be used to power electric ion drive engines. An ion engine is able to build up to very high velocities, far greater than chemical propulsion systems, but has high power and long service requirements. The MAUS concept is described, together with the ion propulsion engine and together with the reference thermoionic process used to convert the thermal power into electricity. The design work has been performed at the Nuclear Engineering and Energy Conversion Department of the University of Rome 'La Sapienza' starting from 1992 on an issue submitted by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), in cooperation with the research laboratories of ENEA.

  20. The Maus nuclear space reactor with ion propulsion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enrico Mainardi [DINCE - Dipartimento di Ingegneria Nucleare e Conversioni Energetiche, University of Rome ' La Sapienza' , C.so V. EmanueleII, 244, 00186 Roma (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    MAUS (Moltiplicatore Avanzato Ultracompatto Spaziale) is a nuclear reactor concept design capable to ensure a reliable, long lasting, low mass, compact energy supply needed for advanced, future space missions. The exploration of the solar system and the space beyond requires the development of nuclear energy generators for supplying electricity to space-bases, spacecrafts, probes or satellites, as well as for propelling ships in long space missions. For propulsion, the MAUS nuclear reactor could be used to power electric ion drive engines. An ion engine is able to build up to very high velocities, far greater than chemical propulsion systems, but has high power and long service requirements. The MAUS concept is described, together with the ion propulsion engine and together with the reference thermionic process used to convert the thermal power into electricity. The design work has been performed at the Nuclear Engineering and Energy Conversion Department of the University of Rome 'La Sapienza' starting from 1992 on an issue submitted by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), in cooperation with the research laboratories of ENEA. (author)

  1. A coupled nuclear reactor thermal energy storage system for enhanced load following operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alameri, Saeed A.

    Nuclear power plants usually provide base-load electric power and operate most economically at a constant power level. In an energy grid with a high fraction of renewable energy sources, future nuclear reactors may be subject to significantly variable power demands. These variable power demands can negatively impact the effective capacity factor of the reactor and result in severe economic penalties. Coupling the reactor to a large Thermal Energy Storage (TES) block will allow the reactor to better respond to variable power demands. In the system described in this thesis, a Prismatic-core Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PAHTR) operates at constant power with heat provided to a TES block that supplies power as needed to a secondary energy conversion system. The PAHTR is designed to have a power rating of 300 MW th, with 19.75 wt% enriched Tri-Structural-Isotropic UO 2 fuel and a five year operating cycle. The passive molten salt TES system will operate in the latent heat region with an energy storage capacity of 150 MWd. Multiple smaller TES blocks are used instead of one large block to enhance the efficiency and maintenance complexity of the system. A transient model of the coupled reactor/TES system is developed to study the behavior of the system in response to varying load demands. The model uses six-delayed group point kinetics and decay heat models coupled to thermal-hydraulic and heat transfer models of the reactor and TES system. Based on the transient results, the preferred TES design consists of 1000 blocks, each containing 11000 LiCl phase change material tubes. A safety assessment of major reactor events demonstrates the inherent safety of the coupled system. The loss of forced circulation study determined the minimum required air convection heat removal rate from the reactor core and the lowest possible reduced primary flow rate that can maintain the reactor in a safe condition. The loss of ultimate heat sink study demonstrated the ability of the TES

  2. Modeling and design of a new core-moderator assembly and neutron beam ports for the Penn State Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Dundar

    This study is for modeling and designing a new reactor core-moderator assembly and new neutron beam ports that aimed to expand utilization of a new beam hall of the Penn State Breazeale Reactor (PSBR). The PSBR is a part of the Radiation Science and Engineering Facility (RSEC) and is a TRIGA MARK III type research reactor with a movable core placed in a large pool and is capable to produce 1MW output. This reactor is a pool-type reactor with pulsing capability up to 2000 MW for 10-20 msec. There are seven beam ports currently installed to the reactor. The PSBR's existing core design limits the experimental capability of the facility, as only two of the seven available neutron beam ports are usable. The finalized design features an optimized result in light of the data obtained from neutronic and thermal-hydraulics analyses as well as geometrical constraints. A new core-moderator assembly was introduced to overcome the limitations of the existing PSBR design, specifically maximizing number of available neutron beam ports and mitigating the hydrogen gamma contamination of the neutron beam channeled in the beam ports. A crescent-shaped moderator is favored in the new PSBR design since it enables simultaneous use of five new neutron beam ports in the facility. Furthermore, the crescent shape sanctions a coupling of the core and moderator, which reduces the hydrogen gamma contamination significantly in the new beam ports. A coupled MURE and MCNP5 code optimization analysis was performed to calculate the optimum design parameters for the new PSBR. Thermal-hydraulics analysis of the new design was achieved using ANSYS Fluent CFD code. In the current form, the PSBR is cooled by natural convection of the pool water. The driving force for the natural circulation of the fluid is the heat generation within the fuel rods. The convective heat data was generated at the reactor's different operating powers by using TRIGSIMS, the fuel management code of the PSBR core. In the CFD

  3. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project. Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, B.

    1991-07-25

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions.

  4. NCTPlan application for neutron capture therapy dosimetric planning at MEPhI nuclear research reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elyutina, A S; Kiger, W S; Portnov, A A

    2011-12-01

    The results of modeling of two therapeutic beams HEC-1 and HEC-4 at the NRNU "MEPhI" research nuclear reactor exploitable for preclinical treatments are reported. The exact models of the beams are constructed as an input to the NCTPlan code used for planning Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) procedure. The computations are purposed to improve the accuracy of prediction of a dose absorbed in tissue with the account of all components of radiation.

  5. Light weight space power reactors for nuclear electric propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewig, H.; Mughabghab, S.; Lazareth, O.; Perkins, K.; Schmidt, E.; Powell, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    A Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) unit capable of propelling a manned vehicle to MARS will be required to have a value of {alpha} (kg/kWe) which is less than five. In order to meet this goal the reactor mass, and thus its contribution to the value of {alpha} will have to be minimized. In this paper a candidate for such a reactor is described. It consists of a gas cooled Particle Bed Reactor (PBR), with specially chosen materials which allow it to operate at an exit temperature of approximately 2000 K. One of the unique features of a PBR is the direct cooling of particulate fuel by the working fluid. This feature allows for high power densities, highest possible gas exit temperatures, for a given fuel temperature and because of the thin particle bed a low pressure drop. The PBR's described in this paper will have a ceramic moderator (Be{sub 2}C), ZrC coated fuel particles and a carbon/carbon hot frit. All the reactors will be designed with sufficient fissile loading to operate at full power for seven years. The burn up possible with particulate fuel is approximately 30%--50%. These rector designs achieve a value of {alpha} less than unity in the power range of interest (5 MWe). 5 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Commercial US nuclear reactors and waste: the current status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platt, A.M.; Robinson, J.V.

    1980-09-01

    Between March 1 and June 15, 1980, the declared size of the commercial light waste reactor (LWR) nuclear power industry in the US has decreased another 9 GWe. For the presently declared size: the 165 declared reactors will peak at a capacity of 153 GWe in 2001 and will consume about 870,000 MTU as enrichment feed; the theoretical rate of enrichment requirements will peak at about 19,000,000 SWUs/y in the year 2014; as few as two repositories each with capacity equivalent to 100,000 MTU would hold the waste; and predisposal storage reactor basins and AFRs (away-from-reactor basins) would peak at <85,000 MTU in the year 2020 if the two respositories were commissioned in the years 1997 and 2020. It should be noted that the number of declared LWRs has dropped from 226 on December 31, 1974 to 165 as of this writing. The oil equivalent of the energy loss, assuming a 50% efficiency in use as in cars, is 17,000 million barrels. This is about 10 years of the current rate of US consumption of OPEC oil.

  7. High-Speed Neutron and Gamma Flux Sensor for Monitoring Surface Nuclear Reactors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA needs compact nuclear reactors to power future bases on the moon and/or Mars. These reactors require robust automatic control systems using low mass, rapid...

  8. High-Speed Neutron and Gamma Flux Sensor for Monitoring Surface Nuclear Reactors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA needs compact nuclear reactors to power future bases on the moon and Mars. These reactors require robust automatic control systems using low mass, rapid...

  9. Use of MCNP for characterization of reactor vessel internals waste from decommissioned nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, E.F.; Pauley, K.A.; Reid, B.D.

    1995-09-01

    This study describes the use of the Monte Carlo Neutron-Photon (MCNP) code for determining activation levels of irradiated reactor vessel internals hardware. The purpose of the analysis is to produce data for the Department of Energy`s Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Program. An MCNP model was developed to analyze the Yankee Rowe reactor facility. The model incorporates reactor geometry, material compositions, and operating history data acquired from Yankee Atomic Electric Company. In addition to the base activation analysis, parametric studies were performed to determine the sensitivity of activation to specific parameters. A component sampling plan was also developed to validate the model results, although the plan was not implemented. The calculations for the Yankee Rowe reactor predict that only the core baffle and the core support plates will be activated to levels above the Class C limits. The parametric calculations show, however, that the large uncertainties in the material compositions could cause errors in the estimates that could also increase the estimated activation level of the core barrel to above the Class C limits. Extrapolation of the results to other reactor facilities indicates that in addition to the baffle and support plates, core barrels may also be activated to above Class C limits; however the classification will depend on the specific operating conditions of the reactor and the specific material compositions of the metal, as well as the use of allowable concentration averaging practices in packaging and classifying the waste.

  10. Parameter Identification with the Random Perturbation Particle Swarm Optimization Method and Sensitivity Analysis of an Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor Nuclear Power Plant Model for Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to obtain appropriate parameters for an advanced pressurized water reactor (PWR unit model is of great significance for power system analysis. The attributes of that ability include the following: nonlinear relationships, long transition time, intercoupled parameters and difficult obtainment from practical test, posed complexity and difficult parameter identification. In this paper, a model and a parameter identification method for the PWR primary loop system were investigated. A parameter identification process was proposed, using a particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm that is based on random perturbation (RP-PSO. The identification process included model variable initialization based on the differential equations of each sub-module and program setting method, parameter obtainment through sub-module identification in the Matlab/Simulink Software (Math Works Inc., Natick, MA, USA as well as adaptation analysis for an integrated model. A lot of parameter identification work was carried out, the results of which verified the effectiveness of the method. It was found that the change of some parameters, like the fuel temperature and coolant temperature feedback coefficients, changed the model gain, of which the trajectory sensitivities were not zero. Thus, obtaining their appropriate values had significant effects on the simulation results. The trajectory sensitivities of some parameters in the core neutron dynamic module were interrelated, causing the parameters to be difficult to identify. The model parameter sensitivity could be different, which would be influenced by the model input conditions, reflecting the parameter identifiability difficulty degree for various input conditions.

  11. Neutronic study of a nuclear reactor of fused salts; Estudio neutronico de un reactor nuclear de sales fundidas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia B, F. B.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: faviolabelen@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The reactors of fused salts called Molten Salt Reactor have presented a resurgence of interest in the last decade, due to they have a versatility in particular to operate, either with a thermal or fast neutrons spectrum. The most active development was by the middle of 1950 and principles of 1970 in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In this work some developed models are presented particularly and studied with the help of the MCNPX code, for the development of the neutronic study of this reactor, starting of proposed models and from a simple and homogeneous geometry until other more complex models and approximate to more real cases. In particular the geometry conditions and criticality of each model were analyzed, the isotopic balance, as well as the concentrations of the salts and different assigned fuel types. (Author)

  12. Exploratory Design of a Reactor/Fuel Cycle Using Spent Nuclear Fuel Without Conventional Reprocessing - 13579

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertch, Timothy C.; Schleicher, Robert W.; Rawls, John D. [General Atomics 3550 General Atomics Court San Diego, CA 92130 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    General Atomics has started design of a waste to energy nuclear reactor (EM2) that can use light water reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This effort addresses two problems: using an advanced small reactor with long core life to reduce nuclear energy overnight cost and providing a disposal path for LWR SNF. LWR SNF is re-fabricated into new EM2 fuel using a dry voloxidation process modeled on AIROX/ OREOX processes which remove some of the fission products but no heavy metals. By not removing all of the fission products the fuel remains self-protecting. By not separating heavy metals, the process remains proliferation resistant. Implementation of Energy Multiplier Module (EM2) fuel cycle will provide low cost nuclear energy while providing a long term LWR SNF disposition path which is important for LWR waste confidence. With LWR waste confidence recent impacts on reactor licensing, an alternate disposition path is highly relevant. Centered on a reactor operating at 250 MWe, the compact electricity generating system design maximizes site flexibility with truck transport of all system components and available dry cooling features that removes the need to be located near a body of water. A high temperature system using helium coolant, electricity is efficiently produced using an asynchronous high-speed gas turbine while the LWR SNF is converted to fission products. Reactor design features such as vented fuel and silicon carbide cladding support reactor operation for decades between refueling, with improved fuel utilization. Beyond the reactor, the fuel cycle is designed so that subsequent generations of EM2 reactor fuel will use the previous EM2 discharge, providing its own waste confidence plus eliminating the need for enrichment after the first generation. Additional LWR SNF is added at each re-fabrication to replace the removed fission products. The fuel cycle uses a dry voloxidation process for both the initial LWR SNF re-fabrication and later for EM2

  13. Summary of space nuclear reactor power systems, 1983--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.

    1993-08-11

    This report summarizes major developments in the last ten years which have greatly expanded the space nuclear reactor power systems technology base. In the SP-100 program, after a competition between liquid-metal, gas-cooled, thermionic, and heat pipe reactors integrated with various combinations of thermoelectric thermionic, Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling energy conversion systems, three concepts:were selected for further evaluation. In 1985, the high-temperature (1,350 K), lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectric conversion was selected for full scale development. Since then, significant progress has been achieved including the demonstration of a 7-y-life uranium nitride fuel pin. Progress on the lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics has progressed from a concept, through a generic flight system design, to the design, development, and testing of specific components. Meanwhile, the USSR in 1987--88 orbited a new generation of nuclear power systems beyond the, thermoelectric plants on the RORSAT satellites. The US has continued to advance its own thermionic fuel element development, concentrating on a multicell fuel element configuration. Experimental work has demonstrated a single cell operating time of about 1 1/2-y. Technology advances have also been made in the Stirling engine; an advanced engine that operates at 1,050 K is ready for testing. Additional concepts have been studied and experiments have been performed on a variety of systems to meet changing needs; such as powers of tens-to-hundreds of megawatts and highly survivable systems of tens-of-kilowatts power.

  14. Study on the selection of nuclear fuel type for a hybrid power extration reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, D. H.; Park, W. S. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-05-01

    In order to solve the problem related to long-lived radioactive nuclides in spent fuel, development of a subcritical transmutation reactor concept is emerging. One of the important issues for the design of the reactor may be the selection of a suitable nuclear fuel type. This study presents a logical decision model for this issue using an analytic hierachy process (AHP). Hierarchy is a representation of a system to study the functional relations of its components and its impact on the entire system. The study shows first how to construct hierachy representing their relations and then measure the individual element's impact to the entire system for a quantitative decision making. Current four fuel types; metal, oxide, molten salt, and nitride, were selected and analyzed based on several characteristics with respect to overall comparison. Based on the decision model, the study concludes that the metal fuel type is the best choice for the transmutation reactor.

  15. Nuclear renaissance in the reactor training of Areva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Braquilanges, Bertrand [Reactor Training Center/France Manager, La Tour Areva - 1, place Jean Millier - 92084 Paris - La Defense (France); Napior, Amy [Reactor Training Center/USA Manager, 1300 Old Graves Mill Road - Lynchburg VA, 2450 (United States); Schoenfelder, Christian [Reactor Training Center/Germany Manager, Kaiserleistrasse 29 - 63067 Offenbach (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Because of the perspectives of new builds, a significant increase in the number of design, construction and management personnel working in AREVA, their clients and sub-contractors has been estimated for the next future. In order to cope with the challenge to integrate newly hired people quickly and effectively into the AREVA workforce, a project - 'Training Task Force (TTF)' - was launched in 2008. The objective was to develop introductory and advanced courses and related tools harmonized between AREVA Training Centers in France, Germany and USA. First, a Global Plants Introductory Session (GPIS) was developed for newly hired employees. GPIS is a two weeks training course introducing in a modular way AREVA and specifically the activities and the reactors technical basics. As an example, design and operation of a nuclear power plant is illustrated on EPRTM. Since January 2009, these GPIS are held regularly in France, Germany and the US with a mixing of employees from these 3 regions. Next, advanced courses for more experienced employees were developed: - Advanced EPR{sup TM}, giving a detailed presentation of the EPR{sup TM} reactor design; - Codes and Standards; - Technical Nuclear Safety. Finally, feasibility studies on a Training Material Management (TMM) system, able to manage the training documentation, and on a worldwide training administration tool, were performed. The TTF project was completed mid of 2009; it transferred their recurrent activities to a new AREVA training department. This unit now consists of the French, German and US Reactors Training Centers. In particular, all courses developed by the TTF are now implemented worldwide with an opening to external trainees. The current worldwide course catalogue includes training courses for operation and maintenance personnel as well as for managers, engineers and non technical personnel of nuclear operators, suppliers, safety authorities and expert organizations. Training delivery is supported

  16. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of core bypass flow and crossflow in a prismatic very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor based on a two-layer block model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huhu, E-mail: huhuwang@tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, 3133 TAMU, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Dominguez-Ontiveros, Elvis, E-mail: elvisdom@tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, 3133 TAMU, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Hassan, Yassin A., E-mail: y-hassan@tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, 3133 TAMU, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, 3123 TAMU, College Station, TX 77840 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • A CFD model was built based on a two-layer block experimental facility at Texas A and M University. • The coolant characterizations within the uniform and wedge-shaped crossflow gap regions were investigated. • The influence on the coolant distribution from the bypass flow gap width was studied. • Discretization and iterative errors involved in the simulations were quantified. - Abstract: The very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (VHTR) has been designated as one of the promising reactors that will serve for the Next Generation (Generation IV) Nuclear Plant. For a prismatic VHTR core, the bypass flow and crossflow phenomena are important design considerations. To investigate the coolant distribution in the reactor core based on the two-layer block facility built at Texas A and M University, a three-dimensional steady-state CFD analysis was performed using the commercial code STAR-CCM+ v6.04. Results from this work serve as a guideline and validating source for the related experiments. A grid independence study was conducted to quantify related errors in the simulations. The simulation results show that the bypass flow fraction was not a strong function of the Reynolds number. The presence of the crossflow gap had a significant effect on the distribution of the coolant in the core. Uniform and wedge-shape crossflow gaps were studied. It was found that a significant secondary flow in the crossflow gap region moved from the bypass flow gap toward coolant holes, which resulted in up to a 28% reduction of the coolant mass flow rate in the bypass flow gap.

  17. Thermo-magnetic systems for space nuclear reactors an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Maidana, Carlos O

    2014-01-01

    Introduces the reader to engineering magnetohydrodynamics applications and presents a comprehensive guide of how to approach different problems found in this multidisciplinary field. An introduction to engineering magnetohydrodynamics, this brief focuses heavily on the design of thermo-magnetic systems for liquid metals, with emphasis on the design of electromagnetic annular linear induction pumps for space nuclear reactors. Alloy systems that are liquid at room temperature have a high degree of thermal conductivity far superior to ordinary non-metallic liquids. This results in their use for

  18. Computation system for nuclear reactor core analysis. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondy, D.R.; Fowler, T.B.; Cunningham, G.W.; Petrie, L.M.

    1977-04-01

    This report documents a system which contains computer codes as modules developed to evaluate nuclear reactor core performance. The diffusion theory approximation to neutron transport may be applied with the VENTURE code treating up to three dimensions. The effect of exposure may be determined with the BURNER code, allowing depletion calculations to be made. The features and requirements of the system are discussed and aspects common to the computational modules, but the latter are documented elsewhere. User input data requirements, data file management, control, and the modules which perform general functions are described. Continuing development and implementation effort is enhancing the analysis capability available locally and to other installations from remote terminals.

  19. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, B.G.; Richards, R.E.; Reece, W.J.; Gertman, D.I.

    1992-10-01

    This Reference Guide contains instructions on how to install and use Version 3.5 of the NRC-sponsored Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR). The NUCLARR data management system is contained in compressed files on the floppy diskettes that accompany this Reference Guide. NUCLARR is comprised of hardware component failure data (HCFD) and human error probability (HEP) data, both of which are available via a user-friendly, menu driven retrieval system. The data may be saved to a file in a format compatible with IRRAS 3.0 and commercially available statistical packages, or used to formulate log-plots and reports of data retrieval and aggregation findings.

  20. Nuclear reactor fuel element with vanadium getter on cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carl E.; Carroll, Kenneth G.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel element is described which has an outer cladding, a central core of fissionable or mixed fissionable and fertile fuel material and a layer of vanadium as an oxygen getter on the inner surface of the cladding. The vanadium reacts with oxygen released by the fissionable material during irradiation of the core to prevent the oxygen from reacting with and corroding the cladding. Also described is a method for coating the inner surface of small diameter tubes of cladding with a layer of vanadium.

  1. Evaluation of a hydrogen sensor for nuclear reactor containment monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffheins, B.S.; McKnight, T.E.; Lauf, R.J.; Smith, R.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); James, R.E. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Measurement of hydrogen concentration in containment atmospheres in nuclear plants is a key safety capability. Current technologies require extensive sampling systems and subsequent maintenance and calibration costs can be very expensive. A new hydrogen sensor has been developed that is small and potentially inexpensive to install and maintain. Its size and low power requirement make it suitable in distributed systems for pinpointing hydrogen buildup. This paper will address the first phase of a testing program conducted to evaluate this sensor for operation in reactor containments.

  2. Promising design options for the encapsulated nuclear heat source reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, L.; Carelli, M.D.; Dzodzo, M. [Westinghouse Science and Technology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Hossain, Q.; Brown, N.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Wade, D.C.; Sienick, J.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Greenspan, E.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Saphier, D. [University of California Dept of Nuclear Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Promising design options for the Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) liquid-metal cooled fast reactor were identified during the first year of the DOE NERI program sponsored feasibility study. Many opportunities for incorporation of innovations in design and fabrication were identified. Three of the innovations are hereby described: a novel IHX (intermediate heat exchanger) made of a relatively small number of rectangular channels, an ENHS module design featuring 100% natural circulation, and a novel conceptual design of core support and fuelling. As a result of the first year study the ENHS concept appears more practical and more promising than perceived at the outset of this study. (authors)

  3. Prediction and modeling of the two-dimensional separation characteristic of a steam generator at a nuclear power station with VVER-1000 reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parchevsky, V. M.; Guryanova, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    A computational and experimental procedure for construction of the two-dimensional separation curve (TDSC) for a horizontal steam generator (SG) at a nuclear power station (NPS) with VVER-reactors. In contrast to the conventional one-dimensional curve describing the wetness of saturated steam generated in SG as a function of the boiler water level at one, usually rated, load, TDSC is a function of two variables, which are the level and the load of SGB that enables TDSC to be used for wetness control in a wide load range. The procedure is based on two types of experimental data obtained during rated load operation: the nonuniformity factor of the steam load at the outlet from the submerged perforated sheet (SPS) and the dependence of the mass water level in the vicinity of the "hot" header on the water level the "cold" end of SG. The TDSC prediction procedure is presented in the form of an algorithm using SG characteristics, such as steam load and water level as the input and giving the calculated steam wetness at the output. The zoneby-zone calculation method is used. The result is presented in an analytical form (as an empirical correlation) suitable for uploading into controllers or other controls. The predicted TDSC can be used during real-time operation for implementation of different wetness control scenarios (for example, if the effectiveness is a priority, then the minimum water level, minimum wetness, and maximum turbine efficiency should be maintained; if safety is a priority, then the maximum level at the allowable wetness and the maximum water inventory should be kept), for operation of NPS in controlling the frequency and power in a power system, at the design phase (as a part of the simulation complex for verification of design solutions), during construction and erection (in developing software for personnel training simulators), during commissioning tests (to reduce the duration and labor-intensity of experimental activities), and for training.

  4. CFD-DEM simulation of a conceptual gas-cooled fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Lucilla C.; Su, Jian, E-mail: lucillalmeida@gmail.com, E-mail: sujian@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Aguirre, Joao, E-mail: aguirre@rocky-dem.com [Engineering Simulation and Scientific Software (ESSS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Several conceptual designs of the fluidized-bed nuclear reactor have been proposed due to its many advantages over conventional nuclear reactors such as PWRs and BWRs. Amongst their characteristics, the enhanced heat transfer and mixing enables a more uniform temperature distribution, reducing the risk of hot-spot and excessive fuel temperature, in addition to resulting in a higher burnup of the fuel. Furthermore, the relationship between the bed height and reactor neutronics turns the coolant flow rate control into a power production mechanism. Moreover, the possibility of removing the fuel by gravity from the movable core in case of a loss-of-cooling accident increases its safety. High-accuracy modeling of particles and coolant flow in fluidized bed reactors is needed to evaluate reliably the thermal-hydraulic efficiency and safety margin. The two-way coupling between solid and fluid can account for high-fidelity solid-solid interaction and reasonable accuracy in fluid calculation and fluid-solid interaction. In the CFD-DEM model, the particles are modeled as a discrete phase, following the DEM approach, whereas the fluid flow is treated as a continuous phase, described by the averaged Navier-Stokes equations on a computational cell scale. In this work, the coupling methodology between Fluent and Rocky is described. The numerical approach was applied to the simulation of a bubbling fluidized bed and the results were compared to experimental data and showed good agreement. (author)

  5. A cermet fuel reactor for nuclear thermal propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Gordon

    1991-01-01

    Work on the cermet fuel reactor done in the 1960's by General Electric (GE) and the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) that had as its goal the development of systems that could be used for nuclear rocket propulsion as well as closed cycle propulsion system designs for ship propulsion, space nuclear propulsion, and other propulsion systems is reviewed. It is concluded that the work done in the 1960's has demonstrated that we can have excellent thermal and mechanical performance with cermet fuel. Thousands of hours of testing were performed on the cermet fuel at both GE and AGL, including very rapid transients and some radiation performance history. We conclude that there are no feasibility issues with cermet fuel. What is needed is reactivation of existing technology and qualification testing of a specific fuel form. We believe this can be done with a minimum development risk.

  6. High-intensity power-resolved radiation imaging of an operational nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Jonathan S.; Mellor, Matthew P.; Villa, Mario; Joyce, Malcolm J.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the neutron distribution in a nuclear reactor is necessary to ensure the safe and efficient burnup of reactor fuel. Currently these measurements are performed by in-core systems in what are extremely hostile environments and in most reactor accident scenarios it is likely that these systems would be damaged. Here we present a compact and portable radiation imaging system with the ability to image high-intensity fast-neutron and gamma-ray fields simultaneously. This system has been deployed to image radiation fields emitted during the operation of a TRIGA test reactor allowing a spatial visualization of the internal reactor conditions to be obtained. The imaged flux in each case is found to scale linearly with reactor power indicating that this method may be used for power-resolved reactor monitoring and for the assay of ongoing nuclear criticalities in damaged nuclear reactors. PMID:26450669

  7. High-intensity power-resolved radiation imaging of an operational nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Jonathan S.; Mellor, Matthew P.; Villa, Mario; Joyce, Malcolm J.

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge of the neutron distribution in a nuclear reactor is necessary to ensure the safe and efficient burnup of reactor fuel. Currently these measurements are performed by in-core systems in what are extremely hostile environments and in most reactor accident scenarios it is likely that these systems would be damaged. Here we present a compact and portable radiation imaging system with the ability to image high-intensity fast-neutron and gamma-ray fields simultaneously. This system has been deployed to image radiation fields emitted during the operation of a TRIGA test reactor allowing a spatial visualization of the internal reactor conditions to be obtained. The imaged flux in each case is found to scale linearly with reactor power indicating that this method may be used for power-resolved reactor monitoring and for the assay of ongoing nuclear criticalities in damaged nuclear reactors.

  8. Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum for Generation IV Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anghel, C. (Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)); Penttilae, S. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland))

    2010-03-15

    A network for material issues for Generation IV nuclear power has been initiated within the Nordic countries. The objectives of the Generation IV Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum (NOMAGE4) are to put the basis of a sustainable forum for Gen IV issues, especially focussing on fuels, cladding, structural materials and coolant interaction. Other issues include reactor physics, dynamics and diagnostics, core and fuel design. The present report summarizes the work performed during the year 2009. The efforts made include identification of organisations involved in Gen IV issues in the Nordic countries, update of the forum website, http://www.studsvik.se/GenerationIV, and investigation of capabilities for research within the area of Gen IV. Within the NOMAGE4 project a seminar on Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems has been organized during 15-16th of October 2009. The aim of the seminar was to provide a forum for exchange of information, discussion on future research needs and networking of experts on Generation IV reactor concepts. As an outcome of the NOMAGE4, a few collaboration project proposals have been prepared/planned in 2009. The network was welcomed by the European Commission and was mentioned as an exemplary network with representatives from industries, universities, power companies and research institutes. NOMAGE4 has been invited to participate to the 'European Energy Research Alliance, EERA, workshop for nuclear structural materials' http://www.eera-set.eu/index.php?index=41 as external observers. Future plans include a new Nordic application for continuation of NOMAGE4 network. (author)

  9. Nonlinear control for core power of pressurized water nuclear reactors using constant axial offset strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Reza Ansarifar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important operations in nuclear power plants is load following, in which an imbalance of axial power distribution induces xenon oscillations. These oscillations must be maintained within acceptable limits otherwise the nuclear power plant could become unstable. Therefore, bounded xenon oscillation is considered to be a constraint for the load following operation. In this paper, the design of a sliding mode control (SMC, which is a robust nonlinear controller, is presented. SMC is a means to control pressurized water nuclear reactor (PWR power for the load following operation problem in a way that ensures xenon oscillations are kept bounded within acceptable limits. The proposed controller uses constant axial offset (AO strategy to ensure xenon oscillations remain bounded. The constant AO is a robust state constraint for the load following problem. The reactor core is simulated based on the two-point nuclear reactor model with a three delayed neutron groups. The stability analysis is given by means of the Lyapunov approach, thus the control system is guaranteed to be stable within a large range. The employed method is easy to implement in practical applications and moreover, the SMC exhibits the desired dynamic properties during the entire output-tracking process independent of perturbations. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller in terms of performance, robustness, and stability. Results show that the proposed controller for the load following operation is so effective that the xenon oscillations are kept bounded in the given region.

  10. Nonlinear control for core power of pressurized water nuclear reactors using constant axial offset strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansarifar, Gholam Reza; Saadatzi, Saeed [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Advanced Sciences and Technology, University of Isfahan, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    One of the most important operations in nuclear power plants is load following, in which an imbalance of axial power distribution induces xenon oscillations. These oscillations must be maintained within acceptable limits otherwise the nuclear power plant could become unstable. Therefore, bounded xenon oscillation is considered to be a constraint for the load following operation. In this paper, the design of a sliding mode control (SMC), which is a robust nonlinear controller, is presented. SMC is a means to control pressurized water nuclear reactor (PWR) power for the load following operation problem in a way that ensures xenon oscillations are kept bounded within acceptable limits. The proposed controller uses constant axial offset (AO) strategy to ensure xenon oscillations remain bounded. The constant AO is a robust state constraint for the load following problem. The reactor core is simulated based on the two-point nuclear reactor model with a three delayed neutron groups. The stability analysis is given by means of the Lyapunov approach, thus the control system is guaranteed to be stable within a large range. The employed method is easy to implement in practical applications and moreover, the SMC exhibits the desired dynamic properties during the entire output-tracking process independent of perturbations. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller in terms of performance, robustness, and stability. Results show that the proposed controller for the load following operation is so effective that the xenon oscillations are kept bounded in the given region.

  11. Study of Natural Convection Passive Cooling System for Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdillah, Habibi; Saputra, Geby; Novitrian; Permana, Sidik

    2017-07-01

    Fukushima nuclear reactor accident occurred due to the reactor cooling pumps and followed by all emergencies cooling systems could not work. Therefore, the system which has a passive safety system that rely on natural laws such as natural convection passive cooling system. In natural convection, the cooling material can flow due to the different density of the material due to the temperature difference. To analyze such investigation, a simple apparatus was set up and explains the study of natural convection in a vertical closed-loop system. It was set up that, in the closed loop, there is a heater at the bottom which is representing heat source system from the reactor core and cooler at the top which is showing the cooling system performance in room temperature to make a temperature difference for convection process. The study aims to find some loop configurations and some natural convection performances that can produce an optimum flow of cooling process. The study was done and focused on experimental approach and simulation. The obtained results are showing and analyzing in temperature profile data and the speed of coolant flow at some point on the closed-loop system.

  12. Reducing numerical costs for core wide nuclear reactor CFD simulations by the Coarse-Grid-CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viellieber, Mathias; Class, Andreas G.

    2013-11-01

    Traditionally complete nuclear reactor core simulations are performed with subchannel analysis codes, that rely on experimental and empirical input. The Coarse-Grid-CFD (CGCFD) intends to replace the experimental or empirical input with CFD data. The reactor core consists of repetitive flow patterns, allowing the general approach of creating a parametrized model for one segment and composing many of those to obtain the entire reactor simulation. The method is based on a detailed and well-resolved CFD simulation of one representative segment. From this simulation we extract so-called parametrized volumetric forces which close, an otherwise strongly under resolved, coarsely-meshed model of a complete reactor setup. While the formulation so far accounts for forces created internally in the fluid others e.g. obstruction and flow deviation through spacers and wire wraps, still need to be accounted for if the geometric details are not represented in the coarse mesh. These are modelled with an Anisotropic Porosity Formulation (APF). This work focuses on the application of the CGCFD to a complete reactor core setup and the accomplishment of the parametrization of the volumetric forces.

  13. Application of gaseous core reactors for transmutation of nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, B. G.; Paternoster, R. R.; Schneider, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    An acceptable management scheme for high-level radioactive waste is vital to the nuclear industry. The hazard potential of the trans-uranic actinides and of key fission products is high due to their nuclear activity and/or chemical toxicity. Of particular concern are the very long-lived nuclides whose hazard potential remains high for hundreds of thousands of years. Neutron induced transmutation offers a promising technique for the treatment of problem wastes. Transmutation is unique as a waste management scheme in that it offers the potential for "destruction" of the hazardous nuclides by conversion to non-hazardous or more manageable nuclides. The transmutation potential of a thermal spectrum uranium hexafluoride fueled cavity reactor was examined. Initial studies focused on a heavy water moderated cavity reactor fueled with 5% enriched U-235-F6 and operating with an average thermal flux of 6 times 10 to the 14th power neutrons/sq cm-sec. The isotopes considered for transmutation were I-129, Am-241, Am-242m, Am-243, Cm-243, Cm-244, Cm-245, and Cm-246.

  14. Application of gaseous core reactors for transmutation of nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, B. G.; Paternoster, R. R.; Schneider, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    An acceptable management scheme for high-level radioactive waste is vital to the nuclear industry. The hazard potential of the trans-uranic actinides and of key fission products is high due to their nuclear activity and/or chemical toxicity. Of particular concern are the very long-lived nuclides whose hazard potential remains high for hundreds of thousands of years. Neutron induced transmutation offers a promising technique for the treatment of problem wastes. Transmutation is unique as a waste management scheme in that it offers the potential for "destruction" of the hazardous nuclides by conversion to non-hazardous or more manageable nuclides. The transmutation potential of a thermal spectrum uranium hexafluoride fueled cavity reactor was examined. Initial studies focused on a heavy water moderated cavity reactor fueled with 5% enriched U-235-F6 and operating with an average thermal flux of 6 times 10 to the 14th power neutrons/sq cm-sec. The isotopes considered for transmutation were I-129, Am-241, Am-242m, Am-243, Cm-243, Cm-244, Cm-245, and Cm-246.

  15. A design study of reactor core optimization for direct nuclear heat-to-electricity conversion in a space power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Takahashi, Makoto; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Takeoka, Satoshi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Nakagawa, Masayuki; Kugo, Teruhiko

    1998-01-01

    To propose a new design concept of a nuclear reactor used in the space, research has been conducted on the conceptual design of a new nuclear reactor on the basis of the following three main concepts: (1) Thermionic generation by thermionic fuel elements (TFE), (2) reactivity control by rotary reflector, and (3) reactor cooling by liquid metal. The outcomes of the research are: (1) A calculation algorithm was derived for obtaining convergent conditions by repeating nuclear characteristic calculation and thermal flow characteristic calculation for the space nuclear reactor. (2) Use of this algorithm and the parametric study established that a space nuclear reactor using 97% enriched uranium nitride as the fuel and lithium as the coolant and having a core with a radius of about 25 cm, a height of about 50 cm and a generation efficiency of about 7% can probably be operated continuously for at least more than ten years at 100 kW only by reactivity control by rotary reflector. (3) A new CAD/CAE system was developed to assist design work to optimize the core characteristics of the space nuclear reactor comprehensively. It is composed of the integrated design support system VINDS using virtual reality and the distributed system WINDS to collaboratively support design work using Internet. (N.H.)

  16. Monte Carlo Simulation Study of a Differential Calorimeter Measuring the Nuclear Heating in Material Testing Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amharrak, H.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Lyoussi, A.; Carette, M.; Brun, J.; De Vita, C.; Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J.-F.; Guimbal, P.

    2016-02-01

    The nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs) are crucial for the study of nuclear materials and fuels under irradiation. The reference measurements of this nuclear heating are especially performed by a differential calorimeter including a graphite sample material. Then these measurements are used for other materials, other geometries, or other experimental conditions in order to predict the nuclear heating and thermal conditions induced in the irradiation devices. This paper will present new simulations with MCNP Monte-Carlo transport code to determine the gamma heating profile inside the calorimeter. The whole complex geometry of the sensor has been considered. We use as an input source in the model, the photon spectra calculated in various positions of CARMEN-1 irradiation program in OSIRIS reactor. After a description of the differential calorimeter device, the MCNP modeling used for the calculations of radial profile of nuclear heating inside the calorimeter elements will be introduced. The obtained results of different simulations will be detailed and discussed in this paper. The charged particle equilibrium inside the calorimeter elements will be studied. Then we will focus on parametric studies of the various components of the calorimeter. The influence of source type will be also took into account. Moreover the influence of the material used for the sample will be described.

  17. Monte Carlo Simulation Study of a Differential Calorimeter Measuring the Nuclear Heating in Material Testing Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amharrak H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs are crucial for the study of nuclear materials and fuels under irradiation. The reference measurements of this nuclear heating are especially performed by a differential calorimeter including a graphite sample material. Then these measurements are used for other materials, other geometries, or other experimental conditions in order to predict the nuclear heating and thermal conditions induced in the irradiation devices. This paper will present new simulations with MCNP Monte-Carlo transport code to determine the gamma heating profile inside the calorimeter. The whole complex geometry of the sensor has been considered. We use as an input source in the model, the photon spectra calculated in various positions of CARMEN-1 irradiation program in OSIRIS reactor. After a description of the differential calorimeter device, the MCNP modeling used for the calculations of radial profile of nuclear heating inside the calorimeter elements will be introduced. The obtained results of different simulations will be detailed and discussed in this paper. The charged particle equilibrium inside the calorimeter elements will be studied. Then we will focus on parametric studies of the various components of the calorimeter. The influence of source type will be also took into account. Moreover the influence of the material used for the sample will be described.

  18. Computer code system for the R and D of nuclear fuel cycle with fast reactor. 5. Development and application of reactor analysis code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Kenji; Hazama, Taira; Chiba, Go; Ohki, Shigeo; Ishikawa, Makoto [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    2002-12-01

    In the core design of fast reactors (FRs), it is very important to improve the prediction accuracy of the nuclear characteristics for both reducing cost and ensuring reliability of FR plants. A nuclear reactor analysis code system for FRs has been developed by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). This paper describes the outline of the calculation models and methods in the system consisting of several analysis codes, such as the cell calculation code CASUP, the core calculation code TRITAC and the sensitivity analysis code SAGEP. Some examples of verification results and improvement of the design accuracy are also introduced based on the measurement data from critical assemblies, e.g, the JUPITER experiment (USA/Japan), FCA (Japan), MASURCA (France), and BFS (Russia). Furthermore, application fields and future plans, such as the development of new generation nuclear constants and applications to MA{center_dot}FP transmutation, are described. (author)

  19. A Spouted Bed Reactor Monitoring System for Particulate Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. S. Wendt; R. L. Bewley; W. E. Windes

    2007-06-01

    Conversion and coating of particle nuclear fuel is performed in spouted (fluidized) bed reactors. The reactor must be capable of operating at temperatures up to 2000°C in inert, flammable, and coating gas environments. The spouted bed reactor geometry is defined by a graphite retort with a 2.5 inch inside diameter, conical section with a 60° included angle, and a 4 mm gas inlet orifice diameter through which particles are removed from the reactor at the completion of each run. The particles may range from 200 µm to 2 mm in diameter. Maintaining optimal gas flow rates slightly above the minimum spouting velocity throughout the duration of each run is complicated by the variation of particle size and density as conversion and/or coating reactions proceed in addition to gas composition and temperature variations. In order to achieve uniform particle coating, prevent agglomeration of the particle bed, and monitor the reaction progress, a spouted bed monitoring system was developed. The monitoring system includes a high-sensitivity, low-response time differential pressure transducer paired with a signal processing, data acquisition, and process control unit which allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor. The pressure transducer is mounted upstream of the spouted bed reactor gas inlet. The gas flow into the reactor induces motion of the particles in the bed and prevents the particles from draining from the reactor due to gravitational forces. Pressure fluctuations in the gas inlet stream are generated as the particles in the bed interact with the entering gas stream. The pressure fluctuations are produced by bulk movement of the bed, generation and movement of gas bubbles through the bed, and the individual motion of particles and particle subsets in the bed. The pressure fluctuations propagate upstream to the pressure transducer where they can be monitored. Pressure fluctuation, mean differential pressure, gas flow rate, reactor

  20. Sites for locations of nuclear reactors; Sitios para emplazamientos de reactores nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcazar, M.; Huerta, M.; Lopez, A., E-mail: miguel.balcazar@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    A restriction on sites of nuclear energy is the history of seismic activity, in its magnitude (Richter) and intensity (Mercalli). This article delimits the areas of greatest magnitude and national seismic intensity, with restrictions of ground acceleration; the supplement areas with a low magnitude of seismic activity are shown. Potential sites for the location of these sites are introduced into a geographic information system. The set of geo-referenced data contains the location of the active volcanic manifestations; the historical record of earthquake epicenters, magnitudes and intensities; major geological faults; surface hydrology and water bodies; location of population density; protected areas; contour lines; the rock type or geology. The geographic information system allows entering normative criteria and environmental restrictions that correlate with geo-referenced data described above, forms both probable and exclusion areas for the installation of nuclear sites. (Author)

  1. Impact of thorium based molten salt reactor on the closure of the nuclear fuel cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaradat, Safwan Qasim Mohammad

    Molten salt reactor (MSR) is one of six reactors selected by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF). The liquid fluoride thorium reactor (LFTR) is a MSR concept based on thorium fuel cycle. LFTR uses liquid fluoride salts as a nuclear fuel. It uses 232Th and 233U as the fertile and fissile materials, respectively. Fluoride salt of these nuclides is dissolved in a mixed carrier salt of lithium and beryllium (FLiBe). The objective of this research was to complete feasibility studies of a small commercial thermal LFTR. The focus was on neutronic calculations in order to prescribe core design parameter such as core size, fuel block pitch (p), fuel channel radius, fuel path, reflector thickness, fuel salt composition, and power. In order to achieve this objective, the applicability of Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) to MSR modeling was verified. Then, a prescription for conceptual small thermal reactor LFTR and relevant calculations were performed using MCNP to determine the main neutronic parameters of the core reactor. The MCNP code was used to study the reactor physics characteristics for the FUJI-U3 reactor. The results were then compared with the results obtained from the original FUJI-U3 using the reactor physics code SRAC95 and the burnup analysis code ORIPHY2. The results were comparable with each other. Based on the results, MCNP was found to be a reliable code to model a small thermal LFTR and study all the related reactor physics characteristics. The results of this study were promising and successful in demonstrating a prefatory small commercial LFTR design. The outcome of using a small core reactor with a diameter/height of 280/260 cm that would operate for more than five years at a power level of 150 MWth was studied. The fuel system 7LiF - BeF2 - ThF4 - UF4 with a (233U/ 232Th) = 2.01 % was the candidate fuel for this reactor core.

  2. Porous nuclear fuel element for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2011-03-01

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  3. Porous nuclear fuel element with internal skeleton for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2013-09-03

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  4. Transitioning nuclear fuel cycles with uncertain fast reactor costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phathanapirom, U.B., E-mail: bphathanapirom@utexas.edu; Schneider, E.A.

    2016-06-15

    This paper applies a novel decision making methodology to a case study involving choices leading to the transition from the current once-through light water reactor fuel cycle to one relying on continuous recycle of plutonium and minor actinides in fast reactors in the face of uncertain fast reactor capital costs. Unique to this work is a multi-stage treatment of a range of plausible trajectories for the evolution of fast reactor capital costs over time, characterized by first-of-a-kind penalties as well as time- and unit-based learning. The methodology explicitly incorporates uncertainties in key parameters into the decision-making process by constructing a stochastic model and embedding uncertainties as bifurcations in the decision tree. “Hedging” strategies are found by applying a choice criterion to select courses of action which mitigate “regrets”. These regrets are calculated by evaluating the performance of all possible transition strategies for every feasible outcome of the uncertain parameter. The hedging strategies are those that preserve the most flexibility for adjusting the fuel cycle strategy in response to new information as uncertainties are resolved.

  5. Thermal-hydraulic analysis techniques for axisymmetric pebble bed nuclear reactor cores. [PEBBLE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroh, K.R.

    1979-03-01

    The pebble bed reactor's cylindrical core volume contains a random bed of small, spherical fuel-moderator elements. These graphite spheres, containing a central region of dispersed coated-particle fissile and fertile material, are cooled by high pressure helium flowing through the connected interstitial voids. A mathematical model and numerical solution technique have been developed which allow calculation of macroscopic values of thermal-hydraulic variables in an axisymmetric pebble bed nuclear reactor core. The computer program PEBBLE is based on a mathematical model which treats the bed macroscopically as a generating, conducting porous medium. The steady-state model uses a nonlinear Forchheimer-type relation between the coolant pressure gradient and mass flux, with newly derived coefficients for the linear and quadratic resistance terms. The remaining equations in the model make use of mass continuity, and thermal energy balances for the solid and fluid phases.

  6. Investigation of the low enrichment conversion of the Texas A and M Nuclear Science Center Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuscher, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The use of highly enriched uranium as a fuel research reactors is of concern due to the possibility of diversion for nuclear weapons applications. The Texas A M TRIGA reactor currently uses 70% enriched uranium in a FLIP (Fuel Life Improvement Program) fuel element manufactured by General Atomics. Thus fuel also contains 1.5 weight percent of erbium as a burnable poison to prolong useful core life. US university reactors that use highly enriched uranium will be required to covert to 20% or less enrichment to satisfy Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements for the next core loading if the fuel is available. This investigation examined the feasibility of a material alternate to uranium-zirconium hydride for LEU conversion of a TRIGA reactor. This material is a beryllium oxide uranium dioxide based fuel. The theoretical aspects of core physics analyses were examined to assess the potential advantages of the alternative fuel. A basic model was developed for the existing core configuration since it is desired to use the present fuel element grid for the replacement core. The computing approach was calibrated to the present core and then applied to a core of BeO-UO{sub 2} fuel elements. Further calculations were performed for the General Atomics TRIGA low-enriched uranium zirconium hydride fuel.

  7. Computer simulation of Angra-2 PWR nuclear reactor core using MCNPX code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Marcos P.C. de; Rebello, Wilson F., E-mail: eng.cavaliere@ime.eb.br, E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia - Secao de Engenharia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, Claudio L. [Universidade Gama Filho, Departamento de Matematica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Vellozo, Sergio O., E-mail: vellozo@cbpf.br [Centro Tecnologico do Exercito. Divisao de Defesa Quimica, Biologica e Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Ademir X. da, E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos Gaduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In this work the MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code) code was used to develop a computerized model of the core of Angra 2 PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) nuclear reactor. The model was created without any kind of homogenization, but using real geometric information and material composition of that reactor, obtained from the FSAR (Final Safety Analysis Report). The model is still being improved and the version presented in this work is validated by comparing values calculated by MCNPX with results calculated by others means and presented on FSAR. This paper shows the results already obtained to K{sub eff} and K{infinity}, general parameters of the core, considering the reactor operating under stationary conditions of initial testing and operation. Other stationary operation conditions have been simulated and, in all tested cases, there was a close agreement between values calculated computationally through this model and data presented on the FSAR, which were obtained by other codes. This model is expected to become a valuable tool for many future applications. (author)

  8. A homogenization method for the modal analysis of a nuclear reactor with internal structures modelling and fluid-structure interaction coupling; Une methode d'homogeneisation pour l'analyse modale d'un reacteur nucleaire avec modelisation des structures internes et de l'interaction fluide / structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigrist, J.F. [DCN Propulsion, Service Technique et Scientifique, 44 - La Montagne (France); Broc, D. [CEA Saclay, Lab. d' Etude Mecanique et Sismique, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2007-03-15

    A homogenization method is presented and validated in order to perform the dynamic analysis of a nuclear pressure vessel with a 'reduced' numerical model accounting for inertial fluid-structure coupling and describing the geometrical details of the internal structures, periodically embedded within the nuclear reactor. Homogenization techniques have been widely used in nuclear engineering to model confinement effects in reactor cores or tubes bundles. Application of such techniques to reactor internals is investigated in the present paper. The theory bases of the method are first recalled. Adaptation of the homogenization approach to the case of reactor internals is then exposed: it is shown that in such case, confinement effects can be modelled by a suitable modification of classical fluid-structure symmetric formulation. The method is then validated by comparison of 3D and 2D calculations. In the latter, a 'reduced' model with homogenized fluid is used, whereas in the former, a full finite element model of the nuclear pressure vessel with internal structures is elaborated. The homogenization approach is proved to be efficient from the numerical of view point and accurate from the physical point of view. Confinement effects in the industrial case can then be highlighted. (authors)

  9. Advanced Small Modular Reactor Economics Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2014-10-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) research and development activities focus on four key areas: Developing assessment methods for evaluating advanced SMR technologies and characteristics; and Developing and testing of materials, fuels and fabrication techniques; and Resolving key regulatory issues identified by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and industry; and Developing advanced instrumentation and controls and human-machine interfaces. This report focuses on development of assessment methods to evaluate advanced SMR technologies and characteristics. Specifically, this report describes the expansion and application of the economic modeling effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Analysis of the current modeling methods shows that one of the primary concerns for the modeling effort is the handling of uncertainty in cost estimates. Monte Carlo–based methods are commonly used to handle uncertainty, especially when implemented by a stand-alone script within a program such as Python or MATLAB. However, a script-based model requires each potential user to have access to a compiler and an executable capable of handling the script. Making the model accessible to multiple independent analysts is best accomplished by implementing the model in a common computing tool such as Microsoft Excel. Excel is readily available and accessible to most system analysts, but it is not designed for straightforward implementation of a Monte Carlo–based method. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm requires in-spreadsheet scripting and statistical analyses or the use of add-ons such as Crystal Ball. An alternative method uses propagation of error calculations in the existing Excel-based system to estimate system cost uncertainty. This method has the advantage of using Microsoft Excel as is, but it requires the use of simplifying assumptions. These assumptions do not necessarily bring into question the analytical results. In fact, the

  10. Needs of Accurate Prompt and Delayed γ-spectrum and Multiplicity for Nuclear Reactor Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimpault, G.; Bernard, D.; Blanchet, D.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Ravaux, S.; Santamarina, A.

    The local energy photon deposit must be accounted accurately for Gen-IV fast reactors, advanced light-water nuclear reactors (Gen-III+) and the new experimental Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR). The γ energy accounts for about 10% of the total energy released in the core of a thermal or fast reactor. The γ-energy release is much greater in the core of the reactor than in its structural sub-assemblies (such as reflector, control rod followers, dummy sub-assemblies). However, because of the propagation of γ from the core regions to the neighboring fuel-free assemblies, the contribution of γ energy to the total heating can be dominant. For reasons related to their performance, power reactors require a 7.5% (1σ) uncertainty for the energy deposition in non-fuelled zones. For the JHR material-testing reactor, a 5% (1 s) uncertainty is required in experimental positions. In order to verify the adequacy of the calculation of γ-heating, TLD and γ-fission chambers were used to derive the experimental heating values. Experimental programs were and are still conducted in different Cadarache facilities such as MASURCA (for SFR), MINERVE and EOLE (for JHR and Gen-III+ reactors). The comparison of calculated and measured γ-heating values shows an underestimation in all experimental programs indicating that for the most γ-production data from 239Pu in current nuclear-data libraries is highly suspicious.The first evaluation priority is for prompt γ-multiplicity for U and Pu fission but similar values for otheractinides such as Pu and U are also required. The nuclear data library JEFF3.1.1 contains most of the photon production data. However, there are some nuclei for which there are missing or erroneous data which need to be completed or modified. A review of the data available shows a lack of measurements for conducting serious evaluation efforts. New measurements are needed to guide new evaluation efforts which benefit from consolidated modeling techniques.

  11. 10 CFR 50.44 - Combustible gas control for nuclear power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Combustible gas control for nuclear power reactors. 50.44... FACILITIES Standards for Licenses, Certifications, and Regulatory Approvals § 50.44 Combustible gas control for nuclear power reactors. (a) Definitions—(1) Inerted atmosphere means a containment atmosphere...

  12. Dynamic model of Fast Breeder Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidyanathan, G., E-mail: vaidya@igcar.gov.i [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Kasinathan, N.; Velusamy, K. [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2010-04-15

    Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) is a 40 M Wt/13.2 MWe sodium cooled reactor operating since 1985. It is a loop type reactor. As part of the safety analysis the response of the plant to various transients is needed. In this connection a computer code named DYNAM was developed to model the reactor core, the intermediate heat exchanger, steam generator, piping, etc. This paper deals with the mathematical model of the various components of FBTR, the numerical techniques to solve the model, and comparison of the predictions of the code with plant measurements. Also presented is the benign response of the plant to a station blackout condition, which brings out the role of the various reactivity feedback mechanisms combined with a gradual coast down of reactor sodium flow.

  13. 10 CFR 71.97 - Advance notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... fuel and nuclear waste. 71.97 Section 71.97 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING... notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste. (a) As specified in paragraphs (b), (c... advance notification of transportation of nuclear waste was published in the Federal Register on June...

  14. 10 CFR 110.26 - General license for the export of nuclear reactor components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General license for the export of nuclear reactor components. 110.26 Section 110.26 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Licenses § 110.26 General license for the export of nuclear...

  15. Analysis of simulation results of damaged nuclear fuel accidents at NPPs with shell-type nuclear reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor L. Kozlov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lessons from the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP made it necessary to reevaluate and intensificate the work on modeling and analyzing various scenarios of severe accidents with damage to the nuclear fuel in the reactor, containment and spent nuclear fuel storage pool with the expansion of the primary initiating event causes group listing. Further development of computational tools for modeling the explosion prevention criteria as to steam and gas mixtures, considering the specific thermal-hydrodynamic conditions and mechanisms of explosive situations arrival at different stages of a severe accident development, is substantiated. Based on the analysis of the known shell-type nuclear reactors accidents results the explosion safety thermodynamic criteria are presented, the parameters defining the steam and gas explosions conditions are found, the need to perform the further verification and validation of deterministic codes serving to simulate general accident processes behavior as well as phase-to-phase interaction calculated dependencies is established. The main parameters controlling and defining the criteria explosion safety effective regulation areas and their optimization conditions are found.

  16. Effects of Nuclear Energy on Sustainable Development and Energy Security: Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Case

    OpenAIRE

    Sungjoo Lee; Byungun Yoon; Juneseuk Shin

    2016-01-01

    We propose a stepwise method of selecting appropriate indicators to measure effects of a specific nuclear energy option on sustainable development and energy security, and also to compare an energy option with another. Focusing on the sodium-cooled fast reactor, one of the highlighted Generation IV reactors, we measure and compare its effects with the standard pressurized water reactor-based nuclear power, and then with coal power. Collecting 36 indicators, five experts select seven key indic...

  17. Measuring of fissile isotopes partial antineutrino spectra in direct experiment at nuclear reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Sinev, V V

    2009-01-01

    The direct measuring method is considered to get nuclear reactor antineutrino spectrum. We suppose to isolate partial spectra of the fissile isotopes by using the method of antineutrino spectrum extraction from the inverse beta decay positron spectrum applied at Rovno experiment. This admits to increase the accuracy of partial antineutrino spectra forming the total nuclear reactor spectrum. It is important for the analysis of the reactor core fuel composition and could be applied for non-proliferation purposes.

  18. CALMOS: Innovative device for the measurement of nuclear heating in material testing reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carcreff, H. [Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission CEA, Saclay Center, DEN/DANS/DRSN/SIREN, Gif Sur Yvette, 91191 (France)

    2011-07-01

    An R and D program has been carried out since 2002 in order to improve gamma heating measurements in the 70 MWth OSIRIS Material Testing Reactor operated by CEA's Nuclear Energy Div. at the Saclay research center. Throughout this program an innovative calorimetric probe associated to a specific handling system has been designed in order to make measurements both along the fissile height and on the upper part of the core, where nuclear heating rates still remain high. Two mock-ups of the probe were manufactured and tested in 2005 and 2009 in ex-core area of OSIRIS reactor for the process validation, while a displacement system has been especially designed to move the probe axially. A final probe has been designed thanks to modeling results and to preliminary measurements obtained with mock-ups irradiated to a heating level of 2W/g, This paper gives an overview of the development, describes the calorimetric probe, and expected advantages such as the possibility to use complementary methods to get the nuclear heating measurement. Results obtained with mock-ups irradiated in ex-core area of the reactor are presented and discussed. (authors)

  19. Chemical reactor modeling multiphase reactive flows

    CERN Document Server

    Jakobsen, Hugo A

    2014-01-01

    Chemical Reactor Modeling closes the gap between Chemical Reaction Engineering and Fluid Mechanics.  The second edition consists of two volumes: Volume 1: Fundamentals. Volume 2: Chemical Engineering Applications In volume 1 most of the fundamental theory is presented. A few numerical model simulation application examples are given to elucidate the link between theory and applications. In volume 2 the chemical reactor equipment to be modeled are described. Several engineering models are introduced and discussed. A survey of the frequently used numerical methods, algorithms and schemes is provided. A few practical engineering applications of the modeling tools are presented and discussed. The working principles of several experimental techniques employed in order to get data for model validation are outlined. The monograph is based on lectures regularly taught in the fourth and fifth years graduate courses in transport phenomena and chemical reactor modeling, and in a post graduate course in modern reactor m...

  20. Evaluating the Cost, Safety, and Proliferation Risks of Small Floating Nuclear Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Michael J; Abdulla, Ahmed; Morgan, M Granger

    2017-01-17

    It is hard to see how our energy system can be decarbonized if the world abandons nuclear power, but equally hard to introduce the technology in nonnuclear energy states. This is especially true in countries with limited technical, institutional, and regulatory capabilities, where safety and proliferation concerns are acute. Given the need to achieve serious emissions mitigation by mid-century, and the multidecadal effort required to develop robust nuclear governance institutions, we must look to other models that might facilitate nuclear plant deployment while mitigating the technology's risks. One such deployment paradigm is the build-own-operate-return model. Because returning small land-based reactors containing spent fuel is infeasible, we evaluate the cost, safety, and proliferation risks of a system in which small modular reactors are manufactured in a factory, and then deployed to a customer nation on a floating platform. This floating small modular reactor would be owned and operated by a single entity and returned unopened to the developed state for refueling. We developed a decision model that allows for a comparison of floating and land-based alternatives considering key International Atomic Energy Agency plant-siting criteria. Abandoning onsite refueling is beneficial, and floating reactors built in a central facility can potentially reduce the risk of cost overruns and the consequences of accidents. However, if the floating platform must be built to military-grade specifications, then the cost would be much higher than a land-based system. The analysis tool presented is flexible, and can assist planners in determining the scope of risks and uncertainty associated with different deployment options.

  1. Risks of nuclear energy technology safety concepts of light water reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Kessler, Günter; Schlüter, Franz-Hermann

    2014-01-01

    The book analyses the risks of nuclear power stations. The security concept of reactors is explained. Measures against the spread of radioactivity after a severe accident, accidents of core melting and a possible crash of an air plane on?reactor containment are discussed. The book covers three scientific subjects of the safety concepts of Light Water Reactors: ? A first part describes the basic safety design concepts of operating German Pressurized Water Reactors and Boiling Water Reactors including accident management measures introduced after the reactor accidents of Three Mile Island and Ch

  2. Search for neutrino oscillations at the palo verde nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm; Busenitz; Cook; Gratta; Henrikson; Kornis; Lawrence; Lee; McKinny; Miller; Novikov; Piepke; Ritchie; Tracy; Vogel; Wang; Wolf

    2000-04-24

    We report on the initial results from a measurement of the antineutrino flux and spectrum at a distance of about 800 m from the three reactors of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station using a segmented gadolinium-loaded scintillation detector. We find that the antineutrino flux agrees with that predicted in the absence of oscillations excluding at 90% C.L. nu;(e)-nu;(x) oscillations with Deltam(2)>1.12x10(-3) eV(2) for maximal mixing and sin (2)2straight theta>0.21 for large Deltam(2). Our results support the conclusion that the atmospheric neutrino oscillations observed by Super-Kamiokande do not involve nu(e).

  3. Subsize specimen testing of nuclear reactor pressure vessel material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A.S. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Materials Research Center; Rosinski, S.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cannon, N.S. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Hamilton, M.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1991-12-31

    A new methodology is proposed to correlate the upper shelf energy (USE) of full size and subsize Charpy specimens of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel plate material, A533B. The methodology appears to be more satisfactory than the methodologies proposed earlier. USE of a notched-only specimen is partitioned into macro-crack initiation and crack propagation energies. USE of a notched and precracked specimen provides the crack propagation energy. {Delta}USE, the difference between the USE`s of notched-only and precracked specimens, is an estimate of the crack initiation energy. {Delta}USE was normalized by a factor involving the dimensions of the Charpy specimen and the stress concentration factor at the notch root. The normalized values of the {Delta}USE were found to be invariant with specimen size.

  4. Subsize specimen testing of nuclear reactor pressure vessel material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A.S. (Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Materials Research Center); Rosinski, S.T. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Cannon, N.S. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)); Hamilton, M.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    A new methodology is proposed to correlate the upper shelf energy (USE) of full size and subsize Charpy specimens of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel plate material, A533B. The methodology appears to be more satisfactory than the methodologies proposed earlier. USE of a notched-only specimen is partitioned into macro-crack initiation and crack propagation energies. USE of a notched and precracked specimen provides the crack propagation energy. [Delta]USE, the difference between the USE's of notched-only and precracked specimens, is an estimate of the crack initiation energy. [Delta]USE was normalized by a factor involving the dimensions of the Charpy specimen and the stress concentration factor at the notch root. The normalized values of the [Delta]USE were found to be invariant with specimen size.

  5. Determination of 36Cl in nuclear waste from reactor decommissioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Ostergaard, Lars Frøsig; Nielsen, Sven P

    2007-04-15

    An analytical method for the determination of 36Cl in nuclear waste such as graphite, heavy concrete, steel, aluminum, and lead was developed. Several methods were investigated for decomposing the samples. AgCl precipitation was used to separate 36Cl from the matrix elements, followed by ion-exchange chromatography to remove interfering radionuclides. The purified 36Cl was then measured by liquid scintillation counting. The chemical yield of chlorine, as measured by ICPMS, is above 70% and the decontamination factors for all interfering radionuclides are greater than 10(6). The detection limit of this analytical method for 36Cl is 14 mBq. The method has been used to determine 36Cl in heavy concrete, aluminum, and graphite from the Danish DR-2 research reactor.

  6. Preloading of bolted connections in nuclear reactor component supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahr, G T

    1984-10-01

    A number of failures of threaded fasteners in nuclear reactor component supports have been reported. Many of those failures were attributed to stress corrosion cracking. This report discusses how stress corrosion cracking can be avoided in bolting by controlling the maximum bolt preloads so that the sustained stresses in the bolts are below the level required to cause stress corrosion cracking. This is a basic departure from ordinary bolted joint design where the only limits on preload are on the minimum preload. Emphasis is placed on the importance of detailed analysis to determine the acceptable range of preload and the selection of a method for measuring the preload that is sufficiently accurate to ensure that the preload is actually within the acceptable range. Procedures for determining acceptable preload range are given, and the accuracy of various methods of measuring preload is discussed.

  7. Rocketdyne/Westinghouse nuclear thermal rocket engine modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, James F.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: systems approach needed for nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) design optimization; generic NTR engine power balance codes; rocketdyne nuclear thermal system code; software capabilities; steady state model; NTR engine optimizer code-logic; reactor power calculation logic; sample multi-component configuration; NTR design code output; generic NTR code at Rocketdyne; Rocketdyne NTR model; and nuclear thermal rocket modeling directions.

  8. Modelling the nuclear parton distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Kulagin, S A

    2016-01-01

    We review a semi-microscopic model of nuclear parton distributions, which takes into account a number of nuclear effects including Fermi motion and nuclear binding, nuclear meson-exchange currents and off-shell corrections to bound nucleon distributions as well as nuclear shadowing effect. We also discuss applications of the model to the lepton-nuclear deep-inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan process and neutrino total cross sections.

  9. Time variability of α from realistic models of Oklo reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, C. R.; Sharapov, E. I.; Lamoreaux, S. K.

    2006-08-01

    We reanalyze Oklo Sm149 data using realistic models of the natural nuclear reactors. Disagreements among recent Oklo determinations of the time evolution of α, the electromagnetic fine structure constant, are shown to be due to different reactor models, which led to different neutron spectra used in the calculations. We use known Oklo reactor epithermal spectral indices as criteria for selecting realistic reactor models. Two Oklo reactors, RZ2 and RZ10, were modeled with MCNP. The resulting neutron spectra were used to calculate the change in the Sm149 effective neutron capture cross section as a function of a possible shift in the energy of the 97.3-meV resonance. We independently deduce ancient Sm149 effective cross sections and use these values to set limits on the time variation of α. Our study resolves a contradictory situation with previous Oklo α results. Our suggested 2σ bound on a possible time variation of α over 2 billion years is stringent: -0.11≤Δα/α≤0.24, in units of 10-7, but model dependent in that it assumes only α has varied over time.

  10. Nuclear Hybrid Energy System Modeling: RELAP5 Dynamic Coupling Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan Anderson; Haihua Zhao; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; George Mesina

    2012-09-01

    The nuclear hybrid energy systems (NHES) research team is currently developing a dynamic simulation of an integrated hybrid energy system. A detailed simulation of proposed NHES architectures will allow initial computational demonstration of a tightly coupled NHES to identify key reactor subsystem requirements, identify candidate reactor technologies for a hybrid system, and identify key challenges to operation of the coupled system. This work will provide a baseline for later coupling of design-specific reactor models through industry collaboration. The modeling capability addressed in this report focuses on the reactor subsystem simulation.

  11. A world class nuclear research reactor complex for South Africa's nuclear future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keshaw, Jeetesh [South African Young Nuclear Professional Society, PO Box 9396, Centurion, 0157 (South Africa)

    2008-07-01

    South Africa recently made public its rather ambitious goals pertaining to nuclear energy developments in a Draft Policy and Strategy issued for public comment. Not much attention was given to an important tool for nuclear energy research and development, namely a well equipped and maintained research reactor, which on its own does not do justice to its potential, unless it is fitted with all the ancillaries and human resources as most first world countries have. In South Africa's case it is suggested to establish at least one Nuclear Energy Research and Development Centre at such a research reactor, where almost all nuclear energy related research can be carried out on par with some of the best in the world. The purpose of this work is to propose how this could be done, and motivate why it is important that it be done with great urgency, and with full involvement of young professionals, if South Africa wishes to face up to the challenges mentioned in the Draft Strategy and Policy. (authors)

  12. BISON and MARMOT Development for Modeling Fast Reactor Fuel Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Williamson, Richard L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, Daniel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Medvedev, Pavel G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    BISON and MARMOT are two codes under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for engineering scale and lower length scale fuel performance modeling. It is desired to add capabilities for fast reactor applications to these codes. The fast reactor fuel types under consideration are metal (U-Pu-Zr) and oxide (MOX). The cladding types of interest include 316SS, D9, and HT9. The purpose of this report is to outline the proposed plans for code development and provide an overview of the models added to the BISON and MARMOT codes for fast reactor fuel behavior. A brief overview of preliminary discussions on the formation of a bilateral agreement between the Idaho National Laboratory and the National Nuclear Laboratory in the United Kingdom is presented.

  13. Radiochemical analysis of concrete samples for decommission of nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata-Garcia, Daniel; Wershofen, Herbert [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Bundesallee 100 38116, Braunschweig (Germany); Larijani, Cyrus; Sobrino-Petrirena, Maitane; Garcia-Miranda, Maria; Jerome, Simon M. [National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Decommissioning of the oldest nuclear power reactors are some of the most challenging technological legacy issues many countries will face in forthcoming years, as many power reactors reach the end of their design lives. Decommissioning of nuclear reactors generates large amounts of waste that need to be classified according to their radioactive content. Approximately 10 % of the contaminated material ends up in different repositories (depending on their level of contamination) while the rest is decontaminated, measured and released into the environment or sent for recycling. Such classification needs to be done accurately in order to ensure that both the personnel involved in decommissioning and the population at large are not needlessly exposed to radiation or radioactive material and to minimise the environmental impact of such work. However, too conservative classification strategies should not be applied, in order to make proper use of radioactive waste repositories since space is limited and the full process must be cost-effective. Implicit in decommissioning and classification of waste is the need to analyse large amounts of material which usually combine a complex matrix with a non-homogeneous distribution of the radionuclides. Because the costs involved are large, it is possible to make great savings by the adoption of best available practices, such as the use of validated methods for on-site measurements and simultaneous determination of more than one radionuclide whenever possible. The work we present deals with the development and the validation of a procedure for the simultaneous determination of {sup 241}Am, plutonium isotopes, uranium isotopes and {sup 90}Sr in concrete samples. Samples are firstly ground and fused with LiBO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}. After dissolution of the fused sample, silicate and alkaline elements are removed followed by radiochemical separation of the target radionuclides using extraction chromatography. Measurement

  14. Development of Improved Burnable Poisons for Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renier, J.A.

    2002-04-17

    Burnable poisons are used in all modern nuclear reactors to permit higher loading of fuel without the necessity of an overly large control rod system. This not only permits a longer core life but can also be used to level the power distribution. Commercial nuclear reactors commonly use B{sub 4}C in separate non-fueled rods and more recently, zirconium boride coatings on the fuel pellets or gadolinium oxide mixed with the fuel. Although the advantages are great, there are problems with using these materials. Boron, which is an effective neutron absorber, transmutes to lithium and helium upon absorption of a neutron. Helium is insoluble and is eventually released to the interior of the fuel rod, where it produces an internal pressure. When sufficiently high, this pressure stress could cause separation of the cladding from the fuel, causing overly high centerline temperatures. Gadolinium has several very strongly absorbing isotopes, but not all have large cross sections and result in residual burnable poison reactivity worth at the end of the fuel life. Even if the amount of this residual absorber is small and the penalty in operation small, the cost of this penalty, even if only several days, can be very high. The objective of this investigation was to study the performance of single isotopes in order to reduce the residual negative reactivity left over at the end of the fuel cycle. Since the behavior of burnable poisons can be strongly influenced by their configuration, four forms for the absorbers were studied: homogeneously mixed with the fuel, mixed with only the outer one-third of the fuel pellet, coated on the perimeter of the fuel pellets, and alloyed with the cladding. In addition, the numbers of fuel rods containing burnable poison were chosen as 8, 16, 64, and 104. Other configurations were chosen for a few special cases. An enrichment of 4.5 wt% {sup 235}U was chosen for most cases for study in order to achieve a 4-year fuel cycle. A standard pressurized

  15. 10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... generated from the chemical reaction of the cladding with water or steam shall not exceed 0.01 times the... light-water nuclear power reactors. 50.46 Section 50.46 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... reactors. (a)(1)(i) Each boiling or pressurized light-water nuclear power reactor fueled with uranium oxide...

  16. Examination of offsite radiological emergency measures for nuclear reactor accidents involving core melt. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, D.C.; McGrath, P.E.; Rasmussen, N.C.

    1978-06-01

    Evacuation, sheltering followed by population relocation, and iodine prophylaxis are evaluated as offsite public protective measures in response to nuclear reactor accidents involving core-melt. Evaluations were conducted using a modified version of the Reactor Safety Study consequence model. Models representing each measure were developed and are discussed. Potential PWR core-melt radioactive material releases are separated into two categories, ''Melt-through'' and ''Atmospheric,'' based upon the mode of containment failure. Protective measures are examined and compared for each category in terms of projected doses to the whole body and thyroid. Measures for ''Atmospheric'' accidents are also examined in terms of their influence on the occurrence of public health effects.

  17. System aspects of a Space Nuclear Reactor Power System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffe, L.; Fujita, T.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Grossman, M.; Kia, T.; Nesmith, B.

    1988-01-01

    Selected systems aspects of a 300 kW nuclear reactor power system for spacecraft have been studied. The approach included examination of two candidate missions and their associated spacecraft, and a number of special topics dealing with the power system design and operation. The missions considered were a reusable orbital transfer vehicle and a space-based radar. The special topics included: power system configuration and scaling, launch vehicle integration, operating altitude, orbital storage, start-up, thawing, control, load following, procedures in case of malfunction, restart, thermal and nuclear radiation to other portions of the spacecraft, thermal stresses between subsystems, boom and cable designs, vibration modes, altitude control, reliability, and survivability. Among the findings are that the stowed length of the power system is important to mission design and that orbital storage for months to years may be needed for missions involving orbital assembly. The power system design evolved during the study and has continued to evolve; the current design differs somewhat from that examined in this paper.

  18. Temperature oscillations near natural nuclear reactor cores and the potential for prebiotic oligomer synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Zachary R

    2016-06-01

    Geologic settings capable of driving prebiotic oligomer synthesis reactions remain a relatively unexplored aspect of origins of life research. Natural nuclear reactors are an example of Precambrian energy sources that produced unique temperature fluctuations. Heat transfer models indicate that water-moderated, convectively-cooled natural fission reactors in porous host rocks create temperature oscillations that resemble those employed in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) devices to artificially amplify oligonucleotides. This temperature profile is characterized by short-duration pulses up to 70-100 °C, followed by a sustained period of temperatures in the range of 30-70 °C, and finally a period of relaxation to ambient temperatures until the cycle is restarted by a fresh influx of pore water. For a given reactor configuration, temperature maxima and the time required to relax to ambient temperatures depend most strongly on the aggregate effect of host rock permeability in decreasing the thermal expansion and increasing the viscosity and evaporation temperature of the pore fluids. Once formed, fission-fueled reactors can sustain multi-kilowatt-level power production for 10(5)-10(6) years, ensuring microenvironmental longevity and chemical output. The model outputs indicate that organic synthesis on young planetary bodies with a sizeable reservoir of fissile material can involve more sophisticated energy dissipation pathways than modern terrestrial analog settings alone would suggest.

  19. Temperature oscillations near natural nuclear reactor cores and the potential for prebiotic oligomer synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Zachary R.

    2016-06-01

    Geologic settings capable of driving prebiotic oligomer synthesis reactions remain a relatively unexplored aspect of origins of life research. Natural nuclear reactors are an example of Precambrian energy sources that produced unique temperature fluctuations. Heat transfer models indicate that water-moderated, convectively-cooled natural fission reactors in porous host rocks create temperature oscillations that resemble those employed in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) devices to artificially amplify oligonucleotides. This temperature profile is characterized by short-duration pulses up to 70-100 °C, followed by a sustained period of temperatures in the range of 30-70 °C, and finally a period of relaxation to ambient temperatures until the cycle is restarted by a fresh influx of pore water. For a given reactor configuration, temperature maxima and the time required to relax to ambient temperatures depend most strongly on the aggregate effect of host rock permeability in decreasing the thermal expansion and increasing the viscosity and evaporation temperature of the pore fluids. Once formed, fission-fueled reactors can sustain multi-kilowatt-level power production for 105-106 years, ensuring microenvironmental longevity and chemical output. The model outputs indicate that organic synthesis on young planetary bodies with a sizeable reservoir of fissile material can involve more sophisticated energy dissipation pathways than modern terrestrial analog settings alone would suggest.

  20. Worldwide advanced nuclear power reactors with passive and inherent safety: What, why, how, and who

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Reich, W.J.

    1991-09-01

    The political controversy over nuclear power, the accidents at Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl, international competition, concerns about the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect and technical breakthroughs have resulted in a segment of the nuclear industry examining power reactor concepts with PRIME safety characteristics. PRIME is an acronym for Passive safety, Resilience, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended time after initiation of an accident for external help. The basic ideal of PRIME is to develop power reactors in which operator error, internal sabotage, or external assault do not cause a significant release of radioactivity to the environment. Several PRIME reactor concepts are being considered. In each case, an existing, proven power reactor technology is combined with radical innovations in selected plant components and in the safety philosophy. The Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) reactor is a modified pressurized-water reactor, the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is a modified gas-cooled reactor, and the Advanced CANDU Project is a modified heavy-water reactor. In addition to the reactor concepts, there is parallel work on super containments. The objective is the development of a passive box'' that can contain radioactivity in the event of any type of accident. This report briefly examines: why a segment of the nuclear power community is taking this new direction, how it differs from earlier directions, and what technical options are being considered. A more detailed description of which countries and reactor vendors have undertaken activities follows. 41 refs.

  1. Exploration of High-Dimensional Scalar Function for Nuclear Reactor Safety Analysis and Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Maljovec; Bei Wang; Valerio Pascucci; Peer-Timo Bremer; Michael Pernice; Robert Nourgaliev

    2013-05-01

    The next generation of methodologies for nuclear reactor Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) explicitly accounts for the time element in modeling the probabilistic system evolution and uses numerical simulation tools to account for possible dependencies between failure events. The Monte-Carlo (MC) and the Dynamic Event Tree (DET) approaches belong to this new class of dynamic PRA methodologies. A challenge of dynamic PRA algorithms is the large amount of data they produce which may be difficult to visualize and analyze in order to extract useful information. We present a software tool that is designed to address these goals. We model a large-scale nuclear simulation dataset as a high-dimensional scalar function defined over a discrete sample of the domain. First, we provide structural analysis of such a function at multiple scales and provide insight into the relationship between the input parameters and the output. Second, we enable exploratory analysis for users, where we help the users to differentiate features from noise through multi-scale analysis on an interactive platform, based on domain knowledge and data characterization. Our analysis is performed by exploiting the topological and geometric properties of the domain, building statistical models based on its topological segmentations and providing interactive visual interfaces to facilitate such explorations. We provide a user’s guide to our software tool by highlighting its analysis and visualization capabilities, along with a use case involving dataset from a nuclear reactor safety simulation.

  2. Exploration of High-Dimensional Scalar Function for Nuclear Reactor Safety Analysis and Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Maljovec; Bei Wang; Valerio Pascucci; Peer-Timo Bremer; Michael Pernice; Robert Nourgaliev

    2013-05-01

    The next generation of methodologies for nuclear reactor Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) explicitly accounts for the time element in modeling the probabilistic system evolution and uses numerical simulation tools to account for possible dependencies between failure events. The Monte-Carlo (MC) and the Dynamic Event Tree (DET) approaches belong to this new class of dynamic PRA methodologies. A challenge of dynamic PRA algorithms is the large amount of data they produce which may be difficult to visualize and analyze in order to extract useful information. We present a software tool that is designed to address these goals. We model a large-scale nuclear simulation dataset as a high-dimensional scalar function defined over a discrete sample of the domain. First, we provide structural analysis of such a function at multiple scales and provide insight into the relationship between the input parameters and the output. Second, we enable exploratory analysis for users, where we help the users to differentiate features from noise through multi-scale analysis on an interactive platform, based on domain knowledge and data characterization. Our analysis is performed by exploiting the topological and geometric properties of the domain, building statistical models based on its topological segmentations and providing interactive visual interfaces to facilitate such explorations. We provide a user’s guide to our software tool by highlighting its analysis and visualization capabilities, along with a use case involving dataset from a nuclear reactor safety simulation.

  3. Above-ground antineutrino detection for nuclear reactor monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweany, M.; Brennan, J.; Cabrera-Palmer, B.; Kiff, S.; Reyna, D.; Throckmorton, D.

    2015-01-01

    Antineutrino monitoring of nuclear reactors has been demonstrated many times (Klimov et al., 1994 [1]; Bowden et al., 2009 [2]; Oguri et al., 2014 [3]), however the technique has not as of yet been developed into a useful capability for treaty verification purposes. The most notable drawback is the current requirement that detectors be deployed underground, with at least several meters-water-equivalent of shielding from cosmic radiation. In addition, the deployment of liquid-based detection media presents a challenge in reactor facilities. We are currently developing a detector system that has the potential to operate above ground and circumvent deployment problems associated with a liquid detection media: the system is composed of segments of plastic scintillator surrounded by {sup 6}LiF/ZnS:Ag. ZnS:Ag is a radio-luminescent phosphor used to detect the neutron capture products of {sup 6}Li. Because of its long decay time compared to standard plastic scintillators, pulse-shape discrimination can be used to distinguish positron and neutron interactions resulting from the inverse beta decay (IBD) of antineutrinos within the detector volume, reducing both accidental and correlated backgrounds. Segmentation further reduces backgrounds by identifying the positron's annihilation gammas, a signature that is absent for most correlated and uncorrelated backgrounds. This work explores different configurations in order to maximize the size of the detector segments without reducing the intrinsic neutron detection efficiency. We believe that this technology will ultimately be applicable to potential safeguards scenarios such as those recently described by Huber et al. (2014) [4,5].

  4. Recent advances on thermohydraulic simulation of HTR-10 nuclear reactor core using realistic CFD approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Alexandro S., E-mail: alexandrossilva@ifba.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia (IFBA), Vitoria da Conquista, BA (Brazil); Mazaira, Leorlen Y.R., E-mail: leored1984@gmail.com, E-mail: cgh@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (INSTEC), La Habana (Cuba); Dominguez, Dany S.; Hernandez, Carlos R.G., E-mail: alexandrossilva@gmail.com, E-mail: dsdominguez@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Modelagem Computacional; Lira, Carlos A.B.O., E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) have the potential to be used as possible energy generation sources in the near future, owing to their inherently safe performance by using a large amount of graphite, low power density design, and high conversion efficiency. However, safety is the most important issue for its commercialization in nuclear energy industry. It is very important for safety design and operation of an HTGR to investigate its thermal-hydraulic characteristics. In this article, it was performed the thermal-hydraulic simulation of compressible flow inside the core of the pebble bed reactor HTR (High Temperature Reactor)-10 using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The realistic approach was used, where every closely packed pebble is realistically modelled considering a graphite layer and sphere of fuel. Due to the high computational cost is impossible simulate the full core; therefore, the geometry used is a FCC (Face Centered Cubic) cell with the half height of the core, with 21 layers and 95 pebbles. The input data used were taken from the thermal-hydraulic IAEA Bechmark. The results show the profiles of velocity and temperature of the coolant in the core, and the temperature distribution inside the pebbles. The maximum temperatures in the pebbles do not exceed the allowable limit for this type of nuclear fuel. (author)

  5. Research on Mathematical Model of Thermo-Economics Analysis for Pressurized Water Reactor Nuclear Cogeneration Plant%热电联产压水堆核电机组热经济性定量分析模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严俊杰; 刘继平; 林万超; 陈国慧; 邢秦安

    2001-01-01

    A thermo-economical diagnostic mathematical model for pressurizedwater reactor (PWR) nuclear cogeneration plant is proposed based on heat assignment method.This model simplifies the calculation of thermal system and can be used to calculate the index variations caused by heating steam parameters as temperature,return percentage and return place of the return water.Some examples are given to show the usefulness of this model.%基于热电联产机组热量法分配的特点,建立了热电联产压水堆机组热力系统发生变化对热经济性指标影响的计算模型,提出了供热系统参数——供热回水率、回水温度、回水地点变化对压水堆机组热经济性影响的定量诊断数学模型,可将复杂的热力系统全面计算简化成3个一次方程.通过实例计算,验证了所提数学模型是正确可行的,同时具有概念清晰、计算简捷的特点.

  6. Turbulence coefficients and stability studies for the coaxial flow or dissimiliar fluids. [gaseous core nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, H.; Lavan, Z.

    1975-01-01

    Analytical investigations of fluid dynamics problems of relevance to the gaseous core nuclear reactor program are presented. The vortex type flow which appears in the nuclear light bulb concept is analyzed along with the fluid flow in the fuel inlet region for the coaxial flow gaseous core nuclear reactor concept. The development of numerical methods for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for appropriate geometries is extended to the case of rotating flows and almost completes the gas core program requirements in this area. The investigations demonstrate that the conceptual design of the coaxial flow reactor needs further development.

  7. Controlling the power output of a nuclear reactor with fuzzy logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruan, D.; Wal, A.J. van der

    1998-01-01

    The application of fuzzy logic control (FLC) in the domain of nuclear industry presents a tremendous challenge. The main reason for this is the public awareness of the risks of nuclear reactors and the very strict safety regulations in force for nuclear power plants. The very same regulations preven

  8. Controlling the Power Output of a Nuclear Reactor with Fuzzy Logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruan, D.; Wal, A.J. van der

    1997-01-01

    The application of fuzzy logic control (FLC) in the domain of nuclear industry presents a tremendous challenge. The main reason for this is the public awareness of the risks of nuclear reactors and the very strict safety regulations in force for nuclear power plants. The very same regulations preven

  9. Controlling the power output of a nuclear reactor with fuzzy logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruan, D.; Wal, A.J. van der

    1998-01-01

    The application of fuzzy logic control (FLC) in the domain of nuclear industry presents a tremendous challenge. The main reason for this is the public awareness of the risks of nuclear reactors and the very strict safety regulations in force for nuclear power plants. The very same regulations preven

  10. Nuclear Waste Transmutation in Subcritical Reactors Driven by Target-Distributed Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Blanovsky, A

    2004-01-01

    A radioactive waste transmutation system based extensively on existing nuclear power technology is presented. By replacing the control rods with neutron sources, we could maintain good power distribution and perform long-lived waste burning in high flux subcritical reactors. The design is based on a small pressurized water reactor, fission electric cell (FEC), target-distributed accelerator (TDA) and power monitoring system with in-core gamma-ray detectors, now under development in several countries. The TDA, in which an FEC electric field compensates for lost beam energy in the target, offers a new approach to obtain large neutron fluxes. The analysis takes into consideration a wide range of TDA design aspects including the wave model of observed relativistic phenomena, in-core microwave power source, the FEC with a multistage collector (anode) and layered cathode.

  11. Selection of nuclear reactors through the hierarchic analysis process: the Mexican case; Seleccion de reactores nucleares mediante el proceso de analisis jerarquico: el caso Mexicano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin del Campo, C.; Nelson, P.F.; Francois, J.L. [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, 62550 Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: cmcm@fi-b.unam.mx

    2008-07-01

    In this work the decision making method known as hierarchical analysis process for the selection of a new reactor in Mexico was applied. The main objective of the process it is to select the nuclear reactor technology more appropriate for Mexico, to begin the bid process inside one or two years to begin their operation in 2016. The options were restricted to four reactors that fulfill the following ones approaches: 1) its are advanced reactors, from the technological point of view, with regard to the reactors that at the moment operate in the Laguna Verde Power Station, 2) its are reactors that have the totally finished design, 3) its are reactors that already have the certification on the part of the regulator organism of the origin country or that they are in an advanced state of the certification process and 4) its are reactors offered by the companies that they have designed and built the greater number of reactors that are at the moment in operation at world level. Taking into account these restrictions it was decided to consider as alternative at the reactors: Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), European Reactor of Pressurized Water (EPR), Water at Pressure reactor (AP1000) and Simplified Economic Reactor of Boiling Water (ESBWR). The evaluation approaches include economic and of safety indicators, qualitative some of them and other quantitative ones. Another grade of complexity in the solution of the problem is that there are actors that can be involved in the definition of the evaluation approaches and in the definition of the relative importance among them, according to each actor's interests. To simplify the problem its were only considered two actors or groups of interest that can influence in more significant way and that are the Federal Commission of Electricity and the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards. The qualifications for each reactor in function of the evaluation approaches were obtained, being the A BWR the best

  12. A comparative study of kinetics of nuclear reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obaidurrahman Khalilurrahman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the study of reactivity initiated transients to investigate major differences in the kinetics behavior of various reactor systems under different operating conditions. The article also states guidelines to determine the safety limits on reactivity insertion rates. Three systems, light water reactors (pressurized water reactors, heavy water reactors (pressurized heavy water reactors, and fast breeder reactors are considered for the sake of analysis. The upper safe limits for reactivity insertion rate in these reactor systems are determined. The analyses of transients are performed by a point kinetics computer code, PKOK. A simple but accurate method for accounting total reactivity feedback in kinetics calculations is suggested and used. Parameters governing the kinetics behavior of the core are studied under different core states. A few guidelines are discussed to project the possible kinetics trends in the next generation reactors.

  13. Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    1988-01-01

    This standard applies to the following types of reactors: shunt reactors, current-limiting reactors including neutral-earthing reactors, damping reactors, tuning (filter) reactors, earthing transformers (neutral couplers), arc-suppression reactors, smoothing reactors, with the exception of the following reactors: small reactors with a rating generally less than 2 kvar single-phase and 10 kvar three-phase, reactors for special purposes such as high-frequency line traps or reactors mounted on rolling stock.

  14. Assessment of uncertainties in early off-site consequences from nuclear reactor accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madni, I.K.; Cazzoli, E.G. (Brookhaven National Lab., Dept. of Nuclear Energy, Upton, NY (US)); Khatib-Rahbar, M. (Energy Research, Inc., Rockville, MD (US))

    1990-04-01

    A simplified approach has been developed to calculate uncertainties in early off-site consequences from nuclear reactor accidents. The consequence model (SMART) is based on a solution procedure that uses simplified meteorology and involves direct analytic integration of air concentration equations over time and position. This is different from the discretization approach currently used in the CRAC2 and MACCS codes. The SMART code is fast running, thereby providing a valuable tool for sensitivity and uncertainty studies. The code was benchmarked against both MACCS version 1.4 and CRAC2. Results of benchmarketing and detailed sensitivity and uncertainty analyses using SMART are presented.

  15. Bayesian Zero-Failure (BAZE) reliability demonstration testing procedure for components of nuclear reactor safety systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waller, R.A.

    1977-06-01

    A Bayesian-Zero-Failure (BAZE) reliability demonstration testing procedure is presented. The method is developed for an exponential failure-time model and a gamma prior distribution on the failure-rate. A simple graphical approach using percentiles is used to fit the prior distribution. The procedure is given in an easily applied step-by-step form which does not require the use of a computer for its implementation. The BAZE approach is used to obtain sample test plans for selected components of nuclear reactor safety systems.

  16. Crystal Plasticity Model of Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement in GRIZZLY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Biner, Suleyman Bulent [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is of utmost importance to ensure safe operation of nuclear reactors under extended lifetime. Microstructure-scale models at various length and time scales, coupled concurrently or through homogenization methods, can play a crucial role in understanding and quantifying irradiation-induced defect production, growth and their influence on mechanical behavior of RPV steels. A multi-scale approach, involving atomistic, meso- and engineering-scale models, is currently being pursued within the GRIZZLY project to understand and quantify irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels. Within this framework, a dislocation-density based crystal plasticity model has been developed in GRIZZLY that captures the effect of irradiation-induced defects on the flow stress behavior and is presented in this report. The present formulation accounts for the interaction between self-interstitial loops and matrix dislocations. The model predictions have been validated with experiments and dislocation dynamics simulation.

  17. Study of a fuel assembly for the nuclear reactor of IV generation cooled with supercritical water; Estudio de un ensamble de combustible para el reactor nuclear de generacion IV enfriado con agua supercritica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barragan M, A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Francois L, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Espinosa P, G., E-mail: albrm29@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (MX)

    2011-11-15

    In this work a neutron study is presented about a square assembly design of double line of fuel rods, with moderator box to the center of the arrangement, for a nuclear reactor cooled with supercritical water (SCWR). The SCWR reactor was chosen by the characteristics of its design, mainly because is based in light water reactors (PWR and BWR), and the operational experience that has of them allow to use models and similar programs to simulate the fuel and the nucleus of this type of reactors. To develop the necessary models and to carry out the design and analysis of the SCWR reactor, the neutron codes MCNPX and Helios were used. The reason of using both codes, is because the code MCNPX used thoroughly in the neutron simulation of these reactors, it has been our reference code to analyze the results obtained with the Helios code which results are more efficient because its calculation times are minors. In the nucleus design the same parameters for both codes were considered. The results show that the design with Helios is a viable option to simulate these reactors since their values of the neutrons multiplication factor are very similar to those obtained with MCNPX. On the other hand, it could be corroborated that the CASMO-4 code is inadequate to simulate the fuel to the temperature conditions and water pressure in the SCWR. (Author)

  18. 核电站反应堆冷却剂平均温度内模控制系统仿真%Simulation Study of Internal Model Control System of Refrigerant Average Temperature of Nuclear Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许天舒; 史小平

    2001-01-01

    采用系统开环脉冲响应序列,创造了一种非参数建模方法,解决了复杂非线性系统的建模难题,并应用内模控制原理创造了一种反应堆冷却剂平均温度恒定控制的非参数模型.该模型设计简单、跟踪调节性能好、鲁棒性强、能消除不可测干扰.仿真实验证明了本设计方法的正确性和有效性,实现了系统的高精度控制.%This paper applies the internal model control method to the refrigerant average temperature control problem of a nuclear reactor, using the open-loop impulse response series of the system as its non-parameter model. The control method presented in this paper is rather simple and has good tracking performance and robustness. The simulation experiment testifies the correctness and effectiveness of the method. The high accuracy control of the system is achieved

  19. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidaspow, D. [IIT Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this investigation is to convert a {open_quotes}learning gas-solid-liquid{close_quotes} fluidization model into a predictive design model. This model is capable of predicting local gas, liquid and solids hold-ups and the basic flow regimes: the uniform bubbling, the industrially practical churn-turbulent (bubble coalescence) and the slugging regimes. Current reactor models incorrectly assume that the gas and the particle hold-ups (volume fractions) are uniform in the reactor. They must be given in terms of empirical correlations determined under conditions that radically differ from reactor operation. In the proposed hydrodynamic approach these hold-ups are computed from separate phase momentum balances. Furthermore, the kinetic theory approach computes the high slurry viscosities from collisions of the catalyst particles. Thus particle rheology is not an input into the model.

  20. Sustainability and the Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhang Sefidvash

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability as a multifaceted and holistic concept is analyzed. Sustainability involves human relationship with elements such as natural environment, economy, power, governance, education and technology with the ultimate purpose of carrying forward an ever-advancing civilization. The Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR is an innovative, small, simple in design, inherently safe, non-proliferating, and environmentally friendly concept that its deployment can generate energy in a sustainable manner contributing to the prosperity of humanity. The development of FBNR will provide electricity as well as desalinated water through a simple but advanced technology for the developing, as well as developed countries. FBNR is environmentally friendly due to its inherent safety and the convenience of using its spent fuel as the source of radiation for irradiation purposes in agriculture, industry, and medicine. Politically, if a ping pong game brought peace between China and USA, a program of development of FBNR supported by the peace loving international community can become a more mature means to bring peace among certain apparently hostile nations who crave sustainable energy, desalinated water and simple advanced technology.

  1. Delayed Gamma Measurements in Different Nuclear Research Reactors Bringing Out the Importance of the Delayed Contribution in Gamma Flux Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourmentel, D.; Radulovic, V.; Barbot, L.; Villard, J-F. [Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission, CEA, DEN, DER, Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, 13108 Saint- Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Zerovnik, G.; Snoj, L. [Reactor Physics Department, Jozef Stefan Institute, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Tarchalski, M.; Pytel, K. [National Centre for Nuclear Research A. Soltana 7, 05-400 Swierk (Poland); Malouch, F. [Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission - CEA, DEN, DM2S, Saclay, 91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-07-01

    Neutron and gamma flux levels are key parameters in nuclear research reactors. In Material Testing Reactors, such as the future Jules Horowitz Reactor, under construction at the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA Cadarache, France), the expected gamma flux levels are very high (nuclear heating is of the order of 20 W/g at 100 MWth). As gamma rays deposit their energy in the reactor structures and structural materials it is important to take them into account when designing irradiation devices. There are only a few sensors which allow measurements of the nuclear heating ; a recent development at the CEA Cadarache allows measurements of the gamma flux using a miniature ionization chamber (MIC). The measured MIC response is often compared with calculation using modern Monte Carlo (MC) neutron and photon transport codes, such as TRIPOLI-4 and MCNP6. In these calculations only the production of prompt gamma rays in the reactor is usually modelled thus neglecting the delayed gamma rays. Hence calculations and measurements are usually in better accordance for the neutron flux than for the gamma flux. In this paper we study the contribution of delayed gamma rays to the total MIC signal in order to estimate the systematic error in gamma flux MC calculations. In order to experimentally determine the delayed gamma flux contributions to the MIC response, we performed gamma flux measurements with CEA developed MIC at three different research reactors: the OSIRIS reactor (MTR - 70 MWth at CEA Saclay, France), the TRIGA MARK II reactor (TRIGA - 250 kWth at the Jozef Stefan Institute, Slovenia) and the MARIA reactor (MTR - 30 MWth at the National Center for Nuclear Research, Poland). In order to experimentally assess the delayed gamma flux contribution to the total gamma flux, several reactor shut down (scram) experiments were performed specifically for the purpose of the measurements. Results show that on average about 30 % of the MIC signal is due to

  2. The application of research reactor Maria for analysis of thorium use in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chwaszczewski, S.; Andrzejewski, K.; Myslek-Laurikainen, B.; Pytel, B.; Szczurek, J. [Dep. Thorium Project, Institute of Atomic Energy POLATOM, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Polkowska-Motrenko, H. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, ul.Dorodna 16 03-195 Warszawa (Poland)

    2010-07-01

    The MARIA reactor, pool-type light-water cooled and beryllium moderated nuclear research reactor was used to evaluate the {sup 233}U breeding during the experimental irradiation of the thorium samples. The level of impurities concentrations was determined using ICP-MS method. The associated development of computer programs for analysis of application of thorium in EPR reactor consist of PC version of CORD-2/GNOMER system are presented. (authors)

  3. Future development of the research nuclear reactor IRT-2000 in Sofia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolov, T.G. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, BAS, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1999-07-01

    The present paper presents a short description of the research reactor IRT-2000 Sofia, started in 1961 and operated for 28 years. Some items are considered, connected to the improvements made in the contemporary safety requirements and the unrealized project for modernization to 5 MW. Proposals are considered for reconstruction of reactor site to a 'reactor of low power' for education purposes and as a basis for the country's nuclear technology development. (author)

  4. Contribution of recently measured nuclear data to reactor antineutrino energy spectra predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Fallot M.; Cormon S.; Estienne M.; Algora A.; Bui V.M.; Cucoanes A.; Elnimr M.; Giot L.; Jordan D.; Martino J.; Onillon A.; Porta A.; Pronost G.; Remoto A.; Taín J.L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper attempts to summarize the actual problematic of reactor antineutrino energy spectra in the frame of fundamental and applied neutrino physics. Nuclear physics is an important ingredient of reactor antineutrino experiments. These experiments are motivated by neutrino oscillations, i.e. the measure of the θ13 mixing angle. In 2011, after a new computation of the reactor antineutrino energy spectra, based on the conversion of integral data of the beta spectra from 235U, and 239;241Pu, ...

  5. Model biases in high-burnup fast reactor simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touran, N.; Cheatham, J.; Petroski, R. [TerraPower LLC, 11235 S.E. 6th St, Bellevue, WA 98004 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    A new code system called the Advanced Reactor Modeling Interface (ARMI) has been developed that loosely couples multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulations to provide rapid, user-friendly, high-fidelity full systems analysis. Incorporating neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, safety/transient, fuel performance, core mechanical, and economic analyses, ARMI provides 'one-click' assessments of many multi-disciplined performance metrics and constraints that historically require iterations between many diverse experts. The capabilities of ARMI are implemented in this study to quantify neutronic biases of various modeling approximations typically made in fast reactor analysis at an equilibrium condition, after many repetitive shuffles. Sensitivities at equilibrium that result in very high discharge burnup are considered ( and >20% FIMA), as motivated by the development of the Traveling Wave Reactor. Model approximations discussed include homogenization, neutronic and depletion mesh resolution, thermal-hydraulic coupling, explicit control rod insertion, burnup-dependent cross sections, fission product model, burn chain truncation, and dynamic fuel performance. The sensitivities of these approximations on equilibrium discharge burnup, k{sub eff}, power density, delayed neutron fraction, and coolant temperature coefficient are discussed. (authors)

  6. Effects of Nuclear Energy on Sustainable Development and Energy Security: Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungjoo Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose a stepwise method of selecting appropriate indicators to measure effects of a specific nuclear energy option on sustainable development and energy security, and also to compare an energy option with another. Focusing on the sodium-cooled fast reactor, one of the highlighted Generation IV reactors, we measure and compare its effects with the standard pressurized water reactor-based nuclear power, and then with coal power. Collecting 36 indicators, five experts select seven key indicators to meet data availability, nuclear energy relevancy, comparability among energy options, and fit with Korean energy policy objectives. The results show that sodium-cooled fast reactors is a better alternative than existing nuclear power as well as coal electricity generation across social, economic and environmental dimensions. Our method makes comparison between energy alternatives easier, thereby clarifying consequences of different energy policy decisions.

  7. The reactor ALLEGRO and the sustainable nuclear energy in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadó János

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Visegrád-4 countries (CZ, HU, PL and SK would like to use nuclear energy on the long run. The construction of new Generation 3+ nuclear units probably belong in each country to this realm. These reactors will provide safe and cheap electric energy approximately until the end of the 21st century. In order to use nuclear energy in the 22nd century, sustainability of fuel supply shall be achieved by applying Generation 4 breeder reactors with fast spectrum. The corresponding research and development is organized now in the framework of the V4G4 Centre of Excellence establshed by the nuclear research institutes of the region with a strong technical support from the French CEA. The most important milestone of these efforts is the start-up of the ALLEGRO reactor that shall demonstrate the viability of the gas cooled fast reactor technology.

  8. Twenty years of Radiology in RP-10 nuclear reactor protection; Veinte anos de proteccion radiologica en el reactor nuclear RP-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, Alejandro L.; Ramos, Fernando T.; Arrieta, Rolando W.B.; Vela Mora, Mariano, E-mail: lzapata@ipen.gob.pe, E-mail: framos@ipen.gob.pe, E-mail: rarrieta@ipen.gob.pe, E-mail: mvela@ipen.gob.pe [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN), Lima (Peru)

    2013-07-01

    In this report we present the results about radiation controls during 1990 - 2010, carried out in the Nuclear Reactor RP-10 of the Nuclear Center of Huarangal. These controls and radiological evaluation are of much utility for the radio personnel protection of this one and other reactors, since it allows to compares these variables with respect to the time. From the results obtained in monitoring and radiation controls, we conclude that in no case it has been reached the limits allowed by the Peruvian Regulating Authority. (author)

  9. Nuclear energy was the way of the future; 50 anniversary of the research reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassink, J.

    2013-01-01

    It was the hidden jewel of TU Delft, according to the employees of the nuclear reactor. Others protested against it and insisted that it be eliminated. Following a major mid-life crisis, the Delft research reactor is now in better shape than ever before.

  10. State of the art of nuclear facilities with organic cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brede, O.; Nagel, S.; Ziegenbein, D.

    1984-06-01

    USA, Canadian, and USSR activities aimed at developing nuclear facilities with organic cooled reactors are summarized. The facilities OMRE, PNPF, WR-1, and ARBUS are described, discussing in particular the problems of the chemistry of organic coolants. Finally, problems of further development and prospects of the application of organic cooled reactors are briefly outlined.

  11. Proceedings of the 1984 DOE nuclear reactor and facility safety conference. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    This report is a collection of papers on reactor safety. The report takes the form of proceedings from the 1984 DOE Nuclear Reactor and Facility Safety Conference, Volume II of two. These proceedings cover Safety, Accidents, Training, Task/Job Analysis, Robotics and the Engineering Aspects of Man/Safety interfaces.

  12. The near boiling reactor: Conceptual design of a small inherently safe nuclear reactor to extend the operational capability of the Victoria Class submarine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Christopher J. P.

    Nuclear power has several unique advantages over other air independent energy sources for nuclear combat submarines. An inherently safe, small nuclear reactor, capable of supply the hotel load of the Victoria Class submarines, has been conceptually developed. The reactor is designed to complement the existing diesel electric power generation plant presently onboard the submarine. The reactor, rated at greater than 1 MW thermal, will supply electricity to the submarine's batteries through an organic Rankine cycle energy conversion plant at 200 kW. This load will increase the operational envelope of the submarine by providing up to 28 continuous days submerged, allowing for an enhanced indiscretion ratio (ratio of time spent on the surface versus time submerged) and a limited under ice capability. The power plant can be fitted into the existing submarine by inserting a 6 m hull plug. With its simplistic design and inherent safety features, the reactor plant will require a minimal addition to the crew. The reactor employs TRISO fuel particles for increased safety. The light water coolant remains at atmospheric pressure, exiting the core at 96°C. Burn-up control and limiting excess reactivity is achieved through movable reflector plates. Shut down and regulatory control is achieved through the thirteen hafnium control rods. Inherent safety is achieved through the negative prompt and delayed temperature coefficients, as well as the negative void coefficient. During a transient, the boiling of the moderator results in a sudden drop in reactivity, essentially shutting down the reactor. It is this characteristic after which the reactor has been named. The design of the reactor was achieved through modelling using computer codes such as MCNP5, WIMS-AECL, FEMLAB, and MicroShield5, in addition to specially written software for kinetics, heat transfer and fission product poisoning calculations. The work has covered a broad area of research and has highlighted additional areas

  13. The near boiling reactor : conceptual design of a small inherently safe nuclear reactor to extend the operational capability of the Victoria Class submarine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, C.J.P

    2005-07-01

    Nuclear power has several unique advantages over other air independent energy sources for nuclear combat submarines. An inherently safe, small nuclear reactor, capable of supply the hotel load of the 'Victoria' Class submarines, has been conceptually developed. The reactor is designed to complement the existing diesel electric power generation plant presently onboard the submarine. The reactor, rated at greater than 1 MW thermal, will supply electricity to the submarine's batteries through an organic Rankine cycle energy conversion plant at 200 kW. This load will increase the operational envelope of the submarine by providing up to 28 continuous days submerged, allowing for an enhanced indiscretion ratio (ratio of time spent on the surface versus time submerged) and a limited under ice capability. The power plant can be fitted into the existing submarine by inserting a 6 m hull plug. With its simplistic design and inherent safety features, the reactor plant will require a minimal addition to the crew. The reactor employs TRISO fuel particles for increased safety. The light water coolant remains at atmospheric pressure, exiting the core at 96{sup o}C. Burn-up control and limiting excess reactivity is achieved through movable reflector plates. Shut down and regulatory control is achieved through the thirteen hafnium control rods. Inherent safety is achieved through the negative prompt and delayed temperature coefficients, as well as the negative void coefficient. During a transient, the boiling of the moderator results in a sudden drop in reactivity, essentially shutting down the reactor. It is this characteristic after which the reactor has been named. The design of the reactor was achieved through modelling using computer codes such as MCNP5, WIMS-AECL, FEMLAB, and MicroShield5, in addition to specially written software for kinetics, heat transfer and fission product poisoning calculations. The work has covered a broad area of research and has

  14. Ultrahigh temperature vapor core reactor-MHD system for space nuclear electric power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, Isaac; Anghaie, Samim; Diaz, Nils J.; Dugan, Edward T.

    1991-01-01

    The conceptual design of a nuclear space power system based on the ultrahigh temperature vapor core reactor with MHD energy conversion is presented. This UF4 fueled gas core cavity reactor operates at 4000 K maximum core temperature and 40 atm. Materials experiments, conducted with UF4 up to 2200 K, demonstrate acceptable compatibility with tungsten-molybdenum-, and carbon-based materials. The supporting nuclear, heat transfer, fluid flow and MHD analysis, and fissioning plasma physics experiments are also discussed.

  15. Challenges to deployment of twenty-first century nuclear reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Sue

    2017-02-01

    The science and engineering of materials have always been fundamental to the success of nuclear power to date. They are also the key to the successful deployment and operation of a new generation of nuclear reactor systems and their associated fuel cycles. This article reflects on some of the historical issues, the challenges still prevalent today and the requirement for significant ongoing materials R&D and discusses the potential role of small modular reactors.

  16. Experimental and computational studies of thermal mixing in next generation nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfried, Douglas Tyler

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is a proposed next generation nuclear power plant. The VHTR utilizes helium as a coolant in the primary loop of the reactor. Helium traveling through the reactor mixes below the reactor in a region known as the lower plenum. In this region there exists large temperature and velocity gradients due to non-uniform heat generation in the reactor core. Due to these large gradients, concern should be given to reducing thermal striping in the lower plenum. Thermal striping is the phenomena by which temperature fluctuations in the fluid and transferred to and attenuated by surrounding structures. Thermal striping is a known cause of long term material failure. To better understand and predict thermal striping in the lower plenum two separate bodies of work have been conducted. First, an experimental facility capable of predictably recreating some aspects of flow in the lower plenum is designed according to scaling analysis of the VHTR. Namely the facility reproduces jets issuing into a crossflow past a tube bundle. Secondly, extensive studies investigate the mixing of a non-isothermal parallel round triple-jet at two jet-to-jet spacings was conducted. Experimental results were validation with an open source computational fluid dynamics package, OpenFOAMRTM. Additional care is given to understanding the implementation of the realizable k-a and Launder Gibson RSM turbulence Models in OpenFOAMRTM. In order to measure velocity and temperature in the triple-jet experiment a detailed investigation of temperature compensated hotwire anemometry is carried out with special concern being given to quantify the error with the measurements. Finally qualitative comparisons of trends in the experimental results and the computational results is conducted. A new and unexpected physical behavior was observed in the center jet as it appeared to spread unexpectedly for close spacings (S/Djet = 1.41).

  17. An assessment of coupling algorithms for nuclear reactor core physics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Steven; Berrill, Mark; Clarno, Kevin; Pawlowski, Roger; Toth, Alex; Kelley, C. T.; Evans, Thomas; Philip, Bobby

    2016-04-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of multiphysics coupling algorithms applied to a light water nuclear reactor core simulation. The simulation couples the k-eigenvalue form of the neutron transport equation with heat conduction and subchannel flow equations. We compare Picard iteration (block Gauss-Seidel) to Anderson acceleration and multiple variants of preconditioned Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov (JFNK). The performance of the methods are evaluated over a range of energy group structures and core power levels. A novel physics-based approximation to a Jacobian-vector product has been developed to mitigate the impact of expensive on-line cross section processing steps. Numerical simulations demonstrating the efficiency of JFNK and Anderson acceleration relative to standard Picard iteration are performed on a 3D model of a nuclear fuel assembly. Both criticality (k-eigenvalue) and critical boron search problems are considered.

  18. Modelling of Pressurized Water Reactor Nuclear Power Plant Integrated Into Power System Simulation%压水堆核电厂接入电力系统建模

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵洁; 刘涤尘; 吴耀文

    2009-01-01

    为研究核电厂接入电力系统后二者之间的相互影响,利用电力系统分析综合程序(power system analysis software package,PSASP)的用户自定义建模功能建立压水堆(pressurized water reactor,PWR)核电厂主要环节的数学模型.该模型将压水堆核电厂动力部分作为发电机调速器,可与电力系统连接,计算核电厂与电力系统之间的动态过程.在PSASP中使用该模型计算核电机组的自稳定性、自调节性和接入单机无穷大系统的故障响应,验证了模型的正确性和适用性.此外,由于压水堆的负温度效应,核电机组可承受一定的外部干扰和功率阶跃.若电网故障切除迅速,核电厂与电力系统之间的相互影响很小.

  19. Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems FY16 Modeling Efforts at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cetiner, Sacit M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Greenwood, Michael Scott [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Qualls, A. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Guler Yigitoglu, Askin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Fugate, David W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A nuclear hybrid system uses a nuclear reactor as the basic power generation unit. The power generated by the nuclear reactor is utilized by one or more power customers as either thermal power, electrical power, or both. In general, a nuclear hybrid system will couple the nuclear reactor to at least one thermal power user in addition to the power conversion system. The definition and architecture of a particular nuclear hybrid system is flexible depending on local markets needs and opportunities. For example, locations in need of potable water may be best served by coupling a desalination plant to the nuclear system. Similarly, an area near oil refineries may have a need for emission free hydrogen production. A nuclear hybrid system expands the nuclear power plant from its more familiar central power station role by diversifying its immediately and directly connected customer base. The definition, design, analysis, and optimization work currently performed with respect to the nuclear hybrid systems represents the work of three national laboratories. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is the lead lab working with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Each laboratory is providing modeling and simulation expertise for the integration of the hybrid system.

  20. Conceptual Nuclear Design of a 20 MW Multipurpose Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Chul Gyo; Kim, Hak Sung; Park, Cheol [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Nghiem, Huynh Ton; Vinh, Le Vinh; Dang, Vo Doan Hai [Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2007-08-15

    A conceptual nuclear design of a 20 MW multi-purpose research reactor for Vietnam has been jointly done by the KAERI and the DNRI (VAEC). The AHR reference core in this report is a right water cooled and a heavy water reflected open-tank-in-pool type multipurpose research reactor with 20 MW. The rod type fuel of a dispersed U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al with a density of 4.0 gU/cc is used as a fuel. The core consists of fourteen 36-element assemblies, four 18-element assemblies and has three in-core irradiation sites. The reflector tank filled with heavy water surrounds the core and provides rooms for various irradiation holes. Major analyses have been done for the relevant nuclear design parameters such as the neutron flux and power distributions, reactivity coefficients, control rod worths, etc. For the analysis, the MCNP, MVP, and HELIOS codes were used by KAERI and DNRI (VAEC). The results by MCNP (KAERI) and MVP (DNRI) showed good agreements and can be summarized as followings. For a clean, unperturbed core condition such that the fuels are all fresh and there are no irradiation holes in the reflector region, the fast neutron flux (E{sub n}{>=}1.0 MeV) reaches 1.47x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}s and the maximum thermal neutron flux (E{sub n}{<=}0.625 eV) reaches 4.43x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}s in the core region. In the reflector region, the thermal neutron peak occurs about 28 cm far from the core center and the maximum thermal neutron flux is estimated to be 4.09x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}s. For the analysis of the equilibrium cycle core, the irradiation facilities in the reflector region were considered. The cycle length was estimated as 38 days long with a refueling scheme of replacing three 36-element fuel assemblies or replacing two 36-element and one 18-element fuel assemblies. The excess reactivity at a BOC was 103.4 mk, and 24.6 mk at a minimum was reserved at an EOC. The assembly average discharge burnup was 54.6% of initial U-235 loading. For the proposed fuel management

  1. New options for developing of nuclear energy using an accelerator-driven reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    1997-09-01

    Fissile fuel can be produced at a high rate using an accelerator-driven Pu-fueled subcritical fast reactor. Thus, the necessity of early introduction of the fast reactor can be moderated. High reliability of the proton accelerator, which is essential to implementing an accelerator-driven reactor in the nuclear energy field can be achieved by a slight extension of the accelerator`s length, with only a small economical penalty. Subcritical operation provides flexible nuclear energy options including high neutron economy producing the fuel, transmuting high-level wastes, such as minor actinides, and of converting efficiently the excess Pu and military Pu into proliferation-resistant fuel.

  2. Nuclear resurrection: Must Ontario fire up more reactors to power its future?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewar, E.

    2005-06-01

    An extensive historical review of Canada's nuclear reactor program is provided. The author also examines the role of nuclear power generation in Ontario's energy future, concluding that given the limited capacity for additional hydro power, and the uncertainty of natural gas supply, nuclear power will likely remain a significant source of energy for Ontario for the foreseeable future. Nevertheless, the challenge to bring nuclear power generation under control remains, considering that despite the best efforts of generations of nuclear engineers, politicians and regulators the industry appears close to being unmanageable, and Ontario taxpayers are likely to be paying its old debt far into the future. The current contingent of reactors is rapidly aging and the disposal of used nuclear fuel still defies a satisfactory solution. These formidable challenges notwithstanding, best estimates are that Ontario has few viable alternatives, and will have to embark on a new cycle of nuclear construction before the end of this decade.

  3. International academic program in technologies of light-water nuclear reactors. Phases of development and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraskin, N. I.; Glebov, V. B.

    2017-01-01

    The results of implementation of European educational projects CORONA and CORONA II dedicated to preserving and further developing nuclear knowledge and competencies in the area of technologies of light-water nuclear reactors are analyzed. Present article addresses issues of design and implementation of the program for specialized training in the branch of technologies of light-water nuclear reactors. The systematic approach has been used to construct the program for students of nuclear specialties, which corresponding to IAEA standards and commonly accepted nuclear principles recognized in the European Union. Possibilities of further development of the international cooperation between countries and educational institutions are analyzed. Special attention is paid to e-learning/distance training, nuclear knowledge preservation and interaction with European Nuclear Education Network.

  4. Specific schedule conditions for the formation of personnel of A or B category working in nuclear facilities. Option nuclear reactor-borne

    CERN Document Server

    Int. At. Energy Agency, Wien

    2002-01-01

    This document describes the specific dispositions relative to the nuclear reactor-borne domain, for the formation to the conventional and radiation risks prevention of personnel of A or B category working in nuclear facilities. The application domain, the applicable documents, the liability, the specificity of the nuclear reactor-borne and of the retraining, the Passerelle formation, are presented. (A.L.B.)

  5. Virtual reality technology as a tool for human factors requirements evaluation in design of the nuclear reactors control desks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grecco, Claudio H.S.; Santos, Isaac J.A.L.; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Carvalho, Paulo V.R.; Silva, Antonio C.F.; Ferreira, Francisco J.O.; Dutra, Marco A.M. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: grecco@ien.gov.br; luquetti@ien.gov.br; mol@ien.gov.br; paulov@ien.gov.br; tonico@ien.gov.br; fferreira@ien.gov.br; dutra@ien.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    The Virtual Reality (VR) is an advanced computer interface technology that allows the user to internet or to explore a three-dimensional environment through the computer, as was part of the virtual world. This technology presents great applicability in the most diverse areas of the human knowledge. This paper presents a study on the use of the VR as tool for human factors requirements evaluation in design of the nuclear reactors control desks. Moreover, this paper presents a case study: a virtual model of the control desk, developed using virtual reality technology to be used in the human factors requirements evaluation. This case study was developed in the Virtual Reality Laboratory at IEN, and understands the stereo visualization of the Argonauta research nuclear reactor control desk for a static ergonomic evaluation using check-lists, in accordance to the standards and human factors nuclear international guides (IEC 1771, NUREG-0700). (author)

  6. Qualification of the nuclear reactor core model DYN3D coupled to the thermohydraulic system code ATHLET, applied as an advanced tool for accident analysis of VVER-type reactors. Final report; Qualifizierung des Kernmodells DYN3D im Komplex mit dem Stoerfallcode ATHLET als fortgeschrittenes Werkzeug fuer die Stoerfallanalyse von WWER-Reaktoren. T. 1. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundmann, U.; Kliem, S.; Krepper, E.; Mittag, S; Rohde, U.; Schaefer, F.; Seidel, A.

    1998-03-01

    The nuclear reactor core model DYN3D with 3D neutron kinetics has been coupled to the thermohydraulic system code ATHLET. In the report, activities on qualification of the coupled code complex ATHLET-DYN3D as a validated tool for the accident analysis of russian VVER type reactors are described. That includes: - Contributions to the validation of the single codes ATHLET and DYN3D by the analysis of experiments on natural circulation behaviour in thermohydraulic test facilities and solution of benchmark tasks on reactivity initiated transients, - the acquisition and evaluation of measurement data on transients in nuclear power plants, the validation of ATHLET-DYN3D by calculating an accident with delayed scram and a pump trip in VVER plants, - the complementary improvement of the code DYN3D by extension of the neutron physical data base, implementation of an improved coolant mixing model, consideration of decay heat release and xenon transients, - the analysis of steam leak scenarios for VVER-440 type reactors with failure of different safety systems, investigation of different model options. The analyses showed, that with realistic coolant mixing modelling in the downcomer and the lower plenum, recriticality of the scramed reactor due to overcooling can be reached. The application of the code complex ATHLET-DYN3D in Czech Republic, Bulgaria and the Ukraine has been started. Future work comprises the verification of ATHLET-DYN3D with a DYN3D version for the square fuel element geometry of western PWR. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das Reaktorkernmodell DYN3D mit 3D Neutronenkinetik wurde an den Thermohydraulik-Systemcode ATHLET angekoppelt. Im vorliegenden Bericht werden Arbeiten zur Qualifizierung des gekoppelten Codekomplexes zu einem validierten Hilfsmittel fuer Stoerfallablaufanalysen zu Reaktoren des russischen Typs WWER dargestellt. Diese umfassten im einzelnen: - Beitraege zur Validierung der Einzelcodes ATHLET und DYN3D anhand der Nachrechnung von Experimenten zum

  7. Review of nuclear data improvement needs for nuclear radiation measurement techniques used at the CEA experimental reactor facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destouches, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    The constant improvement of the neutron and gamma calculation codes used in experimental nuclear reactors goes hand in hand with that of the associated nuclear data libraries. The validation of these calculation schemes always requires the confrontation with integral experiments performed in experimental reactors to be completed. Nuclear data of interest, straight as cross sections, or elaborated ones such as reactivity, are always derived from a reaction rate measurement which is the only measurable parameter in a nuclear sensor. So, in order to derive physical parameters from the electric signal of the sensor, one needs specific nuclear data libraries. This paper presents successively the main features of the measurement techniques used in the CEA experimental reactor facilities for the on-line and offline neutron/gamma flux characterizations: reactor dosimetry, neutron flux measurements with miniature fission chambers and Self Power Neutron Detector (SPND) and gamma flux measurements with chamber ionization and TLD. For each technique, the nuclear data necessary for their interpretation will be presented, the main identified needs for improvement identified and an analysis of their impact on the quality of the measurement. Finally, a synthesis of the study will be done.

  8. Review of nuclear data improvement needs for nuclear radiation measurement techniques used at the CEA experimental reactor facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Destouches Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The constant improvement of the neutron and gamma calculation codes used in experimental nuclear reactors goes hand in hand with that of the associated nuclear data libraries. The validation of these calculation schemes always requires the confrontation with integral experiments performed in experimental reactors to be completed. Nuclear data of interest, straight as cross sections, or elaborated ones such as reactivity, are always derived from a reaction rate measurement which is the only measurable parameter in a nuclear sensor. So, in order to derive physical parameters from the electric signal of the sensor, one needs specific nuclear data libraries. This paper presents successively the main features of the measurement techniques used in the CEA experimental reactor facilities for the on-line and offline neutron/gamma flux characterizations: reactor dosimetry, neutron flux measurements with miniature fission chambers and Self Power Neutron Detector (SPND and gamma flux measurements with chamber ionization and TLD. For each technique, the nuclear data necessary for their interpretation will be presented, the main identified needs for improvement identified and an analysis of their impact on the quality of the measurement. Finally, a synthesis of the study will be done.

  9. Contribution of recently measured nuclear data to reactor antineutrino energy spectra predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallot M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to summarize the actual problematic of reactor antineutrino energy spectra in the frame of fundamental and applied neutrino physics. Nuclear physics is an important ingredient of reactor antineutrino experiments. These experiments are motivated by neutrino oscillations, i.e. the measure of the θ13 mixing angle. In 2011, after a new computation of the reactor antineutrino energy spectra, based on the conversion of integral data of the beta spectra from 235U, and 239;241Pu, a deficit of reactor antineutrinos measured by short baseline experiments was pointed out. This is called the “reactor anomaly”, a new puzzle in the neutrino physics area. Since then, numerous new experimental neutrino projects have emerged. In parallel, computations of the antineutrino spectra independant from the ILL data would be desirable. One possibility is the use of the summation method, summing all the contributions of the fission product beta decay branches that can be found in nuclear databases. Studies have shown that in order to obtain reliable summation antineutrino energy spectra, new nuclear physics measurements of selected fission product beta decay properties are required. In these proceedings, we will present the computation methods of reactor antineutrino energy spectra and the impact of recent beta decay measurements on summation method spectra. The link of these nuclear physics studies with short baseline line oscillation search will be drawn and new neutrino physics projects at research reactors will be briefly presented.

  10. Empirical Risk Analysis of Severe Reactor Accidents in Nuclear Power Plants after Fukushima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Christian Kaiser

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many countries are reexamining the risks connected with nuclear power generation after the Fukushima accidents. To provide updated information for the corresponding discussion a simple empirical approach is applied for risk quantification of severe reactor accidents with International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES level ≥5. The analysis is based on worldwide data of commercial nuclear facilities. An empirical hazard of 21 (95% confidence intervals (CI 4; 62 severe accidents among the world’s reactors in 100,000 years of operation has been estimated. This result is compatible with the frequency estimate of a probabilistic safety assessment for a typical pressurised power reactor in Germany. It is used in scenario calculations concerning the development in numbers of reactors in the next twenty years. For the base scenario with constant reactor numbers the time to the next accident among the world's 441 reactors, which were connected to the grid in 2010, is estimated to 11 (95% CI 3.7; 52 years. In two other scenarios a moderate increase or decrease in reactor numbers have negligible influence on the results. The time to the next accident can be extended well above the lifetime of reactors by retiring a sizeable number of less secure ones and by safety improvements for the rest.

  11. Modeling and Simulation of Seawater Desalination Unit for Low Temperature Nuclear Heating Reactor%低温核供热堆海水淡化装置的建模与仿真

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪晓理; 张亚军; 黄晓津

    2013-01-01

    为了研究山东核能海水淡化高技术产业化示范工程的系统最优运行方案和控制策略,建立能正确、全面反映其特性的数学模型是重要的先决条件之一.本文通过对系统的热力性能分析,建立了可用于低温核供热堆的热压缩多效蒸馏与反渗透混合法海水淡化的数学模型,并计算了系统在不同工况下的运行结果.通过与反渗透设备厂商软件计算结果及工程技术方案设计参数比较,结果表明,该模型可正确反映海水淡化系统运行特性,满足进一步研究的需要.%In order to study the optimal system operation schemes and control strategy of hightech industrialization demonstration project for seawater desalination in Shandong Province,a mathematical model which reflects correctly and comprehensively the system characteristics is an important prerequisite.This paper introduced a mathematical model based on the thermal performance analysis of the system with hybrid desalination method suitable for low temperature nuclear heating reactor,including low temperature multi-effect distiller (LT-MED-TVC) and reverse osmosis (RO) systems,and showed the calculated results of the system operation under different conditions.By comparing with the engineering design parameters and commercial software calculation results provided by RO plant supplier,it is indicated that the model can correctly catch desalination system operating characteristics,and meet the need for further research.

  12. Comparative assessment of nuclear fuel cycles. Light-water reactor once-through, classical fast breeder reactor, and symbiotic fast breeder reactor cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardie, R.W.; Barrett, R.J.; Freiwald, J.G.

    1980-06-01

    The object of the Alternative Nuclear Fuel Cycle Study is to perform comparative assessments of nuclear power systems. There are two important features of this study. First, this evaluation attempts to encompass the complete, integrated fuel cycle from mining of uranium ore to disposal of waste rather than isolated components. Second, it compares several aspects of each cycle - energy use, economics, technological status, proliferation, public safety, and commercial potential - instead of concentrating on one or two assessment areas. This report presents assessment results for three fuel cycles. These are the light-water reactor once-through cycle, the fast breeder reactor on the classical plutonium cycle, and the fast breeder reactor on a symbiotic cycle using plutonium and /sup 233/U as fissile fuels. The report also contains a description of the methodology used in this assessment. Subsequent reports will present results for additional fuel cycles.

  13. Applicability of base-isolation R and D in non-reactor facilities to a nuclear reactor plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidensticker, R.W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Seismic isolation is gaining increased attention worldwide for use in a wide spectrum of critical facilities, ranging from hospitals and computing centers to nuclear power plants. The level of assurance of performance for such isolation systems for a nuclear power plant will be much greater than that required for non-nuclear facilities. The question is to what extent can R and D for non-nuclear use of seismic isolation be applied to a nuclear power plant. Experience shows that considerable effort is needed to adapt any technology to nuclear power facilities. This paper reviews the R and D programs ongoing for seismic isolation in non-nuclear facilities and related experience and makes a preliminary assessment of the extent to which such R and D and experience can be used for nuclear power plant application. Ways are suggested to improve the usefulness of such non-nuclear R and D in providing the high level of confidence required for the use of seismic isolation in a nuclear reactor plant. (orig.).

  14. Core Physics of Pebble Bed High Temperature Nuclear Reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auwerda, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    To more accurately predict the temperature distribution inside the reactor core of pebble bed type high temperature reactors, in this thesis we investigated the stochastic properties of randomly stacked beds and the effects of the non-homogeneity of these beds on the neutronics and thermal-hydraulic

  15. Nuclear Checker Board Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Theodore

    2016-03-01

    The NCB Model 1 , 2 , 3 suggests that the nucleus is a relativistic 2D structure. In 1996 at Argonne National Lab the Checker Board Model was first presented. In that poster presentation it was explained that the relativistic constituent quarks orbit inside the proton at about 85% c and about 99% c inside the neutron. As a way to test the model it was found that the de Broglie wavelength of the up quark matched the calculated circumference of the proton (radius = 0.5194 fm) analogous to the Bohr model of the electron in the H atom. 20 years later it is now accepted that the quarks are moving at relativistic speeds and the orbital motion of the quarks contribute the major part of the spin of the proton. If one considers the motion of the relativistic quarks inside the nucleus (take for example Ca 40) about its center of mass, one realizes that these relativistic quarks are confined to shells inside the nucleus (the He shell {the inner 4 nucleons}, the Oxygen shell ...). So the CBM eliminates the need for an illusionary strong nuclear force in favor of a force based upon an E/M force in perfect spin synchronization in a 2D plane. So the CBM is not at odds with the shell model but instead explains why the nucleus has a shell structure and correctly predicts the shell closures.

  16. Hanging core support system for a nuclear reactor. [LMFBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burelbach, J.P.; Kann, W.J.; Pan, Y.C.; Saiveau, J.G.; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1984-04-26

    For holding the reactor core in the confining reactor vessel, a support is disclosed that is structurally independent of the vessel, that is dimensionally accurate and stable, and that comprises tandem tension linkages that act redundantly of one another to maintain stabilized core support even in the unlikely event of the complete failure of one of the linkages. The core support has a mounting platform for the reactor core, and unitary structure including a flange overlying the top edge of the reactor vessels, and a skirt and box beams between the flange and platform for establishing one of the linkages. A plurality of tension rods connect between the deck closing the reactor vessel and the platform for establishing the redundant linkage. Loaded Belleville springs flexibly hold the tension rods at the deck and separable bayonet-type connections hold the tension rods at the platform.

  17. Monte-Carlo Simulations of the Nuclear Energy Deposition Inside the CARMEN-1P Differential Calorimeter Irradiated into OSIRIS Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amharrak, H.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Carette, M. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, Universite de Toulon, IM2NP UMR 7334, 13397, Marseille (France); Lemaire, M.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C. [CEA, DEN, DER, SPRC, LPN, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Fourmentel, D.; Lyoussi, A. [CEA, DEN, Departement d' Etudes des Reacteurs, Service de Physique Experimentale, Laboratoire Dosimetrie Capteurs Instrumentation, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-07-01

    The nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs) are crucial for the study of nuclear materials and fuels under irradiation. The reference measurements of this nuclear heating are especially performed by a differential calorimeter including a graphite sample material. These measurements are then used for other experimental conditions in order to predict the nuclear heating and thermal conditions induced in the irradiation devices. Nuclear heating is a great deal of interest at the moment as the measurement of such heating is an important issue for MTRs reactors. This need is especially generated by the new Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR), under construction at CEA/Cadarache 'French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission'. This new reactor, that will be operational in late 2019, is a new facility for the nuclear research on materials and fuels. Indeed the expected nuclear heating rate is about 20 W/g for nominal capacity of 100 MW. The present Monte Carlo calculation works belong to the IN-CORE (Instrumentation for Nuclear radiation and Calorimetry On line in Reactor): a joint research program between the CEA and Aix- Marseille University in 2009. One scientific aim of this program is to design and develop a multi-sensors device, called CARMEN, dedicated to the measurements of main physical parameters simultaneously encountered inside JHR's experimental channels (core and reflector) such as neutron fluxes, photon fluxes, temperature, and nuclear heating. A first prototype was already developed. This prototype includes two mock-ups dedicated respectively to neutronic measurements (CARMEN-1N) and to photonic measurements (CARMEN-1P) with in particular a specific differential calorimeter. Two irradiation campaigns were performed successfully in the periphery of OSIRIS reactor (a MTR located at Saclay, France) in 2012 for nuclear heating levels up to 2 W/g. First Monte Carlo calculations reduced to the graphite sample of the

  18. Engine System Model Development for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karl W.; Simpson, Steven P.

    2006-01-01

    In order to design, analyze, and evaluate conceptual Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) engine systems, an improved NTP design and analysis tool has been developed. The NTP tool utilizes the Rocket Engine Transient Simulation (ROCETS) system tool and many of the routines from the Enabler reactor model found in Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS). Improved non-nuclear component models and an external shield model were added to the tool. With the addition of a nearly complete system reliability model, the tool will provide performance, sizing, and reliability data for NERVA-Derived NTP engine systems. A new detailed reactor model is also being developed and will replace Enabler. The new model will allow more flexibility in reactor geometry and include detailed thermal hydraulics and neutronics models. A description of the reactor, component, and reliability models is provided. Another key feature of the modeling process is the use of comprehensive spreadsheets for each engine case. The spreadsheets include individual worksheets for each subsystem with data, plots, and scaled figures, making the output very useful to each engineering discipline. Sample performance and sizing results with the Enabler reactor model are provided including sensitivities. Before selecting an engine design, all figures of merit must be considered including the overall impacts on the vehicle and mission. Evaluations based on key figures of merit of these results and results with the new reactor model will be performed. The impacts of clustering and external shielding will also be addressed. Over time, the reactor model will be upgraded to design and analyze other NTP concepts with CERMET and carbide fuel cores.

  19. Safeguards Issues at Nuclear Reactors and Enrichment Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-15

    The Agency's safeguards technical objective is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection.

  20. 78 FR 64029 - Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... COMMISSION Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors AGENCY... Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors,'' in which the NRC made editorial corrections and... analysis for liquid and gaseous radwaste system components for light water nuclear power...

  1. Status of Fuel Development and Manufacturing for Space Nuclear Reactors at BWX Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmack, W. J.; Husser, D. L.; Mohr, T. C.; Richardson, W. C.

    2004-02-01

    New advanced nuclear space propulsion systems will soon seek a high temperature, stable fuel form. BWX Technologies Inc (BWXT) has a long history of fuel manufacturing. UO2, UCO, and UCx have been fabricated at BWXT for various US and international programs. Recent efforts at BWXT have focused on establishing the manufacturing techniques and analysis capabilities needed to provide a high quality, high power, compact nuclear reactor for use in space nuclear powered missions. To support the production of a space nuclear reactor, uranium nitride has recently been manufactured by BWXT. In addition, analytical chemistry and analysis techniques have been developed to provide verification and qualification of the uranium nitride production process. The fabrication of a space nuclear reactor will require the ability to place an unclad fuel form into a clad structure for assembly into a reactor core configuration. To this end, BWX Technologies has reestablished its capability for machining, GTA welding, and EB welding of refractory metals. Specifically, BWX Technologies has demonstrated GTA welding of niobium flat plate and EB welding of niobium and Nb-1Zr tubing. In performing these demonstration activities, BWX Technologies has established the necessary infrastructure to manufacture UO2, UCx, or UNx fuel, components, and complete reactor assemblies in support of space nuclear programs.

  2. Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) as a potential therapy for rheumatoid arthritis: radiobiological studies at RA-1 Nuclear Reactor in a model of antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivillin, Veronica A.; Schwint, Amanda E. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Department of Radiobiology, San Martin, Provincia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bruno, Leandro J.; Gatti, David A. [Universidad Nacional de Rosario, LABOATEM (Laboratorio de Biologia Osteoarticular, Ingenieria Tisular y Terapias Emergentes), Facultad de Ciencias Medicas, Rosario (Argentina); Stur, Mariela [Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Catedra de Diagnostico por Imagenes, Facultad de Ciencias Medicas, Rosario (Argentina); Garabalino, Marcela A.; Hughes, Andrea Monti [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Department of Radiobiology, San Martin, Provincia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Castillo, Jorge; Wentzeis, Luis; Scolari, Hugo [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Department of Reactors, San Martin, Provincia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pozzi, Emiliano C.C. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Department of Research and Production Reactors, Ezeiza, Province Buenos Aires (Argentina); Feldman, Sara [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de Rosario, LABOATEM (Laboratorio de Biologia Osteoarticular, Ingenieria Tisular y Terapias Emergentes), Facultad de Ciencias Medicas, Rosario (Argentina)

    2016-11-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune pathology characterized by the proliferation and inflammation of the synovium. Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS), a binary treatment modality that combines the preferential incorporation of boron carriers to target tissue and neutron irradiation, was proposed to treat the pathological synovium in arthritis. In a previous biodistribution study, we showed the incorporation of therapeutically useful boron concentrations to the pathological synovium in a model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in rabbits, employing two boron compounds approved for their use in humans, i.e., decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) and boronophenylalanine (BPA). The aim of the present study was to perform low-dose BNCS studies at the RA-1 Nuclear Reactor in the same model. Neutron irradiation was performed post intra-articular administration of BPA or GB-10 to deliver 2.4 or 3.9 Gy, respectively, to synovium (BNCS-AIA). AIA and healthy animals (no AIA) were used as controls. The animals were followed clinically for 2 months. At that time, biochemical, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological studies were performed. BNCS-AIA animals did not show any toxic effects, swelling or pain on palpation. In BNCS-AIA, the post-treatment levels of TNF-α decreased in four of six rabbits and IFN-γ levels decreased in five of six rabbits. In all cases, MRI images of the knee joint in BNCS-AIA resembled those of no AIA, with no necrosis or periarticular effusion. Synovial membranes of BNCS-AIA were histologically similar to no AIA. BPA-BNCS and GB-10-BNCS, even at low doses, would be therapeutically useful for the local treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.)

  3. FX2-TH: a two-dimensional nuclear reactor kinetics code with thermal-hydraulic feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shober, R.A.; Daly, T.A.; Ferguson, D.R.

    1978-10-01

    FX2-TH is a two-dimensional, time-dependent nuclear reactor kinetics program with thermal and hydraulic feedback. The neutronics model used is multigroup neutron diffusion theory. The following geometry options are available: x, r, x-y, r-z, theta-r, and triangular. FX2-TH contains two basic thermal and hydraulic models: a simple adiabatic fuel temperature calculation, and a more detailed model consisting of an explicit representation of a fuel pin, gap, clad, and coolant. FX2-TH allows feedback effects from both fuel temperature (Doppler) and coolant temperature (density) changes. FX2-TH will calculate a consistent set of steady state conditions by iterating between the neutronics and thermal-hydraulics until convergence is reached. The time-dependent calculation is performed by the use of the improved quasistatic method. A disk editing capability is available. FX2-TH is operational on IBM system 360 or 370 computers and on the CDC 7600.

  4. Nuclear Data Uncertainties for Typical LWR Fuel Assemblies and a Simple Reactor Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochman, D.; Leray, O.; Hursin, M.; Ferroukhi, H.; Vasiliev, A.; Aures, A.; Bostelmann, F.; Zwermann, W.; Cabellos, O.; Diez, C. J.; Dyrda, J.; Garcia-Herranz, N.; Castro, E.; van der Marck, S.; Sjöstrand, H.; Hernandez, A.; Fleming, M.; Sublet, J.-Ch.; Fiorito, L.

    2017-01-01

    The impact of the current nuclear data library covariances such as in ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.2, JENDL-4.0, SCALE and TENDL, for relevant current reactors is presented in this work. The uncertainties due to nuclear data are calculated for existing PWR and BWR fuel assemblies (with burn-up up to 40 GWd/tHM, followed by 10 years of cooling time) and for a simplified PWR full core model (without burn-up) for quantities such as k∞, macroscopic cross sections, pin power or isotope inventory. In this work, the method of propagation of uncertainties is based on random sampling of nuclear data, either from covariance files or directly from basic parameters. Additionally, possible biases on calculated quantities are investigated such as the self-shielding treatment. Different calculation schemes are used, based on CASMO, SCALE, DRAGON, MCNP or FISPACT-II, thus simulating real-life assignments for technical-support organizations. The outcome of such a study is a comparison of uncertainties with two consequences. One: although this study is not expected to lead to similar results between the involved calculation schemes, it provides an insight on what can happen when calculating uncertainties and allows to give some perspectives on the range of validity on these uncertainties. Two: it allows to dress a picture of the state of the knowledge as of today, using existing nuclear data library covariances and current methods.

  5. Systems and methods for processing irradiation targets through a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Yogeshwar; Saito, Earl F.; Berger, John F.; Brittingham, Martin W.; Morales, Stephen K.; Hare, Jeffrey M.

    2016-05-03

    Apparatuses and methods produce radioisotopes in instrumentation tubes of operating commercial nuclear reactors. Irradiation targets may be inserted and removed from instrumentation tubes during operation and converted to radioisotopes otherwise unavailable during operation of commercial nuclear reactors. Example apparatuses may continuously insert, remove, and store irradiation targets to be converted to useable radioisotopes or other desired materials at several different origin and termination points accessible outside an access barrier such as a containment building, drywell wall, or other access restriction preventing access to instrumentation tubes during operation of the nuclear plant.

  6. Emergency planning and response: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuth, D.; Boyd, R.

    1981-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has formed a Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee to assess the implications of the recommendations contained in the President's Commission Report on the Three Mile Island (TMI) Accident (the Kemeny Commission report) that are applicable to DOE's nuclear reactor operations. Thirteen DOE nuclear reactors have been reviewed. The assessments of the 13 facilities are based on information provided by the individual operator organizations and/or cognizant DOE Field Offices. Additional clarifying information was supplied in some, but not all, instances. This report indicates how these 13 reactor facilities measure up in light of the Kemeny and other TMI-related studies and recommendations, particularly those that have resulted in upgraded Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements in the area of emergency planning and response.

  7. Radionuclide inventories for short run-time space nuclear reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Space Nuclear Reactor Systems, especially those used for propulsion, often have expected operation run times much shorter than those for land-based nuclear power plants. This produces substantially different radionuclide inventories to be considered in the safety analyses of space nuclear systems. This presentation describes an analysis utilizing ORIGEN2 and DKPOWER to provide comparisons among representative land-based and space systems. These comparisons enable early, conceptual considerations of safety issues and features in the preliminary design phases of operational systems, test facilities, and operations by identifying differences between the requirements for space systems and the established practice for land-based power systems. Early indications are that separation distance is much more effective as a safety measure for space nuclear systems than for power reactors because greater decay of the radionuclide activity occurs during the time to transport the inventory a given distance. In addition, the inventories of long-lived actinides are very low for space reactor systems.

  8. T-S fuzzy control on nuclear reactor power based on model of point kinetics with one delayed neutron group%基于单组缓发中子模型的反应堆功率T-S模糊控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵伟宁; 栾秀春; 樊达宜; 周杰

    2013-01-01

    The T - S fuzzy controller was designed based on the dynamic model of point kinetics with one delayed neutron group to control the power of nuclear reactor. The simulation result showed the satisfactory performance of the T - S fuzzy controller to control the nuclear reactor power output.%基于T-S模糊模型,针对单组缓发中子点堆动力学方程,设计了T-S模糊控制器来实现对反应堆功率的控制.仿真结果表明,所设计的T-S模糊模型控制器能够较好的控制反应堆功率的输出,取得较好的控制效果.

  9. Zirconium-based alloys, nuclear fuel rods and nuclear reactors including such alloys, and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Robert Dominick

    2014-09-09

    Zirconium-based metal alloy compositions comprise zirconium, a first additive in which the permeability of hydrogen decreases with increasing temperatures at least over a temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C., and a second additive having a solubility in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. At least one of a solubility of the first additive in the second additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. and a solubility of the second additive in the first additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. is higher than the solubility of the second additive in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. Nuclear fuel rods include a cladding material comprising such metal alloy compositions, and nuclear reactors include such fuel rods. Methods are used to fabricate such zirconium-based metal alloy compositions.

  10. Nuclear Data for Astrophysical Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Pritychenko, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear physics has been playing an important role in modern astrophysics and cosmology. Since the early 1950's it has been successfully applied for the interpretation and prediction of astrophysical phenomena. Nuclear physics models helped to explain the observed elemental and isotopic abundances and star evolution and provided valuable insights on the Big Bang theory. Today, the variety of elements observed in stellar surfaces, solar system and cosmic rays, and isotope abundances are calculated and compared with the observed values. Consequently, the overall success of the modeling critically depends on the quality of underlying nuclear data that helps to bring physics of macro and micro scales together. To broaden the scope of traditional nuclear astrophysics activities and produce additional complementary information, I will investigate applicability of the U.S. Nuclear Data Program (USNDP) databases for astrophysical applications. EXFOR (Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data) and ENDF (Evaluated Nuclear Dat...

  11. Supplying the nuclear arsenal: Production reactor technology, management, and policy, 1942--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlisle, R.P.; Zenzen, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This book focuses on the lineage of America`s production reactors, those three at Hanford and their descendants, the reactors behind America`s nuclear weapons. The work will take only occasional sideways glances at the collateral lines of descent, the reactor cousins designed for experimental purposes, ship propulsion, and electric power generation. Over the decades from 1942 through 1992, fourteen American production reactors made enough plutonium to fuel a formidable arsenal of more than twenty thousand weapons. In the last years of that period, planners, nuclear engineers, and managers struggled over designs for the next generation of production reactors. The story of fourteen individual machines and of the planning effort to replace them might appear relatively narrow. Yet these machines lay at the heart of the nation`s nuclear weapons complex. The story of these machines is the story of arming the winning weapon, supplying the nuclear arms race. This book is intended to capture the history of the first fourteen production reactors, and associated design work, in the face of the end of the Cold War.

  12. Role of Halden Reactor Project for world-wide nuclear energy development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, M.A.; Volkov, B.

    2011-07-01

    The great interest for utilization of nuclear materials to produce energy in the middle of last century needed special investigations using first class research facilities. Common problems in the area of nuclear fuel development motivated the establishment of joint research efforts. The OECD Halden Reactor Project (HRP) is a good example of such a cooperative research effort, which has been performing for more than 50 years. During that time, the Halden Reactor evolved from a prototype heavy water reactor envisaged as a power source for different applications to a research reactor that is able to simulate in-core conditions of modern commercial power reactors. The adaptability of the Halden Reactor enables the HRP to be an important international test facility for nuclear fuels and materials development. The long-term international cooperation is based on the flexible HRP organizational structure which also provides the continued success. [1,2] This paper gives a brief history of the Halden Reactor Project and its contribution to world-wide nuclear energy development. Recent expansion of the Project to the East and Asian countries may also assist and stimulate the development of a nuclear industry within these countries. The achievements of the HRP rely on the versatility of the research carried out in the reactor with reliable testing techniques and in-pile instrumentation. Diversification of scientific activity in the areas of development of alternative energy resources and man-machine technology also provide the HRP with a stable position as one of the leaders in the world scientific community. All of these aspects are described in this paper together with current experimental works, including the investigation of ULBA (Kazakhstan) production fuel in comparison with other world fuel suppliers, as well as other future and prospective plans of the Project.(Author)

  13. A Study on Comparison of HANARO and KIJANG Research Reactor in Nuclear Safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Juang; Lee, Sung Ho; Kim, Hyun-Jo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    As one of major national projects for nuclear science and engineering in Korea, the KIJANG Research Reactor(KJRR) project was commenced in order to develop the core research reactor(RR) technologies for strengthening the competitiveness of the RR export and also to stabilize the supply of key radioisotopes for medical and industrial applications. This paper is about applying IAEA safeguards at new nuclear facility (KJRR). The beginning of this project is comparing of HANARO and KIJANG research reactor in nuclear safeguards for nuclear material accountancy method. As mentioned before, research reactor is basically item counting facility. In Fig 1, first two processes are belonging to item counting. But last two processes are for bulk handling. So KIJANG RR would be treated item counting facility as well as bulk handling facility by fission moly production facility. For this reason, nuclear material accountancy method for KJRR is not easy compared to existing one. This paper accounted for solution of KJRR nuclear material accountancy briefly. Future study on the suitable nuclear material accountancy method for mixed facility between item counting facility and bulk handling facility will be conducted more specifically.

  14. Models of iodine behavior in reactor containments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, C.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Kress, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    Models are developed for many phenomena of interest concerning iodine behavior in reactor containments during severe accidents. Processes include speciation in both gas and liquid phases, reactions with surfaces, airborne aerosols, and other materials, and gas-liquid interface behavior. Although some models are largely empirical formulations, every effort has been made to construct mechanistic and rigorous descriptions of relevant chemical processes. All are based on actual experimental data generated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) or elsewhere, and, hence, considerable data evaluation and parameter estimation are contained in this study. No application or encoding is attempted, but each model is stated in terms of rate processes, with the intention of allowing mechanistic simulation. Taken together, this collection of models represents a best estimate iodine behavior and transport in reactor accidents.

  15. Hybrid fusion–fission reactor with a thorium blanket: Its potential in the fuel cycle of nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmelev, A. N., E-mail: shmelan@mail.ru; Kulikov, G. G., E-mail: ggkulikov@mephi.ru; Kurnaev, V. A., E-mail: kurnaev@yandex.ru; Salahutdinov, G. H., E-mail: saip07@mail.ru; Kulikov, E. G., E-mail: egkulikov@mephi.ru; Apse, V. A., E-mail: apseva@mail.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Discussions are currently going on as to whether it is suitable to employ thorium in the nuclear fuel cycle. This work demonstrates that the {sup 231}Pa–{sup 232}U–{sup 233}U–Th composition to be produced in the thorium blanket of a hybrid thermonuclear reactor (HTR) as a fuel for light-water reactors opens up the possibility of achieving high, up to 30% of heavy metals (HM), or even ultrahigh fuel burnup. This is because the above fuel composition is able to stabilize its neutron-multiplying properties in the process of high fuel burnup. In addition, it allows the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) to be better protected against unauthorized proliferation of fissile materials owing to an unprecedentedly large fraction of {sup 232}U (several percent!) in the uranium bred from the Th blanket, which will substantially hamper the use of fissile materials in a closed NFC for purposes other than power production.

  16. Hybrid fusion-fission reactor with a thorium blanket: Its potential in the fuel cycle of nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmelev, A. N.; Kulikov, G. G.; Kurnaev, V. A.; Salahutdinov, G. H.; Kulikov, E. G.; Apse, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    Discussions are currently going on as to whether it is suitable to employ thorium in the nuclear fuel cycle. This work demonstrates that the 231Pa-232U-233U-Th composition to be produced in the thorium blanket of a hybrid thermonuclear reactor (HTR) as a fuel for light-water reactors opens up the possibility of achieving high, up to 30% of heavy metals (HM), or even ultrahigh fuel burnup. This is because the above fuel composition is able to stabilize its neutron-multiplying properties in the process of high fuel burnup. In addition, it allows the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) to be better protected against unauthorized proliferation of fissile materials owing to an unprecedentedly large fraction of 232U (several percent!) in the uranium bred from the Th blanket, which will substantially hamper the use of fissile materials in a closed NFC for purposes other than power production.

  17. Nuclear Checker Board Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Theodore

    2017-01-01

    The Checkerboard model of the Nucleus has been in the public domain for over 20 years. Over those years it has been described by nuclear and partic